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Sample records for increases tumour cell

  1. Infrared laser pulse triggers increased singlet oxygen production in tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovski, S. G.; Zolotovskaya, S. A.; Goltsov, A.; Pourreyron, C.; South, A. P.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2013-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique developed to treat the ever-increasing global incidence of cancer. This technique utilises singlet oxygen (1O2) generation via a laser excited photosensitiser (PS) to kill cancer cells. However, prolonged sensitivity to intensive light (6-8 weeks for lung cancer), relatively low tissue penetration by activating light (630 nm up to 4 mm), and the cost of PS administration can limit progressive PDT applications. The development of quantum-dot laser diodes emitting in the highest absorption region (1268 nm) of triplet oxygen (3O2) presents the possibility of inducing apoptosis in tumour cells through direct 3O2 --> 1O2 transition. Here we demonstrate that a single laser pulse triggers dose-dependent 1O2 generation in both normal keratinocytes and tumour cells and show that tumour cells yield the highest 1O2 far beyond the initial laser pulse exposure. Our modelling and experimental results support the development of direct infrared (IR) laser-induced tumour treatment as a promising approach in tumour PDT.

  2. Oral administration of Aloe vera and honey reduces Walker tumour growth by decreasing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis in tumour tissue.

    PubMed

    Tomasin, Rebeka; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2011-04-01

    Cancer is diagnosed in approximately 11 million people and is responsible for almost 8 million deaths worldwide every year. Research in cancer control has shown the importance of co-adjuvant therapies. Aloe vera may reduce tumour mass and metastasis rates, while honey may inhibit tumour growth. This study verified the influence of Aloe vera and honey on tumour growth and in the apoptosis process by assessing tumour size, the cell proliferation rate (Ki67-LI) and Bax/Bcl-2 expression at 7, 14 and 20 days after Walker 256 carcinoma implant in Wistar rats distributed into two groups: the WA group - tumour-bearing rats that received a gavage with a 670 µL/kg dose of Aloe vera and honey solution daily, and the CW group - tumour-bearing rats which received only a 0.9% NaCl solution. The effect of Aloe vera and honey against tumour growth was observed through a decrease in relative weight (%) and Ki67-LI in tumours from the WA group compared with those from the CW group. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased in tumours from the WA group at all tested timepoints. These data suggest Aloe vera and honey can modulate tumour growth by reducing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis susceptibility. PMID:20839215

  3. Enforced telomere elongation increases the sensitivity of human tumour cells to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Fairlie, Jennifer; Harrington, Lea

    2015-01-01

    More than 85% of all human cancers possess the ability to maintain chromosome ends, or telomeres, by virtue of telomerase activity. Loss of functional telomeres is incompatible with survival, and telomerase inhibition has been established in several model systems to be a tractable target for cancer therapy. As human tumour cells typically maintain short equilibrium telomere lengths, we wondered if enforced telomere elongation would positively or negatively impact cell survival. We found that telomere elongation beyond a certain length significantly decreased cell clonogenic survival after gamma irradiation. Susceptibility to irradiation was dosage-dependent and increased at telomere lengths exceeding 17 kbp despite the fact that all chromosome ends retained telomeric DNA. These data suggest that an optimal telomere length may promote human cancer cell survival in the presence of genotoxic stress. PMID:25484304

  4. Increased exosome production from tumour cell cultures using the Integra CELLine Culture System.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J Paul; Court, Jacqueline; Mason, Malcolm David; Tabi, Zsuzsanna; Clayton, Aled

    2008-06-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles, secreted from most cell types, with documented immune-modulatory functions. Exosomes can be purified from cultured cells but to do so effectively, requires maintenance of cells at high density in order to obtain sufficient accumulation of exosomes in the culture medium, prior to purification. Whilst high density cultures can be achieved with cells in suspension, this remains difficult with adherent cells, resulting in low quantity of exosomes for subsequent study. We have used the Integra CELLine culture system, originally designed for hybridoma cultures, to achieve a significant increase in obtainable exosomes from adherent and non-adherent tumour cells. Traditional cultures of mesothelioma cells (cultured in 75 cm(2) flasks) gave an average yield of 0.78 microg+/-0.14 microg exosome/ml of conditioned medium. The CELLine Adhere 1000 (CLAD1000) flask, housing the same cell line, increased exosome yield approximately 12 fold to 10.06 microg+/-0.97 microg/ml. The morphology, phenotype and immune function of these exosomes were compared, and found to be identical in all respects. Similarly an 8 fold increase in exosome production was obtained from NKL cells (a suspension cell line) using a CELLine 1000 (CL1000) flask. The CELLine system also incurred ~5.5 fold less cost and reduced labour for cell maintenance. This simple culture system is a cost effective, useful method for significantly increasing the quantity of exosomes available from cultured cells, without detrimental effects. This tool should prove advantageous in future studies of exosome-immune modulation in cancer and other settings. PMID:18423480

  5. Tumour-initiating stem-like cells in human prostate cancer exhibit increased NF-κB signalling

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Studer, Lorenz; Gerald, William; Socci, Nicholas D.; Scher, Howard I.

    2011-01-01

    Androgen depletion is a key strategy for treating human prostate cancer, but the presence of hormone-independent cells escaping treatment remains a major therapeutic challenge. Here, we identify a minor subset of stem-like human prostate tumour-initiating cells (TICs) that do not express prostate cancer markers, such as androgen receptor or prostate specific antigen. These TICs possess stem cell characteristics and multipotency as demonstrated by in vitro sphere-formation and in vivo tumour-initiation, respectively. The cells represent an undifferentiated subtype of basal cells and can be purified from prostate tumours based on coexpression of the human pluripotent stem cell marker TRA-1-60 with CD151 and CD166. Such triple-marker-positive TICs recapitulate the original parent tumour heterogeneity in serial xeno-transplantations indicating a tumour cell hierarchy in human prostate cancer development. These TICs exhibit increased nuclear factor-κB activity. These findings are important in understanding the molecular basis of human prostate cancer. PMID:21245843

  6. Testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; McGlynn, Katherine A; Okamoto, Keisei; Jewett, Michael A S; Bokemeyer, Carsten

    2016-04-23

    Testicular germ cell tumours are at the crossroads of developmental and neoplastic processes. Their cause has not been fully elucidated but differences in incidences suggest that a combination of genetic and environment factors are involved, with environmental factors predominating early in life. Substantial progress has been made in understanding genetic susceptibility in the past 5 years on the basis of the results of large genome-wide association studies. Testicular germ cell tumours are highly sensitive to radiotherapy and chemotherapy and hence have among the best outcomes of all tumours. Because the tumours occur mainly in young men, preservation of reproductive function, quality of life after treatment, and late effects are crucial concerns. In this Seminar, we provide an overview of advances in the understanding of the epidemiology, genetics, and biology of testicular germ cell tumours. We also summarise the consensus on how to treat testicular germ cell tumours and focus on a few controversies and improvements in the understanding of late effects of treatment and quality of life for survivors. PMID:26651223

  7. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  8. Edema-induced increase in tumour cell survival for 125I and 103Pd prostate permanent seed implants - a bio-mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Ning; Chen, Zhe; Nath, Ravinder

    2002-04-01

    Edema caused by the surgical procedure of prostate seed implantation expands the source-to-point distances within the prostate and hence decreases the dose coverage. The decrease of dose coverage results in an increase in tumour cell survival. To investigate the effects of edema on tumour cell survival, a bio-mathematical model of edema and the corresponding cell killing by continuous low dose rate irradiation (CLDRI) was developed so that tumour cell surviving fractions can be estimated in an edematous prostate for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants. The dynamic nature of edema and its resolution were modelled with an exponential function V(T) = Vp (1 + M exp(-0.693T/Te)) where Vp is the prostate volume before implantation, M is the edema magnitude and Te is edema half-life (EHL). The dose rate of a radioactive seed was calculated according to AAPM TG43, i.e. Λg(r) αBED), where α is the linear coefficient of the survival curve. The tumour cell survival was calculated for both 125I and 103Pd seed implants and for different tumour potential doubling time (TPDT) (from 5 days to 30 days) and for edemas of different magnitudes (from 0% to 95%) and edema half-lives (from 4 days to 30 days). Tumour cell survival increased with the increase of edema magnitude and EHL. For a typical edema of a half-life of 10 days and a magnitude of 50%, the edema increased tumour cell survival by about 1 and 2 orders of magnitude for 125I and 103Pd seed implants respectively. At the extreme (95% edema magnitude and an edema half-life of 30 days), the increase was more than 3 and 5 orders of magnitude for 125I and 103Pd seed implants respectively. The absolute increases were almost independent of TPDT and the prostate edema did not significantly change the effective treatment time. Tumour cell survival for prostate undergoing CLDRI using 125I or 103Pd seeds may be increased substantially due to the presence of edema caused by surgical trauma. This effect appears to be more pronounced for

  9. Fibulin-5 localisation in human endometrial cancer shifts from epithelial to stromal with increasing tumour grade, and silencing promotes endometrial epithelial cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    WINSHIP, AMY LOUISE; RAINCZUK, KATE; TON, AMANDA; DIMITRIADIS, EVA

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynaecological malignancy. While endocrine, genetic and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to its pathogenesis, its precise etiology and molecular regulators remain poorly understood. Fibulin-5 is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that inhibits cell growth and invasion in several cancer cell types and is downregulated in a number of types of human cancer. However, it is unknown whether fibulin-5 plays a role in endometrial tumourigenesis. In the current report, the expression and localisation of fibulin-5 in type I endometrioid human endometrial cancers of grades (G) 1–3 was investigated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Fibulin-5 mRNA was found to be significantly reduced in whole tumour tissues from women across G1-3 compared with benign endometrium (P<0.0001). Consistently, fibulin-5 protein was also reduced in the tumour epithelial compartment across increasing tumour grades. By contrast, increased protein localisation to the tumour stroma was observed with increasing grade. Knockdown by small interfering RNA in Ishikawa endometrial epithelial cancer cells expressing fibulin-5 stimulated cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro. Fibulin-5 mRNA expression in Ishikawa cells was induced by transforming growth factor-β and fibulin-5 in turn activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), suggesting that it may act via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In summary, the present study identified fibulin-5 as a downregulated ECM gene in human endometrial cancer and observed a shift from epithelial to stromal protein localisation with increasing tumour grade in women. These data suggest that loss of fibulin-5 function may promote endometrial cancer progression by enhancing epithelial cell adhesion and proliferation. PMID:27347195

  10. Leydig cell tumours in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mengel, W; Knorr, D

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of Leydig cell tumours in childhood are presented. In one case, delayed diagnosis and operation led to pubertas praecox vera whereas in the other case normal growth and development occurred after early diagnosis and operation. PMID:6878724

  11. Ovarian stimulation and granulosa-cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, W; Kruitwagen, R; Bastiaans, B; Hanselaar, T; Rolland, R

    1993-04-17

    Ovarian stimulation in the treatment of infertility is far from physiological because patients and their ovaries are exposed to high concentrations of gonadotropins. Many studies have focused on the two most common side-effects of ovarian stimulation--ie, hyperstimulation and multiple pregnancy. We describe 12 patients in whom granulosa-cell tumour was discovered after ovarian stimulation treatment with clomiphene citrate and/or gonadotropins. Although we cannot prove a causal link between the tumour and the medication, investigations in animals have shown a relation between gonadotropin exposition and the development of granulosa-cell tumours. The possible relation of ovarian stimulation and granulosa-cell tumours in human beings has not been published before. We postulate three explanations for this finding; first, the granulosa-cell tumour is present in the ovary, waiting for a hormonal trigger; second, increased follicle stimulating hormone concentrations are oncogenic to granulosa cell; and third, the onset of the granulosa-cell tumour during ovarian stimulation is coincidental. We recommend that ovarian stimulation is done only if there is a valid indication after proper assessment of the ovaries, and that women who have had ovarian stimulation are followed for longer than at present. PMID:8096944

  12. Tumour-specific CD4 T cells eradicate melanoma via indirect recognition of tumour-derived antigen.

    PubMed

    Shklovskaya, Elena; Terry, Alexandra M; Guy, Thomas V; Buckley, Adrian; Bolton, Holly A; Zhu, Erhua; Holst, Jeff; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in tumour immunity has been increasingly recognised, with recent reports describing robust CD4 T cell-dependent tumour control in mice whose immune-regulatory mechanisms have been disturbed by irradiation, chemotherapy, immunomodulatory therapy and/or constitutive immunodeficiency. Tumour control in such models has been attributed in large part to direct Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II-dependent CD4 T cell killing of tumour cells. To test whether CD4 T cells can eradicate tumours without directly killing tumour cells, we developed an animal model in which tumour-derived antigen could be presented to T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD4 T cells by host but not tumour MHC class II molecules. In I-E(+) mice bearing I-E(null) tumours, naive I-E-restricted CD4 T cells proliferated locally in tumour-draining lymph nodes after recognising tumour-derived antigen on migratory dendritic cells. In lymphopaenic but not immunosufficient hosts, CD4 T cells differentiated into polarised T helper type 1 (Th1) cells expressing interferon gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-2 but little IL-17, and cleared established tumours. Tumour clearance was enhanced by higher TCR affinity for tumour antigen-MHC class II and was critically dependent on IFNγ, as demonstrated by early tumour escape in animals treated with an IFNγ blocking antibody. Thus, CD4 T cells and IFNγ can control tumour growth without direct T-cell killing of tumour cells, and without requiring additional adaptive immune cells such as CD8 T cells and B cells. Our results support a role for effective CD4 T cell-dependent tumour immunity against MHC class II-negative tumours. PMID:26837456

  13. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 04: Label-free Raman spectroscopy of single tumour cells detects early radiation-induced glycogen synthesis associated with increased radiation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Q; Lum, JJ; Isabelle, M; Harder, S; Jirasek, A; Brolo, AG

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To use label-free Raman spectroscopy (RS) for early treatment monitoring of tumour cell radioresistance. Methods: Three human tumour cell lines, two radioresistant (H460, SF{sub 2} = 0.57 and MCF7, SF{sub 2} = 0.70) and one radiosensitive (LNCaP, SF{sub 2} = 0.36), were irradiated with single fractions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. In additional experiments, H460 and MCF7 cells were irradiated under co-treatment with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, a known radiosensitizing agent. Treated and control cultures were analyzed with RS daily for 3 days post-treatment. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 live cells per sample, and experiments were repeated in triplicate. The combined data sets were analyzed with principal component analysis using standard algorithms. Cells from each culture were also subjected to standard assays for viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and radiation clonogenic survival. Results: The radioresistant cells (H460, MCF7) exhibited a RS molecular radiation response signature, detectable as early as 1 day post-treatment, of which radiation-induced glycogen synthesis is a significant contributor. The radiosensitive cells (LNCaP) exhibited negligible glycogen synthesis. Co-treatment with metformin in MCF7 cells blocked glycogen synthesis, reduced viability and proliferation, and increased radiosensitivity. Conversely, metformin co-treatment in H460 cells did not produce these same effects; importantly, both radiation-induced synthesis of glycogen and radiosensitivity were unaffected. Conclusions: Label-free RS can detect early glycogen synthesis post-irradiation, a previously undocumented metabolic mechanism associated with tumour cell radioresistance that can be targeted to increase radiosensitivity. RS monitoring of intratumoral glycogen may provide new opportunities for personalized combined modality radiotherapy treatments.

  14. Distribution of Photofrin between tumour cells and tumour associated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Korbelik, M.; Krosl, G.; Olive, P. L.; Chaplin, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Photofrin levels in cells derived from SCCVII tumours, excised from mice that previously received the drug, were measured using a fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS). Concomitantly, in the same cells the FACS was used to measure fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) fluorescence that originated from FITC-conjugated antimouse IgG added to the cell suspension before sorting. This later measurement enabled discrimination between IgG negative tumour malignant cells and IgG positive host cells (primarily macrophages). In addition, cellular Photofrin content in 'tumour' and 'host' cells sorted by FACS was determined by chemical extraction. The measurements were performed for the time intervals 1-96 h post Photofrin administration. The data showed consistently higher Photofrin levels in the 'host cells', i.e., tumour associated macrophages (TAM), than in 'tumour' cells. On a per cell basis, at any time point studied there was a minimum of 1.7 times more Photofrin in 'host' than in 'tumour cells', while at 4-12 h postadministration, ratios of up to 3.0 times were observed. This corresponds to ratio values greater than 9, when based on Photofrin content per micrograms cell protein. PMID:1832927

  15. Cancer Cell Death-Inducing Radiotherapy: Impact on Local Tumour Control, Tumour Cell Proliferation and Induction of Systemic Anti-tumour Immunity.

    PubMed

    Frey, Benjamin; Derer, Anja; Scheithauer, Heike; Wunderlich, Roland; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) predominantly is aimed to induce DNA damage in tumour cells that results in reduction of their clonogenicity and finally in tumour cell death. Adaptation of RT with higher single doses has become necessary and led to a more detailed view on what kind of tumour cell death is induced and which immunological consequences result from it. RT is capable of rendering tumour cells immunogenic by modifying the tumour cell phenotype and the microenvironment. Danger signals are released as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. This results in maturation of dendritic cells and priming of cytotoxic T cells as well as in activation of natural killer cells. However, RT on the other hand can also result in immune suppressive events including apoptosis induction and foster tumour cell proliferation. That's why RT is nowadays increasingly combined with selected immunotherapies. PMID:27558821

  16. Enhancement of T cell recruitment and infiltration into tumours

    PubMed Central

    Oelkrug, C; Ramage, J M

    2014-01-01

    Studies have documented that cancer patients with tumours which are highly infiltrated with cytotoxic T lymphocytes show enhanced survival rates. The ultimate goal of cancer immunotherapy is to elicit high-avidity tumour-specific T cells to migrate and kill malignant tumours. Novel antibody therapies such as ipilumimab (a cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 blocking antibody) show enhanced T cell infiltration into the tumour tissue and increased survival. More conventional therapies such as chemotherapy or anti-angiogenic therapy and recent therapies with oncolytic viruses have been shown to alter the tumour microenvironment and thereby lead to enhanced T cell infiltration. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the migration of high-avidity tumour-specific T cells into tumours will support and provide solutions for the optimization of therapeutic options in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24828133

  17. Increased expression of the Th17-IL-6R/pSTAT3/BATF/RorγT-axis in the tumoural region of adenocarcinoma as compared to squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Balabko, Ljubov; Andreev, Katerina; Burmann, Nadine; Schubert, Melanie; Mathews, Martina; Trufa, Denis I; Reppert, Sarah; Rau, Tilmann; Schicht, Martin; Sirbu, Horia; Hartmann, Arndt; Finotto, Susetta

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe increased expression of IL6R in the tumoural region of lung tissue from patients affected by lung adenocarcinoma as compared to squamous cell lung carcinoma. Moreover, here we found increased IL6R in the tumour free part of the lung. By using a murine model of lung adenocarcinoma, we discovered that few lung tumour cells expressed IL-6R and CD4+CD25+Foxp-3+ T regulatory cells down-regulated IL-6R in the tumour bearing lungs. Downstream of IL-6R, the Th17 lineage-specification factors: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), Basic leucine zipper transcription factor, BATF and a protein encoded by the RORC in human (RAR-related orphan receptor C) (RORγT), were also found induced in the tumoural region of lung tissue from patients affected by lung adenocarcinoma as compared to those carrying squamous cell carcinoma. Moreover, pSTAT3 protein was found phosphorylated and auto-phosphorylated in the tumoural region of patients with adeno cell carcinoma of the lung as compared to the tumoural region of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Intranasal application of anti-IL-6R antibodies in a murine model of lung adenocarcinoma, induced T regulatory cell markers such as Foxp3, Ctla4, Icos, Il10, Il21, Folr4 and Lag3 and inhibited Rorc in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:25491772

  18. Thrombin enhances the adhesion and migration of human colon adenocarcinoma cells via increased beta 3-integrin expression on the tumour cell surface and their inhibition by the snake venom peptide, rhodostomin.

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, H. S.; Yang, R. S.; Huang, T. F.

    1996-01-01

    The interactions between tumour cells and the microvasculature, including the adhesion of tumour cells to endothelium and extracellular matrix (ECM) as well as their migratory ability, are prerequisites for metastasis to occur. In this study we showed that thrombin is capable of enhancing in vitro tumour cell metastatic potential in terms of adhesive properties and migratory response. Following exposure to subclotting concentrations of thrombin, SW-480 human colon adenocarcinoma cells exhibited increased adhesion to both the endothelium and ECM component (i.e. fibronectin). Likewise, the pretreatment of thrombin enhanced the migratory ability of SW-480 cells. The enhanced adhesion was significantly inhibited by complexing of thrombin with its inhibitor hirudin, or by serine proteinase inhibition with 3,4-DCI, but was unaffected by pretreatment of tumour cells with actinomycin D or cycloheximide. The effect of thrombin resulted in an upregulated cell-surface expression of beta 3 integrins, a group of receptors mediating interactions between tumour cells and endothelial cells, and between tumour cells and ECM. Antibodies against beta 3 integrins effectively blocked both the enhanced adhesion and migration. This thrombin-mediated up-regulation of beta 3 integrins involved the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) as thrombin-enhanced adhesion was diminished by PKC inhibition. Rhodostomin, an Arg-Gly-Asp-containing antiplatelet snake venom peptide that antagonises the binding of ECM toward beta 3 integrins on SW-480 cells, was about 600 and 500 times, more potent that RGDS in inhibiting thrombin-enhanced adhesion and migration respectively. Our data suggest that PKC inhibitors as well as rhodostomin may serve as inhibitory agents in the prevention of thrombin-enhanced metastasis. PMID:8611404

  19. Myoepithelial cells in canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Céspedes, Raquel; Millán, Yolanda; Guil-Luna, Silvia; Reymundo, Carlos; Espinosa de Los Monteros, Antonio; Martín de Las Mulas, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common neoplasms of female dogs. Compared to mammary tumours of humans and cats, myoepithelial (ME) cell involvement is common in canine mammary tumours (CMT) of any subtype. Since ME cell involvement in CMT influences both histogenetic tumour classification and prognosis, correct identification of ME cells is important. This review describes immunohistochemical methods for identification of canine mammary ME cells used in vivo. In addition, phenotypic and genotypic methods to isolate ME cells for in vitro studies to analyse tumour-suppressor protein production and gene expression are discussed. The contribution of ME cells to both histogenetic classifications and the prognosis of CMT is compared with other species and the potential use of ME cells as a method to identify carcinoma in situ is discussed. PMID:26639832

  20. Malignant Leydig cell tumour of the testis.

    PubMed

    Powari, Manish; Kakkar, Nandita; Singh, S K; Rai, R S; Jogai, Sanjay

    2002-01-01

    A case of malignant Leydig cell tumour is presented. It is a rare primary malignant tumour of the testis and occurs exclusively in adults. The present case is of interest because it occurred at the young age of 25 years which is rare. Histologically it showed almost all features which suggest malignancy and also had metastases to the lungs and liver. The clinical details and pathology of this tumour are discussed. PMID:11803271

  1. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  2. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan.

    PubMed

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-Ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  3. One very rare and one new tracheal tumour found by electron microscopy: glomus tumour and acinic cell tumour resembling carcinoid tumours by light microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Heard, B E; Dewar, A; Firmin, R K; Lennox, S C

    1982-01-01

    Tracheal tumours were removed surgically from two patients and diagnosed as carcinoid tumours by routine light microscopy. At a later date, electron microscopy was performed on stored tumour tissue and no neurosecretory granules were found in either case. One showed features of a glomus tumour and the other of an acinic cell tumour. Only two glomus tumours appear to have been reported previously in the trachea, and no acinic cell tumours. Electron microscopy is thus sometimes of great assistance in diagnosing accurately unusual tumours of the lower respiratory tract. Images PMID:6281934

  4. Anti tumour necrosis-α therapy increases the number of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in children affected by Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Ricciardelli, Ida; Lindley, Keith J; Londei, Marco; Quaratino, Sonia

    2008-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the gastrointestinal tract. Its pathogenesis is not completely understood, though the prevailing model is that the intestinal flora drives a strong intestinal T helper 1 (Th1)/Th17 type immune response and inflammation in the genetically susceptible host. This leads to overly aggressive T-cell responses to normal bacteria causing tissue damage. Intestinal homeostasis and maintenance of tolerance to harmless antigens in the intestine has been shown to be maintained by CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells (Treg) in animal models of inflammatory bowel diseases. Here we investigated whether Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody directed against tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α shown to be highly effective in the treatment of CD, has any effect on mucosal CD4+ CD25+ (FOXP3+) Tregs. Colonic mucosal biopsies from children with active Crohn's disease treated in vivo with Infliximab and controls were analysed to determine FOXP3 expression by immunofluorescence and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. We observed that FOXP3+ T cells were significantly reduced in mucosa of CD patients with active disease compared with controls and restored to normal following Infliximab treatment. The frequency of FOXP3+ cells and mRNA expression was significantly increased in CD mucosa from patients treated in vivo with Infliximab compared with CD patients treated with conventional therapies. In conclusion, we show that Infliximab treatment does not solely neutralize soluble TNF-α, but also affects activation and possibly expansion of mucosal regulatory T cells. We suggest that anti TNF-α immunotherapy can also restore mucosal homeostasis in Crohn's disease. PMID:18422560

  5. Anti-tumour activity of oncolytic Western Reserve vaccinia viruses in canine tumour cell lines, xenografts, and fresh tumour biopsies.

    PubMed

    Autio, K; Knuuttila, A; Kipar, A; Ahonen, M; Parviainen, S; Diaconu, I; Kanerva, A; Hakonen, T; Vähä-Koskela, M; Hemminki, A

    2014-10-10

    Cancer is one of the most common reasons for death in dogs. One promising approach is oncolytic virotherapy. We assessed the oncolytic effect of genetically modified vaccinia viruses in canine cancer cells, in freshly excised tumour biopsies, and in mice harbouring canine tumour xenografts. Tumour transduction efficacy was assessed using virus expressing luciferase or fluorescent marker genes and oncolysis was quantified by a colorimetric cell viability assay. Oncolytic efficacy in vivo was evaluated in a nude mouse xenograft model. Vaccinia virus was shown to infect most tested canine cancer cell lines and primary surgical tumour tissues. Virus infection significantly reduced tumour growth in the xenograft model. Oncolytic vaccinia virus has antitumour effects against canine cancer cells and experimental tumours and is able to replicate in freshly excised patient tumour tissue. Our results suggest that oncolytic vaccinia virus may offer an effective treatment option for otherwise incurable canine tumours. PMID:25302859

  6. Tumours with cancer stem cells: A PDE model.

    PubMed

    Fasano, A; Mancini, A; Primicerio, M

    2016-02-01

    The role of cancer stem cells (CSC) in tumour growth has received increasing attention in the recent literature. Here we stem from an integro-differential system describing the evolution of a population of CSC and of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells formulated and studied in a previous paper, and we investigate an approximation in which the system reduces to a pair of nonlinear coupled parabolic equation. We prove that the new system is well posed and we examine some general properties. Numerical simulations show more on the qualitative behaviour of the solutions, concerning in particular the so-called tumour paradox, according to which an increase of the mortality rate of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells results asymptotically in a faster growth. PMID:26719124

  7. Sertoli cell tumour in an Amur tiger.

    PubMed

    Scudamore, C L; Meredith, A L

    2001-01-01

    The histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of a malignant Sertoli cell tumour in a 17-year-old Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) are described. Histological examination of the primary lesion in the right testis and metastatic lesions throughout the internal organs showed a variable cellular pattern with an admixture of tubular structures divided by fine stroma filled with fusiform to stellate cells, and sheets of polygonal cells with abundant vacuolated cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical techniques demonstrated strong positive staining for neuron-specific enolase and variable positive staining for vimentin in neoplastic cells, supporting a diagnosis of a tumour of Sertoli cell origin. PMID:11428192

  8. Quantification of immunocompetent cells in testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Torres, A; Casanova, J F; Nistal, M; Regadera, J

    1997-01-01

    The immunocompetent cells present in the different histological patterns of 43 testicular germ cell tumours were evaluated. CD3 + and CD45RO + (UCHL1 +) T lymphocytes, CD68 + and MAC 387 + macrophages, CD20 + (L26 +) B lymphocytes, and kappa and lambda + plasma cells were counted. The number of immunocompetent cells per mm2 of tumour tissue, excluding the necrotic areas, was evaluated. Microscopic fields were randomly selected by two observers. In order to guarantee randomization each surface was divided into parts, numbered through a lattice, and some fields were chosen via a random numbers table. This procedure yielded significantly different counts from those obtained on subjective selection. The number of T-lymphocytes and macrophages was higher in seminomas than in the non-seminomatous testicular germ cell tumours (P < 0.05) Embryonal carcinomas had more T-lymphocytes than immature teratomas. No significant differences were found among testicular germ cell tumours with regards to the B-lymphocytes, with the exception of the high number of B-lymphocytes in mature teratomas. Kappa + and lambda + plasma cells were few in the testicular germ cell tumours. Randomization in the quantification of immunocompetent cells in testicular germ cell tumours is a good means for evaluation of immune response in all the tumour mass, not only in the areas with the most intense inflammatory cell infiltrate, and permits comparison of testicular germ cell tumours with other malignant tumours. Study of immunocompetent cells in every histological type of testicular germ cell tumour is useful in comparing them with other extra-testicular germ cell tumours. PMID:9023554

  9. Characterization of twenty-five ovarian tumour cell lines that phenocopy primary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Tan A.; Sousa, Aurea D.; Jones, Michelle A.; Harrell, J. Chuck; Agoston, Elin S.; Krohn, Marit; Selfors, Laura M.; Liu, Wenbin; Chen, Ken; Yong, Mao; Buchwald, Peter; Wang, Bin; Hale, Katherine S.; Cohick, Evan; Sergent, Petra; Witt, Abigail; Kozhekbaeva, Zhanna; Gao, Sizhen; Agoston, Agoston T.; Merritt, Melissa A.; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R.; Crum, Christopher P.; Brugge, Joan S.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available human tumour cell line panels consist of a small number of lines in each lineage that generally fail to retain the phenotype of the original patient tumour. Here we develop a cell culture medium that enables us to routinely establish cell lines from diverse subtypes of human ovarian cancers with >95% efficiency. Importantly, the 25 new ovarian tumour cell lines described here retain the genomic landscape, histopathology and molecular features of the original tumours. Furthermore, the molecular profile and drug response of these cell lines correlate with distinct groups of primary tumours with different outcomes. Thus, tumour cell lines derived using this methodology represent a significantly improved platform to study human tumour pathophysiology and response to therapy. PMID:26080861

  10. Characterization of twenty-five ovarian tumour cell lines that phenocopy primary tumours.

    PubMed

    Ince, Tan A; Sousa, Aurea D; Jones, Michelle A; Harrell, J Chuck; Agoston, Elin S; Krohn, Marit; Selfors, Laura M; Liu, Wenbin; Chen, Ken; Yong, Mao; Buchwald, Peter; Wang, Bin; Hale, Katherine S; Cohick, Evan; Sergent, Petra; Witt, Abigail; Kozhekbaeva, Zhanna; Gao, Sizhen; Agoston, Agoston T; Merritt, Melissa A; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R; Crum, Christopher P; Brugge, Joan S; Mills, Gordon B

    2015-01-01

    Currently available human tumour cell line panels consist of a small number of lines in each lineage that generally fail to retain the phenotype of the original patient tumour. Here we develop a cell culture medium that enables us to routinely establish cell lines from diverse subtypes of human ovarian cancers with >95% efficiency. Importantly, the 25 new ovarian tumour cell lines described here retain the genomic landscape, histopathology and molecular features of the original tumours. Furthermore, the molecular profile and drug response of these cell lines correlate with distinct groups of primary tumours with different outcomes. Thus, tumour cell lines derived using this methodology represent a significantly improved platform to study human tumour pathophysiology and response to therapy. PMID:26080861

  11. Efficient Monte Carlo modelling of individual tumour cell propagation for hypoxic head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckwell, W.; Bezak, E.; Yeoh, E.; Marcu, L.

    2008-09-01

    A Monte Carlo tumour model has been developed to simulate tumour cell propagation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The model aims to eventually provide a radiobiological tool for radiation oncology clinicians to plan patient treatment schedules based on properties of the individual tumour. The inclusion of an oxygen distribution amongst the tumour cells enables the model to incorporate hypoxia and other associated parameters, which affect tumour growth. The object oriented program FORTRAN 95 has been used to create the model algorithm, with Monte Carlo methods being employed to randomly assign many of the cell parameters from probability distributions. Hypoxia has been implemented through random assignment of partial oxygen pressure values to individual cells during tumour growth, based on in vivo Eppendorf probe experimental data. The accumulation of up to 10 million virtual tumour cells in 15 min of computer running time has been achieved. The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia are the parameters which most influence the final tumour growth rate. For a tumour with a doubling time of 40 days, the final stem cell percentage is approximately 1% of the total cell population. The effect of hypoxia on the tumour growth rate is significant. Using a hypoxia induced cell quiescence limit which affects 50% of cells with and oxygen levels less than 1 mm Hg, the tumour doubling time increases to over 200 days and the time of tumour growth for a clinically detectable tumour (109 cells) increases from 3 to 8 years. A biologically plausible Monte Carlo model of hypoxic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumour growth has been developed for real time assessment of the effects of multiple biological parameters which impact upon the response of the individual patient to fractionated radiotherapy.

  12. Efficient Monte Carlo modelling of individual tumour cell propagation for hypoxic head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Tuckwell, W; Bezak, E; Yeoh, E; Marcu, L

    2008-09-01

    A Monte Carlo tumour model has been developed to simulate tumour cell propagation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The model aims to eventually provide a radiobiological tool for radiation oncology clinicians to plan patient treatment schedules based on properties of the individual tumour. The inclusion of an oxygen distribution amongst the tumour cells enables the model to incorporate hypoxia and other associated parameters, which affect tumour growth. The object oriented program FORTRAN 95 has been used to create the model algorithm, with Monte Carlo methods being employed to randomly assign many of the cell parameters from probability distributions. Hypoxia has been implemented through random assignment of partial oxygen pressure values to individual cells during tumour growth, based on in vivo Eppendorf probe experimental data. The accumulation of up to 10 million virtual tumour cells in 15 min of computer running time has been achieved. The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia are the parameters which most influence the final tumour growth rate. For a tumour with a doubling time of 40 days, the final stem cell percentage is approximately 1% of the total cell population. The effect of hypoxia on the tumour growth rate is significant. Using a hypoxia induced cell quiescence limit which affects 50% of cells with and oxygen levels less than 1 mm Hg, the tumour doubling time increases to over 200 days and the time of tumour growth for a clinically detectable tumour (10(9) cells) increases from 3 to 8 years. A biologically plausible Monte Carlo model of hypoxic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumour growth has been developed for real time assessment of the effects of multiple biological parameters which impact upon the response of the individual patient to fractionated radiotherapy. PMID:18677039

  13. Endothelial CD276 (B7-H3) expression is increased in human malignancies and distinguishes between normal and tumour-derived circulating endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kraan, J; van den Broek, P; Verhoef, C; Grunhagen, D J; Taal, W; Gratama, J W; Sleijfer, S

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mature circulating endothelial cells (CEC) are surrogate markers of endothelial damage. CEC measured in patients with advanced cancer are thought not only to derive from damaged normal vasculature (n-CEC), but also from damaged (t-CEC). Therefore, assays that allow the discrimination between these two putative types of CEC are thought to improve the specificity of the enumeration of CEC in cancer. Methods: Identification of tumour-associated endothelial markers (TEM) by comparing antigen expression on normal vs t-CEC and assess the presence of t-CEC in peripheral blood of cancer patients by incorporating TEM in our novel flow cytometry-based CEC detection assay. Results: No difference in antigen expression between normal and malignant endothelial cells (ECs) was found for CD54, CD109, CD137, CD141, CD144 and CXCR7. In contrast, overexpression for CD105, CD146, CD276 and CD309 was observed in tumour ECs compared with normal ECs. CD276 was most differentially expressed and chosen as a marker for further investigation. CD276-expressing CEC were significantly higher in 15 patients with advanced colorectal cancer (median 9 (range 1–293 cell per 4 ml); P<0.005), in 83 patients with a glioblastoma multiforme (median 10 (range 0–804); P<0.0001) and in 14 patients with advanced breast cancer (median 14 (range 0–390) P<0.05) as compared with 24 healthy individuals (median 3 (range 0–11)). Of all patients with malignancies, 58% had CD276+ CEC counts above the ULN (8 cell per 4 ml). Conclusions: The present study shows that CD276 can be used to discriminate ECs from malignant tissue from ECs from normal tissue. In addition, CD276+ CEC do occur in higher frequencies in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:24892449

  14. Metastatic colonization by circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C

    2016-01-21

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in people with cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating tumour cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are only now starting to understand. These include infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue. They make metastasis a highly inefficient process. However, once metastases have been established, current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. An improved understanding of the mechanistic determinants of such colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  15. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Thomas M.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.; Folkes, Lisa K.; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J.; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M.; Hammond, Ester M.; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J.; Higgins, Geoff S.; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  16. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Thomas M; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Folkes, Lisa K; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M; Hammond, Ester M; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J; Higgins, Geoff S; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  17. Glutathione and the rate of cellular proliferation determine tumour cell sensitivity to tumour necrosis factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, E; Navarro, J; Mompo, J; Asensi, M; Pellicer, J A; Estrela, J M

    1997-01-01

    Low rates of cellular proliferation are associated with low GSH content and enhanced sensitivity of Ehrlich ascites-tumour (EAT) cells to the cytotoxic effects of recombinant human tumour necrosis factor (rhTNF-alpha). Buthionine sulphoximine, a selective inhibitor of GSH synthesis, inhibited tumour growth and increased rhTNF-alpha cytoxicity in vitro. Administration of sublethal doses (10(6)units/kg per day) of rhTNF-alpha to EAT-bearing mice promoted oxidative stress (as measured by increases in intracellular peroxide levels, O2(-); generation and mitochondrial GSSG) and resulted in a slight reduction (19%) in tumour cell number when controls showed the highest rate of cellular proliferation. ATP (1mmol/kg per day)-induced selective GSH depletion, when combined with rhTNF-alpha administration, afforded a 61% inhibition of tumour growth and resulted in a significant extension of host survival. Administration of N-acetylcysteine (1mmol/kg per day) or GSH ester (5mmol/kg per day) abolished the rhTNF-alpha- and ATP-induced effects on tumour growth by maintaining high GSH levels in the cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity of tumour cells to rhTNF-alpha in vivo depends on their GSH content and their rate of proliferation. PMID:9224645

  18. Oncolytic viruses & their specific targeting to tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prafull K.; Doley, Juwar; Kumar, G. Ravi; Sahoo, A.P.; Tiwari, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of death worldwide. In spite of achieving significant successes in medical sciences in the past few decades, the number of deaths due to cancer remains unchecked. The conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy have limited therapeutic index and a plethora of treatment related side effects. This situation has provided an impetus for search of novel therapeutic strategies that can selectively destroy the tumour cells, leaving the normal cells unharmed. Viral oncotherapy is such a promising treatment modality that offers unique opportunity for tumour targeting. Numerous viruses with inherent anti-cancer activity have been identified and are in different phases of clinical trials. In the era of modern biotechnology and with better understanding of cancer biology and virology, it has become feasible to engineer the oncolytic viruses (OVs) to increase their tumour selectivity and enhance their oncolytic activity. In this review, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses kill the tumour cells have been discussed as also the development made in virotherapy for cancer treatment with emphasis on their tumour specific targeting. PMID:23168697

  19. Brain tumour cells interconnect to a functional and resistant network.

    PubMed

    Osswald, Matthias; Jung, Erik; Sahm, Felix; Solecki, Gergely; Venkataramani, Varun; Blaes, Jonas; Weil, Sophie; Horstmann, Heinz; Wiestler, Benedikt; Syed, Mustafa; Huang, Lulu; Ratliff, Miriam; Karimian Jazi, Kianush; Kurz, Felix T; Schmenger, Torsten; Lemke, Dieter; Gömmel, Miriam; Pauli, Martin; Liao, Yunxiang; Häring, Peter; Pusch, Stefan; Herl, Verena; Steinhäuser, Christian; Krunic, Damir; Jarahian, Mostafa; Miletic, Hrvoje; Berghoff, Anna S; Griesbeck, Oliver; Kalamakis, Georgios; Garaschuk, Olga; Preusser, Matthias; Weiss, Samuel; Liu, Haikun; Heiland, Sabine; Platten, Michael; Huber, Peter E; Kuner, Thomas; von Deimling, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Winkler, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytic brain tumours, including glioblastomas, are incurable neoplasms characterized by diffusely infiltrative growth. Here we show that many tumour cells in astrocytomas extend ultra-long membrane protrusions, and use these distinct tumour microtubes as routes for brain invasion, proliferation, and to interconnect over long distances. The resulting network allows multicellular communication through microtube-associated gap junctions. When damage to the network occurred, tumour microtubes were used for repair. Moreover, the microtube-connected astrocytoma cells, but not those remaining unconnected throughout tumour progression, were protected from cell death inflicted by radiotherapy. The neuronal growth-associated protein 43 was important for microtube formation and function, and drove microtube-dependent tumour cell invasion, proliferation, interconnection, and radioresistance. Oligodendroglial brain tumours were deficient in this mechanism. In summary, astrocytomas can develop functional multicellular network structures. Disconnection of astrocytoma cells by targeting their tumour microtubes emerges as a new principle to reduce the treatment resistance of this disease. PMID:26536111

  20. Cell metabolism, tumour diagnosis and multispectral FLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, A.; Hauser, C.; Lorenz, S.; Mosch, S.; Rotte, S.; Kessler, M.; Kalinina, S.

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence guided diagnosis of tumour tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results are interfering with the outcome. Discrimination between tumour and inflammation could be therefore difficult. Improvement of fluorescence diagnosis through observation of cell metabolism could be the solution, which needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. However, a complex combination of fluorophores give rise to the emission signal. Also in PDD (photodynamic diagnosis) different photosensitizer metabolites contribute to the fluorescence signal. Therefore, the fluorescence decay in many cases does not show a simple monoexponential profile. In those cases a considerable improvement could be achieved when time-resolved and spectral-resolved techniques are simultaneously incorporated. The discussion will focus on the detection of NADH, FAD and 5-ALA induced porphyrins. With respect to NADH and FAD the discrimination between protein bound and free coenzyme was investigated with multispectral FLIM in normal oral keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cells from different origin. The redox ratio, which can be correlated with the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and FAD changed depending on the state of the cells. Most of the investigations were done in monolayer cell cultures. However, in order to get information from a more realistic in vivo situation additionally the chorioallantoismembrane (CAM) of fertilized eggs was used where tumour cells or biopsies were allowed to grow. The results of theses measurements will be discussed as well.

  1. Canine oral mucosal mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Elliott, J W; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L; Berlato, D; Murphy, S; Grant, I A

    2016-03-01

    Mast cell tumours (MCTs) are the most common cutaneous tumours of dogs, however rarely they can arise from the oral mucosa. This subset of MCT is reported to demonstrate a more aggressive clinical course than those tumours on the haired skin and the authors hypothesised that dogs with oral, mucosal MCT would have a high incidence of local lymph node metastasis at presentation and that this would be a negative prognostic factor. An additional hypothesis was that mitotic index (MI) would be prognostic. This retrospective study examines 33 dogs with MCTs arising from the oral mucosa. The results suggest that oral mucosal MCTs in the dog have a high incidence of lymph node metastasis at diagnosis (55%) which results in a poor prognosis. MI and nodal metastasis is highly prognostic. Loco-regional progression is common in these patients and dogs with adequate local control of their tumour had an improved outcome. Despite a more aggressive clinical course, treatment can result in protracted survivals, even when metastasis is present. PMID:24215587

  2. Enhanced cytotoxicity of mitomycin C in human tumour cells with inducers of DT-diaphorase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Doherty, G P; Leith, M K; Curphey, T J; Begleiter, A

    1999-01-01

    DT-diaphorase is a two-electron reducing enzyme that activates the bioreductive anti-tumour agent, mitomycin C (MMC). Cell lines having elevated levels of DT-diaphorase are generally more sensitive to MMC. We have shown that DT-diaphorase can be induced in human tumour cells by a number of compounds, including 1,2-dithiole-3-thione. In this study, we investigated whether induction of DT-diaphorase could enhance the cytotoxic activity of MMC in six human tumour cell lines representing four tumour types. DT-diaphorase was induced by many dietary inducers, including propyl gallate, dimethyl maleate, dimethyl fumarate and sulforaphane. The cytotoxicity of MMC was significantly increased in four tumour lines with the increase ranging from 1.4- to threefold. In contrast, MMC activity was not increased in SK-MEL-28 human melanoma cells and AGS human gastric cancer cells, cell lines that have high base levels of DT-diaphorase activity. Toxicity to normal human marrow cells was increased by 50% when MMC was combined with 1,2-dithiole-3-thione, but this increase was small in comparison with the threefold increase in cytotoxicity to tumour cells. This study demonstrates that induction of DT-diaphorase can increase the cytotoxic activity of MMC in human tumour cell lines, and suggests that it may be possible to use non-toxic inducers of DT-diaphorase to enhance the efficacy of bioreductive anti-tumour agents. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10376975

  3. Pedunculated islet-cell tumour of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Britt, R P

    1966-05-01

    An unusual islet-cell tumour found at necropsy in a patient who had died from a myocardial infarction is described. Of particular interest were the pedunculated nature and large size of the tumour. The clinical features of the case are considered. Four islet-cell tumours in the duodenum have previously been reported and it seems probable that such tumours arise in heterotopic pancreas. PMID:4287114

  4. Circulating tumour cells in patients with urothelial tumours: Enrichment and in vitro culture

    PubMed Central

    Kolostova, Katarina; Cegan, Martin; Bobek, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Results of clinical trials have demonstrated that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are frequently detected in patients with urothelial tumours. The monitoring of CTCs has the potential to improve therapeutic management at an early stage and also to identify patients with increased risk of tumour progression or recurrence before the onset of clinically detected metastasis. In this study, we report a new effectively simplified methodology for a separation and in vitro culturing of viable CTCs from peripheral blood. Method: We include patients diagnosed with 3 types of urothelial tumours (prostate cancer, urinary bladder cancer, and kidney cancer). A size-based separation method for viable CTC - enrichment from unclothed peripheral blood has been introduced (MetaCell, Ostrava, Czech Republic). The enriched CTCs fraction was cultured directly on the separation membrane, or transferred from the membrane and cultured on any plastic surface or a microscopic slide. Results: We report a successful application of a CTCs isolation procedure in patients with urothelial cancers. The CTCs captured on the membrane are enriched with a remarkable proliferation potential. This has enabled us to set up in vitro cell cultures from the viable CTCs unaffected by any fixation buffers, antibodies or lysing solutions. Next, the CTCs were cultured in vitro for a minimum of 10 to 14 days to enable further downstream analysis (e.g., immunohistochemistry). Conclusion: We demonstrated an efficient CTCs capture platform, based on a cell size separation principle. Furthermore, we report an ability to culture the enriched cells – a critical requirement for post-isolation cellular analysis. PMID:25408812

  5. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumour of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tarplin, Sarah; Osterberg, E Charles; Robinson, Brian D; Herman, Michael P; Rosoff, James S

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old woman presented with a long history of pelvic pain and urinary urgency. Prior workup by her primary care doctor had been negative. The patient's gynaecologist ultimately referred her to a urologist following an ultrasound that revealed a possible bladder mass. MRI of the abdomen and pelvis demonstrated a 4 cm soft tissue lesion arising from the bladder. Cystoscopy showed an atypical mass on the anterior bladder wall, and pathological examination of the TURBT (transurethral resection of the bladder tumour) specimen revealed a perivascular epithelioid cell tumour (PEComa) with involvement of the detrusor muscle. The patient underwent a robotically assisted laparoscopic partial cystectomy. Final pathology confirmed a PEComa with negative margins. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course and is doing well following surgery. A surveillance cystoscopy at 6 months showed no evidence of recurrence. This case underscores the variability of clinical presentation of PEComas while proposing an appropriate method of surgical management. PMID:25123573

  6. Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumour: Correlation of Histopathology with Clinicopathologic Features

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ghazala; Ansari, Hena A.; Sherwani, Rana K.; Rahman, Khaliqur; Akhtar, Nishat

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian steroid cell tumours (not otherwise specified) are rare neoplasms of the ovary and are classified under lipid cell tumours. Their diagnosis can be considered as one of exclusion. Histopathologically, the tumour should carefully be evaluated for microscopic features of malignancy, but it is essential for the clinician and the pathologist to remember that in these tumours, pathologically benign histomorphology does not exclude the possibility of clinically malignant behaviour. Our case study focuses on the comparative findings in a postmenopausal female diagnosed with an ovarian steroid tumour (not otherwise specified). A careful correlation between clinical and surgical evaluation and microscopic analysis is necessary, as is a regular followup. PMID:21436872

  7. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Thusyanth; Bakhshinyan, David; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs), are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools. PMID:26064134

  8. Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumour: Anaplastic Variant with Omental Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Anuradha C.K.; Monappa, Vidya

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumour (JGCT) of ovary represents a small fraction of all primary ovarian malignancies. It is a subtype of granulosa cell tumour that is almost always found during the first three decades of life. Histologically, it differs from the typical adult type of granulosa cell tumour. It accounts for 5-15% of all granulosa cell tumours, majority being unilateral. Herein, we describe an unusual histopathological variant of JGCT with numerous large cystic spaces, anaplasia and focal syncytiotrophoblast like giant cells. PMID:27042471

  9. Recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells into prostate tumours promotes metastasis.

    PubMed

    Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jin Koo; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Wang, Jingcheng; Mishra, Anjali; Joseph, Jeena; Berry, Janice E; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Sun, Hongli; Wang, Jianhua; Jin, Taocong; Zhang, Honglai; Dai, Jinlu; Krebsbach, Paul H; Keller, Evan T; Pienta, Kenneth J; Taichman, Russell S

    2013-01-01

    Tumours recruit mesenchymal stem cells to facilitate healing, which induces their conversion into cancer-associated fibroblasts that facilitate metastasis. However, this process is poorly understood on the molecular level. Here we show that CXCL16, a ligand for CXCR6, facilitates mesenchymal stem cell or very small embryonic-like cells recruitment into prostate tumours. CXCR6 signalling stimulates the conversion of mesenchymal stem cells into cancer-associated fibroblasts, which secrete stromal-derived factor-1, also known as CXCL12. CXCL12 expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts then binds to CXCR4 on tumour cells and induces an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, which ultimately promotes metastasis to secondary tumour sites. Our results provide the molecular basis for mesenchymal stem cell recruitment into tumours and how this process leads to tumour metastasis. PMID:23653207

  10. The testicular germ cell tumour transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Alagaratnam, S; Lind, G E; Kraggerud, S M; Lothe, R A; Skotheim, R I

    2011-08-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) are characterized by young age of onset and a complex pattern of histological subtypes. Transcriptomic studies have tried to uncover the gene expression patterns underlying this. Here, we present a systematic review of transcriptome studies of TGCTs of adolescents and young adults and identify genes common across the various studies, both for TGCTs in general as well as the histological subtypes, hence elucidating both transcriptional changes associated with malignant transformation and differentiation patterns. A meta-analysis of this type adds power and significance to the genes thus found, where most studies have included only a limited number of samples. Both known (KRAS, MYCN and TPD52) and novel (CCT6A, IGFBP3 and SALL2) cancer genes are implicated in TGC tumorigenesis. Gene expression patterns characteristic to embryonic stem cells are also found deregulated in TGC tumorigenesis. This is reflected in how pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells commonly differentiate into a variety of embryonic and extra-embryonic histological types, each with unique transcriptomes. The embryonal carcinomas in particular are found to overexpress pluripotency genes, while gene signatures for seminomas, teratomas and yolk sac tumours were also identified. This underlines the distinctive transcriptomic programme across histological subtypes, especially striking given that the TGCT genome is largely similar across the same subtypes. PMID:21651573

  11. Alternatively spliced variants of the cell adhesion molecule CD44 and tumour progression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gotley, D. C.; Fawcett, J.; Walsh, M. D.; Reeder, J. A.; Simmons, D. L.; Antalis, T. M.

    1996-01-01

    Increased expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CD44 family of cell adhesion molecules has been associated with tumour metastasis. In the present study, expression of alternatively spliced variants of CD44 and their cellular distribution have been investigated in human colonic tumours and in the corresponding normal mucosa, in addition to benign adenomatous polyps. The expression of CD44 alternatively spliced variants has been correlated with tumour progression according to Dukes' histological stage. CD44 variant expression was determined by immunohistochemisty using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific CD44 variant domains together with RT-PCR analysis of CD44 variant mRNA expression in the same tissue specimens. We demonstrate that as well as being expressed in colonic tumour cells, the full range of CD44 variants, CD44v2-v10, are widely expressed in normal colonic crypt epithelium, predominantly in the crypt base. CD44v6, the epitope which is most commonly associated with tumour progression and metastasis, was not only expressed by many benign colonic tumours, but was expressed as frequently in normal basal crypt epithelium as in malignant colonic tumour cells, and surprisingly, was even absent from some metastatic colorectal tumours. Expression of none of the CD44 variant epitopes was found to be positively correlated with tumour progression or with colorectal tumour metastasis to the liver, results which are inconsistent with a role for CD44 variants as indicators of colonic cancer progression. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8695347

  12. Induction of DT-diaphorase by 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones in human tumour and normal cells and effect on anti-tumour activity of bioreductive agents.

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, G. P.; Leith, M. K.; Wang, X.; Curphey, T. J.; Begleiter, A.

    1998-01-01

    DT-diaphorase is a two-electron-reducing enzyme that is an important activator of bioreductive anti-tumour agents, such as mitomycin C (MMC) and EO9, and is inducible by many compounds, including 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones (D3Ts). We showed previously that D3T selectively increased DT-diaphorase activity in mouse lymphoma cells compared with normal mouse marrow cells, and also increased MMC or EO9 cytotoxic activity in the lymphoma cells with only minor effects in the marrow cells. In this study, we found that D3T significantly increased DT-diaphorase activity in 28 of 38 human tumour cell lines representing ten tissue types with no obvious relationships between the tumour type, or the base level of DT-diaphorase activity, and the ability of D3T to increase the enzyme activity. Induction of DT-diaphorase activity in human tumour cell lines by 12 D3T analogues varied markedly with the D3T structure. D3T also increased DT-diaphorase activity in normal human bone marrow and kidney cells but the increases were small in these cells. In addition, D3T increased the level of enzyme activity in normal human lung cells. Pretreatment of human tumour cells with D3T analogues significantly increased the cytotoxic activity of MMC or EO9 in these cells, and the level of enhancement of anti-tumour activity paralleled the level of DT-diaphorase induction. In contrast, D3T did not effect the toxicity of EO9 in normal kidney cells. These results demonstrate that D3T analogues can increase DT-diaphorase activity in a wide variety of human tumour cells and that this effect can enhance the anti-tumour activity of the bioreductive agents MMC and EO9. PMID:9579829

  13. Tumour cell–derived extracellular vesicles interact with mesenchymal stem cells to modulate the microenvironment and enhance cholangiocarcinoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Hiroaki; Yan, Irene K.; Takahashi, Kenji; Wood, Joseph; Zubair, Abba; Patel, Tushar

    2015-01-01

    The contributions of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to tumour growth and stroma formation are poorly understood. Tumour cells can transfer genetic information and modulate cell signalling in other cells through the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs). We examined the contribution of EV-mediated inter-cellular signalling between bone marrow MSCs and tumour cells in human cholangiocarcinoma, highly desmoplastic cancers that are characterized by tumour cells closely intertwined within a dense fibrous stroma. Exposure of MSCs to tumour cell–derived EVs enhanced MSC migratory capability and expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin mRNA, in addition to mRNA expression and release of CXCL-1, CCL2 and IL-6. Conditioned media from MSCs exposed to tumour cell–derived EVs increased STAT-3 phosphorylation and proliferation in tumour cells. These effects were completely blocked by anti-IL-6R antibody. In conclusion, tumour cell–derived EVs can contribute to the generation of tumour stroma through fibroblastic differentiation of MSCs, and can also selectively modulate the cellular release of soluble factors such as IL-6 by MSCs that can, in turn, alter tumour cell proliferation. Thus, malignant cells can “educate” MSCs to induce local microenvironmental changes that enhance tumour cell growth. PMID:25557794

  14. Optical diagnostics of tumour cells at different stages of pathology development

    SciTech Connect

    Shcheglova, L S; Maryakhina, V S; Abramova, L L

    2013-11-30

    The differences in optical and biophysical properties between the cells of mammary gland tumour extracted from tumours of different diameter are described. It is shown that the spectral and spectrokinetic properties of fluorescent probes in the cells extracted from the tumours 1 – 3 cm in diameter are essentially different. Thus, the extinction coefficient of rhodamine 6G gradually increases with the pathology development. At the same time the rate of interaction of the triplet states of molecular probes with the oxygen, diluted in the tumour cells cytoplasm, decreases with the growth of the tumour capsule diameter. The observed regularities can be due to the changes in the cell structure, biochemical and biophysical properties. The reported data may be useful for developing optical methods of diagnostics of biotissue pathological conditions. (optical methods in biology and medicine)

  15. Optical diagnostics of tumour cells at different stages of pathology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglova, L. S.; Abramova, L. L.; Maryakhina, V. S.

    2013-11-01

    The differences in optical and biophysical properties between the cells of mammary gland tumour extracted from tumours of different diameter are described. It is shown that the spectral and spectrokinetic properties of fluorescent probes in the cells extracted from the tumours 1 - 3 cm in diameter are essentially different. Thus, the extinction coefficient of rhodamine 6G gradually increases with the pathology development. At the same time the rate of interaction of the triplet states of molecular probes with the oxygen, diluted in the tumour cells cytoplasm, decreases with the growth of the tumour capsule diameter. The observed regularities can be due to the changes in the cell structure, biochemical and biophysical properties. The reported data may be useful for developing optical methods of diagnostics of biotissue pathological conditions.

  16. Immunological hallmarks of stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Turley, Shannon J; Cremasco, Viviana; Astarita, Jillian L

    2015-11-01

    A dynamic and mutualistic interaction between tumour cells and the surrounding stroma promotes the initiation, progression, metastasis and chemoresistance of solid tumours. Far less understood is the relationship between the stroma and tumour-infiltrating leukocytes; however, emerging evidence suggests that the stromal compartment can shape antitumour immunity and responsiveness to immunotherapy. Thus, there is growing interest in elucidating the immunomodulatory roles of the stroma that evolve within the tumour microenvironment. In this Review, we discuss the evidence that stromal determinants interact with leukocytes and influence antitumour immunity, with emphasis on the immunological attributes of stromal cells that may foster their protumorigenic function. PMID:26471778

  17. Survival in rectal cancer is predicted by T cell infiltration of tumour-associated lymphoid nodules

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, T P W; Lai, R; Dabbagh, L; Wallace, T M; de Gara, C J

    2010-01-01

    Lymphoid nodules are a normal component of the mucosa of the rectum, but little is known about their function and whether they contribute to the host immune response in malignancy. In rectal cancer specimens from patients with local (n = 18), regional (n = 12) and distant (n = 10) disease, we quantified T cell (CD3, CD25) and dendritic cell (CD1a, CD83) levels at the tumour margin as well as within tumour-associated lymphoid nodules. In normal tissue CD3+, but not CD25+, T cells are concentrated at high levels within lymphoid nodules, with significantly fewer cells found in surrounding normal mucosa (P = 0·001). Mature (CD83), but not immature (CD1a), dendritic cells in normal tissue are also found clustered almost exclusively within lymphoid nodules (P = < 0·0001). In rectal tumours, both CD3+ T cells (P = 0·004) and CD83+ dendritic cells (P = 0·0001) are also localized preferentially within tumour-associated lymphoid nodules. However, when comparing tumour specimens to normal rectal tissue, the average density of CD3+ T cells (P = 0·0005) and CD83+ dendritic cells (P = 0·0006) in tumour-associated lymphoid nodules was significantly less than that seen in lymphoid nodules in normal mucosa. Interestingly, regardless of where quantified, T cell and dendritic cell levels did not depend upon the stage of disease. Increased CD3+ T cell infiltration of tumour-associated lymphoid nodules predicted improved survival, independent of stage (P = 0·05). Other T cell (CD25) markers and different levels of CD1a+ or CD83+ dendritic cells did not predict survival. Tumour-associated lymphoid nodules, enriched in dendritic cells and T cells, may be an important site for antigen presentation and increased T cell infiltration may be a marker for improved survival. PMID:20408858

  18. Tumour cell-derived Wnt7a recruits and activates fibroblasts to promote tumour aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Avgustinova, Alexandra; Iravani, Marjan; Robertson, David; Fearns, Antony; Gao, Qiong; Klingbeil, Pamela; Hanby, Andrew M.; Speirs, Valerie; Sahai, Erik; Calvo, Fernando; Isacke, Clare M.

    2016-01-01

    Stromal fibroblast recruitment to tumours and activation to a cancer-associated fibroblast (CAF) phenotype has been implicated in promoting primary tumour growth and progression to metastatic disease. However, the mechanisms underlying the tumour:fibroblast crosstalk that drive the intertumoural stromal heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Using in vivo models we identify Wnt7a as a key factor secreted exclusively by aggressive breast tumour cells, which induces CAF conversion. Functionally, this results in extracellular matrix remodelling to create a permissive environment for tumour cell invasion and promotion of distant metastasis. Mechanistically, Wnt7a-mediated fibroblast activation is not dependent on classical Wnt signalling. Instead, we demonstrate that Wnt7a potentiates TGFβ receptor signalling both in 3D in vitro and in vivo models, thus highlighting the interaction between two of the key signalling pathways in development and disease. Importantly, in clinical breast cancer cohorts, tumour cell Wnt7a expression correlates with a desmoplastic, poor-prognosis stroma and poor patient outcome. PMID:26777421

  19. Natural cytotoxicity of haemopoietic cell populations against murine lymphoid tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Burton, R. C.; Grail, D.; Warner, N. L.

    1978-01-01

    Homozygous nude and normal mice of 3 strains, BALB/c, CBA and C57BL, were used as sources of nucleated haemopoietic "natural killer" (NK) cells. These killer cells could lyse a wide range of syngeneic and allogeneic lymphoid tumour cell lines in vitro, and it was found that cell suspensions from nude mice were always significantly more active than those from normal mice, and that the most active effector population was a polymorph-enriched peritoneal-exudate cell suspension. Eosinophils did not appear to be involved in the phenomenon, and mononuclear peritoneal-exudate cell suspensions were actually highly inhibitory. Three non-lymphoid tumours, a carcinoma, a fibrosarcoma and a mastocytoma, were totally resistant to in vitro lysis. Although all susceptible tumour cell lines were C-type virus-associated, not all of these tumours were killed by all strain sources of spleen cells, indicating a specificity of killing. PMID:656308

  20. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 is induced by epidermal growth factor in human bladder tumour cell lines and is detectable in urine of patients with bladder tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Nutt, J. E.; Mellon, J. K.; Qureshi, K.; Lunec, J.

    1998-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases are a family of enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix and are considered to be important in tumour invasion and metastasis. The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) production in two human bladder tumour cell lines, RT112 and RT4, has been investigated. In the RT112 cell line, an increase in MMP1 mRNA levels was found after a 6-h incubation with EGF, and this further increased to 20-fold that of control levels at 24- and 48-h treatment with 50 ng ml(-1) of EGF. MMP2 mRNA levels remained constant over this time period, whereas in the RT4 cells no MMP2 transcripts were detectable, but MMP1 transcripts again increased with 24- and 48-h treatment with 50 ng ml(-1) of EGF. MMP1 protein concentration in the conditioned medium from both cell lines increased with 24- and 48-h treatment of the cells and the total MMP1 was higher in the medium than the cells, demonstrating that the bladder tumour cell lines synthesize and secrete MMP1 protein after continuous stimulation with EGF. MMP1 protein was detected in urine from patients with bladder tumours, with a significant increase in concentration with increased stage and grade of tumour. MMP1 urine concentrations may therefore be a useful prognostic indicator for bladder tumour progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9683296

  1. Single-cell Raman spectroscopy of irradiated tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Quinn

    This work describes the development and application of a novel combination of single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS), automated data processing, and principal component analysis (PCA) for investigating radiation induced biochemical responses in human tumour cells. The developed techniques are first validated for the analysis of large data sets (˜200 spectra) obtained from single cells. The effectiveness and robustness of the automated data processing methods is demonstrated, and potential pitfalls that may arise during the implementation of such methods are identified. The techniques are first applied to investigate the inherent sources of spectral variability between single cells of a human prostate tumour cell line (DU145) cultured in vitro. PCA is used to identify spectral differences that correlate with cell cycle progression and the changing confluency of a cell culture during the first 3-4 days after sub-culturing. Spectral variability arising from cell cycle progression is (i) expressed as varying intensities of protein and nucleic acid features relative to lipid features, (ii) well correlated with known biochemical changes in cells as they progress through the cell cycle, and (iii) shown to be the most significant source of inherent spectral variability between cells. This characterization provides a foundation for interpreting spectral variability in subsequent studies. The techniques are then applied to study the effects of ionizing radiation on human tumour cells. DU145 cells are cultured in vitro and irradiated to doses between 15 and 50 Gy with single fractions of 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator. Raman spectra are acquired from irradiated and unirradiated cells, up to 5 days post-irradiation. PCA is used to distinguish radiation induced spectral changes from inherent sources of spectral variability, such as those arising from cell cycle. Radiation induced spectral changes are found to correlate with both the irradiated dose and the

  2. Bacterial-mediated DNA delivery to tumour associated phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Byrne, W L; Murphy, C T; Cronin, M; Wirth, T; Tangney, M

    2014-12-28

    Phagocytic cells including macrophages, dendritic cells and neutrophils are now recognised as playing a negative role in many disease settings including cancer. In particular, macrophages are known to play a pathophysiological role in multiple diseases and present a valid and ubiquitous therapeutic target. The technology to target these phagocytic cells in situ, both selectively and efficiently, is required in order to translate novel therapeutic modalities into clinical reality. We present a novel delivery strategy using non-pathogenic bacteria to effect gene delivery specifically to tumour-associated phagocytic cells. Non-invasive bacteria lack the ability to actively enter host cells, except for phagocytic cells. We exploit this natural property to effect 'passive transfection' of tumour-associated phagocytic cells following direct administration of transgene-loaded bacteria to tumour regions. Using an in vitro-differentiated human monocyte cell line and two in vivo mouse models (an ovarian cancer ascites and a solid colon tumour model) proof of delivery is demonstrated with bacteria carrying reporter constructs. The results confirm that the delivery strategy is specific for phagocytic cells and that the bacterial vector itself recruits more phagocytic cells to the tumour. While proof of delivery to phagocytic cells is demonstrated in vivo for solid and ascites tumour models, this strategy may be applied to other settings, including non-cancer related disease. PMID:25466954

  3. Anti-tumour effect of metformin in canine mammary gland tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Watanabe, M; Tsuboi, M; Sugano, S; Yoshitake, R; Tanaka, Y; Ong, S M; Saito, T; Matsumoto, K; Fujita, N; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2015-08-01

    Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic drug used in type 2 diabetes. Its pharmacological activity reportedly involves mitochondrial respiratory complex I, and mitochondrial respiratory complex inhibitors have a strong inhibitory effect on the growth of metastatic canine mammary gland tumour (CMGT) cell lines. It is hypothesised that metformin has selective anti-tumour effects on metastatic CMGT cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of metformin on cell growth, production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in two CMGT clonal cell lines with different metastatic potential. In addition, transcriptome analysis was used to determine cellular processes disrupted by metformin and in vivo anti-tumour effects were examined in a mouse xenograft model. Metformin inhibited CMGT cell growth in vitro, with the metastatic clone (CHMp-5b) displaying greater sensitivity. ATP depletion and ROS elevation were observed to a similar extent in the metastatic and non-metastatic (CHMp-13a) cell lines after metformin exposure. However, subsequent AMPK activation and mTOR pathway inhibition were prominent only in metformin-insensitive non-metastatic cells. Microarray analysis revealed inhibition of cell cycle progression by metformin treatment in CHMp-5b cells, which was further confirmed by Western blotting and cell cycle analysis. Additionally, metformin significantly suppressed tumour growth in xenografted metastatic CMGT cells. In conclusion, metformin exhibited an anti-tumour effect in metastatic CMGT cells through AMPK-independent cell cycle arrest. Its mechanism of action differed in the non-metastatic clone, where AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition were observed. PMID:25981932

  4. Breast spindle cell tumours: about eight cases

    PubMed Central

    Abd El All, Howayda S

    2006-01-01

    Background Breast spindle cell tumours (BSCTs), although rare, represent a heterogeneous group with different treatment modalities. This work was undertaken to evaluate the utility of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differentiating BSCTs. Methods FNAC of eight breast masses diagnosed cytologically as BSCTs was followed by wide excision biopsy. IHC using a panel of antibodies against vimentin, pan-cytokeratin, s100, desmin, smooth muscle actin, CD34, and CD10 was evaluated to define their nature. Results FNAC defined the tumors as benign (n = 4), suspicious (n = 2) and malignant (n = 3), based on the cytopathological criteria of malignancy. Following wide excision biopsy, the tumors were reclassified into benign (n = 5) and malignant (n = 3). In the benign group, the diagnosis was raised histologically and confirmed by IHC for 3 cases (one spindle cell lipoma, one myofibroblastoma and one leiomyoma). For the remaining two cases, the diagnosis was set up after IHC (one fibromatosis and one spindle cell variant of adenomyoepithelioma). In the malignant group, a leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed histologically, while IHC was crucial to set up the diagnosis of one case of spindle cell carcinoma and one malignant myoepithelioma. Conclusion FNAC in BSCTs is an insufficient tool and should be followed by wide excision biopsy. The latter technique differentiate benign from malignant BSCTs and is able in 50% of the cases to set up the definite diagnosis. IHC is of value to define the nature of different benign lesions and is mandatory in the malignant ones for optimal treatment. Awareness of the different types of BSCTs prevents unnecessary extensive therapeutic regimes. PMID:16859566

  5. Novel association between microglia and stem cells in human gliomas: A contributor to tumour proliferation?

    PubMed Central

    Noorani, Imran; Petty, Gareth; Grundy, Paul L; Sharpe, Geoff; Willaime‐Morawek, Sandrine; Harris, Scott; Thomas, Gareth J; Nicoll, James AR

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Brain tumour stem cells and microglia both promote the growth of astrocytomas, the commonest form of primary brain tumour, with recent emerging evidence that these cell types may interact in glioma models. It is unclear whether microglia and stem cells are associated in human gliomas. To investigate this question, we used the technique of tissue microarrays to perform a correlative study of a large number of tumour samples. We quantified immunostaining of human astrocytic tumour tissue microarrays (86 patients; World Health Organisation grade II–IV) for microglia Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1) and CD68, and stem cell nestin, SOX2 and CD133. Ki67 was used to assess proliferation and GFAP for astrocytic differentiation. Immunoreactivity for both microglial markers and stem cell markers nestin and SOX2 significantly increased with increasing tumour grade. GFAP was higher in low grade astrocytomas. There was a positive correlation between: (i) both microglial markers and nestin and CD133, (ii) nestin and tumour cell proliferation Ki67 and (iii) both microglial markers and Ki67. SOX2 was not associated with microglia or tumour proliferation. To test the clinical relevance, we investigated the putative association of these markers with clinical outcomes. High expression for nestin and Iba1 correlated with significantly shorter survival times, and high expression for nestin, Iba1, CD68 and Ki67 was associated with faster tumour progression on univariate analysis. On multivariate analysis, nestin, CD133 and Ki67 remained significant predictors of poorer survival, after adjustment for other markers. These results confirm previous in vitro findings, demonstrating their functional relevance as a therapeutic target in humans. This is the first report of a novel correlation between microglia and stem cells that may drive human astrocytic tumour development.

  6. Tumour-cell-induced endothelial cell necroptosis via death receptor 6 promotes metastasis.

    PubMed

    Strilic, Boris; Yang, Lida; Albarrán-Juárez, Julián; Wachsmuth, Laurens; Han, Kang; Müller, Ulrike C; Pasparakis, Manolis; Offermanns, Stefan

    2016-08-11

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death in humans. It is a complex multistep process during which individual tumour cells spread primarily through the circulatory system to colonize distant organs. Once in the circulation, tumour cells remain vulnerable, and their metastatic potential largely depends on a rapid and efficient way to escape from the blood stream by passing the endothelial barrier. Evidence has been provided that tumour cell extravasation resembles leukocyte transendothelial migration. However, it remains unclear how tumour cells interact with endothelial cells during extravasation and how these processes are regulated on a molecular level. Here we show that human and murine tumour cells induce programmed necrosis (necroptosis) of endothelial cells, which promotes tumour cell extravasation and metastasis. Treatment of mice with the receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1)-inhibitor necrostatin-1 or endothelial-cell-specific deletion of RIPK3 reduced tumour-cell-induced endothelial necroptosis, tumour cell extravasation and metastasis. In contrast, pharmacological caspase inhibition or endothelial-cell-specific loss of caspase-8 promoted these processes. We furthermore show in vitro and in vivo that tumour-cell-induced endothelial necroptosis leading to extravasation and metastasis requires amyloid precursor protein expressed by tumour cells and its receptor, death receptor 6 (DR6), on endothelial cells as the primary mediators of these effects. Our data identify a new mechanism underlying tumour cell extravasation and metastasis, and suggest endothelial DR6-mediated necroptotic signalling pathways as targets for anti-metastatic therapies. PMID:27487218

  7. Molecular design of hybrid tumour necrosis factor alpha with polyethylene glycol increases its anti-tumour potency.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Y.; Kihira, T.; Tsunoda, S.; Kanamori, T.; Nakagawa, S.; Mayumi, T.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to increase the anti-tumour potency and reduce the toxic side-effects of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Natural human TNF-alpha was chemically conjugated with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (PEG) using succinimidyl coupling of lysine amino groups of TNF-alpha. The number-average molecular weight of PEG-modified TNF-alpha (PEG-TNF-alpha) increased with an increase in the reaction time and the initial molar ratio of PEG relative to TNF-alpha. The resulting modified TNF-alpha was separated into fractions of various molecular weights. The specific activity of separated PEG-TNF-alpha s relative to that of native TNF-alpha gradually decreased with an increase in the degree of PEG modification, but the plasma half-life was drastically increased with the increase in molecular weight of modified TNF-alpha. PEG-TNF-alpha s, in which 29% and 56% of lysine residues were coupled to PEG, had anti-tumour activity approximately 4 and 100 times greater than unmodified TNF-alpha in the murine Meth-A fibrosarcoma model. Extensive PEG modification did not increase its in vivo activity. A high dose of unmodified TNF-alpha induced toxic side-effects, but these were not observed with the modified TNF-alpha s. Optimal PEG modification of TNF-alpha markedly increased its bioavailability and may facilitate its potential anti-tumour therapeutic use. PMID:7734321

  8. Mixed odontogenic tumour with dentinoid and ghost cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Patil, Shruthi; Zingade, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Ameloblastomas do not generally show evidence of induction, however, rare cases associated with odontome have been reported and are referred to as odontoameloblastomas. We report an unusual case of an ameloblastoma with features of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumour, showing evidence of induction of dentinoid by tumour cells--but without concomitant formation of enamel--and with features of ghost cells. The lesion occurred on the left side of the maxilla in a 31-year-old woman. PMID:26698201

  9. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-06-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:27234586

  10. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine

    PubMed Central

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H+-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:27234586

  11. Acute vascular response to cediranib treatment in human non-small-cell lung cancer xenografts with different tumour stromal architecture

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yanyan; Allen, Danny; Kersemans, Veerle; Devery, Aoife M.; Bokobza, Sivan M.; Smart, Sean; Ryan, Anderson J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Tumours can be categorised based on their stromal architecture into tumour vessel and stromal vessel phenotypes, and the phenotypes have been suggested to define tumour response to chronic treatment with a VEGFR2 antibody. However, it is unclear whether the vascular phenotypes of tumours associate with acute vascular response to VEGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), or whether the early changes in vascular function are associated with subsequent changes in tumour size. This study was sought to address these questions by using xenograft models of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) representing stromal vessel phenotype (Calu-3) and tumour vessel phenotype (Calu-6), respectively. Methods For dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), nude mice bearing established Calu-3 or Calu-6 xenografts were treated with a potent pan-VEGFR TKI, cediranib (6 mg/kg), at 0 h and 22 h. DCE-MRI was performed 2 h before the first dose and 2 h after the second dose of cediranib to examine acute changes in tumour vessel perfusion. Tumours were harvested for hypoxia detection by CA9 immunohistochemistry. For tumour growth study, mice carrying established Calu-3 or Calu-6 tumours were treated with cediranib once daily for 5 days. Results Twenty-four hours after cediranib administration, the perfusion of Calu-3 tumours was markedly reduced, with a significant increase in hypoxia. In contrast, neither perfusion nor hypoxia was significantly affected in Calu-6 tumours. Tumour regressions were induced in Calu-3 xenografts, but not in Calu-6 xenografts, although there was a trend towards tumour growth inhibition after 5 days of cediranib treatment. Conclusion These findings suggest that tumour stromal architecture may associate with acute tumour vascular response to VEGFR TKI, and this acute tumour vascular response may be a promising early predictive marker of response to VEGFR TKI in NSCLC. PMID:26323213

  12. M2 tumour-associated macrophages contribute to tumour progression via legumain remodelling the extracellular matrix in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Long; Li, Honghao; Shi, Yuzhi; Wang, Dekun; Gong, Junbo; Xun, Jing; Zhou, Sifan; Xiang, Rong; Tan, Xiaoyue

    2016-01-01

    Effects of M2 tumour-associated macrophages on the pathogenesis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are still controversial. Our data showed that the number of CD163-positive M2 macrophages correlated negatively with DLBCL prognosis. Macrophage depletion by clodronate liposomes significantly suppressed tumour growth in a xenograft mouse model of DLBCL using OCI-Ly3 cells. Moreover, M2 polarization of macrophages induced legumain expression in U937 cells. Exogenous legumain promoted degradation of fibronectin and collagen I, which was abolished by administration of a legumain inhibitor RR-11a. Overexpression of legumain in Raw 264.7 cells also induced tube formation of endothelial cells in matrigel. In the xenograft mouse model of DLBCL, decreased fibronectin and collagen I, as well as increased legumain expression and angiogenesis were found at the late stage tumours compared with early stage tumours. Co-localization of legumain and fibronectin was observed in the extracellular matrix of tumour tissues. Administration of the legumain inhibitor to the xenograft DLBCL model suppressed tumour growth, angiogenesis and collagen deposition compared with the control. Taken together, our results suggest that M2 tumour-associated macrophages affect degradation of the extracellular matrix and angiogenesis via overexpression of legumain, and therefore play an active role in the progression of DLBCL. PMID:27464733

  13. M2 tumour-associated macrophages contribute to tumour progression via legumain remodelling the extracellular matrix in diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shen, Long; Li, Honghao; Shi, Yuzhi; Wang, Dekun; Gong, Junbo; Xun, Jing; Zhou, Sifan; Xiang, Rong; Tan, Xiaoyue

    2016-01-01

    Effects of M2 tumour-associated macrophages on the pathogenesis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are still controversial. Our data showed that the number of CD163-positive M2 macrophages correlated negatively with DLBCL prognosis. Macrophage depletion by clodronate liposomes significantly suppressed tumour growth in a xenograft mouse model of DLBCL using OCI-Ly3 cells. Moreover, M2 polarization of macrophages induced legumain expression in U937 cells. Exogenous legumain promoted degradation of fibronectin and collagen I, which was abolished by administration of a legumain inhibitor RR-11a. Overexpression of legumain in Raw 264.7 cells also induced tube formation of endothelial cells in matrigel. In the xenograft mouse model of DLBCL, decreased fibronectin and collagen I, as well as increased legumain expression and angiogenesis were found at the late stage tumours compared with early stage tumours. Co-localization of legumain and fibronectin was observed in the extracellular matrix of tumour tissues. Administration of the legumain inhibitor to the xenograft DLBCL model suppressed tumour growth, angiogenesis and collagen deposition compared with the control. Taken together, our results suggest that M2 tumour-associated macrophages affect degradation of the extracellular matrix and angiogenesis via overexpression of legumain, and therefore play an active role in the progression of DLBCL. PMID:27464733

  14. Canine cutaneous spindle cell tumours with features of peripheral nerve sheath tumours: a histopathological and immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Gaitero, L; Añor, S; Fondevila, D; Pumarola, M

    2008-07-01

    In veterinary medicine, the term peripheral nerve sheath tumour is usually restricted to neoplasms that are closely associated with an identified nerve. Thirty-three cases of canine cutaneous tumours previously classified as spindle cell tumours with features resembling peripheral nerve sheath tumours were examined. Two histological patterns were identified: dense areas of spindle shaped cells resembling the Antoni A pattern and less cellular areas with more pleomorphic cells resembling the Antoni B pattern. Immunohistochemically, all tumours uniformly expressed vimentin and 15/33 (45.4%) had scattered and patchy expression of S-100. Laminin expression was found in 25/33 (75.7%) tumours and collagen IV labelling occurred in 14/33 (42.4%). Expression of protein gene product 9.5 was detected in 31/33 (93.9%) of tumours and neuron specific enolase labelling was present in 27/33 (81.8%). Glial fibrillary acidic protein was only expressed within the cytoplasm of some large multinucleated cells in one tumour. These findings suggest that any cutaneous tumour with one of the two histopathological patterns described above should be described as a cutaneous peripheral nerve sheath tumour and that expression of S-100, laminin and collagen IV may be used to define a schwannoma. PMID:18514218

  15. Therapeutic effect of interleukin 12 on mouse haemangiosarcomas is not associated with an increased anti-tumour cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed Central

    Vizler, C.; Rosato, A.; Calderazzo, F.; Quintieri, L.; Fruscella, P.; Wainstok de Calmanovici, R.; Mantovani, A.; Vecchi, A.; Zanovello, P.; Collavo, D.

    1998-01-01

    In syngeneic mice, the H5V polyoma middle-T oncogene-transformed endothelioma cell line induces Kaposi's sarcoma-like cavernous haemangiomas that regress transiently, probably because of an anti-tumour immune response, but eventually grow progressively and kill the host. To evaluate the generation of tumour-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), spleen cells of tumour-bearing mice were restimulated with irradiated H5V cells in mixed leucocyte-tumour cell cultures. Tumour-specific CTLs were demonstrable only when low numbers of H5V stimulator cells were used (<1 H5V cell per 50 splenocytes). We found that H5V cells secrete immunosuppressive mediators because CTL generation was blocked when H5V cells culture supernatants were added to allogeneic mixed leucocyte cultures. As numerous tumour-derived immunosuppressive mediators may interfere with interleukin 12 (IL-12) production, we tested whether IL-12 treatment of the tumour-bearing mice would augment their immune response and thus suppress tumour growth. Indeed, IL-12 inhibited tumour growth and prevented mortality, but did not increase anti-H5V CTL generation either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, the anti-tumour activity in IL-12-treated mice was abrogated by anti-interferon (IFN)-gamma monoclonal antibody (MAb) co-administration. These results strongly suggest that the anti-tumour effect of IL-12 is principally mediated by IFN-gamma release that in turn blocks H5V cell proliferation and induces the release of factors that suppress angiogenesis. PMID:9484826

  16. Transport of calcium ions by Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Landry, Y; Lehninger, A L

    1976-08-15

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells accumulate Ca2+ when incubated aerobically with succinate, phosphate and rotenone, as revealed by isotopic and atomic-absorption measurements. Ca2+ does not stimulate oxygen consumption by carefully prepared Ehrlich cells, but des so when the cells are placed in a hypo-osmotic medium. Neither glutamate nor malate support Ca2+ uptake in 'intact' Ehrlich cells, nor does the endogenous NAD-linked respiration. Ca2+ uptake is completely dependent on mitochondrial energy-coupling mechansims. It was an unexpected finding that maximal Ca2+ uptake supported by succinate requires rotenone, which blocks oxidation of enogenous NAD-linked substrates. Phosphate functions as co-anion for entry of Ca2+. Ca2+ uptake is also supported by extra-cellular ATP; no other nucleoside 5'-di- or tri-phosphate was active. The accumulation of Ca2+ apparently takes place in the mitochondria, since oligomycin and atractyloside inhibit ATP-supported Ca2+ uptake. Glycolysis does not support Ca2+ uptake. Neither free mitochondria released from disrupted cells nor permeability-damaged cells capable of absorbing Trypan Blue were responsible for any large fraction of the total observed energy-coupled Ca2+ uptake. The observations reported also indicate that electron flow through energy-conserving site 1 promotes Ca2+ release from Ehrlich cells and that extra-cellular ATP increase permeability of the cell membrane, allowing both ATP and Ca2+ to enter the cells more readily. PMID:988829

  17. Dichloroacetate induces autophagy in colorectal cancer cells and tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lin, G; Hill, D K; Andrejeva, G; Boult, J K R; Troy, H; Fong, A-C L F W T; Orton, M R; Panek, R; Parkes, H G; Jafar, M; Koh, D-M; Robinson, S P; Judson, I R; Griffiths, J R; Leach, M O; Eykyn, T R; Chung, Y-L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dichloroacetate (DCA) has been found to have antitumour properties. Methods: We investigated the cellular and metabolic responses to DCA treatment and recovery in human colorectal (HT29, HCT116 WT and HCT116 Bax-ko), prostate carcinoma cells (PC3) and HT29 xenografts by flow cytometry, western blotting, electron microscopy, 1H and hyperpolarised 13C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results: Increased expression of the autophagy markers LC3B II was observed following DCA treatment both in vitro and in vivo. We observed increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mTOR inhibition (decreased pS6 ribosomal protein and p4E-BP1 expression) as well as increased expression of MCT1 following DCA treatment. Steady-state lactate excretion and the apparent hyperpolarised [1-13C] pyruvate-to-lactate exchange rate (kPL) were decreased in DCA-treated cells, along with increased NAD+/NADH ratios and NAD+. Steady-state lactate excretion and kPL returned to, or exceeded, control levels in cells recovered from DCA treatment, accompanied by increased NAD+ and NADH. Reduced kPL with DCA treatment was found in HT29 tumour xenografts in vivo. Conclusions: DCA induces autophagy in cancer cells accompanied by ROS production and mTOR inhibition, reduced lactate excretion, reduced kPL and increased NAD+/NADH ratio. The observed cellular and metabolic changes recover on cessation of treatment. PMID:24892448

  18. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Aguiar, Pablo; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models.

  19. Role of the microtubule-targeting drug vinflunine on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vinflunine (VFL) is a microtubule-targeting drug that suppresses microtubule dynamics, showing anti-metastatic properties both in vitro and in living cancer cells. An increasing body of evidence underlines the influence of the microtubules dynamics on the cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions. E-cadherin is a marker of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a tumour suppressor; its reduced levels in carcinoma are associated with poor prognosis. In this report, we investigate the role of VFL on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells. Methods Human bladder epithelial tumour cell lines HT1376, 5637, SW780, T24 and UMUC3 were used to analyse cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions under VFL treatment. VFL effect on growth inhibition was measured by using a MTT colorimetric cell viability assay. Western blot, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy analyses were performed to assess the roles of VFL effect on cell-cell adhesions, epithelial-to-mesenchymal markers and apoptosis. The role of the proteasome in controlling cell-cell adhesion was studied using the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Results We show that VFL induces cell death in bladder cancer cells and activates epithelial differentiation of the remaining living cells, leading to an increase of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion and a reduction of mesenchymal markers, such as N-cadherin or vimentin. Moreover, while E-cadherin is increased, the levels of Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin-ligase for E-cadherin, were significantly reduced in presence of VFL. In 5637, this reduction on Hakai expression was blocked by MG132 proteasome inhibitor, indicating that the proteasome pathway could be one of the molecular mechanisms involved in its degradation. Conclusions Our findings underscore a critical function for VFL in cell-cell adhesions of epithelial bladder tumour cells, suggesting a novel molecular mechanism by which VFL may impact upon EMT and metastasis. PMID:25012153

  20. Tumour and immune cell dynamics explain the PSA bounce after prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Offord, Chetan P; Kimura, Go; Kuribayashi, Shigehiko; Takeda, Hayato; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Shimojo, Hisashi; Kanno, Hiroyuki; Bozic, Ivana; Nowak, Martin A; Bajzer, Željko; Dingli, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interstitial brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer may be followed by transient increases in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that resolve without therapy. Such PSA bounces may be associated with an improved outcome but often cause alarm in the patient and physician, and have defied explanation. Methods: We developed a mathematical model to capture the interactions between the tumour, radiation and anti-tumour immune response. The model was fitted to data from a large cohort of patients treated exclusively with interstitial brachytherapy. Immunohistological analysis for T-cell infiltration within the same tumours was also performed. Results: Our minimal model captures well the dynamics of the tumour after therapy, and suggests that a strong anti-tumour immune response coupled with the therapeutic effect of radiation on the tumour is responsible for the PSA bounce. Patients who experience a PSA bounce had a higher density of CD3 and CD8 cells within the tumour that likely contribute to the PSA bounce and the overall better outcomes observed. Conclusions: Our observations provide a novel and unifying explanation for the PSA bounce in patients with early prostate cancer and also have implications for the use of immune-based therapies in such patients to improve outcomes. PMID:27404586

  1. Versatile and enhanced tumour modelling in mice via somatic cell transduction

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Esther; Mannion, Liz; D'Santos, Paula; Griffiths, Meryl; Arends, Mark J; Brindle, Kevin M; Lyons, Scott K

    2014-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of cancer currently comprise the most accurate way to experimentally recapitulate the human disease in the laboratory. Given recent advances in genomics and genetic screens, however, as well as an increasing urgency for the translation of effective preclinical treatments into the clinic, there is a pressing need to make these models easier and more efficient to work with. Accordingly, we have developed a versatile lentivirus-based approach to induce tumours from somatic cells of GEMs, add or subtract gene expression and render the tumours imageable from a simple breeding stock. The vectors deliver a tamoxifen-inducible and self-inactivating Cre recombinase, conditional bioluminescent and fluorescent proteins and an shRNA component. Following the transduction of somatic cells, tumours are initiated by Cre-mediated recombination of the inherited floxed alleles. Self-inactivation of Cre expression switches on the expression of luciferase, thereby rendering the recombined cells and resulting tumours bioluminescent. We demonstrate proof of concept of this approach by inducing bioluminescent lung tumours in conditional Kras and p53 mice. We also show that a variant vector expressing shRNA alters tumour growth dynamics and the histological grade associated with the inherited genotype. This approach comprises a versatile means to induce imageable and spontaneous tumour burden in mice. The vectors can be readily customized at the bench to modify reporter readout or tumour phenotype without additional transgenic strain development or breeding. They should also be useful for inducing imageable tumours in organs other than the lung, provided that the inherited conditional genotype is sufficiently penetrant. © 2013 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:24307564

  2. In Silico Analysis of Cell Cycle Synchronisation Effects in Radiotherapy of Tumour Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Harald; Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Bleicher, Marcus; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tumour cells show a varying susceptibility to radiation damage as a function of the current cell cycle phase. While this sensitivity is averaged out in an unperturbed tumour due to unsynchronised cell cycle progression, external stimuli such as radiation or drug doses can induce a resynchronisation of the cell cycle and consequently induce a collective development of radiosensitivity in tumours. Although this effect has been regularly described in experiments it is currently not exploited in clinical practice and thus a large potential for optimisation is missed. We present an agent-based model for three-dimensional tumour spheroid growth which has been combined with an irradiation damage and kinetics model. We predict the dynamic response of the overall tumour radiosensitivity to delivered radiation doses and describe corresponding time windows of increased or decreased radiation sensitivity. The degree of cell cycle resynchronisation in response to radiation delivery was identified as a main determinant of the transient periods of low and high radiosensitivity enhancement. A range of selected clinical fractionation schemes is examined and new triggered schedules are tested which aim to maximise the effect of the radiation-induced sensitivity enhancement. We find that the cell cycle resynchronisation can yield a strong increase in therapy effectiveness, if employed correctly. While the individual timing of sensitive periods will depend on the exact cell and radiation types, enhancement is a universal effect which is present in every tumour and accordingly should be the target of experimental investigation. Experimental observables which can be assessed non-invasively and with high spatio-temporal resolution have to be connected to the radiosensitivity enhancement in order to allow for a possible tumour-specific design of highly efficient treatment schedules based on induced cell cycle synchronisation. PMID:24244120

  3. GANT-like gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumours with oncocytic features.

    PubMed

    Damiani, S; Pasquinelli, G; Eusebi, V

    1999-08-01

    We describe two cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumours with prominent oncocytic features. Both had features consistent with differentiation towards the interstitial cells of Cajal (CC). They were composed of nests and bundles of cells with abundant, deeply granular, eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical investigations revealed positivity with c-kit, vimentin and CD34 antibodies in both neoplasms. Ultrastructurally the neoplastic cells showed characteristic features of CC; they had synapse-like structures and dense core cytoplasmic granules. Oncocytic features were confirmed by immunohistochemistry using anti-mitochondrion antibody in both cases and by electron microscopy in one case (case 1). Although the CC are frequently described as mitochondrion-rich cells, oncocytic changes have not previously been reported as a feature of gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumour (GANT)-like stromal tumours. PMID:10599314

  4. Oncogenic mTOR signalling recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Welte, Thomas; Kim, Ik Sun; Tian, Lin; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Li, June; Holdman, Xue B; Herschkowitz, Jason I; Pond, Adam; Xie, Guorui; Kurley, Sarah; Nguyen, Tuan; Liao, Lan; Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Pang, Lan; Mo, Qianxing; Edwards, Dean P; Huang, Shixia; Xin, Li; Xu, Jianming; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Wang, Tian; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Zhang, Xiang H-F

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in primary and metastatic cancer progression. MDSC regulation is widely variable even among patients harbouring the same type of malignancy, and the mechanisms governing such heterogeneity are largely unknown. Here, integrating human tumour genomics and syngeneic mammary tumour models, we demonstrate that mTOR signalling in cancer cells dictates a mammary tumour's ability to stimulate MDSC accumulation through regulating G-CSF. Inhibiting this pathway or its activators (for example, FGFR) impairs tumour progression, which is partially rescued by restoring MDSCs or G-CSF. Tumour-initiating cells (TICs) exhibit elevated G-CSF. MDSCs reciprocally increase TIC frequency through activating Notch in tumour cells, forming a feedforward loop. Analyses of primary breast cancers and patient-derived xenografts corroborate these mechanisms in patients. These findings establish a non-canonical oncogenic role of mTOR signalling in recruiting pro-tumorigenic MDSCs and show how defined cancer subsets may evolve to promote and depend on a distinct immune microenvironment. PMID:27183469

  5. Prognostic impact of tumour-infiltrating immune cells on biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goeppert, B; Frauenschuh, L; Zucknick, M; Stenzinger, A; Andrulis, M; Klauschen, F; Joehrens, K; Warth, A; Renner, M; Mehrabi, A; Hafezi, M; Thelen, A; Schirmacher, P; Weichert, W

    2013-01-01

    Background: Biliary tract cancers (BTC) are relatively rare malignant tumours with poor prognosis. It is known from other solid neoplasms that antitumour inflammatory response has an impact on tumour behaviour and patient outcome. The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive characterisation of antitumour inflammatory response in human BTC. Methods: Tumour-infiltrating T lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+, and Foxp3+), natural killer cells (perforin+), B lymphocytes (CD20+), macrophages (CD68+) as well as mast cells (CD117+) were assessed by immunohistochemistry in 375 BTC including extrahepatic (ECC; n=157), intrahepatic (ICC; n=149), and gallbladder (GBAC; n=69) adenocarcinomas. Overall and intraepithelial quantity of tumour-infiltrating immune cells was analysed. Data were correlated with clinicopathological variables and patient survival. Results: The most prevalent inflammatory cell type in BTC was the T lymphocyte. Components of the adaptive immune response decreased, whereas innate immune response components increased significantly in the biliary intraepithelial neoplasia – primary carcinoma – metastasis sequence. BTC patients with intraepithelial tumour-infiltrating CD4+, CD8+, and Foxp3+ T lymphocytes showed a significantly longer overall survival. Number of total intraepithelial tumour-infiltrating Foxp3+ regulatory T lymphocytes (HR: 0.492, P=0.002) and CD4+ T lymphocytes (HR: 0.595, P=0.008) were tumour grade- and UICC-stage-independent prognosticators. The subtype-specific evaluation revealed that the tumour-infiltrating lymphocytic infiltrate is a positive outcome predictor in ECC and GBAC but not in ICC. Conclusion: Our findings characterise the immune response in cholangiocarcinogenesis and identify inflammatory cell types that influence the outcome of BTC patients. Further, we show that BTC subtypes show relevant differences with respect to density, quality of inflammation, and impact on patient survival. PMID:24136146

  6. Tumour growth stimulation following partial hepatectomy in mice is associated with increased upregulation of c-Met.

    PubMed

    Harun, Nadia; Costa, Patricia; Christophi, C

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic resection is the preferred option for curative treatment of colorectal liver metastasis (CLM). However, this is associated with significant recurrence rates in both hepatic and extrahepatic sites. The upregulation of growth factors required for liver regeneration after resection is thought to stimulate the growth of micrometastases. The current study describes temporal changes in the expression of hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-Met), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and insulin growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) in an orthotopic mouse model of liver resection and tumour induction. Mice underwent 70% hepatectomy and induction of liver metastases through intrasplenic injection of colorectal cancer cells. Control groups included sham-operated mice and 70% hepatectomy alone. The expression levels of liver and tumour c-Met, EGFR and IGF-IR were quantified by quantitative RT-PCR at different time points. 70% liver resection stimulates tumour growth; increases the expression of c-Met within established tumours and surrounding liver parenchyma; downregulates EGFR expression and increases IGF-IR expression within the liver parenchyma. In conclusion, we demonstrate in our mouse model that major hepatectomy stimulates engraftment and growth of CLM and that this effect is probably due to the upregulation of c-Met as a result of the liver regeneration process. Liver IGF-IR may also contribute to this phenomenon through a paracrine effect on tumour growth. This study provides support for the role of c-Met in the stimulation of tumour growth after resection possibly through the promotion of tumour cell proliferation. PMID:23900501

  7. Niche appropriation by Drosophila intestinal stem cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Patel, Parthive H; Dutta, Devanjali; Edgar, Bruce A

    2015-09-01

    Mutations that inhibit differentiation in stem cell lineages are a common early step in cancer development, but precisely how a loss of differentiation initiates tumorigenesis is unclear. We investigated Drosophila intestinal stem cell (ISC) tumours generated by suppressing Notch (N) signalling, which blocks differentiation. Notch-defective ISCs require stress-induced divisions for tumour initiation and an autocrine EGFR ligand, Spitz, during early tumour growth. On achieving a critical mass these tumours displace surrounding enterocytes, competing with them for basement membrane space and causing their detachment, extrusion and apoptosis. This loss of epithelial integrity induces JNK and Yki/YAP activity in enterocytes and, consequently, their expression of stress-dependent cytokines (Upd2, Upd3). These paracrine signals, normally used within the stem cell niche to trigger regeneration, propel tumour growth without the need for secondary mutations in growth signalling pathways. The appropriation of niche signalling by differentiation-defective stem cells may be a common mechanism of early tumorigenesis. PMID:26237646

  8. Large cell neuroendocrine – Adenocarcinona mixed tumour of colon: Collision tumour with peculiar behaviour. What do we know about these tumours?

    PubMed Central

    Minaya-Bravo, Ana María; Garcia Mahillo, Julio Cesar; Mendoza Moreno, Fernando; Noguelares Fraguas, Fernando; Granell, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mixed glandular-endocrine carcinomas are rare tumours of gastrointestinal tract (MANEC). They are more frequent in stomach and hardly one hundred cases have been described in colon. According to Lewis, they are classified into collision (side by side pattern), composite (intermingled) or amphicrine (neuroendocrine and glandular features inside a same cell). Collision tumours are related to biclonal theory: two simultaneous cancerogenic events. Conversely, multidirectional differentiation from a stem cell is accepted as origin of composite tumours. The aim of this paper is to analyse the behaviour of these tumours, with an especial concern about how these tumours metastasise, and the different theories about carcinogenesis. Presentation of case We report a rare case of collision adenocarcinoma-large cell neuroendocrine tumour of colon that after a three-year period of follow-up has presented a retroperitoneal recurrence that features adenocarcinoma and large cell neuroendocrine components. Discussion After an exhaustive review of the English literature, we found that only two cases of collision tumour of colon with metastases showing glandular and endocrine components have been described up to date, so we report the third case, and the first happening in transverse colon. Conclusion We conclude that not all collision tumours follow the biclonal theory and more studies are needed to clarify the origin of these neoplasms, and consequently, to reach an adequate treatment. PMID:26635955

  9. The genomic landscape of epithelioid sarcoma cell lines and tumours.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Farzad; Bashashati, Ali; Shumansky, Karey; Dickson, Brendan; Gokgoz, Nalan; Wunder, Jay S; Andrulis, Irene L; Lazar, Alexander J; Shah, Sohrab P; Huntsman, David G; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2016-01-01

    We carried out whole genome and transcriptome sequencing on four tumour/normal pairs of epithelioid sarcoma. These index cases were supplemented with whole transcriptome sequencing of three additional tumours and three cell lines. Unlike rhabdoid tumour (the other major group of SMARCB1-negative cancers), epithelioid sarcoma shows a complex genome with a higher mutational rate, comparable to that of ovarian carcinoma. Despite this mutational burden, SMARCB1 mutations remain the most frequently recurring event and are probably critical drivers of tumour formation. Several cases show heterozygous SMARCB1 mutations without inactivation of the second allele, and we explore this further in vitro. Finding CDKN2A deletions in our discovery cohort, we evaluated CDKN2A protein expression in a tissue microarray. Six out of 16 cases had lost CDKN2A in greater than or equal to 90% of cells, while the remaining cases had retained the protein. Expression analysis of epithelioid sarcoma cell lines by transcriptome sequencing shows a unique profile that does not cluster with any particular tissue type or with other SWI/SNF-aberrant lines. Evaluation of the levels of members of the SWI/SNF complex other than SMARCB1 revealed that these proteins are expressed as part of a residual complex, similarly to previously studied rhabdoid tumour lines. This residual SWI/SNF is susceptible to synthetic lethality and may therefore indicate a therapeutic opportunity. PMID:26365879

  10. Leukaemia cell of origin identified by chromatin landscape of bulk tumour cells.

    PubMed

    George, Joshy; Uyar, Asli; Young, Kira; Kuffler, Lauren; Waldron-Francis, Kaiden; Marquez, Eladio; Ucar, Duygu; Trowbridge, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    The precise identity of a tumour's cell of origin can influence disease prognosis and outcome. Methods to reliably define tumour cell of origin from primary, bulk tumour cell samples has been a challenge. Here we use a well-defined model of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) to demonstrate that transforming haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent progenitors results in more aggressive AML than transforming committed progenitor cells. Transcriptome profiling reveals a gene expression signature broadly distinguishing stem cell-derived versus progenitor cell-derived AML, including genes involved in immune escape, extravasation and small GTPase signal transduction. However, whole-genome profiling of open chromatin reveals precise and robust biomarkers reflecting each cell of origin tested, from bulk AML tumour cell sampling. We find that bulk AML tumour cells exhibit distinct open chromatin loci that reflect the transformed cell of origin and suggest that open chromatin patterns may be leveraged as prognostic signatures in human AML. PMID:27397025

  11. Control of leucocyte differentiation from embryonic stem cells upon vasculogenesis and confrontation with tumour tissue.

    PubMed

    Hannig, Madeleine; Figulla, Hans-Reiner; Sauer, Heinrich; Wartenberg, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells spontaneously differentiate capillary-like structures as well as leucocytes such as monocytes/macrophages, neutrophils, natural killer (NK) cells and cytototoxic T lymphocytes. The interplay between vasculogenesis and leucocyte differentiation as well as the population of tumour tissues with ES cell-derived leucocytes and endothelial cells is, however, not sufficiently specified. In the present study, gene expression of the cell surface markers CD68 and CD14 (expressed on monocytes and macrophages), Mac-1 (CD11b) (expressed on granulocytes, monocytes and NK cells) and CD16 (expressed on neutrophils) was investigated in murine CGR8 ES cells in relation to the endothelial cell markers CD31 and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. Expression of leucocyte markers increased from day 7-8 of cell culture on. Furthermore, addition of macrophage colony-stimulating factor to the cell culture medium resulted in a threefold increase in the number of CD68(+) monocytes/macrophages. Treatment of embryoid bodies with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) up-regulated CD14 thus suggesting functionality of the CD14 LPS receptor. Differentiation of vascular structures positive for CD31 and VE-cadherin preceded leucocyte differentiation by 2 days (i.e. from day 5-6 on) suggesting that vasculogenesis may be a determinant of leucocyte differentiation. Consequently the Flk-1 antagonist SU5416 which inhibits vasculogenesis of ES cells significantly blunted leucocyte differentiation. Confrontation culture of embryoid bodies with multicellular breast tumour spheroids initiated significant increase of leucocyte cell numbers and invasion of leucocytes into the tumour tissue. In summary our data demonstrate that during ES cell differentiation vasculogenesis precedes leucocyte differentiation, and point towards the direction that leucocyte cell invasion into tumour tissue may initiate the pro-inflammatory microenvironment necessary for tumour vascularization. PMID:20414974

  12. Glutathione-related factors are not correlated with sensitivity of human tumour cells to actinomycin D.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Yang, E B; Zhao, Y N; Wong, K P; Mack, P

    2000-02-28

    Glutathione (GSH) contents and activities of glutathione S-transferases (GST), glutathione reductase (GSH-RD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx) and glutathione conjugate export pump (GS-X pump) were determined in eight human tumour cell lines with different sensitivities to melphalan, a substrate of glutathione conjugation, and actinomycin D which has not been shown to be detoxified by glutathione-related mechanisms. Chang liver cells with highest GSH content and highest activities of GST, GSH-RD, GSHpx and GS-X pump were found to be most resistant to melphalan. Statistical analysis showed significant correlations between sensitivities of the human tumour cells to melphalan and the glutathione-related factors (r = 0.72-0.79; except for GST, r = 0.65, P = 0.08), while there were no significant correlations observed between sensitivities of the human tumour cells to actinomycin D and all the glutathione-related factors tested (r = -0.25-0.14). Significant correlations of the glutathione-related factors to resistance of human tumour cells to melphalan, a substrate of glutathione conjugation, but not to resistance of the human tumour cells to actinomycin D which has not been shown to be detoxified by glutathione-related mechanisms suggested that glutathione-related mechanisms contribute to drug resistance by increased detoxification of the drugs involved. PMID:10737727

  13. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  14. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth. PMID:20491794

  15. A practical approach to immunohistochemical diagnosis of ovarian germ cell tumours and sex cord-stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Rabban, Joseph T; Zaloudek, Charles J

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry can be useful in the diagnosis of ovarian germ cell tumours and sex cord-stromal tumours. A wide variety of markers are available, including many that are novel. The aim of this review is to provide a practical approach to the selection and interpretation of these markers, emphasizing an understanding of their sensitivity and specificity in the particular differential diagnosis in question. The main markers discussed include those for malignant germ cell differentiation (SALL4 and placental alkaline phosphatase), dysgerminoma (OCT4, CD117, and D2-40), yolk sac tumour (α-fetoprotein and glypican-3), embryonal carcinoma (OCT4, CD30, and SOX2), sex cord-stromal differentiation (calretinin, inhibin, SF-1, FOXL2) and steroid cell tumours (melan-A). In addition, the limited role of immunohistochemistry in determining the primary site of origin of an ovarian carcinoid tumour is discussed. PMID:23240671

  16. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base. PMID:27330421

  17. Increased concentrations of tumour necrosis factor in "cachectic" patients with severe chronic heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, J; Abdullah, I; Dargie, H J; Shapiro, D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain whether patients with cardiac failure and reduced body weight ("cardiac cachexia") have increased circulating concentrations of tumour necrosis factor (cachectin). DESIGN--Patients with cardiac failure were prospectively identified as "cachectic" (body fat less than 27% in men and less than 29% in women measured by skinfold thickness callipers) or "non-cachectic". Tumour necrosis factor was assayed blind to patient group. SETTING--Cardiology unit in a tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--26 consecutive patients (10 women) (mean age 61) admitted for investigation or treatment of chronic heart failure. All were in New York Heart Association class III or IV. RESULTS--In nine of the 16 cachectic patients the concentration of tumour necrosis factor was increased (mean (SEM) 74 (20) pg/ml) compared with one of the 10 "non-cachectic" patients (22 pg/ml, p less than 0.001). Patients with a raised circulating concentration of tumour necrosis factor weighed significantly less (55.6 (3.5) kg) than those in whom the concentration of tumour necrosis factor was normal (69.0 (4.1) kg) (p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS--Circulating concentrations of tumour necrosis factor were increased in a significant proportion of patients with chronic heart failure and low body weight. Tumour necrosis factor stimulates catabolism experimentally and it may be a factor in the weight loss seen in patients with "cardiac cachexia". PMID:1747295

  18. CXCL1 mediates obesity-associated adipose stromal cell trafficking and function in the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Sirin, Olga; Corn, Paul G.; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Davis, John; Pettaway, Curtis; Ward, John; Frazier, Marsha L.; Logothetis, Christopher; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) overgrowth in obesity is linked with increased aggressiveness of certain cancers. Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) can become mobilized from WAT, recruited by tumours and promote cancer progression. Mechanisms underlying ASC trafficking are unclear. Here we demonstrate that chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8 chemoattract ASC by signalling through their receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, in cell culture models. We further show that obese patients with prostate cancer have increased epithelial CXCL1 expression. Concomitantly, we observe that cells with ASC phenotype are mobilized and infiltrate tumours in obese patients. Using mouse models, we show that the CXCL1 chemokine gradient is required for the obesity-dependent tumour ASC recruitment, vascularization and tumour growth promotion. We demonstrate that αSMA expression in ASCs is induced by chemokine signalling and mediates the stimulatory effects of ASCs on endothelial cells. Our data suggest that ASC recruitment to tumours, driven by CXCL1 and CXCL8, promotes prostate cancer progression. PMID:27241286

  19. CXCL1 mediates obesity-associated adipose stromal cell trafficking and function in the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Sirin, Olga; Corn, Paul G; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M; Troncoso, Patricia; Davis, John; Pettaway, Curtis; Ward, John; Frazier, Marsha L; Logothetis, Christopher; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) overgrowth in obesity is linked with increased aggressiveness of certain cancers. Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) can become mobilized from WAT, recruited by tumours and promote cancer progression. Mechanisms underlying ASC trafficking are unclear. Here we demonstrate that chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8 chemoattract ASC by signalling through their receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, in cell culture models. We further show that obese patients with prostate cancer have increased epithelial CXCL1 expression. Concomitantly, we observe that cells with ASC phenotype are mobilized and infiltrate tumours in obese patients. Using mouse models, we show that the CXCL1 chemokine gradient is required for the obesity-dependent tumour ASC recruitment, vascularization and tumour growth promotion. We demonstrate that αSMA expression in ASCs is induced by chemokine signalling and mediates the stimulatory effects of ASCs on endothelial cells. Our data suggest that ASC recruitment to tumours, driven by CXCL1 and CXCL8, promotes prostate cancer progression. PMID:27241286

  20. Sonic Hedgehog promotes proliferation of Notch-dependent monociliated choroid plexus tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Grausam, Katie B; Wang, Jun; Lun, Melody P; Ohli, Jasmin; Lidov, Hart G W; Calicchio, Monica L; Zeng, Erliang; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Lehtinen, Maria K; Schüller, Ulrich; Zhao, Haotian

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant Notch signalling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly paediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours, by inducing sustained expression of Notch1, that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signalling. Whole-transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate differentiation. A Shh-driven signalling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from monociliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signalling. Abnormal SHH signalling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting the SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues. PMID:26999738

  1. Modelling tumour cell proliferation from vascular structure using tissue decomposition into avascular elements.

    PubMed

    Besenhard, Maximilian O; Jarzabek, Monika; O'Farrell, Alice C; Callanan, John J; Prehn, Jochen Hm; Byrne, Annette T; Huber, Heinrich J

    2016-08-01

    Computer models allow the mechanistically detailed study of tumour proliferation and its dependency on nutrients. However, the computational study of large vascular tumours requires detailed information on the 3-dimensional vessel network and rather high computation times due to complex geometries. This study puts forward the idea of partitioning vascularised tissue into connected avascular elements that can exchange cells and nutrients between each other. Our method is able to rapidly calculate the evolution of proliferating as well as dead and quiescent cells, and hence a proliferative index, from a given amount and distribution of vascularisation of arbitrary complexity. Applying our model, we found that a heterogeneous vessel distribution provoked a higher proliferative index, suggesting increased malignancy, and increased the amount of dead cells compared to a more static tumour environment when a homogenous vessel distribution was assumed. We subsequently demonstrated that under certain amounts of vascularisation, cell proliferation may even increase when vessel density decreases, followed by a subsequent decrease of proliferation. This effect was due to a trade-off between an increase in compensatory proliferation for replacing dead cells and a decrease of cell population due to lack of oxygen supply in lowly vascularised tumours. Findings were illustrated by an ectopic colorectal cancer mouse xenograft model. Our presented approach can be in the future applied to study the effect of cytostatic, cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic chemotherapy and is ideally suited for translational systems biology, where rapid interaction between theory and experiment is essential. PMID:27155046

  2. NUT protein immunoreactivity in ovarian germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Iacobelli, J F; Charles, A K; Crook, M; Stewart, C J R

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate NUT (nuclear protein in the testis) expression in ovarian germ cell tumours (GCTs). Immunostaining for NUT protein was performed in 10 mature cystic teratomas and in 49 malignant ovarian GCTs including 15 pure dysgerminomas, six dysgerminomas associated with gonadoblastoma, nine yolk sac tumours, 12 immature teratomas, and seven mixed malignant tumours. Only nuclear staining was considered a positive finding although cytoplasmic staining was noted when present. Thirty-seven (76%) malignant GCTs were NUT positive but staining was usually of weak to moderate intensity and observed in a relatively small proportion of neoplastic cells. Staining in immature teratomas and yolk sac tumours was restricted to foci of hepatoid and intestinal/glandular differentiation, where both nuclear and cytoplasmic reactivity were observed. In dysgerminoma associated with gonadoblastoma only the in situ and invasive germ cell elements were NUT positive. Nuclear staining was not seen in benign teratomas. Most malignant ovarian GCTs express NUT protein, albeit focally, and this should be considered when evaluating immunostaining in the differential diagnosis of poorly differentiated malignancies, particularly NUT midline carcinoma. Since NUT protein appears to play a role in normal germ cell maturation it may influence intestinal or hepatoid differentiation within malignant GCTs. PMID:25551299

  3. Tumour-initiating cells vs. cancer 'stem' cells and CD133: What's in the name?

    SciTech Connect

    Neuzil, Jiri; E-mail: j.neuzil@griffith.edu.au; Stantic, Marina; Zobalova, Renata; Chladova, Jaromira; Wang, Xiufang; Prochazka, Lubomir; Dong, Lanfeng; Andera, Ladislav; Ralph, Stephen J.

    2007-04-20

    Recent evidence suggests that a subset of cells within a tumour have 'stem-like' characteristics. These tumour-initiating cells, distinct from non-malignant stem cells, show low proliferative rates, high self-renewing capacity, propensity to differentiate into actively proliferating tumour cells, resistance to chemotherapy or radiation, and they are often characterised by elevated expression of the stem cell surface marker CD133. Understanding the molecular biology of the CD133{sup +} cancer cells is now essential for developing more effective cancer treatments. These may include drugs targeting organelles, such as mitochondria or lysosomes, using highly efficient and selective inducers of apoptosis. Alternatively, agents or treatment regimens that enhance sensitivity of these therapy-resistant 'tumour stem cells' to the current or emerging anti-tumour drugs would be of interest as well.

  4. Biosensors for the Detection of Circulating Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Clotilde; Abal, Miguel; López-López, Rafael; Muinelo-Romay, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the cause of most cancer deaths. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are cells released from the primary tumour into the bloodstream that are considered the main promoters of metastasis. Therefore, these cells are targets for understanding tumour biology and improving clinical management of the disease. Several techniques have emerged in recent years to isolate, detect, and characterise CTCs. As CTCs are a rare event, their study requires multidisciplinary considerations of both biological and physical properties. In addition, as isolation of viable cells may give further insights into metastatic development, cell recovery must be done with minimal cell damage. The ideal system for CTCs analysis must include maximum efficiency of detection in real time. In this sense, new approaches used to enrich CTCs from clinical samples have provided an important improvement in cell recovery. However, this progress should be accompanied by more efficient strategies of cell quantification. A range of biosensor platforms are being introduced into the technology for CTCs quantification with promising results. This review provides an update on recent progress in CTCs identification using different approaches based on sensor signaling. PMID:24618729

  5. Interfering with stem cell-specific gatekeeper functions controls tumour initiation and malignant progression of skin tumours

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Monika; Reuter, Karen; Brylka, Heike; Kraus, Andreas; Schettina, Peter; Niemann, Catherin

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cancer constitutes a major clinical challenge and molecular mechanisms underlying the process of tumour initiation are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that hair follicle bulge stem cells (SCs) give rise to well-differentiated sebaceous tumours and show that SCs are not only crucial in tumour initiation, but are also involved in tumour plasticity and heterogeneity. Our findings reveal that SC-specific expression of mutant Lef1, which mimics mutations found in human sebaceous tumours, drives sebaceous tumour formation. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that mutant Lef1 abolishes p53 activity in SCs. Intriguingly, mutant Lef1 induces DNA damage and interferes with SC-specific gatekeeper functions normally protecting against accumulations of DNA lesions and cell loss. Thus, normal control of SC proliferation is disrupted by mutant Lef1, thereby allowing uncontrolled propagation of tumour-initiating SCs. Collectively, these findings identify underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumour-initiating events in tissue SCs providing a potential target for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25608467

  6. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  7. Tumourigenic non-small-cell lung cancer mesenchymal circulating tumour cells: a clinical case study

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, C. J.; Trapani, F.; Metcalf, R. L.; Bertolini, G.; Hodgkinson, C. L.; Khandelwal, G.; Kelly, P.; Galvin, M.; Carter, L.; Simpson, K. L.; Williamson, S.; Wirth, C.; Simms, N.; Frankliln, L.; Frese, K. K.; Rothwell, D. G.; Nonaka, D.; Miller, C. J.; Brady, G.; Blackhall, F. H.; Dive, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, numerous reports describe the generation and increasing utility of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient-derived xenografts (PDX) from tissue biopsies. While PDX have proven useful for genetic profiling and preclinical drug testing, the requirement of a tissue biopsy limits the available patient population, particularly those with advanced oligometastatic disease. Conversely, ‘liquid biopsies’ such as circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are minimally invasive and easier to obtain. Here, we present a clinical case study of a NSCLC patient with advanced metastatic disease, a never smoker whose primary tumour was EGFR and ALK wild-type. We demonstrate for the first time, tumorigenicity of their CTCs to generate a patient CTC-derived eXplant (CDX). Patients and methods CTCs were enriched at diagnosis and again 2 months later during disease progression from 10 ml blood from a 48-year-old NSCLC patient and implanted into immunocompromised mice. Resultant tumours were morphologically, immunohistochemically, and genetically compared with the donor patient's diagnostic specimen. Mice were treated with cisplatin and pemetrexed to assess preclinical efficacy of the chemotherapy regimen given to the donor patient. Results The NSCLC CDX expressed lung lineage markers TTF1 and CK7 and was unresponsive to cisplatin and pemetrexed. Examination of blood samples matched to that used for CDX generation revealed absence of CTCs using the CellSearch EpCAM-dependent platform, whereas size-based CTC enrichment revealed abundant heterogeneous CTCs of which ∼80% were mesenchymal marker vimentin positive. Molecular analysis of the CDX, mesenchymal and epithelial CTCs revealed a common somatic mutation confirming tumour origin and showed CDX RNA and protein profiles consistent with the predominantly mesenchymal phenotype. Conclusions This study shows that the absence of NSCLC CTCs detected by CellSearch (EpCAM+) does not preclude CDX generation

  8. Ion channels and transporters in tumour cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Albrecht; Stock, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is a central component of the metastatic cascade requiring a concerted action of ion channels and transporters (migration-associated transportome), cytoskeletal elements and signalling cascades. Ion transport proteins and aquaporins contribute to tumour cell migration and invasion among other things by inducing local volume changes and/or by modulating Ca2+ and H+ signalling. Targeting cell migration therapeutically bears great clinical potential, because it is a prerequisite for metastasis. Ion transport proteins appear to be attractive candidate target proteins for this purpose because they are easily accessible as membrane proteins and often overexpressed or activated in cancer. Importantly, a number of clinically widely used drugs are available whose anticipated efficacy as anti-tumour drugs, however, has now only begun to be evaluated. PMID:24493750

  9. The haemopoietic and immunogenic capacities of living hybrid bone marrow cells tested in tumour allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Kerckhaert, J A; Hofhuis, F M; Willers, J M

    1975-01-01

    In irradiated mice the capacity to reject allogenic tumours can be reconstituted with syngeneic lymphoid cells if the transferred cells are primed with the allogenicantigen. Living semi-allogeneic cells proved to be 30-100-times more acitve as priming antigen than cell membrane fractions. The tumour-suppressive activity of primed lymphoid cells increased in the following order: bone marrow less than Peyer's patches less than thymus less than spleen less than lymph node cells. Even bone marrowcells showed a considerable suppressing activity after priming with live antigen. It was a great advantage that 2 times 10-6 semi-allogeneic bone marrow cells could be used both for the restoration of the haemopoietic system after irradiation and for stimulation of the transferred parental lymphocytes. Priming with large numbers of semi-allogeneic spleen cells abolished the tumour-suppressive activity of the transferred lymphoid cells. This tolerogenic effect disappeared when the priming cells were pretreated with mitomycin. Tolerance could be induced when the cell donors were treated with cyclophosphamide in combination with the living cells. Cell membranes were not effective. PMID:1150311

  10. Assays of drug sensitivity for cells from human tumours: in vitro and in vivo tests on a xenografted tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, A. E.; Peckham, M. J.; Steel, G. G.

    1979-01-01

    A human tumour which grows as a xenograft in immune-suppressed mice and forms colonies in vitro has been used to test the correlation between 2 methods of exposure of human tumour cells to chemotherapeutic agents. In vivo exposure to drugs was achieved by injection of tumour-bearing mice with each of 8 cytotoxic agents. For the in vitro exposure, cell suspensions were incubated for 1 h with the same series of drugs. The survival of tumour clonogenic cells was assayed in vitro after either treatment or dose-response curves were obtained. The 8 drugs were ranked according to their in vivo effect at doses equitoxic to mice, and according to their in vitro effect at concentrations designed to approximate to levels of drugs in human plasma. The ranks for in vivo and in vitro exposure correlated well. PMID:475962

  11. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  12. The role of myeloid cells in the promotion of tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Craig; Muthana, Munitta; Coffelt, Seth B; Lewis, Claire E

    2008-08-01

    The use of various transgenic mouse models and analysis of human tumour biopsies has shown that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells and dendritic cells, have an important role in regulating the formation and maintenance of blood vessels in tumours. In this Review the evidence for each of these cell types driving tumour angiogenesis is outlined, along with the mechanisms regulating their recruitment and activation by the tumour microenvironment. We also discuss the therapeutic implications of recent findings that specific myeloid cell populations modulate the responses of tumours to agents such as chemotherapy and some anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:18633355

  13. Beneficial role of overexpression of TFPI-2 on tumour progression in human small cell lung cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Marion; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Blechet, Claire; Guyetant, Serge; Pape, Alain Le; Heuze-Vourc’h, Nathalie; Courty, Yves; Lerondel, Stephanie; Sobilo, Julien; Iochmann, Sophie; Reverdiau, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) is a potent inhibitor of plasmin, a protease which is involved in tumour progression by activating (MMPs). This therefore makes TFPI-2 a potential inhibitor of invasiveness and the development of metastases. In this study, low levels of TFPI-2 expression were found in 65% of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), the most aggressive type of lung cancer. To study the impact of TFPI-2 in tumour progression, TFPI-2 was overexpressed in NCI-H209 SCLC cells which were orthotopically implanted in nude mice. Investigations showed that TFPI-2 inhibited lung tumour growth. Such inhibition could be explained in vitro by a decrease in tumour cell viability, blockade of G1/S phase cell cycle transition and an increase in apoptosis shown in NCI-H209 cells expressing TFPI-2. We also demonstrated that TFPI-2 upregulation in NCI-H209 cells decreased MMP expression, particularly by downregulating MMP-1 and MMP-3. Moreover, TFPI-2 inhibited phosphorylation of the MAPK signalling pathway proteins involved in the induction of MMP transcripts, among which MMP-1 was predominant in SCLC tissues and was inversely expressed with TFPI-2 in 35% of cases. These results suggest that downregulation of TFPI-2 expression could favour the development of SCLC. PMID:23905012

  14. MEK inhibition prevents tumour-shed transforming growth factor-β-induced T-regulatory cell augmentation in tumour milieu.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Dewan M S; Panda, Abir K; Chakrabarty, Sreeparna; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Kajal, Kirti; Mohanty, Suchismita; Sarkar, Irene; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Kar, Santosh K; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-04-01

    Tumour progression is associated with immune-suppressive conditions that facilitate the escape of tumour cells from the regimen of immune cells, subsequently paralysing the host defence mechanisms. Induction of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells has been implicated in the tumour immune escape mechanism, although the novel anti-cancer treatment strategies targeting Treg cells remain unknown. The focus of this study is to define the interaction between tumour and immune system, i.e. how immune tolerance starts and gradually leads to the induction of adaptive Treg cells in the tumour microenvironment. Our study identified hyperactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) -signalling as a potential target for reversing Treg cell augmentation in breast cancer patients. In more mechanistic detail, pharmacological inhibitors of MEK/ERK signalling inhibited transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in tumour cells that essentially blocked TGF-β-SMAD3/SMAD4-mediated induction of CD25/interleukin-2 receptor α on CD4(+) T-cell surface. As a result high-affinity binding of interleukin-2 on those cells was prohibited, causing lack of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/JAK3-mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/STAT5 activation required for FoxP3 expression. Finally, for a more radical approach towards a safe MEK inhibitor, we validate the potential of multi-kinase inhibitor curcumin, especially the nano-curcumin made out of pure curcumin with greater bioavailability; in repealing tumour-shed TGF-β-induced Treg cell augmentation. PMID:25284464

  15. The management of metastatic germ cell tumours and the clinical utility of lactate dehydrogenase estimations.

    PubMed

    Gill, P G; Abbott, R; Jones, A M; Thomas, D W

    1985-04-01

    Forty-five patients with metastatic germ cell tumour were treated with chemotherapy. Complete remission was achieved in 63% of all cases and in 65% of patients whose primary tumour arose in the testis or ovary. Surgical resection of abdominal masses persisting after chemotherapy was performed in seven patients, two of whom were found to have persistent tumours. Twenty-seven of the 33 patients with teratoma originating in the gonads remain in complete remission. Total serum LDH activity was elevated in 28 of the patients with measurable disease. The increased LDH was not accompanied by significant alteration in other hepatic enzymes nor were hepatic metastases demonstrable in these patients. Fractionation of the LDH demonstrated that the increased LDH in these patients was located in either iso-enzymes 1 or fractions 1 + 2. Alteration of the serum LDH activity correlated with the response to therapy and warrants further study. PMID:2412541

  16. Increased midkine expression correlates with desmoid tumour recurrence: a potential biomarker and therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Chiara; Creighton, Chad J; Ghadimi, Markus P; Bolshakov, Svetlana; Warneke, Carla L; Zhang, Yiqun; Lusby, Kristelle; Zhu, Shirley; Lazar, Alexander J; West, Robert B; van de Rijn, Matt; Lev, Dina

    2011-12-01

    Desmoid tumours (DTs) are soft tissue monoclonal neoplasms exhibiting a unique phenotype, consisting of aggressive local invasiveness without metastatic capacity. While DTs can infrequently occur as part of familial adenomatosis polyposis, most cases arise sporadically. Sporadic DTs harbour a high prevalence of CTNNB1 mutations and hence increased β-catenin signalling. However, β-catenin downstream transcriptional targets and other molecular deregulations operative in DT inception and progression are currently not well defined, contributing to the lack of sensitive molecular prognosticators and efficacious targeted therapeutic strategies. We compared the gene expression profiles of 14 sporadic DTs to those of five corresponding normal tissues and six solitary fibrous tumour specimens. A DT expression signature consisting of 636 up- and 119 down-regulated genes highly enriched for extracellular matrix, cell adhesion and wound healing-related proteins was generated. Furthermore, 98 (15%) of the over-expressed genes were demonstrated to contain a TCF/LEF consensus binding site in their promoters, possibly heralding direct β-catenin downstream targets relevant to DT. The protein products of three of the up-regulated DT genes: ADAM12, MMP2 and midkine, were found to be commonly expressed in a large cohort of human DT samples assembled on a tissue microarray. Interestingly, enhanced midkine expression significantly correlated with a higher propensity and decreased time for primary DT recurrence (log-rank p = 0.0025). Finally, midkine was found to enhance the migration and invasion of primary DT cell cultures. Taken together, these studies provide insights into potential DT molecular aberrations and novel β-catenin transcriptional targets. Further studies to confirm the utility of midkine as a clinical DT molecular prognosticator and a potential therapeutic target are therefore warranted. Raw gene array data can be found at: http://smd.stanford.edu/ PMID:21826666

  17. POMB/ACE chemotherapy for mediastinal germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Bower, M; Brock, C; Holden, L; Nelstrop, A; Makey, A R; Rustin, G J; Newlands, E S

    1997-05-01

    Mediastinal germ cell tumours (MGCT) are rare and most published series reflect the experiences of individual institutions over many years. Since 1979, we have treated 16 men (12 non-seminomatous germ cell tumours and 4 seminomas) with newly diagnosed primary MGCT with POMB/ACE chemotherapy and elective surgical resection of residual masses. This approach yielded complete remissions in 15/16 (94%) patients. The median follow-up was 6.0 years and no relapses occurred more than 2 years after treatment. The 5 year overall survival in the non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT) is 73% (95% confidence interval 43-90%). One patient with NSGCT developed drug-resistant disease and died without achieving remission and 2 patients died of relapsed disease. In addition, 4 patients with bulky and/or metastatic seminoma were treated with POMB/ACE. One died of treatment-related neutropenic sepsis in complete remission and one died of relapsed disease. Finally, 4 patients (2 NSGCT and 2 seminomas) referred at relapse were treated with POMB/ACE and one was successfully salvaged. The combination of POMB/ACE chemotherapy and surgery is effective management for MGCT producing high long-term survival rates. PMID:9291802

  18. Mitochondria: An intriguing target for killing tumour-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing; Dong, Lanfeng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-initiating cells (TICs) play a pivotal role in cancer initiation, metastasis and recurrence, as well as in resistance to therapy. Therefore, development of drugs targeting TICs has become a focus of contemporary research. Mitochondria have emerged as a promising target of anti-cancer therapies due to their specific role in cancer metabolism and modulation of apoptotic pathways. Mitochondria of TICs possess special characteristics, some of which can be utilised to design drugs specifically targeting these cells. In this paper, we will review recent research on TICs and their mitochondria, and introduce drugs that kill these cells by way of mitochondrial targeting. PMID:26702582

  19. Cyclopentenylcytosine does not enhance cisplatin-induced radiosensitization in human lung tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    RODERMOND, HANS M.; CATE, ROSEMARIE TEN; HAVEMAN, JAAP; VAN KUILENBURG, ANDRÉ; MEDEMA, JAN PAUL; VAN BREE, CHRIS; FRANKEN, NICOLAAS A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The search for agents that enhance the effect of ionizing radiation has been an object of study for decades. In this study, the sensitizing properties of cyclopentenylcytosine (CPEC) on radiation and cisplatin-induced radiosensitization in human squamous lung carcinoma cells were investigated. Human lung tumour SW-1573 cells (SWp, parental; SWg, gemcitabine-resistant) were incubated with CPEC and cisplatin and subsequently irradiated with different doses of γ-rays. Clonogenic survival was determined to measure the effectiveness of the treatments. CPEC (1 or 2 μM) treatment for 4 h decreased the plating efficiency to 75 and 50% in SWp and SWg cells, respectively. In the SWg cells, 0.1 and 1 μM CPEC for 4 h enhanced the cell killing effect of cisplatin. However, an increase was not noted in the SWp cells. Due to the moderate toxicity of 1 μM for 4 h, this CPEC dose was used in the radiosensitization experiments. However, CPEC neither radiosensitized the lung tumour cells nor enhanced the radiosensitizing effect of cisplatin. A 2-h incubation with 4 μM cisplatin also decreased the plating efficiency to 75–80% in the two cell lines. Using this cisplatin dose, radiosensitization was obtained in the two cell lines. Although cisplatin treatment clearly radiosensitized the lung tumour cells, CPEC treatment did not. Cisplatin-induced radiosensitization was also not enhanced by CPEC. PMID:22966339

  20. Treatment of advanced solid tumours with NSAIDs: Correlation of quantitative monitoring of circulating tumour cells and positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Willecke-Hochmuth, Regina; Pachmann, Katharina; Drevs, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The detection and characterisation of tumour-derived circulating epithelial tumor cells (CETCs) or circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been a main focus of basic oncological research over previous years. Numerous studies in the past decade have shown that CTCs are a promising tool for the estimation of the risk for metastatic relapse. The present observational study describes treatment results using tumour imaging and the quantification of CTCs. A group of 14 patients with advanced carcinomas was followed during their anticancer treatments. CTC numbers were serially detected and treatment success was estimated by positron emission tomography-computed tomography. A connection was found between tumour remission and a decreasing CTC count in 83%, a connection between stable disease and stable CTC numbers in 78% and a connection between progressive disease (PD) and an increase in CTC count in 50% of cases. In the patients with PD, an incomplete response was observed affecting the CTCs, but not the solid region of the tumour. As a result of this study, it may be concluded that patients with solid tumours benefit from serial quantification of CTCs in addition to imaging, as this combination of techniques provides a more sensitive result than imaging alone. PMID:27588120

  1. Effect of VEGF receptor inhibitor PTK787/ZK222548 combined with ionizing radiation on endothelial cells and tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Hess, C; Vuong, V; Hegyi, I; Riesterer, O; Wood, J; Fabbro, D; Glanzmann, C; Bodis, S; Pruschy, M

    2001-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a major target for anti-angiogenesis-based cancer treatment. Here we report the treatment effect of ionizing radiation in combination with the novel orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro and with tumour xenografts in vivo. Combined treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with increasing doses of PTK787/ZK222584 and ionizing radiation abrogated VEGF-dependent proliferation in a dose-dependent way, but inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation was not due to apoptosis induction. In vivo, a combined treatment regimen of PTK787/ZK222584 (4 × 100 mg/kg) during 4 consecutive days in combination with ionizing radiation (4 × 3 Gy) exerted a substantial tumour growth delay for radiation-resistant p53-disfunctional tumour xenografts derived from SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cells while each treatment modality alone had only a minimal effect on tumour size and neovascularization. SW480 tumours from animals that received a combined treatment regimen, displayed not only an extended tumour growth delay but also a significant decrease in the number of microvessels in the tumour xenograft. These results support the model of a cooperative antitumoural effect of angiogenesis inhibitor and irradiation and show that the orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 is suitable for combination therapy with irradiation. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747347

  2. Chronic stress in mice remodels lymph vasculature to promote tumour cell dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Le, Caroline P.; Nowell, Cameron J.; Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Botteri, Edoardo; Hiller, Jonathan G.; Ismail, Hilmy; Pimentel, Matthew A.; Chai, Ming G.; Karnezis, Tara; Rotmensz, Nicole; Renne, Giuseppe; Gandini, Sara; Pouton, Colin W.; Ferrari, Davide; Möller, Andreas; Stacker, Steven A.; Sloan, Erica K.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress induces signalling from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and drives cancer progression, although the pathways of tumour cell dissemination are unclear. Here we show that chronic stress restructures lymphatic networks within and around tumours to provide pathways for tumour cell escape. We show that VEGFC derived from tumour cells is required for stress to induce lymphatic remodelling and that this depends on COX2 inflammatory signalling from macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of SNS signalling blocks the effect of chronic stress on lymphatic remodelling in vivo and reduces lymphatic metastasis in preclinical cancer models and in patients with breast cancer. These findings reveal unanticipated communication between stress-induced neural signalling and inflammation, which regulates tumour lymphatic architecture and lymphogenous tumour cell dissemination. These findings suggest that limiting the effects of SNS signalling to prevent tumour cell dissemination through lymphatic routes may provide a strategy to improve cancer outcomes. PMID:26925549

  3. Chronic stress in mice remodels lymph vasculature to promote tumour cell dissemination.

    PubMed

    Le, Caroline P; Nowell, Cameron J; Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Botteri, Edoardo; Hiller, Jonathan G; Ismail, Hilmy; Pimentel, Matthew A; Chai, Ming G; Karnezis, Tara; Rotmensz, Nicole; Renne, Giuseppe; Gandini, Sara; Pouton, Colin W; Ferrari, Davide; Möller, Andreas; Stacker, Steven A; Sloan, Erica K

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress induces signalling from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and drives cancer progression, although the pathways of tumour cell dissemination are unclear. Here we show that chronic stress restructures lymphatic networks within and around tumours to provide pathways for tumour cell escape. We show that VEGFC derived from tumour cells is required for stress to induce lymphatic remodelling and that this depends on COX2 inflammatory signalling from macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of SNS signalling blocks the effect of chronic stress on lymphatic remodelling in vivo and reduces lymphatic metastasis in preclinical cancer models and in patients with breast cancer. These findings reveal unanticipated communication between stress-induced neural signalling and inflammation, which regulates tumour lymphatic architecture and lymphogenous tumour cell dissemination. These findings suggest that limiting the effects of SNS signalling to prevent tumour cell dissemination through lymphatic routes may provide a strategy to improve cancer outcomes. PMID:26925549

  4. The role of macrophages in the cytotoxic killing of tumour cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zembala, M.; Ptak, W.; Hanczakowska, Maria

    1973-01-01

    Lymph node and spleen cells from normal mice were cultured for 3 days with polyoma virus-induced tumour, Ehrlich's ascites tumour or leukaemia L 1210 cells. This resulted in in vitro immunization of the lymphocytes, which were then transferred to irradiated target cells labelled with 51Cr. Normal, i.e. non-immune thioglycollate-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were also added to some tubes. Non-immune macrophages mixed with immunized lymphocytes showed a significantly increased ability to destroy tumour cells as compared with macrophages in the absence of immunized lymphocytes. The immunized lymphocytes were almost entirely inactive alone. When the number of macrophages was kept constant the cytotoxicity was dependent on the number of viable immunized lymphocytes placed on the target cells. Immunized lymphocytes, in the presence of macrophages, only exhibited strong killing of the target cells against which they had been immunized; some lysis of `bystander' cells was, however, seen provided specific target cells were present. Macrophage monolayers exposed to immunized lymphocytes upon contact with specific antigen became `armed' and showed a significant cytotoxicity for specific target cells. When immunized lymphocytes and normal macrophages were treated with actinomycin D and puromycin, cytotoxicity was inhibited in the immunized lymphocytes but not in the macrophages. The possible mechanism of normal macrophage cooperation with immunized lymphocytes in the cytotoxic killing reaction is discussed. Results presented in this paper favour the view that immunologically specific cytophilic factor (presumptive cytophilic antibody) is involved in the macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in the system studied. PMID:4356674

  5. Germ-cell malignant tumours in father and son.

    PubMed Central

    Musa, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    Germ-cell malignant tumours occurred in a man and his son. The father, who had a teratoma of the right testicle removed 24 years ago, is presently alive and well. The son, who had a choriocarcinoma presenting as an abdominal mass, possibly originating in the testicle, died within 7 months of the diagnosis with metastases in the lungs, liver and retroperitoneum. This report documents the third such case of germ-cell neoplasms occurring in father and son. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:1168534

  6. The epigenetics of tumour initiation: cancer stem cells and their chromatin.

    PubMed

    Avgustinova, Alexandra; Benitah, Salvador Aznar

    2016-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in various tumours and are defined by their potential to initiate tumours upon transplantation, self-renew and reconstitute tumour heterogeneity. Modifications of the epigenome can favour tumour initiation by affecting genome integrity, DNA repair and tumour cell plasticity. Importantly, an in-depth understanding of the epigenomic alterations underlying neoplastic transformation may open new avenues for chromatin-targeted cancer treatment, as these epigenetic changes could be inherently more amenable to inhibition and reversal than hard-wired genomic alterations. Here we discuss how CSC function is affected by chromatin state and epigenomic instability. PMID:26874045

  7. Autophagy mediates survival of pancreatic tumour-initiating cells in a hypoxic microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Vanessa; Liu, Li; Apel, Anja; Rettig, Theresa; Gladkich, Jury; Labsch, Sabrina; Kallifatidis, Georgios; Kaczorowski, Adam; Groth, Ariane; Gross, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Martha M; Schemmer, Peter; Werner, Jens; Salnikov, Alexei V; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Büchler, Markus W; Herr, Ingrid

    2012-07-01

    Involvement of dysregulated autophagy in cancer growth and progression has been shown in different tumour entities, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). PDA is an extremely aggressive tumour characterized by a small population of highly therapy-resistant cancer stem cells (CSCs) capable of self-renewal and migration. We examined whether autophagy might be involved in the survival of CSCs despite nutrition and oxygen deprivation typical for the hypoxic tumour microenvironment of PDA. Immunohistochemistry revealed that markers for hypoxia, CSCs and autophagy are co-expressed in patient-derived tissue of PDA. Hypoxia starvation (H/S) enhanced clonogenic survival and migration of established pancreatic cancer cells with stem-like properties (CSC(high)), while pancreatic tumour cells with fewer stem cell markers (CSC(low)) did not survive these conditions. Electron microscopy revealed more advanced autophagic vesicles in CSC(high) cells, which exhibited higher expression of autophagy-related genes under normoxic conditions and relative to CSC(low) cells, as found by RT-PCR and western blot analysis. LC3 was already fully converted to the active LC3-II form in both cell lines, as evaluated by western blot and detection of accumulated GFP-LC3 protein by fluorescence microscopy. H/S increased formation of autophagic and acid vesicles, as well as expression of autophagy-related genes, to a higher extent in CSC(high) cells. Modulation of autophagy by inhibitors and activators resensitized CSC(high) to apoptosis and diminished clonogenicity, spheroid formation, expression of CSC-related genes, migratory activity and tumourigenicity in mice. Our data suggest that enhanced autophagy levels may enable survival of CSC(high) cells under H/S. Interference with autophagy-activating or -inhibiting drugs disturbs the fine-tuned physiological balance of enhanced autophagy in CSC and switches survival signalling to suicide. PMID:22262369

  8. Therapeutic vaccine generated by electrofusion of dendritic cells and tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, H; Shimizu, K; Lee, W; Kjaergaard, J; Parkhurst, M R; Cohen, P A; Shu, S

    2004-01-01

    Immunotherapy with fusion of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumour cells potentially confers the advantages of DC antigen-presenting functionality and a continuous source of unaltered tumour antigens. However, fusion using chemical or viral fusogens has been inefficient. We have recently developed a high throughput electrofusion technique with which very efficient fusion rates (15-54%) were observed in over 300 experiments, using a variety of murine and human tumour cell lines. The fused cells display a mature DC phenotype and express tumour-associated antigens. In two pre-clinical animal models (B16 melanoma transduced with the LacZ gene and the MCA 205 fibrosarcoma), a single vaccination of mice bearing tumours established in the lung, brain and skin resulted in tumour regression and prolongation of life. However, therapeutic efficacy required the administration of adjuvants such as IL-12 and OX-40R mAbs. Effective immunotherapy also required the delivery of fusion cells directly into lymphoid organs (spleen or lymph nodes). Using five defined human T cell lines derived from melanoma patients, allogeneic DCs of HLA-A2, HLA-DR4 and HLA-DR7 haplotypes fused with MART-1, gp100, tyrosinase and TRP-2 expressing 888 mel melanoma cells were analysed for their ability to stimulate specific cytokine (IFN-gamma and GM-CSF) secretion. DC-888 mel hybrids presented all tumour-associated epitopes to both CD4 and CD8 T cell lines in the context of MHC class II and I molecules, respectively. The therapeutic efficacy of a DC-tumour fusion vaccine is now being evaluated for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:15603192

  9. Imaging tumour cell heterogeneity following cell transplantation into optically clear immune-deficient zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Moore, John C.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Tenente, Inês M.; Hayes, Madeline N.; Garcia, Elaine G.; Torres Yordán, Nora; Bourque, Caitlin; He, Shuning; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Look, A. Thomas; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancers contain a wide diversity of cell types that are defined by differentiation states, genetic mutations and altered epigenetic programmes that impart functional diversity to individual cells. Elevated tumour cell heterogeneity is linked with progression, therapy resistance and relapse. Yet, imaging of tumour cell heterogeneity and the hallmarks of cancer has been a technical and biological challenge. Here we develop optically clear immune-compromised rag2E450fs (casper) zebrafish for optimized cell transplantation and direct visualization of fluorescently labelled cancer cells at single-cell resolution. Tumour engraftment permits dynamic imaging of neovascularization, niche partitioning of tumour-propagating cells in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, emergence of clonal dominance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and tumour evolution resulting in elevated growth and metastasis in BRAFV600E-driven melanoma. Cell transplantation approaches using optically clear immune-compromised zebrafish provide unique opportunities to uncover biology underlying cancer and to dynamically visualize cancer processes at single-cell resolution in vivo. PMID:26790525

  10. Effect of anti-glycolytic agents on tumour cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A metabolic change is one of the tumour hallmarks, which has recently attracted a great amount of attention. One of the main metabolic characteristics of tumour cells is a high level of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. The energy production is much less in a glycolysis pathway than that in a tricarboxylic acid cycle. The Warburg effect constitutes a fundamental adaptation of tumour cells to a relatively hostile environment, and supports the evolution of aggressive and metastatic phenotypes. As a result, tumour glycolysis may become an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we research the effect of potential anticancer agents on tumour cells in vitro. In our study, we found a high sensitivity of tumour cells to anti-glycolityc drugs. In addition, tumour cells are more resistant to the agents studied in comparison with normal cells. We also observed an atypical cooperative interaction of tumour cells in the median lethal dose of drugs. They formed the specific morphological structure of the surviving cells. This behavior is not natural for the culture of tumour cells. Perhaps this is one of the mechanisms of cells' adaptation to the aggressive environment.

  11. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  12. Extramedullary myeloid cell tumours--the NIMS experience.

    PubMed

    Paul, T Roshni; Sundaram, C; Gayathri, K; Prayaga, Aruna; Rao, D Raghunadha

    2005-07-01

    Extramedullary myeloid cell tumours are rare clinical entities, which often pose diagnostic problems. From the pathology record files of Nizam's Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, 16 cases of EMCTs were traced, over a period of 14 years. The clinical details, follow-up were noted and morphology re-evaluated, and immunohistochemistry with LCA was performed. Of the 16 cases, the distribution was as follows--skin and subcutaneous nodules, lymph nodes, extradural masses presenting with cord compression and one case each with eyelid, orbital and breast masses. The problems in diagnosis are presented and a panel of immunohistochemical markers suggested for proper diagnosis and treatment. PMID:16761741

  13. Cytological grading of canine cutaneous mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Filippo; Sabattini, Silvia; Bettini, Giuliano

    2016-09-01

    A cytological grading for mast cell tumours (MCTs) would be highly desirable, allowing to select the most appropriate therapeutic intervention prior to surgery. This study evaluates the applicability on fine-needle aspirations (FNAs) of the novel Kiupel grading system, based on number of mitoses, multinucleated cells, bizarre nuclei and presence of karyomegaly. Fifty consecutive cases with pre-operative cytological diagnosis were included. In cytological specimens, approximately 1000 cells were evaluated, and the histological grade was assessed on the corresponding resected specimens. On cytology, the above parameters were significantly different between histologically low-grade and high-grade tumours (P < 0.001). The cytograding correctly predicted the histological grade in 47 cases (accuracy, 94%; sensitivity, 84.6%; specificity, 97.3%). Two high-grade MCTs (4%) were not detected on cytology. The cytograding can provide helpful insights to assist clinical decisions in most cases. However, the risk of underestimation in a minority of patients represents a limit to the overall utility of the technique. PMID:24717019

  14. HMGA2 expression distinguishes between different types of postpubertal testicular germ cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Kloth, Lars; Gottlieb, Andrea; Helmke, Burkhard; Wosniok, Werner; Löning, Thomas; Burchardt, Käte; Belge, Gazanfer; Günther, Kathrin; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2015-10-01

    The group of postpubertal testicular germ cell tumours encompasses lesions with highly diverse differentiation - seminomas, embryonal carcinomas, yolk sac tumours, teratomas and choriocarcinomas. Heterogeneous differentiation is often present within individual tumours and the correct identification of the components is of clinical relevance. HMGA2 re-expression has been reported in many tumours, including testicular germ cell tumours. This is the first study investigating HMGA2 expression in a representative group of testicular germ cell tumours with the highly sensitive method of quantitative real-time PCR as well as with immunohistochemistry. The expression of HMGA2 and HPRT was measured using quantitative real-time PCR in 59 postpubertal testicular germ cell tumours. Thirty specimens contained only one type of tumour and 29 were mixed neoplasms. With the exception of choriocarcinomas, at least two pure specimens from each subgroup of testicular germ cell tumour were included. In order to validate the quantitative real-time PCR data and gather information about the localisation of the protein, additional immunohistochemical analysis with an antibody specific for HMGA2 was performed in 23 cases. Expression of HMGA2 in testicular germ cell tumours depended on the histological differentiation. Seminomas and embryonal carcinomas showed no or very little expression, whereas yolk sac tumours strongly expressed HMGA2 at the transcriptome as well as the protein level. In teratomas, the expression varied and in choriocarcinomas the expression was moderate. In part, these results contradict data from previous studies but HMGA2 seems to represent a novel marker to assist pathological subtyping of testicular germ cell tumours. The results indicate a critical role in yolk sac tumours and some forms of teratoma. PMID:27499908

  15. NMR metabolomics of human lung tumours reveals distinct metabolic signatures for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Cláudia M; Barros, António S; Goodfellow, Brian J; Carreira, Isabel M; Gomes, Ana; Sousa, Vitor; Bernardo, João; Carvalho, Lina; Gil, Ana M; Duarte, Iola F

    2015-01-01

    Lung tumour subtyping, particularly the distinction between adenocarcinoma (AdC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC), is a critical diagnostic requirement. In this work, the metabolic signatures of lung carcinomas were investigated through (1)H NMR metabolomics, with a view to provide additional criteria for improved diagnosis and treatment planning. High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to analyse matched tumour and adjacent control tissues from 56 patients undergoing surgical excision of primary lung carcinomas. Multivariate modeling allowed tumour and control tissues to be discriminated with high accuracy (97% classification rate), mainly due to significant differences in the levels of 13 metabolites. Notably, the magnitude of those differences were clearly distinct for AdC and SqCC: major alterations in AdC were related to phospholipid metabolism (increased phosphocholine, glycerophosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine, together with decreased acetate) and protein catabolism (increased peptide moieties), whereas SqCC had stronger glycolytic and glutaminolytic profiles (negatively correlated variations in glucose and lactate and positively correlated increases in glutamate and alanine). Other tumour metabolic features were increased creatine, glutathione, taurine and uridine nucleotides, the first two being especially prominent in SqCC and the latter in AdC. Furthermore, multivariate analysis of AdC and SqCC profiles allowed their discrimination with a 94% classification rate, thus showing great potential for aiding lung tumours subtyping. Overall, this study has provided new, clear evidence of distinct metabolic signatures for lung AdC and SqCC, which can potentially impact on diagnosis and provide important leads for future research on novel therapeutic targets or imaging tracers. PMID:25368033

  16. Tumour growth inhibition in mice by glycosylated recombinant human lymphotoxin: analysis of tumour-regional mononuclear cells involved with its action.

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, I.; Watanabe, H.; Abo, T.; Indo, K.; Miyaji, H.

    1993-01-01

    We compared the antitumour effects of glycosylated LT (gLT), nonglycosylated LT and TNF against a solid tumour in mice. We found that: (a) The systemic administration of gLT showed significant antitumour activity. These effects were, however, quite small in nude mice. Nonglycosylated LT and TNF attained the same degree of effectiveness as gLT, but at a 5-times higher dose. The serum half-life of gLT was 3-fold longer than that of nonglycosylated LT and 22-fold longer than that of TNF. (b) The effect of gLT was significantly blocked by pretreatment with anti-asialo GM1 antibody. Treatment with gLT produced a significant reduction in numbers of tumour-regional mononuclear cells, which in turn, produced increases intensive necrosis. (c) Mononuclear cells in the tumour tissues before gLT-injection were predominantly IL-2 receptor +/CD3- cells and CD3+ cells. Pretreatment with the anti-asialo GM1 antibody produced a drastic reduction of IL-2 receptor +/CD3- cells. These findings suggest that the efficient antitumour effect of gLT is due to a longer serum half-life than that of nonglycosylated LT or TNF in vivo, and its function is largely mediated by IL-2 receptor +/CD3- cells. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8439496

  17. Mediastinal mass-a rare presentation of desmoplastic small round cell tumour

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Hemanta K; Vangipuram, Deepak Rajkumar; Sonika, Ujjwal; Kar, Premashish; Kumar, Naresh; Kapoor, Neha

    2011-01-01

    Primary mediastinal desmoplastic small round cell cancer is an uncommon tumour usually located in the abdomen and pelvis. Here the authors report an extremely rare case of a young male with a primary desmoplastic small round cell tumour in the anterior and middle mediastinum. The patient had non-specific complaints but an abnormal shadow was seen in a routine chest x-ray. He was diagnosed as having mediastinal mass with few lung parenchymal deposits on CT. Mediastinoscopy and guided biopsy revealed desmoplastic small round cell tumour. Desmoplastic small round cell tumour is a rare and aggressive tumour which rarely involves the mediastinum as a primary site. The nature of the lesion and its prognosis were explained to the patient. He was offered chemotherapy and radiotherapy for the tumour management. He refused treatment and left against medical advice. PMID:22670008

  18. Rapid and Non-Enzymatic In Vitro Retrieval of Tumour Cells from Surgical Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Brigitte; Eggert, Carola; Eder, Katharina; Imrich, Sannia; Baumeister, Philipp; Harréus, Ulrich; Gires, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The study of tumourigenesis commonly involves the use of established cell lines or single cell suspensions of primary tumours. Standard methods for the generation of short-term tumour cell cultures include the disintegration of tissue based on enzymatic and mechanical stress. Here, we describe a simple and rapid method for the preparation of single cells from primary carcinomas, which is independent of enzymatic treatment and feeder cells. Tumour biopsies are processed to 1 mm3 cubes termed explants, which are cultured 1–3 days on agarose-coated well plates in specified medium. Through incisions generated in the explants, single cells are retrieved and collected from the culture supernatant and can be used for further analysis including in vitro and in vivo studies. Collected cells retain tumour-forming capacity in xenotransplantation assays, mimic the phenotype of the primary tumour, and facilitate the generation of cell lines. PMID:23383219

  19. Histidine decarboxylase and urinary methylimidazoleacetic acid in gastric neuroendocrine cells and tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tsolakis, Apostolos V; Grimelius, Lars; Granerus, Göran; Stridsberg, Mats; Falkmer, Sture E; Janson, Eva T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study histidine decarboxylase (HDC) expression in normal and neoplastic gastric neuroendocrine cells in relationship to the main histamine metabolite. METHODS: Control tissues from fundus (n = 3) and corpus (n = 3) mucosa of six patients undergoing operations for gastric adenocarcinoma, biopsy and/or gastric surgical specimens from 64 patients with primary gastric neuroendocrine tumours (GNETs), as well as metastases from 22 of these patients, were investigated using conventional immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence with commercial antibodies vs vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT-2), HDC and ghrelin. The urinary excretion of the main histamine metabolite methylimidazoleacetic acid (U-MeImAA) was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography in 27 of the 64 patients. RESULTS: In the gastric mucosa of the control tissues, co-localization studies identified neuroendocrine cells that showed immunoreactivity only to VMAT-2 and others with reactivity only to HDC. A third cell population co-expressed both antigens. There was no co-expression of HDC and ghrelin. Similar results were obtained in the foci of neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia associated with chronic atrophic gastritis type A and also in the tumours. The relative incidence of the three aforementioned markers varied in the tumours that were examined using conventional immunohistochemistry. All of these GNETs revealed both VMAT-2 and HDC immunoreactivity, and their metastases showed an immunohistochemical pattern and frequency similar to that of their primary tumours. In four patients, increased U-MeImAA excretion was detected, but only two of the patients exhibited related endocrine symptoms. CONCLUSION: Human enterochromaffin-like cells appear to partially co-express VMAT-2 and HDC. Co-expression of VMAT-2 and HDC might be required for increased histamine production in patients with GNETs. PMID:26715806

  20. [Demonstration of cells of myothelial origin in canine mammary tumours by special staining methods (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schlotke, B

    1975-01-01

    Three recent staining methods, the TPA-, TPL-, and TPT-method, were used to demonstrate cells of myothelial origin in mammary gland tumours in bitches and were compared with older techniques. The newer methods proved more suitable for demonstration of myofibrils in myothelial cells. With these techniques it is possible to reveal myofibril containing cells in adenomatous, papillary, myomatour, and myxoid tumour regions but not in chondroid parts of mixed tumours. Two of the tumours examined were classified as malignant myotheliomas because of their staining qualities, structure, ultrastructural appearance and signs of malignancy. PMID:49985

  1. Cell Population Kinetics of a Spontaneous Rat Tumour During Serial Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Steel, G. G.; Adams, K.; Hodgett, J.; Janik, P.

    1971-01-01

    Studies have been made on the growth and cell population kinetics of a spontaneous rat mammary fibroadenoma and of 10 successive transplantation passages. The volume doubling time decreased from about 30 days in the primary tumour and first two transplants to 1·7 days in the tenth transplant. This acceleration was accompanied by a considerable shortening of the mitotic cycle and of its S and G1 phases but without change in the proportion of time spent in S. There was also a reduction in the apparent extent of cell loss and a considerable increase in the growth fraction. Histological changes were noted and studies by feulgen densitometry indicated a considerable shift in ploidy from hyperdiploid to hypertetraploid. The results constitute a detailed example of the effect on tumour growth kinetics of serial transplantation. ImagesFig. 5 PMID:5144541

  2. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  3. Tumour Angiogenesis: Ultrastructure of Endothelial Cells in Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Warren, B. A.; Greenblatt, M.; Kommineni, V. R. C.

    1972-01-01

    Under the influence of a diffusible factor or factors from melanoma tumour tissue and neonatal hamster renal tissue, which passed through millipore filters, the endothelial cells of capillaries and small venules in the adult hamster were found to undergo mitotic division. Occasional endothelial cells in mitosis were noted in small arteries. Endothelial cells within the same vessel did not undergo mitosis in a synchronous fashion. During mitosis they retained intact their intercellular junctions with adjacent endothelial cells. No specific orientation of the mitotic spindle to the long axis of the vessel was noted. The usual appearance of cells in division was observed in this specific instance of endothelial cells in an adult animal undergoing mitotic division. In particular the formation of chromosomes and the various changes that ensue in the nuclear membrane were traced within endothelial cells. Typical spindle lamellae were found in cells during the formation of the membranes of the daughter nuclei. ImagesFig. 7Fig. 1Figs. 2-3Figs. 4-5Fig. 6 PMID:4555714

  4. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium immunotherapy for B-cell lymphoma induces broad anti-tumour immunity with therapeutic effect

    PubMed Central

    Grille, Sofía; Moreno, María; Bascuas, Thais; Marqués, Juan M; Muñoz, Natalia; Lens, Daniela; Chabalgoity, Jose A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of current immune-chemotherapy for treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a substantial proportion of patients relapse, highlighting the need for new therapeutic modalities. The use of live microorganisms to develop anti-tumoural therapies has evolved since Coley's toxin and is now receiving renewed attention. Salmonella Typhimurium has been shown to be highly effective as an anti-tumour agent in many solid cancer models, but it has not been used in haemato-oncology. Here, we report that intra-tumoural administration of LVR01 (attenuated S. Typhimurium strain with safety profile) elicits local and systemic anti-tumour immunity, resulting in extended survival in a lymphoma model. LVR01 induces intra-tumoural recruitment of neutrophils and activated CD8+ T cells, as well as increasing the natural killer cell activation status. Furthermore, a systemic specific anti-tumour response with a clear T helper type 1 profile was observed. This approach is an alternative therapeutic strategy for lymphoma patients that could be easily moved into clinical trials. PMID:24834964

  5. Primary Malignant Mixed Germ Cell Tumour with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Mandible; A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arun; Parmar, Harshad; Chacko, Rabin

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell Tumours (GCT) are neoplasm derived from germ cells. GCT usually occurs inside the gonads. Extragonadal GCT’s are rare. Most common GCT associated with head and neck region are the teratomas. Of the few teratomas found in the head and neck, malignant transformation of a teratomatous element is very uncommon, and primary bone involvement within the head and neck is even rare. We present a case of primary malignant mixed germ cell Tumour involving the mandible, the present case presented malignant transformation of the epithelial component showing foci of squamous cell carcinoma within the GCT. PMID:26266228

  6. Solid blue dot tumour: minor salivary gland acinic cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M; Makarla, Soumya; Nadaf, Afreen; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2014-01-01

    Acinic cell adenocarcinoma (ACC) is a low-grade malignant salivary neoplasm that constitutes approximately 17% of all primary salivary gland malignancies. In the head and neck region, the parotid gland is the predominant site of origin and ACC is usually more frequent in women than men. Previous radiation exposure and familial predisposition are some of the risk factors for ACC. ACCs rarely involve minor salivary glands constituting only 13–17% of all minor salivary gland tumours. Generally, a slowly enlarging mass lesion in the tail of the parotid gland is the most frequent presentation. ACC has a significant tendency to recur, metastasise and may have an aggressive evolution. Therefore, a long-term follow-up is mandatory after treatment. Here we report the case of a woman in her 60s with an ACC in association with the labial minor salivary gland, presenting in the post-treatment period of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue. PMID:24928927

  7. Guiding intracortical brain tumour cells to an extracortical cytotoxic hydrogel using aligned polymeric nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anjana; Betancur, Martha; Patel, Gaurangkumar D.; Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Mukhatyar, Vivek J.; Vakharia, Ajit; Pai, S. Balakrishna; Brahma, Barunashish; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2014-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive, invasive brain tumour with a poor survival rate. Available treatments are ineffective and some tumours remain inoperable because of their size or location. The tumours are known to invade and migrate along white matter tracts and blood vessels. Here, we exploit this characteristic of glioblastoma multiforme by engineering aligned polycaprolactone (PCL)-based nanofibres for tumour cells to invade and, hence, guide cells away from the primary tumour site to an extracortical location. This extracortial sink is a cyclopamine drug-conjugated, collagen-based hydrogel. When aligned PCL-nanofibre films in a PCL/polyurethane carrier conduit were inserted in the vicinity of an intracortical human U87MG glioblastoma xenograft, a significant number of human glioblastoma cells migrated along the aligned nanofibre films and underwent apoptosis in the extracortical hydrogel. Tumour volume in the brain was significantly lower following insertion of aligned nanofibre implants compared with the application of smooth fibres or no implants.

  8. CD45 negatively regulates tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6 production in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Piercy, Jenny; Petrova, Svetla; Tchilian, Elma Z; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-06-01

    CD45 is known to regulate signalling through many different surface receptors in diverse haemopoietic cell types. Here we report for the first time that CD45-/- bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC) are more activated than CD45+/+ cells and that tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production by BMDC and splenic dendritic cells (sDC), is increased following stimulation via Toll-like receptor (TLR)3 and TLR9. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation, an important downstream consequence of TLR3 and TLR9 signalling, is also increased in CD45-/- BMDC. BMDC of CD45-/- mice also produce more TNF and IL-6 following stimulation with the cytokines TNF and interferon-alpha. These results show that TLR signalling is increased in CD45-/- dendritic cells and imply that CD45 is a negative regulator of TLR and cytokine receptor signalling in dendritic cells. PMID:16771860

  9. A single dividing cell population with imbalanced fate drives oesophageal tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Frede, Julia; Greulich, Philip; Nagy, Tibor; Simons, Benjamin D; Jones, Philip H

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of tumour growth is key for designing rational anticancer treatment. Here we used genetic lineage tracing to quantify cell behaviour during neoplastic transformation in a model of oesophageal carcinogenesis. We found that cell behaviour was convergent across premalignant tumours, which contained a single proliferating cell population. The rate of cell division was not significantly different in the lesions and the surrounding epithelium. However, dividing tumour cells had a uniform, small bias in cell fate so that, on average, slightly more dividing than non-dividing daughter cells were generated at each round of cell division. In invasive cancers induced by Kras(G12D) expression, dividing cell fate became more strongly biased towards producing dividing over non-dividing cells in a subset of clones. These observations argue that agents that restore the balance of cell fate may prove effective in checking tumour growth, whereas those targeting cycling cells may show little selectivity. PMID:27548914

  10. Tumours of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Head, K. W.; Nielsen, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Lung tumours are not common in domestic animals; there has not been the increase in epidermoid carcinomas and anaplastic small-cell carcinomas that has occurred in man this century. Adenocarcinoma is the most common type in animals. The biological behaviour of each type of tumour in animals seems to be much the same as in man. The tumours are described histologically, the main categories being: epidermoid carcinoma, anaplastic carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, combined epidermoid and adenocarcinoma, carcinoid tumours, bronchial gland tumours, benign tumours, and sarcomas. ImagesFig. 13Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 16Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12 PMID:4371738

  11. Rapid and quantitative discrimination of tumour cells on tissue slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wei, Wen-Chun; Hsiao, Pei-Yi; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er

    2016-06-01

    After a needle biopsy, immunohistochemistry is generally used to stain tissue slices for clinically confirming tumours. Currently, tissue slices are immersed in a bioprobe-linked fluorescent reagent for several minutes, washed to remove the unbound reagent, and then observed using a fluorescence microscope. However, the observation must be performed by experienced pathologists, and producing a qualitative analysis is time consuming. Therefore, this study proposes a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference device biosusceptometry (SSB) method for avoiding these drawbacks. First, stain reagents were synthesised for the dual modalities of fluorescent and magnetic imaging by combining iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles and the currently used fluorescent reagent. The reagent for the proposed approach was stained using the same procedure as that for the current fluorescent reagent, and tissue slices were rapidly imaged using the developed SSB for obtaining coregistered optical and magnetic images. Analysing the total intensity of magnetic spots in SSB images enables quantitatively determining the tumour cells of tissue slices. To confirm the magnetic imaging results, a traditional observation methodology entailing the use of a fluorescence microscope was also performed as the gold standard. This study determined high consistency between the fluorescent and magnetic spots in different regions of the tissue slices, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach, which will benefit future clinical pathology.

  12. Rapid and quantitative discrimination of tumour cells on tissue slices.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wei, Wen-Chun; Hsiao, Pei-Yi; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er

    2016-06-10

    After a needle biopsy, immunohistochemistry is generally used to stain tissue slices for clinically confirming tumours. Currently, tissue slices are immersed in a bioprobe-linked fluorescent reagent for several minutes, washed to remove the unbound reagent, and then observed using a fluorescence microscope. However, the observation must be performed by experienced pathologists, and producing a qualitative analysis is time consuming. Therefore, this study proposes a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference device biosusceptometry (SSB) method for avoiding these drawbacks. First, stain reagents were synthesised for the dual modalities of fluorescent and magnetic imaging by combining iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles and the currently used fluorescent reagent. The reagent for the proposed approach was stained using the same procedure as that for the current fluorescent reagent, and tissue slices were rapidly imaged using the developed SSB for obtaining coregistered optical and magnetic images. Analysing the total intensity of magnetic spots in SSB images enables quantitatively determining the tumour cells of tissue slices. To confirm the magnetic imaging results, a traditional observation methodology entailing the use of a fluorescence microscope was also performed as the gold standard. This study determined high consistency between the fluorescent and magnetic spots in different regions of the tissue slices, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach, which will benefit future clinical pathology. PMID:27138705

  13. Giant Cell Tumour of the Tendon Sheath: Analysis of 35 Cases and their Ki-67 Proliferation Indexes

    PubMed Central

    Balik, Mehmet Sabri; Sehitoglu, Ibrahim; Güçer, Hasan; Yurdakul, Cüneyt

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: A giant cell Tumour of the tendon sheath (GCTTS) is a slow-growing benign Tumour originating from the synovial cells of the tendon sheath. It is the second most common Tumour of the hand. The aim of this study was to perform a retrospective clinicopathological evaluation of GCTTS cases and determine whether the proliferative activity of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is related to its recurrence rate and local aggressiveness. Materials and Methods: The age, gender, Tumour location and diameter, treatment mode, Ki-67 proliferation index, mitotic rate, and recurrence were retrospectively evaluated in 35 patients diagnosed with GCTTS in the Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University between 2009 and 2014. Results: Of the 35 GCTTS cases, 23 were female, and 12 were male. The mean age was 45 y (range 10–70). Sixteen tumours were located in the right hand and 14 in the left hand, and five were in the feet. The mean Tumour diameter was 2.3 cm (0.6–6 cm). All patients underwent marginal excision. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 4 y (range 28 months–5 y). Only six patients showed recurrence. In these cases, the site of GCTTS recurrence was the phalanx of the hand. The mean Ki-67 index in the recurrence cases was 6.5%, whereas it was 2.3% in those without recurrence. Conclusion: The Ki-67 proliferation index and mitotic activity were increased in recurrent cases compared to nonrecurrent cases. Therefore, these parameters may be helpful in predicting recurrence of GCTTS. However, adequate surgical excision and complete removal of the Tumour are important steps to minimize the recurrence rate. PMID:25653956

  14. L-lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, T L; Lehninger, A L

    1976-02-15

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells were investigated with regard to their stability to transport L-lactate by measuring either the distribution of [14C]lactate or concomitant H+ ion movements. The movement of lactate was dependent on the pH difference across the cell membrane and was electroneutral, as evidenced by an observed 1:1 antiport for OH- ions or 1:1 symport with H+ ions. 2. Kinetic experiments showed that lactate transport was saturable, with an apparent Km of approx. 4.68 mM and a Vmax. as high as 680 nmol/min per mg of protein at pH 6.2 and 37 degrees C. 3. Lactate transport exhibited a high temperature dependence (activation energy = 139 kJ/mol). 4. Lactate transport was inhibited competitively by (a) a variety of other substituted monocarboxylic acids (e.g. pyruvate, Ki = 6.3 mM), which were themselves transported, (b) the non-transportable analogues alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 0.5 mM), alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 2mM) and DL-p-hydroxyphenyl-lactate (Ki = 3.6 mM) and (c) the thiol-group reagent mersalyl (Ki = 125 muM). 5. Transport of simple monocarboxylic acids, including acetate and propionate, was insensitive to these inhibitors; they presumably cross the membrane by means of a different mechanism. 6. Experiments using saturating amounts of mersalyl as an "inhibitor stop" allowed measurements of the initial rates of net influx and of net efflux of [14C]lactate. Influx and efflux of lactate were judged to be symmetrical reactions in that they exhibited similar concentration dependence. 7. It is concluded that lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells is mediated by a carrier capable of transporting a number of other substituted monocarboxylic acids, but not unsubstituted short-chain aliphatic acids. PMID:7237

  15. Radical Resection of a Late-Relapsed Testicular Germ Cell Tumour: Hepatectomy, Cavotomy, and Thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ní Leidhin, C.; Redmond, C. E.; Cahalane, A. M.; Heneghan, H. M.; Motyer, R.; Ryan, E. R.; Hoti, E.

    2014-01-01

    Up to 3.2% of patients with testicular germ cell tumours represent with late-relapsing disease. Aggressive surgical resection confers the greatest chance of cure in this patient group. We present the case of a late and extensively relapsed nonseminomatous germ cell tumour with thrombus present along the entire length of the inferior vena cava, as well as in the right hepatic vein. Techniques practised in liver transplantation were used to achieve complete resection of the tumour thrombus. This case illustrates the enhanced potential for tumour resection through a fusion of principles derived from surgical oncology and liver transplantation. PMID:25587480

  16. Radical resection of a late-relapsed testicular germ cell tumour: hepatectomy, cavotomy, and thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Ní Leidhin, C; Redmond, C E; Cahalane, A M; Heneghan, H M; Motyer, R; Ryan, E R; Hoti, E

    2014-01-01

    Up to 3.2% of patients with testicular germ cell tumours represent with late-relapsing disease. Aggressive surgical resection confers the greatest chance of cure in this patient group. We present the case of a late and extensively relapsed nonseminomatous germ cell tumour with thrombus present along the entire length of the inferior vena cava, as well as in the right hepatic vein. Techniques practised in liver transplantation were used to achieve complete resection of the tumour thrombus. This case illustrates the enhanced potential for tumour resection through a fusion of principles derived from surgical oncology and liver transplantation. PMID:25587480

  17. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  18. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W.; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M.; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C.; Wade, Rebecca C.; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  19. The effects of shortening lactoferrin derived peptides against tumour cells, bacteria and normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nannan; Strøm, Morten B; Mekonnen, Seble M; Svendsen, John S; Rekdal, Oystein

    2004-01-01

    A number of shortened derivatives of the lactoferrin model peptide L12, PAWRKAFRWAKRMLKKAA, were designed in order to elucidate the structural basis for antitumour activity of lactoferrin derivatives. Three tumour cell lines were included in the study and toxicity determined by measuring lysis of human red blood cells and fibroblasts. The results demonstrated a strong correlation between antitumour activity and net positive charge, in which a net charge close to +7 was essential for a high antitumour activity. In order to increase the antitumour activity of the shortest peptide with a net charge less than +7, the hydrophobicity had to be increased by adding a bulky Trp residue. None of the peptides were haemolytic, but toxicity against fibroblasts was observed. However, modifications of the peptides had a higher effect on reducing fibroblast toxicity than antitumour activity and thereby resulted in peptides displaying an almost 7-fold selectivity for tumour cells compared with fibroblasts. The antimicrobial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coil and the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus was also included in order to compare the structural requirements for antitumour activity with those required for a high antimicrobial activity. The results showed that most of the peptides were highly active against both bacterial strains. Less modification by shortening the peptide sequences was tolerated for maintaining a high antitumour activity and selectivity compared with antimicrobial activity. The order of the amino acid residues and thereby the conformation of the peptides was highly essential for antitumour activity, whereas the antimicrobial activity was hardly influenced by changes in this parameter. Thus, in addition to a certain net positive charge and hydrophobicity, the ability to adopt an amphipathic conformation was a more critical structural parameter for antitumour activity than for antimicrobial activity, and implied that a

  20. Diagnostic technologies for circulating tumour cells and exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Issadore, David

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and exosomes are promising circulating biomarkers. They exist in easily accessible blood and carry large diversity of molecular information. As such, they can be easily and repeatedly obtained for minimally invasive cancer diagnosis and monitoring. Because of their intrinsic differences in counts, size and molecular contents, CTCs and exosomes pose unique sets of technical challenges for clinical translation–CTCs are rare whereas exosomes are small. Novel technologies are underway to overcome these specific challenges to fully harness the clinical potential of these circulating biomarkers. Herein, we will overview the characteristics of CTCs and exosomes as valuable circulating biomarkers and their associated technical challenges for clinical adaptation. Specifically, we will describe emerging technologies that have been developed to address these technical obstacles and the unique clinical opportunities enabled by technological innovations. PMID:26604322

  1. Expression of different phenotypes in cell lines from canine mammary spindle-cell tumours and osteosarcomas indicating a pluripotent mammary stem cell origin.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E; Moller, M; Blankenstein, M A; Andersson, L; Westermark, B

    2000-06-01

    Mammary spindle-cell tumours and sarcomas seem to be restricted to dogs and humans. Two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary spindle-cell tumours (CMT-U304 and CMT-U309) and two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary osteosarcomas (CMT-U334 and CMT-U335) were established to study the mesenchymal phenotypes of mammary tumours in the female dog. The cells from the spindle-cell tumours expressed cytokeratin, vimentin and smooth muscle actin filaments. When these cells were inoculated subcutaneously into female and male nude mice they formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as spindle-cell tumours, fibroma and rhabdomyoid tumours (n = 6/8). The cells from the osteosarcomas expressed vimentin filaments and also formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as chondroid, rhabdomyoid, smooth muscle-like and spindle-cell tumours (n = 6/10). The cell lines CMT-U304, CMT-U309 and CMT-U335 had receptors for progesterone but none of the four cell lines had receptors for estrogen. All four cell lines and their corresponding primary tumours showed identical allelic patterns in microsatellite analysis. By in situ hybridization with genomic DNA we could verify that all formed tumours but one were of canine origin. Our results support the hypothesis that canine mammary tumours are derived from pluripotent stem cells. PMID:10965996

  2. Co-expression of glutaminase K and L isoenzymes in human tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The pattern of expression of glutaminase isoenzymes in tumour cells has been investigated to clarify its role in the malignant transformation and the prospect of its use as a clinically relevant factor. Using leukaemia cells from medullar blood of human patients and several established human cancer cell lines, we have developed a competitive RT (reverse transcriptase)-PCR assay to quantify simultaneously K-type (kidney-type) and L-type (liver-type) glutaminase mRNAs. Co-expression of both transcripts and higher amounts of L-type mRNA were always found in all cancer cell types analysed. However, mature lymphocytes from the medullar blood of a patient suffering aplasia did not express the K-type transcript and showed a 15-fold increase of L-type transcript. Co-expression was also confirmed at the protein level using isoform-specific antibodies; nevertheless, it did not correlate with the relative abundance of glutaminase transcripts and strong K-type protein signals were detected. On the other hand, marked differences were found with regard to glutamate inhibition and phosphate activation of tumour glutaminase activity. Taken together, the protein data suggest that K isoform would account for the majority of glutaminase activity in these human tumour cells. The results confirm that simultaneous expression of both isoenzymes in human cancer cells is a more frequent event than previously thought. Furthermore, the present work and other previous data suggest that K isoform is up-regulated with increased rates of proliferation, whereas prevalence of the L isoform seems to be related with resting or quiescent cell states. PMID:15496140

  3. Chemotherapy and immunotherapy of tumours induced by gene-modified HPV16-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Sobotková, Eva; Dusková, Martina; Smahel, Michal; Holán, Vladimir; Janousková, Olga; Vonka, Vladimir

    2004-10-01

    HPV16 E6/E7 transformed mouse kidney cells designated MK16/1/IIIABC (MK16) were modified by the insertion of a suicide gene, viz. the thymidine-kinase gene of herpes simplex virus (HSV TK). Tumour induction by these cells, designated N2A, was suppressed by ganciclovir (GCV). The growth of already established tumours was partially inhibited by GCV. This effect was markedly potentiated by a single dose of cyclophosphamide (Cy). Ganciclovir- or GCV+ Cy-cured mice were not protected against challenge with MK16 cells. N2A tumour growth was suppressed by simultaneous administration of MK16-derived, non-oncogenic B9 and 181 cells, which express either mouse GM-CSF or mouse IL2, respectively, in addition to HSV TK. The animals treated were protected against challenge with MK16 cells. Animals with already established N2A tumours were treated with GCV and/or repeated doses of B9 or 181 cells. Ganciclovir treatment alone and immunotherapy alone resulted in partial suppression of tumour growth but not in tumour cure. On the other hand, combined chemo- and immunotherapy resulted in tumour rejection by nearly all animals. Similar results were obtained if the immunotherapy with homologous gene-modified cells was substituted by treatment with anti-CD4 antibody. The animals cured of tumours with GCV combined with cell-based vaccine therapy but not those cured by GCV and anti-CD4 antibody treatment were found resistant to challenge with MK16 cells. The present results suggest that combined specific and non-specific chemo- and immunotherapy of tumours induced by appropriately gene-modified cells might provide a special advantage in the treatment of established tumours. PMID:15375516

  4. Increasing the speed of tumour diagnosis during surgery with selective scanning Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kenny; Rowlands, Christopher J.; Varma, Sandeep; Perkins, William; Leach, Iain H.; Koloydenko, Alexey A.; Pitiot, Alain; Williams, Hywel C.; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-09-01

    One of the main challenges in cancer surgery is ensuring that all tumour cells are removed during surgery, while sparing as much healthy tissue as possible. Histopathology, the gold-standard technique for cancer diagnosis, is often impractical for intra-operative use because of the time-consuming tissue preparation procedures (sectioning and staining). Raman micro-spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can discriminate between tumours and healthy tissues with high accuracy, based entirely on intrinsic chemical differences. However, raster-scanning Raman micro-spectroscopy is a slow imaging technique that typically requires data acquisition times as long as several days for typical tissue samples obtained during surgery (1 × 1 cm2) - in particular when high signal-to-noise ratio spectra are required to ensure accurate diagnosis. In this paper we present two techniques based on selective sampling Raman micro-spectroscopy that can overcome these limitations. In selective sampling, information regarding the spatial features of the tissue, either measured by an alternative optical technique or estimated in real-time from the Raman spectra, can be used to drastically reduce the number of Raman spectra required for diagnosis. These sampling strategies allowed diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma in skin tissue samples excised during Mohs micrographic surgery faster than frozen section histopathology, and two orders of magnitude faster than previous techniques based on raster-scanning Raman microscopy. Further development of these techniques may help during cancer surgery by providing a fast and objective way for surgeons to ensure the complete removal of tumour cells while sparing as much healthy tissue as possible.

  5. Microencapsulation of human cells: its effects on growth of normal and tumour cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, S. M.; Hopwood, D.; Newman, E. L.; Cuschieri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth kinetics of established human colorectal tumour cell lines (HT29, HT115 and COLO 320DM) and human diploid fibroblasts (Flow 2002) were studied in conventional culture and in microcapsules formed from alginate-poly(L-lysine)-alginate membranes. The tumour lines grew rapidly in microcapsules but, in the case of the substrate-adherent lines HT29 and HT115, only after a prolonged lag phase. This phase was reduced by serial passage in microcapsules. The anchorage-independent line COLO 320DM showed no lengthening in lag phase. Microencapsulated fibroblasts underwent negligible growth but remained viable. Some evidence for functional differentiation (microvilli, cell-cell junctions) of the tumour line HT115 within the microcapsules was observed. We conclude that the use of microcapsules provides an alternative system with some advantages for the study of human cancer and its metastases in vitro. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:2039691

  6. Efficient and reproducible generation of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, V; Griffiths, R; Hawkins, R E; Gilham, D E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy is showing great promise in the treatment of patients with advanced malignant melanoma. However, the translation of TIL therapy to non-melanoma tumours such as renal cell carcinoma has been less successful with a major constraint being the inability to reproducibly generate TILs from primary and metastatic tumour tissue. Methods: Primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma biopsies were subjected to differential tumour disaggregation methods and procedures that stimulate the specific expansion of TILs tested to determine which reliably generated TIL maintained antitumour specificity. Results: Enzymatic or combined enzymatic/mechanical disaggregation resulted in equivalent numbers of TILs being liberated from renal cell carcinoma biopsies. Following mitogenic activation of the isolated TILs with anti-CD3/anti-CD28-coated paramagnetic beads, successful TIL expansion was achieved in 90% of initiated cultures. The frequency of T-cell recognition of autologous tumours was enhanced when tumours were disaggregated using the GentleMACS enzymatic/mechanical system. Conclusion: TILs can be consistently produced from renal cell carcinoma biopsies maintaining autologous tumour recognition after expansion in vitro. While the method of disaggregation has little impact on the success of TIL growth, methods that preserve the cell surface architecture facilitate TIL recognition of an autologous tumour, which is important in terms of characterising the functionality of the expanded TIL population. PMID:25867267

  7. Multiple RT-PCR markers for the detection of circulating tumour cells of metastatic canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    da Costa, A; Kohn, B; Gruber, A D; Klopfleisch, R

    2013-04-01

    In humans, detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) using nucleic acid-based methods such as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has proven to be of prognostic relevance. However, similar procedures are still lacking in veterinary oncology. To assess the correlation of CTC markers with the metastatic potential of canine mammary tumours, 120 peripheral blood samples from bitches with mammary carcinomas with (group 1) and without (group 2) histological evidence of vascular invasion and/or presence of lymph node metastases and mammary adenomas (group 3) were analyzed. Blood samples were collected in EDTA tubes and RNA was extracted within 48 h. Subsequently, the samples were tested by RT-PCR for a panel of seven CTC mRNA markers. CRYAB was the most sensitive single marker with a sensitivity of 35% and also the most specific marker with a specificity of 100% to detect group 1 blood samples. A multimarker assay combining four genes enhanced the sensitivity up to 77.5%, but decreased the specificity to 80%. CRYAB appeared to be highly specific but only moderately sensitive at detecting blood samples from dogs with metastatic tumours and detection significantly correlated with vascular invasion of primary mammary tumours. However, a multimarker assay of four genes significantly enhanced the sensitivity of the assay and is therefore preferable for CTC detection. PMID:23036177

  8. Tumour-specific metabolic adaptation to acidosis is coupled to epigenetic stability in osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chano, Tokuhiro; Avnet, Sofia; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Sonveaux, Pierre; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic-based metabolism of cancers promotes an acidic microenvironment that is responsible for increased aggressiveness. However, the effects of acidosis on tumour metabolism have been almost unexplored. By using capillary electrophoresis with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we observed a significant metabolic difference associated with glycolysis repression (dihydroxyacetone phosphate), increase of amino acid catabolism (phosphocreatine and glutamate) and urea cycle enhancement (arginino succinic acid) in osteosarcoma (OS) cells compared with normal fibroblasts. Noteworthy, metabolites associated with chromatin modification, like UDP-glucose and N8-acetylspermidine, decreased more in OS cells than in fibroblasts. COBRA assay and acetyl-H3 immunoblotting indicated an epigenetic stability in OS cells than in normal cells, and OS cells were more sensitive to an HDAC inhibitor under acidosis than under neutral pH. Since our data suggest that acidosis promotes a metabolic reprogramming that can contribute to the epigenetic maintenance under acidosis only in tumour cells, the acidic microenvironment should be considered for future therapies. PMID:27186436

  9. Tumour-specific metabolic adaptation to acidosis is coupled to epigenetic stability in osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chano, Tokuhiro; Avnet, Sofia; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Sonveaux, Pierre; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic-based metabolism of cancers promotes an acidic microenvironment that is responsible for increased aggressiveness. However, the effects of acidosis on tumour metabolism have been almost unexplored. By using capillary electrophoresis with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we observed a significant metabolic difference associated with glycolysis repression (dihydroxyacetone phosphate), increase of amino acid catabolism (phosphocreatine and glutamate) and urea cycle enhancement (arginino succinic acid) in osteosarcoma (OS) cells compared with normal fibroblasts. Noteworthy, metabolites associated with chromatin modification, like UDP-glucose and N(8)-acetylspermidine, decreased more in OS cells than in fibroblasts. COBRA assay and acetyl-H3 immunoblotting indicated an epigenetic stability in OS cells than in normal cells, and OS cells were more sensitive to an HDAC inhibitor under acidosis than under neutral pH. Since our data suggest that acidosis promotes a metabolic reprogramming that can contribute to the epigenetic maintenance under acidosis only in tumour cells, the acidic microenvironment should be considered for future therapies. PMID:27186436

  10. Depletion of Regulatory T Cells Induces High Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Unmasks a Subset of Anti-Tumour CD8+CD11c+ PD-1lo Effector T Cells.

    PubMed

    Goudin, Nicolas; Chappert, Pascal; Mégret, Jérome; Gross, David-Alexandre; Rocha, Benedita; Azogui, Orly

    2016-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (Treg) cells interfere with multiple functions, which are crucial for the development of strong anti-tumour responses. In a model of 4T1 mammary carcinoma, depletion of CD25+Tregs results in tumour regression in Balb/c mice, but the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we show that partial Treg depletion leads to the generation of a particular effector CD8 T cell subset expressing CD11c and low level of PD-1 in tumour draining lymph nodes. These cells have the capacity to migrate into the tumour, to kill DCs, and to locally regulate the anti-tumour response. These events are concordant with a substantial increase in CD11b+ resident dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in draining lymph nodes followed by CD8+ DCs. These results indicate that Treg depletion leads to tumour regression by unmasking an increase of DC subsets as a part of a program that optimizes the microenvironment by orchestrating the activation, amplification, and migration of high numbers of fully differentiated CD8+CD11c+PD1lo effector T cells to the tumour sites. They also indicate that a critical pattern of DC subsets correlates with the evolution of the anti-tumour response and provide a template for Treg depletion and DC-based therapy. PMID:27341421

  11. Depletion of Regulatory T Cells Induces High Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Unmasks a Subset of Anti-Tumour CD8+CD11c+ PD-1lo Effector T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goudin, Nicolas; Chappert, Pascal; Mégret, Jérome; Gross, David-Alexandre; Rocha, Benedita

    2016-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (Treg) cells interfere with multiple functions, which are crucial for the development of strong anti-tumour responses. In a model of 4T1 mammary carcinoma, depletion of CD25+Tregs results in tumour regression in Balb/c mice, but the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we show that partial Treg depletion leads to the generation of a particular effector CD8 T cell subset expressing CD11c and low level of PD-1 in tumour draining lymph nodes. These cells have the capacity to migrate into the tumour, to kill DCs, and to locally regulate the anti-tumour response. These events are concordant with a substantial increase in CD11b+ resident dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in draining lymph nodes followed by CD8+ DCs. These results indicate that Treg depletion leads to tumour regression by unmasking an increase of DC subsets as a part of a program that optimizes the microenvironment by orchestrating the activation, amplification, and migration of high numbers of fully differentiated CD8+CD11c+PD1lo effector T cells to the tumour sites. They also indicate that a critical pattern of DC subsets correlates with the evolution of the anti-tumour response and provide a template for Treg depletion and DC-based therapy. PMID:27341421

  12. Relative biological effectiveness of light ions in human tumoural cell lines: role of protein p53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggio, L.; Cavinato, M.; Cherubini, R.; Conzato, M.; Cucinotta, F.; Favaretto, S.; Gerardi, S.; Lora, S.; Stoppa, P.; Williams, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Protons and alpha particles of high linear energy transfer (LET) have shown an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with respect to X/gamma rays for several cellular and molecular endpoints in different in vitro cell systems. To contribute to understanding the biochemical mechanisms involved in the increased effectiveness of high LET radiation, an extensive study has been designed. The present work reports the preliminary result of this study on two human tumoural cell lines, DLD1 and HCT116, (with different p53 status), which indicate that for these cell lines, p53 does not appear to take a part in the response to radiation induced DNA damage, suggesting an alternative p53-independent pathway and a cell biochemical mechanism dependent on the cell type.

  13. Interactions of ion transporters and channels with cancer cell metabolism and the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Anne Poder; Moreira, José M. A.; Pedersen, Stine Falsig

    2014-01-01

    Major changes in intra- and extracellular pH homoeostasis are shared features of most solid tumours. These changes stem in large part from the metabolic shift of most cancer cells towards glycolytic metabolism and other processes associated with net acid production. In combination with oncogenic signalling and impact from factors in the tumour microenvironment, this upregulates acid-extruding plasma membrane transport proteins which maintain intracellular pH normal or even more alkaline compared with that of normal cells, while in turn acidifying the external microenvironment. Mounting evidence strongly indicates that this contributes significantly to cancer development by favouring e.g. cancer cell migration, invasion and chemotherapy resistance. Finally, while still under-explored, it seems likely that non-cancer cells in the tumour microenvironment also exhibit altered pH regulation and that this may contribute to their malignant properties. Thus, the physical tumour microenvironment and the cancer and stromal cells within it undergo important reciprocal interactions which modulate the tumour pH profile, in turn severely impacting on the course of cancer progression. Here, we summarize recent knowledge of tumour metabolism and the tumour microenvironment, placing it in the context of tumour pH regulation, and discuss how interfering with these properties may be exploited clinically. PMID:24493746

  14. Circulating Cell-Free Tumour DNA in the Management of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Glenn; Stein, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    With the development of new sensitive molecular techniques, circulating cell-free tumour DNA containing mutations can be identified in the plasma of cancer patients. The applications of this technology may result in significant changes to the care and management of cancer patients. Whilst, currently, these “liquid biopsies” are used to supplement the histological diagnosis of cancer and metastatic disease, in the future these assays may replace the need for invasive procedures. Applications include the monitoring of tumour burden, the monitoring of minimal residual disease, monitoring of tumour heterogeneity, monitoring of molecular resistance and early diagnosis of tumours and metastatic disease. PMID:26101870

  15. A Study of the Mechanisms of Attachment of Allergised Lymphocytes to BP8 Ascites Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P. J.; Cater, D. B.

    1969-01-01

    The attachment of allergised and non-allergised lymph-node cells from C57B1 mice to BP8 ascites tumour cells were compared in vitro in the presence of vaso-active agents and mediators of the inflammatory reaction. It was found that Priscol, noradrenaline, adrenaline, 5-HT and histamine caused some cell adherence, while bradykinin and lysolecithin caused a marked increase of adherence of the allergised lymph-node cells to the BP8 cells. Electrophoretic studies of BP8 cells in the presence of polyornithine showed an abolition of the anodic mobility. Theories of action of the various agents are discussed. ImagesFigs. 5-8Figs. 1-4 PMID:5364386

  16. How does the metabolism of tumour cells differ from that of normal cells.

    PubMed

    Amoêdo, Nívea Dias; Valencia, Juan Perez; Rodrigues, Mariana Figueiredo; Galina, Antonio; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2013-01-01

    Tumour cells thrive in environments that would be hostile to their normal cell counterparts. Survival depends on the selection of cell lines that harbour modifications of both, gene regulation that shifts the balance between the cell cycle and apoptosis and those that involve the plasticity of the metabolic machinery. With regards to metabolism, the selected phenotypes usually display enhanced anaerobic glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, the so-called Warburg effect, and anabolic pathways that provide precursors for the synthesis of lipids, proteins and DNA. The review will discuss the original ideas of Otto Warburg and how they initially led to the notion that mitochondria of tumour cells were dysfunctional. Data will be presented to show that not only the organelles are viable and respiring, but that they are key players in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Likewise, interconnecting pathways that stand out in the tumour phenotype and that require intact mitochondria such as glutaminolysis will be addressed. Furthermore, comments will be made as to how the peculiarities of the biochemistry of tumour cells renders them amenable to new forms of treatment by highlighting possible targets for inhibitors. In this respect, a case study describing the effect of a metabolite analogue, the alkylating agent 3BP (3-bromopyruvate), on glycolytic enzyme targets will be presented. PMID:24079832

  17. Emerging roles of regulatory T cells in tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Elizabeth C; Mahmoud, Sahar M; Bennewith, Kevin L

    2014-12-01

    The metastasis of cancer is a complex and life-threatening process that is only partially understood. Immune suppressive cells are recognized as important contributors to tumour progression and may also promote the development and growth of tumour metastases. Specifically, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been found to promote primary tumour progression, and emerging pre-clinical data suggests that Tregs may promote metastasis and metastatic tumour growth. While the precise role that Tregs play in metastatic progression is understudied, recent findings have indicated that by suppressing innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity, Tregs may shield tumour cells from immune detection, and thereby allow tumour cells to survive, proliferate and acquire characteristics that facilitate dissemination. This review will highlight our current understanding of Tregs in metastasis, including an overview of pre-clinical findings and discussion of clinical data regarding Tregs and therapeutic outcome. Evolving strategies to directly ablate Tregs or to inhibit their function will also be discussed. Improving our understanding of how Tregs may influence tumour metastasis may lead to novel treatments for metastatic cancer. PMID:25359584

  18. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications. PMID:25910782

  19. Chronic phase CML patients possess T cells capable of recognising autologous tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ludmila; Pawelec, Graham

    2002-05-01

    Much circumstantial evidence points to the immunogenicity of chronic myloid leukemia (CML) cells, most impressively the well-established T cell-dependent GvL effect seen in bone marrow transplantation. However, only a small number of shared antigens expressed by CML cells have been identified as potential targets for T cell-mediated immune responses which might be exploited for immunotherapy. It may be that unique antigens expressed by individual tumours are more potent rejection antigens if the patient's own T cells could be encouraged to react against them. Work is reviewed here which documents that in vitro mixed cultures between autologous T cells and dendritic cells of chronic-phase CML patients can give rise to sensitised T cells capable of recognising the patient's tumour cells. Additionally, mixed autologous tumour cell/lymphocyte cultures, modified by the addition of cytokine cocktails, may also result in the generation of similarly sensitised T cells. These results could be exploited for adoptive immunotherapy, and possibly, after identification of the antigens recognised, also for active immunotherapy, i.e. including therapeutic vaccination. PMID:12148904

  20. Nonlinear modelling of cancer: bridging the gap between cells and tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowengrub, J. S.; Frieboes, H. B.; Jin, F.; Chuang, Y.-L.; Li, X.; Macklin, P.; Wise, S. M.; Cristini, V.

    2010-01-01

    Despite major scientific, medical and technological advances over the last few decades, a cure for cancer remains elusive. The disease initiation is complex, and including initiation and avascular growth, onset of hypoxia and acidosis due to accumulation of cells beyond normal physiological conditions, inducement of angiogenesis from the surrounding vasculature, tumour vascularization and further growth, and invasion of surrounding tissue and metastasis. Although the focus historically has been to study these events through experimental and clinical observations, mathematical modelling and simulation that enable analysis at multiple time and spatial scales have also complemented these efforts. Here, we provide an overview of this multiscale modelling focusing on the growth phase of tumours and bypassing the initial stage of tumourigenesis. While we briefly review discrete modelling, our focus is on the continuum approach. We limit the scope further by considering models of tumour progression that do not distinguish tumour cells by their age. We also do not consider immune system interactions nor do we describe models of therapy. We do discuss hybrid-modelling frameworks, where the tumour tissue is modelled using both discrete (cell-scale) and continuum (tumour-scale) elements, thus connecting the micrometre to the centimetre tumour scale. We review recent examples that incorporate experimental data into model parameters. We show that recent mathematical modelling predicts that transport limitations of cell nutrients, oxygen and growth factors may result in cell death that leads to morphological instability, providing a mechanism for invasion via tumour fingering and fragmentation. These conditions induce selection pressure for cell survivability, and may lead to additional genetic mutations. Mathematical modelling further shows that parameters that control the tumour mass shape also control its ability to invade. Thus, tumour morphology may serve as a predictor of

  1. Nonlinear modelling of cancer: bridging the gap between cells and tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lowengrub, J S; Frieboes, H B; Jin, F; Chuang, Y-L; Li, X; Macklin, P; Wise, S M; Cristini, V

    2010-01-01

    Despite major scientific, medical and technological advances over the last few decades, a cure for cancer remains elusive. The disease initiation is complex, and including initiation and avascular growth, onset of hypoxia and acidosis due to accumulation of cells beyond normal physiological conditions, inducement of angiogenesis from the surrounding vasculature, tumour vascularization and further growth, and invasion of surrounding tissue and metastasis. Although the focus historically has been to study these events through experimental and clinical observations, mathematical modelling and simulation that enable analysis at multiple time and spatial scales have also complemented these efforts. Here, we provide an overview of this multiscale modelling focusing on the growth phase of tumours and bypassing the initial stage of tumourigenesis. While we briefly review discrete modelling, our focus is on the continuum approach. We limit the scope further by considering models of tumour progression that do not distinguish tumour cells by their age. We also do not consider immune system interactions nor do we describe models of therapy. We do discuss hybrid-modelling frameworks, where the tumour tissue is modelled using both discrete (cell-scale) and continuum (tumour-scale) elements, thus connecting the micrometre to the centimetre tumour scale. We review recent examples that incorporate experimental data into model parameters. We show that recent mathematical modelling predicts that transport limitations of cell nutrients, oxygen and growth factors may result in cell death that leads to morphological instability, providing a mechanism for invasion via tumour fingering and fragmentation. These conditions induce selection pressure for cell survivability, and may lead to additional genetic mutations. Mathematical modelling further shows that parameters that control the tumour mass shape also control its ability to invade. Thus, tumour morphology may serve as a predictor of

  2. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures. PMID:25227763

  3. Bone morphogenetic protein signalling activity distinguishes histological subsets of paediatric germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Fustino, N; Rakheja, D; Ateek, C S; Neumann, J C; Amatruda, J F

    2011-08-01

    Germ cell tumours (GCTs) are cancers of the testis, ovary or extragonadal sites that occur in infants, children and adults. Testicular GCT is the most common cancer in young men aged 15-40 years. Abnormalities in developmental signalling pathways such as wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β/BMP and Hedgehog have been described in many childhood tumours. To date, however, the status of BMP signalling in GCTs has not been described. Herein, we examine BMP-SMAD signalling in a set of clinically-annotated paediatric GCTs. We find that BMP signalling activity is absent in undifferentiated tumours such as seminomas and dysgerminomas, but robustly present in most yolk sac tumours, a differentiated tumour type. Gene expression profiling of TGF-β/BMP pathway genes in germinomas and yolk sac tumours reveals a set of genes that distinguish the two tumour types. There is significant intertumoural heterogeneity between tumours of the same histological subclass, implying that the BMP pathway can be differentially regulated in individual tumours. Finally, through miRNA expression profiling, we identify differential regulation of a set of miRNAs predicted to target the TGF-β/BMP pathway at multiple sites. Taken together, these results suggest that the BMP signalling pathway may represent a new therapeutical target for childhood GCTs. PMID:21696393

  4. Mixed Germ Cell Tumour in an Infertile Male Having Unilateral Cryptorchidism: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Singla, Anand; Kaur, Navneet; Sandhu, Gunjeet; Nagori, Rupesh

    2016-02-01

    Mixed germ cell tumours with multiple components occur more frequently than the pure varieties of germ cell tumours. Embryonal carcinoma and teratoma together form the most common components of the mixed germ cell tumour but the yolk sac tumour is usually seen as a minor component in patients presenting with mixed germ cell tumour. We report a rare case of 27-year-old Hepatitis C positive male presenting with pain in left lower abdomen with associated history of same sided undescended testis and infertility. Right sided testis lying in scrotal sac appeared normal on ultrasonography but patient was azoospermic. He had raised levels of serum markers, alpha feto protein and beta HCG. Examination showed a large mass in left lower abdomen involving the sigmoid colon with the absence of left testis in left scrotum which was confirmed on CT scan. Excision of the mass was done and histopathology examination revealed it as a malignant mixed germ cell tumour composed predominantly of a yolk sac tumour, with minor component as seminoma and embryonal carcinoma in an undescended testis. Following this, the level of serum markers came down. The patient is now undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy and is doing well. PMID:27042527

  5. Mixed Germ Cell Tumour in an Infertile Male Having Unilateral Cryptorchidism: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Navneet; Sandhu, Gunjeet; Nagori, Rupesh

    2016-01-01

    Mixed germ cell tumours with multiple components occur more frequently than the pure varieties of germ cell tumours. Embryonal carcinoma and teratoma together form the most common components of the mixed germ cell tumour but the yolk sac tumour is usually seen as a minor component in patients presenting with mixed germ cell tumour. We report a rare case of 27-year-old Hepatitis C positive male presenting with pain in left lower abdomen with associated history of same sided undescended testis and infertility. Right sided testis lying in scrotal sac appeared normal on ultrasonography but patient was azoospermic. He had raised levels of serum markers, alpha feto protein and beta HCG. Examination showed a large mass in left lower abdomen involving the sigmoid colon with the absence of left testis in left scrotum which was confirmed on CT scan. Excision of the mass was done and histopathology examination revealed it as a malignant mixed germ cell tumour composed predominantly of a yolk sac tumour, with minor component as seminoma and embryonal carcinoma in an undescended testis. Following this, the level of serum markers came down. The patient is now undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy and is doing well. PMID:27042527

  6. Matrix metalloproteinases inhibition promotes the polyfunctionality of human natural killer cells in therapeutic antibody-based anti-tumour immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Q; Gil-Krzewska, A; Peruzzi, G; Borrego, F

    2013-07-01

    Activation of human natural killer (NK) cells is associated with the cleavage of CD16 from the cell surface, a process mediated by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this report, we examined whether inhibition of MMPs would lead to improved NK cell antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. Using an in-vitro ADCC assay, we tested the anti-tumour function of NK cells with three different therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in the presence of MMPs inhibitor GM6001 or its control. Loss of CD16 was observed when NK cells were co-cultured with tumour targets in the presence of specific anti-tumour antibodies, and was found particularly on the majority of degranulating NK responding cells. Treatment with MMPs inhibitors not only prevented CD16 down-regulation, but improved the quality of the responding cells significantly, as shown by an increase in the percentage of polyfunctional NK cells that are capable of both producing cytokines and degranulation. Furthermore, MMPs inhibition resulted in augmented and sustained CD16-mediated signalling, as shown by increased tyrosine phosphorylation of CD3ζ and other downstream signalling intermediates, which may account for the improved NK cell function. Collectively, our results provide a foundation for combining MMPs inhibitors and therapeutic mAbs in new clinical trials for cancer treatment. PMID:23607800

  7. Expression of the chemokine CXCL14 and cetuximab-dependent tumour suppression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Ozawa, S; Ikoma, T; Yang, X-Y; Kanamori, K; Suzuki, K; Iwabuchi, H; Maehata, Y; Miyamoto, C; Taguchi, T; Kiyono, T; Kubota, E; Hata, R-I

    2016-01-01

    Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), has been successfully used to treat some patients with colorectal cancer and those with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). For the effective treatment, it is essential to first identify cetuximab-responsive patients. The level of EGFR expression and/or the presence of mutations in signalling molecules downstream of the EGFR pathway have been reported to be determining factors for cetuximab responsiveness in colorectal cancer patients; however, limited data have been reported for HNSCC patients. We previously reported that the chemokine CXCL14 exhibits tumour-suppressive effects against xenografted HNSCC cells, which may be classified into two groups, CXCL14-expressing and non-expressing cells under serum-starved culture conditions. Here we employed CXCL14-expressing HSC-3 cells and CXCL14-non-expressing YCU-H891 cells as representatives of the two groups and compared their responses to cetuximab and their CXCL14 expression under various conditions. The growth of xenografted tumours initiated by HSC-3 cells, which expressed CXCL14 in vivo and in vitro, was suppressed by the injection of cetuximab into tumour-bearing mice; however, neither the expression of the chemokine nor the cetuximab-dependent suppression of xenograft tumour growth was observed for YCU-H891 cells. Both types of cells expressed EGFR and neither type harboured mutations in signalling molecules downstream of EGFR that have been reported in cetuximab-resistant colon cancer patients. The inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling increased the levels of CXCL14 messenger RNA (mRNA) in HSC-3 cells, but not in YCU-H891 cells. We also observed that the CXCL14 promoter region in YCU-H891 cells was hypermethylated, and that demethylation of the promoter by treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored CXCL14 mRNA expression and in vivo cetuximab-mediated tumour growth suppression

  8. Enhanced thermal stability of lysosomal beta-D-galactosidase in parenchymal cells of tumour bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lenti, L.; Lipari, M.; Lombardi, D.; Zicari, A.; Dotta, A.; Pontieri, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal stability of the enzyme beta-D-galactosidase varies among different organs in normal C57Bl/6 mice, and increases in the same organs in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma. Thermal stability of this enzyme is also increased by treatment of the mice with cell-free extracts of tumour cells or with inflammatory compounds such as carrageenan or orosomucoid. After desialylation, orosomucoid more effectively increases the heat stability of the enzyme. By contrast talc, which has no galactosyl groups, is without effect on the stability of the enzyme in vivo. Macrophages of tumour bearing mice release into the culture medium a more heat resistant enzyme than macrophages from control mice. In both cases the heat resistance of the secreted enzyme is higher when fetal calf serum is present in the culture medium. Bovine serum does not modify the thermal stability of beta-D-galactosidase in this system. Incubation of lysosomal fractions of various organs with the synthetic beta-D-galactosidase substrate, p-nitrophenyl-galactopyranoside, also strongly increases the heat resistance of the enzyme. The results suggest that one factor influencing the heat resistance of this enzyme may be complex formation between the enzyme and its substrates, an example of substrate protection of the enzyme. This may not be the only factor involved in enzyme stabilization in vivo. PMID:3099822

  9. Blue Cell Tumour at Unusual Site: Retropritoneal Ewings Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Javalgi, Anita P; Karigoudar, Mahesh H; Palur, Katyayani

    2016-04-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a highly malignant tumour of osseous or non-osseous origin, tremed as extra-skeletal Ewings sarcoma if arising from soft tissue. It is rare occurrence tumor most commonly occurring in paravertebral area, chest wall, head & neck and retroperitoneum. Reporting an interesting case of retroperitoneal Ewing's sarcoma in 39 years old female. Patient had complains of abdominal discomfort & vague pain since 2 months, following weakness in lower limb and loss of weight. On detail history and examination she was further referred to detail pathological and radiological investigations. Haematological profile, renal function test and liver function test were in normal limits. USG abdomen was normal, MRI showed a mass in pelvis retroperitoneum measuring 10x10cms, bilateral ovaries and tubes were normal. Because of retroperitoneal nature of tumor and suspicion of uterine sarcoma, laparotomy was performed. The large retroperitoneal mass adherent to posterior of uterus was excised and send for histopathological diagnosis. On gross and microscopy examination the diagnosis of blue cell tumor with PAS positivity, possibility of extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor was made which was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry, positive for S100, Vementin and CD99 and negative for desmin and CK. Confirmed diagnosis help in accurate management and improves survival rate. PMID:27190820

  10. Blue Cell Tumour at Unusual Site: Retropritoneal Ewings Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Karigoudar, Mahesh H; Palur, Katyayani

    2016-01-01

    Ewing’s sarcoma is a highly malignant tumour of osseous or non-osseous origin, tremed as extra-skeletal Ewings sarcoma if arising from soft tissue. It is rare occurrence tumor most commonly occurring in paravertebral area, chest wall, head & neck and retroperitoneum. Reporting an interesting case of retroperitoneal Ewing’s sarcoma in 39 years old female. Patient had complains of abdominal discomfort & vague pain since 2 months, following weakness in lower limb and loss of weight. On detail history and examination she was further referred to detail pathological and radiological investigations. Haematological profile, renal function test and liver function test were in normal limits. USG abdomen was normal, MRI showed a mass in pelvis retroperitoneum measuring 10x10cms, bilateral ovaries and tubes were normal. Because of retroperitoneal nature of tumor and suspicion of uterine sarcoma, laparotomy was performed. The large retroperitoneal mass adherent to posterior of uterus was excised and send for histopathological diagnosis. On gross and microscopy examination the diagnosis of blue cell tumor with PAS positivity, possibility of extraskeletal Ewing’s sarcoma/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor was made which was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry, positive for S100, Vementin and CD99 and negative for desmin and CK. Confirmed diagnosis help in accurate management and improves survival rate. PMID:27190820

  11. Prospects for T cell immunotherapy of tumours by vaccination with immunodominant and subdominant peptides.

    PubMed

    Melief, C J; Kast, W M

    1994-01-01

    Immunotherapy of tumours by adoptive transfer of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) is now feasible in experimental murine systems. These CTL recognize peptide sequences of defined length presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Effective eradication of large tumour masses requires co-administration of interleukin 2. Tumour escape strategies are numerous but in various instances can be counteracted by defined measures. Initiation of CTL responses against poorly immunogenic virally induced tumours and other tumours requires novel strategies to overcome T cell inertia. We propose a strategy in which CTL are raised against target molecules of choice including differentiation antigens of restricted tissue distribution (autoantigens) or mutated/overexpressed oncogene products. The steps proposed include: (1) identification of target molecules of choice. (2) Identification in these target molecules of peptides fitting MHC allele-specific peptide motifs involved in peptide binding to MHC molecules. (3) Evaluation of actual binding of such peptides to specific MHC class I molecules. (4) In vitro CTL response induction by such peptides, presented by highly efficient antigen-presenting cells such as antigen processing-defective cells carrying empty MHC class I molecules loaded with a single peptide or dendritic cells. Both types of cells are capable of primary CTL response induction in vitro. (5) Evaluation of proper processing by the demonstration of tumour cell lysis by these CTL. (6) Adoptive transfer of tumour-specific CTL generated in vitro or vaccination with peptides. These various steps have now been taken for several viruses, virally induced tumours and other types of tumours and the first indications that this strategy is useful have been obtained. PMID:7796678

  12. Mitogen-activated Tasmanian devil blood mononuclear cells kill devil facial tumour disease cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Tovar, Cesar; Cooray, Anne A; Kreiss, Alexandre; Darby, Jocelyn; Murphy, James M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Bettiol, Silvana S; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer that has brought the host species, the Tasmanian devil, to the brink of extinction. The cancer cells avoid allogeneic immune recognition by downregulating cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I expression. This should prevent CD8(+) T cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxicity. The reason why NK cells, normally reactive to MHC-negative cells, are not activated to kill DFTD cells has not been determined. The immune response of wild devils to DFTD, if it occurs, is uncharacterised. To investigate this, we tested 12 wild devils with DFTD, and found suggestive evidence of low levels of antibodies against DFTD cells in one devil. Eight of these devils were also analysed for cytotoxicity, however, none showed evidence for cytotoxicity against cultured DFTD cells. To establish whether mimicking activation of antitumour responses could induce cytotoxic activity against DFTD, Tasmanian devil peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with either the mitogen Concanavalin A, the Toll-like receptor agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or recombinant Tasmanian devil IL-2. All induced the PBMC cells to kill cultured DFTD cells, suggesting that activation does not occur after encounter with DFTD cells in vivo, but can be induced. The identification of agents that activate cytotoxicity against DFTD target cells is critical for developing strategies to protect against DFTD. Such agents could function as adjuvants to induce functional immune responses capable of targeting DFTD cells and tumours in vivo. PMID:27089941

  13. HIPK2: A tumour suppressor that controls DNA damage-induced cell fate and cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Thomas G; Glas, Carolina; Bitomsky, Nadja

    2013-01-01

    In response to DNA-damage, cells have to decide between different cell fate programmes. Activation of the tumour suppressor HIPK2 specifies the DNA damage response (DDR) and tips the cell fate balance towards an apoptotic response. HIPK2 is activated by the checkpoint kinase ATM, and triggers apoptosis through regulatory phosphorylation of a set of cellular key molecules including the tumour suppressor p53 and the anti-apoptotic corepressor CtBP. Recent work has identified HIPK2 as a regulator of the ultimate step in cytokinesis: the abscission of the mother and daughter cells. Since proper cytokinesis is essential for genome stability and maintenance of correct ploidy, this finding sheds new light on the tumour suppressor function of HIPK2. Here we highlight the molecular mechanisms coordinating HIPK2 function and discuss its emerging role as a tumour suppressor. PMID:23169233

  14. Sensitivity of locally recurrent rat mammary tumour cell lines to syngeneic polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Aeed, P A; Welch, D R

    1988-12-01

    Using a recently developed model for studying the biology of locally recurrent (LR) mammary tumours in the 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma system, we examined the sensitivity to polymorphonuclear cell, macrophage and natural killer cell cytolysis. The parental MTF7(T20) cell line; the 'primary' tumours which arose following subcutaneous inoculation into the mammary fat pad, sc1 and sc3; and the local recurrences (following surgical excision) LR1 and LR1a from sc1, and LR3 from sc3 were all cells generally resistant to specific PMN cytolysis. LPS-activated macrophages caused 25.1%, 38.7% and 58.8% specific cytolysis in MTF7, sc1 and LR1 cells, respectively at E:T of 20:1 and 72 h co-incubation. LR1a, sc3 and LR3 lysis ranged from 0-4.4% under the same conditions. Non-activated macrophages did not lyse any of the cell lines. Locally recurrent and 'primary' tumour cell lines were also not lysed by naive NK cells (range 0.5-4.0% cytolysis). NK cells activated with bropirimine, a potent immunomodulator currently being studied in clinical trials, and/or interleukin-2 were mildly more effective at killing LR cells. Our results show that locally recurrent tumours exhibit heterogeneous sensitivities and are different from 'primary' tumour cells in sensitivities to immune cell killing, but they are not necessarily more or less sensitive. Results with bropirimine-activated or IL-2-activated NK cells emphasize that nonspecific activation is insufficient to eliminate all tumour subpopulations. PMID:3224080

  15. LINE-1 induces hTERT and ensures telomere maintenance in tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Aschacher, T; Wolf, B; Enzmann, F; Kienzl, P; Messner, B; Sampl, S; Svoboda, M; Mechtcheriakova, D; Holzmann, K; Bergmann, M

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of cancer cells is an activated telomere maintenance mechanism, which allows prolonged survival of the malignant cells. In more than 80% of tumours, telomeres are elongated by the enzyme telomerase, which adds de novo telomere repeats to the ends of chromosomes. Cancer cells are also characterized by expression of active LINE-1 elements (L1s, long interspersed nuclear elements-1). L1 elements are abundant retrotransposons in the eukaryotic genome that are primarily known for facilitating aberrant recombination. Using L1-knockdown (KD), we show for the first time that L1 is critical for telomere maintenance in telomerase-positive tumour cells. The reduced length of telomeres in the L1-KD-treated cells correlated with an increased rate of telomere dysfunction foci, a reduced expression of shelterin proteins and an increased rate of anaphase bridges. The decreased telomere length was associated with a decreased telomerase activity and decreased telomerase mRNA level; the latter was increased upon L1 overexpression. L1-KD also led to a decrease in mRNA and protein expression of cMyc and KLF-4, two main transcription factors of telomerase and altered mRNA levels of other stem-cell-associated proteins such as CD44 and hMyb, as well as a corresponding reduced growth of spheroids. The KD of KLF-4 or cMyc decreased the level of L1-ORF1 mRNA, suggesting a specific reciprocal regulation with L1. Thus, our findings contribute to the understanding of L1 as a pathogenicity factor in cancer cells. As L1 is only expressed in pathophysiological conditions, L1 now appears to be target in the rational treatment of telomerase-positive cancer. PMID:25798839

  16. Combretastatin A-4 inhibits cell growth and metastasis in bladder cancer cells and retards tumour growth in a murine orthotopic bladder tumour model

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Shee, Jia-Jen; Wu, Jin-Yi; Lin, Yi-Wen; Wu, Jiann-Der; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Bladder cancer is a highly recurrent cancer after intravesical therapy, so new drugs are needed to treat this cancer. Hence, we investigated the anti-cancer activity of combretastatin A-4 (CA-4), an anti-tubulin agent, in human bladder cancer cells and in a murine orthotopic bladder tumour model. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Cytotoxicity of CA-4 was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, propidium iodide (PI) staining assay and clonogenic survival assay. In vivo microtubule assembly assay, cell cycle analyses, Western blot and cell migration assay were used to study the mechanism of CA-4. The effect of intravesical CA-4 therapy on the development of tumours was studied in the murine orthotopic bladder tumour model. KEY RESULTS CA-4 inhibited microtubule polymerization in vivo. Cytotoxic IC50 values of CA-4 in human bladder cancer cells were below 4 nM. Analyses of cell-cycle distribution showed CA-4 obviously induced G2-M phase arrest with sub-G1 formation. The analyses of apoptosis showed that CA-4 induced caspase-3 activation and decreased BubR1 and Bub3 in cancer cells. In addition to apoptosis, CA-4 was also found to induce the formation of multinucleated cells. CA-4 had a significantly reduced cell migration in vitro. Importantly, the in vivo study revealed that intravesical CA-4 therapy retarded the development of murine bladder tumours. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS These data demonstrate that CA-4 kills bladder cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe. It inhibited cell migration in vitro and tumour growth in vivo. Hence, CA-4 intravesical therapy could provide another strategy for treating superficial bladder cancers. PMID:20649598

  17. Radiation-Sensitising Effects of Antennapedia Proteins (ANTP)-SmacN7 on Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Du, Li Qing; Wang, Yan; Xu, Chang; Cao, Jia; Wang, Qin; Zhao, Hui; Fan, Fei Yue; Wang, Bing; Katsube, Takanori; Fan, Sai Jun; Liu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms behind the radiation-sensitising effects of the antennapedia proteins (ANTP)-smacN7 fusion protein on tumour cells. ANTP-SmacN7 fusion proteins were synthesised, and the ability of this fusion protein to penetrate cells was observed. Effects of radiation on the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) were detected by western blotting. The radiation-sensitising effects of ANTP-SmacN7 fusion proteins were observed by a clonogenic assay. The effects of drugs and radiation on tumour cell apoptosis were determined using Annexin V/FITC double staining. Changes in caspase-8, caspase-9 and caspase-3 were detected by western blot before and after ANTP-SmacN7 inhibition of XIAP. The ANTP-SmacN7 fusion protein could enter and accumulate in cells; in vitro XIAP expression of radiation-induced tumour cells was negatively correlated with tumour radiosensitivity. The ANTP-SmacN7 fusion protein promoted tumour cell apoptosis through the activation of caspase3. ANTP-SmacN7 fusion protein may reduce tumour cell radioresistance by inducing caspase3 activation. PMID:24336110

  18. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  19. Isolation and functional characterization of chicken intestinal intra-epithelial lymphocytes showing natural killer cell activity against tumour target cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chai, J Y; Lillehoj, H S

    1988-01-01

    Intestinal intra-epithelial lymphocytes (IEL) of SC or FP chickens were isolated and examined for their natural killer (NK)-cell activity against chicken tumour cell lines, LSCC-RP9 (RP9), LSCC-RP12 (RP12), MDCC-MSB-1 (MSB-1) and MDCC-CU36 (CU36). In general, IEL of satisfactory yield and of good viability were obtained with EDTA treatment of the gut tissues, followed by rapid passages of the resultant cells through nylon-wool columns and centrifugation on two-step Percoll density gradients (45% and 80%). In 4-hr and 16-hr 51Cr-release assays, the NK-cell activity of chicken IEL depended not only upon the type of target cells but also upon the incubation time and the host genetic background. RP9, MSB-1 and CU36 were susceptible to NK lysis by IEL and by spleen cells, while RP12 was resistant to lysis even after a prolonged incubation. In kinetic studies the cytotoxicity was detactable from 2 hr after incubation and progressively increased up to 16 or 18 hr. The IEL of SC chickens revealed significantly higher levels of NK-cell activity against RP9 than FP-strain chickens, whereas their splenic NK-cell activity was not significantly different. Against MSB-1 targets, however, IEL of SC and FP chickens showed similar levels of NK-cell activity while their spleens did not (being higher in FP). When tested in FP chickens, IEL NK-cell activity was inhibited by the addition of unlabelled homologous target cells. In general, NK-cell activity was higher in the jejunum and ileum than in the duodenum and caecum. Efforts to enrich IEL NK-effector cells by discontinuous Percoll gradients were not successful. The results of the present study show that IEL of chicken intestine contain effector cells that can mediate NK-cell activity against chicken tumour cells. PMID:3338816

  20. Increased survival of children with solid tumours: how did we get there and how to keep the success going?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Survival after childhood cancer has dramatically increased in the last 3 to 4 decades. Among extracranial tumours, Wilms tumours and other less common kidney tumours have the best results, but treatment of neuroblastoma, often disseminated at diagnosis, is still extremely challenging. How did survival of solid tumours in childhood increase from around 30% in the 1970s to 70–90% today? This is the result of a multidisciplinary effort and access to improved diagnostic techniques and treatment modalities. This article focuses on the role of imaging in this positive evolution and particularly, how imaging will contribute to keep the survival curves improving. Radiologists and other imaging experts retain a key position before diagnosis and during and after treatment. Investigations before diagnosis are key to further investigations and referral with no delay. The first investigations will most often involve radiologists through radiography or ultrasonography, according to tumour site. The description of these first observations and particularly the conclusion and its wording are crucial to the subsequent events leading to diagnosis. In imaging at diagnosis, the aim is to obtain a precise description of the primary tumour and its local spread as soon as possible. The choice of technique depends on local conditions but may include ultrasonography, computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning, scintigraphies (bone, meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), octreotide), or fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET), combined with low dose CT or MRI scanning. CT scan and chest radiography are recommended for investigating the presence of lung metastases. There is no infiltrate too small to be a metastasis. Overall there is no specific imaging criterion. The pathologists hold this diagnostic key. Tumour response is evaluated during and after preoperative chemotherapy using techniques and measurements comparable with those used at

  1. Feline cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma (Merkel cell tumour): clinical and pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Bagnasco, Giorgio; Properzi, Roberto; Porto, Roberto; Nardini, Vincenzo; Poli, Alessandro; Abramo, Francesca

    2003-04-01

    A case of a feline Merkel cell tumour is described. An 8-year-old, female cat developed a round, alopecic, reddish mass on the nose. Wide excisional surgery was performed with cartilage resection. Histologically the mass was composed of solid islands of mostly basophilic densely packed cells with a scant cytoplasm, which was suggestive of a neuroendocrine origin. Results of immunohistochemical studies using antibodies against neurone-specific enolase, chromogranin, synaptophysin and pan-cytokeratin allowed classification of the lesion as a Merkel cell tumour. Ultrastructurally, dense core granules were identified in the cytoplasm. In a 2-year follow-up no relapses or metastases were observed. The clinical course recorded is in contrast with the malignant nature of a Merkel cell tumour recently described in a cat and of the human Merkel cell tumour, but is similar to the course of the canine Merkel cell tumour which is often benign. Early diagnosis along with the use of wide surgical excision might be considered an important factor in preventing relapse of this tumour. PMID:12662269

  2. The cell proliferation kinetics of the EMT6/M/AC mouse tumour at four volumes during unperturbed growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Watson, J V

    1976-03-01

    The cell proliferation kinetics of the EMT6/M/AC mouse tumour were determined at four different volumes between 1-5 mm3 and 175 mm3. The decrease in the growth rate between these volumes are mainly due to a decrease in the rate constant for cell production. A small increase in the rate constant for cell loss occurred, but this was thought to be insignificant. The cell loss factor increased from 40% at 1-5 mm3 to over 70% in the 175 mm3 tumours. An increase in the median cell cycle time, from 14-1 hr to 18-5 hr was also found between these same volumes. Results obtained for the NCTC fibrosarcoma and the R-1 rhabdo-myosarcoms indicate that there may be a threshold volume in these sarcomas below which little or no cell loss takes place. This was not found in the EMT6/M/AC tumour. PMID:1260835

  3. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  4. The contribution of lactic acid to acidification of tumours: studies of variant cells lacking lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, M.; Hasuda, K.; Stamato, T.; Tannock, I. F.

    1998-01-01

    Solid tumours develop an acidic extracellular environment with high concentration of lactic acid, and lactic acid produced by glycolysis has been assumed to be the major cause of tumour acidity. Experiments using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-deficient ras-transfected Chinese hamster ovarian cells have been undertaken to address directly the hypothesis that lactic acid production is responsible for tumour acidification. The variant cells produce negligible quantities of lactic acid and consume minimal amounts of glucose compared with parental cells. Lactate-producing parental cells acidified lightly-buffered medium but variant cells did not. Tumours derived from parental and variant cells implanted into nude mice were found to have mean values of extracellular pH (pHe) of 7.03 +/- 0.03 and 7.03 +/- 0.05, respectively, both of which were significantly lower than that of normal muscle (pHe = 7.43 +/- 0.03; P < 0.001). Lactic acid concentration in variant tumours (450 +/- 90 microg g(-1) wet weight) was much lower than that in parental tumours (1880 +/- 140 microg/g(-1)) and similar to that in serum (400 +/- 35 microg/g(-1)). These data show discordance between mean levels of pHe and lactate content in tumours; the results support those of Newell et al (1993) and suggest that the production of lactic acid via glycolysis causes acidification of culture medium, but is not the only mechanism, and is probably not the major mechanism responsible for the development of an acidic environment within solid tumours. PMID:9667639

  5. Proteomic analysis for nuclear proteins related to tumour malignant progression: a comparative proteomic study between malignant progressive cells and regressive cells.

    PubMed

    Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Hayashi, Eiko; Okada, Futoshi; Tanaka, Toshiyuki; Zhang, Xiulian; Ueyama, Yoshiya; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2010-06-01

    Tumour development and progression consists a series of multiple changes in gene expression. Progressive tumour cells acquire more aggressive properties manifested by rapid growth, invasiveness and metastatic ability, as well as increased genetic instability leading to multiple genetic alterations. Therefore, it is crucial to identify the possible intracellular and extracellular molecular mechanisms that accelerate tumour progression, in particular to identify nuclear proteins which interact with DNA. Nuclear proteomics provides an opportunity to qualitatively and quantitatively examine protein effectors that contribute to cellular phenotype. This study performed a differential display analysis for the expression of nuclear proteome between regressive tumour cell clone QR-32 and malignant progressive tumour cell clone QRsP-11 using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Eight nuclear proteins whose expressions were different between QR-32 and QRsP-11 cells were identified. Seven of those protein spots, zinc finger protein ZXDC, lamin-A/C, far upstream clement-binding protein 1, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A/B and guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) subunit beta-1, were down-regulated in QRsP-11, while one protein, nucleolin, was up-regulated in QRsP-11. PMID:20651356

  6. Effects of tumour cells on angiogenesis and vasoconstrictor responses in sponge implants in mice.

    PubMed

    Andrade, S P; Bakhle, Y S; Hart, I; Piper, P J

    1992-11-01

    The effects of tumour cells (Colon 26) on the development and response of new blood vessels to different vasoconstrictors (platelet activating factor; PAF, endothelin-1, angiotensin II, adrenalin and 5-hydroxytryptamine) have been investigated. Sponge implants in mice were used to host tumour cells while washout of 133Xe was employed to assess local blood flow in the implanted sponges. By 14 days after implantation the response of vessels in tumour-bearing implants to the various vasoconstrictors generally was decreased compared to that obtained in control sponge implants or adjacent normal skin. Thus at this time point the t1/2 for 133Xe washout from control sponges treated with adrenalin (0.5 micrograms) was 30 +/- 4 min whereas in tumour-bearing sponges it was 5 +/- 1 min. This decreased sensitivity in tumour vessels was probably not due to a complete lack of contractile elements since actin was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry around blood vessels in both types of implant. The results of the present study have shown that the pharmacological responses of blood vessels in a growing tumour, Colon 26, differed from the responses of vessels of a similar age in non-neoplastic tissue. These results appear to suggest that the different angiogenic stimuli released from tumour tissue may markedly influence pharmacological reactivity of newly formed blood vessels. PMID:1384642

  7. Combined blockade of signalling pathways shows marked anti-tumour potential in phaeochromocytoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Nölting, Svenja; Garcia, Edwin; Alusi, Ghassan; Giubellino, Alessio; Pacak, Karel; Korbonits, Márta; Grossman, Ashley B

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no completely effective therapy available for metastatic phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas. In this study, we explore new molecular targeted therapies for these tumours, using one more benign (mouse phaeochromocytoma cell (MPC)) and one more malignant (mouse tumour tissue (MTT)) mouse PCC cell line –both generated from heterozygous neurofibromin 1 knockout mice. Several PCC-promoting gene mutations have been associated with aberrant activation of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1 and RAS/RAF/ERK signalling. We therefore investigated different agents that interfere specifically with these pathways, including antagonism of the IGF1 receptor by NVP-AEW541. We found that NVP-AEW541 significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at relatively high doses but led to a compensatory up-regulation of ERK and mTORC1 signalling at suboptimal doses while PI3K/AKT inhibition remained stable. We subsequently investigated the effect of the dual PI3K/mTORC1/2 inhibitor NVP-BEZ235, which led to a significant decrease of MPC and MTT cell viability at doses down to 50 nM but again increased ERK signalling. Accordingly, we next examined the combination of NVP-BEZ235 with the established agent lovastatin, as this has been described to inhibit ERK signalling. Lovastatin alone significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at therapeutically relevant doses and inhibited both ERK and AKT signalling, but increased mTORC1/p70S6K signalling. Combination treatment with NVP-BEZ235 and lovastatin showed a significant additive effect in MPC and MTT cells and resulted in inhibition of both AKT and mTORC1/p70S6K signalling without ERK up-regulation. Simultaneous inhibition of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1/2 and ERK signalling suggests a novel therapeutic approach for malignant PCCs. PMID:22715163

  8. Giant cell tumours in fingers among the Inuit population in Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Duelund, Nick; Hougaard, Kjeld

    2016-01-01

    Objective Giant cell tumours (GCTs) of the tendon sheets in fingers are rare. We therefore find it of interest to report on 5 cases identified in the Inuit population in Greenland within 16 months prior to this study. Material and methods The Inuit account for 56,000 people of the total population in Greenland. From November 2010 to 16 months prior to this study, we diagnosed 5 cases (0.6% of all orthopaedic operations) with a GCT of the flexor tendon sheet of a finger. The patients were aged between 10 and 54 years, and 4 were women. All of them had noticed slow-growing tumours over 3 or more years and were referred for a suspected ganglion. Results In two cases, the tumour was located at the distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint in the thumb and in one case at the third finger. Two other patients had tumours at the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint of the third finger and the thumb, respectively; one of these two had a communicating tumour to the DIP joint. The last patient had two tumours on the same finger, one at the MCP joint and the other at the DIP joint. In one case, the tumour had also eroded the cortex of the first phalanx of the thumb, and the largest tumour measured 5 cm. Conclusion GCTs of the flexor tendon sheets in fingers are rare. It could be a coincidence that we have seen 5 cases within a short period of time. It is not possible to identify past cases through a register. A tumour in a finger is not the most common location for a ganglion, especially not at the DIP level. Therefore, a large tumour at this location is more likely to be a GCT. PMID:27052154

  9. RA-XII inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in breast tumour-bearing mice via reducing cell adhesion and invasion and promoting matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hoi-Wing; Zhao, Si-Meng; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Tan, Ning-Hua; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire invasive ability to degrade and adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) and migrate to adjacent tissues. This ultimately results metastasis. Hence, the present study investigated the in vitro effects of cyclopeptide glycoside, RA-XII on cell adhesion, invasion, proliferation and matrix degradation, and its underlying mechanism in murine breast tumour cells, 4T1. The effect of RA-XII on tumour growth and metastasis in 4T1-bearing mice was also investigated. Our results showed that RA-XII inhibited tumour cell adhesion to collagen, fibronectin and laminin, RA-XII also reduced the expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule, intracellular adhesion molecule and integrins, and integrin binding. In addition, RA-XII significantly inhibited breast tumour cell migration via interfering cofilin signaling and chemokine receptors. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase-type of plasminogen activator, and the expressions of ECM-associated proteinases were attenuated significantly by RA-XII. Furthermore, RA-XII induced G1 phase arrest and inhibited the expressions of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. RA-XII inhibited the expressions of molecules in PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, FAK/pSRC, MAPK and EGFR signaling. RA-XII was also shown to have anti-tumour, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in metastatic breast tumour-bearing mice. These findings strongly suggested that RA-XII is a potential anti-metastatic agent for breast cancer. PMID:26592552

  10. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  11. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumour of Thyroid with its Prominent Spindle Cell Pattern: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Marylilly, S.; Ramya, V.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of thyroid is very rare. Only 18 cases reported so far. Here we report a case of Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour with its prominent spindle cell (fibrohistiocytic) pattern in a 61-year-old male patient. The dominant histological pattern in our case was myofibroblastic in contrast to prominent lymphoplasmocytic pattern in other previously reported cases. The tumour was strongly positive for vimentin, Anaplastic lymphoma kinase and showed focal positivity for Smooth Muscle Actin. The patient was treated with total thyroidectomy and he is comfortable after surgery. PMID:27190815

  12. Silencing of hypoxia inducible factor-1α by RNA interference inhibits growth of SK-NEP-1 Wilms tumour cells in vitro, and suppresses tumourigenesis and angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Li, Ying; Wang, Xiuli; Yang, Yi; Li, Dan; Liu, Xin; Yang, Xianghong

    2016-06-01

    Wilms tumour is the most common tumour of the pediatric kidney. Elevation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) has been detected in 93% to 100% of human Wilms tumour specimens, suggesting a potential value of HIF-1α as a therapeutic target for Wilms tumour. In the present study, a stable HIF-1α-silenced Wilms tumour cell strain was established by introducing HIF-1α short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) into SK-NEP-1 cells. Silencing of HIF-1α significantly reduced single-cell growth capacity, suppressed proliferation and arrested cell cycle of SK-NEP-1 cells. In addition, reduction of HIF-1α expression induced apoptosis in SK-NEP-1 cells, which was accompanied by increased levels of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and Bax as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 in the cells. Furthermore, when inoculated subcutaneously in nude mice, HIF-1α-silenced SK-NEP-1 cells displayed retarded tumour growth and impaired tumour angiogenesis. In summary, the findings of this study suggest that HIF-1α plays a critical role in the development of Wilms tumour, and it may serve as a candidate target of gene therapy for Wilms tumour. PMID:27015631

  13. An integrated on-chip platform for negative enrichment of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Bhuvanendran Nair Gourikutty, Sajay; Chang, Chia-Pin; Poenar, Daniel Puiu

    2016-08-15

    The study of cancer cells in blood, popularly called circulating tumour cells (CTCs), has exceptional prospects for cancer risk assessment and analysis. Separation and enrichment of CTCs by size-based methods suffer from a well-known recovery/purity trade-off while methods targeting certain specific surface proteins can lead to risk of losing CTCs due to Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and thus adversely affect the separation efficiency. A negative selection approach is thus preferred for tumour cell isolation as it does not depend on biomarker expression or defines their physical property as the separation criteria. In this work, we developed a microfluidic chip to isolate CTCs from whole blood samples without targeting any tumour specific antigen. This chip employs a two-stage cell separation: firstly, magnetophoresis depletes the white blood cells (WBCs) from a whole blood sample and is then followed by a micro-slit membrane that enables depleting the red blood cells (RBCs) and retaining only the tumour cells. By creating strong magnetic field gradients along with customized antibody complexes to target WBCs, we are able to remove >99.9% of WBCs from 1:1 diluted blood at a sample processing rate of 500μL/min. This approach achieves an average of >80% recovery of spiked tumour cells from 2mL of whole blood in a total assay processing time of 50min without multiple processing steps. PMID:27344255

  14. Expression of the cluster 1 antigen (neural cell adhesion molecule) in neuroectodermal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, K.; Frost, G.; Kiely, F.; Phimister, E.; Coakham, H. B.; Kemshead, J. T.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in the human brain, primary brain tumours and neuroblastoma. Adult brain was found to express discrete isoforms of 180, 170, 140 and 120 kDa, which on neuraminidase treatment resolved into bands of 180, 170, 140, 120 and 95 kDa. Primary brain tumours such as Schwannoma and medulloblastoma expressed embryonic NCAM characterised by a high level of glycosylation, whereas other tumours, e.g. astrocytoma, meningioma, glioma and oligodendroglioma expressed adult NCAM. Post-neuraminidase treatment, differential expression of the 180, 170, 140, 120 and 95 kDa isoforms were noted in these various tumour types. On the other hand, neuroblastoma cell lines were found to express only embryonic NCAM, which after neuraminidase treatment resulted in differential presence of only 180, 140 and 120 kDa proteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2039710

  15. Tumour cell membrane poration and ablation by pulsed low-intensity electric field with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Dun; Zhou, Ru; Wang, Zhigang; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation is a physical method to increase permeabilization of cell membrane by electrical pulses. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can potentially act like "lighting rods" or exhibit direct physical force on cell membrane under alternating electromagnetic fields thus reducing the required field strength. A cell poration/ablation system was built for exploring these effects of CNTs in which two-electrode sets were constructed and two perpendicular electric fields could be generated sequentially. By applying this system to breast cancer cells in the presence of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), the effective pulse amplitude was reduced to 50 V/cm (main field)/15 V/cm (alignment field) at the optimized pulse frequency (5 Hz) of 500 pulses. Under these conditions instant cell membrane permeabilization was increased to 38.62%, 2.77-fold higher than that without CNTs. Moreover, we also observed irreversible electroporation occurred under these conditions, such that only 39.23% of the cells were viable 24 h post treatment, in contrast to 87.01% cell viability without presence of CNTs. These results indicate that CNT-enhanced electroporation has the potential for tumour cell ablation by significantly lower electric fields than that in conventional electroporation therapy thus avoiding potential risks associated with the use of high intensity electric pulses. PMID:25822874

  16. Tumour Cell Membrane Poration and Ablation by Pulsed Low-Intensity Electric Field with Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Dun; Zhou, Ru; Wang, Zhigang; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Electroporation is a physical method to increase permeabilization of cell membrane by electrical pulses. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can potentially act like “lighting rods” or exhibit direct physical force on cell membrane under alternating electromagnetic fields thus reducing the required field strength. A cell poration/ablation system was built for exploring these effects of CNTs in which two-electrode sets were constructed and two perpendicular electric fields could be generated sequentially. By applying this system to breast cancer cells in the presence of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), the effective pulse amplitude was reduced to 50 V/cm (main field)/15 V/cm (alignment field) at the optimized pulse frequency (5 Hz) of 500 pulses. Under these conditions instant cell membrane permeabilization was increased to 38.62%, 2.77-fold higher than that without CNTs. Moreover, we also observed irreversible electroporation occurred under these conditions, such that only 39.23% of the cells were viable 24 h post treatment, in contrast to 87.01% cell viability without presence of CNTs. These results indicate that CNT-enhanced electroporation has the potential for tumour cell ablation by significantly lower electric fields than that in conventional electroporation therapy thus avoiding potential risks associated with the use of high intensity electric pulses. PMID:25822874

  17. Lessons from T cell responses to virus induced tumours for cancer eradication in general.

    PubMed

    Melief, C J; Kast, W M

    1992-01-01

    Immunotherapy of virus induced tumours by adoptive transfer of virus specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) is now feasible in experimental murine systems. These CTL recognize viral peptide sequences of defined length presented in the groove of MHC class I molecules. Effective eradication of large tumour masses requires coadministration of IL-2. In essence, T cell immunity against virus induced tumours does not differ from anti-viral T cell immunity in general. Tumour escape strategies are numerous but, in various instances, can be counteracted by defined measures. Initiation of CTL responses against poorly immunogenic non-virus induced tumours (the majority of human cancer) requires novel strategies to overcome T cell inertia. Rather than waiting to see whether tumour specific CTL (against unknown antigens) can be cultured from TIL, we propose an alternative strategy in which CTL are raised against target molecules of choice, including differentiation antigens of restricted tissue distribution (autoantigens) or mutated/overexpressed oncogene products. The various steps proposed include: (a) identification of target molecules of choice; (b) identification in these target molecules of MHC allele specific peptide motifs involved in peptide binding to MHC molecules; (c) evaluation of actual binding of such peptides to specific MHC class I molecules; (d) in vitro CTL response induction by such peptides, presented either by highly efficient antigen presenting cells (such as processing defective cells, which carry empty MHC class I molecules) loaded with a single peptide or by dendritic cells, both cell types being capable of primary CTL response induction in vitro and (e) adoptive transfer of tumour specific CTL generated in vivo or, more conveniently, vaccination with immunodominant peptides. The latter possibility seems to be feasible because peptide vaccination with a single immunodominant viral peptide can install CTL memory and confer protection against lethal virus

  18. Prognostic impact of tumour-infiltrating B cells and plasma cells in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Berntsson, Jonna; Nodin, Björn; Eberhard, Jakob; Micke, Patrick; Jirström, Karin

    2016-09-01

    Multiple studies have described associations between infiltrating immune cells and prognosis in cancer; however, the clinical relevance has most often been attributed to the T-cell linage. This study aimed to further investigate the clinicopathological correlates and prognostic impact of B cell and plasma cell infiltration in CRC. Immunohistochemical expression of CD20, CD138 and immunoglobulin kappa C (IGKC) was analysed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 557 incident cases of CRC from a prospective population-based cohort. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression analysis were used to determine the impact of CD20, CD138 and IGKC expression on 5-year overall survival. Immune cell-specific CD20, CD138, and IGKC expression correlated significantly with lower T-stage (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p = 0.006, respectively). A higher density of CD20+ cells correlated significantly with an improved OS (HR = 0.53, 95% CI 0.36-0.78), remaining significant in multivariable analysis adjusted for age, TNM stage, differentiation grade and vascular invasion (HR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.33-0.80). Immune cell-specific CD138 and IGKC expression correlated significantly with an improved OS in univariable Cox regression analysis; however, these associations did not remain significant in multivariable analysis. Finally, tumour cell-specific CD138 expression was found to be an independent factor of poor prognosis (HR 1.52; 95% CI 1.03-2.24). The results from the present study demonstrate that B cell infiltration in CRC has a significant impact on tumour progression and prognosis. These findings supplement and extend the current knowledge of the immune landscape in colorectal cancer, and merit further study. PMID:27074317

  19. Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumour in a Young Woman with Widespread Metastasis and Peritoneal Caking

    PubMed Central

    Monappa, Vidya; Bhat, Sudha S.; Valiathan, Manna

    2013-01-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumour (DSRCT) is a rare, highly aggressive, mesenchymal tumour that arises from the peritoneal cavity. It is commonly seen in adolescent and young adult males and its occurrence in females is uncommon. We are reporting here a rare case of DSRCT in a young woman, which clinically masqueraded as an ovarian malignancy, with metastasis to liver, lung, spleen and peritoneum. The cytologic findings, Histomorphological and immunohistochemical features have been discussed, with a brief review of literature. PMID:24551689

  20. A peptide corresponding to the neuropilin-1-binding site on VEGF165 induces apoptosis of neuropilin-1-expressing breast tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Barr, M P; Byrne, A M; Duffy, A M; Condron, C M; Devocelle, M; Harriott, P; Bouchier-Hayes, D J; Harmey, J H

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has autocrine as well as paracrine functions in tumour biology. Vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated cell survival signalling occurs via the classical tyrosine kinase receptors Flt-1, KDR/Flk-1 and the more novel neuropilin (NP) receptors, NP-1 and NP-2. A 24-mer peptide, which binds to neuropilin-1, induced apoptosis of murine and human breast carcinoma cells, whereas a peptide directed against KDR had no effect. Both anti-NP1 and anti-KDR peptides induced endothelial cell apoptosis. Confocal microscopy using 5-(6)-carboxyfluorescein-labelled peptides showed that anti-NP1 bound to both tumour and endothelial cells, whereas anti-KDR bound endothelial cells only. This study demonstrates that NP-1 plays an essential role in autocrine antiapoptotic signalling by VEGF in tumour cells and that NP1-blockade induces tumour cell and endothelial cell apoptosis. Specific peptides can therefore be used to target both autocrine (tumour cells) and paracrine (endothelial cells) signalling by VEGF. PMID:15655556

  1. The RBE of fast neutrons for in vitro inactivation of human tumour cells determined by the ratio of mean inactivation doses.

    PubMed

    Courdi, A; Brassart, N; Herault, J; Mari, D; Chauvel, P

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to clarify the relationship between sensitivity of human tumour cells to low-LET and to fast neutron irradiation, 10 human tumour cell lines were exposed to cobalt gamma-rays and to 60 MeV (p -> Be+) neutron beam. The data were pooled with results of 31 human tumour cell lines previously published. The analysis of date using the linear-quadratic model indicated that not only alpha values increased after neutron irradiation, but so did beta values too, although to a lesser extent. The mean inactivation dose (MID) was derived for each cell line from the linear-quadratic parameters after low-LET and high-LET exposure. MID values following neutron irradiation were closely correlated to those after gamma-ray irradiation. In these 41 cell lines, the extreme values of RBE derived by the ratio of MID varied by a factor of 3 among the cell lines. RBE was positively correlated to photon MID, meaning that intrinsically radiation resistant tumour cells have a higher neutron RBE, on average. Similar findings were observed if alpha ratios were used instead of MID ratios. In addition, the RBE/dose variations were more marked in cells with the higher RBE. Taken together, these data suggest that, although considerable variations exist among human tumour cell lines, intrinsically radioresistant cells are relatively more sensitized when exposed to high LET beams than radioresponsive tumours. An 'intrinsic gain factor' may thus be expected in irradiating radiation resistant tumours with fast neutrons, in addition to the hypoxic or kinetic gain factors. Because the quadratic component is still present after neutron irradiation, we suggest using MID ratio as a reference RBE when comparing survival curves of cells exposed to radiations of different qualities. PMID:8639321

  2. [Denosumab may be a supplement to the surgical treatment of giant cell tumours of bone].

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Anna Lynge; Hansen, Rehne Lessmann; Jørgensen, Peter Holmberg

    2016-09-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is an aggressive bone tumour causing bone destruction. GCTB requires surgical treatment, and severe cases have a high risk of functional morbidity. GCTB consists of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK)-positive osteoclast-like giant cells. The formation and activity of these cells are mediated by the interaction with RANK ligand (RANKL) released from neoplastic stromal cells. Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody which inhibits RANKL and impairs the growth of the GCTB. Several studies have described the ability of denosumab to downgrade the extent of surgical treatment and improve the functional outcome. PMID:27593237

  3. Dissection of tumour and host cells from target organs of metastasis for testing gene expression directly ex vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, M.; Hexel, K.; Bucur, M.; Schirrmacher, V.; Umansky, V.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a new methodology which allows the direct analysis ex vivo of tumour cells and host cells (lymphocytes, macrophages, endothelial cells) from a metastasised organ (liver or spleen) at any time point during the metastatic process and without any further in vitro culture. First, we used a tumour cell line transduced with the bacterial gene lacZ, which permits the detection of the procaryotic enzyme beta-galactosidase in eukaryotic cells at the single cell level thus allowing flow adhesion cell sorting (FACS) analysis of tumour cells from metastasised target organs. Second, we established a method for the separation and enrichment of tumour and host cells from target organs of metastasis with a high viability and reproducibility. As exemplified with the murine lymphoma ESb, this new methodology permits the study of molecules of importance for metastasis or anti-tumour immunity (adhesion, costimulatory and cytotoxic molecules, cytokines, etc.) at the RNA or protein level in tumour and host cells during the whole process of metastasis. This novel approach may open new possibilities of developing strategies for intervention in tumour progression, since it allows the determination of the optimal window in time for successful treatments. The possibility of direct analysis of tumour and host cell properties also provides a new method for the evaluation of the effects of immunisation with tumour vaccines or of gene therapy. Images Figure 3 PMID:8883407

  4. High‐resolution imaging for the detection and characterisation of circulating tumour cells from patients with oesophageal, hepatocellular, thyroid and ovarian cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dent, Barry M.; Ogle, Laura F.; O'Donnell, Rachel L.; Hayes, Nicholas; Malik, Ujjal; Curtin, Nicola J.; Boddy, Alan V.; Plummer, E. Ruth; Edmondson, Richard J.; Reeves, Helen L.; Jamieson, David

    2015-01-01

    Interest has increased in the potential role of circulating tumour cells in cancer management. Most cell‐based studies have been designed to determine the number of circulating tumour cells in a given volume of blood. Ability to understand the biology of the cancer cells would increase the clinical potential. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a novel, widely applicable method for detection and characterisation of circulating tumour cells. Cells were imaged with an ImageStreamX imaging flow cytometer which allows detection of expression of multiple biomarkers on each cell and produces high‐resolution images. Depletion of haematopoietic cells was by red cell lysis, leukocyte common antigen CD45 depletion and differential centrifugation. Expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule, cytokeratins, tumour‐type‐specific biomarkers and CD45 was detected by immunofluorescence. Nuclei were identified with DAPI or DRAQ5 and brightfield images of cells were collected. The method is notable for the dearth of cell damage, recoveries greater than 50%, speed and absence of reliance on the expression of a single biomarker by the tumour cells. The high‐quality images obtained ensure confidence in the specificity of the method. Validation of the methodology on samples from patients with oesophageal, hepatocellular, thyroid and ovarian cancers confirms its utility and specificity. Importantly, this adaptable method is applicable to all tumour types including those of nonepithelial origin. The ability to measure simultaneously the expression of multiple biomarkers will facilitate analysis of the cancer cell biology of individual circulating tumour cells. PMID:26178530

  5. In vivo magnetic enrichment and multiplex photoacoustic detection of circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Shashkov, Evgeny V; Kelly, Thomas; Kim, Jin-Woo; Yang, Lily; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2009-12-01

    The spread of cancer cells between organs, a process known as metastasis, is the cause of most cancer deaths. Detecting circulating tumour cells -- a common marker for the development of metastasis -- is difficult because ex vivo methods are not sensitive enough owing to limited blood sample volume and in vivo diagnosis is time-consuming as large volumes of blood must be analysed. Here, we show a way to magnetically capture circulating tumour cells in the bloodstream of mice followed by rapid photoacoustic detection. Magnetic nanoparticles, which were functionalized to target a receptor commonly found in breast cancer cells, bound and captured circulating tumour cells under a magnet. To improve detection sensitivity and specificity, gold-plated carbon nanotubes conjugated with folic acid were used as a second contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging. By integrating in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification and multicolour recognition, our approach allows circulating tumour cells to be concentrated from a large volume of blood in the vessels of tumour-bearing mice, and this could have potential for the early diagnosis of cancer and the prevention of metastasis in humans. PMID:19915570

  6. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M.; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Simeone, Diane M.; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 +/- 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  7. In vivo magnetic enrichment and multiplex photoacoustic detection of circulating tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Shashkov, Evgeny V.; Kelly, Thomas; Kim, Jin-Woo; Yang, Lily; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2009-12-01

    The spread of cancer cells between organs, a process known as metastasis, is the cause of most cancer deaths. Detecting circulating tumour cells-a common marker for the development of metastasis-is difficult because ex vivo methods are not sensitive enough owing to limited blood sample volume and in vivo diagnosis is time-consuming as large volumes of blood must be analysed. Here, we show a way to magnetically capture circulating tumour cells in the bloodstream of mice followed by rapid photoacoustic detection. Magnetic nanoparticles, which were functionalized to target a receptor commonly found in breast cancer cells, bound and captured circulating tumour cells under a magnet. To improve detection sensitivity and specificity, gold-plated carbon nanotubes conjugated with folic acid were used as a second contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging. By integrating in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification and multicolour recognition, our approach allows circulating tumour cells to be concentrated from a large volume of blood in the vessels of tumour-bearing mice, and this could have potential for the early diagnosis of cancer and the prevention of metastasis in humans.

  8. Immunological Characterization of Whole Tumour Lysate-Loaded Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ottobrini, Luisa; Biasin, Mara; Borelli, Manuela; Lucignani, Giovanni; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dendritic cells play a key role as initiators of T-cell responses, and even if tumour antigen-loaded dendritic cells can induce anti-tumour responses, their efficacy has been questioned, suggesting a need to enhance immunization strategies. Matherials & Methods We focused on the characterization of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with whole tumour lysate (TAA-DC), as a source of known and unknown antigens, in a mouse model of breast cancer (MMTV-Ras). Dendritic cells were evaluated for antigen uptake and for the expression of MHC class I/II and costimulatory molecules and markers associated with maturation. Results Results showed that antigen-loaded dendritic cells are characterized by a phenotypically semi-mature/mature profile and by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and T-cell priming. Activated dendritic cells stimulated T-cell proliferation and induced the production of high concentrations of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ but only low levels of IL-10, indicating their ability to elicit a TH1-immune response. Furthermore, administration of Antigen loaded-Dendritic Cells in MMTV-Ras mice evoked a strong anti-tumour response in vivo as demonstrated by a general activation of immunocompetent cells and the release of TH1 cytokines. Conclusion Data herein could be useful in the design of antitumoral DC-based therapies, showing a specific activation of immune system against breast cancer. PMID:26795765

  9. Isolated guinea pig gastric chief cells express tumour necrosis factor receptors coupled with the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Fiorucci, S; Santucci, L; Migliorati, G; Riccardi, C; Amorosi, A; Mancini, A; Roberti, R; Morelli, A

    1996-01-01

    The tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy and Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis. Both conditions are characterised by high plasma pepsinogen concentrations, which are thought to reflect an increased rate of enzyme release by the pepsinogen secreting (chief) cells. The mechanisms responsible for this cell dysfunction are unknown. This study investigates whether chief cells express TNF receptors and, if so, whether their activation results in cell death. Immunohistochemical studies conducted with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against two TNF receptor associated proteins of 55 kDa (TNF-R1) and 75 kDa (TNF-R2) showed that TNF binding sites were expressed in approximately 100% gastric chief cells. Western blot analysis of whole chief cell lysates probed with the TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 mAbs gave two distinct bands of 55 and 75 kDa in the immunoprecipitate. Incubating chief cells with TNF caused concentration and time dependent cell death, which was prevented by pretreating the cells with anti-TNF receptor mAbs. Exposing the cells to TNF reduced sphingomyelin content by 25%. Sphingomyelinase (10(-6) to 10(-2) IU/ml) mimicked the effect of TNF in that it provoked a concentration and time dependent reduction in chief cell viability and increased pepsinogen release. In conclusion, gastric chief cells express two TNF receptors partially linked to the sphingomyelin pathway. TNF induced chief cell dysfunction might be responsible for the high plasma pepsinogen concentrations seen in patients with NSAID gastropathy or H pylori induced gastritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8801194

  10. In vivo magnetic enrichment and multiplex photoacoustic detection of circulating tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Shashkov, Evgeny V.; Kelly, Thomas; Kim, Jin-Woo; Yang, Lily; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2012-01-01

    The spread of cancer cells between organs, a process known as metastasis, is the cause of most cancer deaths1,2. Detecting circulating tumour cells—a common marker for the development of metastasis3,4—is difficult because ex vivo methods are not sensitive enough owing to limited blood sample volume and in vivo diagnosis is time-consuming as large volumes of blood must be analysed5–7. Here, we show a way to magnetically capture circulating tumour cells in the bloodstream of mice followed by rapid photoacoustic detection. Magnetic nanoparticles, which were functionalized to target a receptor commonly found in breast cancer cells, bound and captured circulating tumour cells under a magnet. To improve detection sensitivity and specificity, gold-plated carbon nanotubes conjugated with folic acid were used as a second contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging. By integrating in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification and multicolour recognition, our approach allows circulating tumour cells to be concentrated from a large volume of blood in the vessels of tumour-bearing mice, and this could have potential for the early diagnosis of cancer and the prevention of metastasis in humans. PMID:19915570

  11. Giant cell tumour of the sacrum: a suggested algorithm for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Grimer, R. J.; Carter, S. R.; Stirling, A. J.; Spilsbury, J.; Spooner, D.

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the outcome of our management of patients with giant cell tumour of the sacrum and draw lessons from this. A retrospective review of medical records and scans for all patients treated at our unit over the past 20 years with a giant cell tumour of the sacrum. Of the 517 patients treated at our unit for giant cell tumour over the past 20 years, only 9 (1.7%) had a giant cell tumour in the sacrum. Six were female, three male with a mean age of 34 (range 15–52). All, but two tumours involved the entire sacrum and there was only one purely distal to S3. The mean size was 10 cm and the most common symptom was back or buttock pain. Five had abnormal neurology at diagnosis, but only one presented with cauda equina syndrome. The first four patients were treated by curettage alone, but two patients had intraoperative cardiac arrests and although both survived all subsequent curettages were preceded by embolisation of the feeding vessels. Of the seven patients who had curettage, three developed local recurrence, but all were controlled with a combination of further embolisation, surgery or radiotherapy. One patient elected for treatment with radiotherapy and another had excision of the tumour distal to S3. All the patients are alive and only two patients have worse neurology than at presentation, one being impotent and one with stress incontinence. Three patients required spinopelvic fusion for sacral collapse. All patients are mobile and active at a follow-up between 2 and 21 years. Giant cell tumour of the sacrum can be controlled with conservative surgery rather than subtotal sacrectomy. The excision of small distal tumours is the preferred option, but for larger and more extensive tumours conservative management may well avoid morbidity whilst still controlling the tumour. Embolisation and curettage are the preferred first option with radiotherapy as a possible adjunct. Spinopelvic fusion may be needed when the sacrum collapses. PMID:20076978

  12. Tumour, Oxidative Stress and Host T Cell Response: Cementing the Dominance.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, S; Saha, J

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals are produced intrinsically during normal cellular metabolic processes or extrinsically due to ionizing radiations, UV rays, xenobiotic insult, etc. ROS are important signal mediators and are used by the immune system to destroy pathogens, but as these are highly reactive, they also have the capacity to cause DNA damage and alter protein and lipid components of a cell. As a result, cells have evolved a tight regulation of internal redox environment that involves a balanced interplay between free radicals produced and quenched by cellular antioxidants and enzyme systems. Any deregulation of this subtle balance can result in oxidative stress that can lead to various pathological conditions including cancer. Oxidative stress can be a cause of neoplasia, or it can be induced by a growing tumour itself. The link existing between oxidative stress and inflammation is also very strong. Suppressed cellular immune system, especially effector T cell system, is a characteristic of tumour-bearing host. Both the direct oxidative stress caused by tumour cell(s) and oxidative stress mediators present in tumour microenvironment play a significant role in the suppression of effector T cell function and induction of T cell death. This review discusses in detail the complex interplay between tumour-stroma-immune system in the light of oxidative stress that dominates every phase of cancer including initiation, progression and establishment. This review also addresses in detail the mechanisms of oxidative stress-induced T cell dysfunction in tumour-bearing host and also briefly points out the possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:26286126

  13. Label-free identification and characterization of living human primary and secondary tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Tsikritsis, Dimitrios; Richmond, Susanna; Stewart, Patrick; Elfick, Alistair; Downes, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    We used three label-free minimally invasive methods to characterize individual cells derived from primary and secondary tumours from the same patient, and of the same type – colorectal. Raman spectroscopy distinguished cells by their biochemical 'fingerprint' in a vibrational spectrum with 100% accuracy, and revealed that the primary cell line contains more lipids and alpha-helix proteins, whereas the secondary cell line contains more porphyrins and beta-sheet proteins. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy distinguished cells in chemically-specific images of CH2 bonds which revealed lipid droplets in secondary tumour cells. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to distinguish cells with 80% accuracy by measuring their elasticity – secondary tumour cells (SW620) are around 3 times softer than primary ones (SW480). As well as characterizing the physical and biochemical differences between cell lines in vitro, these techniques offer three novel methods which could potentially be used for diagnosis – to assign a tumour as primary or secondary. PMID:26086957

  14. Differential Expression of Prognostic Proteomic Markers in Primary Tumour, Venous Tumour Thrombus and Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Tissue and Correlation with Patient Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Laird, Alexander; O’Mahony, Fiach C.; Nanda, Jyoti; Riddick, Antony C. P.; O’Donnell, Marie; Harrison, David J.; Stewart, Grant D.

    2013-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most deadly of urological malignancies. Metastatic disease affects one third of patients at diagnosis with a further third developing metastatic disease after extirpative surgery. Heterogeneity in the clinical course ensures predicting metastasis is notoriously difficult, despite the routine use of prognostic clinico-pathological parameters in risk stratification. With greater understanding of pathways involved in disease pathogenesis, a number of biomarkers have been shown to have prognostic significance, including Ki67, p53, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1) and ligand D (VEGFD), SNAIL and SLUG. Previous pathway analysis has been from study of the primary tumour, with little attention to the metastatic tumours which are the focus of targeted molecular therapies. As such, in this study a tissue microarray from 177 patients with primary renal tumour, renal vein tumour thrombus and/or RCC metastasis has been created and used with Automated Quantitative Analysis (AQUA) of immunofluorescence to study the prognostic significance of these markers in locally advanced and metastatic disease. Furthermore, this has allowed assessment of differential protein expression between the primary tumours, renal vein tumour thrombi and metastases. The results demonstrate that clinico-pathological parameters remain the most significant predictors of cancer specific survival; however, high VEGFR1 or VEGFD can predict poor cancer specific survival on univariate analysis for locally advanced and metastatic disease. There was significantly greater expression of Ki67, p53, VEGFR1, SLUG and SNAIL in the metastases compared with the primary tumours and renal vein tumour thrombi. With the exception of p53, these differences in protein expression have not been shown previously in RCC. This confirms the importance of proliferation, angiogenesis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition in the pathogenesis and metastasis of RCC. Importantly

  15. Diagnosing a rare case of desmoplastic small round cell tumour on liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Cheo, F F; Leow, W Q

    2016-08-01

    A 50-year-old male of Indian descent presented with jaundice and right hypochondrium pain. Following a computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen, a segment 7 liver lesion was visualized, accompanied by extensive peritoneal tumour deposits. An ultrasound guided liver biopsy was performed and histology showed loose nests and sheets of tumour cells with a small blue round cell morphology. The tumour cells showed patchy strong immunopositivity for cytokeratins (AE1/3, CK7, CK19) and synaptophysin, while showing diffuse strong perinuclear positivity for desmin. Interphase fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) study using EWSR1 breakapart probe was positive for EWSR1 gene rearrangement. Desmoplastic small round cell tumour is a rare but aggressive intra-abdominal mesenchymal tumour. While the primary sites of involvement are usually the peritoneum and omentum, visceral involvement can occur. We wish to highlight the importance of considering this entity when evaluating a liver biopsy especially in a less than classical clinical context. PMID:27568672

  16. Comparative immunohistochemical study of stellate cells in normal canine and equine adenohypophyses and in pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Méndez, A; Martín de las Mulas, J; Bautista, M J; Chacón, F; Millán, Y; Fondevila, D; Pumarola, M

    1998-01-01

    The presence and distribution of S100 protein (alpha and beta subunits), cytokeratin polypeptides, glial fibrillary acidic protein, neurofilaments, vimentin, neuron specific enolase, synaptophysin, HLA class II DR antigen, and pituitary hormones (prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone and human chorionic gonadotrophin) in stellate cells were studied immunohistochemically in four normal canine pituitary glands, five canine pituitary adenomas, two canine pituitary carcinomas and two equine pituitary adenomas (with surrounding normal glandular tissue). Stellate cells of the pars distalis and pars intermedia of canine and equine adenohypophyses showed a strong reaction with antibodies against S100 protein subunits alpha and beta. They also reacted with antibody against high and low molecular weight cytokeratins, but not with those against other intermediate filament proteins, neuroendocrine markers, the HLA-class II DR antigen or the pituitary hormones. Other populations of cells expressing both subunits of the S100 protein were polygonal cells of the pars distalis of the adenohypophysis (horse) and marginal epithelial cells of the pars intermedia of the adenohypophysis (dog and horse). Some pituitary tumours had S100-immunoreactive cells with a distribution of alpha and beta subunits that differed between the two species. Some canine tumours (one adenoma and one carcinoma) expressed only the alpha subunit, but both of the equine adenomas expressed alpha and beta protein subunits. Some of the S100-immunoreactive tumour cells reacted with RCK-102 (cytokeratins 5+8) antibody in the dog but not in the horse. The results suggested that canine and equine stellate cells of the adenohypophysis are more closely related to epithelial than to glial cells, as is the case in cattle, sheep and goats but not human beings or mice. No subpopulation of cells of bone marrow origin could be identified among canine stellate cells, as they lack MHC class II antigen. The results also

  17. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kooijmans, Sander A. A.; Aleza, Clara Gómez; Roffler, Steve R.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF). EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results EV analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression), but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules. PMID:26979463

  18. Expression pattern of clinically relevant markers in paediatric germ cell- and sex-cord stromal tumours is similar to adult testicular tumours.

    PubMed

    Mosbech, Christiane Hammershaimb; Svingen, Terje; Nielsen, John Erik; Toft, Birgitte Groenkaer; Rechnitzer, Catherine; Petersen, Bodil Laub; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Hoei-Hansen, Christina Engel

    2014-11-01

    Paediatric germ cell tumours (GCTs) are rare and account for less than 3 % of childhood cancers. Like adult GCTs, they probably originate from primordial germ cells, but the pattern of histopathological types is different, and they occur predominantly in extragonadal sites along the body midline. Because they are rare, histology of paediatric GCTs is poorly documented, and it remains unclear to what extent they differ from adult GCTs. We have analysed 35 paediatric germ cell tumours and 5 gonadal sex-cord stromal tumours from prepubertal patients aged 0-15 years, to gain further knowledge, elaborate on clinical-pathological associations and better understand their developmental divergence. The tumours were screened for expression of stemness-related factors (OCT4, AP-2γ, SOX2), classical yolk sac tumours (YSTs; AFP, SALL4), GCTs (HCG, PLAP, PDPN/D2-40), as well as markers for sex-cord stromal tumour (PDPN, GATA4). All YSTs expressed AFP and SALL4, with GATA4 present in 13/14. The majority of teratomas expressed SOX2 and PDPN, whereas SALL4 was found in 8/13 immature teratomas. Adult seminoma markers AP-2γ, OCT4, SALL4 and PDPN were all expressed in dysgerminoma. We further report a previously unrecognised pathogenetic relationship between AFP and SALL4 in YST in that different populations of YST cells express either SALL4 or AFP, which suggests variable differentiation status. We also show that AP-2γ is expressed in the granulosa layer of ovarian follicles and weakly expressed in immature but not in mature granulosa cell tumours. Our findings indicate that the expression pattern of these antigens is similar between paediatric and adult GCTs, even though they develop along different developmental trajectories. PMID:25074678

  19. Cytotoxic activity of an octadecenoic acid extract from Euphorbia kansui (Euphorbiaceae) on human tumour cell strains.

    PubMed

    Yu, Farong; Lu, Shunqing; Yu, Fahong; Shi, Junnian; McGuire, Peter M; Wang, Rui

    2008-02-01

    We have investigated the cytotoxic and antitumour activity of an octadecenoic acid extract, mainly containing oleic and linoleic acids, from Euphorbia kansui on human gastric (SGC-7901), hepatocellular carcinoma (BEL-7402), and leukaemia (HL-60) tumour cell strains. Significant and dose-dependent antiproliferation effects were observed on tumour cells from the dose of 3.2 microg mL(-1), which were comparable with or better than those of the common antitumour agent 5-fluorouracil. Results from the clone formation assay and flow cytometry indicated that the mixture of octadecenoic acids resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in the number of tumour cells and significantly inhibited cell proliferation, with induced apoptosis and G(0)/G(1) phase cell cycle arrest. Also, the octadecenoic acids could not only cause cell apoptosis/necrosis but also functionally and structurally damage the tumour cell membrane and cell ultra-structures. These observations encourage further clinical evaluation of the inhibitory effects of octadecenoic acids on various forms of cancer. PMID:18237474

  20. Inhibition of ERK attenuates autophagy and potentiates tumour necrosis factor-α-induced cell death in MCF-7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Sivaprasad, U; Basu, A

    2008-01-01

    The role of autophagy in cell death is under considerable debate. The process of autophagy has been shown to lead to either cell survival or cell death depending on cell type and stimulus. In the present study, we determined the contribution of ERK1/2 signalling to autophagy and cell death induced by tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF) in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with TNF caused a time-dependent increase in ERK1/2 activity. There was an induction of autophagy and cleavage of caspase-7, -8, -9 and PARP. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation with U0126 or PD98059 resulted in a decrease in TNF-induced autophagy that was accompanied by an increase in cleavage of caspase-7, -8, -9 and PARP Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 signalling resulted in decreased clonogenic capacity of MCF-7 cells. These data suggest that TNF-induces autophagy through ERK1/2 and that inhibition of autophagy increases cellular sensitivity to TNF. PMID:18266953

  1. Tumour thrombus consistency has no impact on survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gołąbek, T; Przydacz, M; Okoń, K; Kopczyński, J; Bukowczan, J; Sobczyński, R; Curyło, Ł; Gołąbek, K; Curyło, Ł; Chłosta, P

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with venous tumour thrombus (VTT) is variable and not always possible to predict. The prognostic impact and independence of tumour thrombus-related factors including the recently introduced tumour thrombus consistency (TTC) on overall survival remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of TTC in patients' survival. We determined the tumour thrombus consistency (solid vs. friable) in a cohort of 84 patients with RCC and VTT who underwent nephrectomy with thrombectomy, and performed a retrospective evaluation of the patients' data from the prospectively maintained database. A total of 45% of patients had solid thrombus (sTT) and 55% had friable thrombus (fTT). The venous tumour thrombus consistency was not predictive of overall survival. Further studies, preferably prospective and with a larger number of patients, are needed to validate the obtained results, as well as to evaluate the usefulness of tumour thrombus consistency in clinical practice for stratifying the risk of recurrence and planning further follow-up. PMID:27543869

  2. p53 Expression Helps Identify High Risk Oral Tongue Pre- malignant Lesions and Correlates with Patterns of Invasive Tumour Front and Tumour Depth in Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cases.

    PubMed

    Viveka, Thangaraj Soundara; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Ramani, Pratibha; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common oral cancer subtype with a maximum propensity for regional spread. Our objective was to study if p53 expression might have any correlation with aggressive patterns of invasion within oral tongue cancers as well as with the histologically identified degree of oral tongue dysplasia. p53 immunoexpression was studied using immunohistochemistry in early staged OTSCCs (n=155), oral tongue dysplasias, (n=29) and oral tongue normal specimens (n=10) and evaluated for correlations with histological and clinicopathological parameters. Our study (n=194) showed a pattern of p53 expression increasing with different grades of tongue dysplasia to different grades of invasive OTSCC (p=0.000). Among the OTSCC tumours, positive p53 expression was seen in 43.2% (67/155) and a higher p53 labelling index was significantly associated with increased Bryne's grade of the tumour invasive front (p=0.039) and increased tumour depth (p=0.018). Among the OTSCC patients with tobacco habits, (n=91), a higher p53 labelling index was significantly associated with increased risk of local recurrence (p=0.025) and with lymphovascular space involvement (p=0.014). Evaluation of p53 through varying degrees of dysplasia to oral tongue cancer indicates that p53 expression is linked to aggressive features of oral tongue cancers and tongue precancers entailing a closer monitoring in positive cases. Among the OTSCCs, p53 expression is associated with tumour aggressiveness correlating with increased grading of invasive tumour front and tumour depth. PMID:26838208

  3. Latent cytomegalovirus infection enhances anti-tumour cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C+ NK cells in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bigley, A B; Rezvani, K; Shah, N; Sekine, T; Balneger, N; Pistillo, M; Agha, N; Kunz, H; O'Connor, D P; Bollard, C M; Simpson, R J

    2016-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection markedly expands NKG2C+/NKG2A- NK cells, which are potent killers of infected cells expressing human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E. As HLA-E is also over-expressed in several haematological malignancies and CMV has been linked to a reduced risk of leukaemic relapse, we determined the impact of latent CMV infection on NK cell cytotoxicity against four tumour target cell lines with varying levels of HLA-E expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 (leukaemia origin) and U266 (multiple myeloma origin) target cells was strikingly greater in healthy CMV-seropositive donors than seronegative donors and was associated strongly with target cell HLA-E and NK cell NKG2C expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E transfected lymphoma target cells (221.AEH) was ∼threefold higher with CMV, while NK cell cytotoxicity against non-transfected 721.221 cells was identical between the CMV groups. NK cell degranulation (CD107a(+) ) and interferon (IFN)-γ production to 221.AEH cells was localized almost exclusively to the NKG2C subset, and antibody blocking of NKG2C completely eliminated the effect of CMV on NK cell cytotoxicity against 221.AEH cells. Moreover, 221.AEH feeder cells and interleukin (IL)-15 were found to expand NKG2C(+) /NKG2A(-) NK cells preferentially from CMV-seronegative donors and increase NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E(+) tumour cell lines. We conclude that latent CMV infection enhances NK cell cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C(+) NK cells, which may be beneficial in preventing the initiation and progression of haematological malignancies characterized by high HLA-E expression. PMID:26940026

  4. The value of immunohistochemical expression of BAX in formulating a prognosis for canine cutaneous mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Strefezzi, R De F; Kleeb, S R; Xavier, J G; Fukumasu, H; Catão-Dias, J L

    2012-05-01

    Immunohistochemical expression of BAX was evaluated in 24 canine cutaneous mast cell tumours in order to verify the relationship of this expression to the histopathological grade of the lesions and its prognostic value for clinical outcome. BAX expression increased with higher histopathological grades (P=0.0148; P<0.05 between grades I and III). Animals with high levels of BAX expression were 4.25 times more likely to die from the disease and had shorter post-surgical survival times (P=0.0009). These results suggest that alterations in BAX expression may be related to the aggressiveness of canine cutaneous mast cell tumours, indicating that immunohistochemical detection of BAX may be predictive of clinical outcome. PMID:21899858

  5. Infiltrating orbital granular cell tumour: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, P J; Rootman, J; Dolman, C L

    1987-01-01

    A surgical biopsy of an infiltrative retrobulbar mass in a 44-year-old man was diagnosed as granular cell tumour. Electron microscopy and immunoperoxidase stains were used to confirm the diagnosis and to study the histogenesis of this rare soft tissue neoplasm. S-100 stain was positive, while neuron-specific enolase and myoglobin stains were negative, suggesting a non-specific neural origin for the cells. The capability of this tumour to invade surrounding tissues has seldom been described in the orbit and is demonstrated by this case. Images PMID:3028469

  6. Giant cell tumour of peroneus brevis tendon sheath – a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Goni, Vijay; Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Radotra, B D; Viswanathan, Vibhu Krishnan; Logithasan, Rajesh Kumar; S, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue lesion most commonly found in the flexor aspect of hand and wrist. Being rare in foot and ankle, the unusual presentation of this lesion may sometimes mimic other lesions like lipoma, synovial sarcoma, malignant fibrous histiocytoma, synovial cyst and ganglion. Hence it is important to include this lesion in differential diagnoses especially if the lesion is found to be anchored to any of the surrounding tendons. This article describes the unusual occurrence of giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath of peroneus brevis which is rarely described in literature. PMID:22802558

  7. In vitro evaluation of human hybrid cell lines generated by fusion of B-lymphoblastoid cells and ex vivo tumour cells as candidate vaccines for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Dunnion, Debbie; Teobald, Iryna; Walewska, Renata; Browning, Michael J

    2012-10-12

    Fusions of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumour cells have been shown to induce protective immunity to tumour challenge in animal models, and to represent a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. The broader clinical application of this approach, however, is potentially constrained by the lack of replicative capacity and limited standardisation of fusion cell preparations. We show here that fusion of ex vivo tumour cells isolated from patients with a range of haematological malignancies with the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL), HMy2, followed by chemical selection of the hybridomas, generated stable, self-replicating human hybrid cell lines that grew continuously in tissue culture, and survived freeze/thawing cycles. The hybrid cell lines expressed HLA class I and class II molecules, and the major T-cell costimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD86. All but two of 14 hybrid cell lines generated expressed tumour-associated antigens that were not expressed by HMy2 cells, and were therefore derived from the parent tumour cells. The hybrid cell lines stimulated allogeneic T-cell proliferative responses and interferon-gamma release in vitro to a considerably greater degree than their respective parent tumour cells. The enhanced T-cell stimulation was inhibited by CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, and by blocking antibodies to MHC class I and class II molecules. Finally, all of five LCL/tumour hybrid cell lines tested induced tumour antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses in vitro in PBL from healthy, HLA-A2+ individuals, as detected by HLA-A2-peptide pentamer staining and cellular cytotoxicity. These data show that stable hybrid cell lines, with enhanced immunostimulatory properties and potential for therapeutic vaccination, can be generated by in vitro fusion and chemical selection of B-LCL and ex vivo haematological tumour cells. PMID:22939910

  8. Increased tumour necrosis factor α production in mesenteric lymph nodes of cirrhotic patients with ascites

    PubMed Central

    Genescà, J; Martí, R; Rojo, F; Campos, F; Peribáñez, V; Gónzalez, A; Castells, L; Ruiz-Marcellán, C; Margarit, C; Esteban, R; Guardia, J; Segura, R

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cytokines produced in mesenteric lymph nodes of cirrhotic rats with bacterial translocation may participate in circulatory alterations of cirrhosis. Aim: To investigate whether cirrhotic patients present an increased local generation of cytokines in mesenteric lymph nodes. Methods: Mesenteric lymph nodes from 26 cirrhotic and 10 control patients were assessed for tumour necrosis factor α (TNF) and interleukin 6 mRNA and protein expression by competitive reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and by enzyme immunoassay and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Results: Interleukin 6 levels were not different between cirrhotics and controls. Protein and mRNA TNF levels in mesenteric lymph nodes from cirrhotics were higher than in controls (p<0.05). Tissue expression of TNF by immunohistochemistry was more abundant in cirrhotics. Ascitic patients showed higher TNF levels (47 (34–54) pg/mg protein) than patients without ascites (18 (17–25) pg/mg protein) (p<0.001). Elevated TNF levels (>28 pg/mg protein) in cirrhotics were associated with a higher Child-Pugh score, the antecedent of ascites, a lower prothrombin rate, and higher bilirubin and blood TNF levels. The strongest association, confirmed by multivariate analysis, was with the presence of ascites (p<0.001). Bacterial infections after transplantation, mainly by enteric bacteria, were only detected in patients with high TNF levels in mesenteric lymph nodes (33% of patients; p=0.05). Conclusion: Patients with advanced liver cirrhosis, and especially with ascites, have increased local production of TNF in mesenteric lymph nodes that, in common with experimental cirrhosis, may also be induced by bacterial translocation. PMID:12801966

  9. Increased serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor in beta thalassaemia: effect of bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Meliconi, R; Uguccioni, M; Lalli, E; Nesci, S; Delfini, C; Paradisi, O; Lucarelli, G; Gasbarrini, G; Facchini, A

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: Serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) were determined in beta thalassemic patients before and after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) to evaluate whether changes in TNF concentrations after BMT were related to immune mediated complications. METHODS: Serum TNF concentrations were determined by enzyme linked immunoassay (EIA) in paired samples from 71 patients with beta thalassemia before and after BMT. Serial samples from 13 patients were also studied for up to six months after BMT. Forty one normal healthy children matched for sex and age were studied as controls. RESULTS: beta thalassemic patients had high serum TNF concentrations before transplantation compared with controls. These were not related to sex, age, duration of disease, number of blood transfusions, transferrin concentrations or splenectomy. DQw1 positive patients showed significantly lower TNF concentrations than non-DQw1 cases. Patients with severe liver fibrosis had significantly higher TNF concentrations. No correlation was found between TNF values and BMT outcome before transplantation but TNF alpha values fell significantly after BMT. The decrease persisted only in patients with successful engraftment. In serial samples studied for up to six months after BMT, TNF values decreased but in four out of five patients with graft rejection and in all five with acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) sharp increases occurred at the time of clinical symptoms. No correlation was found between the degree of GVHD and serum TNF-alpha concentrations nor between TNF-alpha concentrations after BMT and the presence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. CONCLUSIONS: About 50% of beta thalassemic patients have increased serum TNF, and the changes after BMT are related to the occurrence of immune mediate complications. The persistence of low TNF concentrations after successful engraftment may be due to the preparative regimen and the lack of adverse immune reactions. PMID:1740519

  10. The novel tumour suppressor Madm regulates stem cell competition in the Drosophila testis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shree Ram; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Jiangsha; Zeng, Xiankun; Hou, Steven X

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell competition has emerged as a mechanism for selecting fit stem cells/progenitors and controlling tumourigenesis. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanism. Here we identify Mlf1-adaptor molecule (Madm), a novel tumour suppressor that regulates the competition between germline stem cells (GSCs) and somatic cyst stem cells (CySCs) for niche occupancy. Madm knockdown results in overexpression of the EGF receptor ligand vein (vn), which further activates EGF receptor signalling and integrin expression non-cell autonomously in CySCs to promote their overproliferation and ability to outcompete GSCs for niche occupancy. Conversely, expressing a constitutively activated form of the Drosophila JAK kinase (hop(Tum-l)) promotes Madm nuclear translocation, and suppresses vn and integrin expression in CySCs that allows GSCs to outcompete CySCs for niche occupancy and promotes GSC tumour formation. Tumour suppressor-mediated stem cell competition presented here could be a mechanism of tumour initiation in mammals. PMID:26792023

  11. ΔPK oncolytic activity includes modulation of the tumour cell milieu.

    PubMed

    Bollino, Dominique; Colunga, Aric; Li, Baiquan; Aurelian, Laure

    2016-02-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a unique cancer therapeutic that encompasses tumour cell lysis through both virus replication and programmed cell death (PCD) pathways. Nonetheless, clinical efficacy is relatively modest, likely related to the immunosuppressive tumour milieu. Our studies use the herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2)-based oncolytic virus ΔPK that has documented anti-tumour activity associated with virus replication, PCD and cancer stem cell lysis. They are designed to examine whether ΔPK-mediated oncolysis includes the ability to reverse the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment by altering the balance of cytokines directly secreted by the melanoma cells and to define its mechanism. Here, we show that melanoma cells secreted the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, and that secretion was inhibited by ΔPK through virus replication and c-Jun N-terminal kinase/c-Jun activation. ΔPK-induced IL-10 inhibition upregulated surface expression of MHC class I chain-related protein A, the ligand for the activating NKG2D receptor expressed on NK- and cytotoxic T-cells. Concomitantly, ΔPK also upregulated the secretion of inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and IL-1β through autophagy-mediated activation of Toll-like receptor 2 pathways and pyroptosis, and it inhibited the expression of the negative immune checkpoint regulator cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. Pharmacologic inhibition of these processes significantly reduces the oncolytic activity of ΔPK. PMID:26602205

  12. The novel tumour suppressor Madm regulates stem cell competition in the Drosophila testis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shree Ram; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Jiangsha; Zeng, Xiankun; Hou, Steven X.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell competition has emerged as a mechanism for selecting fit stem cells/progenitors and controlling tumourigenesis. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanism. Here we identify Mlf1-adaptor molecule (Madm), a novel tumour suppressor that regulates the competition between germline stem cells (GSCs) and somatic cyst stem cells (CySCs) for niche occupancy. Madm knockdown results in overexpression of the EGF receptor ligand vein (vn), which further activates EGF receptor signalling and integrin expression non-cell autonomously in CySCs to promote their overproliferation and ability to outcompete GSCs for niche occupancy. Conversely, expressing a constitutively activated form of the Drosophila JAK kinase (hopTum−l) promotes Madm nuclear translocation, and suppresses vn and integrin expression in CySCs that allows GSCs to outcompete CySCs for niche occupancy and promotes GSC tumour formation. Tumour suppressor-mediated stem cell competition presented here could be a mechanism of tumour initiation in mammals. PMID:26792023

  13. A biophysical approach to the optimisation of dendritic-tumour cell electrofusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhorukov, Vladimir L.; Reuss, Randolph; Endter, Joerg M.; Fehrmann, Steffen; Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Gessner, Petra; Steinbach, Andrea; Mueller, Kilian J.; Karpas, Abraham; Zimmermann, Ulrich . E-mail: zimmermann@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2006-08-04

    Electrofusion of tumour and dendritic cells (DCs) is a promising approach for production of DC-based anti-tumour vaccines. Although human DCs are well characterised immunologically, little is known about their biophysical properties, including dielectric and osmotic parameters, both of which are essential for the development of efficient electrofusion protocols. In the present study, human DCs from the peripheral blood along with a tumour cell line used as a model fusion partner were examined by means of time-resolved cell volumetry and electrorotation. Based on the biophysical cell data, the electrofusion protocol could be rapidly optimised with respect to the sugar composition of the fusion medium, duration of hypotonic treatment, frequency range for stable cell alignment, and field strengths of breakdown pulses triggering membrane fusion. The hypotonic electrofusion consistently gave a tumour-DC hybrid rate of up to 19%, as determined by counting dually labelled fluorescent hybrids in a microscope. This fusion rate is nearly twice as high as that usually reported in the literature for isotonic media. The experimental findings and biophysical approach presented here are generally useful for the development of efficient electrofusion protocols, especially for rare and valuable human cells.

  14. Early detection of metastatic disease in asymptomatic breast cancer patients with whole-body imaging and defined tumour marker increase

    PubMed Central

    Di Gioia, D; Stieber, P; Schmidt, G P; Nagel, D; Heinemann, V; Baur-Melnyk, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Follow-up care in breast cancer is still an issue of debate. Diagnostic methods are more sensitive, and more effective therapeutic options are now available. The risk of recurrence is not only influenced by tumour stage but also by the different molecular subtypes. This study was performed to evaluate the use of whole-body imaging combined with tumour marker monitoring for the early detection of asymptomatic metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Methods: This analysis was performed as part of a follow-up study evaluating 813 patients with a median follow-up of 63 months. After primary therapy, all patients underwent tumour marker monitoring for CEA, CA 15-3 and CA 125 at 6-week intervals within an intensified diagnostic aftercare algorithm. A reproducible previously defined increase was considered as a strong indicator of MBC. From 2007 to 2010, 44 patients with tumour marker increase underwent whole-body magnetic resonance imaging and/or an FDG-PET/CT scan. Histological clarification and/or imaging follow-up were done. Results: Metastases were detected in 65.9% (29/44) of patients, 13.6% (6/44) had secondary malignancies besides breast cancer and 20.5% (9/44) had no detectable malignancy. Limited disease was found in 24.1% (7/29) of patients. Median progression-free survival of MBC was 9.2 months and median overall survival was 41.1 months. The 3- and 5-year survival rates were 64.2% and 40.0%, respectively. Conclusions: A reproducible tumour marker increase followed by whole-body imaging is highly effective for early detection. By consequence, patients might benefit from earlier detection and improved therapeutic options with a prolonged survival. PMID:25647014

  15. Decreased NK-cell tumour immunosurveillance consequent to JAK inhibition enhances metastasis in breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Bottos, Alessia; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Gill, Jason W.; Gattelli, Albana; Frei, Anna; Tzankov, Alexandar; Sexl, Veronika; Wodnar-Filipowicz, Aleksandra; Hynes, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is an attractive target for breast cancer therapy due to its frequent activation, and clinical trials evaluating JAK inhibitors (JAKi) in advanced breast cancer are ongoing. Using patient biopsies and preclinical models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that the JAK/STAT pathway is active in metastasis. Unexpectedly, blocking the pathway with JAKi enhances the metastatic burden in experimental and orthotopic models of breast cancer metastasis. We demonstrate that this prometastatic effect is due to the immunosuppressive activity of JAKi with ensuing impairment of NK-cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity. Furthermore, we show that immunostimulation with IL-15 overcomes the enhancing effect of JAKi on metastasis formation. Our findings highlight the importance of evaluating the effect of targeted therapy on the tumour environment. The impact of JAKi on NK cells and the potential value of immunostimulators to overcome the weakened tumour immunosurveillance, are worthwhile considering in the clinical setting of breast cancer. PMID:27406745

  16. Decreased NK-cell tumour immunosurveillance consequent to JAK inhibition enhances metastasis in breast cancer models.

    PubMed

    Bottos, Alessia; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Gill, Jason W; Gattelli, Albana; Frei, Anna; Tzankov, Alexandar; Sexl, Veronika; Wodnar-Filipowicz, Aleksandra; Hynes, Nancy E

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is an attractive target for breast cancer therapy due to its frequent activation, and clinical trials evaluating JAK inhibitors (JAKi) in advanced breast cancer are ongoing. Using patient biopsies and preclinical models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that the JAK/STAT pathway is active in metastasis. Unexpectedly, blocking the pathway with JAKi enhances the metastatic burden in experimental and orthotopic models of breast cancer metastasis. We demonstrate that this prometastatic effect is due to the immunosuppressive activity of JAKi with ensuing impairment of NK-cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity. Furthermore, we show that immunostimulation with IL-15 overcomes the enhancing effect of JAKi on metastasis formation. Our findings highlight the importance of evaluating the effect of targeted therapy on the tumour environment. The impact of JAKi on NK cells and the potential value of immunostimulators to overcome the weakened tumour immunosurveillance, are worthwhile considering in the clinical setting of breast cancer. PMID:27406745

  17. Interferon regulatory factor-8 modulates the development of tumour-induced CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Trina J; Greeneltch, Kristy M; Reid, Julia E; Liewehr, David J; Steinberg, Seth M; Liu, Kebin; Abrams, Scott I

    2009-09-01

    Tumour-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote immune suppression and mediate tumour progression. However, the molecular basis for the generation of MDSC, which in mice co-express the CD11b(+) and Gr-1(+) cell surface markers remains unclear. Because CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells expand during progressive tumour growth, this suggests that tumour-induced events alter signalling pathways that affect normal myeloid cell development. Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8), a member of the IFN-gamma regulatory factor family, is essential for normal myelopoiesis. We therefore examined whether IRF-8 modulated tumour-induced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cell development or accumulation using both implantable (4T1) and transgenic (MMTV-PyMT) mouse models of mammary tumour growth. In the 4T1 model, both splenic and bone marrow-derived CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells of tumour-bearing mice displayed a marked reduction in IRF-8 expression compared to control populations. A causal link between IRF-8 expression and the emergence of tumour-induced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells was explored in vivo using a double transgenic (dTg) mouse model designed to express transgenes for both IRF-8 and mammary carcinoma development. Despite the fact that tumour growth was unaffected, splenomegaly, as well as the frequencies and absolute numbers of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells were significantly lower in dTg mice when compared with single transgenic tumour-bearing mice. Overall, these data reveal that IRF-8 plays an important role in tumour-induced development and/or accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells, and establishes a molecular basis for the potential manipulation of these myeloid populations for cancer therapy. PMID:20196788

  18. Five human tumour cell lines derived from a primary squamous carcinoma of the tongue, two subsequent local recurrences and two nodal metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Easty, D. M.; Easty, G. C.; Carter, R. L.; Monaghan, P.; Pittam, M. R.; James, T.

    1981-01-01

    Five tumour cell lines have been derived from a primary squamous carcinoma of the tongue, from 2 subsequent local recurrences, and from 2 lymph-node metastases--all from the same patient. While the cell lines shared many morphological and biochemical characteristics, those derived from recurrences and metastases appeared to be less differentiated, were less well organized in culture, and displayed fewer desmosomes and tonofilaments than cells in the primary tumour line. A recurrent line showing greatest morphological divergence from the primary tumour line also demonstrated the greatest differences at the ultrastructural level, in increased production of plasminogen activator and in the composition of cell-surface glycoproteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7284233

  19. The radiation response of cells from 9L gliosarcoma tumours is correlated with [F18]-EF5 uptake

    PubMed Central

    KOCH, CAMERON J.; SHUMAN, ANNE L.; JENKINS, WALTER T.; KACHUR, ALEXANDER V.; KARP, JOEL S.; FREIFELDER, RICHARD; DOLBIER, WILLIAM R.; EVANS, SYDNEY M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tumour hypoxia affects cancer biology and therapy-resistance in both animals and humans. The purpose of this study was to determine whether EF5 ([2-(2-nitro-1-H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)-acetamide]) binding and/or radioactive drug uptake correlated with single-dose radiation response in 9L gliosarcoma tumours. Materials and methods Twenty-two 9L tumours were grown in male Fischer rats. Rats were administered low specific activity 18F-EF5 and their tumours irradiated and assessed for cell survival and hypoxia. Hypoxia assays included EF5 binding measured by antibodies against bound-drug adducts and gamma counts of 18F-EF5 tumour uptake compared with uptake by normal muscle and blood. These assays were compared with cellular radiation response (in vivo to in vitro assay). In six cases, uptake of tumour versus muscle was also assayed using images from a PET (positron emission tomography) camera (PENN G-PET). Results The intertumoural variation in radiation response of 9L tumour-cells was significantly correlated with uptake of 18F-labelled EF5 (i.e., including both bound and non-bound drug) using either tumour to muscle or tumour to blood gamma count ratios. In the tumours where imaging was performed, there was a significant correlation between the image analysis and gamma count analysis. Intertumoural variation in cellular radiation response of the same 22 tumours was also correlated with mean flow cytometry signal due to EF5 binding. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first animal model/drug combination demonstrating a correlation of radioresponse for tumour-cells from individual tumours with drug metabolism using either immunohistochemical or non-invasive techniques. PMID:19995239

  20. High-content analysis of tumour cell invasion in three-dimensional spheroid assays

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vinton; Esteves, Filomena; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Cockle, Julia; Short, Susan; Brüning-Richardson, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Targeting infiltrating tumour cells is an attractive way of combating cancer invasion and metastasis. Here we describe a novel and reproducible method for high content analysis of invading cells using multicellular tumour spheroid assays in a high grade glioma model. Live cell imaging of spheroids generated from glioma cell lines, U87 and U251, gave insight into migration dynamics and cell morphology in response to anti-migratory drugs. Immunofluorescence imaging confirmed cytoskeletal rearrangements in the treated cells indicating a direct effect on cell morphology. Effect on migration was determined by a Migration Index (MI) from brightfield images which confirmed anti-migratory activity of the drugs. A marked effect on the core with treatment suggestive of disordered proliferation was also observed. A newly developed technique to prepare the spheroids and migratory cells for immunohistochemistry allowed an assessment of response to drug treatment with a selection of markers. A difference in protein expression was noted between cells maintained within the core and migratory cells indicative of the presence of cell subpopulations within the spheroid core. We conclude that this high content analysis allows researchers to perform screening of anti-tumour invasion compounds and study their effects on cellular dynamics, particularly in relation to protein expression, for the first time. PMID:26244167

  1. High-content analysis of tumour cell invasion in three-dimensional spheroid assays.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Vinton; Esteves, Filomena; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Cockle, Julia; Short, Susan; Brüning-Richardson, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Targeting infiltrating tumour cells is an attractive way of combating cancer invasion and metastasis. Here we describe a novel and reproducible method for high content analysis of invading cells using multicellular tumour spheroid assays in a high grade glioma model. Live cell imaging of spheroids generated from glioma cell lines, U87 and U251, gave insight into migration dynamics and cell morphology in response to anti-migratory drugs. Immunofluorescence imaging confirmed cytoskeletal rearrangements in the treated cells indicating a direct effect on cell morphology. Effect on migration was determined by a Migration Index (MI) from brightfield images which confirmed anti-migratory activity of the drugs. A marked effect on the core with treatment suggestive of disordered proliferation was also observed. A newly developed technique to prepare the spheroids and migratory cells for immunohistochemistry allowed an assessment of response to drug treatment with a selection of markers. A difference in protein expression was noted between cells maintained within the core and migratory cells indicative of the presence of cell subpopulations within the spheroid core. We conclude that this high content analysis allows researchers to perform screening of anti-tumour invasion compounds and study their effects on cellular dynamics, particularly in relation to protein expression, for the first time. PMID:26244167

  2. Increasing rates of brain tumours in the Swedish national inpatient register and the causes of death register.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz-300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., "possibly", carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR) and Causes of Death Register (CDR) to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998-2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC) +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007-2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008-2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk. PMID:25854296

  3. Suspension survival mediated by PP2A-STAT3-Col XVII determines tumour initiation and metastasis in cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Chi; Lin, Shih-Pei; Hsu, Han-Shui; Yang, Shung-Haur; Lin, Chiu-Hua; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Hung, Mien-Chie; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Targeting tumour-initiating cells (TICs) would lead to new therapies to cure cancer. We previously demonstrated that TICs have the capacity to survive under suspension conditions, while other cells undergo anoikis. Here we show that TICs exhibit increased phosphorylation levels of S727STAT3 because of PP2A inactivation. Collagen 17 gene expression is upregulated in a STAT3-dependent manner, which also stabilizes laminin 5 and engages cells to form hemidesmosome-like junctions in response. Blocking the PP2A-S727STAT3-collagen 17 pathway inhibits the suspension survival of TICs and their ability to form tumours in mice, while activation of the same pathway increases the suspension survival and tumour-initiation capacities of bulk cancer cells. The S727STAT3 phosphorylation levels correlate with collagen 17 expression in colon tumour samples, and correlate inversely with survival. Finally, this signalling axis enhances the ability of TIC to form tumours in mouse models of malignant lung cancer pleural effusion and spontaneous colon cancer metastasis. PMID:27306323

  4. Suspension survival mediated by PP2A-STAT3-Col XVII determines tumour initiation and metastasis in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Chi; Lin, Shih-Pei; Hsu, Han-Shui; Yang, Shung-Haur; Lin, Chiu-Hua; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Hung, Mien-Chie; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Targeting tumour-initiating cells (TICs) would lead to new therapies to cure cancer. We previously demonstrated that TICs have the capacity to survive under suspension conditions, while other cells undergo anoikis. Here we show that TICs exhibit increased phosphorylation levels of S727STAT3 because of PP2A inactivation. Collagen 17 gene expression is upregulated in a STAT3-dependent manner, which also stabilizes laminin 5 and engages cells to form hemidesmosome-like junctions in response. Blocking the PP2A-S727STAT3-collagen 17 pathway inhibits the suspension survival of TICs and their ability to form tumours in mice, while activation of the same pathway increases the suspension survival and tumour-initiation capacities of bulk cancer cells. The S727STAT3 phosphorylation levels correlate with collagen 17 expression in colon tumour samples, and correlate inversely with survival. Finally, this signalling axis enhances the ability of TIC to form tumours in mouse models of malignant lung cancer pleural effusion and spontaneous colon cancer metastasis. PMID:27306323

  5. Pharmacological Inhibition of polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII Modulates Tumour Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saraireh, Yousef M. J.; Sutherland, Mark; Springett, Bradley R.; Freiberger, Friedrich; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M.; Errington, Rachel J.; Smith, Paul J.; Fukuda, Minoru; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Patterson, Laurence H.; Shnyder, Steven D.; Falconer, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia), an α-2,8-glycosidically linked polymer of sialic acid, is a developmentally regulated post-translational modification predominantly found on NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule). Whilst high levels are expressed during development, peripheral adult organs do not express polySia-NCAM. However, tumours of neural crest-origin re-express polySia-NCAM: its occurrence correlates with aggressive and invasive disease and poor clinical prognosis in different cancer types, notably including small cell lung cancer (SCLC), pancreatic cancer and neuroblastoma. In neuronal development, polySia-NCAM biosynthesis is catalysed by two polysialyltransferases, ST8SiaII and ST8SiaIV, but it is ST8SiaII that is the prominent enzyme in tumours. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ST8SiaII inhibition by a small molecule on tumour cell migration, utilising cytidine monophosphate (CMP) as a tool compound. Using immunoblotting we showed that CMP reduced ST8iaII-mediated polysialylation of NCAM. Utilizing a novel HPLC-based assay to quantify polysialylation of a fluorescent acceptor (DMB-DP3), we demonstrated that CMP is a competitive inhibitor of ST8SiaII (Ki = 10 µM). Importantly, we have shown that CMP causes a concentration-dependent reduction in tumour cell-surface polySia expression, with an absence of toxicity. When ST8SiaII-expressing tumour cells (SH-SY5Y and C6-STX) were evaluated in 2D cell migration assays, ST8SiaII inhibition led to significant reductions in migration, while CMP had no effect on cells not expressing ST8SiaII (DLD-1 and C6-WT). The study demonstrates for the first time that a polysialyltransferase inhibitor can modulate migration in ST8SiaII-expressing tumour cells. We conclude that ST8SiaII can be considered a druggable target with the potential for interfering with a critical mechanism in tumour cell dissemination in metastatic cancers. PMID:23951351

  6. Interdependent IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T-cell controls tumour eradication by combined α-CTLA-4+α-PD-1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Fu, Tihui; Guan, Baoxiang; Chen, Jianfeng; Blando, Jorge M; Allison, James P; Xiong, Liangwen; Subudhi, Sumit K; Gao, Jianjun; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-1 has shown significant clinical responses in different types of cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, combining detailed analysis of human tumour samples with preclinical tumour models, we report that concomitant blockade of CTLA-4 and PD-1 improves anti-tumour immune responses and synergistically eradicates tumour. Mechanistically, combination therapy relies on the interdependence between IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T cells, as lack of either pathway abrogates the immune-boosting and therapeutic effects of combination therapy. Combination treatment increases IL-7Rα expression on tumour-infiltrating T cells in an IFN-γ/IFN-γR signalling-dependent manner, which may serve as a potential biomarker for clinical trials with immune checkpoint blockade. Our data suggest that combining immune checkpoint blockade with IL-7 signalling could be an effective modality to improve immunotherapeutic efficacy. Taken together, we conclude that combination therapy potently reverses immunosuppression and eradicates tumours via an intricate interplay between IFN-γ/IFN-γR and IL-7/IL-7R pathways. PMID:27498556

  7. Interdependent IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T-cell controls tumour eradication by combined α-CTLA-4+α-PD-1 therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Fu, Tihui; Guan, Baoxiang; Chen, Jianfeng; Blando, Jorge M.; Allison, James P.; Xiong, Liangwen; Subudhi, Sumit K.; Gao, Jianjun; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-1 has shown significant clinical responses in different types of cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, combining detailed analysis of human tumour samples with preclinical tumour models, we report that concomitant blockade of CTLA-4 and PD-1 improves anti-tumour immune responses and synergistically eradicates tumour. Mechanistically, combination therapy relies on the interdependence between IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T cells, as lack of either pathway abrogates the immune-boosting and therapeutic effects of combination therapy. Combination treatment increases IL-7Rα expression on tumour-infiltrating T cells in an IFN-γ/IFN-γR signalling-dependent manner, which may serve as a potential biomarker for clinical trials with immune checkpoint blockade. Our data suggest that combining immune checkpoint blockade with IL-7 signalling could be an effective modality to improve immunotherapeutic efficacy. Taken together, we conclude that combination therapy potently reverses immunosuppression and eradicates tumours via an intricate interplay between IFN-γ/IFN-γR and IL-7/IL-7R pathways. PMID:27498556

  8. Sex determination by SRY PCR and sequencing of Tasmanian devil facial tumour cell lines reveals non-allograft transmission.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xianlan; Wang, Yunfeng; Hua, Bobby; Miller, Webb; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Hongyu; Kong, Xiangang

    2016-05-20

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is an infectious tumour disease and was hypothesised to be transmitted by allograft during biting based on two cytogenetic findings of DFTD tumours in 2006. It was then believed that DFTD tumours were originally from a female devil. In this study the devil sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene was PCR amplified and sequenced, and six pairs of devil SRY PCR primers were used for detection of devil SRY gene fragments in purified DFTD tumour cell lines. Using three pairs of devil SRY PCR primers, devil SRY gene sequence was detected by PCR and sequencing in genomic DNA of DFTD tumour cell lines from six male devils, but not from six female devils. Four out of six DFTD tumour cell lines from male devils contained nucleotides 288-482 of the devil SRY gene, and another two DFTD tumour cell lines contained nucleotides 381-577 and 493-708 of the gene, respectively. These results indicate that the different portions of the SRY gene in the DFTD tumours of the male devils were originally from the male hosts, rejecting the currently believed DFTD allograft transmission theory. The reasons why DFTD transmission was incorrectly defined as allograft are discussed. PMID:27084454

  9. MPLA incorporation into DC-targeting glycoliposomes favours anti-tumour T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Boks, Martine A; Ambrosini, Martino; Bruijns, Sven C; Kalay, Hakan; van Bloois, Louis; Storm, Gert; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-10-28

    Dendritic cells (DC) are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy as they initiate strong and long-lived tumour-specific T cell responses. DC can be effectively targeted in vivo with tumour antigens by using nanocarriers such as liposomes. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens is enhanced with strong adjuvants such as TLR ligands. However, often these adjuvants have off-target effects, and would benefit from a DC-specific targeting strategy, similar to the tumour antigen. The goal of this study was to develop a strategy for specifically targeting DC with tumour antigen and adjuvant by using glycoliposomes. We have generated liposomes containing the glycan Lewis(Le)(X) which is highly specific for the C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN expressed by DC. Le(X)-modified liposomes were taken up by human monocyte-derived DC in a DC-SIGN-specific manner. As adjuvants we incorporated the TLR ligands Pam3CySK4, Poly I:C, MPLA and R848 into liposomes and compared their adjuvant capacity on DC. Incorporation of the TLR4 ligand MPLA into glycoliposomes induced DC maturation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in a DC-SIGN-specific manner, and DC activation was comparable to administration of soluble MPLA. Incorporation of MPLA into glycoliposomes significantly enhanced antigen cross-presentation of the melanoma tumour antigen gp100280-288 peptide to CD8(+) T cells compared to non-glycosylated MPLA liposomes. Importantly, antigen cross-presentation of the gp100280-288 peptide was significantly higher using MPLA glycoliposomes compared to the co-administration of soluble MPLA with glycoliposomes. Taken together, our data demonstrates that specific targeting of a gp100 tumour antigen and the adjuvant MPLA to DC-SIGN-expressing DC enhances the uptake of peptide-containing liposomes, the activation of DC, and induces tumour antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. These data demonstrate that adjuvant-containing glycoliposome-based vaccines targeting DC-SIGN(+) DC

  10. Three-dimensional spatial configuration of tumour cells confers resistance to chemotherapy independent of drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Pamela H S; Chia, Su Shin; Toh, Siew Lok; Goh, James C H; Nathan, Saminathan Suresh

    2016-08-01

    Anticancer drug discovery has been hampered by the lack of reliable preclinical models, which routinely use cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) culture systems. However, many of the characteristics of cells in 2D culture do not translate into the findings in animal xenografts. Three-dimensional (3D) growth may be responsible for some of these changes, and models using cells grown in 3D may form a more representative step in tumouricidal validation prior to animal implantation and human testing. For the 3D model, we cultured 143.98.2, SaOS2 or U2OS osteosarcoma cells seeded in porous Bombyx mori silk sponges. We conducted real-time PCR on cells grown in 2D culture and 3D scaffolds for the proliferation markers cyclin B1 and E2F1 and the actin regulator RhoA, and found a significant decrease in expression levels for the 3D tumour models (p = 0.02, < 0.001 and 0.008 for cyclin B1, E2F1 and RhoA for 143.98.2; p = 0.02, 0.002 and 0.02 for cyclin B1, E2F1 and RhoA for U2OS, respectively). In contrast, p21 was upregulated when SaOS2 and U2OS were cultured in the 3D scaffolds (p < 0.001) and there was no increase in DNA quantity during the culture period. We correspondingly observed G1 arrest when cell cycle analysis was conducted. Cytotoxicity results for cells treated with serial dilutions of doxorubicin and cisplatin showed that cells in 3D scaffolds were less sensitive to drug treatment than in 2D culture, and the difference was more pronounced for cell cycle specific agents. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24668783

  11. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events.

  12. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events. PMID:26787230

  13. The Toxicity of 125IUdR in Cultured Mouse BP8 Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Porteous, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    The toxicity of the low-energy electrons from 125I in labelled IUdR was assayed by labelling the DNA of BP8 mouse tumour cells with the nucleoside and studying their subsequent growth in culture. Toxicity was observed in cells grown in medium containing more than 0·01 μCi/ml. The amount of label incorporated into cells showing deleterious effects is compared with that reported by others. PMID:5169169

  14. Increase in Sialylation and Branching in the Mouse Serum N-glycome Correlates with Inflammation and Ovarian Tumour Progression

    PubMed Central

    Saldova, Radka; Piccard, Helene; Pérez-Garay, Marta; Harvey, David J.; Struwe, Weston B.; Galligan, Marie C.; Berghmans, Nele; Madden, Stephen F.; Peracaula, Rosa; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Rudd, Pauline M.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer and is often diagnosed in late stage, often as the result of the unavailability of sufficiently sensitive biomarkers for early detection, tumour progression and tumour-associated inflammation. Glycosylation is the most common posttranslational modification of proteins; it is altered in cancer and therefore is a potential source of biomarkers. We investigated the quantitative and qualitative effects of anti-inflammatory (acetylsalicylic acid) and pro-inflammatory (thioglycolate and chlorite-oxidized oxyamylose) drugs on glycosylation in mouse cancer serum. A significant increase in sialylation and branching of glycans in mice treated with an inflammation-inducing compound was observed. Moreover, the increases in sialylation correlated with increased tumour sizes. Increases in sialylation and branching were consistent with increased expression of sialyltransferases and the branching enzyme MGAT5. Because the sialyltransferases are highly conserved among species, the described changes in the ovarian cancer mouse model are relevant to humans and serum N-glycome analysis for monitoring disease treatment and progression might be a useful biomarker. PMID:24023608

  15. Malignant histiocytosis (histiocytic medullary reticulosis) with spindle cell differentiation and tumour formation.

    PubMed Central

    Macgillivray, J B; Duthie, J S

    1977-01-01

    Malignant histiocytosis (histiocytic medullary reticulosis) in a 45-year-old white man is described. Unusual features were presentation as a surgical emergency with signs of obstruction and peritonitis due to an ileal tumour and extensive spindle cell differentiation. Problems in the differential diagnosis of malignant histiocytosis are briefly discussed. Images PMID:845260

  16. Tumour resistance in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from naked mole-rats.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Shingo; Kawamura, Yoshimi; Oiwa, Yuki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Bono, Hidemasa; Koya, Ikuko; Okada, Yohei; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Tsuchiya, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Sadafumi; Onishi, Nobuyuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Narita, Minoru; Ikeda, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo; Seino, Ken-Ichiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Okano, Hideyuki; Miura, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber), which is the longest-lived rodent species, exhibits extraordinary resistance to cancer. Here we report that NMR somatic cells exhibit a unique tumour-suppressor response to reprogramming induction. In this study, we generate NMR-induced pluripotent stem cells (NMR-iPSCs) and find that NMR-iPSCs do not exhibit teratoma-forming tumorigenicity due to the species-specific activation of tumour-suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) and a disruption mutation of the oncogene ES cell-expressed Ras (ERAS). The forced expression of Arf in mouse iPSCs markedly reduces tumorigenicity. Furthermore, we identify an NMR-specific tumour-suppression phenotype-ARF suppression-induced senescence (ASIS)-that may protect iPSCs and somatic cells from ARF suppression and, as a consequence, tumorigenicity. Thus, NMR-specific ARF regulation and the disruption of ERAS regulate tumour resistance in NMR-iPSCs. Our findings obtained from studies of NMR-iPSCs provide new insight into the mechanisms of tumorigenicity in iPSCs and cancer resistance in the NMR. PMID:27161380

  17. Tumour resistance in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from naked mole-rats

    PubMed Central

    Miyawaki, Shingo; Kawamura, Yoshimi; Oiwa, Yuki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Bono, Hidemasa; Koya, Ikuko; Okada, Yohei; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Tsuchiya, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Sadafumi; Onishi, Nobuyuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Narita, Minoru; Ikeda, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo; Seino, Ken-ichiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Okano, Hideyuki; Miura, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    The naked mole-rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber), which is the longest-lived rodent species, exhibits extraordinary resistance to cancer. Here we report that NMR somatic cells exhibit a unique tumour-suppressor response to reprogramming induction. In this study, we generate NMR-induced pluripotent stem cells (NMR-iPSCs) and find that NMR-iPSCs do not exhibit teratoma-forming tumorigenicity due to the species-specific activation of tumour-suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) and a disruption mutation of the oncogene ES cell-expressed Ras (ERAS). The forced expression of Arf in mouse iPSCs markedly reduces tumorigenicity. Furthermore, we identify an NMR-specific tumour-suppression phenotype—ARF suppression-induced senescence (ASIS)—that may protect iPSCs and somatic cells from ARF suppression and, as a consequence, tumorigenicity. Thus, NMR-specific ARF regulation and the disruption of ERAS regulate tumour resistance in NMR-iPSCs. Our findings obtained from studies of NMR-iPSCs provide new insight into the mechanisms of tumorigenicity in iPSCs and cancer resistance in the NMR. PMID:27161380

  18. Chemosensitivity measurements of human tumour cells by soft agar assays are influenced by the culture conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Endresen, L.; Tveit, K. M.; Rugstad, H. E.; Pihl, A.

    1985-01-01

    To investigate the influence of culture conditions on the in vitro responses of tumour cells to anticancer drugs, the sensitivities observed with the soft agar methods of Hamburger & Salmon (1977) (H-S) and of Courtenay & Mills (1978) (C-M) were compared. In all cases the ID50 values were determined from dose-response curves. Six human tumour cell lines exposed to 10 different agents, and 9 patients' melanomas exposed to 5 different agents, were examined. In the studies of cell lines the H-S method gave higher sensitivity values than the C-M method in 38 out of 52 cases, whereas in 14 cases the results were the same. In the patients' tumours the H-S method gave higher sensitivity in 21 of 35 cases, equal sensitivity in 11, and lower sensitivity in 3 cases. In many instances the ID50 values obtained with the two test systems differed by factors of 10 or more, both in the case of cell lines and tumour specimens. Systematic alterations in the culture conditions indicated that the presence or absence of rat erythrocytes is the most important factor responsible for the differences observed. Also, other factors, such as supplements (in the H-S method) and the use of different serum types, appeared to influence both colony growth and chemosensitivity. PMID:4005141

  19. Distinct EMT programs control normal mammary stem cells and tumour-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xin; Tam, Wai Leong; Shibue, Tsukasa; Kaygusuz, Yasemin; Reinhardt, Ferenc; Ng Eaton, Elinor; Weinberg, Robert A

    2015-09-10

    Tumour-initiating cells (TICs) are responsible for metastatic dissemination and clinical relapse in a variety of cancers. Analogies between TICs and normal tissue stem cells have led to the proposal that activation of the normal stem-cell program within a tissue serves as the major mechanism for generating TICs. Supporting this notion, we and others previously established that the Slug epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor (EMT-TF), a member of the Snail family, serves as a master regulator of the gland-reconstituting activity of normal mammary stem cells, and that forced expression of Slug in collaboration with Sox9 in breast cancer cells can efficiently induce entrance into the TIC state. However, these earlier studies focused on xenograft models with cultured cell lines and involved ectopic expression of EMT-TFs, often at non-physiological levels. Using genetically engineered knock-in reporter mouse lines, here we show that normal gland-reconstituting mammary stem cells residing in the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and breast TICs originating in the luminal layer exploit the paralogous EMT-TFs Slug and Snail, respectively, which induce distinct EMT programs. Broadly, our findings suggest that the seemingly similar stem-cell programs operating in TICs and normal stem cells of the corresponding normal tissue are likely to differ significantly in their details. PMID:26331542

  20. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Tandra, Varun Sharma; Kotha, Krishna Mohan Reddy; Satyanarayana, Moorthy Gadisetti Venkata; Vadlamani, Kali Varaprasad; Yerravalli, Vyjayanthi

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge. PMID:26106496

  1. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases.

    PubMed

    Tandra, Varun Sharma; Kotha, Krishna Mohan Reddy; Satyanarayana, Moorthy Gadisetti Venkata; Vadlamani, Kali Varaprasad; Yerravalli, Vyjayanthi

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge. PMID:26106496

  2. Whole-exome sequencing reveals the mutational spectrum of testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Kevin; Summersgill, Brenda; Yost, Shawn; Sultana, Razvan; Labreche, Karim; Dudakia, Darshna; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Al-Saadi, Reem; Broderick, Peter; Turner, Nicholas C; Houlston, Richard S; Huddart, Robert; Shipley, Janet; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) are the most common cancer in young men. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 42 TGCTs to comprehensively study the cancer's mutational profile. The mutation rate is uniformly low in all of the tumours (mean 0.5 mutations per Mb) as compared with common cancers, consistent with the embryological origin of TGCT. In addition to expected copy number gain of chromosome 12p and mutation of KIT, we identify recurrent mutations in the tumour suppressor gene CDC27 (11.9%). Copy number analysis reveals recurring amplification of the spermatocyte development gene FSIP2 (15.3%) and a 0.4 Mb region at Xq28 (15.3%). Two treatment-refractory patients are shown to harbour XRCC2 mutations, a gene strongly implicated in defining cisplatin resistance. Our findings provide further insights into genes involved in the development and progression of TGCT. PMID:25609015

  3. Whole exome sequencing reveals the mutational spectrum of testicular germ cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Summersgill, Brenda; Yost, Shawn; Sultana, Razvan; Labreche, Karim; Dudakia, Darshna; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Al-Saadi, Reem; Broderick, Peter; Turner, Nicholas C.; Houlston, Richard S; Huddart, Robert; Shipley, Janet; Turnbull, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) are the most common cancer in young men. Here we perform whole exome sequencing of 42 TGCTs to comprehensively study the mutational profile of TGCT. The mutation rate is uniformly low in all of the tumours (mean 0.5 mutations per megabase [Mb]) as compared to the common cancers, consistent with the embryological origin of TGCT. In addition to expected copy number gain of chromosome 12p and mutation of KIT we identify recurrent mutations in the tumour suppressor gene CDC27 (11.9%). Copy number analysis reveals recurring amplification of the spermatocyte development gene FSIP2 (15.3%) and a 0.4Mb region at Xq28 (15.3%). Two treatment-refractory patients are shown to harbour XRCC2 mutations, a gene strongly implicated in defining cisplatin resistance. Our findings provide further insights into genes involved in the development and progression of TGCT. PMID:25609015

  4. Intralymphatic mRNA vaccine induces CD8 T-cell responses that inhibit the growth of mucosally located tumours

    PubMed Central

    Bialkowski, Lukasz; van Weijnen, Alexia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Renmans, Dries; Daszkiewicz, Lidia; Heirman, Carlo; Stangé, Geert; Breckpot, Karine; Aerts, Joeri L.; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-01-01

    The lack of appropriate mouse models is likely one of the reasons of a limited translational success rate of therapeutic vaccines against cervical cancer, as rapidly growing ectopic tumours are commonly used for preclinical studies. In this work, we demonstrate that the tumour microenvironment of TC-1 tumours differs significantly depending on the anatomical location of tumour lesions (i.e. subcutaneously, in the lungs and in the genital tract). Our data demonstrate that E7-TriMix mRNA vaccine-induced CD8+ T lymphocytes migrate into the tumour nest and control tumour growth, although they do not express mucosa-associated markers such as CD103 or CD49a. We additionally show that despite the presence of the antigen-specific T cells in the tumour lesions, the therapeutic outcomes in the genital tract model remain limited. Here, we report that such a hostile tumour microenvironment can be reversed by cisplatin treatment, leading to a complete regression of clinically relevant tumours when combined with mRNA immunization. We thereby demonstrate the necessity of utilizing clinically relevant models for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapies and the importance of a simultaneous combination of anticancer immune response induction with targeting of tumour environment. PMID:26931556

  5. Intralymphatic mRNA vaccine induces CD8 T-cell responses that inhibit the growth of mucosally located tumours.

    PubMed

    Bialkowski, Lukasz; van Weijnen, Alexia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Renmans, Dries; Daszkiewicz, Lidia; Heirman, Carlo; Stangé, Geert; Breckpot, Karine; Aerts, Joeri L; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-01-01

    The lack of appropriate mouse models is likely one of the reasons of a limited translational success rate of therapeutic vaccines against cervical cancer, as rapidly growing ectopic tumours are commonly used for preclinical studies. In this work, we demonstrate that the tumour microenvironment of TC-1 tumours differs significantly depending on the anatomical location of tumour lesions (i.e. subcutaneously, in the lungs and in the genital tract). Our data demonstrate that E7-TriMix mRNA vaccine-induced CD8(+) T lymphocytes migrate into the tumour nest and control tumour growth, although they do not express mucosa-associated markers such as CD103 or CD49a. We additionally show that despite the presence of the antigen-specific T cells in the tumour lesions, the therapeutic outcomes in the genital tract model remain limited. Here, we report that such a hostile tumour microenvironment can be reversed by cisplatin treatment, leading to a complete regression of clinically relevant tumours when combined with mRNA immunization. We thereby demonstrate the necessity of utilizing clinically relevant models for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapies and the importance of a simultaneous combination of anticancer immune response induction with targeting of tumour environment. PMID:26931556

  6. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy. PMID:27464652

  7. Redirecting adenoviruses to tumour cells using therapeutic antibodies: Generation of a versatile human bispecific adaptor.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Snezana; Beale, Emma V; Bonomelli, Camille; Easthope, Iona S; Pritchard, Laura K; Seabright, Gemma E; Caputo, Alessandro T; Scanlan, Christopher N; Dalziel, Martin; Crispin, Max

    2015-12-01

    Effective use of adenovirus-5 (Ad5) in cancer therapy is heavily dependent on the degree to which the virus's natural tropism can be subverted to one that favours tumour cells. This is normally achieved through either engineering of the viral fiber knob or the use of bispecific adaptors that display both adenovirus and tumour antigen receptors. One of the main limitations of these strategies is the need to tailor each engineering event to any given tumour antigen. Here, we explore bispecific adaptors that can utilise established anti-cancer therapeutic antibodies. Conjugates containing bacterially derived antibody binding motifs are efficient at retargeting virus to antibody targets. Here, we develop a humanized strategy whereby we synthesise a re-targeting adaptor based on a chimeric Ad5 ligand/antibody receptor construct. This adaptor acts as a molecular bridge analogous to therapeutic antibody mediated cross-linking of cytotoxic effector and tumour cells during immunotherapy. As a proof or principle, we demonstrate how this adaptor allows efficient viral recognition and entry into carcinoma cells through the therapeutic monoclonal antibodies Herceptin/trastuzumab and bavituximab. We show that targeting can be augmented by use of contemporary antibody enhancement strategies such as the selective elimination of competing serum IgG using "receptor refocusing" enzymes and we envisage that further improvements are achievable by enhancing the affinities between the adaptor and its ligands. Humanized bispecific adaptors offer the promise of a versatile retargeting technology that can exploit both clinically approved adenovirus and therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26391350

  8. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy. PMID:27464652

  9. Investigating the role of tumour cell derived iNOS on tumour growth and vasculature in vivo using a tetracycline regulated expression system.

    PubMed

    Papaevangelou, Efthymia; Whitley, Guy S; Johnstone, Alan P; Robinson, Simon P; Howe, Franklyn A

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical signalling molecule involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Both tumouricidal and tumour promoting effects have been attributed to NO, making its role in cancer biology controversial and unclear. To investigate the specific role of tumour-derived NO in vascular development, C6 glioma cells were genetically modified to include a doxycycline regulated gene expression system that controls the expression of an antisense RNA to inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to manipulate endogenous iNOS expression. Xenografts of these cells were propagated in the presence or absence of doxycycline. Susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), initially with a carbogen (95% O2 /5% CO2 ) breathing challenge and subsequently an intravascular blood pool contrast agent, was used to assess haemodynamic vasculature (ΔR2 *) and fractional blood volume (fBV), and correlated with histopathological assessment of tumour vascular density, maturation and function. Inhibition of NO production in C6 gliomas led to significant growth delay and inhibition of vessel maturation. Parametric fBV maps were used to identify vascularised regions from which the carbogen-induced ΔR2 * was measured and found to be positively correlated with vessel maturation, quantified ex vivo using fluorescence microscopy for endothelial and perivascular cell staining. These data suggest that tumour-derived iNOS is an important mediator of tumour growth and vessel maturation, hence a promising target for anti-vascular cancer therapies. The combination of ΔR2 * response to carbogen and fBV MRI can provide a marker of tumour vessel maturation that could be applied to non-invasively monitor treatment response to iNOS inhibitors. PMID:26756734

  10. Simian adenovirus type 7 (SA-7) induces tumours of nerve-supporting or paraneural cell origin in newborn hamsters.

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaki, S.; Kato, K.

    1989-01-01

    Simian adenovirus type 7 (SA-7) was found to induce tumours originating from nerve-supporting or paraneural cells in newborn hamsters, regardless of injection site or tissues. SA-7 induces glioblastomas characterized by definite localization (subependymal regions) and its main cell type, bipolar spongioblast-like cells, in the brain of hamsters inoculated as newborns. When the eyes of newborn hamsters were directly inoculated, SA-7 failed to induce retinoblastoma (0/27), but retro or peri-bulbar SA-7 tumours frequently occurred in tissues closely related to the peripheral nerve apparatus, including the oculomotor nerve or ciliary ganglion. These tumour cells were situated like stromal cells in these nerve tissues. The histological features of the orbital tumours were similar to those of SA-7-induced subcutaneous tumours but not to brain tumours. In contrast with other hamster brain tumours induced by human adenovirus type 12 or human papova JC virus, medulloepithelioma or medulloblastoma, SA-7 induced tumours exhibit distinctive histological and localization characteristics. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6a Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12a PMID:2765394

  11. Sertoliform cystadenoma: a rare benign tumour of the rete testis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Sertoliform cystadenoma of the rete testis represents an uncommon benign tumour. They appear in patients from 26 to 62 years of age. We describe a case of a 66-year-old man with a tumour in the area of the epididymal head. The tumour markers were not increased. Under the assumption of a malignant testicular tumour an inguinal orchiectomy was performed. The cut surface of this tumour was of grey/white color and showed small cysts. The tumour consisted of two compartments. The epithelial like tumour cells showed a sertoliform growth pattern and cystic dilatations. In between the tumour cells repeatedly actin expressing sclerotic areas could be recognized as the second tumour component. Proliferative activity was not increased. Immunohistochemically the tumour cells were positiv for inhibin, S-100, and CD 99. Alpha feto protein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) and placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) as well as synaptophysin, epithelial membrane antigene (EMA), and BCL-2 were not expressed. As far as we know this is the sixth reported case of this tumour. Because of the benign nature of this tumour the correct diagnosis is important for the intra- and postoperative management. Here we present a case of this rare tumour and discuss potential differential diagnosis. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1956026143857335 PMID:23406299

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles as bimodal tools in magnetically induced labelling and magnetic heating of tumour cells: an in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettering, M.; Winter, J.; Zeisberger, M.; Bremer-Streck, S.; Oehring, H.; Bergemann, C.; Alexiou, C.; Hergt, R.; Halbhuber, K. J.; Kaiser, W. A.; Hilger, I.

    2007-05-01

    Localized magnetic heating treatments (hyperthermia, thermal ablation) using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles continue to be an active area of cancer research. The present study uses magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) as bimodal tools and combines magnetically induced cell labelling and magnetic heating. The main focus was to assess if a selective and higher MNP accumulation within tumour cells due to magnetic labelling (max. 56 and 83 mT) and consequently a larger heating effect occurs after exposure to an alternating magnetic field (magnetic heating: frequency 400 kHz, amplitude 24.6 kA m-1) in order to eliminate labelled tumour cells effectively. The results demonstrate that the magnetically based cellular MNP uptake by human adenocarcinoma cells is due to suitable magnetic field gradients in vitro which intensify the temperature increase generated during magnetic heating. A significantly (P<=0.05) enhanced MNP cell uptake due to 83 mT labelling compared to controls or to 56 mT labelling was observed. Our experiments required the following conditions, namely a cell concentration of 2.5 × 107 cells ml-1, a minimum MNP concentration of 0.32 mg Fe ml-1 culture medium, and an incubation time of 24 h, to reach this effect as well as for the significantly enlarged heating effects to occur.

  13. Challenges in imaging and histopathological assessment of a giant cell tumour with secondary aneurysmal cyst in the patella

    PubMed Central

    Low, Soo Fin; Hanafiah, Mohammad; Nurismah, Md Isa; Suraya, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    The patella is an uncommon site for all primary and metastatic bone tumours and primary intra-osseous tumours of the patella are very rare. A majority of the patella tumours are benign. We report a patient with a sudden onset swelling and pain of the right knee following a staircase fall. The plain radiograph showed an expansile multiseptated patella lesion and it was further assessed with an MRI. The radiological findings and the initial histopathological features from a limited sample were suggestive of a primary aneurysmal bone cyst. However, the final histopathological diagnosis from a more adequate specimen was a giant cell tumour with a secondary aneurysmal bone cyst. PMID:24057334

  14. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhar, Kaushik; Mallick, Sanjaya K; Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Das Saha, Krishna; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD) in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:27293892

  15. Induction of manganese superoxide dismutase by tumour necrosis factor-alpha in human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Karube-Harada, A; Sugino, N; Kashida, S; Takiguchi, S; Takayama, H; Yamagata, Y; Nakamura, Y; Kato, H

    2001-11-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) on superoxide dismutase (SOD) expression in human endometrial stromal cells (ESC) and to determine whether there is a difference in responsiveness to TNFalpha between ESC and decidualized ESC. TNFalpha increased manganese-SOD (Mn-SOD) mRNA level and Mn-SOD activity in a dose-dependent manner in ESC. The concentration of TNFalpha required for an effect was lower for decidualized ESC than for non-decidualized ESC. TNFalpha had no effect on copper-zinc-SOD (Cu,Zn-SOD) expression in either type of cell. Incubation of ESC with actinomycin D, an RNA synthesis inhibitor, blocked TNFalpha-induced Mn-SOD mRNA expression, but cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, had no effect. H7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), also inhibited TNFalpha-stimulated Mn-SOD mRNA expression in both types of cells. These findings suggest that TNFalpha-induced Mn-SOD expression is regulated at the transcription level and mediated by PKC-dependent phosphorylation and that de-novo protein synthesis is not required for the TNFalpha effect. In summary, TNFalpha induces Mn-SOD expression in human ESC. This phenomenon may be important for protection of ESC from cytokine-mediated oxidative stress. PMID:11675473

  16. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhar, Kaushik; Mallick, Sanjaya K.; Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Das Saha, Krishna; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD) in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:27293892

  17. Regulation of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase by methionine in human tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kokkinakis, D. M.; von Wronski, M. A.; Vuong, T. H.; Brent, T. P.; Schold, S. C.

    1997-01-01

    Methionine (MET)-dependent cell lines require MET to proliferate, and homocysteine (HCY) does not act as a substitute for this requirement. From six O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT)-efficient (mer+) cell lines tested, two medulloblastomas (Daoy and D-341) and a lung non-small-cell adenocarcinoma with metastatic potential (H-1623) were most sensitive to MET deprivation, while two glioblastomas (U-138, D-263) and a small-cell lung carcinoma H-1944 were moderately to weakly dependent. Regardless of the degree of MET dependence, all of these lines down-regulated their MGMT activity within 48-72 h of transfer from MET+HCY- to MET-HCY+ media, long before the eradication of the culture. Reduction of MGMT activity was due to a decline of both MGMT mRNA and protein levels. However, the reduction was not related to the methylation status of the MGMT promoter at the SmaI site or the HpaII sites in the body of the gene; such sites have been shown to be associated in MGMT regulation and in defining the mer phenotype. MET-dependent, mer+ tumour cells cultured in MET-HCY+ were more sensitive to BCNU (IC50 = 5-10 microM) than those cultured in MET+HCY-(IC50 = 45-90 microM), while MET-independent or mer- cell lines were unaffected. This indicates that reduction of MGMT, imposed by the absence of MET, renders mer+ tumour cells more susceptible to alkylating agents. The relatively selective suppression of MGMT activity in mer+ MET-dependent tumour cells, in combination with the inability of such cells to proliferate in the absence of MET, may lead to the development of more effective treatment strategies for mer+ MET-dependent tumours. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9062396

  18. Manipulation of regulatory T cells and antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirin; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chakraborty, Nitya G

    2015-01-01

    The most potent killing machinery in our immune system is the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL). Since the possibility for self-destruction by these cells is high, many regulatory activities exist to prevent autoimmune destruction by these cells. A tumour (cancer) grows from the cells of the body and is tolerated by the body's immune system. Yet, it has been possible to generate tumour-associated antigen (TAA) -specific CTL that are also self-antigen specific in vivo, to achieve a degree of therapeutic efficacy. Tumour-associated antigen-specific T-cell tolerance through pathways of self-tolerance generation represents a significant challenge to successful immunotherapy. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T cells, referred to as T regulatory (Treg) cells, are selected in the thymus as controllers of the anti-self repertoire. These cells are referred to as natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells. According to the new consensus (Nature Immunology 2013; 14:307–308) these cells are to be termed as (tTreg). There is another class of CD4+ Treg cells also involved in regulatory function in the periphery, also phenotypically CD4+ CD25±, classified as induced Treg (iTreg) cells. These cells are to be termed as peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells. In vitro-induced Treg cells with suppressor function should be termed as iTreg. These different Treg cells differ in their requirements for activation and in their mode of action. The current challenges are to determine the degree of specificity of these Treg cells in recognizing the same TAA as the CTL population and to circumvent their regulatory constraints so as to achieve robust CTL responses against cancer. PMID:25243729

  19. Influence of femtosecond laser radiation on cells of the transplantable tumour Krebs-2

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Popova, N A; Nikolin, V P; Kaledin, V I; Kirpichnikov, A V; Pestryakov, Efim V

    2012-06-30

    The influence of femtosecond radiation of a titaniumsapphire laser on cells of the transplantable ascitic tumour Krebs-2 was studied. After in vitro irradiation by the pulsed fundamentalharmonic radiation with the wavelength 800 nm, pulse duration 30 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz, mean power 100 and 300 mW and exposure time 3 min, as well as by the second-harmonic radiation (40 nm, 50 fs, 120 mW), all cells were diffusely stained by the vital stain trypan blue, which may be an evidence of their death or abnormalities of membrane permeability. However, implantation of such cells to experimental animals led to formation of tumours at the transplantation site with the kinetics slightly different from the control one. In the group of mice to which the cells were inoculated after irradiation with second harmonic pulses of titanium-sapphire laser the inhibition of tumour growth was observed due to partial death of cells under the action of UV spectral components. To explain the mechanism of the observed phenomenon the possibility of pore formation (photoporation) in the cell membrane, described earlier in the papers on foreign DNA transfection into cells, is considered.

  20. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature. PMID:26564735

  1. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    PubMed

    Whelan, M C; Casey, G; MacConmara, M; Lederer, J A; Soden, D; Collins, J K; Tangney, M; O'Sullivan, G C

    2010-07-01

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development. PMID:20186173

  2. Evaluation of pretreatment serum interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha as a potential biomarker for recurrence in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Brailo, Vlaho; Vidovic-Juras, Danica; Vucicevic-Boras, Vanja; Milenovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) constitutes 3 percent of all cancers with predominant occurrence in middle aged and elderly males. Tumour recurrence worsens disease prognosis and decreases quality of life in patients with OSCC. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) have been suggested to play a certain role in variety of tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of pretreatment serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels on tumour recurrence in patients with OSCC in order to identify potential biomarkers for the early detection of disease recurrence. Material and Methods The patients with newly diagnosed OSCC were treated and followed from the first visit from November 2006 until January 2008. Serum IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations were measured. The records of the patients were re-examined in July 2012 and data were recorded about cancer characteristics and tumour recurrence. Disease free survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Serum IL-6 was shown as an independent risk factor for tumour recurrence. Conclusions Pretreatment serum IL-6 concentration may be a useful biomarker for identification of OSCC patients with increased risk of the disease recurrence. Key words: Serum IL-6, serum TNF-α, oral cancer, recurrence. PMID:25858079

  3. Embryonic reversions and lineage infidelities in tumour cells: genome-based models and role of genetic instability

    PubMed Central

    Bignold, Leon P

    2005-01-01

    Reversions to ‘embryonic precursor’-type cells and infidelities of tumour cell lineage (including metaplasias) have been recognized as aspects of various tumour types since the 19th century. Since then, evidence of these phenomena has been obtained from numerous clinical, biochemical, immunological and molecular biological studies. In particular, microarray studies have suggested that ‘aberrant’ expressions of relevant genes are common. An unexplained aspect of the results of these studies is that, in many tumour types, the embryonic reversion or lineage infidelity only occurs in a proportion of cases. As a parallel development during the molecular biological investigation of tumours over the last several decades, genetic instability has been found much more marked, at least in some preparations of tumour cells, than that identified by means of previous karyotypic investigations of tumours. This study reviews examples of embryonic reversion and lineage infidelity phenomena, which have derived from the various lines of investigation of cancer over the last 150 or so years. Four categories of circumstances of the occurrence of embryonic reversions or lineage infidelities have been identified – (i) as part of the defining phenotype of the tumour, and hence being presumably integral to the tumour type, (ii) present ab initio in only some cases of the tumour type, and presumably being regularly associated with, but incidental to, the essential features of the tumour type, (iii) occurring later in the course of the disease and thus being possibly a manifestation of in vivo genetic instability and ‘tumour progression’ and (iv) arising probably by genetic instability, during the processes, especially cell culture, associated with ex vivo investigations. Genomic models are described which might account for the origin of these phenomena in each of these circumstances. PMID:15810978

  4. Evaluation of miRNA-expression and clinical tumour parameters in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).

    PubMed

    Moratin, J; Hartmann, S; Brands, R; Brisam, M; Mutzbauer, G; Scholz, C; Seher, A; Müller-Richter, U; Kübler, A C; Linz, C

    2016-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) is the sixth most common malignancy worldwide. The past decades have not led to substantial improvement in diagnosis and therapy. Analysis of miRNA-expression may help to determine the progression profiles and outcomes of many different diseases, including HNSCC. Therefore, in this investigation, 43 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma were micro-dissected, analysed for expression of 30 miRNAs and were compared with non-tumorous tissue. Furthermore, correlation analysis was performed, investigating possible correlations of miRNA-expression and patient or tumour-linked data, such as age, sex, tumour stage and size. miRNA extraction from FFPE samples functioned well for OSCC, and several miRNAs were differently expressed in tumours compared with non-tumorous tissue (i.e., miR-99*; miR-224; miR-205*), indicating their possible utility as biomarkers. Moreover, some miRNAs showed significant correlations with clinical and pathological data (e.g. tumour size: miR-3156, P = 0.033; T-stage: miR-212, P = 0.0009). PMID:27210505

  5. The effect of calcium ions on the glycolytic activity of Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Bygrave, F. L.

    1966-01-01

    1. Added Ca2+ inhibited lactate formation from sugar phosphates by intact Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells. Lactate formation from glucose by these cells was unaffected by added Ca2+. 2. The Ca2+ inhibition of lactate formation by intact cells occurred in the extracellular medium. 3. Intact ascites-tumour cells did not take up Ca2+ in vitro. 4. Glycolysis of sugar phosphates by cell extracts as well as pyruvate formation from 3-phosphoglycerate and phosphoenolpyruvate was inhibited by Ca2+. 5. It was concluded that Ca2+ inhibited the pyruvate-kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) reaction. Further, Ca2+ inhibition of pyruvate kinase could be correlated with the overall inhibition of glycolysis. 6. Concentrations of Ca2+ usually present in Krebs–Ringer buffers, inhibited glycolysis and pyruvate-kinase activity by approx. 50%. 7. The inhibition of glycolysis by added Ca2+ could be partially reversed by K+ and completely reversed by Mg2+ or by stoicheiometric amounts of EDTA. 8. The hypothesis is advanced that the inability of tumour cells to take up Ca2+ is a factor contributing towards their high rate of glycolysis. PMID:6007855

  6. Minimal residual disease in breast cancer: an overview of circulating and disseminated tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, A; McInnes, L M; Jacobsen, N; Thompson, E W; Saunders, C M

    2016-08-01

    Within the field of cancer research, focus on the study of minimal residual disease (MRD) in the context of carcinoma has grown exponentially over the past several years. MRD encompasses circulating tumour cells (CTCs)-cancer cells on the move via the circulatory or lymphatic system, disseminated tumour cells (DTCs)-cancer cells which have escaped into a distant site (most studies have focused on bone marrow), and resistant cancer cells surviving therapy-be they local or distant, all of which may ultimately give rise to local relapse or overt metastasis. Initial studies simply recorded the presence and number of CTCs and DTCs; however recent advances are allowing assessment of the relationship between their persistence, patient prognosis and the biological properties of MRD, leading to a better understanding of the metastatic process. Technological developments for the isolation and analysis of circulating and disseminated tumour cells continue to emerge, creating new opportunities to monitor disease progression and perhaps alter disease outcome. This review outlines our knowledge to date on both measurement and categorisation of MRD in the form of CTCs and DTCs with respect to how this relates to cancer outcomes, and the hurdles and future of research into both CTCs and DTCs. PMID:27189371

  7. Tumour progression of human neuroblastoma cells tagged with a lacZ marker gene: earliest events at ectopic injection sites.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, N. R.; Lewandowska, K.; Culp, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Human Platt neuroblastoma cells were transfected with the marker gene, bacterial lacZ, to track cells at the earliest stages after ectopic injection at two different sites in athymic nude mice. Three clones (LZPt-1,-2 and -3) of differing morphologies were analysed. All clones yielded large primary tumours subcutaneously or intradermally with similar latency. While LZPt-2 and -3 clones generated well-staining primary tumours, LZPt-1 cells yielded many non-staining tumours, indicating greater instability of lacZ expression for this clone in situ (stability of lacZ expression in culture was similar for all three clones). After s.c. or intradermal injections, tumour cells were tracked for 1 h to > 3 weeks (palpable) to evaluate the topology and population expansion characteristics at the earliest times. From 1 h to 2 days, tumour cells were concentrated in central masses with 'crinkly hair' distributions emanating from the periphery. Between 3 and 7 days, these 'crinkly hair' patterns were cleared from the tissue, leaving dense ovoid patterns of tumour cells. These concentrations of cells expanded collectively, not by division of one or a few cells, but by division of many cells. For clone LZPt-1, cells stained well with X-gal for 2-3 days; by 7 days, most cells were non-staining. Evidence suggests that lacZ expression is turned off in these tumour cells, rather than a lacZ- cell type clonally dominating the population. For all three clones, tumour cells remained rounded and did not spread in any tissue environment at all time points, indicating very different matrix adhesion mechanisms operating in situ compared with their distinctive spreading patterns in culture. Angioneogenesis near primary tumours became evident by 2-3 days, leading to extensive vascularisation by 1-2 weeks. Overall, these studies indicate common tumour progression characteristics for three different clones of human neuroblastoma, insight into lacZ instability mechanisms operating in one of these

  8. CA 15–3 cell lines and tissue expression in canine mammary cancer and the correlation between serum levels and tumour histological grade

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mammary tumours are the most common malignancy diagnosed in female dogs and a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in this species. Carbohydrate antigen (CA) 15–3 is a mucinous glycoprotein aberrantly over-expressed in human mammary neoplasms and one of the most widely used serum tumour markers in women with breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the antigenic analogies of human and canine CA 15–3 and to assess its expression in canine mammary cancer tissues and cell lines. Immunohistochemical expression of CA 15–3 was evaluated in 7 canine mammary cancer cell lines and 50 malignant mammary tumours. As a positive control, the human breast carcinoma cell line MCF7 and tissue were used. To assess CA 15–3 staining, a semi-quantitative method was applied. To confirm the specificity and cross-reactivity of an anti-human CA 15–3 antibody to canine tissues, an immunoblot analysis was performed. We also investigated serum CA 15–3 activity to establish whether its expression could be assigned to several tumour characteristics to evaluate its potential use as a serum tumour marker in the canine mammary oncology field. Results Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CA 15–3 expression in all examined canine mammary cancer cell lines, whereas its expression was confirmed by immunoblot only in the most invasive cells (CMT-W1, CMT-W1M, CMT-W2 and CMT-W2M). In the tissue, an immunohistochemical staining pattern was observed in 34 (68%) of the malignant tumours. A high statistical correlation (p = 0.0019) between serum CA 15–3 levels and the degree of tumour proliferation and differentiation was shown, which indicates that the values of this serum marker increase as the tumour stage progresses. Conclusions The results of this study reveal that CA 15–3 is expressed in both canine mammary tumour cell lines and tissues and that serum levels significantly correlate with the histological grade of the malignancy. PMID:22726603

  9. Increased microtubule assembly rates influence chromosomal instability in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ertych, Norman; Stolz, Ailine; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Weichert, Wilko; Kaulfuß, Silke; Burfeind, Peter; Aigner, Achim; Wordeman, Linda; Bastians, Holger

    2014-08-01

    Chromosomal instability (CIN) is defined as the perpetual missegregation of whole chromosomes during mitosis and represents a hallmark of human cancer. However, the mechanisms influencing CIN and its consequences on tumour growth are largely unknown. We identified an increase in microtubule plus-end assembly rates as a mechanism influencing CIN in colorectal cancer cells. This phenotype is induced by overexpression of the oncogene AURKA or by loss of the tumour suppressor gene CHK2, a genetic constitution found in 73% of human colorectal cancers. Increased microtubule assembly rates are associated with transient abnormalities in mitotic spindle geometry promoting the generation of lagging chromosomes and influencing CIN. Reconstitution of proper microtubule assembly rates by chemical or genetic means suppresses CIN and thereby, unexpectedly, accelerates tumour growth in vitro and in vivo. Thus, we identify a fundamental mechanism influencing CIN in cancer cells and reveal its adverse consequence on tumour growth. PMID:24976383

  10. Distinct effects of human glioblastoma immunoregulatory molecules programmed cell death ligand-1 (PDL-1) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) on tumour-specific T cell functions.

    PubMed

    Avril, Tony; Saikali, Stéphan; Vauleon, Elodie; Jary, Anne; Hamlat, Abderrahmane; De Tayrac, Marie; Mosser, Jean; Quillien, Véronique

    2010-08-25

    Immunotherapy is a promising new treatment for patients suffering from glioma, in particular glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, tumour cells use different mechanisms to escape the immune responses induced by the treatment. As many other tumours, gliomas express or secrete several immunosuppressive molecules that regulate immune cell functions. In this study, we first analysed FasL, HLA-G, IDO, PDL-1 and TGF-beta1, -beta2 and -beta3 expression by transcriptomic microarray analysis in a series of 20 GBM samples and found respectively 15%, 60%, 85%, 30%, 70%, 80% and 35% of positive specimens. mRNA expression was then confirmed in 10 GBM primary cell lines and 2 immortalised cell lines U251 and U87MG. Furthermore, the protein expression of PDL-1, IDO activity and TGF-beta2 secretion were found on most of the untreated GBM primary cell lines. Remarkably, treatment with IFN-gamma increased the PDL-1 cell surface expression and the IDO activity, but reduced the TGF-beta2 secretion of GBM cell lines. We finally analysed the immunosuppressive effects of IDO, PDL-1 and TGF-beta1-3 by measuring IFN-gamma production and cell cytotoxicity activity of tumour antigen-specific T cells. PDL-1 partially affected the IFN-gamma production of antigen-specific T cells in response to GBM primary cell lines, and IDO inhibited lymphocyte proliferation induced by lectins. None of these molecules directly affected the T cell cytotoxicity function. Due to the functional role of PDL-1 and IDO molecules expressed by GBM cells, one could expect that blocking these molecules in the immunotherapy strategies would reinforce the efficiency of these treatments of GBM patients. PMID:20493562

  11. Monte Carlo based protocol for cell survival and tumour control probability in BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Sung-Joon

    1999-02-01

    A mathematical model to calculate the theoretical cell survival probability (nominally, the cell survival fraction) is developed to evaluate preclinical treatment conditions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A treatment condition is characterized by the neutron beam spectra, single or bilateral exposure, and the choice of boron carrier drug (boronophenylalanine (BPA) or boron sulfhydryl hydride (BSH)). The cell survival probability defined from Poisson statistics is expressed with the cell-killing yield, the (n, ) reaction density, and the tolerable neutron fluence. The radiation transport calculation from the neutron source to tumours is carried out using Monte Carlo methods: (i) reactor-based BNCT facility modelling to yield the neutron beam library at an irradiation port; (ii) dosimetry to limit the neutron fluence below a tolerance dose (10.5 Gy-Eq); (iii) calculation of the (n, ) reaction density in tumours. A shallow surface tumour could be effectively treated by single exposure producing an average cell survival probability of - for probable ranges of the cell-killing yield for the two drugs, while a deep tumour will require bilateral exposure to achieve comparable cell kills at depth. With very pure epithermal beams eliminating thermal, low epithermal and fast neutrons, the cell survival can be decreased by factors of 2-10 compared with

  12. Commensal bacteria drive endogenous transformation and tumour stem cell marker expression through a bystander effect

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingmin; Yang, Yonghong; Huycke, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Commensal bacteria and innate immunity play a major role in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC). We propose that selected commensals polarise colon macrophages to produce endogenous mutagens that initiate chromosomal instability (CIN), lead to expression of progenitor and tumour stem cell markers, and drive CRC through a bystander effect. Design Primary murine colon epithelial cells were repetitively exposed to Enterococcus faecalis-infected macrophages, or purified trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE)—an endogenous mutagen and spindle poison produced by macrophages. CIN, gene expression, growth as allografts in immunodeficient mice were examined for clones and expression of markers confirmed using interleukin (IL) 10 knockout mice colonised by E. faecalis. Results Primary colon epithelial cells exposed to polarised macrophages or 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal developed CIN and were transformed after 10 weekly treatments. In immunodeficient mice, 8 of 25 transformed clones grew as poorly differentiated carcinomas with 3 tumours invading skin and/or muscle. All tumours stained for cytokeratins confirming their epithelial cell origin. Gene expression profiling of clones showed alterations in 3 to 7 cancer driver genes per clone. Clones also strongly expressed stem/progenitor cell markers Ly6A and Ly6E. Although not differentially expressed in clones, murine allografts positively stained for the tumour stem cell marker doublecortin-like kinase 1. Doublecortin-like kinase 1 and Ly6A/E were expressed by epithelial cells in colon biopsies for areas of inflamed and dysplastic tissue from E. faecalis-colonised IL-10 knockout mice. Conclusions These results validate a novel mechanism for CRC that involves endogenous CIN and cellular transformation arising through a microbiome-driven bystander effect. PMID:24906974

  13. Mutant p53 proteins alter cancer cell secretome and tumour microenvironment: Involvement in cancer invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Marco; Pacchiana, Raffaella; Butera, Giovanna; D'Orazi, Gabriella; Scarpa, Aldo; Donadelli, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    An ever-increasing number of studies highlight the role of mutant p53 proteins in the alteration of cancer cell secretome and in the modification of tumour microenvironment, sustaining an invasive phenotype of cancer cell. The knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay between mutant p53 proteins and the microenvironment is becoming fundamental for the identification of both efficient anticancer therapeutic strategies and novel serum biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the novel findings concerning the regulation of secreted molecules by cancer cells bearing mutant TP53 gene. In particular, we highlight data from available literature, suggesting that mutant p53 proteins are able to (i) alter the secretion of enzymes involved in the modulation of extracellular matrix components; (ii) alter the secretion of inflammatory cytokines; (iii) increase the extracellular acidification; and (iv) regulate the crosstalk between cancer and stromal cells. PMID:27045472

  14. Rational peptide-based tumour vaccine development and T cell monitoring.

    PubMed

    Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Letsch, Anne; Schmittel, Alexander; Asemissen, Anne-Marie; Thiel, Eckhard; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2003-12-01

    Antigen-specific vaccination is a promising emerging treatment option for cancer patients. Results from early clinical vaccination trials with tumour peptides in patients with metastatic disease have shown tumour regressions in few patients usually with limited disease. Current clinical studies focus on the development of more potent vaccination strategies and on the vaccination of patients with occult or small volume metastatic disease. The novel generation of sensitive T-cell assays allowing direct quantitation and characterisation of specific T cells provide an essential tool for further systematic clinical development of vaccine protocols. There is accumulating evidence from clinical cancer vaccination trials of a relation between the induction of specific T cells and clinical efficacy. PMID:15001161

  15. Immunohistochemical Expression of the Pluripotency Factor OCT4 in Canine Mast Cell Tumours.

    PubMed

    Vargas, T H M; Pulz, L H; Barra, C N; Kleeb, S R; Xavier, J G; Catão-Dias, J L; Fukumasu, H; Nishiya, A T; Strefezzi, R F

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are related to malignancy and resistance to chemotherapy in several tumours. OCT4 is a 'pluripotency factor' that is expressed by these cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate OCT4 expression in canine cutaneous mast cell tumours (MCTs) by means of immunohistochemistry. Twenty-eight cases were evaluated and showed variable immunolabelling patterns. The dogs were treated by surgery alone and followed up for a minimum of 180 days. No significant difference was found between histopathological grades and similar results were obtained for mortality due to the disease and post-surgical survival. These preliminary results suggest that OCT4 expression is not a precise prognostic indicator for canine MCT. PMID:26460092

  16. Heat shock protein derived from a non-autologous tumour can be used as an anti-tumour vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Casey, David G; Lysaght, Joanne; James, Tharappel; Bateman, Andrew; Melcher, Alan A; Todryk, Stephen M

    2003-01-01

    Antigenic cross-reactivity between certain tumours has allowed the development of more widely applicable, major histocompatibility complex-disparate (allogeneic) whole-cell vaccines. This principle should also allow heat shock proteins (hsp) derived from certain tumours (and carrying cross-reactive antigens) to be used as vaccines to generate anti-tumour immunity in a range of cancer patients. Here, hsp70 derived from gp70-antigen+ B16 melanoma generated cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte-mediated immune protection in BALB/c mice against challenge with gp70-antigen+ CT26 colorectal tumour cells. Using ovalbumin as a model tumour antigen, it is shown that hsp70 enhances peptide re-presentation by dendritic cells via class I over equimolar whole ovalbumin antigen. However, while transfection of tumour cells with inducible hsp70 increases hsp yield from tumours, it does not enhance antigen recognition via purified hsp70 nor via whole cells or their lysate. PMID:12941147

  17. Protective effect of pantothenic acid and related compounds against permeabilization of Ehrlich ascites tumour cells by digitonin.

    PubMed

    Slyshenkov, V S; Rakowska, M; Wojtczak, L

    1996-01-01

    Preincubation of Ehrlich ascites tumour cells with millimolar concentrations of pantothenic acid, pantothenol or pantethine, but not with homopantothenic acid, at 22 degrees C or 32 degrees C, but not at 0 degrees C, makes the plasma membrane more resistant to the damaging effect of submillimolar concentrations of digitonin. It is proposed that this increased resistance is due to the increased rate of cholesterol biosynthesis. In fact, incorporation of [14C]acetate into cholesterol is by 45% increased in the cells preincubated with pantothenic acid; this probably reflects elevation of the content of CoA in such cells [Slyshenkov, V.S., Rakowska, M., Moiseenok, A.G. & Wojtczak, L. (1995) Free Radical Biol. Med. 19, 767-772]. PMID:8862188

  18. NPM1 Silencing Reduces Tumour Growth and MAPK Signalling in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Loubeau, Gaëlle; Boudra, Rafik; Maquaire, Sabrina; Lours-Calet, Corinne; Beaudoin, Claude; Verrelle, Pierre; Morel, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The chaperone nucleophosmin (NPM1) is over-expressed in the epithelial compartment of prostate tumours compared to adjacent healthy epithelium and may represent one of the key actors that support the neoplastic phenotype of prostate adenocarcinoma cells. Yet, the mechanisms that underlie NPM1 mediated phenotype remain elusive in the prostate. To better understand NPM1 functions in prostate cancer cells, we sought to characterize its impact on prostate cancer cells behaviour and decipher the mechanisms by which it may act. Here we show that NPM1 favors prostate tumour cell migration, invasion and colony forming. Furthermore, knockdown of NPM1 leads to a decrease in the growth of LNCaP-derived tumours grafted in Nude mice in vivo. Such oncogenic-like properties are found in conjunction with a positive regulation of NPM1 on the ERK1/2 (Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinases 1/2) kinase phosphorylation in response to EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor) stimulus, which is critical for prostate cancer progression following the setting of an autonomous production of the growth factor. NPM1 could then be a target to switch off specifically ERK1/2 pathway activation in order to decrease or inhibit cancer cell growth and migration. PMID:24796332

  19. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumour of the vagina in an 8 year old girl.

    PubMed

    Ong, Lin Yin; Hwang, Wei Sek; Wong, Adelina; Chan, Mei Yoke; Chui, Chan Hon

    2007-03-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare mesenchymal tumor with an unpredictable natural history. We present the first reported case of PEComa of the vagina diagnosed in an 8-year-old girl. This was initially diagnosed on biopsy as an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and the patient underwent 3 cycles of chemotherapy according to the Mesenchymal Malignant Tumour 1989 protocol. A repeat scan, however, revealed an increase in tumor size. Total resection was achieved via a transvaginal (vertical sleeve) partial vaginectomy. The resected tumor had the typical appearance of a PEComa. Immunostains showed positive staining of tumor cells for HMB45, neuron-specific enolase, and calponin but were negative for S100 protein, melaninA, chromogranin, smooth muscle actin, desmin, caldesmon, epithelial membrane antigen, AE1/3, and synaptophysin. Six months after surgery, she remains free of tumor and is on follow-up with regular local examinations under anesthesia and computed tomography scans. Our case highlights the importance of an accurate initial diagnosis, and we stress the importance of regular surveillance over a significant period. PMID:17336201

  20. Inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism and its implication on cell proliferation and tumour-angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, C A C; Missailidis, S

    2009-06-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites have recently generated a heightened interest due to growing evidence of their significant role in cancer biology. Thus, inhibitors of the AA cascade, first and foremost COX inhibitors, which have originally been of interest in the treatment of inflammatory conditions and certain types of cardiovascular disease, are now attracting attention as an arsenal against cancer. An increasing number of investigations support their role in cancer chemoprevention, although the precise molecular mechanisms that link levels of AA, and its metabolites, with cancer progression have still to be elucidated. This article provides an overview of the AA cascade and focuses on the roles of its inhibitors and their implication in cancer treatment. In particular, emphasis is placed on the inhibition of cell proliferation and neo-angiogenesis through inhibition of the enzymes COX-2, 5-LOX and CYP450. Downstream effects of inhibition of AA metabolites are analysed and the molecular mechanisms of action of a selected number of inhibitors of catalytic pathways reviewed. Lastly, the benefits of dietary omega-3 fatty acids and their mechanisms of action leading to reduced cancer risk and impeded cancer cell growth are mentioned. Finally, a proposal is put forward, suggesting a novel and integrated approach in viewing the molecular mechanisms and complex interactions responsible for the involvement of AA metabolites in carcinogenesis and the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and tumour prevention. PMID:19239926

  1. FKBP51 increases the tumour-promoter potential of TGF-beta

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background FKBP51 (FKBP5 Official Symbol) is a large molecular weight component of the family of FK506 binding proteins (FKBP). In recent years, research studies from our laboratory highlighted functions for FKBP51 in the control of apoptosis and melanoma progression. FKBP51 expression correlated with the invasiveness and aggressiveness of melanoma. Since a role for TGF-β in the enhanced tumorigenic potential of melanoma cells is widely described, we hypothesized a cooperative effect between FKBP51 and TGF-β in melanoma progression. Methods SAN and A375 melanoma cell lines were utilized for this study. Balb/c IL2γ NOD SCID served to assess the ability to colonize organs and metastasize of different cell lines, which was evaluated by in vivo imaging. Realtime PCR and western blot served for measurement of mRNA and protein expression, respectively. Results By comparing the metastatic potential of two melanoma cell lines, namely A375 and SAN, we confirmed that an increased capability to colonize murine organs was associated with increased levels of FKBP51. A375 melanoma cell line expressed FKBP51 mRNA levels 30-fold higher in comparison to the SAN mRNA level and appeared more aggressive than SAN melanoma cell line in an experimental metastasis model. In addition, A375 expressed, more abundantly than SAN, the TGF-β and the pro angiogenic TGF-β receptor type III (TβRIII) factors. FKBP51 silencing produced a reduction of TGF-β and TβRIII gene expression in A375 cell line, in accordance with previous studies. We found that the inducing effect of TGF-β on Sparc and Vimentin expression was impaired in condition of FKBP51 depletion, suggesting that FKBP51 is an important cofactor in the TGF-β signal. Such a hypothesis was supported by co immunoprecipitation assays, showing that FKBP51 interacted with either Smad2,3 and p300. In normal melanocytes, FKBP51 potentiated the effect of TGF-β on N-cadherin expression and conferred a mesenchymal-like morphology to such

  2. Hepatocyte growth factor-induced up-regulation of Twist drives epithelial-mesenchymal transition in a canine mammary tumour cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kota; Choisunirachon, Nan; Saito, Tomochika; Matsumoto, Kaori; Saeki, Kohei; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Sasaki, Nobuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2014-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial step in tumour progression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT in canine tumours remain to be elucidated. In this study, the similarity or difference in the molecular mechanism of EMT in canine cells was evaluated and compared with that reported in human and mouse cells. We used eight cell lines derived from canine mammary cancers. Stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) increased cell motility and changed EMT-related markers towards mesenchyme in CHMm cell line. These changes were accompanied by an increase in Twist expression and did not occur in CHMm transfected with Twist siRNA, indicating that Twist plays a key role in this phenomenon in CHMm. However, the down-regulation of E-cadherin was not observed by HGF stimulation. Further studies are required to elucidate the difference between human and canine Twist. PMID:25278141

  3. Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Fibula Managed by En Block Resection and Reconstruction with Ipsilateral Proximal Fibula.

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Sambprasad; Punit, Abhinanadan S; Nair, Rohit V

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell tumour is the commonest benign bone tumour arising at the epiphyseometaphyseal regions of long bones. Around the knee is commonest site followed by distal radius. A giant cell tumour of the distal fibula is extremely rare. We report here a case of giant cell tumour of distal fibula. There are very few similar cases reported worldwide and it is the purpose of this report to describe the management of such a case. Case Report: A 17 year old girl presented with swelling of ankle and pain while walking for six months. Radiographs were suggestive of a giant cell tumour, computerised tomography revealed cortical break, en block resection was done with ipsilateral proximal fibula used in reconstruction of ankle mortise. Conclusion: Giant cell tumour of long bones are common but those involving the distal fibula are exceedingly rare. The management of such tumours with high recurrence rates can be easily accomplished by en block resection and reconstruction of the ankle mortise with proximal fibula ensuring good range of motion of the joint post operatively.

  4. Univalent antibodies kill tumour cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennie, M. J.; Stevenson, G. T.

    1982-02-01

    Antibody molecules are bivalent, or less often multivalent, with each antibody site within a single molecule having the same specificity. Bivalency must enhance the tenacity of antibody attachment to cell surfaces, as dissociation will require simultaneous release at both sites. However, the bivalency of the antibody sometimes induces a target cell to undergo antigenic modulation1-3, thereby offering the cell a means of evading complement and the various effector cells recruited by the antibody. We have investigated the attack by univalent antibodies, which, despite removal of one antibody site, retain their Fc zones and hence their ability to recruit the killing agents, on neoplastic B lymphocytes of the guinea pig L2C line. Rabbit antibodies raised against surface immunoglobulin of these cells were partially digested with papain to yield the univalent Fab/c derivatives4,5. We report here that these derivatives showed enhanced cell killing both in vitro and in vivo, and that this enhancement appeared to derive from avoiding antigenic modulation.

  5. Oncologic Trogocytosis of an Original Stromal Cells Induces Chemoresistance of Ovarian Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Arash; Mirshahi, Pejman; Poupot, Mary; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Simon, Anne; Ducros, Elodie; Mery, Eliane; Couderc, Bettina; Lis, Raphael; Capdet, Jerome; Bergalet, Julie; Querleu, Denis; Dagonnet, Francoise; Fournié, Jean-Jacques; Marie, Jean-Pierre; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Favre, Gilles; Soria, Jeanine; Mirshahi, Massoud

    2008-01-01

    Background The microenvironment plays a major role in the onset and progression of metastasis. Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) tends to metastasize to the peritoneal cavity where interactions within the microenvironment might lead to chemoresistance. Mesothelial cells are important actors of the peritoneal homeostasis; we determined their role in the acquisition of chemoresistance of ovarian tumours. Methodology/Principal Findings We isolated an original type of stromal cells, referred to as “Hospicells” from ascitis of patients with ovarian carcinosis using limiting dilution. We studied their ability to confer chemoresistance through heterocellular interactions. These stromal cells displayed a new phenotype with positive immunostaining for CD9, CD10, CD29, CD146, CD166 and Multi drug resistance protein. They preferentially interacted with epithelial ovarian cancer cells. This interaction induced chemoresistance to platin and taxans with the implication of multi-drug resistance proteins. This contact enabled EOC cells to capture patches of the Hospicells membrane through oncologic trogocytosis, therefore acquiring their functional P-gp proteins and thus developing chemoresistance. Presence of Hospicells on ovarian cancer tissue micro-array from patients with neo-adjuvant chemotherapy was also significantly associated to chemoresistance. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of trogocytosis occurring between a cancer cell and an original type of stromal cell. This interaction induced autonomous acquisition of chemoresistance. The presence of stromal cells within patient's tumour might be predictive of chemoresistance. The specific interaction between cancer cells and stromal cells might be targeted during chemotherapy. PMID:19079610

  6. The Ter Mutation In The Dead End Gene Causes Germ Cell Loss And Testicular Germ Cell Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Youngren, Kirsten K.; Coveney, Douglas; Peng, Xiaoning; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Schmidt, Laura S.; Nickerson, Michael L.; Lamb, Bruce T.; Deng Jian Min; Behringer, Richard R.; Capel, Blanche; Rubin, Edward M.; Nadeau, Joseph H.; Matin, Angabin

    2005-01-01

    In mice, the Ter mutation causes primordial germ cell (PGC) loss in all genetic backgrounds1. Ter is also a potent modifier of spontaneous testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) susceptibility in the 129 family of inbred strains, and markedly increases TGCT incidence in 129-Ter/Ter males2 4. In 129-Ter/Ter mice, some of the remaining PGCs transform into undifferentiated pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells2 6, and after birth differentiate into various cells and tissues that compose TGCTs. Here, we report the positional cloning of Ter, revealing a point mutation that introduces a termination codon in the mouse orthologue (Dnd1) of the zebrafish dead end (dnd) gene. PGC deficiency is corrected both with bacterial artificial chromosomes that contain Dnd1 and with a Dnd1-encoding transgene. Dnd1 is expressed in fetal gonads during the critical period when TGCTs originate. DND1 has an RNA recognition motif and is most similar to the apobec complementation factor, a component of the cytidine t o uridine RNA-editing complex. These results suggest that Ter may adversely affect essential aspects of RNA biology during PGC development. DND1 is the first protein known to have an RNA recognition motif directly implicated as a heritable cause of spontaneous tumorigenesis. TGCT development in the 129-Ter mouse strain models paediatric TGCT in humans. This work will have important implications for our understanding of the genetic control of TGCT pathogenesis and PGC biology.

  7. Unusual renal tumour: multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Niza, João Luz; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Conceição e Silva, João Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma (MCRCC) is a rare presentation of renal cell carcinoma. Most patients are asymptomatic and frequently MCRCCs are detected incidentally. MCRCCs have good prognosis because of their low malignant potential. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with mild right flank pain and normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a Bosniak III cystic lesion was detected in the lower third of the right kidney. She underwent right partial nephrectomy and histopathology showed a multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma Fuhrman grade 1. In this article, we also present a review of the literature on MCRCC, highlight the correlation of the pathological and imaging characteristics of these low aggressive renal lesions, and underscore the importance of their recognition to prevent unnecessary radical surgery. PMID:26957035

  8. Cobalt(III) Chaperone Complexes of Curcumin: Photoreduction, Cellular Accumulation and Light-Selective Toxicity towards Tumour Cells.

    PubMed

    Renfrew, Anna K; Bryce, Nicole S; Hambley, Trevor

    2015-10-19

    Light-activated prodrugs offer the potential for highly selective tumour targeting. However, the application of many photoactivated chemotherapeutics is limited by a requirement for oxygen, or for short activation wavelengths that can damage surrounding tissue. Herein, we present a series of cobalt(III)-curcumin prodrugs that can be activated by visible light under both oxygenated and hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the photoproduct can be controlled by the activation wavelength: green light yields free curcumin, whereas blue light induces photolysis of curcumin to a phototoxic product. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and phototocytotoxicity studies in DLD-1 and MCF-7 tumour cells demonstrated that the cobalt(III) prodrugs are nontoxic in the dark but accumulate in significant concentrations in the cell membrane. When cells were treated with light for 15  min, the cytotoxicity of the cobalt complexes increased by up to 20-fold, whereas free curcumin exhibited only a two-fold increase in cytotoxicity. The nature of the ancillary ligand and cobalt reduction potential were found to strongly influence the stability and biological activity of the series. PMID:26471438

  9. The potential effect of patulin on mice bearing melanoma cells: an anti-tumour or carcinogenic effect?

    PubMed

    Boussabbeh, Manel; Ben Salem, Intidhar; Rjiba-Touati, Karima; Bouyahya, Chedy; Neffati, Fadwa; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel; Bacha, Hassen; Abid-Essefi, Salwa

    2016-05-01

    Mycotoxins are bioactive compounds that are noxious to human. Their effects on oncogenesis have been satisfactorily elucidated, and some of mycotoxins have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. Nevertheless, patulin (PAT) is considered by the International Agency of Research on Cancer as 'not carcinogenic to humans'. The present study was designed to understand the effect of this mycotoxin on melanoma cells (B16F10) by measuring cell proliferation and assessing the anti-tumour effect in vivo in Balb/c mice. Our results revealed that intraperitoneally administration of PAT for 20 days significantly induces tumour regression in B16F10 cell-implanted mice. This effect was evidenced by the activation of apoptosis which is supported by the increase in p53 and Bax expressions, the downregulation of the protein levels of Bcl2, and the increase in caspase-3 activity. Moreover, systemic toxicity analysis demonstrated that there is no potential toxicity following PAT treatment unlike untreated melanoma mice which suffer from anaemia, inflammation and liver dysfunction. Remarkably, this is the first published report demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy of PAT in vivo models. PMID:26619846

  10. Nitroimidazole adducts as markers for tissue hypoxia: mechanistic studies in aerobic normal tissues and tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Parliament, M. B.; Wiebe, L. I.; Franko, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    Two aspects of the aerobic metabolism of nitroimidazole markers for hypoxia were investigated. Several normal murine tissues which are likely to be well oxygenated bind misonidazole at rates comparable to those of hypoxic regions in tumours. The possibility that this aerobic activation occurs via an oxygen independent process such as an initial two electron reduction was studied. Binding to the oesophageal mucosa of mice which occurred under hypoxia in vitro was inhibited by at least 95% in the presence of 10% oxygen. Dicoumarol, an inhibitor of DT-diaphorase, was shown to cause only small reductions in misonidazole binding to oesophageal epithelium and smooth muscle in vitro and to EMT6 tumours, liver, oesophageal and tracheal epithelium, parotid gland and smooth muscle in vivo. Thus an oxygen-insensitive process is not a major cause of the high binding rate in oesophageal mucosa, and may not contribute significantly to the observed binding in other normal tissues. It has been suggested that metabolism of nitroimidazoles by aerobic cells in tumours might be sufficient to minimise access of these compounds to hypoxic regions, particularly at the micromolar concentrations currently in use clinically. The uptake of 125I-iodoazomycin arabinoside by RIF-1 and EMT6 tumours was found to be directly proportional to injected dose over concentrations between 0.5 and 50 microM. Labelling of hypoxic regions in EMT6 tumours by high specific activity 3H-misonidazole at 1 microM was found to be similar to that obtained at 50 microM. Images Figure 1 PMID:1280990

  11. Equine Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumours Exhibit Variable Differentiation, Proliferation Activity and KIT Expression.

    PubMed

    Ressel, L; Ward, S; Kipar, A

    2015-11-01

    Equine cutaneous mast cell tumours (CMCTs) are generally considered to be benign skin lesions, although recurrent and multicentric tumours have been described. For canine CMCTs, grading and prognostic approaches are well established and aberrant KIT expression as well as high proliferation indices are associated with poor outcome. However, in the case of equine CMCTs, morphological features, proliferative activity and KIT expression pattern have not been assessed or related to biological behaviour, and there is discussion as to whether CMCTs are true neoplastic processes. The present study describes 45 equine CMCTs in terms of their morphology and KIT and PCNA expression by immunohistochemistry. KIT expression was classified as membranous (I), cytoplasmic and focally stippled (II) or diffuse cytoplasmic (III). A large proportion of the tumours were multinodular or diffuse dermal infiltrates of mast cells with mild anisokaryosis, a low proliferative rate and a dominance of KIT pattern I, representing well-differentiated CMCTs. In approximately one third of the cases, the mast cells exhibited more infiltrative growth, moderate to marked anisokaryosis and a higher degree of proliferation. These were classified as poorly differentiated CMCTs and exhibited only KIT patterns II and III. These findings indicate that there is a subgroup of poorly differentiated equine CMCTs, in which there is an association between aberrant KIT expression, high proliferative rate and potential aggressive behaviour, all features that confirm at least the poorly differentiated CMCT as a true neoplastic processes. PMID:26292768

  12. Effector lymphocyte-induced lymph node-like vasculature enables naive T-cell entry into tumours and enhanced anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Peske, J David; Thompson, Elizabeth D; Gemta, Lelisa; Baylis, Richard A; Fu, Yang-Xin; Engelhard, Victor H

    2015-01-01

    The presence of lymph node (LN)-like vasculature in tumours, characterized by expression of peripheral node addressin and chemokine CCL21, is correlated with T-cell infiltration and positive prognosis in breast cancer and melanoma patients. However, mechanisms controlling the development of LN-like vasculature and how it might contribute to a beneficial outcome for cancer patients are unknown. Here we demonstrate that LN-like vasculature is present in murine models of melanoma and lung carcinoma. It enables infiltration by naive T cells that significantly delay tumour outgrowth after intratumoral activation. Development of this vasculature is controlled by a mechanism involving effector CD8 T cells and NK cells that secrete LTα3 and IFNγ. LN-like vasculature is also associated with organized aggregates of B lymphocytes and gp38(+) fibroblasts, which resemble tertiary lymphoid organs that develop in models of chronic inflammation. These results establish LN-like vasculature as both a consequence of and key contributor to anti-tumour immunity. PMID:25968334

  13. Identification of four new susceptibility loci for testicular germ cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Kevin; Holroyd, Amy; Lloyd, Amy; Broderick, Peter; Nsengimana, Jérémie; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Douglas F; Dudakia, Darshna; Bishop, D Timothy; Reid, Alison; Huddart, Robert A; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik; Shipley, Janet; Houlston, Richard S; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple risk loci for testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT), revealing a polygenic model of disease susceptibility strongly influenced by common variation. To identify additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with TGCT, we conducted a multistage GWAS with a combined data set of >25,000 individuals (6,059 cases and 19,094 controls). We identified new risk loci for TGCT at 3q23 (rs11705932, TFDP2, P=1.5 × 10(-9)), 11q14.1 (rs7107174, GAB2, P=9.7 × 10(-11)), 16p13.13 (rs4561483, GSPT1, P=1.6 × 10(-8)) and 16q24.2 (rs55637647, ZFPM1, P=3.4 × 10(-9)). We additionally present detailed functional analysis of these loci, identifying a statistically significant relationship between rs4561483 risk genotype and increased GSPT1 expression in TGCT patient samples. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of TGCT risk and further insight into the biological basis of disease development. PMID:26503584

  14. Identification of four new susceptibility loci for testicular germ cell tumour

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Holroyd, Amy; Lloyd, Amy; Broderick, Peter; Nsengimana, Jérémie; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Douglas F; Dudakia, Darshna; Bishop, D. Timothy; Reid, Alison; Huddart, Robert A.; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik; Shipley, Janet; Houlston, Richard S.; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple risk loci for testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT), revealing a polygenic model of disease susceptibility strongly influenced by common variation. To identify additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with TGCT, we conducted a multistage GWAS with a combined data set of >25,000 individuals (6,059 cases and 19,094 controls). We identified new risk loci for TGCT at 3q23 (rs11705932, TFDP2, P=1.5 × 10−9), 11q14.1 (rs7107174, GAB2, P=9.7 × 10−11), 16p13.13 (rs4561483, GSPT1, P=1.6 × 10−8) and 16q24.2 (rs55637647, ZFPM1, P=3.4 × 10−9). We additionally present detailed functional analysis of these loci, identifying a statistically significant relationship between rs4561483 risk genotype and increased GSPT1 expression in TGCT patient samples. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of TGCT risk and further insight into the biological basis of disease development. PMID:26503584

  15. Transcriptome and proteome analysis of tyrosine kinase inhibitor treated canine mast cell tumour cells identifies potentially kit signaling-dependent genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Canine mast cell tumour proliferation depends to a large extent on the activity of KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Inhibitors of the KIT tyrosine kinase have recently been introduced and successfully applied as a therapeutic agent for this tumour type. However, little is known on the downstream target genes of this signaling pathway and molecular changes after inhibition. Results Transcriptome analysis of the canine mast cell tumour cell line C2 treated for up to 72 hours with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor masitinib identified significant changes in the expression levels of approximately 3500 genes or 16% of the canine genome. Approximately 40% of these genes had increased mRNA expression levels including genes associated with the pro-proliferative pathways of B- and T-cell receptors, chemokine receptors, steroid hormone receptors and EPO-, RAS and MAP kinase signaling. Proteome analysis of C2 cells treated for 72 hours identified 24 proteins with changed expression levels, most of which being involved in gene transcription, e.g. EIA3, EIA4, TARDBP, protein folding, e.g. HSP90, UCHL3, PDIA3 and protection from oxidative stress, GSTT3, SELENBP1. Conclusions Transcriptome and proteome analysis of neoplastic canine mast cells treated with masitinib confirmed the strong important and complex role of KIT in these cells. Approximately 16% of the total canine genome and thus the majority of the active genes were significantly transcriptionally regulated. Most of these changes were associated with reduced proliferation and metabolism of treated cells. Interestingly, several pro-proliferative pathways were up-regulated, which may represent attempts of masitinib treated cells to activate alternative pro-proliferative pathways. These pathways may contain hypothetical targets for a combination therapy with masitinib to further improve its therapeutic effect. PMID:22747577

  16. Decoy receptors block TRAIL sensitivity at a supracellular level: the role of stromal cells in controlling tumour TRAIL sensitivity.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, L; van der Sloot, A M; Reis, C R; Deegan, S; Ryan, A E; Dhami, S P S; Murillo, L S; Cool, R H; Correa de Sampaio, P; Thompson, K; Murphy, G; Quax, W J; Serrano, L; Samali, A; Szegezdi, E

    2016-03-10

    Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a death ligand cytokine known for its cytotoxic activity against malignantly transformed cells. TRAIL induces cell death through binding to death receptors DR4 and DR5. The inhibitory decoy receptors (DcR1 and DcR2) co-expressed with death receptor 4 (DR4)/DR5 on the same cell can block the transmission of the apoptotic signal. Here, we show that DcRs also regulate TRAIL sensitivity at a supracellular level and thus represent a mechanism by which the microenvironment can diminish tumour TRAIL sensitivity. Mathematical modelling and layered or spheroid stroma-extracellular matrix-tumour cultures were used to model the tumour microenvironment. By engineering TRAIL to escape binding by DcRs, we found that DcRs do not only act in a cell-autonomous or cis-regulatory manner, but also exert trans-cellular regulation originating from stromal cells and affect tumour cells, highlighting the potent inhibitory effect of DcRs in the tumour tissue and the necessity of selective targeting of the two death-inducing TRAIL receptors to maximise efficacy. PMID:26050621

  17. Genetic profiling of tumours using both circulating free DNA and circulating tumour cells isolated from the same preserved whole blood sample.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Dominic G; Smith, Nigel; Morris, Daniel; Leong, Hui Sun; Li, Yaoyong; Hollebecque, Antoine; Ayub, Mahmood; Carter, Louise; Antonello, Jenny; Franklin, Lynsey; Miller, Crispin; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline; Brady, Ged

    2016-04-01

    Molecular information obtained from cancer patients' blood is an emerging and powerful research tool with immense potential as a companion diagnostic for patient stratification and monitoring. Blood, which can be sampled routinely, provides a means of inferring the current genetic status of patients' tumours via analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) or circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA). However, accurate assessment of both CTCs and ctDNA requires all blood cells to be maintained intact until samples are processed. This dictates for ctDNA analysis EDTA blood samples must be processed with 4 h of draw, severely limiting the use of ctDNA in multi-site trials. Here we describe a blood collection protocol that is amenable for analysis of both CTCs and ctDNA up to four days after blood collection. We demonstrate that yields of circulating free DNA (cfDNA) obtained from whole blood CellSave samples are equivalent to those obtained from conventional EDTA plasma processed within 4 h of blood draw. Targeted and genome-wide NGS revealed comparable DNA quality and resultant sequence information from cfDNA within CellSave and EDTA samples. We also demonstrate that CTCs and ctDNA can be isolated from the same patient blood sample, and give the same patterns of CNA enabling direct analysis of the genetic status of patients' tumours. In summary, our results demonstrate the utility of a simple approach that enabling robust molecular analysis of CTCs and cfDNA for genotype-directed therapies in multi-site clinical trials and represent a significant methodological improvement for clinical benefit. PMID:26639657

  18. Genetic profiling of tumours using both circulating free DNA and circulating tumour cells isolated from the same preserved whole blood sample

    PubMed Central

    Rothwell, Dominic G.; Smith, Nigel; Morris, Daniel; Leong, Hui Sun; Li, Yaoyong; Hollebecque, Antoine; Ayub, Mahmood; Carter, Louise; Antonello, Jenny; Franklin, Lynsey; Miller, Crispin; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline; Brady, Ged

    2016-01-01

    Molecular information obtained from cancer patients' blood is an emerging and powerful research tool with immense potential as a companion diagnostic for patient stratification and monitoring. Blood, which can be sampled routinely, provides a means of inferring the current genetic status of patients' tumours via analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) or circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA). However, accurate assessment of both CTCs and ctDNA requires all blood cells to be maintained intact until samples are processed. This dictates for ctDNA analysis EDTA blood samples must be processed with 4 h of draw, severely limiting the use of ctDNA in multi-site trials. Here we describe a blood collection protocol that is amenable for analysis of both CTCs and ctDNA up to four days after blood collection. We demonstrate that yields of circulating free DNA (cfDNA) obtained from whole blood CellSave samples are equivalent to those obtained from conventional EDTA plasma processed within 4 h of blood draw. Targeted and genome-wide NGS revealed comparable DNA quality and resultant sequence information from cfDNA within CellSave and EDTA samples. We also demonstrate that CTCs and ctDNA can be isolated from the same patient blood sample, and give the same patterns of CNA enabling direct analysis of the genetic status of patients' tumours. In summary, our results demonstrate the utility of a simple approach that enabling robust molecular analysis of CTCs and cfDNA for genotype-directed therapies in multi-site clinical trials and represent a significant methodological improvement for clinical benefit. PMID:26639657

  19. Endothelial cell differentiation into capillary-like structures in response to tumour cell conditioned medium: a modified chemotaxis chamber assay.

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, T.; Riese, H. H.; Aracil, M.; Pérez-Aranda, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a modified chemotaxis chamber assay in which bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells degrade Matrigel basement membrane and migrate and form capillary-like structures on type I collagen. This capillary formation occurs in the presence of conditioned media from highly metastatic tumour cell lines, such as B16F10 murine melanoma or MDA-MD-231 human breast adenocarcinoma, but not in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) from the less invasive B16F0 cell line. Replacement of tumour cell CM by 10 ng ml-1 basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) also results in capillary-like structure formation by BAE cells. An anti-bFGF antibody blocks this effect, showing that bFGF is one of the factors responsible for the angiogenic response induced by B16F10 CM in our assay. Addition of an anti-laminin antibody reduces significantly the formation of capillary-like structures, probably by blocking the attachment of BAE cells to laminin present in Matrigel. The anti-angiogenic compound suramin inhibits in a dose-dependent manner (complete inhibition with 100 microM suramin) the migration and differentiation of BAE cells on type I collagen in response to B16F10 CM. This assay represents a new model system to study tumour-induced angiogenesis in vitro. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7536021

  20. The sodium channel β1 subunit mediates outgrowth of neurite-like processes on breast cancer cells and promotes tumour growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michaela; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Forrest, Lorna C; Brackenbury, William J

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric proteins composed of pore-forming α subunits and smaller β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional channel modulators and are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). β1, encoded by SCN1B, is best characterized in the central nervous system (CNS), where it plays a critical role in regulating electrical excitability, neurite outgrowth and migration during development. β1 is also expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it regulates adhesion and migration in vitro. In the present study, we found that SCN1B mRNA/β1 protein were up-regulated in BCa specimens, compared with normal breast tissue. β1 upregulation substantially increased tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of BCa. β1 over-expression also increased vascularization and reduced apoptosis in the primary tumours, and β1 over-expressing tumour cells had an elongate morphology. In vitro, β1 potentiated outgrowth of processes from BCa cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, via trans-homophilic adhesion. β1-mediated process outgrowth in BCa cells required the presence and activity of fyn kinase, and Na+ current, thus replicating the mechanism by which β1 regulates neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons. We conclude that when present in breast tumours, β1 enhances pathological growth and cellular dissemination. This study is the first demonstration of a functional role for β1 in tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. We propose that β1 warrants further study as a potential biomarker and targeting β1-mediated adhesion interactions may have value as a novel anti-cancer therapy. PMID:24729314

  1. Inhibition of Lysyl Oxidase and Lysyl Oxidase-Like Enzymes Has Tumour-Promoting and Tumour-Suppressing Roles in Experimental Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Bergh, Anders; Halin Bergström, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) and LOX-like (LOXL) enzymes are key players in extracellular matrix deposition and maturation. LOX promote tumour progression and metastasis, but it may also have tumour-inhibitory effects. Here we show that orthotopic implantation of rat prostate AT-1 tumour cells increased LOX and LOXLs mRNA expressions in the tumour and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue. Inhibition of LOX enzymes, using Beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), initiated before implantation of AT-1 cells, reduced tumour growth. Conversely, treatment that was started after the tumours were established resulted in unaffected or increased tumour growth. Moreover, treatment with BAPN did not suppress the formation of spontaneous lymph node metastases, or lung tumour burden, when tumour cells were injected intravenously. A temporal decrease in collagen fibre content, which is a target for LOX, was observed in tumours and in the tumour-adjacent prostate tissue. This may explain why early BAPN treatment is more effective in inhibiting tumour growth compared to treatment initiated later. Our data suggest that the enzymatic function of the LOX family is context-dependent, with both tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting properties in prostate cancer. Further investigations are needed to understand the circumstances under which LOX inhibition may be used as a therapeutic target for cancer patients. PMID:26804196

  2. Cytoreductive surgery in disseminated non-seminomatous germ cell tumours of testis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, R P; Reynolds, K W; Newlands, E S; Dawson, P M; Makey, A R; Theodorou, N A; Bradley, J; Begent, R H; Rustin, G J; Bagshawe, K D

    1991-02-01

    Between 1977 and 1988, 67 patients underwent surgical removal of residual metastatic deposits following an aggressive chemotherapy regimen (cisplatin, vincristine, methotrexate and bleomycin alternating with etoposide, actinomycin D and cyclophosphamide) for disseminated germ cell tumours of the testis (stage IIB or above). Ninety-one surgical procedures were performed. There were 63 (69 per cent) retroperitoneal lymph node dissections, 16 (18 per cent) thoracotomies, three (3 per cent) hepatic resections, three (3 per cent) craniotomies, five (5 per cent) delayed orchidectomies and one anterolateral decompression of the vertebral column. Nine (13 per cent) patients required a repeat retroperitoneal node dissection and one patient needed a repeat thoracotomy to remove recurrent metastatic deposits during the period of follow-up. Multivisceral resections and vascular reconstruction procedures were required in 20 (30 per cent) patients undergoing retroperitoneal node dissection. Fifty-five (82 per cent) patients remain in complete remission with a mean follow-up period of 49.6 months (range 2-121 months). Nine (13 per cent) patients died with metastatic disease between 2 months to 4 years after operation. There were three deaths in the perioperative period (4 per cent). The histology of the resected metastases revealed undifferentiated active tumour in 20 (30 per cent) patients, differentiated mature teratoma in 29 (43 per cent) patients and fibrosis/necrosis in 18 (27 per cent) patients. Twelve (60 per cent) patients with undifferentiated elements and 15 patients (60 per cent) with raised preoperative tumour markers (poor prognostic categories) are in complete remission. Cytoreductive surgery in patients with metastatic germ cell tumours offers the best chance of remission following chemotherapy even in poor prognostic group categories. PMID:1707715

  3. Effects of a cloned cell line with NK activity on bone marrow transplants, tumour development and metastasis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John F.; Dennert, Gunther

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells cloned in vitro have been transferred into NK-deficient hosts. These cells have been shown to have a role in the rejection of allogeneic bone marrow grafts, resistance to both radiation-induced thymic leukaemia and challenge with melanoma tumour cells. It appears that NK cells have an important role in immune surveillance.

  4. A direct comparison of CellSearch and ISET for circulating tumour-cell detection in patients with metastatic carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Farace, F; Massard, C; Vimond, N; Drusch, F; Jacques, N; Billiot, F; Laplanche, A; Chauchereau, A; Lacroix, L; Planchard, D; Le Moulec, S; André, F; Fizazi, K; Soria, J C; Vielh, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) can provide information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. However, there is no universal method to detect CTC currently available. Here, we compared the performance of two CTC detection systems based on the expression of the EpCAM antigen (CellSearch assay) or on cell size (ISET assay). Methods: Circulating tumour cells were enumerated in 60 patients with metastatic carcinomas of breast, prostate and lung origins using CellSearch according to the manufacturer's protocol and ISET by studying cytomorphology and immunolabelling with anti-cytokeratin or lineage-specific antibodies. Results: Concordant results were obtained in 55% (11 out of 20) of the patients with breast cancer, in 60% (12 out of 20) of the patients with prostate cancer and in only 20% (4 out of 20) of lung cancer patients. Conclusion: Our results highlight important discrepancies between the numbers of CTC enumerated by both techniques. These differences depend mostly on the tumour type. These results suggest that technologies limiting CTC capture to EpCAM-positive cells, may present important limitations, especially in patients with metastatic lung carcinoma. PMID:21829190

  5. Codon 12 Ki-ras mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer: comparative evaluation in tumoural and non-tumoural lung.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, T.; Ricci, S.; Lacave, R.; Antoine, M.; Kambouchner, M.; Capron, F.; Bernaudin, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    Ki-ras activation by point mutation on codon 12 has been reported in non-small-cell lung carcinomas and in various models of experimental lung tumours induced by chemical carcinogens. The cellular targets for carcinogenic compounds of tobacco smoke are usually considered to be the cells of the bronchial mucosa or alveolar epithelium. However, little is known about preneoplastic events in bronchopulmonary carcinogenesis. The hypothesis of the presence of widespread target cells containing Ki-ras mutation was investigated by evaluating concurrent neoplastic and non-neoplastic bronchial and alveolar samples from 51 patients with non-small-cell lung carcinomas. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method used can detect one cell with a mutation on codon 12 among 10(2) normal cells. In tumour samples, a mutation was detected in 20% of adenocarcinomas, but in none of the adenosquamous or squamous cell carcinomas. No mutation was detected in the non-neoplastic bronchial or parenchymal samples. When using an enriched PCR-RFLP method detecting one mutated allele among 10(3) normal alleles a mutation was detected in 23% of adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, Ki-ras activation by mutation on codon 12 was not observed in non-neoplastic bronchial or parenchymal tissues in patients with bronchopulmonary cancers and does not appear to be a genetic event present in non-malignant epithelial target cells exposed to tobacco smoke. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8855973

  6. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells. PMID:25754106

  7. Human breast cancer bone metastasis in vitro and in vivo: a novel 3D model system for studies of tumour cell-bone cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Holen, I; Nutter, F; Wilkinson, J M; Evans, C A; Avgoustou, P; Ottewell, Penelope D

    2015-10-01

    Bone is established as the preferred site of breast cancer metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for this preference remain unidentified. In order to improve outcome for patients with advanced breast cancer and skeletal involvement, we need to better understand how this process is initiated and regulated. As bone metastasis cannot be easily studied in patients, researchers have to date mainly relied on in vivo xenograft models. A major limitation of these is that they do not contain a human bone microenvironment, increasingly considered to be an important component of metastases. In order to address this shortcoming, we have developed a novel humanised bone model, where 1 × 10(5) luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 or T47D human breast tumour cells are seeded on viable human subchaodral bone discs in vitro. These discs contain functional osteoclasts 2-weeks after in vitro culture and positive staining for calcine 1-week after culture demonstrating active bone resorption/formation. In vitro inoculation of MDA-MB-231 or T47D cells colonised human bone cores and remained viable for <4 weeks, however, use of matrigel to enhance adhesion or a moving platform to increase diffusion of nutrients provided no additional advantage. Following colonisation by the tumour cells, bone discs pre-seeded with MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously into NOD SCID mice, and tumour growth monitored using in vivo imaging for up to 6 weeks. Tumour growth progressed in human bone discs in 80 % of the animals mimicking the later stages of human bone metastasis. Immunohistochemical and PCR analysis revealed that growing MDA-MB-231 cells in human bone resulted in these cells acquiring a molecular phenotype previously associated with breast cancer bone metastases. MDA-MB-231 cells grown in human bone discs showed increased expression of IL-1B, HRAS and MMP9 and decreased expression of S100A4, whereas, DKK2 and FN1 were unaltered compared with the same cells grown in

  8. CARS based label-free assay for assessment of drugs by monitoring lipid droplets in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Steuwe, Christian; Patel, Imran I; Ul-Hasan, Mahmud; Schreiner, Alexander; Boren, Joan; Brindle, Kevin M; Reichelt, Stefanie; Mahajan, Sumeet

    2014-11-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is becoming an established tool for label-free multi-photon imaging based on molecule specific vibrations in the sample. The technique has proven to be particularly useful for imaging lipids, which are abundant in cells and tissues, including cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LD), which are recognized as dynamic organelles involved in many cellular functions. The increase in the number of lipid droplets in cells undergoing cell proliferation is a common feature in many neoplastic processes [1] and an increase in LD number also appears to be an early marker of drug-induced cell stress and subsequent apoptosis [3]. In this paper, a CARS-based label-free method is presented to monitor the increase in LD content in HCT116 colon tumour cells treated with the chemotherapeutic drugs Etoposide, Camptothecin and the protein kinase inhibitor Staurosporine. Using CARS, LDs can easily be distinguished from other cell components without the application of fluorescent dyes and provides a label-free non-invasive drug screening assay that could be used not only with cells and tissues ex vivo but potentially also in vivo. PMID:24343869

  9. Characterization of the human activator protein-2gamma (AP-2gamma) gene: control of expression by Sp1/Sp3 in breast tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hasleton, Mark D; Ibbitt, J Claire; Hurst, Helen C

    2003-01-01

    The activator protein-2 (AP-2) family of DNA-binding transcription factors are developmentally regulated and also play a role in human neoplasia. In particular, the AP-2gamma protein has been shown to be overexpressed in a high percentage of breast tumours. In the present study, we report the complete sequence determination of the human TFAP2C gene encoding the AP-2gamma transcription factor plus the mapping of the transcription start site used in breast tumour-derived cells. The 5'-end of the gene lies within a CpG island and transcription is initiated at a single site within a classical initiator motif. We have gone on to investigate why some breast tumour-derived cell lines readily express AP-2gamma, whereas others do not, and show that the proximal promoter (+191 to -312) is differentially active in the two cell phenotypes. DNase footprinting led to the identification of three Sp1/Sp3-binding sites within this region, two of which are absolutely required both for promoter function and cell-type-specific activity. By Western blotting a panel of expressing and non-expressing breast tumour lines we show that the latter have higher levels of Sp3. Furthermore, increasing Sp3 levels in AP-2gamma-expressing cells led to the repression of AP-2gamma promoter activity, particularly when Sp3 inhibitory function was maximized through sumoylation. We propose that differences in the level and activity of Sp3 between breast tumour lines can determine the expression level of their AP-2gamma gene. PMID:12733991

  10. Canine pancreatic islet cell tumours secreting insulin-like growth factor type 2: a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Finotello, R; Ressel, L; Arvigo, M; Baroni, G; Marchetti, V; Romanelli, G; Burrow, R; Mignacca, D; Blackwood, L

    2016-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor type II (IGF-II) is the main cause of non-islet cell tumour hypoglycaemia (NICTH) and insulin is thought to be the only factor causing hypoglycaemia in insulinomas. However, two case reports of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PNETs) producing IGF-II have been previously published: a human and a canine patient. In this study, we investigated clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features, and biological behaviour of canine pancreatic IGF-II-omas, a subgroup of PNETs that has not been previously characterized. Case records of 58 dogs with confirmed PNETs and hypoglycaemia were reviewed: six patients were affected by IGF-II-omas. Surgery was performed in all cases and two dogs had metastases. Four patients remained alive and in remission at 370, 440, 560 and 890 days post-diagnosis; two died of non-tumour-related causes. IGF-II-omas can be differentiated from insulinomas through hypoinsulinaemia, IGF-II positive and insulin negative immunostaining. The prevalence of this neoplasia is low, accounting for just 6% of PNETs. PMID:24428588

  11. Electrochemotherapy on liver tumours in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, L. H.; Orlowski, S.; An, D.; Bindoula, G.; Dzodic, R.; Ardouin, P.; Bognel, C.; Belehradek, J.; Munck, J. N.; Mir, L. M.

    1998-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy (ECT) is a new therapeutic approach combining the effects of a low-permeant cytotoxic drug, bleomycin (BLM), administered i.v. and cell-permeabilizing electric pulses (EPs) locally delivered to tumours. The transient permeabilization of the cell membrane by the EPs allows free access of BLM to its intracellular targets, largely enhancing BLM's cytotoxic effects. ECT efficacy has been proved so far on transplanted subcutaneous murine tumours and on subcutaneous metastases in humans. Here, we present the first study of the effects of ECT on tumours transplanted to livers in rabbits. We used a recently developed EP applicator consisting of an array of parallel and equidistant needles to be inserted in tissues. Effects of EPs alone or of ECT were assessed by histological analysis, tumour growth rates and survival of the treated animals. A transient blood hypoperfusion was seen in the electropulsed areas, with or without BLM, related to EP-dependent vasoconstriction but this had no major effects on cell survival. Long-term effects depended on the presence of BLM at the time of EP delivery. Almost complete tumour necrosis was observed after ECT, resulting from both BLM direct cytotoxic effects on electropermeabilized tumour cells and indirect effects on the tumour vessels. A large reduction in tumour growth rate and significantly longer survival times were scored in comparison with control rabbits. Moreover, ECT of liver tumours was well tolerated and devoid of systemic side-effects. When ECT was associated with a local interleukin 2-based immunotherapy, increased local anti-tumour effectiveness as well as a large decrease in the number of metastases were observed. Thus, ECT could become a novel treatment modality for liver tumours and other solid internal malignancies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9649121

  12. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78–83%), high retention of cell viability (71–74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7–2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4–0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research. PMID:25487434

  13. Differential DNA methylome profiling of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas suggesting tumour invasion is correlated with cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ye; Zhou, Xinyao; Hu, Fan; Yu, Yong; Xie, Tao; Huang, Yuying; Zhao, Xinzhi; Zhang, Xiaobiao

    2016-08-01

    Global and gene-specific changes to the epigenome are hallmarks of most tumours including those of pituitary origin, and this fact might offer important clues about diagnostic and therapeutic applications. We performed global DNA methylation screening with 6 invasive and 6 noninvasive nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (PA) to investigate whether DNA methylation was associated with the invasion of nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas. An additional seven PAs were included as an independent cohort to validate the initial results. Five thousand nine hundred thirty-one CpGs were selected (△β ≥0.15 and p value ≤0.01) as differentially methylated sites (DMSs). The hypomethylated DMSs in the invasive PAs were significantly more than the hypermethylated sites. Cluster analysis of 339 CpGs (△β ≥0.25 and p value ≤0.001) demonstrated a complete distinction between the invasive and noninvasive nonfunctioning groups. GO analysis of the three hundred seven corresponding genes shown they were involved in homophilic cell adhesion, cell-cell adhesion, cell adhesion and biological adhesion. The mRNA expression of GALNT9 which contain a validated DMS was significantly downregulated in invasive group. Our findings indicate that the differential DNA methylome profiling of invasive and noninvasive nonfunctioning PAs suggesting tumour invasion is correlated with cell adhesion. PMID:27168190

  14. Histopathologic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of a granular cell tumour in an Australian parakeet (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Hernández, V; Carrera, E; Méndez, A; Morales, J C; Morales, E; Sánchez, F D

    2012-10-01

    An adult male Australian parakeet (Melopsittacus undulatus) presented a firm nodular lesion in the lateral metacarpal region of the right wing. Microscopically, there were neoplastic cells, round and polyhedral in shape, with abundant, slightly eosinophilic granular cytoplasm; they were strongly periodic-acid Schiff-positive and resistant to diastase digestion. Some groups of neoplastic cells were immunopositive for smooth muscle actin and desmin. There was no immunopositivity for S-100 protein, CD68 and cytokeratin. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were round and polygonal in shape, and they were characterized by abundant cytoplasm with numerous homogeneous osmophilic bodies covered by an electron-dense membrane (lysosomes). The histopathologic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of the neoplastic tissue are consistent with a granular cell tumour, which has been described in different animal species and anatomic locations; however, this seems to be an infrequent neoplasm in Australian parakeets. The immunopositivity of the neoplastic cells for smooth muscle actin and desmin, as well as slight positivity for muscle with Masson's trichrome, suggest that this is a tumour of myogenic origin. PMID:22913601

  15. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78-83%), high retention of cell viability (71-74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7-2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4-0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research.

  16. Role of hypoxia and HIF2α in development of the sympathoadrenal cell lineage and chromaffin cell tumours with distinct catecholamine phenotypic features

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Susan; Qin, Nan; Pacak, Karel; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia has wide-ranging impact in normal physiology and disease processes. This stimulus evokes changes in gene expression mediated by transcription factors termed hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) that affect numerous processes: angiogenesis, cell survival, cellular metabolism, stem cell self- renewal and multipotency, migration, invasiveness and metastatic progression in tumour cells. Over the past decade increasing numbers of reports have emerged documenting differential roles of HIF1α and HIF2α in these processes. In cells of the sympathoadrenal lineage both HIFs differentially mediate influences of hypoxia on catecholamine synthesis and secretion, but HIF2α signalling has particularly prominent functions in regulating developmental processes of growth and differentiation. This article discusses the role of HIF2α and HIF1α in the context of the development, phenotypic features and functions of chromaffin cells. Moreover, current knowledge about tumour formation in cells of the sympathoadrenal lineage, leading to catecholamine producing pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, is analysed in the light of the HIF2α signalling network. PMID:24054150

  17. Radioresistance of cancer stem-like cell derived from canine tumours.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, A; Deguchi, T; Sato, T; Nemoto, Y; Maruo, T; Madarame, H; Shida, T; Naya, Y; Ogihara, K; Sahara, H

    2016-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are a small subpopulation of cancer cells that are responsible for the initiation, recurrence and metastasis of cancer. We previously demonstrated that, using the Hoechst 33342 dye-based side population technique, CSCs/CICs in canine lung adenocarcinoma cell line exist. In this study, as CSCs/CICs are known to form spheres in anchorage-independent environment in vitro, we evaluated the stemness of spheroid cells derived from canine lung adenocarcinoma and osteosarcoma cells by expression of stemness markers, and investigated radioresistance. Spheroid cells showed greater expression of stemness markers Oct-4 and CD133 gene than those of adherent-cultured cells. In nude mouse xenograft models, spheroid cells showed higher tumourigenic ability than adherent-cultured cells. In addition, spheroid cells showed significantly resistant against radioactivity as compared with adherent-cultured cells. These results suggest that spheroid cells could possess stemness and provide a CSCs/CICs research tool to investigate CSCs/CICs of canine tumour cells. PMID:25070729

  18. Oestrogen receptors and small nuclear ring finger protein 4 (RNF4) in malignant ovarian germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Salonen, Jonna; Butzow, Ralf; Palvimo, Jorma J; Heikinheimo, Markku; Heikinheimo, Oskari

    2009-08-13

    The peak incidence of malignant ovarian germ cell tumours occurs soon after puberty. Thus, gonadal steroids may play a role in their development. Oestrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) and their co-regulators, including small nuclear ring finger protein 4 (SNURF/RNF4) mediate oestrogen actions. While ERbeta and SNURF are down-regulated in testicular germ cell tumours, their role in the ovarian germ cell tumours remains unknown. We herein studied the different subtypes of malignant ovarian germ cell tumours, and found that they all express ERalpha, ERbeta, and SNURF. Stimulation with oestradiol (E2), ERalpha, ERbeta and SNURF significantly up-regulated mRNA expression in the human germinoma derived NCC-IT cells. Further, the effects of E2 were counteracted by an anti-oestrogen (ICI 182,780). Neither E2 nor ICI 182,780 had an effect on the proliferation of NCC-IT cells as assessed by flow cytometric analysis. Our results suggest that oestrogen signalling has a role in malignant ovarian germ cell tumours. PMID:19524139

  19. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  20. NK cells engineered to express a GD2-specific antigen receptor display built-in ADCC-like activity against tumour cells of neuroectodermal origin

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Ruth; Müller, Tina; Stefes, Dörthe; Kloess, Stephan; Seidel, Diana; Gillies, Stephen D; Aperlo-Iffland, Christel; Huston, James S; Uherek, Christoph; Schönfeld, Kurt; Tonn, Torsten; Huebener, Nicole; Lode, Holger N; Koehl, Ulrike; Wels, Winfried S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) represents a major challenge in paediatric oncology. Alternative therapeutic strategies include antibodies targeting the disialoganglioside GD2, which is expressed at high levels on NB cells, and infusion of donor-derived natural killer (NK) cells. To combine specific antibody-mediated recognition of NB cells with the potent cytotoxic activity of NK cells, here we generated clonal derivatives of the clinically applicable human NK cell line NK-92 that stably express a GD2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) comprising an anti-GD2 ch14.18 single chain Fv antibody fusion protein with CD3-ζ chain as a signalling moiety. CAR expression by gene-modified NK cells facilitated effective recognition and elimination of established GD2 expressing NB cells, which were resistant to parental NK-92. In the case of intrinsically NK-sensitive NB cell lines, we observed markedly increased cell killing activity of retargeted NK-92 cells. Enhanced cell killing was strictly dependent on specific recognition of the target antigen and could be blocked by GD2-specific antibody or anti-idiotypic antibody occupying the CAR’s cell recognition domain. Importantly, strongly enhanced cytotoxicity of the GD2-specific NK cells was also found against primary NB cells and GD2 expressing tumour cells of other origins, demonstrating the potential clinical utility of the retargeted effector cells. PMID:21595822

  1. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha up-regulates decay-accelerating factor gene expression in human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, A; Fujiyama, Y; Sumiyoshi, K; Sakumoto, H; Okabe, H; Bamba, T

    1997-01-01

    The increased expression of decay-accelerating factor (DAF) has been detected in intestinal epithelial cells at the inflamed mucosa. In this study, we examined the effects of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha on DAF expression in three intestinal epithelial cell lines. DAF mRNA expression was evaluated by Northern blot analysis, and DAF protein expression was analysed by biotin labelling and immunoprecipitation. TNF-alpha induced a marked increase in DAF mRNA and protein expression in HT-29, T84 and Caco-2 cells. In HT-29 cells, the effects of TNF-a on DAF mRNA accumulation were observed in a dose-dependent manner; DAF mRNA accumulation reached a maximum at 3-6 hr, and then gradually decreased. These effects of TNF-alpha required de novo protein synthesis. Messenger RNA stability studies suggested that TNF-alpha partially regulated DAF gene expression by a posttranscriptional mechanism. Moreover, the combination of TNF-alpha and interleukin (IL)-4 induced an additive increase in DAF mRNA accumulation in HT-29 and T84 cells. In human intestinal epithelial cells, TNF-alpha acts as a potent inducer of DAF mRNA expression, indicating an important role for TNF-alpha in the regulation of DAF expression at the inflamed mucosa. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:9155641

  2. Collision Tumour of Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Malignant Melanoma in the Oral Cavity of a Dog.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, F; Castro, P; Ramírez, G A

    2016-05-01

    A 7-year-old, male cocker spaniel was presented with a gingival proliferative lesion in the rostral maxilla and enlargement of the regional lymph node. Morphological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed a collision tumour composed of two malignant populations, epithelial and melanocytic, with metastasis of the neoplastic melanocytes to the regional lymph node. The epithelial component consisted of trabeculae and islands of well-differentiated squamous epithelium immunoreactive to cytokeratins. The melanocytic component had a varying degree of pigmentation of polygonal and spindle-shaped cells, growing in nests or densely packed aggregates and immunolabelled with S100, melanoma-associated antigen (melan A), neuron-specific enolase and vimentin antibodies. Protein markers involved in tumorigenesis or cell proliferation (i.e. COX-2, p53, c-kit and Ki67), were overexpressed by the neoplastic cells. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of an oral collision tumour involving malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the dog. PMID:27147111

  3. Metabolic reprogramming of the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yazhi; Zhao, Shimin; Zhou, Binhua P; Mi, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Tumour cells, stromal cells and the stroma comprise the tumour microenvironment. The metabolism of both tumour cells and several types of tumour stromal cells, such as cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages, is reprogrammed. Current studies have found that stromal cells promote tumour progression and metastasis, through not only the paracrine secretion of cytokines or chemokines, but also intermediate metabolites. Here, we summarize the latest insights into the mechanism of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts and tumour-associated macrophages, and their potential roles in tumour progression and metastasis. PMID:26255648

  4. Isolation of rare circulating tumour cells in cancer patients by microchip technology

    PubMed Central

    Nagrath, Sunitha; Sequist, Lecia V.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Bell, Daphne W.; Irimia, Daniel; Ulkus, Lindsey; Smith, Matthew R.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Digumarthy, Subba; Muzikansky, Alona; Ryan, Paula; Balis, Ulysses J.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Haber, Daniel A.; Toner, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Viable tumour-derived epithelial cells (circulating tumour cells or CTCs) have been identified in peripheral blood from cancer patients and are probably the origin of intractable metastatic disease1–4. Although extremely rare, CTCs represent a potential alternative to invasive biopsies as a source of tumour tissue for the detection, characterization and monitoring of non-haematologic cancers5–8. The ability to identify, isolate, propagate and molecularly characterize CTC subpopulations could further the discovery of cancer stem cell biomarkers and expand the understanding of the biology of metastasis. Current strategies for isolating CTCs are limited to complex analytic approaches that generate very low yield and purity9. Here we describe the development of a unique microfluidic platform (the ‘CTC-chip’) capable of efficient and selective separation of viable CTCs from peripheral whole blood samples, mediated by the interaction of target CTCs with antibody (EpCAM)-coated microposts under precisely controlled laminar flow conditions, and without requisite pre-labelling or processing of samples. The CTC-chip successfully identified CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic lung, prostate, pancreatic, breast and colon cancer in 115 of 116 (99%) samples, with a range of 5–1,281 CTCs per ml and approximately 50% purity. In addition, CTCs were isolated in 7/7 patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Given the high sensitivity and specificity of the CTC-chip, we tested its potential utility in monitoring response to anti-cancer therapy. In a small cohort of patients with metastatic cancer undergoing systemic treatment, temporal changes in CTC numbers correlated reasonably well with the clinical course of disease as measured by standard radiographic methods. Thus, the CTC-chip provides a new and effective tool for accurate identification and measurement of CTCs in patients with cancer. It has broad implications in advancing both cancer biology

  5. Stressed Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.) excrete a protein fraction with specific cytotoxicity on plant and animal tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Griffaut, B; Debiton, E; Madelmont, J C; Maurizis, J C; Ledoigt, G

    2007-09-01

    Wounds from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers excrete bioactive metabolites from a variety of structural classes, including proteins. Here we describe a protein specifically active against tumour cells arising either from human, animal or plant tissues. The non-tumour animal cells or the plant callus cells are not sensitive to these excreta. The active product was only obtained after a wound-drought stress of plant tubers. The cytotoxicity varies according to the tumour cell type. For instance, some human tumour cell lines and especially the human mammary tumour cells MDA-MB-231 were shown to be very susceptible to the active product. The active agent is shown to contain an 18-kDa polypeptide with homology to a superoxide dismutase (SOD). A 28-kDa polypeptide, related to an alkaline phosphatase (AP), was shown to be tightly linked to this 18-kDa polypeptide. The excreted 28-kDa polypeptide also displayed a consensus sequence similar to the group of DING proteins, but with a smaller molecular weight. The superoxide dismutase polypeptide was shown to be involved in the antitumour activity, but the presence of smaller factors (MW<10 kDa), such as salicylic acid, can enhance this activity. PMID:17662535

  6. In vitro activity of bortezomib in cultures of patient tumour cells--potential utility in haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Kristina; Carlson, Kristina; Aleskog, Anna; Larsson, Rolf; Nygren, Peter; Lindhagen, Elin

    2009-01-01

    Bortezomib represents a new class of anti-cancer drugs, the proteasome inhibitors. We evaluated the in vitro activity of bortezomib with regard to tumour-type specificity and possible mechanisms of drug resistance in 115 samples of tumour cells from patients and in a cell-line panel, using the short-term fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay. Bortezomib generally showed dose-response curves with a steep slope. In patient cells, bortezomib was more active in haematological than in solid tumour samples. Myeloma and chronic myeloid leukaemia were the most sensitive tumour types although with great variability in drug response between the individual samples. Colorectal and kidney cancer samples were the least sensitive. In the cell-line panel, only small differences in response were seen between the different cell lines, and the proteasome inhibitors, lactacystin and MG 262, showed an activity pattern similar to that of bortezomib. The cell-line data suggest that resistance to bortezomib was not mediated by MRP-, PgP, GSH-; tubulin and topo II-associated MDR. Combination experiments indicated synergy between bortezomib and arsenic trioxide or irinotecan. The data support the current use of bortezomib but also points to its potential utility in other tumour types and in combination with cytotoxic drugs. PMID:19016012

  7. Physical nanoscale conduit-mediated communication between tumour cells and the endothelium modulates endothelial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Yamicia; Tekleab, Sarah; Nandakumar, Shyama; Walls, Cherelle; Tekleab, Yonatan; Husain, Amjad; Gadish, Or; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Kaushik, Shelly; Sehrawat, Seema; Kulkarni, Ashish; Dvorak, Harold; Zetter, Bruce; R. Edelman, Elazer; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of mortality and remains a hurdle in the search for a cure for cancer. Not much is known about metastatic cancer cells and endothelial cross-talk, which occurs at multiple stages during metastasis. Here we report a dynamic regulation of the endothelium by cancer cells through the formation of nanoscale intercellular membrane bridges, which act as physical conduits for transfer of microRNAs. The communication between the tumour cell and the endothelium upregulates markers associated with pathological endothelium, which is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of these nanoscale conduits. These results lead us to define the notion of ‘metastatic hijack': cancer cell-induced transformation of healthy endothelium into pathological endothelium via horizontal communication through the nanoscale conduits. Pharmacological perturbation of these nanoscale membrane bridges decreases metastatic foci in vivo. Targeting these nanoscale membrane bridges may potentially emerge as a new therapeutic opportunity in the management of metastatic cancer. PMID:26669454

  8. Physical nanoscale conduit-mediated communication between tumour cells and the endothelium modulates endothelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Connor, Yamicia; Tekleab, Sarah; Nandakumar, Shyama; Walls, Cherelle; Tekleab, Yonatan; Husain, Amjad; Gadish, Or; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Kaushik, Shelly; Sehrawat, Seema; Kulkarni, Ashish; Dvorak, Harold; Zetter, Bruce; R Edelman, Elazer; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of mortality and remains a hurdle in the search for a cure for cancer. Not much is known about metastatic cancer cells and endothelial cross-talk, which occurs at multiple stages during metastasis. Here we report a dynamic regulation of the endothelium by cancer cells through the formation of nanoscale intercellular membrane bridges, which act as physical conduits for transfer of microRNAs. The communication between the tumour cell and the endothelium upregulates markers associated with pathological endothelium, which is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of these nanoscale conduits. These results lead us to define the notion of 'metastatic hijack': cancer cell-induced transformation of healthy endothelium into pathological endothelium via horizontal communication through the nanoscale conduits. Pharmacological perturbation of these nanoscale membrane bridges decreases metastatic foci in vivo. Targeting these nanoscale membrane bridges may potentially emerge as a new therapeutic opportunity in the management of metastatic cancer. PMID:26669454

  9. The oxidation of cyst(e)ine by mast-cell tumour P815 in culture

    PubMed Central

    Wheldrake, J. F.; Pasternak, C. A.

    1968-01-01

    1. Mast-cell tumour P815 cells oxidize [35S]cyst(e)ine to 35SO42−. 2. Addition of cysteinesulphinate or sulphite decreases the formation of 35SO42−; at the same time [35S]cysteinesulphinate or 35SO32− accumulates. 3. Extracts of P815 cells form sulphite from cysteinesulphinate and 2-oxoglutarate. The Km for cysteinesulphinate is 6·35mm and that for 2-oxoglutarate is 0·165mm. 4. Extracts oxidize sulphite to sulphate. 5. No formation of hydrogen sulphide from cyst(e)ine was detectable. 6. It is concluded that P815 cells oxidize cyst(e)ine to sulphate solely via cysteinesulphinate and sulphite. 7. The concentration of the enzymes catalysing this sequence is unaltered by several variations in the conditions of growth. PMID:4966082

  10. The oxidation of cyst(e)ine by mast-cell tumour P815 in culture.

    PubMed

    Wheldrake, J F; Pasternak, C A

    1968-01-01

    1. Mast-cell tumour P815 cells oxidize [(35)S]cyst(e)ine to (35)SO(4) (2-). 2. Addition of cysteinesulphinate or sulphite decreases the formation of (35)SO(4) (2-); at the same time [(35)S]cysteinesulphinate or (35)SO(3) (2-) accumulates. 3. Extracts of P815 cells form sulphite from cysteinesulphinate and 2-oxoglutarate. The K(m) for cysteinesulphinate is 6.35mm and that for 2-oxoglutarate is 0.165mm. 4. Extracts oxidize sulphite to sulphate. 5. No formation of hydrogen sulphide from cyst(e)ine was detectable. 6. It is concluded that P815 cells oxidize cyst(e)ine to sulphate solely via cysteinesulphinate and sulphite. 7. The concentration of the enzymes catalysing this sequence is unaltered by several variations in the conditions of growth. PMID:4966082

  11. Clofarabine, a novel adenosine analogue, reactivates DNA methylation-silenced tumour suppressor genes and inhibits cell growth in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lubecka-Pietruszewska, Katarzyna; Kaufman-Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Stefanska, Barbara; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; Smolewski, Piotr; Fabianowska-Majewska, Krystyna

    2014-01-15

    Clofarabine (2-chloro-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyarabinosyladenine, ClF) is a second-generation 2'-deoxyadenosine analogue that is structurally related to cladribine (2-chloro-2'-deoxyadenosine, 2CdA) and fludarabine (9-beta-d-arabinosyl-2-fluoroadenine, F-ara-A). It demonstrates potent antitumour activity at much lower doses than parent compounds with high therapeutic efficacy in paediatric blood cancers. Our previous studies in breast cancer cells indicate that 2CdA and F-ara-A are involved in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. We therefore investigated whether ClF influences methylation and expression of selected tumour suppressor genes, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), and retinoic acid receptor beta 2 (RARbeta2), as well as expression of p53, p21 and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines with different invasive potential. Promoter methylation and gene expression were estimated using methylation-sensitive restriction analysis (MSRA) and real-time PCR, respectively. ClF demonstrated potent growth inhibitory activity in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells after 96h treatment with IC50 determined as equal to 640nM and 50nM, respectively. In both breast cancer cell lines, ClF led to hypomethylation and up-regulation of APC, PTEN and RARbeta2 as well as increase in p21 expression. Only in non-invasive MCF-7 cells, these changes were associated with down-regulation of DNMT1. Our results provide first evidence of ClF implications in epigenetic regulation of transcriptional activity of selected tumour suppressor genes in breast cancer. It seems to be a new important element of ClF anticancer activity and may indicate its potential efficacy in epigenetic therapy of solid tumours, especially at early stages of carcinogenesis. PMID:24296317

  12. Calcium-dependent photodynamic action of di- and tetrasulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine on normal and tumour-derived rat pancreatic exocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    al-Laith, M.; Matthews, E. K.

    1994-01-01

    Important differences exist in the responses to photodynamic agents of normal and tumour-derived pancreatic acinar cells. In the present study amylase release has been used to assess the mechanisms by which the photodynamic drugs tetra- and disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (A1PcS4, A1PcS2) act on pancreatic cells via energy and calcium-dependent activation and transduction pathways. The photodynamic release of amylase was found to be energy dependent and inhibited by the chelation of free cytoplasmic calcium but not by the removal of extracellular calcium. In contrast to their effects on normal acinar cells, the photodynamic action of A1PcS4 and A1PcS2 was to inhibit amylase secretion from pancreatoma AR4-2J cells. Removal of extracellular calcium reversed this inhibitory effect on AR4-2J cells and produced a significant increase in amylase release, but chelation of free cytoplasmic calcium did not affect the inhibitory photodynamic action of the phthalocyanines on amylase release from the tumour cells. Overall, these results demonstrate further important distinctions between the photodynamic action of sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanines on normal versus tumour exocrine cells of the pancreas and indicate that calcium plays an important role in photodynamic drug action, since these agents affected intracellular calcium mobilisation at some distal point in the membrane signal transduction pathway for regulated secretion. Furthermore, the photodynamic inhibition of constitutive secretion in tumour cells may involve a calcium-dependent membrane target site or modulation of membrane calcium channels by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:7524603

  13. Spermatogonial Nature of the Germ Cell Component of Canine Testicular Mixed Germ Cell-Sex Cord Stromal Tumours.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, S; Murakami, T; Tanaka, T; Machida, N; Nomura, K; Yoshida, T; Shibutani, M

    2016-07-01

    The present study has characterized the germ cell component of canine testicular mixed germ cell-sex cord stromal tumours (MGSCTs) by examining the histological nature and histochemical and immunohistochemical features using gonocytic and spermatogonial cellular markers, c-Kit, placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP), protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5), Sal-like protein 4 (SALL4), and the periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reaction. Histologically, all 45 examples of MGSCTs were classified as spermatocytic seminomas (SSs) and Sertoli cell tumours in combination. The germ cell component of all MGSCTs was negative by PAS staining. Immunohistochemically, PLAP immunoreactivity was lacking in the germ cell component of all MGSCTs, which is not consistent with a gonocytic origin. The germ cell component was positive for PGP9.5 and SALL4 in all MGSCTs and positive for c-Kit in 53% of MGSCTs, which is consistent with the phenotype of spermatogonia. Furthermore, the germ cell component in 71% of MGSCTs had moderate immunoreactivity for SALL4, which is suggestive of a spermatogonial phenotype. Conversely, 29% of cases had a minor population of germ cells showing strong SALL4 immunoreactivity, suggesting a phenotype similar to prespermatogonia. The results suggest that the germ cell component of canine MGSCTs is morphologically classified as SS, with the majority of cases showing the spermatogonial phenotype and some cases containing a small population of prespermatogonia. PMID:27241073

  14. New sorafenib derivatives: synthesis, antiproliferative activity against tumour cell lines and antimetabolic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Babić, Zeljka; Crkvenčić, Maja; Rajić, Zrinka; Mikecin, Ana-Matea; Kralj, Marijeta; Balzarini, Jan; Petrova, Mariya; Vanderleyden, Jos; Zorc, Branka

    2012-01-01

    Sorafenib is a relatively new cytostatic drug approved for the treatment of renal cell and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this report we describe the synthesis of sorafenib derivatives 4a-e which differ from sorafenib in their amide part. A 4-step synthetic pathway includes preparation of 4-chloropyridine-2-carbonyl chloride hydrochloride (1), 4-chloro-pyridine-2-carboxamides 2a-e, 4-(4-aminophenoxy)-pyridine-2-carboxamides 3a-e and the target compounds 4-[4-[[4-chloro-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]carbamoylamino]-phenoxy]-pyridine-2-carboxamides 4a-e. All compounds were fully chemically characterized and evaluated for their cytostatic activity against a panel of carcinoma, lymphoma and leukemia tumour cell lines. In addition, their antimetabolic potential was investigated as well. The most prominent antiproliferative activity was obtained for compounds 4a-e (IC(50) = 1-4.3 μmol·L-1). Their potency was comparable to the potency of sorafenib, or even better. The compounds inhibited DNA, RNA and protein synthesis to a similar extent and did not discriminate between tumour cell lines and primary fibroblasts in terms of their anti-proliferative activity. PMID:22269830

  15. Dendritic cells transduced with wild-type p53 gene elicit potent anti-tumour immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, T; Chada, S; Stipanov, M; Nadaf, S; Ciernik, F I; Gabrilovich, D I; Carbone, D P

    1999-01-01

    In this study we have tested the concept of using wild-type p53 gene for immunotherapy of cancer. Dendritic cells (DC) were transduced with a human wild-type p53 containing recombinant adenovirus (Ad-p53). About a half of DC transduced with this virus expressed p53 protein by FACS analysis 48 h after infection. Mice immunized twice with Ad-p53 DC developed substantial cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against tumour cells expressing wild-type and different mutant human and murine p53 genes. Very low CTL responses were observed against target cells infected with control adenovirus (Ad-c). Immunization with Ad-p53 provided complete tumour protection in 85% of mice challenged with tumour cells expressing human mutant p53 and in 72.7% of mice challenged with tumour cells with murine mutant p53. Treatment with Ad-p53-transduced DC significantly slowed the growth of established tumours. Thus, DC transduced with wild-type p53 may be a promising new tool for the immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:10444254

  16. Photodynamic therapy and anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic photosensitizers and harmless visible light in combination with oxygen to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species that kill malignant cells by apoptosis and/or necrosis, shut down the tumour microvasculature and stimulate the host immune system. In contrast to surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy that are mostly immunosuppressive, PDT causes acute inflammation, expression of heat-shock proteins, invasion and infiltration of the tumour by leukocytes, and might increase the presentation of tumour-derived antigens to T cells. PMID:16794636

  17. Juvenile granulosa cell tumour of the ovary presenting with hyperprolactinaemic amenorrhoea and galactorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Ahmed; Lubina-Solomon, Alexandra; Kew, Fiona M; Webster, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Secondary amenorrhoea and galactorrhoea represent a common endocrine presentation. We report a case of an oestrogen-producing juvenile granulosa cell tumour (JGCT) of the ovary in a 16-year-old post-pubertal woman with hyperprolactinaemia amenorrhoea and galactorrhoea which resolved following surgical resection of the tumour. This patient presented with a 9-month history of secondary amenorrhoea and a 2-month history of galactorrhoea. Elevated serum prolactin at 7081 mIU/l and suppressed gonadotropins (LH <0.1 U/l; FSH <0.1 U/l) were detected. Serum oestradiol was significantly elevated at 7442 pmol/l with undetectable β-human chorionic gonadotropin. MRI showed a bulky pituitary with no visible adenoma. MRI of the abdomen showed a 4.8 cm mass arising from the right ovary with no evidence of metastatic disease. Serum inhibin B was elevated at 2735 ng/l. A right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed, and histology confirmed the diagnosis of a JGCT, stage International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 1A. Immunohistochemical staining for prolactin was negative. Post-operatively, oestrogen and prolactin levels were normalised, and she subsequently had a successful pregnancy. In summary, we present a case of an oestrogen-secreting JGCT with hyperprolactinaemia manifesting clinically with galactorrhoea and secondary amenorrhoea. We postulate that observed hyperprolactinaemia was caused by oestrogenic stimulation of pituitary lactotroph cells, a biochemical state analogous to pregnancy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of hyperprolactinaemia as a result of excessive oestrogen production in the context of a JGCT. Learning points Hyperprolactinaemia with bilateral galactorrhoea and secondary amenorrhoea has a wide differential diagnosis and is not always caused by a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma.Significantly elevated serum oestradiol levels in the range seen in this case, in the absence of pregnancy, are indicative

  18. Diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumour: Current treatment concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Staals, Eric L; Ferrari, Stefano; Donati, Davide M; Palmerini, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    At present, the optimal treatment strategy in patients with diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumour (D-TGCT) is unclear. The purpose of this review was to describe current treatment options, and to highlight recent developments in the knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of D-TGCT as well as related therapeutic implications. Epidemiology, clinical features, and the pathogenesis of D-TGCT and the most widely used treatment modalities are described. D-TGCT is a benign clonal neoplastic proliferation arising from the synovium. Patients are often symptomatic and require multiple surgical procedures during their lifetime. Currently, surgery is the main treatment for patients with D-TGCT, with relapse rates ranging from 14% to 55%. Radiosynovectomy and external beam radiotherapy have been used in combination with surgical excision or as single modalities. The finding that D-TGCT cells overexpress colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), resulting in recruitment of CSF1 receptor (CSF1R)-bearing macrophages that are polyclonal and make up the bulk of the tumour, has led to clinical trials with CSF1R inhibitors. These inhibitors include small molecules such as imatinib, nilotinib, PLX3397, and the monoclonal antibody RG7155. In conclusion, D-TGCT impairs patients' quality of life significantly. The evidence that the pathogenetic loop of D-TGCT can be inhibited could potentially change the therapeutic armamentarium for this condition. Clinical trials of agents that target D-TGCT are currently ongoing. In the meantime, international registries should be activated in order to provide useful information on this relatively rare tumour. PMID:27267143

  19. The genomic landscape of testicular germ cell tumours: from susceptibility to treatment.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Kevin; Levy, Max; Huddart, Robert A; Shipley, Janet; Turnbull, Clare

    2016-07-01

    The genomic landscape of testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) can be summarized using four overarching hypotheses. Firstly, TGCT risk is dominated by inherited genetic factors, which determine nearly half of all disease risk and are highly polygenic in nature. Secondly KIT-KITLG signalling is currently the major pathway that is implicated in TGCT formation, both as a predisposition risk factor and a somatic driver event. Results from genome-wide association studies have also consistently suggested that other closely related pathways involved in male germ cell development and sex determination are associated with TGCT risk. Thirdly, the method of disease formation is unique, with tumours universally stemming from a noninvasive precursor lesion, probably of fetal origin, which lies dormant through childhood into adolescence and then eventually begins malignant growth in early adulthood. Formation of a 12p isochromosome, a hallmark of TGCT observed in nearly all tumours, is likely to be a key triggering event for malignant transformation. Finally, TGCT have been shown to have a distinctive somatic mutational profile, with a low rate of point mutations contrasted with frequent large-scale chromosomal gains. These four hypotheses by no means constitute a complete model that explains TGCT tumorigenesis, but advances in genomic technologies have enabled considerable progress in describing and understanding the disease. Further advancing our understanding of the genomic basis of TGCT offers a clear opportunity for clinical benefit in terms of preventing invasive cancer arising in young men, decreasing the burden of chemotherapy-related survivorship issues and reducing mortality in the minority of patients who have treatment-refractory disease. PMID:27296647

  20. Further analysis of the anti-tumour effect in vitro of peritoneal exudate cells from mice treated with Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Ghaffar, A; Cullen, R T; Woodruff, M A

    1975-01-01

    Administration of C. parvum to both intact and thymectomized mice resulted in the appearance in the peritoneal exudate of cells which inhibited tumour growth in vitro. This effect was mediated by intact, viable adherent cells, which it seems reasonable to categorize as macrophages, and was contingent on contact between the effector and target cells. No co-operation was observed between lymph node cells from C. parvum treated mice and peritoneal exudate cells from normal mice. PMID:1156505

  1. Inhibition of p38 MAPK sensitizes tumour cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis mediated by reactive oxygen species and JNK

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Lorena; Igea, Ana; Canovas, Begoña; Dolado, Ignacio; Nebreda, Angel R

    2013-01-01

    The p38 MAPK pathway is an important regulator of many cellular responses. It is well established that p38 MAPK signalling negatively regulates epithelial cell transformation, but enhanced p38 MAPK activity has been also correlated with bad clinical prognosis in some tumour types. Here, we provide genetic and pharmacological evidence showing that p38 MAPK inhibition cooperates with the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin to kill tumour cells. We show that p38 MAPK inhibition results in ROS upregulation, which in turn activates the JNK pathway via inactivation of phosphatases, sensitizing human tumour cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Using a mouse model for breast cancer, we confirm that inhibition of p38 MAPK cooperates with cisplatin treatment to reduce tumour size and malignancy in vivo. Taken together, our results illustrate a new function of p38 MAPK that helps tumour cells to survive chemotherapeutic drug treatments, and reveal that the combination of p38 MAPK inhibitors with cisplatin can be potentially exploited for cancer therapy. PMID:24115572

  2. Familial adenomatous patients with desmoid tumours show increased expression of miR-34a in serum and high levels in tumours.

    PubMed

    Walton, Sarah-Jane; Lewis, Amy; Jeffery, Rosemary; Thompson, Hannah; Feakins, Roger; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Yau, Christopher; Lindsay, James O; Clark, Susan K; Silver, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is rare affecting 1 in 10,000 people and a subset (10%) are at risk of myofibroblastic desmoid tumours (DTs) after colectomy to prevent cancer. DTs are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The absence of markers to monitor progression and a lack of treatment options are significant limitations to clinical management. We investigated microRNAs (miRNA) levels in DTs and serum using expression array analysis on two independent cohorts of FAP patients (total, n=24). Each comprised equal numbers of patients who had formed DTs (cases) and those who had not (controls). All controls had absence of DTs confirmed by clinical and radiological assessment over at least three years post- colectomy. Technical qPCR validation was performed using an expanded cohort (29 FAP patients; 16 cases and 13 controls). The most significant elevated serum miRNA marker of DTs was miR-34a-5p and in-situ hybridisation (ISH) showed most DTs analysed (5/6) expressed miRNA-34a-5p. Exome sequencing of tumour and matched germline DNA did not detect mutations within the miR-34a-5p transcript sites or 3'-UTR of target genes that would alter functional miRNA activity. In conclusion, miR-34a-5p is a potential circulatory marker and therapy target. A large prospective world-wide multi-centre study is now warranted. PMID:27489864

  3. Familial adenomatous patients with desmoid tumours show increased expression of miR-34a in serum and high levels in tumours

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Sarah-Jane; Lewis, Amy; Jeffery, Rosemary; Thompson, Hannah; Feakins, Roger; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Yau, Christopher; Lindsay, James O.; Clark, Susan K.; Silver, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is rare affecting 1 in 10,000 people and a subset (10%) are at risk of myofibroblastic desmoid tumours (DTs) after colectomy to prevent cancer. DTs are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The absence of markers to monitor progression and a lack of treatment options are significant limitations to clinical management. We investigated microRNAs (miRNA) levels in DTs and serum using expression array analysis on two independent cohorts of FAP patients (total, n=24). Each comprised equal numbers of patients who had formed DTs (cases) and those who had not (controls). All controls had absence of DTs confirmed by clinical and radiological assessment over at least three years post- colectomy. Technical qPCR validation was performed using an expanded cohort (29 FAP patients; 16 cases and 13 controls). The most significant elevated serum miRNA marker of DTs was miR-34a-5p and in-situ hybridisation (ISH) showed most DTs analysed (5/6) expressed miRNA-34a-5p. Exome sequencing of tumour and matched germline DNA did not detect mutations within the miR-34a-5p transcript sites or 3′-UTR of target genes that would alter functional miRNA activity. In conclusion, miR-34a-5p is a potential circulatory marker and therapy target. A large prospective world-wide multi-centre study is now warranted. PMID:27489864

  4. Tumour suppressive microRNA-874 regulates novel cancer networks in maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Nohata, N; Hanazawa, T; Kikkawa, N; Sakurai, D; Fujimura, L; Chiyomaru, T; Kawakami, K; Yoshino, H; Enokida, H; Nakagawa, M; Katayama, A; Harabuchi, Y; Okamoto, Y; Seki, N

    2011-01-01

    Background: On the basis of the microRNA (miRNA) expression signature of maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinoma (MSSCC), we found that miR-874 was significantly reduced in cancer cells. We focused on the functional significance of miR-874 in cancer cells and identification of miR-874-regulated novel cancer networks in MSSCC. Methods: We used PCR-based methods to investigate the downregulated miRNAs in clinical specimens of MSSCC. Our signature analyses identified 23 miRNAs that were significantly reduced in cancer cells, such as miR-874, miR-133a, miR-375, miR-204, and miR-1. We focused on miR-874 as the most downregulated novel miRNA in our analysis. Results: We found potential tumour suppressive functions such as inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and invasion. A molecular target search of miR-874 revealed that PPP1CA was directly regulated by miR-874. Overexpression of PPP1CA was observed in MSSCC clinical specimens. Silencing of the PPP1CA gene significantly inhibited cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Conclusion: The downregulation of miR-874 was a frequent event in MSSCC, which suggests that miR-874 functions as a tumour suppressive miRNA, directly regulating PPP1CA that has a potential role of an oncogene. The identification of novel miR-874-regulated cancer pathways could provide new insights into potential molecular mechanisms of MSSCC oncogenesis. PMID:21847129

  5. The tumour-suppressor p53 is not required for pancreatic β cell death during diabetes and upon irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Shin Yuen; Lee, Ming Kei; Sabapathy, Kanaga

    2008-01-01

    Immune-independent diabetes often occurs via pancreatic β cell dysfunction. However, the role of the tumour suppressor p53 that regulates cellular life and death in multiple tissues, in pancreatic cell death and diabetes has not been clarified. We have therefore utilized an established mouse model for diabetes in which the MHC class I antigen is overexpressed in pancreatic β cells under the rat insulin promoter, to investigate the role of p53. We show that pancreatic β cell death, as determined by TUNEL staining, is elevated in transgenic mice compared to wild-type mice. However, there was no increase in immuno-reactivity towards anti-p53 antibodies in the pancreas of transgenic mice over the course of diabetes formation and β cell death, suggesting that p53 may not be involved in these processes. Interestingly, p53 expression was also not induced in pancreas upon γ-irradiation, which resulted in a massive increase in the number of TUNEL-positive cells, suggesting that the p53 pathway may not be causally involved in pancreatic cell death. To further confirm these findings, we generated MHC class I transgenic mice lacking p53 expression. Absence of p53 did not result in any significant changes in pancreatic morphology or affect cell death levels. Importantly, p53 absence did not rescue the diabetic phenotype of the transgenic mice. The results therefore demonstrate that p53 may not be causally involved in pancreatic β cell death, and suggests that the classical cell death pathway dependent on p53 may not be operating in pancreatic β cells. PMID:18006584

  6. Surgical implications of tumour immunology.

    PubMed Central

    Somers, S. S.

    1996-01-01

    The presence of immune infiltration of tumour deposits and the existence of effective in vitro anti-tumour immune responses would suggest the possibility of therapeutic manipulation against tumour cells. However, clinical immunotherapy has shown little promise as a cancer treatment. Numerous explanations for this inefficacy have been proposed, one of which involves the elaboration of immunosuppressive moieties from tumour cells. The results of studies presented below show that serum from patients with gastrointestinal and other tumours have immunosuppressive influences on normal lymphocytes. The degree of this in vitro inhibition is related to tumour 'bulk' and may reflect a systemic immunosuppressive influence of the tumour. Isolation and culture of lymphocytes from gastrointestinal tumour deposits demonstrated that these immune cells are functionally inert, suggesting the existence of an immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment. The isolation and partial purification of an immunosuppressive moiety from conditioned culture medium of a variety of human tumour cell lines further supports the hypothesis of tumour-mediated immunosuppression. A number of protein tumour cell products have been described with potent immunosuppressive properties. These include transforming growth factor-beta, interleukin-10, and the retroviral envelope protein p15E. The surgical implications of the proposed tumour-host immune relationship includes the hypothesis that clinically apparent disease may not be amenable to immune attack owing to tumour-mediated immune suppression. The use of immunostimulatory strategies as adjuvant perioperative therapy would seem a more effective environment for the activation of antitumour immune responses in the surgical patient. PMID:8678441

  7. Defining the clonal dynamics leading to mouse skin tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Danés, Adriana; Hannezo, Edouard; Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Liagre, Mélanie; Youssef, Khalil Kass; Simons, Benjamin D; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-08-18

    The changes in cell dynamics after oncogenic mutation that lead to the development of tumours are currently unknown. Here, using skin epidermis as a model, we assessed the effect of oncogenic hedgehog signalling in distinct cell populations and their capacity to induce basal cell carcinoma, the most frequent cancer in humans. We found that only stem cells, and not progenitors, initiated tumour formation upon oncogenic hedgehog signalling. This difference was due to the hierarchical organization of tumour growth in oncogene-targeted stem cells, characterized by an increase in symmetric self-renewing divisions and a higher p53-dependent resistance to apoptosis, leading to rapid clonal expansion and progression into invasive tumours. Our work reveals that the capacity of oncogene-targeted cells to induce tumour formation is dependent not only on their long-term survival and expansion, but also on the specific clonal dynamics of the cancer cell of origin. PMID:27459053

  8. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  9. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management. PMID:27610194

  10. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management. PMID:27610194

  11. Biology of childhood germ cell tumours, focussing on the significance of microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Murray, M J; Nicholson, J C; Coleman, N

    2015-01-01

    Genomic and protein-coding transcriptomic data have suggested that germ cell tumours (GCTs) of childhood are biologically distinct from those of adulthood. Global messenger RNA profiles segregate malignant GCTs primarily by histology, but then also by age, with numerous transcripts showing age-related differential expression. Such differences are likely to account for the heterogeneous clinico-pathological behaviour of paediatric and adult malignant GCTs. In contrast, as global microRNA signatures of human tumours reflect their developmental lineage, we hypothesized that microRNA profiles would identify common biological abnormalities in all malignant GCTs owing to their presumed shared origin from primordial germ cells. MicroRNAs are short, non-protein-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression via translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. We showed that all malignant GCTs over-express the miR-371–373 and miR-302/367 clusters, regardless of patient age, histological subtype or anatomical tumour site. Furthermore, bioinformatic approaches and subsequent Gene Ontology analysis revealed that these two over-expressed microRNAs clusters co-ordinately down-regulated genes involved in biologically significant pathways in malignant GCTs. The translational potential of this finding has been demonstrated with the detection of elevated serum levels of miR-371–373 and miR-302/367 microRNAs at the time of malignant GCT diagnosis, with levels falling after treatment. The tumour-suppressor let-7 microRNA family has also been shown to be universally down-regulated in malignant GCTs, because of abundant expression of the regulatory gene LIN28. Low let-7 levels resulted in up-regulation of oncogenes including MYCN, AURKB and LIN28 itself, the latter through a direct feedback mechanism. Targeting LIN28, or restoring let-7 levels, both led to effective inhibition of this pathway. In summary, paediatric malignant GCTs show biological differences from their adult

  12. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A.; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Strowski, Mathias Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highly Ca2+ permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca2+ response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca2+-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  13. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Strowski, Mathias Z

    2016-08-01

    Highly Ca(2+) permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca(2+) response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  14. Up-regulation of the embryonic self-renewal network through reversible polyploidy in irradiated p53-mutant tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Salmina, Kristine; Jankevics, Eriks; Huna, Anda; Perminov, Dmitry; Radovica, Ilze; Klymenko, Tetyana; Ivanov, Andrey; Jascenko, Elina; Scherthan, Harry; Cragg, Mark; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina

    2010-08-01

    We have previously documented that transient polyploidy is a potential cell survival strategy underlying the clonogenic re-growth of tumour cells after genotoxic treatment. In an attempt to better define this mechanism, we recently documented the key role of meiotic genes in regulating the DNA repair and return of the endopolyploid tumour cells (ETC) to diploidy through reduction divisions after irradiation. Here, we studied the role of the pluripotency and self-renewal stem cell genes NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in this polyploidy-dependent survival mechanism. In irradiation-resistant p53-mutated lymphoma cell-lines (Namalwa and WI-L2-NS) but not sensitive p53 wild-type counterparts (TK6), low background expression of OCT4 and NANOG was up-regulated by ionising radiation with protein accumulation evident in ETC as detected by OCT4/DNA flow cytometry and immunofluorescence (IF). IF analysis also showed that the ETC generate PML bodies that appear to concentrate OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 proteins, which extend into complex nuclear networks. These polyploid tumour cells resist apoptosis, overcome cellular senescence and undergo bi- and multi-polar divisions transmitting the up-regulated OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 self-renewal cassette to their descendents. Altogether, our observations indicate that irradiation-induced ETC up-regulate key components of germ-line cells, which potentially facilitate survival and propagation of the tumour cell population.

  15. A three-dimensional engineered tumour for spatial snapshot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenhizer, Darren; Gaude, Edoardo; Cojocari, Dan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Frezza, Christian; Wouters, Bradly G.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2016-02-01

    The profound metabolic reprogramming that occurs in cancer cells has been investigated primarily in two-dimensional cell cultures, which fail to recapitulate spatial aspects of cell-to-cell interactions as well as tissue gradients present in three-dimensional tumours. Here, we describe an engineered model to assemble three-dimensional tumours by rolling a scaffold-tumour composite strip. By unrolling the strip, the model can be rapidly disassembled for snapshot analysis, allowing spatial mapping of cell metabolism in concert with cell phenotype. We also show that the establishment of oxygen gradients within samples that are shaped by oxygen-dependent signalling pathways, as well as the consequential variations in cell growth, response to hypoxic gradients extending from normoxia to severe hypoxia, and therapy responsiveness, are consistent with those of tumours in vivo. Moreover, by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we mapped cellular metabolism and identified spatially defined metabolic signatures of cancer cells to reveal both known and novel metabolic responses to hypoxia.

  16. Tetrandrine suppresses human glioma growth by inhibiting cell survival, proliferation and tumour angiogenesis through attenuating STAT3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji-wei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ru; Ye, Jie-cheng; Li, Hai-ying; Zhang, Yi-kai; Ma, Zheng-lai; Li, Jin-ying; Zhong, Xue-yun; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-10-01

    Tetrandrine (Tet), a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid, has been reported to possess anti-tumour activity. However, its effects on human glioma remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that Tet inhibited human glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo. It has been hypothesised that Tet inhibits glioma growth by affecting glioma cell survival, proliferation and vasculature in and around the xenograft tumour in the chick CAM model and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mediated these activities. Therefore, we conducted a detailed analysis of the inhibitory effects of Tet on cell survival using a TUNEL assay and flow cytometric analysis; on cell proliferation based on the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen; and on angiogenesis using a CAM anti-angiogenesis assay. We used western blotting to investigate the role of STAT3 on the anti-glioma activities of Tet. The results revealed that Tet inhibited survival and proliferation in human glioma cells, impaired tumour angiogenesis and decreased the expression of phosphorylated STAT3 and its downstream proteins. In sum, our data indicate that STAT3 is involved in Tet-induced the regression of glioma growth by activating tumour cell apoptosis, inhibiting glioma cell proliferation and inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:26086859

  17. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Cragg, Mark S.; Salmina, Kristine; Hausmann, Michael; Scherthan, Harry

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  18. A three-dimensional engineered tumour for spatial snapshot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients.

    PubMed

    Rodenhizer, Darren; Gaude, Edoardo; Cojocari, Dan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Frezza, Christian; Wouters, Bradly G; McGuigan, Alison P

    2016-02-01

    The profound metabolic reprogramming that occurs in cancer cells has been investigated primarily in two-dimensional cell cultures, which fail to recapitulate spatial aspects of cell-to-cell interactions as well as tissue gradients present in three-dimensional tumours. Here, we describe an engineered model to assemble three-dimensional tumours by rolling a scaffold-tumour composite strip. By unrolling the strip, the model can be rapidly disassembled for snapshot analysis, allowing spatial mapping of cell metabolism in concert with cell phenotype. We also show that the establishment of oxygen gradients within samples that are shaped by oxygen-dependent signalling pathways, as well as the consequential variations in cell growth, response to hypoxic gradients extending from normoxia to severe hypoxia, and therapy responsiveness, are consistent with those of tumours in vivo. Moreover, by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we mapped cellular metabolism and identified spatially defined metabolic signatures of cancer cells to reveal both known and novel metabolic responses to hypoxia. PMID:26595121

  19. Immunoscintigraphy of small-cell lung cancer xenografts with anti neural cell adhesion molecule monoclonal antibody, 123C3: improvement of tumour uptake by internalisation.

    PubMed

    Kwa, H B; Wesseling, J; Verhoeven, A H; van Zandwijk, N; Hilkens, J

    1996-02-01

    The efficacy of three murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunoscintigraphy of small-cell lung cancer (SCLS) xenografts was studied in a Balb/c nu/nu mouse model. These Mabs, 123C3, 123A8 and MOC191, belong to cluster 1 of anti-SCLC MAbs and bind to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) with similar affinity. After intraperitoneal injection of these MAbs, labelled with 125I, the highest uptake in tumour tissue was obtained with MAb 123C3. Seven days after the administration of this MAb 13.9% of the injected dose per gram of tumour tissue was retained in the tumour. The corresponding tumour tissue ratios ranged from 3.97 for blood to 31.03 for colon. The imaging results and the tumour uptake were less favourable for the two other MAbs, 123A8 and MOC191 (fractions of injected dose respectively 6.7% and 9.2%), although affinity, biological activity after labelling and uptake in non-tumour tissues were very similar for all three MAbs. These results may be explained by the differences in the interaction between the MAbs and the tumour cells. Mab 123C3 is internalised into tumour cells, whereas both other anti-NCAM Mabs are not. Internalisation into NCI H69 cells was demonstrated in vitro by radioimmunoassay, confocal laser scanning microscopy and electron microscopy. The internalised fraction of MAb 123C3 was 22.3% after 24h, whereas this fraction was only 7.5% for MAb 123A8. Although the internalised radiolabeled Mabs are usually degraded and dehalogenated intracellularly, the retained radioactivity is high. Apparently, intracellular degradation of radiolabelled MAb 123C3 and subsequent secretion of radioactive iodine did not prevent the accumulation of intracellular radioactivity. In conclusion, accumulation and retention of radioactivity in the tumour tissue, due to internalisation of radiolabelled MAbs, may improve the results immunoscintigraphy. PMID:8595157

  20. Dendrogenin A arises from cholesterol and histamine metabolism and shows cell differentiation and anti-tumour properties

    PubMed Central

    de Medina, Philippe; Paillasse, Michael R.; Segala, Gregory; Voisin, Maud; Mhamdi, Loubna; Dalenc, Florence; Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Filleron, Thomas; Pont, Frederic; Saati, Talal Al; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc

    2013-01-01

    We previously synthesized dendrogenin A and hypothesized that it could be a natural metabolite occurring in mammals. Here we explore this hypothesis and report the discovery of dendrogenin A in mammalian tissues and normal cells as an enzymatic product of the conjugation of 5,6α-epoxy-cholesterol and histamine. Dendrogenin A was not detected in cancer cell lines and was fivefold lower in human breast tumours compared with normal tissues, suggesting a deregulation of dendrogenin A metabolism during carcinogenesis. We established that dendrogenin A is a selective inhibitor of cholesterol epoxide hydrolase and it triggered tumour re-differentiation and growth control in mice and improved animal survival. The properties of dendrogenin A and its decreased level in tumours suggest a physiological function in maintaining cell integrity and differentiation. The discovery of dendrogenin A reveals a new metabolic pathway at the crossroads of cholesterol and histamine metabolism and the existence of steroidal alkaloids in mammals. PMID:23673625

  1. Prooxidative effect of copper--metallothionein in the acute cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Suntres, Zacharias E; Lui, Edmund M K

    2006-01-16

    This study was concerned with the role of copper (Cu) and Cu-metallothionein (Cu-MT) in oxidative stress. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced oxidative injury was examined in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells isolated from host mice pretreated with 0, 1 or 2mg of CuSO(4) (ip) 24h earlier. Control Ehrlich cells contained low levels of Cu and Cu treatment produced dose-related increases in cellular Cu and Cu-MT levels and corresponding increases in sensitivity to oxidative toxicity of H(2)O(2) (LC(50), cell blebbing, lipid peroxidation, GSH depletion, and increase in intracellular free [Ca(2+)](i)). Hydrogen peroxide treatment also resulted in the oxidation of MT thiolates, reduction in the binding of Cu to MT resulting in translocation of Cu to other subcellular sites. d-penicillamine, a Cu-chelating agent, obliterated the sensitization effect of Cu-pretreatment and reduced the redistribution of MT-bound Cu, suggesting the participation of Cu ions derived from MT in promoting oxidant stress. Additional experiments with desferoxamine and mannitol have revealed the involvement of a Cu-dependent Fenton reaction in the mediation of the prooxidative effect of Cu-MT. These data suggest that cells with high levels of Cu-MT may be particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. PMID:16221516

  2. Isolation and characterisation of Kasumi-1 human myeloid leukaemia cell line resistant to tumour necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ido, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kato, S.; Ogawa, H.; Komada, Y.; Zhau, Y. W.; Zhang, X. L.; Sakurai, M.; Suzuki, K.

    1996-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha induces apoptosis in a human acute myeloid leukaemia cell line, Kasumi-1. To examine the role of protein phosphorylation in signal transduction of TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis, a variant cell line resistant to TNF-alpha was established by an intermittent challenge of Kasumi-1 cells with increasing concentrations of TNF-alpha for 6 months. The mechanism of resistance to TNF-alpha appears to be in the post-receptor pathway because expression of p55 TNF receptor in the variant cells is increased compared with that of the parental Kasumi-1 cells. In renaturation assays, TNF-alpha induced a rapid activation of different protein kinases of different molecular weights, including the 50 kDa protein kinase (PK50) followed by the 35 kDa protein kinase (PK35), in the parental Kasumi-1 cells. The dose-response of TNF-alpha required to activate PK50 and PK35 was closely related to concentrations of TNF-alpha that induced apoptosis. Treatment of Kasumi-1 cells with ceramide also activated PK35. In TNF-resistant variant cells, activation of PK35 in response to TNF-alpha or ceramide was practically nil. These findings suggest that activation of PK35 through the ceramide pathway may play an important role in signal transduction of TNF-alpha in the Kasumi-1 cell line, while the decreased activation of PK35 may explain the insensitivity of the variant cells towards TNF-alpha. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8562342

  3. ERas protein is overexpressed and binds to the activated platelet-derived growth factor β receptor in bovine urothelial tumour cells associated with papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Russo, Valeria; Roperto, Franco; Esposito, Iolanda; Ceccarelli, Dora Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Leonardi, Leonardo; Capparelli, Rosanna; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Roperto, Sante

    2016-06-01

    Embryonic stem cell-expressed Ras (ERas) encodes a constitutively active form of guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that binds to and activates phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), which in turn phosphorylates and activates downstream targets such as Akt. The current study evaluated ERas regulation and expression in papillomavirus-associated urothelial tumours in cattle grazing on lands rich in bracken fern. ERas was found upregulated and overexpressed by PCR, real time PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, protein overexpression was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry. ERas was found to interact physically and colocalise with the activated platelet derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) by coimmunoprecipitation and laser scanning confocal investigations. Phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream effector both of ERas and PDGFβR, appeared to be increased in urothelial tumour cells. Altogether, these data indicate that ERas/PDGFβR complex could play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine papillomavirus-associated bladder neoplasia. PMID:27256024

  4. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  5. Post-chemotherapy surgery in advanced non-seminomatous germ-cell testicular tumours: the significance of histology with particular reference to differentiated (mature) teratoma.

    PubMed Central

    Tait, D.; Peckham, M. J.; Hendry, W. F.; Goldstraw, P.

    1984-01-01

    Of a total of 307 patients treated with chemotherapy for advanced non-seminomatous germ-cell testicular tumours between 1976 and 1983, 73 (23.8%) had masses excised after treatment. Resected tissue showed residual malignancy in 16 (22%), fibrosis and necrosis in 25 (34%) and differentiated (mature teratoma) in 32 (44%). Of the 16 patients with tumour only 7 (44%) are alive and disease-free compared with 21/25 (84%) and 27/32 (84%) for fibrosis/necrosis and differentiated teratoma respectively. In addition to histological evidence of residual tumour, elevated serum markers at the time of surgery and/or incomplete excision of residual masses were adverse prognostic features. Of 12 patients with differentiated teratoma or fibrosis who had incomplete resections or densely adherent masses excised with difficulty, 7 subsequently relapsed. The majority of differentiated teratoma patients (75%) had evidence of differentiation in their primary tumours; 88% showed cystic change in metastases and almost one-third showed an increase in the size of metastases during chemotherapy. The data suggest that post-chemotherapy surgery may have a therapeutic as well as a diagnostic role and that complete excision of residual disease should be attempted even if resection at one site has shown either fibrosis or differentiated teratoma. The significance of these findings in relation to treatment induced differentiation is discussed. PMID:6093838

  6. MINDEC-An Enhanced Negative Depletion Strategy for Circulating Tumour Cell Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Lapin, Morten; Tjensvoll, Kjersti; Oltedal, Satu; Buhl, Tove; Gilje, Bjørnar; Smaaland, Rune; Nordgård, Oddmund

    2016-01-01

    Most current methods of circulating tumour cell (CTC) enrichment target the epithelial protein EpCAM, which is commonly expressed in adenocarcinoma cells. However, such methods will not recover the fraction of CTCs that have a non-epithelial phenotype due to epithelial–mesenchymal transition. For phenotype-independent CTC enrichment, we developed a new enhanced negative depletion strategy—termed MINDEC—that is based on multi-marker (CD45, CD16, CD19, CD163, and CD235a/GYPA) depletion of blood cells rather than targeted enrichment of CTCs. Here we validated the performance of MINDEC using epithelial and mesenchymal cancer cell lines, demonstrating a mean recovery of 82 ± 10%, high depletion (437 ± 350 residual white blood cells (WBCs)/mL peripheral blood), linearity between spiked and recovered cells (correlation coefficient: r = 0.995), and a low detection limit (≥1 cell recovered in all four replicates spiked with 3 cells). For clinical validation of this method, we enumerated CTCs in peripheral blood samples from patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, detecting CTCs in 15 of 21 blood samples (71%) from 9 patients. The promising performance of the MINDEC enrichment strategy in our study encourages validation in larger clinical trials. PMID:27432216

  7. Both tumour cells and infiltrating T-cells in equine sarcoids express FOXP3 associated with an immune-supressed cytokine microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A Douglas; Hicks, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) infections of equine species have a central role in the aetiology of equine sarcoids; a common benign skin tumour of horses, zebras and donkeys. Within the lesions, all of the early papillomavirus genes are expressed and promote the excessive replication of fibroblasts which characterise these tumours. Equine sarcoids differ from BPV induced fibro-papillomas of cattle (the natural host of BPV), in that they do not produce high amounts of virus particles, do not usually regress spontaneously and do not sero-convert to BPV; features which suggest that affected horses lack an effective anti-viral immune response to BPV. Equine sarcoids contain large numbers of CD4+ CD8+ dual positive T-cells which uniformly express FOXP3, the key transcription factor of regulatory T-cells, and FOXP3 is also expressed within the BPV infected fibroblasts. Compared to healthy skin, sarcoids showed increased mRNA transcription for FOXP3 and the regulatory cytokine TGFβ. Transcription of IL17, which has been shown to have a regulatory function in human papillomavirus-associated tumours, was also elevated in equine sarcoids compared to spleen. In contrast, the levels of mRNA transcripts for effector T cell cytokines IL2, IL4 and interferon-gamma (IFNγ) were not elevated in sarcoids compared to healthy skin or spleen. Similarly neither interferon-alpha (IFNα), interferon-beta (IFNβ) nor IL12 family members were elevated in sarcoids compared to normal skin. We suggest that the regulatory cytokine micro-environment within sarcoids enables the persistence of the lesions by preventing an effective anti-viral immune response. PMID:27160146

  8. Newly-derived neuroblastoma cell lines propagated in serum-free media recapitulate the genotype and phenotype of primary neuroblastoma tumours.

    PubMed

    Bate-Eya, Laurel T; Ebus, Marli E; Koster, Jan; den Hartog, Ilona J M; Zwijnenburg, Danny A; Schild, Linda; van der Ploeg, Ida; Dolman, M Emmy M; Caron, Huib N; Versteeg, Rogier; Molenaar, Jan J

    2014-02-01

    Recently protocols have been devised for the culturing of cell lines from fresh tumours under serum-free conditions in defined neural stem cell medium. These cells, frequently called tumour initiating cells (TICs) closely retained characteristics of the tumours of origin. We report the isolation of eight newly-derived neuroblastoma TICs from six primary neuroblastoma tumours and two bone marrow metastases. The primary tumours from which these TICs were generated have previously been fully typed by whole genome sequencing (WGS). Array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) analysis showed that TIC lines retained essential characteristics of the primary tumours and exhibited typical neuroblastoma chromosomal aberrations such as MYCN amplification, gain of chromosome 17q and deletion of 1p36. Protein analysis showed expression for neuroblastoma markers MYCN, NCAM, CHGA, DBH and TH while haematopoietic markers CD19 and CD11b were absent. We analysed the growth characteristics and confirmed tumour-forming potential using sphere-forming assays, subcutaneous and orthotopic injection of these cells into immune-compromised mice. Affymetrix mRNA expression profiling of TIC line xenografts showed an expression pattern more closely mimicking primary tumours compared to xenografts from classical cell lines. This establishes that these neuroblastoma TICs cultured under serum-free conditions are relevant and useful neuroblastoma tumour models. PMID:24321263

  9. The sensitivity of human tumour cells to quinone bioreductive drugs: what role for DT-diaphorase?

    PubMed

    Robertson, N; Stratford, I J; Houlbrook, S; Carmichael, J; Adams, G E

    1992-08-01

    15 human tumour cell lines (lung, breast and colon) have been evaluated for their sensitivity to the quinone based anti-cancer drugs Mitomycin C, Porfiromycin, and EO9 (3-hydroxymethyl-5-aziridinyl-1-methyl-2-(IH-indole-4,7-dione)prop-beta- en-alpha-ol). Sensitivity has been compared with the intra-cellular levels of DT-diaphorase, an enzyme thought to be important in the reductive activation of these quinones. No correlation exists between levels of DT-diaphorase and sensitivity to Mitomycin C or Porfiromycin. However, for EO9 those cell lines showing highest levels of DT-diaphorase activity tend to be the most sensitive. PMID:1510692

  10. Immunolocalization of steroid hormone receptors in normal and tumour cells: mechanisms of their cellular traffic.

    PubMed

    Perrot-Applanat, M; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Milgrom, E

    1992-01-01

    Experimental conditions are described for the detection of steroid receptors in tissue sections or cells at the light microscope level. Current knowledge about the ultrastructural distribution of these receptors is summarized; the mechanisms of their nuclear localization are described. Karyophilic signals involved in nuclear translocation are characterized by means of in vitro mutagenesis of steroid receptor cDNAs. Studies analysing the subcellular distribution of various transfected receptor mutants in energy depleted cells together with fusion experiments provide evidence for nucleoplasmic shuttling of progesterone receptors. We conclude that the "nuclear" location of the wild type progesterone receptor reflects a dynamic equilibrium between active nuclear import and outward diffusion. We also describe the use of immunocytochemistry in pathology, especially for the detection of steroid receptors in hormone dependent tumours. PMID:1423330

  11. Tumour-Associated Tissue Eosinophilia in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma- A Boon or a Bane?

    PubMed Central

    Yellapurkar, Shweta; Boaz, Karen; Baliga, Mohan; Shetty, Premalatha; Manaktala, Nidhi; Prasad, Mukul; Ravi, Mahalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The infiltration of tumour stroma by eosinophils, Tumour-Associated Tissue Eosinophilia (TATE) is known to modulate the evolution of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). Identification of eosinophils in the inflammatory stroma has been proven to be an important factor in prognostication of malignant tumours including cancers of mouth, oesophagus, larynx, pharynx, breast, lung, intestine and genitourinary tract. Aim Our study aimed to assess the role of TATE as a prognosticator in OSCC as visualized by Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and congo red staining. Materials and Methods Thirty histologically-proven cases of OSCC were retrieved from the archives of Department of Oral Pathology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Manipal University, Karnataka, India. Two serial sections of 4μm thickness were made and subjected to routine staining with H&E and modified congo red staining, where eosinophil granules stained red and nuclei stained blue. In 40x magnification, 10 HPF at invasive tumour front were assessed for counting eosinophils by placing a 49 square grid (measuring 0.0289 sq mm). Statistical Analysis The TATE was compared with the prognosticators using Mann-Whitney U-test. The grades of carcinoma were correlated with TATE using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Post-hoc Bonferronis correction. Agreement of the number of eosinophils counted in the two staining techniques (H&E and Congo red) in OSCC was achieved using interclass correlation coefficient, and Friedman’s test. A value of p< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Our results showed that tissue eosinophil counts were higher in well-differentiated cases of OSCC, cases with lymph node involvement, decreased survival, without margin involvement and in cases that did not recur. H&E stain showed significantly better visualization of eosinophils resulting in higher eosinophil counts than when seen with Congo red (p=0.008). Conclusion Thus, TATE can be used as a

  12. Molecular and functional consequences of Smad4 C-terminal missense mutations in colorectal tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    De Bosscher, Karolien; Hill, Caroline S; Nicolás, Francisco J

    2004-01-01

    Smad4 is an essential signal transducer of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) signalling pathway and has been identified as a tumour suppressor, being mutated in approx. 50% of pancreatic cancers and approx. 15% of colorectal cancers. Two missense mutations in the C-terminal domain of Smad4, D351H (Asp351-->His) and D537Y (Asp537-->Tyr), have been described recently in the human colorectal cancer cell lines CACO-2 and SW948 respectively [Woodford-Richens, Rowan, Gorman, Halford, Bicknell, Wasan, Roylance, Bodmer and Tomlinson (2001) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 98, 9719-9723]. Previous work in vitro suggested that only Asp-351 was required for interaction with Smad2 [Wu, Fairman, Penry and Shi (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 20688-20694]. In the present study, we investigate the functional consequences of these point mutations in vivo. We demonstrate that neither of these colorectal cancer cells undergo growth arrest in response to TGF-beta, which can be explained, at least in part, by their inability to up-regulate cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 (CIP1 ) or p15 ( INK4b) after TGF-beta stimulation. Although the point-mutated Smad4s are expressed at normal levels in these colorectal cancer cells, they cannot interact with either TGF-beta-induced phosphorylated Smad2 or Smad3. As a result, these Smad4 mutants do not accumulate in the nucleus after TGF-beta stimulation, are not recruited to DNA by relevant Smad-binding transcription factors and cannot generate transcriptionally active DNA-bound complexes. Therefore both these colorectal tumour cells completely lack functional Smad4 activity owing to the missense mutations. Given the location of these mutations in the three-dimensional structure of the Smad4 C-terminal domain, the results also give us significant insights into Smad complex formation. PMID:14715079

  13. Game theory in the death galaxy: interaction of cancer and stromal cells in tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Tlsty, Thea D; Sturm, James C; Austin, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    Preventing relapse is the major challenge to effective therapy in cancer. Within the tumour, stromal (ST) cells play an important role in cancer progression and the emergence of drug resistance. During cancer treatment, the fitness of cancer cells can be enhanced by ST cells because their molecular signalling interaction delays the drug-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. On the other hand, competition among cancer and ST cells for space or resources should not be ignored. We explore the population dynamics of multiple myeloma (MM) versus bone marrow ST cells by using an experimental microecology that we call the death galaxy, with a stable drug gradient and connected microhabitats. Evolutionary game theory is a quantitative way to capture the frequency-dependent nature of interactive populations. Therefore, we use evolutionary game theory to model the populations in the death galaxy with the gradients of pay-offs and successfully predict the future densities of MM and ST cells. We discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression. PMID:25097749

  14. Profiling of Sox4-dependent transcriptome in skin links tumour suppression and adult stem cell activation.

    PubMed

    Foronda, Miguel; Morgado-Palacin, Lucia; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Domínguez, Orlando; Pisano, David G; Blasco, Maria A

    2015-12-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) reside in specific niches in a quiescent state in adult mammals. Upon specific cues they become activated and respond by self-renewing and differentiating into newly generated specialised cells that ensure appropriate tissue fitness. ASC quiescence also serves as a tumour suppression mechanism by hampering cellular transformation and expansion (White AC et al., 2014). Some genes restricted to early embryonic development and adult stem cell niches are often potent modulators of stem cell quiescence, and derailed expression of these is commonly associated to cancer (Vervoort SJ et al., 2013). Among them, it has been shown that recommissioned Sox4 expression facilitates proliferation, survival and migration of malignant cells. By generating a conditional Knockout mouse model in stratified epithelia (Sox4 (cKO) mice), we demonstrated a delayed plucking-induced Anagen in the absence of Sox4. Skin global transcriptome analysis revealed a prominent defect in the induction of transcriptional networks that control hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) activation such as those regulated by Wnt/Ctnnb1, Shh, Myc or Sox9, cell cycle and DNA damage response-associated pathways. Besides, Sox4 (cKO) mice are resistant to skin carcinogenesis, thus linking Sox4 to both normal and pathological HFSC activation (Foronda M et al., 2014). Here we provide additional details on the analysis of Sox4-regulated transcriptome in Telogen and Anagen skin. The raw and processed microarray data is deposited in GEO under GSE58155. PMID:26697322

  15. Therapeutically engineered induced neural stem cells are tumour-homing and inhibit progression of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bagó, Juli R.; Alfonso-Pecchio, Adolfo; Okolie, Onyi; Dumitru, Raluca; Rinkenbaugh, Amanda; Baldwin, Albert S.; Miller, C. Ryan; Magness, Scott T.; Hingtgen, Shawn D.

    2016-01-01

    Transdifferentiation (TD) is a recent advancement in somatic cell reprogramming. The direct conversion of TD eliminates the pluripotent intermediate state to create cells that are ideal for personalized cell therapy. Here we provide evidence that TD-derived induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) are an efficacious therapeutic strategy for brain cancer. We find that iNSCs genetically engineered with optical reporters and tumouricidal gene products retain the capacity to differentiate and induced apoptosis in co-cultured human glioblastoma cells. Time-lapse imaging shows that iNSCs are tumouritropic, homing rapidly to co-cultured glioblastoma cells and migrating extensively to distant tumour foci in the murine brain. Multimodality imaging reveals that iNSC delivery of the anticancer molecule TRAIL decreases the growth of established solid and diffuse patient-derived orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts 230- and 20-fold, respectively, while significantly prolonging the median mouse survival. These findings establish a strategy for creating autologous cell-based therapies to treat patients with aggressive forms of brain cancer. PMID:26830441

  16. Profiling of Sox4-dependent transcriptome in skin links tumour suppression and adult stem cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Foronda, Miguel; Morgado-Palacin, Lucia; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Domínguez, Orlando; Pisano, David G.; Blasco, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Adult stem cells (ASCs) reside in specific niches in a quiescent state in adult mammals. Upon specific cues they become activated and respond by self-renewing and differentiating into newly generated specialised cells that ensure appropriate tissue fitness. ASC quiescence also serves as a tumour suppression mechanism by hampering cellular transformation and expansion (White AC et al., 2014). Some genes restricted to early embryonic development and adult stem cell niches are often potent modulators of stem cell quiescence, and derailed expression of these is commonly associated to cancer (Vervoort SJ et al., 2013). Among them, it has been shown that recommissioned Sox4 expression facilitates proliferation, survival and migration of malignant cells. By generating a conditional Knockout mouse model in stratified epithelia (Sox4cKO mice), we demonstrated a delayed plucking-induced Anagen in the absence of Sox4. Skin global transcriptome analysis revealed a prominent defect in the induction of transcriptional networks that control hair follicle stem cell (HFSC) activation such as those regulated by Wnt/Ctnnb1, Shh, Myc or Sox9, cell cycle and DNA damage response-associated pathways. Besides, Sox4cKO mice are resistant to skin carcinogenesis, thus linking Sox4 to both normal and pathological HFSC activation (Foronda M et al., 2014). Here we provide additional details on the analysis of Sox4-regulated transcriptome in Telogen and Anagen skin. The raw and processed microarray data is deposited in GEO under GSE58155. PMID:26697322

  17. Game theory in the death galaxy: interaction of cancer and stromal cells in tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Tlsty, Thea D.; Sturm, James C.; Austin, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Preventing relapse is the major challenge to effective therapy in cancer. Within the tumour, stromal (ST) cells play an important role in cancer progression and the emergence of drug resistance. During cancer treatment, the fitness of cancer cells can be enhanced by ST cells because their molecular signalling interaction delays the drug-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. On the other hand, competition among cancer and ST cells for space or resources should not be ignored. We explore the population dynamics of multiple myeloma (MM) versus bone marrow ST cells by using an experimental microecology that we call the death galaxy, with a stable drug gradient and connected microhabitats. Evolutionary game theory is a quantitative way to capture the frequency-dependent nature of interactive populations. Therefore, we use evolutionary game theory to model the populations in the death galaxy with the gradients of pay-offs and successfully predict the future densities of MM and ST cells. We discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression. PMID:25097749

  18. Treating giant cell tumours with curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Myung-Sang; Kim, Sung-SooS S; Moon, Jeong-Lim; Kim, Sung-Sim; Moon, Hanlim

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To report on 23 patients with giant cell tumour (GCT) of the femur or tibia treated with curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation. METHODS. Records of these 14 men and 9 women aged 22 to 38 (mean, 31) years were reviewed. The most common site involved was the distal femur (n=13), followed by proximal tibia (n=8), proximal femur (n=1), and distal tibia (n=1). The lesions were classified as grade I (n=3), grade II (n=18), and grade III (n=2). Based on histology, the tumour stage was classified as grade I (n=5) and grade II (n=18). Two of these patients had recurrences, which were initially treated with simple curettage and bone grafting of the distal femur and distal tibia. RESULTS. The mean follow-up period was 5.7 (range, 2.5-10.1) years. 14 of the 23 patients were followed up for over 10 years. No patient developed any local recurrence, remote metastasis, or complication related to surgery or adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSION. Combined treatment entailing curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation was effective in treating GCT of bone. PMID:24014786

  19. Targeting Human Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour Cells with a Quadruplex-binding Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Gunaratnam, Mekala; Beltran, Monica; Galesa, Katja; Haider, Shozeb M.; Reszka, Anthony P.; Cuenca, Francisco; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Neidle, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The majority of human gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are driven by activating mutations in the proto-oncogene KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Clinical treatment with imatinib targets the kinase domain of KIT, but tumour regrowth occurs as a result of the development of resistant mutations in the kinase active site. An alternative small-molecule approach to GIST therapy is described, in which the KIT gene is directly targeted, and thus kinase resistance may be circumvented. A naphthalene dimiide derivative has been used to demonstrate the concept of dual quadruplex targeting. This compound strongly stabilises both telomeric quadruplex DNA and quadruplex sites in the KIT promoter in vitro. It is shown here that the compound is a potent inducer of growth arrest in a patient-derived GIST cell line at a concentration (ca 1μM) that also results in effective inhibition of telomerase activity and almost complete suppression of KIT mRNA and KIT protein expression. Molecular modelling studies with a telomeric quadruplex have been used to rationalise aspects of the experimental quadruplex melting data. PMID:19469547

  20. Anti-tumour activity of two novel compounds in cisplatin-resistant testicular germ cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nitzsche, B; Gloesenkamp, C; Schrader, M; Hoffmann, B; Zengerling, F; Balabanov, S; Honecker, F; Höpfner, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy is associated with poor prognosis in testicular germ cell cancer, emphasising the need for new therapeutic approaches. In this respect, the therapeutic concept of anti-angiogenesis is of particular interest. In a previous study, we presented two novel anti-angiogenic compounds, HP-2 and HP-14, blocking the tyrosine kinase activity of angiogenic growth factor receptors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), and related signalling pathways in testicular cancer. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of these new compounds in platinum-resistant testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs), in vitro and in vivo. Methods and results: Drug-induced changes in cell proliferation of the cisplatin-sensitive TGCT cell line 2102EP and its cisplatin-resistant counterpart 2102EP-R, both expressing the VEGFR-2, were evaluated by crystal violet staining. Both compounds inhibited the growth of cisplatin-resistant TGCT cells in a dose-dependent manner. In combination experiments with cisplatin, HP-14 revealed additive growth-inhibitory effects in TGCT cells, irrespective of the level of cisplatin resistance. Anti-angiogenic effects of HP compounds were confirmed by tube formation assays with freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Using TGCT cells inoculated onto the chorioallantoic membrane of fertilised chicken eggs (chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay), the anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative potency of the novel compounds was also demonstrated in vivo. Gene expression profiling revealed changes in the expression pattern of genes related to DNA damage detection and repair, as well as in chaperone function after treatment with both cisplatin and HP-14, alone or in combination. This suggests that HP-14 can revert the lost effectiveness of cisplatin in the resistant cells by altering the expression of critical genes. Conclusion: The novel compound HP-14 effectively inhibits the

  1. Endopolyploidy in irradiated p53-deficient tumour cell lines: Persistence of cell division activity in giant cells expressing Aurora B- kinase

    PubMed Central

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Ivanov, Andrei; Wheatley, Sally P; Kosmacek, Elizabeth A; Ianzini, Fiorenza; Anisimov, Alim P; Mackey, Michael; Davis, Paul J; Plakhins, Grigorijs; Illidge, Timothy M

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings including computerized live imaging suggest that polyploidy cells transiently emerging after severe genotoxic stress (and named ‘endopolyploid cells’) may have a role in tumour regrowth after anti-cancer treatment. Until now, mostly the factors enabling metaphase were studied in them. Here we investigate the mitotic activities and the role of Aurora B, in view of potential de-polyploidisation of these cells, because Aurora B- kinase is responsible for coordination and completion of mitosis. We observed that endopolyploid giant cells are formed in irradiated p53 tumours in several ways: (1) by division/fusion of daughter cells creating early multi-nucleated cells; (2) by asynchronous division/fusion of sub-nuclei of these multinucleated cells; (3) by a series of polyploidising mitoses reverting replicative interphase from aborted metaphase and forming giant cells with a single nucleus; (4) by micronucleation of arrested metaphases enclosing genome fragments; or (5) by incomplete division in the multipolar mitoses forming late multi-nucleated giant cells. We also observed that these activities are able to release para-diploid cells, although they do so infrequently. Although after a substantial delay, apoptosis typically occurs in these cells, we also found that roughly 2% of endopolyploid cells evade apoptosis and senescence arrest and continue mitotic activities. In this article we describe that catalytically active aurora B-kinase is expressed in the nuclei of many interphase endopolyploid cells, as well as being present at the centromeres, mitotic spindle and cleavage furrow during their mitotic efforts. The totally micronucleated giant cells (containing subgenomic fragments in multiple micronuclei) represented the only minor fraction, which failed to undergo mitosis and Aurora B was absent from it. These observations suggest that most endopolyploid tumour cells are not reproductively inert and that aurora B may contribute to the establishment

  2. Inhibitory effect of STAT3 gene combined with CDDP on growth of human Wilms tumour SK-NEP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junrong; Zhang, Nina; Qu, Haijiang; You, Guangxian; Yuan, Junhui; Chen, Caie; Li, Wenyi; Pan, Feng

    2016-07-01

    To investigate the effects of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) combined with cisplatin (CDDP) on the growth of human Wilms tumour (WT) SK-NEP-1 cell subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice and the possible mechanisms. Human WT SK-NEP-1 cells were subcutaneously transplanted to establish the BALB/c nude mice xenograft model. Mice were randomly divided into five groups: blank control group, adenovirus control group (NC group), STAT3 group, CDDP group and STAT3 plus CDDP group (combination group). Tumour volume and tumour weight were observed during the therapeutic process. The expression levels of STAT3, glucose regulatory protein 78 (GRP78) and BCL2-associated X protein (BAX) were evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis. Compared with the STAT3 group or CDDP group, the tumour weight and volume was significantly reduced in the combination group (P<0.05). No statistical significance was found in NC group compared with the blank control group (P > 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that STAT3, GRP78 and BAX protein levels in the combination group were significantly higher than those in STAT3 group and CDDP group (P<0.05). Exogenous STAT3 and CDDP may synergistically inhibit the xenograft tumour growth through up-regulation of BAX protein via GRP78. PMID:27129294

  3. IGF-II dependent autocrine growth in cell lines derived from renal tumours of childhood

    PubMed Central

    Zumkeller, W; Mahmood, A; Dellow, R; Schofield, P N

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To determine the role of insulin-like growth factors (IGF) in the proliferation of tumour cells, by studying the mitogenic response to IGFs of three cell lines of differing phenotype established from both malignant rhabdoid and Wilms tumour, representing a range of cell types (GOS 4, G401, and T3/73). Methods—Production of IGF-II and IGF-I was measured by radioimmunoassay, and the presence of IGF binding protein complexes was observed by gel exclusion chromatography. Following growth analyses in serum-free media to ascertain the dependence of the cell lines on exogenous IGFs, the generation of autocrine growth was measured by a density dependence assay of proliferation in culture. Receptors were measured by radioligand cross linking and autocrine growth through these receptors assayed by the use of blocking antibodies. Results—While GOS 4 and G401 were able to proliferate in serum-free medium over a period of 5 d, T3/73 showed an absolute dependence on IGFs added daily at 1-10 ng/ml. Plating at clonal density showed that cell growth was directly density dependent in serum-free medium. The serum independent proliferation of G401 and GOS 4 was blocked by the addition of an antibody to the type 1 IGF receptor (α-IR3) suggesting that the effects of autocrine factors are mediated through type 1 IGF receptors. S1 nuclease protection analysis indicated that all three cell lines produced significant amounts of mRNA derived mainly from the P3 IGF-II promoter, but transcripts for IGF-I were undetectable. Radioimmunoassay of IGFs from conditioned media showed that all the lines made assayable IGF-II (8·6, 8·4, and 6·1 ng/ml/24 h/106 cells for GOS 4, G401, and T3/73 respectively). The presence of species consistent with both type 1 and type II IGF receptors was demonstrated using radioligand binding to cell membranes followed by cross linking. Conclusions—Autocrine IGF-II may contribute to the serum independence of GOS 4 and G401 cells, whereas T3/73 may

  4. Oxidative stress signalling: a potential mediator of tumour necrosis factor alpha-induced genomic instability in primary vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, M; Gibbons, C F; Mohan, S; Moore, S; Kadhim, M A

    2007-09-01

    Studying the potential role of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)alpha in the initiation of genomic instability is necessary to understand whether TNFalpha can serve as a signalling mediator of radiation-induced genomic instability in non-irradiated bystander cells. In this study, we examined whether TNFalpha could initiate processes through oxidative stress signalling that lead to DNA damage and genomic instability in primary vascular endothelium. In these cells, low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation (0.1-2 Gy) induced the secretion of TNFalpha into the culture medium. When added ectopically, TNFalpha at concentrations ranging from 0.1 ng ml(-1) to 10 ng ml(-1) increased (twofold to threefold) intracellular oxidative stress. Next, to examine whether TNFalpha induces genetic damage, cells were treated with TNFalpha for 5 h and analysed immediately using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay or after 3 days, 12 days and 20 days using solid stain chromosomal analysis. Cells exposed to 0.1 Gy, 1 Gy or 2 Gy or treated with 100 microM H2O2 were used as positive controls. The results showed that TNFalpha as low as 0.1 ng ml(-1) could initiate increased DNA damage compared with untreated controls. When examined in the progeny cells after several generations, the chromosomal instability appeared to be carried over even after day 12 and day 20. The increased genetic damage is inhibited in cells that are pre-incubated with the antioxidant enzyme catalase, the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine or the metal chelator pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. These results clearly indicate that TNFalpha at concentrations at which no cytotoxicity is observed could induce genetic damage through free radical generation, which could, in turn, lead to the delayed events associated with genomic instability. PMID:17704321

  5. Growth of cultured human glioma tumour cells can be regulated with histamine and histamine antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Ven, L. T.; Prinsen, I. M.; Jansen, G. H.; Roholl, P. J.; Defferrari, R.; Slater, R.; Den Otter, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 50% survival time for low grade astrocytomas is 50 months and for high grade astrocytomas it is 13 months, underlining the need for new therapies. Several reports show that in vivo histamine antagonists cause retardation of tumour growth in some animal models and prolonged survival in cancer patients. Therefore we have tested the growth modulating effects of histamine and histamine antagonists on human glioma cultures. Twelve freshly excised human gliomas were cultured and tested for their in vitro sensitivity to histamine and histamine antagonists. Four continuous glioma cell lines were used to confirm the glioma-specificity of the effects observed in the primary cell lines. In low serum concentration (0 or 1%) the growth of 5/9 primary glioma-derived cultures could be stimulated with 0.2 mM histamine, and in 4/5 cases with 0.2 microM histamine. One mM of the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine could inhibit the growth of 4/5 primary glioma cultures when tested in 1% human AB serum, and of 6/13 cases when tested in 1% FCS. Lower concentrations (down to 1 microM) were less effective. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist pyrilamine gave variable results. The specificity of the effects is indicated by the absence of a generalised toxic effect, by the observation that the antagonist-induced inhibition could be reversed with histamine, and by the correlation of the obtained cimetidine-induced growth inhibition with the maximal growth rate of the primary cell lines in 10% FCS. The observed cimetidine-induced inhibition of the in vitro proliferation of gliomas suggests that cimetidine is a relevant candidate for the in vivo growth inhibition of these tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8353038

  6. P-glycoprotein expression in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells after in vitro and in vivo selection with daunorubicin.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, D.; Eriksen, J.; Maare, C.; Jakobsen, A. H.; Skovsgaard, T.

    1998-01-01

    Fluctuation analysis experiments were performed to assess whether selection or induction determines expression of P-glycoprotein and resistance in the murine Ehrlich ascites tumour cell line (EHR2) after exposure to daunorubicin. Thirteen expanded populations of EHR2 cells were exposed to daunorubicin 7.5 x 10(-9) M or 10(-8) M for 2 weeks. Surviving clones were scored and propagated. Only clones exposed to daunorubicin 7.5 x 10(-9) M could be expanded for investigation. Drug resistance was assessed by the tetrazolium dye (MTT) cytotoxicity assay. Western blot was used for determination of P-glycoprotein. Compared with EHR2, the variant cells were 2.5- to 5.2-fold resistant to daunorubicin (mean 3.6-fold). P-glycoprotein was significantly increased in 11 of 25 clones (44%). Analysis of variance supported the hypothesis that spontaneous mutations conferred drug resistance in EHR2 cells exposed to daunorubicin 7.5 x 10(-9) M. At this level (5 log cell killing) of drug exposure, the mutation rate was estimated at 4.1 x 10(-6) per cell generation. In contrast, induction seemed to determine resistance in EHR2 cells in vitro exposed to daunorubicin 10(-8) M. The revertant EHR2/0.8/R was treated in vivo with daunorubicin for 24 h. After treatment, P-glycoprotein increased in EHR2/0.8/R (sevenfold) and the cell line developed resistance to daunorubicin (12-fold), suggesting that in EHR2/0.8/R the mdr1 gene was activated by induction. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that P-glycoprotein expression and daunorubicin resistance are primarily acquired by selection of spontaneously arising mutants. However, under certain conditions the mdr1 gene may be activated by induction. PMID:9820176

  7. Immunological screening of a glycoprotein antigen expressed by Zajdela ascites hepatoma cells on normal rat tissues and tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Nato, F; Goulut, C; Mirshahi, M; Bourrillon, R

    1991-10-01

    Expression of the glycoprotein MII2 antigen originally identified in Zajdela ascites hepatoma cells was investigated in several normal rat tissues and in more or less differentiated tumours using biochemical and immunological approaches. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by fluorography or immunoblotting with an antiserum raised against the purified MII2 antigen revealed that this antigen was absent from normal liver cells. ELISA assays, indirect immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation experiments using the same antiserum showed that this glycoprotein was not expressed in various normal tissues such as liver, spleen, lung, pancreas, intestine and stomach, but it was unexpectedly detected in kidney and thymic tissues. However, the molecular weight of the antigens immunoprecipitated from kidney and thymus was lower than the one of MII2 (Mr of 60,000 versus 110,000-160,000 for purified MII2). No staining was observed in embryonic rat liver at 10 and 20 days of development. Moreover, this antigen was present on the surface of Morris hepatoma 7777, another rapidly proliferating and poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. In contrast, this antigen was not detected on the surface of in vitro Zajdela hepatoma cells (ZHC) or of partially differentiated hepatomas (Faza) which have recovered some hepatic functions. In addition, the MII2 antigen was found on the human non-hepatic HT-29 tumour cell line, under its undifferentiated form (HT-29 G+ subline). The possible relationships between the expression of this antigen and both the malignant transformation process and the differentiation process are discussed. PMID:1656518

  8. Tirapazamine-induced DNA damage measured using the comet assay correlates with cytotoxicity towards hypoxic tumour cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Siim, B. G.; van Zijl, P. L.; Brown, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Tirapazamine (SR 4233), a bioreductive drug selectively toxic towards hypoxic cells, is presently in phase II clinical trials. Since it would not be expected that all tumours would respond equally to the drug, we are exploring ways of predicting the response of individual tumours. In this study we have tested whether the comet assay, which measures DNA damage in individual cells, can provide a simple, surrogate end point for cell killing by tirapazamine. We examined the relationship between the cytotoxicity of tirapazamine under hypoxic conditions and tirapazamine-induced DNA strand breaks in murine (SCCVII, EMT6, RIF-1) and human (HT1080, A549, HT29) tumour cell lines. These results were compared with the relationship between tirapazamine cytotoxicity and another measure of the ability of cells to metabolise tirapazamine; high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of tirapazamine loss or formation of the two electron reduction product SR 4317. The correlation between the hypoxic cytotoxic potency of tirapazamine and DNA damage was highly significant (r = 0.905, P = 0.013). A similar correlation was observed for hypoxic potency and tirapazamine loss (r = 0.812, P = 0.050), while the correlation between hypoxic potency and SR 4317 formation was not significant (r = 0.634, P = 0.171). The hypoxic cytotoxicity of tirapazamine in vitro can therefore be predicted by measuring tirapazamine-induced DNA damage using the comet assay. This approach holds promise for predicting the response of individual tumours to tirapazamine in the clinic. PMID:8611431

  9. The isolation and characterization of renal cancer initiating cells from human Wilms' tumour xenografts unveils new therapeutic targets†

    PubMed Central

    Pode-Shakked, Naomi; Shukrun, Rachel; Mark-Danieli, Michal; Tsvetkov, Peter; Bahar, Sarit; Pri-Chen, Sara; Goldstein, Ronald S; Rom-Gross, Eithan; Mor, Yoram; Fridman, Edward; Meir, Karen; Simon, Amos; Magister, Marcus; Kaminski, Naftali; Goldmacher, Victor S; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Dekel, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    There are considerable differences in tumour biology between adult and paediatric cancers. The existence of cancer initiating cells/cancer stem cells (CIC/CSC) in paediatric solid tumours is currently unclear. Here, we show the successful propagation of primary human Wilms' tumour (WT), a common paediatric renal malignancy, in immunodeficient mice, demonstrating the presence of a population of highly proliferative CIC/CSCs capable of serial xenograft initiation. Cell sorting and limiting dilution transplantation analysis of xenograft cells identified WT CSCs that harbour a primitive undifferentiated – NCAM1 expressing – “blastema” phenotype, including a capacity to expand and differentiate into the mature renal-like cell types observed in the primary tumour. WT CSCs, which can be further enriched by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, overexpressed renal stemness and genes linked to poor patient prognosis, showed preferential protein expression of phosphorylated PKB/Akt and strong reduction of the miR-200 family. Complete eradication of WT in multiple xenograft models was achieved with a human NCAM antibody drug conjugate. The existence of CIC/CSCs in WT provides new therapeutic targets. PMID:23239665

  10. Malignant transformations in a patient with a mediastinal germ cell tumour: lack of efficacy of bone marrow transplantation after chemotherapy on tumour recurrence.

    PubMed

    Kassim, Yusra; Penther, Dominique; Schneider, Pascale; Callat, Marie-Paul; Bastard, Christian; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    The report describes the case of a young male with a malignant teratoma which was followed by an acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia sharing similar chromosomal abnormalities. In leukemic cells, the authors have obtained cytogenetic evidence by fluorescent in situ hybridisation technique suggesting that this leukaemia arose directly from the germ cell tumour (GCT). The patient received allogenic bone marrow transplantation, which unfortunately, did not prevent the patient to relapse with an undifferentiated sarcoma containing rhabdomyosarcoma components, as well as reappearance of a residual teratoma with metastasis. The treatment strategy for malignant transformation of a GCT seems to be unpredictable and should be dictated by the malignant tissue counterpart. Except for acute leukaemia, unresectable or metastatic settings will generally require multi-modal therapy including chemotherapy, in addition to loco regional approaches. Additionally, long or even a life time follow-up is necessary in patients with poor prognostic characteristics. PMID:22707696

  11. Malignant transformations in a patient with a mediastinal germ cell tumour: lack of efficacy of bone marrow transplantation after chemotherapy on tumour recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Kassim, Yusra; Penther, Dominique; Schneider, Pascale; Callat, Marie-Paul; Bastard, Christian; Vannier, Jean-pierre

    2012-01-01

    The report describes the case of a young male with a malignant teratoma which was followed by an acute megakaryoblastic leukaemia sharing similar chromosomal abnormalities. In leukemic cells, the authors have obtained cytogenetic evidence by fluorescent in situ hybridisation technique suggesting that this leukaemia arose directly from the germ cell tumour (GCT). The patient received allogenic bone marrow transplantation, which unfortunately, did not prevent the patient to relapse with an undifferentiated sarcoma containing rhabdomyosarcoma components, as well as reappearance of a residual teratoma with metastasis. The treatment strategy for malignant transformation of a GCT seems to be unpredictable and should be dictated by the malignant tissue counterpart. Except for acute leukaemia, unresectable or metastatic settings will generally require multi-modal therapy including chemotherapy, in addition to loco regional approaches. Additionally, long or even a life time follow-up is necessary in patients with poor prognostic characteristics. PMID:22707696

  12. Lysyl oxidase-like-2 promotes tumour angiogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in angiogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Zaffryar-Eilot, Shelly; Marshall, Derek; Voloshin, Tali; Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Spangler, Rhyannon; Kessler, Ofra; Ghermazien, Haben; Brekhman, Vera; Suss-Toby, Edith; Adam, Dan; Shaked, Yuval; Smith, Victoria; Neufeld, Gera

    2013-10-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), a secreted enzyme that catalyzes the cross-linking of collagen, plays an essential role in developmental angiogenesis. We found that administration of the LOXL2-neutralizing antibody AB0023 inhibited bFGF-induced angiogenesis in Matrigel plug assays and suppressed recruitment of angiogenesis promoting bone marrow cells. Small hairpin RNA-mediated inhibition of LOXL2 expression or inhibition of LOXL2 using AB0023 reduced the migration and network-forming ability of endothelial cells, suggesting that the inhibition of angiogenesis results from a direct effect on endothelial cells. To examine the effects of AB0023 on tumour angiogenesis, AB0023 was administered to mice bearing tumours derived from SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma or Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. AB0023 treatment significantly reduced the microvascular density in these tumours but did not inhibit tumour growth. However, treatment of mice bearing SKOV-3-derived tumours with AB0023 also promoted increased coverage of tumour vessels with pericytes and reduced tumour hypoxia, providing evidence that anti-LOXL2 therapy results in the normalization of tumour blood vessels. In agreement with these data, treatment of mice bearing LLC-derived tumours with AB0023 improved the perfusion of the tumour-associated vessels as determined by ultrasonography. Improved perfusion and normalization of tumour vessels after treatment with anti-angiogenic agents were previously found to improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents into tumours and to result in an enhancement of chemotherapeutic efficiency. Indeed, treatment with AB0023 significantly enhanced the anti-tumourigenic effects of taxol. Our results suggest that inhibition of LOXL2 may prove beneficial for the treatment of angiogenic tumours. PMID:23828904

  13. Genetic mutations in accordance with a low malignant potential tumour are not demonstrated in clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria; Castiglione, Francesca; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) cases were evaluated for mutations on the following genes: KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, ERBB2, DDR2, MAP2K1, RET and EGFR. Four male and three female patients of age 42-74 years were evaluated. All cases were incidentally detected by ultrasound and ranged 1.8-3.5 cm. Microscopic examination showed variably tubulopapillary, tubular acinar, cystic architecture and the characteristic linear arrangement of nuclei. The cells were reactive with CK7 (strong), CA IX (cup-shape) and 34 β E12. CD10, AMACR/RACEMASE and GATA3 were negative. There were no mutations on any of the investigated genes. This preliminary observation supports the concept that CCPRCC might be indeed an indolent tumour worth it to be named as clear cell papillary neoplasm of low potential. PMID:26941183

  14. Chemical composition of Schinus molle essential oil and its cytotoxic activity on tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Cecilia; Quesada, Silvia; Brenes, Oscar; Aguilar, Gilda; Cicció, José F

    2008-01-01

    The leaf essential oil hydrodistilled from Schinus molle grown in Costa Rica was characterised in terms of its chemical composition, antioxidant activity, ability to induce cytotoxicity and the mechanism of cell death involved in the process. As a result, 42 constituents, accounting for 97.2% of the total oil, were identified. The major constituents of the oil were beta-pinene and alpha-pinene. The antioxidant activity showed an IC(50) of 36.3 microg mL(-1). The essential oil was cytotoxic in several cell lines, showing that it is more effective on breast carcinoma and leukemic cell lines. The LD(50) for cytotoxicity at 48 h in K562 corresponded to 78.7 microg mL(-1), which was very similar to the LD(50) obtained when apoptosis was measured. The essential oil did not induce significant necrosis up to 200 microg mL(-1), which together with the former results indicate that apoptosis is the main mechanism of toxicity induced by S. molle essential oil in this cell line. In conclusion, the essential oil tested was weak antioxidant and induced cytotoxicity in different cell types by a mechanism related to apoptosis. It would be interesting to elucidate the role that different components of the oil play in the effect observed here, since some of them could have potential anti-tumoural effects, either alone or in combination. PMID:19023816

  15. Microimaging FT-IR of oral cavity tumours. Part III: Cells, inoculated tissues and human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, C.; Ferraris, P.; Giorgini, E.; Pieramici, T.; Possati, L.; Rocchetti, R.; Rubini, C.; Sabbatini, S.; Tosi, G.; Mariggiò, M. A.; Lo Muzio, L.

    2007-05-01

    The biochemistry of healthy and tumour cell cultures, inoculated tissues and oral cavity tissues have been studied by FT-IR Microscopy with the aim to relate spectral patterns with microbiological and histopathological findings. 'Supervised' and 'unsupervised' procedures of data handling afforded a satisfactory degree of accordance between spectroscopic and the other two techniques. In particular, changes in frequency and intensity of proteins, connective and nucleic acids vibrational modes as well as the visualization of biochemical single wave number or band ratio images, allowed an evaluation of the pathological changes. The spectroscopic patterns of inoculated tissues resulted quite similar to human tissues; differences of both types of sections with cellular lines could be explained by the influence of the environment.

  16. Spontaneous tumour lysis syndrome associated with contrast dye iohexol use in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Seongseok; Vincelette, Nicole D; Phan, Tuan; Anwer, Faiz

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of a 73-year-old man who presented with right-sided abdominal pain associated with palpable mass. Initial laboratory examination was normal except lactate dehydrogenase level. Subsequent CT image showed situs inversus and splenic mass with multiple lymph nodes enlargement. Biopsy taken from the splenic mass demonstrated mantle cell lymphoma. Staging CT examination was performed with intravenous contrast, and patient developed altered mental status, respiratory failure and acute kidney injury requiring intensive care unit care. Laboratory examination revealed hyperuricaemia, hyperphosphataemia, hyperkalaemia and hypocalcaemia, which are consistent with spontaneous tumour lysis syndrome. The patient was successfully treated with rasburicase and haemodialysis, and completed the first course of chemotherapy without further complications. PMID:25028407

  17. Tumour macrophages as potential targets of bisphosphonates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Tumour cells communicate with the cells of their microenvironment via a series of molecular and cellular interactions to aid their progression to a malignant state and ultimately their metastatic spread. Of the cells in the microenvironment with a key role in cancer development, tumour associated macrophages (TAMs) are among the most notable. Tumour cells release a range of chemokines, cytokines and growth factors to attract macrophages, and these in turn release numerous factors (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9 and EGF) that are implicated in invasion-promoting processes such as tumour cell growth, flicking of the angiogenic switch and immunosuppression. TAM density has been shown to correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer, suggesting that these cells may represent a potential therapeutic target. However, there are currently no agents that specifically target TAM's available for clinical use. Bisphosphonates (BPs), such as zoledronic acid, are anti-resorptive agents approved for treatment of skeletal complication associated with metastatic breast cancer and prostate cancer. These agents act on osteoclasts, key cells in the bone microenvironment, to inhibit bone resorption. Over the past 30 years this has led to a great reduction in skeletal-related events (SRE's) in patients with advanced cancer and improved the morbidity associated with cancer-induced bone disease. However, there is now a growing body of evidence, both from in vitro and in vivo models, showing that zoledronic acid can also target tumour cells to increase apoptotic cell death and decrease proliferation, migration and invasion, and that this effect is significantly enhanced in combination with chemotherapy agents. Whether macrophages in the peripheral tumour microenvironment are exposed to sufficient levels of bisphosphonate to be affected is currently unknown. Macrophages belong to the same cell lineage as osteoclasts, the major target of BPs, and are highly phagocytic cells shown to be sensitive to

  18. Simultaneous removal of a tumour of the right atrium and inferior vena cava and coronary bypass-grafting in a patient with recurrent clear renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzyk, Edward; Głuszek, Stanisław; Michta, Kamil; Kot, Marta; Wożakowska-Kapłon, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cardiac tumours are the most common malignant cardiac tumours. In the early stages they are usually asymptomatic, but their consequences can be very serious, and the prognosis is poor. We present a patient with recurrent renal cell carcinoma as a tumour of the right atrium and the vena cava inferior in whom cancerous masses were removed with simultaneously coronary artery bypass-grafting. PMID:26855653

  19. The anti-tumour efficacy of human recombinant interleukin 2. Correlation between sensitivity of tumours to the cytolytic effect of LAK cells in vitro and their susceptibility to interleukin 2 immunotherapy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bubeník, J; Indrová, M

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were designed to test what percentage of experimental MC-induced murine sarcomas were sensitive to the local tumour inhibitory effect of IL-2 and whether any correlation existed between the sensitivity of these sarcomas to the immunotherapeutic effect of IL-2 and their susceptibility to the cytolytic effect of IL-2-activated killer cells. It was found that the sensitivity of MC-induced sarcomas to local IL-2 immunotherapy was a general phenomenon. Repeated peri-tumoural injections of RIL-2 inhibited the growth of five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) out of six sarcomas in syngeneic mice. The sixth murine sarcoma (MC12) was found to be resistant to the tumour inhibitory effect of IL-2. Similarly, five (MC11, MC13, MC14, MC15, MC16) out of six murine sarcoma cell lines were sensitive to the cytolytic effect of IL-2-activated syngeneic killer spleen cells when examined in vitro, whereas the sixth (MC12) sarcoma cell line was resistant. These results suggest that LAK cells represent the effector cell mechanism responsible for the anti-tumour efficacy of local IL-2 immunotherapy and that in vitro testing of sensitivity to the LAK cell-mediated cytolysis may be used to detect tumours responding to IL-2 immunotherapy in vivo. PMID:3496154

  20. Tumour-associated hypoglycaemia in a murine cachexia model.

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, T. M.; Tisdale, M. J.

    1992-01-01

    Animals bearing a cachexia-inducing tumour, the MAC16 adenocarcinoma, showed a progressive decrease in blood glucose levels with increasing weight loss, while animals bearing a histologically similar tumour, the MAC13 adenocarcinoma, showed no change in either body weight or blood glucose levels with growth of the tumour. The effect of the MAC16 tumour on blood glucose levels appeared to be unrelated to food intake, glucose consumption by the tumour, or to the production of increased levels of IGF-I and IGF-II mRNA by the tumour cells. The relationship between the induction of cachexia and alteration in blood glucose levels remains unknown. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1358167