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Sample records for increasing oxidative stress

  1. Increased oxidative stress in foam cells obtained from hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marlene S B; Fabris, Bruno A; Brinholi, Francis F; Bortolasci, Chiara C; Watanabe, Maria A E; Oliveira, Karen B; Delfino, Vinícius D A; Lavado, Edson L; Barbosa, Décio S

    2013-04-01

    Premature atherosclerosis represents the main cause of mortality among end-stage renal disease patients (ESRD). Increased inflammation and oxidative stress are involved in initiation and progression of the atherosclerotic plaque. As foam cells are capable of producing significant amounts of inflammatory mediators and free radicals, we hypothesized that foam cells from uremic patients could produce more inflammation and oxidative stress than foam cells from normal people and be, somehow, involved in the accelerated atherosclerosis of uremia. To test this hypothesis, the levels of a few markers of inflammation and oxidative stress: Tumor necrosis factor-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide by-products were measured in the supernatants of macrophage-derived foam cells cultures from 18 hemodialysis patients and 18 apparently healthy individuals controls. Malondialdehyde levels in the supernatant of cell cultures (macrophages stimulated or not with native and oxidized lipoprotein) were significantly increased in uremic patients; no statistically significant difference was found between the supernatant concentrations of nitric oxide by-products, inducible nitric oxide synthase activity, and tumor necrosis factor-α between patients and controls. Our results, obtained with human macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells, are compatible with the theory that increased cellular oxidative stress and inflammatory activity in ESRD patients could accelerate the atherosclerotic process. The present culture protocol showed it is possible to use human mononuclear cells to evaluate the oxidative metabolism of foam cells, which are considered to be the initial step of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:22928784

  2. Increased oxidative stress following acute and chronic high altitude exposure.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Simoni, Jan; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Swenson, Erik R; Wesson, Donald E; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Johnson, Richard J; Hurtado, Abdias

    2004-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species is typically associated with hyperoxia and ischemia reperfusion. Recent evidence has suggested that increased oxidative stress may occur with hypoxia. We hypothesized that oxidative stress would be increased in subjects exposed to high altitude hypoxia. We studied 28 control subjects living in Lima, Peru (sea level), at baseline and following 48 h exposure to high altitude (4300 m). To assess the effects of chronic altitude exposure, we studied 25 adult males resident in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude 4300 m). We also studied 27 subjects living in Cerro de Pasco who develop excessive erythrocytosis (hematocrit > 65%) and chronic mountain sickness. Acute high altitude exposure led to increased urinary F(2)-isoprostane, 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.31 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 2.15 +/- 1.1, p = 0.001) and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.37 +/- 0.09, p = 0.002), with a trend to increased plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 63.8 +/- 27, p = NS). High altitude residents had significantly elevated levels of urinary 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.3 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 4.1 +/- 3.4, p = 0.007), plasma TBARS (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 85 +/- 28, p = 0.008), and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.55 +/- 0.19, p < 0.0001) compared to sea level. High altitude residents with excessive erythrocytosis had higher levels of oxidative stress compared to high altitude residents with normal hematological adaptation. In conclusion, oxidative stress is increased following both acute exposure to high altitude without exercise and with chronic residence at high altitude. PMID:15072717

  3. Exposure of rat hippocampal astrocytes to Ziram increases oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Matei, Ann-Marie; Trombetta, Louis D

    2016-04-01

    Pesticides have been shown in several studies to be the leading candidates of environmental toxins and may contribute to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Ziram (zinc-bis(dimethyldithiocarbamate)) is an agricultural dithiocarbamate fungicide that is used to treat a variety of plant diseases. In spite of their generally acknowledged low toxicity, dithiocarbamates are known to cause a wide range of neurobehavioral effects as well as neuropathological changes in the brain. Astrocytes play a key role in normal brain physiology and in the pathology of the nervous system. This investigation studied the effects of 1.0 µM Ziram on rat hippocampal astrocytes. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substance assay performed showed a significant increase in malondialdehyde, a product of lipid peroxidation, in the Ziram-treated cells. Biochemical analysis also revealed a significant increase in the induction of 70 kDa heat shock and heme oxygenase 1 stress proteins. In addition, an increase of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and a significant increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG) were observed in the Ziram-treated cells. The ratio GSH to GSSG calculated from the treated cells was also decreased. Light and transmission electron microscopy supported the biochemical findings in Ziram-treated astrocytes. This data suggest that the cytotoxic effects observed with Ziram treatments may be related to the increase of oxidative stress. PMID:24193059

  4. Increased oxidative stress and impaired antioxidant response in Lafora disease.

    PubMed

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Aguado, Carmen; García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibáñez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Seco-Cervera, Marta; Pallardó, Federico V; Knecht, Erwin; Sanz, Pascual

    2014-10-01

    Lafora Disease (LD, OMIM 254780, ORPHA501) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of glycogen-like intracellular inclusions called Lafora bodies and caused, in the vast majority of cases, by mutations in either EPM2A or EPM2B genes, encoding respectively laforin and malin. In the last years, several reports have revealed molecular details of these two proteins and have identified several processes affected in LD, but the pathophysiology of the disease still remains largely unknown. Since autophagy impairment has been reported as a characteristic treat in both Lafora disease cell and animal models, and as there is a link between autophagy and mitochondrial performance, we sought to determine if mitochondrial function could be altered in those models. Using fibroblasts from LD patients, deficient in laforin or malin, we found mitochondrial alterations, oxidative stress and a deficiency in antioxidant enzymes involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Similar results were obtained in brain tissue samples from transgenic mice deficient in either the EPM2A or EPM2B genes. Furthermore, in a proteomic analysis of brain tissue obtained from Epm2b-/- mice, we observed an increase in a modified form of peroxirredoxin-6, an antioxidant enzyme involved in other neurological pathologies, thus corroborating an alteration of the redox condition. These data support that oxidative stress produced by an increase in ROS production and an impairment of the antioxidant enzyme response to this stress play an important role in development of LD. PMID:26461389

  5. Increased Oxidative Stress as a Selective Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiahui; Wang, Zhichong

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to tumorgenesis. Under hypoxic environment, increased levels of ROS induce the expression of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) in cancer stem cells (CSCs), resulting in the promotion of the upregulation of CSC markers, and the reduction of intracellular ROS level, thus facilitating CSCs survival and proliferation. Although the ROS level is regulated by powerful antioxidant defense mechanisms in cancer cells, it is observed to remain higher than that in normal cells. Cancer cells may be more sensitive than normal cells to the accumulation of ROS; consequently, it is supposed that increased oxidative stress by exogenous ROS generation therapy has an effect on selectively killing cancer cells without affecting normal cells. This paper reviews the mechanisms of redox regulation in CSCs and the pivotal role of ROS in anticancer treatment. PMID:26273420

  6. Increased platelet oxidative metabolism, blood oxidative stress and neopterin levels after ultra-endurance exercise.

    PubMed

    de Lucas, Ricardo Dantas; Caputo, Fabrizio; Mendes de Souza, Kristopher; Sigwalt, André Roberto; Ghisoni, Karina; Lock Silveira, Paulo Cesar; Remor, Aline Pertile; da Luz Scheffer, Débora; Guglielmo, Luiz Guilherme Antonacci; Latini, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to identify muscle damage, inflammatory response and oxidative stress blood markers in athletes undertaking the ultra-endurance MultiSport Brazil race. Eleven well-trained male athletes (34.3 ± 3.1 years, 74.0 ± 7.6 kg; 172.2 ± 5.1 cm) participated in the study and performed the race, which consisted of about 90 km of alternating off-road running, mountain biking and kayaking. Twelve hours before and up to 15 minutes after the race a 10 mL blood sample was drawn in order to measure the following parameters: lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities, lipid peroxidation, catalase activity, protein carbonylation, respiratory chain complexes I, II and IV activities, oxygen consumption and neopterin concentrations. After the race, plasma lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities were significantly increased. Erythrocyte TBA-RS levels and plasma protein carbonylation were markedly augmented in post-race samples. Additionally, mitochondrial complex II activity and oxygen consumption in post-race platelet-rich plasma were also increased. These altered biochemical parameters were accompanied by increased plasma neopterin levels. The ultra-endurance event provoked systemic inflammation (increased neopterin) accompanied by marked oxidative stress, likely by increasing oxidative metabolism (increased oxidative mitochondrial function). This might be advantageous during prolonged exercise, mainly for efficient substrate oxidation at the mitochondrial level, even when tissue damage is induced. PMID:24117160

  7. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Severino, Lorella; Marzocco, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  8. Increasing oxidative stress with molsidomine increases blood pressure in genetically hypertensive rats but not normotensive controls.

    PubMed

    Fortepiani, Lourdes A; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2005-09-01

    Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) have a higher level of oxidative stress and exhibit a greater depressor response to a superoxide scavenger, tempol, than normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY). This study determined whether an increase in oxidative stress with a superoxide/NO donor, molsidomine, would amplify the blood pressure in SHR. Male SHR and WKY were given molsidomine (30 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) or vehicle (0.01% ethanol) for 1 wk, and blood pressure, renal hemodynamics, nitrate and nitrite excretion (NOx), renal superoxide production, and expression of renal antioxidant enzymes, Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), were measured. Renal superoxide and NOx were higher in control SHR than in WKY. Molsidomine increased superoxide by approximately 35% and NOx by 250% in both SHR and WKY. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was also higher in control SHR than WKY. Molsidomine increased MAP by 14% and caused renal vasoconstriction in SHR but reduced MAP by 16%, with no effect on renal hemodynamics, in WKY. Renal expression of Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD was not different between SHR and WKY, but expression of catalase and GPx were approximately 30% lower in kidney of SHR than WKY. The levels of Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD were not increased with molsidomine in either WKY or SHR. Renal catalase and GPx expression was increased by 300-400% with molsidomine in WKY, but there was no effect in SHR. Increasing oxidative stress elevated blood pressure further in SHR but not WKY. WKY are likely protected because of higher bioavailable levels of NO and the ability to upregulate catalase and GPx. PMID:15905221

  9. Oxidized low density lipoprotein increases RANKL level in human vascular cells. Involvement of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Mazière, Cécile; Salle, Valéry; Gomila, Cathy; Mazière, Jean-Claude

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •Oxidized LDL enhances RANKL level in human smooth muscle cells. •The effect of OxLDL is mediated by the transcription factor NFAT. •UVA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and buthionine sulfoximine also increase RANKL level. •All these effects are observed in human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. -- Abstract: Receptor Activator of NFκB Ligand (RANKL) and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been shown to play a role not only in bone remodeling but also in inflammation, arterial calcification and atherosclerotic plaque rupture. In human smooth muscle cells, Cu{sup 2+}-oxidized LDL (CuLDL) 10–50 μg/ml increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and RANKL level in a dose-dependent manner, whereas OPG level was not affected. The lipid extract of CuLDL reproduced the effects of the whole particle. Vivit, an inhibitor of the transcription factor NFAT, reduced the CuLDL-induced increase in RANKL, whereas PKA and NFκB inhibitors were ineffective. LDL oxidized by myeloperoxidase (MPO-LDL), or other pro-oxidant conditions such as ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation, incubation with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis{sub ,} also induced an oxidative stress and enhanced RANKL level. The increase in RANKL in pro-oxidant conditions was also observed in fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Since RANKL is involved in myocardial inflammation, vascular calcification and plaque rupture, this study highlights a new mechanism whereby OxLDL might, by generation of an oxidative stress, exert a deleterious effect on different cell types of the arterial wall.

  10. Ethanol withdrawal increases oxidative stress and reduces nitric oxide bioavailability in the vasculature of rats.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Natalia A; Mecawi, André S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; De Martinis, Bruno S; Padovan, Claudia M; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2015-02-01

    We analyzed the effects of ethanol withdrawal on the vascular and systemic renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and vascular oxidative stress. Male Wistar rats were treated with ethanol 3-9% (v/v) for a period of 21 days. Ethanol withdrawal was induced by abrupt discontinuation of the treatment. Experiments were performed 48 h after ethanol discontinuation. Rats from the ethanol withdrawal group showed decreased exploration of the open arms of the elevated-plus maze (EPM) and increased plasma corticosterone levels. Ethanol withdrawal significantly increased systolic blood pressure and plasma angiotensin II (ANG II) levels without an effect on plasma renin activity (PRA), angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity, or plasma angiotensin I (ANG I) levels. No differences in vascular ANG I, ANG II levels, and ACE activity/expression and AT1 and AT2 receptor expression were detected among the experimental groups. Plasma osmolality, as well as plasma sodium, potassium, and glucose levels were not affected by ethanol withdrawal. Ethanol withdrawal induced systemic and vascular oxidative stress, as evidenced by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances (TBARS) levels and the vascular generation of superoxide anion. Ethanol withdrawal significantly decreased plasma and vascular nitrate/nitrite levels. Major new findings of the present study are that ethanol withdrawal induces vascular oxidative stress and reduces nitric oxide (NO) levels in the vasculature. Additionally, our study provides novel evidence that ethanol withdrawal does not affect the vascular ANG II generating system while stimulating systemic RAS. These responses could predispose individuals to the development of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25557835

  11. Dysregulated autophagy in the RPE is associated with increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and AMD

    PubMed Central

    Mitter, Sayak K; Song, Chunjuan; Qi, Xiaoping; Mao, Haoyu; Rao, Haripriya; Akin, Debra; Lewin, Alfred; Grant, Maria; Dunn, William; Ding, Jindong; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Boulton, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Autophagic dysregulation has been suggested in a broad range of neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To test whether the autophagy pathway plays a critical role to protect retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells against oxidative stress, we exposed ARPE-19 and primary cultured human RPE cells to both acute (3 and 24 h) and chronic (14 d) oxidative stress and monitored autophagy by western blot, PCR, and autophagosome counts in the presence or absence of autophagy modulators. Acute oxidative stress led to a marked increase in autophagy in the RPE, whereas autophagy was reduced under chronic oxidative stress. Upregulation of autophagy by rapamycin decreased oxidative stress-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or by knockdown of ATG7 or BECN1 increased ROS generation, exacerbated oxidative stress-induced reduction of mitochondrial activity, reduced cell viability, and increased lipofuscin. Examination of control human donor specimens and mice demonstrated an age-related increase in autophagosome numbers and expression of autophagy proteins. However, autophagy proteins, autophagosomes, and autophagy flux were significantly reduced in tissue from human donor AMD eyes and 2 animal models of AMD. In conclusion, our data confirm that autophagy plays an important role in protection of the RPE against oxidative stress and lipofuscin accumulation and that impairment of autophagy is likely to exacerbate oxidative stress and contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25484094

  12. KIDNEY HYPOXIA, DUE TO INCREASED OXYGEN CONSUMPTION, INDUCES NEPHROPATHY INDEPENDENTLY OF HYPERGLYCEMIA AND OXIDATIVE STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Friederich-Persson, Malou; Thörn, Erik; Hansell, Peter; Nangaku, Masaomi; Levin, Max; Palm, Fredrik

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is strongly associated with both increased oxidative stress and kidney tissue hypoxia. The increased oxidative stress causes increased kidney oxygen consumption resulting in kidney tissue hypoxia. It has so far been difficult to determine the role of kidney hypoxia per se for the development of nephropathy. We tested the hypothesis that kidney hypoxia, without confounding factors such as hyperglycemia or elevated oxidative stress, results in nephropathy. To induce kidney hypoxia, dinitrophenol (30 mg/day/kg by gavage), a mitochondrial uncoupler that increases oxygen consumption and causes kidney hypoxia, was administered for 30 consecutive days to rats. Thereafter, glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, kidney oxygen consumption, kidney oxygen tension, kidney concentrations of glucose and glycogen, markers of oxidative stress, urinary protein excretion and histology were determined and compared to vehicle-treated controls. Dinitrophenol did not affect arterial blood pressure, renal blood flow, glomerular filtration rate, blood glucose or markers of oxidative stress, but increased kidney oxygen consumption and reduced cortical and medullary concentrations of glucose and glycogen and resulted in intrarenal tissue hypoxia. Furthermore, dinitrophenol treatment increased urinary protein excretion, kidney vimentin expression and infiltration of inflammatory cells. In conclusion, increased mitochondrial oxygen consumption results in kidney hypoxia and subsequent nephropathy. Importantly, these results demonstrate that kidney tissue hypoxia per se, without confounding hyperglycemia or oxidative stress, may be sufficient to initiate the development of nephropathy and therefore demonstrate a new interventional target for treating kidney disease. PMID:24019401

  13. Increased oxidative stress in pemphigus vulgaris is related to disease activity and HLA-association.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Dey-Rao, Rama; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sinha, Animesh A

    2016-06-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare blistering skin disorder characterized by the disadhesion of keratinocytes due to autoantibody attack against epidermal targets including desmoglein (Dsg) 3, Dsg 1 and possibly other adhesion and non-adhesion molecules. The mechanisms leading to immune-mediated pathology in PV are multifactorial and not fully understood. Recently, oxidative stress (antioxidant/oxidant disequilibrium) has been proposed as a contributory mechanism of autoimmune skin diseases, including PV. In this study, we directly assessed oxidative stress via measurement of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) using ELISA in 47 PV patients, 25 healthy controls and 18 bullous pemphigoid (BP) patients. We also performed microarray gene expression analysis on a separate set of 21 PV patients and 10 healthy controls to evaluate transcriptional dysregulation in oxidative stress-related pathways. Our data indicate that there is a significant reduction in TAC levels in PV patients compared with healthy controls, as well as BP patients. Furthermore, PV patients with active disease have significantly lower TAC levels than PV patients in remission. We also find that HLA allele status has a significant influence on oxidative stress. These findings are corroborated by microarray analysis showing differentially expressed genes involved in oxidative stress between the aforementioned groups. Collectively, our findings provide support for a role of oxidative stress in PV. Whether increased oxidative stress leads to disease manifestation and/or activity, or if disease activity leads to increased oxidative stress remains unknown. Future longitudinal studies may help to further elucidate the relationship between PV and oxidative stress. PMID:26911801

  14. Is cognitive impairment in cirrhotic patients due to increased peroxynitrite and oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Gimenez-Garzó, Carla; Urios, Amparo; Agustí, Ana; González-López, Olga; Escudero-García, Desamparados; Escudero-Sanchis, Amparo; Serra, Miguel Angel; Giner-Durán, Remedios; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2015-04-01

    Cirrhotic patients may suffer minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE), with mild cognitive impairment. 3-Nitro-tyrosine levels are a good biomarker for diagnosis of the cognitive impairment and MHE in cirrhotic patients. This suggests that oxidative stress could be involved in the induction of cognitive and motor alterations in MHE. We have observed that patients with MHE show increased oxidative stress in blood compared with cirrhotic patients without MHE, with increased lipid peroxidation, DNA oxidation, protein carbonylation, 3-nitrotyrosine, oxidized glutathione (GSSG)/reduced glutathione (GSH) ratio, and GSH levels. The activities of antioxidant enzymes are enhanced in erythrocytes and mononuclear cells from patients with and without MHE compared with control subjects. Only glutathione peroxidase activity was increased in MHE patients compared with patients without MHE. Oxidative stress markers in blood, especially GSSG/GSH ratio, GSH, malondialdehyde, and 3-nitrotyrosine, correlate with deficits in attention and motor coordination. The increase in antioxidant activities in patients would be an adaptive mechanism to cope with enhanced oxidative stress, although it is not effective enough to normalize it. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that oxidative stress and increased peroxynitrite formation would mediate the synergistic effects of hyperammonemia and inflammation on cognitive and motor impairment in MHE. PMID:25557123

  15. Proline Metabolism Increases katG Expression and Oxidative Stress Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Alfano, James R.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidation of l-proline to glutamate in Gram-negative bacteria is catalyzed by the proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme, which contains proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase domains in a single polypeptide. Previous studies have suggested that aside from providing energy, proline metabolism influences oxidative stress resistance in different organisms. To explore this potential role and the mechanism, we characterized the oxidative stress resistance of wild-type and putA mutant strains of Escherichia coli. Initial stress assays revealed that the putA mutant strain was significantly more sensitive to oxidative stress than the parental wild-type strain. Expression of PutA in the putA mutant strain restored oxidative stress resistance, confirming that depletion of PutA was responsible for the oxidative stress phenotype. Treatment of wild-type cells with proline significantly increased hydroperoxidase I (encoded by katG) expression and activity. Furthermore, the ΔkatG strain failed to respond to proline, indicating a critical role for hydroperoxidase I in the mechanism of proline protection. The global regulator OxyR activates the expression of katG along with several other genes involved in oxidative stress defense. In addition to katG, proline increased the expression of grxA (glutaredoxin 1) and trxC (thioredoxin 2) of the OxyR regulon, implicating OxyR in proline protection. Proline oxidative metabolism was shown to generate hydrogen peroxide, indicating that proline increases oxidative stress tolerance in E. coli via a preadaptive effect involving endogenous hydrogen peroxide production and enhanced catalase-peroxidase activity. PMID:25384482

  16. Hindlimb unloading increases oxidative stress and disrupts antioxidant capacity in skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawler, John M.; Song, Wook; Demaree, Scott R.; Bloomfield, S. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle disuse with space-flight and ground-based models (e.g., hindlimb unloading) results in dramatic skeletal muscle atrophy and weakness. Pathological conditions that cause muscle wasting (i.e., heart failure, muscular dystrophy, sepsis, COPD, cancer) are characterized by elevated "oxidative stress," where antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed by oxidant production. However, the existence, cellular mechanisms, and ramifications of oxidative stress in skeletal muscle subjected to hindlimb unloading are poorly understood. Thus we examined the effects of hindlimb unloading on hindlimb muscle antioxidant enzymes (e.g., superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase), nonenzymatic antioxidant scavenging capacity (ASC), total hydroperoxides, and dichlorohydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) oxidation, a direct indicator of oxidative stress. Twelve 6 month old Sprague Dawley rats were divided into two groups: 28 d of hindlimb unloading (n = 6) and controls (n = 6). Hindlimb unloading resulted in a small decrease in Mn-superoxide dismutase activity (10.1%) in the soleus muscle, while Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase increased 71.2%. In contrast, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, antioxidant enzymes that remove hydroperoxides, were significantly reduced in the soleus with hindlimb unloading by 54.5 and 16.1%, respectively. Hindlimb unloading also significantly reduced ASC. Hindlimb unloading increased soleus lipid hydroperoxide levels by 21.6% and hindlimb muscle DCFH-DA oxidation by 162.1%. These results indicate that hindlimb unloading results in a disruption of antioxidant status, elevation of hydroperoxides, and an increase in oxidative stress.

  17. Nanoparticle Inhalation Increases Microvascular Oxidative Stress and Compromises Nitric Oxide Bioavailability

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have shown that pulmonary nanoparticle exposure impairs endothelium dependent dilation in systemic arterioles. However, the mechanism(s) through which this effect occurs are unclear. The purpose of this study was to identify alterations in the production of oxidative stress an...

  18. Oxidative Stress is Increased in Serum from Mexican Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P.; Cruz-Ramos, José A.; Sustersik, Silvia; Barba, Elías Alejandro; Aguayo, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oxidative stress markers in serum from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Methods: Blood samples from healthy controls and 22 patients 15 women (7 aged from 20 to 30 and 8 were > 40 years old) and 7 men (5 aged from 20 to 30 and 2 were > 40 years old) fulfilling the McDonald Criteria and classified as having Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis accordingly with Lublin were collected for oxidative stress markers quantification. Results: Nitric oxide metabolites (nitrates/nitrites), lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde plus 4-hidroxialkenals), and glutathione peroxidase activity were significantly increased in serum of subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in comparison with that of healthy controls. These data support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is a component closely linked to oxidative stress. PMID:19242067

  19. Oxidative Stress Is a Mediator for Increased Lipid Accumulation in a Newly Isolated Dunaliella salina Strain

    PubMed Central

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Cokol, Murat; Pastirmaci, Inanc; Erman, Batu; Cetiner, Selim

    2014-01-01

    Green algae offer sustainable, clean and eco-friendly energy resource. However, production efficiency needs to be improved. Increasing cellular lipid levels by nitrogen depletion is one of the most studied strategies. Despite this, the underlying physiological and biochemical mechanisms of this response have not been well defined. Algae species adapted to hypersaline conditions can be cultivated in salty waters which are not useful for agriculture or consumption. Due to their inherent extreme cultivation conditions, use of hypersaline algae species is better suited for avoiding culture contamination issues. In this study, we identified a new halophilic Dunaliella salina strain by using 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. We found that growth and biomass productivities of this strain were directly related to nitrogen levels, as the highest biomass concentration under 0.05 mM or 5 mM nitrogen regimes were 495 mg/l and 1409 mg/l, respectively. We also confirmed that nitrogen limitation increased cellular lipid content up to 35% under 0.05 mM nitrogen concentration. In order to gain insight into the mechanisms of this phenomenon, we applied fluorometric, flow cytometric and spectrophotometric methods to measure oxidative stress and enzymatic defence mechanisms. Under nitrogen depleted cultivation conditions, we observed increased lipid peroxidation by measuring an important oxidative stress marker, malondialdehyde and enhanced activation of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase antioxidant enzymes. These observations indicated that oxidative stress is accompanied by increased lipid content in the green alga. In addition, we also showed that at optimum cultivation conditions, inducing oxidative stress by application of exogenous H2O2 leads to increased cellular lipid content up to 44% when compared with non-treated control groups. Our results support that oxidative stress and lipid overproduction are linked. Importantly, these results also suggest that

  20. Oxidative stress is a mediator for increased lipid accumulation in a newly isolated Dunaliella salina strain.

    PubMed

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Cokol, Murat; Pastirmaci, Inanc; Erman, Batu; Cetiner, Selim

    2014-01-01

    Green algae offer sustainable, clean and eco-friendly energy resource. However, production efficiency needs to be improved. Increasing cellular lipid levels by nitrogen depletion is one of the most studied strategies. Despite this, the underlying physiological and biochemical mechanisms of this response have not been well defined. Algae species adapted to hypersaline conditions can be cultivated in salty waters which are not useful for agriculture or consumption. Due to their inherent extreme cultivation conditions, use of hypersaline algae species is better suited for avoiding culture contamination issues. In this study, we identified a new halophilic Dunaliella salina strain by using 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. We found that growth and biomass productivities of this strain were directly related to nitrogen levels, as the highest biomass concentration under 0.05 mM or 5 mM nitrogen regimes were 495 mg/l and 1409 mg/l, respectively. We also confirmed that nitrogen limitation increased cellular lipid content up to 35% under 0.05 mM nitrogen concentration. In order to gain insight into the mechanisms of this phenomenon, we applied fluorometric, flow cytometric and spectrophotometric methods to measure oxidative stress and enzymatic defence mechanisms. Under nitrogen depleted cultivation conditions, we observed increased lipid peroxidation by measuring an important oxidative stress marker, malondialdehyde and enhanced activation of catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase antioxidant enzymes. These observations indicated that oxidative stress is accompanied by increased lipid content in the green alga. In addition, we also showed that at optimum cultivation conditions, inducing oxidative stress by application of exogenous H2O2 leads to increased cellular lipid content up to 44% when compared with non-treated control groups. Our results support that oxidative stress and lipid overproduction are linked. Importantly, these results also suggest that

  1. Preconditioning L6 Muscle Cells with Naringin Ameliorates Oxidative Stress and Increases Glucose Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Dhanya, R.; Arun, K. B.; Nisha, V. M.; Syama, H. P.; Nisha, P.; Santhosh Kumar, T. R.; Jayamurthy, P.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to pathological changes in diabetes and its complications. Thus, strategies to reduce oxidative stress may alleviate these pathogenic processes. Herein, we have investigated Naringin mediated regulation of glutathione (GSH) & intracellular free radical levels and modulation of glucose uptake under oxidative stress in L6 cell lines. The results from the study demonstrated a marked decrease in glutathione with a subsequent increase in free radical levels, which was reversed by the pretreatment of Naringin. We also observed that the increased malondialdehyde level, the marker of lipid peroxidation on induction of oxidative stress was retrieved on Naringin pretreatment. Addition of Naringin (100 μM) showed approximately 40% reduction in protein glycation in vitro. Furthermore, we observed a twofold increase in uptake of fluorescent labeled glucose namely 2-(N-(7-Nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)Amino)-2-Deoxyglucose (2 - NBDG) on Naringin treatment in differentiated L6 myoblast. The increased uptake of 2-NBDG by L6 myotubes may be attributed due to the enhanced translocation of GLUT4. Our results demonstrate that Naringin activate GSH synthesis through a novel antioxidant defense mechanism against excessive Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) production, contributing to the prevention of oxidative damage in addition to its effect on glycemic control. PMID:26147673

  2. Increasing Fatty Acid Oxidation Remodels the Hypothalamic Neurometabolome to Mitigate Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Joseph W.; Aja, Susan; Li, Qun; Bandaru, Veera V. R.; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Haughey, Norman J.; Kuhajda, Francis P.; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2014-01-01

    Modification of hypothalamic fatty acid (FA) metabolism can improve energy homeostasis and prevent hyperphagia and excessive weight gain in diet-induced obesity (DIO) from a diet high in saturated fatty acids. We have shown previously that C75, a stimulator of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1) and fatty acid oxidation (FAOx), exerts at least some of its hypophagic effects via neuronal mechanisms in the hypothalamus. In the present work, we characterized the effects of C75 and another anorexigenic compound, the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) inhibitor FSG67, on FA metabolism, metabolomics profiles, and metabolic stress responses in cultured hypothalamic neurons and hypothalamic neuronal cell lines during lipid excess with palmitate. Both compounds enhanced palmitate oxidation, increased ATP, and inactivated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hypothalamic neurons in vitro. Lipidomics and untargeted metabolomics revealed that enhanced catabolism of FA decreased palmitate availability and prevented the production of fatty acylglycerols, ceramides, and cholesterol esters, lipids that are associated with lipotoxicity-provoked metabolic stress. This improved metabolic signature was accompanied by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and yet favorable changes in oxidative stress, overt ER stress, and inflammation. We propose that enhancing FAOx in hypothalamic neurons exposed to excess lipids promotes metabolic remodeling that reduces local inflammatory and cell stress responses. This shift would restore mitochondrial function such that increased FAOx can produce hypothalamic neuronal ATP and lead to decreased food intake and body weight to improve systemic metabolism. PMID:25541737

  3. Aluminium sulphate exposure increases oxidative stress and suppresses brain development in Ross broiler chicks

    PubMed Central

    Oğuz, Emin Oğuzhan; Enli, Yaşar; Şahin, Barbaros; Gönen, Cafer; Turgut, Günfer

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Aluminium (Al) is known to have neurotoxic effects that can result in oxidative damage to a range of cellular biomolecules. These effects appear to be of significance in the developmental stages of the brain. We therefore investigated the oxidative and histopathological damage induced by Al during growth and development of the chick brain. Material/Methods We used a chick embryonic development model, with Al treatment of 500 μg Al sulphate in 0.1 ml saline injected into the egg air chambers at the beginning of their incubation period. The effects on chick-brain growth and development were then assessed at term (day 21). Determination of malondialdehyde and glutathione levels were used as relevant biological measures for increased oxidative stress in terms of lipid peroxidation and biochemical oxidative damage, respectively. Furthermore, we also monitored neuronal degeneration as estimated stereologically using the Cavalieri brain volume estimation tool. Results This Al treatment showed significantly increased MDA levels and decreased GSH levels, as indicators of increased biochemical oxidative damage. This was accompanied by significantly decreased brain volume, as a measure of neuronal degeneration during brain development in this chick embryonic development model. Conclusions Exposure to Al during chick embryonic development results in increased oxidative stress in the brain that is accompanied by neuronal degeneration. PMID:22367119

  4. Obesity-induced oxidative stress, accelerated functional decline with age and increased mortality in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiqiang; Fischer, Kathleen E.; Soto, Vanessa; Liu, Yuhong; Sosnowska, Danuta; Richardson, Arlan; Salmon, Adam B.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a serious chronic disease that increases the risk of numerous co-morbidities including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and cancer as well as increases risk of mortality leading some to suggest this represents accelerated aging. Obesity is associated with significant increases in oxidative stress in vivo and, despite the well-explored relationship between oxidative stress and aging, the role this plays in the increased mortality of obese subjects remains an unanswered question. Here, we addressed this by undertaking a comprehensive, longitudinal study of a group of high fat-fed obese mice and assessed both their changes in oxidative stress and in their performance in physiological assays known to decline with aging. In female C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet starting in adulthood, mortality was significantly increased in high fat-fed mice as was oxidative damage in vivo. High fat-feeding significantly accelerated the decline in performance in several assays, including activity, gait, and rotarod. However, we also found that obesity had little effect on other markers and actually improved performance in grip strength, a marker of muscular function. Together, this first comprehensive assessment of longitudinal functional changes in high fat-fed mice suggests that obesity may induce segmental acceleration of some of the aging process. PMID:25558793

  5. Oral Sucrose for Heel Lance Increases ATP Utilization and Oxidative Stress in Preterm Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Asmerom, Yayesh; Slater, Laurel; Boskovic, Danilo S.; Bahjri, Khaled; Plank, Megan S; Phillips, Raylene; Deming, Douglas; Ashwal, Stephen; Fayard, Elba; Angeles, Danilyn M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of sucrose on pain and biochemical markers of adenosine trisphosphate(ATP) degradation and oxidative stress in preterm neonates experiencing a clinically required heel lance. Study design Preterm neonates that met study criteria (n=131) were randomized into three groups: (1) control; (2) heel lance treated with placebo and non-nutritive sucking (NNS); and (3) heel lance treated with sucrose and NNS. Plasma markers of ATP degradation (hypoxanthine, xanthine and uric acid) and oxidative stress (allantoin) were measured before and after the heel lance. Pain was measured using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP). Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA and Spearman rho. Results We found significant increases in plasma hypoxanthine and uric acid over time in neonates who received sucrose. We also found a significant negative correlation between plasma allantoin concentration and PIPP in a subgroup of neonates who received sucrose. Conclusion A single dose of oral sucrose, given before heel lance, significantly increased ATP utilization and oxidative stress in premature neonates. Because neonates are given multiple doses of sucrose per day, randomized trials are needed to examine the effect of repeated sucrose administration on ATP degradation, oxidative stress and cell injury. PMID:23415615

  6. Puromycin aminonucleoside increases podocyte permeability by modulating ZO-1 in an oxidative stress-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae-Sun; Park, Hye-Young; Seong, Su-Bin; Ahn, Hee Yul

    2016-01-01

    Puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced nephrosis is a widely studied animal model of human idiopathic nephrotic syndrome because PAN injection into rats results in increased glomerular permeability with the characteristic ultrastructural changes in podocytes similar to human nephrosis. To investigate the role of zonula occludens (ZO)-1 and oxidative stress on PAN-induced podocyte phenotypical changes and hyperpermeability in vitro, we cultured rat and mouse podocytes and treated with various concentrations of PAN. PAN treatment increased oxidative stress level of podocytes significantly with the induction of Nox4. In addition, PAN changed the ultrastructure of podocytes, such as shortening and fusion of microvilli, and the separation of intercellular gaps, which were improved by anti-oxidative vitamin C and Nox4 siRNA. PAN also disrupted the intercellular linear ZO-1 staining and induced inner cytoplasmic re-localization of ZO-1 protein, resulting in increased podocyte intercellular permeability. PAN reduced ZO-1 protein amount and mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, which means that PAN could also modulate ZO-1 protein transcriptionally. However, the decreased ZO-1 protein of podocytes by PAN was improved by Nox4 siRNA transfection. Furthermore, vitamin C mitigated the quantitative and distributional disturbances of ZO-1 protein caused by PAN. Our results demonstrate that the phenotypical changes of intercellular ZO-1 by oxidative stress via Nox4 likely contribute to the glomerular hyperpermeability caused by PAN. PMID:26683996

  7. Silicon dioxide nanoparticles increase macrophage atherogenicity: Stimulation of cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and triglycerides accumulation.

    PubMed

    Petrick, Lauren; Rosenblat, Mira; Paland, Nicole; Aviram, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle research has focused on their toxicity in general, while increasing evidence points to additional specific adverse effects on atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophage cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) accumulation and foam cell formation are the hallmark of early atherogenesis, leading to cardiovascular events. To investigate the in vitro atherogenic effects of silicon dioxide (SiO2 ), J774.1 cultured macrophages (murine cell line) were incubated with SiO2 nanoparticle (SP, d = 12 nm, 0-20 µg/mL), followed by cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, TG and cholesterol metabolism analyses. A significant dose-dependent increase in oxidative stress (up to 164%), in cytotoxicity (up to 390% measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release), and in TG content (up to 63%) was observed in SiO2 exposed macrophages compared with control cells. A smaller increase in macrophage cholesterol mass (up to 22%) was noted. TG accumulation in macrophages was not due to a decrease in TG cell secretion or to an increased TG biosynthesis rate, but was the result of attenuated TG hydrolysis secondary to decreased lipase activity and both adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) protein expression (by 42 and 25%, respectively). Overall, SPs showed pro-atherogenic effects on macrophages as observed by cytotoxicity, increased oxidative stress and TG accumulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 713-723, 2016. PMID:25448404

  8. Increased oxidative stress and antioxidant expression in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to paraquat

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Adrienne T.; Gray, Joshua P.; Shakarjian, Michael P.; Laskin, Debra L. Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2008-09-15

    Paraquat (1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium) is a widely used herbicide known to induce skin toxicity. This is thought to be due to oxidative stress resulting from the generation of cytotoxic reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) during paraquat redox cycling. The skin contains a diverse array of antioxidant enzymes which protect against oxidative stress including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), metallothionein-2 (MT-2), and glutathione-S-transferases (GST). In the present studies we compared paraquat redox cycling in primary cultures of undifferentiated and differentiated mouse keratinocytes and determined if this was associated with oxidative stress and altered expression of antioxidant enzymes. We found that paraquat readily undergoes redox cycling in both undifferentiated and differentiated keratinocytes, generating superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide as well as increased protein oxidation which was greater in differentiated cells. Paraquat treatment also resulted in increased expression of HO-1, Cu,Zn-SOD, catalase, GSTP1, GSTA3 and GSTA4. However, no major differences in expression of these enzymes were evident between undifferentiated and differentiated cells. In contrast, expression of GSTA1-2 was significantly greater in differentiated relative to undifferentiated cells after paraquat treatment. No changes in expression of MT-2, Mn-SOD, GPx-1, GSTM1 or the microsomal GST's mGST1, mGST2 and mGST3, were observed in response to paraquat. These data demonstrate that paraquat induces oxidative stress in keratinocytes leading to increased expression of antioxidant genes. These intracellular proteins may be important in protecting the skin from paraquat-mediated cytotoxicity.

  9. Systemic inflammatory changes and increased oxidative stress in rural Indian women cooking with biomass fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Anindita; Ray, Manas Ranjan; Banerjee, Anirban

    2012-06-15

    The study was undertaken to investigate whether regular cooking with biomass aggravates systemic inflammation and oxidative stress that might result in increase in the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in rural Indian women compared to cooking with a cleaner fuel like liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). A total of 635 women (median age 36 years) who cooked with biomass and 452 age-matched control women who cooked with LPG were enrolled. Serum interleukin-6 (IL-6), C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) were measured by ELISA. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by leukocytes was measured by flow cytometry, and erythrocytic superoxide dismutase (SOD) was measured by spectrophotometry. Hypertension was diagnosed following the Seventh Report of the Joint Committee. Tachycardia was determined as pulse rate > 100 beats per minute. Particulate matter of diameter less than 10 and 2.5 μm (PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}, respectively) in cooking areas was measured using real-time aerosol monitor. Compared with control, biomass users had more particulate pollution in indoor air, their serum contained significantly elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and CRP, and ROS generation was increased by 37% while SOD was depleted by 41.5%, greater prevalence of hypertension and tachycardia compared to their LPG-using neighbors. PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5} levels were positively associated with markers of inflammation, oxidative stress and hypertension. Inflammatory markers correlated with raised blood pressure. Cooking with biomass exacerbates systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, hypertension and tachycardia in poor women cooking with biomass fuel and hence, predisposes them to increased risk of CVD development compared to the controls. Systemic inflammation and oxidative stress may be the mechanistic factors involved in the development of CVD. -- Highlights: ► Effect of chronic biomass smoke exposure on

  10. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked: considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and ...

  11. Increased methyl esterification of altered aspartyl residues in erythrocyte membrane proteins in response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ingrosso, D; D'angelo, S; di Carlo, E; Perna, A F; Zappia, V; Galletti, P

    2000-07-01

    Protein-L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferase (PCMT; EC 2. 1.1.77) catalyses the methyl esterification of the free alpha-carboxyl group of abnormal L-isoaspartyl residues, which occur spontaneously in protein and peptide substrates as a consequence of molecular ageing. The biological function of this transmethylation reaction is related to the repair or degradation of age-damaged proteins. Methyl ester formation in erythrocyte membrane proteins has also been used as a marker reaction to tag these abnormal residues and to monitor their increase associated with erythrocyte ageing diseases, such as hereditary spherocytosis, or cell stress (thermal or osmotic) conditions. The study shows that levels of L-isoaspartyl residues rise in membrane proteins of human erythrocytes exposed to oxidative stress, induced by t-butyl hydroperoxide or H2O2. The increase in malondialdehyde content confirmed that the cell membrane is a primary target of oxidative alterations. A parallel rise in the methaemoglobin content indicates that proteins are heavily affected by the molecular alterations induced by oxidative treatments in erythrocytes. Antioxidants largely prevented the increase in membrane protein methylation, underscoring the specificity of the effect. Conversely, we found that PCMT activity, consistent with its repair function, remained remarkably stable under oxidative conditions, while damaged membrane protein substrates increased significantly. The latter include ankyrin, band 4.1 and 4.2, and the integral membrane protein band 3 (the anion exchanger). The main target was found to be particularly protein 4.1, a crucial element in the maintenance of membrane-cytoskeleton network stability. We conclude that the increased formation/exposure of L-isoaspartyl residues is one of the major structural alterations occurring in erythrocyte membrane proteins as a result of an oxidative stress event. In the light of these and previous findings, the occurrence of isoaspartyl

  12. Synergistic increase of oxidative stress and tumor markers in PAH-exposed workers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mei-Li; Chen, Lei; Li, Yong-Fei; Xue, Xiao-Chang; Chen, Lan; Wang, Li-Na; Shah, Walayat; Kong, Yu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated oxidative stress and tumor marker levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 136 coke oven workers and in 60 control subjects, and evaluated the correlation between oxidative stress and tumor marker levels. Questionnaires on basic demographic information were also administered. Significant differences in employment time and percentages of alcohol drinkers were observed between the control and exposed groups. PAH exposure was assessed using urinary 1-hydroxy-pyrene (1-OHP) levels and was found to be significantly higher in workers than in the controls. Significant differences (P<0.001) of MDA, GST, LDH, NSE, Cyfra21-1, and of SCC and TNF-a (P<0.0001 and P<0.05, P<0.001, respectively) levels were observed among controls and coke-oven workers, except for bottom coke oven workers. Associations between age and risk of increased TNF-a, smoking and increased GST activities, and drinking with increased MDA concentrations, were marginal (P=0.055, P=0.048, P=0.057, respectively). The association between smoking with MDA (P=0.004), NSE (P=0.005), SCC (P=0.004) and TNF-a (P<0.001), and drinking with TNF-a levels was significant (P=0.012). In addition, a significant positive correlation between oxidative stress and tumor markers was found in the present study. These results suggest that a synergistic increase of oxidative stress and tumor markers induced by PAHs may play a role in toxic responses for PAHs in coke oven workers. PMID:25227798

  13. Chronic intermittent hypoxia increases rat sternohyoid muscle NADPH oxidase expression with attendant modest oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Robert; Lemaire, Paul; Lewis, Philip; McDonald, Fiona B.; Lucking, Eric; Hogan, Sean; Sheehan, David; Healy, Vincent; O'Halloran, Ken D.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) causes upper airway muscle dysfunction. We hypothesized that the superoxide generating NADPH oxidase (NOX) is upregulated in CIH-exposed muscle causing oxidative stress. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (5% O2 at the nadir for 90 s followed by 210 s of normoxia), for 8 h per day for 14 days. The effect of CIH exposure on the expression of NOX subunits, total myosin and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein adducts in sternohyoid muscle was determined by western blotting and densitometry. Sternohyoid protein free thiol and carbonyl group contents were determined by 1D electrophoresis using specific fluorophore probes. Aconitase and glutathione reductase activities were measured as indices of oxidative stress. HIF-1α content and key oxidative and glycolytic enzyme activities were determined. Contractile properties of sternohyoid muscle were determined ex vivo in the absence and presence of apocynin (putative NOX inhibitor). We observed an increase in NOX 2 and p47 phox expression in CIH-exposed sternohyoid muscle with decreased aconitase and glutathione reductase activities. There was no evidence, however, of increased lipid peroxidation or protein oxidation in CIH-exposed muscle. CIH exposure did not affect sternohyoid HIF-1α content or aldolase, lactate dehydrogenase, or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activities. Citrate synthase activity was also unaffected by CIH exposure. Apocynin significantly increased sternohyoid force and power. We conclude that CIH exposure upregulates NOX expression in rat sternohyoid muscle with concomitant modest oxidative stress but it does not result in a HIF-1α-dependent increase in glycolytic enzyme activity. Constitutive NOX activity decreases sternohyoid force and power. Our results implicate NOX-dependent reactive oxygen species in CIH-induced upper airway muscle dysfunction which likely relates to redox modulation of key regulatory proteins in excitation

  14. Increased pulmonary arteriolar tone associated with lung oxidative stress and nitric oxide in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Andrew M; Jagadapillai, Rekha; Vaishnav, Radhika A; Friedland, Robert P; Drinovac, Robert; Lin, Xingyu; Gozal, Evelyne

    2016-09-01

    Vascular dysfunction and decreased cerebral blood flow are linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Loss of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress in human cerebrovascular endothelium increase expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and enhance production of the Aβ peptide, suggesting that loss of endothelial NO contributes to AD pathology. We hypothesize that decreased systemic NO bioavailability in AD may also impact lung microcirculation and induce pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. The acute effect of NO synthase (NOS) inhibition on pulmonary arteriolar tone was assessed in a transgenic mouse model (TgAD) of AD (C57BL/6-Tg(Thy1-APPSwDutIowa)BWevn/Mmjax) and age-matched wild-type controls (C57BL/6J). Arteriolar diameters were measured before and after the administration of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME Lung superoxide formation (DHE) and formation of nitrotyrosine (3-NT) were assessed as indicators of oxidative stress, inducible NOS (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) expression as indicators of inflammation. Administration of L-NAME caused either significant pulmonary arteriolar constriction or no change from baseline tone in wild-type (WT) mice, and significant arteriolar dilation in TgAD mice. DHE, 3-NT, TNF-α, and iNOS expression were higher in TgAD lung tissue, compared to WT mice. These data suggest L-NAME could induce increased pulmonary arteriolar tone in WT mice from loss of bioavailable NO In contrast, NOS inhibition with L-NAME had a vasodilator effect in TgAD mice, potentially caused by decreased reactive nitrogen species formation, while significant oxidative stress and inflammation were present. We conclude that AD may increase pulmonary microvascular tone as a result of loss of bioavailable NO and increased oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that AD may have systemic microvascular implications beyond central neural control mechanisms. PMID:27604401

  15. Loss of tafazzin in yeast leads to increased oxidative stress during respiratory growth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuliang; He, Quan; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2008-05-01

    The tafazzin (TAZ) gene is highly conserved from yeast to humans, and the yeast taz1 null mutant shows alterations in cardiolipin (CL) metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction and stabilization of supercomplexes similar to those found in Barth syndrome, a human disorder resulting from loss of tafazzin. We have previously shown that the yeast tafazzin mutant taz1Delta, which cannot remodel CL, is ethanol-sensitive at elevated temperature. In the current report, we show that in response to ethanol, CL mutants taz1Delta as well as crd1Delta, which cannot synthesize CL, exhibited increased protein carbonylation, an indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The increase in ROS is most likely not due to defective oxidant defence systems, as the CL mutants do not display sensitivity to paraquat, menadione or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Ethanol sensitivity and increased protein carbonylation in the taz1Delta mutant but not in crd1Delta can be rescued by supplementation with oleic acid, suggesting that oleoyl-CL and/or oleoyl-monolyso-CL enables growth of taz1Delta in ethanol by decreasing oxidative stress. Our findings of increased oxidative stress in the taz1Delta mutant during respiratory growth may have important implications for understanding the pathogenesis of Barth syndrome. PMID:18430085

  16. Increased resistance to oxidative stress in transgenic plants by targeting mannitol biosynthesis to chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, B.; Jensen, R.G.; Bohnert, H.J.

    1997-04-01

    To investigate the potential role of a polyol, mannitol, in oxidative stress protection, a bacterial mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase gene was targeted to chloroplasts by the addition of an aminoterminal transit peptide. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) lines accumulate mannitol at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 7 {mu}mol/g fresh weight. Line BS1-31 accumulated approximately 100 mm mannitol in chloroplasts and was identical to the wild type in phenotype and photosynthetic performance. The presence of mannitol in chloroplasts resulted in an increased resistance to methyl viologen (MV)-induced oxidative stress, documented by the increased retention of chlorophyll in transgenic leaf tissue following MV treatment. In the presence of MV, isolated mesophyll cells of BS1-31 exhibited higher CO{sub 2} fixation than the wild type. When the hydroxyl radical probe dimethyl sulfoxide was introduced into cells, the initial formation rate of methane sulfinic acid was significantly lower in cells containing mannitol in the chloroplast compartment than in wild-type cells, indicating an increased hydroxyl radical-scavenging capacity in BS1-31 tobacco. We suggest that the chloroplast location of mannitol can supplement endogenous radical-scavenging mechanisms and reduce oxidative damage of cells by hydroxyl radicals. 43 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Oxidative stress in retinal pigment epithelium cells increases exosome secretion and promotes angiogenesis in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Atienzar-Aroca, Sandra; Flores-Bellver, Miguel; Serrano-Heras, Gemma; Martinez-Gil, Natalia; Barcia, Jorge M; Aparicio, Silvia; Perez-Cremades, Daniel; Garcia-Verdugo, Jose M; Diaz-Llopis, Manuel; Romero, Francisco J; Sancho-Pelluz, Javier

    2016-08-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a monolayer located between the photoreceptors and the choroid, is constantly damaged by oxidative stress, particularly because of reactive oxygen species (ROS). As the RPE, because of its physiological functions, is essential for the survival of the retina, any sustained damage may consequently lead to loss of vision. Exosomes are small membranous vesicles released into the extracellular medium by numerous cell types, including RPE cells. Their cargo includes genetic material and proteins, making these vesicles essential for cell-to-cell communication. Exosomes may fuse with neighbouring cells influencing their fate. It has been observed that RPE cells release higher amounts of exosomes when they are under oxidative stress. Exosomes derived from cultured RPE cells were isolated by ultracentrifugation and quantified by flow cytometry. VEGF receptors (VEGFR) were analysed by both flow cytometry and Western blot. RT-PCR and qPCR were conducted to assess mRNA content of VEGFRs in exosomes. Neovascularization assays were performed after applying RPE exosomes into endothelial cell cultures. Our results showed that stressed RPE cells released a higher amount of exosomes than controls, with a higher expression of VEGFR in the membrane, and enclosed an extra cargo of VEGFR mRNA. Angiogenesis assays confirmed that endothelial cells increased their tube formation capacity when exposed to stressed RPE exosomes. PMID:26999719

  18. Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Oxidative Stress in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mateen, Somaiya; Moin, Shagufta; Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Zafar, Atif; Fatima, Naureen

    2016-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disorder. Highly reactive oxygen free radicals are believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, RA patients were sub-grouped depending upon the presence or absence of rheumatoid factor, disease activity score and disease duration. RA Patients (120) and healthy controls (53) were evaluated for the oxidant—antioxidant status by monitoring ROS production, biomarkers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage. The level of various enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants was also monitored. Correlation analysis was also performed for analysing the association between ROS and various other parameters. Methods Intracellular ROS formation, lipid peroxidation (MDA level), protein oxidation (carbonyl level and thiol level) and DNA damage were detected in the blood of RA patients. Antioxidant status was evaluated by FRAP assay, DPPH reduction assay and enzymatic (SOD, catalase, GST, GR) and non-enzymatic (vitamin C and GSH) antioxidants. Results RA patients showed a higher ROS production, increased lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage. A significant decline in the ferric reducing ability, DPPH radical quenching ability and the levels of antioxidants has also been observed. Significant correlation has been found between ROS and various other parameters studied. Conclusion RA patients showed a marked increase in ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, DNA damage and decrease in the activity of antioxidant defence system leading to oxidative stress which may contribute to tissue damage and hence to the chronicity of the disease. PMID:27043143

  19. Consumption of Oxidized Soybean Oil Increased Intestinal Oxidative Stress and Affected Intestinal Immune Variables in Yellow-feathered Broilers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fangfang; Jiang, Shouqun; Mo, Yi; Zhou, Guilian; Yang, Lin

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of oxidized soybean oil in the diet of young chickens on growth performance and intestinal oxidative stress, and indices of intestinal immune function. Corn-soybean-based diets containing 2% mixtures of fresh and oxidized soybean oil provided 6 levels (0.15, 1.01, 3.14, 4.95, 7.05, and 8.97 meqO2/kg) of peroxide value (POV) in the diets. Each dietary treatment, fed for 22 d, had 6 replicates, each containing 30 birds (n = 1,080). Increasing POV levels reduced average daily feed intake (ADFI) of the broilers during d 1 to 10, body weight and average daily gain at d 22 but did not affect overall ADFI. Concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased in plasma and jejunum as POV increased but total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) declined in plasma and jejunum. Catalase (CAT) activity declined in plasma and jejunum as did plasma glutathione S-transferase (GST). Effects were apparent at POV exceeding 3.14 meqO2/kg for early ADFI and MDA in jejunum, and POV exceeding 1.01 meqO2/kg for CAT in plasma and jejunum, GST in plasma and T-AOC in jejunum. Relative jejunal abundance of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) P50 and NF-κB P65 increased as dietary POV increased. Increasing POV levels reduced the jejunal concentrations of secretory immunoglobulin A and cluster of differentiation (CD) 4 and CD8 molecules with differences from controls apparent at dietary POV of 3.14 to 4.95 meqO2/kg. These findings indicated that growth performance, feed intake, and the local immune system of the small intestine were compromised by oxidative stress when young broilers were fed moderately oxidized soybean oil. PMID:26104529

  20. Aldosterone Increases Oxidant Stress to Impair Guanylyl Cyclase Activity by Cysteinyl Thiol Oxidation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Handy, Diane E.; Beuve, Annie; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity owing to increased reactive oxygen species and decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO·); however, the effects of aldosterone on vasodilatory signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) remain unknown. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC) is a heterodimer that is activated by NO· to convert cytosolic GTP to cGMP, a second messenger required for normal VSMC relaxation. Here, we show that aldosterone (10-9-10-7 mol/liter) diminishes GC activity by activating NADPH oxidase in bovine aortic VSMC to increase reactive oxygen species levels and induce oxidative posttranslational modification(s) of Cys-122, a β1-subunit cysteinyl residue demonstrated previously to modulate NO· sensing by GC. In VSMC treated with aldosterone, Western immunoblotting detected evidence of GC β1-subunit disulfide bonding, whereas mass spectrometry analysis of a homologous peptide containing the Cys-122-bearing sequence exposed to conditions of increased oxidant stress confirmed cysteinyl sulfinic acid (m/z 435), sulfonic acid (m/z 443), and disulfide (m/z 836) bond formation. The functional effect of these modifications was examined by transfecting COS-7 cells with wild-type GC or mutant GC containing an alanine substitution at Cys-122 (C122A). Exposure to aldosterone or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) significantly decreased cGMP levels in cells expressing wild-type GC. In contrast, aldosterone or H2O2 did not influence cGMP levels in cells expressing the mutant C122A GC, confirming that oxidative modification of Cys-122 specifically impairs GC activity. These findings demonstrate that pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of aldosterone increase oxidant stress to convert GC to an NO·-insensitive state, resulting in disruption of normal vasodilatory signaling pathways in VSMC. PMID:19141618

  1. Hepatic mitochondrial alterations and increased oxidative stress in nutritional diabetes-prone Psammomys obesus model.

    PubMed

    Bouderba, Saida; Sanz, M Nieves; Sánchez-Martín, Carlos; El-Mir, M Yehia; Villanueva, Gloria R; Detaille, Dominique; Koceïr, E Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is considered to be a pivotal component of insulin resistance and associated metabolic diseases. Psammomys obesus is a relevant model of nutritional diabetes since these adult animals exhibit a state of insulin resistance when fed a standard laboratory chow, hypercaloric for them as compared to their natural food. In this context, alterations in bioenergetics were studied. Using liver mitochondria isolated from these rats fed such a diet for 18 weeks, oxygen consumption rates, activities of respiratory complexes, and content in cytochromes were examined. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and gluthatione (GSH) were measured in tissue homogenates. Diabetic Psammomys showed a serious liver deterioration (hepatic mass accretion, lipids accumulation), accompanied by an enhanced oxidative stress (MDA increased, GSH depleted). On the other hand, both ADP-dependent and uncoupled respirations greatly diminished below control values, and the respiratory flux to cytochrome oxydase was mildly lowered. Furthermore, an inhibition of complexes I and III together with an activation of complex II were found. With emergence of oxidative stress, possibly related to a defect in oxidative phosphorylation, some molecular adjustments could contribute to alleviate, at least in part, the deleterious outcomes of insulin resistance in this gerbil species. PMID:22675340

  2. Elimination of damaged mitochondria through mitophagy reduces mitochondrial oxidative stress and increases tolerance to trichothecenes.

    PubMed

    Bin-Umer, Mohamed Anwar; McLaughlin, John E; Butterly, Matthew S; McCormick, Susan; Tumer, Nilgun E

    2014-08-12

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are natural contaminants of small grain cereals and are encountered in the environment, posing a worldwide threat to human and animal health. Their mechanism of toxicity is poorly understood, and little is known about cellular protection mechanisms against trichothecenes. We previously identified inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis as a novel mechanism for trichothecene-induced cell death. To identify cellular functions involved in trichothecene resistance, we screened the Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library for increased sensitivity to nonlethal concentrations of trichothecin (Tcin) and identified 121 strains exhibiting higher sensitivity than the parental strain. The largest group of sensitive strains had significantly higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels relative to the parental strain. A dose-dependent increase in ROS levels was observed in the parental strain treated with different trichothecenes, but not in a petite version of the parental strain or in the presence of a mitochondrial membrane uncoupler, indicating that mitochondria are the main site of ROS production due to toxin exposure. Cytotoxicity of trichothecenes was alleviated after treatment of the parental strain and highly sensitive mutants with antioxidants, suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to trichothecene sensitivity. Cotreatment with rapamycin and trichothecenes reduced ROS levels and cytotoxicity in the parental strain relative to the trichothecene treatment alone, but not in mitophagy deficient mutants, suggesting that elimination of trichothecene-damaged mitochondria by mitophagy improves cell survival. These results reveal that increased mitophagy is a cellular protection mechanism against trichothecene-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and a potential target for trichothecene resistance. PMID:25071194

  3. Oxidative stress increases the risk of pancreatic β cell damage in chronic renal hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Park, Byung M; Cha, Seung A; Bae, Ui J; Park, Byung H; Park, Woo H; Kim, Suhn H

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension often occurs in conjunction with insulin resistance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether sustained renal hypertension increases the risk of diabetes mellitus in rats, and to define the underlying mechanisms. Two-kidney, one-clip hypertensive (2K1C) rats received captopril (50 mg/kg/day), α-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg/day), or vehicle treatment for 3 months after surgery. Blood pressure was measured by tail cuff plethysmography. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), immunohistochemistry, and western blotting were performed. In addition, insulin secretion from islet cells was measured. OGTT yielded abnormal results, and the number of islet cells and the size of pancreatic β/α cells were decreased in 2K1C rats. Basal insulin levels were also reduced in the plasma. Insulin secretion from pancreatic islet cells in response to high glucose was also attenuated in 2K1C rats compared with sham rats. The levels of oxidative stress markers, including 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine and NADPH oxidase-4, were increased in pancreatic tissue and pancreatic islets in 2K1C rats. The abnormalities observed in 2K1C rats were improved by captopril or α-lipoic acid treatment. These findings indicate that sustained renal hypertension may lead to pancreatic dysfunction, increasing oxidative stress in pancreatic islets. PMID:27535482

  4. Nanomolar concentration of triclocarban increases the vulnerability of rat thymocytes to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kanbara, Yasuhiro; Murakane, Kazuyoshi; Nishimura, Yumiko; Satoh, Masaya; Oyama, Yasuo

    2013-02-01

    It was recently reported that triclocarban was absorbed significantly from soap used during showering in human subjects and that its C(max) in their whole blood ranged from 23 nM to 530 nM. We revealed that a nanomolar concentration (300 nM) of triclocarban potentiated the cytotoxicity of 300 µM H(2)O(2) in rat thymocytes by using cytometric techniques with appropriate fluorescent probes. Although 300 nM triclocarban did not itself increase the population of dead cells (cell lethality), it facilitated the process of cell death induced by H(2)O(2), resulting in a further increase in the population of dead cells. Nanomolar concentrations (300 nM or higher) of triclocarban significantly decreased the cellular content of nonprotein thiol (glutathione), which has a protective role against oxidative stress. Triclocarban at 300 nM or higher increased the cell vulnerability to oxidative stress. The results may suggest that nanomolar concentration (300 nM or higher) of triclocarban affects some cellular functions although there is no evidence for adverse effects of triclocarban in humans at present. PMID:23358139

  5. Elimination of damaged mitochondria through mitophagy reduces mitochondrial oxidative stress and increases tolerance to trichothecenes

    PubMed Central

    Bin-Umer, Mohamed Anwar; McLaughlin, John E.; Butterly, Matthew S.; McCormick, Susan; Tumer, Nilgun E.

    2014-01-01

    Trichothecene mycotoxins are natural contaminants of small grain cereals and are encountered in the environment, posing a worldwide threat to human and animal health. Their mechanism of toxicity is poorly understood, and little is known about cellular protection mechanisms against trichothecenes. We previously identified inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis as a novel mechanism for trichothecene-induced cell death. To identify cellular functions involved in trichothecene resistance, we screened the Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion library for increased sensitivity to nonlethal concentrations of trichothecin (Tcin) and identified 121 strains exhibiting higher sensitivity than the parental strain. The largest group of sensitive strains had significantly higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels relative to the parental strain. A dose-dependent increase in ROS levels was observed in the parental strain treated with different trichothecenes, but not in a petite version of the parental strain or in the presence of a mitochondrial membrane uncoupler, indicating that mitochondria are the main site of ROS production due to toxin exposure. Cytotoxicity of trichothecenes was alleviated after treatment of the parental strain and highly sensitive mutants with antioxidants, suggesting that oxidative stress contributes to trichothecene sensitivity. Cotreatment with rapamycin and trichothecenes reduced ROS levels and cytotoxicity in the parental strain relative to the trichothecene treatment alone, but not in mitophagy deficient mutants, suggesting that elimination of trichothecene-damaged mitochondria by mitophagy improves cell survival. These results reveal that increased mitophagy is a cellular protection mechanism against trichothecene-induced mitochondrial oxidative stress and a potential target for trichothecene resistance. PMID:25071194

  6. Absence of systemic oxidative stress and increased CSF prostaglandin F2α in progressive MS

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Magda A.; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Khademi, Mohsen; Piehl, Fredik; Ratzer, Rikke; Romme Christensen, Jeppe; Sellebjerg, Finn Thorup; Olsson, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the role of oxidative stress in the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: We determined by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry nonenzymatic (F2-isoprostanes) and enzymatic oxidation products of arachidonic acid (prostaglandin F2α [PGF2α]) in plasma and CSF of 45 controls (other neurologic disease [OND] with no signs of inflammation) and 62 patients with MS. Oxidation products were correlated with disease severity and validated biomarkers of inflammation (chemokine ligand 13; matrix metalloproteinase-9; osteopontin) and axonal damage (neurofilament light protein). Results: Compared with OND controls, plasma concentrations of F2-isoprostanes and PGF2α were significantly lower in patients with progressive disease, and decreased with increasing disability score (Expanded Disability Status Scale). In contrast, CSF concentrations of PGF2α, but not F2-isoprostanes, were significantly higher in patients with progressive disease than OND controls (p < 0.01). The content of PGF2α in CSF increased with disease severity (p = 0.044) and patient age (p = 0.022), although this increase could not be explained by age. CSF PGF2α decreased with natalizumab and methylprednisolone treatment and was unaffected by the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in secondary progressive MS. CSF PGF2α did not associate with validated CSF markers of inflammation and axonal damage that themselves did not associate with the Expanded Disability Status Scale. Conclusions: Our data suggest that MS progression is associated with low systemic oxidative activity. This may contribute to immune dysregulation with CNS inflammation accompanied by increased local cyclooxygenase-dependent lipid oxidation. PMID:27386506

  7. Increasing the Oxidative Stress Response Allows Escherichia coli To Overcome Inhibitory Effects of Condensed Tannins

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexandra H.; Imlay, James A.; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2003-01-01

    Tannins are plant-derived polyphenols with antimicrobial effects. The mechanism of tannin toxicity towards Escherichia coli was determined by using an extract from Acacia mearnsii (Black wattle) as a source of condensed tannins (proanthocyanidins). E. coli growth was inhibited by tannins only when tannins were exposed to oxygen. Tannins auto-oxidize, and substantial hydrogen peroxide was generated when they were added to aerobic media. The addition of exogenous catalase permitted growth in tannin medium. E. coli mutants that lacked HPI, the major catalase, were especially sensitive to tannins, while oxyR mutants that constitutively overexpress antioxidant enzymes were resistant. A tannin-resistant mutant was isolated in which a promoter-region point mutation increased the level of HPI by 10-fold. Our results indicate that wattle condensed tannins are toxic to E. coli in aerobic medium primarily because they generate H2O2. The oxidative stress response helps E. coli strains to overcome their inhibitory effect. PMID:12788743

  8. Cutaneous interstitial nitric oxide concentration does not increase during heat stress in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; MacLean, D. A.

    2001-01-01

    Inhibition of cutaneous nitric oxide (NO) synthase reduces the magnitude of cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heating in humans. However, this observation is insufficient to conclude that NO concentration increases in the skin during a heat stress. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that whole body heating increases cutaneous interstitial NO concentration. This was accomplished by placing 2 microdialysis membranes in the forearm dermal space of 12 subjects. Both membranes were perfused with lactated Ringer solutions at a rate of 2 microl/min. In both normothermia and during whole body heating via a water perfused suit, dialysate from these membranes were obtained and analyzed for NO using the chemiluminescence technique. In six of these subjects, after the heat stress, the membranes were perfused with a 1 M solution of acetylcholine to stimulate NO release. Dialysate from these trials was also assayed to quantify cutaneous interstitial NO concentration. Whole body heating increased skin temperature from 34.6 +/- 0.2 to 38.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C (P < 0.05), which increased sublingual temperature (36.4 +/- 0.1 to 37.6 +/- 0.1 degrees C; P < 0.05), heart rate (63 +/- 5 to 93 +/- 5 beats/min; P < 0.05), and skin blood flow over the membranes (21 +/- 4 to 88 +/- 10 perfusion units; P < 0.05). NO concentration in the dialysate did not increase significantly during of the heat stress (7.6 +/- 0.7 to 8.6 +/- 0.8 microM; P > 0.05). After the heat stress, administration of acetylcholine in the perfusate significantly increased skin blood flow (128 +/- 6 perfusion units) relative to both normothermic and heat stress values and significantly increased NO concentration in the dialysate (15.8 +/- 2.4 microM). These data suggest that whole body heating does not increase cutaneous interstitial NO concentration in forearm skin. Rather, NO may serve in a permissive role in facilitating the effects of an unknown neurotransmitter, leading to cutaneous vasodilation

  9. Testosterone depletion increases the susceptibility of brain tissue to oxidative damage in a restraint stress mouse model.

    PubMed

    Son, Seung-Wan; Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Kim, Dong-Woon; Ahn, Yo-Chan; Son, Chang-Gue

    2016-01-01

    Among sex hormones, estrogen is particularly well known to act as neuroprotective agent. Unlike estrogen, testosterone has not been well investigated in regard to its effects on the brain, especially under psychological stress. To investigate the role of testosterone in oxidative brain injuries under psychological stress, we adapted an orchiectomy and restraint stress model. BALB/c mice were subjected to either an orchiectomy or sham operation. After allowing 15 days for recovery, mice were re-divided into four groups according to exposure of restraint stress: sham, sham plus stress, orchiectomy, and orchiectomy plus stress. Serum testosterone was undetectable in orchiectomized groups and restraint-induced stress significantly reduced testosterone levels in sham plus stress group. The serum levels of corticosterone and adrenaline were notably elevated by restraint stress, and these elevated hormones were markedly augmented by orchiectomy. Two oxidative stressors and biomarkers for lipid and protein peroxidation were significantly increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus by restraint stress, while the reverse pattern was observed in antioxidant enzymes. These results were supported by histopathological findings, with 4-hydroxynonenal staining for oxidative injury and Fluoro-Jade B staining showing the degenerating neurons. The aforementioned patterns of oxidative injury were accelerated by orchiectomy. These findings strongly suggest the conclusion that testosterone exerts a protective effect against oxidative brain damage, especially under stressed conditions. Unlike estrogen, the effects of testosterone on the brain have not been thoroughly investigated. In order to investigate the role of testosterone in oxidative brain injuries under psychological stress, we adapted an orchiectomy and restraint stress model. Orchiectomy markedly augmented the restraint stress-induced elevation of serum corticosterone and adrenaline levels as well as oxidative alterations

  10. Increase in oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment in hypothalamus of streptozotocin treated diabetic rat: Antioxidative effect of Withania somnifera.

    PubMed

    Parihar, P; Shetty, R; Ghafourifar, P; Parihar, M S

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamus, the primary brain region for glucose sensing, is severely affected by oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress in this region of brain may cause severe impairment in neuronal metabolic functions. Mitochondria are prominent targets of oxidative stress and the combination of increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions may further decline hypothalamic neuronal functions. In the present study we examined the oxidative damage response, antioxidative responses and mitochondrial membrane permeability transition in hypothalamus of streptozotocin-treated diabetic rats. Our results show that streptozotocin significantly increases hypothalamic lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content while glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione were declined. Mitochondrial impairment marked by an increase in mitochondrial membrane permeabilization was seen following streptozotocin treatment in the hypothalamus. The oral administration of Withania somnifera root extract stabilized mitochondrial functions and prevented oxidative damage in the hypothalamus of diabetic rat. These findings suggest an increase in the oxidative stress and decline in antioxidative responses in the hypothalamus of streptozotocin treated diabetic rats. Withania somnifera root extract was found useful in reducing oxidative stress and mitochondrial impairment in hypothalamus of diabetic rat. PMID:26828992

  11. Ischaemic Priapism and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A Mechanism of Increased Oxidative Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, BF; Thompson, EB; Shah, SD; Wharfe, GH

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ischaemic priapism is a devastating urological condition that has the potential to cause permanent erectile dysfunction. The disorder has been associated with numerous medical conditions and the use of pharmacotherapeutic agents. The aetiology is idiopathic in a number of cases. There are two prior case reports of the association of ischaemic priapism and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. We report on a third case of priapism associated with G6PD deficiency and review recently described molecular mechanisms of increased oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of ischaemic priapism. The case report of a 32-year old Afro-Caribbean male with his first episode of major ischaemic priapism is described. Screening for common causes of ischaemic priapism, including sickle cell disease was negative. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency was discovered on evaluation for priapism. Penile aspiration was performed and erectile function was good post treatment. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is a cause for ischaemic priapism and should be a part of the screening process in idiopathic causes of the disorder. Increased oxidative stress occurs in G6PD deficiency and may lead to priapism. PMID:25803385

  12. Increased Oxidative and Nitrative Stress Accelerates Aging of the Retinal Vasculature in the Diabetic Retina

    PubMed Central

    Lamoke, Folami; Shaw, Sean; Yuan, Jianghe; Ananth, Sudha; Duncan, Michael; Martin, Pamela; Bartoli, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced retinal oxidative and nitrative stress can accelerate vascular cell aging, which may lead to vascular dysfunction as seen in diabetes. There is no information on whether this may contribute to the progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR). In this study, we have assessed the occurrence of senescence-associated markers in retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats at 8 and 12 weeks of hyperglycemia as compared to normoglycemic aging (12 and 14 months) and adult (4.5 months) rat retinas. We have found that in the diabetic retinas there was an up-regulation of senescence-associated markers SA-β-Gal, p16INK4a and miR34a, which correlated with decreased expression of SIRT1, a target of miR34a. Expression of senescence-associated factors primarily found in retinal microvasculature of diabetic rats exceeded levels measured in adult and aging rat retinas. In aging rats, retinal expression of senescence associated-factors was mainly localized at the level of the retinal pigmented epithelium and only minimally in the retinal microvasculature. The expression of oxidative/nitrative stress markers such as 4-hydroxynonenal and nitrotyrosine was more pronounced in the retinal vasculature of diabetic rats as compared to normoglycemic aging and adult rat retinas. Treatments of STZ-rats with the anti-nitrating drug FeTPPS (10mg/Kg/day) significantly reduced the appearance of senescence markers in the retinal microvasculature. Our results demonstrate that hyperglycemia accelerates retinal microvascular cell aging whereas physiological aging affects primarily cells of the retinal pigmented epithelium. In conclusion, hyperglycemia-induced retinal vessel dysfunction and DR progression involve vascular cell senescence due to increased oxidative/nitrative stress. PMID:26466127

  13. A high linoleic acid diet increases oxidative stress in vivo and affects nitric oxide metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Turpeinen, A M; Basu, S; Mutanen, M

    1998-09-01

    Evidence from in vitro studies shows that increased intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids leads to increased oxidative stress, which may be associated with endothelial damage. We measured the urinary levels of 8-iso-PGF2alpha and nitric oxide metabolites as well as plasma sICAM-1 levels from healthy subjects after strictly controlled diets rich in either linoleic acid (LA, C18:2 n-6) or oleic acid (OA, C18:1 n-9). Thirty-eight volunteers (20 women and 18 men, mean age 27 years) consumed a baseline diet rich in saturated fatty acids (SFA) for 4 weeks and were then switched to either a high LA diet (11.5 en%) or a high OA diet (18.0 en%) also for 4 weeks. During the LA and OA diets, nearly all food was provided for the whole day. A control group of 13 subjects consumed their habitual diet throughout the study. Urinary excretion of 8-iso-PGF2alpha was significantly increased after the LA diet (170 vs 241 ng/mmol creatinine, P=0.04), whereas the urinary concentration of nitric oxide metabolites decreased (4.2 vs 2.6 mg/mmol creatinine, P=0.03). No significant changes were seen in the OA group. Significant differences between the LA and control group were found for both 8-oxo-PGF2alpha (P=0.03) and NO (P=0.02), whereas the OA and LA groups did not differ with respect to any parameter. Also plasma sICAM-1 remained unchanged in both groups throughout the study. In conclusion, the high-LA diet increased oxidative stress and affected endothelial function in a way which may in the long-term predispose to endothelial dysfunction. PMID:9844997

  14. Adverse effects of free fatty acid associated with increased oxidative stress in postischemic isolated rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Gambert, Ségolène; Vergely, Catherine; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Moreau, Daniel; Bettaieb, Ali; Opie, Lionel H; Rochette, Luc

    2006-02-01

    The mechanisms of the adverse effects of free fatty acids on the ischemic-reperfused myocardium are not fully understood. Long-chain fatty acids, including palmitate, uncouple oxidative phosphorylation and should therefore promote the formation of oxygen-derived free radicals, with consequent adverse effects. Conversely, the antianginal agent trimetazidine (TMZ), known to inhibit cardiac fatty acid oxidation, could hypothetically lessen the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and thus improve reperfusion mechanical function. Isolated perfused rat hearts underwent 30 min of total global ischemia followed by 30 min of reperfusion. Hearts were perfused with glucose 5.5 mmol/l or palmitate 1.5 mmol/l with or without TMZ (100 micromol/l). Ascorbyl free radical (AFR) release during perfusion periods was measured by electron spin resonance as a marker of oxidative stress. Post-ischemic recovery in the palmitate group of heart was lower than in the glucose group with a marked rise in diastolic tension and reduction in left ventricular developed pressure (Glucose: 85 +/- 11 mmHg; Palmitate: 10 +/- 6 mmHg; p < 0.001). TMZ decreased diastolic tension in both glucose- and in palmitate-perfused hearts. Release of AFR within the first minute of reperfusion was greater in palmitate-perfused hearts and in hearts perfused with either substrate, this marker of oxidative stress was decreased by TMZ (expressed in arbitrary units/ml; respectively: 8.49 +/- 1.24 vs. 1.06 +/- 0.70 p < 0.05; 12.47 +/- 2.49 vs. 3.37 +/- 1.29 p < 0.05). Palmitate increased the formation of ROS and reperfusion contracture. TMZ, a potential inhibitor of palmitate-induced mitochondrial uncoupling, decreased the formation of free radicals and improved postischemic mechanical dysfunction. The novel conclusion is that adverse effects of fatty acids on ischemic-reperfusion injury may be mediated, at least in part, by oxygen-derived free radicals. PMID:16444597

  15. Selective downregulation of mitochondrial electron transport chain activity and increased oxidative stress in human atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Emelyanova, Larisa; Ashary, Zain; Cosic, Milanka; Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Ross, Gracious; Rizvi, Farhan; Olet, Susan; Kress, David; Sra, Jasbir; Tajik, A Jamil; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Shi, Yang; Jahangir, Arshad

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are critical for maintaining normal cardiac function, and a deficit in mitochondrial energetics can lead to the development of the substrate that promotes atrial fibrillation (AF) and its progression. However, the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and AF in humans is still not fully defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate differences in the functional activity of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and oxidative stress in right atrial tissue from patients without (non-AF) and with AF (AF) who were undergoing open-heart surgery and were not significantly different for age, sex, major comorbidities, and medications. The overall functional activity of the electron transport chain (ETC), NADH:O2 oxidoreductase activity, was reduced by 30% in atrial tissue from AF compared with non-AF patients. This was predominantly due to a selective reduction in complex I (0.06 ± 0.007 vs. 0.09 ± 0.006 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.02) and II (0.11 ± 0.012 vs. 0.16 ± 0.012 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.003) functional activity in AF patients. Conversely, complex V activity was significantly increased in AF patients (0.21 ± 0.027 vs. 0.12 ± 0.01 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.005). In addition, AF patients exhibited a higher oxidative stress with increased production of mitochondrial superoxide (73 ± 17 vs. 11 ± 2 arbitrary units, P = 0.03) and 4-hydroxynonenal level (77.64 ± 30.2 vs. 9.83 ± 2.83 ng·mg(-1) protein, P = 0.048). Our findings suggest that AF is associated with selective downregulation of ETC activity and increased oxidative stress that can contribute to the progression of the substrate for AF. PMID:27199126

  16. Coking wastewater increases micronucleus frequency in mouse in vivo via oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Na; Li, Hongyan; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2013-10-01

    Coking wastewater has caused serious health risk in coal-producing areas of China, however its toxic effects have not been well understood. The genotoxicity induced by coking wastewater on mice in vivo and its possible oxidative mechanisms were investigated via observing the induction of micronuclei in polychromatic erythrocytes of mouse bone marrow, and subsequently determining the antioxidative enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase Cu, Zn-SOD, Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase, and catalase), thiobarbituric acid reactive substance contents and protein carbonyl levels in brains and livers of mice. Results showed that the tested coking wastewater caused a significant increase of micronucleus frequencies in a concentration-dependent manner. Also, the sample increased lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation levels, which was accompanied by changes in antioxidative status. Interestingly, pre-treatment with an antioxidant (vitamin C) led to a statistical reduction in the micronucleus frequency caused by coking wastewater. This implies that coking wastewater induces evident genetic damage in mammalian cells, and exposure to polluted areas might pose a potential genotoxic risk to human beings; in the process, oxidative stress played a crucial role. PMID:24494500

  17. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. PMID:27422326

  18. Glucocorticoids and Tumor Necrosis Factor α Increase Oxidative Stress and Suppress Wnt Protein Signaling in Osteoblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Maria; Han, Li; Ambrogini, Elena; Weinstein, Robert S.; Manolagas, Stavros C.

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoids (GCs) and inflammatory cytokines contribute to the age-associated loss of bone mass and strength, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for their deleterious effects on the aging skeleton are unclear. Based on evidence that oxidative stress is a causal mechanism of the insulin resistance produced by either one of these two agents, we tested the hypothesis that their adverse skeletal effects also result from increased oxidative stress. We report that administration of prednisolone to mice increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the phosphorylation of p66shc (an amplifier of H2O2 generation in mitochondria) in bone. Dexamethasone (Dex) and TNFα had a similar effect on osteoblastic cells in vitro. The generation of ROS by Dex and TNFα required PKCβ/p66shc signaling and was responsible for the activation of JNK and induction of apoptosis by both agents. The activity of Forkhead box O (FoxO) transcription factors was also increased in response to ROS; however, FoxO activation opposed apoptosis induced by Dex and TNFα. In addition, both agents suppressed Akt phosphorylation as well as Wnt-induced proliferation and osteoblast differentiation. However, the inhibitory actions on Wnt signaling were independent of PKCβ/p66shc. Instead, they were mediated by inhibition of Akt and stimulation of FoxOs. These results demonstrate that ROS-induced activation of a PKCβ/p66shc/JNK signaling cascade is responsible for the pro-apoptotic effects of Dex and TNFα on osteoblastic cells. Moreover, modulation of Akt and FoxOs by GCs and TNFα are cell-autonomous mechanisms of Wnt/β-catenin antagonism contributing to the adverse effects of GC excess and inflammatory cytokines on bone alike. PMID:22030390

  19. Aluminum overload increases oxidative stress in four functional brain areas of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Higher aluminum (Al) content in infant formula and its effects on neonatal brain development are a cause for concern. This study aimed to evaluate the distribution and concentration of Al in neonatal rat brain following Al treatment, and oxidative stress in brain tissues induced by Al overload. Methods Postnatal day 3 (PND 3) rat pups (n =46) received intraperitoneal injection of aluminum chloride (AlCl3), at dosages of 0, 7, and 35 mg/kg body wt (control, low Al (LA), and high Al (HA), respectively), over 14 d. Results Aluminum concentrations were significantly higher in the hippocampus (751.0 ± 225.8 ng/g v.s. 294.9 ± 180.8 ng/g; p < 0.05), diencephalon (79.6 ± 20.7 ng/g v.s. 20.4 ± 9.6 ng/g; p < 0.05), and cerebellum (144.8 ± 36.2 ng/g v.s. 83.1 ± 15.2 ng/g; p < 0.05) in the HA group compared to the control. The hippocampus, diencephalon, cerebellum, and brain stem of HA animals displayed significantly higher levels of lipid peroxidative products (TBARS) than the same regions in the controls. However, the average superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brain stem were lower in the HA group compared to the control. The HA animals demonstrated increased catalase activity in the diencephalon, and increased glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brain stem, compared to controls. Conclusion Aluminum overload increases oxidative stress (H2O2) in the hippocampus, diencephalon, cerebellum, and brain stem in neonatal rats. PMID:22613782

  20. Nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation increases blood flow during the early stages of stress fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Ryan E; Shoghi, Kooresh I; Silva, Matthew J

    2014-02-15

    Despite the strong connection between angiogenesis and osteogenesis in skeletal repair conditions such as fracture and distraction osteogenesis, little is known about the vascular requirements for bone formation after repetitive mechanical loading. Here, established protocols of damaging (stress fracture) and nondamaging (physiological) forelimb loading in the adult rat were used to stimulate either woven or lamellar bone formation, respectively. Positron emission tomography was used to evaluate blood flow and fluoride kinetics at the site of bone formation. In the group that received damaging mechanical loading leading to woven bone formation (WBF), (15)O water (blood) flow rate was significantly increased on day 0 and remained elevated 14 days after loading, whereas (18)F fluoride uptake peaked 7 days after loading. In the group that received nondamaging mechanical loading leading to lamellar bone formation (LBF), (15)O water and (18)F fluoride flow rates in loaded limbs were not significantly different from nonloaded limbs at any time point. The early increase in blood flow rate after WBF loading was associated with local vasodilation. In addition, Nos2 expression in mast cells was increased in WBF-, but not LBF-, loaded limbs. The nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester was used to suppress NO generation, resulting in significant decreases in early blood flow rate and bone formation after WBF loading. These results demonstrate that NO-mediated vasodilation is a key feature of the normal response to stress fracture and precedes woven bone formation. Therefore, patients with impaired vascular function may heal stress fractures more slowly than expected. PMID:24356518

  1. Chronic Oxidative Stress Increases Growth and Tumorigenic Potential of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingaiah, Prathap Kumar S.; Singh, Kamaleshwar P.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that exposures to elevated levels of either endogenous estrogen or environmental estrogenic chemicals are associated with breast cancer development and progression. These natural or synthetic estrogens are known to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increased ROS has been implicated in both cellular apoptosis and carcinogenesis. Though there are several studies on direct involvement of ROS in cellular apoptosis using short-term exposure model, there is no experimental evidence to directly implicate chronic exposure to ROS in increased growth and tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic oxidative stress on growth, survival and tumorigenic potential of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. MCF-7 cells were exposed to exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a source of ROS at doses of 25 µM and 250 µM for acute (24 hours) and chronic period (3 months) and their effects on cell growth/survival and tumorigenic potential were evaluated. The results of cell count, MTT and cell cycle analysis showed that while acute exposure inhibits the growth of MCF-7 cells in a dose-dependent manner, the chronic exposure to H2O2-induced ROS leads to increased cell growth and survival of MCF-7 cells. This was further confirmed by gene expression analysis of cell cycle and cell survival related genes. Significant increase in number of soft agar colonies, up-regulation of pro-metastatic genes VEGF, WNT1 and CD44, whereas down-regulation of anti-metastatic gene E-Cadherin in H2O2 treated MCF-7 cells observed in this study further suggests that persistent exposure to oxidative stress increases tumorigenic and metastatic potential of MCF-7 cells. Since many chemotherapeutic drugs are known to induce their cytotoxicity by increasing ROS levels, the results of this study are also highly significant in understanding the mechanism for adaptation to ROS-induced toxicity leading to acquired

  2. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide are increased in obese children and correlate with cardiometabolic risk and renal function.

    PubMed

    Correia-Costa, Liane; Sousa, Teresa; Morato, Manuela; Cosme, Dina; Afonso, Joana; Areias, José C; Schaefer, Franz; Guerra, António; Afonso, Alberto C; Azevedo, Ana; Albino-Teixeira, António

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) appear to represent important links between obesity and cardiovascular, metabolic and/or renal disease. We investigated whether oxidative stress and NO production/metabolism are increased in overweight and obese prepubertal children and correlate with cardiometabolic risk and renal function. We performed a cross-sectional evaluation of 313 children aged 8-9 years. Anthropometrics, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure, pulse wave velocity (PWV), insulin resistance (homoeostasis model assessment index (HOMA-IR)), inflammatory/metabolic biomarkers, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), plasma total antioxidant status (TAS), plasma and urinary isoprostanes (P-Isop, U-Isop), urinary hydrogen peroxide (U-H2O2), and plasma and urinary nitrates and nitrites (P-NOx, U-NOx) were compared among normal weight, overweight and obese groups, according to WHO BMI z-score reference. U-Isop were increased in the obese group, whereas U-NOx were increased in both overweight and obese children. U-Isop were positively correlated with U-H2O2, myeloperoxidase (MPO), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, HOMA-IR and TAG. TAS correlated negatively with U-Isop and MPO and positively with PWV. HOMA-IR and U-H2O2 were associated with higher U-Isop, independently of BMI and eGFR, and total cholesterol and U-H2O2 were associated with U-NOx, independently of BMI, eGFR values and P-NOx concentration. In overweight and obese children, eGFR decreased across P-NOx tertiles (median: 139·3 (25th, 75th percentile 128·0, 146·5), 128·0 (25th, 75th percentile 121·5, 140·4), 129·5 (25th, 75th percentile 119·4, 138·3), P for linear trend=0·003). We conclude that oxidant status and NO are increased in relation to fat accumulation and, even in young children, they translate into higher values of cardiometabolic risk markers and affect renal function. PMID:27480380

  3. Increased oxidative stress in patients with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos Mello, Mariana; Ribas, Graziela Schmitt; Wayhs, Carlos Alberto Yasin; Hammerschmidt, Tatiane; Guerreiro, Gilian Batista Balbueno; Favenzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Sitta, Ângela; de Moura Coelho, Daniella; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric aciduria (HMGA; OMIM 246450) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder, caused by the deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (4.1.3.4), which results in the accumulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaric (HMG) and 3-methylglutaric (MGA) acids in tissues and biological fluids of affected individuals. Recent in vivo and in vitro animal studies have demonstrated that the accumulation of these metabolites can disturb the cellular redox homeostasis, which can contribute to the neurological manifestations presented by the patients. So, in the present work, we investigated oxidative stress parameters in plasma and urine samples from HMGA patients, obtained at the moment of diagnosis of this disorder and during therapy with low-protein diet and L-carnitine supplementation. It was verified that untreated HMGA patients presented higher levels of urinary di-tyrosine and plasma thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), which are markers of protein and lipid oxidative damage, respectively, as well as a reduction of the urinary antioxidant capacity. Treated HMGA patients also presented an increased protein oxidative damage, as demonstrated by their higher concentrations of plasma protein carbonyl groups and urinary di-tyrosine, as well as by the reduction of total sulfhydryl groups in plasma, in relation to controls. On the other hand, HMGA patients under therapy presented normal levels of TBA-RS and urinary antioxidant capacity, which can be related, at least in part, to the antioxidant and antiperoxidative effects exerted by L-carnitine. The results of this work are the first report showing that a redox imbalance occurs in patients with HMGA what reinforces the importance of the antioxidant therapy in this disorder. PMID:25557019

  4. Uncoupling of increased cellular oxidative stress and myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury by directed sarcolemma stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Martindale, Joshua J.; Metzger, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major clinical problem leading to cardiac dysfunction and myocyte death. It is widely held that I/R causes damage to membrane phospholipids, and is a significant mechanism of cardiac I/R injury. Molecular dissection of sarcolemmal damage in I/R, however, has been difficult to address experimentally. We studied here cardiac I/R injury under conditions targeting gain- or loss-of sarcolemma integrity. To implement gain-in-sarcolemma integrity during I/R, synthetic copolymer-based sarcolemmal stabilizers (CSS), including Poloxamer 188 (P188), were used as a tool to directly stabilize the sarcolemma. Consistent with the hypothesis of sarcolemmal stabilization, cellular markers of necrosis and apoptosis evident in untreated myocytes were fully blocked in sarcolemma stabilized myocytes. Unexpectedly, sarcolemmal stabilization of adult cardiac myocytes did not affect the status of myocyte-generated oxidants or lipid peroxidation in two independent assays. We also investigated the loss of sarcolemmal integrity using two independent genetic mouse models, dystrophin-deficient mdx or dysferlin knockout (Dysf KO) mice. Both models of sarcolemmal loss-of-function were severely affected by I/R injury ex vivo, and this was lessened by CSS. In vivo studies also showed that infarct size was significantly reduced in CSS-treated hearts. Mechanistically, these findings support a model whereby I/R-mediated increased myocyte oxidative stress is uncoupled from myocyte injury. Because the sarcolemma stabilizers used here do not transit across the myocyte membrane this is evidence that intracellular targets of oxidants are not sufficiently altered to affect cell death when sarcolemma integrity is preserved by synthetic stabilizers. These findings, in turn, suggest that sarcolemma destabilization, and consequent Ca2+ mishandling, as a focal initiating mechanism underlying myocardial I/R injury. PMID:24362314

  5. Increased oxidative stress and disrupted small intestinal tight junctions in cigarette smoke-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongwei; Wu, Qi; Xu, Long; Li, Xue; Duan, Jianmin; Zhan, Jingyan; Feng, Jing; Sun, Xin; Chen, Huaiyong

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major public health problem, and cigarette smoke (CS) is the primary risk factor. The pathology is often observed in the lung, but COPD is also associated with intestinal barrier disruption, although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To address this, a CS‑exposed rat model was evaluated in the present study by analyzing small intestinal gene expression using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. CS exposure caused upregulation of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate‑oxidase subunits nox2 and p22phox in the small intestine, while the antioxidative enzyme superoxide dismutase was downregulated. CS exposure also increased bax expression and decreased bcl‑2 expression. This was associated with an elevation of hypoxia‑inducible factor (HIF)‑1α. Claudin‑1 was decreased and claudin‑2 increased, indicating a loosening of small intestinal tight junctions (TJs). These data suggest that during the development of COPD, HIF‑1α expression is altered in the small intestine, which may be associated with the increased oxidative stress and apoptosis, eventually resulting in disruption of the intestinal TJs. PMID:25606848

  6. Increased Oxidative Stress Impairs Adipose Tissue Function in Sphingomyelin Synthase 1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Naotaka; Gotoh, Tomomi; Watanabe, Ken; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Garan, Yohei; Taguchi, Ryo; Node, Koichi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Oike, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS1) catalyzes the conversion of ceramide to sphingomyelin. Here, we found that SMS1 null mice showed lipodystrophic phenotype. Mutant mice showed up-regulation of plasma triglyceride concentrations accompanied by reduction of white adipose tissue (WAT) as they aged. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was severely reduced in mutant mice. In vivo analysis indicated that fatty acid uptake in WAT but not in liver decreased in SMS1 null compared to wild-type mice. In vitro analysis using cultured cell revealed that SMS1 depletion reduced fatty acid uptake. Proteins extracted from WAT of mutant mice were severely modified by oxidative stress, and up-regulation of mRNAs related to apoptosis, redox adjustment, mitochondrial stress response and mitochondrial biogenesis was observed. ATP content of WAT was reduced in SMS1 null mice. Blue native gel analysis indicated that accumulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes was reduced. These results suggest that WAT of SMS1 null mice is severely damaged by oxidative stress and barely functional. Indeed, mutant mice treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) showed partial recovery of lipodystrophic phenotypes together with normalized plasma triglyceride concentrations. Altogether, our data suggest that SMS1 is crucial to control oxidative stress in order to maintain WAT function. PMID:23593476

  7. Increased oxidative stress impairs adipose tissue function in sphingomyelin synthase 1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Yano, Masato; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Nishimura, Naotaka; Gotoh, Tomomi; Watanabe, Ken; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Garan, Yohei; Taguchi, Ryo; Node, Koichi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Oike, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS1) catalyzes the conversion of ceramide to sphingomyelin. Here, we found that SMS1 null mice showed lipodystrophic phenotype. Mutant mice showed up-regulation of plasma triglyceride concentrations accompanied by reduction of white adipose tissue (WAT) as they aged. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was severely reduced in mutant mice. In vivo analysis indicated that fatty acid uptake in WAT but not in liver decreased in SMS1 null compared to wild-type mice. In vitro analysis using cultured cell revealed that SMS1 depletion reduced fatty acid uptake. Proteins extracted from WAT of mutant mice were severely modified by oxidative stress, and up-regulation of mRNAs related to apoptosis, redox adjustment, mitochondrial stress response and mitochondrial biogenesis was observed. ATP content of WAT was reduced in SMS1 null mice. Blue native gel analysis indicated that accumulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes was reduced. These results suggest that WAT of SMS1 null mice is severely damaged by oxidative stress and barely functional. Indeed, mutant mice treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) showed partial recovery of lipodystrophic phenotypes together with normalized plasma triglyceride concentrations. Altogether, our data suggest that SMS1 is crucial to control oxidative stress in order to maintain WAT function. PMID:23593476

  8. Green Tea Increases Insulin Sensitivity and Decreases Brain Oxidative Stress in Fructose Fed Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are leading causes of early brain alterations. Our objective was to investigate the in vivo effects of green tea extract on insulin sensitivity, insulin signaling, and brain oxidative stress using an experimental rodent model of diet-induced insulin resistance, t...

  9. Decreased SIRT3 in aged human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells increases cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Shao, Yong; Ma, Chong-Yi; Chen, Wei; Sun, Lu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Dong-Yang; Fu, Bi-Cheng; Liu, Kai-Yu; Jia, Zhi-Bo; Xie, Bao-Dong; Jiang, Shu-Lin; Li, Ren-Ke; Tian, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) is an important member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized to mitochondria and linked to lifespan extension in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. As aged cells have less regenerative capacity and are more susceptible to oxidative stress, we investigated the effect of ageing on SIRT3 levels and its correlation with antioxidant enzyme activities. Here, we show that severe oxidative stress reduces SIRT3 levels in young human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs). Overexpression of SIRT3 improved hMSCs resistance to the detrimental effects of oxidative stress. By activating manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT), SIRT3 protects hMSCs from apoptosis under stress. SIRT3 expression, levels of MnSOD and CAT, as well as cell survival showed little difference in old versus young hMSCs under normal growth conditions, whereas older cells had a significantly reduced capacity to withstand oxidative stress compared to their younger counterparts. Expression of the short 28 kD SIRT3 isoform was higher, while the long 44 kD isoform expression was lower in young myocardial tissues compared with older ones. These results suggest that the active short isoform of SIRT3 protects hMSCs from oxidative injury by increasing the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes. The expression of this short isoform decreases in cardiac tissue during ageing, leading to a reduced capacity for the heart to withstand oxidative stress. PMID:25210848

  10. Decreased SIRT3 in aged human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells increases cellular susceptibility to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Shao, Yong; Ma, Chong-Yi; Chen, Wei; Sun, Lu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Dong-Yang; Fu, Bi-Cheng; Liu, Kai-Yu; Jia, Zhi-Bo; Xie, Bao-Dong; Jiang, Shu-Lin; Li, Ren-Ke; Tian, Hai

    2014-11-01

    Sirtuin3 (SIRT3) is an important member of the sirtuin family of protein deacetylases that is localized to mitochondria and linked to lifespan extension in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. As aged cells have less regenerative capacity and are more susceptible to oxidative stress, we investigated the effect of ageing on SIRT3 levels and its correlation with antioxidant enzyme activities. Here, we show that severe oxidative stress reduces SIRT3 levels in young human mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (hMSCs). Overexpression of SIRT3 improved hMSCs resistance to the detrimental effects of oxidative stress. By activating manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and catalase (CAT), SIRT3 protects hMSCs from apoptosis under stress. SIRT3 expression, levels of MnSOD and CAT, as well as cell survival showed little difference in old versus young hMSCs under normal growth conditions, whereas older cells had a significantly reduced capacity to withstand oxidative stress compared to their younger counterparts. Expression of the short 28 kD SIRT3 isoform was higher, while the long 44 kD isoform expression was lower in young myocardial tissues compared with older ones. These results suggest that the active short isoform of SIRT3 protects hMSCs from oxidative injury by increasing the expression and activity of antioxidant enzymes. The expression of this short isoform decreases in cardiac tissue during ageing, leading to a reduced capacity for the heart to withstand oxidative stress. PMID:25210848

  11. Exercise Increases Cystathionine-γ-lyase Expression and Decreases the Status of Oxidative Stress in Myocardium of Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiping; Wang, Yujun; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Ni, Xin; Lu, Jianqiang

    2016-01-01

    Exercise could be a therapeutic approach for cardiovascular dysfunction induced by estrogen deficiency. Our previous study has shown that estrogen maintains cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) expression and inhibits oxidative stress in the myocardium of female rats. In the present study, we investigated whether exercise improves CSE expression and oxidative stress status and ameliorates isoproterenol (ISO)-induced cardiac damage in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. The results showed that treadmill training restored the ovariectomy-induced reduction of CSE and estrogen receptor (ER)α and decrease of total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and increase of malondialdehyde (MDA). The level of CSE was positively correlated to T-AOC and ERα while inversely correlated to MDA. OVX rats showed increases in the serum levels of creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and the percentage of TUNEL staining in myocardium upon ISO insult compared to sham rats. Exercise training significantly reduced the serum levels of LDH and CK and the percentage of TUNEL staining in myocardium upon ISO insult in OVX rats. In cultured cardiomyocytes, ISO treatment decreased cell viability and increased LDH release, while overexpression of CSE increased cell viability and decreased LDH release in the cells upon ISO insult. The results suggest that exercise training improves the oxidative stress status and ameliorates the cardiac damage induced by oxidative stress in OVX rats. The improvement of oxidative stress status by exercise might be at least partially due to upregulation of CSE/H2S signaling. PMID:26673437

  12. Nanomolar concentrations of zinc pyrithione increase cell susceptibility to oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide in rat thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tomohiro M; Saito, Minoru; Yonezawa, Takayasu; Okano, Yoshiro; Oyama, Yasuo

    2012-06-01

    Zinc pyrithione is used as an antifouling agent. However, the environmental impacts of zinc pyrithione have recently been of concern. Zinc induces diverse actions during oxidative stress; therefore, we examined the effect of zinc pyrithione on rat thymocytes suffering from oxidative stress using appropriate fluorescent probes. The cytotoxicity of zinc pyrithione was not observed when the cells were incubated with 3 μM zinc pyrithione for 3 h. However, zinc pyrithione at nanomolar concentrations (10 nM or more) significantly increased the lethality of cells suffering from oxidative stress induced by 3 mM H(2)O(2). The application of zinc pyrithione alone at nanomolar concentrations increased intracellular Zn(2+) level and the cellular content of superoxide anions, and decreased the cellular content of nonprotein thiols. The simultaneous application of nanomolar zinc pyrithione and micromolar H(2)O(2) synergistically increased the intracellular Zn(2+) level. Therefore, zinc pyrithione at nanomolar concentrations may exert severe cytotoxic action on cells simultaneously exposed to chemicals that induce oxidative stress. If so, zinc pyrithione leaked from antifouling materials into surrounding environments would be a risk factor for aquatic ecosystems. Alternatively, zinc pyrithione under conditions of oxidative stress may become more potent antifouling ingredient. PMID:22356860

  13. Increasing nitric oxide content in Arabidopsis thaliana by expressing rat neuronal nitric oxide synthase resulted in enhanced stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hai-Tao; Li, Rong-Jun; Cai, Wei; Liu, Wen; Wang, Chao-Lun; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2012-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays essential roles in many physiological and developmental processes in plants, including biotic and abiotic stresses, which have adverse effects on agricultural production. However, due to the lack of findings regarding nitric oxide synthase (NOS), many difficulties arise in investigating the physiological roles of NO in vivo and thus its utilization for genetic engineering. Here, to explore the possibility of manipulating the endogenous NO level, rat neuronal NOS (nNOS) was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The 35S::nNOS plants showed higher NOS activity and accumulation of NO using the fluorescent probe 3-amino, 4-aminomethyl-2', 7'-difluorescein, diacetate (DAF-FM DA) assay and the hemoglobin assay. Compared with the wild type, the 35S::nNOS plants displayed improved salt and drought tolerance, which was further confirmed by changes in physiological parameters including reduced water loss rate, reduced stomatal aperture, and altered proline and malondialdehyde content. Quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed that the expression of several stress-regulated genes was up-regulated in the transgenic lines. Furthermore, the transgenic lines also showed enhanced disease resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 by activating the expression of defense-related genes. In addition, we found that the 35S::nNOS lines flowered late by regulating the expression of CO, FLC and LFY genes. Together, these results demonstrated that it is a useful strategy to exploit the roles of plant NO in various processes by the expression of rat nNOS. The approach may also be useful for genetic engineering of crops with increased environmental adaptations. PMID:22186181

  14. NTBC treatment of the pyomelanogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa clinical isolate PA1111 inhibits pigment production and increases sensitivity to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ketelboeter, Laura M; M Ketelboeter, Laura; Potharla, Vishwakanth Y; Y Potharla, Vishwakanth; Bardy, Sonia L; L Bardy, Sonia

    2014-09-01

    Pyomelanin is a brown/black extracellular pigment with antioxidant and iron acquisition properties that is produced by a number of different bacteria. Production of pyomelanin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa contributes to increased resistance to oxidative stress and persistence in chronic infections. We demonstrate that pyomelanin production can be inhibited by 2-[2-nitro-4-(trifluoromethyl) benzoyl]-1,3-cyclohexanedione (NTBC). This treatment increases sensitivity of pyomelanogenic P. aeruginosa strains to oxidative stress, without altering the growth rate or resistance to aminoglycosides. As such, NTBC has potential to function as an anti-virulence factor in treating pyomelanogenic bacterial infections. PMID:24801336

  15. Early life low-level cadmium exposure is positively associated with increased oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kippler, Maria; Bakhtiar Hossain, Mohammad; Lindh, Christian; Moore, Sophie E.; Kabir, Iqbal; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2012-01-15

    Environmental exposure to cadmium (Cd) is known to induce oxidative stress, a state of imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the ability to detoxify them, in adults. However, data are lacking on potential effects in early-life. We evaluated urinary concentrations of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2 Prime -deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), a recognized marker of oxidative DNA damage, in relation to Cd exposure in 96 predominantly breast-fed infants (11-17 weeks of age) in rural Bangladesh. Urinary 8-oxodG was measured using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and Cd in urine and breast milk by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Median concentration of 8-oxodG was 3.9 nmol/L, urinary Cd 0.30 {mu}g/L, and breast-milk Cd 0.13 {mu}g/L. In linear regression analyses, urinary 8-oxodG was positively associated with Cd in both urine (p=0.00067) and breast milk (p=0.0021), and negatively associated with body weight (kg; p=0.0041). Adjustment for age, body weight, socio-economic status, urinary arsenic, as well as magnesium, calcium, and copper in breast milk did not change the association between Cd exposure and urinary 8-oxodG. These findings suggest that early-life low-level exposure to Cd via breast milk induces oxidative stress. Further studies are warranted to elucidate whether this oxidative stress is associated with impaired child health and development.

  16. Environmental Stresses Increase Photosynthetic Disruption by Metal Oxide Nanomaterials in a Soil-Grown Plant.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jon R; Beaulieu, Arielle L; Beaulieu, Nicole L; Mazer, Susan J; Keller, Arturo A

    2015-12-22

    Despite an increasing number of studies over the past decade examining the interactions between plants and engineered nanomaterials (ENMs), very few have investigated the influence of environmental conditions on ENM uptake and toxicity, particularly throughout the entire plant life cycle. In this study, soil-grown herbaceous annual plants (Clarkia unguiculata) were exposed to TiO2, CeO2, or Cu(OH)2 ENMs at different concentrations under distinct light and nutrient levels for 8 weeks. Biweekly fluorescence and gas exchange measurements were recorded, and tissue samples from mature plants were analyzed for metal content. During peak growth, exposure to TiO2 and CeO2 decreased photosynthetic rate and CO2 assimilation efficiency of plants grown under high light and nutrient conditions, possibly by disrupting energy transfer from photosystem II (PSII) to the Calvin cycle. Exposure Cu(OH)2 particles also disrupted photosynthesis but only in plants grown under the most stressful conditions (high light, limited nutrient) likely by preventing the oxidation of a primary PSII reaction center. TiO2 and CeO2 followed similar uptake and distribution patterns with concentrations being highest in roots followed by leaves then stems, while Cu(OH)2 was present at highest concentrations in leaves, likely as ionic Cu. ENM accumulation was highly dependent on both light and nutrient levels and a predictive regression model was developed from these data. These results show that abiotic conditions play an important role in mediating the uptake and physiological impacts of ENMs in terrestrial plants. PMID:26505090

  17. Folic acid supplementation at lower doses increases oxidative stress resistance and longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Rathor, Laxmi; Akhoon, Bashir Akhlaq; Pandey, Swapnil; Srivastava, Swati; Pandey, Rakesh

    2015-12-01

    Folic acid (FA) is an essential nutrient that the human body needs but cannot be synthesized on its own. Fortified foods and plant food sources such as green leafy vegetables, beans, fruits, and juices are good sources of FA to meet the daily requirements of the body. The aim was to evaluate the effect of dietary FA levels on the longevity of well-known experimental aging model Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we show for first time that FA extends organism life span and causes a delay in aging. We observed that FA inhibits mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and insulin/insulin growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling pathways to control both oxidative stress levels and life span. The expression levels of stress- and life span-relevant gerontogenes, viz. daf-16, skn-1, and sir. 2.1, and oxidative enzymes, such as glutathione S-transferase 4 (GST-4) and superoxide dismutase 3 (SOD-3), were also found to be highly enhanced to attenuate the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage and to delay the aging process. Our study promotes the use of FA to mitigate abiotic stresses and other aging-related ailments. PMID:26546011

  18. Mitochondrial oxidative stress-induced hepatocyte apoptosis reflects increased molybdenum intake in caprine.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yu; Liu, Ping; Wang, Liqi; Luo, Junrong; Zhang, Caiying; Guo, Xiaoquan; Hu, Guoliang; Cao, Huabin

    2016-03-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) is an essential trace element for animals and humans. However, the high dietary intake of Mo leads to disease conditions in heavy metal pollution areas. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of high levels of Mo on the apoptosis of hepatocyte in goats has not been investigated. Therefore, the aim of the present in vivo study was to investigate the impact of Mo on mitochondrial oxidative stress and apoptosis genes in the liver using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Thirty-six healthy goats were randomly divided into three groups: two groups treated with ammonium molybdate [(NH4)6·Mo7O24·H2O] at 15 and 45 mg Mo kg(-1) BW, respectively, and a control group without treatment. Liver samples were collected from individual goats at different time intervals. The levels of oxidative stress in the mitochondrial membrane and expression of liver-related apoptosis genes, including Bcl-2, Cyt c, caspase-3, and Smac, were examined. The results demonstrated that the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) expression were significantly down-regulated in liver cells, whereas malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and total nitric oxide synthase (T-NOS) expression was up-regulated (P < 0.01). The expression of Smac, Cyt c, and caspase-3 was significantly up-regulated, whereas Bcl-2 expression was down-regulated in liver cells (P < 0.01). In addition, histopathological examination revealed varying degrees of vacuolization, irregularity, nuclear fission, and mitochondrial swelling and high-density electrons in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes in groups treated with 15 and 45 mg Mo kg(-1) BW. Thus, these results suggested that high molybdenum induced hepatocyte apoptosis and might involve a mitochondrial pathway. PMID:26208811

  19. Oxidative stress response to acute hypobaric hypoxia and its association with indirect measurement of increased intracranial pressure: a field study.

    PubMed

    Strapazzon, Giacomo; Malacrida, Sandro; Vezzoli, Alessandra; Dal Cappello, Tomas; Falla, Marika; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Moretti, Sarah; Procter, Emily; Brugger, Hermann; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona

    2016-01-01

    High altitude is the most intriguing natural laboratory to study human physiological response to hypoxic conditions. In this study, we investigated changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress biomarkers during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia in 16 lowlanders. Moreover, we looked at the potential relationship between ROS related cellular damage and optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) as an indirect measurement of intracranial pressure. Baseline measurement of clinical signs and symptoms, biological samples and ultrasonography were assessed at 262 m and after passive ascent to 3830 m (9, 24 and 72 h). After 24 h the imbalance between ROS production (+141%) and scavenging (-41%) reflected an increase in oxidative stress related damage of 50-85%. ONSD concurrently increased, but regression analysis did not infer a causal relationship between oxidative stress biomarkers and changes in ONSD. These results provide new insight regarding ROS homeostasis and potential pathophysiological mechanisms of acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia, plus other disease states associated with oxidative-stress damage as a result of tissue hypoxia. PMID:27579527

  20. Oxidative stress response to acute hypobaric hypoxia and its association with indirect measurement of increased intracranial pressure: a field study

    PubMed Central

    Strapazzon, Giacomo; Malacrida, Sandro; Vezzoli, Alessandra; Dal Cappello, Tomas; Falla, Marika; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Moretti, Sarah; Procter, Emily; Brugger, Hermann; Mrakic-Sposta, Simona

    2016-01-01

    High altitude is the most intriguing natural laboratory to study human physiological response to hypoxic conditions. In this study, we investigated changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress biomarkers during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia in 16 lowlanders. Moreover, we looked at the potential relationship between ROS related cellular damage and optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD) as an indirect measurement of intracranial pressure. Baseline measurement of clinical signs and symptoms, biological samples and ultrasonography were assessed at 262 m and after passive ascent to 3830 m (9, 24 and 72 h). After 24 h the imbalance between ROS production (+141%) and scavenging (−41%) reflected an increase in oxidative stress related damage of 50–85%. ONSD concurrently increased, but regression analysis did not infer a causal relationship between oxidative stress biomarkers and changes in ONSD. These results provide new insight regarding ROS homeostasis and potential pathophysiological mechanisms of acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia, plus other disease states associated with oxidative-stress damage as a result of tissue hypoxia. PMID:27579527

  1. Long-Term Exposure to AZT, but not d4T, Increases Endothelial Cell Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Erik R.; Bassit, Leda; Hernandez-Santiago, Brenda I.; Detorio, Mervi A.; Liang, Bill; Kleinhenz, Dean J.; Walp, Erik R.; Dikalov, Sergey; Jones, Dean P.; Schinazi, Raymond F.

    2009-01-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), such as zidovudine (AZT) and stavudine (d4T), cause toxicities to numerous tissues, including the liver and vasculature. While much is known about hepatic NRTI toxicity, the mechanism of toxicity in endothelial cells is incompletely understood. Human aortic endothelial and HepG2 liver cells were exposed to 1 μM AZT or d4T for up to 5 weeks. Markers of oxidative stress, mitochondrial function, NRTI phosphorylation, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) levels, and cytotoxicity were monitored over time. In endothelial cells, AZT significantly oxidized glutathione redox potential, increased total cellular and mitochondrial-specific superoxide, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, increased lactate release, and caused cell death from weeks 3 through 5. Toxicity occurred in the absence of di- and tri-phosphorylated AZT and mtDNA depletion. These data show that oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in endothelial cells occur with a physiologically relevant concentration of AZT, and require long-term exposure to develop. In contrast, d4T did not induce endothelial oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, or cytotoxicity despite the presence of d4T-triphosphate. Both drugs depleted mtDNA in HepG2 cells without causing cell death. Endothelial cells are more susceptible to AZT-induced toxicity than HepG2 cells, and AZT caused greater endothelial dysfunction than d4T because of its pro-oxidative effects. PMID:19067249

  2. Oxidative Stress Is Associated with an Increased Antioxidant Defense in Elderly Subjects: A Multilevel Approach

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Mateo, Gemma; Elosua, Roberto; Rodriguez-Blanco, Teresa; Basora-Gallisà, Josep; Bulló, Mònica; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Estruch, Ramon; Corella, Dolores; Fitó, Montserrat; Fiol, Miquel; Arós, Fernando; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Subirana, Isaac; Lapetra, José; Ruiz-Gutiérrez, Valentina; Sáez, Guillermo T.; Covas, Maria-Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies of associations between plasma GSH-Px activity and cardiovascular risk factors have been done in humans, and contradictory results have been reported. The aim of our study was to assess the association between the scavenger antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity in plasma and the presence of novel and classical cardiovascular risk factors in elderly patients. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study with baseline data from a subsample of the PREDIMED (PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea) study in Spain. Participants were 1,060 asymptomatic subjects at high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), aged 55 to 80, selected from 8 primary health care centers (PHCCs). We assessed classical CVD risk factors, plasma oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) using multilevel statistical procedures. Results Mean GSH-Px value was 612 U/L (SE: 12 U/L), with variation between PHCCs ranging from 549 to 674 U/L (Variance = 1013.5; P<0.001). Between-participants variability within a PHCC accounted for 89% of the total variation. Both glucose and oxidized LDL were positively associated with GSH-Px activity after adjustment for possible confounder variables (P = 0.03 and P = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion In a population at high cardiovascular risk, a positive linear association was observed between plasma GSH-Px activity and both glucose and ox-LDL levels. The high GSH-Px activity observed when an oxidative stress situation occurred, such as hyperglycemia and lipid oxidative damage, could be interpreted as a healthy defensive response against oxidative injury in our cardiovascular risk population. PMID:25269026

  3. Tetrahydrocannabinol induces brain mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction and increases oxidative stress: a potential mechanism involved in cannabis-related stroke.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Valérie; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Rouyer, Olivier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Singh, François; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Marescaux, Christian; Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities V max (complexes I, III, and IV activities), V succ (complexes II, III, and IV activities), V tmpd (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (V max/V 0), were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased V max (-71%; P < 0.0001), V succ (-65%; P < 0.0001), and V tmpd (-3.5%; P < 0.001). Mitochondrial coupling (V max/V 0) was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P < 0.001). Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P < 0.05) and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P < 0.001). Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient's vulnerability to stroke. PMID:25654095

  4. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Valérie; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Rouyer, Olivier; Charles, Anne-Laure; Singh, François; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Marescaux, Christian; Raul, Jean-Sébastien; Zoll, Joffrey; Geny, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities), Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities), Vtmpd (complex IV activity), together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0), were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P < 0.0001), Vsucc (−65%; P < 0.0001), and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P < 0.001). Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0) was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P < 0.001). Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P < 0.05) and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P < 0.001). Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient's vulnerability to stroke. PMID:25654095

  5. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase Modifier Subunit (Gclm) Null Mice Have Increased Ovarian Oxidative Stress and Accelerated Age-Related Ovarian Failure.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinhwan; Nakamura, Brooke N; Mohar, Isaac; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Luderer, Ulrike

    2015-09-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the one of the most abundant intracellular antioxidants. Mice lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (Gclm), the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis, have decreased GSH. Our prior work showed that GSH plays antiapoptotic roles in ovarian follicles. We hypothesized that Gclm(-/-) mice have accelerated ovarian aging due to ovarian oxidative stress. We found significantly decreased ovarian GSH concentrations and oxidized GSH/oxidized glutathione redox potential in Gclm(-/-) vs Gclm(+/+) ovaries. Prepubertal Gclm(-/-) and Gclm(+/+) mice had similar numbers of ovarian follicles, and as expected, the total number of ovarian follicles declined with age in both genotypes. However, the rate of decline in follicles was significantly more rapid in Gclm(-/-) mice, and this was driven by accelerated declines in primordial follicles, which constitute the ovarian reserve. We found significantly increased 4-hydroxynonenal immunostaining (oxidative lipid damage marker) and significantly increased nitrotyrosine immunostaining (oxidative protein damage marker) in prepubertal and adult Gclm(-/-) ovaries compared with controls. The percentage of small ovarian follicles with increased granulosa cell proliferation was significantly higher in prepubertal and 2-month-old Gclm(-/-) vs Gclm(+/+) ovaries, indicating accelerated recruitment of primordial follicles into the growing pool. The percentages of growing follicles with apoptotic granulosa cells were increased in young adult ovaries. Our results demonstrate increased ovarian oxidative stress and oxidative damage in young Gclm(-/-) mice, associated with an accelerated decline in ovarian follicles that appears to be mediated by increased recruitment of follicles into the growing pool, followed by apoptosis at later stages of follicular development. PMID:26083875

  6. MATERNAL TOBACCO USE IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED MARKERS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS IN THE PLACENTA

    PubMed Central

    SBRANA, Elena; SUTER, Melissa A.; ABRAMOVICI, Adi R.; HAWKINS, Hal K.; MOSS, Joan E.; PATTERSON, Lauren; SHOPE, Cynthia; AAGAARD-TILLERY, Kjersti

    2011-01-01

    Objective We sought to extend our prior observations and histopathologically characterize key metabolic enzymes (CYP1A1) with markers of oxidative damage in placental sections from smokers. Study Design Placental specimens were collected from term singleton deliveries from smokers (n=10) and non-smokers (n=10), and subjected to detailed histopathologic examination. To quantify the extent of oxidative damage, masked score-graded (0–6) histopathology against 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanisine (8-OHdG) was performed. Minimal significance (p<0.05) was determined with Fisher’s-exact and two-tailed T-test as appropriate. Results We observed a significant increase in the presence of syncytial knots in placentas from smokers (70% versus 10%, p=0.02). These gross observations were accompanied by significant aberrant placental aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism (increased CYP1A1, 4.4 vs. 2.1, p=0.002) alongside evidence of oxidative damage (4-HNE 3.4 vs. 1.1, p=0.00005; 8-OHdG 4.9 vs. 3.1, p=0.0038). Conclusions We observe a strong association between maternal tobacco use and aberrant placental metabolism, syncytial knot formation, and multiple markers of oxidative damage. PMID:21803321

  7. Increased plasma peroxides as a marker of oxidative stress in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS)

    PubMed Central

    Maes, Michael; Kubera, Marta; Uytterhoeven, Marc; Vrydags, Nicolas; Bosmans, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background There is evidence that myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is characterized by activation of immune, inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress (IO&NS) pathways. The present study was carried out in order to examine whether ME/CFS is accompanied by increased levels of plasma peroxides and serum oxidized LDL (oxLDL) antibodies, two biomarkers of oxidative stress. Material/Methods Blood was collected from 56 patients with ME/CFS and 37 normal volunteers. Severity of ME/CFS was measured using the Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (FF) Rating Scale. Results Plasma peroxide concentrations were significantly higher in patients with ME/CFS than in normal controls. There was a trend towards significantly higher serum oxLDL antibodies in ME/CFS than in controls. Both biomarkers contributed significantly in discriminating between patients with ME/CFS and normal controls. Plasma peroxide and serum oxLDL antibody levels were both significantly related to one of the FF symptoms. Conclusions The results show that ME/CFS is characterized by increased oxidative stress. PMID:21455120

  8. Increased activity of osteocyte autophagy in ovariectomized rats and its correlation with oxidative stress status and bone loss

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuehua Zheng, Xinfeng Li, Bo Jiang, Shengdan Jiang, Leisheng

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Examine autophagy level in the proximal tibia of ovariectomized rats. • Investigate whether autophagy level is associated with bone loss. • Investigate whether autophagy level is associated with oxidative stress status. - Abstract: Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to investigate ovariectomy on autophagy level in the bone and to examine whether autophagy level is associated with bone loss and oxidative stress status. Methods: 36 female Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operated (Sham), and ovariectomized (OVX) rats treated either with vehicle or 17-β-estradiol. At the end of the six-week treatment, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone micro-architecture in proximal tibias were assessed by micro-CT. Serum 17β-estradiol (E2) level were measured. Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, catalase (CAT) activity in proximal tibia was also determined. The osteocyte autophagy in proximal tibias was detected respectively by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescent histochemistry (IH), realtime-PCR and Western blot. In addition, the spearman correlation between bone mass, oxidative stress status, serum E2 and autophagy were analyzed. Results: Ovariectomy increased Atg5, LC3, and Beclin1 mRNA and proteins expressions while decreased p62 expression. Ovariectomy also declined the activities of T-AOC, CAT, and SOD. Treatment with E2 prevented the reduction in bone mass as well as restored the autophagy level. Furthermore, LC3-II expression was inversely correlated with T-AOC, CAT, and SOD activities. A significant inverse correlation between LC3-II expression and BV/TV, Tb.N, BMD in proximal tibias was found. Conclusions: Ovariectomy induced oxidative stress, autophagy and bone loss. Autophagy of osteocyte was inversely correlated with oxidative stress status and bone loss.

  9. Increased resistance to oxidative stress in transgenic plants that overexpress chloroplastic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A S; Heinen, J L; Holaday, A S; Burke, J J; Allen, R D

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants that express a chimeric gene that encodes chloroplast-localized Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) from pea have been developed. To investigate whether increased expression of chloroplast-targeted SOD could alter the resistance of photosynthesis to environmental stress, these plants were subjected to chilling temperatures and moderate (500 mumol of quanta per m2 per s) or high (1500 mumol of quanta per m2 per s) light intensity. During exposure to moderate stress, transgenic SOD plants retained rates of photosynthesis approximately 20% higher than untransformed tobacco plants, implicating active oxygen species in the reduction of photosynthesis during chilling. Unlike untransformed plants, transgenic SOD plants were capable of maintaining nearly 90% of their photosynthetic capacity (determined by their photosynthetic rates at 25 degrees C) following exposure to chilling at high light intensity for 4 hr. These plants also showed reduced levels of light-mediated cellular damage from the superoxide-generating herbicide methyl viologen. These results demonstrate that SOD is a critical component of the active-oxygen-scavenging system of plant chloroplasts and indicate that modification of SOD expression in transgenic plants can improve plant stress tolerance. Images PMID:8434026

  10. Complex I and complex III inhibition specifically increase cytosolic hydrogen peroxide levels without inducing oxidative stress in HEK293 cells

    PubMed Central

    Forkink, Marleen; Basit, Farhan; Teixeira, José; Swarts, Herman G.; Koopman, Werner J.H.; Willems, Peter H.G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor studies with isolated mitochondria demonstrated that complex I (CI) and III (CIII) of the electron transport chain (ETC) can act as relevant sources of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we studied ROS generation and oxidative stress induction during chronic (24 h) inhibition of CI and CIII using rotenone (ROT) and antimycin A (AA), respectively, in intact HEK293 cells. Both inhibitors stimulated oxidation of the ROS sensor hydroethidine (HEt) and increased mitochondrial NAD(P)H levels without major effects on cell viability. Integrated analysis of cells stably expressing cytosolic- or mitochondria-targeted variants of the reporter molecules HyPer (H2O2-sensitive and pH-sensitive) and SypHer (H2O2-insensitive and pH-sensitive), revealed that CI- and CIII inhibition increased cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels. Total and mitochondria-specific lipid peroxidation was not increased in the inhibited cells as reported by the C11-BODIPY581/591 and MitoPerOx biosensors. Also expression of the superoxide-detoxifying enzymes CuZnSOD (cytosolic) and MnSOD (mitochondrial) was not affected. Oxyblot analysis revealed that protein carbonylation was not stimulated by CI and CIII inhibition. Our findings suggest that chronic inhibition of CI and CIII: (i) increases the levels of HEt-oxidizing ROS and (ii) specifically elevates cytosolic but not mitochondrial H2O2 levels, (iii) does not induce oxidative stress or substantial cell death. We conclude that the increased ROS levels are below the stress-inducing level and might play a role in redox signaling. PMID:26516986

  11. Increased ANG II sensitivity following recovery from acute kidney injury: role of oxidant stress in skeletal muscle resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Shane A.; Pechman, Kimberly R.; Leonard, Ellen C.; Friedrich, Jessica L.; Bian, Jing-Tan; Beal, Alisa G.

    2010-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) results in prolonged impairment of peripheral (i.e., nonrenal) vascular function since skeletal muscle resistance arteries derived from rats 5 wk post-I/R injury, show enhanced responses to ANG II stimulation but not other constrictors. Because vascular superoxide increases ANG II sensitivity, we hypothesized that peripheral responsiveness following recovery from AKI was attributable to vascular oxidant stress. Gracilis arteries (GA) isolated from post-I/R rats (∼5 wk recovery) showed significantly greater superoxide levels relative to sham-operated controls, as detected by dihydroeithidium, which was further augmented by acute ANG II stimulation in vitro. Hydrogen peroxide measured by dichlorofluorescein was not affected by ANG II. GA derived from postischemic animals manifested significantly greater constrictor responses in vitro to ANG II than GA from sham-operated controls. The addition of the superoxide scavenging reagent Tempol (10−5 M) normalized the response to values similar to sham-operated controls. Apocynin (10−6 M) and endothelial denudation nearly abrogated all ANG II-stimulated constrictor activity in GA from post-AKI rats, suggesting an important role for an endothelial-derived source of peripheral oxidative stress. Apocynin treatment in vivo abrogated GA oxidant stress and attenuated ANG II-induced pressor responses post-AKI. Interestingly, gene expression studies in GA vessels indicated a paradoxical reduction in NADPH oxidase subunit and AT1-receptor genes and no effect on several antioxidant genes. Taken together, this study demonstrates that AKI alters peripheral vascular responses by increasing oxidant stress, likely in the endothelium, via an undefined mechanism. PMID:20335375

  12. Overexpression of Heat Shock Factor Gene HsfA3 Increases Galactinol Levels and Oxidative Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Song, Chieun; Chung, Woo Sik; Lim, Chae Oh

    2016-06-30

    Heat shock factors (Hsfs) are central regulators of abiotic stress responses, especially heat stress responses, in plants. In the current study, we characterized the activity of the Hsf gene HsfA3 in Arabidopsis under oxidative stress conditions. HsfA3 transcription in seedlings was induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS), exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and an endogenous H2O2 propagator, 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB). HsfA3-overexpressing transgenic plants exhibited increased oxidative stress tolerance compared to untransformed wild-type plants (WT), as revealed by changes in fresh weight, chlorophyll fluorescence, and ion leakage under light conditions. The expression of several genes encoding galactinol synthase (GolS), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs), which function as antioxidants in plant cells, was induced in HsfA3 overexpressors. In addition, galactinol levels were higher in HsfA3 overexpressors than in WT under unstressed conditions. In transient transactivation assays using Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts, HsfA3 activated the transcription of a reporter gene driven by the GolS1 or GolS2 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that GolS1 and GolS2 are directly regulated by HsfA3. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that GolS1 and GolS2 are directly regulated by HsfA3 and that GolS enzymes play an important role in improving oxidative stress tolerance by increasing galactinol biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:27109422

  13. Overexpression of Heat Shock Factor Gene HsfA3 Increases Galactinol Levels and Oxidative Stress Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chieun; Chung, Woo Sik; Lim, Chae Oh

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock factors (Hsfs) are central regulators of abiotic stress responses, especially heat stress responses, in plants. In the current study, we characterized the activity of the Hsf gene HsfA3 in Arabidopsis under oxidative stress conditions. HsfA3 transcription in seedlings was induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS), exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and an endogenous H2O2 propagator, 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-p-benzoquinone (DBMIB). HsfA3-overexpressing transgenic plants exhibited increased oxidative stress tolerance compared to untransformed wild-type plants (WT), as revealed by changes in fresh weight, chlorophyll fluorescence, and ion leakage under light conditions. The expression of several genes encoding galactinol synthase (GolS), a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs), which function as antioxidants in plant cells, was induced in HsfA3 overexpressors. In addition, galactinol levels were higher in HsfA3 overexpressors than in WT under unstressed conditions. In transient transactivation assays using Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts, HsfA3 activated the transcription of a reporter gene driven by the GolS1 or GolS2 promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that GolS1 and GolS2 are directly regulated by HsfA3. Taken together, these findings provide evidence that GolS1 and GolS2 are directly regulated by HsfA3 and that GolS enzymes play an important role in improving oxidative stress tolerance by increasing galactinol biosynthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:27109422

  14. Oxidative stress is increased in critically ill patients according to antioxidant vitamins intake, independent of severity: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Abilés, Jimena; de la Cruz, Antonio Pérez; Castaño, José; Rodríguez-Elvira, Manuel; Aguayo, Eduardo; Moreno-Torres, Rosario; Llopis, Juan; Aranda, Pilar; Argüelles, Sandro; Ayala, Antonio; de la Quintana, Alberto Machado; Planells, Elena Maria

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Critically ill patients suffer from oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Although ROS/RNS are constantly produced under normal circumstances, critical illness can drastically increase their production. These patients have reduced plasma and intracellular levels of antioxidants and free electron scavengers or cofactors, and decreased activity of the enzymatic system involved in ROS detoxification. The pro-oxidant/antioxidant balance is of functional relevance during critical illness because it is involved in the pathogenesis of multiple organ failure. In this study the objective was to evaluate the relation between oxidative stress in critically ill patients and antioxidant vitamin intake and severity of illness. Methods Spectrophotometry was used to measure in plasma the total antioxidant capacity and levels of lipid peroxide, carbonyl group, total protein, bilirubin and uric acid at two time points: at intensive care unit (ICU) admission and on day seven. Daily diet records were kept and compliance with recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of antioxidant vitamins (A, C and E) was assessed. Results Between admission and day seven in the ICU, significant increases in lipid peroxide and carbonyl group were associated with decreased antioxidant capacity and greater deterioration in Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score. There was significantly greater worsening in oxidative stress parameters in patients who received antioxidant vitamins at below 66% of RDA than in those who received antioxidant vitamins at above 66% of RDA. An antioxidant vitamin intake from 66% to 100% of RDA reduced the risk for worsening oxidative stress by 94% (ods ratio 0.06, 95% confidence interval 0.010 to 0.39), regardless of change in severity of illness (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score). Conclusion The critical condition of patients admitted to the ICU is associated with worsening oxidative stress. Intake of

  15. High Dietary Iron and Radiation Exposure Increase Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Blood and Liver of Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Theriot, Corey A.; Wu, Honglu; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure and increased iron (Fe) status independently cause oxidative damage that can result in protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation. During space flight astronauts are exposed to both increased radiation and increased Fe stores. Increased body Fe results from a decrease in red blood cell mass and the typically high Fe content of the food system. In this study we investigated the combined effects of radiation exposure (0.375 Gy of Cs-137 every other day for 16 days for a total of 3 Gy) and high dietary Fe (650 mg Fe/kg diet compared to 45 mg Fe/kg for controls) in Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Liver and serum Fe were significantly increased in the high dietary Fe groups. Likewise, radiation treatment increased serum ferritin and Fe concentrations. These data indicate that total body Fe stores increase with both radiation exposure and excess dietary Fe. Hematocrit decreased in the group exposed to radiation, providing a possible mechanism for the shift in Fe indices after radiation exposure. Markers of oxidative stress were also affected by both radiation and high dietary Fe, evidenced by increased liver glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and serum catalase as well as decreased serum GPX. We thus found preliminary indications of synergistic effects of radiation exposure and increased dietary Fe, warranting further study. This study was funded by the NASA Human Research Project.

  16. Oxidative stress in autism.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved

    2006-08-01

    Autism is a severe developmental disorder with poorly understood etiology. Oxidative stress in autism has been studied at the membrane level and also by measuring products of lipid peroxidation, detoxifying agents (such as glutathione), and antioxidants involved in the defense system against reactive oxygen species (ROS). Lipid peroxidation markers are elevated in autism, indicating that oxidative stress is increased in this disease. Levels of major antioxidant serum proteins, namely transferrin (iron-binding protein) and ceruloplasmin (copper-binding protein), are decreased in children with autism. There is a positive correlation between reduced levels of these proteins and loss of previously acquired language skills in children with autism. The alterations in ceruloplasmin and transferrin levels may lead to abnormal iron and copper metabolism in autism. The membrane phospholipids, the prime target of ROS, are also altered in autism. The levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) are decreased, and phosphatidylserine (PS) levels are increased in the erythrocyte membrane of children with autism as compared to their unaffected siblings. Several studies have suggested alterations in the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in autism. Additionally, altered glutathione levels and homocysteine/methionine metabolism, increased inflammation, excitotoxicity, as well as mitochondrial and immune dysfunction have been suggested in autism. Furthermore, environmental and genetic factors may increase vulnerability to oxidative stress in autism. Taken together, these studies suggest increased oxidative stress in autism that may contribute to the development of this disease. A mechanism linking oxidative stress with membrane lipid abnormalities, inflammation, aberrant immune response, impaired energy metabolism and excitotoxicity, leading to clinical symptoms and pathogenesis of autism is proposed. PMID:16766163

  17. Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus of diabetic male mice in the insulin receptor substrate-2 knockout model.

    PubMed

    Baquedano, Eva; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Canelles, Sandra; González-Rodríguez, Agueda; Chowen, Julie A; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente; Valverde, Angela M; Frago, Laura M

    2016-05-01

    Insulin receptor substrate-2-deficient (IRS2(-/-)) mice are considered a good model to study the development of diabetes because IRS proteins mediate the pleiotropic effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on metabolism, mitogenesis and cell survival. The hypothalamus might play a key role in the early onset of diabetes, owing to its involvement in the control of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Because some inflammatory markers are elevated in the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice, our aim was to analyze whether the diabetes associated with the absence of IRS2 results in hypothalamic injury and to analyze the intracellular mechanisms involved. Only diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice showed increased cell death and activation of caspase-8 and -3 in the hypothalamus. Regulators of apoptosis such as FADD, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and p53 were also increased, whereas p-IκB and c-FLIPL were decreased. This was accompanied by increased levels of Nox-4 and catalase, enzymes involved in oxidative stress. In summary, the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice showed an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers that finally resulted in cell death via substantial activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conversely, non-diabetic IRS2(-/-) mice did not show cell death in the hypothalamus, possibly owing to an increase in the levels of circulating IGF-I and in the enhanced hypothalamic IGF-IR phosphorylation that would lead to the stimulation of survival pathways. In conclusion, diabetes in IRS2-deficient male mice is associated with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus. PMID:27013528

  18. Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus of diabetic male mice in the insulin receptor substrate-2 knockout model

    PubMed Central

    Canelles, Sandra; Argente, Jesús; Barrios, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insulin receptor substrate-2-deficient (IRS2−/−) mice are considered a good model to study the development of diabetes because IRS proteins mediate the pleiotropic effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin on metabolism, mitogenesis and cell survival. The hypothalamus might play a key role in the early onset of diabetes, owing to its involvement in the control of glucose homeostasis and energy balance. Because some inflammatory markers are elevated in the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2−/− mice, our aim was to analyze whether the diabetes associated with the absence of IRS2 results in hypothalamic injury and to analyze the intracellular mechanisms involved. Only diabetic IRS2−/− mice showed increased cell death and activation of caspase-8 and -3 in the hypothalamus. Regulators of apoptosis such as FADD, Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and p53 were also increased, whereas p-IκB and c-FLIPL were decreased. This was accompanied by increased levels of Nox-4 and catalase, enzymes involved in oxidative stress. In summary, the hypothalamus of diabetic IRS2−/− mice showed an increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers that finally resulted in cell death via substantial activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Conversely, non-diabetic IRS2−/− mice did not show cell death in the hypothalamus, possibly owing to an increase in the levels of circulating IGF-I and in the enhanced hypothalamic IGF-IR phosphorylation that would lead to the stimulation of survival pathways. In conclusion, diabetes in IRS2-deficient male mice is associated with increased oxidative stress and apoptosis in the hypothalamus. PMID:27013528

  19. Acute laminar shear stress reversibly increases human glomerular endothelial cell permeability via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Heather S; Slater, Sadie C; Clarke, Hayley; Cahill, Paul A; Mathieson, Peter W; Welsh, Gavin I; Satchell, Simon C

    2011-10-01

    Laminar shear stress is a key determinant of systemic vascular behavior, including through activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), but little is known of its role in the glomerulus. We confirmed eNOS expression by glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC) in tissue sections and examined effects of acute exposure (up to 24 h) to physiologically relevant levels of laminar shear stress (10-20 dyn/cm(2)) in conditionally immortalized human GEnC. Laminar shear stress caused an orientation of GEnC and stress fibers parallel to the direction of flow and induced Akt and eNOS phosphorylation along with NO production. Inhibition of the phophatidylinositol (PI)3-kinase/Akt pathway attenuated laminar shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Laminar shear stress of 10 dyn/cm(2) had a dramatic effect on GEnC permeability, reversibly decreasing the electrical resistance across GEnC monolayers. Finally, the laminar shear stress-induced reduction in electrical resistance was attenuated by the NOS inhibitors l-N(G)-monomethyl arginine (l-NMMA) and l-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and also by inhibition of the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Hence we have shown for GEnC in vitro that acute permeability responses to laminar shear stress are dependent on NO, produced via activation of the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway and increased eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest the importance of laminar shear stress and NO in regulating the contribution of GEnC to the permeability properties of the glomerular capillary wall. PMID:21775480

  20. Increased tolerance to salt stress in OPDA-deficient rice ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE mutants is linked to an increased ROS-scavenging activity

    PubMed Central

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress represents a global constraint for rice, the most important staple food worldwide. Therefore the role of the central stress signal jasmonate for the salt response was analysed in rice comparing the responses to salt stress for two jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis rice mutants (cpm2 and hebiba) impaired in the function of ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) and their wild type. The aoc mutants were less sensitive to salt stress. Interestingly, both mutants accumulated smaller amounts of Na+ ions in their leaves, and showed better scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Leaves of the wild type and JA mutants accumulated similar levels of abscisic acid (ABA) under stress conditions, and the levels of JA and its amino acid conjugate, JA–isoleucine (JA-Ile), showed only subtle alterations in the wild type. In contrast, the wild type responded to salt stress by strong induction of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), which was not observed in the mutants. Transcript levels of representative salinity-induced genes were induced less in the JA mutants. The absence of 12-OPDA in the mutants correlated not only with a generally increased ROS-scavenging activity, but also with the higher activity of specific enzymes in the antioxidative pathway, such as glutathione S-transferase, and fewer symptoms of damage as, for example, indicated by lower levels of malondialdehyde. The data are interpreted in a model where the absence of OPDA enhanced the antioxidative power in mutant leaves. PMID:25873666

  1. Suppression of Cytosolic NADPH Pool by Thionicotinamide Increases Oxidative Stress and Synergizes with Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tedeschi, Philip M; Lin, HongXia; Gounder, Murugesan; Kerrigan, John E; Abali, Emine Ercikan; Scotto, Kathleen; Bertino, Joseph R

    2015-10-01

    NAD(+) kinase (NADK) is the only known cytosolic enzyme that converts NAD(+) to NADP(+), which is subsequently reduced to NADPH. The demand for NADPH in cancer cells is elevated as reducing equivalents are required for the high levels of nucleotide, protein, and fatty acid synthesis found in proliferating cells as well as for neutralizing high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We determined whether inhibition of NADK activity is a valid anticancer strategy alone and in combination with chemotherapeutic drugs known to induce ROS. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of NADK with either small-hairpin RNA or thionicotinamide inhibited proliferation. Thionicotinamide enhanced the ROS produced by several chemotherapeutic drugs and produced synergistic cell kill. NADK inhibitors alone or in combination with drugs that increase ROS-mediated stress may represent an efficacious antitumor combination and should be explored further. PMID:26219913

  2. The Adaptogens Rhodiola and Schizandra Modify the Response to Immobilization Stress in Rabbits by Suppressing the Increase of Phosphorylated Stress-activated Protein Kinase, Nitric Oxide and Cortisol

    PubMed Central

    Panossian, Alexander; Hambardzumyan, Marina; Hovhanissyan, Areg; Wikman, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Adaptogens possess anti-fatigue and anti-stress activities that can increase mental and physical working performance against a background of fatigue or stress. The aim of the present study was to ascertain which mediators of stress response are significantly involved in the mechanisms of action of adaptogens, and to determine their relevance as biochemical markers for evaluating anti-stress effects in rabbits subjected to restraint stress. Blood levels of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK), the phosphorylated kinase p-SAPK/p-JNK, nitric oxide (NO), cortisol, testosterone, prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4 and thromboxane B2 were determined in groups of animals prior to daily oral administration of placebo, rhodioloside or extracts of Eleutherococcus senticosus, Schizandra chinensis, Rhodiola rosea, Bryonia alba and Panax ginseng over a 7 day period. Ten minutes after the final treatment, animals were immobilized for 2 hours and blood levels of the markers re-determined. In the placebo group, only p-SAPK/p-JNK, NO and cortisol were increased significantly (by 200–300% cf basal levels) following restraint stress, whilst in animals that had received multiple doses of adaptogens/stress-protectors, the levels of NO and cortisol remained practically unchanged after acute stress. Rhodioloside and extracts of S. chinensis and R. rosea were the most active inhibitors of stress-induced p-SAPK/p-JNK. E. senticosus, B. alba and P. ginseng exerted little effect on p-SAPK/p-JNK levels. It is suggested that the inhibitory effects of R. rosea and S. chinensis on p-SAPK/p-JNK activation may be associated with their antidepressant activity as well as their positive effects on mental performance under stress. PMID:21901061

  3. Chronic oxidative stress increases the integration frequency of foreign DNA and human papillomavirus 16 in human keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen Wongworawat, Yan; Filippova, Maria; Williams, Vonetta M; Filippov, Valery; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer, and the fourth most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Nearly all of these cases are caused by high-risk HPVs (HR HPVs), of which HPV16 is the most prevalent type. In most cervical cancer specimens, HR HPVs are found integrated into the human genome, indicating that integration is a key event in cervical tumor development. An understanding of the mechanisms that promote integration may therefore represent a unique opportunity to intercept carcinogenesis. To begin identifying these mechanisms, we tested the hypothesis that chronic oxidative stress (OS) induced by virus- and environmentallymediated factors can induce DNA damage, and thereby increase the frequency with which HPV integrates into the host genome. We found that virus-mediated factors are likely involved, as expression of E6*, a splice isoform of HPV16 E6, increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), caused oxidative DNA damage, and increased the frequency of plasmid DNA integration as assessed by colony formation assays. To assess the influence of environmentally induced chronic OS, we used L-Buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) to lower the level of the intracellular antioxidant glutathione. Similar to our observations with E6*, glutathione depletion by BSO also increased ROS levels, caused oxidative DNA damage and increased the integration frequency of plasmid DNA. Finally, under conditions of chronic OS, we were able to induce and characterize a few independent events in which episomal HPV16 integrated into the host genome of cervical keratinocytes. Our results support a chain of events leading from induction of oxidative stress, to DNA damage, to viral integration, and ultimately to carcinogenesis. PMID:27186429

  4. Chronic oxidative stress increases the integration frequency of foreign DNA and human papillomavirus 16 in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen Wongworawat, Yan; Filippova, Maria; Williams, Vonetta M; Filippov, Valery; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer, and the fourth most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Nearly all of these cases are caused by high-risk HPVs (HR HPVs), of which HPV16 is the most prevalent type. In most cervical cancer specimens, HR HPVs are found integrated into the human genome, indicating that integration is a key event in cervical tumor development. An understanding of the mechanisms that promote integration may therefore represent a unique opportunity to intercept carcinogenesis. To begin identifying these mechanisms, we tested the hypothesis that chronic oxidative stress (OS) induced by virus- and environmentallymediated factors can induce DNA damage, and thereby increase the frequency with which HPV integrates into the host genome. We found that virus-mediated factors are likely involved, as expression of E6*, a splice isoform of HPV16 E6, increased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), caused oxidative DNA damage, and increased the frequency of plasmid DNA integration as assessed by colony formation assays. To assess the influence of environmentally induced chronic OS, we used L-Buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) to lower the level of the intracellular antioxidant glutathione. Similar to our observations with E6*, glutathione depletion by BSO also increased ROS levels, caused oxidative DNA damage and increased the integration frequency of plasmid DNA. Finally, under conditions of chronic OS, we were able to induce and characterize a few independent events in which episomal HPV16 integrated into the host genome of cervical keratinocytes. Our results support a chain of events leading from induction of oxidative stress, to DNA damage, to viral integration, and ultimately to carcinogenesis. PMID:27186429

  5. Effects of increased temperature on metabolic activity and oxidative stress in the first life stages of marble trout (Salmo marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Simčič, Tatjana; Jesenšek, Dušan; Brancelj, Anton

    2015-08-01

    Climate change may result in future alterations in thermal regime which could markedly affect the early developmental stages of cold water fish due to their expected high sensitivity to increasing temperature. In the present study, the effect of temperature increase of 2, 4 and 6°C on the oxygen consumption rate (R), the activity of respiratory electron transport system (ETS) and oxidative stress have been studied in four developmental stages of the marble trout (Salmo marmoratus)-eyed eggs, yolk-sac larvae and juveniles of 1 and 3 months. Oxygen consumption rate and ETS activity increased with level of development and with temperature in all four stages. ETS/R ratios decreased during development and correlated with temperature in eyed eggs, larvae and juveniles of 1 month, but not in juveniles of 3 months. Low ETS/R ratios at higher temperatures indicate stress response in eyed eggs, the most temperature sensitive developmental stage. Catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities increased during development, but responded differently to elevated temperature in the different developmental stages. Stress in eyed eggs, caused by higher temperatures, resulted in increased oxygen consumption rate and increased activities of CAT and GR. Larvae were sensitive to increased temperature only at the highest experimental temperature of 16°C. Increased temperature did not stress the metabolism of the juveniles, since they were able to compensate their metabolic activity. The earlier developmental stages of marble trout are thus more sensitive to temperature increase than juveniles and therefore more endangered by higher water temperatures. This is the first report connecting oxygen consumption, ETS activity and ETS/R ratio with the activities of antioxidant enzymes in relation to increased temperature in salmonids. PMID:25935664

  6. Saikosaponin-D attenuates heat stress-induced oxidative damage in LLC-PK1 cells by increasing the expression of anti-oxidant enzymes and HSP72.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-Zhen; Guo, Xiao-Tong; Chen, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Yuan; Cong, Xia; Jiang, Zhong-Ling; Cao, Rong-Feng; Cui, Kai; Gao, Shan-Song; Tian, Wen-Ru

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which cause oxidative damage in the kidney. This study clarifies the mechanism by which saikosaponin-d (SSd), which is extracted from the roots of Bupleurum falcatum L, protects heat-stressed pig kidney proximal tubular (LLC-PK1) cells against oxidative damage. SSd alone is not cytotoxic at concentrations of 1 or 3 μg/mL as demonstrated by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. To assess the effects of SSd on heat stress-induced cellular damage, LLC-PK1 cells were pretreated with various concentrations of SSd, heat stressed at 42°C for 1 h, and then returned to 37°C for 9 h. DNA ladder and MTT assays demonstrated that SSd helped to prevent heat stress-induced cellular damage when compared to untreated cells. Additionally, pretreatment with SSd increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) but decreased the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) in a dose-dependent manner when compared to controls. Furthermore, real-time PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated that SSd significantly increased the expression of copper and zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), CAT, GPx-1 and heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) at both the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these results are the first to demonstrate that SSd ameliorates heat stress-induced oxidative damage by modulating the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes and HSP72 in LLC-PK1 cells. PMID:25169909

  7. Oxidative Stress Attenuates Lipid Synthesis and Increases Mitochondrial Fatty Acid Oxidation in Hepatoma Cells Infected with Hepatitis C Virus.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Donna N; Pu, Christopher Hao; Lewis, Jamie T; Bhat, Rakesh; Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Logan, Michael; Lund, Garry; Addison, William R; Lehner, Richard; Kneteman, Norman M

    2016-01-22

    Cytopathic effects are currently believed to contribute to hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced liver injury and are readily observed in Huh7.5 cells infected with the JFH-1 HCV strain, manifesting as apoptosis highly correlated with growth arrest. Reactive oxygen species, which are induced by HCV infection, have recently emerged as activators of AMP-activated protein kinase. The net effect is ATP conservation via on/off switching of metabolic pathways that produce/consume ATP. Depending on the scenario, this can have either pro-survival or pro-apoptotic effects. We demonstrate reactive oxygen species-mediated activation of AMP-activated kinase in Huh7.5 cells during HCV (JFH-1)-induced growth arrest. Metabolic labeling experiments provided direct evidence that lipid synthesis is attenuated, and β-oxidation is enhanced in these cells. A striking increase in nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, which plays a dominant role in the expression of β-oxidation genes after ligand-induced activation, was also observed, and we provide evidence that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α is constitutively activated in these cells. The combination of attenuated lipid synthesis and enhanced β-oxidation is not conducive to lipid accumulation, yet cellular lipids still accumulated during this stage of infection. Notably, the serum in the culture media was the only available source for polyunsaturated fatty acids, which were elevated (2-fold) in the infected cells, implicating altered lipid import/export pathways in these cells. This study also provided the first in vivo evidence for enhanced β-oxidation during HCV infection because HCV-infected SCID/Alb-uPA mice accumulated higher plasma ketones while fasting than did control mice. Overall, this study highlights the reprogramming of hepatocellular lipid metabolism and bioenergetics during HCV infection, which are predicted to impact both the HCV life cycle and pathogenesis. PMID:26627833

  8. Oxidative stress by inorganic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tee, Jie Kai; Ong, Choon Nam; Bay, Boon Huat; Ho, Han Kiat; Leong, David Tai

    2016-05-01

    Metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been increasingly used for various bio-applications owing to their unique physiochemical properties in terms of conductivity, optical sensitivity, and reactivity. With the extensive usage of NPs, increased human exposure may cause oxidative stress and lead to undesirable health consequences. To date, various endogenous and exogenous sources of oxidants contributing to oxidative stress have been widely reported. Oxidative stress is generally defined as an imbalance between the production of oxidants and the activity of antioxidants, but it is often misrepresented as a single type of cellular stress. At the biological level, NPs can initiate oxidative stress directly or indirectly through various mechanisms, leading to profound effects ranging from the molecular to the disease level. Such effects of oxidative stress have been implicated owing to their small size and high biopersistence. On the other hand, cellular antioxidants help to counteract oxidative stress and protect the cells from further damage. While oxidative stress is commonly known to exert negative biological effects, measured and intentional use of NPs to induce oxidative stress may provide desirable effects to either stimulate cell growth or promote cell death. Hence, NP-induced oxidative stress can be viewed from a wide paradigm. Because oxidative stress is comprised of a wide array of factors, it is also important to use appropriate assays and methods to detect different pro-oxidant and antioxidant species at molecular and disease levels. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:414-438. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1374 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26359790

  9. Iron-Superoxide Dismutase Expression in Transgenic Alfalfa Increases Winter Survival without a Detectable Increase in Photosynthetic Oxidative Stress Tolerance1

    PubMed Central

    McKersie, Bryan D.; Murnaghan, Julia; Jones, Kim S.; Bowley, Stephen R.

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether overexpression of Fe-superoxide (SOD) dismutase would increase superoxide-scavenging capacity and thereby improve the winter survival of transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) plants, two genotypes were transformed with the vector pEXSOD10, which contains a cDNA for Arabidopsis Fe-SOD with a chloroplast transit peptide and cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. A novel Fe-SOD was detected by native PAGE in both greenhouse- and field-grown transgenic plants, but activity varied among independent transgenic plants. The increased Fe-SOD activity was associated with increased winter survival over 2 years in field trials, but not with oxidative stress tolerance as measured by resistance of leaves to methyl viologen, a superoxide generator. Total shoot dry matter production over 2 harvest years was not associated with Fe-SOD activity. There was no detectable difference in the pattern of primary freezing injury, as shown by vital staining, nor was there additional accumulation of carbohydrates in field-acclimated roots of the transgenic alfalfa plants. We did not detect any difference in growth of one transgenic plant with high Fe-SOD activity compared with a non-transgenic control. Therefore, the improvement in winter survival did not appear to be a consequence of improved oxidative stress tolerance associated with photosynthesis, nor was it a consequence of a change in primary freezing injury. We suggest that Fe-SOD overexpression reduced secondary injury symptoms and thereby enhanced recovery from stresses experienced during winter. PMID:10759538

  10. Anti-inflammatory Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 strain protects against oxidative stress and increases lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Grompone, Gianfranco; Martorell, Patricia; Llopis, Silvia; González, Núria; Genovés, Salvador; Mulet, Ana Paula; Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Tiscornia, Inés; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Chambaud, Isabelle; Foligné, Benoit; Montserrat, Agustín; Ramón, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that resistance to oxidative stress is crucial to stay healthy and to reduce the adverse effects of aging. Accordingly, nutritional interventions using antioxidant food-grade compounds or food products are currently an interesting option to help improve health and quality of life in the elderly. Live lactic acid bacteria (LAB) administered in food, such as probiotics, may be good antioxidant candidates. Nevertheless, information about LAB-induced oxidative stress protection is scarce. To identify and characterize new potential antioxidant probiotic strains, we have developed a new functional screening method using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as host. C. elegans were fed on different LAB strains (78 in total) and nematode viability was assessed after oxidative stress (3 mM and 5 mM H(2)O(2)). One strain, identified as Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690, protected worms by increasing their viability by 30% and, also, increased average worm lifespan by 20%. Moreover, transcriptomic analysis of C. elegans fed with this strain showed that increased lifespan is correlated with differential expression of the DAF-16/insulin-like pathway, which is highly conserved in humans. This strain also had a clear anti-inflammatory profile when co-cultured with HT-29 cells, stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, and co-culture systems with HT-29 cells and DC in the presence of LPS. Finally, this Lactobacillus strain reduced inflammation in a murine model of colitis. This work suggests that C. elegans is a fast, predictive and convenient screening tool to identify new potential antioxidant probiotic strains for subsequent use in humans. PMID:23300685

  11. Increased oxidative stress and coenzyme Q10 deficiency in juvenile fibromyalgia: amelioration of hypercholesterolemia and fatigue by ubiquinol-10 supplementation.

    PubMed

    Miyamae, Takako; Seki, Manabu; Naga, Tomoko; Uchino, Shinya; Asazuma, Haruki; Yoshida, Takuma; Iizuka, Yuki; Kikuchi, Masako; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Natsumeda, Yutaka; Yokota, Shumpei; Yamamoto, Yorihiro

    2013-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by generalized pain and chronic fatigue of unknown etiology. To evaluate the role of oxidative stress in this disorder, we measured plasma levels of ubiquinone-10, ubiquinol-10, free cholesterol (FC), cholesterol esters (CE), and free fatty acids (FFA) in patients with juvenile FM (n=10) and in healthy control subjects (n=67). Levels of FC and CE were significantly increased in juvenile FM as compared with controls, suggesting the presence of hypercholesterolemia in this disease. However, plasma level of ubiquinol-10 was significantly decreased and the ratio of ubiquinone-10 to total coenzyme Q10 (%CoQ10) was significantly increased in juvenile FM relative to healthy controls, suggesting that FM is associated with coenzyme Q10 deficiency and increased oxidative stress. Moreover, plasma level of FFA was significantly higher and the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in total FFA was significantly lower in FM than in controls, suggesting increased tissue oxidative damage in juvenile FM. Interestingly, the content of monoenoic acids, such as oleic and palmitoleic acids, was significantly increased in FM relative to controls, probably to compensate for the loss of PUFA. Next, we examined the effect of ubiquinol-10 supplementation (100 mg/day for 12 weeks) in FM patients. This resulted in an increase in coenzyme Q10 levels and a decrease in %CoQ10. No changes were observed in FFA levels or their composition. However, plasma levels of FC and CE significantly decreased and the ratio of FC to CE also significantly decreased, suggesting that ubiquinol-10 supplementation improved cholesterol metabolism. Ubiquinol-10 supplementation also improved chronic fatigue scores as measured by the Chalder Fatigue Scale. PMID:23394493

  12. Enriching the drinking water of rats with extracts of Salvia officinalis and Thymus vulgaris increases their resistance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Horváthová, Eva; Srančíková, Annamária; Regendová-Sedláčková, Eva; Melušová, Martina; Meluš, Vladimír; Netriová, Jana; Krajčovičová, Zdenka; Slameňová, Darina; Pastorek, Michal; Kozics, Katarína

    2016-01-01

    Nature is an attractive source of therapeutic compounds. In comparison to the artificial drugs, natural compounds cause less adverse side effects and are suitable for current molecularly oriented approaches to drug development and their mutual combining. Medicinal plants represent one of the most available remedy against various diseases. Proper examples are Salvia officinalis L. and Thymus vulgaris L. which are known aromatic medicinal plants. They are very popular and frequently used in many countries. The molecular mechanism of their biological activity has not yet been fully understood. The aim of this study was to ascertain if liver cells of experimental animals drinking extracts of sage or thyme will manifest increased resistance against oxidative stress. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into seven groups. They drank sage or thyme extracts for 2 weeks. At the end of the drinking period, blood samples were collected for determination of liver biochemical parameters and hepatocytes were isolated to analyze (i) oxidatively generated DNA damage (conventional and modified comet assay), (ii) activities of antioxidant enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)] and (iii) content of glutathione. Intake of sage and thyme had no effect either on the basal level of DNA damage or on the activity of SOD in rat hepatocytes and did not change the biochemical parameters of blood plasma. Simultaneously, the activity of GPx was significantly increased and the level of DNA damage induced by oxidants was decreased. Moreover, sage extract was able to start up the antioxidant protection expressed by increased content of glutathione. Our results indicate that the consumption of S.officinalis and T.vulgaris extracts positively affects resistency of rat liver cells against oxidative stress and may have hepatoprotective potential. PMID:26297740

  13. Enabling non-invasive assessment of an engineered endothelium on ePTFE vascular grafts without increasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bin; Perrin, Louisiane; Kats, Dina; Meade, Thomas; Ameer, Guillermo

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combination with contrast enhancement is a potentially powerful tool to non-invasively monitor cell distribution in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The most commonly used contrast agent for cell labeling is super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). However, uptake of SPIONs triggers the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells often leading to a pro-inflammatory phenotype. The objective of this study was to develop a labeling system to non-invasively visualize an engineered endothelium in vascular grafts without creating excessive oxidative stress. Specifically, we investigated: (1) chitosan-coated SPIONs (CSPIONs) as an antioxidant contrast agent for contrast enhancement, and (2) poly(1,8-octamethylene citrate) (POC) as an antioxidant interface to support cell adhesion and function of labeled cells on the vascular graft. While SPION-labeled endothelial cells (ECs) experienced elevated ROS formation and altered cell morphology, CSPION-labeled ECs cultured on POC-coated surfaces mitigated SPION-induced ROS formation and maintained EC morphology, phenotype, viability and functions. A monolayer of labeled ECs exhibited sufficient contrast with T2-weighed MR imaging. CSPION labeling of endothelial cells in combination with coating the graft wall with POC allows non-invasive monitoring of an engineered endothelium on ePTFE grafts without increasing oxidative stress. PMID:26283158

  14. Subacute Oxidative Stress and Glial Reactivity in the Amygdala are Associated with Increased Anxiety Following Blast Neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Hubbard, William B; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2015-08-01

    Behavioral symptoms, such as anxiety, are widely reported after blast overpressure (BOP) exposure. Amygdalar vulnerability to increasing magnitudes of BOP has not been investigated, and single exposures to blast have been limited to acute (<72 h) assessment. Rats were exposed to a single low, moderate, or high BOP (10, 14, or 24 psi) with an advanced blast simulator to test the susceptibility of the amygdala. Anxiety-like behavior was observed in the low- and moderate-pressure groups when subjected to the light/dark box assessment 7 days after the blast but not in high-pressure group. Immunohistochemistry was performed to measure apoptosis (cleaved caspase-3), neuronal loss (NeuN), reactive astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein), microglia (Iba-1), and oxidative stress (CuZn superoxide dismutase). Slower progression of injury cascades was associated with a significant increase in anxiety, apoptosis, and astrogliosis in the low pressure group compared with others. A significant increase of CuZn superoxide dismutase in the low pressure group could be associated with neuroprotection from cell death caused by oxidative stress because neuronal loss was significant in the moderate- and high- but not the low-pressure group. Overall, this study demonstrated that overpressure as low as 10 psi can induce subacute anxiety, in addition to neuropathologic changes in the amygdala. PMID:25521536

  15. Fenofibrate Improves Vascular Endothelial Function by Reducing Oxidative Stress While Increasing eNOS in Healthy Normolipidemic Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ashley E; Kaplon, Rachelle E; Lucking, Sara Marian S; Russell-Nowlan, Molly J; Eckel, Robert H; Seals, Douglas R

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial dysfunction develops with aging, as indicated by impaired endothelium-dependent dilation(EDD), and is related to increased cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that short-term treatment with fenofibrate, a lipid-lowering agent with potential pleiotropic effects, would improve EDD in middle-aged and older normolipidemic adults by reducing oxidative stress. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD), a measure of EDD, was assessed in 22healthy adults aged 50-77 years before and after 7days of fenofibrate (145 mg/d; n=12/7M) or placebo (n=10/5M). Brachial FMD was unchanged with placebo, but improved after 2 and 7 days of fenofibrate (5.1±0.7 vs. 2d: 6.0±0.7 and 7d: 6.4±0.6 %Δ; both P<0.005). The improvements in FMD after 7 days remained significant (P<0.05) after accounting for modest changes in plasma total and LDL-cholesterol. Endothelium-independent dilation was not affected by fenofibrate or placebo (P>0.05). Infusion (i.v.) of the antioxidant vitamin C improved brachial FMD at baseline in both groups and during placebo treatment (P<0.05), but not after 2 and 7 days of fenofibrate (P>0.05). Fenofibrate treatment also reduced plasma oxidized LDL, a systemic marker of oxidative stress, compared with placebo (P<0.05). In vascular endothelial cells sampled from peripheral veins of the subjects, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) protein expression was unchanged with placebo and after 2 days of fenofibrate, but was increased after 7 days of fenofibrate (0.54±0.03 vs. 2d: 0.52±0.04 and 7d: 0.76±0.11 intensity/HUVEC control; P<0.05 7d). Short-term treatment with fenofibrate improves vascular endothelial function in healthy normolipidemic middle-aged/older adults by reducing oxidative stress and induces increases in eNOS. PMID:23108655

  16. Vitamin B6 deficient plants display increased sensitivity to high light and photo-oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Havaux, Michel; Ksas, Brigitte; Szewczyk, Agnieszka; Rumeau, Dominique; Franck, Fabrice; Caffarri, Stefano; Triantaphylidès, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background Vitamin B6 is a collective term for a group of six interconvertible compounds: pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine and their phosphorylated derivatives. Vitamin B6 plays essential roles as a cofactor in a range of biochemical reactions. In addition, vitamin B6 is able to quench reactive oxygen species in vitro, and exogenously applied vitamin B6 protects plant cells against cell death induced by singlet oxygen (1O2). These results raise the important question as to whether plants employ vitamin B6 as an antioxidant to protect themselves against reactive oxygen species. Results The pdx1.3 mutation affects the vitamin B6 biosynthesis enzyme, pyridoxal synthase (PDX1), and leads to a reduction of the vitamin B6 concentration in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. Although leaves of the pdx1.3 Arabidopsis mutant contained less chlorophyll than wild-type leaves, we found that vitamin B6 deficiency did not significantly impact photosynthetic performance or shoot and root growth. Chlorophyll loss was associated with an increase in the chlorophyll a/b ratio and a selective decrease in the abundance of several PSII antenna proteins (Lhcb1/2, Lhcb6). These changes were strongly dependent on light intensity, with high light amplifying the difference between pdx1.3 and the wild type. When leaf discs were exposed to exogenous 1O2, lipid peroxidation in pdx1.3 was increased relative to the wild type; this effect was not observed with superoxide or hydrogen peroxide. When leaf discs or whole plants were exposed to excess light energy, 1O2-mediated lipid peroxidation was enhanced in leaves of the pdx1.3 mutant relative to the wild type. High light also caused an increased level of 1O2 in vitamin B6-deficient leaves. Combining the pdx1.3 mutation with mutations affecting the level of 'classical' quenchers of 1O2 (zeaxanthin, tocopherols) resulted in a highly photosensitive phenotype. Conclusion This study demonstrates that vitamin B6 has a function in the in vivo antioxidant

  17. High glucose modifies transient receptor potential canonical type 6 channels via increased oxidative stress and syndecan-4 in human podocytes.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Florian; Lee, Marlene; Xia, Shengqiang; Zakrzewicz, Andreas; Tepel, Martin

    2014-07-18

    Transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels type 6 play an important role in the function of human podocytes. Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by altered TRPC6 expression and functions of podocytes. Thus, we hypothesized that high glucose modifies TRPC6 channels via increased oxidative stress and syndecan-4 (SDC-4) in human podocytes. Human podocytes were exposed to control conditions (5.6 mmol/L D-glucose), high glucose (30 mmol/L D-glucose or L-glucose), 100 μmol/L peroxynitrite, or high glucose and the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol (100 μmol/L). TRPC6 and SDC-4 transcripts and protein expression were measured using RT-PCR and in-cell Western assay. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cytosolic calcium were measured using fluorescent dye techniques. High D-glucose increased TRPC6 transcripts to 8.66±4.08 (p<0.05) and TRPC6 protein expression to 1.44±0.07 (p<0.05) without altering SDC-4 transcripts or protein expression. The D-glucose induced increase of TRPC6 expression was blocked by tempol. Increased oxidative stress using peroxynitrite significantly increased TRPC6 transcripts to 4.29±1.26 (p<0.05) and TRPC6 protein expression to 1.28±0.05 (p<0.05) without altering SDC-4 transcripts or protein expression. In human podocytes transfected with scrambled siRNA, high D-glucose increased ROS after 90 min to 3.55±0.08 arbitrary units while 5.6 mmol/L D-glucose increased ROS to 2.49±0.09 (p<0.001) only. The increase in ROS was inhibited by tempol and by SDC-4 knockdown. High glucose modifies TRPC6 channels and ROS production via SDC-4 in human podocytes. PMID:24942878

  18. Decreased endothelial nitric oxide, systemic oxidative stress, and increased sympathetic modulation contribute to hypertension in obese rats.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Natalia Veronez; Pinge-Filho, Phileno; Panis, Carolina; Silva, Bruno Rodrigues; Pernomian, Laena; Grando, Marcella Daruge; Cecchini, Rubens; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2014-05-15

    We investigated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on autonomic cardiovascular parameters, vascular reactivity, and endothelial cells isolated from aorta of monosodium glutamate (MSG) obese rats. Obesity was induced by administration of 4 mg/g body wt of MSG or equimolar saline [control (CTR)] to newborn rats. At the 60th day, the treatment was started with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 20 mg/kg) or 0.9% saline. At the 90th day, after artery catheterization, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate were recorded. Plasma was collected to assess lipid peroxidation. Endothelial cells isolated from aorta were evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescence intensity (FI) emitted by NO-sensitive dye [4,5-diaminofluoresceindiacetate (DAF-2DA)] and by ROS-sensitive dye [dihydroethidium (DHE)]. Vascular reactivity was made by concentration-response curves of acetylcholine. MSG showed hypertension compared with CTR. Treatment with L-NAME increased MAP only in CTR. The MSG induced an increase in the low-frequency (LF) band and a decrease in the high-frequency band of pulse interval. L-NAME treatment increased the LF band of systolic arterial pressure only in CTR without changes in MSG. Lipid peroxidation levels were higher in MSG and were attenuated after L-NAME. In endothelial cells, basal FI to DAF was higher in CTR than in MSG. In both groups, acetylcholine increased FI for DAF from basal. The FI baseline to DHE was higher in MSG than in CTR. Acetylcholine increased FI to DHE in the CTR group, but decreased in MSG animals. We suggest that reduced NO production and increased production of ROS may contribute to hypertension in obese MSG animals. PMID:24633548

  19. OsCYP21-4, a novel Golgi-resident cyclophilin, increases oxidative stress tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang S; Park, Hyun J; Jung, Won Y; Lee, Areum; Yoon, Dae H; You, Young N; Kim, Hyun-Soon; Kim, Beom-Gi; Ahn, Jun C; Cho, Hye S

    2015-01-01

    OsCYP21-4 is a rice cyclophilin protein that binds to cyclosporine A, an immunosuppressant drug. CYP21-4s in Arabidopsis and rice were previously shown to function as mitochondrial cyclophilins, as determined by TargetP analysis. In the current study, we found that OsCYP21-4-GFP localized to the Golgi, rather than mitochondria, in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, which was confirmed based on its co-localization with cis Golgi α-ManI-mCherry protein. OsCYP21-4 transcript levels increased in response to treatments with various abiotic stresses and the phytohormone abscisic acid, revealing its stress-responsiveness. CYP21-4 homologs do not possess key peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity/cyclosporine A (CsA) binding residues, and recombinant OsCYP21-4 protein did not convert the synthetic substrate Suc-AAPF-pNA via cis- trans- isomerization in vitro. In addition, transgenic plants overexpressing OsCYP21-4 exhibited increased tolerance to salinity and hydrogen peroxide treatment, along with increased peroxidase activity. These results demonstrate that OsCYP21-4 is a novel Golgi-localized cyclophilin that plays a role in oxidative stress tolerance, possibly by regulating peroxidase activity. PMID:26483814

  20. OsCYP21-4, a novel Golgi-resident cyclophilin, increases oxidative stress tolerance in rice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang S.; Park, Hyun J.; Jung, Won Y.; Lee, Areum; Yoon, Dae H.; You, Young N.; Kim, Hyun-Soon; Kim, Beom-Gi; Ahn, Jun C.; Cho, Hye S.

    2015-01-01

    OsCYP21-4 is a rice cyclophilin protein that binds to cyclosporine A, an immunosuppressant drug. CYP21-4s in Arabidopsis and rice were previously shown to function as mitochondrial cyclophilins, as determined by TargetP analysis. In the current study, we found that OsCYP21-4-GFP localized to the Golgi, rather than mitochondria, in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, which was confirmed based on its co-localization with cis Golgi α-ManI-mCherry protein. OsCYP21-4 transcript levels increased in response to treatments with various abiotic stresses and the phytohormone abscisic acid, revealing its stress-responsiveness. CYP21-4 homologs do not possess key peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity/cyclosporine A (CsA) binding residues, and recombinant OsCYP21-4 protein did not convert the synthetic substrate Suc-AAPF-pNA via cis- trans- isomerization in vitro. In addition, transgenic plants overexpressing OsCYP21-4 exhibited increased tolerance to salinity and hydrogen peroxide treatment, along with increased peroxidase activity. These results demonstrate that OsCYP21-4 is a novel Golgi-localized cyclophilin that plays a role in oxidative stress tolerance, possibly by regulating peroxidase activity. PMID:26483814

  1. LPS from P. gingivalis and Hypoxia Increases Oxidative Stress in Periodontal Ligament Fibroblasts and Contributes to Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gölz, L.; Memmert, S.; Rath-Deschner, B.; Jäger, A.; Appel, T.; Baumgarten, G.; Götz, W.; Frede, S.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is characterized by an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and plays a key role in the progression of inflammatory diseases. We hypothesize that hypoxic and inflammatory events induce oxidative stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL) by activating NOX4. Human primary PDL fibroblasts were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis (LPS-PG), a periodontal pathogen bacterium under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. By quantitative PCR, immunoblot, immunostaining, and a specific ROS assay we determined the amount of NOX4, ROS, and several redox systems. Healthy and inflamed periodontal tissues were collected to evaluate NOX4 and redox systems by immunohistochemistry. We found significantly increased NOX4 levels after hypoxic or inflammatory stimulation in PDL cells (P < 0.001) which was even more pronounced after combination of the stimuli. This was accompanied by a significant upregulation of ROS and catalase (P < 0.001). However, prolonged incubation with both stimuli induced a reduction of catalase indicating a collapse of the protective machinery favoring ROS increase and the progression of inflammatory oral diseases. Analysis of inflamed tissues confirmed our hypothesis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the interplay of NOX4 and redox systems is crucial for ROS formation which plays a pivotal role during oral diseases. PMID:25374447

  2. The acute antinociceptive effect of hyperbaric oxygen is not accompanied by an increase in markers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shulin; Shirachi, Donald Y.; Quock, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Exposure to hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) causes an antinociceptive response in mice. However, breathing oxygen (O2) at an elevated pressure can potentially cause oxygen toxicity. The aim of this study was to identify the determinants of HBO2 antinociception and the toxicity profile of HBO2. Main methods Male NIH Swiss mice were assessed for acute antinociceptive responsiveness under room air or 100% O2 at 1.0 or 3.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA), using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test. For the oxygen toxicity test, mice were exposed to 3.5 ATA oxygen for 11 min, 60 min, 60 min daily for 2 days (120 min) or 60 min daily for 4 days (240 min), then assessed by analyzing the levels of two oxidative stress markers, MDA (malondialdehyde) and protein carbonyl in brain, spinal cord and lung. Key Findings Only the combination of 100% O2 and 3.5 ATA caused significant antinociception. The antinociceptive effect of 100% O2 was pressure-dependent up to 3.5 ATA. In the oxygen toxicity test, mice exposed to HBO2 for different time intervals had levels of brain, spinal cord and lung MDA and protein carbonyl that were comparable to that of control animals exposed to room air. Significance Treatment with 100% O2 evokes a pressure-dependent antinociceptive effect. Since there was no significant increase in levels of the oxidative stress markers in the tested tissues, it is concluded HBO2 at 3.5 ATA produces antinociception in the absence of oxidative stress in mice. PMID:24418003

  3. Oxidative stress and antioxidant responses to increasing concentrations of trivalent chromium in the Andean crop species Chenopodium quinoa Willd.

    PubMed

    Scoccianti, Valeria; Bucchini, Anahi E; Iacobucci, Marta; Ruiz, Karina B; Biondi, Stefania

    2016-11-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd), an ancient Andean seed crop, exhibits exceptional nutritional properties and resistance to abiotic stress. The species' tolerance to heavy metals has, however, not yet been investigated nor its ability to take up and translocate chromium (Cr). This study aimed to investigate the metabolic adjustments occurring upon exposure of quinoa to several concentrations (0.01-5mM) of CrCl3. Young hydroponically grown plants were used to evaluate Cr uptake, growth, oxidative stress, and other biochemical parameters three and/or seven days after treatment. Leaves accumulated the lowest amounts of Cr, while roots and stems accumulated the most at low and at high metal concentrations, respectively. Fresh weight and photosynthetic pigments were reduced only by the higher Cr(III) doses. Substantially increased lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and proline levels were observed only with 5mM Cr(III). Except for a significant decrease at day 7 with 5mM Cr(III), total polyphenols and flavonoids maintained control levels in Cr(III)-treated plants, whereas antioxidant activity increased in a dose-dependent manner. Maximum polyamine accumulation was observed in 1mM CrCl3-treated plants. Even though α- and γ-tocopherols also showed enhanced levels only with the 1mM concentration, tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT, EC 2.6.1.5) activity increased under Cr(III) treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, results suggest that polyamines, tocopherols, and TAT activity could contribute to tolerance to 1mM Cr(III), but not to the highest concentration that, instead, generated oxidative stress. PMID:27400061

  4. Reduction of Oxidative Stress in Chronic Kidney Disease Does Not Increase Circulating α-Klotho Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Adema, Aaltje Y.; van Ittersum, Frans J.; Hoenderop, Joost G.; de Borst, Martin H.; Nanayakkara, Prabath W.; Ter Wee, Piet M.; Heijboer, Annemieke C.; Vervloet, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    The CKD-associated decline in soluble α-Klotho levels is considered detrimental. Some in vitro and in vivo animal studies have shown that anti-oxidant therapy can upregulate the expression of α-Klotho in the kidney. We examined the effect of anti-oxidant therapy on α-Klotho concentrations in a clinical cohort with mild tot moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD). We performed a post-hoc analysis of a prospective randomized trial involving 62 patients with mild to moderate CKD (the ATIC study), all using an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) for 12 months. On top of that, the intervention group received anti-oxidative therapy consisting of the combination of pravastatin (40 mg/d) and vitamin E (α-tocopherol acetate, 300 mg/d) while the placebo was not treated with anti-oxidants. α-Klotho concentrations were measured at baseline and after 12 months of anti-oxidant therapy. Data were analysed using T-tests and Generalized Estimating Equations, adjusting for potential confounders such as vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, fibroblast-growth-factor 23 (FGF23) and eGFR. The cohort existed of 62 patients with an eGFR (MDRD) of 35 ± 14 ml/min/1.72m2, 34 were male and mean age was 53.0 ± 12.5 years old. Anti-oxidative therapy did successfully reduce oxLDL and LDL concentrations (P <0.001). α-Klotho concentrations did not change in patients receiving either anti-oxidative therapy (476.9 ± 124.3 to 492.7 ± 126.3 pg/mL, P = 0.23) nor in those receiving placebo 483.2 ± 142.5 to 489.6 ± 120.3 pg/mL, P = 0.62). Changes in α-Klotho concentrations were not different between both groups (p = 0.62). No evidence was found that anti-oxidative therapy affected α-Klotho concentrations in patients with mild-moderate CKD. PMID:26807718

  5. Strawberry or blueberry supplementation may protect against increased oxidative stress vulnerability from both irradiation and aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; Carey, A.; Rabin, B. M.

    In several studies we have now shown that there are some interesting parallels between aging and the effects of heavy particle irradiation (56Fe) in a rat model. Interestingly this research also has shown that, much as has been seen in aged animals, dietary supplementation with high antioxidant-strawberry (SB) or blueberry (BB) extracts (2% of the diet) reversed many of the age-related changes. Similarly, supplementing the diets of young rats with SBs or BBs (2% of diet as in the aged animals) for 8 weeks prior to being exposed to 56Fe (1 GeV/n), using the AGS or NSRL at Brookhaven National Laboratory, prevented the deleterious effects of the radiation exposure on the motor, cognitive and neuronal parameters described above. In the present experiment we examined whether striatal tissue obtained from BB- or SB-supplemented or control-fed, irradiated or non-radiated, young rats would show differential sensitivity (as assessed via decrements in mAChR stimulation of dopamine release) to hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generating agent. The results indicated that, just as we had seen previously with respect to radiation protection in the parameters described above, the tissue from the SB or BB-supplemented irradiated or non-radiated animals showed increased mAChR-stimulated DA release from the striatal tissue following hydrogen peroxide exposure compared to that seen in non-supplemented irradiated or non-radiated animals (e.g., DA rels. p moles/mg protein, rad + H202 non-supplemented = 90, SB = 260, BB = 360). These results show that aging and irradiation may produce similar decrements in dopamine release and that, much as we have seen previously with age, radiation enhances the vulnerability to oxidative stressors, but these are reduced with SB or BB supplementation. They are discussed in-terms of protection against the effects of exposure to heavy particles and aging via nutritional supplementation with foods that are high in antioxidant activity

  6. Increased risk of cardiovascular disease in premenopausal female ragpickers of Eastern India: involvement of inflammation, oxidative stress, and platelet hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Nandan Kumar; Roychoudhury, Sanghita; Mukherjee, Sayali; Siddique, Shabana; Banerjee, Madhuchanda; Slaughter, Mark S; Lahiri, Twisha; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2016-08-01

    Millions of poor people in the developing world still thrive on ragpicking. In the present study, we have examined whether ragpicking is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. For this, we have enrolled 112 premenopausal female ragpickers (median age 30 years) and 98 age-matched housemaids as control from Kolkata, Eastern India. Venous blood was drawn for routine hematology; flow cytometry was used to measure generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by leukocytes, surface expression of CD62P (P-selectin) in platelets and CD11b in leukocytes. Collagen-induced platelet aggregation was evaluated by aggregometer, and erythrocytic superoxide dismutase (SOD) was measured by spectrophotometry. Soluble P-selectin (sP-sel) and CD40L (sCD40L), neutrophil-activating protein-2 (NAP-2), platelet and plasma serotonin, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), and anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) in plasma were measured by ELISA. Compared with control, the ragpickers had significantly higher prevalence of hypertension and prehypertension, and hypertension was positively associated with ragpicking. The ragpickers also had higher levels of inflammation (elevated NAP-2), oxidative stress (elevated ROS generation with depleted SOD) with oxLDL, platelet activation and aggregability, soluble CD40 ligand, with altered serotonin level (rose in plasma but depleted in platelet). A greater percentage of ragpickers had elevated serum level of aCL of the IgG and IgM isotypes than the controls. The results suggest that the occupation of ragpicking increases the risk of cardiovascular diseases in premenopausal women of Eastern India via inflammation, oxidative stress, platelet hyperactivity, and hypertension. PMID:27421852

  7. Increase in antioxidant-defense gene transcripts, stress tolerance and biocontrol efficacy of Candida oleophila following sublethal oxidative stress exposure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Candida oleophila is one of several yeast species that have been used as bicontrol agents to manage postharvest diseases of fruits and vegetables. Current research is aimed at improving the tolerance of various antagonistic yeasts to environmental stresses in order to improve their efficacy. We ex...

  8. N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate promotes oxidative stress prior to myelin structural changes and increases myelin copper content

    SciTech Connect

    Viquez, Olga M.; Lai, Barry; Ahn, Jae Hee; Does, Mark D.; Valentine, Holly L.; Valentine, William M.

    2009-08-15

    dithiocarbamate-mediated inhibition of proteasome function and inhibition of cuproenzyme activity to neurotoxicity, and also to assess the potential of dithiocarbamates to promote oxidative stress and injury within the central nervous system. These evaluations were performed using an established model for dithiocarbamate-mediated demyelination in the rat utilizing sciatic nerve, spinal cord and brain samples obtained from rats exposed to N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDC) by intra-abdominal pumps for periods of 2, 4, and 8 weeks and from non exposed controls. The data supported the ability of DEDC to increase copper within myelin and to enhance oxidative stress prior to structural changes detectable by MET{sub 2}. Evidence was also obtained that the excess copper produced by DEDC in the central nervous system is redox active and promotes oxidative injury.

  9. High glucose promotes the migration of retinal pigment epithelial cells through increased oxidative stress and PEDF expression.

    PubMed

    Farnoodian, Mitra; Halbach, Caroline; Slinger, Cassidy; Pattnaik, Bikash R; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-09-01

    Defects in the outer blood-retinal barrier have significant impact on the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy and macular edema. However, the detailed mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. This is, in part, attributed to the lack of suitable animal and cell culture models, including those of mouse origin. We recently reported a method for the culture of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from wild-type and transgenic mice. The RPE cells are responsible for maintaining the integrity of the outer blood-retinal barrier whose dysfunction during diabetes has a significant impact on vision. Here we determined the impact of high glucose on the function of RPE cells. We showed that high glucose conditions resulted in enhanced migration and increased the level of oxidative stress in RPE cells, but minimally impacted their rate of proliferation and apoptosis. High glucose also minimally affected the cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions of RPE cells. However, the expression of integrins and extracellular matrix proteins including pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) were altered under high glucose conditions. Incubation of RPE cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine under high glucose conditions restored normal migration and PEDF expression. These cells also exhibited increased nuclear localization of the antioxidant transcription factor Nrf2 and ZO-1, reduced levels of β-catenin and phagocytic activity, and minimal effect on production of vascular endothelial growth factor, inflammatory cytokines, and Akt, MAPK, and Src signaling pathways. Thus high glucose conditions promote RPE cell migration through increased oxidative stress and expression of PEDF without a significant effect on the rate of proliferation and apoptosis. PMID:27440660

  10. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yong Weon; Kang, Hyo Jin; Bae, Insoo

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers. PMID:24704793

  11. Depression, anxiety-like behavior and memory impairment are associated with increased oxidative stress and inflammation in a rat model of social stress

    PubMed Central

    Patki, Gaurav; Solanki, Naimesh; Atrooz, Fatin; Allam, Farida; Salim, Samina

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have examined the behavioral and biochemical effect of induction of psychological stress using a modified version of the resident-intruder model for social stress (social defeat). At the end of the social defeat protocol, body weights, food and water intake were recorded, depression and anxiety-like behaviors as well as learning-memory function was examined. Biochemical analysis including oxidative stress measurement, inflammatory markers and other molecular parameters, critical to behavioral effects were examined. We observed a significant decrease in the body weight in the socially defeated rats as compared to the controls. Furthermore, social defeat increased anxiety-like behavior and caused memory impairment in rats (P<0.05). Socially defeated rats made significantly more errors in long term memory tests (P<0.05) as compared to control rats. Furthermore, brain extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2), and an inflammatory marker, interleukin (IL)-6 were activated (P<0.05), while the protein levels of glyoxalase (GLO)-1, glutathione reductase (GSR)-1, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type (CAMK)-IV, cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were significantly less (P<0.05) in the hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala of socially defeated rats, when compared to control rats. We suggest that social defeat stress alters ERK1/2, IL-6, GLO1, GSR1, CAMKIV, CREB, and BDNF levels in specific brain areas, leading to oxidative stress-induced anxiety-depression-like behaviors and as well as memory impairment in rats. PMID:24096214

  12. Blackcurrant seed press residue increases tocopherol concentrations in serum and stool whilst biomarkers in stool and urine indicate increased oxidative stress in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Helbig, Dorit; Wagner, Andreas; Glei, Michael; Basu, Samar; Schubert, Rainer; Jahreis, Gerhard

    2009-08-01

    Berry seeds are a tocopherol-rich by-product of fruit processing without specific commercial value. In a human intervention study, the physiological impact of blackcurrant seed press residue (PR) was tested. Thirty-six women (aged 24 +/- 3 years; twenty non-smokers, sixteen smokers) consumed 250 g bread/d containing 8% PR for a period of 4 weeks (period 3). Comparatively, a control bread without PR (250 g/d) was tested (period 2) and baseline data were obtained (period 1). Blood, stool and 24 h urine were collected during a 5 d standardised diet within each period. Tocopherol and Fe intakes were calculated from food intake. In serum, tocopherol concentration and Fe parameters were determined. In urine, oxidative stress markers 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-iso-PGF2alpha and inflammatory response marker 15-keto-dihydro-PGF2alpha were analysed. Stool tocopherol concentration, genotoxicity of faecal water (comet assay) and antioxidant capacity of stool (aromatic hydroxylation of salicylic acid) were determined. Fe and total tocopherol intake, total tocopherol concentrations in serum and stool, and genotoxicity of faecal water increased with PR bread consumption (P < 0.05). The antioxidant capacity of stool decreased between baseline and intervention, expressed by increased formation of 2,3- and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid in vitro (P < 0.05). In smokers, 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine increased with PR consumption (P < 0.05). Prostane concentrations were unaffected by PR bread consumption. In summary, the intake of bread containing blackcurrant PR for 4 weeks increased serum and stool total tocopherol concentrations. However, various biomarkers indicated increased oxidative stress, suggesting that consumption of ground berry seed may not be of advantage. PMID:19302719

  13. Soy Isoflavone Protects Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Increasing Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Decreasing Oxidative Stress in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yan; Li, Shuangyue; Zhang, Ping; Zhu, Jinbiao; Meng, Guoliang; Xie, Liping; Yu, Ying; Ji, Yong; Han, Yi

    2016-01-01

    There is a special role for estrogens in preventing and curing cardiovascular disease in women. Soy isoflavone (SI), a soy-derived phytoestrogen, has similar chemical structure to endogenous estrogen-estradiol. We investigate to elucidate the protective mechanism of SI on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (MI/R) injury. Female SD rats underwent bilateral ovariectomy. One week later, rats were randomly divided into several groups, sham ovariectomy (control group), ovariectomy with MI/R, or ovariectomy with sham MI/R. Other ovariectomy rats were given different doses of SI or 17β-estradiol (E2). Four weeks later, they were exposed to 30 minutes of left coronary artery occlusion followed by 6 or 24 hours of reperfusion. SI administration significantly reduced myocardial infarct size and improved left ventricle function and restored endothelium-dependent relaxation function of thoracic aortas after MI/R in ovariectomized rats. SI also decreased serum creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activity, reduced plasma malonaldehyde, and attenuated oxidative stress in the myocardium. Meanwhile, SI increased phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) signal pathway. SI failed to decrease infarct size of hearts with I/R in ovariectomized rats if PI3K was inhibited. Overall, these results indicated that SI protects myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in ovariectomized rats through increasing PI3K/Akt/eNOS signal pathway and decreasing oxidative stress. PMID:27057277

  14. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  15. PGC1α Expression Defines a Subset of Human Melanoma Tumors with Increased Mitochondrial Capacity and Resistance to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Francisca; Lim, Ji-Hong; Chim, Helen; Bhalla, Kavita; Girnun, Geoff; Pierce, Kerry; Clish, Clary B.; Granter, Scott R.; Widlund, Hans R.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Puigserver, Pere

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism using different strategies to meet energy and anabolic demands to maintain growth and survival. Understanding the molecular and genetic determinants of these metabolic programs is critical to successfully exploit them for therapy. Here, we report that the oncogenic melanocyte lineage-specification transcription factor MITF drives PGC1α (PPARGC1A) overexpression in a subset of human melanomas and derived cell lines. Functionally, PGC1α positive melanoma cells exhibit increased mitochondrial energy metabolism and ROS detoxification capacities that enables survival under oxidative stress conditions. Conversely, PGC1α negative melanoma cells are more glycolytic and sensitive to ROS-inducing drugs. These results demonstrate that differences in PGC1α levels in melanoma tumors have a profound impact in their metabolism, biology and drug sensitivity. PMID:23416000

  16. D-004 ameliorates phenylephrine-induced urodynamic changes and increased prostate and bladder oxidative stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Oyarzábal, Ambar; Pérez, Yohani; Mas, Rosa; Ravelo, Yazmin; Jiménez, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Background Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) mainly depend on alpha1-adrenoreceptors (α1-ADR) stimulation, but a link with oxidative stress (OS) is also involved. D-004, a lipid extract of Roystonea regia fruits, antagonizes ADR-induced responses and produces antioxidant effects. The objective of this study was to investigate whether D-004 produce antioxidant effects in rats with phenylephrine (PHE)-induced urodynamic changes. Methods Rats were randomized into eight groups (ten rats/group): a negative vehicle control and seven groups injected with PHE: a positive control, three treated with D-004 (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg) and three others with tamsulosin (0.4 mg/kg), grape seed extract (GSE) (250 mg/kg) and vitamin E (VE) (250 mg/kg), respectively. Results Effects on urinary total volume (UTV), volume voided per micturition (VM), malondialdehyde (MDA) and carbonyl groups (CG) concentrations in prostate and bladder homogenates were study outcomes. While VM and UTV lowered significantly in the positive control as compared to the negative control group, the opposite occurred with prostate and bladder MDA and CG values. D-004 (200-800 mg/kg) increased significantly both VM and UTV, lowered significantly MDA in prostate and bladder homogenates, and reduced GC levels only in the prostate. Tamsulosin increased significantly VM and UTV, but unchanged oxidative variables. GSE and VE unchanged the UTV, whereas VE, not GSE, modestly but significantly attenuated the PHE-induced decrease of VM. Conclusions Single oral administration of D-004 (200-800 mg/kg) was the only treatment that ameliorated the urodynamic changes and reduced increased oxidative variables in the prostate of rats with PHE-induced prostate hyperplasia. PMID:26816837

  17. The organophosphate insecticide Coumaphos induces oxidative stress and increases antioxidant and detoxification defences in the green macroalgae Ulva pertusa.

    PubMed

    Schweikert, Katja; Burritt, David J

    2012-10-15

    It is well established that many pesticides used in the farming and horticultural industries are harmful to not only the target species they were developed for, but also other organisms. Organophosphates were introduced as a replacement for the organochlorines and are generally considered non-toxic to plants and algae. This study investigated the impact of Coumaphos, a commonly used organophosphate, on the estuarine macrophyte Ulva pertusa. In a seven-day experiment U. pertusa cultures were exposed to four environmentally relevant concentrations of Coumaphos (0.01 mg/L, 0.05 mg/L, 0.1mg/L, 0.5 mg/L), well below the aqueous solubility maximum of the insecticide. The impact of Coumaphos was determined at a cellular level by assessing oxidative damage in the form of protein carbonyl and lipid hydroperoxide levels. Furthermore, non-enzymatic antioxidant levels and changes in the levels of enzymatic antioxidants and the enzyme GST were measured. Concentrations of Coumaphos above 0.01 mg/L caused rapid increases in the levels of protein carbonyls and lipid hydroperoxides peaking after 2-3 days of exposure, followed by a rapid decline in both markers of oxidative stress. Glutathione levels and the activities SOD, CAT, GR, APOX and GST all increased in response to the higher concentrations of Coumaphos tested and remained elevated for the duration of the experiment. These results demonstrate that environmentally relevant levels of the insecticide Coumaphos can cause oxidative damage and increase the antioxidant scavenging capacity, and GST activity in U. pertusa. This could potentially alter resource allocation within this alga, impacting algal growth and development, with possible indirect ecological consequences. PMID:22728208

  18. Natural thioallyl compounds increase oxidative stress resistance and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans by modulating SKN-1/Nrf.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Kodera, Yukihiro; Hirata, Dai; Blackwell, T Keith; Mizunuma, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Identification of biologically active natural compounds that promote health and longevity, and understanding how they act, will provide insights into aging and metabolism, and strategies for developing agents that prevent chronic disease. The garlic-derived thioallyl compounds S-allylcysteine (SAC) and S-allylmercaptocysteine (SAMC) have been shown to have multiple biological activities. Here we show that SAC and SAMC increase lifespan and stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans and reduce accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These compounds do not appear to activate DAF-16 (FOXO orthologue) or mimic dietary restriction (DR) effects, but selectively induce SKN-1 (Nrf1/2/3 orthologue) targets involved in oxidative stress defense. Interestingly, their treatments do not facilitate SKN-1 nuclear accumulation, but slightly increased intracellular SKN-1 levels. Our data also indicate that thioallyl structure and the number of sulfur atoms are important for SKN-1 target induction. Our results indicate that SAC and SAMC may serve as potential agents that slow aging. PMID:26899496

  19. Natural thioallyl compounds increase oxidative stress resistance and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans by modulating SKN-1/Nrf

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Takahiro; Kodera, Yukihiro; Hirata, Dai; Blackwell, T. Keith; Mizunuma, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Identification of biologically active natural compounds that promote health and longevity, and understanding how they act, will provide insights into aging and metabolism, and strategies for developing agents that prevent chronic disease. The garlic-derived thioallyl compounds S-allylcysteine (SAC) and S-allylmercaptocysteine (SAMC) have been shown to have multiple biological activities. Here we show that SAC and SAMC increase lifespan and stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans and reduce accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These compounds do not appear to activate DAF-16 (FOXO orthologue) or mimic dietary restriction (DR) effects, but selectively induce SKN-1 (Nrf1/2/3 orthologue) targets involved in oxidative stress defense. Interestingly, their treatments do not facilitate SKN-1 nuclear accumulation, but slightly increased intracellular SKN-1 levels. Our data also indicate that thioallyl structure and the number of sulfur atoms are important for SKN-1 target induction. Our results indicate that SAC and SAMC may serve as potential agents that slow aging. PMID:26899496

  20. Six weeks of aerobic dance exercise improves blood oxidative stress status and increases interleukin-2 in previously sedentary women.

    PubMed

    Leelarungrayub, Donrawee; Saidee, Kunteera; Pothongsunun, Prapas; Pratanaphon, Sainetee; YanKai, Araya; Bloomer, Richard J

    2011-07-01

    This study evaluated the change in blood oxidative stress, blood interleukin-2, and physical performance following 6 weeks of moderate intensity and duration aerobic dance exercise in 24 sedentary women. Blood samples were collected at rest twice before (baseline) and after the 6-week intervention for analysis of protein hydroperoxide (PrOOH), malondialdehyde (MDA), total anti-oxidant capacity (TAC), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) levels. Maximal treadmill run time (Time(max)) and maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)) were also measured. All variables were statistically analyzed with a repeated measurement ANOVA and Tukey post hoc. No differences were noted in any variable during the baseline period (p > 0.05). After aerobic dance exercise, VO(2max), Time(max), TAC and IL-2 were significantly increased, whereas MDA levels were decreased significantly (p < 0.05). PrOOH did not change either between baseline measures or after exercise. It can be concluded that aerobic dance exercise at a moderate intensity and duration can improve physical fitness, decrease MDA, and increase TAC and IL-2 in previously sedentary women. PMID:21665113

  1. Duration of priapism is associated with increased corporal oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kucukdurmaz, F; Kucukgergin, C; Akman, T; Salabas, E; Armagan, A; Seckin, S; Kadıoglu, A

    2016-05-01

    Ischaemic priapism is characterised by hypoxia, hypercapnia and acidosis with resultant corporal fibrosis. Studies reported decreased erectile recovery after treatment of priapism longer than 36 h. However, a recent study revealed that half of patients with 3 days of priapism achieved recovery after T-shunt, although mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the effect of priapism duration on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes. Twenty-four male rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 served as control. Groups 2, 3 and 4 represented 1, 2 and 4 h, respectively, of priapism induced by vacuum device and rubber band placed at base of erect penis. After 30 min of reperfusion, penectomy and blood withdrawal were performed to investigate levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PC), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Corporal MDA progressively increased with priapism duration (P = 0.01). Corporal SOD significantly differed between groups 1, 2 and 4. Also, there were significant differences in corporal GPx in groups 1 and 4 (P = 0.004) and groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.01). Corporal CAT was higher in group 4, but multivariable analysis revealed insignificant differences. Plasma MDA of the experimental groups was significantly higher than that of controls. There were no differences among groups in terms of other parameters. Increased antioxidant enzymes according to duration of priapism suggest that immediate treatment to relieve oxidative stress should be initiated in prolonged cases. However, further studies should be conducted to determine resistance mechanisms of the corpora to prolonged ischaemia. PMID:26223151

  2. Oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Durany, Nuria

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive dementia affecting a large proportion of the aging population. The histopathological changes in AD include neuronal cell death, formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. There is also evidence that brain tissue in patients with AD is exposed to oxidative stress (e.g., protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, DNA oxidation and glycoxidation) during the course of the disease. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are present in amyloid plaques in AD, and its extracellular accumulation may be caused by an accelerated oxidation of glycated proteins. AGEs participate in neuronal death causing direct (chemical) and indirect (cellular) free radical production and consequently increase oxidative stress. The development of drugs for the treatment of AD that breaks the vicious cycles of oxidative stress and neurodegeneration offer new opportunities. These approaches include AGE-inhibitors, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory substances, which prevent free radical production. PMID:19372765

  3. Pyocyanin Stimulates Quorum Sensing-Mediated Tolerance to Oxidative Stress and Increases Persister Cell Populations in Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Nidhi; Sharma, Prince

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are nosocomial pathogens with overlapping sites of infection. This work reports that the two can coexist stably in mixed-culture biofilms. In a study intended to improve our understanding of the mechanism of their coexistence, it was found that pyocyanin, produced by P. aeruginosa that generally eliminates competition from other pathogens, led to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A. baumannii cells, which in response showed a significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in production of enzymes, specifically, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD). This work shows for the first time that the expression of catalase and SOD is under the control of a quorum-sensing system in A. baumannii. In support of this observation, a quorum-sensing mutant of A. baumannii (abaI::Km) was found to be sensitive to pyocyanin compared to its wild type and showed significantly (P ≤ 0.001) lower levels of the antioxidant enzymes, which increased on addition of 5 μM N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. Likewise, in wild-type A. baumannii, there was a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in the level of anti-oxidant enzymes in the presence of salicylic acid, a known quencher of quorum sensing. In the presence of amikacin and carbenicillin, A. baumannii formed 0.07 and 0.02% persister cells, which increased 4- and 3-fold, respectively, in the presence of pyocyanin. These findings show that pyocyanin induces a protective mechanism in A. baumannii against oxidative stress and also increases its persistence against antibiotics which could be of clinical significance in the case of coinfections with A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa. PMID:24891106

  4. Pyocyanin stimulates quorum sensing-mediated tolerance to oxidative stress and increases persister cell populations in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Nidhi; Sharma, Prince; Capalash, Neena

    2014-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are nosocomial pathogens with overlapping sites of infection. This work reports that the two can coexist stably in mixed-culture biofilms. In a study intended to improve our understanding of the mechanism of their coexistence, it was found that pyocyanin, produced by P. aeruginosa that generally eliminates competition from other pathogens, led to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in A. baumannii cells, which in response showed a significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in production of enzymes, specifically, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD). This work shows for the first time that the expression of catalase and SOD is under the control of a quorum-sensing system in A. baumannii. In support of this observation, a quorum-sensing mutant of A. baumannii (abaI::Km) was found to be sensitive to pyocyanin compared to its wild type and showed significantly (P ≤ 0.001) lower levels of the antioxidant enzymes, which increased on addition of 5 μM N-(3-hydroxydodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. Likewise, in wild-type A. baumannii, there was a significant (P < 0.01) decrease in the level of anti-oxidant enzymes in the presence of salicylic acid, a known quencher of quorum sensing. In the presence of amikacin and carbenicillin, A. baumannii formed 0.07 and 0.02% persister cells, which increased 4- and 3-fold, respectively, in the presence of pyocyanin. These findings show that pyocyanin induces a protective mechanism in A. baumannii against oxidative stress and also increases its persistence against antibiotics which could be of clinical significance in the case of coinfections with A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa. PMID:24891106

  5. The pro-oxidant gene p66shc increases nicotine exposure-induced lipotoxic oxidative stress in renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Arany, Istvan; Hall, Samuel; Reed, Dustin K; Dixit, Mehul

    2016-09-01

    Nicotine (NIC) exposure augments free fatty acid (FFA) deposition and oxidative stress, with a concomitant increase in the expression of the pro-oxidant p66shc. In addition, a decrease in the antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) has been observed in the kidneys of mice fed a high‑fat diet. The present study aimed to determine whether the pro‑oxidant p66shc mediates NIC‑dependent increases in renal oxidative stress by augmenting the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and suppressing the FFA‑induced antioxidant response in cultured NRK52E renal proximal tubule cells. Briefly, NRK52E renal proximal tubule cells were treated with 200 µM NIC, 100 µM oleic acid (OA), or a combination of NIC and OA. The expression levels of p66shc and MnSOD were modulated according to genetic methods. ROS production and cell injury, in the form of lactate dehydrogenase release, were subsequently detected. Promoter activity of p66shc and MnSOD, as well as forkhead box (FOXO)‑dependent transcription, was investigated using reporter luciferase assays. The results demonstrated that NIC exacerbated OA‑mediated intracellular ROS production and cell injury through the transcriptional activation of p66shc. NIC also suppressed OA‑mediated induction of the antioxidant MnSOD promoter activity through p66shc‑dependent inactivation of FOXO activity. Overexpression of p66shc and knockdown of MnSOD had the same effect as treatment with NIC on OA‑mediated lipotoxicity. These data may be used to generate a therapeutic means to ameliorate renal lipotoxicity in obese smokers. PMID:27486058

  6. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Aguado, Andrea; Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice; Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María; Alonso, María Jesús; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  7. Androgen-inducible gene 1 increases the ER Ca(2+) content and cell death susceptibility against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nickel, Nadine; Cleven, Astrid; Enders, Vitalij; Lisak, Dmitrij; Schneider, Lars; Methner, Axel

    2016-07-15

    Androgen-induced gene 1 (AIG1) is a transmembrane protein implicated with survival (its expression level was shown to correlate with the survival of patients suffering from hepatocellular carcinoma) and Ca(2+) signaling (over-expression of AIG1 increased transcription mediated by the Ca(2+)-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells). We aimed to shed light on this less-studied protein and investigated its tissue expression, genomic organization, intracellular localization and membrane topology as well as its effects on cell death susceptibility and the Ca(2+) content of the endoplasmic reticulum. Immunoblotting of mouse tissues demonstrated highest expression of AIG1 in the liver, lung and heart. AIG1 has a complex genomic organization and expresses several splice variants in a tissue-dependent manner. Analyzing the topology of AIG1 in the ER membrane using a protease-protection assay suggested that AIG has five transmembrane domains with a luminal N- and cytosolic C-terminus and a hydrophobic stretch between the third and fourth membrane domain that does not cross the membrane. AIG1 over-expression slightly increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, which correlated with an increased ER Ca(2+) concentration in two different cell lines. Together, these results indicate that AIG1 plays a role in the control of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and cell death susceptibility. PMID:27040980

  8. Oxidative Stress and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyong; Gross, Myron; Lee, Duk-Hee; Holvoet, Paul; Himes, John H.; Shikany, James M.; Jacobs, David R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although cumulative evidence suggests that increased oxidative stress may lead to insulin resistance in vivo or in vitro, community-based studies are scarce. This study examined the longitudinal relationships of oxidative stress biomarkers with the development of insulin resistance and whether these relationships were independent of obesity in nondiabetic young adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Biomarkers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes [F2Isop] and oxidized LDL [oxLDL]), insulin resistance (the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and various fatness measures (BMI, waist circumference, and estimated percent fat) were obtained in a population-based observational study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) and its ancillary study (Young Adult Longitudinal Trends in Antioxidants) during 2000–2006. RESULTS There were substantial increases in estimated mean HOMA-IR over time. OxLDL and F2Isop showed little association with each other. Mean evolving HOMA-IR increased with increasing levels of oxidative stress markers (P < 0.001 for oxLDL and P = 0.06 for F2Isop), measured in 2000–2001. After additional adjustment for adiposity, a positive association between oxLDL and HOMA-IR was strongly evident, whereas the association between F2Isop and HOMA-IR was not. CONCLUSIONS We observed positive associations between each of two oxidative stress markers and insulin resistance. The association with oxidized LDL was independent of obesity, but that with F2Isop was not. PMID:19389821

  9. Pretreatment of the yeast antagonist, Candida oleophila with glycine betaine increases oxidative stress tolerance in the microenvironment of apple wounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In response to wounding, harvested fruit tissues of apple and citrus exhibit the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS production is greater when yeast antagonists used as biocontrol agents are applied in the wounds. These phenomena result in an oxidative stress environment for the yeas...

  10. Levodopa increases oxidative stress and repulsive guidance molecule A levels: a pilot study in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Trommer, Isabel; Muhlack, Siegfried; Mueller, Bernhard K

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to free radicals influences synthesis, degradation and function of proteins, such as repulsive guidance molecule A. Decay of this protein is essential for neuronal maintenance and recovery. Levodopa elevates oxidative stress. Therefore levodopa may impact repulsive guidance molecule A metabolism. Objectives were to investigate plasma concentrations of repulsive guidance molecule A, levodopa, cysteine and cysteinyl-glycine before and 1 h after levodopa application in patients with Parkinson's disease. Cysteine and cysteinyl-glycine as biomarkers for oxidative stress exposure decreased, repulsive guidance molecule A and levodopa rose. Repulsive guidance molecule A remained unchanged in levodopa naïve patients, but particularly went up in patients on a prior chronic levodopa regimen. Decay of cysteine specifically cysteinyl-glycine results from an elevated glutathione generation with rising cysteine consumption respectively from the alternative glutathione transformation to its oxidized form glutathione disulfide after free radical scavenging. Repulsive guidance molecule A rise may inhibit physiologic mechanisms for neuronal survival. PMID:26880022

  11. Oxidative-stress induced increase in circulating fatty acids does not contribute to phospholipase A2-dependent appetitive long-term memory failure in the pond snail Lymnaeastagnalis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential for normal physiological functioning of the brain. However, uncompensated increase in ROS levels may results in oxidative stress. Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) is one of the key players activated by elevated ROS levels resulting in the hydrolysis of various products from the plasmamembrane such as peroxidized fatty acids. Free fatty acids (FFAs) and fatty acid metabolites are often implicated to the genesis of cognitive impairment. Previously we have shown that age-, and experimentally induced oxidative stress causes PLA2-dependent long-term memory (LTM) failure in an aversive operant conditioning model in Lymnaea stagnalis. In the present study, we investigate the effects of experimentally induced oxidative stress and the role of elevated levels of circulating FFAs on LTM function using a non-aversive appetitive classical conditioning paradigm. Results We show that intracoelomic injection of exogenous PLA2 or pro-oxidant induced PLA2 activation negatively affects LTM performance in our learning paradigm. In addition, we show that experimental induction of oxidative stress causes significant temporal changes in circulating FFA levels. Importantly, the time of training coincides with the peak of this change in lipid metabolism. However, intracoelomic injection with exogenous arachidonic acid, one of the main FFAs released by PLA2, does not affect LTM function. Moreover, sequestrating circulating FFAs with the aid of bovine serum albumin does not rescue pro-oxidant induced appetitive LTM failure. Conclusions Our data substantiates previous evidence linking lipid peroxidation and PLA2 activation to age- and oxidative stress-related cognitive impairment, neuronal dysfunction and disease. In addition however, our data indicate that lipid peroxidation induced increased levels of circulating (per)oxidized FFAs are not a factor in oxidative stress induced LTM impairment. PMID:24886155

  12. Systemic alterations in the metabolome of diabetic NOD mice delineate increased oxidative stress accompanied by reduced inflammation and hypertriglyceremia

    PubMed Central

    Fahrmann, Johannes; Grapov, Dmitry; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce; Fiehn, Oliver; Bell, Graeme I.

    2015-01-01

    Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice are a commonly used model of type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, not all animals will develop overt diabetes despite undergoing similar autoimmune insult. In this study, a comprehensive metabolomic approach, consisting of gas chromatography time-of-flight (GC-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-accurate mass quadruple time-of-flight (UHPLC-qTOF) MS and targeted UHPLC-tandem mass spectrometry-based methodologies, was used to capture metabolic alterations in the metabolome and lipidome of plasma from NOD mice progressing or not progressing to T1D. Using this multi-platform approach, we identified >1,000 circulating lipids and metabolites in male and female progressor and nonprogressor animals (n = 71). Statistical and multivariate analyses were used to identify age- and sex-independent metabolic markers, which best differentiated metabolic profiles of progressors and nonprogressors. Key T1D-associated perturbations were related with 1) increases in oxidation products glucono-δ-lactone and galactonic acid and reductions in cysteine, methionine and threonic acid, suggesting increased oxidative stress; 2) reductions in circulating polyunsaturated fatty acids and lipid signaling mediators, most notably arachidonic acid (AA) and AA-derived eicosanoids, implying impaired states of systemic inflammation; 3) elevations in circulating triacylglyercides reflective of hypertriglyceridemia; and 4) reductions in major structural lipids, most notably lysophosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylcholines. Taken together, our results highlight the systemic perturbations that accompany a loss of glycemic control and development of overt T1D. PMID:25852003

  13. Systemic alterations in the metabolome of diabetic NOD mice delineate increased oxidative stress accompanied by reduced inflammation and hypertriglyceremia.

    PubMed

    Fahrmann, Johannes; Grapov, Dmitry; Yang, Jun; Hammock, Bruce; Fiehn, Oliver; Bell, Graeme I; Hara, Manami

    2015-06-01

    Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice are a commonly used model of type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, not all animals will develop overt diabetes despite undergoing similar autoimmune insult. In this study, a comprehensive metabolomic approach, consisting of gas chromatography time-of-flight (GC-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS), ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-accurate mass quadruple time-of-flight (UHPLC-qTOF) MS and targeted UHPLC-tandem mass spectrometry-based methodologies, was used to capture metabolic alterations in the metabolome and lipidome of plasma from NOD mice progressing or not progressing to T1D. Using this multi-platform approach, we identified >1,000 circulating lipids and metabolites in male and female progressor and nonprogressor animals (n = 71). Statistical and multivariate analyses were used to identify age- and sex-independent metabolic markers, which best differentiated metabolic profiles of progressors and nonprogressors. Key T1D-associated perturbations were related with 1) increases in oxidation products glucono-δ-lactone and galactonic acid and reductions in cysteine, methionine and threonic acid, suggesting increased oxidative stress; 2) reductions in circulating polyunsaturated fatty acids and lipid signaling mediators, most notably arachidonic acid (AA) and AA-derived eicosanoids, implying impaired states of systemic inflammation; 3) elevations in circulating triacylglyercides reflective of hypertriglyceridemia; and 4) reductions in major structural lipids, most notably lysophosphatidylcholines and phosphatidylcholines. Taken together, our results highlight the systemic perturbations that accompany a loss of glycemic control and development of overt T1D. PMID:25852003

  14. U18666A Treatment Results in Cholesterol Accumulation, Reduced Na(+), K(+)-ATPase Activity, and Increased Oxidative Stress in Rat Cortical Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Copetti-Santos, Daniela; Moraes, Vitoria; Weiler, Dácio Franco; de Mello, Alexandre Silva; Machado, Fernanda de Souza; Marinho, Jéssica Pereira; Siebert, Cassiana; Kolling, Janaina; Funchal, Cláudia; Wyse, Angela T S; Coelho, Janice Carneiro

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of U18666A, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis and its intracellular transport, on oxidative stress parameters in cortical astrocytes cultured from Wistar rats (0-3 days old). The cultures were incubated with U18666A (0.25 µg/mL) for 48 h, conditions that are considered ideal to mimic Niemann-Pick type C disease. A variety of indicators of oxidative stress were measured. U18666A treatment increased cholesterol 2-fold in treated compared to control astrocytes. Oxidative stress was significantly elevated in treated cells as demonstrated by a 1.7-fold increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a 60% decrease is sulfhydral groups, and a 3.7-fold increase in carbonyl groups, indicative of increased lipid and protein oxidation following U18666A treatment. Consistent with these changes, both catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly reduced nearly 50% in treated compared to control astrocytes. Collectively, these change resulted in a 50% reduction in Na(+), K(+)-ATPase specific activity following U18666A treatment, suggesting a significant alteration in its plasma membrane environment. Overall, these changes indicate that U18666A treatment results in increased cholesterol levels and an increased level of oxidative stress in cortical astrocytes, consistent with what is observed in Niemann-Pick type C disease. PMID:26344921

  15. Resveratrol Directly Binds to Mitochondrial Complex I and Increases Oxidative Stress in Brain Mitochondria of Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chupin, Stéphanie; Baron, Stéphanie; Nivet-Antoine, Valérie; Vessières, Emilie; Ayer, Audrey; Henrion, Daniel; Lenaers, Guy; Reynier, Pascal; Procaccio, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is often described as a promising therapeutic molecule for numerous diseases, especially in metabolic and neurodegenerative disorders. While the mechanism of action is still debated, an increasing literature reports that resveratrol regulates the mitochondrial respiratory chain function. In a recent study we have identified mitochondrial complex I as a direct target of this molecule. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and consequences of such an interaction still require further investigation. In this study, we identified in silico by docking study a binding site for resveratrol at the nucleotide pocket of complex I. In vitro, using solubilized complex I, we demonstrated a competition between NAD+ and resveratrol. At low doses (<5μM), resveratrol stimulated complex I activity, whereas at high dose (50 μM) it rather decreased it. In vivo, in brain mitochondria from resveratrol treated young mice, we showed that complex I activity was increased, whereas the respiration rate was not improved. Moreover, in old mice with low antioxidant defenses, we demonstrated that complex I activation by resveratrol led to oxidative stress. These results bring new insights into the mechanism of action of resveratrol on mitochondria and highlight the importance of the balance between pro- and antioxidant effects of resveratrol depending on its dose and age. These parameters should be taken into account when clinical trials using resveratrol or analogues have to be designed. PMID:26684010

  16. Absence of aryl hydrocarbon receptors increases endogenous kynurenic acid levels and protects mouse brain against excitotoxic insult and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    García-Lara, Lucia; Pérez-Severiano, Francisca; González-Esquivel, Dinora; Elizondo, Guillermo; Segovia, José

    2015-09-01

    L-kynurenine (Kyn) is a key element of tryptophan metabolism; it is enzymatically converted by kynurenine aminotransferase II (KAT II) to kynurenic acid (KYNA), which acts as an antagonist to the NMDA receptor-glycine site. Kyn is also an endogenous ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a transcription factor that regulates the expression of a diverse set of genes. KYNA levels are reduced in several regions of the brain of Huntington's disease (HD) patients. The present work uses an AhR-null mouse and age-matched wild-type mice to determine the effect of the absence of AhR on KYNA availability. We found that, in AhR-null mice, there is an increase of KYNA levels in specific brain areas associated with higher expression of KAT II. Moreover, we induced an excitotoxic insult by intrastriatal administration of quinolinic acid, a biochemical model of HD, in both AhR-null and wild-type mice to evaluate the neurological damage as well as the oxidative stress caused by the lesion. The present work demonstrates that, in specific brain regions of AhR-null mice, the levels of KYNA are increased and that this induces a neuroprotective effect against neurotoxic insults. Moreover, AhR-null mice also show improved motor performance in the rotarod test, indicating a constitutive protection of striatal tissue. PMID:26013807

  17. Effect of increasing temperature in the differential activity of oxidative stress biomarkers in various tissues of the Rock goby, Gobius paganellus.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, Catarina; Madeira, Diana; Mendonça, Vanessa; Dias, Marta; Roma, Joana; Diniz, Mário S

    2014-06-01

    Oxidative stress biomarkers have been widely used in the development of ecological indices and in the assessment of exposure of aquatic organisms to contaminants from agricultural, industrial and urban pollution. However, temperature is known to also have a significant effect on oxidative stress biomarkers. This way, temperature is a confounding factor that may result in difficulties in the interpretation of oxidative stress biomarkers response patterns. Since climate change is expected to result in more frequent and intense heat wave events it is pertinent to investigate the effect of increasing temperature in the oxidative stress response of common aquatic organisms. It is also important to assess the differential response of different body tissues, given that they are differently exposed to temperature depending on their location and physiological function. This study investigates the effect of increasing temperature (20 °C-34 °C) in the response of multiple biomarkers of oxidative stress: lipid peroxidation, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, in the muscle, liver and gills of a common coastal fish, the Rock goby, Gobius paganellus. The response of the oxidative stress biomarkers analysed were always higher in the gills than in the other tissues. Muscle generally presented the lower levels of any of the biomarkers tested when compared to other tissues. Nevertheless, muscle tissue always responded significantly to temperature, as did the liver, while the gills were unresponsive in terms of lipid peroxidation and glutathione-S-transferase. Unresponsive tissues to temperature may be particularly interesting as indicators of pollution, given that temperature will not be a confounding variable in their oxidative stress response. PMID:24534436

  18. Pioglitazone treatment increases COX-2-derived prostacyclin production and reduces oxidative stress in hypertensive rats: role in vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Hernanz, Raquel; Martín, Ángela; Pérez-Girón, Jose V; Palacios, Roberto; Briones, Ana M; Miguel, Marta; Salaices, Mercedes; Alonso, María J

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE PPARγ agonists, glitazones, have cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory actions associated with gene transcription interference. In this study, we determined whether chronic treatment of adult spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with pioglitazone alters BP and vascular structure and function, and the possible mechanisms involved. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Mesenteric resistance arteries from untreated or pioglitazone-treated (2.5 mg·kg−1·day−1, 28 days) SHR and normotensive [Wistar Kyoto (WKY)] rats were used. Vascular structure was studied by pressure myography, vascular function by wire myography, protein expression by Western blot and immunohistochemistry, mRNA levels by RT-PCR, prostanoid levels by commercial kits and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by dihydroethidium-emitted fluorescence. KEY RESULTS In SHR, pioglitazone did not modify either BP or vascular structural and mechanical alterations or phenylephrine-induced contraction, but it increased vascular COX-2 levels, prostacyclin (PGI2) production and the inhibitory effects of NS 398, SQ 29,548 and tranylcypromine on phenylephrine responses. The contractile phase of the iloprost response, which was reduced by SQ 29,548, was greater in pioglitazone-treated and pioglitazone-untreated SHR than WKY. In addition, pioglitazone abolished the increased vascular ROS production, NOX-1 levels and the inhibitory effect of apocynin and allopurinol on phenylephrine contraction, whereas it did not modify eNOS expression but restored the potentiating effect of N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester on phenylephrine responses. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Although pioglitazone did not reduce BP in SHR, it increased COX-2-derived PGI2 production, reduced oxidative stress, and increased NO bioavailability, which are all involved in vasoconstrictor responses in resistance arteries. These effects would contribute to the cardioprotective effect of glitazones reported in several pathologies. PMID

  19. Oxidative stress promotes the increase of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 activities in the feto-placental unit of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Pustovrh, María Carolina; Jawerbaum, Alicia; Capobianco, Evangelina; White, Verónica; Martínez, Nora; López-Costa, Juan José; González, Elida

    2005-12-01

    Maternal diabetes increases the risk of congenital malformations, placental dysfunction and diseases in both the neonate and the offspring's later life. Oxidative stress has been involved in the etiology of these abnormalities. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), involved in multiple developmental pathways, are increased in the fetus and placenta from diabetic experimental models. As oxidants could be involved in the activation of latent MMPs, we investigated a putative relationship between MMPs activities and oxidative stress in the feto-placental unit of diabetic rats at midgestation. We found that H2O2 enhanced and that superoxide dismutase (SOD) reduced MMPs activities in the maternal side of the placenta and in the fetuses from control and diabetic rats. MMPs were not modified by oxidative status in the fetal side of the placenta. Lipid peroxidation was enhanced in the maternal and fetal sides of the placenta and in the fetus from diabetic rats when compared to controls, and gradually decreased from the maternal placental side to the fetus in diabetic animals. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and catalase were decreased in the maternal placental side, catalase activity was enhanced in the fetal placental side and both enzymes were increased in the fetuses from diabetic rats when compared to controls. Our data demonstrate changes in the oxidative balance and capability of oxidants to upregulate MMPs activity in the feto-placental unit from diabetic rats, a basis to elucidate links between oxidative stress and alterations in the developmental pathways in which MMPs are involved. PMID:16298858

  20. Increased p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is involved in the oxidative stress associated with oxygen and glucose deprivation in neonatal hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Rau, Thomas F.; Harris, Valerie; Johnson, Maribeth; Poulsen, David J.; Black, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    The pathological basis of neonatal hypoxia–ischemia (HI) brain damage is characterized by neuronal cell loss. Oxidative stress is thought to be one of the main causes of HI-induced neuronal cell death. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is activated under conditions of cell stress. However, its pathogenic role in regulating the oxidative stress associated with HI injury in the brain is not well understood. Thus, this study was conducted to examine the role of p38 MAPK signaling in neonatal HI brain injury using neonatal rat hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen / glucose deprivation (OGD). Our results indicate that OGD led to a transient increase in p38 MAPK activation that preceded increases in superoxide generation and neuronal death. This increase in neuronal cell death correlated with an increase in the activation of caspase-3 and the appearance of apoptotic neuronal cells. Pre-treatment of slice cultures with the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, or the expression of an antisense p38 MAPK construct only in neuronal cells, through a Synapsin I-1-driven adeno-associated virus vector, inhibited p38 MAPK activity and exerted a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by decreases in OGD-mediated oxidative stress, caspase activation and neuronal cell death. Thus, we conclude that the activation of p38 MAPK in neuronal cells plays a key role in the oxidative stress and neuronal cell death associated with OGD. PMID:21939459

  1. Free Fatty Acids Increase Intracellular Lipid Accumulation and Oxidative Stress by Modulating PPARα and SREBP-1c in L-02 Cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shumin; Yin, Jinjin; Huang, Keer

    2016-07-01

    Excessive fat accumulation and increased oxidative stress contribute to the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the mechanisms underlying the development of steatosis are not entirely understood. The present study was undertaken to establish an experimental model of hepatocellular steatosis with a fat overaccumulation profile in which the effects of oxidative stress could be studied in L-02 cells. We investigated the effects of free fatty acids (FFA) (palmitate:oleate, 1:2) on lipid accumulation and oxidative stress and their possible mechanisms in L-02 cells. High concentrations of fatty acids significantly induced excessive lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in L-02 cells, which could only be reversed with 50 μΜ WY14643 (the PPARα agonist). Immunoblotting and qPCR analyses revealed that FFA downregulated the expression of proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), which contributed to the increased activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). These results suggest that FFA induce lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in L-02 cells by upregulating SREBP-1c expression through the suppression of PPARα. PMID:27270405

  2. Oxidative stress alters base excision repair pathway and increases apoptotic response in apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 haploinsufficient mice.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Archana; Raffoul, Julian J; Patel, Hiral V; Prychitko, Thomas M; Anyangwe, Njwen; Meira, Lisiane B; Friedberg, Errol C; Cabelof, Diane C; Heydari, Ahmad R

    2009-06-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1/redox factor-1 (APE1/Ref-1) is the redox regulator of multiple stress-inducible transcription factors, such as NF-kappaB, and the major 5'-endonuclease in base excision repair (BER). We utilized mice containing a heterozygous gene-targeted deletion of APE1/Ref-1 (Apex(+/-)) to determine the impact of APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency on the processing of oxidative DNA damage induced by 2-nitropropane (2-NP) in the liver tissue of mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency results in a significant decline in NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity in response to oxidative stress in liver. In addition, loss of APE1/Ref-1 increases the apoptotic response to oxidative stress, in which significant increases in GADD45g expression, p53 protein stability, and caspase activity are observed. Oxidative stress displays a differential impact on monofunctional (UNG) and bifunctional (OGG1) DNA glycosylase-initiated BER in the liver of Apex(+/-) mice. APE1/Ref-1 haploinsufficiency results in a significant decline in the repair of oxidized bases (e.g., 8-OHdG), whereas removal of uracil is increased in liver nuclear extracts of mice using an in vitro BER assay. Apex(+/-) mice exposed to 2-NP displayed a significant decline in 3'-OH-containing single-strand breaks and an increase in aldehydic lesions in their liver DNA, suggesting an accumulation of repair intermediates of failed bifunctional DNA glycosylase-initiated BER. PMID:19268524

  3. Liver metabolomics reveals increased oxidative stress and fibrogenic potential in gfrp transgenic mice in response to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Cheema, Amrita K; Pathak, Rupak; Zandkarimi, Fereshteh; Kaur, Prabhjit; Alkhalil, Lynn; Singh, Rajbir; Zhong, Xiaogang; Ghosh, Sanchita; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Although radiation-induced tissue-specific injury is well documented, the underlying molecular changes resulting in organ dysfunction and the consequences thereof on overall metabolism and physiology have not been elucidated. We previously reported the generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse strain that ubiquitously overexpresses Gfrp (GTPH-1 feedback regulatory protein) and exhibits higher oxidative stress, which is a possible result of decreased tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) bioavailability. In this study, we report genotype-dependent changes in the metabolic profiles of liver tissue after exposure to nonlethal doses of ionizing radiation. Using a combination of untargeted and targeted quantitative mass spectrometry, we report significant accumulation of metabolites associated with oxidative stress, as well as the dysregulation of lipid metabolism in transgenic mice after radiation exposure. The radiation stress seems to exacerbate lipid peroxidation and also results in higher expression of genes that facilitate liver fibrosis, in a manner that is dependent on the genetic background and post-irradiation time interval. These findings suggest the significance of Gfrp in regulating redox homeostasis in response to stress induced by ionizing radiation affecting overall physiology. PMID:24824572

  4. Liver Metabolomics Reveals Increased Oxidative Stress and Fibrogenic Potential in Gfrp Transgenic Mice in Response to Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Although radiation-induced tissue-specific injury is well documented, the underlying molecular changes resulting in organ dysfunction and the consequences thereof on overall metabolism and physiology have not been elucidated. We previously reported the generation and characterization of a transgenic mouse strain that ubiquitously overexpresses Gfrp (GTPH-1 feedback regulatory protein) and exhibits higher oxidative stress, which is a possible result of decreased tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) bioavailability. In this study, we report genotype-dependent changes in the metabolic profiles of liver tissue after exposure to nonlethal doses of ionizing radiation. Using a combination of untargeted and targeted quantitative mass spectrometry, we report significant accumulation of metabolites associated with oxidative stress, as well as the dysregulation of lipid metabolism in transgenic mice after radiation exposure. The radiation stress seems to exacerbate lipid peroxidation and also results in higher expression of genes that facilitate liver fibrosis, in a manner that is dependent on the genetic background and post-irradiation time interval. These findings suggest the significance of Gfrp in regulating redox homeostasis in response to stress induced by ionizing radiation affecting overall physiology. PMID:24824572

  5. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gaupp, Rosmarie; Ledala, Nagender; Somerville, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria's interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host. PMID:22919625

  6. Enhanced nitric oxide generation from nitric oxide synthases as the cause of increased peroxynitrite formation during acute restraint stress: Effects on carotid responsiveness to angiotensinergic stimuli in type-1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Josimar D; Pernomian, Larissa; Gomes, Mayara S; Moreira, Rafael P; do Prado, Alejandro F; da Silva, Carlos H T P; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species accumulation. Behavioral stress increases nitric oxide production, which may trigger a massive impact on vascular cells and accelerate cardiovascular complications under oxidative stress conditions such as Diabetes. For this study, type-1 Diabetes mellitus was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. After 28 days, cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II were obtained in endothelium-intact carotid rings from diabetic rats that underwent to acute restraint stress for 3h. The contractile response evoked by angiotensin II was increased in carotid arteries from diabetic rats. Acute restraint stress did not alter angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid arteries from normoglycaemic rats. However acute stress combined with Diabetes increased angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid rings. Western blot experiments and the inhibition of nitric oxide synthases in functional assays showed that neuronal, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms contribute to the increased formation of peroxynitrite and contractile hyperreactivity to angiotensin II in carotid rings from stressed diabetic rats. In summary, these findings suggest that the increased superoxide anion generation in carotid arteries from diabetic rats associated to the increased local nitric oxide synthases expression and activity induced by acute restrain stress were responsible for exacerbating the local formation of peroxynitrite and the contraction induced by angiotensin II. PMID:27118175

  7. Impaired Corpus Cavernosum Relaxation Is Accompanied by Increased Oxidative Stress and Up-Regulation of the Rho-Kinase Pathway in Diabetic (Db/Db) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Priviero, Fernanda B. M.; Toque, Haroldo A. F.; Nunes, Kenia Pedrosa; Priolli, Denise G.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2016-01-01

    Basal release of nitric oxide from endothelial cells modulates contractile activity in the corpus cavernosum via inhibition of the RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling pathway. We aimed to investigate nitric oxide bioavailability, oxidative stress and the Rho-kinase pathway in the relaxation of the corpus cavernosum of an obese and diabetic model of mice (db/db mice). We hypothesized that in db/db mice impaired relaxation induced by Rho-kinase inhibitor is accompanied by diminished NO bioavailability, increased oxidative stress and upregulation of the RhoA/Rho-kinase signalling pathway. Cavernosal strips from male lean and non-diabetic db/+ and db/db mice were mounted in myographs and isometric force in response to Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was recorded. Enzyme activity and protein expression of oxidative stress markers and key molecules of the RhoA/Rho-kinase pathway were analyzed. The Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 concentration-dependently caused corpus cavernosum relaxation and inhibited cavernosal contractions. Nonetheless, a rightward shift in the curves obtained in corpus cavernosum of db/db mice was observed. Compared to db/+, this strain presented increased active RhoA, higher MYPT-1 phosphorylation stimulated by phenylephrine, and increased expression of ROKα and Rho-GEFs. Further, we observed normal expression of endothelial and neuronal NOS in corpus cavernosum of db/db mice. However, nitrate/nitrate (NOx) levels were diminished, suggesting decreased NO bioavailability. We measured the oxidant status and observed increased lipid peroxidation, with decreased SOD activity and expression. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that in db/db mice, upregulation of the RhoA/Rho-kinase signalling pathway was accompanied by decreased NO bioavailability and increased oxidative stress contributing to impaired relaxation of the corpus cavermosum of db/db mice. PMID:27227463

  8. Twofold cost of reproduction: an increase in parental effort leads to higher malarial parasitaemia and to a decrease in resistance to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Christe, Philippe; Glaizot, Olivier; Strepparava, Nicole; Devevey, Godefroy; Fumagalli, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Parental effort is usually associated with high metabolism that could lead to an increase in the production of reactive oxidative species giving rise to oxidative stress. Since many antioxidants involved in the resistance to oxidative stress can also enhance immune function, an increase in parental effort may diminish the level of antioxidants otherwise involved in parasite resistance. In the present study, we performed brood size manipulation in a population of great tits (Parus major) to create different levels of parental effort. We measured resistance to oxidative stress and used a newly developed quantitative PCR assay to quantify malarial parasitaemia. We found that males with an enlarged brood had significantly higher level of malarial parasites and lower red blood cell resistance to free radicals than males rearing control and reduced broods. Brood size manipulation did not affect female parasitaemia, although females with an enlarged brood had lower red blood cell resistance than females with control and reduced broods. However, for both sexes, there was no relationship between the level of parasitaemia and resistance to oxidative stress, suggesting a twofold cost of reproduction. Our results thus suggest the presence of two proximate and independent mechanisms for the well-documented trade-off between current reproductive effort and parental survival. PMID:21920974

  9. Decreased glutamine synthetase, increased citrulline-nitric oxide cycle activities, and oxidative stress in different regions of brain in epilepsy rat model.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mummedy; Yusof, Wan Roslina Wan; Sirajudeen, K N S; Mustapha, Zulkarnain; Govindasamy, Chandran

    2011-03-01

    To understand their role in epilepsy, the nitric oxide synthetase (NOS), argininosuccinate synthetase (AS), argininosuccinate lyase (AL), glutamine synthetase (GS), and arginase activities, along with the concentration of nitrate/nitrite (NOx), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and total antioxidant status (TAS), were estimated in different regions of brain in rats subjected to experimental epilepsy induced by subcutaneous administration of kainic acid (KA). The short-term (acute) group animals were killed after 2 h and the long term (chronic) group animals were killed after 5 days of single injection of KA (15 mg/kg body weight). After decapitation of rats, the brain regions were separated and in their homogenates, the concentration of NOx, TBARS and TAS and the activities of NOS, AS, AL, arginase and glutamine synthetase were assayed by colorimetric methods. The results of the study demonstrated the increased activity of NOS and formation of NO in acute and chronic groups epilepsy. The activities of AS and AL were increased and indicate the effective recycling of citrulline to arginine. The activity of glutamine synthetase was decreased in acute and chronic groups of epilepsy compared to control group and indicate the modulation of its activity by NO in epilepsy. The activity of arginase was not changed in acute group; however it was decreased in chronic group and may favor increased production of NO in this condition. The concentration TBARS were increased and TAS decreased in acute and chronic groups of epilepsy and supports the oxidative stress in epilepsy. PMID:20960085

  10. Ablation of the Locus Coeruleus Increases Oxidative Stress in Tg-2576 Transgenic but Not Wild-Type Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hurko, Orest; Boudonck, Kurt; Gonzales, Cathleen; Hughes, Zoe A.; Jacobsen, J. Steve; Reinhart, Peter H.; Crowther, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Mice transgenic for production of excessive or mutant forms of beta-amyloid differ from patients with Alzheimer's disease in the degree of inflammation, oxidative damage, and alteration of intermediary metabolism, as well as the paucity or absence of neuronal atrophy and cognitive impairment. Previous observers have suggested that differences in inflammatory response reflect a discrepancy in the state of the locus coeruleus (LC), loss of which is an early change in Alzheimer's disease but which is preserved in the transgenic mice. In this paper, we extend these observations by examining the effects of the LC on markers of oxidative stress and intermediary metabolism. We compare four groups: wild-type or Tg2576 Aβ transgenic mice injected with DSP4 or vehicle. Of greatest interest were metabolites different between ablated and intact transgenics, but not between ablated and intact wild-type animals. The Tg2576_DSP4 mice were distinguished from the other three groups by oxidative stress and altered energy metabolism. These observations provide further support for the hypothesis that Tg2576 Aβ transgenic mice with this ablation may be a more congruent model of Alzheimer's disease than are transgenics with an intact LC. PMID:20981353

  11. Age-Related Decrease in Heat Shock 70-kDa Protein 8 in Cerebrospinal Fluid Is Associated with Increased Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, David A; Klaver, Andrea C; Coffey, Mary P; Aasly, Jan O; LeWitt, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Age-associated declines in protein homeostasis mechanisms ("proteostasis") are thought to contribute to age-related neurodegenerative disorders. The increased oxidative stress which occurs with aging can activate a key proteostatic process, chaperone-mediated autophagy. This study investigated age-related alteration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of heat shock 70-kDa protein 8 (HSPA8), a molecular chaperone involved in proteostatic mechanisms including chaperone-mediated autophagy, and its associations with indicators of oxidative stress (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG] and 8-isoprostane) and total anti-oxidant capacity. We examined correlations between age, HSPA8, 8-OHdG, 8-isoprostane, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in CSF samples from 34 healthy subjects ranging from 20 to 75 years of age. Age was negatively associated with HSPA8 (ρ = -0.47; p = 0.005). An age-related increase in oxidative stress was indicated by a positive association between age and 8-OHdG (ρ = 0.61; p = 0.0001). HSPA8 was moderately negatively associated with 8-OHdG (ρ = -0.58; p = 0.0004). Age and HSPA8 were weakly associated with 8-isoprostane and TAC (range of ρ values: -0.15 to 0.16). Our findings in this exploratory study suggest that during healthy aging, CSF HSPA8 may decrease, perhaps due in part to an increase in oxidative stress. Our results also suggest that 8-OHdG may be more sensitive than 8-isoprostane for measuring oxidative stress in CSF. Further studies are indicated to determine if our findings can be replicated with a larger cohort, and if the age-related decrease in HSPA8 in CSF is reflected by a similar change in the brain. PMID:27507943

  12. Age-Related Decrease in Heat Shock 70-kDa Protein 8 in Cerebrospinal Fluid Is Associated with Increased Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Loeffler, David A.; Klaver, Andrea C.; Coffey, Mary P.; Aasly, Jan O.; LeWitt, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Age-associated declines in protein homeostasis mechanisms (“proteostasis”) are thought to contribute to age-related neurodegenerative disorders. The increased oxidative stress which occurs with aging can activate a key proteostatic process, chaperone-mediated autophagy. This study investigated age-related alteration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of heat shock 70-kDa protein 8 (HSPA8), a molecular chaperone involved in proteostatic mechanisms including chaperone-mediated autophagy, and its associations with indicators of oxidative stress (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG] and 8-isoprostane) and total anti-oxidant capacity. We examined correlations between age, HSPA8, 8-OHdG, 8-isoprostane, and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in CSF samples from 34 healthy subjects ranging from 20 to 75 years of age. Age was negatively associated with HSPA8 (ρ = –0.47; p = 0.005). An age-related increase in oxidative stress was indicated by a positive association between age and 8-OHdG (ρ = 0.61; p = 0.0001). HSPA8 was moderately negatively associated with 8-OHdG (ρ = –0.58; p = 0.0004). Age and HSPA8 were weakly associated with 8-isoprostane and TAC (range of ρ values: –0.15 to 0.16). Our findings in this exploratory study suggest that during healthy aging, CSF HSPA8 may decrease, perhaps due in part to an increase in oxidative stress. Our results also suggest that 8-OHdG may be more sensitive than 8-isoprostane for measuring oxidative stress in CSF. Further studies are indicated to determine if our findings can be replicated with a larger cohort, and if the age-related decrease in HSPA8 in CSF is reflected by a similar change in the brain. PMID:27507943

  13. Senescence marker protein-30/superoxide dismutase 1 double knockout mice exhibit increased oxidative stress and hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yoshitaka; Masutomi, Hirofumi; Noda, Yoshihiro; Ozawa, Yusuke; Takahashi, Keita; Handa, Setsuko; Maruyama, Naoki; Shimizu, Takahiko; Ishigami, Akihito

    2014-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) is an antioxidant enzyme that converts superoxide anion radicals into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. The senescence marker protein-30 (SMP30) is a gluconolactonase that functions as an antioxidant protein in mammals due to its involvement in ascorbic acid (AA) biosynthesis. SMP30 also participates in Ca(2+) efflux by activating the calmodulin-dependent Ca(2+)-pump. To reveal the role of oxidative stress in lipid metabolism defects occurring in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease pathogenesis, we generated SMP30/SOD1-double knockout (SMP30/SOD1-DKO) mice and investigated their survival curves, plasma and hepatic lipid profiles, amounts of hepatic oxidative stress, and hepatic protein levels expressed by genes related to lipid metabolism. While SMP30/SOD1-DKO pups had no growth retardation by 14 days of age, they did have low plasma and hepatic AA levels. Thereafter, 39% and 53% of male and female pups died by 15-24 and 89 days of age, respectively. Compared to wild type, SMP30-KO and SOD1-KO mice, by 14 days SMP30/SOD1-DKO mice exhibited: (1) higher plasma levels of triglyceride and aspartate aminotransferase; (2) severe accumulation of hepatic triglyceride and total cholesterol; (3) higher levels of superoxide anion radicals and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in livers; and (4) decreased mRNA and protein levels of Apolipoprotein B (ApoB) in livers - ApoB is an essential component of VLDL secretion. These results suggest that high levels of oxidative stress due to concomitant deficiency of SMP30 and/or AA, and SOD1 cause abnormal plasma lipid metabolism, hepatic lipid accumulation and premature death resulting from impaired VLDL secretion. PMID:25003023

  14. Iron Dextran Increases Hepatic Oxidative Stress and Alters Expression of Genes Related to Lipid Metabolism Contributing to Hyperlipidaemia in Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maísa; Guerra, Joyce Ferreira da Costa; Sampaio, Ana Flávia Santos; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of iron dextran on lipid metabolism and to determine the involvement of oxidative stress. Fischer rats were divided into two groups: the standard group (S), which was fed the AIN-93M diet, and the standard plus iron group (SI), which was fed the same diet but also received iron dextran injections. Serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were higher in the SI group than in the S group. Iron dextran was associated with decreased mRNA levels of pparα, and its downstream gene cpt1a, which is involved in lipid oxidation. Iron dextran also increased mRNA levels of apoB-100, MTP, and L-FABP indicating alterations in lipid secretion. Carbonyl protein and TBARS were consistently higher in the liver of the iron-treated rats. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between oxidative stress products, lfabp expression, and iron stores. In addition, a negative correlation was found between pparα expression, TBARS, carbonyl protein, and iron stores. In conclusion, our results suggest that the increase observed in the transport of lipids in the bloodstream and the decreased fatty acid oxidation in rats, which was promoted by iron dextran, might be attributed to increased oxidative stress. PMID:25685776

  15. Iron dextran increases hepatic oxidative stress and alters expression of genes related to lipid metabolism contributing to hyperlipidaemia in murine model.

    PubMed

    Silva, Maísa; da Costa Guerra, Joyce Ferreira; Sampaio, Ana Flávia Santos; de Lima, Wanderson Geraldo; Silva, Marcelo Eustáquio; Pedrosa, Maria Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of iron dextran on lipid metabolism and to determine the involvement of oxidative stress. Fischer rats were divided into two groups: the standard group (S), which was fed the AIN-93M diet, and the standard plus iron group (SI), which was fed the same diet but also received iron dextran injections. Serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were higher in the SI group than in the S group. Iron dextran was associated with decreased mRNA levels of pparα, and its downstream gene cpt1a, which is involved in lipid oxidation. Iron dextran also increased mRNA levels of apoB-100, MTP, and L-FABP indicating alterations in lipid secretion. Carbonyl protein and TBARS were consistently higher in the liver of the iron-treated rats. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was found between oxidative stress products, lfabp expression, and iron stores. In addition, a negative correlation was found between pparα expression, TBARS, carbonyl protein, and iron stores. In conclusion, our results suggest that the increase observed in the transport of lipids in the bloodstream and the decreased fatty acid oxidation in rats, which was promoted by iron dextran, might be attributed to increased oxidative stress. PMID:25685776

  16. Chemically induced oxidative stress increases polyamine levels by activating the transcription of ornithine decarboxylase and spermidine/spermine-N1-acetyltransferase in human hepatoma HUH7 cells.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Olga A; Isaguliants, Maria G; Hyvonen, Mervi T; Keinanen, Tuomo A; Tunitskaya, Vera L; Vepsalainen, Jouko; Alhonen, Leena; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Ivanov, Alexander V

    2012-09-01

    Biogenic polyamines spermine and spermidine participate in numerous cellular processes including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Specifically, they counteract oxidative stress, an alteration of cell redox balance involved in generation and progression of various pathological states including cancer. Here, we investigated how chemically induced oxidative stress affects polyamine metabolism, specifically the expression and activities of enzymes catalyzing polyamine synthesis (ornithine decarboxylase; ODC) and degradation (spermidine/spermine-N(1)-acetyltransferase; SSAT), in human hepatoma cells. Oxidative stress induced the up-regulation of ODC and SSAT gene transcription mediated by Nrf2, and in case of SSAT, also by NF-κB transcription factors. Activation of transcription led to the elevated intracellular activities of both enzymes. The balance in antagonistic activities of ODC and SSAT in the stressed hepatoma cells was shifted towards polyamine biosynthesis, which resulted in increased intracellular levels of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine. Accumulation of putrescine is indicating for accelerated degradation of polyamines by SSAT - acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO) pathway generating toxic products that promote carcinogenesis, whereas accelerated polyamine synthesis via activation of ODC is favorable for proliferation of cells including those sub-lethally damaged by oxidative stress. PMID:22579641

  17. Oxidative stress is increased in women with epilepsy: Is it a potential mechanism of anti-epileptic drug-induced teratogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Damayanthi; Jayakumari, Narayani; Thomas, Sanjeev V.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Oxidative stress can be a final common pathway for AED-induced teratogenesis. Aims: To compare the oxidative stress of women with epilepsy (WWE) and unfavorable pregnancy outcome (fetal malformation or spontaneous abortion - group EM) with that of WWE with normal pregnancy outcome (group ENM) and healthy women with normal pregnancy outcome (group C). Materials and Methods: We identified WWE under group EM (n = 43) and group ENM (n = 22) from the Kerala Registry of Epilepsy and Pregnancy (KREP). Group C was constituted of healthy volunteers (N = 20). Oxidative stress was assessed by estimating serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and isoprostane (ISP). The antioxidant profile was evaluated as activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR), catalase (CAT), total antioxidant status (TAO), and glutathione (GSH) content. Results: The MDA and ISP levels for group EM (3.46 + 0.82 and 17.77 + 3.0) were higher than that of group ENM (3.07 + 1.02 and 14.0 + 5.3), and both were significantly higher than that of group C (2.42 + 0.51 and 10.77 + 4.1). Their levels of SOD (146.82 + 42.64 vs. 175.81 + 42.61) and GSH (0.98 + 0.98 vs. 1.55 + 1.3) were significantly lower than those of controls. No significant changes were seen in TAO and GR. WWE on polytherapy showed significant increase in MDA when compared to monotherapy group. Conclusion: WWE (group EM and ENM) had higher oxidative stress and reduced antioxidant activity. The subgroup of WWE with unfavorable pregnancy outcome (group EM) had higher oxidative stress. Excess oxidative stress can be a final common pathway, by which AEDs exert teratogenic effects. PMID:23349593

  18. Space flight and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Stein, T P

    2002-10-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress. PMID:12361781

  19. Space flight and oxidative stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress.

  20. Treatment of β-Thalassemia/Hemoglobin E with Antioxidant Cocktails Results in Decreased Oxidative Stress, Increased Hemoglobin Concentration, and Improvement of the Hypercoagulable State

    PubMed Central

    Yanpanitch, Orn-uma; Hatairaktham, Suneerat; Charoensakdi, Ratiya; Panichkul, Narumol; Fucharoen, Suthat; Siritanaratkul, Noppadol; Kalpravidh, Ruchaneekorn W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on the antioxidant treatment for thalassemia have reported variable outcomes. However, treatment of thalassemia with a combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic antioxidants and an iron chelator has not been studied. This study investigated the effects of antioxidant cocktails for the treatment of β-thalassemia/hemoglobin E (HbE), which is the most common form of β-thalassemia in Southeast Asia. Sixty patients were divided into two groups receiving N-acetylcysteine, deferiprone, and either curcuminoids (CUR) or vitamin E (Vit-E), and their hematological parameters, iron load, oxidative stress, and blood coagulation potential were evaluated. Patients were classified as responders if they showed the improvements of the markers of iron load and oxidative stress, otherwise as nonresponders. During treatment, the responders in both groups had significantly decreased iron load, oxidative stress, and coagulation potential and significantly increased antioxidant capacity and hemoglobin concentration. The significantly maximum increase (P < 0.01) in hemoglobin concentration was 11% at month 4 in CUR group responders and 10% at month 10 in Vit-E group responders. In conclusion, the two antioxidant cocktails can improve anemia, iron overload, oxidative stress, and hypercoagulable state in β-thalassemia/HbE. PMID:26078808

  1. Increased Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Independent of Body Adiposity in Diabetic and Nondiabetic Controls in falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Acquah, Samuel; Boampong, Johnson Nyarko; Eghan Jnr, Benjamin Ackon

    2016-01-01

    Information on the extent to which oxidative stress and inflammation occur in the presence of falciparum malaria and type 2 diabetes mellitus in the same individual is limited. This study sought to investigate the extent of inflammation and oxidative stress in adult uncomplicated malaria by measuring fasting levels of lipid peroxides, C-reactive protein (CRP), and total antioxidant power (TAP) before and during falciparum malaria, in 100 respondents with type 2 diabetes and 100 age-matched controls in the Cape Coast metropolis of Ghana. Also, body adiposity index, body mass index, and waist-to-hip ratio were computed. Before and during falciparum malaria, diabetes patients exhibited higher (P < 0.05) levels of CRP and peroxides than controls but TAP and BAI were comparable (P > 0.05) between the two groups. Baseline CRP correlated positively (r = 0.341, P = 0.002) with peroxide only in the diabetic group. During malaria, TAP level in both study groups declined (P < 0.05) by 80% of their baseline levels. CRP correlated negatively (r = −0.352, P = 0.011) with TAP in the control but not the diabetic group. Uncomplicated falciparum malaria elevated inflammation and peroxidation but decreased antioxidant power independent of adiposity. This finding may have implication on cardiovascular health. PMID:27298824

  2. Plant-Adapted Escherichia coli Show Increased Lettuce Colonizing Ability, Resistance to Oxidative Stress and Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Dublan, Maria de los Angeles; Ortiz-Marquez, Juan Cesar Federico; Lett, Lina; Curatti, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Background Escherichia coli is a widespread gut commensal and often a versatile pathogen of public health concern. E. coli are also frequently found in different environments and/or alternative secondary hosts, such as plant tissues. The lifestyle of E. coli in plants is poorly understood and has potential implications for food safety. Methods/Principal Findings This work shows that a human commensal strain of E. coli K12 readily colonizes lettuce seedlings and produces large microcolony-like cell aggregates in leaves, especially in young leaves, in proximity to the vascular tissue. Our observations strongly suggest that those cell aggregates arise from multiplication of single bacterial cells that reach those spots. We showed that E. coli isolated from colonized leaves progressively colonize lettuce seedlings to higher titers, suggesting a fast adaptation process. E. coli cells isolated from leaves presented a dramatic rise in tolerance to oxidative stress and became more chemotactic responsive towards lettuce leaf extracts. Mutant strains impaired in their chemotactic response were less efficient lettuce colonizers than the chemotactic isogenic strain. However, acclimation to oxidative stress and/or minimal medium alone failed to prime E. coli cells for enhanced lettuce colonization efficiency. Conclusion/Significance These findings help to understand the physiological adaptation during the alternative lifestyle of E. coli in/on plant tissues. PMID:25313845

  3. A natural formulation (imoviral™) increases macrophage resistance to LPS-induced oxidative and inflammatory stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Menghini, L; Leporini, L; Pintore, G; Ferrante, C; Recinella, L; Orlando, G; Vacca, M; Brunetti, L

    2014-01-01

    Imoviral™ is a natural product formulation containing a mixture of uncaria, shiitake and ribes extracts. All ingredients are recognized as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory agent and immunomodulant. In order to evaluate the rational basis of extract mixture as immunomodulatory agent, we tested the effect of Imoviral™ formulation on macrophage response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced stress. The effect was evaluated as variation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and as cytokine gene expression. The extract did not affect cell viability up to 250 μg/ml. Treatment with extract (10-150 μg/ml) reduced ROS and PGE2 production as well as IL-8 and TNF-α gene expression. A pre-treatment with extract blunted LPS-induced production of ROS and PGE2, markers of oxidative and inflammatory stress, as well as the gene expression of all cytokines tested, indicators, in vitro, of immune response activation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Imoviral™ formulation could be a useful tool to modulate the immune function, reducing the oxidative and inflammatory markers related to bacterial attack. Experimental data suggest that Imoviral™ extract mixture could also represent a preventive pharmacological strategy to enhance cell resistance to bacterial infections. PMID:25620186

  4. Postprandial oxidative stress is increased after a phytonutrient-poor food but not after a kilojoule-matched phytonutrient-rich food.

    PubMed

    Khor, Amanda; Grant, Ross; Tung, Chin; Guest, Jade; Pope, Belinda; Morris, Margaret; Bilgin, Ayse

    2014-05-01

    Research indicates that energy-dense foods increase inflammation and oxidative activity, thereby contributing to the development of vascular disease. However, it is not clear whether the high kilojoule load alone, irrespective of the nutritional content of the ingested food, produces the postprandial oxidative and inflammatory activity. This study investigated the hypothesis that ingestion of a high-fat, high-sugar, phytonutrient-reduced food (ice cream) would increase oxidative and inflammatory activity greater than a kilojoule-equivalent meal of a phytonutrient-rich whole food (avocado). The individual contributions of the fat/protein and sugar components of the ice cream meal to postprandial inflammation and oxidative stress were also quantified. Using a randomized, crossover design, 11 healthy participants ingested 4 test meals: ice cream, avocado, the fat/protein component in ice cream, and the sugar equivalent component in ice cream. Plasma glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, and inflammatory and oxidative stress markers were measured at baseline and 1, 2, and 4 hours (t1, t2, t4) after ingestion. Lipid peroxidation was increased at 2 hours after eating fat/protein (t0-t2, P < .05) and sugar (t1-t2, P < .05; t1-t4, P < .05). Antioxidant capacity was decreased at 4 hours after eating ice cream (t0-t4, P < .01) and sugar (t0-t4, P < .01). Ingestion of a kilojoule-equivalent avocado meal did not produce any changes in either inflammatory or oxidative stress markers. These data indicate that the ingestion of a phytonutrient-poor food and its individual fat/protein or sugar components increase plasma oxidative activity. This is not observed after ingestion of a kilojoule-equivalent phytonutrient-rich food. PMID:24916552

  5. Oxidative Stress Markers in Sputum

    PubMed Central

    Antus, Balazs

    2016-01-01

    Although oxidative stress is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway diseases, its assessment in clinical practice remains elusive. In recent years, it has been conceptualized that oxidative stress markers in sputum should be employed to monitor oxidative processes in patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or cystic fibrosis (CF). In this review, the use of sputum-based oxidative markers was explored and potential clinical applications were considered. Among lipid peroxidation-derived products, 8-isoprostane and malondialdehyde have been the most frequently investigated, while nitrosothiols and nitrotyrosine may serve as markers of nitrosative stress. Several studies have showed higher levels of these products in patients with asthma, COPD, or CF compared to healthy subjects. Marker concentrations could be further increased during exacerbations and decreased along with recovery of these diseases. Measurement of oxidized guanine species and antioxidant enzymes in the sputum could be other approaches for assessing oxidative stress in pulmonary patients. Collectively, even though there are promising findings in this field, further clinical studies using more established detection techniques are needed to clearly show the benefit of these measurements in the follow-up of patients with inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26885248

  6. The Impact of Organic Farming on Quality of Tomatoes Is Associated to Increased Oxidative Stress during Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Aurelice B.; Moura, Carlos F. H.; Gomes-Filho, Enéas; Marco, Claudia A.; Urban, Laurent; Miranda, Maria Raquel A.

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted with the objective of testing the hypothesis that tomato fruits from organic farming accumulate more nutritional compounds, such as phenolics and vitamin C as a consequence of the stressing conditions associated with farming system. Growth was reduced in fruits from organic farming while titratable acidity, the soluble solids content and the concentrations in vitamin C were respectively +29%, +57% and +55% higher at the stage of commercial maturity. At that time, the total phenolic content was +139% higher than in the fruits from conventional farming which seems consistent with the more than two times higher activity of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) we observed throughout fruit development in fruits from organic farming. Cell membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO) degree was 60% higher in organic tomatoes. SOD activity was also dramatically higher in the fruits from organic farming. Taken together, our observations suggest that tomato fruits from organic farming experienced stressing conditions that resulted in oxidative stress and the accumulation of higher concentrations of soluble solids as sugars and other compounds contributing to fruit nutritional quality such as vitamin C and phenolic compounds. PMID:23437115

  7. Vitamin E deficiency accelerates nitrate tolerance via a decrease in cardiac P450 expression and increased oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Minamiyama, Yukiko; Takemura, Shigekazu; Hai, Seikan; Suehiro, Shigefumi; Okada, Shigeru

    2006-03-01

    accelerate nitrate tolerance via an increase in oxidative stress, the reduced bioconversion because of decreased P450 expression, and impairment of the NO/cGMP pathway in tolerant heart tissues. PMID:16520233

  8. Deranged bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T lymphocytes and neutrophils are related to cellular dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Lu, Ming-Chi; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Yu, Chia-Li

    2012-01-01

    Urinary excretion of N-benzoyl-glycyl-Nε-(hexanonyl)lysine, a biomarker of oxidative stress, was higher in 26 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in 11 non-SLE patients with connective tissue diseases and in 14 healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress in active SLE might be attributable to deranged bioenergetics, defective reduction-oxidation (redox) capacity, or other factors. We demonstrated that, compared to normal cells, T lymphocytes (T) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) of active SLE showed defective expression of facilitative glucose transporters GLUT-3 and GLUT-6, which led to increased intracellular basal lactate and decreased ATP production. In addition, the redox capacity, including intracellular GSH levels and the enzyme activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT), was decreased in SLE-T. Compared to normal cells, SLE-PMN showed decreased intracellular GSH levels, and GGT enzyme activity was found in SLE-PMN and enhanced expression of CD53, a coprecipitating molecule for GGT. We conclude that deranged cellular bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T and PMN are responsible for cellular immune dysfunction and are related to increased oxidative stress in active SLE patients. PMID:22007252

  9. Increased tolerance to oxidative stress in transgenic tobacco expressing a wheat oxalate oxidase gene via induction of antioxidant enzymes is mediated by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoqing; Tan, Jiali; Lu, Shaoyun; Lin, Chuyu; Hu, Yihong; Guo, Zhenfei

    2009-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) plays a key role in the regulation of plant responses to various environmental stresses and modulates the expression of related genes including those encoding antioxidant enzymes. A wheat oxalate oxidase (OxO) gene was transformed and expressed in tobacco for production of H(2)O(2). The transgenic plants exhibited enhanced OxO activities and H(2)O(2) concentrations, which was blocked by inhibitors of OxO. The transgenic plants showed increased tolerance to methyl viologen (MV) or high light-induced oxidative stress in both short-time and long-time tests by measuring their maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)), ion leakage and malondialdehyde. Higher activities and transcripts of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) were observed in the transgenic plants compared to their wild-type controls under normal growth conditions. Pretreatments with inhibitors of OxO and scavenger of H(2)O(2) blocked the increase of tolerance to MV-induced or high light-induced oxidative stress, as well as the induction of antioxidant enzyme activities. Pretreatments with H(2)O(2) increased tolerance to oxidative stresses and antioxidant enzyme activities. It is suggested that H(2)O(2) produced by OxO in the transgenic tobacco plants triggers the signaling pathways to upregulate expressions of antioxidant enzyme genes, which in turn results in the increase of tolerance to MV-induced and high light-induced oxidative stresses. PMID:19508366

  10. Oxidative Stress and Psychological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Samina

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an imbalance between cellular production of reactive oxygen species and the counteracting antioxidant mechanisms. The brain with its high oxygen consumption and a lipid-rich environment is considered highly susceptible to oxidative stress or redox imbalances. Therefore, the fact that oxidative stress is implicated in several mental disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, is not surprising. Although several elegant studies have established a link between oxidative stress and psychiatric disorders, the causal relationship between oxidative stress and psychiatric diseases is not fully determined. Another critical aspect that needs much attention and effort is our understanding of the association between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines some of the recent discoveries that link oxidative status with anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A discussion of published results and questions that currently exist in the field regarding a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress is also provided. PMID:24669208

  11. Nrf2 expression is increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from mild–moderate ex-smoker COPD patients with persistent oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Fratta Pasini, Anna Maria; Ferrari, Marcello; Stranieri, Chiara; Vallerio, Paola; Mozzini, Chiara; Garbin, Ulisse; Zambon, Giorgia; Cominacini, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    Inadequacy of antioxidant nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated unfolded protein response has been implicated in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and cigarette smoking-induced emphysema. As evidence suggests that the ability to upregulate Nrf2 expression may influence the progression of COPD and no data exist up to now in ex-smokers with mild–moderate COPD, this study was first aimed to evaluate Nrf2 and unfolded protein response expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of mild–moderate ex-smokers with COPD compared to smoking habit-matched non-COPD subjects. Then, we tested whether oxidative stress persists after cigarette smoking cessation and whether the concentrations of oxidized phospholipids (oxidation products of the phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine [oxPAPC]) in the PBMC of the same subjects may have a causative role in determining the upregulation of Nrf2. The expression (mRNA and protein) of Nrf2 and of its related gene heme oxygenase-1 was significantly increased in COPD group without differences in the unfolded protein response. Plasma malondialdehyde, the circulating marker of oxidative stress, and oxPAPC in PBMC were significantly higher in COPD than in non-COPD subjects. The fact that the expression of p47phox, a subunit of NADPH oxidase, was increased in PBMC of COPD patients and that it was directly correlated with oxPAPC may indicate that oxPAPC may be one of the determinants of oxidative stress-induced Nrf2 upregulation. Finally, we also demonstrated that lung function inversely correlated with plasma malondialdehyde and with Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression in all subjects. Our results indicate that mild–moderate ex-smokers with COPD may be able to counteract oxidative stress by increasing the expression of Nrf2/antioxidant-response elements. Because Nrf2 failure significantly contributes to the development of COPD

  12. Peroxiredoxin-2 expression is increased in β-thalassemic mouse red cells but is displaced from the membrane as a marker of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Matte, Alessandro; Low, Philip S.; Turrini, Franco; Bertoldi, Mariarita; Campanella, Maria Estela; Spano, Daniela; Pantaleo, Antonella; Siciliano, Angela; De Franceschi, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin 2 (Prx2), the third most abundant cytoplasmic protein in red blood cells (RBCs), is involved in the defense against oxidative stress. Although much is known about Prx2 in healthy RBCs, its role in pathological RBCs remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that the expression and net content of Prx2 are markedly increased in RBCs from two mouse models of β-thalassemia (β-thal; Hbbth/th and Hbbth3/+ strains). We also demonstrate that the increased expression of Prx2 correlates with the severity of the disease and that the amount of Prx2 bound to the membrane is markedly reduced in β-thal mouse RBCs. To explore the impact of oxidative stress on Prx2 membrane association, we examined Prx2 dimerization and membrane translocation in murine RBCs exposed to various oxidants (phenylhydrazine, PHZ; diamide; H2O2). PHZ-treated RBCs, which mimic the membrane damage in β-thal RBCs, exhibited a kinetic correlation among Prx2 membrane displacement, intracellular methemoglobin levels, and hemichrome membrane association, suggesting the possible masking of Prx2 docking sites by membrane-bound hemichromes, providing a possible mechanism for the accumulation of oxidized/dimerized Prx2 in the cytoplasm and the increased membrane damage in β-thal RBCs. Thus, reduced access of Prx2 to the membrane in β-thal RBCs represents a new factor that could contribute to the oxidative damage characterizing the pathology. PMID:20488244

  13. Oxidative stress in inherited mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Genki; Cortopassi, Gino

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria are a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial diseases are the result of inherited defects in mitochondrially expressed genes. One potential pathomechanism for mitochondrial disease is oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can occur as the result of increased ROS production or decreased ROS protection. The role of oxidative stress in the five most common inherited mitochondrial diseases, Friedreich ataxia, LHON, MELAS, MERRF, and Leigh syndrome (LS), is discussed. Published reports of oxidative stress involvement in the pathomechanisms of these five mitochondrial diseases are reviewed. The strongest evidence for an oxidative stress pathomechanism among the five diseases was for Friedreich ataxia. In addition, a meta-analysis was carried out to provide an unbiased evaluation of the role of oxidative stress in the five diseases, by searching for "oxidative stress" citation count frequency for each disease. Of the five most common mitochondrial diseases, the strongest support for oxidative stress is for Friedreich ataxia (6.42%), followed by LHON (2.45%), MELAS (2.18%), MERRF (1.71%), and LS (1.03%). The increased frequency of oxidative stress citations was significant relative to the mean of the total pool of five diseases (p<0.01) and the mean of the four non-Friedreich diseases (p<0.0001). Thus there is support for oxidative stress in all five most common mitochondrial diseases, but the strongest, significant support is for Friedreich ataxia. PMID:26073122

  14. Cutaneous oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Polefka, Thomas G; Meyer, Thomas A; Agin, Patricia P; Bianchini, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The earliest known microfossil records suggest that microorganisms existed on the earth approximately 3.8 billion years ago. Not only did sunlight drive this evolutionary process, but it also allowed photosynthetic organisms to elaborate oxygen and fundamentally change the earth's atmosphere and subsequent evolution. Paradoxically, however, an atmosphere of 20% oxygen offers aerobic organisms both benefits and some key challenges, particularly, to the external integument. This mini-review summarizes almost 40 years of research and provides a "60 000-foot" perspective on cutaneous oxidative stress. Topics reviewed include the following: What are free radicals and reactive oxygen species? Where do they come from? What is their chemistry? What are their roles and/or impact on the skin? What antioxidant defenses are available to mitigate oxidative stress. PMID:22360336

  15. Conditional knockout of Mn-SOD targeted to type IIB skeletal muscle fibers increases oxidative stress and is sufficient to alter aerobic exercise capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lustgarten, Michael S.; Jang, Youngmok C.; Liu, Yuhong; Muller, Florian L.; Qi, Wenbo; Steinhelper, Mark; Brooks, Susan V.; Larkin, Lisa; Shimizu, Takahiko; Shirasawa, Takuji; McManus, Linda M.; Bhattacharya, Arunabh; Richardson, Arlan

    2009-01-01

    In vitro studies of isolated skeletal muscle have shown that oxidative stress is limiting with respect to contractile function. Mitochondria are a potential source of muscle function-limiting oxidants. To test the hypothesis that skeletal muscle-specific mitochondrial oxidative stress is sufficient to limit muscle function, we bred mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the promoter for the inhibitory subunit of troponin (TnIFast-iCre) with mice containing a floxed Sod2 (Sod2fl/fl) allele. Mn-SOD activity was reduced by 82% in glycolytic (mainly type II) muscle fiber homogenates from young TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice. Furthermore, Mn-SOD content was reduced by 70% only in type IIB muscle fibers. Aconitase activity was decreased by 56%, which suggests an increase in mitochondrial matrix superoxide. Mitochondrial superoxide release was elevated more than twofold by mitochondria isolated from glycolytic skeletal muscle in TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice. In contrast, the rate of mitochondrial H2O2 production was reduced by 33%, and only during respiration with complex II substrate. F2-isoprostanes were increased by 36% in tibialis anterior muscles isolated from TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice. Elevated glycolytic muscle-specific mitochondrial oxidative stress and damage in TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice were associated with a decreased ability of the extensor digitorum longus and gastrocnemius muscles to produce contractile force as a function of time, whereas force production by the soleus muscle was unaffected. TnIFastCreSod2fl/fl mice ran 55% less distance on a treadmill than wild-type mice. Collectively, these data suggest that elevated mitochondrial oxidative stress and damage in glycolytic muscle fibers are sufficient to reduce contractile muscle function and aerobic exercise capacity. PMID:19776389

  16. Oxidative Stress in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Percário, Sandro; Moreira, Danilo R.; Gomes, Bruno A. Q.; Ferreira, Michelli E. S.; Gonçalves, Ana Carolina M.; Laurindo, Paula S. O. C.; Vilhena, Thyago C.; Dolabela, Maria F.; Green, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a significant public health problem in more than 100 countries and causes an estimated 200 million new infections every year. Despite the significant effort to eradicate this dangerous disease, lack of complete knowledge of its physiopathology compromises the success in this enterprise. In this paper we review oxidative stress mechanisms involved in the disease and discuss the potential benefits of antioxidant supplementation as an adjuvant antimalarial strategy. PMID:23208374

  17. Oxidative stress in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Kumar, Binod; Koul, Sweaty; Maroni, Paul; Koul, Hari K

    2009-09-18

    As prostate cancer and aberrant changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) become more common with aging, ROS signaling may play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy. Increased ROS, otherwise known as oxidative stress, is a result of either increased ROS generation or a loss of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidative stress is associated with several pathological conditions including inflammation and infection. ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism and play vital roles in stimulation of signaling pathways in response to changing intra- and extracellular environmental conditions. Chronic increases in ROS over time are known to induce somatic mutations and neoplastic transformation. In this review we summarize the causes for increased ROS generation and its potential role in etiology and progression of prostate cancer. PMID:19185987

  18. Expression of the tetrahydrofolate-dependent nitric oxide synthase from the green alga Ostreococcus tauri increases tolerance to abiotic stresses and influences stomatal development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Foresi, Noelia; Mayta, Martín L; Lodeyro, Anabella F; Scuffi, Denise; Correa-Aragunde, Natalia; García-Mata, Carlos; Casalongué, Claudia; Carrillo, Néstor; Lamattina, Lorenzo

    2015-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule with diverse biological functions in plants. NO plays a crucial role in growth and development, from germination to senescence, and is also involved in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In animals, NO is synthesized by well-described nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes. NOS activity has also been detected in higher plants, but no gene encoding an NOS protein, or the enzymes required for synthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin, an essential cofactor of mammalian NOS activity, have been identified so far. Recently, an NOS gene from the unicellular marine alga Ostreococcus tauri (OtNOS) has been discovered and characterized. Arabidopsis thaliana plants were transformed with OtNOS under the control of the inducible short promoter fragment (SPF) of the sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Hahb-4 gene, which responds to abiotic stresses and abscisic acid. Transgenic plants expressing OtNOS accumulated higher NO concentrations compared with siblings transformed with the empty vector, and displayed enhanced salt, drought and oxidative stress tolerance. Moreover, transgenic OtNOS lines exhibited increased stomatal development compared with plants transformed with the empty vector. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that OtNOS, unlike mammalian NOS, efficiently uses tetrahydrofolate as a cofactor in Arabidopsis plants. The modulation of NO production to alleviate abiotic stress disturbances in higher plants highlights the potential of genetic manipulation to influence NO metabolism as a tool to improve plant fitness under adverse growth conditions. PMID:25880454

  19. Analysis of Oxidative Stress in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Mugoni, Vera; Camporeale, Annalisa; Santoro, Massimo M.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause a change of cellular redox state towards oxidative stress condition. This situation causes oxidation of molecules (lipid, DNA, protein) and leads to cell death. Oxidative stress also impacts the progression of several pathological conditions such as diabetes, retinopathies, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Thus, it is important to define tools to investigate oxidative stress conditions not only at the level of single cells but also in the context of whole organisms. Here, we consider the zebrafish embryo as a useful in vivo system to perform such studies and present a protocol to measure in vivo oxidative stress. Taking advantage of fluorescent ROS probes and zebrafish transgenic fluorescent lines, we develop two different methods to measure oxidative stress in vivo: i) a “whole embryo ROS-detection method” for qualitative measurement of oxidative stress and ii) a “single-cell ROS detection method” for quantitative measurements of oxidative stress. Herein, we demonstrate the efficacy of these procedures by increasing oxidative stress in tissues by oxidant agents and physiological or genetic methods. This protocol is amenable for forward genetic screens and it will help address cause-effect relationships of ROS in animal models of oxidative stress-related pathologies such as neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:25046434

  20. Metformin increases APP expression and processing via oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and NF-κB activation: Use of insulin to attenuate metformin's effect.

    PubMed

    Picone, Pasquale; Nuzzo, Domenico; Caruana, Luca; Messina, Elisa; Barera, Annalisa; Vasto, Sonya; Di Carlo, Marta

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and experimental biomedical studies have shown Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) to be a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study demonstrates the effect of metformin, a therapeutic biguanide administered for T2DM therapy, on β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism in in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models. Furthermore, the protective role of insulin against metformin is also demonstrated. In LAN5 neuroblastoma cells, metformin increases APP and presenilin levels, proteins involved in AD. Overexpression of APP and presenilin 1 (Pres 1) increases APP cleavage and intracellular accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which, in turn, promotes aggregation of Aβ. In the experimental conditions utilized the drug causes oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, decrease of Hexokinase-II levels and cytochrome C release, all of which lead to cell death. Several changes in oxidative stress-related genes following metformin treatment were detected by PCR arrays specific for the oxidative stress pathway. These effects of metformin were found to be antagonized by the addition of insulin, which reduced Aβ levels, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Similarly, antioxidant molecules, such as ferulic acid and curcumin, are able to revert metformin's effect. Comparable results were obtained using peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Finally, the involvement of NF-κB transcription factor in regulating APP and Pres 1 expression was investigated. Upon metformin treatment, NF-κB is activated and translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where it induces increased APP and Pres 1 transcription. The use of Bay11-7085 inhibitor suppressed the effect of metformin on APP and Pres 1 expression. PMID:25667085

  1. Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) as a target of oxidative stress-mediated damage: cochlear and cortical responses after an increase in antioxidant defense.

    PubMed

    Fetoni, Anna Rita; De Bartolo, Paola; Eramo, Sara Letizia Maria; Rolesi, Rolando; Paciello, Fabiola; Bergamini, Christian; Fato, Romana; Paludetti, Gaetano; Petrosini, Laura; Troiani, Diana

    2013-02-27

    This study addresses the relationship between cochlear oxidative damage and auditory cortical injury in a rat model of repeated noise exposure. To test the effect of increased antioxidant defenses, a water-soluble coenzyme Q10 analog (Qter) was used. We analyzed auditory function, cochlear oxidative stress, morphological alterations in auditory cortices and cochlear structures, and levels of coenzymes Q9 and Q10 (CoQ9 and CoQ10, respectively) as indicators of endogenous antioxidant capability. We report three main results. First, hearing loss and damage in hair cells and spiral ganglion was determined by noise-induced oxidative stress. Second, the acoustic trauma altered dendritic morphology and decreased spine number of II-III and V-VI layer pyramidal neurons of auditory cortices. Third, the systemic administration of the water-soluble CoQ10 analog reduced oxidative-induced cochlear damage, hearing loss, and cortical dendritic injury. Furthermore, cochlear levels of CoQ9 and CoQ10 content increased. These findings indicate that antioxidant treatment restores auditory cortical neuronal morphology and hearing function by reducing the noise-induced redox imbalance in the cochlea and the deafferentation effects upstream the acoustic pathway. PMID:23447610

  2. AMPK-mediated increase of glycolysis as an adaptive response to oxidative stress in human cells: implication of the cell survival in mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shi-Bei; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2012-02-01

    We report that the energy metabolism shifts to anaerobic glycolysis as an adaptive response to oxidative stress in the primary cultures of skin fibroblasts from patients with MERRF syndrome. In order to unravel the molecular mechanism involved in the alteration of energy metabolism under oxidative stress, we treated normal human skin fibroblasts (CCD-966SK cells) with sub-lethal doses of H(2)O(2). The results showed that several glycolytic enzymes including hexokinase type II (HK II), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) were up-regulated in H(2)O(2)-treated normal skin fibroblasts. In addition, the glycolytic flux of skin fibroblasts was increased by H(2)O(2) in a dose-dependent manner through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphorylation of its downstream target, phosphofructokinase 2 (PFK2). Moreover, we found that the AMPK-mediated increase of glycolytic flux by H(2)O(2) was accompanied by an increase of intracellular NADPH content. By treatment of the cells with glycolysis inhibitors, an AMPK inhibitor or genetic knockdown of AMPK, respectively, the H(2)O(2)-induced increase of NADPH was abrogated leading to the overproduction of intracellular ROS and cell death. Significantly, we showed that phosphorylation levels of AMPK and glycolysis were up-regulated to confer an advantage of survival for MERRF skin fibroblasts. Taken together, our findings suggest that the increased production of NADPH by AMPK-mediated increase of the glycolytic flux contributes to the adaptation of MERRF skin fibroblasts and H(2)O(2)-treated normal skin fibroblasts to oxidative stress. PMID:22001850

  3. Oxidative stress and adrenocortical insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, R; Kowalczyk, J C; Meimaridou, E; Storr, H L; Metherell, L A

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of redox balance is essential for normal cellular functions. Any perturbation in this balance due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress and may lead to cell dysfunction/damage/death. Mitochondria are responsible for the majority of cellular ROS production secondary to electron leakage as a consequence of respiration. Furthermore, electron leakage by the cytochrome P450 enzymes may render steroidogenic tissues acutely vulnerable to redox imbalance. The adrenal cortex, in particular, is well supplied with both enzymatic (glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins) and non-enzymatic (vitamins A, C and E) antioxidants to cope with this increased production of ROS due to steroidogenesis. Nonetheless oxidative stress is implicated in several potentially lethal adrenal disorders including X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, triple A syndrome and most recently familial glucocorticoid deficiency. The finding of mutations in antioxidant defence genes in the latter two conditions highlights how disturbances in redox homeostasis may have an effect on adrenal steroidogenesis. PMID:24623797

  4. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION IN CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE WITH INCREASED PULMONARY BLOOD FLOW: LESSONS FROM THE NEONATAL LAMB

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases associated with increased pulmonary blood flow commonly lead to the development of pulmonary hypertension. However, most patients who undergo histological evaluation have advanced pulmonary hypertension, and therefore it has been difficult to investigate aberrations in signaling cascades that precede the development of overt vascular remodeling. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role played by oxidative and nitrosative stress in the lung and their impact on the signaling pathways that regulate vasodilation, vessel growth and vascular remodeling in the neonatal lung exposed to increased pulmonary blood flow. PMID:22293025

  5. Increased dietary iron and radiation in rats promote oxidative stress, induce localized and systemic immune system responses, and alter colon mucosal environment.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jennifer L L; Ritchie, Lauren E; Crucian, Brian E; Theriot, Corey; Wu, Honglu; Sams, Clarence; Smith, Scott M; Turner, Nancy D; Zwart, Sara R

    2014-03-01

    Astronauts are exposed to increased body iron stores and radiation, both of which can cause oxidative damage leading to negative health effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate combined effects of high dietary iron (650 mg/kg diet) and radiation exposure (0.375 Gy cesium-137 every other day for 16 d) on markers of oxidative stress, immune system function, and colon mucosal environment in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Control rats consumed adequate iron (45 mg/kg diet) and were not irradiated. Combined treatments increased liver glutathione peroxidase, serum catalase, and colon myeloperoxidase while decreasing total fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations. The high-iron diet alone increased leukocyte count. Radiation decreased the T-cell CD4:CD8 ratio. Plasma iron was negatively correlated with cytokine production in activated monocytes. Genes involved in colon microbial signaling, immune response, and injury repair were altered by radiation. Genes involved with injury repair and pathogen recognition changed with dietary iron. These data demonstrate that dietary iron and radiation, alone and combined, contribute to oxidative stress that is related to immune system alterations in circulation and the colon. The model presented may help us better understand the changes to these systems that have been identified among astronauts. PMID:24334706

  6. Preexposure to Olive Oil Polyphenols Extract Increases Oxidative Load and Improves Liver Mass Restoration after Hepatectomy in Mice via Stress-Sensitive Genes

    PubMed Central

    Marinić, Jelena; Broznić, Dalibor; Milin, Čedomila

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols can act as oxidants in some conditions, inducing redox-sensitive genes. We investigated the effect of preexposure to the olive oil polyphenols extract (PFE) on time-dependent changes in the hepatic oxidative state in a model of liver regeneration—a process in which oxidative stress associated with the metabolic overload accounts for the early events that contribute to the onset of liver self-repair. Liver regeneration was induced by one-third hepatectomy in mice. Prior to hepatectomy, mice were intraperitoneally given either PFE (50 mg/kg body weight) or saline for seven consecutive days, while respective controls received vehicle alone. Redox state-regulating enzymes and thiol proteins along with the mRNA levels of Nrf2 gene and its targets γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase and heme oxygenase-1 were determined at different time intervals after hepatectomy. The liver mass restoration was calculated to assess hepatic regeneration. The resulting data demonstrate the effectiveness of preexposure to PFE in stimulating liver regeneration in a model of a small tissue loss which may be ascribed to the transient increase in oxidant load during the first hours after hepatectomy and associated induction of stress response gene-profiles under the control of Nrf2. PMID:26925195

  7. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  8. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  9. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Nikolaus; Gatterer, Hannes; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Martin; Pramsohler, Stephan; Pesta, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators. PMID:26061760

  10. Ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate inhibit ubiquitin activation through intracellular metal transport and increased oxidative stress in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Kathleen E; Valentine, William M

    2015-04-20

    Ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 plays a pivotal role in ubiquitin based protein signaling through regulating the initiating step of the cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that E1 is inhibited by covalent modification of reactive cysteines contained within the ubiquitin-binding groove and by conditions that increase oxidative stress and deplete cellular antioxidants. In this study, we determined the relative contribution of covalent adduction and oxidative stress to E1 inhibition produced by ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDC) in HEK293 cells. Although no dithiocarbamate-derived E1 adducts were identified on E1 using shotgun LC/MS/MS for either ziram or DMDC, both dithiocarbamates significantly decreased E1 activity, with ziram demonstrating greater potency. Ziram increased intracellular levels of zinc and copper, DMDC increased intracellular levels of only copper, and both dithiocarbamates enhanced oxidative injury evidenced by elevated levels of protein carbonyls and expression of heme oxygenase-1. To assess the contribution of intracellular copper transport to E1 inhibition, coincubations were performed with the copper chelator triethylenetetramine hydrochloride (TET). TET significantly protected E1 activity for both of the dithiocarbamates and decreased the associated oxidative injury in HEK293 cells as well as prevented dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation assayed using an ethyl aracidonate micelle system. Because TET did not completely ameliorate intracellular transport of copper or zinc for ziram, TET apparently maintained E1 activity through its ability to diminish dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidative stress. Experiments to determine the relative contribution of elevated intracellular zinc and copper were performed using a metal free incubation system and showed that increases in either metal were sufficient to inhibit E1. To evaluate the utility of the HEK293 in vitro system for screening environmental agents, a series of additional

  11. Ziram and Sodium N,N-Dimethyldithiocarbamate Inhibit Ubiquitin Activation through Intracellular Metal Transport and Increased Oxidative Stress in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 plays a pivotal role in ubiquitin based protein signaling through regulating the initiating step of the cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that E1 is inhibited by covalent modification of reactive cysteines contained within the ubiquitin-binding groove and by conditions that increase oxidative stress and deplete cellular antioxidants. In this study, we determined the relative contribution of covalent adduction and oxidative stress to E1 inhibition produced by ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDC) in HEK293 cells. Although no dithiocarbamate-derived E1 adducts were identified on E1 using shotgun LC/MS/MS for either ziram or DMDC, both dithiocarbamates significantly decreased E1 activity, with ziram demonstrating greater potency. Ziram increased intracellular levels of zinc and copper, DMDC increased intracellular levels of only copper, and both dithiocarbamates enhanced oxidative injury evidenced by elevated levels of protein carbonyls and expression of heme oxygenase-1. To assess the contribution of intracellular copper transport to E1 inhibition, coincubations were performed with the copper chelator triethylenetetramine hydrochloride (TET). TET significantly protected E1 activity for both of the dithiocarbamates and decreased the associated oxidative injury in HEK293 cells as well as prevented dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation assayed using an ethyl aracidonate micelle system. Because TET did not completely ameliorate intracellular transport of copper or zinc for ziram, TET apparently maintained E1 activity through its ability to diminish dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidative stress. Experiments to determine the relative contribution of elevated intracellular zinc and copper were performed using a metal free incubation system and showed that increases in either metal were sufficient to inhibit E1. To evaluate the utility of the HEK293 in vitro system for screening environmental agents, a series of additional

  12. Chronic Cigarette Smoking Impairs Erectile Function through Increased Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis, Decreased nNOS, Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Contents in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Chin, Chih-Chien; Chen, Chih-Shou; Shindel, Alan W; Ho, Dong-Ru; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette use is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). While the association between chronic smoking and ED is well established, the fundamental mechanism(s) of cigarette-related ED are incompletely understood, partly due to no reliable animal model of smoking-induced ED. The present study was designed to validate an in vivo rat model of chronic cigarette-induced ED. Forty 12-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Ten rats served as control group and were exposed only to room air. The remaining 30 rats were passively exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 4 weeks (n = 10), 12 weeks (n = 10), and 24 weeks (n = 10). At the 24-week time point all rats were assessed with intracavernous pressure (ICP) during cavernous nerve electrostimulation. Blood and urine were collected to measure serum testosterone and oxidative stress, respectively. Corporal tissue was assessed by Western blot for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Penile tissues were subjected to immunohistochemistry for endothelial, smooth muscle, and apoptotic content. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in 24-week cigarette exposed animals compared to the control animals. Mean ICP/MAP ratio and cavernosal smooth muscle/endothelial contents were significantly lower in the 12- and 24-week rats compared to control animals. Oxidative stress was significantly higher in the 24-week cigarette exposed group compared to control animals. Mean nNOS expression was significantly lower, and apoptotic index significantly higher, in CS-exposed animals compared to control animals. These findings indicate that the rat model exposure to CS increases apoptosis and oxidative stress and decreases nNOS, endothelial and smooth muscle contents, and ICP in a dose dependent fashion. The rat model is a useful tool for further study of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of CS-related ED. PMID:26491965

  13. Chronic Cigarette Smoking Impairs Erectile Function through Increased Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis, Decreased nNOS, Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Contents in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yun-Ching; Chin, Chih-Chien; Chen, Chih-Shou; Shindel, Alan. W.; Ho, Dong-Ru; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Shi, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette use is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). While the association between chronic smoking and ED is well established, the fundamental mechanism(s) of cigarette-related ED are incompletely understood, partly due to no reliable animal model of smoking-induced ED. The present study was designed to validate an in vivo rat model of chronic cigarette-induced ED. Forty 12-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups. Ten rats served as control group and were exposed only to room air. The remaining 30 rats were passively exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 4 weeks (n = 10), 12 weeks (n = 10), and 24 weeks (n = 10). At the 24-week time point all rats were assessed with intracavernous pressure (ICP) during cavernous nerve electrostimulation. Blood and urine were collected to measure serum testosterone and oxidative stress, respectively. Corporal tissue was assessed by Western blot for neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Penile tissues were subjected to immunohistochemistry for endothelial, smooth muscle, and apoptotic content. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly higher in 24-week cigarette exposed animals compared to the control animals. Mean ICP/MAP ratio and cavernosal smooth muscle/endothelial contents were significantly lower in the 12- and 24-week rats compared to control animals. Oxidative stress was significantly higher in the 24-week cigarette exposed group compared to control animals. Mean nNOS expression was significantly lower, and apoptotic index significantly higher, in CS-exposed animals compared to control animals. These findings indicate that the rat model exposure to CS increases apoptosis and oxidative stress and decreases nNOS, endothelial and smooth muscle contents, and ICP in a dose dependent fashion. The rat model is a useful tool for further study of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of CS-related ED. PMID:26491965

  14. Role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lubos, Edith; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade basic and clinical research has highlighted the central role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular disease. Enhanced production or attenuated degradation of ROS leads to oxidative stress, a process that affects endothelial and vascular function, and contributes to vascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO), a product of the normal endothelium, is a principal determinant of normal endothelial and vascular function. In states of inflammation, NO production by the vasculature increases considerably and, in conjunction with other ROS, contributes to oxidative stress. This review examines the role of oxidative stress and NO in mechanisms of endothelial and vascular dysfunction with an emphasis on atherothrombosis. PMID:18508590

  15. Necrosis is increased in lymphoblastoid cell lines from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Main, Penelope A E; Thomas, Philip; Esterman, Adrian; Fenech, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterised by impairments in reciprocal social interaction, communication and stereotyped behaviours. As increased DNA damage events have been observed in a range of other neurological disorders, it was hypothesised that they would be elevated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) obtained from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings. Six case-sibling pairs of LCLs from children with autistic disorder and their non-autistic siblings were obtained from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) and cultured in standard RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium. Cells were exposed to medium containing either 0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM hydrogen peroxide (an oxidative stressor) or 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 µM s-nitroprusside (a nitric oxide producer) for 1h. Following exposure, the cells were microscopically scored for DNA damage, cytostasis and cytotoxicity biomarkers as measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. Necrosis was significantly increased in cases relative to controls when exposed to oxidative and nitrosative stress (P = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Nuclear division index was significantly lower in LCLs from children with autistic disorder than their non-autistic siblings when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (P = 0.016), but there was no difference in apoptosis, micronucleus frequency, nucleoplasmic bridges or nuclear buds. Exposure to s-nitroprusside significantly increased the number of micronuclei in non-autistic siblings compared with cases (P = 0.003); however, other DNA damage biomarkers, apoptosis and nuclear division did not differ significantly between groups. The findings of this study show (i) that LCLs from children with autism are more sensitive to necrosis under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress than their non-autistic siblings and (ii) refutes the hypothesis that children with autistic disorder are abnormally

  16. Necrosis is increased in lymphoblastoid cell lines from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress

    PubMed Central

    Fenech, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterised by impairments in reciprocal social interaction, communication and stereotyped behaviours. As increased DNA damage events have been observed in a range of other neurological disorders, it was hypothesised that they would be elevated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) obtained from children with autism compared with their non-autistic siblings. Six case–sibling pairs of LCLs from children with autistic disorder and their non-autistic siblings were obtained from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) and cultured in standard RPMI-1640 tissue culture medium. Cells were exposed to medium containing either 0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 µM hydrogen peroxide (an oxidative stressor) or 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 µM s-nitroprusside (a nitric oxide producer) for 1h. Following exposure, the cells were microscopically scored for DNA damage, cytostasis and cytotoxicity biomarkers as measured using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay. Necrosis was significantly increased in cases relative to controls when exposed to oxidative and nitrosative stress (P = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Nuclear division index was significantly lower in LCLs from children with autistic disorder than their non-autistic siblings when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (P = 0.016), but there was no difference in apoptosis, micronucleus frequency, nucleoplasmic bridges or nuclear buds. Exposure to s-nitroprusside significantly increased the number of micronuclei in non-autistic siblings compared with cases (P = 0.003); however, other DNA damage biomarkers, apoptosis and nuclear division did not differ significantly between groups. The findings of this study show (i) that LCLs from children with autism are more sensitive to necrosis under conditions of oxidative and nitrosative stress than their non-autistic siblings and (ii) refutes the hypothesis that children with autistic disorder are abnormally

  17. Increased expression of the dopamine transporter leads to loss of dopamine neurons, oxidative stress and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits.

    PubMed

    Masoud, S T; Vecchio, L M; Bergeron, Y; Hossain, M M; Nguyen, L T; Bermejo, M K; Kile, B; Sotnikova, T D; Siesser, W B; Gainetdinov, R R; Wightman, R M; Caron, M G; Richardson, J R; Miller, G W; Ramsey, A J; Cyr, M; Salahpour, A

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine transporter is a key protein responsible for regulating dopamine homeostasis. Its function is to transport dopamine from the extracellular space into the presynaptic neuron. Studies have suggested that accumulation of dopamine in the cytosol can trigger oxidative stress and neurotoxicity. Previously, ectopic expression of the dopamine transporter was shown to cause damage in non-dopaminergic neurons due to their inability to handle cytosolic dopamine. However, it is unknown whether increasing dopamine transporter activity will be detrimental to dopamine neurons that are inherently capable of storing and degrading dopamine. To address this issue, we characterized transgenic mice that over-express the dopamine transporter selectively in dopamine neurons. We report that dopamine transporter over-expressing (DAT-tg) mice display spontaneous loss of midbrain dopamine neurons that is accompanied by increases in oxidative stress markers, 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine and 5-S-cysteinyl-DOPAC. In addition, metabolite-to-dopamine ratios are increased and VMAT2 protein expression is decreased in the striatum of these animals. Furthermore, DAT-tg mice also show fine motor deficits on challenging beam traversal that are reversed with l-DOPA treatment. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that even in neurons that routinely handle dopamine, increased uptake of this neurotransmitter through the dopamine transporter results in oxidative damage, neuronal loss and l-DOPA reversible motor deficits. In addition, DAT over-expressing animals are highly sensitive to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The effects of increased dopamine uptake in these transgenic mice could shed light on the unique vulnerability of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease. PMID:25447236

  18. Vitamin C deficiency in the brain impairs cognition, increases amyloid accumulation and deposition, and oxidative stress in APP/PSEN1 and normally aging mice.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Shilpy; Bernardo, Alexandra; Walker, Jennifer Michelle; Kennard, John Andrew; Kim, Grace Youngeun; Kessler, Eric Sean; Harrison, Fiona Edith

    2015-04-15

    Subclinical vitamin C deficiency is widespread in many populations, but its role in both Alzheimer's disease and normal aging is understudied. In the present study, we decreased brain vitamin C in the APPSWE/PSEN1deltaE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease by crossing APP/PSEN1(+) bigenic mice with SVCT2(+/-) heterozygous knockout mice, which have lower numbers of the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter required for neuronal vitamin C transport. SVCT2(+/-) mice performed less well on the rotarod task at both 5 and 12 months of age compared to littermates. SVCT2(+/-) and APP/PSEN1(+) mice and the combination genotype SVCT2(+/-)APP/PSEN1(+) were also impaired on multiple tests of cognitive ability (olfactory memory task, Y-maze alternation, conditioned fear, Morris water maze). In younger mice, both low vitamin C (SVCT2(+/-)) and APP/PSEN1 mutations increased brain cortex oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyls, F2-isoprostanes) and decreased total glutathione compared to wild-type controls. SVCT2(+/-) mice also had increased amounts of both soluble and insoluble Aβ1-42 and a higher Aβ1-42/1-40 ratio. By 14 months of age, oxidative stress levels were similar among groups, but there were more amyloid-β plaque deposits in both hippocampus and cortex of SVCT2(+/-)APP/PSEN1(+) mice compared to APP/PSEN1(+) mice with normal brain vitamin C. These data suggest that even moderate intracellular vitamin C deficiency plays an important role in accelerating amyloid pathogenesis, particularly during early stages of disease development, and that these effects are likely modulated by oxidative stress pathways. PMID:25642732

  19. Vitamin C deficiency in the brain impairs cognition, increases amyloid accumulation and deposition, and oxidative stress in APP/PSEN1 and normally-aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Shilpy; Bernardo, Alexandra; Walker, Michelle Jennifer; Kennard, John Andrew; Kim, Grace Youngeun; Kessler, Eric Sean; Harrison, Fiona Edith

    2015-01-01

    Subclinical vitamin C deficiency is widespread in many populations, but its role in both Alzheimer’s disease and normal aging is understudied. In the present study we decreased brain vitamin C in the APPSWE/PSEN1deltaE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, by crossing APP/PSEN1+ bigenic mice with SVCT2+/− heterozygous knockout mice, which have lower numbers of the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter required for neuronal vitamin C transport. SVCT2+/− mice performed less well on the rotarod task at both 5 and 12 months of age compared to littermates. SVCT2+/− and APP/PSEN1+, mice, and the combination genotype SVCT2+/−APP/PSEN1+, were also impaired on multiple tests of cognitive ability (olfactory memory task, Y-maze alternation, conditioned fear, Morris water maze). In younger mice, both low vitamin C (SVCT2+/−) and APP/PSEN1 mutations increased brain cortex oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyls, F2-isoprostanes) and decreased total glutathione compared to wild-type controls. SVCT2+/− mice also had increased amounts of both soluble and insoluble Aβ1-42 and a higher Aβ1-42/1-40 ratio. By 14 months of age, oxidative stress levels were similar among groups, but there were more amyloid-β plaque deposits in both hippocampus and cortex of SVCT2+/−APP/PSEN1+ mice compared to APP/PSEN1+ mice with normal brain vitamin C. The data suggest that even moderate intracellular vitamin C deficiency plays an important role in accelerating amyloid pathogenesis, particularly during early stages of disease development, and that these effects are likely modulated by oxidative stress pathways. PMID:25642732

  20. Increasing the Vegetable Intake Dose Is Associated with a Rise in Plasma Carotenoids without Modifying Oxidative Stress or Inflammation in Overweight or Obese Postmenopausal Women123

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Tracy E.; Kubota, Chieri; West, Julie L.; Kroggel, Mark A.; Wertheim, Betsy C.; Thomson, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    The optimal amount of vegetable consumption required to reduce chronic disease risk is widely debated. Intervention trials evaluating biological activity of vegetables at various doses are limited. We conducted a 3-dose, crossover feeding trial to test the hypothesis that vegetable intake is associated in a dose-dependent manner with increased plasma carotenoids and subsequently reduced oxidative stress and inflammation in 49 overweight, postmenopausal women. Participants were assigned in random order to 2 (130 g), 5 (287 g), and 10 (614 g) daily servings of fresh, greenhouse-grown vegetables for 3-wk intervals with a 4-wk washout period between treatments. Plasma total carotenoids significantly increased from 1.63 to 2.07 μmol/L with a dose of 2 vegetable servings, from 1.49 to 2.84 μmol/L with a dose of 5 vegetable servings, and from 1.40 to 4.42 μmol/L with a dose of 10 vegetable servings (pre-post paired ttests, all P < 0.001). The change during each feeding period increased with each dose level (P < 0.001). Urine concentrations of 8-isoprostane F2α, hexanoyl lysine, and serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein were not affected by any administered vegetable dose. In this variable-dose vegetable study, a dose-response for plasma carotenoids was demonstrated without significant change in oxidative stress and inflammation in overweight, postmenopausal women. PMID:21865569

  1. Hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirin, ACS14, attenuates high glucose-induced increased methylglyoxal and oxidative stress in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qian; Sparatore, Anna; Del Soldato, Piero; Wu, Lingyun; Desai, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide is a gasotransmitter with vasodilatory and anti-inflammatory properties. Aspirin is an irreversible cyclooxygenase inhibitor anti-inflammatory drug. ACS14 is a novel synthetic hydrogen sulfide releasing aspirin which inhibits cyclooxygenase and has antioxidant effects. Methylglyoxal is a chemically active metabolite of glucose and fructose, and a major precursor of advanced glycation end products formation. Methylglyoxal is harmful when produced in excess. Plasma methylglyoxal levels are significantly elevated in diabetic patients. Our aim was to investigate the effects of ACS14 on methylglyoxal levels in cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. We used cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells for the study. Methylglyoxal was measured by HPLC after derivatization, and nitrite+nitrate with an assay kit. Western blotting was used to determine NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein expression. Dicholorofluorescein assay was used to measure oxidative stress. ACS14 significantly attenuated elevation of intracellular methylglyoxal levels caused by incubating cultured vascular smooth muscle cells with methylglyoxal (30 µM) and high glucose (25 mM). ACS14, but not aspirin, caused a significant attenuation of increase in nitrite+nitrate levels caused by methylglyoxal or high glucose. ACS14, aspirin, and sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS, a hydrogen sulfide donor), all attenuated the increase in oxidative stress caused by methylglyoxal and high glucose in cultured cells. ACS14 prevented the increase in NOX4 expression caused by incubating the cultured VSMCs with MG (30 µM). ACS14, aspirin and NaHS attenuated the increase in iNOS expression caused by high glucose (25 mM). In conclusion, ACS14 has the novel ability to attenuate an increase in methylglyoxal levels which in turn can reduce oxidative stress, decrease the formation of advanced glycation end products and prevent many of the known deleterious effects

  2. Increase in thiol oxidative stress via glutathione reductase inhibition as a novel approach to enhance cancer sensitivity to X-ray irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Seefeldt, Teresa; Chen, Wei; Carlson, Laura; Stoebner, Adam; Hanson, Sarah; Foll, Ryan; Matthees, Duane P; Palakurthi, Srinath; Guan, Xiangming

    2009-07-15

    Depletion of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) has been extensively studied for its effect on sensitizing cancer to radiation. However, little is known about the effects of thiol oxidative stress created through an increase in glutathione disulfide (GSSG) on cancer sensitivity to radiation. In this study, an increase in GSSG was effectively created using 2-acetylamino-3-[4-(2-acetylamino-2-carboxyethylsulfanylthiocarbonylamino)phenylthiocarbamoylsulfanyl]propionic acid (2-AAPA), an irreversible glutathione reductase (GR) inhibitor. Our results demonstrate that the GSSG increase significantly enhanced cancer sensitivity to X-ray irradiation in four human cancer cell lines (A431, MCF7, NCI-H226, and OVCAR-3). When cells were pretreated with 2-AAPA followed by X-ray irradiation, the IC(50) values for X-ray irradiation of A431, MCF7, NCI-H226, and OVCAR-3 cells were reduced, from 24.2 +/- 2.8, 42.5 +/- 3.0, 43.0 +/- 3.6, and 27.8+/-3.5 Gy to 6.75 +/- 0.9, 8.1 +/- 1.1, 6.75 +/- 1.0, and 12.1 +/- 1.7 Gy, respectively. The synergistic effects observed from the combination of X-rays plus 2-AAPA were comparable to those from the combination of X-rays plus buthionine sulfoximine, a reference compound known to increase cancer sensitivity to radiation. The synergistic effect was correlated with an increase in cell thiol oxidative stress, which was reflected by a five-to sixfold increase in GSSG and 25% increase in total disulfides. No change in GSH or total thiols was observed as a result of GR inhibition. PMID:19397999

  3. Relationship between the Increased Haemostatic Properties of Blood Platelets and Oxidative Stress Level in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with the Secondary Progressive Stage

    PubMed Central

    Bijak, Michał; Miller, Elżbieta; Miller, Sergiusz

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with complex pathogenesis, different clinical courses and recurrent neurological relapses and/or progression. Despite various scientific papers that focused on early stage of MS, our study targets selective group of late stage secondary progressive MS patients. The presented work is concerned with the reactivity of blood platelets in primary hemostasis in SP MS patients. 50 SP MS patients and 50 healthy volunteers (never diagnosed with MS or other chronic diseases) were examined to evaluate the biological activity of blood platelets (adhesion, aggregation), especially their response to the most important physiological agonists (thrombin, ADP, and collagen) and the effect of oxidative stress on platelet activity. We found that the blood platelets from SP MS patients were significantly more sensitive to all used agonists in comparison with control group. Moreover, the platelet hemostatic function was advanced in patients suffering from SP MS and positively correlated with increased production of O2−∙ in these cells, as well as with Expanded Disability Status Scale. We postulate that the increased oxidative stress in blood platelets in SP MS may be primarily responsible for the altered haemostatic properties of blood platelets. PMID:26064417

  4. Oxidative Stress and Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) Increase Peritoneal Filtration and Contribute to Ascites Formation in Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Udwan, Khalil; Brideau, Gaëlle; Fila, Marc; Edwards, Aurélie; Vogt, Bruno; Doucet, Alain

    2016-05-20

    Water accumulation in the interstitium (edema) and the peritoneum (ascites) of nephrotic patients is classically thought to stem from the prevailing low plasma albumin concentration and the decreased transcapillary oncotic pressure gradient. However, several clinical and experimental observations suggest that it might also stem from changes in capillary permeability. We addressed this hypothesis by studying the peritoneum permeability of rats with puromycin aminonucleoside-induced nephrotic syndrome. The peritoneum of puromycin aminonucleoside rats displayed an increase in the water filtration coefficient of paracellular and transcellular pathways, and a decrease in the reflection coefficient to proteins. It also displayed oxidative stress and subsequent activation of NF-κB. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species and inhibition of NF-κB prevented the changes in the water permeability and reflection coefficient to proteins and reduced the volume of ascites by over 50%. Changes in water permeability were associated with the overexpression of the water channel aquaporin 1, which was prevented by reactive oxygen species scavenging and inhibition of NF-κB. In conclusion, nephrotic syndrome is associated with an increased filtration coefficient of the peritoneum and a decreased reflection coefficient to proteins. These changes, which account for over half of ascite volume, are triggered by oxidative stress and subsequent activation of NF-κB. PMID:27033704

  5. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Waldbaum, Simon; Patel, Manisha

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction are contributing factors to various neurological disorders. Recently, there has been increasing evidence supporting the association between mitochondrial oxidative stress and epilepsy. Although certain inherited epilepsies are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, little is known about its role in acquired epilepsies such as temporal lobe epilepsy. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction are emerging as key factors that not only result from seizures, but may also contribute to epileptogenesis. The occurrence of epilepsy increases with age, and mitochondrial oxidative stress is a leading mechanism of aging and age-related degenerative disease, suggesting a further involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in seizure generation. Mitochondria have critical cellular functions that effect neuronal excitability including production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), fatty acid oxidation, control of apoptosis and necrosis, regulation of amino acid cycling, neurotransmitter biosynthesis, and regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis. Mitochondria are the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production making them uniquely vulnerable to oxidative stress and damage which can further affect cellular macromolecule function, the ability of the electron transport chain to produce ATP, antioxidant defenses, mitochondrial DNA stability, and synaptic glutamate homeostasis. Oxidative damage to one or more of these cellular targets may affect neuronal excitability and increase seizure susceptibility. The specific targeting of mitochondrial oxidative stress, dysfunction, and bioenergetics with pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments may be a novel avenue for attenuating epileptogenesis and seizure initiation. PMID:19850449

  6. Ethanol and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, A Y; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Neve, E; Matsumoto, H; Nishitani, Y; Minowa, Y; Fukui, Y; Bailey, S M; Patel, V B; Cunningham, C C; Zima, T; Fialova, L; Mikulikova, L; Popov, P; Malbohan, I; Janebova, M; Nespor, K; Sun, G Y

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chair was Albert Y. Sun. The presentations were (1) Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P-4502E1 in alcoholic liver disease, by Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg and Etienne Neve; (2) Regulation of NF-kappaB by ethanol, by H. Matsumoto, Y. Nishitani, Y. Minowa, and Y. Fukui; (3) Chronic ethanol consumption increases concentration of oxidized proteins in rat liver, by Shannon M. Bailey, Vinood B. Patel, and Carol C. Cunningham; (4) Antiphospholipids antibodies and oxidized modified low-density lipoprotein in chronic alcoholic patients, by Tomas Zima, Lenka Fialova, Ludmila Mikulikova, Ptr Popov, Ivan Malbohan, Marta Janebova, and Karel Nespor; and (5) Amelioration of ethanol-induced damage by polyphenols, by Albert Y. Sun and Grace Y. Sun. PMID:11391077

  7. Increase in Blood Brain Barrier Permeability, Oxidative Stress, and Activated Microglia in a Rat Model of Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Readnower, Ryan D.; Chavko, Mikulas; Adeeb, Saleena; Conroy, Michael D.; Pauly, James R.; McCarron, Richard M.; Sullivan, Patrick G.

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a consequence of exposure to blast is increasingly prevalent in military populations, with the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms mostly unknown. In the present study, we utilized an air-driven shock tube to investigate the effects of blast exposure (120 kPa) on rat brains. Immediately following exposure to blast neurological function was reduced. BBB permeability was measured using IgG antibody and evaluating its immunoreactivity in the brain. At 3 and 24 h post-exposure there was a transient significant increase in IgG staining in the cortex. At 3 days post-exposure IgG immunoreactivity returned to control levels. Quantitative immunostaining was employed to determine the temporal course of brain oxidative stress following exposure to blast. Levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3NT) were significantly increased at 3 h post-exposure and returned to control levels at 24 h post-exposure. The response of microglia to blast exposure was determined by autoradiographic localization of 3H-PK11195 binding. At 5 days post-exposure increased binding was observed in the contralateral and ipsilateral dentate gyrus. These regions also displayed increased binding at 10 days post-exposure; in addition to these regions there was increased binding in the contralateral ventral hippocampus and substantia nigra at this time point. Using antibodies against CD11b/c, microglia morphology characteristic of activated microglia was observed in the hippocampus and substantia nigra of animals exposed to blast. These results indicate that BBB breakdown, oxidative stress, and microglia activation likely play a role in the neuropathology associated with TBI as a result of blast exposure. PMID:20882564

  8. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G.; Zarkovic, Neven; Davies, Sean S.; Stocker, Roland; Cheng, David; Knight, Annie R.; Taylor, Emma Louise; Oettrich, Jeannette; Ruskovska, Tatjana; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Cuadrado, Antonio; Weber, Daniela; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Grune, Tilman; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is considered to be an important component of various diseases. A vast number of methods have been developed and used in virtually all diseases to measure the extent and nature of oxidative stress, ranging from oxidation of DNA to proteins, lipids, and free amino acids. Recent Advances: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. Critical Issues: The literature is very heterogeneous. It is often difficult to draw general conclusions on the significance of oxidative stress biomarkers, as only in a limited proportion of diseases have a range of different biomarkers been used, and different biomarkers have been used to study different diseases. In addition, biomarkers are often measured using nonspecific methods, while specific methodologies are often too sophisticated or laborious for routine clinical use. Future Directions: Several markers of oxidative stress still represent a viable biomarker opportunity for clinical use. However, positive findings with currently used biomarkers still need to be validated in larger sample sizes and compared with current clinical standards to establish them as clinical diagnostics. It is important to realize that oxidative stress is a nuanced phenomenon that is difficult to characterize, and one biomarker is not necessarily better than others. The vast diversity in oxidative stress between diseases and conditions has to be taken into account when selecting the most appropriate biomarker. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1144–1170. PMID:26415143

  9. Functionalized Fullerene Increases NF-κB Activity and Blocks Genotoxic Effect of Oxidative Stress in Serum-Starving Human Embryo Lung Diploid Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ershova, E. S.; Sergeeva, V. A.; Tabakov, V. J.; Kameneva, L. A.; Voronov, I. I.; Khakina, E. A.; Troshin, P. A.; Kutsev, S. I.; Veiko, N. N.; Kostyuk, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of a water-soluble [60] fullerene derivative containing five residues of 3-phenylpropionic acid and a chlorine addend appended to the carbon cage (F-828) on serum-starving human embryo lung diploid fibroblasts (HELFs) was studied. Serum deprivation evokes oxidative stress in HELFs. Cultivation of serum-starving HELFs in the presence of 0.1–1 µM F-828 significantly decreases the level of free radicals, inhibits autophagy, and represses expression of NOX4 and NRF2 proteins. The activity of NF-κB substantially grows up in contrast to the suppressed NRF2 activity. In the presence of 0.2–0.25 µM F-828, the DSB rate and apoptosis level dramatically decrease. The maximum increase of proliferative activity of the HELFs and maximum activity of NF-κB are observed at these concentration values. Conclusion. Under the conditions of oxidative stress evoked by serum deprivation the water-soluble fullerene derivative F-828 used in concentrations of 0.1 to 1 µM strongly stimulates the NF-κB activity and represses the NRF2 activity in HELFs.

  10. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbich, Maria Helena; Pache de Faria Guimaraes, Luciana; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa Mazzola; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Nephropathic cystinosis (NC) is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS) and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS) in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p < 0.0001). We detected no significant correlation between plasma TBARS levels and renal function. Conclusion An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients. PMID:22470381

  11. Oxidant stress in the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Maytin, M; Leopold, J; Loscalzo, J

    1999-09-01

    Vascular disease and vasomotor responses are largely influenced by oxidant stress. Superoxide is generated via the cellular oxidase systems, xanthine oxidase, and NADH/NADPH oxidases. Once formed, superoxides participate in a number of reactions, yielding various free radicals such as hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, or hypochlorous acid. Numerous cellular antioxidant systems exist to defend against oxidant stress; glutathione and the enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase are critical for maintaining the redox balance of the cell. However, the redox state is disrupted by certain vascular diseases. It appears that oxidant stress both promotes and is induced by diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and restenosis as well as by certain risk factors for coronary artery disease including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and cigarette smoking. Once oxidant stress is invoked, characteristic pathophysiologic features ensue, namely adverse vessel reactivity, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, macrophage adhesion, platelet activation, and lipid peroxidation. PMID:11122705

  12. Ablation of the mitochondrial complex IV assembly protein Surf1 leads to increased expression of the UPR(MT) and increased resistance to oxidative stress in primary cultures of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pharaoh, Gavin; Pulliam, Daniel; Hill, Shauna; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Van Remmen, Holly

    2016-08-01

    Mice deficient in the electron transport chain (ETC) complex IV assembly protein SURF1 have reduced assembly and activity of cytochrome c oxidase that is associated with an upregulation of components of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(MT)) and increased mitochondrial number. We hypothesized that the upregulation of proteins associated with the UPR(MT) in response to reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity in Surf1(-/-) mice might contribute to increased stress resistance. To test this hypothesis we asked whether primary cultures of fibroblasts from Surf1(-/-) mice exhibit enhanced resistance to stressors compared to wild-type fibroblasts. Here we show that primary dermal fibroblasts isolated from Surf1(-/-) mice have increased expression of UPR(MT) components ClpP and Hsp60, and increased expression of Lon protease. Fibroblasts from Surf1(-/-) mice are significantly more resistant to cell death caused by oxidative stress induced by paraquat or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide compared to cells from wild-type mice. In contrast, Surf1(-/-) fibroblasts show no difference in sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide stress. The enhanced cell survival in response to paraquat or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide in Surf1(-/-) fibroblasts compared to wild-type fibroblasts is associated with induced expression of Lon, ClpP, and Hsp60, increased maximal respiration, and increased reserve capacity as measured using the Seahorse Extracellular Flux Analyzer. Overall these data support a protective role for the activation of the UPR(MT) in cell survival. PMID:27208630

  13. Oxidative stress of brain and liver is increased by Wi-Fi (2.45GHz) exposure of rats during pregnancy and the development of newborns.

    PubMed

    Çelik, Ömer; Kahya, Mehmet Cemal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2016-09-01

    An excessive production of reactive oxygen substances (ROS) and reduced antioxidant defence systems resulting from electromagnetic radiation (EMR) exposure may lead to oxidative brain and liver damage and degradation of membranes during pregnancy and development of rat pups. We aimed to investigate the effects of Wi-Fi-induced EMR on the brain and liver antioxidant redox systems in the rat during pregnancy and development. Sixteen pregnant rats and their 48 newborns were equally divided into control and EMR groups. The EMR groups were exposed to 2.45GHz EMR (1h/day for 5 days/week) from pregnancy to 3 weeks of age. Brain cortex and liver samples were taken from the newborns between the first and third weeks. In the EMR groups, lipid peroxidation levels in the brain and liver were increased following EMR exposure; however, the glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, and vitamin A, vitamin E and β-carotene concentrations were decreased in the brain and liver. Glutathione (GSH) and vitamin C concentrations in the brain were also lower in the EMR groups than in the controls; however, their concentrations did not change in the liver. In conclusion, Wi-Fi-induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver of developing rats was the result of reduced GSH-Px, GSH and antioxidant vitamin concentrations. Moreover, the brain seemed to be more sensitive to oxidative injury compared to the liver in the development of newborns. PMID:26520617

  14. Increased oxidative stress and decreased activities of Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase in the red blood cells of the hibernating black bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chauhan, V.P.S.; Tsiouris, J.A.; Chauhan, A.; Sheikh, A.M.; Brown, W. Ted; Vaughan, M.

    2002-01-01

    During hibernation, animals undergo metabolic changes that result in reduced utilization of glucose and oxygen. Fat is known to be the preferential source of energy for hibernating animals. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA) is an end product of fatty acid oxidation, and is generally used as an index of lipid peroxidation. We report here that peroxidation of lipids is increased in the plasma and in the membranes of red blood cells in black bears during hibernation. The plasma MDA content was about four fold higher during hibernation as compared to that during the active, non-hibernating state (P < 0.0001). Similarly, MDA content of erythrocyte membranes was significantly increased during hibernation (P < 0.025). The activity of Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase in the erythrocyte membrane was significantly decreased in the hibernating state as compared to the active state. Na+/K+-ATPase activity was also decreased, though not significant, during hibernation. These results suggest that during hibernation, the bears are under increased oxidative stress, and have reduced activities of membrane-bound enzymes such as Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase. These changes can be considered part of the adaptive for survival process of metabolic depression. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Alba; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Bautista, Mirandeli; Esquivel-Soto, Jaime; Morales-González, Ángel; Esquivel-Chirino, Cesar; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Sánchez-Rivera, Graciela; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Morales-González, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6); other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS). Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO), and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease. PMID:21686173

  16. Increased ventricular lactate in chronic fatigue syndrome. III. Relationships to cortical glutathione and clinical symptoms implicate oxidative stress in disorder pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Shungu, Dikoma C.; Weiduschat, Nora; Murrough, James W.; Mao, Xiangling; Pillemer, Sarah; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Medow, Marvin S.; Natelson, Benjamin H.; Stewart, Julian M.; Mathew, Sanjay J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a complex illness, which is often misdiagnosed as a psychiatric illness. In two previous reports, using 1H MRSI, we found significantly higher levels of ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate in patients with CFS relative to those with generalized anxiety disorder and healthy volunteers (HV), but not relative to those with major depressive disorder (MDD). In this third independent cross-sectional neuroimaging study, we investigated a pathophysiological model which postulated that elevations of CSF lactate in patients with CFS might be caused by increased oxidative stress, cerebral hypoperfusion and/or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Fifteen patients with CFS, 15 with MDD and 13 HVs were studied using the following modalities: (i) 1H MRSI to measure CSF lactate; (ii) single-voxel 1H MRS to measure levels of cortical glutathione (GSH) as a marker of antioxidant capacity; (iii) arterial spin labeling (ASL) MRI to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF); and (iv) 31P MRSI to measure brain high-energy phosphates as objective indices of mitochondrial dysfunction. We found elevated ventricular lactate and decreased GSH in patients with CFS and MDD relative to HVs. GSH did not differ significantly between the two patient groups. In addition, we found lower rCBF in the left anterior cingulate cortex and the right lingual gyrus in patients with CFS relative to HVs, but rCBF did not differ between those with CFS and MDD. We found no differences between the three groups in terms of any high-energy phosphate metabolites. In exploratory correlation analyses, we found that levels of ventricular lactate and cortical GSH were inversely correlated, and significantly associated with several key indices of physical health and disability. Collectively, the results of this third independent study support a pathophysiological model of CFS in which increased oxidative stress may play a key role in CFS etiopathophysiology. PMID:22281935

  17. Smoking is associated with reduced serum paraoxonase, antioxidants and increased oxidative stress in normolipidaemic acute myocardial infarct patients

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; Biswas, Utpal Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Background Paraoxonase is a high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated enzyme that protects lipoproteins from oxidative modifications and from becoming atherogenic in nature. Smoking is a well-known major cardiovascular risk factor that promotes lipid peroxidation (LP). The present study examined the hypothesis that smoking modulates the activity of paraoxonase and depletes antioxidants. Aim The present study evaluated paraoxonase activity, antioxidant status and LP in smoking and non-smoking normolipidaemic acute myocardial infarct (AMI) patients, and results were compared with controls. Settings and design The serum paraoxonase activities, antioxidants and LP were determined in 86 normolipidaemic patients diagnosed of AMI, and 86 age–sex-matched healthy volunteers served as control. Material and methods Serum paraoxonase activities were measured by enzymatic kit. The glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase activity was determined by standard methods. Malondialdehyde was measured by the thiobarbituric acid reaction, and conjugated diene levels by the Recknagel and Glende method. Serum uric acid, total bilirubin, serum albumin and lipid profiles were analysed by standard methods. Statistics The values were expressed as mean±SD, and data from the patients and control were compared using the Student t test. Results and conclusion The total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio, triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein/HDL cholesterol ratio and triglyceride/HDL cholesterol ratio were significantly higher, and HDL cholesterol significantly lower in smokers compared with non-smoking AMI patients. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase were significantly higher in non-smokers compared with smokers. Serum albumin, uric acid and bilirubin were higher in the control compared with smoking AMI patients. The malondialdehyde and conjugated dienes were significantly higher, and paraoxonase activities were

  18. Dietary Squalene Increases High Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol and Paraoxonase 1 and Decreases Oxidative Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gabás-Rivera, Clara; Barranquero, Cristina; Martínez-Beamonte, Roberto; Navarro, María A.; Surra, Joaquín C.; Osada, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Squalene, the main hydrocarbon in the unsaponifiable fraction of virgin olive oil, is involved in cholesterol synthesis and it has been reported to own antiatherosclerotic and antiesteatosic effects. However, the squalene's role on lipid plasma parameters and the influence of genotype on this effect need to be addressed. Experimental Approaches Three male mouse models (wild-type, Apoa1- and Apoe- deficient) were fed chow semisynthetic diets enriched in squalene to provide a dose of 1 g/kg during 11 weeks. After this period, their plasma parameters and lipoprotein profiles were analyzed. Key Results Squalene administration at a dose of 1 g/kg showed decreased reactive oxygen species in lipoprotein fractions independently of the animal background and caused an specific increase in high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels, accompanied by an increase in phosphatidylcholine and paraoxonase 1 and no changes in apolipoproteins A1 and A4 in wild-type mice. In these mice, the cholesterol increase was due to its esterified form and associated with an increased hepatic expression of Lcat. These effects were not observed in absence of apolipoprotein A1. The increases in HDL- paraoxonase 1 were translated into decreased plasma malondialdehyde levels depending on the presence of Apolipoprotein A1. Conclusions and Implications Dietary squalene promotes changes in HDL- cholesterol and paraoxonase 1 and decreases reactive oxygen species in lipoproteins and plasma malondialdehyde levels, providing new benefits of its intake that might contribute to explain the properties of virgin olive oil, although the phenotype related to apolipoproteins A1 and E may be particularly relevant. PMID:25117703

  19. Acute, food-induced moderate elevation of plasma uric acid protects against hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress and increase in arterial stiffness in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Vukovic, Jonatan; Modun, Darko; Budimir, Danijela; Sutlovic, Davorka; Salamunic, Ilza; Zaja, Ivan; Boban, Mladen

    2009-11-01

    We examined the effects of acute, food-induced moderate increase of plasma uric acid (UA) on arterial stiffness and markers of oxidative damage in plasma in healthy males exposed to 100% normobaric oxygen. Acute elevation of plasma UA was induced by consumption of red wine, combination of ethanol and glycerol, or fructose. By using these beverages we were able to separate the effects of UA, wine polyphenols and ethanol. Water was used as a control beverage. Ten males randomly consumed test beverages in a cross-over design over the period of 4 weeks, one beverage per week. They breathed 100% O(2) between 60(th) and 90(th)min of the 4-h study protocol. Pulse wave augmentation index (AIx) at brachial and radial arteries, plasma antioxidant capacity (AOC), thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) assessed by xylenol orange method, UA and blood ethanol concentrations were determined before and 60, 90, 120, 150 and 240 min after beverage consumption. Consumption of the beverages did not affect the AIx, TBARS or LOOH values during 60 min before exposure to hyperoxia, while AOC and plasma UA increased except in the water group. Significant increase of AIx, plasma TBARS and LOOH, which occurred during 30 min of hyperoxia in the water group, was largely prevented in the groups that consumed red wine, glycerol+ethanol or fructose. In contrast to chronic hyperuricemia, generally considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome, acute increase of UA acts protectively against hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress and related increase of arterial stiffness in large peripheral arteries. PMID:19457484

  20. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  1. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-04-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  2. Peroxisomal metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Marcus; Fransen, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous and multifunctional organelles that are primarily known for their role in cellular lipid metabolism. As many peroxisomal enzymes catalyze redox reactions as part of their normal function, these organelles are also increasingly recognized as potential regulators of oxidative stress-related signaling pathways. This in turn suggests that peroxisome dysfunction is not only associated with rare inborn errors of peroxisomal metabolism, but also with more common age-related diseases such as neurodegeneration, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. This review intends to provide a comprehensive picture of the complex role of mammalian peroxisomes in cellular redox metabolism. We highlight how peroxisomal metabolism may contribute to the bioavailability of important mediators of oxidative stress, with particular emphasis on reactive oxygen species. In addition, we review the biological properties of peroxisome-derived signaling messengers and discuss how these molecules may mediate various biological responses. Furthermore, we explore the emerging concepts that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. This is particularly relevant to the observed demise of peroxisome function which accompanies cellular senescence, organismal aging, and age-related diseases. PMID:23933092

  3. Atorvastatin blocks increased l-type Ca2+ current and cell injury elicited by angiotensin II via inhibiting oxide stress.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanzhuo; Kong, Lingfeng; Qi, Shuying; Wang, Dongmei

    2016-04-01

    Thel-type Ca(2+)current (ICa,l) plays a crucial role in shaping action potential and is involved in cardiac arrhythmia. Statins have been demonstrated to contribute to anti-apoptotic and anti-arrhythmic effects in the heart. Here, we examined whether atorvastatin regulates theICa,land cell injury induced by angiotensin II (AngII) as well as the putative intracellular cascade responsible for the effects. Cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes were incubated with AngII for 24 h, and then cell injury and expression levels of Nox2/gp91(phox), p47(phox) ,and Cav1.2 were analyzed. In addition,ICa,lwas recorded using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, and mechanisms of atorvastatin actions were also investigated. It was found that the number of apoptotic cardiomyocytes was increased and cell viability was significantly decreased after AngII administration. AngII also augmented the expressions of Nox2/gp91(phox)and p47(phox)compared with control cardiomyocytes. Exposure to AngII evokedICa,lin a voltage-dependent manner without affecting theI-Vrelationship. In addition, AngII enhanced membrane Cav1.2 expression. These effects were abolished in the presence of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, manganese (III)-tetrakis 4-benzoic acid porphyrin [Mn(III)TBAP], or the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, atorvastatin. These results suggested that atorvastatin mediates cardioprotection against arrhythmias and cell injury by controlling the AngII-ROS cascade. PMID:26940997

  4. Resveratrol self-emulsifying system increases the uptake by endothelial cells and improves protection against oxidative stress-mediated death.

    PubMed

    Amri, Ahmed; Le Clanche, Solenn; Thérond, Patrice; Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique; Borderie, Didier; Lai-Kuen, René; Chaumeil, Jean-Claude; Sfar, Souad; Charrueau, Christine

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop and characterize a resveratrol self-emulsifying drug delivery system (Res-SEDDS), and to compare the uptake of resveratrol by bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs), and the protection of these cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death, versus a control resveratrol ethanolic solution. Three Res-SEDDSs were prepared and evaluated. The in vitro self-emulsification properties of these formulations, the droplet size and the zeta potential of the nanoemulsions formed on adding them to water under mild agitation conditions were studied, together with their toxicity on BAECs. An optimal atoxic formulation (20% Miglyol® 812, 70% Montanox® 80, 10% ethanol 96% v/v) was selected and further studied. Pre-incubation of BAECs for 180 min with 25 μM resveratrol in the nanoemulsion obtained from the selected SEDDS significantly increased the membrane and intracellular concentrations of resveratrol (for example, 0.076±0.015 vs. ethanolic solution 0.041±0.016 nmol/mg of protein after 60 min incubation, p<0.05). Resveratrol intracellular localization was confirmed by fluorescence confocal microscopy. Resveratrol nanoemulsion significantly improved the endothelial cell protection from H2O2-induced injury (750, 1000 and 1500 μM H2O2) in comparison with incubation with the control resveratrol ethanolic solution (for example, 55±6% vs. 38±5% viability after 1500 μM H2O2 challenge, p<0.05). In conclusion, formulation of resveratrol as a SEDDS significantly improved its cellular uptake and potentiated its antioxidant properties on BAECs. PMID:24184672

  5. [Heme metabolism and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Barannik, T B

    2001-01-01

    The role of heme metabolism in oxidative stress development and defense reactions formation in mammals under different stress factors are discussed in the article. Heme metabolism is considered as the totality of synthesis, degradation, transport and exchange processes of exogenous heme and heme liberated from erythrocyte hemoglobin under erythrocyte aging and hemolysis. The literature data presented display normal heme metabolism including mammals heme-binding proteins and intracellular free heme pool and heme metabolism alterations under oxidative stress development. The main attention is focused to the prooxidant action of heme, the interaction of heme transport and lipid exchange, and to the heme metabolism key enzymes (delta-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase), serum heme-binding protein hemopexin and intracellular heme-binding proteins participating in metabolism adaptation under the action of factors, which cause oxidative stress. PMID:11599427

  6. Exposure to O-16 particle irradiation causes age-like decrements in rats through increased oxidative stress, inflammation and loss of autophagy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles) enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation, disrupts the functioning of neuronal communication, and alters cognitive behaviors. Even though exposure to these highly charged particles occurs at low fluence rates, p...

  7. Oxidative stress in developmental brain disorders.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu; Miyata, Rie; Tanuma, Naoyuki

    2012-01-01

    In order to examine the involvement of oxidative stress in developmental brain disorders, we have performed immunohistochemistry in autopsy brains and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the cerebrospinal fluid and urines of patients. Here, we review our data on the hereditary DNA repair disorders, congenital metabolic errors and childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorders. First, in our studies on hereditary DNA repair disorders, increased oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation were carried out in the degeneration of basal ganglia, intracerebral calcification and cerebellar degeneration in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum, Cockayne syndrome and ataxia-telangiectasia-like disorder, respectively. Next, congenital metabolic errors, apoptosis due to lipid peroxidation seemed to cause neuronal damage in neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis. Oxidative stress of DNA combined with reduced expression of antioxidant enzymes occurred in the lesion of the cerebral cortex in mucopolysaccharidoses and mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes. In childhood-onset neurodegenerative disorders, increased oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation may lead to motor neuron death in spinal muscular atrophy like in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In patients with dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy, a triplet repeat disease, deposition of oxidative products of nucleosides and reduced expression of antioxidant enzymes were found in the lenticular nucleus. In contrast, the involvement of oxidative stress is not definite in patients with Lafora disease. Rett syndrome patients showed changes of oxidative stress markers and antioxidant power in urines, although the changes may be related to systemic complications. PMID:22411250

  8. Modulation of PKCδ signaling alters the shear stress-mediated increases in endothelial nitric oxide synthase transcription: role of STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Neetu; Kumar, Sanjiv; Wedgwood, Stephen; Black, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    We have previously shown that the regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in endothelial cells isolated from fetal lamb under static conditions is positively regulated by PKCδ. In this study, we explore the role of PKCδ in regulating shear-induced upregulation of eNOS. We found that shear caused a decrease in PKCδ activation. Modulation of PKCδ before shear with a dominant negative mutant of PKCδ (DN PKCδ) or bryostatin (a known PKCδ activator) demonstrated that PKCδ inhibition potentiates the shear-mediated increases in eNOS expression and activity, while PKCδ activation inhibited these events. To gain insight into the mechanism by which PKCδ inhibits shear-induced eNOS expression, we examined activation of STAT3, a known target for PKCδ phosphorylation. We found that shear decreased the phosphorylation of STAT3. Further the transfection of cells with DN PKCδ reduced, while PKCδ activation enhanced, STAT3 phosphorylation in the presence of shear. Transfection of cells with a dominant negative mutant of STAT3 enhanced eNOS promoter activity and nitric oxide production in response to shear. Finally, we found that mutating the STAT3 binding site sequence within the eNOS promoter increased promoter activity in response to shear and that this was no longer inhibited by bryostatin. In conclusion, shear decreases PKCδ activity and, subsequently, reduces STAT3 binding to the eNOS promoter. This signaling pathway plays a previously unidentified role in the regulation of eNOS expression by shear stress. PMID:19118090

  9. Phagocytes and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Babior, B M

    2000-07-01

    Neutrophils and other phagocytes manufacture O(2)(-) (superoxide) by the one-electron reduction of oxygen at the expense of NADPH. Most of the O(2)(-) reacts with itself to form H(2)O(2) (hydrogen peroxide). From these agents a large number of highly reactive microbicidal oxidants are formed, including HOCl (hypochlorous acid), which is produced by the myeloperoxidase-catalyzed oxidation of Cl(-) by H(2)O(2); OH(*) (hydroxyl radical), produced by the reduction of H(2)O(2) by Fe(++) or Cu(+); ONOO(-) (peroxynitrite), formed by the reaction between O(2)(-) and NO(*); and many others. These reactive oxidants are manufactured for the purpose of killing invading microorganisms, but they also inflict damage on nearby tissues, and are thought to be of pathogenic significance in a large number of diseases. Included among these are emphysema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atherosclerosis, reperfusion injury, malignancy and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:10936476

  10. Zerumbone increases oxidative stress in a thiol-dependent ROS-independent manner to increase DNA damage and sensitize colorectal cancer cells to radiation.

    PubMed

    Deorukhkar, Amit; Ahuja, Niharika; Mercado, Armando-Lopez; Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Raju, Uma; Patel, Nalini; Mohindra, Pranshu; Diep, Nga; Guha, Sushovan; Krishnan, Sunil

    2015-02-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancers are treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. In a minority (~20%) of patients, no tumor is present at the time of surgery; these patients with a complete pathologic response (pathCR) to neoadjuvant therapy have better treatment outcomes. Unfortunately, the inherent radioresistance of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dictates that the majority of patients do not achieve a pathCR. Efforts to improve these odds have fueled the search for novel, relatively less-toxic radiosensitizers with distinct molecular mechanism(s) and broad-spectrum anticancer activities. Here, we use zerumbone, a sesquiterpene from the edible ginger (Zingiber zerumbet Smith), to enhance radiosensitivity of CRC cells. Short exposure to zerumbone (7 h) profoundly sensitized CRC cells, independent of their p53 or k-RAS status. Zerumbone enhanced radiation-induced cell cycle arrest (G2/M), increased radiation-induced apoptosis, but induced little apoptosis by itself. Zerumbone significantly enhanced radiation-induced DNA damage, as evident by delayed resolution of post-irradiation nuclear γH2AX foci, whereas zerumbone treatment alone did not induce γH2AX foci formation. Zerumbone pretreatment inhibited radiation-induced nuclear expression of DNA repair proteins ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-PKcs. Interestingly, zerumbone-mediated radiosensitization did not involve reactive oxygen species (ROS), but was mediated through depletion of cellular glutathione (GSH). Ability of only thiol-based antioxidants to abrogate zerumbone-mediated radiosensitization further corroborated this hypothesis. The α,β-unsaturated carbonyl group in zerumbone was found to be essential for its bioactivity as zerumbone analog α-Humulene that lacks this functional group, could neither radiosensitize CRC cells, nor deplete cellular GSH. Our studies elucidate novel mechanism(s) of zerumbone's ability to enhance CRC radiosensitivity. PMID:25450478

  11. Oxidative Stress, Prooxidants, and Antioxidants: The Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Anu; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Vivek; Yadav, Brijesh

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a normal phenomenon in the body. Under normal conditions, the physiologically important intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are maintained at low levels by various enzyme systems participating in the in vivo redox homeostasis. Therefore, oxidative stress can also be viewed as an imbalance between the prooxidants and antioxidants in the body. For the last two decades, oxidative stress has been one of the most burning topics among the biological researchers all over the world. Several reasons can be assigned to justify its importance: knowledge about reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production and metabolism; identification of biomarkers for oxidative damage; evidence relating manifestation of chronic and some acute health problems to oxidative stress; identification of various dietary antioxidants present in plant foods as bioactive molecules; and so on. This review discusses the importance of oxidative stress in the body growth and development as well as proteomic and genomic evidences of its relationship with disease development, incidence of malignancies and autoimmune disorders, increased susceptibility to bacterial, viral, and parasitic diseases, and an interplay with prooxidants and antioxidants for maintaining a sound health, which would be helpful in enhancing the knowledge of any biochemist, pathophysiologist, or medical personnel regarding this important issue. PMID:24587990

  12. Oxidative Stress in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongxiu; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic pruritic skin disorder affecting many people especially young children. It is a disease caused by the combination of genetic predisposition, immune dysregulation, and skin barrier defect. In recent years, emerging evidence suggests oxidative stress may play an important role in many skin diseases and skin aging, possibly including AD. In this review, we give an update on scientific progress linking oxidative stress to AD and discuss future treatment strategies for better disease control and improved quality of life for AD patients. PMID:27006746

  13. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  14. Hemoglobin oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, S.; Ortalli, I.; Pedrazzi, G.; Passeri, G.; Piccolo, P.

    2000-07-01

    Venous blood obtained from healthy donors and from patients suffering from breast cancer have been treated with acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) for different time. Mössbauer spectra of the packed red cells have been recorded and compared. The largest difference occurs after 50 min of treatment with APH where the patient samples show a broad spectral pattern indicating an advanced hemoglobin oxidation. These results may have some relevance in early cancer diagnosis.

  15. VNN1, a potential biomarker for pancreatic cancer-associated new-onset diabetes, aggravates paraneoplastic islet dysfunction by increasing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kang, Muxing; Qin, Wenjie; Buya, Miranbieke; Dong, Xin; Zheng, Wen; Lu, Wenjie; Chen, Jian; Guo, Qingqu; Wu, Yulian

    2016-04-10

    In our previous clinical microarray analysis, we were the first to report on Vanin-1 (VNN1) as a novel clinically derived biomarker of pancreatic cancer-associated new-onset diabetes (PCAND). The functional mechanisms of VNN1 in the pathogenesis of PCAND, however, are not completely understood. In the present study, we further extend our previous clinical study to include laboratory research. The functions and mechanisms of neoplastic overexpressed VNN1 in PCAND have been explored using a co-culture model. Furthermore, the serum concentrations and discrimination power of downstream molecules of VNN1 were tested in a PCAND cohort. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) overexpressed VNN1 further aggravates paraneoplastic islet dysfunction; decreases in GSH/PPAR-γ concentrations and increases in ROS/cysteamine might be primary cause of this effect. Clinical serum analyses revealed that the expression profiles of these molecules were aberrant in the PCAND group. Our results further demonstrated that PCAND is a type of paraneoplastic diabetes. As the only clinically derived biomarker for PCAND screening available today, the biological role of VNN1 in triggering oxidative stress within the pancreatic microenvironment is important. The molecules downstream of VNN1 are also potential biomarkers for PCAND screening. PMID:26845448

  16. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; O, Wuliji; Li, Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS) of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs. PMID:24351827

  17. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease. PMID:26512646

  18. Update on the oxidative stress theory of aging: Does oxidative stress play a role in aging or healthy aging?

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, Adam B.; Richardson, Arlan; Pérez, Viviana I.

    2010-01-01

    The oxidative stress theory of aging predicts that manipulations that alter oxidative stress/damage will alter aging. The gold standard for determining whether aging is altered is lifespan, i.e., does altering oxidative stress/damage change lifespan? Mice with genetic manipulations in the antioxidant defense system designed to directly address this prediction have, with few exceptions, shown no change in lifespan. However, when these transgenic/knockout mice are tested using models that develop various types of age-related pathology, they show alterations in progression and/or severity of pathology as predicted by the oxidative stress theory; increased oxidative stress accelerates pathology and reduced oxidative stress retards pathology. These contradictory observations might mean a) oxidative stress plays a very limited, if any, role in aging but a major role in healthspan; and/or b) the role that oxidative stress plays in aging depends on environment. In environments with minimal stress, as expected under optimal husbandry, oxidative damage plays little role in aging. However, under chronic stress, including pathological phenotypes that diminish optimal health, oxidative stress/damage plays a major role in aging. Under these conditions, enhanced antioxidant defenses exert an “anti-aging” action, leading to changes in lifespan, age-related pathology, and physiological function as predicted by the oxidative stress theory of aging. PMID:20036736

  19. Oxidative stress and antioxidant strategies in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jinok; Lee, Min-Geol

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress results from a prooxidant-antioxidant imbalance, leading to cellular damage. It is mediated by free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species, that are generated during physiological aerobic metabolism and pathological inflammatory processes. Skin serves as a protective organ that plays an important role in defending both external and internal toxic stimuli and maintaining homeostasis. It is becoming increasingly evident that oxidative stress is involved in numerous skin diseases and that antioxidative strategies can serve as effective and easy methods for improving these conditions. Herein, we review dysregulated antioxidant systems and antioxidative therapeutic strategies in dermatology. PMID:26020527

  20. The impact of oxidative stress on hair.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. They are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges, while the body possesses endogenous defense mechanisms. With age, production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defense mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the aging phenotype. While the role of oxidative stress has been widely discussed in skin aging, little focus has been placed on its impact on hair condition. Moreover, most literature on age-related hair changes focuses on alopecia, but it is equally important that the hair fibers that emerge from the scalp exhibit significant age-related changes that have equal impact on the overall cosmetic properties of hair. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the pre-emerging fiber include: oxidative metabolism, smoking, UVR, and inflammation from microbial, pollutant, or irritant origins. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the post-emerging fiber include: UVR (enhanced by copper), chemical insults, and oxidized scalp lipids. The role of the dermatologist is recognition and treatment of pre- and post-emerging factors for lifetime scalp and hair health. PMID:26574302

  1. Oxidative stress and alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Prie, BE; Voiculescu, VM; Ionescu-Bozdog, OB; Petrutescu, B; Iosif, L; Gaman, LE; Clatici, VG; Stoian, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an inflammatory and autoimmune disease presenting with non-scarring hair loss. The aethiopathogenesis of alopecia areata is unclear and many factors including autoimmunity, genetic predisposition, emotional and environmental stress are thought to play important roles in its development. Antioxidant/ oxidant balance perturbation is a common feature in autoimmune, emotional and environmental stress. Therefore, our paper discusses the implications of oxidative stress in alopecia areata. Abbreviations: AA = alopecia areata, ROS = reactive oxygen species, H2O2 = hydrogen peroxide, TBARS = thiobarbituric acid rective substances, MDA = malondialdehyde, TBARS = thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, SOD = superoxide dismutase, CAT = catalase, GSH-Px = glutathione peroxidase, PON1 = paraoxonase 1, HO-1 = hemoxigenase 1, TrxR = thioredoxin reductase, GSH = glutathione PMID:26361510

  2. Marine carotenoids and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the etiology of many diseases. Dietary phytochemical products, such as bioactive food components and marine carotenoids (asthaxantin, lutein, β-carotene, fucoxanthin), have shown an antioxidant effect in reducing oxidative markers stress. Scientific evidence supports the beneficial role of phytochemicals in the prevention of some chronic diseases. Many carotenoids with high antioxidant properties have shown a reduction in disease risk both in epidemiological studies and supplementation human trials. However, controlled clinical trials and dietary intervention studies using well-defined subjects population have not provided clear evidence of these substances in the prevention of diseases. The most important aspects of this special issue will cover the synthesis, biological activities, and clinical applications of marine carotenoids, with particular attention to recent evidence regarding anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22363224

  3. Marine Carotenoids and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Riccioni, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the etiology of many diseases. Dietary phytochemical products, such as bioactive food components and marine carotenoids (asthaxantin, lutein, β-carotene, fucoxanthin), have shown an antioxidant effect in reducing oxidative markers stress. Scientific evidence supports the beneficial role of phytochemicals in the prevention of some chronic diseases. Many carotenoids with high antioxidant properties have shown a reduction in disease risk both in epidemiological studies and supplementation human trials. However, controlled clinical trials and dietary intervention studies using well-defined subjects population have not provided clear evidence of these substances in the prevention of diseases. The most important aspects of this special issue will cover the synthesis, biological activities, and clinical applications of marine carotenoids, with particular attention to recent evidence regarding anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22363224

  4. Control of oxidative stress in hepatocellular carcinoma: Helpful or harmful?

    PubMed Central

    Takaki, Akinobu; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is becoming recognized as a key factor in the progression of chronic liver disease (CLD) and hepatocarcinogenesis. The metabolically important liver is a major reservoir of mitochondria that serve as sources of reactive oxygen species, which are apparently responsible for the initiation of necroinflammation. As a result, CLD could be a major inducer of oxidative stress. Chronic hepatitis C is a powerful generator of oxidative stress, causing a high rate of hepatocarcinogenesis among patients with cirrhosis. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is also associated with oxidative stress although its hepatocarcinogenic potential is lower than that of chronic hepatitis C. Analyses of serum markers and histological findings have shown that hepatocellular carcinoma correlates with oxidative stress and experimental data indicate that oxidative stress increases the likelihood of developing hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the results of antioxidant therapy have not been favorable. Physiological oxidative stress is a necessary biological response, and thus adequate control of oxidative stress and a balance between oxidative and anti-oxidative responses is important. Several agents including metformin and L-carnitine can reportedly control mechanistic oxidative stress. This study reviews the importance of oxidative stress in hepatocarcinogenesis and of control strategies for the optimal survival of patients with CLD and hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:25954479

  5. Sustained stress response after oxidative stress in trabecular meshwork cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guorong; Luna, Coralia; Liton, Paloma B.; Navarro, Iris; Epstein, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the mechanisms by which chronic oxidative stress may lead to a sustained stress response similar to that previously observed in the trabecular meshwork (TM) of glaucoma donors. Methods Porcine TM cells were treated with 200 μM H2O2 twice a day for four days and were allowed to recover for three additional days. After the treatment, TM cells were analyzed for generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS), mitochondrial potential, activation of NF-κB, and the expression of inflammatory markers IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and ELAM-1. Potential sources of iROS were evaluated using inhibitors for nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthetase, cyclooxygenase, xanthine oxidase, NADPH oxidase, mitochondrial ROS, and PKC. The role of NF-κB activation in the induction of inflammatory markers was evaluated using the inhibitors Lactacystin and BAY11–7082. Results Chronic oxidative stress simulated by H2O2 exposure of porcine TM cells resulted in the sustained production of iROS by the mitochondria. Inhibition of mitochondrial iROS had a significant inhibitory effect on the activation of NF-κB and the induction of IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and ELAM-1 triggered by chronic oxidative stress. Inhibition of NF-κB partially prevented the induction of IL-1α, IL-8, and ELAM-1, but not IL-6. Conclusions Chronic oxidative stress in TM cells induced iROS production in mitochondria. This increase in iROS may contribute to the pathogenesis of the TM in glaucoma by inducing the expression of inflammatory mediators previously observed in glaucoma donors as well as the levels of oxidative damage in the tissue. PMID:18199969

  6. Rapamycin reverses age-related increases in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I, oxidative stress, accumulation of mtDNA fragments inside nuclear DNA, and lipofuscin level, and increases autophagy, in the liver of middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cisuelo, V; Gómez, J; García-Junceda, I; Naudí, A; Cabré, R; Mota-Martorell, N; López-Torres, M; González-Sánchez, M; Pamplona, R; Barja, G

    2016-10-01

    Rapamycin consistently increases longevity in mice although the mechanism of action of this drug is unknown. In the present investigation we studied the effect of rapamycin on mitochondrial oxidative stress at the same dose that is known to increase longevity in mice (14mgofrapamycin/kg of diet). Middle aged mice (16months old) showed significant age-related increases in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I, accumulation of mtDNA fragments inside nuclear DNA, mitochondrial protein lipoxidation, and lipofuscin accumulation compared to young animals (4months old) in the liver. After 7weeks of dietary treatment all those increases were totally or partially (lipofuscin) abolished by rapamycin, middle aged rapamycin-treated animals showing similar levels in those parameters to young animals. The decrease in mitochondrial ROS production was due to qualitative instead of quantitative changes in complex I. The decrease in mitochondrial protein lipoxidation was not due to decreases in the amount of highly oxidizable unsaturated fatty acids. Rapamycin also decreased the amount of RAPTOR (of mTOR complex) and increased the amounts of the PGC1-α and ATG13 proteins. The results are consistent with the possibility that rapamycin increases longevity in mice at least in part by lowering mitochondrial ROS production and increasing autophagy, decreasing the derived final forms of damage accumulated with age which are responsible for increased longevity. The decrease in lipofuscin accumulation induced by rapamycin adds to previous information suggesting that the increase in longevity induced by this drug can be due to a decrease in the rate of aging. PMID:27498120

  7. [Statins and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Filip-Ciubotaru, Florina; Foia, Liliana; Manciuc, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Statins, as inhibitors of the first regulatory enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis --HMG-CoA reductase--have a special impact in medical practice. Given their therapeutic efficacy, statins are believed to be the strongest class of agents in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. Moreover, besides decreasing total cholesterol and C-LDL levels, numerous fundamental and clinical researches suggest that statins also have an antiinflammatory effect. Inflammation is closely related to the production of oxygen-derived reactive species (ROS). The antioxidant effects of statins associated with their ability to block the formation and/or action of ROS may add up their therapeutic efficacy. Within this context, the present paper presents data in literature related to the effect of statins on the expression and activity of NAD(P)H oxidase, activity of the enzymes involved in the antioxidative defence (SOD, GPx, catalase, paraoxonase), and their ability to act as free radical scavengers and oxidized-LDL inhibitors. By their antioxidant properties statins may decrease the atherogenic potential of lipoproteins. PMID:21495335

  8. Postnatal exposure to chromium through mother’s milk accelerates follicular atresia in F1 offspring through increased oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jone A.; Sivakumar, Kirthiram K.; Nithy, Thamizh K.; Arosh, Joe A.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Banu, Sakhila K.

    2013-01-01

    female offspring by altering the ratio of ROS and AOXs in the ovary. Vitamin C is able to protect the ovary from CrIII-induced oxidative stress and follicle atresia through protective effects on GCs rather than TCs. PMID:23470461

  9. Mitochondrial oxidative stress promotes atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenjun; Santulli, Gaetano; Reiken, Steven R.; Yuan, Qi; Osborne, Brent W.; Chen, Bi-Xing; Marks, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation (AF). Indeed, the prevalence of AF increases with age as does oxidative stress. However, the mechanisms linking redox state to AF are not well understood. In this study we identify a link between oxidative stress and aberrant intracellular Ca2+ release via the type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) that promotes AF. We show that RyR2 are oxidized in the atria of patients with chronic AF compared with individuals in sinus rhythm. To dissect the molecular mechanism linking RyR2 oxidation to AF we used two murine models harboring RyR2 mutations that cause intracellular Ca2+ leak. Mice with intracellular Ca2+ leak exhibited increased atrial RyR2 oxidation, mitochondrial dysfunction, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and AF susceptibility. Both genetic inhibition of mitochondrial ROS production and pharmacological treatment of RyR2 leakage prevented AF. Collectively, our results indicate that alterations of RyR2 and mitochondrial ROS generation form a vicious cycle in the development of AF. Targeting this previously unrecognized mechanism could be useful in developing effective interventions to prevent and treat AF. PMID:26169582

  10. Oxidative stress-induced posttranslational modifications of alpha-synuclein: specific modification of alpha-synuclein by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal increases dopaminergic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wei; Schlachetzki, Johannes C M; Helling, Stefan; Bussmann, Julia C; Berlinghof, Marvin; Schäffer, Tilman E; Marcus, Katrin; Winkler, Jürgen; Klucken, Jochen; Becker, Cord-Michael

    2013-05-01

    Aggregation and neurotoxicity of misfolded alpha-synuclein (αSyn) are crucial mechanisms for progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of αSyn caused by oxidative stress, including modification by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE-αSyn), nitration (n-αSyn), and oxidation (o-αSyn), have been implicated to promote oligomerization of αSyn. However, it is yet unclear if these PTMs lead to different types of oligomeric intermediates. Moreover, little is known about which PTM-derived αSyn species exerts toxicity to dopaminergic cells. In this study, we directly compared aggregation characteristics of HNE-αSyn, n-αSyn, and o-αSyn. Generally, all of them promoted αSyn oligomerization. Particularly, HNE-αSyn and n-αSyn were more prone to forming oligomers than unmodified αSyn. Moreover, these PTMs prevented the formation of amyloid-like fibrils, although HNE-αSyn and o-αSyn were able to generate protofibrillar structures. The cellular effects associated with distinct PTMs were studied by exposing modified αSyn to dopaminergic Lund human mesencephalic (LUHMES) neurons. The cellular toxicity of HNE-αSyn was significantly higher than other PTM species. Furthermore, we tested the toxicity of HNE-αSyn in dopaminergic LUHMES cells and other cell types with low tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression, and additionally analyzed the loss of TH-immunoreactive cells in HNE-αSyn-treated LUHMES cells. We observed a selective toxicity of HNE-αSyn to neurons with higher TH expression. Further mechanistic studies showed that HNE-modification apparently increased the interaction of extracellular αSyn with neurons. Moreover, exposure of differentiated LUHMES cells to HNE-αSyn triggered the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, preceding neuronal cell death. Antioxidant treatment effectively protected cells from the damage triggered by HNE-αSyn. Our findings suggest a specific

  11. Selenium-enriched Agaricus bisporus mushroom protects against increase in gut permeability ex vivo and up-regulates glutathione peroxidase 1 and 2 in hyperthermally-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Tebo; Dunshea, Frank Rowland; Howell, Kate; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Rivera, Leni Rose; Furness, John Barton; Ng, Ken

    2014-06-01

    Dietary effects of organic Se supplementation in the form of Se-enriched Agaricus bisporus mushroom on ileal mucosal permeability and antioxidant selenoenzymes status in heat induced oxidative stress in rats were evaluated. Acute heat stress (40 °C, 21% relative humidity, 90 min exposure) increased ileum baseline short circuit current (Isc; 2.40-fold) and epithelial conductance (Ge; 2.74-fold). Dietary supplementation with Se-enriched A. bisporus (1 µg Se/g feed) reduced (p < 0.05) ileum Isc and Ge during heat stress to 1.74 and 1.91 fold, respectively, indicating protection from heat stress-induced mucosal permeability increase. The expression of ileum glutathione peroxidase (GPx-) 1 and 2 mRNAs were up-regulated (p < 0.05) by 1.90 and 1.87-fold, respectively, for non-heat stress rats on the Se-enriched diet relative to the control. The interplay between heat stress and dietary Se is complex. For rats on the control diet, heat stress alone increased ileum expression of GPx-1 (2.33-fold) and GPx-2 (2.23-fold) relative to thermoneutral conditions. For rats on the Se-enriched diet, heat stress increased (p < 0.05) GPx-1 expression only. Rats on Se-enriched + α-tocopherol diet exhibited increased expression of both genes (p < 0.05). Thus, dietary Se-enriched A. bisporus protected against increase in ileum permeability and up-regulated GPx-1 and GPx-2 expression, selenoenzymes relevant to mitigating oxidative stress. PMID:24962481

  12. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1–7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  13. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1-7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  14. Oxidative Stress and Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akhilesh Kumar; Srivastava, Mona; Srivastava, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    Background: Major causative factor for major depression is inflammation, autoimmune tissue damage and prolonged psychological stress, which leads to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to know the association of free radicals and antioxidant status in subjects suffering from major depression. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients diagnosed as a case of unipolar depression as per DSM IV, fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were compared with 40 healthy age and sex matched controls. The sera of both the groups were collected taking aseptic precautions and were evaluated for the markers of oxidative stress and for the antioxidants. The age group of the sample and the controls was between 18-60 y, both males and females were equally represented in the groups. Results: A significantly high level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was found in the patients with major depression (1.95 ± 1.04 mmol/L) as compared to healthy controls (0.366 ± 0.175 mmol/L) (p < 0.0001). The serum level of nitrite was found to be lower in cases (23.18 ± 12.08 μmol/L) in comparison to controls (26.18 ± 8.68 μmol/L) (p = 0.1789). Similarly the serum level of ascorbic acid and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly below as compared to healthy controls (all p < 0.0001). Ceruloplasmin levels were also depressed in cases (p = 0.3943). Conclusion: The study concluded that in the absence of known oxidative injury causative agents, the lowered levels of antioxidants and higher levels of MDA implicate the high degree of oxidative stress in unipolar depression. PMID:25653939

  15. Evidence that hyperglycemia after recovery from hypoglycemia worsens endothelial function and increases oxidative stress and inflammation in healthy control subjects and subjects with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, Antonio; Novials, Anna; Ortega, Emilio; La Sala, Lucia; Pujadas, Gemma; Testa, Roberto; Bonfigli, Anna Rita; Esposito, Katherine; Giugliano, Dario

    2012-11-01

    Currently there is debate on whether hypoglycemia is an independent risk factor for atherosclerosis, but little attention has been paid to the effects of recovery from hypoglycemia. In normal control individuals and in people with type 1 diabetes, recovery from a 2-h induced hypoglycemia was obtained by reaching normoglycemia or hyperglycemia for another 2 h and then maintaining normal glycemia for the following 6 h. Hyperglycemia after hypoglycemia was also repeated with the concomitant infusion of vitamin C. Recovery with normoglycemia is accompanied by a significant improvement in endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammation, which are affected by hypoglycemia; however, a period of hyperglycemia after hypoglycemia worsens all of these parameters, an effect that persists even after the additional 6 h of normoglycemia. This effect is partially counterbalanced when hyperglycemia after hypoglycemia is accompanied by the simultaneous infusion of vitamin C, suggesting that when hyperglycemia follows hypoglycemia, an ischemia-reperfusion-like effect is produced. This study shows that the way in which recovery from hypoglycemia takes place in people with type 1 diabetes could play an important role in favoring the appearance of endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammation, widely recognized cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:22891214

  16. Oxidative stress, NADPH oxidases, and arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Runge, Marschall S; Madamanchi, Nageswara R

    2016-05-10

    Atherosclerosis and its major complications - myocardial infarction and stroke - remain major causes of death and disability in the United States and world-wide. Indeed, with dramatic increases in obesity and diabetes mellitus, the prevalence and public health impact of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) will likely remain high. Major advances have been made in development of new therapies to reduce the incidence of atherosclerosis and CVD, in particular for treatment of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. Oxidative stress is the common mechanistic link for many CVD risk factors. However, only recently have the tools existed to study the interface between oxidative stress and CVD in animal models. The most important source of reactive oxygen species (and hence oxidative stress) in vascular cells are the multiple forms of enzymes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase). Recently published and emerging studies now clearly establish that: 1) NADPH oxidases are of critical importance in atherosclerosis and hypertension in animal models; 2) given the tissue-specific expression of key components of NADPH oxidase, it may be possible to target vascular oxidative stress for prevention of CVD. PMID:25649240

  17. Renal oxidative stress, oxygenation, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Palm, Fredrik; Nordquist, Lina

    2011-11-01

    Hypertension is closely associated with progressive kidney dysfunction, manifested as glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, proteinuria, and eventually declining glomerular filtration. The postulated mechanism for development of glomerulosclerosis is barotrauma caused by increased capillary pressure, but the reason for development of interstitial fibrosis and the subsequently reduced kidney function is less clear. However, it has been hypothesized that tissue hypoxia induces fibrogenesis and progressive renal failure. This is very interesting, since recent reports highlight several different mechanisms resulting in altered oxygen handling and availability in the hypertensive kidney. Such mechanisms include decreased renal blood flow due to increased vascular tone induced by ANG II that limits oxygen delivery and increases oxidative stress, resulting in increased mitochondrial oxygen usage, increased oxygen usage for tubular electrolyte transport, and shunting of oxygen from arterial to venous blood in preglomerular vessels. It has been shown in several studies that interventions to prevent oxidative stress and to restore kidney tissue oxygenation prevent progression of kidney dysfunction. Furthermore, inhibition of ANG II activity, by either blocking ANG II type 1 receptors or angiotensin-converting enzyme, or by preventing oxidative stress by administration of antioxidants also results in improved blood pressure control. Therefore, it seems likely that tissue hypoxia in the hypertensive kidney contributes to progression of kidney damage, and perhaps also persistence the high blood pressure. PMID:21832206

  18. Selected oxidative stress markers in gynecological laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koźlik, Jacek; Przybyłowska, Joanna; Mikrut, Kinga; Zwoliński, Jacek; Piątek, Jacek; Sobczak, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The surgical stress response after laparoscopy is smaller when compared with open surgery, and it is expected that after minimally invasive surgery the possible development of oxidative stress will be less severe. Aim To evaluate markers of pro-oxidant activity – levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde – and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the perioperative period in patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopy and to determine whether the duration of laparoscopy can affect these changes. Material and methods The study included 64 patients, divided into two groups: group 1 with duration of laparoscopy up to 20 min, and group 2 with duration of the operation over 40 min. Blood samples were collected before anesthesia, 5 min after release of pneumoperitoneum, and 10 h after surgery. Results A statistically significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde in samples collected after surgery was found in comparison with values obtained before surgery. Also statistically significant differences existed between groups of patients with different duration of surgery. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity values were significantly decreased. They were also significantly different between the two groups with different duration of surgery. Conclusions In our study, levels of the markers of pro-oxidant activity increased and levels of the markers of antioxidant enzymes decreased, suggesting development of oxidative stress. The duration of laparoscopic procedures affects the severity of the presented changes. PMID:25960799

  19. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-05-12

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  20. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  1. Oxidative stress and immunotoxicity induced by graphene oxide in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjie; Yin, Junfa; Liang, Yong; Yuan, Shaopeng; Wang, Fengbang; Song, Maoyong; Wang, Hailin

    2016-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively explored as a promising nanomaterial for applications in biology because of its unique properties. Therefore, systematic investigation of GO toxicity is essential to determine its fate in the environment and potential adverse effects. In this study, acute toxicity, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity of GO were investigated in zebrafish. No obvious acute toxicity was observed when zebrafish were exposed to 1, 5, 10 or 50mg/L GO for 14 days. However, a number of cellular alterations were detected by histological analysis of the liver and intestine, including vacuolation, loose arrangement of cells, histolysis and disintegration of cell boundaries. As evidence for oxidative stress, malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were increased and glutathione content was decreased in the liver after treatment with GO. GO treatment induced an immune response in zebrafish, as demonstrated by increased expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 β, and interleukin-6 in the spleen. Our findings demonstrated that GO administration in an aquatic system can cause oxidative stress and immune toxicity in adult zebrafish. To our knowledge, this is the first report of immune toxicity of GO in zebrafish. PMID:26921726

  2. Protein Quality Control Under Oxidative Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jan-Ulrik; Gray, Michael J.; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen and chlorine species (RO/CS) is generally regarded to be a toxic and highly undesirable event, which serves as contributing factor in aging and many age-related diseases. However, it is also put to excellent use during host defense, when high levels of RO/CS are produced to kill invading microorganisms and regulate bacterial colonization. Biochemical and cell biological studies of how bacteria and other microorganisms deal with RO/CS have now provided important new insights into the physiological consequences of oxidative stress, the major targets that need protection, and the cellular strategies employed by organisms to mitigate the damage. This review examines the redox-regulated mechanisms by which cells maintain a functional proteome during oxidative stress. We will discuss the well-characterized redox-regulated chaperone Hsp33, and review recent discoveries demonstrating that oxidative stress-specific activation of chaperone function is a much more widespread phenomenon than previously anticipated. New members of this group include the cytosolic ATPase Get3 in yeast, the E. coli protein RidA, and the mammalian protein α2-macroglobin. We will conclude our review with recent evidence showing that inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), whose accumulation significantly increases bacterial oxidative stress resistance, works by a protein-like chaperone mechanism. Understanding the relationship between oxidative and proteotoxic stresses will improve our understanding of both host-microbe interactions and of how mammalian cells combat the damaging side effects of uncontrolled RO/CS production, a hallmark of inflammation. PMID:25698115

  3. Protein quality control under oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Jan-Ulrik; Gray, Michael J; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-04-10

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen and chlorine species (RO/CS) is generally regarded to be a toxic and highly undesirable event, which serves as contributing factor in aging and many age-related diseases. However, it is also put to excellent use during host defense, when high levels of RO/CS are produced to kill invading microorganisms and regulate bacterial colonization. Biochemical and cell biological studies of how bacteria and other microorganisms deal with RO/CS have now provided important new insights into the physiological consequences of oxidative stress, the major targets that need protection, and the cellular strategies employed by organisms to mitigate the damage. This review examines the redox-regulated mechanisms by which cells maintain a functional proteome during oxidative stress. We will discuss the well-characterized redox-regulated chaperone Hsp33, and we will review recent discoveries demonstrating that oxidative stress-specific activation of chaperone function is a much more widespread phenomenon than previously anticipated. New members of this group include the cytosolic ATPase Get3 in yeast, the Escherichia coli protein RidA, and the mammalian protein α2-macroglobulin. We will conclude our review with recent evidence showing that inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), whose accumulation significantly increases bacterial oxidative stress resistance, works by a protein-like chaperone mechanism. Understanding the relationship between oxidative and proteotoxic stresses will improve our understanding of both host-microbe interactions and how mammalian cells combat the damaging side effects of uncontrolled RO/CS production, a hallmark of inflammation. PMID:25698115

  4. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Ewa; Smaga, Irena; Gawlik, Maciej; Moniczewski, Andrzej; Stankowicz, Piotr; Pera, Joanna; Filip, Małgorzata

    2016-08-01

    The pathophysiologies of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD), are far from being fully explained. Oxidative stress (OS) has been proposed as one factor that plays a potential role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by higher levels of OS biomarkers and by lower levels of antioxidant defense biomarkers in the brain and peripheral tissues. In this article, we review the current knowledge regarding the involvement of OS in neurodegenerative diseases, based on clinical trials and animal studies. In addition, we analyze the effects of the drug-induced modulation of oxidative balance, and we explore pharmacotherapeutic strategies for OS reduction. PMID:26198567

  5. Oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Csányi, Gábor; Miller, Francis J

    2014-01-01

    In the special issue "Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease" authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24722571

  6. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Csányi, Gábor; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24722571

  7. Oxidative stress in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Kesarwala, A H; Krishna, M C; Mitchell, J B

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative species, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), are components of normal cellular metabolism and are required for intracellular processes as varied as proliferation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. In the situation of chronic oxidative stress, however, ROS contribute to various pathophysiologies and are involved in multiple stages of carcinogenesis. In head and neck cancers specifically, many common risk factors contribute to carcinogenesis via ROS-based mechanisms, including tobacco, areca quid, alcohol, and viruses. Given their widespread influence on the process of carcinogenesis, ROS and their related pathways are attractive targets for intervention. The effects of radiation therapy, a central component of treatment for nearly all head and neck cancers, can also be altered via interfering with oxidative pathways. These pathways are also relevant to the development of many benign oral diseases. In this review, we outline how ROS contribute to pathophysiology with a focus toward head and neck cancers and benign oral diseases, describing potential targets and pathways for intervention that exploit the role of oxidative species in these pathologic processes. PMID:25417961

  8. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Mario D; de Miguel, Manuel; Carmona-López, Inés; Bonal, Pablo; Campa, Francisco; Moreno-Fernández, Ana María

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have shown some evidence demonstrating that oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of FM. Furthermore, it is controversial the role of mitochondria in the oxidant imbalance documented in FM. Signs and symptoms associated with muscular alteration and mitochondrial dysfunction, including oxidative stress, have been observed in patients with FM. To this respect, Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency, an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a strong antioxidant, alters mitochondria function and mitochondrial respiratory complexes organization and leading to increased ROS generation. Recently have been showed CoQ10 deficiency in blood mononuclear cells in FM patients, so if the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is the origin of oxidative stress in FM patients is demonstrated, could help to understand the complex pathophysiology of this disorder and may lead to development of new therapeutic strategies for prevention and treatment of this disease. PMID:20424583

  9. Electromagnetic Fields, Oxidative Stress, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Consales, Claudia; Merla, Caterina; Marino, Carmela; Benassi, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) originating both from both natural and manmade sources permeate our environment. As people are continuously exposed to EMFs in everyday life, it is a matter of great debate whether they can be harmful to human health. On the basis of two decades of epidemiological studies, an increased risk for childhood leukemia associated with Extremely Low Frequency fields has been consistently assessed, inducing the International Agency for Research on Cancer to insert them in the 2B section of carcinogens in 2001. EMFs interaction with biological systems may cause oxidative stress under certain circumstances. Since free radicals are essential for brain physiological processes and pathological degeneration, research focusing on the possible influence of the EMFs-driven oxidative stress is still in progress, especially in the light of recent studies suggesting that EMFs may contribute to the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders. This review synthesizes the emerging evidences about this topic, highlighting the wide data uncertainty that still characterizes the EMFs effect on oxidative stress modulation, as both pro-oxidant and neuroprotective effects have been documented. Care should be taken to avoid methodological limitations and to determine the patho-physiological relevance of any alteration found in EMFs-exposed biological system. PMID:22991514

  10. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  11. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Denu, Ryan A; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  12. [Carbonyl stress and oxidatively modified proteins in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Bargnoux, A-S; Morena, M; Badiou, S; Dupuy, A-M; Canaud, B; Cristol, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly observed in chronic renal failure patients resulting from an unbalance between overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impairement of defense mechanisms. Proteins appear as potential targets of uremia-induced oxidative stress and may undergo qualitative modifications. Proteins could be directly modified by reactive oxygen species which leads to amino acid oxydation and cross-linking. Proteins could be indirectly modified by reactive carbonyl compounds produced by glycoxidation and lipo-peroxidation. The resulting post-traductional modifications are known as carbonyl stress. In addition, thiols could be oxidized or could react with homocystein leading to homocysteinylation. Finally, tyrosin could be oxidized by myeloperoxidase leading to advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP). Oxidatively modified proteins are increased in chronic renal failure patients and may contribute to exacerbate the oxidative stress/inflammation syndrome. They have been involved in long term complications of uremia such as amyloidosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:19297289

  13. Oxidative Stress and Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lodovici, Maura; Bigagli, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms of air pollution-induced health effects involve oxidative stress and inflammation. As a matter of fact, particulate matter (PM), especially fine (PM2.5, PM < 2.5 μm) and ultrafine (PM0.1, PM < 0.1 μm) particles, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and transition metals, are potent oxidants or able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress can trigger redox-sensitive pathways that lead to different biological processes such as inflammation and cell death. However, it does appear that the susceptibility of target organ to oxidative injury also depends upon its ability to upregulate protective scavenging systems. As vehicular traffic is known to importantly contribute to PM exposure, its intensity and quality must be strongly relevant determinants of the qualitative characteristics of PM spread in the atmosphere. Change in the composition of this PM is likely to modify its health impact. PMID:21860622

  14. Long-term exposure to electromagnetic radiation from mobile phones and Wi-Fi devices decreases plasma prolactin, progesterone, and estrogen levels but increases uterine oxidative stress in pregnant rats and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Yüksel, Murat; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Özkaya, Mehmet Okan

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the effects of mobile phone (900 and 1800 MHz)- and Wi-Fi (2450 MHz)-induced electromagnetic radiation (EMR) exposure on uterine oxidative stress and plasma hormone levels in pregnant rats and their offspring. Thirty-two rats and their forty newborn offspring were divided into the following four groups according to the type of EMR exposure they were subjected to: the control, 900, 1800, and 2450 MHz groups. Each experimental group was exposed to EMR for 60 min/day during the pregnancy and growth periods. The pregnant rats were allowed to stand for four generations (total 52 weeks) before, plasma and uterine samples were obtained. During the 4th, 5th, and 6th weeks of the experiment, plasma and uterine samples were also obtained from the developing rats. Although uterine lipid peroxidation increased in the EMR groups, uterine glutathione peroxidase activity (4th and 5th weeks) and plasma prolactin levels (6th week) in developing rats decreased in these groups. In the maternal rats, the plasma prolactin, estrogen, and progesterone levels decreased in the EMR groups, while the plasma total oxidant status, and body temperatures increased. There were no changes in the levels of reduced glutathione, total antioxidants, or vitamins A, C, and E in the uterine and plasma samples of maternal rats. In conclusion, although EMR exposure decreased the prolactin, estrogen, and progesterone levels in the plasma of maternal rats and their offspring, EMR-induced oxidative stress in the uteri of maternal rats increased during the development of offspring. Mobile phone- and Wi-Fi-induced EMR may be one cause of increased oxidative uterine injury in growing rats and decreased hormone levels in maternal rats. TRPV1 cation channels are the possible molecular pathways responsible for changes in the hormone, oxidative stress, and body temperature levels in the uterus of maternal rats following a year-long exposure to electromagnetic radiation exposure from mobile

  15. Ferritin and the response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Orino, K; Lehman, L; Tsuji, Y; Ayaki, H; Torti, S V; Torti, F M

    2001-01-01

    Iron is required for normal cell growth and proliferation. However, excess iron is potentially harmful, as it can catalyse the formation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) via Fenton chemistry. For this reason, cells have evolved highly regulated mechanisms for controlling intracellular iron levels. Chief among these is the sequestration of iron in ferritin. Ferritin is a 24 subunit protein composed of two subunit types, termed H and L. The ferritin H subunit has a potent ferroxidase activity that catalyses the oxidation of ferrous iron, whereas ferritin L plays a role in iron nucleation and protein stability. In the present study we report that increased synthesis of both subunits of ferritin occurs in HeLa cells exposed to oxidative stress. An increase in the activity of iron responsive element binding proteins in response to oxidative stress was also observed. However, this activation was transient, allowing ferritin protein induction to subsequently proceed. To assess whether ferritin induction reduced the accumulation of ROS, and to test the relative contribution of ferritin H and L subunits in this process, we prepared stable transfectants that overexpressed either ferritin H or ferritin L cDNA under control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter. We observed that overexpression of either ferritin H or ferritin L reduced the accumulation of ROS in response to oxidant challenge. PMID:11415455

  16. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalın, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women. Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status

  17. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Erhan; Akaln, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women.Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated.Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status markers

  18. Increased susceptibility to oxidative stress- and ultraviolet A-induced apoptosis in fibroblasts in atypical progeroid syndrome/atypical Werner syndrome with LMNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-Ichiro; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Yamada, Kazuya; Ogino, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Yoko; Perera, Buddhini; Takeuchi, Yuko; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-08-01

    Atypical progeroid syndrome (APS), including atypical Werner syndrome (AWS), is a disorder of premature ageing caused by mutation of the lamin A gene, the same causal gene involved in Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome (HGS). We previously reported the first Japanese case of APS/AWS with a LMNA mutation (p.D300N). Recently, it has been reported that UVA induced abnormal truncated form of lamin A, called progerin, as well as HGS-like abnormal nuclear structures in normal human fibroblasts, being more frequent in the elderly, suggesting that lamin A may be involved in the regulation of photoageing. The objective of this study was to elucidate the sensitivity to cell damage induced by oxidative stress or UVA in fibroblasts from APS/AWS patient. Using immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry analysis, the amount of early apoptotic cells and degree of intra-cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were higher in H2 02 - or UVA-treated APS/AWS fibroblasts than in normal fibroblasts, suggesting that repeated UV exposure may induce premature ageing of the skin in APS/AWS patients and that protecting against sunlight is possibly important for delaying the emergence of APS/AWS symptoms. In addition, we demonstrated that H2 O2 -, or UVA-induced apoptosis and necrosis in normal and APS/AWS fibroblasts were enhanced by farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI) treatment, indicating that FTI might not be useful for treating our APS/AWS patient. PMID:27539898

  19. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Arican, Ozer; Belge Kurutas, Ergul; Sasmaz, Sezai

    2005-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the common dermatological diseases and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. In this study, we aim to determine the effects of oxidative stress in acne vulgaris. Forty-three consecutive acne patients and 46 controls were enrolled. The parameters of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the venous blood of cases were measured spectrophotometrically. The values compared with control group, the relation between the severity and distribution of acne, and the correlation of each enzyme level were researched. CAT and G6PD levels in patients were found to be statistically decreased, and SOD and MDA levels were found to be statistically increased (P < .001). However, any statistical difference and correlation could not be found between the severity and distribution of lesions and the mean levels of enzymes. In addition, we found that each enzyme is correlated with one another. Our findings show that oxidative stress exists in the acne patients. It will be useful to apply at least one antioxidant featured drug along with the combined acne treatment. PMID:16489259

  20. Oxidative stress in coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Amaury Edgardo Mont’Serrat Ávila Souza; Melnikov, Petr; Cônsolo, Lourdes Zélia Zanoni

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this prospective study was to assess the dynamics of oxidative stress during coronary artery bypass surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Sixteen patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were enrolled. Blood samples were collected from the systemic circulation during anesthesia induction (radial artery - A1), the systemic venous return (B1 and B2) four minutes after removal of the aortic cross-clamping, of the coronary sinus (CS1 and CS2) four minutes after removal of the aortic cross-clamping and the systemic circulation four minutes after completion of cardiopulmonary bypass (radial artery - A2). The marker of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde, was measured using spectrophotometry. Results The mean values of malondialdehyde were (ng/dl): A1 (265.1), B1 (490.0), CS1 (527.0), B2 (599.6), CS2 (685.0) and A2 (527.2). Comparisons between A1/B1, A1/CS1, A1/B2, A1/CS2, A1/A2 were significant, with ascending values (P<0.05). Comparisons between the measurements of the coronary sinus and venous reservoir after the two moments of reperfusion (B1/B2 and CS1/CS2) were higher when CS2 (P<0.05). Despite higher values ​​after the end of cardiopulmonary bypass (A2), when compared to samples of anesthesia (A1), those show a downward trend when compared to the samples of the second moment of reperfusion (CS2) (P<0.05). Conclusion The measurement of malondialdehyde shows that coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass is accompanied by increase of free radicals and this trend gradually decreases after its completion. Aortic clamping exacerbates oxidative stress but has sharper decline after reperfusion when compared to systemic metabolism. The behavior of thiobarbituric acid species indicates that oxidative stress is an inevitable pathophysiological component. PMID:27163415

  1. Oxidative stress, thyroid dysfunction & Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Carlos; Casado, Ángela

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most common chromosomal disorders, occurring in one out of 700-1000 live births, and the most common cause of mental retardation. Thyroid dysfunction is the most typical endocrine abnormality in patients with DS. It is well known that thyroid dysfunction is highly prevalent in children and adults with DS and that both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are more common in patients with DS than in the general population. Increasing evidence has shown that DS individuals are under unusual increased oxidative stress, which may be involved in the higher prevalence and severity of a number of pathologies associated with the syndrome, as well as the accelerated ageing observed in these individuals. The gene for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is coded on chromosome 21 and it is overexpressed (~50%) resulting in an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to overproduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). ROS leads to oxidative damage of DNA, proteins and lipids, therefore, oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of DS. PMID:26354208

  2. Curcumin alleviates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Daverey, Amita; Agrawal, Sandeep K

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in various neurodegenerative diseases, thus alleviating oxidative stress is a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention and/or prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, alleviation of oxidative stress through curcumin is investigated in A172 (human glioblastoma cell line) and HA-sp (human astrocytes cell line derived from the spinal cord) astrocytes. H2O2 was used to induce oxidative stress in astrocytes (A172 and HA-sp). Data show that H2O2 induces activation of astrocytes in dose- and time-dependent manner as evident by increased expression of GFAP in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24 and 12h respectively. An upregulation of Prdx6 was also observed in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24h of H2O2 treatment as compared to untreated control. Our data also showed that curcumin inhibits oxidative stress-induced cytoskeleton disarrangement, and impedes the activation of astrocytes by inhibiting upregulation of GFAP, vimentin and Prdx6. In addition, we observed an inhibition of oxidative stress-induced inflammation, apoptosis and mitochondria fragmentation after curcumin treatment. Therefore, our results suggest that curcumin not only protects astrocytes from H2O2-induced oxidative stress but also reverses the mitochondrial damage and dysfunction induced by oxidative stress. This study also provides evidence for protective role of curcumin on astrocytes by showing its effects on attenuating reactive astrogliosis and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:27423629

  3. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  4. Role of oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, WEN-JUAN; ZHANG, XIA; CHEN, WEI-WEI

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of disability in individuals aged >65 years worldwide. AD is characterized by the abnormal deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, and intracellular accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles of hyperphosphorylated τ protein and dementia. The neurotoxic oligomer Aβ peptide, which is the neuropathological diagnostic criterion of the disease, together with τ protein, are mediators of the neurodegeneration that is among the main causative factors. However, these phenomena are mainly initiated and enhanced by oxidative stress, a process referring to an imbalance between antioxidants and oxidants in favour of oxidants. This imbalance can occur as a result of increased free radicals or a decrease in antioxidant defense, free radicals being a species that contains one or more unpaired electrons in its outer shell. The major source of potent free radicals is the reduction of molecular oxygen in water, that initially yields the superoxide radical, which produces hydrogen peroxide by the addition of an electron. The reduction of hydrogen peroxide produces highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, termed reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can react with lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, and other molecules and may also alter their structures and functions. Thus, tissues and organs, particularly the brain, a vulnerable organ, are affected by ROS due to its composition. The brain is largely composed of easily oxidizable lipids while featuring a high oxygen consumption rate. The current review examined the role of oxidative stress in AD. PMID:27123241

  5. Mutational activation of a Galphai causes uncontrolled proliferation of aerial hyphae and increased sensitivity to heat and oxidative stress in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Q; Borkovich, K A

    1999-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins, consisting of alpha, beta, and gamma subunits, transduce environmental signals through coupling to plasma membrane-localized receptors. We previously reported that the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa possesses a Galpha protein, GNA-1, that is a member of the Galphai superfamily. Deletion of gna-1 leads to defects in apical extension, differentiation of asexual spores, sensitivity to hyperosmotic media, and female fertility. In addition, Deltagna-1 strains have lower intracellular cAMP levels under conditions that promote morphological abnormalities. To further define the function of GNA-1 in signal transduction in N. crassa, we examined properties of strains with mutationally activated gna-1 alleles (R178C or Q204L) as the only source of GNA-1 protein. These mutations are predicted to inhibit the GTPase activity of GNA-1 and lead to constitutive signaling. In the sexual cycle, gna-1(R178C) and gna-1(Q204L) strains are female-fertile, but produce fewer and larger perithecia than wild type. During asexual development, gna-1(R178C) and gna-1(Q204L) strains elaborate abundant, long aerial hyphae, produce less conidia, and possess lower levels of carotenoid pigments in comparison to wild-type controls. Furthermore, gna-1(R178C) and gna-1(Q204L) strains are more sensitive to heat shock and exposure to hydrogen peroxide than wild-type strains, while Deltagna-1 mutants are more resistant. In contrast to Deltagna-1 mutants, gna-1(R178C) and gna-1(Q204L) strains have higher steady-state levels of cAMP than wild type. The results suggest that GNA-1 possesses several Gbetagamma-independent functions in N. crassa. We propose that GNA-1 mediates signal transduction pathway(s) that regulate aerial hyphae development and sensitivity to heat and oxidative stresses, possibly through modulation of cAMP levels. PMID:9872952

  6. Induction of Oxidative Stress in Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Emin

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a critical role in the pathophysiology of several kidney diseases, and many complications of these diseases are mediated by oxidative stress, oxidative stress-related mediators, and inflammation. Several systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia; infection; antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, and radiocontrast agents; and environmental toxins, occupational chemicals, radiation, smoking, as well as alcohol consumption induce oxidative stress in kidney. We searched the literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google scholar with “oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, oxygen free radicals, kidney, renal injury, nephropathy, nephrotoxicity, and induction”. The literature search included only articles written in English language. Letters or case reports were excluded. Scientific relevance, for clinical studies target populations, and study design, for basic science studies full coverage of main topics, are eligibility criteria for articles used in this paper. PMID:22577546

  7. Primary and secondary oxidative stress in Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Mols, Maarten; Abee, Tjakko

    2011-06-01

    Coping with oxidative stress originating from oxidizing compounds or reactive oxygen species (ROS), associated with the exposure to agents that cause environmental stresses, is one of the prerequisites for an aerobic lifestyle of Bacillus spp. such as B. subtilis, B. cereus and B. anthracis. This minireview highlights novel insights in the primary oxidative stress response caused by oxidizing compounds including hydrogen peroxide and the secondary oxidative stress responses apparent upon exposure to a range of agents and conditions leading to environmental stresses such as antibiotics, heat and acid. Insights in the pathways and damaging radicals involved have been compiled based among others on transcriptome studies, network analyses and fluorescence techniques for detection of ROS at single cell level. Exploitation of the current knowledge for the control of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria is discussed. PMID:21352461

  8. Oxidative stress induction by nanoparticles in THP-1 cells with 4-HNE production: stress biomarker or oxidative stress signalling molecule?

    PubMed

    Foucaud, L; Goulaouic, S; Bennasroune, A; Laval-Gilly, P; Brown, D; Stone, V; Falla, J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether carbon black (CB) nanoparticles might induce toxicity to monocytic cells in vitro via an oxidative stress mechanism involving formation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and the subsequent role of 4-HNE in inducing further cytotoxic effects. ROS production in cells by CB nanoparticles was shown by the oxidation of DCFH after a short time exposure. These particles induced the formation of 4-HNE-protein adducts and significant modification of glutathione content corresponding to an increase of oxidized glutathione form (GSSG) and a decrease of total glutathione (GSX) content. These results attest to an oxidative stress induced by the carbon black nanoparticles, although no induction of HO-1 protein expression was detected. Concerning the effects of a direct exposure to 4-HNE, our results showed that 4-HNE is not cytotoxic for concentrations lower than 12.5 microM. By contrast, it provokes a very high cytotoxicity for concentrations above 25 microM. An induction of HO-1 expression was observed from concentrations above 5 microM of 4-HNE. Finally, glutathione content decreased significantly from 5 microM of 4-HNE but no modification was observed under this concentration. The discrepancy between effects of carbon black nanoparticles and 4-HNE on the intracellular markers of oxidative stress suggests that 4-HNE is not directly implied in the signalling of oxidative toxicity of nanoparticles but is an effective biomarker of oxidative effects of nanoparticles. PMID:20638469

  9. Oxidative stress in haemodialysis--intradialytic changes.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa Rao, P V; Dakshinamurty, K V; Saibaba, K S; Raghavan, M S; Vijayabhaskar, M; Sreekrishna, V; Ambekar, J G; Jayaseelan, L

    2001-01-01

    Oxidative stress is likely to be involved in the development of complications due to haemodialysis. Though there is evidence for production of oxygen free radicals during haemodialysis, reports on net oxidative imbalance due to a single dialysis session are conflicting. Hence, a time-course analysis of changes in lipid peroxides (LPO) along with antioxidant enzymes and vitamins was carried out. Hourly changes in LPO and antioxidants were studied during a first-use cuprophan membrane and acetate dialysis in 20 patients on regular haemodialysis treatment. Data were corrected for haemoconcentration and standardised to measure the rate of change before statistical evaluation using analysis of variance for repeated measures. The results of the study showed a net oxidative stress due to a single dialysis session in the form of increased plasma and erythrocyte lipid peroxidation, decrease in plasma vitamin E, slight increase in plasma superoxide dismutase and erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and no change in plasma glutathione peroxidase. erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and plasma vitamin A levels. The oxygen radical production was found to be maximum in the first hour of dialysis. PMID:11778848

  10. Clinical Perspective of Oxidative Stress in Sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Emanuele; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Santella, Regina M.; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS) is one of the most devastating neurological diseases; most patients die within 3 to 4 years after symptom onset. Oxidative stress is a disturbance in the pro-oxidative/anti-oxidative balance favoring the pro-oxidative state. Autopsy and laboratory studies in ALS indicate that oxidative stress plays a major role in motor neuron degeneration and astrocyte dysfunction. Oxidative stress biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and urine, are elevated, suggesting that abnormal oxidative stress is generated outside of the central nervous system. Our review indicates that agricultural chemicals, heavy metals, military service, professional sports, excessive physical exertion, chronic head trauma, and certain foods might be modestly associated with ALS risk, with a stronger association between risk and smoking. At the cellular level, these factors are all involved in generating oxidative stress. Experimental studies indicate that a combination of insults that induce modest oxidative stress can exert additive deleterious effects on motor neurons, suggesting multiple exposures in real-world environments are important. As the disease progresses, nutritional deficiency, cachexia, psychological stress, and impending respiratory failure may further increase oxidative stress. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggests that ALS is possibly a systemic disease. Laboratory, pathologic, and epidemiologic evidence clearly support the hypothesis that oxidative stress is central in the pathogenic process, particularly in genetically susceptive individuals. If we are to improve ALS treatment, well-designed biochemical and genetic epidemiological studies, combined with a multidisciplinary research approach, are needed and will provide knowledge crucial to our understanding of ALS etiology, pathophysiology, and prognosis. PMID:23797033

  11. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  12. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  13. Juniperus communis Linn oil decreases oxidative stress and increases antioxidant enzymes in the heart of rats administered a diet rich in cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Gumral, Nurhan; Kumbul, Duygu Doguc; Aylak, Firdevs; Saygin, Mustafa; Savik, Emin

    2015-01-01

    It has been asserted that consumption of dietary cholesterol (Chol) raises atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases and that Chol causes an increase in free radical production. Hypercholesterolemic diet has also been reported to cause changes in the antioxidant system. In our study, different doses of Juniperus communis Linn (JCL) oil, a tree species growing in Mediterranean and Isparta regions and having aromatic characteristics, were administered to rats; and the levels of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay (TBARS) were examined in the heart tissue of rats. In this study, 35 Wistar Albino male adult rats weighing approximately 250-300 g were used. The rats were divided into five groups of seven each. The control group was administered normal pellet chow, and the Chol group was administered pellet chow including 2% Chol, while 50 JCL, 100 JCL, and 200 JCL groups were administered 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg JCL oil dissolved in 0.5% sodium carboxy methyl cellulose, respectively, in addition to the pellet chow containing 2% Chol, by gavage. After 30 days, the experiment was terminated and the antioxidant enzyme activities were examined in the heart tissue of rats. While consumption of dietary Chol decreases the activities of SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT in heart tissue of rats (not significant), administeration of 200 mg/kg JCL oil in addition to Chol led to a significant increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Administering Chol led to a significant increase in TBARS level. Administering 100 and 200 mg/kg JCL oil together with Chol prevented significantly the increase in lipid peroxides. As a result of the study, JCL oil showed oxidant-antioxidant effect in the heart tissue of rats. PMID:23293127

  14. Mitochondrial oxidant stress in locus coeruleus is regulated by activity and nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Padilla, Javier; Guzman, Jaime N; Ilijic, Ema; Kondapalli, Jyothisri; Galtieri, Daniel J; Yang, Ben; Schieber, Simon; Oertel, Wolfgang; Wokosin, David; Schumacker, Paul T; Surmeier, D James

    2014-06-01

    Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is a prominent feature of aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The basis of this vulnerability is not understood. To explore possible physiological determinants, we studied LC neurons using electrophysiological and optical approaches in ex vivo mouse brain slices. We found that autonomous activity in LC neurons was accompanied by oscillations in dendritic Ca(2+) concentration that were attributable to the opening of L-type Ca(2+) channels. This oscillation elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress and was attenuated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relationship between activity and stress was malleable, as arousal and carbon dioxide increased the spike rate but differentially affected mitochondrial oxidant stress. Oxidant stress was also increased in an animal model of PD. Thus, our results point to activity-dependent Ca(2+) entry and a resulting mitochondrial oxidant stress as factors contributing to the vulnerability of LC neurons. PMID:24816140

  15. Mitochondrial oxidant stress in locus coeruleus is regulated by activity and nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez–Padilla, J.; Guzman, J.N.; Ilijic, E.; Kondapalli, J.; Galtieri, D.J.; Yang, B.; Schieber, S.; Oertel, W.; Wokosin, D.; Schumacker, P. T.; Surmeier, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is a prominent feature of aging–related neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s disease (PD). The basis of this vulnerability is not understood. To explore possible physiological determinants, LC neurons were studied using electrophysiological and optical approaches in ex vivo mouse brain slices. These studies revealed that autonomous activity in LC neurons was accompanied by oscillations in dendritic Ca2+ concentration attributable to opening of L–type Ca2+ channels. This oscillation elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress and was attenuated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relationship between activity and stress was malleable, as arousal and carbon dioxide, each increased the spike rate, but differentially affected mitochondrial oxidant stress. Oxidant stress also was increased in an animal model of PD. Thus, our results point to activity–dependent Ca2+ entry and a resulting mitochondrial oxidant stress as factors contributing to the vulnerability of LC neurons. PMID:24816140

  16. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  17. Oxidative stress and metabolic disorders: Pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Rani, Vibha; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rakesh K; Palle, Komaraiah; Yadav, Umesh C S

    2016-03-01

    Increased body weight and metabolic disorder including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications together constitute metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome involves multitude of factors. A number of studies however indicate, with some conformity, that oxidative stress along with chronic inflammatory condition pave the way for the development of metabolic diseases. Oxidative stress, a state of lost balance between the oxidative and anti-oxidative systems of the cells and tissues, results in the over production of oxidative free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS generated could attack the cellular proteins, lipids and nucleic acids leading to cellular dysfunction including loss of energy metabolism, altered cell signalling and cell cycle control, genetic mutations, altered cellular transport mechanisms and overall decreased biological activity, immune activation and inflammation. In addition, nutritional stress such as that caused by high fat high carbohydrate diet also promotes oxidative stress as evident by increased lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonylation, and decreased antioxidant system and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. These changes lead to initiation of pathogenic milieu and development of several chronic diseases. Studies suggest that in obese person oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are the important underlying factors that lead to development of pathologies such as carcinogenesis, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases through altered cellular and nuclear mechanisms, including impaired DNA damage repair and cell cycle regulation. Here we discuss the aspects of metabolic disorders-induced oxidative stress in major pathological conditions and strategies for their prevention and therapy. PMID:26851532

  18. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage.

    PubMed

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg-1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  19. Inhibition of the oxidative stress response by heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Timothy A; Tang, Lanlan; Choe, Keith P; Julian, David

    2016-07-15

    It has long been recognized that simultaneous exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress shows a synergistic interaction that reduces organismal fitness, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying this interaction. We investigated the role of molecular stress responses in driving this synergistic interaction using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans To induce oxidative stress, we used the pro-oxidant compounds acrylamide, paraquat and juglone. As expected, we found that heat stress and oxidative stress interact synergistically to reduce survival. Compared with exposure to each stressor alone, during simultaneous sublethal exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress the normal induction of key oxidative-stress response (OxSR) genes was generally inhibited, whereas the induction of key heat-shock response (HSR) genes was not. Genetically activating the SKN-1-dependent OxSR increased a marker for protein aggregation and decreased whole-worm survival during heat stress alone, with the latter being independent of HSF-1. In contrast, compared with wild-type worms, inactivating the HSR by HSF-1 knockdown, which would be expected to decrease basal heat shock protein expression, increased survival during oxidative stress alone. Taken together, these data suggest that, in C. elegans, the HSR and OxSR cannot be simultaneously activated to the same extent that each can be activated during a single stressor exposure. We conclude that the observed synergistic reduction in survival during combined exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress is due, at least in part, to inhibition of the OxSR during activation of the HSR. PMID:27207646

  20. Oxidative Stress in Niemann-Pick Disease, Type C

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Rao; Yanjanin, Nicole M.; Bianconi, Simona; Pavan, William J.; Porter, Forbes D.

    2010-01-01

    Niemann-Pick Disease, type C (NPC) is a neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder due to impaired intracellular cholesterol and lipid transport. Increased oxidative stress has been reported in human NPC1 mutant fibroblasts and in tissues from Npc1 mutant mice. However, oxidative stress in NPC patients has not been established. In this study, we demonstrated increased oxidative stress in NPC patients. Evaluation of serum from 37 NPC patients, compared to control values, showed significant decreases (p<0.01) in both the fraction of reduced coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC). Both findings are consistent with increased oxidative stress in NPC. Supplementation with CoQ10 was not effective in correcting the decreased fraction of reduced CoQ10. Increased oxidative stress may be a contributing factor to the pathology of NPC, and demonstration of increased oxidative stress in NPC patients provides both a rationale and the biomarkers necessary to test the efficacy of antioxidant therapy in NPC. PMID:20667755

  1. Efavirenz Promotes β-Secretase Expression and Increased Aβ1-40,42 via Oxidative Stress and Reduced Microglial Phagocytosis: Implications for HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND)

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lecia A. M.; Jin, Jingji; Ferrell, Darren; Sadic, Edin; Obregon, Demian; Smith, Adam J.; Tan, Jun; Giunta, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Efavirenz (EFV) is among the most commonly used antiretroviral drugs globally, causes neurological symptoms that interfere with adherence and reduce tolerability, and may have central nervous system (CNS) effects that contribute in part to HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) in patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Thus we evaluated a commonly used EFV containing regimen: EFV/zidovudine (AZT)/lamivudine (3TC) in murine N2a cells transfected with the human “Swedish” mutant form of amyloid precursor protein (SweAPP N2a cells) to assess for promotion of amyloid-beta (Aβ) production. Treatment with EFV or the EFV containing regimen generated significantly increased soluble amyloid beta (Aβ), and promoted increased β-secretase-1 (BACE-1) expression while 3TC, AZT, or, vehicle control did not significantly alter these endpoints. Further, EFV or the EFV containing regimen promoted significantly more mitochondrial stress in SweAPP N2a cells as compared to 3TC, AZT, or vehicle control. We next tested the EFV containing regimen in Aβ - producing Tg2576 mice combined or singly using clinically relevant doses. EFV or the EFV containing regimen promoted significantly more BACE-1 expression and soluble Aβ generation while 3TC, AZT, or vehicle control did not. Finally, microglial Aβ phagocytosis was significantly reduced by EFV or the EFV containing regimen but not by AZT, 3TC, or vehicle control alone. These data suggest the majority of Aβ promoting effects of this cART regimen are dependent upon EFV as it promotes both increased production, and decreased clearance of Aβ peptide. PMID:24759994

  2. Oxidative stress involving changes in Nrf2 and ER stress in early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mota, Sandra I; Costa, Rui O; Ferreira, Ildete L; Santana, Isabel; Caldeira, Gladys L; Padovano, Carmela; Fonseca, Ana C; Baldeiras, Inês; Cunha, Catarina; Letra, Liliana; Oliveira, Catarina R; Pereira, Cláudia M F; Rego, Ana Cristina

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression. In this study we analyzed whether oxidative stress involving changes in Nrf2 and ER stress may constitute early events in AD pathogenesis by using human peripheral blood cells and an AD transgenic mouse model at different disease stages. Increased oxidative stress and increased phosphorylated Nrf2 (p(Ser40)Nrf2) were observed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Moreover, we observed impaired ER Ca2+ homeostasis and increased ER stress markers in PBMCs from MCI individuals and mild AD patients. Evidence of early oxidative stress defense mechanisms in AD was substantiated by increased p(Ser40)Nrf2 in 3month-old 3xTg-AD male mice PBMCs, and also with increased nuclear Nrf2 levels in brain cortex. However, SOD1 protein levels were decreased in human MCI PBMCs and in 3xTg-AD mice brain cortex; the latter further correlated with reduced SOD1 mRNA levels. Increased ER stress was also detected in the brain cortex of young female and old male 3xTg-AD mice. We demonstrate oxidative stress and early Nrf2 activation in AD human and mouse models, which fails to regulate some of its targets, leading to repressed expression of antioxidant defenses (e.g., SOD-1), and extending to ER stress. Results suggest markers of prodromal AD linked to oxidative stress associated with Nrf2 activation and ER stress that may be followed in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:25857617

  3. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns.

    PubMed

    Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  4. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  5. Oxidative Stress, Lens Gap Junctions, and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The eye lens is constantly subjected to oxidative stress from radiation and other sources. The lens has several mechanisms to protect its components from oxidative stress and to maintain its redox state, including enzymatic pathways and high concentrations of ascorbate and reduced glutathione. With aging, accumulation of oxidized lens components and decreased efficiency of repair mechanisms can contribute to the development of lens opacities or cataracts. Maintenance of transparency and homeostasis of the avascular lens depend on an extensive network of gap junctions. Communication through gap junction channels allows intercellular passage of molecules (up to 1 kDa) including antioxidants. Lens gap junctions and their constituent proteins, connexins (Cx43, Cx46, and Cx50), are also subject to the effects of oxidative stress. These observations suggest that oxidative stress-induced damage to connexins (and consequent altered intercellular communication) may contribute to cataract formation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 339–353. PMID:18831679

  6. Protective mechanisms of Cucumis sativus in diabetes-related modelsof oxidative stress and carbonyl stress

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Himan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Noubarani, Maryam; Rahmati, Mokhtar; Jafarian, Iman; Adiban, Hasan; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Oxidative stress and carbonyl stress have essential mediatory roles in the development of diabetes and its related complications through increasing free radicals production and impairing antioxidant defense systems. Different chemical and natural compounds have been suggested for decreasing such disorders associated with diabetes. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the protective effects of Cucumis sativus (C. sativus) fruit (cucumber) in oxidative and carbonyl stress models. These diabetes-related models with overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) simulate conditions observed in chronic hyperglycemia. Methods: Cytotoxicity induced by cumene hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) or glyoxal (carbonyl stress model) were measured and the protective effects of C. sativus were evaluated using freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Results: Aqueous extract of C. sativus fruit (40 μg/mL) prevented all cytotoxicity markers in both the oxidative and carbonyl stress models including cell lysis, ROS formation, membrane lipid peroxidation, depletion of glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential decline, lysosomal labialization, and proteolysis. The extract also protected hepatocytes from protein carbonylation induced by glyoxal. Our results indicated that C. sativus is able to prevent oxidative stress and carbonyl stress in the isolated hepatocytes. Conclusion: It can be concluded that C. sativus has protective effects in diabetes complications and can be considered a safe and suitable candidate for decreasing the oxidative stress and carbonyl stress that is typically observed in diabetes mellitus. PMID:27340622

  7. Tumor necrosis factor-α-induced colitis increases NADPH oxidase 1 expression, oxidative stress, and neutrophil recruitment in the colon: preventive effect of apocynin.

    PubMed

    Mouzaoui, Souad; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Makhezer, Nesrine; Kroviarski, Yolande; El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species- (ROS-) mediated injury has been implicated in several inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are the major source of endogenous ROS. Here, we investigated the role of NOXs derived-ROS in a mouse model of colitis induced by the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Intraperitoneal injection of TNFα (10 μg · kg(-1)) induced an acute inflammation of the colon and a marked increase in expression of NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), a colon specific NADPH oxidase isoform. TNFα-induced colitis was also characterized by high production of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) and mucosal infiltration of neutrophils, NOX2-expressing cells. Concomitantly, ROS production and lipid peroxidation were significantly enhanced while catalase activity and glutathione level were reduced indicating a redox imbalance in the colon. Furthermore, the redox-sensitive MAP kinases, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, were activated during TNFα-induced colitis. Pretreatment of mice with apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor with antioxidant properties, before TNFα challenge, prevented all these events. These data suggest that ROS derived from NADPH oxidases (mainly NOX1 and NOX2) and MAP kinase pathways could contribute to the induction and expansion of oxidative lesions characteristics of IBD and that apocynin could potentially be beneficial in IBD treatment. PMID:25276054

  8. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Induced Colitis Increases NADPH Oxidase 1 Expression, Oxidative Stress, and Neutrophil Recruitment in the Colon: Preventive Effect of Apocynin

    PubMed Central

    Mouzaoui, Souad; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Makhezer, Nesrine; Kroviarski, Yolande; El-Benna, Jamel; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species- (ROS-) mediated injury has been implicated in several inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). NADPH oxidases (NOXs) are the major source of endogenous ROS. Here, we investigated the role of NOXs derived-ROS in a mouse model of colitis induced by the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Intraperitoneal injection of TNFα (10 μg · kg−1) induced an acute inflammation of the colon and a marked increase in expression of NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), a colon specific NADPH oxidase isoform. TNFα-induced colitis was also characterized by high production of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC) and mucosal infiltration of neutrophils, NOX2-expressing cells. Concomitantly, ROS production and lipid peroxidation were significantly enhanced while catalase activity and glutathione level were reduced indicating a redox imbalance in the colon. Furthermore, the redox-sensitive MAP kinases, ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK, were activated during TNFα-induced colitis. Pretreatment of mice with apocynin, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor with antioxidant properties, before TNFα challenge, prevented all these events. These data suggest that ROS derived from NADPH oxidases (mainly NOX1 and NOX2) and MAP kinase pathways could contribute to the induction and expansion of oxidative lesions characteristics of IBD and that apocynin could potentially be beneficial in IBD treatment. PMID:25276054

  9. Metformin induces microRNA-34a to downregulate the Sirt1/Pgc-1α/Nrf2 pathway, leading to increased susceptibility of wild-type p53 cancer cells to oxidative stress and therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Choi, Jae Ho; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2014-09-01

    Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) plays an important role in cellular redox balance and resistance to oxidative stress. Sirt1 exhibits oncogenic properties in wild-type p53 cancer cells, whereas it acts as a tumor suppressor in p53-mutated cancer cells. Here, we investigated the effects of metformin on Sirt1 expression in several cancer cell lines. Using human cancer cell lines that exhibit differential expression of p53, we found that metformin reduced Sirt1 protein levels in cancer cells bearing wild-type p53, but did not affect Sirt1 protein levels in cancer cell lines harboring mutant forms of p53. Metformin-induced p53 protein levels in wild-type p53 cancer cells resulted in upregulation of microRNA (miR)-34a. The use of a miR-34a inhibitor confirmed that metformin-induced miR-34a was required for Sirt1 downregulation. Metformin suppressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator-1α (Pgc-1α) expression and its downstream target Nrf2 in MCF-7 cells. Genetic tools demonstrated that the reduction of Sirt1 and Pgc-1α by metformin caused Nrf2 downregulation via suppression of PPARγ transcriptional activity. Metformin reduced heme oxygenase-1 and superoxide dismutase 2 but upregulated catalase expression in MCF-7 cells. Metformin-treated MCF-7 cells had no increase in basal levels of reactive oxygen species but were more susceptible to oxidative stress. Furthermore, upregulation of death receptor 5 by metformin-mediated Sirt1 downregulation enhanced the sensitivity of wild-type p53 cancer cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that metformin induces miR-34a to suppress the Sirt1/Pgc-1α/Nrf2 pathway and increases susceptibility of wild-type p53 cancer cells to oxidative stress and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. PMID:24970682

  10. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  11. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, Anita; Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  12. Mitochondrial metabolism mediates oxidative stress and inflammation in fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Satapati, Santhosh; Kucejova, Blanka; Duarte, Joao A.G.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Reynolds, Lacy; Sunny, Nishanth E.; He, Tianteng; Nair, L. Arya; Livingston, Kenneth; Fu, Xiaorong; Merritt, Matthew E.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Shelton, John M.; Lambert, Jennifer; Parks, Elizabeth J.; Corbin, Ian; Magnuson, Mark A.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Burgess, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical for respiration in all tissues; however, in liver, these organelles also accommodate high-capacity anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways that are essential to gluconeogenesis and other biosynthetic activities. During nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), mitochondria also produce ROS that damage hepatocytes, trigger inflammation, and contribute to insulin resistance. Here, we provide several lines of evidence indicating that induction of biosynthesis through hepatic anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways is energetically backed by elevated oxidative metabolism and hence contributes to oxidative stress and inflammation during NAFLD. First, in murine livers, elevation of fatty acid delivery not only induced oxidative metabolism, but also amplified anaplerosis/cataplerosis and caused a proportional rise in oxidative stress and inflammation. Second, loss of anaplerosis/cataplerosis via genetic knockdown of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1) prevented fatty acid–induced rise in oxidative flux, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Flux appeared to be regulated by redox state, energy charge, and metabolite concentration, which may also amplify antioxidant pathways. Third, preventing elevated oxidative metabolism with metformin also normalized hepatic anaplerosis/cataplerosis and reduced markers of inflammation. Finally, independent histological grades in human NAFLD biopsies were proportional to oxidative flux. Thus, hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with elevated oxidative metabolism during an obesogenic diet, and this link may be provoked by increased work through anabolic pathways. PMID:26571396

  13. p66Shc, oxidative stress and aging

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    The 66 KDa isoform of Shc and its signalling properties have attracted in the past years major interest in aging research. Here, we summarize p66Shc functions and outline a specific signalling route leading to mitochondrial import, that accounts for its pro-apoptotic activity upon oxidative stress. This model, that could explain the alterations of mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis observed after oxidative stress, highlights novel pharmacological targets in age-related disorders. PMID:18235239

  14. Residual stress distribution in oxide films formed on Zircaloy-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawabe, T.; Sonoda, T.; Furuya, M.; Kitajima, S.; Takano, H.

    2015-11-01

    In order to evaluate residual the stress distribution in oxides formed on zirconium alloys, synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed on the oxides formed on Zircaloy-2 after autoclave treatment at a temperature of 360° C in pure water. The use of a micro-beam XRD and a micro-sized cross-sectional sample achieved the detailed local characterization of the oxides. The oxide microstructure was observed by TEM following the micro-beam XRD measurements. The residual compressive stress increased in the vicinity of the oxide/metal interface of the pre-transition oxide. Highly oriented columnar grains of a monoclinic phase were observed in that region. Furthermore, at the interface of the post-first transition oxide, there was only a small increase in the residual compressive stress and the columnar grains had a more random orientation. The volume fraction of the tetragonal phase increased with the residual compressive stress. The results are discussed in terms of the formation and transition of the protective oxide.

  15. HCV-Induced Oxidative Stress: Battlefield-Winning Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Rebbani, Khadija; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    About 150 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The persistence of the infection is controlled by several mechanisms including the induction of oxidative stress. HCV relies on this strategy to redirect lipid metabolism machinery and escape immune response. The 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) is one of the newly discovered host markers of oxidative stress. This protein, as HCV-induced oxidative stress responsive protein, may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV chronic infection and associated liver diseases, when aberrantly expressed. The sustained expression of DHCR24 in response to HCV-induced oxidative stress results in suppression of nuclear p53 activity by blocking its acetylation and increasing its interaction with MDM2 in the cytoplasm leading to its degradation, which may induce hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27293514

  16. Management of multicellular senescence and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Haines, David D; Juhasz, Bela; Tosaki, Arpad

    2013-08-01

    Progressively sophisticated understanding of cellular and molecular processes that contribute to age-related physical deterioration is being gained from ongoing research into cancer, chronic inflammatory syndromes and other serious disorders that increase with age. Particularly valuable insight has resulted from characterization of how senescent cells affect the tissues in which they form in ways that decrease an organism's overall viability. Increasingly, the underlying pathophysiology of ageing is recognized as a consequence of oxidative damage. This leads to hyperactivity of cell growth pathways, prominently including mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), that contribute to a build-up in cells of toxic aggregates such as progerin (a mutant nuclear cytoskeletal protein), lipofuscin and other cellular debris, triggering formation of senescent cellular phenotypes, which interact destructively with surrounding tissue. Indeed, senescent cell ablation dramatically inhibits physical deterioration in progeroid (age-accelerated) mice. This review explores ways in which oxidative stress creates ageing-associated cellular damage and triggers induction of the cell death/survival programs' apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and 'necroapoptophagy'. The concept of 'necroapoptophagy' is presented here as a strategy for varying tissue oxidative stress intensity in ways that induce differential activation of death versus survival programs, resulting in enhanced and sustained representation of healthy functional cells. These strategies are discussed in the context of specialized mesenchymal stromal cells with the potential to synergize with telocytes in stabilizing engrafted progenitor cells, thereby extending periods of healthy life. Information and concepts are summarized in a hypothetical approach to suppressing whole-organism senescence, with methods drawn from emerging understandings of ageing, gained from Cnidarians (jellyfish, corals and anemones) that undergo a unique form of

  17. Management of multicellular senescence and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Haines, David D; Juhasz, Bela; Tosaki, Arpad

    2013-01-01

    Progressively sophisticated understanding of cellular and molecular processes that contribute to age-related physical deterioration is being gained from ongoing research into cancer, chronic inflammatory syndromes and other serious disorders that increase with age. Particularly valuable insight has resulted from characterization of how senescent cells affect the tissues in which they form in ways that decrease an organism's overall viability. Increasingly, the underlying pathophysiology of ageing is recognized as a consequence of oxidative damage. This leads to hyperactivity of cell growth pathways, prominently including mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), that contribute to a build-up in cells of toxic aggregates such as progerin (a mutant nuclear cytoskeletal protein), lipofuscin and other cellular debris, triggering formation of senescent cellular phenotypes, which interact destructively with surrounding tissue. Indeed, senescent cell ablation dramatically inhibits physical deterioration in progeroid (age-accelerated) mice. This review explores ways in which oxidative stress creates ageing-associated cellular damage and triggers induction of the cell death/survival programs’ apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and ‘necroapoptophagy’. The concept of ‘necroapoptophagy’ is presented here as a strategy for varying tissue oxidative stress intensity in ways that induce differential activation of death versus survival programs, resulting in enhanced and sustained representation of healthy functional cells. These strategies are discussed in the context of specialized mesenchymal stromal cells with the potential to synergize with telocytes in stabilizing engrafted progenitor cells, thereby extending periods of healthy life. Information and concepts are summarized in a hypothetical approach to suppressing whole-organism senescence, with methods drawn from emerging understandings of ageing, gained from Cnidarians (jellyfish, corals and anemones) that undergo a

  18. Iron-Deficiency Anemia Enhances Red Blood Cell Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Nagababu, Enika; Gulyani, Seema; Earley, Christopher J.; Cutler, Roy G.; Mattson, Mark P.; Rifkind, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress associated with iron deficiency anemia in a murine model was studied feeding an iron deficient diet. Anemia was monitored by a decrease in hematocrit and hemoglobin. For the 9 week study an increase in total iron binding capacity was also demonstrated. Anemia resulted in an increase in red blood cells (RBC) oxidative stress as indicated by increased levels of fluorescent heme degradation products (1.24 fold after 5 weeks; 2.1 fold after 9 weeks). The increase in oxidative stress was further confirmed by elevated levels of methemoglobin for mice fed an iron deficient diet. Increased hemoglobin autoxidation and subsequent generation of ROS can account for the shorter RBC lifespan and other pathological changes associated with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:19051108

  19. Oxidized Extracellular DNA as a Stress Signal in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Aleksei V.; Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Izevskaya, Vera L.; Veiko, Natalya N.

    2013-01-01

    The term “cell-free DNA” (cfDNA) was recently coined for DNA fragments from plasma/serum, while DNA present in in vitro cell culture media is known as extracellular DNA (ecDNA). Under oxidative stress conditions, the levels of oxidative modification of cellular DNA and the rate of cell death increase. Dying cells release their damaged DNA, thus, contributing oxidized DNA fragments to the pool of cfDNA/ecDNA. Oxidized cell-free DNA could serve as a stress signal that promotes irradiation-induced bystander effect. Evidence points to TLR9 as a possible candidate for oxidized DNA sensor. An exposure to oxidized ecDNA stimulates a synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that evokes an adaptive response that includes transposition of the homologous loci within the nucleus, polymerization and the formation of the stress fibers of the actin, as well as activation of the ribosomal gene expression, and nuclear translocation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2) that, in turn, mediates induction of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, the oxidized DNA is a stress signal released in response to oxidative stress in the cultured cells and, possibly, in the human body; in particular, it might contribute to systemic abscopal effects of localized irradiation treatments. PMID:23533696

  20. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathi-one peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway. PMID:26545251

  1. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes. PMID:25143584

  2. Oxidative stress in juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welker, T.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), were held in 8-11??C freshwater, starved for 3 days and subjected to a low-water stressor to determine the relationship between the general stress response and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured in kidney, liver and brain samples taken at the beginning of the experiment (0-h unstressed controls) and at 6, 24 and 48 h after application of a continuous low-water stressor. Tissue samples were also taken at 48 h from fish that had not been exposed to the stressor (48-h unstressed controls). Exposure to the low-water stressor affected LPO in kidney and brain tissues. In kidney, LPO decreased 6 h after imposition of the stressor; similar but less pronounced decreases also occurred in the liver and brain. At 48 h, LPO increased (in comparison with 6-h stressed tissues) in the kidney and brain. In comparison with 48-h unstressed controls, LPO levels were higher in the kidney and brain of stressed fish. Although preliminary, results suggest that stress can cause oxidative tissue damage in juvenile chinook salmon. Measures of oxidative stress have shown similar responses to stress in mammals; however, further research is needed to determine the extent of the stress-oxidative stress relationship and the underlying physiological mechanisms in fish.

  3. Plasma infusions into porcine cerebral white matter induce early edema, oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and DNA fragmentation: implications for white matter injury with increased blood-brain-barrier permeability.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Kenneth R; Dean, Christopher; Beiler, Shauna; Bryan, David W; Packard, Benjamin A; Smulian, A George; Linke, Michael J; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle M

    2005-04-01

    Plasma infused into porcine cerebral white matter induces both acute interstitial and delayed vasogenic edema. Edematous white matter contains extracellular plasma proteins and rapidly induces oxidative stress as evidenced by increased protein carbonyl formation and heme oxygenase-1 induction. We tested the hypothesis that edematous white matter would also upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and develop DNA damage. We infused autologous plasma into the frontal hemispheric white matter of pentobarbital-anesthetized pigs. We monitored and controlled physiological variables and froze brains in situ at 1, 4 or 24 hrs. We determined edema volumes by computer-assisted morphometry. We measured white matter protein carbonyl formation by immunoblotting, cytokine gene expression by standard RT-PCR methods and DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis. White matter edema developed acutely (1 hr) after plasma infusion and increased significantly in volume between 4 and 24 hrs. Protein carbonyl formation also occurred rapidly in edematous white matter with significant elevations (3 to 4-fold) already present at 1 hr. This increase remained through 24 hrs. Pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression was also rapidly increased at 1 hr post-infusion. Evidence for DNA fragmentation began at 2 to 4 hrs, and a pattern indicative of both ongoing necrosis and apoptosis was robust by 24 hrs. Plasma protein accumulation in white matter induces acute edema development and a cascade of patho-chemical events including oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression and DNA damage. These results suggest that in diseases with increased blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability or following intracerebral hemorrhage or traumatic brain injury, interstitial plasma can rapidly damage white matter. PMID:16181107

  4. Chronic unpredictable stress deteriorates the chemopreventive efficacy of pomegranate through oxidative stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shirin; Suhail, Nida; Bilal, Nayeem; Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Zaidi, Syed Kashif; AlNohair, Sultan; Banu, Naheed

    2016-05-01

    Chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) can influence the risk and progression of cancer through increased oxidative stress. Pomegranate is known to protect carcinogenesis through its anti-oxidative properties. This study is carried out to examine whether CUS affects the chemopreventive potential of pomegranate through oxidative stress pathway. Role of CUS on early stages of 7, 12 dimethyl benz(a) anthracene (DMBA) induced carcinogenesis, and its pre-exposure effect on chemopreventive efficacy of pomegranate juice (PJ) was examined in terms of in vivo antioxidant and biochemical parameters in Swiss albino rats. Rats were divided in various groups and were subjected to CUS paradigm, DMBA administration (65 mg/kg body weight, single dose), and PJ treatment. Exposure to stress (alone) and DMBA (alone) led to increased oxidative stress by significantly decreasing the antioxidant enzymes activities and altering the glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT), and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) levels. A significant increase in DNA damage demonstrated by comet assay was seen in the liver cells. Stress exposure to DMBA-treated rats further increased the oxidative stress and disturbed the biochemical parameters as compared to DMBA (alone)-treated rats. Chemoprevention with PJ in DMBA (alone)-treated rats restored the altered parameters. However, in the pre-stress DMBA-treated rats, the overall antioxidant potential of PJ was significantly diminished. Our results indicate that chronic stress not only increases the severity of carcinogenesis but also diminishes the anti-oxidative efficacy of PJ. In a broader perspective, special emphasis should be given to stress management and healthy diet during cancer chemoprevention. PMID:26596837

  5. Markers of Oxidative Stress and Neuroprogression in Depression Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Vaváková, Magdaléna; Trebatická, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is multifactorial disorder with high prevalence and alarming prognostic in the nearest 15 years. Several mechanisms of depression are known. Neurotransmitters imbalance and imbalance between neuroprogressive and neuroprotective factors are observed in major depression. Depression is accompanied by inflammatory responses of the organism and consequent elevation of proinflammatory cytokines and increased lipid peroxidation are described in literature. Neuropsychiatric disorders including major depression are also associated with telomerase shortening, oxidative changes in nucleotides, and polymorphisms in several genes connected to metabolism of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrion dysfunction is directly associated with increasing levels of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress plays significant role in pathophysiology of major depression via actions of free radicals, nonradical molecules, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Products of oxidative stress represent important parameters for measuring and predicting of depression status as well as for determining effectiveness of administrated antidepressants. Positive effect of micronutrients, vitamins, and antioxidants in depression treatment is also reviewed. PMID:26078821

  6. Oxidative stress, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tangvarasittichai, Surapon

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is increased in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and this appears to underlie the development of cardiovascular disease, T2DM and diabetic complications. Increased oxidative stress appears to be a deleterious factor leading to insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, β-cell dysfunction, impaired glucose tolerance and ultimately leading to T2DM. Chronic oxidative stress, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia are particularly dangerous for β-cells from lowest levels of antioxidant, have high oxidative energy requirements, decrease the gene expression of key β-cell genes and induce cell death. If β-cell functioning is impaired, it results in an under production of insulin, impairs glucose stimulated insulin secretion, fasting hyperglycemia and eventually the development of T2DM. PMID:25897356

  7. Oxidative stress, circulating antioxidants, and dietary preferences in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Alan, Rebecca R; McWilliams, Scott R

    2013-03-01

    Oxidative stress is an unavoidable consequence of metabolism and increases during intensive exercise. This is especially problematic for migratory birds that metabolize fat to fuel long-distance flight. Birds can mitigate damage by increasing endogenous antioxidants (e.g. uric acid) or by consuming dietary antioxidants (e.g. tocopherol). During flight, birds may increase protein catabolism of lean tissue which may increase circulating uric acid and many birds also consume an antioxidant-rich frugivorous diet during autumn migration. We evaluated three related hypotheses in a migratory passerine: (1) protein consumption is positively related to circulating antioxidants, (2) a dietary oxidative stressor [i.e. polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)] influences antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage, and (3) oxidative stress influences dietary antioxidant preferences. White-throated Sparrows (Zonotrichia albicollis) consuming a high protein diet increased circulating uric acid; however, uric acid, antioxidant capacity, and oxidative stress did not differ between birds consuming a high PUFA versus a low PUFA diet, despite increased oxidative damage in high PUFA birds. Birds did not prefer antioxidant-rich diets even when fed high PUFA, low protein. We conclude that White-throated Sparrows successfully mitigated oxidative damage associated with a high PUFA diet and mounted an endogenous antioxidant response independent of uric acid, other circulating antioxidants, and dietary antioxidants. PMID:23270695

  8. Oxidative Stress in Aging Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bischof, Johannes; Streubel, Maria Karolin; Trost, Andrea; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in skin plays a major role in the aging process. This is true for intrinsic aging and even more for extrinsic aging. Although the results are quite different in dermis and epidermis, extrinsic aging is driven to a large extent by oxidative stress caused by UV irradiation. In this review the overall effects of oxidative stress are discussed as well as the sources of ROS including the mitochondrial ETC, peroxisomal and ER localized proteins, the Fenton reaction, and such enzymes as cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, xanthine oxidases, and NADPH oxidases. Furthermore, the defense mechanisms against oxidative stress ranging from enzymes like superoxide dismutases, catalases, peroxiredoxins, and GSH peroxidases to organic compounds such as L-ascorbate, α-tocopherol, beta-carotene, uric acid, CoQ10, and glutathione are described in more detail. In addition the oxidative stress induced modifications caused to proteins, lipids and DNA are discussed. Finally age-related changes of the skin are also a topic of this review. They include a disruption of the epidermal calcium gradient in old skin with an accompanying change in the composition of the cornified envelope. This modified cornified envelope also leads to an altered anti-oxidative capacity and a reduced barrier function of the epidermis. PMID:25906193

  9. Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Tian, Fu-Ju; Lin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, development of the placenta is interrelated with the oxygen concentration. Embryo development takes place in a low oxygen environment until the beginning of the second trimester when large amounts of oxygen are conveyed to meet the growth requirements. High metabolism and oxidative stress are common in the placenta. Reactive oxidative species sometimes harm placental development, but they are also reported to regulate gene transcription and downstream activities such as trophoblast proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are two crucial, interconnected processes in the placenta that are often influenced by oxidative stress. The proper interactions between them play an important role in placental homeostasis. However, an imbalance between the protective and destructive mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis seems to be linked with pregnancy-related disorders such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, potential therapies to hold oxidative stress in leash, promote placentation, and avoid unwanted apoptosis are discussed. PMID:26693479

  10. Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Tian, Fu-Ju; Lin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, development of the placenta is interrelated with the oxygen concentration. Embryo development takes place in a low oxygen environment until the beginning of the second trimester when large amounts of oxygen are conveyed to meet the growth requirements. High metabolism and oxidative stress are common in the placenta. Reactive oxidative species sometimes harm placental development, but they are also reported to regulate gene transcription and downstream activities such as trophoblast proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are two crucial, interconnected processes in the placenta that are often influenced by oxidative stress. The proper interactions between them play an important role in placental homeostasis. However, an imbalance between the protective and destructive mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis seems to be linked with pregnancy-related disorders such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, potential therapies to hold oxidative stress in leash, promote placentation, and avoid unwanted apoptosis are discussed. PMID:26693479

  11. Impaired Metabolic Reactivity to Oxidative Stress in Early Psychosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Margot; Ferrari, Carina; Baumann, Philipp S.; Polari, Andrea; Monin, Aline; Bellier-Teichmann, Tanja; Wulff, Jacob; Pappan, Kirk L.; Cuenod, Michel; Conus, Philippe; Do, Kim Q.

    2014-01-01

    Because increasing evidence point to the convergence of environmental and genetic risk factors to drive redox dysregulation in schizophrenia, we aim to clarify whether the metabolic anomalies associated with early psychosis reflect an adaptation to oxidative stress. Metabolomic profiling was performed to characterize the response to oxidative stress in fibroblasts from control individuals (n = 20) and early psychosis patients (n = 30), and in all, 282 metabolites were identified. In addition to the expected redox/antioxidant response, oxidative stress induced a decrease of lysolipid levels in fibroblasts from healthy controls that were largely muted in fibroblasts from patients. Most notably, fibroblasts from patients showed disrupted extracellular matrix- and arginine-related metabolism after oxidative stress, indicating impairments beyond the redox system. Plasma membrane and extracellular matrix, 2 regulators of neuronal activity and plasticity, appeared as particularly susceptible to oxidative stress and thus provide novel mechanistic insights for pathophysiological understanding of early stages of psychosis. Statistically, antipsychotic medication at the time of biopsy was not accounting for these anomalies in the metabolism of patients’ fibroblasts, indicating that they might be intrinsic to the disease. Although these results are preliminary and should be confirmed in a larger group of patients, they nevertheless indicate that the metabolic signature of reactivity to oxidative stress may provide reliable early markers of psychosis. Developing protective measures aimed at normalizing the disrupted pathways should prevent the pathological consequences of environmental stressors. PMID:24687046

  12. Impact of early life stress on the pathogenesis of mental disorders: relation to brain oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Stefania; Colaianna, Marilena; Curtis, Logos

    2015-01-01

    Stress is an inevitable part of human life and it is experienced even before birth. Stress to some extent could be considered normal and even necessary for the survival and the regular psychological development during childhood or adolescence. However, exposure to prolonged stress could become harmful and strongly impact mental health increasing the risk of developing psychiatric disorders. Recent studies have attempted to clarify how the human central nervous system (CNS) reacts to early life stress, focusing mainly on neurobiological modifications. Oxidative stress, defined as a disequilibrium between the oxidant generation and the antioxidant response, has been recently described as a candidate for most of the observed modifications. In this review, we will discuss how prolonged stressful events during childhood or adolescence (such as early maternal separation, parental divorce, physical violence, sexual or psychological abuses, or exposure to war events) can lead to increased oxidative stress in the CNS and enhance the risk to develop psychiatric diseases such as anxiety, depression, drug abuse or psychosis. Defining the sources of oxidative stress following exposure to early life stress might open new beneficial insights in therapeutic approaches to these mental disorders. PMID:25564385

  13. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Rustin, Pierre; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  14. Ginsenoside Rb1 protects against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced oxidative stress by increasing heme oxygenase-1 expression through an estrogen receptor-related PI3K/Akt/Nrf2-dependent pathway in human dopaminergic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2010-01-01

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenolic non-steroidal plant compounds with estrogen-like biological activity. Ginseng, the root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (Araliaceae), is a popular traditional herbal medicine. Ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1), an active component commonly found in ginseng root, is a phytoestrogen that exerts estrogen-like activity. In this study, we demonstrate that the phytoestrogen Rb1 inhibits 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced oxidative injury via an ER-dependent Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with Rb1 significantly reduced 6-OHDA-induced caspase-3 activation and subsequent cell death. Rb1 also up-regulated HO-1 expression, which conferred cytoprotection against 6-OHDA-induced oxidative injury. Moreover, Rb1 induced both Nrf2 nuclear translocation, which is upstream of HO-1 expression and PI3K activation, a pathway that is involved in induced Nrf2 nuclear translocation, HO-1 expression and cytoprotection. Also, Rb1-mediated increases in PI3K activation and HO-1 induction were reversed by co-treatment with ICI 182,780 and pertussis toxin. Taken together, these results suggest that Rb1 augments the cellular antioxidant defenses through ER-dependent HO-1 induction via the Gbeta1/PI3K/Akt-Nrf2 signaling pathway, thereby protecting cells from oxidative stress. Thus our study indicates that Rb1 has a partial cytoprotective role in dopaminergic cell culture systems.

  15. Oxidative Stress Resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans†

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Dea; Radman, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Deinococcus radiodurans is a robust bacterium best known for its capacity to repair massive DNA damage efficiently and accurately. It is extremely resistant to many DNA-damaging agents, including ionizing radiation and UV radiation (100 to 295 nm), desiccation, and mitomycin C, which induce oxidative damage not only to DNA but also to all cellular macromolecules via the production of reactive oxygen species. The extreme resilience of D. radiodurans to oxidative stress is imparted synergistically by an efficient protection of proteins against oxidative stress and an efficient DNA repair mechanism, enhanced by functional redundancies in both systems. D. radiodurans assets for the prevention of and recovery from oxidative stress are extensively reviewed here. Radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacteria such as D. radiodurans have substantially lower protein oxidation levels than do sensitive bacteria but have similar yields of DNA double-strand breaks. These findings challenge the concept of DNA as the primary target of radiation toxicity while advancing protein damage, and the protection of proteins against oxidative damage, as a new paradigm of radiation toxicity and survival. The protection of DNA repair and other proteins against oxidative damage is imparted by enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant defense systems dominated by divalent manganese complexes. Given that oxidative stress caused by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species is associated with aging and cancer, a comprehensive outlook on D. radiodurans strategies of combating oxidative stress may open new avenues for antiaging and anticancer treatments. The study of the antioxidation protection in D. radiodurans is therefore of considerable potential interest for medicine and public health. PMID:21372322

  16. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and cellular responses to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Allen

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the primary cytosolic proteolytic machinery for the selective degradation of various forms of damaged proteins. Thus, the UPP is an important protein quality control mechanism. In the canonical UPP, both ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome are involved. Substrate proteins of the canonical UPP are first tagged by multiple ubiquitin molecules and then degraded by the 26S proteasome. However, in non-canonical UPP, proteins can be degraded by the 26S or the 20S proteasome without being ubiquitinated. It is clear that a proteasome is responsible for selective degradation of oxidized proteins, but the extent to which ubiquitination is involved in this process remains a subject of debate. While many publications suggest that the 20S proteasome degrades oxidized proteins independent of ubiquitin, there is also solid evidence indicating that ubiquitin and ubiquitination are involved in degradation of some forms of oxidized proteins. A fully functional UPP is required for cells to cope with oxidative stress and the activity of the UPP is also modulated by cellular redox status. Mild or transient oxidative stress up-regulates the ubiquitination system and proteasome activity in cells and tissues and transiently enhances intracellular proteolysis. Severe or sustained oxidative stress impairs the function of the UPP and decreases intracellular proteolysis. Both the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes and the proteasome can be inactivated by sustained oxidative stress, especially the 26S proteasome. Differential susceptibilities of the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes and the 26S proteasome to oxidative damage lead to an accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates in cells in response to mild oxidative stress. Thus, increased levels of ubiquitin conjugates in cells appear to be an indicator of mild oxidative stress. PMID:21530648

  17. Metallothionein Alleviates Oxidative Stress-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Myocardial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Ma, Heng; Gao, Feng; Zhong, Li; Ren, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress have been implicated in cardiovascular diseases although the interplay between the two is not clear. This study was designed to examine the influence of oxidative stress through glutathione depletion on myocardial ER stress and contractile function in the absence or presence of the heavy metal scavenger antioxidant metallothionein (MT). FVB and MT overexpression transgenic mice received the GSH synthase inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, 30 mM) in drinking water for 2 weeks. Oxidative stress, ER stress, apoptosis, cardiac function and ultrastructure were assessed using GSH/GSSG assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS), immunoblotting, caspase-3 activity, Langendorff perfused heart function (LVDP and ± dP/dt), and transmission electron microscopy. BSO led to a robust decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio and increased ROS production, consolidating oxidative stress. Cardiac function and ultrastructure were compromised following BSO treatment, the effect of which was obliterated by MT. BSO promoted overt ER stress as evidenced by upregulated BiP, calregulin, phospho-IRE1α and phospho-eIF2α without affecting total IRE1α and eIF2α. BSO treatment led to apoptosis manifested as elevated expression of CHOP/GADD153, caspase-12 and Bax as well as caspase-3 activity, reduced Bcl-2 expression and JNK phosphorylation, all of which was ablated by MT. Moreover, both antioxidant N-acetylcysteine and the ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid reversed the oxidative stress inducer menadione-elicited depression in cardiomyocyte contractile function. Taken together, these data suggested that ER stress occurs likely downstream of oxidative stress en route to cardiac dysfunction. PMID:19344729

  18. Glutamate Increases In Vitro Survival and Proliferation and Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death in Adult Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells via Non-NMDA Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Hachem, Laureen D; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a cascade of secondary chemical insults, including oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, which damage host neurons and glia. Transplantation of exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has shown promise in enhancing regeneration after SCI, although survival of transplanted cells remains poor. Understanding the response of NSPCs to the chemical mediators of secondary injury is essential in finding therapies to enhance survival. We examined the in vitro effects of glutamate and glutamate receptor agonists on adult rat spinal cord-derived NSPCs. NSPCs isolated from the periventricular region of the adult rat spinal cord were exposed to various concentrations of glutamate for 96 h. We found that glutamate treatment (500 μM) for 96 h significantly increased live cell numbers, reduced cell death, and increased proliferation, but did not significantly alter cell phenotype. Concurrent glutamate treatment (500 μM) in the setting of H2O2 exposure (500 μM) for 10 h increased NSPC survival compared to H2O2 exposure alone. The effects of glutamate on NSPCs were blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist GYKI-52466, but not by the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist MK-801 or DL-AP5, or the mGluR3 antagonist LY-341495. Furthermore, treatment of NSPCs with AMPA, kainic acid, or the kainate receptor-specific agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid mimicked the responses seen with glutamate both alone and in the setting of oxidative stress. These findings offer important insights into potential mechanisms to enhance NSPC survival and implicate a potential role for glutamate in promoting NSPC survival and proliferation after traumatic SCI. PMID:27316370

  19. Glutamate neurotoxicity, oxidative stress and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Calissano, P; Bobba, A; Giannattasio, S; Marra, E; Passarella, S

    2001-05-18

    The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate plays a major role in determining certain neurological disorders. This situation, referred to as 'glutamate neurotoxicity' (GNT), is characterized by an increasing damage of cell components, including mitochondria, leading to cell death. In the death process, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated. The present study describes the state of art in the field of GNT with a special emphasis on the oxidative stress and mitochondria. In particular, we report how ROS are generated and how they affect mitochondrial function in GNT. The relationship between ROS generation and cytochrome c release is described in detail, with the released cytochrome c playing a role in the cell defense mechanism against neurotoxicity. PMID:11376653

  20. Effects of oxidative stress on erythrocyte deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Rainer; Wasser, Gerd

    1996-05-01

    Hemolysis as a consequence of open heart surgery is well investigated and explained by the oxidative and/or mechanical stress produced, e.g. by the heart lung machine. In Europe O3 is widely used by physicians, dedicated to alternative medicine. They apply O3 mostly by means of the Major Autohematotherapy (MAH, a process of removing 50 - 100 ml of blood, adding O3 gas to it and returning it to the patient's body). No controlled studies on the efficacy of O3 are available so far, but several anecdotal cases appear to confirm that MAH improves microcirculation, possibly due to increased RBC flexibility. Most methods established to estimate RBC deformability are hard to standardize and include high error of measurement. For our present investigation we used the method of laser diffraction in combination with image analysis. The variation coefficient of the measurement is less than 1%. Previous investigations of our group have shown, that mechanical stress decreases deformability, already at rather low levels of mechanical stress which do not include hemolysis. On the other hand exposure to O2, H2O2 or O3 does not alter the deformability of RBC and--except O3--does not induce considerably hemolysis. However this only holds true if deformability (shear rates 36/s - 2620/s) is determined in isotonic solutions. In hypertonic solutions O3 decreases RBC deformability, but improves it in hypotonic solutions. The results indicate that peroxidative stress dehydrates RBC and reduces their size. To explain the positive effect of O3 on the mechanical fragility of RBC we tentatively assume, that the reduction of RBC size facilitates the feed through small pore filters. In consequence, the size reduction in combination with undisturbed deformability at iso-osmolarity may have a beneficial effect on microcirculation.

  1. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions. PMID:26949396

  2. Diabetic Neuropathy and Oxidative Stress: Therapeutic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Asieh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a widespread disabling disorder comprising peripheral nerves' damage. DN develops on a background of hyperglycemia and an entangled metabolic imbalance, mainly oxidative stress. The majority of related pathways like polyol, advanced glycation end products, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, hexosamine, and protein kinase c all originated from initial oxidative stress. To date, no absolute cure for DN has been defined; although some drugs are conventionally used, much more can be found if all pathophysiological links with oxidative stress would be taken into account. In this paper, although current therapies for DN have been reviewed, we have mainly focused on the links between DN and oxidative stress and therapies on the horizon, such as inhibitors of protein kinase C, aldose reductase, and advanced glycation. With reference to oxidative stress and the related pathways, the following new drugs are under study such as taurine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, protein kinase C inhibitor (ruboxistaurin), aldose reductase inhibitors (fidarestat, epalrestat, ranirestat), advanced glycation end product inhibitors (benfotiamine, aspirin, aminoguanidine), the hexosamine pathway inhibitor (benfotiamine), inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (nicotinamide), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril). The development of modern drugs to treat DN is a real challenge and needs intensive long-term comparative trials. PMID:23738033

  3. Aerobic Production and Utilization of Lactate Satisfy Increased Energy Demands Upon Neuronal Activation in Hippocampal Slices and Provide Neuroprotection Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schurr, Avital; Gozal, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Ever since it was shown for the first time that lactate can support neuronal function in vitro as a sole oxidative energy substrate, investigators in the field of neuroenergetics have been debating the role, if any, of this glycolytic product in cerebral energy metabolism. Our experiments employed the rat hippocampal slice preparation with electrophysiological and biochemical methodologies. The data generated by these experiments (a) support the hypothesis that lactate, not pyruvate, is the end-product of cerebral aerobic glycolysis; (b) indicate that lactate plays a major and crucial role in affording neural tissue to respond adequately to glutamate excitation and to recover unscathed post-excitation; (c) suggest that neural tissue activation is accompanied by aerobic lactate and NADH production, the latter being produced when the former is converted to pyruvate by mitochondrial lactate dehydrogenase (mLDH); (d) imply that NADH can be utilized as an endogenous scavenger of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to provide neuroprotection against ROS-induced neuronal damage. PMID:22275901

  4. Characterization of RNA damage under oxidative stress in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Min; Gong, Xin; Alluri, Ravi Kumar; Wu, Jinhua; Sablo, Tene’; Li, Zhongwei

    2012-01-01

    We have examined the level of 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-oxo-G), an oxidized form of guanosine, in RNA in Escherichia coli under normal and oxidative stress conditions. The level of 8-oxo-G in RNA rises rapidly and remains high for hours in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) challenge in a dose-dependent manner. H2O2 induced elevation of 8-oxo-G content is much higher in RNA than that of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in DNA. Under normal conditions, the 8-oxo-G level is low in RNA isolated from the ribosome and it is nearly three times higher in non-ribosomal RNAs. In contrast, 8-oxo-G generated by a short exposure to H2O2 is almost equally distributed in various RNA species, suggesting that although ribosomal RNAs are normally less oxidized, they are not protected against exogenous H2O2. Interestingly, highly folded RNA is not protected from oxidation because 8-oxo-G generated by H2O2 treatment in vitro increases to approximately the same levels in tRNA and rRNA in both native and denatured forms. Lastly, increased RNA oxidation is closely associated with cell death by oxidative stress. Our data suggests that RNA is a primary target for reactive oxygen species and RNA oxidation is part of the paradox that cells have to deal with under oxidative stress. PMID:22718628

  5. Drug-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Deavall, Damian G.; Martin, Elizabeth A.; Horner, Judith M.; Roberts, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a byproduct of normal metabolism and have roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Species include oxygen radicals and reactive nonradicals. Mechanisms exist that regulate cellular levels of ROS, as their reactive nature may otherwise cause damage to key cellular components including DNA, protein, and lipid. When the cellular antioxidant capacity is exceeded, oxidative stress can result. Pleiotropic deleterious effects of oxidative stress are observed in numerous disease states and are also implicated in a variety of drug-induced toxicities. In this paper, we examine the nature of ROS-induced damage on key cellular targets of oxidative stress. We also review evidence implicating ROS in clinically relevant, drug-related side effects including doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage, azidothymidine-induced myopathy, and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:22919381

  6. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chunyan; Sun, Li; Chen, Xueping; Zhang, Danshen

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Oxidative stress is characterized by the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which can induce mitochondrial DNA mutations, damage the mitochondrial respiratory chain, alter membrane permeability, and influence Ca2+ homeostasis and mitochondrial defense systems. All these changes are implicated in the development of these neurodegenerative diseases, mediating or amplifying neuronal dysfunction and triggering neurodegeneration. This paper summarizes the contribution of oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage to the onset of neurodegenerative eases and discusses strategies to modify mitochondrial dysfunction that may be attractive therapeutic interventions for the treatment of various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25206509

  7. A Novel Role for Connexin Hemichannel in Oxidative Stress and Smoking-Induced Cell Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Xie, Lai-Hua; John, Scott A.; Subramaniam, Shankar; Lal, Ratnesh

    2007-01-01

    Oxidative stress is linked to many pathological conditions, including ischemia, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative disorders. The molecular mechanisms of oxidative stress induced pathophysiology and cell death are currently poorly understood. Our present work demonstrates that oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species and cigarette smoke extract depolarize the cell membrane and open connexin hemichannels. Under oxidative stress, connexin expression and connexin silencing resulted in increased and reduced cell deaths, respectively. Morphological and live/dead assays indicate that cell death is likely through apoptosis. Our studies provide new insights into the mechanistic role of hemichannels in oxidative stress induced cell injury. PMID:17684558

  8. Oxidative stress and autophagy: Crucial modulators of kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Sureshbabu, Angara; Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) that lead to diminished kidney function are interdependent risk factors for increased mortality. If untreated over time, end stage renal disease (ESRD) is an inevitable outcome. Acute and chronic kidney diseases occur partly due to imbalance between the molecular mechanisms that govern oxidative stress, inflammation, autophagy and cell death. Oxidative stress refers to the cumulative effects of highly reactive oxidizing molecules that cause cellular damage. Autophagy removes damaged organelles, protein aggregates and pathogens by recruiting these substrates into double membrane vesicles called autophagosomes which subsequently fuse with lysosomes. Mounting evidence suggests that both oxidative stress and autophagy are significantly involved in kidney health and disease. However, very little is known about the signaling processes that link them. This review is focused on understanding the role of oxidative stress and autophagy in kidney diseases. In this review, we also discuss the potential relationships between oxidative stress and autophagy that may enable the development of better therapeutic intervention to halt the progression of kidney disease and promote its repair and resolution. PMID:25613291

  9. Oxidative stress in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Passali, D; Corallo, G; Yaremchuk, S; Longini, M; Proietti, F; Passali, G C; Bellussi, L

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a disorder that leads to metabolic abnormalities and increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to identify early laboratory markers of cardiovascular disease through analysis of oxidative stress in normal subjects and patients with OSAS. A prospective study was designed to compare outcomes of oxidative stress laboratory tests in 20 adult patients with OSAS and a control group of 20 normal subjects. Laboratory techniques for detecting and quantifying free radical damage must be targeted to assess the pro-oxidant component and the antioxidant in order to obtain an overall picture of oxidative balance. No statistical differences in age, sex distribution, or BMI were found between the two groups (p>0.05). There were significant differences in the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) between OSAS patients and the control group (p<0.05). Statistically significant differences in isoprostane, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and non-protein bound iron (NPBI) levels were found between the study and control groups. No significant difference in the levels of thiol biomarkers was found between the two groups. The main finding of the present study was increased production of oxidative stress biomarkers in OSAS patients. The major difference between thiols and other oxidative stress biomarkers is that thiols are antioxidants, while the others are expressions of oxidative damage. The findings of the present study indicate that biomarkers of oxidative stress in OSAS may be used as a marker of upper airway obstructive episodes due to mechanical trauma, as well as a marker of hypoxaemia causing local oropharyngeal inflammation. PMID:26900248

  10. A Meta-Analysis of Oxidative Stress Markers in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Zhong, Shuming; Liao, Xiaoxiao; Chen, Jian; He, Tingting; Lai, Shunkai; Jia, Yanbin

    2015-01-01

    Object Studies have suggested that depression was accompanied by oxidative stress dysregulation, including abnormal total antioxidant capacity (TAC), antioxidants, free radicals, oxidative damage and autoimmune response products. This meta-analysis aims to analyse the clinical data quantitatively by comparing the oxidative stress markers between depressed patients and healthy controls. Methods A search was conducted to collect the studies that measured the oxidative stress markers in depressed patients. Studies were searched in Embase, Medline, PsychINFO, Science direct, CBMDisc, CNKI and VIP from 1990 to May 2015. Data were subjected to meta-analysis by using a random effects model for examining the effect sizes of the results. Bias assessments, heterogeneity assessments and sensitivity analyses were also conducted. Results 115 articles met the inclusion criteria. Lower TAC was noted in acute episodes (AEs) of depressed patients (p<0.05). Antioxidants, including serum paraoxonase, uric acid, albumin, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and zinc levels were lower than controls (p<0.05); the serum uric acid, albumin and vitamin C levels were increased after antidepressant therapy (p<0.05). Oxidative damage products, including red blood cell (RBC) malondialdehyde (MDA), serum MDA and 8-F2-isoprostanes levels were higher than controls (p<0.05). After antidepressant medication, RBC and serum MDA levels were decreased (p<0.05). Moreover, serum peroxide in free radicals levels were higher than controls (p<0.05). There were no differences between the depressed patients and controls for other oxidative stress markers. Conclusion This meta-analysis supports the facts that the serum TAC, paraoxonase and antioxidant levels are lower, and the serum free radical and oxidative damage product levels are higher than controls in depressed patients. Meanwhile, the antioxidant levels are increased and the oxidative damage product levels are decreased after antidepressant medication

  11. Are metallothioneins equally good biomarkers of metal and oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Figueira, Etelvina; Branco, Diana; Antunes, Sara C; Gonçalves, Fernando; Freitas, Rosa

    2012-10-01

    Several researchers investigated the induction of metallothioneins (MTs) in the presence of metals, namely Cadmium (Cd). Fewer studies observed the induction of MTs due to oxidizing agents, and literature comparing the sensitivity of MTs to different stressors is even more scarce or even nonexistent. The role of MTs in metal and oxidative stress and thus their use as a stress biomarker, remains to be clearly elucidated. To better understand the role of MTs as a biomarker in Cerastoderma edule, a bivalve widely used as bioindicator, a laboratory assay was conducted aiming to assess the sensitivity of MTs to metal and oxidative stressors. For this purpose, Cd was used to induce metal stress, whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), being an oxidizing compound, was used to impose oxidative stress. Results showed that induction of MTs occurred at very different levels in metal and oxidative stress. In the presence of the oxidizing agent (H2O2), MTs only increased significantly when the degree of oxidative stress was very high, and mortality rates were higher than 50 percent. On the contrary, C. edule survived to all Cd concentrations used and significant MTs increases, compared to the control, were observed in all Cd exposures. The present work also revealed that the number of ions and the metal bound to MTs varied with the exposure conditions. In the absence of disturbance, MTs bound most (60-70 percent) of the essential metals (Zn and Cu) in solution. In stressful situations, such as the exposure to Cd and H2O2, MTs did not bind to Cu and bound less to Zn. When organisms were exposed to Cd, the total number of ions bound per MT molecule did not change, compared to control. However the sort of ions bound per MT molecule differed; part of the Zn and all Cu ions where displaced by Cd ions. For organisms exposed to H2O2, each MT molecule bound less than half of the ions compared to control and Cd conditions, which indicates a partial oxidation of thiol groups in the cysteine

  12. Phloroglucinol Attenuates Free Radical-induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    So, Mi Jung; Cho, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The protective role of phloroglucinol against oxidative stress and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) was investigated in vitro and in cell culture. Phloroglucinol had strong and concentration-dependent radical scavenging effects against nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions (O2−), and hydroxyl radicals. In this study, free radical generators were used to induce oxidative stress in LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells. Treatment with phloroglucinol attenuated the oxidative stress induced by peroxyl radicals, NO, O2−, and peroxynitrite. Phloroglucinol also increased cell viability and decreased lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. WI-38 human diploid fibroblast cells were used to investigate the protective effect of phloroglucinol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced SIPS. Phloroglucinol treatment attenuated H2O2-induced SIPS by increasing cell viability and inhibited lipid peroxidation, suggesting that treatment with phloroglucinol should delay the aging process. The present study supports the promising role of phloroglucinol as an antioxidative agent against free radical-induced oxidative stress and SIPS. PMID:25320709

  13. Lithospermum erythrorhizon extract protects keratinocytes and fibroblasts against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hee Geun; Lee, Bong Han; Kim, Wooki; Lee, Jong Suk; Kim, Gun Hee; Chun, Ock K; Koo, Sung I; Kim, Dae-Ok

    2014-11-01

    Oxidative stress damages dermal and epidermal cells and degrades extracellular matrix proteins, such as collagen, ultimately leading to skin aging. The present study evaluated the potential protective effect of the aqueous methanolic extract obtained from Lithospermum erythrorhizon (LE) against oxidative stress, induced by H2O2 and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, on human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and human dermal fibroblast-neonatal (HDF-n) cells. Exposure of cells to H2O2 or UVB irradiation markedly increased oxidative stress and reduced cell viability. However, pretreatment of cells with the LE extract not only increased cell viability (up to 84.5%), but also significantly decreased oxidative stress. Further, the LE extract downregulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1, an endopeptidase that degrades extracellular matrix collagen. In contrast, treatment with the LE extract did not affect the expression of procollagen type 1 in HDF-n cells exposed to UVA irradiation. Thirteen phenolic compounds, including derivatives of shikonin and caffeic acid, were identified by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. These results suggest that LE-derived extracts may protect oxidative-stress-induced skin aging by inhibiting degradation of skin collagen, and that this protection may derive at least in part from the antioxidant phenolics present in these extracts. Further studies are warranted to determine the potential utility of LE-derived extracts in both therapeutic and cosmetic applications. PMID:25136892

  14. Arterial Stiffness, Oxidative Stress, and Smoke Exposure in Wildland Firefighters

    PubMed Central

    Gaughan, Denise M.; Siegel, Paul D.; Hughes, Michael D.; Chang, Chiung-Yu; Law, Brandon F.; Campbell, Corey R.; Richards, Jennifer C.; Kales, Stefanos F.; Chertok, Marcia; Kobzik, Lester; Nguyen, Phuongson; O’Donnell, Carl R.; Kiefer, Max; Wagner, Gregory R.; Christiani, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between exposure, oxidative stress, symptoms, and cardiorespiratory function in wildland firefighters. Methods We studied two Interagency Hotshot Crews with questionnaires, pulse wave analysis for arterial stiffness, spirometry, urinary 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-isoprostane) and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and the smoke exposure marker (urinary levoglucosan). Arterial stiffness was assessed by examining levels of the aortic augmentation index, expressed as a percentage. An oxidative stress score comprising the average of z-scores created for 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane was calculated. Results Mean augmentation index % was higher for participants with higher oxidative stress scores after adjusting for smoking status. Specifically for every one unit increase in oxidative stress score the augmentation index % increased 10.5% (95% CI: 2.5, 18.5%). Higher mean lower respiratory symptom score was associated with lower percent predicted forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity. Conclusions Biomarkers of oxidative stress may serve as indicators of arterial stiffness in wildland firefighters. PMID:24909863

  15. Oxidative Stress in Schizophrenia: An Integrated Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bitanihirwe, Byron K.Y.; Woo, Tsung-Ung W.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In particular, oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA as observed in schizophrenia is known to impair cell viability and function, which may subsequently account for the deteriorating course of the illness. Currently available evidence points towards an alteration in the activities of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant systems in schizophrenia. In fact, experimental models have demonstrated that oxidative stress induces behavioural and molecular anomalies strikingly similar to those observed in schizophrenia. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is intimately linked to a variety of pathophysiological processes, such as inflammation, oligodendrocyte abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction, hypoactive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and the impairment of fast-spiking gamma-aminobutyric acid interneurons.[bkyb1] Such self-sustaining mechanisms may progressively worsen producing the functional and structural consequences associated with schizophrenia. Recent clinical studies have shown antioxidant treatment to be effective in ameliorating schizophrenic symptoms. Hence, identifying viable therapeutic strategies to tackle oxidative stress and the resulting physiological disturbances provide an exciting opportunity for the treatment and ultimately prevention of schizophrenia. PMID:20974172

  16. Correlation of Zinc with Oxidative Stress Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, María; Llopis-González, Agustín; González-Albert, Verónica; López-Izquierdo, Raúl; González-Manzano, Isabel; Cháves, Javier; Huerta-Biosca, Vicente; Martin-Escudero, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and smoking are related with oxidative stress (OS), which in turn reports on cellular aging. Zinc is an essential element involved in an individual’s physiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation of zinc levels in serum and urine with OS and cellular aging and its effect on the development of hypertension. In a Spanish sample with 1500 individuals, subjects aged 20–59 years were selected, whose zinc intake levels fell within the recommended limits. These individuals were classified according to their smoking habits and hypertensive condition. A positive correlation was found (Pearson’s C = 0.639; p = 0.01) between Zn serum/urine quotient and oxidized glutathione levels (GSSG). Finally, risk of hypertension significantly increased when the GSSG levels exceeded the 75 percentile; OR = 2.80 (95%CI = 1.09–7.18) and AOR = 3.06 (95%CI = 0.96–9.71). Low zinc levels in serum were related with OS and cellular aging and were, in turn, to be a risk factor for hypertension.  PMID:25774936

  17. Diaphragmatic breathing reduces exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martarelli, Daniele; Cocchioni, Mario; Scuri, Stefania; Pompei, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Diaphragmatic breathing is relaxing and therapeutic, reduces stress, and is a fundamental procedure of Pranayama Yoga, Zen, transcendental meditation and other meditation practices. Analysis of oxidative stress levels in people who meditate indicated that meditation correlates with lower oxidative stress levels, lower cortisol levels and higher melatonin levels. It is known that cortisol inhibits enzymes responsible for the antioxidant activity of cells and that melatonin is a strong antioxidant; therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diaphragmatic breathing on exercise-induced oxidative stress and the putative role of cortisol and melatonin hormones in this stress pathway. We monitored 16 athletes during an exhaustive training session. After the exercise, athletes were divided in two equivalent groups of eight subjects. Subjects of the studied group spent 1 h relaxing performing diaphragmatic breathing and concentrating on their breath in a quiet place. The other eight subjects, representing the control group, spent the same time sitting in an equivalent quite place. Results demonstrate that relaxation induced by diaphragmatic breathing increases the antioxidant defense status in athletes after exhaustive exercise. These effects correlate with the concomitant decrease in cortisol and the increase in melatonin. The consequence is a lower level of oxidative stress, which suggests that an appropriate diaphragmatic breathing could protect athletes from long-term adverse effects of free radicals. PMID:19875429

  18. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Spiers, Jereme G.; Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure. PMID:25646076

  19. Acute exercise and oxidative stress: a 30 year history

    PubMed Central

    Fisher-Wellman, Kelsey; Bloomer, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    The topic of exercise-induced oxidative stress has received considerable attention in recent years, with close to 300 original investigations published since the early work of Dillard and colleagues in 1978. Single bouts of aerobic and anaerobic exercise can induce an acute state of oxidative stress. This is indicated by an increased presence of oxidized molecules in a variety of tissues. Exercise mode, intensity, and duration, as well as the subject population tested, all can impact the extent of oxidation. Moreover, the use of antioxidant supplements can impact the findings. Although a single bout of exercise often leads to an acute oxidative stress, in accordance with the principle of hormesis, such an increase appears necessary to allow for an up-regulation in endogenous antioxidant defenses. This review presents a comprehensive summary of original investigations focused on exercise-induced oxidative stress. This should provide the reader with a well-documented account of the research done within this area of science over the past 30 years. PMID:19144121

  20. Causes and consequences of oxidative stress in spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Robert John; Gibb, Zamira; Baker, Mark A; Drevet, Joel; Gharagozloo, Parviz

    2015-02-01

    Spermatozoa are highly vulnerable to oxidative attack because they lack significant antioxidant protection due to the limited volume and restricted distribution of cytoplasmic space in which to house an appropriate armoury of defensive enzymes. In particular, sperm membrane lipids are susceptible to oxidative stress because they abound in significant amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Susceptibility to oxidative attack is further exacerbated by the fact that these cells actively generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in order to drive the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation associated with sperm capacitation. However, this positive role for ROS is reversed when spermatozoa are stressed. Under these conditions, they default to an intrinsic apoptotic pathway characterised by mitochondrial ROS generation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine exposure and oxidative DNA damage. In responding to oxidative stress, spermatozoa only possess the first enzyme in the base excision repair pathway, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase. This enzyme catalyses the formation of abasic sites, thereby destabilising the DNA backbone and generating strand breaks. Because oxidative damage to sperm DNA is associated with both miscarriage and developmental abnormalities in the offspring, strategies for the amelioration of such stress, including the development of effective antioxidant formulations, are becoming increasingly urgent. PMID:27062870

  1. Plasma levels of oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP) in rats subjected to physicochemical oxidative stresses.

    PubMed

    Yao, Takako; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Murayama, Kimie; Seko, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of various disorders including atherosclerosis, aging and especially ischaemia/reperfusion injury. It causes cell damage that leads to apoptosis. However, the precise mechanism has been uncertain. Recently, we identified an apoptosis-inducing humoral factor in a hypoxia/reoxygenated medium of cardiac myocytes. We named this novel post-translationally modified secreted form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) as oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP). We developed a sandwich ELISA and confirmed that myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion markedly increased plasma levels of ORAIP. To investigate whether the role of ORAIP is common to various types of oxidative stress, we measured plasma ORAIP levels in rats subjected to three physicochemical models of oxidative stress including N2/O2 inhalation, cold/warm-stress (heat shock) and blood acidification. In all three models, plasma ORAIP levels significantly increased and reached a peak level at 10-30 min after stimulation, then decreased within 60 min. The (mean±S.E.M.) plasma ORAIP levels before and after (peak) stimulation were (16.4±9.6) and (55.2±34.2) ng/ml in N2/O2 inhalation, (14.1±12.4) and (34.3±14.6) ng/ml in cold/warm-stress, and (18.9±14.3) and (134.0±67.2) ng/ml in blood acidification study. These data strongly suggest that secretion of ORAIP in response to oxidative stress is universal mechanism and plays an essential role. ORAIP will be an important novel biomarker as well as a specific therapeutic target of these oxidative stress-induced cell injuries. PMID:26934977

  2. Antioxidant supplementation overcomes the deleterious effects of maternal restraint stress-induced oxidative stress on mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lian, Hua-Yu; Gao, Yan; Jiao, Guang-Zhong; Sun, Ming-Ju; Wu, Xiu-Fen; Wang, Tian-Yang; Li, Hong; Tan, Jing-He

    2013-12-01

    In this study, using a mouse model, we tested the hypothesis that restraint stress would impair the developmental potential of oocytes by causing oxidative stress and that antioxidant supplementation could overcome the adverse effect of stress-induced oxidative stress. Female mice were subjected to restraint stress for 24 h starting 24 h after equine chorionic gonadotropin injection. At the end of stress exposure, mice were either killed to recover oocytes for in vitro maturation (IVM) or injected with human chorionic gonadotropin and caged with male mice to observe in vivo development. The effect of antioxidants was tested in vitro by adding them to IVM medium or in vivo by maternal injection immediately before restraint stress exposure. Assays carried out to determine total oxidant and antioxidant status, oxidative stress index, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione levels indicated that restraint stress increased oxidative stress in mouse serum, ovaries, and oocytes. Whereas the percentage of blastocysts and number of cells per blastocyst decreased significantly in oocytes from restraint-stressed mice, addition of antioxidants to IVM medium significantly improved their blastocyst development. Supplementation of cystine and cysteamine to IVM medium reduced ROS levels and aneuploidy while increasing glutathione synthesis and improving pre- and postimplantation development of oocytes from restraint-stressed mice. Furthermore, injection of the antioxidant epigallocatechin gallate into restraint-stressed mice significantly improved the blastocyst formation and postimplantation development of their oocytes. In conclusion, restraint stress at the oocyte prematuration stage impaired the developmental potential of oocytes by increasing oxidative stress and addition of antioxidants to IVM medium or maternal antioxidant injection overcame the detrimental effect of stress-induced oxidative stress. The data reported herein are helpful when making attempts to

  3. Maillard reaction, mitochondria and oxidative stress: potential role of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Edeas, M; Attaf, D; Mailfert, A-S; Nasu, M; Joubet, R

    2010-06-01

    Glycation and oxidative stress are two important processes known to play a key role in complications of many disease processes. Oxidative stress, either via increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS), or by depleting the antioxidants may modulate the genesis of early glycated proteins in vivo. Maillard Reactions, occur in vivo as well as in vitro and are associated with the chronic complications of diabetes, aging and age-related diseases. Hyperglycaemia causes the autoxidation of glucose, glycation of proteins, and the activation of polyol metabolism. These changes facilitate the generation of reactive oxygen species and decrease the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, resulting in a remarkable increase of oxidative stress. A large body of evidence indicates that mitochondria alteration is involved and plays a central role in various oxidative stress-related diseases. The damaged mitochondria produce more ROS (increase oxidative stress) and less ATP (cellular energy) than normal mitochondria. As they are damaged, they cannot burn or use glucose or lipid and cannot provide cell with ATP. Further, glucose, amino acids and lipid will not be correctly used and will accumulate outside the mitochondria; they will undergo more glycation (as observed in diabetes, obesity, HIV infection and lipodystrophia). The objective of this paper is to discuss how to stop the vicious circle established between oxidative stress, Maillard Reaction and mitochondria. The potential application of some antioxidants to reduce glycation phenomenon and to increase the antioxidant defence system by targeting mitochondria will be discussed. Food and pharmaceutical companies share the same challenge, they must act now, urgently and energetically. PMID:20031340

  4. Contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-04-01

    The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms was described more than 60 years ago and virtually immediately it was suggested that ROS were involved in various pathological processes and aging. The state when ROS generation exceeds elimination leading to an increased steady-state ROS level has been called "oxidative stress." Although ROS association with many pathological states in animals is well established, the question of ROS responsibility for the development of these states is still open. Fish represent the largest group of vertebrates and they inhabit a broad range of ecosystems where they are subjected to many different aquatic contaminants. In many cases, the deleterious effects of contaminants have been connected to induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, deciphering of molecular mechanisms leading to such contaminant effects and organisms' response may let prevent or minimize deleterious impacts of oxidative stress. This review describes general aspects of ROS homeostasis, in particular highlighting its basic aspects, modification of cellular constituents, operation of defense systems and ROS-based signaling with an emphasis on fish systems. A brief introduction to oxidative stress theory is accompanied by the description of a recently developed classification system for oxidative stress based on its intensity and time course. Specific information on contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish is covered in sections devoted to such pollutants as metal ions (particularly iron, copper, chromium, mercury, arsenic, nickel, etc.), pesticides (insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides) and oil with accompanying pollutants. In the last section, certain problems and perspectives in studies of oxidative stress in fish are described. PMID:26607273

  5. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Venco, Paola; Bonora, Massimo; Giorgi, Carlotta; Papaleo, Elena; Iuso, Arcangela; Prokisch, Holger; Pinton, Paolo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane), while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls. C19orf12 protein is a 17 kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologs to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction. PMID:26136767

  6. Treatment with Parkinsonia aculeata combats insulin resistance-induced oxidative stress through the increase in PPARγ/CuZn-SOD axis expression in diet-induced obesity mice.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Tiago Gomes; Oliveira, Alexandre Gabarra; Vecina, Juliana Falcato; Marin, Rodrigo Miguel; Franco, Eryvelton Souza; Abdalla Saad, Mario J; de Sousa Maia, Maria Bernadete

    2016-08-01

    Parkinsonia aculeata L. (Caesalpiniaceae) is a traditional ethnomedicine and has been used for the empiric treatment of hyperglycemia, without scientific background. Mechanistic analyses at molecular level from the antioxidant mechanism observed by P. aculeata are required. Herein the effects of the treatment by hydroethanolic extract partitioned with ethyl acetate of P. aculeata aerial parts (HEPa/EtOAc) in mice fed a high-fat diet that share many obesity phenotypes with humans were evaluated. The animals were treated orally with HEPa/EtOAc (125 and 250 mg/kg/day) and pioglitazone (5 mg/kg/day), for 16 days. After the treatment, HEPa/EtOAc reduced fasting serum glucose and insulin levels, as well as homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance. In addition, an improvement in glucose intolerance was also observed. Indeed, a reduction in the circulating levels of TNF-α and IL-6 was also observed. Furthermore, at molecular level, it was demonstrated that the HEPa/EtOAc treatment was able to improve these physiological parameters, through the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) per si, as well as the enhancement of antioxidant mechanism by an increase in PPARγ/Cu(2+), Zn(2+)-superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD) axis expression in liver and adipose tissue. In sum, P. aculeata is effective to improve insulin resistance in a mouse model of obesity and this effect seems to involve the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms through the increase in PPARγ/CuZn-SOD axis expression. PMID:27372351

  7. Muscle Aging and Oxidative Stress in Wild-Caught Shrews

    PubMed Central

    Hindle, Allyson G.; Lawler, John M.; Campbell, Kevin L.; Horning, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Red-toothed shrews (Soricidae, subfamily Soricinae) are an intriguing model system to examine the free radical theory of aging in wild mammals, given their short (<18 month) lifespan and high mass-specific metabolic rates. As muscle performance underlies both foraging ability and predator avoidance, any age-related decline should be detrimental to fitness and survival. Muscle samples of water shrews (Sorex palustris) and sympatrically distributed short-tailed shrews (Blarina brevicauda) were therefore assessed for oxidative stress markers, protective antioxidant enzymes and apoptosis. Activity levels of catalase and glutathione peroxidase increased with age in both species. Similarly, Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase isoform content was elevated significantly in older animals of both species (increases of 60% in the water shrew, 25% in the short-tailed shrew). Only one oxidative stress marker (lipid peroxidation) was age-elevated; the others were stable or declined (4-hydroxynonenal adducts and dihydroethidium oxidation). Glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly higher in the short-tailed shrew, while catalase activity was 2× higher in water shrews. Oxidative stress indicators were on average higher in short-tailed shrews. Apoptosis occurred in <1% of myocytes examined, and did not increase with age. Within the constraints of the sample size we found evidence of protection against elevated oxidative stress in wild-caught shrews. PMID:20109576

  8. Muscle aging and oxidative stress in wild-caught shrews.

    PubMed

    Hindle, Allyson G; Lawler, John M; Campbell, Kevin L; Horning, Markus

    2010-04-01

    Red-toothed shrews (Soricidae, subfamily Soricinae) are an intriguing model system to examine the free-radical theory of aging in wild mammals, given their short (<18months) lifespan and high mass-specific metabolic rates. As muscle performance underlies both foraging ability and predator avoidance, any age-related decline should be detrimental to fitness and survival. Muscle samples of water shrews (Sorex palustris) and sympatrically distributed short-tailed shrews (Blarina brevicauda) were therefore assessed for oxidative stress markers, protective antioxidant enzymes and apoptosis. Activity levels of catalase and glutathione peroxidase increased with age in both species. Similarly, Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase isoform content was elevated significantly in older animals of both species (increases of 60% in the water shrew, 25% in the short-tailed shrew). Only one oxidative stress marker (lipid peroxidation) was age-elevated; the others were stable or declined (4-hydroxynonenal adducts and dihydroethidium oxidation). Glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly higher in the short-tailed shrew, while catalase activity was 2x higher in water shrews. Oxidative stress indicators were on average higher in short-tailed shrews. Apoptosis occurred in <1% of myocytes examined, and did not increase with age. Within the constraints of the sample size we found evidence of protection against elevated oxidative stress in wild-caught shrews. PMID:20109576

  9. Transgenic Tobacco Plants Overexpressing Chloroplastic Ferredoxin-NADP(H) Reductase Display Normal Rates of Photosynthesis and Increased Tolerance to Oxidative Stress1

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Ramiro E.; Lodeyro, Anabella; Poli, Hugo O.; Zurbriggen, Matias; Peisker, Martin; Palatnik, Javier F.; Tognetti, Vanesa B.; Tschiersch, Henning; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Valle, Estela M.; Carrillo, Néstor

    2007-01-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(H) reductase (FNR) catalyzes the last step of photosynthetic electron transport in chloroplasts, driving electrons from reduced ferredoxin to NADP+. This reaction is rate limiting for photosynthesis under a wide range of illumination conditions, as revealed by analysis of plants transformed with an antisense version of the FNR gene. To investigate whether accumulation of this flavoprotein over wild-type levels could improve photosynthetic efficiency and growth, we generated transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants expressing a pea (Pisum sativum) FNR targeted to chloroplasts. The alien product distributed between the thylakoid membranes and the chloroplast stroma. Transformants grown at 150 or 700 μmol quanta m−2 s−1 displayed wild-type phenotypes regardless of FNR content. Thylakoids isolated from plants with a 5-fold FNR increase over the wild type displayed only moderate stimulation (approximately 20%) in the rates of electron transport from water to NADP+. In contrast, when donors of photosystem I were used to drive NADP+ photoreduction, the activity was 3- to 4-fold higher than the wild-type controls. Plants expressing various levels of FNR (from 1- to 3.6-fold over the wild type) failed to show significant differences in CO2 assimilation rates when assayed over a range of light intensities and CO2 concentrations. Transgenic lines exhibited enhanced tolerance to photooxidative damage and redox-cycling herbicides that propagate reactive oxygen species. The results suggest that photosynthetic electron transport has several rate-limiting steps, with FNR catalyzing just one of them. PMID:17189326

  10. Eating increases oxidative damage in a reptile.

    PubMed

    Butler, Michael W; Lutz, Thomas J; Fokidis, H Bobby; Stahlschmidt, Zachary R

    2016-07-01

    While eating has substantial benefits in terms of both nutrient and energy acquisition, there are physiological costs associated with digesting and metabolizing a meal. Frequently, these costs have been documented in the context of energy expenditure while other physiological costs have been relatively unexplored. Here, we tested whether the seemingly innocuous act of eating affects either systemic pro-oxidant (reactive oxygen metabolite, ROM) levels or antioxidant capacity of corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) by collecting plasma during absorptive (peak increase in metabolic rate due to digestion of a meal) and non-absorptive (baseline) states. When individuals were digesting a meal, there was a minimal increase in antioxidant capacity relative to baseline (4%), but a substantial increase in ROMs (nearly 155%), even when controlling for circulating nutrient levels. We report an oxidative cost of eating that is much greater than that due to long distance flight or mounting an immune response in other taxa. This result demonstrates the importance of investigating non-energetic costs associated with meal processing, and it begs future work to identify the mechanism(s) driving this increase in ROM levels. Because energetic costs associated with eating are taxonomically widespread, identifying the taxonomic breadth of eating-induced ROM increases may provide insights into the interplay between oxidative damage and life history theory. PMID:27099366

  11. Oxidative Stress Control by Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Izui, Natália M.; Schettert, Isolmar; Liebau, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause infectious diseases that are either a severe public health problem or an economic burden. In this paper we will shed light on how oxidative stress can influence the host-pathogen relationship by focusing on three major diseases: babesiosis, coccidiosis, and toxoplasmosis. PMID:25722976

  12. Oxidative Stress and Ca2+ Release Events in Mouse Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Shirokova, Natalia; Kang, Chifei; Fernandez-Tenorio, Miguel; Wang, Wei; Wang, Qiongling; Wehrens, Xander H.T.; Niggli, Ernst

    2014-01-01

    Cellular oxidative stress, associated with a variety of common cardiac diseases, is well recognized to affect the function of several key proteins involved in Ca2+ signaling and excitation-contraction coupling, which are known to be exquisitely sensitive to reactive oxygen species. These include the Ca2+ release channels of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (ryanodine receptors or RyR2s) and the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). Oxidation of RyR2s was found to increase the open probability of the channel, whereas CaMKII can be activated independent of Ca2+ through oxidation. Here, we investigated how oxidative stress affects RyR2 function and SR Ca2+ signaling in situ, by analyzing Ca2+ sparks in permeabilized mouse cardiomyocytes under a broad range of oxidative conditions. The results show that with increasing oxidative stress Ca2+ spark duration is prolonged. In addition, long and very long-lasting (up to hundreds of milliseconds) localized Ca2+ release events started to appear, eventually leading to sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ depletion. These changes of release duration could be prevented by the CaMKII inhibitor KN93 and did not occur in mice lacking the CaMKII-specific S2814 phosphorylation site on RyR2. The appearance of long-lasting Ca2+ release events was paralleled by an increase of RyR2 oxidation, but also by RyR-S2814 phosphorylation, and by CaMKII oxidation. Our results suggest that in a strongly oxidative environment oxidation-dependent activation of CaMKII leads to RyR2 phosphorylation and thereby contributes to the massive prolongation of SR Ca2+ release events. PMID:25517148

  13. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Busch, Andrea W U; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  14. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrea W.U.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  15. Thiol specific oxidative stress response in Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Nirpjit S; Rawat, Mamta; Chung, Ji-Hae; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2005-08-01

    The cellular response of mycobacteria to thiol specific oxidative stress was studied in Mycobacterium bovis BCG cultures. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed that upon diamide treatment at least 60 proteins were upregulated. Fourteen of these proteins were identified by MALDI-MS; four proteins, AhpC, Tpx, GroEL2, and GroEL1 are functionally related to oxidative stress response; eight proteins, LeuC, LeuD, Rv0224c, Rv3029c, AsnB, Rv2971, PheA and HisH are classified as part of the bacterial intermediary metabolism and respiration pathways; protein EchA14 belong to lipid metabolism, and NrdE, belongs to the mycobacterial information pathway category. Reverse transcription followed by quantitative real time PCR in response to diamide stress demonstrated that protein expression is directly proportional to the corresponding gene transcription. PMID:16006064

  16. Oxidative stress and therapeutic implications in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang Yang; Yao, Jeffrey K

    2013-10-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that disturbances of antioxidant defense system and presence of oxidative stress can play a part in a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression, as well as antipsychotic-induced tardive dyskinesia (TD). Moreover, researchers have embarked on using antioxidant treatment as adjunct therapy for psychiatry disorders. Evidence from clinical, pre-clinical and epidemiological studies suggests that a benefit of using antioxidant compounds should be considered as an adjunctive therapy in these patients. These are some of the main perspectives that are reviewed by four articles in this special section. Overall, there has been growing recognition of the importance of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders and the development of TD. The collection of articles in this special section will contribute to providing more efficacious treatments arising from a better appreciation of the roles of oxidative stress in these psychiatric disorders. PMID:23523744

  17. Does aspirin-induced oxidative stress cause asthma exacerbation?

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzak, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by severe asthma exacerbations after ingestion of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The exact pathomechanism of AIA remains unknown, though ongoing research has shed some light. Recently, more and more attention has been focused on the role of aspirin in the induction of oxidative stress, especially in cancer cell systems. However, it has not excluded the similar action of aspirin in other inflammatory disorders such as asthma. Moreover, increased levels of 8-isoprostanes, reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress in expired breath condensate in steroid-naïve patients with AIA compared to AIA patients treated with steroids and healthy volunteers, has been observed. This review is an attempt to cover aspirin-induced oxidative stress action in AIA and to suggest a possible related pathomechanism. PMID:26170841

  18. Transketolase counteracts oxidative stress to drive cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Iris Ming-Jing; Lai, Robin Kit-Ho; Lin, Shu-Hai; Tse, Aki Pui-Wah; Chiu, David Kung-Chun; Koh, Hui-Yu; Law, Cheuk-Ting; Wong, Chun-Ming; Cai, Zongwei; Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells experience an increase in oxidative stress. The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a major biochemical pathway that generates antioxidant NADPH. Here, we show that transketolase (TKT), an enzyme in the PPP, is required for cancer growth because of its ability to affect the production of NAPDH to counteract oxidative stress. We show that TKT expression is tightly regulated by the Nuclear Factor, Erythroid 2-Like 2 (NRF2)/Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1 (KEAP1)/BTB and CNC Homolog 1 (BACH1) oxidative stress sensor pathway in cancers. Disturbing the redox homeostasis of cancer cells by genetic knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of TKT sensitizes cancer cells to existing targeted therapy (Sorafenib). Our study strengthens the notion that antioxidants are beneficial to cancer growth and highlights the therapeutic benefits of targeting pathways that generate antioxidants. PMID:26811478

  19. Transketolase counteracts oxidative stress to drive cancer development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Iris Ming-Jing; Lai, Robin Kit-Ho; Lin, Shu-Hai; Tse, Aki Pui-Wah; Chiu, David Kung-Chun; Koh, Hui-Yu; Law, Cheuk-Ting; Wong, Chun-Ming; Cai, Zongwei; Wong, Carmen Chak-Lui; Ng, Irene Oi-Lin

    2016-02-01

    Cancer cells experience an increase in oxidative stress. The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is a major biochemical pathway that generates antioxidant NADPH. Here, we show that transketolase (TKT), an enzyme in the PPP, is required for cancer growth because of its ability to affect the production of NAPDH to counteract oxidative stress. We show that TKT expression is tightly regulated by the Nuclear Factor, Erythroid 2-Like 2 (NRF2)/Kelch-Like ECH-Associated Protein 1 (KEAP1)/BTB and CNC Homolog 1 (BACH1) oxidative stress sensor pathway in cancers. Disturbing the redox homeostasis of cancer cells by genetic knockdown or pharmacologic inhibition of TKT sensitizes cancer cells to existing targeted therapy (Sorafenib). Our study strengthens the notion that antioxidants are beneficial to cancer growth and highlights the therapeutic benefits of targeting pathways that generate antioxidants. PMID:26811478

  20. Heat stress increases insulin sensitivity in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Sanz Fernandez, M Victoria; Stoakes, Sara K; Abuajamieh, Mohannad; Seibert, Jacob T; Johnson, Jay S; Horst, Erin A; Rhoads, Robert P; Baumgard, Lance H

    2015-01-01

    Proper insulin homeostasis appears critical for adapting to and surviving a heat load. Further, heat stress (HS) induces phenotypic changes in livestock that suggest an increase in insulin action. The current study objective was to evaluate the effects of HS on whole-body insulin sensitivity. Female pigs (57 ± 4 kg body weight) were subjected to two experimental periods. During period 1, all pigs remained in thermoneutral conditions (TN; 21°C) and were fed ad libitum. During period 2, pigs were exposed to: (i) constant HS conditions (32°C) and fed ad libitum (n = 6), or (ii) TN conditions and pair-fed (PFTN; n = 6) to eliminate the confounding effects of dissimilar feed intake. A hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HEC) was conducted on d3 of both periods; and skeletal muscle and adipose tissue biopsies were collected prior to and after an insulin tolerance test (ITT) on d5 of period 2. During the HEC, insulin infusion increased circulating insulin and decreased plasma C-peptide and nonesterified fatty acids, similarly between treatments. From period 1 to 2, the rate of glucose infusion in response to the HEC remained similar in HS pigs while it decreased (36%) in PFTN controls. Prior to the ITT, HS increased (41%) skeletal muscle insulin receptor substrate-1 protein abundance, but did not affect protein kinase B or their phosphorylated forms. In adipose tissue, HS did not alter any of the basal or stimulated measured insulin signaling markers. In summary, HS increases whole-body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. PMID:26243213

  1. Work at high altitude and oxidative stress: antioxidant nutrients.

    PubMed

    Askew, E W

    2002-11-15

    A significant portion of the world's geography lies above 10,000 feet elevation, an arbitrary designation that separates moderate and high altitude. Although the number of indigenous people living at these elevations is relatively small, many people travel to high altitude for work or recreation, exposing themselves to chronic or intermittent hypoxia and the associated risk of acute mountain sickness (AMS) and less frequently, high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE). The symptoms of AMS (headache, nausea, anorexia, fatigue, lassitude) occur in those who travel too high, too fast. Some investigators have linked the development of these symptoms with the condition of altered blood-brain barrier permeability, possibly related to hypoxia induced free radical formation. The burden of oxidative stress increases during the time spent at altitude and may even persist for some time upon return to sea level. The physiological and medical consequences of increased oxidative stress engendered by altitude is unclear; indeed, hypoxia is believed to be the trigger for the cascade of signaling events that ultimately leads to adaptation to altitude. These signaling events include the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may elicit important adaptive responses. If produced in excess, however, these ROS may contribute to impaired muscle function and reduced capillary perfusion at altitude or may even play a role in precipitating more serious neurological and pulmonary crisis. Oxidative stress can be observed at altitude without strenuous physical exertion; however, environmental factors other than hypoxia, such as exercise, UV light exposure and cold exposure, can also contribute to the burden. Providing antioxidant nutrients via the diet or supplements to the diet can reduce oxidative stress secondary to altitude exposure. In summary, the significant unanswered question concerning altitude exposure and antioxidant supplementation is

  2. Cofactor binding protects flavodoxin against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; van den Berg, Willy A M; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Heck, Albert J R; van Mierlo, Carlo P M; van Berkel, Willem J H

    2012-01-01

    In organisms, various protective mechanisms against oxidative damaging of proteins exist. Here, we show that cofactor binding is among these mechanisms, because flavin mononucleotide (FMN) protects Azotobacter vinelandii flavodoxin against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidation. We identify an oxidation sensitive cysteine residue in a functionally important loop close to the cofactor, i.e., Cys69. Oxidative stress causes dimerization of apoflavodoxin (i.e., flavodoxin without cofactor), and leads to consecutive formation of sulfinate and sulfonate states of Cys69. Use of 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl) reveals that Cys69 modification to a sulfenic acid is a transient intermediate during oxidation. Dithiothreitol converts sulfenic acid and disulfide into thiols, whereas the sulfinate and sulfonate forms of Cys69 are irreversible with respect to this reagent. A variable fraction of Cys69 in freshly isolated flavodoxin is in the sulfenic acid state, but neither oxidation to sulfinic and sulfonic acid nor formation of intermolecular disulfides is observed under oxidising conditions. Furthermore, flavodoxin does not react appreciably with NBD-Cl. Besides its primary role as redox-active moiety, binding of flavin leads to considerably improved stability against protein unfolding and to strong protection against irreversible oxidation and other covalent thiol modifications. Thus, cofactors can protect proteins against oxidation and modification. PMID:22829943

  3. Oxidative stress induced carbonylation in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Madian, Ashraf G; Diaz-Maldonado, Naomi; Gao, Qiang; Regnier, Fred E

    2011-10-19

    The focus of this study was on the assessment of technology that might be of clinical utility in identification, quantification, characterization of carbonylation in human plasma proteins. Carbonylation is widely associated with oxidative stress diseases. Breast cancer patient samples were chosen as a stress positive case based on the fact that oxidative stress has been reported to be elevated in this disease. Measurements of 8-isoprostane in plasma confirmed that breast cancer patients in this study were indeed experiencing significant oxidative stress. Carbonyl groups in proteins from freshly drawn blood were derivatized with biotin hydrazide after which the samples were dialyzed and the biotinylated proteins subsequently selected, digested and labeled with iTRAQ™ heavy isotope coding reagent(s). Four hundred sixty proteins were identified and quantified, 95 of which changed 1.5 fold or more in concentration. Beyond confirming the utility of the analytical method, association of protein carbonylation was examined as well. Nearly one fourth of the selected proteins were of cytoplasmic, nuclear, or membrane origin. Analysis of the data by unbiased knowledge assembly methods indicated the most likely disease associated with the proteins was breast neoplasm. Pathway analysis showed the proteins which changed in carbonylation were strongly associated with Brca1, the breast cancer type-1 susceptibility protein. Pathway analysis indicated the major molecular functions of these proteins are defense, immunity and nucleic acid binding. PMID:21856457

  4. Oxidative stress induced carbonylation in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Madian, Ashraf G.; Diaz-Maldonado, Naomi; Gao, Qiang; Regnier, Fred E.

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this study was on the assessment of technology that might be of clinical utility in identification, quantification, characterization of carbonylation in human plasma proteins. Carbonylation is widely associated with oxidative stress diseases. Breast cancer patient samples were chosen as a stress positive case based on the fact that oxidative stress has been reported to be elevated in this disease. Measurements of 8-isoprostane in plasma confirmed that breast cancer patients in this study were indeed experiencing significant oxidative stress. Carbonyl groups in proteins from freshly drawn blood were derivatized with biotin hydrazide after which the samples were dialyzed and the biotinylated proteins subsequently selected, digested and labeled with iTRAQ™ heavy isotope coding reagent(s). Four hundred sixty proteins were identified and quantified, 95 of which changed 1.5 fold or more in concentration. Beyond confirming the utility of the analytical method, association of protein carbonylation was examined as well. Nearly one fourth of the selected proteins were of cytoplasmic, nuclear, or membrane origin. Analysis of the data by unbiased knowledge assembly methods indicated the most likely disease associated with the proteins was breast neoplasm. Pathway analysis showed the proteins which changed in carbonylation were strongly associated with Brca1, the breast cancer type-1 susceptibility protein. Pathway analysis indicated the major molecular functions of these proteins are defense, immunity and nucleic acid binding. PMID:21856457

  5. Obesity and Oxidative Stress Predict AKI after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pretorius, Mias; Schildcrout, Jonathan S.; Mercaldo, Nathaniel D.; Byrne, John G.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Brown, Nancy J.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity increases oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation, but the effect of obesity on postoperative AKI is not known. We examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and AKI in 445 patients undergoing cardiac surgery and whether oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes), inflammation (IL-6), or antifibrinolysis (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 [PAI-1]) contribute to any identified relationship. Overall, 112 (25%) of the 445 patients developed AKI. Higher BMI was independently associated with increased odds of AKI (26.5% increase per 5 kg/m2 [95% confidence interval, 4.3%–53.4%]; P=0.02). Baseline F2-isoprostane (P=0.04), intraoperative F2-isoprostane (P=0.003), and intraoperative PAI-1 (P=0.04) concentrations also independently predicted AKI. BMI no longer predicted AKI after adjustment for the effect of F2-isoprostanes, suggesting that obesity may affect AKI via effects on oxidative stress. In contrast, adjustment for IL-6 or PAI-1 did not substantially alter the association between BMI and AKI. Further, deconstruction of the obesity-AKI relationship into direct (i.e., independent of candidate pathways) and indirect (i.e., effect of BMI on AKI via each candidate pathway) effects indicated that F2-isoprostanes, but not IL-6 or PAI-1, partially mediate the relationship between obesity and AKI (P=0.001). In conclusion, obesity independently predicts AKI after cardiac surgery, and oxidative stress may partially mediate this association. PMID:22626819

  6. Identification of the Oxidative Stress Proteome in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, Rukhsana; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2011-01-01

    The redox proteomics technique normally combines two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and protein databases to analyze the cell proteome from different samples, thereby leading to the identification of specific targets of oxidative modification. Oxidative stress that occurs due to increased levels of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species can target most biomolecules, consequently leading to altered physiological function of the cells. Redox proteomics has identified oxidatively modified protein targets in different pathological conditions, consequently providing insight into the pathways involved in pathogenesis of these conditions. This approach also can be used to identify possible protective mechanisms to prevent or delay these disorders. PMID:21111808

  7. Airway oxidative stress in chronic cough

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanisms of chronic cough are unclear. Many reactive oxygen species affect airway sensory C-fibres which are capable to induce cough. Several chronic lung diseases are characterised by cough and oxidative stress. In asthma, an association between the cough severity and airway oxidative stress has been demonstrated. The present study was conducted to investigate whether airway oxidative stress is associated with chronic cough in subjects without chronic lung diseases. Methods Exhaled breath condensate samples were obtained in 43 non-smoking patients with chronic cough and 15 healthy subjects. Exclusion criteria included a doctor’s diagnosis of any lung disorders and any abnormality in lung x-ray. The concentration of 8-isoprostane was measured. In addition, the patients filled in Leicester Cough Questionnaire and underwent hypertonic saline cough provocation test, spirometry, ambulatory peak flow monitoring, nitric oxide measurement, and histamine airway challenge. In a subgroup of patients the measurements were repeated during 12 weeks’ treatment with inhaled budesonide, 800 ug/day. Results The 8-isoprostane concentrations were higher in the cough patients than in the healthy subjects (24.6 ± 1.2 pg/ml vs. 10.1 ± 1.7 pg/ml, p = 0.045). The 8-isoprostane concentration was associated with the Leicester Cough Questionnaire total score (p = 0.044) but not with the cough sensitivity to saline or other tests. Budesonide treatment did not affect the 8-isoprostane concentrations. Conclusions Chronic cough seems to be associated with airway oxidative stress in subjects with chronic cough but without chronic lung diseases. This finding may help to develop novel antitussive drugs. Trial registration The study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov database (KUH5801112), identifier NCT00859274. PMID:24294924

  8. Molecular and biochemical responses of Volvox carteri to oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingappa, U.; Rankin-Gee, E. K.; Lera, M.; Bebour, B.; Marcu, O.

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the intracellular response to environmental stresses is a key aspect to understanding the limits of habitability for life as we know it. A wide range of relevant stressors, from heat shock to radiation, result in the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are used physiologically as signaling molecules to cause changes in gene expression and metabolism. However, ROS, including superoxide (O2-) and peroxides, are also highly reactive molecules that cause oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA. Here we studied stress response in the multicellular, eukaryotic green alga Volvox carteri, after exposure to heat shock conditions. We show that the ROS response to heat stress is paralleled by changes in photosynthetic metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression, and fluctuations in the elemental composition of cells. Metabolism, as measured by pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry over two hours of heat stress, showed a linear decrease in the photosynthetic efficiency of Volvox. ROS quantification uncovered an increase in ROS in the culture medium, paralleled by a decrease in ROS within the Volvox colonies, suggesting an export mechanism is utilized to mitigate stress. Enzyme kinetics indicated an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity over the heat stress timecourse. Using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, we show that these changes coincide with cell-specific import/export and intracellular redistribution of transition elements and halides, suggesting that the cellular metallome is also engaged in mediating oxidative stress in Volvox.

  9. Iodinated contrast media cause direct tubular cell damage, leading to oxidative stress, low nitric oxide, and impairment of tubuloglomerular feedback

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi Zhao; Schmerbach, Kristin; Lu, Yuan; Perlewitz, Andrea; Nikitina, Tatiana; Cantow, Kathleen; Seeliger, Erdmann; Persson, Pontus B.; Liu, Ruisheng; Sendeski, Mauricio M.

    2014-01-01

    Iodinated contrast media (CM) have adverse effects that may result in contrast-induced acute kidney injury. Oxidative stress is believed to play a role in CM-induced kidney injury. We test the hypothesis that oxidative stress and reduced nitric oxide in tubules are consequences of CM-induced direct cell damage and that increased local oxidative stress may increase tubuloglomerular feedback. Rat thick ascending limbs (TAL) were isolated and perfused. Superoxide and nitric oxide were quantified using fluorescence techniques. Cell death rate was estimated using propidium iodide and trypan blue. The function of macula densa and tubuloglomerular feedback responsiveness were measured in isolated, perfused juxtaglomerular apparatuses (JGA) of rabbits. The expression of genes related to oxidative stress and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) were investigated in the renal medulla of rats that received CM. CM increased superoxide concentration and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability in TAL. Propidium iodide fluorescence and trypan blue uptake increased more in CM-perfused TAL than in controls, indicating increased rate of cell death. There were no marked acute changes in the expression of genes related to oxidative stress in medullary segments of Henle's loop. SOD activity did not differ between CM and control groups. The tubuloglomerular feedback in isolated JGA was increased by CM. Tubular cell damage and accompanying oxidative stress in our model are consequences of CM-induced direct cell damage, which also modifies the tubulovascular interaction at the macula densa, and may therefore contribute to disturbances of renal perfusion and filtration. PMID:24431205

  10. Oxidative-stress-induced epigenetic changes in chronic diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Feng, Biao; Ruiz, Michael Anthony; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2013-03-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development and progression of chronic diabetic complications. Diabetes causes mitochondrial superoxide overproduction in the endothelial cells of both large and small vessels. This increased superoxide production causes the activation of several signal pathways involved in the pathogenesis of chronic complications. In particular, endothelial cells are major targets of glucose-induced oxidative damage in the target organs. Oxidative stress activates cellular signaling pathways and transcription factors in endothelial cells including protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), forkhead box O (FOXO), and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). Oxidative stress also causes DNA damage and activates DNA nucleotide excision repair enzymes including the excision repair cross complimenting 1(ERCC1), ERCC4, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Augmented production of histone acetyltransferase p300, and alterations of histone deacetylases, including class III deacetylases sirtuins, are also involved in this process. Recent research has found that small noncoding RNAs, like microRNA, are a new kind of regulator associated with chronic diabetic complications. There are extensive and complicated interactions and among these molecules. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the role of oxidative stress in the development of diabetic complications in relation to epigenetic changes such as acetylation and microRNA alterations. PMID:23537434

  11. Proteomic analysis of seminal fluid from men exhibiting oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Seminal plasma serves as a natural reservoir of antioxidants. It helps to remove excessive formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and consequently, reduce oxidative stress. Proteomic profiling of seminal plasma proteins is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress and sperm dysfunction in infertile men. Methods This prospective study consisted of 52 subjects: 32 infertile men and 20 healthy donors. Once semen and oxidative stress parameters were assessed (ROS, antioxidant concentration and DNA damage), the subjects were categorized into ROS positive (ROS+) or ROS negative (ROS-). Seminal plasma from each group was pooled and subjected to proteomics analysis. In-solution digestion and protein identification with liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), followed by bioinformatics analyses was used to identify and characterize potential biomarker proteins. Results A total of 14 proteins were identified in this analysis with 7 of these common and unique proteins were identified in both the ROS+ and ROS- groups through MASCOT and SEQUEST analyses, respectively. Prolactin-induced protein was found to be more abundantly present in men with increased levels of ROS. Gene ontology annotations showed extracellular distribution of proteins with a major role in antioxidative activity and regulatory processes. Conclusions We have identified proteins that help protect against oxidative stress and are uniquely present in the seminal plasma of the ROS- men. Men exhibiting high levels of ROS in their seminal ejaculate are likely to exhibit proteins that are either downregulated or oxidatively modified, and these could potentially contribute to male infertility. PMID:24004880

  12. Tolerance of pentose utilising yeast to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Bioethanol fermentations follow traditional beverage fermentations where the yeast is exposed to adverse conditions such as oxidative stress. Lignocellulosic bioethanol fermentations involve the conversion of pentose and hexose sugars into ethanol. Environmental stress conditions such as osmotic stress and ethanol stress may affect the fermentation performance; however, oxidative stress as a consequence of metabolic output can also occur. However, the effect of oxidative stress on yeast with pentose utilising capabilities has yet to be investigated. Results Assaying for the effect of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress on Candida, Pichia and Scheffersomyces spp. has demonstrated that these yeast tolerate hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in a manner consistent with that demonstrated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pichia guillermondii appears to be more tolerant to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress when compared to Candida shehatae, Candida succiphila or Scheffersomyces stipitis. Conclusions Sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress increased in the presence of minimal media; however, addition of amino acids and nucleobases was observed to increase tolerance. In particular adenine increased tolerance and methionine reduced tolerance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. PMID:24636079

  13. Cellular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress in human exercise.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Malcolm J; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; McArdle, Anne

    2016-09-01

    A relative increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA has been recognised to occur in the circulation and tissues of exercising humans and animals since the late 1970s and throughout the ensuing 40 years a great deal of work has been undertaken to elucidate the potential source(s) of this exercise-induced "oxidative stress". Specific aspects of physical exercise (e.g. contractile activity, relative hypoxia, hyperaemia) may theoretically induce increased generation of reactive oxygen species in a number of potential tissues, but data strongly indicate that contractile activity of skeletal muscle predominates as the source of oxidants and contributes to local oxidation and that of extracellular biomaterials. Taken together with the relatively large mass of muscle compared with other tissues and cells it appears that muscle fibres are the major contributor to the relative increase in whole body "oxidative stress" during some forms of exercise. The sub-cellular sources of this increased oxidation have also been the subject of considerable research with early studies predominantly indicating that muscle mitochondria were the likely increased source of oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide, but assessments of the relative concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in skeletal muscle fibres at rest and during contractile activity do not support this possibility. In contrast, several recent studies have identified NADPH oxidase enzymes in skeletal muscle that appear to play a signalling role in physiological responses exercise and together with xanthine oxidase enzymes may contribute to the relative increase in whole body oxidation. A fuller understanding of the relative roles of these sources and the function(s) of the species generated appears increasingly important in attempts to harness the beneficial effects of exercise for maintenance of health in aging and a variety of chronic conditions. PMID:26912036

  14. Tyrphostins protect neuronal cells from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sagara, Yutaka; Ishige, Kumiko; Tsai, Cindy; Maher, Pamela

    2002-09-27

    Tyrphostins are a family of tyrosine kinase inhibitors originally synthesized as potential anticarcinogenic compounds. Because tyrphostins have chemical structures similar to those of the phenolic antioxidants, we decided to test the protective efficacy of tyrphostins against oxidative stress-induced nerve cell death (oxytosis). Many commercially available tyrphostins, at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 200 microm, protect both HT-22 hippocampal cells and rat primary neurons from oxytosis brought about by treatment with glutamate, as well as by treatment with homocysteic acid and buthionine sulfoximine. The tyrphostins protect nerve cells by three distinct mechanisms. Some tyrphostins, such as A25, act as antioxidants and eliminate the reactive oxygen species that accumulate as a result of glutamate treatment. These tyrphostins also protect cells from hydrogen peroxide and act as antioxidants in an in vitro assay. In contrast, tyrphostins A9 and AG126 act as mitochondrial uncouplers, collapsing the mitochondrial membrane potential and thereby reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria during glutamate toxicity. Finally, the third group of tyrphostins does not appear to be effective as antioxidants but rather protects cells by increasing the basal level of cellular glutathione. Therefore, the effects of tyrphostins on cells are not limited to their ability to inhibit tyrosine kinases. PMID:12121989

  15. Effect of Oxidative Stress on Male Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Gurpriya; Ong, Chloe; du Plessis, Stefan S

    2014-01-01

    Infertility affects approximately 15% of couples trying to conceive, and a male factor contributes to roughly half of these cases. Oxidative stress (OS) has been identified as one of the many mediators of male infertility by causing sperm dysfunction. OS is a state related to increased cellular damage triggered by oxygen and oxygen-derived free radicals known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). During this process, augmented production of ROS overwhelms the body's antioxidant defenses. While small amounts of ROS are required for normal sperm functioning, disproportionate levels can negatively impact the quality of spermatozoa and impair their overall fertilizing capacity. OS has been identified as an area of great attention because ROS and their metabolites can attack DNA, lipids, and proteins; alter enzymatic systems; produce irreparable alterations; cause cell death; and ultimately, lead to a decline in the semen parameters associated with male infertility. This review highlights the mechanisms of ROS production, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system, and recent advances in diagnostic methods; it also explores the benefits of using antioxidants in a clinical setting. PMID:24872947

  16. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress, and diabetic mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Ho; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance (Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, 2007). DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR; ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21), a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes, and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis) and myocardium (heart failure) leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in Heather and Clarke, 2011). In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications. PMID:22582044

  17. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism. PMID:24384982

  18. Oxidative stress and the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Jenner, P; Olanow, C W

    1996-12-01

    Current concepts of the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) center on the formation of reactive oxygen species and the onset of oxidative stress leading to oxidative damage to substantia nigra pars compacta. Extensive postmortem studies have provided evidence to support the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of PD; in particular, these include alterations in brain iron content, impaired mitochondrial function, alterations in the antioxidant protective systems (most notably superoxide dismutase [SOD] and reduced glutathione [GSH]), and evidence of oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA. Iron can induce oxidative stress, and intranigral injections have been shown to induce a model of progressive parkinsonism. A loss of GSH is associated with incidental Lewy body disease and may represent the earliest biochemical marker of nigral cell loss. GSH depletion alone may not result in damage to nigral neurons but may increase susceptibility to subsequent toxic or free radical exposure. The nature of the free radical species responsible for cell death in PD remains unknown, but there is evidence of involvement of hydroxyl radical (OH.), peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide. Indeed, OH. and peroxynitrite formation may be critically dependent on nitric oxide formation. Central to many of the processes involved in oxidative stress and oxidative damage in PD are the actions of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B). MAO-B is essential for the activation of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion, for a component of the enzymatic conversion of dopamine to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and for the activation of other potential toxins such as isoquinolines and beta-carbolines. Thus, the inhibition of MAO-B by d