Science.gov

Sample records for incremental dynamic analysis

  1. Incremental dynamical downscaling for probabilistic analysis based on multiple GCM projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakazuki, Y.; Rasmussen, R.

    2015-12-01

    A dynamical downscaling method for probabilistic regional-scale climate change projections was developed to cover the inherent uncertainty associated with multiple general circulation model (GCM) climate simulations. The climatological increments estimated by GCM results were statistically analyzed using the singular vector decomposition. Both positive and negative perturbations from the ensemble mean with the magnitudes of their standard deviations were extracted and added to the ensemble mean of the climatological increments. The analyzed multiple modal increments were utilized to create multiple modal lateral boundary conditions for the future climate regional climate model (RCM) simulations by adding them to reanalysis data. The incremental handling of GCM simulations realized approximated probabilistic climate change projections with the smaller number of RCM simulations. For the probabilistic analysis, three values of a climatological variable simulated by RCMs for a mode were analyzed under an assumption of linear response to the multiple modal perturbations.

  2. Investigation of the nonlinear seismic behavior of knee braced frames using the incremental dynamic analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheidaii, Mohammad Reza; TahamouliRoudsari, Mehrzad; Gordini, Mehrdad

    2016-06-01

    In knee braced frames, the braces are attached to the knee element rather than the intersection of beams and columns. This bracing system is widely used and preferred over the other commonly used systems for reasons such as having lateral stiffness while having adequate ductility, damage concentration on the second degree convenience of repairing and replacing of these elements after Earthquake. The lateral stiffness of this system is supplied by the bracing member and the ductility of the frame attached to the knee length is supplied through the bending or shear yield of the knee member. In this paper, the nonlinear seismic behavior of knee braced frame systems has been investigated using incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) and the effects of the number of stories in a building, length and the moment of inertia of the knee member on the seismic behavior, elastic stiffness, ductility and the probability of failure of these systems has been determined. In the incremental dynamic analysis, after plotting the IDA diagrams of the accelerograms, the collapse diagrams in the limit states are determined. These diagrams yield that for a constant knee length with reduced moment of inertia, the probability of collapse in limit states heightens and also for a constant knee moment of inertia with increasing length, the probability of collapse in limit states increases.

  3. Investigation of the nonlinear seismic behavior of knee braced frames using the incremental dynamic analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheidaii, Mohammad Reza; TahamouliRoudsari, Mehrzad; Gordini, Mehrdad

    2016-03-01

    In knee braced frames, the braces are attached to the knee element rather than the intersection of beams and columns. This bracing system is widely used and preferred over the other commonly used systems for reasons such as having lateral stiffness while having adequate ductility, damage concentration on the second degree convenience of repairing and replacing of these elements after Earthquake. The lateral stiffness of this system is supplied by the bracing member and the ductility of the frame attached to the knee length is supplied through the bending or shear yield of the knee member. In this paper, the nonlinear seismic behavior of knee braced frame systems has been investigated using incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) and the effects of the number of stories in a building, length and the moment of inertia of the knee member on the seismic behavior, elastic stiffness, ductility and the probability of failure of these systems has been determined. In the incremental dynamic analysis, after plotting the IDA diagrams of the accelerograms, the collapse diagrams in the limit states are determined. These diagrams yield that for a constant knee length with reduced moment of inertia, the probability of collapse in limit states heightens and also for a constant knee moment of inertia with increasing length, the probability of collapse in limit states increases.

  4. Incremental dynamic analysis of concrete gravity dams including base and lift joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alembagheri, Mohammad; Ghaemian, Mohsen

    2013-03-01

    The growth in computer processing power has made it possible to use time-consuming analysis methods such as incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) with higher accuracy in less time. In an IDA study, a series of earthquake records are applied to a structure at successively increasing intensity levels, which causes the structure to shift from the elastic state into the inelastic state and finally into collapse. In this way, the limit-states and capacity of a structure can be determined. In the present research, the IDA of a concrete gravity dam considering a nonlinear concrete behavior, and sliding planes within the dam body and at the dam-foundation interface, is performed. The influence of the friction angle and lift joint slope on the response parameters are investigated and the various limit-states of the dam are recognized. It is observed that by introducing a lift joint, the tensile damage can be avoided for the dam structure. The lift joint sliding is essentially independent of the base joint friction angle and the upper ligament over the inclined lift joint slides into the upstream direction in strong earthquakes.

  5. Incremental Discriminant Analysis in Tensor Space

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Liu; Weidong, Zhao; Tao, Yan; Qiang, Pu; Xiaodan, Du

    2015-01-01

    To study incremental machine learning in tensor space, this paper proposes incremental tensor discriminant analysis. The algorithm employs tensor representation to carry on discriminant analysis and combine incremental learning to alleviate the computational cost. This paper proves that the algorithm can be unified into the graph framework theoretically and analyzes the time and space complexity in detail. The experiments on facial image detection have shown that the algorithm not only achieves sound performance compared with other algorithms, but also reduces the computational issues apparently. PMID:26339229

  6. Incremental communication for multilayer neural networks: error analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, A A; Bhavsar, V C

    1998-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) involve a large amount of internode communications. To reduce the communication cost as well as the time of learning process in ANNs, we earlier proposed (1995) an incremental internode communication method. In the incremental communication method, instead of communicating the full magnitude of the output value of a node, only the increment or decrement to its previous value is sent to a communication link. In this paper, the effects of the limited precision incremental communication method on the convergence behavior and performance of multilayer neural networks are investigated. The nonlinear aspects of representing the incremental values with reduced (limited) precision for the commonly used error backpropagation training algorithm are analyzed. It is shown that the nonlinear effect of small perturbations in the input(s)/output of a node does not cause instability. The analysis is supported by simulation studies of two problems. The simulation results demonstrate that the limited precision errors are bounded and do not seriously affect the convergence of multilayer neural networks. PMID:18252431

  7. Design and Performance Analysis of Incremental Networked Predictive Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Guo-Ping; Zhou, Donghua

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the design and performance analysis of networked control systems with network-induced delay, packet disorder, and packet dropout. Based on the incremental form of the plant input-output model and an incremental error feedback control strategy, an incremental networked predictive control (INPC) scheme is proposed to actively compensate for the round-trip time delay resulting from the above communication constraints. The output tracking performance and closed-loop stability of the resulting INPC system are considered for two cases: 1) plant-model match case and 2) plant-model mismatch case. For the former case, the INPC system can achieve the same output tracking performance and closed-loop stability as those of the corresponding local control system. For the latter case, a sufficient condition for the stability of the closed-loop INPC system is derived using the switched system theory. Furthermore, for both cases, the INPC system can achieve a zero steady-state output tracking error for step commands. Finally, both numerical simulations and practical experiments on an Internet-based servo motor system illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:26186798

  8. Kinetics and kinematics analysis of incremental cycling to exhaustion.

    PubMed

    Bini, Rodrigo R; Diefenthaeler, Fernando

    2010-11-01

    Technique changes in cyclists are not well described during exhaustive exercise. Therefore the aim of the present study was to analyze pedaling technique during an incremental cycling test to exhaustion. Eleven cyclists performed an incremental cycling test to exhaustion. Pedal force and joint kinematics were acquired during the last three stages of the test (75%, 90% and 100% of the maximal power output). Inverse dynamics was conducted to calculate the net joint moments at the hip, knee and ankle joints. Knee joint had an increased contribution to the total net joint moments with the increase of workload (5-8% increase, p < 0.01). Total average absolute joint moment and knee joint moment increased during the test (25% and 39%, for p < 0.01, respectively). Increases in plantar flexor moment (32%, p < 0.01), knee (54%, p < 0.01) and hip flexor moments (42%, p = 0.02) were found. Higher dorsiflexion (2%, for p = 0.03) and increased range of motion (19%, for p = 0.02) were observed for the ankle joint. The hip joint had an increased flexion angle (2%, for p < 0.01) and a reduced range of motion (3%, for p = 0.04) with the increase of workload. Differences in joint kinetics and kinematics indicate that pedaling technique was affected by the combined fatigue and workload effects. PMID:21309297

  9. Optimal Curiosity-Driven Modular Incremental Slow Feature Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kompella, Varun Raj; Luciw, Matthew; Stollenga, Marijn Frederik; Schmidhuber, Juergen

    2016-08-01

    Consider a self-motivated artificial agent who is exploring a complex environment. Part of the complexity is due to the raw high-dimensional sensory input streams, which the agent needs to make sense of. Such inputs can be compactly encoded through a variety of means; one of these is slow feature analysis (SFA). Slow features encode spatiotemporal regularities, which are information-rich explanatory factors (latent variables) underlying the high-dimensional input streams. In our previous work, we have shown how slow features can be learned incrementally, while the agent explores its world, and modularly, such that different sets of features are learned for different parts of the environment (since a single set of regularities does not explain everything). In what order should the agent explore the different parts of the environment? Following Schmidhuber's theory of artificial curiosity, the agent should always concentrate on the area where it can learn the easiest-to-learn set of features that it has not already learned. We formalize this learning problem and theoretically show that, using our model, called curiosity-driven modular incremental slow feature analysis, the agent on average will learn slow feature representations in order of increasing learning difficulty, under certain mild conditions. We provide experimental results to support the theoretical analysis. PMID:27348735

  10. Targeted revision: A learning-based approach for incremental community detection in dynamic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jiaxing; Liu, Lianchen; Li, Xin; Xie, Feng; Wu, Cheng

    2016-02-01

    Community detection is a fundamental task in network analysis. Applications on massive dynamic networks require more efficient solutions and lead to incremental community detection, which revises the community assignments of new or changed vertices during network updates. In this paper, we propose to use machine learning classifiers to predict the vertices that need to be inspected for community assignment revision. This learning-based targeted revision (LBTR) approach aims to improve community detection efficiency by filtering out the unchanged vertices from unnecessary processing. In this paper, we design features that can be used for efficient target classification and analyze the time complexity of our framework. We conduct experiments on two real-world datasets, which show our LBTR approach significantly reduces the computational time while keeping a high community detection quality. Furthermore, as compared with the benchmarks, we find our approach's performance is stable on both growing networks and networks with vertex/edge removals. Experiments suggest that one should increase the target classification precision while keeping recall at a reasonable level when implementing our proposed approach. The study provides a unique perspective in incremental community detection.

  11. A dynamic approach for reconstructing missing longitudinal data using the linear increments model.

    PubMed

    Aalen, Odd O; Gunnes, Nina

    2010-07-01

    Missing observations are commonplace in longitudinal data. We discuss how to model and analyze such data in a dynamic framework, that is, taking into consideration the time structure of the process and the influence of the past on the present and future responses. An autoregressive model is used as a special case of the linear increments model defined by Farewell (2006. Linear models for censored data, [PhD Thesis]. Lancaster University) and Diggle and others (2007. Analysis of longitudinal data with drop-out: objectives, assumptions and a proposal. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society, Series C (Applied Statistics, 56, 499-550). We wish to reconstruct responses for missing data and discuss the required assumptions needed for both monotone and nonmonotone missingness. The computational procedures suggested are very simple and easily applicable. They can also be used to estimate causal effects in the presence of time-dependent confounding. There are also connections to methods from survival analysis: The Aalen-Johansen estimator for the transition matrix of a Markov chain turns out to be a special case. Analysis of quality of life data from a cancer clinical trial is analyzed and presented. Some simulations are given in the supplementary material available at Biostatistics online. PMID:20388914

  12. Political dynamics promoting the incremental regulation of secondhand smoke: a case study of New South Wales, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Bryan-Jones, Katherine; Chapman, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Background The history of governmental responses to the accumulation of scientific evidence about the harms of secondhand smoke (SHS) presents an intriguing case study of incremental public health policy development. Australia has long been considered a world-leader in progressive tobacco control policies, but in the last decade has fallen behind other jurisdictions in introducing SHS legislation that protects all workers. Bars, clubs and pubs remain the only public indoor spaces where smoking is legally permitted, despite SHS exposure in the hospitality industry being higher and affecting more people than in any other setting after domestic exposure. This paper examines the political dynamics that have shaped this incremental approach to SHS. Methods In-depth interviews with 21 key stakeholders in the state of New South Wales (NSW), including politicians, their advisors, health officials and tobacco control advocates, were conducted and subjected to thematic content analysis. Interviewees' comments provided insights into the dynamics surrounding the debates and outcomes of SHS legislative attempts and the current political environment, and about how to progress SHS legislation. Results SHS restrictions have been delayed by several broad factors: the influence of industry groups successfully opposing regulation; issue wear-out; and political perceptions that there is not a salient constituency demanding that smoking be banned in bars and clubs. Interviewees also provided suggestions of strategies that advocates might utilise to best overcome the current political inertia of incremental compromises and achieve timely comprehensive smoking bans. Conclusion Advocates concerned to shorten the duration of incremental endgames must continue to insist that governments address SHS fundamentally as a health issue rather than making political concessions to industry groups, and should broaden and amplify community voices calling on governments to finish the job. Publicity to

  13. Dynamically Incremental K-means++ Clustering Algorithm Based on Fuzzy Rough Set Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wang, Rujing; Jia, Xiufang; Jiang, Qing

    Being classic K-means++ clustering algorithm only for static data, dynamically incremental K-means++ clustering algorithm (DK-Means++) is presented based on fuzzy rough set theory in this paper. Firstly, in DK-Means++ clustering algorithm, the formula of similar degree is improved by weights computed by using of the important degree of attributes which are reduced on the basis of rough fuzzy set theory. Secondly, new data only need match granular which was clustered by K-means++ algorithm or seldom new data is clustered by classic K-means++ algorithm in global data. In this way, that all data is re-clustered each time in dynamic data set is avoided, so the efficiency of clustering is improved. Throughout our experiments showing, DK-Means++ algorithm can objectively and efficiently deal with clustering problem of dynamically incremental data.

  14. Use of incremental analysis updates in 4D-Var data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Banglin; Tallapragada, Vijay; Weng, Fuzhong; Sippel, Jason; Ma, Zaizhong

    2015-12-01

    The four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) data assimilation systems used in most operational and research centers use initial condition increments as control variables and adjust initial increments to find optimal analysis solutions. This approach may sometimes create discontinuities in analysis fields and produce undesirable spin ups and spin downs. This study explores using incremental analysis updates (IAU) in 4D-Var to reduce the analysis discontinuities. IAU-based 4D-Var has almost the same mathematical formula as conventional 4D-Var if the initial condition increments are replaced with time-integrated increments as control variables. The IAU technique was implemented in the NASA/GSFC 4D-Var prototype and compared against a control run without IAU. The results showed that the initial precipitation spikes were removed and that other discontinuities were also reduced, especially for the analysis of surface temperature.

  15. Error Analysis In Explicit Finite Element Analysis Of Incremental Sheet Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Bambach, M.; Hirt, G.

    2007-05-17

    Asymmetric incremental sheet forming (AISF) is a relatively new manufacturing process for the production of low volumes of sheet metal parts. Forming is accomplished by the CNC controlled movements of a simple ball-headed tool that follows a 3D trajectory to gradually shape a sheet metal blank. The local plastic deformation under the tool leads to a number of challenges for the Finite Element Modeling. Previous work indicates that implicit finite element methods are at present not efficient enough to allow for the simulation of AISF for industrially relevant parts, mostly due to the fact that the moving contact requires a very small time step. Explicit Finite Element methods can be speeded up by means of mass or load scaling to enable the simulation of large scale sheet metal forming problems, even for AISF. However, it is well known that the methods used to speed up the FE calculations can entail poor results when dynamic effects start to dominate the solution. Typically, the ratio of kinetic to internal energy is used as an assessment of the influence of dynamical effects. It has already been shown in the past that this global criterion can easily be violated locally for a patch of elements of the finite element mesh. This is particularly important for AISF with its highly localised loading and complex tool kinematics. The present paper details an investigation of dynamical effects in explicit Finite Element analysis of AISF. The interplay of mass or time scaling scheme and the smoothness of the tool trajectory is analysed with respect to the resulting errors. Models for tool path generation will be presented allowing for a generation of tool trajectories with predefined maximum speed and acceleration. Based on this, a strategy for error control is proposed which helps reduce the time for setting up reliable explicit finite element models for AISF.

  16. Error Analysis In Explicit Finite Element Analysis Of Incremental Sheet Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambach, M.; Hirt, G.

    2007-05-01

    Asymmetric incremental sheet forming (AISF) is a relatively new manufacturing process for the production of low volumes of sheet metal parts. Forming is accomplished by the CNC controlled movements of a simple ball-headed tool that follows a 3D trajectory to gradually shape a sheet metal blank. The local plastic deformation under the tool leads to a number of challenges for the Finite Element Modeling. Previous work indicates that implicit finite element methods are at present not efficient enough to allow for the simulation of AISF for industrially relevant parts, mostly due to the fact that the moving contact requires a very small time step. Explicit Finite Element methods can be speeded up by means of mass or load scaling to enable the simulation of large scale sheet metal forming problems, even for AISF. However, it is well known that the methods used to speed up the FE calculations can entail poor results when dynamic effects start to dominate the solution. Typically, the ratio of kinetic to internal energy is used as an assessment of the influence of dynamical effects. It has already been shown in the past that this global criterion can easily be violated locally for a patch of elements of the finite element mesh. This is particularly important for AISF with its highly localised loading and complex tool kinematics. The present paper details an investigation of dynamical effects in explicit Finite Element analysis of AISF. The interplay of mass or time scaling scheme and the smoothness of the tool trajectory is analysed with respect to the resulting errors. Models for tool path generation will be presented allowing for a generation of tool trajectories with predefined maximum speed and acceleration. Based on this, a strategy for error control is proposed which helps reduce the time for setting up reliable explicit finite element models for AISF.

  17. Impulse processing: A dynamical systems model of incremental eye movements in the visual world paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kukona, Anuenue; Tabor, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    The visual world paradigm presents listeners with a challenging problem: they must integrate two disparate signals, the spoken language and the visual context, in support of action (e.g., complex movements of the eyes across a scene). We present Impulse Processing, a dynamical systems approach to incremental eye movements in the visual world that suggests a framework for integrating language, vision, and action generally. Our approach assumes that impulses driven by the language and the visual context impinge minutely on a dynamical landscape of attractors corresponding to the potential eye-movement behaviors of the system. We test three unique predictions of our approach in an empirical study in the visual world paradigm, and describe an implementation in an artificial neural network. We discuss the Impulse Processing framework in relation to other models of the visual world paradigm. PMID:21609355

  18. Temperature Humidity and Sea Level Pressure Increments Induced by 1DVAR Analysis of GPS Refractivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; Kursinski, Emil Robert; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) transmitted signals are affected by the atmosphere. Using the radio occultation technique, where a receiver is placed on a low-Earth-orbiting platform. it is possible to perform soundings. by measuring the bending angles of the rays. The information can be converted into atmospheric refractivity. We have developed a one dimensional variational (1DVAR) analysis that uses GPS/MET 1995 refractivity and 6-hour FVDAS (Finite Volume Data Assimilation System) forecasts as background information to constrain the retrievals. The analysis increments are defined as 1DVAR minus background temperature, humidity and sea level pressure. Before assimilating the 1DVAR profiles into the FVDAS. the increments need to be understood. First, some bias could be induced in the retrievals when confronted with actual biased data: second. bias in the back-round could create undesired bias in the retrievals. Anv bias in the analyses will ultimately change the climatology of the model the retrievals will be assimilated into. We relate the increments to the reduction of the difference between observed minus computed refractivity profiles. We also point out the difference in the mean increments using backgrounds which have assimilated either NESDIS TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) operational retrievals or Data Assimilation Office (DAO) TOVS interactive retrievals. The climatology of the model in terms of refractivity is significantly different and this impacts the GPS 1DVAR increments. This testifies that changing the basic load of assimilated data has an influence on the impact the GPS data may have in a DAS.

  19. Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Screening Strategies in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin Yu; Finkelstein, Eric A; Ng, Mor Jack; Yap, Fabian; Yeo, George S H; Rajadurai, Victor Samuel; Chong, Yap Seng; Gluckman, Peter D; Saw, Seang Mei; Kwek, Kenneth Y C; Tan, Kok Hian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis from the payer's perspective in Singapore of 3 gestational diabetes mellitus screening strategies: universal, targeted, or no screening. A decision tree model assessed the primary outcome: incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Probabilities, costs, and utilities were derived from the literature, the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort study, and the KK Women's and Children's Hospital's database. Relative to targeted screening using risk factors, universal screening generates an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $USD10,630/QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses show that disease prevalence rates and intervention effectiveness of glycemic management have the biggest impacts on the ICERs. Based on the model and best available data, universal screening is a cost-effective approach for reducing the complications of gestational diabetes mellitus in Singapore as compared with the targeted screening approach or no screening. PMID:26512030

  20. Dynamic Rotor Deformation and Vibration Monitoring Using a Non-Incremental Laser Doppler Distance Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfister, Thorsten; Guenther, Philipp; Dreier, Florian; Czarske, Juergen

    2010-05-28

    Monitoring rotor deformations and vibrations dynamically is an important task for improving the safety and the lifetime as well as the energy efficiency of motors and turbo machines. However, due to the high rotor speed encountered in particular at turbo machines, this requires concurrently a high measurement rate and high accuracy, which can not be fulfilled by most commercially available sensors. To solve this problem, we developed a non-incremental laser Doppler distance sensor (LDDS), which is able to measure simultaneously the in-plane velocity and the out-of-plane position of moving rough solid objects with micrometer precision. In addition, this sensor concurrently offers a high temporal resolution in the microsecond range, because its position uncertainty is in principle independent of the object velocity in contrast to conventional distance sensors, which is a unique feature of the LDDS. Consequently, this novel sensor enables precise and dynamic in-process deformation and vibration measurements on rotating objects, such as turbo machine rotors, even at very high speed. In order to evidence the capability of the LDDS, measurements of rotor deformations (radial expansion), vibrations and wobbling motions are presented at up to 50,000 rpm rotor speed.

  1. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, Fort Polk, Louisiana. Final executive summary, increment `f`

    SciTech Connect

    1988-06-01

    Executive Order 12003, dated 19 July 1977, initiated the U.S. Army`s energy conservation effort. Specifically, the Executive Order led to the development of the Army Facilities Energy Plan which directs Army Staff and Major Army Commands to develop detailed implementation plans for energy conservation. As a result of these directives, the Fort Worth District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers contracted for an Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The EEAP included Increments `A`, `B`, `E`, and `G`. To accomplish the intent of Increment `P`, namely, providing low cost/no cost energy savings recommendations in the form of specific, practical instructions for use by the Facility Engineer, the following general steps were taken: (1) Consider treasures identified in Detailed Scope of Work. (2) identify other potential Low Cost/No Cost energy Conservation Measures (ECM) through discussions with Fort Polk personnel and field surveys by Graham Associates engineers. (3) Review Increments `A`, `B`, and `G` for ECM`s within the Facility Engineer`s funding authority; $200,000 for alteration projects and $1,000,000 for maintenance and repair type work. (4) Evaluate ECM`s using relevant data for other Increments of the ESAP, and develop new data where appropriate.

  2. Regional Differences of Metabolic Response During Dynamic Incremental Exercise by (31)P-CSI.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yasuhisa; Kime, Ryotaro; Hongo, Yoshinori; Ohno, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Ayumi; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the differences in muscle metabolic response of the quadriceps during incremental dynamic knee exercise using regional (31)Phosphorus Chemical Shift Imaging ((31)P-CSI). Sixteen healthy men participated in this study (age 28 ± 5 years, height 171.4 ± 3.9 cm, weight 67.1 ± 9.8 kg). The experiments were carried out with a 1.5-T superconducting magnet with a 5-in. diameter circular surface coil. The subjects performed isometric unilateral knee extension exercise to detect their maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) in prone position. Then they performed dynamic unilateral knee extension exercise in the magnet at 10, 20, 30 and 40 % of their MVC with the transmit-receive coil placed under the right quadriceps. The subjects pulled down a rope with the adjusted weight attached to the ankle at a frequency of 0.5 Hz for 380 s. Intracellular pH (pHi) was calculated from the median chemical shift of the inorganic phosphate (Pi) peak relative to phosphocreatine (PCr). The quadriceps were divided into three regions, (1) medial, (2) anterior, (3) lateral, and in comparison, there was no significant difference in Pi/PCr nor in pHi between regions, except Pi/PCr of the medial region was significantly higher than the anterior region at maximum intensity (p < 0.05). These results suggest that regional muscle metabolic response is similar in the quadriceps except at maximum intensity. PMID:27526153

  3. On the use of two hardening rules of plasticity in incremental and pseudo force analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunsaker, B., Jr.; Haisler, W. E.; Stricklin, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The tangent stiffness and pseudo force forms of the equations of motion are first derived within the context of a total Lagrangian formulation. After a brief discussion of available incremental theory plasticity models, the small strain formulations and computational procedures of the mechanical sublayer model and combined kinematic-isotropic hardening as used in the general purpose structural analysis program AGGIE I are presented. Several sample problems are then presented along with recommended guidelines for use of the two plasticity models.

  4. Incremental development and prototyping in current laboratory software development projects: Preliminary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griesel, Martha Ann

    1988-01-01

    Several Laboratory software development projects that followed nonstandard development processes, which were hybrids of incremental development and prototyping, are being studied. Factors in the project environment leading to the decision to use a nonstandard development process and affecting its success are analyzed. A simple characterization of project environment based on this analysis is proposed, together with software development approaches which have been found effective for each category. These approaches include both documentation and review requirements.

  5. Comparing dynamic hyperinflation and associated dyspnea induced by metronome-paced tachypnea versus incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Calligaro, Gregory L; Raine, Richard I; Bateman, Mary E; Bateman, Eric D; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) during exercise is associated with both dyspnea and exercise limitation in COPD. Metronome-paced tachypnoea (MPT) is a simple alternative for studying DH. We compared MPT with exercise testing (XT) as methods of provoking DH, and assessed their relationship with dyspnea. We studied 24 patients with moderate COPD (FEV1 59 ± 9% predicted) after inhalation of ipratropium/salbutamol combination or placebo in a double-blind, crossover design. Inspiratory capacity (IC) was measured at baseline and after 30 seconds of MPT with breathing frequencies (fR) of 20, 30 and 40 breaths/min and metronome-defined I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:2, in random sequence, followed by incremental cycle ergometry with interval determinations of IC. DH was defined as a decline in IC from baseline (∆IC) for both methods. Dyspnea was assessed using a Borg CR-10 scale. ∆IC during MPT was greater with higher fR and I:E ratio of 1:1 versus 1:2, and less when patients were treated with bronchodilator rather than placebo (P = 0.032). DH occurred during 19 (40%) XTs, and during 35 (73%) tests using MPT. Eleven of 18 (61%) non-congruent XTs (where DH occurred on MPT but not XT) terminated before fR of 40 breaths/min was reached. Although greater during XT, the intensity of dyspnea bore no relationship to DH during either MPT and XT. MPT at 40 breaths/min and I:E of 1:1 elicits the greatest ∆IC, and is a more sensitive method for demonstrating DH. The relationship between DH and dyspnea is complex and not determined by DH alone. PMID:24152211

  6. Multiscale Analysis of Surface Topography from Single Point Incremental Forming using an Acetal Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, M.; Powers, B. M.; Loiselle, J.

    2014-03-01

    Single point incremental forming (SPIF) is a sheet metal manufacturing process that forms a part by incrementally applying point loads to the material to achieve the desired deformations and final part geometry. This paper investigates the differences in surface topography between a carbide tool and an acetal-tipped tool. Area-scale analysis is performed on the confocal areal surface measurements per ASME B46. The objective of this paper is to determine at which scales surfaces formed by two different tool materials can be differentiated. It is found that the surfaces in contact with the acetal forming tool have greater relative areas at all scales greater than 5 × 104 μm2 than the surfaces in contact with the carbide tools. The surfaces not in contact with the tools during forming, also referred to as the free surface, are unaffected by the tool material.

  7. Power plant performance monitoring and improvement. Volume 2. Incremental heat rate sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crim, H.G.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes the interim findings of the Incremental Heat Rate Sensitivity Analysis task of EPRI Project RP1681-1/2153-1, Power Plant Performance Instrumentation System. Objectives of this task were to develop the models and methods for evaluation of unit performance uncertainty, and to determine the effects of modeling, input/output, and fuel cost uncertainty on production cost and dispatch. Analyses and simulations were made to determine the sensitivity of cost and economic dispatch to modeling errors and measurement errors within realistic system constraints. The results obtained are sufficient to provide the measures necessary to evaluate on-line updates of unit performance to develop incremental heat rate information for economic dispatch.

  8. An application of the J-integral to an incremental analysis of blunting crack behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Merkle, J.G. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an analytical approach to estimating the elastic-plastic stresses and strains near the tip of a blunting crack with a finite root radius. Rice's original derivation of the path independent J-integral considered the possibility of a finite crack tip root radius. For this problem Creager's elastic analysis gives the relation between the stress intensity factor K{sub I} and the near tip stresses. It can be shown that the relation K{sub I}{sup 2} = E{prime}J holds when the root radius is finite. Recognizing that elastic-plastic behavior is incrementally linear then allows a derivation to be performed for a bielastic specimen having a crack tip region of reduced modulus, and the result differentiated to estimate elastic-plastic behavior. The result is the incremental form of Neuber's equation. This result does not require the assumption of any particular stress-strain relation. However by assuming a pure power law stress-strain relation and using Ilyushin's principle, the ordinary deformation theory form of Neuber's equation, K{sub {sigma}} K{sub {var epsilon}} = K{sub t}{sup 2}, is obtained. Applications of the incremental form of Neuber's equation have already been made to fatigue and fracture analysis. This paper helps to provide a theoretical basis for these methods previously considered semiempirical. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Inequality of Size and Size Increment in Pinus banksiana in Relation to Stand Dynamics and Annual Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Metsaranta, Juha M.; Lieffers, Victor J.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Changes in size inequality in tree populations are often attributed to changes in the mode of competition over time. The mode of competition may also fluctuate annually in response to variation in growing conditions. Factors causing growth rate to vary can also influence competition processes, and thus influence how size hierarchies develop. Methods Detailed data obtained by tree-ring reconstruction were used to study annual changes in size and size increment inequality in several even-aged, fire-origin jack pine (Pinus banksiana) stands in the boreal shield and boreal plains ecozones in Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada, by using the Gini and Lorenz asymmetry coefficients. Key Results The inequality of size was related to variables reflecting long-term stand dynamics (e.g. stand density, mean tree size and average competition, as quantified using a distance-weighted absolute size index). The inequality of size increment was greater and more variable than the inequality of size. Inequality of size increment was significantly related to annual growth rate at the stand level, and was higher when growth rate was low. Inequality of size increment was usually due primarily to large numbers of trees with low growth rates, except during years with low growth rate when it was often due to small numbers of trees with high growth rates. The amount of competition to which individual trees were subject was not strongly related to the inequality of size increment. Conclusions Differences in growth rate among trees during years of poor growth may form the basis for development of size hierarchies on which asymmetric competition can act. A complete understanding of the dynamics of these forests requires further evaluation of the way in which factors that influence variation in annual growth rate also affect the mode of competition and the development of size hierarchies. PMID:18089583

  10. iPGA: incremental principal geodesic analysis with applications to movement disorder classification.

    PubMed

    Salehian, Hesamoddin; Vaillancourt, David; Vemuri, Baba C

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear version of the well known PCA called the Prinicipal Geodesic Analysis (PGA) was introduced in the past decade for statistical analysis of shapes as well as diffusion tensors. PGA of diffusion tensor fields or any other manifold-valued fields can be a computationally demanding task due to the dimensionality of the problem and thus establishing motivation for an incremental PGA (iPGA) algorithm. In this paper, we present a novel iPGA algorithm that incrementally updates the current Karcher mean and the principal sub-manifolds with any newly introduced data into the pool without having to recompute the PGA from scratch. We demonstrate substantial computational and memory savings of iPGA over the batch mode PGA for diffusion tensor fields via synthetic and real data examples. Further, we use the iPGA derived representation in an NN classifier to automatically discriminate between controls, Parkinson's Disease and Essential Tremor patients, given their HARDI brain scans. PMID:25485449

  11. Incremental Principal Component Analysis Based Outlier Detection Methods for Spatiotemporal Data Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, A.; Sharker, M. H.; Karimi, H. A.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we address outliers in spatiotemporal data streams obtained from sensors placed across geographically distributed locations. Outliers may appear in such sensor data due to various reasons such as instrumental error and environmental change. Real-time detection of these outliers is essential to prevent propagation of errors in subsequent analyses and results. Incremental Principal Component Analysis (IPCA) is one possible approach for detecting outliers in such type of spatiotemporal data streams. IPCA has been widely used in many real-time applications such as credit card fraud detection, pattern recognition, and image analysis. However, the suitability of applying IPCA for outlier detection in spatiotemporal data streams is unknown and needs to be investigated. To fill this research gap, this paper contributes by presenting two new IPCA-based outlier detection methods and performing a comparative analysis with the existing IPCA-based outlier detection methods to assess their suitability for spatiotemporal sensor data streams.

  12. Real-Time Analysis of Temperature Changes in Composite Increments and Pulp Chamber during Photopolymerization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ryan Jin-Young; Lee, In-Bog; Yoo, Jin-Young; Park, Su-Jung; Kim, Sin-Young; Yi, Young-Ah; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the temperature change at various sites within the composite and on the pulpal side of dentin during polymerization of two composite increments. Materials and Methods. Class I cavities prepared in third molars were restored in two composite increments (n = 5). Temperatures were measured for 110 s using eight thermocouples: bottom center of cavity (BC), top center of 1st increment (MC), top center of 2nd increment (TC), bottom corner of cavity (BE), top corner of 1st increment (ME), top corner of 2nd increment (TE), pulpal side of dentin (PD), and center of curing light guide tip (CL). Results. Maximum temperature values (°C) measured during polymerization of 1st increment were MC (59.8); BC (52.8); ME (51.3); CL (50.7); BE (48.4); and PD (39.8). Maximum temperature values during polymerization of 2nd increment were TC 58.5; TE (52.6); MC (51.7); CL (50.0); ME (48.0); BC (46.7); BE (44.5); and PD (38.8). Conclusion. Temperature at the floor of the cavity was significantly higher during polymerization of 1st increment compared to 2nd increment. Temperature rise was higher at the center than at the corner and at the top surface than at the bottom surface of each increment. PMID:26557716

  13. Piecewise-linear Bonhoeffer-van der Pol dynamics explaining mixed-mode oscillation-incrementing bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kuniyasu; Inaba, Naohiko

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) generated by weakly driven piecewise-linear Bonhoeffer-van der Pol and Fitzhugh-Nagumo dynamics. Such a simple piecewise-linear oscillator can generate extremely complex MMO bifurcations such as mixed-mode oscillation-incrementing bifurcations (MMOIBs) and intermittently chaotic MMOs. These remarkable bifurcations are confirmed using explicit solutions of the piecewise-linear differential equation. Moreover, Lorenz plots are introduced, which strongly suggest that MMOIBs occur successively many times, and show that each MMO sequence is surrounded by chaos.

  14. Proteomic analysis of rat skeletal muscle submitted to one bout of incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Gandra, P G; Valente, R H; Perales, J; Pacheco, A G; Macedo, D V

    2012-04-01

    Exercise can alter gene transcriptional and protein translational rates leading to changes in protein abundance toward adaptation to exercise. We investigated the alterations in protein abundance in skeletal muscle after one bout of an exhaustive exercise through proteomic analysis. Gastrocnemius muscles were sampled from non-exercised control rats and from rats exercised on a treadmill with incremental increases in speed until exhaustion (approximately 30 min). Rats were sacrificed 3 and 24 h after exercise cessation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was performed and spots with a significant alteration in relative volume were identified by mass spectrometry. Six spots presented statistically significant altered abundances after exercise. The spots identified as the metabolic related proteins triosephosphate isomerase 1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the β subunit of pyruvate dehydrogenase E(1) and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 were all more abundant after exercise. One spot identified as heat shock cognate 70 was also more abundant after exercise. One spot demonstrated a decreased abundance after exercise and was identified as α-actin. These results suggest that a single session of exhaustive incremental exercise in untrained muscle can alter thin filaments synthesis/degradation rate and enhance cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins synthesis. The identified proteins may be important to a general preconditioning of skeletal muscle for subsequent exercise sessions. PMID:20973830

  15. Improving greenhouse gas reduction calculations for bioenergy systems: Incremental life cycle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, Richard A.

    There are many scales that can be employed to calculate net greenhouse gas emissions from bioenergy systems, ranging from single point source (stack gas) measurement, to full, multi-layered life cycle analyses considering all of the inputs and outputs throughout the economy. At an appropriate scale within these extremes, a method can be selected to support verification activities related to project-based trading of greenhouse gas emissions. The boundaries of the analysis must be carefully selected in order to meet the twin goals of the verification activity: (1) to meet scientific standards for emission balance quantification; and (2) to meet cost-effectiveness criteria of the emission trading community. The Incremental Life Cycle Analysis (ILCA) methodology is proposed and implemented for the quantification of greenhouse gas emission reductions arising from substitution of switchgrass for coal in electricity generation. The method utilizes an incremental progression through the fuel life cycle, evaluating each level of the life cycle for the quality the emission estimate produced. The method also reviews the scientific uncertainty underlying emission estimation procedures so that areas of relative weakness can be targeted and improved. The ILCA methodology is applied to the Chariton Valley Biomass Project (CVBP) for case study and evaluation. The CVBP is seeking to replace coal combustion in an existing 650-MW generation facility with switchgrass, cofired at a rate of 5 percent switchgrass to 95 percent coal. When the project reaches full capacity, the ILCA estimates that 239 pounds of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2-eq) emissions will be reduced and/or removed from the atmosphere for every million Btu of switchgrass utilized, generating annual greenhouse gas reductions of 305,000 tons CO2-eq, leading to revenue for the project totaling over $1.5 million annually through trading of greenhouse gas emission reduction credits.

  16. Model parameter estimation approach based on incremental analysis for lithium-ion batteries without using open circuit voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongjie; Yuan, Shifei; Zhang, Xi; Yin, Chengliang; Ma, Xuerui

    2015-08-01

    To improve the suitability of lithium-ion battery model under varying scenarios, such as fluctuating temperature and SoC variation, dynamic model with parameters updated realtime should be developed. In this paper, an incremental analysis-based auto regressive exogenous (I-ARX) modeling method is proposed to eliminate the modeling error caused by the OCV effect and improve the accuracy of parameter estimation. Then, its numerical stability, modeling error, and parametric sensitivity are analyzed at different sampling rates (0.02, 0.1, 0.5 and 1 s). To identify the model parameters recursively, a bias-correction recursive least squares (CRLS) algorithm is applied. Finally, the pseudo random binary sequence (PRBS) and urban dynamic driving sequences (UDDSs) profiles are performed to verify the realtime performance and robustness of the newly proposed model and algorithm. Different sampling rates (1 Hz and 10 Hz) and multiple temperature points (5, 25, and 45 °C) are covered in our experiments. The experimental and simulation results indicate that the proposed I-ARX model can present high accuracy and suitability for parameter identification without using open circuit voltage.

  17. The p-version of the finite element method in incremental elasto-plastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, Stefan M.; Yosibash, Zohar

    1993-01-01

    Whereas the higher-order versions of the finite elements method (the p- and hp-version) are fairly well established as highly efficient methods for monitoring and controlling the discretization error in linear problems, little has been done to exploit their benefits in elasto-plastic structural analysis. Aspects of incremental elasto-plastic finite element analysis which are particularly amenable to improvements by the p-version is discussed. These theoretical considerations are supported by several numerical experiments. First, an example for which an analytical solution is available is studied. It is demonstrated that the p-version performs very well even in cycles of elasto-plastic loading and unloading, not only as compared to the traditional h-version but also in respect to the exact solution. Finally, an example of considerable practical importance - the analysis of a cold-worked lug - is presented which demonstrates how the modeling tools offered by higher-order finite element techniques can contribute to an improved approximation of practical problems.

  18. Incremental analysis of springback and kinematic hardening by the variation of tension during deep drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ul Hassan, H.; Güner, A.; Khalifa, N. Ben; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Springback is considered as one of the major problems in sheet metal forming. It leads to assembly defects and cause a huge amount of cost for tool modifications. In this work a tool for incremental analysis of springback analysis has been presented. Development of springback with punch travel has been analyzed for the simple U draw-bend geometry, tunnel geometry with open base and modified tunnel geometry with closed base and variable flange height. The effect of tension variation in the sheet with punch travel has been considered as the steering parameter for the springback and various profiles of varying tension are studied, which would generate different tensile forces in sheet. It is found that the tension in the part in the last quarter of punch travel has a profound effect on the springback reduction as compared to the traditionally applied constant BHF. Two selected kinematic hardening models, namely Yoshida-Uemori(YU) model and Armstrong-Frederick(AF) model are used to study the coupled effects of tension and material hardening.

  19. Express analysis of explosives, chemical warfare agents and drugs with multicapillary column gas chromatography and ion mobility increment spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buryakov, Igor A

    2004-02-01

    Description of a gas chromatograph designed for express analysis of explosives (2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate), chemical warfare agents (mustard gas, lewisite, sarin) and drugs (heroin, cocaine hydrochloride, crack) is given. The devices comprises a multicapillary chromatographic column and an ion mobility increment spectrometer (MCC-IMIS). The main analytical characteristics of an IMIS (estimated detection limit (DL), linear dynamic range (LDR), speed of response) and a chromatographic column (separation power, degree of separation, a number of possible peaks at a chromatogram section, divided by analysis time) are determined. The maximum value of DL equal to 5 pg/ml was registered for cis-alpha-LW, and the lowest one of 0.001 pg/ml was for cocaine. The maximum value of LDR equal to 1000 was registered for sarin and the lowest one of 150 was for the ions of lewisite. Speed of response of one compound detection with the IMIS was 0.7 s. PMID:14698239

  20. Mammography screening: an incremental cost effectiveness analysis of two view versus one view procedures in London.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, S; Brown, J; Warren, R

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To compare the costs and effects of routine mammography screening by a single mediolateral-oblique view and two views (mediolateral-oblique plus craniocaudal) of each breast. DESIGN--A cost effectiveness analysis of a prospective non-randomised trial comparing one and two view mammography screening was carried out at St Margaret's Hospital, Epping. All women in the study had two view mammography. The mediolateral-oblique view was always the first image read by the radiologist. After reading the films for a clinic session, the same radiologist then went back and read both the mediolateral-oblique and craniocaudal views together. Each set of films was read by two radiologists. The main outcome measures were recall rates, number of cancers detected, screening and assessment costs, and cost effectiveness ratios. SUBJECTS--A total of 26,430 women who attended for breast screening using both one and two view mammography participated. A sample of 132 women attending for assessment provided data on the private costs incurred in attending for assessment. RESULTS--There was a reduction in the recall rate from 9.1% (2404 of 26,430) after one view screening to 6.7% (1760 of 26,430) after two view screening. The results also suggest that for every 10,000 women screened an additional five cancers would be detected earlier with two view screening. The additional health service screening cost associated with two view screening was estimated to be 3.63 pounds: the costs associated with one and two view screening policies were estimated to be 41.49 pounds and 32.99 pounds respectively. Private costs incurred were estimated to be 0.35 pounds per woman screened and 32.75 pounds per woman assessed. Two cost effectiveness ratios were calculated: an incremental health service cost per additional cancer detected of 4129 pounds and an incremental health service plus private cost per additional cancer detected of 2742 pounds. The sensitivity analysis suggested that the

  1. Analysis of release cutting effects on increment and growth in Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) stand.

    PubMed

    Yücesan, Zafer; Ozçelik, Sevilay; Oktan, Ercan

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the effects of release cuttings on stand structures and increment and growth relations were investigated in afforested oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) stands. To maximize spatial variation in dataset, stratified random sampling was used to layout transects. 24 sampling plots were determined which reflects average characteristics of actual stand structure. 8 sampling plots were selected from unthinned stands, 8 sampling plots were selected from lightly thinned (19% of the total basal area removed) stand and 8 sampling plots were selected from heavily thinned (40% of the total basal area removed) stand. Light thinning was done in the year 2008 and heavy thinning in 2009. Stem analyses were carried out and pre- and post-treatment height, diameter, basal area and volume increments were examined according to thinning intensities. Obtained results showed that removal of 40% of the basal area does not contribute to stand increment and growth more positively than those in stands treated by removal of 19% of the basal area. Expected increase in height and diameter increment did not occurr post-treatment in 2008 and 2009. However, in only lightly thinned stands mean basal area increment increased after treatment. Release cuttings in beech stand needs to be practiced at least twice every 5 to 6 years, provided that peculiar characteristics of every habitat are considered. PMID:26521547

  2. The Incremental Validity of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue): A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Federica; Siegling, A B; Aloe, Ariel M; Baldaro, Bruno; Petrides, K V

    2016-01-01

    A criticism leveled against the conceptualization of emotional intelligence (EI) as a personality trait is that it overlaps considerably with the higher order personality dimensions and, therefore, has weak utility. To investigate this criticism, a systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to synthesize the literature examining the incremental validity of the 2 adult self-report forms of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue). Twenty-four articles reporting 114 incremental validity analyses of the TEIQue were reviewed according to the studies' methodological features. Additionally, data from 18 studies (providing 105 effect sizes) were pooled in a meta-analysis. Results suggest that the TEIQue consistently explains incremental variance in criteria pertaining to different areas of functioning, beyond higher order personality dimensions and other emotion-related variables. The pooled effect size was relatively small, but statistically and practically significant (ΔR(2) = .06, SE = .0116; 95% CI [.03, .08]). The number of covariates controlled for, the form of the TEIQue, and the focus on higher order personality dimensions versus other individual-difference constructs as baseline predictors did not affect the effect size. Analyses conducted at the factor level indicated that the incremental contribution is mainly due to the well-being and self-control factors of trait EI. Methodological issues and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:26457443

  3. Multi-Reanalysis Comparison of Variability in Analysis Increment of Column-Integrated Water Vapor Associated with Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, S.

    2014-12-01

    This study conducts a comparison of three reanalysis products (JRA-55, JRA-25, and ERA-Interim) in representation of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), focusing on column-integrated water vapor (CWV) that is considered as an essential variable for discussing MJO dynamics. Besides the analysis fields of CWV, which exhibit spatio-temporal distributions that are quite similar to satellite observations, CWV tendency simulated by forecast models and analysis increment calculated by data assimilation are examined. For JRA-55, it is revealed that, while its forecast model is able to simulate eastward propagation of the CWV anomaly, it tends to weaken the amplitude, and data assimilation process sustains the amplitude. The multi-reanalysis comparison of the analysis increment further reveals that this weakening bias is probably caused by excessively weak cloud-radiative feedback represented by the model. This bias in the feedback strength makes anomalous moisture supply by the vertical advection term in the CWV budget equation too insensitive to precipitation anomaly, resulting in reduction of the amplitude of CWV anomaly. ERA-Interim has a nearly opposite feature; the forecast model represents excessively strong feedback and unrealistically strengthens the amplitude, while the data assimilation weakens it. These results imply the necessity of accurate representation of the cloud-radiative feedback strength for a short-term MJO forecast, and may be evidence to support the argument that this feedback is essential for the existence of MJO. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that the multi-reanalysis comparison of the analysis increment will provide useful information for identifying model biases and, potentially, for estimating parameters that are difficult to estimate solely from observation data, such as gross moist stability.

  4. Predicting caries by measuring its activity using quantitative light-induced fluorescence in vivo: a 2-year caries increment analysis.

    PubMed

    Meller, C; Santamaria, R M; Connert, T; Splieth, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the predictive power of several clinical baseline parameters and the de-/remineralisation properties of in vivo etched sites measured with quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) for subsequent 2-year caries increment. At baseline, in 44 children (8.23 ± 1.5 years) two areas (diameter 2 mm) of the buccal surface of a primary posterior tooth were etched with 36% phosphoric acid gel for 1 and 4 min, respectively. The etched sites were analysed immediately after etching (ΔQ1) and 24 h (ΔQ2) later by QLF. Additionally, caries status (deft/DMFT and initial caries), approximal plaque, bleeding on probing, and the patient's current use of fluorides were recorded. In the 2-year follow-up, 29 children were re-assessed. After clinical examination, the caries increment was calculated (ΔDMFT) and correlated with the baseline clinical variables and the QLF readings. Results showed a significant positive correlation between ΔQ(1 min) and the ΔDMFT (r = 0.44, p = 0.02). The ΔDMFT was significantly correlated with the baseline deft (r = 0.56, p = 0.002), cavitated active caries lesions (r = 0.52, p = 0.003), and filled teeth (r = 0.53, p = 0.003). In a regression analysis the use of fluoridated salt (SC = -0.10) and fluoride gel (SC = -0.14) were negatively associated with ΔDMFT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the demineralisation properties of the etched sites and the outcome of the 24-hour measurements with QLF are significantly associated with caries increment. Previous caries experience strongly correlated with caries increment in this group of children. PMID:22614242

  5. Incremental hierarchical discriminant regression.

    PubMed

    Weng, Juyang; Hwang, Wey-Shiuan

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents incremental hierarchical discriminant regression (IHDR) which incrementally builds a decision tree or regression tree for very high-dimensional regression or decision spaces by an online, real-time learning system. Biologically motivated, it is an approximate computational model for automatic development of associative cortex, with both bottom-up sensory inputs and top-down motor projections. At each internal node of the IHDR tree, information in the output space is used to automatically derive the local subspace spanned by the most discriminating features. Embedded in the tree is a hierarchical probability distribution model used to prune very unlikely cases during the search. The number of parameters in the coarse-to-fine approximation is dynamic and data-driven, enabling the IHDR tree to automatically fit data with unknown distribution shapes (thus, it is difficult to select the number of parameters up front). The IHDR tree dynamically assigns long-term memory to avoid the loss-of-memory problem typical with a global-fitting learning algorithm for neural networks. A major challenge for an incrementally built tree is that the number of samples varies arbitrarily during the construction process. An incrementally updated probability model, called sample-size-dependent negative-log-likelihood (SDNLL) metric is used to deal with large sample-size cases, small sample-size cases, and unbalanced sample-size cases, measured among different internal nodes of the IHDR tree. We report experimental results for four types of data: synthetic data to visualize the behavior of the algorithms, large face image data, continuous video stream from robot navigation, and publicly available data sets that use human defined features. PMID:17385628

  6. Extended use of incremental signal-to-noise ratio as reliability criterion for multiple-slope wide-dynamic-range image capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Mobile applications present new image quality challenges. Automotive vision requires reliable capture of scene detail. Photospace measurements have shown that the extremely wide intrascene dynamic range of traffic scenes necessitates wide-dynamic-range (WDR) technology. Multiple-slope complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology adaptively extends dynamic range by partially resetting the pixel, resulting in a response curve with piecewise linear slopes of progressively increasing compression. As compression and thus dynamic range increase, a trade-off against detail loss is observed. Incremental signal-to-noise ratio (iSNR) has been proposed in ISO/TC42 standards for determining dynamic range, and this work describes how to adapt these to WDR. Measurements and computer simulations reveal that the observed trade-off between WDR extension and the loss of local detail can be explained by a drop in iSNR at each reset point. If a reset is not timed optimally, then iSNR may drop below the detection limit causing an iSNR hole to appear within the dynamic range. Thus iSNR has extended utility: it not only determines the dynamic range limits but also defines dynamic range as the luminance range where detail detection is reliable. It has become the critical criterion when maximizing dynamic range to maintain the minimum necessary level of detection reliability.

  7. Detailed Surface Analysis Of Incremental Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) Of Single-Crystal Niobium Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari D.; Tian, Hui; Trofimova, Olga; Reece, Charles E.

    2011-07-01

    We performed Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) on single crystal niobium samples/coupons housed in a stainless steel sample holder following the polishing recipe developed at Fermi Lab (FNAL) in 2011 \\cite{C. A. Cooper 2011}. Post CBP, the sample coupons were analyzed for surface roughness, crystal composition and structure, and particle contamination. Following the initial analysis each coupon was high pressure rinsed (HRP) and analyzed for the effectiveness of contamination removal. We were able to obtain the mirror like surface finish after the final stage of tumbling, although some defects and embedded particles remained. In addition, standard HPR appears to have little effect on removing embedded particles which remain after each tumbling step, although final polishing media removal was partially affected by standard/extended HPR.

  8. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Tom; Flores-Amaya, Felipe

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in fiscal year 2000. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics, spacecraft trajectory, attitude analysis, and attitude determination and control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, government, university, and private industry.

  9. Extended use of ISO 15739 incremental signal-to-noise ratio as reliability criterion for multiple-slope wide dynamic range image capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    In the emerging field of automotive vision, video capture is the critical front-end of driver assistance and active safety systems. Previous photospace measurements have shown that light levels in natural traffic scenes may contain an extremely wide intra-scene intensity range. This requires the camera to have a wide dynamic range (WDR) for it to adapt quickly to changing lighting conditions and to reliably capture all scene detail. Multiple-slope CMOS technology offers a cost-effective way of adaptively extending dynamic range by partially resetting (recharging) the CMOS pixel once or more often within each frame time. This avoids saturation and leads to a response curve with piecewise linear slopes of progressively increasing compression. It was observed that the image quality from multiple-slope image capture is strongly dependent on the control (height and time) of each reset barrier. As compression and thus dynamic range increase there is a trade-off against contrast and detail loss. Incremental signal-to-noise ratio (iSNR) is proposed in ISO 15739 for determining dynamic range. Measurements and computer simulations revealed that the observed trade-off between WDR extension and the loss of local detail could be explained by a drop in iSNR at each reset point. If a reset barrier is not optimally placed then iSNR may drop below the detection limit so that an 'iSNR hole' appears in the dynamic range. Thus ISO 15739 iSNR has gained extended utility: it not only measures the dynamic range limits but also defines dynamic range as the intensity range where detail detection is reliable. It has become a critical criterion when designing adaptive barrier control algorithms that maximize dynamic range while maintaining the minimum necessary level of detection reliability.

  10. Prognostic testing in coronary artery disease: An analysis of the relationship between increments in cost and information

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B.H.

    1988-01-01

    Tests analyzed include stress electrocardiography (ECG), thallium myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, and technetium wall motion scintigraphy. The incremental value of each test was evaluated using staged survival regression and was measured as the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. This approach is preferable to one based on sensitivity and specificity derived from heterogeneous populations, or from approaches that report the most powerful predictor obtained from stepwise regression. Cost-effectiveness for each test was assessed as the increment of ROC area divided by the marginal cost. Three populations were studied. In the thallium population, a significant increment in ROC area was added at each stage of testing; more prognostic information was added by ECG than by thallium. In the technetium population, ECG added a significant increment of ROC area, but technetium did not. In the population receiving both nuclear, more incremental information was added by thallium than by technetium. Thallium was found to be more cost-effective than technetium; thus, it is preferred for assessing prognosis in patients with suspected disease.

  11. Directed Incremental Symbolic Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Person, Suzette; Yang, Guowei; Rungta, Neha; Khurshid, Sarfraz

    2011-01-01

    The last few years have seen a resurgence of interest in the use of symbolic execution -- a program analysis technique developed more than three decades ago to analyze program execution paths. Scaling symbolic execution and other path-sensitive analysis techniques to large systems remains challenging despite recent algorithmic and technological advances. An alternative to solving the problem of scalability is to reduce the scope of the analysis. One approach that is widely studied in the context of regression analysis is to analyze the differences between two related program versions. While such an approach is intuitive in theory, finding efficient and precise ways to identify program differences, and characterize their effects on how the program executes has proved challenging in practice. In this paper, we present Directed Incremental Symbolic Execution (DiSE), a novel technique for detecting and characterizing the effects of program changes. The novelty of DiSE is to combine the efficiencies of static analysis techniques to compute program difference information with the precision of symbolic execution to explore program execution paths and generate path conditions affected by the differences. DiSE is a complementary technique to other reduction or bounding techniques developed to improve symbolic execution. Furthermore, DiSE does not require analysis results to be carried forward as the software evolves -- only the source code for two related program versions is required. A case-study of our implementation of DiSE illustrates its effectiveness at detecting and characterizing the effects of program changes.

  12. Motorcycle dynamics by multibody dynamics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Imaizumi, Hirohide; Fujioka, Takehiko

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to construct simulation models of a motorcycle with a rider by use of multibody dynamics analysis (MDA). Three types of MDA models are developed for evaluation of the effectiveness of MDA for motorcycle dynamics. Impulse responses with parameter study and lane change maneuvers are calculated. The results of simulations agree with that of experiments well and effectiveness of MDA to the motorcycle dynamics field is shown.

  13. Incremental k-core decomposition: Algorithms and evaluation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem; Gedik, Bugra; Jacques-SIlva, Gabriela; Wu, Kun -Lung; Catalyurek, Umit V.

    2016-02-01

    A k-core of a graph is a maximal connected subgraph in which every vertex is connected to at least k vertices in the subgraph. k-core decomposition is often used in large-scale network analysis, such as community detection, protein function prediction, visualization, and solving NP-hard problems on real networks efficiently, like maximal clique finding. In many real-world applications, networks change over time. As a result, it is essential to develop efficient incremental algorithms for dynamic graph data. In this paper, we propose a suite of incremental k-core decomposition algorithms for dynamic graph data. These algorithms locate a small subgraph that ismore » guaranteed to contain the list of vertices whose maximum k-core values have changed and efficiently process this subgraph to update the k-core decomposition. We present incremental algorithms for both insertion and deletion operations, and propose auxiliary vertex state maintenance techniques that can further accelerate these operations. Our results show a significant reduction in runtime compared to non-incremental alternatives. We illustrate the efficiency of our algorithms on different types of real and synthetic graphs, at varying scales. Furthermore, for a graph of 16 million vertices, we observe relative throughputs reaching a million times, relative to the non-incremental algorithms.« less

  14. Discriminant and Incremental Validity of Self-Concept and Academic Self-Efficacy: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined the discriminant and incremental validity of self-concept and academic self-efficacy. Study 1, which meta-analysed 64 studies comprising 74 independent samples (N = 24,773), found a strong mean correlation of 0.43 between self-concept and academic self-efficacy. The domains of self-concept and self-efficacy, and the domain…

  15. Limitations of Spectral Electromyogramic Analysis to Determine the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue Threshold during Incremental Ergometer Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Latasa, Iban; Cordova, Alfredo; Malanda, Armando; Navallas, Javier; Lavilla-Oiz, Ana; Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a new method has been proposed to detect the onset of neuromuscular fatigue during an incremental cycling test by assessing the changes in spectral electromyographic (sEMG) frequencies within individual exercise periods of the test. The method consists on determining the highest power output that can be sustained without a significant decrease in spectral frequencies. This study evaluated the validity of the new approach by assessing the changes in spectral indicators both throughout the whole test and within individual exercise periods of the test. Fourteen cyclists performed incremental cycle ergometer rides to exhaustion with bipolar surface EMG signals recorded from the vastus lateralis. The mean and median frequencies (Fmean and Fmedian, respectively) of the sEMG power spectrum were calculated. The main findings were: (1) Examination of spectral indicators within individual exercise periods of the test showed that neither Fmean nor Fmedian decreased significantly during the last (most fatiguing) exercise periods. (2) Examination of the whole incremental test showed that the behaviour of Fmean and Fmedian with increasing power output was highly inconsistent and varied greatly among subjects. (3) Over the whole incremental test, half of the participants exhibited a positive relation between spectral indicators and workload, whereas the other half demonstrated the opposite behavior. Collectively, these findings indicate that spectral sEMG indexes do not provide a reliable measure of the fatigue state of the muscle during an incremental cycling test. Moreover, it is concluded that it is not possible to determine the onset of neuromuscular fatigue during an incremental cycling test by examining spectral indicators within individual exercise periods of the test. Key points The behaviour of spectral EMG indicators during the incremental test exhibited a high heterogeneity among individuals, with approximately half of the participants showing a positive

  16. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  17. Meta-Analysis of Incremental Rehearsal Using Phi Coefficients to Compare Single-Case and Group Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Matthew K.; Zaslofsky, Anne F.; Kanive, Rebecca; Parker, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The current study meta-analyzed single-case design (SCD) and group research regarding incremental rehearsal (IR). We used phi to meta-analyze data from 19 IR studies. Data from the SCD studies resulted in a nonoverlap of all pairs (NAP) score of 98.9% (95% CI = 97.6-100%), which resulted in a weighted phi of 0.77 (95% CI = 0.69-0.83). The group…

  18. Toward Capturing Momentary Changes of Heart Rate Variability by a Dynamic Analysis Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haoshi; Zhu, Mingxing; Zheng, Yue; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) has been performed on long-term electrocardiography (ECG) recordings (12~24 hours) and short-term recordings (2~5 minutes), which may not capture momentary change of HRV. In this study, we present a new method to analyze the momentary HRV (mHRV). The ECG recordings were segmented into a series of overlapped HRV analysis windows with a window length of 5 minutes and different time increments. The performance of the proposed method in delineating the dynamics of momentary HRV measurement was evaluated with four commonly used time courses of HRV measures on both synthetic time series and real ECG recordings from human subjects and dogs. Our results showed that a smaller time increment could capture more dynamical information on transient changes. Considering a too short increment such as 10 s would cause the indented time courses of the four measures, a 1-min time increment (4-min overlapping) was suggested in the analysis of mHRV in the study. ECG recordings from human subjects and dogs were used to further assess the effectiveness of the proposed method. The pilot study demonstrated that the proposed analysis of mHRV could provide more accurate assessment of the dynamical changes in cardiac activity than the conventional measures of HRV (without time overlapping). The proposed method may provide an efficient means in delineating the dynamics of momentary HRV and it would be worthy performing more investigations. PMID:26172953

  19. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  20. Attempt to distinguish long-range temporal correlations from the statistics of the increments by natural time analysis.

    PubMed

    Varotsos, P A; Sarlis, N V; Skordas, E S; Tanaka, H K; Lazaridou, M S

    2006-08-01

    Self-similarity may originate from two origins: i.e., the process memory and the process' increments "infinite" variance. A distinction is attempted by employing the natural time chi . Concerning the first origin, we analyze recent data on seismic electric signals, which support the view that they exhibit infinitely ranged temporal correlations. Concerning the second, slowly driven systems that emit bursts of various energies E obeying the power-law distribution--i.e., P(E) approximately E(-gamma)--are studied. An interrelation between the exponent gamma and the variance kappa1(identical with - ) is obtained for the shuffled (randomized) data. For real earthquake data, the most probable value of kappa1 of the shuffled data is found to be approximately equal to that of the original data, the difference most likely arising from temporal correlation. Finally, it is found that the differential entropy associated with the probability P(kappa1) maximizes for gamma around gamma approximately 1.6-1.7 , which is comparable to the value determined experimentally in diverse phenomena: e.g., solar flares, icequakes, dislocation glide in stressed single crystals of ice, etc. It also agrees with the b value in the Gutenberg-Richter law of earthquakes. In addition, the case of multiplicative cascades is studied in the natural time domain. PMID:17025409

  1. Dynamic analysis of process reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shadle, L.J.; Lawson, L.O.; Noel, S.D.

    1995-06-01

    The approach and methodology of conducting a dynamic analysis is presented in this poster session in order to describe how this type of analysis can be used to evaluate the operation and control of process reactors. Dynamic analysis of the PyGas{trademark} gasification process is used to illustrate the utility of this approach. PyGas{trademark} is the gasifier being developed for the Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) by Jacobs-Siffine Engineering and Riley Stoker. In the first step of the analysis, process models are used to calculate the steady-state conditions and associated sensitivities for the process. For the PyGas{trademark} gasifier, the process models are non-linear mechanistic models of the jetting fluidized-bed pyrolyzer and the fixed-bed gasifier. These process sensitivities are key input, in the form of gain parameters or transfer functions, to the dynamic engineering models.

  2. Flexible rotor dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to analyze the general nonaxisymmetric and nonsynchronous transient and steady-state rotor dynamic performance of a bending- and shear-wise flexible rotor-bearing system under various operating conditions. The effects of rotor material mechanical hysteresis, rotor torsion flexibility, transverse effects of rotor axial and torsional loading and the anisotropic, in-phase and out-of-phase bearing stiffness and damping force and moment coefficients were included in the program to broaden its capability. An optimum solution method was found and incorporated in the computer program. Computer simulation of experimental data was made and qualitative agreements observed. The mathematical formulations, computer program verification, test data simulation, and user instruction was presented and discussed.

  3. An incremental strategy for calculating consistent discrete CFD sensitivity derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korivi, Vamshi Mohan; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, Perry A.; Hou, Gene W.; Jones, Henry E.

    1992-01-01

    In this preliminary study involving advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes, an incremental formulation, also known as the 'delta' or 'correction' form, is presented for solving the very large sparse systems of linear equations which are associated with aerodynamic sensitivity analysis. For typical problems in 2D, a direct solution method can be applied to these linear equations which are associated with aerodynamic sensitivity analysis. For typical problems in 2D, a direct solution method can be applied to these linear equations in either the standard or the incremental form, in which case the two are equivalent. Iterative methods appear to be needed for future 3D applications; however, because direct solver methods require much more computer memory than is currently available. Iterative methods for solving these equations in the standard form result in certain difficulties, such as ill-conditioning of the coefficient matrix, which can be overcome when these equations are cast in the incremental form; these and other benefits are discussed. The methodology is successfully implemented and tested in 2D using an upwind, cell-centered, finite volume formulation applied to the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented for two laminar sample problems: (1) transonic flow through a double-throat nozzle; and (2) flow over an isolated airfoil.

  4. Incremental geriatric assessment.

    PubMed

    Ensberg, Mark; Gerstenlauer, Cynthia

    2005-09-01

    Older adults value (1) independence and the ability to make their own decisions, (2) mobility (the ability to travel outside or simply inside the home), (3) family and friends and the time spent with those persons who are important to them, (4) ethnicity, religion, and spirituality, and (5) home, wherever that might be. The importance of recognizing each person's individuality cannot be overemphasized. The method of incremental assessment presented in this article and summarized in Box 9 is intended to provide the office-based clinician with sufficient information to make decisions regarding the preventive, therapeutic, rehabilitative, and supportive goals of care. IADL and nutritional triggers are used to identify early signs of dysfunction in the home environment. The strengths and weaknesses of cognitive, physical, psychosocial, and spiritual aspects of function are examined in an incremental manner. Health care providers determine whether there is a match between the person's functional capabilities, the available support network, and the home environment. The approach prompts appropriate use of services needed by older adults who are either at risk for becoming, or already are, chronically ill, disabled, and functionally dependent. Use of validated assessment tools provides structure for the assessment process, helps assure consistency, and provides a mechanism for periodic re-evaluation. The assessment approaches also foster a common language for the health care team and consist of measurable parameters that can be used to monitor outcomes. The clinician should be flexible and realize that the assessment or the tools may need to be modified depending on the circumstances. PMID:16140119

  5. Dynamic analysis of nonlinear rotor-housing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noah, Sherif T.

    1988-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis methods are developed which will enable the reliable prediction of the dynamic behavior of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopumps in the presence of bearing clearances and other local nonlinearities. A computationally efficient convolution method, based on discretized Duhamel and transition matrix integral formulations, is developed for the transient analysis. In the formulation, the coupling forces due to the nonlinearities are treated as external forces acting on the coupled subsystems. Iteration is utilized to determine their magnitudes at each time increment. The method is applied to a nonlinear generic model of the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). As compared to the fourth order Runge-Kutta numerical integration methods, the convolution approach proved to be more accurate and more highly efficient. For determining the nonlinear, steady-state periodic responses, an incremental harmonic balance method was also developed. The method was successfully used to determine dominantly harmonic and subharmonic responses fo the HPOTP generic model with bearing clearances. A reduction method similar to the impedance formulation utilized with linear systems is used to reduce the housing-rotor models to their coordinates at the bearing clearances. Recommendations are included for further development of the method, for extending the analysis to aperiodic and chaotic regimes and for conducting critical parameteric studies of the nonlinear response of the current SSME turbopumps.

  6. International Space Station Increment Operations Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Horst; Sielaff, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The Industrial Operator (IO) has defined End-to-End services to perform efficiently all required operations tasks for the Manned Space Program (MSP) as agreed during the Ministerial Council in Edinburgh in November 2001. Those services are the result of a detailed task analysis based on the operations processes as derived from the Space Station Program Implementation Plans (SPIP) and defined in the Operations Processes Documents (OPD). These services are related to ISS Increment Operations and ATV Mission Operations. Each of these End-to-End services is typically characterised by the following properties: It has a clearly defined starting point, where all requirements on the end-product are fixed and associated performance metrics of the customer are well defined. It has a clearly defined ending point, when the product or service is delivered to the customer and accepted by him, according to the performance metrics defined at the start point. The implementation of the process might be restricted by external boundary conditions and constraints mutually agreed with the customer. As far as those are respected the IO has the free choice to select methods and means of implementation. The ISS Increment Operations Service (IOS) activities required for the MSP Exploitation program cover the complete increment specific cycle starting with the support to strategic planning and ending with the post increment evaluation. These activities are divided into sub-services including the following tasks: - ISS Planning Support covering the support to strategic and tactical planning up to the generation - Development &Payload Integration Support - ISS Increment Preparation - ISS Increment Execution These processes are tight together by the Increment Integration Management, which provides the planning and scheduling of all activities as well as the technical management of the overall process . The paper describes the entire End-to-End ISS Increment Operations service and the

  7. Incremental Contingency Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearden, Richard; Meuleau, Nicolas; Ramakrishnan, Sailesh; Smith, David E.; Washington, Rich

    2003-01-01

    There has been considerable work in AI on planning under uncertainty. However, this work generally assumes an extremely simple model of action that does not consider continuous time and resources. These assumptions are not reasonable for a Mars rover, which must cope with uncertainty about the duration of tasks, the energy required, the data storage necessary, and its current position and orientation. In this paper, we outline an approach to generating contingency plans when the sources of uncertainty involve continuous quantities such as time and resources. The approach involves first constructing a "seed" plan, and then incrementally adding contingent branches to this plan in order to improve utility. The challenge is to figure out the best places to insert contingency branches. This requires an estimate of how much utility could be gained by building a contingent branch at any given place in the seed plan. Computing this utility exactly is intractable, but we outline an approximation method that back propagates utility distributions through a graph structure similar to that of a plan graph.

  8. Complex dynamics of text analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xiaohua; Zeng, Yongqiang; Ma, Qinghua; Zhu, Lin

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a novel method for the analysis of nonlinear text quality in Chinese language. Texts produced by university students in China were represented as scale-free networks (word adjacency model), from which typical network features such as the in/outdegree, clustering coefficient and network dynamics were obtained. The method integrates the classical concepts of network feature representation and text quality series variation. The analytical and numerical scheme leads to a parameter space representation that constitutes a valid alternative to represent the network features. The results reveal that complex network features of different text qualities can be clearly revealed and applied to potential applications in other instances of text analysis.

  9. Dynamical analysis of anisotropic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karčiauskas, Mindaugas

    2016-06-01

    The inflaton coupling to a vector field via the f(φ)2F μνFμν term is used in several contexts in the literature, such as to generate primordial magnetic fields, to produce statistically anisotropic curvature perturbation, to support anisotropic inflation, and to circumvent the η-problem. In this work, I perform dynamical analysis of this system allowing for the most general Bianchi I initial conditions. I also confirm the stability of attractor fixed points along phase-space directions that had not been investigated before.

  10. Nonlinear analysis of pupillary dynamics.

    PubMed

    Onorati, Francesco; Mainardi, Luca Tommaso; Sirca, Fabiola; Russo, Vincenzo; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2016-02-01

    Pupil size reflects autonomic response to different environmental and behavioral stimuli, and its dynamics have been linked to other autonomic correlates such as cardiac and respiratory rhythms. The aim of this study is to assess the nonlinear characteristics of pupil size of 25 normal subjects who participated in a psychophysiological experimental protocol with four experimental conditions, namely “baseline”, “anger”, “joy”, and “sadness”. Nonlinear measures, such as sample entropy, correlation dimension, and largest Lyapunov exponent, were computed on reconstructed signals of spontaneous fluctuations of pupil dilation. Nonparametric statistical tests were performed on surrogate data to verify that the nonlinear measures are an intrinsic characteristic of the signals. We then developed and applied a piecewise linear regression model to detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). Two joinpoints and three scaling intervals were identified: slope α0, at slow time scales, represents a persistent nonstationary long-range correlation, whereas α1 and α2, at middle and fast time scales, respectively, represent long-range power-law correlations, similarly to DFA applied to heart rate variability signals. Of the computed complexity measures, α0 showed statistically significant differences among experimental conditions (p<0.001). Our results suggest that (a) pupil size at constant light condition is characterized by nonlinear dynamics, (b) three well-defined and distinct long-memory processes exist at different time scales, and (c) autonomic stimulation is partially reflected in nonlinear dynamics. PMID:26351899

  11. Parallel incremental compilation. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Gafter, N.M.

    1990-06-01

    The time it takes to compile a large program has been a bottleneck in the software development process. When an interactive programming environment with an incremental compiler is used, compilation speed becomes even more important, but existing incremental compilers are very slow for some types of program changes. We describe a set of techniques that enable incremental compilation to exploit fine-grained concurrency in a shared-memory multi-processor and achieve asymptotic improvement over sequential algorithms. Because parallel non-incremental compilation is a special case of parallel incremental compilation, the design of a parallel compiler is a corollary of our result. Instead of running the individual phases concurrently, our design specifies compiler phases that are mutually sequential. However, each phase is designed to exploit fine-grained parallelism. By allowing each phase to present its output as a complete structure rather than as a stream of data, we can apply techniques such as parallel prefix and parallel divide-and-conquer, and we can construct applicative data structures to achieve sublinear execution time. Parallel algorithms for each phase of a compiler are presented to demonstrate that a complete incremental compiler can achieve execution time that is asymptotically less than sequential algorithms.

  12. Effectiveness of and Financial Returns to Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in South Africa: An Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haacker, Markus; Gorgens, Marelize

    2016-01-01

    Background Empirical studies and population-level policy simulations show the importance of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in generalized epidemics. This paper complements available scenario-based studies (projecting costs and outcomes over some policy period, typically spanning decades) by adopting an incremental approach—analyzing the expected consequences of circumcising one male individual with specific characteristics in a specific year. This approach yields more precise estimates of VMMC’s cost-effectiveness and identifies the outcomes of current investments in VMMC (e.g., within a fiscal budget period) rather than of investments spread over the entire policy period. Methods/Findings The model has three components. We adapted the ASSA2008 model, a demographic and epidemiological model of the HIV epidemic in South Africa, to analyze the impact of one VMMC on HIV incidence over time and across the population. A costing module tracked the costs of VMMC and the resulting financial savings owing to reduced HIV incidence over time. Then, we used several financial indicators to assess the cost-effectiveness of and financial return on investments in VMMC. One circumcision of a young man up to age 20 prevents on average over 0.2 HIV infections, but this effect declines steeply with age, e.g., to 0.08 by age 30. Net financial savings from one VMMC at age 20 are estimated at US$617 at a discount rate of 5% and are lower for circumcisions both at younger ages (because the savings occur later and are discounted more) and at older ages (because male circumcision becomes less effective). Investments in male circumcision carry a financial rate of return of up to 14.5% (for circumcisions at age 20). The cost of a male circumcision is refinanced fastest, after 13 y, for circumcisions at ages 20 to 25. Principal limitations of the analysis arise from the long time (decades) over which the effects of VMMC unfold—the results are therefore sensitive to the

  13. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  14. Incremental learning for automated knowledge capture.

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, Zachary O.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Davis, Warren Leon,; Dixon, Kevin R.; Jones, Brian S.; Martin, Nathaniel; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2013-12-01

    People responding to high-consequence national-security situations need tools to help them make the right decision quickly. The dynamic, time-critical, and ever-changing nature of these situations, especially those involving an adversary, require models of decision support that can dynamically react as a situation unfolds and changes. Automated knowledge capture is a key part of creating individualized models of decision making in many situations because it has been demonstrated as a very robust way to populate computational models of cognition. However, existing automated knowledge capture techniques only populate a knowledge model with data prior to its use, after which the knowledge model is static and unchanging. In contrast, humans, including our national-security adversaries, continually learn, adapt, and create new knowledge as they make decisions and witness their effect. This artificial dichotomy between creation and use exists because the majority of automated knowledge capture techniques are based on traditional batch machine-learning and statistical algorithms. These algorithms are primarily designed to optimize the accuracy of their predictions and only secondarily, if at all, concerned with issues such as speed, memory use, or ability to be incrementally updated. Thus, when new data arrives, batch algorithms used for automated knowledge capture currently require significant recomputation, frequently from scratch, which makes them ill suited for use in dynamic, timecritical, high-consequence decision making environments. In this work we seek to explore and expand upon the capabilities of dynamic, incremental models that can adapt to an ever-changing feature space.

  15. Incremental Reduction in Risk of Death Associated With Use of Guideline-Recommended Therapies in Patients With Heart Failure: A Nested Case-Control Analysis of IMPROVE HF

    PubMed Central

    Fonarow, Gregg C.; Albert, Nancy M.; Curtis, Anne B.; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Liu, Yang; Mehra, Mandeep R.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Reynolds, Dwight; Walsh, Mary N.; Yancy, Clyde W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Several therapies are guideline-recommended to reduce mortality in patients with heart failure (HF) and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction, but the incremental clinical effectiveness of these therapies has not been well studied. We aimed to evaluate the individual and incremental benefits of guideline-recommended HF therapies associated with 24-month survival. Methods and Results We performed a nested case-control study of HF patients enrolled in IMPROVE HF. Cases were patients who died within 24 months and controls were patients who survived to 24 months, propensity-matched 1:2 for multiple prognostic variables. Logistic regression was performed, and the attributable mortality risk from incomplete application of each evidence-based therapy among eligible patients was calculated. A total of 1376 cases and 2752 matched controls were identified. β-Blocker and cardiac resynchronization therapy were associated with the greatest 24-month survival benefit (adjusted odds ratio for death 0.42, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34–0.52; and 0.44, 95% CI, 0.29–0.67, respectively). Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators, anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, and HF education were also associated with benefit, whereas aldosterone antagonist use was not. Incremental benefits were observed with each successive therapy, plateauing once any 4 to 5 therapies were provided (adjusted odds ratio 0.31, 95% CI, 0.23–0.42 for 5 or more versus 0/1, P<0.0001). Conclusions Individual, with a single exception, and incremental use of guideline-recommended therapies was associated with survival benefit, with a potential plateau at 4 to 5 therapies. These data provide further rationale to implement guideline-recommended HF therapies in the absence of contraindications to patients with HF and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. (J Am Heart Assoc. 2012;1:16-26.) PMID:23130115

  16. Determining the Optimum Number of Increments in Composite Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, John E.; Schaalje, G Bruce; Gilbert, Richard O.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2008-09-30

    Composite sampling can be more cost effective than simple random sampling. This paper considers how to determine the optimum number of increments to use in composite sampling. Composite sampling can be more cost effective than simple random sampling. This paper considers how to determine the optimum number of increments to use in composite sampling. Composite sampling terminology and theory are outlined and a method is developed which accounts for different sources of variation in compositing and data analysis. This method is used to define and understand the process of determining the optimum number of increments that should be used in forming a composite. The blending variance is shown to have a smaller range of possible values than previously reported when estimating the number of increments in a composite sample. Accounting for differing levels of the blending variance significantly affects the estimated number of increments.

  17. Neocognitron capable of incremental learning.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kunihiko

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a new neocognitron that accepts incremental learning, without giving a severe damage to old memories or reducing learning speed. The new neocognitron uses a competitive learning, and the learning of all stages of the hierarchical network progresses simultaneously. To increase the learning speed, conventional neocognitrons of recent versions sacrificed the ability of incremental learning, and used a technique of sequential construction of layers, by which the learning of a layer started after the learning of the preceding layers had completely finished. If the learning speed is simply set high for the conventional neocognitron, simultaneous construction of layers produces many garbage cells, which become always silent after having finished the learning. The proposed neocognitron with a new learning method can prevent the generation of such garbage cells even with a high learning speed, allowing incremental learning. PMID:14690705

  18. Incremental learning from stream data.

    PubMed

    He, Haibo; Chen, Sheng; Li, Kang; Xu, Xin

    2011-12-01

    Recent years have witnessed an incredibly increasing interest in the topic of incremental learning. Unlike conventional machine learning situations, data flow targeted by incremental learning becomes available continuously over time. Accordingly, it is desirable to be able to abandon the traditional assumption of the availability of representative training data during the training period to develop decision boundaries. Under scenarios of continuous data flow, the challenge is how to transform the vast amount of stream raw data into information and knowledge representation, and accumulate experience over time to support future decision-making process. In this paper, we propose a general adaptive incremental learning framework named ADAIN that is capable of learning from continuous raw data, accumulating experience over time, and using such knowledge to improve future learning and prediction performance. Detailed system level architecture and design strategies are presented in this paper. Simulation results over several real-world data sets are used to validate the effectiveness of this method. PMID:22057060

  19. Dynamic Hurricane Data Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic hurricane data analysis tool allows users of the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) to analyze data over a Web medium. The TCIS software is described in the previous article, Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) (NPO-45748). This tool interfaces with the TCIS database to pull in data from several different atmospheric and oceanic data sets, both observed by instruments. Users can use this information to generate histograms, maps, and profile plots for specific storms. The tool also displays statistical values for the user-selected parameter for the mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values. There is little wait time, allowing for fast data plots over date and spatial ranges. Users may also zoom-in for a closer look at a particular spatial range. This is version 1 of the software. Researchers will use the data and tools on the TCIS to understand hurricane processes, improve hurricane forecast models and identify what types of measurements the next generation of instruments will need to collect.

  20. Bayesian Analysis of Individual Level Personality Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Edward; Wood, Robert E.; Beckmann, Nadin; Lau, John; Beckmann, Jens F.; Cripps, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    A Bayesian technique with analyses of within-person processes at the level of the individual is presented. The approach is used to examine whether the patterns of within-person responses on a 12-trial simulation task are consistent with the predictions of ITA theory (Dweck, 1999). ITA theory states that the performance of an individual with an entity theory of ability is more likely to spiral down following a failure experience than the performance of an individual with an incremental theory of ability. This is because entity theorists interpret failure experiences as evidence of a lack of ability which they believe is largely innate and therefore relatively fixed; whilst incremental theorists believe in the malleability of abilities and interpret failure experiences as evidence of more controllable factors such as poor strategy or lack of effort. The results of our analyses support ITA theory at both the within- and between-person levels of analyses and demonstrate the benefits of Bayesian techniques for the analysis of within-person processes. These include more formal specification of the theory and the ability to draw inferences about each individual, which allows for more nuanced interpretations of individuals within a personality category, such as differences in the individual probabilities of spiraling. While Bayesian techniques have many potential advantages for the analyses of processes at the level of the individual, ease of use is not one of them for psychologists trained in traditional frequentist statistical techniques. PMID:27486415

  1. Bayesian Analysis of Individual Level Personality Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Edward; Wood, Robert E; Beckmann, Nadin; Lau, John; Beckmann, Jens F; Cripps, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    A Bayesian technique with analyses of within-person processes at the level of the individual is presented. The approach is used to examine whether the patterns of within-person responses on a 12-trial simulation task are consistent with the predictions of ITA theory (Dweck, 1999). ITA theory states that the performance of an individual with an entity theory of ability is more likely to spiral down following a failure experience than the performance of an individual with an incremental theory of ability. This is because entity theorists interpret failure experiences as evidence of a lack of ability which they believe is largely innate and therefore relatively fixed; whilst incremental theorists believe in the malleability of abilities and interpret failure experiences as evidence of more controllable factors such as poor strategy or lack of effort. The results of our analyses support ITA theory at both the within- and between-person levels of analyses and demonstrate the benefits of Bayesian techniques for the analysis of within-person processes. These include more formal specification of the theory and the ability to draw inferences about each individual, which allows for more nuanced interpretations of individuals within a personality category, such as differences in the individual probabilities of spiraling. While Bayesian techniques have many potential advantages for the analyses of processes at the level of the individual, ease of use is not one of them for psychologists trained in traditional frequentist statistical techniques. PMID:27486415

  2. Systems-Dynamic Analysis for Neighborhood Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systems-dynamic analysis (or system dynamics (SD)) helps planners identify interrelated impacts of transportation and land-use policies on neighborhood-scale economic outcomes for households and businesses, among other applications. This form of analysis can show benefits and tr...

  3. Producers of Fast Incremental Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY. Center for Architectural Research.

    School districts sometimes need to add relatively small increments of high quality educational space to their existing physical facilities. For some of these situations, the portable or relocatable classroom is the answer; in other cases, the district needs different or more permanent space--quickly. This document comprises six charts that present…

  4. Viscoelastic incremental formulation using creep and relaxation differential approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazal, Claude; Mouto Pitti, Rostand

    2010-05-01

    A new incremental formulation in the time domain for linear, non-ageing viscoelastic materials undergoing mechanical deformation is presented in this work. The formulation is derived from linear differential equations based on a discrete spectrum representation for the creep and relaxation tensors. The incremental constitutive equations are then obtained by finite difference integration. Thus the difficulty of retaining the stress and strain history in computer solutions is avoided. A complete general formulation of linear viscoelastic stress analysis is developed in terms of increments of strains and stresses in order to establish the constitutive stress-strain relationship. The presented method is validated using numerical simulations and reliable results are obtained.

  5. Guidelines for dynamic data acquisition and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    1992-01-01

    The recommendations concerning pyroshock data presented in the final draft of a proposed military handbook on Guidelines for Dynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis are reviewed. The structural responses produced by pyroshocks are considered to be one of the most difficult types of dynamic data to accurately measure and analyze.

  6. Guidelines for dynamic data acquisition and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    1992-10-01

    The recommendations concerning pyroshock data presented in the final draft of a proposed military handbook on Guidelines for Dynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis are reviewed. The structural responses produced by pyroshocks are considered to be one of the most difficult types of dynamic data to accurately measure and analyze.

  7. Bimolecular dynamics by computer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    As numerical tools (computers and display equipment) become more powerful and the atomic structures of important biological molecules become known, the importance of detailed computation of nonequilibrium biomolecular dynamics increases. In this manuscript we report results from a well developed study of the hydrogen bonded polypeptide crystal acetanilide, a model protein. Directions for future research are suggested. 9 references, 6 figures.

  8. Coupled dynamics analysis of wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative description of all key elements of a complete wind energy system computer analysis code is presented. The analysis system addresses the coupled dynamics characteristics of wind energy systems, including the interactions of the rotor, tower, nacelle, power train, control system, and electrical network. The coupled dynamics are analyzed in both the frequency and time domain to provide the basic motions and loads data required for design, performance verification and operations analysis activities. Elements of the coupled analysis code were used to design and analyze candidate rotor articulation concepts. Fundamental results and conclusions derived from these studies are presented.

  9. Analysis of dynamic multiplicity fluctuations at PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Zhengwei; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the dynamic fluctuations in the inclusive charged particle multiplicity measured by PHOBOS for Au+Au collisions at surdsNN = 200GeV within the pseudo-rapidity range of -3 < η < 3. First the definition of the fluctuations observables used in this analysis is presented, together with the discussion of their physics meaning. Then the procedure for the extraction of dynamic fluctuations is described. Some preliminary results are included to illustrate the correlation features of the fluctuation observable. New dynamic fluctuations results will be available in a later publication.

  10. Detrended fluctuation analysis of heart intrabeat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Eduardo; Echeverria, Juan C.; Alvarez-Ramirez, Jose

    2007-10-01

    We investigate scaling properties of electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings of healthy subjects and heart failure patients based on detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). While the vast majority of scaling analysis has focused on the characterization of the long-range correlations of interbeat (i.e., beat-to-beat) dynamics, in this work we consider instead the characterization of intrabeat dynamics. That is, here we use DFA to study correlations for time scales smaller than one heart beat period (about 0.75 s). Our results show that intrabeat dynamics of healthy subject are less correlated than for heart failure dynamics. As in the case of interbeat dynamics, the DFA scaling exponents can be used to discriminate healthy and pathological data. It is shown that 0.5 h recordings suffices to characterize the ECG correlation properties.

  11. Session 6: Dynamic Modeling and Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey; Chapman, Jeffryes; May, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    These presentations cover some of the ongoing work in dynamic modeling and dynamic systems analysis. The first presentation discusses dynamic systems analysis and how to integrate dynamic performance information into the systems analysis. The ability to evaluate the dynamic performance of an engine design may allow tradeoffs between the dynamic performance and operability of a design resulting in a more efficient engine design. The second presentation discusses the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS). T-MATS is a Simulation system with a library containing the basic building blocks that can be used to create dynamic Thermodynamic Systems. Some of the key features include Turbo machinery components, such as turbines, compressors, etc., and basic control system blocks. T-MAT is written in the Matlab-Simulink environment and is open source software. The third presentation focuses on getting additional performance from the engine by allowing the limit regulators only to be active when a limit is danger of being violated. Typical aircraft engine control architecture is based on MINMAX scheme, which is designed to keep engine operating within prescribed mechanical/operational safety limits. Using a conditionally active min-max limit regulator scheme, additional performance can be gained by disabling non-relevant limit regulators

  12. Obtaining railpad properties via dynamic mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oregui, M.; de Man, A.; Woldekidan, M. F.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we propose combining dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and the time-temperature superposition principle to determine various railpad dynamic properties. Having accurate information regarding the dynamic properties of a railpad is a fundamental requirement for designing tracks and understanding track deterioration. By testing three different railpad types, we demonstrate that the dynamic behavior of railpads over a wide frequency range can be successfully obtained under different preloads and temperatures if time-temperature superposition can be applied. To investigate railpad aging, worn railpads taken from a mainline in the Netherlands are tested. In this case, worn railpads are softer and possess a lower damping capacity than new railpads. In addition to performing these measurements, a Prony series material model is proposed to reproduce the dynamic behavior of railpads. The Prony series model is in good agreement with the measurements. Measured railpad dynamic properties and the corresponding Prony series numerical model provide valuable information for track design and modeling.

  13. A New Sheet Metal Forming System Based on Incremental Punching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuanxin

    Stamping is one of the most commonly used manufacturing processes. Everyday, millions of parts are formed by this process. The conventional stamping is to form a part in one or several operations with a press machine and a set/sets of dies. It is very efficient but is not cost effective for small batch production parts and prototypes as the dies are expensive and time consuming to make. Recently, with the increasing demands for low-volume and customer-made products, a die-less forming method, Incremental Sheet Metal Forming (ISMF), has become one of the leading R&D topics in the industry. ISMF uses a small generic tool to apply a sequence of operations along the given path to deform the sheet incrementally. These small deformations accumulate to form the final shape of the part. As a result, different parts can be made by the same setup. Despite of some 30 years of research and development, however, ISMF technology is still premature for industrial applications due to the following reasons: The accuracy of the part is limited; the surface roughness is poor; and the productivity is low. This motivates the presented research. In this research, a new incremental forming system based on incremental punching is designed and built. The system consists of a 3-axes CNC platform, a high speed hydraulic cylinder with a hemispherical forming tool, and a PC-based CNC control system. The hydraulic system provides the forming force to deform the sheet metal with constant stokes, while the CNC system positions the part. When forming a part, the forming tool punches the sheet metal along the given contour of the part punch by punch; when one layer of the part is completed, the forming tool moves down to the next layer; and the process is finished till all layers are completed. The CNC control system works with standard NC code, and hence, is easy to use. In order to ensure the desirable performance of the machine, dynamic analysis of the machine is necessary. The analysis is

  14. 12 CFR 217.208 - Incremental risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... positions at the portfolio level. If equity positions are included in the model, for modeling purposes... positions in its incremental risk measure. (b) Requirements for incremental risk modeling. For purposes...

  15. Dynamical analysis of strongly nonlinear fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shao-Fang; Shen, Yong-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Na; Yang, Shao-Pu; Xing, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the computation schemes for periodic solutions of the forced fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation are derived based on incremental harmonic balance (IHB) method. The general forms of periodic solutions are founded by the IHB method, which could be useful to obtain the periodic solutions with higher precision. The comparisons of the approximate analytical solutions by the IHB method and numerical integration are fulfilled, and the results certify the correctness and higher precision of the solutions by the IHB method. The dynamical analysis of strongly nonlinear fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation is investigated by the IHB method. Then, the effects of the excitation frequency, fractional order, fractional coefficient, and nonlinear stiffness coefficient on the complex dynamical behaviors are analyzed. At last, the detailed results are summarized and the conclusions are made, which present some useful information to analyze and/or control the dynamical response of this kind of system.

  16. Dynamical analysis of strongly nonlinear fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Shao-Fang; Shen, Yong-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Na; Yang, Shao-Pu; Xing, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the computation schemes for periodic solutions of the forced fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation are derived based on incremental harmonic balance (IHB) method. The general forms of periodic solutions are founded by the IHB method, which could be useful to obtain the periodic solutions with higher precision. The comparisons of the approximate analytical solutions by the IHB method and numerical integration are fulfilled, and the results certify the correctness and higher precision of the solutions by the IHB method. The dynamical analysis of strongly nonlinear fractional-order Mathieu-Duffing equation is investigated by the IHB method. Then, the effects of the excitation frequency, fractional order, fractional coefficient, and nonlinear stiffness coefficient on the complex dynamical behaviors are analyzed. At last, the detailed results are summarized and the conclusions are made, which present some useful information to analyze and/or control the dynamical response of this kind of system. PMID:27586626

  17. STEP Tether Dynamics Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.

    2000-01-01

    The General Tethered Object Simulation System (GTOSS) has been successfully converted to the PC environment. GTOSS has been run under Microsoft Windows 95, 98 and NT4.0 with no problems noted. Adaptation to the PC environment and definition of the 3 three body configuration required resizing some of the GTOSS internal data arrays. To allow studies of the tether dynamics accompanying electrodynamic thrust, a tether current flow model has also been developed for GTOSS. This model includes effects due to the earth's magnetic field and ionosphere, tether conductivity, temperature, motion, shape and available power. Sample cases have been defined for a proposed STEP-AIRSEDS (Space Transfer using Electrodynamic Propulsion-The Michigan Technic Corporation proposed tether missions for commercial applications) three body configuration. This required definition of a 6th power scenario for GTOSS. This power scenario allows a user to specify whether orbit raising or orbit lowering is to be performed by selecting the number of the tether. Orbit raising and orbit lowering sample cases have been run successfully. Results from these runs have been included in this report. Results have only been generated so far for a three body configuration. Only point end masses have been represented. No attitude dynamics have been included. Initial results suggest that tether current can have significant and detrimental effects on tether dynamics and provisions will have to be made for control of it. This control will have to be considered in connection with desired target orbits for electrodynamic thrusting, as well as end body attitude control, momentum management of proposed control moment gyros, solar array pointing. All of these items will interact and thus, any system simulation will have to have each of these effects modeled in sufficient detail to display these interactions.

  18. NERVA dynamic analysis methodology, SPRVIB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vronay, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    The general dynamic computer code called SPRVIB (Spring Vib) developed in support of the NERVA (nuclear engine for rocket vehicle application) program is described. Using normal mode techniques, the program computes kinematical responses of a structure caused by various combinations of harmonic and elliptic forcing functions or base excitations. Provision is made for a graphical type of force or base excitation input to the structure. A description of the required input format and a listing of the program are presented, along with several examples illustrating the use of the program. SPRVIB is written in FORTRAN 4 computer language for use on the CDC 6600 or the IBM 360/75 computers.

  19. Nonlinear Analysis Of Rotor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, William B.; Zalik, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Study explores analytical consequences of nonlinear Jeffcott equations of rotor dynamics. Section 1: Summary of previous studies. Section 2: Jeffcott Equations. Section 3: Proves two theorems that provide inequalities on coefficients of differential equations and magnitude of forcing function in absence of side force. Section 4: Numerical investigation of multiple-forcing-function problem by introducing both side force and mass imbalance. Section 5: Examples of numberical solutions of complex generalized Jeffcott equation with two forcing functions of different frequencies f1 and f2. Section 6: Boundedness and stability of solutions.Section 7: Concludes report reviewing analytical results and significance.

  20. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis of Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerin, John A.; Sporrer, Justin M.; Egolf, David A.

    2013-03-01

    The development of spatiotemporal chaotic behavior in heart tissue, termed fibrillation, is a devastating, life-threatening condition. The chaotic behavior of electrochemical signals, in the form of spiral waves, causes the muscles of the heart to contract in an incoherent manner, hindering the heart's ability to pump blood. We have applied the mathematical tools of nonlinear dynamics to large-scale simulations of a model of fibrillating heart tissue to uncover the dynamical modes driving this chaos. By studying the evolution of Lyapunov vectors and exponents over short times, we have found that the fibrillating tissue is sensitive to electrical perturbations only in narrow regions immediately in front of the leading edges of spiral waves, especially when these waves collide, break apart, or hit the edges of the tissue sample. Using this knowledge, we have applied small stimuli to areas of varying sensitivity. By studying the evolution of the effects of these perturbations, we have made progress toward controlling the electrochemical patterns associated with heart fibrillation. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (DMR-0094178) and Research Corporation.

  1. Analysis of Multidomain Protein Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Roy, Amitava; Hua, Duy P; Post, Carol Beth

    2016-01-12

    Proteins with a modular architecture of multiple domains connected by linkers often exhibit diversity in the relative positions of domains, while the domain tertiary structure remains unchanged. The biological function of these modular proteins, or the regulation of their activity, depends on the variation in domain orientation and separation. Accordingly, careful characterization of interdomain motion and correlated fluctuations of multidomain systems is relevant for understanding the functional behavior of modular proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a powerful approach to study these motions in atomic detail. Nevertheless, the common procedure for analyzing fluctuations from MD simulations after rigid-body alignment fails for multidomain proteins; it greatly overestimates correlated positional fluctuations in the presence of relative domain motion. We show here that expressing the atomic motions of a multidomain protein as a combination of displacement within the domain reference frame and motion of the relative domains correctly separates the internal motions to allow a useful description of correlated fluctuations. We illustrate the methodology of separating the domain fluctuations and local fluctuations by application to the tandem SH2 domains of human Syk protein kinase and by characterizing an effect of phosphorylation on the dynamics. Correlated motions are assessed from a distance covariance rather than the more common vector-coordinate covariance. The approach makes it possible to calculate the proper correlations in fluctuations internal to a domain as well as between domains. PMID:26675644

  2. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... Agreement, as required, until it is fully funded. Any work beyond the funding limit will be at the...

  3. 14 CFR 1260.53 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1260.53 Section 1260.53 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.53 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding October 2000...

  4. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... Agreement, as required, until it is fully funded. Any work beyond the funding limit will be at the...

  5. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... Agreement, as required, until it is fully funded. Any work beyond the funding limit will be at the...

  6. 14 CFR 1260.53 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Incremental funding. 1260.53 Section 1260.53 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.53 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding October 2000 (a) Only $___ of...

  7. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... Agreement, as required, until it is fully funded. Any work beyond the funding limit will be at the...

  8. 14 CFR 1260.53 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1260.53 Section 1260.53 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.53 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding October 2000...

  9. 14 CFR 1260.53 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1260.53 Section 1260.53 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.53 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding October 2000...

  10. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of...

  11. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of...

  12. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of...

  13. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of...

  14. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of...

  15. Visual Analysis of Dynamic Data Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Singhal, Mudita; Nakamura, Grant C.; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Freeman-Cadoret, Natalie A.

    2009-09-01

    For scientific data visualizations, real-time data streams present many interesting challenges when compared to static data. Real-time data are dynamic, transient, high-volume, and temporal. Effective visualizations need to be able to accommodate dynamic data behavior as well as abstract and present the data in ways that make sense to and are usable by humans. The Visual Content Analysis of Real-Time Data Streams project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is researching and prototyping dynamic visualization techniques and tools to help facilitate human understanding and comprehension of high-volume, real-time data. The general strategy of the project is to develop and evolve visual contexts that will organize and orient complex dynamic data in conceptual and perceptive views. The goal is to allow users to quickly grasp dynamic data in forms that are intuitive and natural without requiring intensive training in the use of specific visualization or analysis tools and methods. Thus far, the project has prototyped four different visualization prototypes that represents and convey dynamic data through human-recognizable contexts and paradigms such as hierarchies, relationships, time, and geography. We describe the design considerations and unique features of these dynamic visualization prototypes as well as our findings in the exploration and evaluation of their use.

  16. Structural Dynamics and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthman, Briana L.

    2013-01-01

    This project consists of two parts, the first will be the post-flight analysis of data from a Delta IV launch vehicle, and the second will be a Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. Shock and vibration data was collected on WGS-5 (Wideband Global SATCOM- 5) which was launched on a Delta IV launch vehicle. Using CAM (CAlculation with Matrices) software, the data is to be plotted into Time History, Shock Response Spectrum, and SPL (Sound Pressure Level) curves. In this format the data is to be reviewed and compared to flight instrumentation data from previous flights of the same launch vehicle. This is done to ensure the current mission environments, such as shock, random vibration, and acoustics, are not out of family with existing flight experience. In family means the peaks on the SRS curve for WGS-5 are similar to the peaks from the previous flights and there are no major outliers. The curves from the data will then be compiled into a useful format so that is can be peer reviewed then presented before an engineering review board if required. Also, the reviewed data will be uploaded to the Engineering Review Board Information System (ERBIS) to archive. The second part of this project is conducting Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. In 2010, Merritt Island High School partnered with NASA to design, build and launch a CubeSat. The team is now called StangSat in honor of their mascot, the mustang. Over the past few years, the StangSat team has built a satellite and has now been manifested for flight on a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch in 2014. To prepare for the final launch, a test flight was conducted in Mojave, California. StangSat was launched on a Prospector 18D, a high altitude rocket made by Garvey Spacecraft Corporation, along with their sister satellite CP9 built by California Polytechnic University. However, StangSat was damaged during an off nominal landing and this project will give beneficial insights into what loads the CubeSat experienced during the crash

  17. Dynamic Event Tree Analysis Through RAVEN

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. A. Kinoshita; A. Naviglio

    2013-09-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics is not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (D-PRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other application including the ones based on the MOOSE framework, developed by INL as well. RAVEN performs two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, RAVEN also models stochastic events, such as components failures, and performs uncertainty quantification. Such stochastic modeling is employed by using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This paper focuses on the first task and shows how it is possible to perform the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, the Dynamic PRA analysis, using Dynamic Event Tree, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out scenario is presented.

  18. Property Differencing for Incremental Checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Guowei; Khurshid, Sarfraz; Person, Suzette; Rungta, Neha

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces iProperty, a novel approach that facilitates incremental checking of programs based on a property di erencing technique. Speci cally, iProperty aims to reduce the cost of checking properties as they are initially developed and as they co-evolve with the program. The key novelty of iProperty is to compute the di erences between the new and old versions of expected properties to reduce the number and size of the properties that need to be checked during the initial development of the properties. Furthermore, property di erencing is used in synergy with program behavior di erencing techniques to optimize common regression scenarios, such as detecting regression errors or checking feature additions for conformance to new expected properties. Experimental results in the context of symbolic execution of Java programs annotated with properties written as assertions show the e ectiveness of iProperty in utilizing change information to enable more ecient checking.

  19. Incremental visual text analytics of news story development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krstajic, Milos; Najm-Araghi, Mohammad; Mansmann, Florian; Keim, Daniel A.

    2012-01-01

    Online news sources produce thousands of news articles every day, reporting on local and global real-world events. New information quickly replaces the old, making it difficult for readers to put current events in the context of the past. Additionally, the stories have very complex relationships and characteristics that are difficult to model: they can be weakly or strongly connected, or they can merge or split over time. In this paper, we present a visual analytics system for exploration of news topics in dynamic information streams, which combines interactive visualization and text mining techniques to facilitate the analysis of similar topics that split and merge over time. We employ text clustering techniques to automatically extract stories from online news streams and present a visualization that: 1) shows temporal characteristics of stories in different time frames with different level of detail; 2) allows incremental updates of the display without recalculating the visual features of the past data; 3) sorts the stories by minimizing clutter and overlap from edge crossings. By using interaction, stories can be filtered based on their duration and characteristics in order to be explored in full detail with details on demand. To demonstrate the usefulness of our system, case studies with real news data are presented and show the capabilities for detailed dynamic text stream exploration.

  20. Dynamic Analysis of Nuclear Energy System Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Den Durpel, Luc Van

    2004-06-17

    DANESS is an integrated process model for nuclear energy systems allowing the simulation of multiple reactors and fuel cycles in a continuously changing nuclear reactor park configuration. The model is energy demand driven and simulates all nuclear fuel cycle facilites, up to 10 reactors and fuels. Reactor and fuel cycle facility history are traced and the cost of generating energy is calculated per reactor and for total nuclear energy system. The DANESS model aims at performing dynamic systems analysis of nuclear energy development used for integrated analysis of development paths for nuclear energy, parameter scoping for new nuclear energy systems, economic analysis of nuclear energy, government role analysis, and education.

  1. Dynamical coupled-channel analysis at EBAC.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.-S. H.; Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this contribution, the author reports on the dynamical coupled-channels analysis being pursued at the Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC) of Jefferson Laboratory. EBAC was established in January 2006. Its objective is to extract the parameters associated with the excited states (N*) of the nucleon from the world data of meson production reactions, and to also develop theoretical interpretations of the extracted N* parameters.

  2. Dynamic analysis for shuttle design verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fralich, R. W.; Green, C. E.; Rheinfurth, M. H.

    1972-01-01

    Two approaches that are used for determining the modes and frequencies of space shuttle structures are discussed. The first method, direct numerical analysis, involves finite element mathematical modeling of the space shuttle structure in order to use computer programs for dynamic structural analysis. The second method utilizes modal-coupling techniques of experimental verification made by vibrating only spacecraft components and by deducing modes and frequencies of the complete vehicle from results obtained in the component tests.

  3. Final Report Computational Analysis of Dynamical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenheimer, John

    2012-05-08

    This is the final report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-93ER25164, initiated in 1993. This grant supported research of John Guckenheimer on computational analysis of dynamical systems. During that period, seventeen individuals received PhD degrees under the supervision of Guckenheimer and over fifty publications related to the grant were produced. This document contains copies of these publications.

  4. Martingales, nonstationary increments, and the efficient market hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Joseph L.; Bassler, Kevin E.; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the deep connection between nonstationary increments, martingales, and the efficient market hypothesis for stochastic processes x(t) with arbitrary diffusion coefficients D(x,t). We explain why a test for a martingale is generally a test for uncorrelated increments. We explain why martingales look Markovian at the level of both simple averages and 2-point correlations. But while a Markovian market has no memory to exploit and cannot be beaten systematically, a martingale admits memory that might be exploitable in higher order correlations. We also use the analysis of this paper to correct a misstatement of the ‘fair game’ condition in terms of serial correlations in Fama’s paper on the EMH. We emphasize that the use of the log increment as a variable in data analysis generates spurious fat tails and spurious Hurst exponents.

  5. Topological analysis of chaotic dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Robert

    1998-10-01

    Topological methods have recently been developed for the analysis of dissipative dynamical systems that operate in the chaotic regime. They were originally developed for three-dimensional dissipative dynamical systems, but they are applicable to all ``low-dimensional'' dynamical systems. These are systems for which the flow rapidly relaxes to a three-dimensional subspace of phase space. Equivalently, the associated attractor has Lyapunov dimension dL<3. Topological methods supplement methods previously developed to determine the values of metric and dynamical invariants. However, topological methods possess three additional features: they describe how to model the dynamics; they allow validation of the models so developed; and the topological invariants are robust under changes in control-parameter values. The topological-analysis procedure depends on identifying the stretching and squeezing mechanisms that act to create a strange attractor and organize all the unstable periodic orbits in this attractor in a unique way. The stretching and squeezing mechanisms are represented by a caricature, a branched manifold, which is also called a template or a knot holder. This turns out to be a version of the dynamical system in the limit of infinite dissipation. This topological structure is identified by a set of integer invariants. One of the truly remarkable results of the topological-analysis procedure is that these integer invariants can be extracted from a chaotic time series. Furthermore, self-consistency checks can be used to confirm the integer values. These integers can be used to determine whether or not two dynamical systems are equivalent; in particular, they can determine whether a model developed from time-series data is an accurate representation of a physical system. Conversely, these integers can be used to provide a model for the dynamical mechanisms that generate chaotic data. In fact, the author has constructed a doubly discrete classification of strange

  6. Cross-correlation of instantaneous phase increments in pressure-flow fluctuations: Applications to cerebral autoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Hu, Kun; Stanley, H. Eugene; Novak, Vera; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the relationship between the blood flow velocities (BFV) in the middle cerebral arteries and beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) recorded from a finger in healthy and post-stroke subjects during the quasisteady state after perturbation for four different physiologic conditions: supine rest, head-up tilt, hyperventilation, and CO2 rebreathing in upright position. To evaluate whether instantaneous BP changes in the steady state are coupled with instantaneous changes in the BFV, we compare dynamical patterns in the instantaneous phases of these signals, obtained from the Hilbert transform, as a function of time. We find that in post-stroke subjects the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV exhibit well-pronounced patterns that remain stable in time for all four physiologic conditions, while in healthy subjects these patterns are different, less pronounced, and more variable. We propose an approach based on the cross-correlation of the instantaneous phase increments to quantify the coupling between BP and BFV signals. We find that the maximum correlation strength is different for the two groups and for the different conditions. For healthy subjects the amplitude of the cross-correlation between the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV is small and attenuates within 3-5 heartbeats. In contrast, for post-stroke subjects, this amplitude is significantly larger and cross-correlations persist up to 20 heartbeats. Further, we show that the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV are cross-correlated even within a single heartbeat cycle. We compare the results of our approach with three complementary methods: direct BP-BFV cross-correlation, transfer function analysis, and phase synchronization analysis. Our findings provide insight into the mechanism of cerebral vascular control in healthy subjects, suggesting that this control mechanism may involve rapid adjustments (within a heartbeat) of the cerebral vessels, so that BFV remains steady in

  7. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch 2005 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 595, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including spacecraft navigation (autonomous and ground based); spacecraft trajectory design and maneuver planning; attitude analysis; attitude determination and sensor calibration; and attitude control subsystem (ACS) analysis and design. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, other government agencies, academia, and private industry.

  8. Dynamic analysis of very flexible beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotouhi, R.

    2007-08-01

    The dynamic analysis of flexible beams with large deformations is difficult and few studies have been performed. In this paper, the vibration analysis of several very flexible beams with large deflections using the finite element approach is studied. The examples were a cantilever beam and rotating flexible robot arms. The results were compared with the results available in the published literature. Several successful checks on the finite element results were performed to ensure the accuracy of the solutions. Due to the geometrical nonlinearity, several static equilibrium shapes can exist for large deflections of a cantilever beam for a given load. Nonlinear dynamic finite element analysis was implemented to investigate the stability of these shapes.

  9. Dynamical analysis of generalized Galileon cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Genly; Saridakis, Emmanuel N. E-mail: Emmanuel_Saridakis@baylor.edu

    2013-03-01

    We perform a detailed dynamical analysis of generalized Galileon cosmology, incorporating also the requirements of ghost and instabilities absence. We find that there are not any new stable late-time solutions apart from those of standard quintessence. Furthermore, depending on the model parameters the Galileons may survive at late times or they may completely disappear by the dynamics, however the corresponding observables are always independent of the Galileon terms, determined only by the usual action terms. Thus, although the Galileons can play an important role at inflationary or at recent times, in the future, when the universe will asymptotically reach its stable state, they will not have any effect on its evolution.

  10. Dynamic analysis: a new point of view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaves, Eduardo W. V.

    2016-05-01

    In this article, an alternative to the classical dynamic equation formulation is presented. To achieve this goal, we need to derive the reciprocal theorem in rates and the principle of virtual work in rates, in a small deformation regime, with which we will be able to obtain an expression for damping force. In this new formulation, some terms that are not commonly considered in the classical formulation appear, e.g., the term that is function of jerk (the rate of change of acceleration). Moreover, in this formulation the term that characterizes material nonlinearity, in dynamic analysis, appears naturally.

  11. Incremental Query Rewriting with Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riazanov, Alexandre; Aragão, Marcelo A. T.

    We address the problem of semantic querying of relational databases (RDB) modulo knowledge bases using very expressive knowledge representation formalisms, such as full first-order logic or its various fragments. We propose to use a resolution-based first-order logic (FOL) reasoner for computing schematic answers to deductive queries, with the subsequent translation of these schematic answers to SQL queries which are evaluated using a conventional relational DBMS. We call our method incremental query rewriting, because an original semantic query is rewritten into a (potentially infinite) series of SQL queries. In this chapter, we outline the main idea of our technique - using abstractions of databases and constrained clauses for deriving schematic answers, and provide completeness and soundness proofs to justify the applicability of this technique to the case of resolution for FOL without equality. The proposed method can be directly used with regular RDBs, including legacy databases. Moreover, we propose it as a potential basis for an efficient Web-scale semantic search technology.

  12. Cluster analysis of word frequency dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu S.; Bochkarev, V. V.; Belashova, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and modelling of word usage frequency time series. During one of previous studies, an assumption was put forward that all word usage frequencies have uniform dynamics approaching the shape of a Gaussian function. This assumption can be checked using the frequency dictionaries of the Google Books Ngram database. This database includes 5.2 million books published between 1500 and 2008. The corpus contains over 500 billion words in American English, British English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Hebrew, and Chinese. We clustered time series of word usage frequencies using a Kohonen neural network. The similarity between input vectors was estimated using several algorithms. As a result of the neural network training procedure, more than ten different forms of time series were found. They describe the dynamics of word usage frequencies from birth to death of individual words. Different groups of word forms were found to have different dynamics of word usage frequency variations.

  13. Precise Analysis of Polymer Rotational Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Mo; Baig, Chunggi

    2016-01-01

    Through the analysis of individual chain dynamics alongside the corresponding molecular structures under shear via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of C178H358 linear and short-chain branched polyethylene melts under shear flow, we observed that the conventional method based on the chain end-to-end vector (and/or the gyration tensor of chain) is susceptible to quantitatively inaccurate measurements and often misleading information in describing the rotational dynamics of polymers. Identifying the flaw as attributed to strong irregular Brownian fluctuations inherent to the chain ends associated with their large free volume and strong molecular collisions, we propose a simple, robust way based on the chain center-to-center vector connecting the two centers of mass of the bisected chain, which is shown to adequately describe polymer rotational dynamics without such shortcomings. We present further consideration that the proposed method can be useful in accurately measuring the overall chain structure and dynamics of polymeric materials with various molecular architectures, including branched and ring polymers. PMID:26743689

  14. Niche versus neutrality: a dynamical analysis.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhny, Michael; Seri, Efrat; Chocron, Rachel; Flather, Curtis H; Kadmon, Ronen; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the forces shaping ecological communities is of crucial importance for basic science and conservation. After 50 years in which ecological theory has focused on either stable communities driven by niche-based forces or nonstable "neutral" communities driven by demographic stochasticity, contemporary theories suggest that ecological communities are driven by the simultaneous effects of both types of mechanisms. Here we examine this paradigm using the longest available records for the dynamics of tropical trees and breeding birds. Applying a macroecological approach and fluctuation analysis techniques borrowed from statistical physics, we show that both stabilizing mechanisms and demographic stochasticity fail to play a dominant role in shaping assemblages over time. Rather, community dynamics in these two very different systems is predominantly driven by environmental stochasticity. Clearly, the current melding of niche and neutral theories cannot account for such dynamics. Our results highlight the need for a new theory of community dynamics integrating environmental stochasticity with weak stabilizing forces and suggest that such theory may better describe the dynamics of ecological communities than current neutral theories, deterministic niche-based theories, or recent hybrids. PMID:25226179

  15. Dynamical robustness analysis of weighted complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhiwei; Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2013-09-01

    Robustness of weighted complex networks is analyzed from nonlinear dynamical point of view and with focus on different roles of high-degree and low-degree nodes. We find that the phenomenon for the low-degree nodes being the key nodes in the heterogeneous networks only appears in weakly weighted networks and for weak coupling. For all other parameters, the heterogeneous networks are always highly vulnerable to the failure of high-degree nodes; this point is the same as in the structural robustness analysis. We also find that with random inactivation, heterogeneous networks are always more robust than the corresponding homogeneous networks with the same average degree except for one special parameter. Thus our findings give an integrated picture for the dynamical robustness analysis on complex networks.

  16. Epock: rapid analysis of protein pocket dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Benoist; Chavent, Matthieu; Cragnolini, Tristan; Dahl, Anna Caroline E.; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe; Sansom, Mark S.P.; Baaden, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The volume of an internal protein pocket is fundamental to ligand accessibility. Few programs that compute such volumes manage dynamic data from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Limited performance often prohibits analysis of large datasets. We present Epock, an efficient command-line tool that calculates pocket volumes from MD trajectories. A plugin for the VMD program provides a graphical user interface to facilitate input creation, run Epock and analyse the results. Availability and implementation: Epock C++ source code, Python analysis scripts, VMD Tcl plugin, documentation and installation instructions are freely available at http://epock.bitbucket.org. Contact: benoist.laurent@gmail.com or baaden@smplinux.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25505095

  17. 12 CFR 324.208 - Incremental risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Incremental risk. 324.208 Section 324.208 Banks... ADEQUACY OF FDIC-SUPERVISED INSTITUTIONS Risk-Weighted Assets-Market Risk § 324.208 Incremental risk. (a) General requirement. An FDIC-supervised institution that measures the specific risk of a portfolio of...

  18. Analysis of integral lift-fan engine dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szuch, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    An integral lift-fan engine being considered for VTOL applications was simulated using the hybrid computer. A contractor-proposed fuel control and a simple model of the roll dynamics of a hovering VTOL airplane were used in the simulation. Both steady-state and transient data were generated. The desired engine time constant of 0.20 second was achieved for thrust increments less than 10 precent of the design thrust. For roll angle demands less than 10 deg, roll angle overshoot was acceptable with more than 84 percent of the demand achieved in 1 second.

  19. Simplified Dynamic Analysis of Grinders Spindle Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demec, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The contribution deals with the simplified dynamic analysis of surface grinding machine spindle node. Dynamic analysis is based on the use of the transfer matrix method, which is essentially a matrix form of method of initial parameters. The advantage of the described method, despite the seemingly complex mathematical apparatus, is primarily, that it does not require for solve the problem of costly commercial software using finite element method. All calculations can be made for example in MS Excel, which is advantageous especially in the initial stages of constructing of spindle node for the rapid assessment of the suitability its design. After detailing the entire structure of spindle node is then also necessary to perform the refined dynamic analysis in the environment of FEM, which it requires the necessary skills and experience and it is therefore economically difficult. This work was developed within grant project KEGA No. 023TUKE-4/2012 Creation of a comprehensive educational - teaching material for the article Production technique using a combination of traditional and modern information technology and e-learning.

  20. Dynamic Analysis of Nuclear Energy System Strategies

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2004-06-17

    DANESS is an integrated process model for nuclear energy systems allowing the simulation of multiple reactors and fuel cycles in a continuously changing nuclear reactor park configuration. The model is energy demand driven and simulates all nuclear fuel cycle facilites, up to 10 reactors and fuels. Reactor and fuel cycle facility history are traced and the cost of generating energy is calculated per reactor and for total nuclear energy system. The DANESS model aims atmore » performing dynamic systems analysis of nuclear energy development used for integrated analysis of development paths for nuclear energy, parameter scoping for new nuclear energy systems, economic analysis of nuclear energy, government role analysis, and education.« less

  1. Vehicle dynamic analysis using neuronal network algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oloeriu, Florin; Mocian, Oana

    2014-06-01

    Theoretical developments of certain engineering areas, the emergence of new investigation tools, which are better and more precise and their implementation on-board the everyday vehicles, all these represent main influence factors that impact the theoretical and experimental study of vehicle's dynamic behavior. Once the implementation of these new technologies onto the vehicle's construction had been achieved, it had led to more and more complex systems. Some of the most important, such as the electronic control of engine, transmission, suspension, steering, braking and traction had a positive impact onto the vehicle's dynamic behavior. The existence of CPU on-board vehicles allows data acquisition and storage and it leads to a more accurate and better experimental and theoretical study of vehicle dynamics. It uses the information offered directly by the already on-board built-in elements of electronic control systems. The technical literature that studies vehicle dynamics is entirely focused onto parametric analysis. This kind of approach adopts two simplifying assumptions. Functional parameters obey certain distribution laws, which are known in classical statistics theory. The second assumption states that the mathematical models are previously known and have coefficients that are not time-dependent. Both the mentioned assumptions are not confirmed in real situations: the functional parameters do not follow any known statistical repartition laws and the mathematical laws aren't previously known and contain families of parameters and are mostly time-dependent. The purpose of the paper is to present a more accurate analysis methodology that can be applied when studying vehicle's dynamic behavior. A method that provides the setting of non-parametrical mathematical models for vehicle's dynamic behavior is relying on neuronal networks. This method contains coefficients that are time-dependent. Neuronal networks are mostly used in various types' system controls, thus

  2. Expansion of epicyclic gear dynamic analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Linda Smith; Pike, James A.

    1987-01-01

    The multiple mesh/single stage dynamics program is a gear tooth analysis program which determines detailed geometry, dynamic loads, stresses, and surface damage factors. The program can analyze a variety of both epicyclic and single mesh systems with spur or helical gear teeth including internal, external, and buttress tooth forms. The modifications refine the options for the flexible carrier and flexible ring gear rim and adds three options: a floating Sun gear option; a natural frequency option; and a finite element compliance formulation for helical gear teeth. The option for a floating Sun incorporates two additional degrees of freedom at the Sun center. The natural frequency option evaluates the frequencies of planetary, star, or differential systems as well as the effect of additional springs at the Sun center and those due to a flexible carrier and/or ring gear rim. The helical tooth pair finite element calculated compliance is obtained from an automated element breakup of the helical teeth and then is used with the basic gear dynamic solution and stress postprocessing routines. The flexible carrier or ring gear rim option for planetary and star spur gear systems allows the output torque per carrier and ring gear rim segment to vary based on the dynamic response of the entire system, while the total output torque remains constant.

  3. Dynamic feature analysis in bidirectional pedestrian flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Xia, Yang; Winnie, Daamen; Serge, Paul Hoogendoorn; Hai-Rong, Dong; Xiu-Ming, Yao

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of dynamic features of pedestrian flows is one of the most exciting topics in pedestrian dynamics. This paper focuses on the effect of homogeneity and heterogeneity in three parameters of the social force model, namely desired velocity, reaction time, and body size, on the moving dynamics of bidirectional pedestrian flows in the corridors. The speed and its deviation in free flows are investigated. Simulation results show that the homogeneous higher desired speed which is less than a critical threshold, shorter reaction time or smaller body size results in higher speed of flows. The free dynamics is more sensitive to the heterogeneity in desired speed than that in reaction time or in body size. In particular, an inner lane formation is observed in normal lanes. Furthermore, the breakdown probability and the start time of breakdown are focused on. This study reveals that the sizes of homogeneous desired speed, reaction time or body size play more important roles in affecting the breakdown than the heterogeneities in these three parameters do. Project supported jointly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61233001) and the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities of China (Grant No. 2013JBZ007).

  4. Monitoring marine heavy metal contamination via the chemical analysis of foraminifera and growth increments in bivalves - a pilot study from a Pb and Zn mining region in western Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, C.; Asmund, G.; Elberling, B.; Frei, D.; Knudsen, C.; Rasmussen, P.

    2011-12-01

    Annual monitoring of heavy metal concentrations in the fjords (sea water, seaweed, lichens, blue mussels, shorthorn sculpin and Northern prawn) adjacent to the Black Angel lead-zinc mine (active 1973-1990) at Maarmorilik, western Greenland was initiated during operation of the mine and continues through to today. This pilot study tests whether the calcareous shells of bivalves and foraminifera register these known variations in heavy metal concentrations. Live individuals of Mytilus edulis were collected through a transect of monitoring stations in 2009 and PB-Zn concentrations were measured at multiple points within the yearly increments using LA-ICP-MS. Individuals aged between 12 and 28 years were measured and demonstrated a clear signal of mine closure even at 40 km distance from the plant. Foraminifera (Melonis barleeanus) from a sediment core dating from 1880 AD to present have previously been shown to display a greater percentage of deformities during the period of mining activity (Elberling et al. 2003) possibly suggesting a correlation between heavy metal concentrations in sea water and morphological development. LA-ICP-MS analysis of individual foraminifera confirms an increase in Pb-Zn uptake during mining operations. Although it could therefore be expected that Pb-Zn concentrations would be enhanced in the 'deformed' foraminifera relative to the 'non-deformed', no difference in Pb-Zn was concentrations was detected. This short pilot study (Jessen et al.2010) demonstrates the potential of calcareous material as indicators of environmental pollution and their applicability as a monitoring tool in remote regions. Jessen CA, Asmund G, Elberling B, Frei D, Knudsen C and Rasmussen P. 2010 Monitoring marine heavy metal contamination via the chemical analysis of growth increments in bivalves - a pilot study. Danmarks og Grønlands Geologiske Undersøgelse Rapport 2010/86. 1-20 Elberling, B., Knudsen, K. L., Kristensen, P. H., and Asmund, G. (2003) Applying

  5. DEAN: A program for dynamic engine analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadler, G. G.; Melcher, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    The Dynamic Engine Analysis program, DEAN, is a FORTRAN code implemented on the IBM/370 mainframe at NASA Lewis Research Center for digital simulation of turbofan engine dynamics. DEAN is an interactive program which allows the user to simulate engine subsystems as well as a full engine systems with relative ease. The nonlinear first order ordinary differential equations which define the engine model may be solved by one of four integration schemes, a second order Runge-Kutta, a fourth order Runge-Kutta, an Adams Predictor-Corrector, or Gear's method for still systems. The numerical data generated by the model equations are displayed at specified intervals between which the user may choose to modify various parameters affecting the model equations and transient execution. Following the transient run, versatile graphics capabilities allow close examination of the data. DEAN's modeling procedure and capabilities are demonstrated by generating a model of simple compressor rig.

  6. Multicomponent dynamical nucleation theory and sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, Shawn M; Schenter, Gregory K; Garrett, Bruce C

    2004-05-15

    Vapor to liquid multicomponent nucleation is a dynamical process governed by a delicate interplay between condensation and evaporation. Since the population of the vapor phase is dominated by monomers at reasonable supersaturations, the formation of clusters is governed by monomer association and dissociation reactions. Although there is no intrinsic barrier in the interaction potential along the minimum energy path for the association process, the formation of a cluster is impeded by a free energy barrier. Dynamical nucleation theory provides a framework in which equilibrium evaporation rate constants can be calculated and the corresponding condensation rate constants determined from detailed balance. The nucleation rate can then be obtained by solving the kinetic equations. The rate constants governing the multistep kinetics of multicomponent nucleation including sensitivity analysis and the potential influence of contaminants will be presented and discussed. PMID:15267849

  7. Velocity fluctuation analysis via dynamic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Gupta, D. K.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.

    2006-10-15

    A new method of calculating one-dimensional velocity fluctuations from spatially resolved density fluctuation measurements is presented. The algorithm uses vector-matching methods of dynamic programming that match structures, such as turbulent fluctuations, in two data sets. The associated time delay between data sets is estimated by determining an optimal path to transform one vector to another. This time-delay-estimation (TDE) method establishes a new benchmark for velocity analysis by achieving higher sensitivity and frequency response than previously developed methods, such as time-resolved cross correlations and wavelets. TDE has been successfully applied to beam emission spectroscopy measurements of density fluctuations to obtain poloidal flow fluctuations associated with such phenomena as the geodesic acoustic mode. The dynamic programming algorithm should allow extension to high frequency velocity fluctuations associated with underlying electrostatic potential and resulting ExB fluctuations.

  8. DynaMod: dynamic functional modularity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Choong-Hyun; Hwang, Taeho; Oh, Kimin; Yi, Gwan-Su

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of enriched functional categories in differentially expressed genes is important to extract the underlying biological processes of genome-wide expression profiles. Moreover, identification of the network of significant functional modules in these dynamic processes is an interesting challenge. This study introduces DynaMod, a web-based application that identifies significant functional modules reflecting the change of modularity and differential expressions that are correlated with gene expression profiles under different conditions. DynaMod allows the inspection of a wide variety of functional modules such as the biological pathways, transcriptional factor–target gene groups, microRNA–target gene groups, protein complexes and hub networks involved in protein interactome. The statistical significance of dynamic functional modularity is scored based on Z-statistics from the average of mutual information (MI) changes of involved gene pairs under different conditions. Significantly correlated gene pairs among the functional modules are used to generate a correlated network of functional categories. In addition to these main goals, this scoring strategy supports better performance to detect significant genes in microarray analyses, as the scores of correlated genes show the superior characteristics of the significance analysis compared with those of individual genes. DynaMod also offers cross-comparison between different analysis outputs. DynaMod is freely accessible at http://piech.kaist.ac.kr/dynamod. PMID:20460468

  9. Architectural Analysis of Dynamically Reconfigurable Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindvall, Mikael; Godfrey, Sally; Ackermann, Chris; Ray, Arnab; Yonkwa, Lyly

    2010-01-01

    oTpics include: the problem (increased flexibility of architectural styles decrease analyzability, behavior emerges and varies depending on the configuration, does the resulting system run according to the intended design, and architectural decisions can impede or facilitate testing); top down approach to architecture analysis, detection of defects and deviations, and architecture and its testability; currently targeted projects GMSEC and CFS; analyzing software architectures; analyzing runtime events; actual architecture recognition; GMPUB in Dynamic SAVE; sample output from new approach; taking message timing delays into account; CFS examples of architecture and testability; some recommendations for improved testablity; and CFS examples of abstract interfaces and testability; CFS example of opening some internal details.

  10. Incremental soil sampling root water uptake, or be great through others

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ray Allmaras pursued several research topics in relation to residue and tillage research. He looked for new tools to help explain soil responses to tillage, including disk permeameters and image analysis. The incremental sampler developed by Pikul and Allmaras allowed small-depth increment, volumetr...

  11. Perturbation analysis for patch occupancy dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; Nichols, James D.; McIntyre, Carol L.; Ferraz, Goncalo; Hines, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Perturbation analysis is a powerful tool to study population and community dynamics. This article describes expressions for sensitivity metrics reflecting changes in equilibrium occupancy resulting from small changes in the vital rates of patch occupancy dynamics (i.e., probabilities of local patch colonization and extinction). We illustrate our approach with a case study of occupancy dynamics of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nesting territories. Examination of the hypothesis of system equilibrium suggests that the system satisfies equilibrium conditions. Estimates of vital rates obtained using patch occupancy models are used to estimate equilibrium patch occupancy of eagles. We then compute estimates of sensitivity metrics and discuss their implications for eagle population ecology and management. Finally, we discuss the intuition underlying our sensitivity metrics and then provide examples of ecological questions that can be addressed using perturbation analyses. For instance, the sensitivity metrics lead to predictions about the relative importance of local colonization and local extinction probabilities in influencing equilibrium occupancy for rare and common species.

  12. Dynamical Analysis of the SHIELD Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNichols, Andrew Thomas; Teich, Yaron G.; Cannon, John M.

    2015-08-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the 12 extremely low-mass dwarf galaxies that comprise SHIELD, a product of the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey (ALFALFA). We use multi-configuration, high spatial (˜ 150 - 350 pc) and spectral (0.82 - 2.46 km s-1 ch-1) resolution data obtained from 21 cm observations conducted with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. For each source, we attempt to derive an inclination-corrected rotation curve, to calculate the maximum rotation velocity (≤ 30 km s-1 for the survey population), and to further constrain the H I mass. For sources from which a sufficiently precise rotation curve can be derived, we use spatially resolved Spitzer Space Telescope 3.6 and 4.5 μm images to determine the stellar mass as a function of radius. The gaseous and stellar mass estimates are then used to decompose the total dynamical mass values and to obtain neutral gas fractions and relative baryonic content. Characterizing the kinematics of the SHIELD galaxies allows us to draw more general conclusions about the structure and dynamical evolution of low mass dwarf galaxies in the local universe.This work is a result of collaboration with the SHIELD Team and is supported by NSF grant 1211683.

  13. Separate and combined effects of gabapentin and [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol in humans discriminating [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Lile, Joshua A; Wesley, Michael J; Kelly, Thomas H; Hays, Lon R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine a potential mechanism of action of gabapentin to manage cannabis-use disorders by determining the interoceptive effects of gabapentin in cannabis users discriminating [INCREMENT]-tetrahydrocannabinol ([INCREMENT]-THC) using a pharmacologically selective drug-discrimination procedure. Eight cannabis users learned to discriminate 30 mg oral [INCREMENT]-THC from placebo and then received gabapentin (600 and 1200 mg), [INCREMENT]-THC (5, 15, and 30 mg), and placebo alone and in combination. Self-report, task performance, and physiological measures were also collected. [INCREMENT]-THC served as a discriminative stimulus, produced positive subjective effects, elevated heart rate, and impaired psychomotor performance. Both doses of gabapentin substituted for the [INCREMENT]-THC discriminative stimulus and engendered subjective and performance-impairing effects that overlapped with those of [INCREMENT]-THC when administered alone. When administered concurrently, gabapentin shifted the discriminative-stimulus effects of [INCREMENT]-THC leftward/upward, and combinations of [INCREMENT]-THC and gabapentin generally produced larger effects on cannabinoid-sensitive outcomes relative to [INCREMENT]-THC alone. These results suggest that one mechanism by which gabapentin might facilitate cannabis abstinence is by producing effects that overlap with those of cannabinoids. PMID:26313650

  14. Dynamic analysis of the Milad Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Edwin; Ford, Mitchell; Coelho, Darren; Lawler, Lachlan; Ansourian, Peter; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Tahmasebinia, Faham

    2016-08-01

    This report involves the modelling of the Milad Tower using the finite element analysis program Strand7. A dynamic analysis was performed on the structure in order to understand the deflections and stresses as a result of earthquake and wind loading. In particular, Linear Static as well as Natural Frequency and Spectral Response solvers were used to determine the behaviour of the structure under loading. The findings of the report highlight that the structure was modelled accurately with the outputs representing realistic values. The report suggests that the design of the beams, columns, slabs and all structural members was sufficient enough to support the tower during maximum loading cases. The governing load case was earthquake loading.

  15. Environmental Aspects Regarding The Incremental Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tera, Melania

    2015-09-01

    Future technologies should aim at reducing the consumption of raw materials and energy, avoid technical losses, to save energy and mineral resources, to minimize the emissions and waste, eliminate any irrational use of all resources and also to minimize the environmental impact. The paper present from environmental point of view both a classic forming process such as deep-drawing and incremental forming process. The paper gives an overview of the main environmental aspects regarding the incremental forming process.

  16. NERVA 400E thrust train dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vronay, D. F.

    1972-01-01

    The natural frequencies and dynamic responses of the NERVA 400E engine thrust train were determined for nuclear space operations (NSO), and earth-orbital shuttle (EOS) during launch and boost conditions. For NSO, a mini-tank configuration was analyzed with the forward end of the upper truss assumed fixed at the stage/mini-tank interface. For EOS, both a mini-tank and an engine only configuration were analyzed for a specific engine assembly support (EAS) stiffness. For all cases the effect of the shield on dynamic response characteristics was determined by performing parallel analyses with and without the shield. Gimbaling loads were not generated as that effort was scheduled after the termination date. The analysis, while demonstrating the adequacy of the engine design, revealed serious deficiencies in the EAS. Responses at the unsupported ends of the engine are excessive. Responses at the nuclear subsystem interface appear acceptable. It is recommended that additional analysis and design effort be expended upon the EAS to ensure that all engine responses stay within reasonable bounds.

  17. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  18. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  19. Volatilities, Traded Volumes, and Price Increments in Derivative Securities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyungsik; Lim, Gyuchang; Kim, Soo Yong; Scalas, Enrico

    2007-03-01

    We apply the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to the statistics of the Korean treasury bond (KTB) futures from which the logarithmic increments, volatilities, and traded volumes are estimated over a specific time lag. For our case, the logarithmic increment of futures prices has no long-memory property, while the volatility and the traded volume exhibit the existence of long-memory property. To analyze and calculate whether the volatility clustering is due to the inherent higher-order correlation not detected by applying directly the DFA to logarithmic increments of the KTB futures, it is of importance to shuffle the original tick data of futures prices and to generate the geometric Brownian random walk with the same mean and standard deviation. It is really shown from comparing the three tick data that the higher-order correlation inherent in logarithmic increments makes the volatility clustering. Particularly, the result of the DFA on volatilities and traded volumes may be supported the hypothesis of price changes.

  20. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  1. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  2. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  3. Dynamic characterization and analysis of space shuttle SRM solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hufferd, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of the space shuttle solid rocket moter (TP-H1148) propellant were characterized and the expected limits of propellant variability were established. Dynamic shear modulus tests conducted on six production batches of TP-H1148 at various static and dynamic strain levels over the temperature range from 40 F to 90 F. A heat conduction analysis and dynamic response analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) were also conducted. The dynamic test results show significant dependence on static and dynamic strain levels and considerable batch-to-batch and within-batch variability. However, the results of the SRM dynamic response analyses clearly demonstrate that the stiffness of the propellant has no consequential on the overall SRM dynamic response. Only the mass of the propellant needs to be considered in the dynamic analysis of the space shuttle SRM.

  4. A Novel Classification Algorithm Based on Incremental Semi-Supervised Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Mei, Jingyuan; Sun, Jinping; Wang, Jun; Yang, Erfu; Hussain, Amir

    2015-01-01

    For current computational intelligence techniques, a major challenge is how to learn new concepts in changing environment. Traditional learning schemes could not adequately address this problem due to a lack of dynamic data selection mechanism. In this paper, inspired by human learning process, a novel classification algorithm based on incremental semi-supervised support vector machine (SVM) is proposed. Through the analysis of prediction confidence of samples and data distribution in a changing environment, a “soft-start” approach, a data selection mechanism and a data cleaning mechanism are designed, which complete the construction of our incremental semi-supervised learning system. Noticeably, with the ingenious design procedure of our proposed algorithm, the computation complexity is reduced effectively. In addition, for the possible appearance of some new labeled samples in the learning process, a detailed analysis is also carried out. The results show that our algorithm does not rely on the model of sample distribution, has an extremely low rate of introducing wrong semi-labeled samples and can effectively make use of the unlabeled samples to enrich the knowledge system of classifier and improve the accuracy rate. Moreover, our method also has outstanding generalization performance and the ability to overcome the concept drift in a changing environment. PMID:26275294

  5. Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Device Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Corey Thuen

    2013-01-01

    The On-Device Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Applications (ODAMA) project was started in an effort to protect mobile devices used in Industrial Control Systems (ICS) from cyber attack. Because mobile devices hide as much of the “computer” as possible, the user’s ability to assess the software running on their system is limited. The research team chose Google’s Android platform for this initial research because it is open source and it would give us freedom in our approach, including the ability to modify the mobile device’s operating system itself. The research team concluded that a Privileged Application was the right approach, and the result was ODAMA. This project is an important piece of the work to secure the expanding use of mobile devices with our nation’s critical infrastructure.

  6. Manufacturing in space: Fluid dynamics numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.; Spradley, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Natural convection in a spherical container with cooling at the center was numerically simulated using the Lockheed-developed General Interpolants Method (GIM) numerical fluid dynamic computer program. The numerical analysis was simplified by assuming axisymmetric flow in the spherical container, with the symmetry axis being a sphere diagonal parallel to the gravity vector. This axisymmetric spherical geometry was intended as an idealization of the proposed Lal/Kroes growing experiments to be performed on board Spacelab. Results were obtained for a range of Rayleigh numbers from 25 to 10,000. For a temperature difference of 10 C from the cooling sting at the center to the container surface, and a gravitional loading of 0.000001 g a computed maximum fluid velocity of about 2.4 x 0.00001 cm/sec was reached after about 250 sec. The computed velocities were found to be approximately proportional to the Rayleigh number over the range of Rayleigh numbers investigated.

  7. Dynamic Chest Image Analysis: Model-Based Perfusion Analysis in Dynamic Pulmonary Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jianming; Järvi, Timo; Kiuru, Aaro; Kormano, Martti; Svedström, Erkki

    2003-12-01

    The "Dynamic Chest Image Analysis" project aims to develop model-based computer analysis and visualization methods for showing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging technique. We have proposed and evaluated a multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation model for ventilation analysis. This paper presents a new model-based method for pulmonary perfusion analysis. According to perfusion properties, we first devise a novel mathematical function to form a perfusion model. A simple yet accurate approach is further introduced to extract cardiac systolic and diastolic phases from the heart, so that this cardiac information may be utilized to accelerate the perfusion analysis and improve its sensitivity in detecting pulmonary perfusion abnormalities. This makes perfusion analysis not only fast but also robust in computation; consequently, perfusion analysis becomes computationally feasible without using contrast media. Our clinical case studies with 52 patients show that this technique is effective for pulmonary embolism even without using contrast media, demonstrating consistent correlations with computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) studies. This fluoroscopical examination takes only about 2 seconds for perfusion study with only low radiation dose to patient, involving no preparation, no radioactive isotopes, and no contrast media.

  8. Communication: A combined periodic density functional and incremental wave-function-based approach for the dispersion-accounting time-resolved dynamics of {sup 4}He nanodroplets on surfaces: {sup 4}He/graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de; Stoll, Hermann; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Causà, Mauro; Voloshina, Elena; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Pi, Martí

    2014-10-21

    In this work we propose a general strategy to calculate accurate He–surface interaction potentials. It extends the dispersionless density functional approach recently developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] to adsorbate-surface interactions by including periodic boundary conditions. We also introduce a scheme to parametrize the dispersion interaction by calculating two- and three-body dispersion terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) level via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. The performance of the composite approach is tested on {sup 4}He/graphene by determining the energies of the low-lying selective adsorption states, finding an excellent agreement with the best available theoretical data. Second, the capability of the approach to describe dispersionless correlation effects realistically is used to extract dispersion effects in time-dependent density functional simulations on the collision of {sup 4}He droplets with a single graphene sheet. It is found that dispersion effects play a key role in the fast spreading of the {sup 4}He nanodroplet, the evaporation-like process of helium atoms, and the formation of solid-like helium structures. These characteristics are expected to be quite general and highly relevant to explain experimental measurements with the newly developed helium droplet mediated deposition technique.

  9. Dynamic modelling and analysis of space webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Baoyin, HeXi; Li, JunFeng

    2011-04-01

    Future space missions demand operations on large flexible structures, for example, space webs, the lightweight cable nets deployable in space, which can serve as platforms for very large structures or be used to capture orbital objects. The interest in research on space webs is likely to increase in the future with the development of promising applications such as Furoshiki sat-ellite of JAXA, Robotic Geostationary Orbit Restorer (ROGER) of ESA and Grapple, Retrieve And Secure Payload (GRASP) of NASA. Unlike high-tensioned nets in civil engineering, space webs may be low-tensioned or tensionless, and extremely flexible, owing to the microgravity in the orbit and the lack of support components, which may cause computational difficulties. Mathematical models are necessary in the analysis of space webs, especially in the conceptual design and evaluation for prototypes. A full three-dimensional finite element (FE) model was developed in this work. Trivial truss elements were adopted to reduce the computational complexity. Considering cable is a compression-free material and its tensile stiffness is also variable, we introduced the cable material constitutive relationship to work out an accurate and feasible model for prototype analysis and design. In the static analysis, the stress distribution and global deformation of the webs were discussed to get access to the knowledge of strength of webs with different types of meshes. In the dynamic analysis, special attention was paid to the impact problem. The max stress and global deformation were investigated. The simulation results indicate the interesting phenomenon which may be worth further research.

  10. Analysis of dynamic instability for arbitrarily laminated skew plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. Y.; Shih, Y. S.

    2006-04-01

    The dynamic instability and nonlinear response of rectangular and skew laminated plates subjected to periodic in-plane load are studied. Based on von Karman plate theory, the large amplitude dynamic equations of thin laminated plates are derived by applying the approach of generalized double Fourier series. On the assumed mode shape, the governing equations are reduced to the Mathieu equation using Galerkin's method. The incremental harmonic balance (IHB) method is applied to solve the nonlinear temporal equation of motion, and the region of dynamic instability is determined in this work. Calculations are carried out for isotropic, angle-ply and arbitrarily laminated plates under two cases of boundary conditions. The principal region of dynamic instability associated with the effect of the stacking sequence of lamination and the skew angle of plate are also investigated and discussed. The results obtained indicated that the instability behavior of the system is determined by the several parameters, such as the boundary condition, number of the layers, stacking sequence, in-plane load, aspect ratio, amplitude and the skew angle of plate.

  11. Passivhaus: indoor comfort and energy dynamic analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, Antonella; Pagliuca, Antonello; Cardinale, Nicola; Rospi, Gianluca

    2013-04-01

    The research aims to verify the energy performance as well as the indoor comfort of an energy class A+ building, built so that the sum of the heat passive contributions of solar radiation, transmitted through the windows, and the heat generated inside the building, are adeguate to compensate for the envelope loss during the cold season. The building, located in Emilia Romagna (Italy), was built using a wooden structure, an envelope realized using a pinewood sandwich panels (transmittance U = 0.250 W/m2K) and, inside, a wool flax insulation layer and thermal window frame with low-emissivity glass (U = 0524 W/m2K). The building design and construction process has followed the guidelines set by "CasaClima". The building has been modeled in the code of dynamic calculation "Energy Plus" by the Design Builder application and divided it into homogenous thermal zones, characterized by winter indoor temperature set at 20 ° (+ / - 1 °) and summer indoor temperature set at 26 ° (+ / - 1 °). It has modeled: the envelope, as described above, the "free" heat contributions, the air conditioning system, the Mechanical Ventilation system as well as home automation solutions. The air conditioning system is an heat pump, able to guarantee an optimization of energy consumption (in fact, it uses the "free" heat offered by the external environment for conditioning indoor environment). As regards the air recirculation system, it has been used a mechanical ventilation system with internal heat cross-flow exchanger, with an efficiency equal to 50%. The domotic solutions, instead, regard a system for the control of windows external screening using reeds, adjustable as a function of incident solar radiation and a lighting management system adjusted automatically using a dimmer. A so realized building meets the requirement imposed from Italian standard UNI/TS 11300 1, UNI/TS 11300 2 and UNI/TS 11300 3. The analysis was performed according to two different configurations: in "spontaneous

  12. Fusion metrics for dynamic situation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik P.; Pribilski, Mike; Daughtery, Bryan; Roscoe, Brian; Gunsett, Josh

    2004-08-01

    To design information fusion systems, it is important to develop metrics as part of a test and evaluation strategy. In many cases, fusion systems are designed to (1) meet a specific set of user information needs (IN), (2) continuously validate information pedigree and updates, and (3) maintain this performance under changing conditions. A fusion system"s performance is evaluated in many ways. However, developing a consistent set of metrics is important for standardization. For example, many track and identification metrics have been proposed for fusion analysis. To evaluate a complete fusion system performance, level 4 sensor management and level 5 user refinement metrics need to be developed simultaneously to determine whether or not the fusion system is meeting information needs. To describe fusion performance, the fusion community needs to agree on a minimum set of metrics for user assessment and algorithm comparison. We suggest that such a minimum set should include feasible metrics of accuracy, confidence, throughput, timeliness, and cost. These metrics can be computed as confidence (probability), accuracy (error), timeliness (delay), throughput (amount) and cost (dollars). In this paper, we explore an aggregate set of metrics for fusion evaluation and demonstrate with information need metrics for dynamic situation analysis.

  13. Ozone layer protection: Country incremental costs

    SciTech Connect

    King, K.; Munasinghe, M.

    1995-07-01

    The framework presented in Chapter 1 by King and Munasinghe was developed to estimate the country-level incremental cost. This framework has been applied in several developing countries in transition. The purpose of the Workshop on Country-Level Incremental Costs of Phasing Out Ozone-Depleting Substances was to gather key analysts engaged in this work to review the framework and its practical application. They present the results of their work in India, Turkey, Jordan, and Zimbabwe (Chapter 2: Mason); Egypt (Chapter 3: Catanach); Thailand (Chapter 4: Widge, Radka, and Dillon); and Tunisia and Czechoslovakia (Chapter 5; Bendtsen).

  14. Insights to urban dynamics through landscape spatial pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TV, Ramachandra; Aithal, Bharath H.; Sanna, Durgappa D.

    2012-08-01

    Urbanisation is a dynamic complex phenomenon involving large scale changes in the land uses at local levels. Analyses of changes in land uses in urban environments provide a historical perspective of land use and give an opportunity to assess the spatial patterns, correlation, trends, rate and impacts of the change, which would help in better regional planning and good governance of the region. Main objective of this research is to quantify the urban dynamics using temporal remote sensing data with the help of well-established landscape metrics. Bangalore being one of the rapidly urbanising landscapes in India has been chosen for this investigation. Complex process of urban sprawl was modelled using spatio temporal analysis. Land use analyses show 584% growth in built-up area during the last four decades with the decline of vegetation by 66% and water bodies by 74%. Analyses of the temporal data reveals an increase in urban built up area of 342.83% (during 1973-1992), 129.56% (during 1992-1999), 106.7% (1999-2002), 114.51% (2002-2006) and 126.19% from 2006 to 2010. The Study area was divided into four zones and each zone is further divided into 17 concentric circles of 1 km incrementing radius to understand the patterns and extent of the urbanisation at local levels. The urban density gradient illustrates radial pattern of urbanisation for the period 1973-2010. Bangalore grew radially from 1973 to 2010 indicating that the urbanisation is intensifying from the central core and has reached the periphery of the Greater Bangalore. Shannon's entropy, alpha and beta population densities were computed to understand the level of urbanisation at local levels. Shannon's entropy values of recent time confirms dispersed haphazard urban growth in the city, particularly in the outskirts of the city. This also illustrates the extent of influence of drivers of urbanisation in various directions. Landscape metrics provided in depth knowledge about the sprawl. Principal component

  15. Two numerical models for landslide dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungr, Oldrich; McDougall, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Two microcomputer-based numerical models (Dynamic ANalysis (DAN) and three-dimensional model DAN (DAN3D)) have been developed and extensively used for analysis of landslide runout, specifically for the purposes of practical landslide hazard and risk assessment. The theoretical basis of both models is a system of depth-averaged governing equations derived from the principles of continuum mechanics. Original features developed specifically during this work include: an open rheological kernel; explicit use of tangential strain to determine the tangential stress state within the flowing sheet, which is both more realistic and beneficial to the stability of the model; orientation of principal tangential stresses parallel with the direction of motion; inclusion of the centripetal forces corresponding to the true curvature of the path in the motion direction and; the use of very simple and highly efficient free surface interpolation methods. Both models yield similar results when applied to the same sets of input data. Both algorithms are designed to work within the semi-empirical framework of the "equivalent fluid" approach. This approach requires selection of material rheology and calibration of input parameters through back-analysis of real events. Although approximate, it facilitates simple and efficient operation while accounting for the most important characteristics of extremely rapid landslides. The two models have been verified against several controlled laboratory experiments with known physical basis. A large number of back-analyses of real landslides of various types have also been carried out. One example is presented. Calibration patterns are emerging, which give a promise of predictive capability.

  16. NGC1300 dynamics - III. Orbital analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsis, P. A.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Grosbøl, P.

    2010-10-01

    We present the orbital analysis of four response models that succeed in reproducing morphological features of NGC1300. Two of them assume a planar (2D) geometry with Ωp = 22 and 16kms-1kpc-1, respectively. The two others assume a cylindrical (thick) disc and rotate with the same pattern speeds as the 2D models. These response models reproduce most successfully main morphological features of NGC1300 among a large number of models, as became evident in a previous study. Our main result is the discovery of three new dynamical mechanisms that can support structures in a barred spiral grand design system. These mechanisms are presented in characteristic cases, where these dynamical phenomena take place. They refer first to the support of a strong bar, of ansae type, almost solely by chaotic orbits, then to the support of spirals by chaotic orbits that for a certain number of pattern revolutions follow an n:1 (n = 7,8) morphology, and finally to the support of spiral arms by a combination of orbits trapped around L4, 5 and sticky chaotic orbits with the same Jacobi constant. We have encountered these dynamical phenomena in a large fraction of the cases we studied as we varied the parameters of our general models, without forcing in some way their appearance. This suggests that they could be responsible for the observed morphologies of many barred spiral galaxies. Comparing our response models among themselves we find that the NGC1300 morphology is best described by a thick-disc model for the bar region and a 2D disc model for the spirals, with both components rotating with the same pattern speed Ωp = 16km s-1kpc-1. In such a case, the whole structure is included inside the corotation of the system. The bar is supported mainly by regular orbits, while the spirals are supported by chaotic orbits. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile: programme ESO 69.A-0021. E-mail: patsis@academyofathens.gr (PAP); ckalapot@phys.uoa.gr (CK

  17. What Oracle doesn`t tell you about CASE: An incremental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, A.M.

    1995-04-04

    Oracle CASE is a very large, complex software tool. The incremental-approach method described here helps developers break the analysis paralysis syndrome by using a group of rules of thumb to build more and better applications faster.

  18. Strategic Planning vs. Disjointed Incrementalism: An Institutional Research Perspective. SAIR Conference Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jean, Paul M.; And Others

    Strategic planning in higher education is discussed from the perspective of institutional research. Attention is directed to: institutional mission, institutional assessment, institutional leadership, environmental assessment, market analysis, and competitive position. Strategic planning merges incrementalism, which focuses on flexibility,…

  19. Introducing Dynamic Analysis Using Malthus's Principle of Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pingle, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Declares the use of dynamic models is increasing in macroeconomics. Explains how to introduce dynamic models to students whose technical skills are modest or varied. Chooses Malthus's Principle of Population as a natural context for introducing dynamic analysis because it provides a method for reviewing the mathematical tools and theoretical…

  20. The Space Station decision - Incremental politics and technological choice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, Howard E.

    1990-01-01

    Using primary documents and interviews with participants, this book describes the events that led up to the 1984 decision that NASA should build a permanently occupied, international space station in low earth orbit. The role that civil servants in NASA played in initiating the program is highlighted. The trail of the Space Station proposal as its advocates devised strategies to push it through the White House policy review process is followed. The critical analysis focuses on the way in which 'incrementalism' (the tendency of policy makers to introduce incremental changes once projects are under way) operated in connection with the Space Station program. The book calls for a commitment to a long-range space policy.

  1. Incremental constitutive formulation for time dependent materials: creep integral approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazal, Claude; Moutou Pitti, Rostand

    2011-08-01

    This paper deals with the development of a mathematical approach for the solution of linear, non-ageing viscoelastic materials undergoing mechanical deformation. The formulation is derived from integral approach based on a discrete spectrum representation for the creep tensor. Finite difference integration is used to discretize the integral operators. The resulting constitutive model contains an internal state variable which represents the influence of the whole past history of stress and strain. Thus the difficulty of retaining the strain history in computer solutions is avoided. A complete general formulation of linear viscoelastic stress-strain analysis is developed in terms of increments of stresses and strains. Numerical simulations are included in order to validate the incremental constitutive equations.

  2. International Space Station Increment-2 Microgravity Environment Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Hrovat, Kenneth; Kelly, Eric; McPherson, Kevin; Reckart, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    This summary report presents the results of some of the processed acceleration data, collected aboard the International Space Station during the period of May to August 2001, the Increment-2 phase of the station. Two accelerometer systems were used to measure the acceleration levels during activities that took place during the Increment-2 segment. However, not all of the activities were analyzed for this report due to time constraints, lack of precise information regarding some payload operations and other station activities. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration sponsors the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System and the Space Acceleration Microgravity System to support microgravity science experiments, which require microgravity acceleration measurements. On April 19, 2001, both the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System and the Space Acceleration Measurement System units were launched on STS-100 from the Kennedy Space Center for installation on the International Space Station. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System unit was flown to the station in support of science experiments requiring quasi-steady acceleration measurements, while the Space Acceleration Measurement System unit was flown to support experiments requiring vibratory acceleration measurement. Both acceleration systems are also used in support of vehicle microgravity requirements verification. The International Space Station Increment-2 reduced gravity environment analysis presented in this report uses acceleration data collected by both sets of accelerometer systems: 1) The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System, which consists of two sensors: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment Sensor Subsystem, a low frequency range sensor (up to 1 Hz), is used to characterize the quasi-steady environment for payloads and the vehicle, and the High Resolution Accelerometer Package, which is used to characterize the vibratory environment up to 100 Hz. 2) The Space

  3. Dynamic analysis of news streams: institutional versus environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin; Corman, Steven

    2004-07-01

    Many societal phenomena are studied through analysis of their representation in media-related texts, such as news articles. The dynamics of such data reflect the phenomenon's underlying generative mechanism. Media artifacts are assumed to mirror the social activity occurring in the environment, thus observed dynamics are assumed to reflect environmental dynamics. The institutional mechanics of media production also affect the observed dynamics however. In this study we examine the extent to which institutional versus environmental effects explain the observed dynamics of media content, in particular focusing on semi-continuous "news streams". We examine the dynamics of news streams produced by the electronic news organization Reuters, immediately following the events of September 11, 2001. We find that many of the observed dynamics appear institutionally generated. We conclude with methodological suggestions concerning the dynamic analysis of media content. PMID:15233881

  4. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental...

  5. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental...

  6. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental...

  7. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental...

  8. Flexible aircraft dynamic modeling for dynamic analysis and control synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, David K.

    1989-01-01

    The linearization and simplification of a nonlinear, literal model for flexible aircraft is highlighted. Areas of model fidelity that are critical if the model is to be used for control system synthesis are developed and several simplification techniques that can deliver the necessary model fidelity are discussed. These techniques include both numerical and analytical approaches. An analytical approach, based on first-order sensitivity theory is shown to lead not only to excellent numerical results, but also to closed-form analytical expressions for key system dynamic properties such as the pole/zero factors of the vehicle transfer-function matrix. The analytical results are expressed in terms of vehicle mass properties, vibrational characteristics, and rigid-body and aeroelastic stability derivatives, thus leading to the underlying causes for critical dynamic characteristics.

  9. Engine dynamic analysis with general nonlinear finite element codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A general engine dynamic analysis as a standard design study computational tool is described for the prediction and understanding of complex engine dynamic behavior. Improved definition of engine dynamic response provides valuable information and insights leading to reduced maintenance and overhaul costs on existing engine configurations. Application of advanced engine dynamic simulation methods provides a considerable cost reduction in the development of new engine designs by eliminating some of the trial and error process done with engine hardware development.

  10. 12 CFR 3.208 - Incremental risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... internal risk management methodologies for identifying, measuring, and managing risk. (c) Calculation of... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Incremental risk. 3.208 Section 3.208 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CAPITAL ADEQUACY STANDARDS...

  11. Input-Based Incremental Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcroft, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This fascinating presentation of current research undoes numerous myths about how we most effectively learn new words in a second language. In clear, reader-friendly text, the author details the successful approach of IBI vocabulary instruction, which emphasizes the presentation of target vocabulary as input early on and the incremental (gradual)…

  12. Incremental social learning in particle swarms.

    PubMed

    de Oca, Marco A Montes; Stutzle, Thomas; Van den Enden, Ken; Dorigo, Marco

    2011-04-01

    Incremental social learning (ISL) was proposed as a way to improve the scalability of systems composed of multiple learning agents. In this paper, we show that ISL can be very useful to improve the performance of population-based optimization algorithms. Our study focuses on two particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithms: a) the incremental particle swarm optimizer (IPSO), which is a PSO algorithm with a growing population size in which the initial position of new particles is biased toward the best-so-far solution, and b) the incremental particle swarm optimizer with local search (IPSOLS), in which solutions are further improved through a local search procedure. We first derive analytically the probability density function induced by the proposed initialization rule applied to new particles. Then, we compare the performance of IPSO and IPSOLS on a set of benchmark functions with that of other PSO algorithms (with and without local search) and a random restart local search algorithm. Finally, we measure the benefits of using incremental social learning on PSO algorithms by running IPSO and IPSOLS on problems with different fitness distance correlations. PMID:20875976

  13. Effects of climate variables on intra-annual stem radial increment in Pinus cembra (L.) along the alpine treeline ecotone

    PubMed Central

    GRUBER, Andreas; ZIMMERMANN, Jolanda; WIESER, Gerhard; OBERHUBER, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Within the alpine treeline ecotone tree growth is increasingly restricted by extreme climate conditions. Although intra-annual stem growth recorded by dendrometers can be linked to climate, stem diameter increments in slow-growing subalpine trees are masked by changes in tree water status. We tested the hypothesis that intra-annual radial stem growth in Pinus cembra is influenced by different climate variables along the treeline ecotone in the Austrian Alps. Dendrometer traces were compared with dynamics of xylem cell development to date onset of cambial activity and radial stem growth in spring. Daily fluctuations in stem radius reflected changes in tree water status throughout the treeline ecotone. Extracted daily radial increments were significantly correlated with air temperature at the timberline and treeline only, where budburst, cambial activity and enlargement of first tracheids also occurred quite similarly. A close relationship was detected between radial increment and number of enlarging tracheids throughout the treeline ecotone. We conclude that (i) the relationship between climate and radial stem growth within the treeline ecotone is dependent on a close coupling to atmospheric climate conditions and (ii) initiation of cambial activity and radial growth in spring can be distinguished from stem re-hydration by histological analysis. PMID:21423861

  14. Effects of climate variables on intra-annual stem radial increment in Pinus cembra (L.) along the alpine treeline ecotone.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Andreas; Zimmermann, Jolanda; Wieser, Gerhard; Oberhuber, Walter

    2009-08-01

    Within the alpine treeline ecotone tree growth is increasingly restricted by extreme climate conditions. Although intra-annual stem growth recorded by dendrometers can be linked to climate, stem diameter increments in slow-growing subalpine trees are masked by changes in tree water status.We tested the hypothesis that intra-annual radial stem growth in Pinus cembra is influenced by different climate variables along the treeline ecotone in the Austrian Alps. Dendrometer traces were compared with dynamics of xylem cell development to date onset of cambial activity and radial stem growth in spring.Daily fluctuations in stem radius reflected changes in tree water status throughout the treeline ecotone. Extracted daily radial increments were significantly correlated with air temperature at the timberline and treeline only, where budburst, cambial activity and enlargement of first tracheids also occurred quite similarly. A close relationship was detected between radial increment and number of enlarging tracheids throughout the treeline ecotone.We conclude that (i) the relationship between climate and radial stem growth within the treeline ecotone is dependent on a close coupling to atmospheric climate conditions and (ii) initiation of cambial activity and radial growth in spring can be distinguished from stem re-hydration by histological analysis. PMID:21423861

  15. DYNAMIC MECHANICAL ANALYSIS CHARACTERIZATION OF GLOVEBOX GLOVES

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P.

    2012-02-29

    As part of the characterization of various glovebox glove material from four vendors, the permeability of gas through each type as a function of temperature was determined and a discontinuity in the permeability with temperature was revealed. A series of tests to determine the viscoelastic properties of the glove materials as a function of temperature using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) was initiated. The glass transition temperature and the elastic and viscoelastic properties as a function of temperature up to maximum use temperature were determined for each glove material. The glass transition temperatures of the gloves were -60 C for butyl, -30 C for polyurethane, -16 C Hypalon{reg_sign}, - 16 C for Viton{reg_sign}, and -24 C for polyurethane-Hypalon{reg_sign}. The glass transition was too complex for the butyl-Hypalon{reg_sign} and butyl-Viton{reg_sign} composite gloves to be characterized by a single glass transition temperature. All of the glass transition temperatures exceed the vendor projected use temperatures.

  16. A dynamic human motion: coordination analysis.

    PubMed

    Pchelkin, Stepan; Shiriaev, Anton S; Freidovich, Leonid B; Mettin, Uwe; Gusev, Sergei V; Kwon, Woong; Paramonov, Leonid

    2015-02-01

    This article is concerned with the generic structure of the motion coordination system resulting from the application of the method of virtual holonomic constraints (VHCs) to the problem of the generation and robust execution of a dynamic humanlike motion by a humanoid robot. The motion coordination developed using VHCs is based on a motion generator equation, which is a scalar nonlinear differential equation of second order. It can be considered equivalent in function to a central pattern generator in living organisms. The relative time evolution of the degrees of freedom of a humanoid robot during a typical motion are specified by a set of coordination functions that uniquely define the overall pattern of the motion. This is comparable to a hypothesis on the existence of motion patterns in biomechanics. A robust control is derived based on a transverse linearization along the configuration manifold defined by the coordination functions. It is shown that the derived coordination and control architecture possesses excellent robustness properties. The analysis is performed on an example of a real human motion recorded in test experiments. PMID:25158624

  17. Characterization of sleep stages by correlations in the magnitude and sign of heartbeat increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bunde, Armin; Havlin, Shlomo; Penzel, Thomas; Peter, Jörg-Hermann; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2002-05-01

    We study correlation properties of the magnitude and the sign of the increments in the time intervals between successive heartbeats during light sleep, deep sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep using the detrended fluctuation analysis method. We find short-range anticorrelations in the sign time series, which are strong during deep sleep, weaker during light sleep, and even weaker during REM sleep. In contrast, we find long-range positive correlations in the magnitude time series, which are strong during REM sleep and weaker during light sleep. We observe uncorrelated behavior for the magnitude during deep sleep. Since the magnitude series relates to the nonlinear properties of the original time series, while the sign series relates to the linear properties, our findings suggest that the nonlinear properties of the heartbeat dynamics are more pronounced during REM sleep. Thus, the sign and the magnitude series provide information which is useful in distinguishing between the sleep stages.

  18. Incremental learning of skill collections based on intrinsic motivation

    PubMed Central

    Metzen, Jan H.; Kirchner, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Life-long learning of reusable, versatile skills is a key prerequisite for embodied agents that act in a complex, dynamic environment and are faced with different tasks over their lifetime. We address the question of how an agent can learn useful skills efficiently during a developmental period, i.e., when no task is imposed on him and no external reward signal is provided. Learning of skills in a developmental period needs to be incremental and self-motivated. We propose a new incremental, task-independent skill discovery approach that is suited for continuous domains. Furthermore, the agent learns specific skills based on intrinsic motivation mechanisms that determine on which skills learning is focused at a given point in time. We evaluate the approach in a reinforcement learning setup in two continuous domains with complex dynamics. We show that an intrinsically motivated, skill learning agent outperforms an agent which learns task solutions from scratch. Furthermore, we compare different intrinsic motivation mechanisms and how efficiently they make use of the agent's developmental period. PMID:23898265

  19. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir (NASA Increment 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During NASA Increment 4 (January to May 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 28 optical disks which were returned to Earth on STS-84. During this increment, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE), the Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT), Angular Liquid Bridge (ALB), Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM), Diffusion Controlled Apparatus Module (DCAM), Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS), Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFr), Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD), Protein Crystal Growth in Dewar (PCG/Dewar), Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), and Technical Evaluation of MIM (TEM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-84 operations, a Progress engine bum, Soyuz vehicle docking and undocking, and Progress vehicle docking. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  20. The analysis of Quadrocopter and Hexacopter dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepikhin, T. A.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this operation is to compare dynamic characteristics of two UAVs. The mathematical models of Quadrocopter and Hexacopter in case of full dynamics are considered. For both UAVs the timeless optimal control synthesis is made. Examples of rotational motion simulation between start and finish positions for Quadrocopter and Hexacopter are presented.

  1. Surrogate model reduction for linear dynamic systems based on a frequency domain modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.

    2015-10-01

    A novel model reduction methodology for linear dynamic systems with parameter variations is presented based on a frequency domain formulation and use of the proper orthogonal decomposition. For an efficient treatment of parameter variations, the system matrices are divided into a nominal and an incremental part. It is shown that the perturbed part is modally equivalent to a new system where the incremental matrices are isolated into the forcing term. To account for the continuous changes in the parameters, the single-composite-input is invoked with a finite number of predetermined incremental matrices. The frequency-domain Karhunen-Loeve procedure is used to calculate a rich set of basis modes accounting for the variations. For demonstration, the new procedure is applied to a finite element model of the Goland wing undergoing oscillations and shown to produce extremely accurate reduced-order surrogate model for a wide range of parameter variations.

  2. Dynamic Analysis of Fuel Cycle Transitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Dixon; Steve Piet; David Shropshire; Gretchen Matthern

    2009-09-01

    This paper examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. The once-through system involves only Light Water Reactors (LWRs) operating on uranium oxide fuel UOX), while the closed cycle includes both LWRs and fast spectrum reactors (FRs) in either a single-tier system or two-tier fuel system. The single-tier system includes full transuranic recycle in FRs while the two-tier system adds one pass of mixed oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX U-Pu) fuel in the LWR. While the analysis primarily focuses on burner fast reactors, transuranic conversion ratios up to 1.0 are assessed and many of the findings apply to any fuel cycle transitioning from a thermal once-through system to a synergistic thermal-fast recycle system. These findings include uranium requirements for a range of nuclear electricity growth rates, the importance of back end fuel cycle facility timing and magnitude, the impact of employing a range of fast reactor conversion ratios, system sensitivity to used fuel cooling time prior to recycle, impacts on a range of waste management indicators, and projected electricity cost ranges for once-through, single-tier and two-tier systems. The study confirmed that significant waste management benefits can be realized as soon as recycling is initiated, but natural uranium savings are minimal in this century. The use of MOX in LWRs decouples the development of recycle facilities from fast reactor fielding, but also significantly delays and limits fast reactor deployment. In all cases, fast reactor deployment was significantly below than predicted by static equilibrium analyses.

  3. Thermal maturation of incrementally assembled plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Coleman, D. S.; Heizler, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Cretaceous zoned intrusive suites of the Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB) were each assembled over 8-11 million years through incremental amalgamation of sheeted intrusions. Emplacement as small sheet-like increments inhibits development of a voluminous zone of melt bearing rock; instead the active magma body represents only a small portion of the total volume intruded. Plutons formed incrementally will have a protracted thermal history (T-t) that can be elucidated using thermochronologic techniques yielding insights into the thermal evolution of the lithosphere at magma chamber-pluton scales. Thermal histories are derived for plutons from the dike-like John Muir Intrusive Suite (JMIS) and the laccolithic Mount Whitney Intrusive Suite (MWIS), both located in the eastern-central SNB, by correlating estimated zircon saturation and argon closure temperatures with U-Pb zircon and titanite, 40Ar/39Ar amphibole, biotite, and K-feldspar ages. Close agreement among zircon and hornblende ages indicate rapid cooling following intrusion. However, hornblende and biotite ages are separated by 6-9 million years indicating slow protracted cooling. We interpret these data to reflect the thermal maturation of an incrementally assembled magma system in which temperatures cycled between ~500-300°C for millions of years. Hornblende ages were not reset by younger intrusions, therefore maximum reheating temperatures did not exceed ~500°C for geologically significant durations. T-t cooling curves from the intrusive suites are used to calibrate finite difference numerical simulations of pluton assembly. Intrusion geometries are modeled (HEAT 3D, Wohletz, 2007) by stacking horizontal increments from the top-down and bottom-up and vertical increments are emplaced syntaxially and antitaxially and are designed to generate plutons of the approximate dimensions, depth of emplacement, and age range of the Sierran suites. Numerical simulations yield the following general observations: 1) an

  4. International Space Station Increment-2 Quick Look Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Hrovat, Kenneth; Kelly, Eric

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this quick look report is to disseminate the International Space Station (ISS) Increment-2 reduced gravity environment preliminary analysis in a timely manner to the microgravity scientific community. This report is a quick look at the processed acceleration data collected by the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) during the period of May 3 to June 8, 2001. The report is by no means an exhaustive examination of all the relevant activities, which occurred during the time span mentioned above for two reasons. First, the time span being considered in this report is rather short since the MAMS was not active throughout the time span being considered to allow a detailed characterization. Second, as the name of the report implied, it is a quick look at the acceleration data. Consequently, a more comprehensive report, the ISS Increment-2 report, will be published following the conclusion of the Increment-2 tour of duty. NASA sponsors the MAMS and the Space Acceleration Microgravity System (SAMS) to support microgravity science experiments, which require microgravity acceleration measurements. On April 19, 2001, both the MAMS and the SAMS units were launched on STS-100 from the Kennedy Space Center for installation on the ISS. The MAMS unit was flown to the station in support of science experiments requiring quasisteady acceleration data measurements, while the SAMS unit was flown to support experiments requiring vibratory acceleration data measurement. Both acceleration systems are also used in support of the vehicle microgravity requirements verification. The ISS reduced gravity environment analysis presented in this report uses mostly the MAMS acceleration data measurements (the Increment-2 report will cover both systems). The MAMS has two sensors. The MAMS Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment Sensor Subsystem, which is a low frequency range sensor (up to 1 Hz), is used to characterize the quasi-steady environment for payloads and

  5. Static and Dynamics of a Pump Impeller with a Balancing Device Part II: Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martsinkovsky, V. A.; Zhulyov, A.; Kundera, C.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the theoretical study of the system comprising an impeller and a balancing device. It deals with the dynamic analysis of the system, i.e., the axial vibrations of the impeller, and the system stability. The dynamic analysis took into account linearized hydrodynamic forces and moments generated in the longitudinal clearances of the seals of the impeller. The theoretical analysis was supplemented with a numerical example with characteristics determined for a real single-stage centrifugal pump

  6. Visibility graph analysis on heartbeat dynamics of meditation training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Sen; Bian, Chunhua; Ning, Xinbao; Ma, Qianli D. Y.

    2013-06-01

    We apply the visibility graph analysis to human heartbeat dynamics by constructing the complex networks of heartbeat interval time series and investigating the statistical properties of the network before and during chi and yoga meditation. The experiment results show that visibility graph analysis can reveal the dynamical changes caused by meditation training manifested as regular heartbeat, which is closely related to the adjustment of autonomous neural system, and visibility graph analysis is effective to evaluate the effect of meditation.

  7. Specific mass increment and nonequilibrium crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, Leonid M.; Terentiev, Pavel S.

    2013-09-01

    Unsteady nonequilibrium crystallization of ammonium chloride from an aqueous solution resulting in the formation of irregular, so-called seaweed, structures is experimentally investigated. It is shown that specific increment of mass for the coexisting structures (or parts thereof) is the same and changes with time (t) according to the power law a/t-b, where the factor a=1.87±0.09 and the factor b is determined by the system relaxation time. The normalization of the power law to the total time of structure growth allows obtaining a universal law that describes the specific mass increment with time for both seaweed and dendrite structures (including the non-coexisting ones).

  8. A Fast Incremental Gaussian Mixture Model

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rafael Coimbra; Engel, Paulo Martins

    2015-01-01

    This work builds upon previous efforts in online incremental learning, namely the Incremental Gaussian Mixture Network (IGMN). The IGMN is capable of learning from data streams in a single-pass by improving its model after analyzing each data point and discarding it thereafter. Nevertheless, it suffers from the scalability point-of-view, due to its asymptotic time complexity of O(NKD3) for N data points, K Gaussian components and D dimensions, rendering it inadequate for high-dimensional data. In this work, we manage to reduce this complexity to O(NKD2) by deriving formulas for working directly with precision matrices instead of covariance matrices. The final result is a much faster and scalable algorithm which can be applied to high dimensional tasks. This is confirmed by applying the modified algorithm to high-dimensional classification datasets. PMID:26444880

  9. Ozone layer protection: Country incremental costs

    SciTech Connect

    King, K.; Munasinghe, M.

    1997-12-31

    The report evaluates the frameworks established in various countries to finance the incremental costs of phasing out ozone-depleting substances. The Multilateral Fund and the Global Environment Facility (GEF) were established to assist developing countries in financing the incremental costs of phasing out ozone-depleting substances. Both the Fund and the GEF require a strategic framework for the activities they finance to demonstrate that overall phaseout of these substances will be accomplished. The framework, known as the `country program,` establishes a national strategy and program of proposed activities. This paper describes the country programs in general and reviews the work and results of key analysts who carried out these programs in the former Czechoslovakia, Egypt, India, Jordan, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, and Zimbabwe.

  10. Do otolith increments allow correct inferences about age and growth of coral reef fishes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    Otolith increment structure is widely used to estimate age and growth of marine fishes. Here, I test the accuracy of the long-term otolith increment analysis of the lemon damselfish Pomacentrus moluccensis to describe age and growth characteristics. I compare the number of putative annual otolith increments (as a proxy for actual age) and widths of these increments (as proxies for somatic growth) with actual tagged fish-length data, based on a 6-year dataset, the longest time course for a coral reef fish. Estimated age from otoliths corresponded closely with actual age in all cases, confirming annual increment formation. However, otolith increment widths were poor proxies for actual growth in length [linear regression r 2 = 0.44-0.90, n = 6 fish] and were clearly of limited value in estimating annual growth. Up to 60 % of the annual growth variation was missed using otolith increments, suggesting the long-term back calculations of otolith growth characteristics of reef fish populations should be interpreted with caution.

  11. Some Results on Incremental Vertex Cover Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wenqiang

    In the classical k-vertex cover problem, we wish to find a minimum weight set of vertices that covers at least k edges. In the incremental version of the k-vertex cover problem, we wish to find a sequence of vertices, such that if we choose the smallest prefix of vertices in the sequence that covers at least k edges, this solution is close in value to that of the optimal k-vertex cover solution. The maximum ratio is called competitive ratio. Previously the known upper bound of competitive ratio was 4α, where α is the approximation ratio of the k-vertex cover problem. And the known lower bound was 1.36 unless P = NP, or 2 - ɛ for any constant ɛ assuming the Unique Game Conjecture. In this paper we present some new results for this problem. Firstly we prove that, without any computational complexity assumption, the lower bound of competitive ratio of incremental vertex cover problem is φ, where φ=sqrt{5}+1/2≈ 1.618 is the golden ratio. We then consider the restricted versions where k is restricted to one of two given values(Named 2-IVC problem) and one of three given values(Named 3-IVC problem). For 2-IVC problem, we give an algorithm to prove that the competitive ratio is at most φα. This incremental algorithm is also optimal for 2-IVC problem if we are permitted to use non-polynomial time. For the 3-IVC problem, we give an incremental algorithm with ratio factor (1+sqrt{2})α.

  12. Molecular energies from an incremental fragmentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitei, Oinam Romesh; Heßelmann, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The systematic molecular fragmentation method by Collins and Deev [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 104104 (2006)] has been used to calculate total energies and relative conformational energies for a number of small and extended molecular systems. In contrast to the original approach by Collins, we have tested the accuracy of the fragmentation method by utilising an incremental scheme in which the energies at the lowest level of the fragmentation are calculated on an accurate quantum chemistry level while lower-cost methods are used to correct the low-level energies through a high-level fragmentation. In this work, the fragment energies at the lowest level of fragmentation were calculated using the random-phase approximation (RPA) and two recently developed extensions to the RPA while the incremental corrections at higher levels of the fragmentation were calculated using standard density functional theory (DFT) methods. The complete incremental fragmentation method has been shown to reproduce the supermolecule results with a very good accuracy, almost independent on the molecular type, size, or type of decomposition. The fragmentation method has also been used in conjunction with the DFT-SAPT (symmetry-adapted perturbation theory) method which enables a breakdown of the total nonbonding energy contributions into individual interaction energy terms. Finally, the potential problems of the method connected with the use of capping hydrogen atoms are analysed and two possible solutions are supplied.

  13. Development of methodology for horizontal axis wind turbine dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugundji, J.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine dynamics were studied. The following findings are summarized: (1) review of the MOSTAS computer programs for dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines; (2) review of various analysis methods for rotating systems with periodic coefficients; (3) review of structural dynamics analysis tools for large wind turbine; (4) experiments for yaw characteristics of a rotating rotor; (5) development of a finite element model for rotors; (6) development of simple models for aeroelastics; and (7) development of simple models for stability and response of wind turbines on flexible towers.

  14. Dynamic deformation analysis of light-weight mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yingtao; Cao, Xuedong; Kuang, Long; Yang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    In the process of optical dynamic target work, under the effort of the arm of dynamic target, the mirror needs to do circular motion, additional accelerated motion and uniform motion. The maximum acceleration is 10°/s2 and the maximum velocity is 30°/s. In this paper, we mostly analyze the dynamic deformation of a 600 mm honeycomb light-weight mirror of a certain dynamic target. Using the FEA (finite element analysis) method, first of all, we analyze the deformation of the light-weight mirror induced in gravity at different position; later, the dynamic deformation of light-weight mirror is analyzed in detailed. The analysis results indicate that, when the maximum acceleration is 10°/s2 and the maximum velocity is 30°/s, the centripetal force is 5% of the gravity at the equal mass, and the dynamic deformation of the mirror is 6.1% of the deformation induced by gravity.

  15. Potential Flow Analysis of Dynamic Ground Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feifel, W. M.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of some flight test data suggests the presence of a 'dynamic ground effect'. The lift of an aircraft approaching the ground depends on the rate of descent and is lower than the aircraft steady state lift at a same height above the ground. Such a lift deficiency under dynamic conditions could have a serious impact on the overall aircraft layout. For example, the increased pitch angle needed to compensate for the temporary loss in lift would reduce the tail strike margin or require an increase in landing gear length. Under HSR2 an effort is under way to clarify the dynamic ground effect issue using a multi-pronged approach. A dynamic ground effect test has been run in the NASA Langley 14x22 ft wind tunnel. Northup-Grumman is conducting time accurate CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) Euler analyses on the National Aerodynamic Simulator facility. Boeing has been using linear potential flow methodology which are thought to provide much needed insight in, physics of this very complex problem. The present report summarizes the results of these potential flow studies.

  16. Nonlinear dynamic analysis for elastic robotic arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, M. H.; Rahimi, H. N.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyze the nonlinear dynamics of robotic arms with elastic links and joints. The main contribution of the paper is the comparative assessment of assumed modes and finite element methods as more convenient approaches for computing the nonlinear dynamic of robotic systems. Numerical simulations comprising both methods are carried out and results are discussed. Hence, advantages and disadvantages of each method are illustrated. Then, adding the joint flexibility to the system is dealt with and the obtained model is demonstrated. Finally, a brief description of the optimal motion generation is presented and the simulation is carried out to investigate the role of robot dynamic modeling in the control of robots.

  17. Aeroservoelastic and Flight Dynamics Analysis Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This document in large part is based on the Masters Thesis of Cole Stephens. The document encompasses a variety of technical and practical issues involved when using the STARS codes for Aeroservoelastic analysis of vehicles. The document covers in great detail a number of technical issues and step-by-step details involved in the simulation of a system where aerodynamics, structures and controls are tightly coupled. Comparisons are made to a benchmark experimental program conducted at NASA Langley. One of the significant advantages of the methodology detailed is that as a result of the technique used to accelerate the CFD-based simulation, a systems model is produced which is very useful for developing the control law strategy, and subsequent high-speed simulations.

  18. Dynamic fuzzy hierarchy analysis for evaluation of professionalization degree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Lin; Min, Luo; Ma, Jingxi

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the model of dynamic fuzzy hierarchy analysis for evaluation of professionalization degree, as a combination of the dynamic fuzzy theory and the AHP, which can show the changes and trends of the value of each index of professionalization.

  19. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  20. Computer aided analysis and optimization of mechanical system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haug, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose is to outline a computational approach to spatial dynamics of mechanical systems that substantially enlarges the scope of consideration to include flexible bodies, feedback control, hydraulics, and related interdisciplinary effects. Design sensitivity analysis and optimization is the ultimate goal. The approach to computer generation and solution of the system dynamic equations and graphical methods for creating animations as output is outlined.

  1. Dynamical scaling analysis of plant callus growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, J.; Buceta, J.; Juarez, K.; Pumariño, B.; de la Torre, J.; Iriondo, J. M.

    2003-07-01

    We present experimental results for the dynamical scaling properties of the development of plant calli. We have assayed two different species of plant calli, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa, under different growth conditions, and show that their dynamical scalings share a universality class. From a theoretical point of view, we introduce a scaling hypothesis for systems whose size evolves in time. We expect our work to be relevant for the understanding and characterization of other systems that undergo growth due to cell division and differentiation, such as, for example, tumor development.

  2. Dynamic analysis of mechanisms by finite elements

    SciTech Connect

    Botsali, F.M.; Uenuevar, A.

    1996-11-01

    The need to increase productivity in order to decrease manufacturing costs lead to an increase in the working speeds of machines and mechanical systems used in manufacturing. A method is presented for investigating the dynamics of mechanisms with elastic links. Finite element method is used in the formulation of the dynamic problem. Modal transformation is used in order to reduce the number of equations of motion. Using the presented technique, elastic and rigid body motions of mechanism links are solved simultaneously. The presented method may be applied to spatial and open loop mechanisms including robot manipulators as well.

  3. International Space Station Increment-3 Microgravity Environment Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Hrovat, Kenneth; Kelly, Eric; McPherson, Kevin; Reckart, Timothy; Grodsinksy, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    This summary report presents the results of some of the processed acceleration data measured aboard the International Space Station during the period of August to December 2001. Two accelerometer systems were used to measure the acceleration levels for the activities that took place during Increment-3. However, not all of the activities were analyzed for this report due to time constraint and lack of precise timeline information regarding some payload operations and station activities. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration sponsors the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System and the Space Acceleration Microgravity System to support microgravity science experiments which require microgravity acceleration measurements. On April 19, 2001, both the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System and the Space Acceleration Measurement System units were launched on STS-100 from the Kennedy Space Center for installation on the International Space Station. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System unit was flown to the station in support of science experiments requiring quasi-steady acceleration measurements, while the Space Acceleration Measurement System unit was flown to support experiments requiring vibratory acceleration measurement. Both acceleration systems are also used in support of the vehicle microgravity requirements verification. The International Space Station Increment-3 reduced gravity environment analysis presented in this report uses acceleration data collected by both sets of accelerometer systems: (1) The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System, which consists of two sensors: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment Sensor Subsystem, a low frequency range sensor (up to 1 Hz), is used to characterize the quasi-steady environment for payloads and vehicle, and the High Resolution Accelerometer Package, which is used to characterize the vibratory environment up to 100 Hz. (2) The Space Acceleration Measurement System, which is

  4. Theoretical and software considerations for nonlinear dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. J.; Dodds, R. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In the finite element method for structural analysis, it is generally necessary to discretize the structural model into a very large number of elements to accurately evaluate displacements, strains, and stresses. As the complexity of the model increases, the number of degrees of freedom can easily exceed the capacity of present-day software system. Improvements of structural analysis software including more efficient use of existing hardware and improved structural modeling techniques are discussed. One modeling technique that is used successfully in static linear and nonlinear analysis is multilevel substructuring. This research extends the use of multilevel substructure modeling to include dynamic analysis and defines the requirements for a general purpose software system capable of efficient nonlinear dynamic analysis. The multilevel substructuring technique is presented, the analytical formulations and computational procedures for dynamic analysis and nonlinear mechanics are reviewed, and an approach to the design and implementation of a general purpose structural software system is presented.

  5. Computer program for flexible rotor dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, F. A.

    1974-01-01

    Program analyzes general nonaxisymmetric and nonsynchronous transient and steady-state rotor dynamic performance of bending- and shear-wise flexible rotor-bearing system under various operating conditions. Program can be used as analytical study tool for general transient spin-speed and/or non-axisymmetric rotor motion.

  6. Collecting, preparing, crossdating, and measuring tree increment cores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phipps, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques for collecting and handling increment tree cores are described. Procedures include those for cleaning and caring for increment borers, extracting the sample from a tree, core surfacing, crossdating, and measuring. (USGS)

  7. Using Dynamic Sensitivity Analysis to Assess Testability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voas, Jeffrey; Morell, Larry; Miller, Keith

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses sensitivity analysis and its relationship to random black box testing. Sensitivity analysis estimates the impact that a programming fault at a particular location would have on the program's input/output behavior. Locations that are relatively \\"insensitive" to faults can render random black box testing unlikely to uncover programming faults. Therefore, sensitivity analysis gives new insight when interpreting random black box testing results. Although sensitivity analysis is computationally intensive, it requires no oracle and no human intervention.

  8. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  9. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  10. Dynamic Analysis of Capture Devices for Momentum Exchange with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum exchange / electrodynamic reboost tether system is in the analysis and design of the capture device and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. The goal of this work is to develop appropriate tether momentum exchange models that can simulate and evaluate the requirements of such a system, and be used to create specifications on the design of a capture device. This report briefly describes dynamic model development, simulation of the momentum exchange process, evaluation of dynamic effects of errors in the momentum exchange process, and the development of guidelines in selecting dynamic properties in the design of a capture device.

  11. Turbine blade structural dynamic analysis. [for space shuttle main engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, E. O.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents structural dynamic analysis and test results for the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbine blades. Athough these blades are designed to avoid coincidence of natural frequencies with harmonic excitation forces, the complexity of the turbine hardware, its nonlinearities and lack of information regarding the forcing function have led to fatigue failures. A comparison of single-blade analysis and test modal frequencies, shapes, and stresses is given; analysis techniques to describe the forcing function, compute dynamic responses, and incorporate the nonlinearities of Coulomb-friction dampers are presented. Recommendations are made for new research to improve forcing function computations and structural damping estimates used in the analysis.

  12. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity

    PubMed Central

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26075210

  13. Dynamic mechanical analysis: A practical introduction to techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, K.

    1999-03-01

    This introduction provides the chemist, chemical engineer, or materials scientists with a starting point to understand the applications of dynamic mechanical analysis, its workings, and its advantages and limitations. This book serves as a systematic study of manufacturing polymeric materials and components as well as for developing new materials. Contents include: introduction to dynamic mechanical analysis; basic rheological concepts: stress, strain, and flow; rheology basic: creep-recovery and stress relaxation; dynamic testing; time-temperature scans part 1: transitions in polymers; time and temperature studies part 2: thermosets; frequency scans; DMA applications to real problems: guidelines; and appendix: sample experiments for the DMA.

  14. Structural dynamic analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, L. P.; Jamison, G. T.; Mccutcheon, W. A.; Price, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    This structural dynamic analysis supports development of the SSME by evaluating components subjected to critical dynamic loads, identifying significant parameters, and evaluating solution methods. Engine operating parameters at both rated and full power levels are considered. Detailed structural dynamic analyses of operationally critical and life limited components support the assessment of engine design modifications and environmental changes. Engine system test results are utilized to verify analytic model simulations. The SSME main chamber injector assembly is an assembly of 600 injector elements which are called LOX posts. The overall LOX post analysis procedure is shown.

  15. Dynamics analysis of space robot manipulator with joint clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Bai, Zheng Feng

    2011-04-01

    A computational methodology for analysis of space robot manipulator systems, considering the effects of the clearances in the joint, is presented. The contact dynamics model in joint clearance is established using the nonlinear equivalent spring-damp model and the friction effect is considered using the Coulomb friction model. The space robot system dynamic equation of manipulator with clearance is established. Then the dynamics simulation is presented and the dynamics characteristics of robot manipulator with clearance are analyzed. This work provides a practical method to analyze the dynamics characteristics of space robot manipulator with joint clearance and improves the engineering application. The computational methodology can predict the effects of clearance on space robot manipulator preferably, which is the basis of space robot manipulator design, precision analysis and ground test.

  16. 14 CFR § 1260.53 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Incremental funding. § 1260.53 Section § 1260.53 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.53 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding October 2000...

  17. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Incremental funding. 3452... 3452.232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3452.771, insert the following provision in solicitations: Incremental Funding (AUG 1987) (a) Sufficient funds are not presently available to cover...

  18. 14 CFR § 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Incremental funding. § 1274.918 Section Â... WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding July 2002 (a) Of the award amount indicated on the cover page of this Agreement, only...

  19. Error Analysis of Modified Langevin Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redon, Stephane; Stoltz, Gabriel; Trstanova, Zofia

    2016-06-01

    We consider Langevin dynamics associated with a modified kinetic energy vanishing for small momenta. This allows us to freeze slow particles, and hence avoid the re-computation of inter-particle forces, which leads to computational gains. On the other hand, the statistical error may increase since there are a priori more correlations in time. The aim of this work is first to prove the ergodicity of the modified Langevin dynamics (which fails to be hypoelliptic), and next to analyze how the asymptotic variance on ergodic averages depends on the parameters of the modified kinetic energy. Numerical results illustrate the approach, both for low-dimensional systems where we resort to a Galerkin approximation of the generator, and for more realistic systems using Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Dynamic network analysis of protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind; Deri, Joya

    2007-03-01

    Network approaches have recently become a popular tool to study complex systems such as cellular metabolism and protein interactions. A substantial number of analyses of the protein interaction network (PIN) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have considered this network as a static entity, not taking the network's dynamic nature into account. Here, we examine the time-variation of gene regulation superimposed on the PIN by defining mRNA expression profiles throughout the cell cycle as node weights. To characterize these network dynamics, we have both developed a set of novel network measures as well as studied previously published measures for weighted networks. We expect that our approach will provide a deeper understanding of protein regulation during the cell cycle.

  1. Error Analysis of Modified Langevin Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redon, Stephane; Stoltz, Gabriel; Trstanova, Zofia

    2016-08-01

    We consider Langevin dynamics associated with a modified kinetic energy vanishing for small momenta. This allows us to freeze slow particles, and hence avoid the re-computation of inter-particle forces, which leads to computational gains. On the other hand, the statistical error may increase since there are a priori more correlations in time. The aim of this work is first to prove the ergodicity of the modified Langevin dynamics (which fails to be hypoelliptic), and next to analyze how the asymptotic variance on ergodic averages depends on the parameters of the modified kinetic energy. Numerical results illustrate the approach, both for low-dimensional systems where we resort to a Galerkin approximation of the generator, and for more realistic systems using Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Inferring robust gene networks from expression data by a sensitivity-based incremental evolution method

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Reconstructing gene regulatory networks (GRNs) from expression data is one of the most important challenges in systems biology research. Many computational models and methods have been proposed to automate the process of network reconstruction. Inferring robust networks with desired behaviours remains challenging, however. This problem is related to network dynamics but has yet to be investigated using network modeling. Results We propose an incremental evolution approach for inferring GRNs that takes network robustness into consideration and can deal with a large number of network parameters. Our approach includes a sensitivity analysis procedure to iteratively select the most influential network parameters, and it uses a swarm intelligence procedure to perform parameter optimization. We have conducted a series of experiments to evaluate the external behaviors and internal robustness of the networks inferred by the proposed approach. The results and analyses have verified the effectiveness of our approach. Conclusions Sensitivity analysis is crucial to identifying the most sensitive parameters that govern the network dynamics. It can further be used to derive constraints for network parameters in the network reconstruction process. The experimental results show that the proposed approach can successfully infer robust GRNs with desired system behaviors. PMID:22595005

  3. Network analysis of human heartbeat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang

    2010-02-01

    We construct the complex networks of human heartbeat dynamics and investigate their statistical properties, using the visibility algorithm proposed by Lacasa and co-workers [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105, 4972 (2008)]. Our results show that the associated networks for the time series of heartbeat interval are always scale-free, high clustering, hierarchy, and assortative mixing. In particular, the assortative coefficient of associated networks could distinguish between healthy subjects and patients with congestive heart failure.

  4. Dynamic analysis of a parasite population model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibona, G. J.; Condat, C. A.

    2002-03-01

    We study the dynamics of a model that describes the competitive interaction between an invading species (a parasite) and its antibodies in an living being. This model was recently used to examine the dynamical competition between Tripanosoma cruzi and its antibodies during the acute phase of Chagas' disease. Depending on the antibody properties, the model yields three types of outcomes, corresponding, respectively, to healing, chronic disease, and host death. Here, we study the dynamics of the parasite-antibody interaction with the help of simulations, obtaining phase trajectories and phase diagrams for the system. We show that, under certain conditions, the size of the parasite inoculation can be crucial for the infection outcome and that a retardation in the stimulated production of an antibody species may result in the parasite gaining a definitive advantage. We also find a criterion for the relative sizes of the parameters that are required if parasite-generated decoys are indeed to help the invasion. Decoys may also induce a qualitatively different outcome: a limit cycle for the antibody-parasite population phase trajectories.

  5. High-frequency incremental methods for electromagnetic complex source points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canta, Stefano Mihai

    This dissertation advances knowledge in field-based High-Frequency (HF) incremental methods for electromagnetic Complex Source Points (CSP), and its most immediate impact is a significantly faster analysis and design of reflector antennas. HF incremental methods overcome many difficulties encountered in other ray-tracing techniques, mostly when crossing shadow boundaries in the electromagnetic (EM) field predictions. The combination of HF methods with CSPs allows to speed up EM computations. CSPs are obtained by locating real electric or magnetic dipole sources in complex space. EM field patterns are derived through analytical continuation of the geometrical quantities associated with the source position; the continuation provides an exact Maxwellian description of a Gaussian Beam. When CSPs are used as basis functions, they can represent any radiated field pattern. Then, by truncating negligible beams in the direction of observation, computations are sped up compared to a plane- or spherical-wave based expansion. Because of these facts, CSPs can be used with Physical Optics (PO) based HF methods for the efficient analysis of electrically large reflectors. However, PO does not always provide accurate field predictions, especially in regions of greatest shadowing or at grazing incidence. Therefore, I developed a HF Incremental Fringe Formulation (IFF) for CSPs to provide a correction term for PO that, when added to the total PO field, recovers an accurate estimate of the scattered field at the first asymptotic order. In addition, since PO does not have caustic problems, the new fringe asymptotic recovery is free of caustics for any geometrical configuration, too. Moreover, I also introduced a double diffraction formulation for CSPs, using the Incremental Theory of Diffraction, yielding simulation results very close to those obtained with a Method of Moments (MoM) approach. Unlike ray-based methods, no tracing in complex space is necessary, and no caustics are

  6. Unsupervised analysis of small animal dynamic Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Boschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Clustering analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to dynamic Cerenkov luminescence images (dCLI). In order to investigate the performances of the proposed approaches, two distinct dynamic data sets obtained by injecting mice with 32P-ATP and 18F-FDG were acquired using the IVIS 200 optical imager. The k-means clustering algorithm has been applied to dCLI and was implemented using interactive data language 8.1. We show that cluster analysis allows us to obtain good agreement between the clustered and the corresponding emission regions like the bladder, the liver, and the tumor. We also show a good correspondence between the time activity curves of the different regions obtained by using CA and manual region of interest analysis on dCLIT and PCA images. We conclude that CA provides an automatic unsupervised method for the analysis of preclinical dynamic Cerenkov luminescence image data.

  7. Assessment of aerodynamic and dynamic models in a comprehensive analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1985-01-01

    The history, status, and lessons of a comprehensive analysis for rotorcraft are reviewed. The development, features, and capabilities of the analysis are summarized, including the aerodynamic and dynamic models that were used. Examples of correlation of the computational results with experimental data are given, extensions of the analysis for research in several topics of helicopter technology are discussed, and the experiences of outside users are summarized. Finally, the required capabilities and approach for the next comprehensive analysis are described.

  8. An incremental optimal routing strategy for scale-free networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhong-Yuan

    2014-03-01

    The link congestion based traffic model can more accurately reveal the traffic dynamics of many real complex networks such as the Internet, and heuristically optimizing each link's weight for the shortest path routing strategy can strongly improve the traffic capacity of network. In this work, we propose an optimal routing strategy in which the weight of each link is regulated incrementally to enhance the network traffic capacity by minimizing the maximum link betweenness of any link in the network. We also estimate more suitable value of the tunable parameter β for the efficient routing strategy under the link congestion based traffic model. The traffic load of network can be significantly balanced at the expense of increasing a bit average path length or average traffic load.

  9. Evaluation of incremental reactivity and its uncertainty in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Martien, Philip T; Harley, Robert A; Milford, Jana B; Russell, Armistead G

    2003-04-15

    The incremental reactivity (IR) and relative incremental reactivity (RIR) of carbon monoxide and 30 individual volatile organic compounds (VOC) were estimated for the South Coast Air Basin using two photochemical air quality models: a 3-D, grid-based model and a vertically resolved trajectory model. Both models include an extended version of the SAPRC99 chemical mechanism. For the 3-D modeling, the decoupled direct method (DDM-3D) was used to assess reactivities. The trajectory model was applied to estimate uncertainties in reactivities due to uncertainties in chemical rate parameters, deposition parameters, and emission rates using Monte Carlo analysis with Latin hypercube sampling. For most VOC, RIRs were found to be consistent in rankings with those produced by Carter using a box model. However, 3-D simulations show that coastal regions, upwind of most of the emissions, have comparatively low IR but higher RIR than predicted by box models for C4-C5 alkenes and carbonyls that initiate the production of HOx radicals. Biogenic VOC emissions were found to have a lower RIR than predicted by box model estimates, because emissions of these VOC were mostly downwind of the areas of primary ozone production. Uncertainties in RIR of individual VOC were found to be dominated by uncertainties in the rate parameters of their primary oxidation reactions. The coefficient of variation (COV) of most RIR values ranged from 20% to 30%, whereas the COV of absolute incremental reactivity ranged from about 30% to 40%. In general, uncertainty and variability both decreased when relative rather than absolute reactivity metrics were used. PMID:12731843

  10. Incremental Scheduling Engines: Cost Savings through Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Phillips, Shaun

    2005-01-01

    As humankind embarks on longer space missions farther from home, the requirements and environments for scheduling the activities performed on these missions are changing. As we begin to prepare for these missions it is appropriate to evaluate the merits and applicability of the different types of scheduling engines. Scheduling engines temporally arrange tasks onto a timeline so that all constraints and ob.jectives are met and resources are not over-booked. Scheduling engines used to schedule space missions fall into three general categories: batch, mixed-initiative, and incremental. This paper, presents an assessment of the engine types, a discussion of the impact of human exploration of the moon and Mars on planning and scheduling, and the applicability of the different types of scheduling engines. This paper will pursue the hypothesis that incremental scheduling engines may have a place in the new environment; they have the potential to reduce cost, to improve the satisfaction of those who execute or benefit from a particular timeline (the customers), and to allow astronauts to plan their own tasks and those of their companion robots.

  11. Literal algebra for satellite dynamics. [perturbation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A description of the rather general class of operations available is given and the operations are related to problems in satellite dynamics. The implementation of an algebra processor is discussed. The four main categories of symbol processors are related to list processing, string manipulation, symbol manipulation, and formula manipulation. Fundamental required operations for an algebra processor are considered. It is pointed out that algebra programs have been used for a number of problems in celestial mechanics with great success. The advantage of computer algebra is its accuracy and speed.

  12. Analytical analysis of particle-core dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri K

    2010-01-01

    Particle-core interaction is a well-developed model of halo formation in high-intensity beams. In this paper, we present an analytical solution for averaged, single particle dynamics, around a uniformly charged beam. The problem is analyzed through a sequence of canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian, which describes nonlinear particle oscillations. A closed form expression for maximum particle deviation from the axis is obtained. The results of this study are in good agreement with numerical simulations and with previously obtained data.

  13. Laser speckle analysis of retinal vascular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Neganova, Anastasiia Y; Postnov, Dmitry D; Jacobsen, Jens Christian B.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Studies of vascular responses are usually performed on isolated vessels or on single vessels in vivo. This allows for precise measurements of diameter or blood flow. However, dynamical responses of the whole microvascular network are difficult to access experimentally. We suggest to use full-field laser speckle imaging to evaluate vascular responses of the retinal network. Image segmentation and vessel recognition algorithms together with response mapping allow us to analyze diameter changes and blood flow responses in the intact retinal network upon systemic administration of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II, the vasodilator acetylcholine or on the changing level of anesthesia in in vivo rat preparations.

  14. Stability analysis of dynamic thin shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Francisco S. N.; Crawford, Paulo

    2005-11-01

    We analyse the stability of generic spherically symmetric thin shells to linearized perturbations around static solutions. We include the momentum flux term in the conservation identity, deduced from the 'ADM' constraint and the Lanczos equations. Following the Ishak Lake analysis, we deduce a master equation which dictates the stable equilibrium configurations. Considering the transparency condition, we study the stability of thin shells around black holes, showing that our analysis is in agreement with previous results. Applying the analysis to traversable wormhole geometries, by considering specific choices for the form function, we deduce stability regions and find that the latter may be significantly increased by considering appropriate choices for the redshift function.

  15. Analysis of multi-domain protein dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Amitava; Hua, Duy P; Post, Carol Beth

    2016-01-01

    Proteins with a modular architecture of multiple domains connected by linkers often exhibit diversity in the relative positions of domains while the domain tertiary structure remains unchanged. The biological function of these modular proteins, or the regulation of their activity depends on the variation in domain orientation and separation. Accordingly, careful characterization of inter-domain motion and correlated fluctuations of multi-domain systems is relevant for understanding the functional behavior of modular proteins. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a powerful approach to study these motions in atomic detail. Nevertheless, the common procedure for analyzing fluctuations from MD simulations after overall rigid-body alignment fails for multi-domain proteins; it greatly overestimates correlated positional fluctuations in the presence of relative domain motion. We show here that expressing the atomic motions of a multi-domain protein as a combination of displacement within the domain reference frame and motion of the relative domains correctly separates the internal motions to allow a useful description of correlated fluctuations. We illustrate the methodology of separating the domain fluctuations and local fluctuations by application to the tandem SH2 domains of human Syk protein kinase and by characterizing an effect of phosphorylation on the dynamics. Correlated motions are assessed from a distance covariance rather than the more common vector-coordinate covariance. The approach makes it possible to calculate the proper correlations in fluctuations internal to a domain as well as between domains. PMID:26675644

  16. Bootstrap Standard Error Estimates in Dynamic Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Browne, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic factor analysis summarizes changes in scores on a battery of manifest variables over repeated measurements in terms of a time series in a substantially smaller number of latent factors. Algebraic formulae for standard errors of parameter estimates are more difficult to obtain than in the usual intersubject factor analysis because of the…

  17. Conducting Qualitative Data Analysis: Managing Dynamic Tensions within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    In the third of a series of "how-to" essays on conducting qualitative data analysis, Ron Chenail examines the dynamic tensions within the process of qualitative data analysis that qualitative researchers must manage in order to produce credible and creative results. These tensions include (a) the qualities of the data and the qualitative data…

  18. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  19. A NASTRAN-based computer program for structural dynamic analysis of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, Don W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a computer program developed for structural dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT's). It is based on the finite element method through its reliance on NASTRAN for the development of mass, stiffness, and damping matrices of the tower end rotor, which are treated in NASTRAN as separate structures. The tower is modeled in a stationary frame and the rotor in one rotating at a constant angular velocity. The two structures are subsequently joined together (external to NASTRAN) using a time-dependent transformation consistent with the hub configuration. Aerodynamic loads are computed with an established flow model based on strip theory. Aeroelastic effects are included by incorporating the local velocity and twisting deformation of the blade in the load computation. The turbulent nature of the wind, both in space and time, is modeled by adding in stochastic wind increments. The resulting equations of motion are solved in the time domain using the implicit Newmark-Beta integrator. Preliminary comparisons with data from the Boeing/NASA MOD2 HAWT indicate that the code is capable of accurately and efficiently predicting the response of HAWT's driven by turbulent winds.

  20. A NASTRAN-based computer program for structural dynamic analysis of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobitz, Don W.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes a computer program developed for structural dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT's). It is based on the finite element method through its reliance on NASTRAN for the development of mass, stiffness, and damping matrices of the tower end rotor, which are treated in NASTRAN as separate structures. The tower is modeled in a stationary frame and the rotor in one rotating at a constant angular velocity. The two structures are subsequently joined together (external to NASTRAN) using a time-dependent transformation consistent with the hub configuration. Aerodynamic loads are computed with an established flow model based on strip theory. Aeroelastic effects are included by incorporating the local velocity and twisting deformation of the blade in the load computation. The turbulent nature of the wind, both in space and time, is modeled by adding in stochastic wind increments. The resulting equations of motion are solved in the time domain using the implicit Newmark-Beta integrator. Preliminary comparisons with data from the Boeing/NASA MOD2 HAWT indicate that the code is capable of accurately and efficiently predicting the response of HAWT's driven by turbulent winds.

  1. Decision Analysis of Dynamic Spectrum Access Rules

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Luiz A. DaSilva; Christian Wernz

    2011-12-01

    A current trend in spectrum regulation is to incorporate spectrum sharing through the design of spectrum access rules that support Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA). This paper develops a decision-theoretic framework for regulators to assess the impacts of different decision rules on both primary and secondary operators. We analyze access rules based on sensing and exclusion areas, which in practice can be enforced through geolocation databases. Our results show that receiver-only sensing provides insufficient protection for primary and co-existing secondary users and overall low social welfare. On the other hand, using sensing information between the transmitter and receiver of a communication link, provides dramatic increases in system performance. The performance of using these link end points is relatively close to that of using many cooperative sensing nodes associated to the same access point and large link exclusion areas. These results are useful to regulators and network developers in understanding in developing rules for future DSA regulation.

  2. Crustal Dynamics Project data analysis, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caprette, D. S.; Ma, C.; Ryan, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    The Goddard Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) group reports the results of analyzing 1073 Mark 3 data sets acquired from fixed and mobile observing sites through the end of 1989 and available to the Crustal Dynamics Project. Two large solutions, GLB656 and GLB657, were used to establish a VLBI reference frame with an origin coincident with the ITRF89. Another large solution, GLB658, was used to obtain Earth rotation parameters, nutation offsets, and global source positions. Site velocities were obtained from another large solution, GLB659. A fifth large solution, GLB660, was used to obtain baseline evolution. Site positions are tabulated on a yearly basis from 1979 through 1992. Site velocities are presented in both Cartesian and topocentric coordinates. The results include 76 sources, 80 sites, and 422 baselines.

  3. Condensed Antenna Structural Models for Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R.

    1985-01-01

    Condensed degree-of-freedom models are compared with large degree-of-freedom finite-element models of a representative antenna-tipping and alidade structure, for both locked and free-rotor configurations. It is shown that: (1) the effective-mass models accurately reproduce the lower-mode natural frequencies of the finite element model; (2) frequency responses for the two types of models are in agreement up to at least 16 rad/s for specific points; and (3) transient responses computed for the same points are in good agreement. It is concluded that the effective-mass model, which best represents the five lower modes of the finite-element model, is a sufficient representation of the structure for future incorporation with a total servo control structure dynamic simulation.

  4. Spectrum analysis with quantum dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Shilin; Ang, Shan Zheng; Wheatley, Trevor A.; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Furusawa, Akira; Huntington, Elanor H.; Tsang, Mankei

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the power spectral density of a stochastic process, such as a stochastic force or magnetic field, is a fundamental task in many sensing applications. Quantum noise is becoming a major limiting factor to such a task in future technology, especially in optomechanics for temperature, stochastic gravitational wave, and decoherence measurements. Motivated by this concern, here we prove a measurement-independent quantum limit to the accuracy of estimating the spectrum parameters of a classical stochastic process coupled to a quantum dynamical system. We demonstrate our results by analyzing the data from a continuous-optical-phase-estimation experiment and showing that the experimental performance with homodyne detection is close to the quantum limit. We further propose a spectral photon-counting method that can attain quantum-optimal performance for weak modulation and a coherent-state input, with an error scaling superior to that of homodyne detection at low signal-to-noise ratios.

  5. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of flexible multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauchau, Olivier A.; Kang, Nam Kook

    1991-01-01

    Two approaches are developed to analyze the dynamic behavior of flexible multibody systems. In the first approach each body is modeled with a modal methodology in a local non-inertial frame of reference, whereas in the second approach, each body is modeled with a finite element methodology in the inertial frame. In both cases, the interaction among the various elastic bodies is represented by constraint equations. The two approaches were compared for accuracy and efficiency: the first approach is preferable when the nonlinearities are not too strong but it becomes cumbersome and expensive to use when many modes must be used. The second approach is more general and easier to implement but could result in high computation costs for a large system. The constraints should be enforced in a time derivative fashion for better accuracy and stability.

  6. Analysis & Simulation of Dynamics in Supercooled Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmatad, Yael Sarah

    2011-12-01

    The nature of supercooled liquids and the glass transition has been debated by many scientists. Several theories have been put forth to describe the remarkable properties of this out-of-equilibrium material. Each of these theories makes specific predictions as to how the scaling of various transport properties in supercooled materials should behave. Given access to a large pool of high-quality supercooled liquid data we seek to compare these theories to one another. Moreover, we explore properties of a pair of models which are the basis for one particularly attractive theory---Chandler-Garrahan theory---and discuss the models' behavior in space-time and possible implications to the behavior of experimental supercooled liquids. Here we investigate the nature of dynamics in supercooled liquids using a two pronged approach. First we analyze the transport properties found in experiments and simulations of supercooled liquids. Then, we analyze simulation trajectories for lattice models which reproduce many of the interesting properties of supercooled liquids. In doing so, we illuminate several glass universalities, common properties of a wide variety of glass formers. By analyzing relaxation time and viscosity data for over 50 data sets and 1200 points, we find that relaxation time can be collapsed onto a single, parabolic curve. This collapse supports a theory of universal glass behavior based on facilitated models proposed by David Chandler and Juan Garrahan in 2003. We then show that the parabolic fit parameters for any particular liquid are a material property: they converge fast and are capable of predicting behavior in regions beyond the included data sets. We compare this property to other popular fitting schemes such as the Vogel-Fulcher, double exponential, and fractional exponential forms and conclude that these three forms result in parameters which are non predictive and therefore not material properties. Additionally, we examine the role of attractive

  7. Wavelet spectrum analysis approach to model validation of dynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xiaomo; Mahadevan, Sankaran

    2011-02-01

    Feature-based validation techniques for dynamic system models could be unreliable for nonlinear, stochastic, and transient dynamic behavior, where the time series is usually non-stationary. This paper presents a wavelet spectral analysis approach to validate a computational model for a dynamic system. Continuous wavelet transform is performed on the time series data for both model prediction and experimental observation using a Morlet wavelet function. The wavelet cross-spectrum is calculated for the two sets of data to construct a time-frequency phase difference map. The Box-plot, an exploratory data analysis technique, is applied to interpret the phase difference for validation purposes. In addition, wavelet time-frequency coherence is calculated using the locally and globally smoothed wavelet power spectra of the two data sets. Significance tests are performed to quantitatively verify whether the wavelet time-varying coherence is significant at a specific time and frequency point, considering uncertainties in both predicted and observed time series data. The proposed wavelet spectrum analysis approach is illustrated with a dynamics validation challenge problem developed at the Sandia National Laboratories. A comparison study is conducted to demonstrate the advantages of the proposed methodologies over classical frequency-independent cross-correlation analysis and time-independent cross-coherence analysis for the validation of dynamic systems.

  8. Blade loss transient dynamic analysis of turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallone, M. J.; Gallardo, V.; Storace, A. F.; Bach, L. J.; Black, G.; Gaffney, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on work completed to develop an analytical method for predicting the transient non-linear response of a complete aircraft engine system due to the loss of a fan blade, and to validate the analysis by comparing the results against actual blade loss test data. The solution, which is based on the component element method, accounts for rotor-to-casing rubs, high damping and rapid deceleration rates associated with the blade loss event. A comparison of test results and predicted response show good agreement except for an initial overshoot spike not observed in test. The method is effective for analysis of large systems.

  9. Imaging Brain Dynamics Using Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tzyy-Ping; Makeig, Scott; McKeown, Martin J.; Bell, Anthony J.; Lee, Te-Won; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    The analysis of electroencephalographic (EEG) and magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings is important both for basic brain research and for medical diagnosis and treatment. Independent component analysis (ICA) is an effective method for removing artifacts and separating sources of the brain signals from these recordings. A similar approach is proving useful for analyzing functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (fMRI) data. In this paper, we outline the assumptions underlying ICA and demonstrate its application to a variety of electrical and hemodynamic recordings from the human brain. PMID:20824156

  10. Increment of specific heat capacity of solar salt with SiO2 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable. PACS 65.: Thermal properties of condensed matter; 65.20.-w: Thermal properties of liquids; 65.20.Jk: Studies of thermodynamic properties of specific liquids PMID:25346648

  11. Compiler-Enhanced Incremental Checkpointing for OpenMP Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bronevetsky, G; Marques, D; Pingali, K; Rugina, R; McKee, S A

    2008-01-21

    As modern supercomputing systems reach the peta-flop performance range, they grow in both size and complexity. This makes them increasingly vulnerable to failures from a variety of causes. Checkpointing is a popular technique for tolerating such failures, enabling applications to periodically save their state and restart computation after a failure. Although a variety of automated system-level checkpointing solutions are currently available to HPC users, manual application-level checkpointing remains more popular due to its superior performance. This paper improves performance of automated checkpointing via a compiler analysis for incremental checkpointing. This analysis, which works with both sequential and OpenMP applications, reduces checkpoint sizes by as much as 80% and enables asynchronous checkpointing.

  12. Compiler-Enhanced Incremental Checkpointing for OpenMP Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bronevetsky, G; Marques, D; Pingali, K; McKee, S; Rugina, R

    2009-02-18

    As modern supercomputing systems reach the peta-flop performance range, they grow in both size and complexity. This makes them increasingly vulnerable to failures from a variety of causes. Checkpointing is a popular technique for tolerating such failures, enabling applications to periodically save their state and restart computation after a failure. Although a variety of automated system-level checkpointing solutions are currently available to HPC users, manual application-level checkpointing remains more popular due to its superior performance. This paper improves performance of automated checkpointing via a compiler analysis for incremental checkpointing. This analysis, which works with both sequential and OpenMP applications, significantly reduces checkpoint sizes and enables asynchronous checkpointing.

  13. Dynamic fracture mechanics analysis for an edge delamination crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    A global/local analysis is applied to the problem of a panel with an edge delamination crack subject to an impulse loading to ascertain the dynamic J integral. The approach uses the spectral element method to obtain the global dynamic response and local resultants to obtain the J integral. The variation of J integral along the crack front is shown. The crack behavior is mixed mode (Mode 2 and Mode 3), but is dominated by the Mode 2 behavior.

  14. Dynamical system analysis of unstable flow phenomena in centrifugal blower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, David; Stickland, Matthew; Liśkiewicz, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    Methods of dynamical system analysis were employed to analyze unsteady phenomena in a centrifugal blower. Pressure signals gathered at different control points were decomposed into their Principal Components (PCs) by means of Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA). Certain number of PCs was considered in the analysis based on their statistical correlation. Projection of the original signal onto its PCs allowed to draw the phase trajectory that clearly separated non-stable blower working conditions from its regular operation.

  15. Floquet analysis in accretion disc dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, F.; Bianchini, A.

    2002-01-01

    Floquet analysis is proposed to analyze the evolution of exponentially growing modes of the local instabilities in accretion discs of CVs induced by perturbations in the velocity field. Both the stability of the disc and the deviation of the Reynolds number are described by the Floquet exponents μj of the perturbations, which represent Landau's modes of the fluid.

  16. Incrementality and Prediction in Human Sentence Processing

    PubMed Central

    Altmann, Gerry T. M.; Mirković, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    We identify a number of principles with respect to prediction that, we argue, underpin adult language comprehension: (a) comprehension consists in realizing a mapping between the unfolding sentence and the event representation corresponding to the real-world event being described; (b) the realization of this mapping manifests as the ability to predict both how the language will unfold, and how the real-world event would unfold if it were being experienced directly; (c) concurrent linguistic and nonlinguistic inputs, and the prior internal states of the system, each drive the predictive process; (d) the representation of prior internal states across a representational substrate common to the linguistic and nonlinguistic domains enables the predictive process to operate over variable time frames and variable levels of representational abstraction. We review empirical data exemplifying the operation of these principles and discuss the relationship between prediction, event structure, thematic role assignment, and incrementality. PMID:20396405

  17. Incremental nonlinear dimensionality reduction by manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Law, Martin H C; Jain, Anil K

    2006-03-01

    Understanding the structure of multidimensional patterns, especially in unsupervised cases, is of fundamental importance in data mining, pattern recognition, and machine learning. Several algorithms have been proposed to analyze the structure of high-dimensional data based on the notion of manifold learning. These algorithms have been used to extract the intrinsic characteristics of different types of high-dimensional data by performing nonlinear dimensionality reduction. Most of these algorithms operate in a "batch" mode and cannot be efficiently applied when data are collected sequentially. In this paper, we describe an incremental version of ISOMAP, one of the key manifold learning algorithms. Our experiments on synthetic data as well as real world images demonstrate that our modified algorithm can maintain an accurate low-dimensional representation of the data in an efficient manner. PMID:16526424

  18. Improved VSM for Incremental Text Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Lei, Jianjun; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xing; Guo, Jim

    2008-11-01

    As a simple classification method VSM has been widely applied in text information processing field. There are some problems for traditional VSM to select a refined vector model representation, which can make a good tradeoff between complexity and performance, especially for incremental text mining. To solve these problems, in this paper, several improvements, such as VSM based on improved TF, TFIDF and BM25, are discussed. And then maximum mutual information feature selection is introduced to achieve a low dimension VSM with less complexity, and at the same time keep an acceptable precision. The experimental results of spam filtering and short messages classification shows that the algorithm can achieve higher precision than existing algorithms under same conditions.

  19. Factorial Structure of the Career Decision Scale: Incremental Validity of the Five-Factor Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldt, Ronald C.; Ferry, Ashley; Bullock, Melinda; Camarotti-Carvalho, Ana; Collingwood, Melinda; Eilers, Scott; Meyer, Luke; Nurre, Emily; Woelfel, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    For comparison of one-, three-, and four-factor structures of the Indecision scale of the Career Decision Scale, results of confirmatory factor analysis (N = 686) indicated the best fit for the three-factor structure. Multiple regression analysis results indicated incremental validity of the five-factor model for predicting dimensions of career…

  20. Traffic chaotic dynamics modeling and analysis of deterministic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiqiang; Huang, Ning; Wu, Zhitao

    2016-07-01

    Network traffic is an important and direct acting factor of network reliability and performance. To understand the behaviors of network traffic, chaotic dynamics models were proposed and helped to analyze nondeterministic network a lot. The previous research thought that the chaotic dynamics behavior was caused by random factors, and the deterministic networks would not exhibit chaotic dynamics behavior because of lacking of random factors. In this paper, we first adopted chaos theory to analyze traffic data collected from a typical deterministic network testbed — avionics full duplex switched Ethernet (AFDX, a typical deterministic network) testbed, and found that the chaotic dynamics behavior also existed in deterministic network. Then in order to explore the chaos generating mechanism, we applied the mean field theory to construct the traffic dynamics equation (TDE) for deterministic network traffic modeling without any network random factors. Through studying the derived TDE, we proposed that chaotic dynamics was one of the nature properties of network traffic, and it also could be looked as the action effect of TDE control parameters. A network simulation was performed and the results verified that the network congestion resulted in the chaotic dynamics for a deterministic network, which was identical with expectation of TDE. Our research will be helpful to analyze the traffic complicated dynamics behavior for deterministic network and contribute to network reliability designing and analysis.

  1. Dynamical analysis of a spinning solar sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shengping; Li, Junfeng; Zhu, Kaijian

    2011-12-01

    This paper discusses the orbit and attitude dynamics of a solar sail, and gives the sufficient conditions of a stable orbit and attitude coupled system. The stability of the coupled system is determined by the orbit stability and attitude stability. Based on the sufficient conditions, a spin-stabilized solar sail of cone configuration is proposed to evolve in the heliocentric displaced orbit. For this kind of configuration, the attitude is always stable by spinning itself. The orbit stability depends on the orbit parameters of the heliocentric displaced orbit, the ratio of the orbit radius to displaced distance and orbit angular velocity. If the center of mass and center of pressure overlap, it can be proved that the coupled system is stable when the orbit parameters are chosen in the stable region. When the center of mass and center of pressure offset exists, the stability of the coupled system can not be judged. A numerical example is given and the result shows that both the orbit and attitude are stable for the case.

  2. Structural dynamic analysis of a ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Kwon-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Ball joint is a rotating and swiveling element that is typically installed at the interface between two parts. In an automobile, the ball joint is the component that connects the control arms to the steering knuckle. The ball joint can also be installed in linkage systems for motion control applications. This paper describes the simulation strategy for a ball joint analysis, considering manufacturing process. Its manufacturing process can be divided into plugging and spinning. Then, the interested responses is selected as the stress distribution generated between its ball and bearing. In this paper, a commercial code of NX DAFUL using an implicit integration method is introduced to calculate the response. In addition, the gap analysis is performed to investigate the fitness, focusing on the response of the displacement of a ball stud. Also, the optimum design is suggested through case studies.

  3. Interactive Visual Analysis within Dynamic Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkiewicz, T.

    2012-12-01

    The many observation and simulation based ocean models available today can provide crucial insights for all fields of marine research and can serve as valuable references when planning data collection missions. However, the increasing size and complexity of these models makes leveraging their contents difficult for end users. Through a combination of data visualization techniques, interactive analysis tools, and new hardware technologies, the data within these models can be made more accessible to domain scientists. We present an interactive system that supports exploratory visual analysis within large-scale ocean flow models. The currents and eddies within the models are illustrated using effective, particle-based flow visualization techniques. Stereoscopic displays and rendering methods are employed to ensure that the user can correctly perceive the complex 3D structures of depth-dependent flow patterns. Interactive analysis tools are provided which allow the user to experiment through the introduction of their customizable virtual dye particles into the models to explore regions of interest. A multi-touch interface provides natural, efficient interaction, with custom multi-touch gestures simplifying the otherwise challenging tasks of navigating and positioning tools within a 3D environment. We demonstrate the potential applications of our visual analysis environment with two examples of real-world significance: Firstly, an example of using customized particles with physics-based behaviors to simulate pollutant release scenarios, including predicting the oil plume path for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster. Secondly, an interactive tool for plotting and revising proposed autonomous underwater vehicle mission pathlines with respect to the surrounding flow patterns predicted by the model; as these survey vessels have extremely limited energy budgets, designing more efficient paths allows for greater survey areas.

  4. Solar Dynamic Power System Stability Analysis and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct dynamic analysis, control design, and control performance test of solar power system. Solar power system consists of generation system and distribution network system. A bench mark system is used in this research, which includes a generator with excitation system and governor, an ac/dc converter, six DDCU's and forty-eight loads. A detailed model is used for modeling generator. Excitation system is represented by a third order model. DDCU is represented by a seventh order system. The load is modeled by the combination of constant power and constant impedance. Eigen-analysis and eigen-sensitivity analysis are used for system dynamic analysis. The effects of excitation system, governor, ac/dc converter control, and the type of load on system stability are discussed. In order to improve system transient stability, nonlinear ac/dc converter control is introduced. The direct linearization method is used for control design. The dynamic analysis results show that these controls affect system stability in different ways. The parameter coordination of controllers are recommended based on the dynamic analysis. It is concluded from the present studies that system stability is improved by the coordination of control parameters and the nonlinear ac/dc converter control stabilize system oscillation caused by the load change and system fault efficiently.

  5. Incremental mixed lognormal-Gaussian 4D VAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsythe, J.; Fletcher, S. J.; Kliewer, A.; Jones, A. S.

    2013-12-01

    One of the advances that allowed 4DVAR to be operational for synoptic numerical weather prediction was the introduction of incremental 4DVAR. This method assumes that the errors are additive and Gaussian in nature. However, as work recently has shown, there are errors which are multiplicative. A full field version of the 4DVAR equations have been derived and tested in a toy problem for the situation where there is a mix of Gaussian and lognormal background and observational errors. It is not straight-forward, however, to extend the incremental theory to multiplicative errors. One approach which has been suggested recently involves using a transform for the increment. It is shown here that the increment that is found is not the 'incremental mode', i.e. the most likely state for the increment, but rather a median state for the increment. To overcome the multiplicative nature of the errors we present a geometric tangent linear approximation which enables us to linearize the observation operator with respect to a consistent lognormal multiplicative increment. In this paper we present an equivalent incremental version of the mixed lognormal-Gaussian which is based upon finding the most-likely state for additive increments for the Gaussian variables and lognormal for the multiplicative lognormal variables. We test this new approach with the Lorenz 1963 model under different size observational errors and observation window lengths.

  6. Phase transition analysis of the dynamic instability of microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarahmadian, Shantia; Yari, Masoud

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides the phase transition analysis of a reaction diffusion equations system modelling the dynamic instability of microtubules (MTs). For this purpose, we have generalized the macroscopic model studied by Mourão et al (2011 Comput. Biol. Chem. 35 269-81). This model investigates the interaction between the MT nucleation, the essential dynamics parameters and extinction, and their impact on the stability of the system. The considered framework encompasses a system of partial differential equations for the elongation and shortening of MTs, where the rates of elongation as well as the lifetimes of the elongating shortening phases are linear functions of GTP-tubulin concentration. In a novel way, this paper investigates the stability analysis and provides a bifurcation analysis for the dynamic instability of MTs in the presence of diffusion and all of the fundamental dynamics parameters. Our stability analysis introduces the phase transition method as a new mathematical tool in the study of MT dynamics. The mathematical tools introduced to handle the problem should be of general use.

  7. Dynamic Network-Based Epistasis Analysis: Boolean Examples

    PubMed Central

    Azpeitia, Eugenio; Benítez, Mariana; Padilla-Longoria, Pablo; Espinosa-Soto, Carlos; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we focus on how the hierarchical and single-path assumptions of epistasis analysis can bias the inference of gene regulatory networks. Here we emphasize the critical importance of dynamic analyses, and specifically illustrate the use of Boolean network models. Epistasis in a broad sense refers to gene interactions, however, as originally proposed by Bateson, epistasis is defined as the blocking of a particular allelic effect due to the effect of another allele at a different locus (herein, classical epistasis). Classical epistasis analysis has proven powerful and useful, allowing researchers to infer and assign directionality to gene interactions. As larger data sets are becoming available, the analysis of classical epistasis is being complemented with computer science tools and system biology approaches. We show that when the hierarchical and single-path assumptions are not met in classical epistasis analysis, the access to relevant information and the correct inference of gene interaction topologies is hindered, and it becomes necessary to consider the temporal dynamics of gene interactions. The use of dynamical networks can overcome these limitations. We particularly focus on the use of Boolean networks that, like classical epistasis analysis, relies on logical formalisms, and hence can complement classical epistasis analysis and relax its assumptions. We develop a couple of theoretical examples and analyze them from a dynamic Boolean network model perspective. Boolean networks could help to guide additional experiments and discern among alternative regulatory schemes that would be impossible or difficult to infer without the elimination of these assumption from the classical epistasis analysis. We also use examples from the literature to show how a Boolean network-based approach has resolved ambiguities and guided epistasis analysis. Our article complements previous accounts, not only by focusing on the implications of the hierarchical and

  8. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  9. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING ANALYSIS OF COMBUSTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Freeman, Mark; Gera, Dinesh

    2001-11-06

    In the current fiscal year FY01, several CFD simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of moisture in biomass/coal, particle injection locations, and flow parameters on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} inside a 150 MW GEEZER industrial boiler. Various simulations were designed to predict the suitability of biomass cofiring in coal combustors, and to explore the possibility of using biomass as a reburning fuel to reduce NO{sub x}. Some additional CFD simulations were also conducted on CERF combustor to examine the combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environments. Most of the CFD models available in the literature treat particles to be point masses with uniform temperature inside the particles. This isothermal condition may not be suitable for larger biomass particles. To this end, a stand alone program was developed from the first principles to account for heat conduction from the surface of the particle to its center. It is envisaged that the recently developed non-isothermal stand alone module will be integrated with the Fluent solver during next fiscal year to accurately predict the carbon burnout from larger biomass particles. Anisotropy in heat transfer in radial and axial will be explored using different conductivities in radial and axial directions. The above models will be validated/tested on various fullscale industrial boilers. The current NO{sub x} modules will be modified to account for local CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} radicals chemistry, currently it is based on global chemistry. It may also be worth exploring the effect of enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environment on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} concentration. The research objective of this study is to develop a 3-Dimensional Combustor Model for Biomass Co-firing and reburning applications using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics Code.

  10. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas; Flores-Amaya, Felipe

    1999-01-01

    This document summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)'s Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The document is intended to serve as both an introduction to the type of support carried out by the FDAB (Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch), as well as a concise reference summarizing key analysis results and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles assumed over the past year. The major accomplishments in the FDAB in FY99 were: 1) Provided flight dynamics support to the Lunar Prospector and TRIANA missions among a variety of spacecraft missions; 2) Sponsored the Flight Mechanics Symposium; 3) Supported the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) workshops; 4) Performed numerous analyses and studies for future missions; 5) Started the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch Lab for in-house mission analysis and support; and 6) Complied with all requirements in support of GSFC IS09000 certification.

  11. Dynamic performances analysis of a real vehicle driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M. A.; Jamil, J. F.; Salim, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Vehicle dynamic is the effects of movement of a vehicle generated from the acceleration, braking, ride and handling activities. The dynamic behaviours are determined by the forces from tire, gravity and aerodynamic which acting on the vehicle. This paper emphasizes the analysis of vehicle dynamic performance of a real vehicle. Real driving experiment on the vehicle is conducted to determine the effect of vehicle based on roll, pitch, and yaw, longitudinal, lateral and vertical acceleration. The experiment is done using the accelerometer to record the reading of the vehicle dynamic performance when the vehicle is driven on the road. The experiment starts with weighing a car model to get the center of gravity (COG) to place the accelerometer sensor for data acquisition (DAQ). The COG of the vehicle is determined by using the weight of the vehicle. A rural route is set to launch the experiment and the road conditions are determined for the test. The dynamic performance of the vehicle are depends on the road conditions and driving maneuver. The stability of a vehicle can be controlled by the dynamic performance analysis.

  12. Extruder analysis, modeling, and dynamic matrix control

    SciTech Connect

    Sribuangam, D.

    1991-01-01

    The Modern Plastics extruder of the Material Science and Engineering Department is used to extrude high density polyethylene (Alathon 7040). Diameter sensor characterization is done due to the fiber positioning sensitivity of the sensor (Zimmer) and observed variations in the sensor signal. Detailed step test transfer function models are developed where the input variables are take-up speed, screw speed, gear pump speed, and die temperature set point. The output variables are die temperature, die pressure, end of the barrel temperature and pressure. A total of 18 transfer functions are obtained. The relationships between known periodic input variations and the output variations are analyzed by the power spectrum analysis. Due to the dominance of the draw resonance-like variation, the main control objective is to eliminate this variation. Results show that all control methods can handle set point tracking but achieve only a limited reduction in amplitude of the fiber diameter variation.

  13. Digital data processing system dynamic loading analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagas, J. J.; Peterka, J. J.; Tucker, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Simulation and analysis of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Digital Data Processing System (DDPS) are reported. The mated flight and postseparation flight phases of the space shuttle's approach and landing test configuration were modeled utilizing the Information Management System Interpretative Model (IMSIM) in a computerized simulation modeling of the ALT hardware, software, and workload. System requirements simulated for the ALT configuration were defined. Sensitivity analyses determined areas of potential data flow problems in DDPS operation. Based on the defined system requirements and the sensitivity analyses, a test design is described for adapting, parameterizing, and executing the IMSIM. Varying load and stress conditions for the model execution are given. The analyses of the computer simulation runs were documented as results, conclusions, and recommendations for DDPS improvements.

  14. Validation of daily increments in otoliths of northern squawfish larvae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wertheimer, R.H.; Barfoot, C.A.

    1998-01-01

    Otoliths from laboratory-reared northern squawfish, Ptychocheilus oregonensis, larvae were examined to determine the periodicity of increment deposition. Increment deposition began in both sagittae and lapilli after hatching. Reader counts indicated that increment formation was daily in sagittae of 1-29-day-old larvae. However, increment counts from lapilli were significantly less than the known ages of northern squawfish larvae, possibly because some increments were not detectable. Otolith readability and age agreement among readers were greatest for young (<11 days) northern squawfish larvae. This was primarily because a transitional zone of low-contrast material began forming in otoliths of 8-11-day-old larvae and persisted until approximately 20 days after hatching. Formation of the transition zone appeared to coincide with the onset of exogenous feeding and continued through yolk sac absorption. Our results indicate that aging wild-caught northern squawfish larvae using daily otolith increment counts is possible.

  15. Detection of suspicious activity using incremental outlier detection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrajac, D.; Reljin, N.; Pejcic, N.; Vance, T.; McDaniel, S.; Lazarevic, A.; Chang, H. J.; Choi, J. Y.; Miezianko, R.

    2009-08-01

    Detection of unusual trajectories of moving objects can help in identifying suspicious activity on convoy routes and thus reduce casualties caused by improvised explosive devices. In this paper, using video imagery we compare efficiency of various techniques for incremental outlier detection on detecting unusual trajectories on simulated and real-life data obtained from SENSIAC database. Incremental outlier detection algorithms that we consider in this paper include incremental Support Vector Classifier (incSVC), incremental Local Outlier Factor (incLOF) algorithm and incremental Connectivity Outlier Factor (incCOF) algorithm. Our experiments performed on ground truth trajectory data indicate that incremental LOF algorithm can provide better detection of unusual trajectories in comparison to other examined techniques.

  16. Patient-adaptive lesion metabolism analysis by dynamic PET images.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Liu, Huafeng; Shi, Pengcheng

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic PET imaging provides important spatial-temporal information for metabolism analysis of organs and tissues, and generates a great reference for clinical diagnosis and pharmacokinetic analysis. Due to poor statistical properties of the measurement data in low count dynamic PET acquisition and disturbances from surrounding tissues, identifying small lesions inside the human body is still a challenging issue. The uncertainties in estimating the arterial input function will also limit the accuracy and reliability of the metabolism analysis of lesions. Furthermore, the sizes of the patients and the motions during PET acquisition will yield mismatch against general purpose reconstruction system matrix, this will also affect the quantitative accuracy of metabolism analyses of lesions. In this paper, we present a dynamic PET metabolism analysis framework by defining a patient adaptive system matrix to improve the lesion metabolism analysis. Both patient size information and potential small lesions are incorporated by simulations of phantoms of different sizes and individual point source responses. The new framework improves the quantitative accuracy of lesion metabolism analysis, and makes the lesion identification more precisely. The requirement of accurate input functions is also reduced. Experiments are conducted on Monte Carlo simulated data set for quantitative analysis and validation, and on real patient scans for assessment of clinical potential. PMID:23286175

  17. Operationalizing sustainability in urban coastal systems: a system dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavrommati, Georgia; Bithas, Kostas; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2013-12-15

    We propose a system dynamics approach for Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) in urban coastal systems. A systematic analysis based on theoretical considerations, policy analysis and experts' knowledge is followed in order to define the concept of ESD. The principles underlying ESD feed the development of a System Dynamics Model (SDM) that connects the pollutant loads produced by urban systems' socioeconomic activities with the ecological condition of the coastal ecosystem that it is delineated in operational terms through key biological elements defined by the EU Water Framework Directive. The receiving waters of the Athens Metropolitan area, which bears the elements of typical high population density Mediterranean coastal city but which currently has also new dynamics induced by the ongoing financial crisis, are used as an experimental system for testing a system dynamics approach to apply the concept of ESD. Systems' thinking is employed to represent the complex relationships among the components of the system. Interconnections and dependencies that determine the potentials for achieving ESD are revealed. The proposed system dynamics analysis can facilitate decision makers to define paths of development that comply with the principles of ESD. PMID:24200010

  18. Trajectory analysis of the rotational dynamics of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S. V. Lokshtanov, S. E.

    2015-08-15

    A method for analysis of the rotational dynamics of molecular systems has been proposed on the basis of the calculation of the set of exact classical vibrational–rotational trajectories. It has been proposed to compose and to numerically solve the complete system of dynamic equations consisting of Hamilton’s equations and generalized Euler equations for an arbitrary system. The computer algebra system can be applied to automatize the process of derivation and subsequent solution of dynamic equations. The variation of the picture of known bifurcation in the rotational dynamics of symmetric triatomic hydride molecules with an increase in vibrational excitation has been studied within the proposed approach. It has been shown that manifestations of bifurcation completely disappear at a quite high level of vibrational excitations.

  19. Dynamic analysis of a gear drive system in aeroengine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiangdong; Zhou, Chuanrong

    1993-04-01

    A new technique of structural dynamic analysis especially for analysis of a gear drive system has been developed, which combines the principle of substructure analysis with the idea of structure modification. A gear stiffness model of the degrees of the freedom of the structure node in which the gear relation exists has also been developed. It has the advantages of both the method of substructure analysis and vibration reanalysis of modified structure. The natural frequencies and modes calculated by the present program are in quite good agreement with the results calculated by FEM.

  20. Microcomputed tomographic comparison of posterior composite resin restorative techniques: sonicated bulk fill versus incremental fill.

    PubMed

    Jarisch, Justin; Lien, Wen; Guevara, Peter H; Greenwood, William J; Dunn, William J

    2016-01-01

    Sonication technology has recently been touted to decrease composite viscosity during delivery and may allow better cavity preparation adaptation and minimize voids. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the difference between conventional, hand-placed, incremental application of a standard hybrid resin-based composite (RBC) and sonicated application of a bulk-fill RBC in box-type and cylindrical cavity preparations. Experimental restorations were fabricated using molds of box-type or cylindrical preparations. For bulk-filled specimens, a single compule of bulk-fill composite was dispensed with a sonic handpiece. The conventional hybrid material was placed in 3 increments (2 mm, 2 mm, and 1 mm). Microfocus x-ray computed tomography was used to analyze voids for percentage and total volume porosity as well as number of actual pores. An analysis of variance indicated that RBC restorations that were applied to cylindrical cavities using a sonicated bulk-filled application method exhibited significantly less porosity (1.42%; P < 0.001) than incrementally placed cylindrical restorations (2.87%); sonicated bulk-filled, cube-shaped restorations (3.12%); and incrementally placed cube-shaped restorations (5.16%). When the groups were subcategorized into the specific characteristics of shape (cube vs cylinder) and application method (bulk vs incremental), the cylindrical group, which included both bulk-filled and incrementally placed specimens, demonstrated significantly less porosity (2.00%; P < 0.001) than other groups. Restorations that were incrementally placed into cube-shaped cavities produced the largest amount of porosity. PMID:27599276

  1. Influence of Pedaling Cadence and Incremental Protocol on the Estimation of EMGFT.

    PubMed

    Duff, Timothy M; Fournier, Hallie; Hopp, Orie B; Ochshorn, Eli; Sanders, Eric S; Stevens, Rachel E; Malek, Moh H

    2016-08-01

    Duff, TM, Fournier, H, Hopp, OB, Ochshorn, E, Sanders, ES, Stevens, RE, and Malek, MH. Influence of pedaling cadence and incremental protocol on the estimation of EMGFT. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2206-2211, 2016-Theoretically, the electromyographic fatigue threshold (EMGFT) is the highest exercise intensity that an individual can exercise at indefinitely without an increase in electromyography (EMG) amplitude. This index is estimated from a single incremental test. There are, however, factors that may influence EMG amplitude such as pedaling cadence or the incremental protocol used. The purposes of this study were to determine whether different pedaling cadences and/or incremental protocols influence the estimation of the EMGFT. Eight healthy college-aged men performed incremental cycle ergometry on three separate visits. The participants exercised using the following combinations of pedaling cadences and incremental protocols in random order: 25 W at 70 RPM; 13 W at 70 RPM; and 25 W at 100 RPM. The EMGFT value was determined from the vastus lateralis muscle of each participant for each of the three conditions. Separate 1-way repeated measures analysis of variances were performed to determine mean differences for various outcome indices. The mean maximal power output for the 13 W at 70 RPM condition was significantly lower than the two other conditions. There were, however, no significant mean differences (F (2,14) = 2.03; p = 0.169) for EMGFT between the three conditions. The findings of this study indicated that different pedaling cadences and incremental protocols did not influence the estimation of the EMGFT. PMID:26677833

  2. Low-Rank Incremental Methods for Computing Dominant Singular Subspaces

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Christopher G; Gallivan, Dr. Kyle A; Van Dooren, Dr. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Computing the singular values and vectors of a matrix is a crucial kernel in numerous scientific and industrial applications. As such, numerous methods have been proposed to handle this problem in a computationally efficient way. This paper considers a family of methods for incrementally computing the dominant SVD of a large matrix A. Specifically, we describe a unification of a number of previously disparate methods for approximating the dominant SVD via a single pass through A. We tie the behavior of these methods to that of a class of optimization-based iterative eigensolvers on A'*A. An iterative procedure is proposed which allows the computation of an accurate dominant SVD via multiple passes through A. We present an analysis of the convergence of this iteration, and provide empirical demonstration of the proposed method on both synthetic and benchmark data.

  3. Empirical analysis of online human dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Zhou, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Patterns of human activities have attracted increasing academic interests, since the quantitative understanding of human behavior is helpful to uncover the origins of many socioeconomic phenomena. This paper focuses on behaviors of Internet users. Six large-scale systems are studied in our experiments, including the movie-watching in Netflix and MovieLens, the transaction in Ebay, the bookmark-collecting in Delicious, and the posting in FreindFeed and Twitter. Empirical analysis reveals some common statistical features of online human behavior: (1) The total number of user's actions, the user's activity, and the interevent time all follow heavy-tailed distributions. (2) There exists a strongly positive correlation between user's activity and the total number of user's actions, and a significantly negative correlation between the user's activity and the width of the interevent time distribution. We further study the rescaling method and show that this method could to some extent eliminate the different statistics among users caused by the different activities, yet the effectiveness depends on the data sets.

  4. Theoretical analysis of dynamic processes for interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-01

    Biological transport is supported by the collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by carrying out an analysis of a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes, in which interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. This allows us to explicitly connect microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. A theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that the dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on the interactions, and that the correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motor transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  5. Dynamic analysis of spur gears using computer program DANST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Liou, Chuen-Huei; Valco, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    DANST is a computer program for static and dynamic analysis of spur gear systems. The program can be used for parametric studies to predict the effect on dynamic load and tooth bending stress of spur gears due to operating speed, torque, stiffness, damping, inertia, and tooth profile. DANST performs geometric modeling and dynamic analysis for low- or high-contact-ratio spur gears. DANST can simulate gear systems with contact ratio ranging from one to three. It was designed to be easy to use, and it is extensively documented by comments in the source code. This report describes the installation and use of DANST. It covers input data requirements and presents examples. The report also compares DANST predictions for gear tooth loads and bending stress to experimental and finite element results.

  6. Bifurcation analysis of bubble dynamics in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Blomgren, Peter; Palacios, Antonio; Zhu, Bing; Daw, C Stuart; FINNEY, Charles E A; Halow, John; Pannala, Sreekanth

    2007-01-01

    We use a low-dimensional, agent-based bubble model to study the changes in the global dynamics of fluidized beds in response to changes in the frequency of the rising bubbles. The computationally based bifurcation analysis shows that at low frequencies, the global dynamics is attracted towards a fixed point since the bubbles interact very little with one another. As the frequency of injection increases, however, the global dynamics undergoes a series of bifurcations to new behaviors that include highly periodic orbits, chaotic attractors, and intermittent behavior between periodic orbits and chaotic sets. Using methods from time-series analysis, we are able to approximate nonlinear models that allow for long-term predictions and the possibility of developing control algorithms.

  7. Onsite analysis of data from the Dynamics Explorer (DE) spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Candey, Robert M.; Humphreys, Josephine N.

    1992-01-01

    The tasks performed by ARC Professional Services Group, Inc. fell into five parts: (1) dynamics explorer (DE) data analysis and modeling; (2) DE project support; (3) chemical release observations support; (4) VLF emissions and plasma instability studies; and (5) modeling of planetary radio emissions. Some recommendations for future considerations are also addressed.

  8. An Efficient Crankshaft Dynamic Analysis Using Substructuring with Ritz Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MOURELATOS, Z. P.

    2000-11-01

    A structural analysis using dynamic substructuring with Ritz vectors is presented for predicting the dynamic response of an engine crankshaft, based on the finite-element method. A two-level dynamic substructuring is performed using a set of load-dependent Ritz vectors. The rotating crankshaft is properly coupled with the non-rotating, compliant engine block. The block compliance is represented by a distributed linear elastic foundation at each main bearing location. The stiffness of the elastic foundation can be different in the vertical and horizontal planes, thereby considering the anisotropy of the engine block compliance with respect to the crankshaft rotation. The analysis accounts for the kinematic non-linearity resulting from the crankangle-dependent circumferential contact location between each journal and the corresponding bore of the engine block. Crankshaft “bent” and block “misboring” effects due to manufacturing imperfections are considered in the analysis. The superior accuracy and reduced computational effort of the present method as compared with the equivalent superelement analysis in MSC/NASTRAN, are demonstrated using the free and forced vibrations of a slender cylindrical beam and free vibrations of a four-cylinder engine crankshaft. Subsequently, the accuracy of the present method in calculating the dynamic response of engine crankshafts is shown through comparisons between the analytical predictions and experimental results for the torsional vibrations of an in-line five cylinder engine and the bending vibrations of the crankshaft-flywheel assembly of a V6 engine.

  9. SPAR improved structure-fluid dynamic analysis capability, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient and general method of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of fluid flow and elastic structures is investigated. The improvement of Structural Performance Analysis and Redesign (SPAR) code is summarized. All error codes are documented and the SPAR processor/subroutine cross reference is included.

  10. Bayesian Shrinkage Analysis of Quantitative Trait Loci for Dynamic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runqing; Xu, Shizhong

    2007-01-01

    Many quantitative traits are measured repeatedly during the life of an organism. Such traits are called dynamic traits. The pattern of the changes of a dynamic trait is called the growth trajectory. Studying the growth trajectory may enhance our understanding of the genetic architecture of the growth trajectory. Recently, we developed an interval-mapping procedure to map QTL for dynamic traits under the maximum-likelihood framework. We fit the growth trajectory by Legendre polynomials. The method intended to map one QTL at a time and the entire QTL analysis involved scanning the entire genome by fitting multiple single-QTL models. In this study, we propose a Bayesian shrinkage analysis for estimating and mapping multiple QTL in a single model. The method is a combination between the shrinkage mapping for individual quantitative traits and the Legendre polynomial analysis for dynamic traits. The multiple-QTL model is implemented in two ways: (1) a fixed-interval approach where a QTL is placed in each marker interval and (2) a moving-interval approach where the position of a QTL can be searched in a range that covers many marker intervals. Simulation study shows that the Bayesian shrinkage method generates much better signals for QTL than the interval-mapping approach. We propose several alternative methods to present the results of the Bayesian shrinkage analysis. In particular, we found that the Wald test-statistic profile can serve as a mechanism to test the significance of a putative QTL. PMID:17435239

  11. A Model of Practice in Special Education: Dynamic Ecological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannant, Barbara; Lim, Eng Leong; McAllum, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic Ecological Analysis (DEA) is a model of practice which increases a teams' efficacy by enabling the development of more effective interventions through collaboration and collective reflection. This process has proved to be useful in: a) clarifying thinking and problem-solving, b) transferring knowledge and thinking to significant parties,…

  12. Potential applications of computational fluid dynamics to biofluid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Rogers, S. E.; Rosenfeld, M.; Kwak, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was developed to the stage where it has become an indispensable part of aerospace research and design. In view of advances made in aerospace applications, the computational approach can be used for biofluid mechanics research. Several flow simulation methods developed for aerospace problems are briefly discussed for potential applications to biofluids, especially to blood flow analysis.

  13. Incremental fusion of partial biometric information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Ali J.; Jassim, Sabah A.

    2012-06-01

    Existing face recognition schemes are mostly based on extracting biometric feature vectors either from whole face images, or from a fixed facial region (e.g., eyes, nose, and mouth). Extreme variation in quality conditions between biometric enrolment and verification stages badly affects the performance of face recognition systems. Such problems have partly motivated several investigations into the use of partial facial features for face recognition. Nevertheless, partial face recognition is potentially useful in several applications, for instance, it used in forensics for detectives to identify individuals after some accidents such as fire or explosion. In this paper, we propose a scheme to fuse the biometric information of partial face images incrementally based on their recognition accuracy (or discriminative power) ranks. Such fusion scheme uses the optimal ratio of full/partial face images in each different quality condition. We found that such scheme is also useful for full face images to enhance authentication accuracy significantly. Nevertheless, it reduces the required storage requirements and processing time of the biometric system. Our experiments show that the required ratio of full/partial facial images to achieve optimal performance varies from (5%) to (80%) according to the quality conditions whereas the authentication accuracy improves significantly for low quality biometric samples.

  14. Evolution of cooperation driven by incremental learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pei; Duan, Haibin

    2015-02-01

    It has been shown that the details of microscopic rules in structured populations can have a crucial impact on the ultimate outcome in evolutionary games. So alternative formulations of strategies and their revision processes exploring how strategies are actually adopted and spread within the interaction network need to be studied. In the present work, we formulate the strategy update rule as an incremental learning process, wherein knowledge is refreshed according to one's own experience learned from the past (self-learning) and that gained from social interaction (social-learning). More precisely, we propose a continuous version of strategy update rules, by introducing the willingness to cooperate W, to better capture the flexibility of decision making behavior. Importantly, the newly gained knowledge including self-learning and social learning is weighted by the parameter ω, establishing a strategy update rule involving innovative element. Moreover, we quantify the macroscopic features of the emerging patterns to inspect the underlying mechanisms of the evolutionary process using six cluster characteristics. In order to further support our results, we examine the time evolution course for these characteristics. Our results might provide insights for understanding cooperative behaviors and have several important implications for understanding how individuals adjust their strategies under real-life conditions.

  15. Parameter incremental learning algorithm for neural networks.

    PubMed

    Wan, Sheng; Banta, Larry E

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, a novel stochastic (or online) training algorithm for neural networks, named parameter incremental learning (PIL) algorithm, is proposed and developed. The main idea of the PIL strategy is that the learning algorithm should not only adapt to the newly presented input-output training pattern by adjusting parameters, but also preserve the prior results. A general PIL algorithm for feedforward neural networks is accordingly presented as the first-order approximate solution to an optimization problem, where the performance index is the combination of proper measures of preservation and adaptation. The PIL algorithms for the multilayer perceptron (MLP) are subsequently derived. Numerical studies show that for all the three benchmark problems used in this paper the PIL algorithm for MLP is measurably superior to the standard online backpropagation (BP) algorithm and the stochastic diagonal Levenberg-Marquardt (SDLM) algorithm in terms of the convergence speed and accuracy. Other appealing features of the PIL algorithm are that it is computationally as simple as the BP algorithm, and as easy to use as the BP algorithm. It, therefore, can be applied, with better performance, to any situations where the standard online BP algorithm is applicable. PMID:17131658

  16. Dynamics in non-globally-hyperbolic static spacetimes: II. General analysis of prescriptions for dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishibashi, Akihiro; Wald, Robert M.

    2003-08-01

    It was previously shown by one of us that in any static, non-globally-hyperbolic, spacetime, it is always possible to define a sensible dynamics for a Klein Gordon scalar field. The prescription proposed for doing so involved viewing the spatial derivative part, A, of the wave operator as an operator on a certain L2 Hilbert space Script H and then defining a positive, self-adjoint operator on Script H by taking the Friedrichs extension (or other positive extension) of A. However, this analysis left open the possibility that there could be other inequivalent prescriptions of a completely different nature that might also yield satisfactory definitions of the dynamics of a scalar field. We show here that this is not the case. Specifically, we show that if the dynamics agrees locally with the dynamics defined by the wave equation, if it admits a suitable conserved energy and if it satisfies certain other specified conditions, then it must correspond to the dynamics defined by choosing some positive, self-adjoint extension of A on Script H. Thus, subject to our requirements, the previously given prescription is the only possible way of defining the dynamics of a scalar field in a static, non-globally-hyperbolic, spacetime. In a subsequent paper, this result will be applied to the analysis of scalar, electromagnetic and gravitational perturbations of anti-de Sitter spacetime. By doing so, we will determine all possible choices of boundary conditions at infinity in anti-de Sitter spacetime that give rise to sensible dynamics.

  17. Major component analysis of dynamic networks of physiologic organ interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-09-01

    The human organism is a complex network of interconnected organ systems, where the behavior of one system affects the dynamics of other systems. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse physiologic systems under varied conditions is a challenge due to the complexity in the output dynamics of the individual systems and the transient and nonlinear characteristics of their coupling. We introduce a novel computational method based on the concept of time delay stability and major component analysis to investigate how organ systems interact as a network to coordinate their functions. We analyze a large database of continuously recorded multi-channel physiologic signals from healthy young subjects during night-time sleep. We identify a network of dynamic interactions between key physiologic systems in the human organism. Further, we find that each physiologic state is characterized by a distinct network structure with different relative contribution from individual organ systems to the global network dynamics. Specifically, we observe a gradual decrease in the strength of coupling of heart and respiration to the rest of the network with transition from wake to deep sleep, and in contrast, an increased relative contribution to network dynamics from chin and leg muscle tone and eye movement, demonstrating a robust association between network topology and physiologic function.

  18. Incremental triangulation by way of edge swapping and local optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiltberger, N. Lyn

    1994-01-01

    This document is intended to serve as an installation, usage, and basic theory guide for the two dimensional triangulation software 'HARLEY' written for the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation. This code consists of an incremental triangulation algorithm based on point insertion and local edge swapping. Using this basic strategy, several types of triangulations can be produced depending on user selected options. For example, local edge swapping criteria can be chosen which minimizes the maximum interior angle (a MinMax triangulation) or which maximizes the minimum interior angle (a MaxMin or Delaunay triangulation). It should be noted that the MinMax triangulation is generally only locally optical (not globally optimal) in this measure. The MaxMin triangulation, however, is both locally and globally optical. In addition, Steiner triangulations can be constructed by inserting new sites at triangle circumcenters followed by edge swapping based on the MaxMin criteria. Incremental insertion of sites also provides flexibility in choosing cell refinement criteria. A dynamic heap structure has been implemented in the code so that once a refinement measure is specified (i.e., maximum aspect ratio or some measure of a solution gradient for the solution adaptive grid generation) the cell with the largest value of this measure is continually removed from the top of the heap and refined. The heap refinement strategy allows the user to specify either the number of cells desired or refine the mesh until all cell refinement measures satisfy a user specified tolerance level. Since the dynamic heap structure is constantly updated, the algorithm always refines the particular cell in the mesh with the largest refinement criteria value. The code allows the user to: triangulate a cloud of prespecified points (sites), triangulate a set of prespecified interior points constrained by prespecified boundary curve(s), Steiner triangulate the interior/exterior of prespecified boundary curve

  19. Improved dynamic analysis method using load-dependent Ritz vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobedo-Torres, J.; Ricles, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of large space structures is important in order to predict their behavior under operating conditions. Computer models of large space structures are characterized by having a large number of degrees of freedom, and the computational effort required to carry out the analysis is very large. Conventional methods of solution utilize a subset of the eigenvectors of the system, but for systems with many degrees of freedom, the solution of the eigenproblem is in many cases the most costly phase of the analysis. For this reason, alternate solution methods need to be considered. It is important that the method chosen for the analysis be efficient and that accurate results be obtainable. It is important that the method chosen for the analysis be efficient and that accurate results be obtainable. The load dependent Ritz vector method is presented as an alternative to the classical normal mode methods for obtaining dynamic responses of large space structures. A simplified model of a space station is used to compare results. Results show that the load dependent Ritz vector method predicts the dynamic response better than the classical normal mode method. Even though this alternate method is very promising, further studies are necessary to fully understand its attributes and limitations.

  20. Dynamic Systems Analysis for Turbine Based Aero Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The aircraft engine design process seeks to optimize the overall system-level performance, weight, and cost for a given concept. Steady-state simulations and data are used to identify trade-offs that should be balanced to optimize the system in a process known as systems analysis. These systems analysis simulations and data may not adequately capture the true performance trade-offs that exist during transient operation. Dynamic systems analysis provides the capability for assessing the dynamic tradeoffs at an earlier stage of the engine design process. The dynamic systems analysis concept, developed tools, and potential benefit are presented in this paper. To provide this capability, the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) was developed to provide the user with an estimate of the closed-loop performance (response time) and operability (high pressure compressor surge margin) for a given engine design and set of control design requirements. TTECTrA along with engine deterioration information, can be used to develop a more generic relationship between performance and operability that can impact the engine design constraints and potentially lead to a more efficient engine.

  1. Integrative Analysis of Metabolic Models – from Structure to Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Anja; Schreiber, Falk

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of biological systems with respect to their behavior and functionality based on versatile biochemical interactions is a major challenge. To understand these complex mechanisms at systems level modeling approaches are investigated. Different modeling formalisms allow metabolic models to be analyzed depending on the question to be solved, the biochemical knowledge and the availability of experimental data. Here, we describe a method for an integrative analysis of the structure and dynamics represented by qualitative and quantitative metabolic models. Using various formalisms, the metabolic model is analyzed from different perspectives. Determined structural and dynamic properties are visualized in the context of the metabolic model. Interaction techniques allow the exploration and visual analysis thereby leading to a broader understanding of the behavior and functionality of the underlying biological system. The System Biology Metabolic Model Framework (SBM2 – Framework) implements the developed method and, as an example, is applied for the integrative analysis of the crop plant potato. PMID:25674560

  2. Dynamic analysis of large suspended LMFBR reactor vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

    1983-01-01

    Large breeder reactor vessels are often designed under the top-suspended condition. Since the vessel contains a large volume of liquid sodium as reactor coolant, the structural integrity of the vessel bottom head and its effect on the vessel dynamic response are of great importance to the safety and reliability of the reactor systems. This paper presents a dynamic analysis of the large suspended reactor vessel subjected to the horizontal earthquake excitation with the emphasis on the effect of bottom head vibration on fluid pressure and sloshing response. Unlike the conventional lumped mass method, the present analysis treats the liquid sodium as a continuum medium. As a result, the important effects ignored in the lumped mass method such as fluid coupling, fluid-structure interaction, interaction between sloshing and vessel vibration, etc. can be accounted into the analysis.

  3. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 2005 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 595, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including spacecraft navigation (autonomous and ground based), spacecraft trajectory design and maneuver planning, attitude analysis, attitude determination and sensor calibration, and attitude control subsystem (ACS) analysis and design. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, other government agencies, academia, and private industry.

  4. Nonlinear dynamical analysis of turbulence in a stable cloud layer

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A.J. )

    1995-03-01

    An eight mode truncated spectral model based on Burgers' approximation to the one-dimensional Navier--Stokes equations is used to compute the Lyapunov dimension of the dynamical attractor for turbulence in a stable cloud layer. The model results are compared with the correlation dimension obtained earlier from a time series of radar Doppler and reflectivity signals from a turbulent layer in a marine stratus cloud. The analysis supports a weak coupling explanation for the lower correlation dimension found for the reflectivity time series compared with that for the Doppler time series. Turbulent Prandtl number emerges from the analysis as a flow parameter which can enlarge the dimension of the model's dynamical attractor, but the attractor dimension computed for the model remains lower than the radar Doppler correlation dimension. Linear stability analysis of the model's equilibrium states suggests that a nontruncated version of the model will possess an attractor which is also of lower dimension than the radar Doppler correlation dimension.

  5. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 2004 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLion, Anne (Editor); Stengle, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 595, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including spacecraft navigation (autonomous and ground based); spacecraft trajectory design and maneuver planning; attitude analysis; attitude determination and sensor calibration; and attitude control subsystem (ACS) analysis and design. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, other government agencies, academia, and private industry.

  6. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, T.; Flores-Amaya, F.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key analysis results and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the discipline of flight dynamics, which involves spacecraft trajectory (orbit) and attitude analysis, as well as orbit and attitude determination and control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions involving NASA, government, university, and commercial space missions, at various stages in the mission life cycle.

  7. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Dynamic Analysis of Event Histories. Part III, Chapter 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuma, Nancy Brandon; Hannan, Michael T.

    The document, part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759, examines sociological research methods for the study of change. The advantages and procedures for dynamic analysis of event-history data (data giving the number, timing, and sequence of changes in a categorical dependent variable) are considered. The authors argue for grounding…

  8. Dynamic heave-pitch analysis of air cushion landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, K. M.; Boghani, A. B.; Wormley, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    A program to develop analytical tools for evaluating the dynamic performance of Air Cushion Landing Systems (ACLS) is described. The heave (vertical) motion of the ACLS was analyzed, and the analysis was extended to cover coupled heave-pitch motions. The mathematical models developed are based on a fundamental analysis of the body dynamics and fluid mechanics of the aircraft-cushion-runway interaction. The air source characteristics, flow losses in the feeding ducts, trunk and cushion, the effects of fluid compressibility, and dynamic trunk deflections, including ground contact are considered. A computer program, based on the heave-pitch analysis, was developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of an ACLS during landing impact and taxi over an irregular runway. The program outputs include ACLS motions, loadings, pressures, and flows as a function of time. To illustrate program use, three basic types of simulations were carried out. The results provide an initial indication of ACLS performance during (1) a static drop, (2) landing impact, and (3) taxi over a runway irregularity.

  9. Dynamic path analysis in life-course epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Gamborg, Michael; Jensen, Gorm Boje; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2011-05-15

    Life-course epidemiology seeks to better understand the mechanisms that lead to the development of chronic diseases. An example is the mechanism leading from body size to coronary heart disease (CHD); one way to acquire a better understanding of this mechanism is to investigate to what extent it works through other risk factors. In this paper, the dynamic path analysis model is presented as a tool to analyze these dynamic mechanisms in life-course epidemiology. A key feature of dynamic path analysis is its ability to decompose the total effect of a risk factor into a direct effect (not mediated by other variables) and indirect effects (mediated through other variables). This is illustrated by examining the associations between repeated measurements of body mass index (BMI) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) and the risk of CHD in a sample of Danish men between 1976 and 2006. The effect of baseline BMI on the risk of CHD is decomposed into a direct effect and indirect effects going through later BMI, concurrent SBP, or later SBP. In conclusion, dynamic path analysis is a flexible tool that by the decomposition of effects can be used to increase the understanding of mechanisms that underlie the etiology of chronic disease. PMID:21415031

  10. Propellant Slosh Analysis for the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A. C.; Starin, Scott R.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, part of the Living With a Star program, is a geosynchronous satellite with tight pointing requirements. Due to a large amount of liquid propellant, a detailed slosh analysis is required to ensure the tight pointing budget can be satisfied. Much of the high fidelity slosh analysis and simulation has been performed via computational fluid dynamics. Even though this method of simulation is very accurate, it requires significant computational effort and specialized knowledge, limiting the ability of the SDO project to access fluid dynamics simulations at will. Furthermore, it is very difficult to incorporate most of these models into simulations of the overall spacecraft and its environment. Ultimately, the effects of the propellant slosh on the attitude stability and pointing performance of the entire spacecraft are of great interest to attitude control engineers. Equivalent mechanical models, such as models that approximate the fluid slosh effects by analogy to the movements of a point-mass pendulum, are important tools in simulating propellant slosh dynamics as part of the entire attitude determination and control system. This paper describes some of the current methods used to analyze and model slosh. It focuses on equivalent mechanical models and their incorporation into control-based analysis tools such as Simulink. The SDO mission is used as the case study for this work.

  11. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, N.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze rotation over an island in the mid-latitudes. Earlier research on sea-breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anti-clockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously-studied sea-breeze days and is shown to accurately capture the circulation on all coasts. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined and patterns of clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography, yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with complex topography and/or coastline.

  12. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, N.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze (SB) rotation over an island at the middle latitudes. Earlier research on sea breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anticlockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously studied sea-breeze days, and is shown to capture the circulation on all coasts accurately. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined, and patterns of clockwise and anticlockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with a complex topography and/or coastline.

  13. Dynamic Characteristics Analysis of Analogue Networks Design Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemliak, Alexander M.

    The process of designing analogue circuits is formulated as a controlled dynamic system. For analysis of such system's properties it is suggested to use the concept of Lyapunov's function for a dynamic system. Various forms of Lyapunov's function are suggested. Analyzing the behavior of Lyapunov's function and its first derivative allowed us to determine significant correlation between this function's properties and processor time used to design the circuit. Numerical results prove the possibility of forecasting the behavior of various designing strategies and processor time based on the properties of Lyapunov's function for the process of designing the circuit.

  14. Multifractal analysis of dynamic infrared imaging of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimova, E.; Audit, B.; Roux, S. G.; Khalil, A.; Argoul, F.; Naimark, O.; Arneodo, A.

    2013-12-01

    The wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method was used in a multifractal analysis of skin breast temperature time-series recorded using dynamic infrared (IR) thermography. Multifractal scaling was found for healthy breasts as the signature of a continuous change in the shape of the probability density function (pdf) of temperature fluctuations across time scales from \\sim0.3 to 3 s. In contrast, temperature time-series from breasts with malignant tumors showed homogeneous monofractal temperature fluctuations statistics. These results highlight dynamic IR imaging as a very valuable non-invasive technique for preliminary screening in asymptomatic women to identify those with risk of breast cancer.

  15. Interactive Finite Elements for General Engine Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    General nonlinear finite element codes were adapted for the purpose of analyzing the dynamics of gas turbine engines. In particular, this adaptation required the development of a squeeze-film damper element software package and its implantation into a representative current generation code. The ADINA code was selected because of prior use of it and familiarity with its internal structure and logic. This objective was met and the results indicate that such use of general purpose codes is viable alternative to specialized codes for general dynamics analysis of engines.

  16. Analysis of motion features for molecular dynamics simulation of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Mayumi; Toda, Mikito; Sekijima, Masakazu; Takata, Masami; Joe, Kazuki

    2011-01-01

    Recently, a new method for time series analysis using the wavelet transformation has been proposed by Sakurai et al. We apply it to molecular dynamics simulation of Thermomyces lanuginosa lipase (TLL). Introducing indexes to characterize collective motion of the protein, we have obtained the following two results. First, time evolution of the collective motion involves not only the dynamics within a single potential well but also takes place wandering around multiple conformations. Second, correlation of the collective motion between secondary structures shows that collective motion exists involving multiple secondary structures. We discuss future prospects of our study involving 'disordered proteins'.

  17. Dynamic impact analysis of the M1 105mm projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.

    1993-06-01

    Evaluation of the effects of {open_quotes}rough-handling{close_quotes}-induced stresses in the nose region of a 105mm artillery projectile was performed to determine if these stresses could have contributed to the premature explosion of a projectile during a Desert Shield training mission of the 101st Army Airborne in Saudi Arabia. The rough-handling evaluations were simulated by dynamic impact analysis. It was concluded that the combined residual stress and dynamic impact-induced stress would not be of sufficient magnitude to cause cracking of the projectile in the nose region.

  18. Dynamic impact analysis of the M1 105mm projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.

    1993-06-01

    Evaluation of the effects of [open quotes]rough-handling[close quotes]-induced stresses in the nose region of a 105mm artillery projectile was performed to determine if these stresses could have contributed to the premature explosion of a projectile during a Desert Shield training mission of the 101st Army Airborne in Saudi Arabia. The rough-handling evaluations were simulated by dynamic impact analysis. It was concluded that the combined residual stress and dynamic impact-induced stress would not be of sufficient magnitude to cause cracking of the projectile in the nose region.

  19. Dynamic analysis using superelements for a large helicopter model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, M. P.; Shah, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    Using superelements (substructures), modal and frequency response analysis was performed for a large model of the Advanced Attack Helicopter developed for the U.S. Army. Whiffletree concept was employed so that the residual structure along with the various superelements could be represented as beam-like structures for economical and accurate dynamic analysis. A very large DMAP alter to the rigid format was developed so that the modal analysis, the frequency response, and the strain energy in each component could be computed in the same run.

  20. Equity and Entrepreneurialism: The Impact of Tax Increment Financing on School Finance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Rachel

    2003-01-01

    Describes tax increment financing (TIF), an entrepreneurial strategy with significant fiscal implications for overlapping taxing jurisdictions that provide these functions. Statistical analysis of TIF's impact on the finances of one Illinois county's school districts indicates that municipal use of TIF depletes the property tax revenues of schools…

  1. The Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire: Internal Structure, Convergent, Criterion, and Incremental Validity in an Italian Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrei, Federica; Smith, Martin M.; Surcinelli, Paola; Baldaro, Bruno; Saklofske, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the structure and validity of the Italian translation of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire. Data were self-reported from 227 participants. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the four-factor structure of the scale. Hierarchical regressions also demonstrated its incremental validity beyond demographics, the…

  2. Generalized five-dimensional dynamic and spectral factor analysis

    SciTech Connect

    El Fakhri, Georges; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Zimmerman, Robert E.; Ouyang Jinsong

    2006-04-15

    We have generalized the spectral factor analysis and the factor analysis of dynamic sequences (FADS) in SPECT imaging to a five-dimensional general factor analysis model (5D-GFA), where the five dimensions are the three spatial dimensions, photon energy, and time. The generalized model yields a significant advantage in terms of the ratio of the number of equations to that of unknowns in the factor analysis problem in dynamic SPECT studies. We solved the 5D model using a least-squares approach. In addition to the traditional non-negativity constraints, we constrained the solution using a priori knowledge of both time and energy, assuming that primary factors (spectra) are Gaussian-shaped with full-width at half-maximum equal to gamma camera energy resolution. 5D-GFA was validated in a simultaneous pre-/post-synaptic dual isotope dynamic phantom study where {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I activities were used to model early Parkinson disease studies. 5D-GFA was also applied to simultaneous perfusion/dopamine transporter (DAT) dynamic SPECT in rhesus monkeys. In the striatal phantom, 5D-GFA yielded significantly more accurate and precise estimates of both primary {sup 99m}Tc (bias=6.4%{+-}4.3%) and {sup 123}I (-1.7%{+-}6.9%) time activity curves (TAC) compared to conventional FADS (biases=15.5%{+-}10.6% in {sup 99m}Tc and 8.3%{+-}12.7% in {sup 123}I, p<0.05). Our technique was also validated in two primate dynamic dual isotope perfusion/DAT transporter studies. Biases of {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and {sup 123}I-DAT activity estimates with respect to estimates obtained in the presence of only one radionuclide (sequential imaging) were significantly lower with 5D-GFA (9.4%{+-}4.3% for {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO and 8.7%{+-}4.1% for {sup 123}I-DAT) compared to biases greater than 15% for volumes of interest (VOI) over the reconstructed volumes (p<0.05). 5D-GFA is a novel and promising approach in dynamic SPECT imaging that can also be used in other modalities. It allows accurate and precise

  3. 17 CFR 242.612 - Minimum pricing increment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Minimum pricing increment. 242.612 Section 242.612 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Regulation of the National Market System § 242.612 Minimum pricing increment. (a) No national...

  4. 17 CFR 242.612 - Minimum pricing increment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum pricing increment. 242.612 Section 242.612 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Regulation of the National Market System § 242.612 Minimum pricing increment. (a) No national...

  5. 17 CFR 242.612 - Minimum pricing increment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Minimum pricing increment. 242.612 Section 242.612 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Regulation of the National Market System § 242.612 Minimum pricing increment. (a) No national...

  6. 17 CFR 242.612 - Minimum pricing increment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Minimum pricing increment. 242.612 Section 242.612 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Regulation of the National Market System § 242.612 Minimum pricing increment. (a) No national...

  7. 17 CFR 242.612 - Minimum pricing increment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Minimum pricing increment. 242.612 Section 242.612 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED...-Regulation of the National Market System § 242.612 Minimum pricing increment. (a) No national...

  8. Incremental Seismic Rehabilitation of School Buildings (K-12).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krimgold, Frederick; Hattis, David; Green, Melvyn

    Asserting that the strategy of incremental seismic rehabilitation makes it possible for schools to get started now on improving earthquake safety, this manual provides school administrators with the information necessary to assess the seismic vulnerability of their buildings and to implement a program of incremental seismic rehabilitation for…

  9. Teachers' Preferences toward Alternate Systems of Salary Increment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogie, Cheryl E.; Bogie, Donald W.

    1978-01-01

    Elementary teachers from three different urban socioeconomic neighborhoods were surveyed regarding their preferences toward uniform vs competency-based systems of salary increment; the relationship between selected characteristics of teachers and principals and teachers' attitudes toward alternate forms of salary increment were also investigated.…

  10. Power-law confusion: You say incremental, I say differential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, Joshua E.

    1993-01-01

    Power-law distributions are commonly used to describe the frequency of occurrences of crater diameters, stellar masses, ring particle sizes, planetesimal sizes, and meteoroid masses to name a few. The distributions are simple, and this simplicity has led to a number of misstatements in the literature about the kind of power-law that is being used: differential, cumulative, or incremental. Although differential and cumulative power-laws are mathematically trivial, it is a hybrid incremental distribution that is often used and the relationship between the incremental distribution and the differential or cumulative distributions is not trivial. In many cases the slope of an incremental power-law will be nearly identical to the slope of the cumulative power-law of the same distribution, not the differential slope. The discussion that follows argues for a consistent usage of these terms and against the oft-made implicit claim that incremental and differential distributions are indistinguishable.

  11. Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

    2009-10-09

    Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Dynamic frequency/temperature sweep tests were conducted over the ranges 0.1-100 rad/s and 30-100 C using a parallel plate test geometry. A strain of 0.2% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on initial dynamic strain sweep tests. Master curves of G{prime} and G{double_prime} as a function of frequency were generated using time-temperature superposition (horizontal shift with initial vertical correction). The activation energy calculated from an Arrhenius fit to the horizontal shift factors was 178-355 kJ/mol. The calculated percent load retention at {approx}50 years was 61-68%.

  12. Undersampled dynamic magnetic resonance imaging using kernel principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanhua; Ying, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is a promising approach to accelerate dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Most existing CS methods employ linear sparsifying transforms. The recent developments in non-linear or kernel-based sparse representations have been shown to outperform the linear transforms. In this paper, we present an iterative non-linear CS dynamic MRI reconstruction framework that uses the kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) to exploit the sparseness of the dynamic image sequence in the feature space. Specifically, we apply KPCA to represent the temporal profiles of each spatial location and reconstruct the images through a modified pre-image problem. The underlying optimization algorithm is based on variable splitting and fixed-point iteration method. Simulation results show that the proposed method outperforms conventional CS method in terms of aliasing artifact reduction and kinetic information preservation. PMID:25570262

  13. An analysis of the kinematics and dynamics of underactuated manipulators

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.; Rodriguez, G.

    1993-08-01

    The dynamics and kinematics of manipulators that have fewer actuators than degrees of freedom are studied. These underactuated manipulators arise in a number of important applications such as free-flying space robots, hyperredundant manipulators, manipulators with structural flexibility, etc. In the analysis such underactuated manipulators are decomposed into component active and passive arms. This decomposition allows techniques previously developed for regular (fully actuated) manipulators to be applied to underactuated systems. Spatial operator identities are used to develop closed-form expressions for the generalized accelerations for the system. These expressions form the basis for a recursive dynamics algorithm. The structure of this algorithm is a hybrid of known forward and inverse dynamics algorithms for regular manipulators. Expressions and computational algorithms are also developed for the generalized and disturbance Jacobians for underactuated manipulators. The application of the results in the paper to space manipulators is also described.

  14. Glass-transition dynamics of a polyurethane gel using ultrasonic spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and dynamical mechanical thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabellout, M.; Baillif, P.-Y.; Randrianantoandro, H.; Litzinger, F.; Emery, J. R.; Nicolai, T.; Durand, D.

    1995-05-01

    The glass-transition dynamics of a polyurethane gel were studied over a wide temperature and frequency range using ultrasonic spectroscopy (US), dynamic light scattering (DLS), and dynamical mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). DMTA showed both an α and a β relaxation, while with DLS only the α relaxation could be observed. The α relaxation measured by DLS and DMTA was analyzed in terms of a continuous relaxation time distribution. This analysis method is compared to an analysis in terms of the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts function for the DLS results and the Havriliak-Negami function for the DMTA results. The shape of the relaxation time distribution is temperature independent over the temperature range covered and identical for both techniques. The temperature dependence of the characteristic relaxation rates is well described by the so-called Vogel-Fulcher-Tamman-Hesse equation. Characteristic relaxation rates measured by DLS were about a factor 10 smaller than interpolated from the US and DMTA measurements. Since DLS measures a compliance and the two other techniques a modulus, lower values are expected. If the compliance data are converted into corresponding values for the modulus, the DLS results are compatible with the US and DMTA results.

  15. Static and dynamic analysis of a diamagnetic bearing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cansiz, Ahmet

    2008-02-01

    A unique numerical calculation method was constructed in order to analyze the static and dynamic characteristics of the diamagnetic bearing. An experimental setup consisting of a permanent magnet rotor, levitated with the arrangement of ferrite magnet and bismuth blocks, was used to confirm theoretical calculations. The stability analysis of the bearing relating to the vertical and lateral forces was incorporated with the dynamic model. The interaction force between the rotor magnet and the diamagnetic materials was modeled with the Amperian current approach via the diamagnetic-mirror-image concept. The magnetic potential of the system, which provides the equation of motion, was stated in terms of diamagnetic and gravitational interactions. The equations of motion of the dynamic part of the system were stated as a function of lateral, vertical, and tilt angles. Correlation of the vibrations such as vertical, radial, and tilt was determined with a numerical calculation obtained by the Runge-Kutta method. Translational and rotational tests together with the theoretical calculations showed the equilibrium position of the rotor to be stable statically and dynamically. The permanent magnet was spun up under vacuum conditions and then let to free spin down to analyze its dynamics.

  16. Stability analysis and controller synthesis for hybrid dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Heemels, W P M H; De Schutter, B; Lunze, J; Lazar, M

    2010-11-13

    Wherever continuous and discrete dynamics interact, hybrid systems arise. This is especially the case in many technological systems in which logic decision-making and embedded control actions are combined with continuous physical processes. Also for many mechanical, biological, electrical and economical systems the use of hybrid models is essential to adequately describe their behaviour. To capture the evolution of these systems, mathematical models are needed that combine in one way or another the dynamics of the continuous parts of the system with the dynamics of the logic and discrete parts. These mathematical models come in all kinds of variations, but basically consist of some form of differential or difference equations on the one hand and automata or other discrete-event models on the other hand. The collection of analysis and synthesis techniques based on these models forms the research area of hybrid systems theory, which plays an important role in the multi-disciplinary design of many technological systems that surround us. This paper presents an overview from the perspective of the control community on modelling, analysis and control design for hybrid dynamical systems and surveys the major research lines in this appealing and lively research area. PMID:20921005

  17. Effective field theory of dark energy: a dynamical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Frusciante, Noemi; Raveri, Marco; Silvestri, Alessandra E-mail: mraveri@sissa.it

    2014-02-01

    The effective field theory (EFT) of dark energy relies on three functions of time to describe the dynamics of background cosmology. The viability of these functions is investigated here by means of a thorough dynamical analysis. While the system is underdetermined, and one can always find a set of functions reproducing any expansion history, we are able to determine general compatibility conditions for these functions by requiring a viable background cosmology. In particular, we identify a set of variables that allows us to transform the non-autonomous system of equations into an infinite-dimensional one characterized by a significant recursive structure. We then analyze several autonomous sub-systems, obtained truncating the original one at increasingly higher dimension, that correspond to increasingly general models of dark energy and modified gravity. Furthermore, we exploit the recursive nature of the system to draw some general conclusions on the different cosmologies that can be recovered within the EFT formalism and the corresponding compatibility requirements for the EFT functions. The machinery that we set up serves different purposes. It offers a general scheme for performing dynamical analysis of dark energy and modified gravity models within the model independent framework of EFT; the general results, obtained with this technique, can be projected into specific models, as we show in one example. It also can be used to determine appropriate ansätze for the three EFT background functions when studying the dynamics of cosmological perturbations in the context of large scale structure tests of gravity.

  18. Multistage neural network model for dynamic scene analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ajjimarangsee, P.

    1989-01-01

    This research is concerned with dynamic scene analysis. The goal of scene analysis is to recognize objects and have a meaningful interpretation of the scene from which images are obtained. The task of the dynamic scene analysis process generally consists of region identification, motion analysis and object recognition. The objective of this research is to develop clustering algorithms using neural network approach and to investigate a multi-stage neural network model for region identification and motion analysis. The research is separated into three parts. First, a clustering algorithm using Kohonens' self-organizing feature map network is developed to be capable of generating continuous membership valued outputs. A newly developed version of the updating algorithm of the network is introduced to achieve a high degree of parallelism. A neural network model for the fuzzy c-means algorithm is proposed. In the second part, the parallel algorithms of a neural network model for clustering using the self-organizing feature maps approach and a neural network that models the fuzzy c-means algorithm are modified for implementation on a distributed memory parallel architecture. In the third part, supervised and unsupervised neural network models for motion analysis are investigated. For a supervised neural network, a three layer perceptron network is trained by a series of images to recognize the movement of the objects. For the unsupervised neural network, a self-organizing feature mapping network will learn to recognize the movement of the objects without an explicit training phase.

  19. An Incremental High-Utility Mining Algorithm with Transaction Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Wensheng; Zhang, Binbin

    2015-01-01

    Association-rule mining is commonly used to discover useful and meaningful patterns from a very large database. It only considers the occurrence frequencies of items to reveal the relationships among itemsets. Traditional association-rule mining is, however, not suitable in real-world applications since the purchased items from a customer may have various factors, such as profit or quantity. High-utility mining was designed to solve the limitations of association-rule mining by considering both the quantity and profit measures. Most algorithms of high-utility mining are designed to handle the static database. Fewer researches handle the dynamic high-utility mining with transaction insertion, thus requiring the computations of database rescan and combination explosion of pattern-growth mechanism. In this paper, an efficient incremental algorithm with transaction insertion is designed to reduce computations without candidate generation based on the utility-list structures. The enumeration tree and the relationships between 2-itemsets are also adopted in the proposed algorithm to speed up the computations. Several experiments are conducted to show the performance of the proposed algorithm in terms of runtime, memory consumption, and number of generated patterns. PMID:25811038

  20. Noise masking of S-cone increments and decrements

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Quanhong; Richters, David P.; Eskew, Rhea T.

    2014-01-01

    S-cone increment and decrement detection thresholds were measured in the presence of bipolar, dynamic noise masks. Noise chromaticities were the L-, M-, and S-cone directions, as well as L−M, L+M, and achromatic (L+M+S) directions. Noise contrast power was varied to measure threshold Energy versus Noise (EvN) functions. S+ and S− thresholds were similarly, and weakly, raised by achromatic noise. However, S+ thresholds were much more elevated by S, L+M, L–M, L- and M-cone noises than were S− thresholds, even though the noises consisted of two symmetric chromatic polarities of equal contrast power. A linear cone combination model accounts for the overall pattern of masking of a single test polarity well. L and M cones have opposite signs in their effects upon raising S+ and S− thresholds. The results strongly indicate that the psychophysical mechanisms responsible for S+ and S− detection, presumably based on S-ON and S-OFF pathways, are distinct, unipolar mechanisms, and that they have different spatiotemporal sampling characteristics, or contrast gains, or both. PMID:25391300

  1. Noise masking of S-cone increments and decrements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quanhong; Richters, David P; Eskew, Rhea T

    2014-01-01

    S-cone increment and decrement detection thresholds were measured in the presence of bipolar, dynamic noise masks. Noise chromaticities were the L-, M-, and S-cone directions, as well as L-M, L+M, and achromatic (L+M+S) directions. Noise contrast power was varied to measure threshold Energy versus Noise (EvN) functions. S+ and S- thresholds were similarly, and weakly, raised by achromatic noise. However, S+ thresholds were much more elevated by S, L+M, L-M, L- and M-cone noises than were S- thresholds, even though the noises consisted of two symmetric chromatic polarities of equal contrast power. A linear cone combination model accounts for the overall pattern of masking of a single test polarity well. L and M cones have opposite signs in their effects upon raising S+ and S- thresholds. The results strongly indicate that the psychophysical mechanisms responsible for S+ and S- detection, presumably based on S-ON and S-OFF pathways, are distinct, unipolar mechanisms, and that they have different spatiotemporal sampling characteristics, or contrast gains, or both. PMID:25391300

  2. Dynamic flux balance analysis for synthetic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Henson, Michael A; Hanly, Timothy J

    2014-10-01

    Dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA) is an extension of classical flux balance analysis that allows the dynamic effects of the extracellular environment on microbial metabolism to be predicted and optimised. Recently this computational framework has been extended to microbial communities for which the individual species are known and genome-scale metabolic reconstructions are available. In this review, the authors provide an overview of the emerging DFBA approach with a focus on two case studies involving the conversion of mixed hexose/pentose sugar mixtures by synthetic microbial co-culture systems. These case studies illustrate the key requirements of the DFBA approach, including the incorporation of individual species metabolic reconstructions, formulation of extracellular mass balances, identification of substrate uptake kinetics, numerical solution of the coupled linear program/differential equations and model adaptation for common, suboptimal growth conditions and identified species interactions. The review concludes with a summary of progress to date and possible directions for future research. PMID:25257022

  3. Dynamic Analysis of Geared Rotors by Finite Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, A.; Ozguven, H. Nevzat; Houser, D. R.; Zakrajsek, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    A finite element model of a geared rotor system on flexible bearings has been developed. The model includes the rotary inertia of on shaft elements, the axial loading on shafts, flexibility and damping of bearings, material damping of shafts and the stiffness and the damping of gear mesh. The coupling between the torsional and transverse vibrations of gears were considered in the model. A constant mesh stiffness was assumed. The analysis procedure can be used for forced vibration analysis geared rotors by calculating the critical speeds and determining the response of any point on the shafts to mass unbalances, geometric eccentricities of gears, and displacement transmission error excitation at the mesh point. The dynamic mesh forces due to these excitations can also be calculated. The model has been applied to several systems for the demonstration of its accuracy and for studying the effect of bearing compliances on system dynamics.

  4. Transient analysis techniques in performing impact and crash dynamic studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A. B.; Winter, R.

    1989-01-01

    Because of the emphasis being placed on crashworthiness as a design requirement, increasing demands are being made by various organizations to analyze a wide range of complex structures that must perform safely when subjected to severe impact loads, such as those generated in a crash event. The ultimate goal of crashworthiness design and analysis is to produce vehicles with the ability to reduce the dynamic forces experienced by the occupants to specified levels, while maintaining a survivable envelope around them during a specified crash event. DYCAST is a nonlinear structural dynamic finite element computer code that started from the plans systems of a finite element program for static nonlinear structural analysis. The essential features of DYCAST are outlined.

  5. Dynamic Analysis of Communication and Collaboration in OSS Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinzger, Martin; Gall, Harald C.

    Software repositories, such as versioning, bug reporting, and developer mailing list archives contain valuable data for analyzing the history of software projects and its dynamics. In this chapter, we focus on the analysis of the communication and collaboration in software projects and present an approach that works on software archives with social network analysis techniques. Our tool called STNA-CockpitSTNA-cockpit provides both, a meta-model to represent communication and collaboration and a graph visualization technique to interactively explore instances of the meta-model. These instances are reconstructed from CVS, Bugzilla, and mailing list data. In a case study with the Eclipse Platform Core project data we demonstrate that with STNA-Cockpit one can observe project dynamics for certain periods of time. This allows, for example, project managers to early identify communication bottlenecks, contributor and expertise networks, or to understand how newcomers can be integrated fast and efficiently into their team.

  6. Dynamic Analysis of Large In-Space Deployable Membrane Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, Houfei; Yang, Bingen; Ding, Hongli; Hah, John; Quijano, Ubaldo; Huang, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a vibration analysis of an eight-meter diameter membrane reflectarray antenna, which is composed of a thin membrane and a deployable frame. This analysis process has two main steps. In the first step, a two-variable-parameter (2-VP) membrane model is developed to determine the in-plane stress distribution of the membrane due to pre-tensioning, which eventually yields the differential stiffness of the membrane. In the second step, the obtained differential stiffness is incorporated in a dynamic equation governing the transverse vibration of the membrane-frame assembly. This dynamic equation is then solved by a semi-analytical method, called the Distributed Transfer Function Method (DTFM), which produces the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the antenna. The combination of the 2-VP model and the DTFM provides an accurate prediction of the in-plane stress distribution and modes of vibration for the antenna.

  7. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 2002 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangus, David (Editor); Mendelsohn, Chad (Editor); Starin, Scott (Editor); Stengle, Tom (Editor); Truong, Son (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2002. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including navigation, spacecraft trajectory design, attitude analysis, attitude determination and attitude control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, government, university, and private industry.

  8. DYNAMIC NON LINEAR IMPACT ANALYSIS OF FUEL CASK CONTAINMENT VESSELS

    SciTech Connect

    Leduc, D

    2008-06-10

    Large fuel casks present challenges when evaluating their performance in the accident sequence specified in 10CFR 71. Testing is often limited because of cost, difficulty in preparing test units and the limited availability of facilities which can carry out such tests. In the past, many casks were evaluated without testing using simplified analytical methods. This paper details the use of dynamic non-linear analysis of large fuel casks using advanced computational techniques. Results from the dynamic analysis of two casks, the T-3 Spent Fuel Cask and the Hanford Un-irradiated Fuel Package are examined in detail. These analyses are used to fully evaluate containment vessel stresses and strains resulting from complex loads experienced by cask components during impacts. Importantly, these advanced analytical analyses are capable of examining stresses in key regions of the cask including the cask closure. This paper compares these advanced analytical results with the results of simplified cask analyses like those detailed in NUREG 3966.

  9. Analysis of the human electroencephalogram with methods from nonlinear dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer-Kress, G.; Holzfuss, J.

    1986-09-08

    We apply several different methods from nonlinear dynamical systems to the analysis of the degree of temporal disorder in data from human EEG. Among these are methods of geometrical reconstruction, dimensional complexity, mutual information content, and two different approaches for estimating Lyapunov characteristic exponents. We show how the naive interpretation of numerical results can lead to a considerable underestimation of the dimensional complexity. This is true even when the errors from least squares fits are small. We present more realistic error estimates and show that they seem to contain additional, important information. By applying independent methods of analysis to the same data sets for a given lead, we find that the degree of temporal disorder is minimal in a ''resting awake'' state and increases in sleep as well as in fluroxene induced general anesthesia. At the same time the statistical errors appear to decrease, which can be interpretated as a transition to a more uniform dynamical state. 29 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Dynamic analysis of geared rotors by finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, A.; Ozguven, H. N.; Houser, D. R.; Zakrajsek, J.

    1989-01-01

    The finite element model of a geared rotor system on flexible bearings has been developed. The model includes the rotary inertia of shaft elements, the axial loading on shafts, flexibility and damping of bearings, material damping of shafts and the stiffness and the damping of gear mesh. The coupling between the torsional and transverse vibrations of gears were considered in the model. A constant mesh stiffness was assumed. The analysis procedure can be used for forced vibration analysis of geared rotors by calculating the critical speeds and determining the response of any point on the shaft to mass unbalances, geometric eccentricities of gears and displacement transmission error excitation at the mesh point. The dynamic mesh forces due to these excitations can also be calculated. The model has been applied to several systems for the demonstration of its accuracy and for studying the effect of bearing compliances on system dynamics.

  11. RAVEN, a New Software for Dynamic Risk Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi; Joshua Cogliati; Diego Mandelli; Robert Kinoshita

    2014-06-01

    RAVEN is a generic software driver to perform parametric and probabilistic analysis of code simulating complex systems. Initially developed to provide dynamic risk analysis capabilities to the RELAP-7 code [1] is currently being generalized with the addition of Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). These interfaces are used to extend RAVEN capabilities to any software as long as all the parameters that need to be perturbed are accessible by inputs files or directly via python interfaces. RAVEN is capable to investigate the system response probing the input space using Monte Carlo, grid strategies, or Latin Hyper Cube schemes, but its strength is its focus toward system feature discovery like limit surfaces separating regions of the input space leading to system failure using dynamic supervised learning techniques. The paper will present an overview of the software capabilities and their implementation schemes followed by same application examples.

  12. Dynamic analysis of geared rotors by finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahraman, Ahmet; Ozguven, H. Nevzat; Houser, Donald R.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1990-01-01

    A finite-element model of a geared rotor system on flexible bearings was developed. The model includes the rotary inertia of shaft elements, the axial loading on shafts, flexibility and damping of bearings, material damping of shafts and the stiffness and the damping of gear mesh. The coupling between the torsional and transverse vibrations of gears were considered in the model. A constant mesh stiffness was assumed. The analysis procedure can be used for forced vibration analysis of geared rotors by calculating the critical speeds and determining the response of any point on the shaft to mass unbalances, geometric eccentricities of gears and displacement transmission error excitation at the mesh point. The dynamic mesh forces due to these excitations can also be calculated. The model has been applied to several systems for the demonstration of its accuracy and for studying the effect of bearing compliances on system dynamics.

  13. International Space Station Increment-4/5 Microgravity Environment Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Hrovat, Kenneth; Kelly, Eric; McPherson, Kevin; Reckart, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    This summary report presents the results of some of the processed acceleration data measured aboard the International Space Station during the period of December 2001 to December 2002. Unlike the past two ISS Increment reports, which were increment specific, this summary report covers two increments: Increments 4 and 5, hereafter referred to as Increment-4/5. Two accelerometer systems were used to measure the acceleration levels for the activities that took place during Increment-4/5. Due to time constraint and lack of precise timeline information regarding some payload operations and station activities, not a11 of the activities were analyzed for this report. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration sponsors the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System and the Space Acceleration Microgravity System to support microgravity science experiments which require microgravity acceleration measurements. On April 19, 2001, both the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System and the Space Acceleration Measurement System units were launched on STS-100 from the Kennedy Space Center for installation on the International Space Station. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System supports science experiments requiring quasi-steady acceleration measurements, while the Space Acceleration Measurement System unit supports experiments requiring vibratory acceleration measurement. The International Space Station Increment-4/5 reduced gravity environment analysis presented in this report uses acceleration data collected by both sets of accelerometer systems: The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System, which consists of two sensors: the low-frequency Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment Sensor Subsystem and the higher frequency High Resolution Accelerometer Package. The low frequency sensor measures up to 1 Hz, but is routinely trimmean filtered to yield much lower frequency acceleration data up to 0.01 Hz. This filtered data can be mapped to arbitrary

  14. Incremental Knowledge Discovery in Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Xuning

    2013-01-01

    In light of the prosperity of online social media, Web users are shifting from data consumers to data producers. To catch the pulse of this rapidly changing world, it is critical to transform online social media data to information and to knowledge. This dissertation centers on the issue of modeling the dynamics of user communities, trending…

  15. Severe accident analysis using dynamic accident progression event trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakobyan, Aram P.

    In present, the development and analysis of Accident Progression Event Trees (APETs) are performed in a manner that is computationally time consuming, difficult to reproduce and also can be phenomenologically inconsistent. One of the principal deficiencies lies in the static nature of conventional APETs. In the conventional event tree techniques, the sequence of events is pre-determined in a fixed order based on the expert judgments. The main objective of this PhD dissertation was to develop a software tool (ADAPT) for automated APET generation using the concept of dynamic event trees. As implied by the name, in dynamic event trees the order and timing of events are determined by the progression of the accident. The tool determines the branching times from a severe accident analysis code based on user specified criteria for branching. It assigns user specified probabilities to every branch, tracks the total branch probability, and truncates branches based on the given pruning/truncation rules to avoid an unmanageable number of scenarios. The function of a dynamic APET developed includes prediction of the conditions, timing, and location of containment failure or bypass leading to the release of radioactive material, and calculation of probabilities of those failures. Thus, scenarios that can potentially lead to early containment failure or bypass, such as through accident induced failure of steam generator tubes, are of particular interest. Also, the work is focused on treatment of uncertainties in severe accident phenomena such as creep rupture of major RCS components, hydrogen burn, containment failure, timing of power recovery, etc. Although the ADAPT methodology (Analysis of Dynamic Accident Progression Trees) could be applied to any severe accident analysis code, in this dissertation the approach is demonstrated by applying it to the MELCOR code [1]. A case study is presented involving station blackout with the loss of auxiliary feedwater system for a

  16. On the GFP-based analysis of dynamic concentration profiles.

    PubMed

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y

    2014-02-01

    Studies with GFP-tagged proteins can be used to investigate the dynamics of concentration profiles of regulatory proteins in cells and tissues. Analysis of these experiments must account for the finite rate with which the GFP-tagged proteins mature to the fluorescent state. Toward this end, we present an analytical framework that provides an explicit connection between the apparent kinetics of concentration gradients and the rates of GFP maturation. PMID:24507618

  17. Continuous probabilistic analysis to evolutionary game dynamics in finite populations.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng

    2009-07-01

    Evolutionary game dynamics of two strategies in finite population is studied by continuous probabilistic approach. Besides frequency dependent selection, mutation was also included in this study. The equilibrium probability density functions of abundance, expected time to extinction or fixation were derived and their numerical solutions are calculated as illustrations. Meanwhile, individual-based computer simulations are also done. A comparison reveals the consistency between theoretical analysis and simulations. PMID:19219510

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Thoracic Aortic Dissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yik; Fan, Yi; Cheng, Stephen; Chow, Kwok

    2011-11-01

    Thoracic Aortic Dissection (TAD) is a cardiovascular disease with high mortality. An aortic dissection is formed when blood infiltrates the layers of the vascular wall, and a new artificial channel, the false lumen, is created. The expansion of the blood vessel due to the weakened wall enhances the risk of rupture. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is performed to study the hemodynamics of this pathological condition. Both idealized geometry and realistic patient configurations from computed tomography (CT) images are investigated. Physiological boundary conditions from in vivo measurements are employed. Flow configuration and biomechanical forces are studied. Quantitative analysis allows clinicians to assess the risk of rupture in making decision regarding surgical intervention.

  19. Probabilistic latent semantic analysis for dynamic textures recognition and localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yong; Hu, Shiqiang

    2014-11-01

    We present a framework for dynamic textures (DTs) recognition and localization by using a model developed in the text analysis literature: probabilistic latent semantic analysis (pLSA). The novelty is revealed in three aspects. First, chaotic feature vector is introduced and characterizes each pixel intensity series. Next, the pLSA model is employed to discover the topics by using the bag of words representation. Finally, the spatial layout of DTs can be found. Experimental results are conducted on the well-known DTs datasets. The results show that the proposed method can successfully build DTs models and achieve higher accuracies in DTs recognition and effectively localize DTs.

  20. Dynamic analysis of satellites with deployable hinged appendages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, Kevin F.

    1987-01-01

    The nonlinear equations of motion determining the planar dynamical behavior of an orbiting satellite deploying both one and two rigid appendages have been formulated using Lagrange's equations. The analysis accounts for large angle rotations, Coriolis effects, and the gravitational gradient, and the resulting coupled governing equations are integrated numerically. The analysis is applied to the Space Shuttle based deployment of rigid truss-like members, and results show that spacecraft inertia parameters, appendage mass and length, deployment velocity, and initial conditions all influence the system response. It is found that the resulting librational movement is related to the size of the deployment payload, and that gravitational forces lead to vehicle stabilization.

  1. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Peters, Jeanne M.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient computational method for the nonlinear dynamic analysis of quasi-symmetric anisotropic structures is proposed. The application of mixed models simplifies the analytical development and improves the accuracy of the response predictions, and operator splitting allows the reduction of the analysis model of the quasi-symmetric structure to that of the corresponding symmetric structure. The preconditoned conjugate gradient provides a stable and effective technique for generating the unsymmetric response of the structure as the sum of a symmetrized response plus correction modes. The effectiveness of the strategy is demonstrated with the example of a laminated anisotropic shallow shell of quadrilateral planform subjected to uniform normal loading.

  2. Evaluation of Incremental Improvement in the NWS MPE Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, L.; Habib, E. H.

    2009-12-01

    This study focuses on assessment of incremental improvement in the multi-sensor precipitation estimates (MPE) developed by the National Weather Service (NWS) River Forecast Centers (RFC). The MPE product is based upon merging of data from WSR-88D radar, surface rain gauge, and occasionally geo-stationary satellite data. The MPE algorithm produces 5 intermediate sets of products known as: RMOSAIC, BMOSAIC, MMOSAIC, LMOSAIC, and MLMOSAIC. These products have different bias-removal and optimal gauge-merging mechanisms. The final product used in operational applications is selected by the RFC forecasters. All the MPE products are provided at hourly temporal resolution and over a national Hydrologic Rainfall Analysis Project (HRAP) grid of a nominal size of 4 square kilometers. To help determine the incremental improvement of MPE estimates, an evaluation analysis was performed over a two-year period (2005-2006) using 13 independently operated rain gauges located within an area of ~30 km2 in south Louisiana. The close proximity of gauge sites to each other allows for multiple gauges to be located within the same HRAP pixel and thus provides reliable estimates of true surface rainfall to be used as a reference dataset. The evaluation analysis is performed over two temporal scales: hourly and event duration. Besides graphical comparisons using scatter and histogram plots, several statistical measures are also applied such as multiplicative bias, additive bias, correlation, and error standard deviation. The results indicated a mixed performance of the different products over the study site depending on which statistical metric is used. The products based on local bias adjustment have lowest error standard deviation but worst multiplicative bias. The opposite is true for products that are based on mean-filed bias adjustment. Optimal merging with gauge fields lead to a reduction in the error quantiles of the products. The results of the current study will provide insight into

  3. Benefits Analysis of Multi-Center Dynamic Weather Routes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheth, Kapil; McNally, David; Morando, Alexander; Clymer, Alexis; Lock, Jennifer; Petersen, Julien

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic weather routes are flight plan corrections that can provide airborne flights more than user-specified minutes of flying-time savings, compared to their current flight plan. These routes are computed from the aircraft's current location to a flight plan fix downstream (within a predefined limit region), while avoiding forecasted convective weather regions. The Dynamic Weather Routes automation has been continuously running with live air traffic data for a field evaluation at the American Airlines Integrated Operations Center in Fort Worth, TX since July 31, 2012, where flights within the Fort Worth Air Route Traffic Control Center are evaluated for time savings. This paper extends the methodology to all Centers in United States and presents benefits analysis of Dynamic Weather Routes automation, if it was implemented in multiple airspace Centers individually and concurrently. The current computation of dynamic weather routes requires a limit rectangle so that a downstream capture fix can be selected, preventing very large route changes spanning several Centers. In this paper, first, a method of computing a limit polygon (as opposed to a rectangle used for Fort Worth Center) is described for each of the 20 Centers in the National Airspace System. The Future ATM Concepts Evaluation Tool, a nationwide simulation and analysis tool, is used for this purpose. After a comparison of results with the Center-based Dynamic Weather Routes automation in Fort Worth Center, results are presented for 11 Centers in the contiguous United States. These Centers are generally most impacted by convective weather. A breakdown of individual Center and airline savings is presented and the results indicate an overall average savings of about 10 minutes of flying time are obtained per flight.

  4. Dynamic-Mechanical Analysis of Monodomain Nematic Liquid Crystalline Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, Atsushi; Terentjev, Eugene

    2003-03-01

    Dynamic-mechanical analysis was performed in the glassy, nematic and isotropic states of several monodomain nematic liquid crystalline elastomers (LCE) which differ in their degrees of anisotropy and internal microstructure. It was found that the type of network crosslinker makes a significant difference in the equilibrium properties of these elastomers, in particular, in their effective anisotropy. In spite of these differences, the observed dynamic-mechanical behaviour was very similar. The fact that there is a consistently high and wide loss over the whole nematic region, where storage modulus G' behaves non-monotonically, is most likely an indicator of the fact that the dynamic-mechanical response is not linear. Master curves have been built between the glassy state and the nematic-isotropic phase transition, where the modulus reaches a low-level soft plateau. Above the nematic-isotropic transition temperature Tni, the modulus rises substantially, since internal relaxation is no longer able to reduce the elastic response - and further time-temperature superposition fails. The dynamics of these elastomers are dominated by power laws, which was confirmed by the successful procedure of the master curve inversion (time-frequency inversion) to describe the static stress relaxation. Interestingly, it was found that mechanical properties characterized by power laws (in time) of stress relaxation match very well with the dynamic properties, where power laws (in frequency) were also observed in the dynamic modulus in the appropriate range of temperatures. The work demonstrates the potential for the use of nematic liquid crystalline elastomers in many acoustic and vibration damping applications.

  5. GPU accelerated dynamic functional connectivity analysis for functional MRI data.

    PubMed

    Akgün, Devrim; Sakoğlu, Ünal; Esquivel, Johnny; Adinoff, Bryon; Mete, Mutlu

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in multi-core processors and graphics card based computational technologies have paved the way for an improved and dynamic utilization of parallel computing techniques. Numerous applications have been implemented for the acceleration of computationally-intensive problems in various computational science fields including bioinformatics, in which big data problems are prevalent. In neuroimaging, dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) analysis is a computationally demanding method used to investigate dynamic functional interactions among different brain regions or networks identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. In this study, we implemented and analyzed a parallel DFC algorithm based on thread-based and block-based approaches. The thread-based approach was designed to parallelize DFC computations and was implemented in both Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP) and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming platforms. Another approach developed in this study to better utilize CUDA architecture is the block-based approach, where parallelization involves smaller parts of fMRI time-courses obtained by sliding-windows. Experimental results showed that the proposed parallel design solutions enabled by the GPUs significantly reduce the computation time for DFC analysis. Multicore implementation using OpenMP on 8-core processor provides up to 7.7× speed-up. GPU implementation using CUDA yielded substantial accelerations ranging from 18.5× to 157× speed-up once thread-based and block-based approaches were combined in the analysis. Proposed parallel programming solutions showed that multi-core processor and CUDA-supported GPU implementations accelerated the DFC analyses significantly. Developed algorithms make the DFC analyses more practical for multi-subject studies with more dynamic analyses. PMID:25805449

  6. Dynamical modeling and analysis of large cellular regulatory networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérenguier, D.; Chaouiya, C.; Monteiro, P. T.; Naldi, A.; Remy, E.; Thieffry, D.; Tichit, L.

    2013-06-01

    The dynamical analysis of large biological regulatory networks requires the development of scalable methods for mathematical modeling. Following the approach initially introduced by Thomas, we formalize the interactions between the components of a network in terms of discrete variables, functions, and parameters. Model simulations result in directed graphs, called state transition graphs. We are particularly interested in reachability properties and asymptotic behaviors, which correspond to terminal strongly connected components (or "attractors") in the state transition graph. A well-known problem is the exponential increase of the size of state transition graphs with the number of network components, in particular when using the biologically realistic asynchronous updating assumption. To address this problem, we have developed several complementary methods enabling the analysis of the behavior of large and complex logical models: (i) the definition of transition priority classes to simplify the dynamics; (ii) a model reduction method preserving essential dynamical properties, (iii) a novel algorithm to compact state transition graphs and directly generate compressed representations, emphasizing relevant transient and asymptotic dynamical properties. The power of an approach combining these different methods is demonstrated by applying them to a recent multilevel logical model for the network controlling CD4+ T helper cell response to antigen presentation and to a dozen cytokines. This model accounts for the differentiation of canonical Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes, as well as of inflammatory Th17 and regulatory T cells, along with many hybrid subtypes. All these methods have been implemented into the software GINsim, which enables the definition, the analysis, and the simulation of logical regulatory graphs.

  7. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of hydrodynamically-coupled stainless steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.

    1996-12-01

    Spent nuclear fuel is usually stored temporarily on the site of nuclear power plants. The spent fuel storage racks are nuclear-safety-related stainless steel structures required to be analyzed for seismic loads. When the storage pool is subjected to three-dimensional (3-D) floor seismic excitations, rack modules, stored fuel bundles, adjacent racks and pool walls, and surrounding water are hydrodynamically coupled. Hydrodynamic coupling (HC) significantly affects the dynamic responses of the racks that are free-standing and submerged in water within the pool. A nonlinear time-history dynamic analysis is usually needed to describe the motion behavior of the racks that are both geometrically nonlinear and material nonlinear in nature. The nonlinearities include the friction resistance between the rack supporting legs and the pool floor, and various potential impacts of fuel-rack, rack-rack, and rack-pool wall. The HC induced should be included in the nonlinear dynamic analysis using the added-hydrodynamic-mass concept based on potential theory per the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) acceptance criteria. To this end, a finite element analysis constitutes a feasible and effective tool. However, most people perform somewhat simplified 1-D, or 2-D, or 3-D single rack and 2-D multiple rack analyses. These analyses are incomplete because a 3-D single rack model behaves quite differently from a 2-D mode. Furthermore, a 3-D whole pool multi-rack model behaves differently than a 3-D single rack model, especially when the strong HC effects are unsymmetrical. In this paper 3-D nonlinear dynamic time-history analyses were performed in a more quantitative manner using sophisticated finite element models developed for a single rack as well as all twelve racks in the whole-pool. Typical response results due to different HC effects are determined and discussed.

  8. Dynamic and Thermodynamic Analysis of a Simple Model of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Techera, Mario Isaac Felix

    1991-02-01

    A new simple model of DNA is presented based on the results of lattice dynamics (LD) calculations in conjunction with the modified self-consistent phonon approximation (MSPA) done on a detailed model of DNA homopolymers. The model emphasizes the intrinsic nonlinearities present in the hydrogen-bonded duplex. The impetus for introducing the simplified model is to analyze the importance of the nonlinearities in the dynamics that lead to denaturation. An initial analysis is done on the possible dynamical excitations that can exist in the system due to the hydrogen bond (HB) nonlinearities. It is found that in a certain regime of base-pair motion, the nonlinearities can prevent dissipation of wave packets and thus suggesting the possibility of energy transfer along the molecule. What is also found, is the ability of the nonlinearities to "pin" excitations on the lattice thus suggesting a possible mechanism for localizing energy along the molecule for biologically significant periods of time. This analysis is done on a "cold" chain, i.e. at T = 0 K. In the latter part of this thesis, this model is shown to be thermodynamically unstable under certain circumstances. This instability is analyzed and general conclusions are drawn concerning the thermodynamics of any interaction similar to the ones used in the present case. As a result of this instability the thermodynamic analysis is done in nonequilibrium situations using stochastic methods to simulate a heat bath. Numerical calculations are performed to study the dissociation of the molecule and the possible effects of the thermal bath on the dynamical excitations mentioned in the previous paragraph. It is found that the dissociation time is very long at room temperature for long molecules.

  9. VIEWCACHE: An incremental database access method for autonomous interoperable databases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussopoulos, Nick; Sellis, Timoleon

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to illustrate the concept of incremental access to distributed databases. An experimental database management system, ADMS, which has been developed at the University of Maryland, in College Park, uses VIEWCACHE, a database access method based on incremental search. VIEWCACHE is a pointer-based access method that provides a uniform interface for accessing distributed databases and catalogues. The compactness of the pointer structures formed during database browsing and the incremental access method allow the user to search and do inter-database cross-referencing with no actual data movement between database sites. Once the search is complete, the set of collected pointers pointing to the desired data are dereferenced.

  10. Experimental and Numerical Investigations in Single Point Incremental Sheet Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Dejardin, S.; Thibaud, S.; Gelin, J. C.

    2007-05-17

    As recent studies introduced Incremental Sheet Forming (ISF) process as a very promising technology to manufacture sheet metal parts by the CNC controlled movement of a simple generative tool, industrial interests on ISF have increased. Indeed, due to its various advantages, such process has been demonstrated as an alternative to reduce costs resulting from stamping technology when small batches or prototypes have to be manufactured. Nevertheless, the process still needs further developments. A process analysis based on experimental and numerical investigations is required to carefully analyze the capabilities of the process and to consolidate its application in sheet metal industries. Starting from experimental results on standard components to show the interest of ISF, an application is carried out accounting flexibility of the process linked to the fact that the punches or dies are avoided and preliminary results have been obtained through experimental tests to manufacture micro parts. At the same time, a FEM analysis has been carried out in order to get the characteristics of the formed parts. In order to study the control of the process, a first study is carried out to perform an on-line sheet thickness measurement.

  11. Dynamic analysis of the metal V-belt CVT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Seung-Hyun; Yi, Seung-Jong

    2005-12-01

    A dynamic analysis of the metal V-belt CVT using a multi-body dynamic model is conducted. A dynamic model is derived based on the multi-body dynamics considering the driving mechanisms for a metal V-belt CVT system. The metal V-belt CVT system is considered as a multi-body system composed 302 bodies, i.e., a driving pulley, a driven pulley, and the 300 blocks. The ring is modeled as the spring-damper element. Considering the contacts between the pulley, the block and the ring, the theoretical formulae were derived. The simulation program using MS-Visual Studio C++ is developed to find the metal block trajectories and to calculate the forces acting on the block and the ring by changing the speed and torque ratios. In this study, the simulation is only conducted under the steady state and the transient state is not considered. The simulation results of the ring tension and six forces acting on a block are found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results.

  12. The future of dynamic factor analysis in psychology and biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, P C M

    2006-01-01

    The currently dominant approach to statistical analysis in psychology and biomedicine is based on analysis of inter-individual variation. Differences between subjects drawn from a population of subjects provide the information to make inferences about states of affairs at the population level (e.g., mean and/or covariance structure). Recently it has been shown that in general the inferred states of affairs at the population level do not apply at the level of intra-individual variation characterizing the life trajectories of individual subjects making up the population. This is a direct consequence of the so-called classical ergodic theorems of Birkhoff and Wiener which has important implications for the way in which psychological and biomedical processes have to be analyzed. The classical ergodic theorems are introduced below in order to show the necessity of using an alternative approach which is valid for the analysis of intra-individual variation. This approach has to be based on single-subject time series analysis. Next an overview is presented of dynamic factor models for the analysis of multivariate time series and the various ways to fit these models to the data. We then turn to an empirical application of factor analysis of personality data obtained in a replicated time series design, showing substantial heterogeneity in intra-individual factorial personality structure. The next topic is entirely innovative--for the first time I present my new dynamic factor model for the analysis of nonstationary time series. In the conclusion I will sketch some biomedical research initiatives in which this new model will be used. PMID:17124797

  13. Design improvement and dynamic finite element analysis of novel ITI dental implant under dynamic chewing loads.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung-Chang; Lin, Deng-Huei; Jiang, Cho-Pei; Lee, Shyh-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this article was to introduce the application of a uniform design for experimental methods to drop the micromotion of a novel ITI dental implant model under the dynamic loads. Combining the characteristics of the traditional ITI and Nano-Tite implants, a new implant with concave holes has been constructed. Compared to the traditional ITI dental implant model, the micromotion of the new dental implant model was significantly reduced by explicit dynamic finite element analysis. From uniform design of experiments, the dynamic finite element analysis method was applied to caluculated the maximum micromotion of the full model. Finally, the chief design in all the experiment simulations which cause the minimum micromotion is picked as the advanced model of the design. Related to the original design, which was associated with a micromotion of 45.11 μm, the micromotion of the improved version was 31.37 μm, for an improvement rate of 30.5%. PMID:26406049

  14. Dynamical glucometry: use of multiscale entropy analysis in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Madalena D; Henriques, Teresa; Munshi, Medha N; Segal, Alissa R; Goldberger, Ary L

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the world's most prevalent medical conditions. Contemporary management focuses on lowering mean blood glucose values toward a normal range, but largely ignores the dynamics of glucose fluctuations. We probed analyte time series obtained from continuous glucose monitor (CGM) sensors. We show that the fluctuations in CGM values sampled every 5 min are not uncorrelated noise. Next, using multiscale entropy analysis, we quantified the complexity of the temporal structure of the CGM time series from a group of elderly subjects with type 2 DM and age-matched controls. We further probed the structure of these CGM time series using detrended fluctuation analysis. Our findings indicate that the dynamics of glucose fluctuations from control subjects are more complex than those of subjects with type 2 DM over time scales ranging from about 5 min to 5 h. These findings support consideration of a new framework, dynamical glucometry, to guide mechanistic research and to help assess and compare therapeutic interventions, which should enhance complexity of glucose fluctuations and not just lower mean and variance of blood glucose levels. PMID:25273219

  15. Analysis of dynamic voluntary muscle contractions in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Saara M; Kankaanpää, Markku; Tarvainen, Mika P; Meigal, Alexander Yu; Nuutinen, Juho; Tarkka, Ina M; Airaksinen, Olavi; Karjalainen, Pasi A

    2009-09-01

    A novel method for discrimination of dynamic muscle contractions between patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy controls on the basis of surface electromyography (EMG) and acceleration measurements is presented. In this method, dynamic EMG and acceleration measurements are analyzed using nonlinear methods and wavelets. Ten parameters capturing Parkinson's disease (PD) characteristic features in the measured signals are extracted. Each parameter is computed as time-varying, and for elbow flexion and extension movements separately. For discrimination between subjects, the dimensionality of the feature vectors formed from these parameters is reduced using a principal component approach. The cluster analysis of the low-dimensional feature vectors is then performed for flexion and extension movements separately. The EMG and acceleration data measured from 49 patients with PD and 59 healthy controls are used for analysis. According to clustering results, the method could discriminate 80 % of patient extension movements from 87 % of control extension movements, and 73 % of patient flexion movements from 82 % of control flexion movements. The results show that dynamic EMG and acceleration measurements can be informative for assessing neuromuscular dysfunction in PD, and furthermore, they may help in the objective clinical assessment of the disease. PMID:19497811

  16. Dynamic self-guiding analysis of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kurakin, Alexei; Bredesen, Dale E.

    2015-01-01

    We applied a self-guiding evolutionary algorithm to initiate the synthesis of the Alzheimer's disease-related data and literature. A protein interaction network associated with amyloid-beta precursor protein (APP) and a seed model that treats Alzheimer's disease as progressive dysregulation of APP-associated signaling were used as dynamic “guides” and structural “filters” in the recursive search, analysis, and assimilation of data to drive the evolution of the seed model in size, detail, and complexity. Analysis of data and literature across sub-disciplines and system-scale discovery platforms suggests a key role of dynamic cytoskeletal connectivity in the stability, plasticity, and performance of multicellular networks and architectures. Chronic impairment and/or dysregulation of cell adhesions/synapses, cytoskeletal networks, and/or reversible epithelial-to-mesenchymal-like transitions, which enable and mediate the stable and coherent yet dynamic and reconfigurable multicellular architectures, may lead to the emergence and persistence of the disordered, wound-like pockets/microenvironments of chronically disconnected cells. Such wound-like microenvironments support and are supported by pro-inflammatory, pro-secretion, de-differentiated cellular phenotypes with altered metabolism and signaling. The co-evolution of wound-like microenvironments and their inhabitants may lead to the selection and stabilization of degenerated cellular phenotypes, via acquisition of epigenetic modifications and mutations, which eventually result in degenerative disorders such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26041885

  17. Selecting Earthquake Records for Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Mario E.

    2008-07-08

    An area in earthquake risk reduction that needs an urgent examination is the selection of earthquake records for nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures. An often-mentioned shortcoming from results of nonlinear dynamic analyses of structures is that these results are limited to the type of records that these analyses use as input data. This paper proposes a procedure for selecting earthquake records for nonlinear dynamic analysis of structures. This procedure uses a seismic damage index evaluated using the hysteretic energy dissipated by a Single Degree of Freedom System (SDOF) representing a multi-degree-of freedom structure responding to an earthquake record, and the plastic work capacity of the system at collapse. The type of structural system is considered using simple parameters. The proposed method is based on the evaluation of the damage index for a suite of earthquake records and a selected type of structural system. A set of 10 strong ground motion records is analyzed to show an application of the proposed procedure for selecting earthquake records for structural design.

  18. Dynamical glucometry: Use of multiscale entropy analysis in diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Madalena D.; Henriques, Teresa; Munshi, Medha N.; Segal, Alissa R.; Goldberger, Ary L.

    2014-09-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the world's most prevalent medical conditions. Contemporary management focuses on lowering mean blood glucose values toward a normal range, but largely ignores the dynamics of glucose fluctuations. We probed analyte time series obtained from continuous glucose monitor (CGM) sensors. We show that the fluctuations in CGM values sampled every 5 min are not uncorrelated noise. Next, using multiscale entropy analysis, we quantified the complexity of the temporal structure of the CGM time series from a group of elderly subjects with type 2 DM and age-matched controls. We further probed the structure of these CGM time series using detrended fluctuation analysis. Our findings indicate that the dynamics of glucose fluctuations from control subjects are more complex than those of subjects with type 2 DM over time scales ranging from about 5 min to 5 h. These findings support consideration of a new framework, dynamical glucometry, to guide mechanistic research and to help assess and compare therapeutic interventions, which should enhance complexity of glucose fluctuations and not just lower mean and variance of blood glucose levels.

  19. Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engler, Hans; Pruss, Jan; Webb, Glenn F.

    2006-12-01

    A new mathematical model for the dynamics of prion proliferation involving an ordinary differential equation coupled with a partial integro-differential equation is analyzed, continuing the work in [J. Pruss, L. Pujo-Menjouet, G.F. Webb, R. Zacher, Analysis of a model for the dynamics of prions, Discrete Contin. Dyn. Syst. 6 (2006) 225-235]. We show the well-posedness of this problem in its natural phase space , i.e., there is a unique global semiflow on Z+ associated to the problem. A theorem of threshold type is derived for this model which is typical for mathematical epidemics. If a certain combination of kinetic parameters is below or at the threshold, there is a unique steady state, the disease-free equilibrium, which is globally asymptotically stable in Z+; above the threshold it is unstable, and there is another unique steady state, the disease equilibrium, which inherits that property.

  20. Application of Control Volume Analysis to Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Timothy; Cohen, Benjamin; Anor, Tomer; Madsen, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Hydrocephalus is among the most common birth defects and may not be prevented nor cured. Afflicted individuals face serious issues, which at present are too complicated and not well enough understood to treat via systematic therapies. This talk outlines the framework and application of a control volume methodology to clinical Phase Contrast MRI data. Specifically, integral control volume analysis utilizes a fundamental, fluid dynamics methodology to quantify intracranial dynamics within a precise, direct, and physically meaningful framework. A chronically shunted, hydrocephalic patient in need of a revision procedure was used as an in vivo case study. Magnetic resonance velocity measurements within the patient's aqueduct were obtained in four biomedical state and were analyzed using the methods presented in this dissertation. Pressure force estimates were obtained, showing distinct differences in amplitude, phase, and waveform shape for different intracranial states within the same individual. Thoughts on the physiological and diagnostic research and development implications/opportunities will be presented.

  1. Analysis methods for wind turbine control and electrical system dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinrichsen, E. N.

    1995-01-01

    The integration of new energy technologies into electric power systems requires methods which recognize the full range of dynamic events in both the new generating unit and the power system. Since new energy technologies are initially perceived as small contributors to large systems, little attention is generally paid to system integration, i.e. dynamic events in the power system are ignored. As a result, most new energy sources are only capable of base-load operation, i.e. they have no load following or cycling capability. Wind turbines are no exception. Greater awareness of this implicit (and often unnecessary) limitation is needed. Analysis methods are recommended which include very low penetration (infinite bus) as well as very high penetration (stand-alone) scenarios.

  2. Employment of CB models for non-linear dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. R. M.; Deloo, P.; Fournier-Sicre, A.

    1990-01-01

    The non-linear dynamic analysis of large structures is always very time, effort and CPU consuming. Whenever possible the reduction of the size of the mathematical model involved is of main importance to speed up the computational procedures. Such reduction can be performed for the part of the structure which perform linearly. Most of the time, the classical Guyan reduction process is used. For non-linear dynamic process where the non-linearity is present at interfaces between different structures, Craig-Bampton models can provide a very rich information, and allow easy selection of the relevant modes with respect to the phenomenon driving the non-linearity. The paper presents the employment of Craig-Bampton models combined with Newmark direct integration for solving non-linear friction problems appearing at the interface between the Hubble Space Telescope and its solar arrays during in-orbit maneuvers. Theory, implementation in the FEM code ASKA, and practical results are shown.

  3. Application of tire dynamics to aircraft landing gear design analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    The tire plays a key part in many analyses used for design of aircraft landing gear. Examples include structural design of wheels, landing gear shimmy, brake whirl, chatter and squeal, complex combination of chatter and shimmy on main landing gear (MLG) systems, anti-skid performance, gear walk, and rough terrain loads and performance. Tire parameters needed in the various analyses are discussed. Two tire models are discussed for shimmy analysis, the modified Moreland approach and the von Schlippe-Dietrich approach. It is shown that the Moreland model can be derived from the Von Schlippe-Dietrich model by certain approximations. The remaining analysis areas are discussed in general terms and the tire parameters needed for each are identified. Accurate tire data allows more accurate design analysis and the correct prediction of dynamic performance of aircraft landing gear.

  4. Managing Performance Analysis with Dynamic Statistical Projection Pursuit

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, J.S.; Reed, D.A.

    2000-05-22

    Computer systems and applications are growing more complex. Consequently, performance analysis has become more difficult due to the complex, transient interrelationships among runtime components. To diagnose these types of performance issues, developers must use detailed instrumentation to capture a large number of performance metrics. Unfortunately, this instrumentation may actually influence the performance analysis, leading the developer to an ambiguous conclusion. In this paper, we introduce a technique for focusing a performance analysis on interesting performance metrics. This technique, called dynamic statistical projection pursuit, identifies interesting performance metrics that the monitoring system should capture across some number of processors. By reducing the number of performance metrics, projection pursuit can limit the impact of instrumentation on the performance of the target system and can reduce the volume of performance data.

  5. 48 CFR 3432.771 - Provision for incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... funding. 3432.771 Section 3432.771 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT FINANCING Contract Funding 3432.771 Provision for incremental funding. The contracting officer shall insert the provision in...

  6. An Examination of an Incremental Approach to Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingele, William E.; Reed, Beverly Woods

    1984-01-01

    A study of approximately 600 University of Arkansas remedial algebra students divided into seven control and seven experimental group sections substantially confirms John Saxon's findings that mathematics achievement can be improved by using Saxon's incremental approach to mathematics instruction. (JBM)

  7. Analysis of dynamic deformation processes with adaptive KALMAN-filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the approach of a full system analysis is shown quantifying a dynamic structural ("white-box"-) model for the calculation of thermal deformations of bar-shaped machine elements. The task was motivated from mechanical engineering searching new methods for the precise prediction and computational compensation of thermal influences in the heating and cooling phases of machine tools (i.e. robot arms, etc.). The quantification of thermal deformations under variable dynamic loads requires the modelling of the non-stationary spatial temperature distribution inside the object. Based upon FOURIERS law of heat flow the high-grade non-linear temperature gradient is represented by a system of partial differential equations within the framework of a dynamic Finite Element topology. It is shown that adaptive KALMAN-filtering is suitable to quantify relevant disturbance influences and to identify thermal parameters (i.e. thermal diffusivity) with a deviation of only 0,2%. As result an identified (and verified) parametric model for the realistic prediction respectively simulation of dynamic temperature processes is presented. Classifying the thermal bend as the main deformation quantity of bar-shaped machine tools, the temperature model is extended to a temperature deformation model. In lab tests thermal load steps are applied to an aluminum column. Independent control measurements show that the identified model can be used to predict the columns bend with a mean deviation (r.m.s.) smaller than 10 mgon. These results show that the deformation model is a precise predictor and suitable for realistic simulations of thermal deformations. Experiments with modified heat sources will be necessary to verify the model in further frequency spectra of dynamic thermal loads.

  8. Unveiling Hidden Dynamics of Hippo Signalling: A Systems Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung-Young; Nguyen, Lan K.

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signalling pathway has recently emerged as an important regulator of cell apoptosis and proliferation with significant implications in human diseases. In mammals, the pathway contains the core kinases MST1/2, which phosphorylate and activate LATS1/2 kinases. The pro-apoptotic function of the MST/LATS signalling axis was previously linked to the Akt and ERK MAPK pathways, demonstrating that the Hippo pathway does not act alone but crosstalks with other signalling pathways to coordinate network dynamics and cellular outcomes. These crosstalks were characterised by a multitude of complex regulatory mechanisms involving competitive protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation mediated feedback loops. However, how these different mechanisms interplay in different cellular contexts to drive the context-specific network dynamics of Hippo-ERK signalling remains elusive. Using mathematical modelling and computational analysis, we uncovered that the Hippo-ERK network can generate highly diverse dynamical profiles that can be clustered into distinct dose-response patterns. For each pattern, we offered mechanistic explanation that defines when and how the observed phenomenon can arise. We demonstrated that Akt displays opposing, dose-dependent functions towards ERK, which are mediated by the balance between the Raf-1/MST2 protein interaction module and the LATS1 mediated feedback regulation. Moreover, Ras displays a multi-functional role and drives biphasic responses of both MST2 and ERK activities; which are critically governed by the competitive protein interaction between MST2 and Raf-1. Our study represents the first in-depth and systematic analysis of the Hippo-ERK network dynamics and provides a concrete foundation for future studies. PMID:27527217

  9. Unveiling Hidden Dynamics of Hippo Signalling: A Systems Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sung-Young; Nguyen, Lan K

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signalling pathway has recently emerged as an important regulator of cell apoptosis and proliferation with significant implications in human diseases. In mammals, the pathway contains the core kinases MST1/2, which phosphorylate and activate LATS1/2 kinases. The pro-apoptotic function of the MST/LATS signalling axis was previously linked to the Akt and ERK MAPK pathways, demonstrating that the Hippo pathway does not act alone but crosstalks with other signalling pathways to coordinate network dynamics and cellular outcomes. These crosstalks were characterised by a multitude of complex regulatory mechanisms involving competitive protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation mediated feedback loops. However, how these different mechanisms interplay in different cellular contexts to drive the context-specific network dynamics of Hippo-ERK signalling remains elusive. Using mathematical modelling and computational analysis, we uncovered that the Hippo-ERK network can generate highly diverse dynamical profiles that can be clustered into distinct dose-response patterns. For each pattern, we offered mechanistic explanation that defines when and how the observed phenomenon can arise. We demonstrated that Akt displays opposing, dose-dependent functions towards ERK, which are mediated by the balance between the Raf-1/MST2 protein interaction module and the LATS1 mediated feedback regulation. Moreover, Ras displays a multi-functional role and drives biphasic responses of both MST2 and ERK activities; which are critically governed by the competitive protein interaction between MST2 and Raf-1. Our study represents the first in-depth and systematic analysis of the Hippo-ERK network dynamics and provides a concrete foundation for future studies. PMID:27527217

  10. Sensitivity derivatives for three dimensional supersonic Euler code using incremental iterative strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korivi, Vamshi Mohan; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, Perry A.; Jones, Henry E.

    1994-01-01

    In a recent work, an incremental strategy was proposed to iteratively solve the very large systems of linear equations that are required to obtain quasianalytical sensitivity derivatives from advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. The technique was sucessfully demonstrated for two large two-dimensional problems: a subsonic and a transonic airfoil. The principal feature of this incremental iterative stategy is that it allows the use of the identical approximate coefficient matrix operator and algorithm to solve the nonlinear flow and the linear sensitivity equations; at convergence, the accuracy of the sensitivity derivatives is not compromised. This feature allows a comparatively straightforward extension of the methodology to three-dimensional problems; this extension is successfully demonstrated in the present study for a space-marching solution of the three-dimensional Euler equations over a Mach 2.4 blended wing-body configuration.

  11. Situation Model Updating in Young and Older Adults: Global versus Incremental Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Readers construct mental models of situations described by text. Activity in narrative text is dynamic, so readers must frequently update their situation models when dimensions of the situation change. Updating can be incremental, such that a change leads to updating just the dimension that changed, or global, such that the entire model is updated. Here, we asked whether older and young adults make differential use of incremental and global updating. Participants read narratives containing changes in characters and spatial location and responded to recognition probes throughout the texts. Responses were slower when probes followed a change, suggesting that situation models were updated at changes. When either dimension changed, responses to probes for both dimensions were slowed; this provides evidence for global updating. Moreover, older adults showed stronger evidence of global updating than did young adults. One possibility is that older adults perform more global updating to offset reduced ability to manipulate information in working memory. PMID:25938248

  12. 26 CFR 1.41-8 - Alternative incremental credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....41-8T(b)(5) as contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2006. Paragraphs (b)(3) and (b)(4)(ii) of... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Alternative incremental credit. 1.41-8 Section 1... Credits Against Tax § 1.41-8 Alternative incremental credit. (a) Determination of credit. At the...

  13. 26 CFR 1.41-8 - Alternative incremental credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....41-8T(b)(5) as contained in 26 CFR part 1, revised April 1, 2006. Paragraphs (b)(3) and (b)(4)(ii) of... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Alternative incremental credit. 1.41-8 Section 1... Credits Against Tax § 1.41-8 Alternative incremental credit. (a) Determination of credit. At the...

  14. Boundary value problems with incremental plasticity in granular media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, T. J.; Lee, J. K.; Costes, N. C.

    1974-01-01

    Discussion of the critical state concept in terms of an incremental theory of plasticity in granular (soil) media, and formulation of the governing equations which are convenient for a computational scheme using the finite element method. It is shown that the critical state concept with its representation by the classical incremental theory of plasticity can provide a powerful means for solving a wide variety of boundary value problems in soil media.

  15. The NT-criterion for predicting crack growth increments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yehia, Nabil A. B.; Shephard, Mark S.

    1987-01-01

    A new approach is presented to determine the crack propagation increment after the direction of crack propagation has been predicted. The maximum dilatational strain energy density (NT-criterion) is employed in the derivation for predicting both direction and increment of the propagating crack. The crack propagation path predicted by the NT-criterion is compared to the one predicted by the S-criterion and to some available experimental data.

  16. An optimized procedure for determining incremental heat rate characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Noyola, A.H.; Grady, W.M. ); Viviani, G.L. )

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes an optimized procedure for producing generator incremental heat rate curves from continually sampled unit performance data. A generalized reduced gradient algorithm is applied to optimally locate break points in incremental heat rate curves. The advantages include the ability to automatically take into consideration slow time-varying effects such as unit aging and temperature variations in combustion air and cooling water. The procedure is tested using actual fuel rate data for four generators.

  17. Quantitative cw Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for the Analysis of Local Water Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Franck, John M.; Pavlova, Anna; Scott, John A.; Han, Songi

    2013-01-01

    Liquid state Overhauser Effect Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) has experienced a recent resurgence of interest. The ODNP technique described here relies on the double resonance of electron spin resonance (ESR) at the most common, i.e. X-band (~ 10 GHz), frequency and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at ~ 15 MHz. It requires only a standard continuous wave (cw) ESR spectrometer with an NMR probe inserted or built into an X-band cavity. Our focus lies on reviewing a new and powerful manifestation of ODNP as a high frequency NMR relaxometry tool that probes dipolar cross relaxation between the electron spins and the 1H nuclear spins at X-band frequencies. This technique selectively measures the translational mobility of water within a volume extending 0.5–1.5 nm outward from a nitroxide radical spin probe that is attached to a targeted site of a macromolecule. This method has been applied to study the dynamics of water that hydrates or permeates the surface or interior of proteins, polymers, and lipid membrane vesicles. We begin by reviewing the recent advances that have helped develop ODNP into a tool for mapping the dynamic landscape of hydration water with sub-nanometer locality. In order to bind this work coherently together, and to place it in the context of the extensive body of research in the field of NMR relaxometry, we then rephrase the analytical model and extend the description of the ODNP-derived NMR signal enhancements. This extended model highlights several aspects of ODNP data analysis, including the importance of considering all possible effects of microwave sample heating, the need to consider the error associated with various relaxation rates, and the unique ability of ODNP to probe the electron–1H cross-relaxation process, which is uniquely sensitive to fast (tens of ps) dynamical processes. By implementing the relevant corrections in a stepwise fashion, this paper draws a consensus result from previous ODNP procedures, and then shows

  18. Development of a helicopter rotor/propulsion system dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Hull, R.

    1982-01-01

    A time-domain analysis of coupled engine/drive train/rotor dynamics of a twin-engine, single main rotor helicopter model has been performed. The analysis incorporates an existing helicopter model with nonlinear simulations of a helicopter turboshaft engine and its fuel controller. System dynamic behavior is studied using the resulting simulation which included representations for the two engines and their fuel controllers, drive system, main rotor, tail rotor, and aircraft rigid body motions. Time histories of engine and rotor RPM response to pilot control inputs are studied for a baseline rotor and propulsion system model. Sensitivity of rotor RPM droop to fuel controller gain changes and collective input feed-forward gain changes are studied. Torque-load-sharing between the two engines is investigated by making changes in the fuel controller feedback paths. A linear engine model is derived from the nonlinear engine simulation and used in the coupled system analysis. This four-state linear engine model is then reduced to a three-state model. The effect of this simplification on coupled system behavior is shown.

  19. Nonlinear dynamical analysis of turbulence in a stable cloud layer.

    PubMed

    Palmer, A. J.

    1995-03-01

    An eight mode truncated spectral model based on Burgers' approximation to the one-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations is used to compute the Lyapunov dimension of the dynamical attractor for turbulence in a stable cloud layer. The model results are compared with the correlation dimension obtained earlier from a time series of radar Doppler and reflectivity signals from a turbulent layer in a marine stratus cloud. The analysis supports a weak coupling explanation for the lower correlation dimension found for the reflectivity time series compared with that for the Doppler time series. Turbulent Prandtl number emerges from the analysis as a flow parameter which can enlarge the dimension of the model's dynamical attractor, but the attractor dimension computed for the model remains lower than the radar Doppler correlation dimension. Linear stability analysis of the model's equilibrium states suggests that a nontruncated version of the model will possess an attractor which is also of lower dimension than the radar Doppler correlation dimension. (c) 1995 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12780184

  20. Probing cytoskeleton dynamics by intracellular particle transport analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, M.; Hodeck, K. F.; Witzel, P.; Nandi, A.; Lindner, B.; Heinrich, D.

    2015-07-01

    All cellular functions arise from the transport of molecules through a heterogeneous, highly dynamic cell interior for intracellular signaling. Here, the impact of intracellular architecture and cytoskeleton dynamics on transport processes is revealed by high-resolution single particle tracking within living cells, in combination with time-resolved local mean squared displacement (I-MSD) analysis. We apply the I-MSD analysis to trajectories of 200 nm silica particles within living cells of Dictyostelium discoideum obtained by high resolution spinning disc confocal microscopy with a frame rate of 100 fps and imaging in one fixed focal plane. We investigate phases of motor-driven active transport and subdiffusion, normal diffusion, as well as superdiffusion with high spatial and temporal resolution. Active directed intracellular motion is attributed to microtubule associated molecular motor driven transport with average absolute velocities of 2.8 μm s-1 for 200 nm diameter particles. Diffusion processes of these particles within wild-type cells are found to exhibit diffusion constants ranging across two orders of magnitude from subdiffusive to superdiffusive behavior. This type of analysis might prove of ample importance for medical applications, like targeted drug treatment of cells by nano-sized carriers or innovative diagnostic assays.

  1. Analysis on dynamic tensile extrusion behavior of UFG OFHC Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyung-Tae; Park, Leeju; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Seok Bong; Lee, Chong Soo

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests with the strain rate order of ~105 s-1 were conducted on coarse grained (CG) Cu and ultrafine grained (UFG) Cu. ECAP of 16 passes with route Bc was employed to fabricate UFG Cu. DTE tests were carried out by launching the sphere samples to the conical extrusion die at a speed of ~475 m/sec in a vacuumed gas gun system. UFG Cu was fragmented into 3 pieces and showed a DTE elongation of ~340%. CG Cu exhibited a larger DTE elongation of ~490% with fragmentation of 4 pieces. During DTE tests, dynamic recrystallization occurred in UFG Cu, but not in CG Cu. In order to examine the DTE behavior of CG Cu and UFG Cu under very high strain rates, a numerical analysis was undertaken by using a commercial finite element code (LS-DYNA 2D axis-symmetric model) with the Johnson - Cook model. The numerical analysis correctly predicted fragmentation and DTE elongation of CG Cu. But, the experimental DTE elongation of UFG Cu was much smaller than that predicted by the numerical analysis. This difference is discussed in terms of microstructural evolution of UFG Cu during DTE tests.

  2. Susceptibility-Based Analysis Of Dynamic Gadolinium Bolus Perfusion MRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonekamp, David; Barker, Peter B.; Leigh, Richard; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An algorithm is developed for the reconstruction of dynamic, gadolinium (Gd) bolus MR perfusion images of the human brain, based on quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM). Methods The method is evaluated in 5 perfusion scans obtained from 4 different patients scanned at 3T, and compared to the conventional analysis based on changes in the transverse relaxation rate ΔR2* and to theoretical predictions. QSM images were referenced to ventricular CSF for each dynamic of the perfusion sequence. Results Images of cerebral blood flow and blood volume were successfully reconstructed from the QSM-analysis, and were comparable to those reconstructed using ΔR2*. The magnitudes of the Gd-associated susceptibility effects in gray and white matter were consistent with theoretical predictions. Conclusion QSM-based analysis may have some theoretical advantages compared to ΔR2*, including a simpler relationship between signal change and Gd concentration. However, disadvantages are its much lower contrast-to-noise ratio, artifacts due to respiration and other effects, and more complicated reconstruction methods. More work is required to optimize data acquisition protocols for QSM-based perfusion imaging. PMID:24604343

  3. SIMA: Python software for analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Kaifosh, Patrick; Zaremba, Jeffrey D.; Danielson, Nathan B.; Losonczy, Attila

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is a powerful method for monitoring dynamic signals in the nervous system. However, analysis of dynamic fluorescence imaging data remains burdensome, in part due to the shortage of available software tools. To address this need, we have developed SIMA, an open source Python package that facilitates common analysis tasks related to fluorescence imaging. Functionality of this package includes correction of motion artifacts occurring during in vivo imaging with laser-scanning microscopy, segmentation of imaged fields into regions of interest (ROIs), and extraction of signals from the segmented ROIs. We have also developed a graphical user interface (GUI) for manual editing of the automatically segmented ROIs and automated registration of ROIs across multiple imaging datasets. This software has been designed with flexibility in mind to allow for future extension with different analysis methods and potential integration with other packages. Software, documentation, and source code for the SIMA package and ROI Buddy GUI are freely available at http://www.losonczylab.org/sima/. PMID:25295002

  4. Towards dynamic metabolic flux analysis in CHO cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Woo Suk; Antoniewicz, Maciek R

    2012-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used mammalian cell line for biopharmaceutical production, with a total global market approaching $100 billion per year. In the pharmaceutical industry CHO cells are grown in fed-batch culture, where cellular metabolism is characterized by high glucose and glutamine uptake rates combined with high rates of ammonium and lactate secretion. The metabolism of CHO cells changes dramatically during a fed-batch culture as the cells adapt to a changing environment and transition from exponential growth phase to stationary phase. Thus far, it has been challenging to study metabolic flux dynamics in CHO cell cultures using conventional metabolic flux analysis techniques that were developed for systems at metabolic steady state. In this paper we review progress on flux analysis in CHO cells and techniques for dynamic metabolic flux analysis. Application of these new tools may allow identification of intracellular metabolic bottlenecks at specific stages in CHO cell cultures and eventually lead to novel strategies for improving CHO cell metabolism and optimizing biopharmaceutical process performance. PMID:22102428

  5. Relating annual increments of the endangered Blanding's turtle plastron growth to climate.

    PubMed

    Richard, Monik G; Laroque, Colin P; Herman, Thomas B

    2014-05-01

    This research is the first published study to report a relationship between climate variables and plastron growth increments of turtles, in this case the endangered Nova Scotia Blanding's turtle (Emydoidea blandingii). We used techniques and software common to the discipline of dendrochronology to successfully cross-date our growth increment data series, to detrend and average our series of 80 immature Blanding's turtles into one common chronology, and to seek correlations between the chronology and environmental temperature and precipitation variables. Our cross-dated chronology had a series intercorrelation of 0.441 (above 99% confidence interval), an average mean sensitivity of 0.293, and an average unfiltered autocorrelation of 0.377. Our master chronology represented increments from 1975 to 2007 (33 years), with index values ranging from a low of 0.688 in 2006 to a high of 1.303 in 1977. Univariate climate response function analysis on mean monthly air temperature and precipitation values revealed a positive correlation with the previous year's May temperature and current year's August temperature; a negative correlation with the previous year's October temperature; and no significant correlation with precipitation. These techniques for determining growth increment response to environmental variables should be applicable to other turtle species and merit further exploration. PMID:24963390

  6. Relating annual increments of the endangered Blanding's turtle plastron growth to climate

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Monik G; Laroque, Colin P; Herman, Thomas B

    2014-01-01

    This research is the first published study to report a relationship between climate variables and plastron growth increments of turtles, in this case the endangered Nova Scotia Blanding's turtle (Emydoidea blandingii). We used techniques and software common to the discipline of dendrochronology to successfully cross-date our growth increment data series, to detrend and average our series of 80 immature Blanding's turtles into one common chronology, and to seek correlations between the chronology and environmental temperature and precipitation variables. Our cross-dated chronology had a series intercorrelation of 0.441 (above 99% confidence interval), an average mean sensitivity of 0.293, and an average unfiltered autocorrelation of 0.377. Our master chronology represented increments from 1975 to 2007 (33 years), with index values ranging from a low of 0.688 in 2006 to a high of 1.303 in 1977. Univariate climate response function analysis on mean monthly air temperature and precipitation values revealed a positive correlation with the previous year's May temperature and current year's August temperature; a negative correlation with the previous year's October temperature; and no significant correlation with precipitation. These techniques for determining growth increment response to environmental variables should be applicable to other turtle species and merit further exploration. PMID:24963390

  7. Volatilities, traded volumes, and the hypothesis of price increments in derivative securities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Gyuchang; Kim, SooYong; Scalas, Enrico; Kim, Kyungsik

    2007-08-01

    A detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is applied to the statistics of Korean treasury bond (KTB) futures from which the logarithmic increments, volatilities, and traded volumes are estimated over a specific time lag. In this study, the logarithmic increment of futures prices has no long-memory property, while the volatility and the traded volume exhibit the existence of the long-memory property. To analyze and calculate whether the volatility clustering is due to a inherent higher-order correlation not detected by with the direct application of the DFA to logarithmic increments of KTB futures, it is of importance to shuffle the original tick data of future prices and to generate a geometric Brownian random walk with the same mean and standard deviation. It was found from a comparison of the three tick data that the higher-order correlation inherent in logarithmic increments leads to volatility clustering. Particularly, the result of the DFA on volatilities and traded volumes can be supported by the hypothesis of price changes.

  8. Stress analysis of the subsea dynamic riser baseprocess piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Xuanze; Fang, Wei; Yin, Hanjun; Jiang, Ying

    2014-09-01

    Thesubsea dynamic riser base (SDRB) is an important piece of equipment for the floating production platform mooring system. One end is connected to the rigid pipeline, carrying a rigid pipeline thermal expansion load and the other end is connected to a flexible riser, carrying the dynamic load of the flexible riser, so its function is a transition connection between the flexible riser and the rigid pipeline which fixes the flexible riser on the seabed. On the other hand, as a typical subsea product, the design will satisfy the requirements of the standards for subsea products. By studying the stress analysisphilosophy of the topside piping and subsea pipeline, a physical model and procedure for piping stress analysis of the SDRB have been established. The conditions of the adverse design load have been considered, and a combination of the static load from the rigid pipeline and the dynamic load flexibility has also been optimized. And a comparative analysis between the AMSE, DNV and API standards for piping stress with the checking rules has been done. Because the SDRB belongs to the subsea pipeline terminal product, the use of DNV standards to check its process piping stress is recommended. Finally, the process piping stress of the SDRB has been calculated, and the results show that the jacket pipe and the carrier pipe stress of the SDRB process piping satisfy the DNV standards as a whole.The bulkhead cannot be accurately simulated by the AutoPIPE software which uses the FEA software ANSYS in the detailed analysis, but the checking results will still meet the requirements of the DNV standards.

  9. Analysis of flexible aircraft longitudinal dynamics and handling qualities. Volume 1: Analysis methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, M. R.; Schmidt, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    As aircraft become larger and lighter due to design requirements for increased payload and improved fuel efficiency, they will also become more flexible. For highly flexible vehicles, the handling qualities may not be accurately predicted by conventional methods. This study applies two analysis methods to a family of flexible aircraft in order to investigate how and when structural (especially dynamic aeroelastic) effects affect the dynamic characteristics of aircraft. The first type of analysis is an open loop model analysis technique. This method considers the effects of modal residue magnitudes on determining vehicle handling qualities. The second method is a pilot in the loop analysis procedure that considers several closed loop system characteristics. Volume 1 consists of the development and application of the two analysis methods described above.

  10. Fluid Dynamic and Stability Analysis of a Thin Liquid Sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMaster, Matthew S.

    1992-01-01

    Interest in thin sheet flows has recently been renewed due to their potential application in space radiators. Theoretical and experimental studies of the fluid dynamics and stability of thin liquid sheet flows have been carried out in this thesis. A computer program was developed to determine the cross-sectional shape of the edge cylinder given the cross-sectional area of the edge cylinder. A stability analysis was performed on a non-planer liquid sheet. A study was conducted to determine the effects of air resistance on the sheet.

  11. Dynamic Analysis of Darrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic response characteristics of the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) rotor are important factors governing the safety and fatigue life of VAWT systems. The principal problems are the determination of critical rotor speeds (resonances) and the assessment of forced vibration response amplitudes. The solution to these problems is complicated by centrifugal and Coriolis effects which can have substantial influence on rotor resonant frequencies and mode shapes. The primary tools now in use for rotor analysis are described and discussed. These tools include a lumped spring mass model (VAWTDYN) and also finite-element based approaches. The accuracy and completeness of current capabilities are also discussed.

  12. Development of a rotorcraft. Propulsion dynamics interface analysis, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hull, R.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to establish a coupled rotor/propulsion analysis that would be applicable to a wide range of rotorcraft systems. The effort included the following tasks: (1) development of a model structure suitable for simulating a wide range of rotorcraft configurations; (2) defined a methodology for parameterizing the model structure to represent a particular rotorcraft; (3) constructing a nonlinear coupled rotor/propulsion model as a test case to use in analyzing coupled system dynamics; and (4) an attempt to develop a mostly linear coupled model derived from the complete nonlinear simulations. Documentation of the computer models developed is presented.

  13. Dynamic dielectric analysis for nondestructive cure monitoring and process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D. E.; Delos, S. E.; Hoff, M. S.; Whitham, M. E.; Weller, L. W.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic dielectric analysis (DDA) is an effective in situ NDE method that can monitor the reaction status in thermosets and the phase changes in thermoplastics, including slow reactions occuring late in the cure cycle and recrystallization during annealing. The effects of moisture and resin history on reaction rate can also be determined, as can ionic and dipolar contributions. The ionic mobility parameter is noted to be an excellent monitor of viscosity above the glass transition temperature. The ability of DDA to monitor cure rate variations in a thick section during autoclaving has been demonstrated.

  14. Dynamic analysis of large structures by modal synthesis techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurty, W. C.; Hart, G. C.; Collins, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    Several criteria that may be used to evaluate the merits of some of the existing techniques for the dynamic analysis of large structures which involve division into substructures or components are examined. These techniques make use of component displacement modes to synthetize global systems of generalized coordinates and, for that reason, they have come to be known as modal synthesis or component mode methods. Two techniques have been found to be particularly useful - i.e., the modal synthesis method with fixed attachment modes, and the modal synthesis method with free attachment modes. These two methods are treated in detail, and general flow charts are presented for guidance in computer programming.

  15. Nonstationary Dynamics Data Analysis with Wavelet-SVD Filtering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brenner, Marty; Groutage, Dale; Bessette, Denis (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nonstationary time-frequency analysis is used for identification and classification of aeroelastic and aeroservoelastic dynamics. Time-frequency multiscale wavelet processing generates discrete energy density distributions. The distributions are processed using the singular value decomposition (SVD). Discrete density functions derived from the SVD generate moments that detect the principal features in the data. The SVD standard basis vectors are applied and then compared with a transformed-SVD, or TSVD, which reduces the number of features into more compact energy density concentrations. Finally, from the feature extraction, wavelet-based modal parameter estimation is applied.

  16. SPAR improved structure/fluid dynamic analysis capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. T.; Pearson, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The capability of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of flowing fluid and elastic structure was added to the SPAR computer code. A method, developed and adopted for use in SPAR utilizes the existing assumed stress hybrid plan element in SPAR. An operational mode was incorporated in SPAR which provides the capability for analyzing the flaw of a two dimensional, incompressible, viscous fluid within rigid boundaries. Equations were developed to provide for the eventual analysis of the interaction of such fluids with an elastic solid.

  17. Dynamic analysis of gas-core reactor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, K. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    A heat transfer analysis was incorporated into a previously developed model CODYN to obtain a model of open-cycle gaseous core reactor dynamics which can predict the heat flux at the cavity wall. The resulting model was used to study the sensitivity of the model to the value of the reactivity coefficients and to determine the system response for twenty specified perturbations. In addition, the model was used to study the effectiveness of several control systems in controlling the reactor. It was concluded that control drums located in the moderator region capable of inserting reactivity quickly provided the best control.

  18. Motion analysis of knee joint using dynamic volume images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haneishi, Hideaki; Kohno, Takahiro; Suzuki, Masahiko; Moriya, Hideshige; Mori, Sin-ichiro; Endo, Masahiro

    2006-03-01

    Acquisition and analysis of three-dimensional movement of knee joint is desired in orthopedic surgery. We have developed two methods to obtain dynamic volume images of knee joint. One is a 2D/3D registration method combining a bi-plane dynamic X-ray fluoroscopy and a static three-dimensional CT, the other is a method using so-called 4D-CT that uses a cone-beam and a wide 2D detector. In this paper, we present two analyses of knee joint movement obtained by these methods: (1) transition of the nearest points between femur and tibia (2) principal component analysis (PCA) of six parameters representing the three dimensional movement of knee. As a preprocessing for the analysis, at first the femur and tibia regions are extracted from volume data at each time frame and then the registration of the tibia between different frames by an affine transformation consisting of rotation and translation are performed. The same transformation is applied femur as well. Using those image data, the movement of femur relative to tibia can be analyzed. Six movement parameters of femur consisting of three translation parameters and three rotation parameters are obtained from those images. In the analysis (1), axis of each bone is first found and then the flexion angle of the knee joint is calculated. For each flexion angle, the minimum distance between femur and tibia and the location giving the minimum distance are found in both lateral condyle and medial condyle. As a result, it was observed that the movement of lateral condyle is larger than medial condyle. In the analysis (2), it was found that the movement of the knee can be represented by the first three principal components with precision of 99.58% and those three components seem to strongly relate to three major movements of femur in the knee bend known in orthopedic surgery.

  19. Perturbation and nonlinear dynamic analysis of different singing styles.

    PubMed

    Butte, Caitlin J; Zhang, Yu; Song, Huangqiang; Jiang, Jack J

    2009-11-01

    Previous research has used perturbation analysis methods to study the singing voice. Using perturbation and nonlinear dynamic analysis (NDA) methods in conjunction may provide more accurate information on the singing voice and may distinguish vocal usage in different styles. Acoustic samples from different styles of singing were compared using nonlinear dynamic and perturbation measures. Twenty-six songs from different musical styles were obtained from an online music database (Rhapsody, RealNetworks, Inc., Seattle, WA). One-second samples were selected from each song for analysis. Perturbation analyses of jitter, shimmer, and signal-to-noise ratio and NDA of correlation dimension (D(2)) were performed on samples from each singing style. Percent jitter and shimmer median values were low normal for country (0.32% and 3.82%), musical theater (MT) (0.280% and 2.80%), jazz (0.440% and 2.34%), and soul (0.430% and 6.42%). The popular style had slightly higher median jitter and shimmer values (1.13% and 6.78%) than other singing styles, although this was not statistically significant. The opera singing style had median jitter of 0.520%, and yielded significantly high shimmer (P=0.001) of 7.72%. All six singing styles were measured reliably using NDA, indicating that operatic singing is notably more chaotic than other singing styles. Median correlation dimension values were low to normal, compared to healthy voices, in country (median D(2)=2.14), jazz (median D(2)=2.24), pop (median D(2)=2.60), MT (median D(2)=2.73), and soul (mean D(2)=3.26). Correlation dimension was significantly higher in opera (P<0.001) with median D(2)=6.19. In this study, acoustic analysis in opera singing gave significantly high values for shimmer and D(2), suggesting that it is more irregular than other singing styles; a previously unknown quality of opera singing. Perturbation analysis also suggested significant differences in vocal output in different singing styles. This preliminary study

  20. Dispersion analysis and linear error analysis capabilities of the space vehicle dynamics simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snow, L. S.; Kuhn, A. E.

    1975-01-01

    Previous error analyses conducted by the Guidance and Dynamics Branch of NASA have used the Guidance Analysis Program (GAP) as the trajectory simulation tool. Plans are made to conduct all future error analyses using the Space Vehicle Dynamics Simulation (SVDS) program. A study was conducted to compare the inertial measurement unit (IMU) error simulations of the two programs. Results of the GAP/SVDS comparison are presented and problem areas encountered while attempting to simulate IMU errors, vehicle performance uncertainties and environmental uncertainties using SVDS are defined. An evaluation of the SVDS linear error analysis capability is also included.

  1. A hybrid incremental projection method for thermal-hydraulics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christon, Mark A.; Bakosi, Jozsef; Nadiga, Balasubramanya T.; Berndt, Markus; Francois, Marianne M.; Stagg, Alan K.; Xia, Yidong; Luo, Hong

    2016-07-01

    A new second-order accurate, hybrid, incremental projection method for time-dependent incompressible viscous flow is introduced in this paper. The hybrid finite-element/finite-volume discretization circumvents the well-known Ladyzhenskaya-Babuška-Brezzi conditions for stability, and does not require special treatment to filter pressure modes by either Rhie-Chow interpolation or by using a Petrov-Galerkin finite element formulation. The use of a co-velocity with a high-resolution advection method and a linearly consistent edge-based treatment of viscous/diffusive terms yields a robust algorithm for a broad spectrum of incompressible flows. The high-resolution advection method is shown to deliver second-order spatial convergence on mixed element topology meshes, and the implicit advective treatment significantly increases the stable time-step size. The algorithm is robust and extensible, permitting the incorporation of features such as porous media flow, RANS and LES turbulence models, and semi-/fully-implicit time stepping. A series of verification and validation problems are used to illustrate the convergence properties of the algorithm. The temporal stability properties are demonstrated on a range of problems with 2 ≤ CFL ≤ 100. The new flow solver is built using the Hydra multiphysics toolkit. The Hydra toolkit is written in C++ and provides a rich suite of extensible and fully-parallel components that permit rapid application development, supports multiple discretization techniques, provides I/O interfaces, dynamic run-time load balancing and data migration, and interfaces to scalable popular linear solvers, e.g., in open-source packages such as HYPRE, PETSc, and Trilinos.

  2. A hybrid incremental projection method for thermal-hydraulics applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christon, Mark A.; Bakosi, Jozsef; Nadiga, Balasubramanya T.; Berndt, Markus; Francois, Marianne M.; Stagg, Alan K.; Xia, Yidong; Luo, Hong

    2016-05-04

    In this paper, a new second-order accurate, hybrid, incremental projection method for time-dependent incompressible viscous flow is introduced in this paper. The hybrid finite-element/finite-volume discretization circumvents the well-known Ladyzhenskaya–Babuška–Brezzi conditions for stability, and does not require special treatment to filter pressure modes by either Rhie–Chow interpolation or by using a Petrov–Galerkin finite element formulation. The use of a co-velocity with a high-resolution advection method and a linearly consistent edge-based treatment of viscous/diffusive terms yields a robust algorithm for a broad spectrum of incompressible flows. The high-resolution advection method is shown to deliver second-order spatial convergence on mixed element topology meshes,more » and the implicit advective treatment significantly increases the stable time-step size. The algorithm is robust and extensible, permitting the incorporation of features such as porous media flow, RANS and LES turbulence models, and semi-/fully-implicit time stepping. A series of verification and validation problems are used to illustrate the convergence properties of the algorithm. The temporal stability properties are demonstrated on a range of problems with 2 ≤ CFL ≤ 100. The new flow solver is built using the Hydra multiphysics toolkit. The Hydra toolkit is written in C++ and provides a rich suite of extensible and fully-parallel components that permit rapid application development, supports multiple discretization techniques, provides I/O interfaces, dynamic run-time load balancing and data migration, and interfaces to scalable popular linear solvers, e.g., in open-source packages such as HYPRE, PETSc, and Trilinos.« less

  3. Dynamic stall analysis of horizontal-axis-wind-turbine blades using computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed, Mohamed A.; Kandil, Hamdy A.; Morgan, El-Sayed I.

    2012-06-01

    Dynamic stall has been widely known to significantly affect the performance of the wind turbines. In this paper, aerodynamic simulation of the unsteady low-speed flow past two-dimensional wind turbine blade profiles, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), will be performed. The aerodynamic simulation will be performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The governing equations used in the simulations are the Unsteady-Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. The unsteady separated turbulent flow around an oscillating airfoil pitching in a sinusoidal pattern in the regime of low Reynolds number is investigated numerically. The investigation employs the URANS approach with the most suitable turbulence model. The development of the light dynamic stall of the blades under consideration is studied. The S809 blade profile is simulated at different mean wind speeds. Moreover, the S826 blade profile is also considered for analysis of wind turbine blade which is the most suitable blade profile for the wind conditions in Egypt over the site of Gulf of El-Zayt. In order to find the best oscillating frequency, different oscillating frequencies are studied. The best frequency can then be used for the blade pitch controller. The comparisons with the experimental results showed that the used CFD code can accurately predict the blade profile unsteady aerodynamic loads.

  4. Pixel Analysis and Plasma Dynamics Characterized by Photospheric Spectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasca, Anthony P.; Chen, James; Pevtsov, Alexei A.

    2016-05-01

    Recent observations of the photosphere using high spatial and temporal resolutions show small dynamic features at the resolving limit during emerging flux events. However, line-of-sight (LOS) magnetogram pixels only contain the net uncanceled magnetic flux, which is expected to increase for fixed regions as resolution limits improve. A new pixel dynamics method uses spectrographic images to characterize photospheric absorption line profiles by variations in line displacement, width, asymmetry, and peakedness and is applied to quiet-sun regions, active regions with no eruption, and an active region with an ongoing eruption. Using Stokes I images from SOLIS/VSM on 2012 March 13, variations in line width and peakedness of Fe I 6301.5 Å are shown to have a strong spatial and temporal relationship with an M7.9 X-ray flare originating from NOAA 11429. This relationship is observed as a flattening in the line profile as the X-ray flare approaches peak intensity and was not present in area scans of a non-eruptive active region on 2011 April 14. These results are used to estimate dynamic plasma properties on sub-pixel scales and provide both spatial and temporal information of sub-pixel activity at the photosphere. The analysis can be extended to include the full Stokes parameters and study signatures of magnetic fields and coupled plasma properties.

  5. Functional data analysis for dynamical system identification of behavioral processes.

    PubMed

    Trail, Jessica B; Collins, Linda M; Rivera, Daniel E; Li, Runze; Piper, Megan E; Baker, Timothy B

    2014-06-01

    Efficient new technology has made it straightforward for behavioral scientists to collect anywhere from several dozen to several thousand dense, repeated measurements on one or more time-varying variables. These intensive longitudinal data (ILD) are ideal for examining complex change over time but present new challenges that illustrate the need for more advanced analytic methods. For example, in ILD the temporal spacing of observations may be irregular, and individuals may be sampled at different times. Also, it is important to assess both how the outcome changes over time and the variation between participants' time-varying processes to make inferences about a particular intervention's effectiveness within the population of interest. The methods presented in this article integrate 2 innovative ILD analytic techniques: functional data analysis and dynamical systems modeling. An empirical application is presented using data from a smoking cessation clinical trial. Study participants provided 42 daily assessments of pre-quit and post-quit withdrawal symptoms. Regression splines were used to approximate smooth functions of craving and negative affect and to estimate the variables' derivatives for each participant. We then modeled the dynamics of nicotine craving using standard input-output dynamical systems models. These models provide a more detailed characterization of the post-quit craving process than do traditional longitudinal models, including information regarding the type, magnitude, and speed of the response to an input. The results, in conjunction with standard engineering control theory techniques, could potentially be used by tobacco researchers to develop a more effective smoking intervention. PMID:24079929

  6. Uncertain structural dynamics of aircraft panels and fuzzy structures analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Victor W.; Buehrle, Ralph D.

    2002-11-01

    Aircraft fuselage panels, seemingly simple structures, are actually complex because of the uncertainty of the attachments of the frame stiffeners and longitudinal stringers. It is clearly important to understand the dynamics of these panels because of the subsequent radiation into the passenger cabin, even when complete information is not available for all portions of the finite-element model. Over the last few years a fuzzy structures analysis (FSA) approach has been undertaken at Penn State and NASA Langley to quantify the uncertainty in modeling aircraft panels. A new MSC.Nastran [MSC.Software Corp. (Santa Ana, CA)] Direct Matrix Abstraction Program (DMAP) code was written and tested [AIAA paper 2001-1320, 42nd AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conf., Seattle, WA, 16 April 2001] and was applied to simple fuselage panel models [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 2410(A) (2001)]. Recently the work has focused on understanding the dynamics of a realistic aluminum fuselage panel, typical of today's aircraft construction. This presentation will provide an overview of the research and recent results will be given for the fuselage panel. Comparison between experiments and the FSA results will be shown for different fuzzy input parameters. [Work supported by NASA Research Cooperative Agreement NCC-1-382.

  7. A distributed analysis of Human impact on global sediment dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S.; Kettner, A.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding riverine sediment dynamics is an important undertaking for both socially-relevant issues such as agriculture, water security and infrastructure management and for scientific analysis of landscapes, river ecology, oceanography and other disciplines. Providing good quantitative and predictive tools in therefore timely particularly in light of predicted climate and landuse changes. Ever increasing human activity during the Anthropocene have affected sediment dynamics in two major ways: (1) an increase is hillslope erosion due to agriculture, deforestation and landscape engineering and (2) trapping of sediment in dams and other man-made reservoirs. The intensity and dynamics between these man-made factors vary widely across the globe and in time and are therefore hard to predict. Using sophisticated numerical models is therefore warranted. Here we use a distributed global riverine sediment flux and water discharge model (WBMsed) to compare a pristine (without human input) and disturbed (with human input) simulations. Using these 50 year simulations we will show and discuss the complex spatial and temporal patterns of human effect on riverine sediment flux and water discharge.

  8. Analysis of in situ measurements of cirrus anvil outflow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederman, J. I.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    The airborne campaign, EMERALD 2 (Egrett Microphysics Experiment with Radiation, Lidar, and Dynamics,) was conducted out of Darwin, Australia in 2002. Objectives included characterization of the dynamics in the cirrus anvil outflow from tropical deep convection. Two aircraft, the Egrett and King Air, were flown in tandem in the upper troposphere (7 km - 15 km) to collect in situ measurements in the anvil outflow from a storm named "Hector" that occurs on a regular basis over the Tiwi Islands north of Darwin during November and December. Turbulence probes mounted on the wings of the Egrett aircraft were used to measure the wind fluctuations across the anvil and along its length with a spatial resolution of 2 meters. The in situ measurements from the Egrett were coincident with lidar measurements of the cloud structure from the King Air aircraft flying directly below. The presentation will show results of the analysis of the measurements with an emphasis on the turbulence, gravity waves, and coherent structures that are particular to the cirrus anvil outflow environment. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics associated with the generation of mammatus formations at the base of the anvil clouds.

  9. Finite element dynamic analysis on CDC STAR-100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K.; Lambiotte, J. J., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Computational algorithms are presented for the finite element dynamic analysis of structures on the CDC STAR-100 computer. The spatial behavior is described using higher-order finite elements. The temporal behavior is approximated by using either the central difference explicit scheme or Newmark's implicit scheme. In each case the analysis is broken up into a number of basic macro-operations. Discussion is focused on the organization of the computation and the mode of storage of different arrays to take advantage of the STAR pipeline capability. The potential of the proposed algorithms is discussed and CPU times are given for performing the different macro-operations for a shell modeled by higher order composite shallow shell elements having 80 degrees of freedom.

  10. Logical Modeling and Dynamical Analysis of Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Jaoudé, Wassim; Traynard, Pauline; Monteiro, Pedro T.; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Helikar, Tomáš; Thieffry, Denis; Chaouiya, Claudine

    2016-01-01

    The logical (or logic) formalism is increasingly used to model regulatory and signaling networks. Complementing these applications, several groups contributed various methods and tools to support the definition and analysis of logical models. After an introduction to the logical modeling framework and to several of its variants, we review here a number of recent methodological advances to ease the analysis of large and intricate networks. In particular, we survey approaches to determine model attractors and their reachability properties, to assess the dynamical impact of variations of external signals, and to consistently reduce large models. To illustrate these developments, we further consider several published logical models for two important biological processes, namely the differentiation of T helper cells and the control of mammalian cell cycle. PMID:27303434

  11. Modern wing flutter analysis by computational fluid dynamics methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Herbert J.; Batina, John T.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1988-01-01

    The application and assessment of the recently developed CAP-TSD transonic small-disturbance code for flutter prediction is described. The CAP-TSD code has been developed for aeroelastic analysis of complete aircraft configurations and was previously applied to the calculation of steady and unsteady pressures with favorable results. Generalized aerodynamic forces and flutter characteristics are calculated and compared with linear theory results and with experimental data for a 45 deg sweptback wing. These results are in good agreement with the experimental flutter data which is the first step toward validating CAP-TSD for general transonic aeroelastic applications. The paper presents these results and comparisons along with general remarks regarding modern wing flutter analysis by computational fluid dynamics methods.

  12. Analysis of proteome dynamics in mice by isotopic labeling.

    PubMed

    Price, John C; Ghaemmaghami, Sina

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in mass spectrometry and in vivo isotopic labeling have enabled proteome-wide analyses of protein turnover in complex organisms. Here, we describe a protocol for analyzing protein turnover rates in mouse tissues by comprehensive (15)N labeling. The procedure involves the complete isotopic labeling of blue green algae (Spirulina platensis) with (15)N and utilizing it as a source of dietary nitrogen for mice. We outline a detailed protocol for in-house production of (15)N-labeled algae, labeling of mice, and analysis of isotope incorporation kinetics by mass spectrometry. The methodology can be adapted to analyze proteome dynamics in most murine tissues and may be particularly useful in the analysis of proteostatic disruptions in mouse models of disease. PMID:24791984

  13. Sensitivity analysis of the critical speed in railway vehicle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigoni, D.; True, H.; Engsig-Karup, A. P.

    2014-05-01

    We present an approach to global sensitivity analysis aiming at the reduction of its computational cost without compromising the results. The method is based on sampling methods, cubature rules, high-dimensional model representation and total sensitivity indices. It is applied to a half car with a two-axle Cooperrider bogie, in order to study the sensitivity of the critical speed with respect to the suspension parameters. The importance of a certain suspension component is expressed by the variance in critical speed that is ascribable to it. This proves to be useful in the identification of parameters for which the accuracy of their values is critically important. The approach has a general applicability in many engineering fields and does not require the knowledge of the particular solver of the dynamical system. This analysis can be used as part of the virtual homologation procedure and to help engineers during the design phase of complex systems.

  14. Preliminary analysis of the dynamic heliosphere by MHD simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Washimi, H.; Zank, G. P.; Tanaka, T.

    2006-09-26

    A preliminary analysis of the dynamic heliosphere to estimate the termination shock (TS) distance from the sun around the time when Voyager 1 passed the termination shock at December 16, 2004 is performed by using MHD simulations. For input to this simulation, we use the Voyager 2 solar-wind data. We first find a stationary solution of the 3-D outer heliosphere by assigning a set of LISM parameters as our outer boundary conditions and then the dynamical analysis is performed. The model TS crossing is within 6 months of the observed date. The TS is pushed outward every time a high ram-pressure solar wind pulse arrives. After the end of the high ram-pressure wind, the TS shock shrinks inward. When the last Halloween event passed through the TS at DOY 250, 2004, the TS began to shrink inward very quickly and the TS crossed V1. The highest inward speed of the TS is over 400 km/s. The high ram-pressure solar wind transmitted through the TS becomes a high thermal-pressure plasma in the heliosheath, acting to push the TS inward. This suggests that the position of the TS is determined not only by the steady-state pressure balance condition between the solar wind ram-pressure and the LISM pressure, but by the dynamical ram pressure too. The period when the high ram-pressure solar wind arrives at the TS shock seems to correspond to the period of the TS particle event (Stone et al, 2005, Decker et al., 2005). The TS crossing date will be revised in future simulations using a more appropriate set of parameters for the LISM. This will enable us to undertake a detailed comparison of the simulation results with the TS particle events.

  15. Dynamic Analysis of Integrated Signaling, Metabolic, and Regulatory Networks

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, James A.; Papin, Jason A.

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular cues affect signaling, metabolic, and regulatory processes to elicit cellular responses. Although intracellular signaling, metabolic, and regulatory networks are highly integrated, previous analyses have largely focused on independent processes (e.g., metabolism) without considering the interplay that exists among them. However, there is evidence that many diseases arise from multifunctional components with roles throughout signaling, metabolic, and regulatory networks. Therefore, in this study, we propose a flux balance analysis (FBA)–based strategy, referred to as integrated dynamic FBA (idFBA), that dynamically simulates cellular phenotypes arising from integrated networks. The idFBA framework requires an integrated stoichiometric reconstruction of signaling, metabolic, and regulatory processes. It assumes quasi-steady-state conditions for “fast” reactions and incorporates “slow” reactions into the stoichiometric formalism in a time-delayed manner. To assess the efficacy of idFBA, we developed a prototypic integrated system comprising signaling, metabolic, and regulatory processes with network features characteristic of actual systems and incorporating kinetic parameters based on typical time scales observed in literature. idFBA was applied to the prototypic system, which was evaluated for different environments and gene regulatory rules. In addition, we applied the idFBA framework in a similar manner to a representative module of the single-cell eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Ultimately, idFBA facilitated quantitative, dynamic analysis of systemic effects of extracellular cues on cellular phenotypes and generated comparable time-course predictions when contrasted with an equivalent kinetic model. Since idFBA solves a linear programming problem and does not require an exhaustive list of detailed kinetic parameters, it may be efficiently scaled to integrated intracellular systems that incorporate signaling, metabolic, and

  16. Painleve singularity analysis applied to charged particle dynamics during reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    For a plasma in the collisionless regime, test-particle modelling can lend some insight into the macroscopic behavior of the plasma, e.g. conductivity and heating. A common example for which this technique is used is a system with electric and magnetic fields given by B = [delta]yx + zy + yz and E = [epsilon]z, where [delta], [gamma], and [epsilon] are constant parameters. This model can be used to model plasma behavior near neutral lines, ([gamma] = 0), as well as current sheets ([gamma] = 0, [delta] = 0). The integrability properties of the particle motion in such fields might affect the plasma's macroscopic behavior, and the author has asked the question [open quotes]For what values of [delta], [gamma], and [epsilon] is the system integrable [close quotes] To answer this question, the author has employed Painleve singularity analysis, which is an examination of the singularity properties of a test particle's equations of motion in the complex time plane. This analysis has identified two field geometries for which the system's particle dynamics are integrable in terms of the second Painleve transcendent: the circular O-line case and the case of the neutral sheet configuration. These geometries yield particle dynamics that are integrable in the Liouville sense (i.e., there exist the proper number of integrals in involution) in an extended phase space which includes the time as a canonical coordinate, and this property is also true for nonzero [gamma]. The singularity property tests also identified a large, dense set of X-line and O-line field geometries that yield dynamics that may possess the weak Painleve property. In the case of the X-line geometries, this result shows little relevance to the physical nature of the system, but the existence of a dense set of elliptical O-line geometries with this property may be related to the fact that for [epsilon] positive, one can construct asymptotic solutions in the limit t [yields] [infinity].

  17. Two-photon imaging and analysis of neural network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütcke, Henry; Helmchen, Fritjof

    2011-08-01

    The glow of a starry night sky, the smell of a freshly brewed cup of coffee or the sound of ocean waves breaking on the beach are representations of the physical world that have been created by the dynamic interactions of thousands of neurons in our brains. How the brain mediates perceptions, creates thoughts, stores memories and initiates actions remains one of the most profound puzzles in biology, if not all of science. A key to a mechanistic understanding of how the nervous system works is the ability to measure and analyze the dynamics of neuronal networks in the living organism in the context of sensory stimulation and behavior. Dynamic brain properties have been fairly well characterized on the microscopic level of individual neurons and on the macroscopic level of whole brain areas largely with the help of various electrophysiological techniques. However, our understanding of the mesoscopic level comprising local populations of hundreds to thousands of neurons (so-called 'microcircuits') remains comparably poor. Predominantly, this has been due to the technical difficulties involved in recording from large networks of neurons with single-cell spatial resolution and near-millisecond temporal resolution in the brain of living animals. In recent years, two-photon microscopy has emerged as a technique which meets many of these requirements and thus has become the method of choice for the interrogation of local neural circuits. Here, we review the state-of-research in the field of two-photon imaging of neuronal populations, covering the topics of microscope technology, suitable fluorescent indicator dyes, staining techniques, and in particular analysis techniques for extracting relevant information from the fluorescence data. We expect that functional analysis of neural networks using two-photon imaging will help to decipher fundamental operational principles of neural microcircuits.

  18. Genomic analysis of regulatory network dynamics reveals large topological changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Madan Babu, M.; Yu, Haiyuan; Snyder, Michael; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Gerstein, Mark

    2004-09-01

    Network analysis has been applied widely, providing a unifying language to describe disparate systems ranging from social interactions to power grids. It has recently been used in molecular biology, but so far the resulting networks have only been analysed statically. Here we present the dynamics of a biological network on a genomic scale, by integrating transcriptional regulatory information and gene-expression data for multiple conditions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We develop an approach for the statistical analysis of network dynamics, called SANDY, combining well-known global topological measures, local motifs and newly derived statistics. We uncover large changes in underlying network architecture that are unexpected given current viewpoints and random simulations. In response to diverse stimuli, transcription factors alter their interactions to varying degrees, thereby rewiring the network. A few transcription factors serve as permanent hubs, but most act transiently only during certain conditions. By studying sub-network structures, we show that environmental responses facilitate fast signal propagation (for example, with short regulatory cascades), whereas the cell cycle and sporulation direct temporal progression through multiple stages (for example, with highly inter-connected transcription factors). Indeed, to drive the latter processes forward, phase-specific transcription factors inter-regulate serially, and ubiquitously active transcription factors layer above them in a two-tiered hierarchy. We anticipate that many of the concepts presented here-particularly the large-scale topological changes and hub transience-will apply to other biological networks, including complex sub-systems in higher eukaryotes.

  19. Equilibrium Analysis of a Yellow Fever Dynamical Model with Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Martorano Raimundo, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    We propose an equilibrium analysis of a dynamical model of yellow fever transmission in the presence of a vaccine. The model considers both human and vector populations. We found thresholds parameters that affect the development of the disease and the infectious status of the human population in the presence of a vaccine whose protection may wane over time. In particular, we derived a threshold vaccination rate, above which the disease would be eradicated from the human population. We show that if the mortality rate of the mosquitoes is greater than a given threshold, then the disease is naturally (without intervention) eradicated from the population. In contrast, if the mortality rate of the mosquitoes is less than that threshold, then the disease is eradicated from the populations only when the growing rate of humans is less than another threshold; otherwise, the disease is eradicated only if the reproduction number of the infection after vaccination is less than 1. When this reproduction number is greater than 1, the disease will be eradicated from the human population if the vaccination rate is greater than a given threshold; otherwise, the disease will establish itself among humans, reaching a stable endemic equilibrium. The analysis presented in this paper can be useful, both to the better understanding of the disease dynamics and also for the planning of vaccination strategies. PMID:25834634

  20. Free vibration and dynamic response analysis of spinning structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The proposed effort involved development of numerical procedures for efficient solution of free vibration problems of spinning structures. An eigenproblem solution procedure, based on a Lanczos method employing complex arithmetic, was successfully developed. This task involved formulation of the numerical procedure, FORTRAN coding of the algorithm, checking and debugging of software, and implementation of the routine in the STARS program. A graphics package for the E/S PS 300 as well as for the Tektronix terminals was successfully generated and consists of the following special capabilities: (1) a dynamic response plot for the stresses and displacements as functions of time; and (2) a menu driven command module enabling input of data on an interactive basis. Finally, the STARS analysis capability was further improved by implementing the dynamic response analysis package that provides information on nodal deformations and element stresses as a function of time. A number of test cases were run utilizing the currently developed algorithm implemented in the STARS program and such results indicate that the newly generated solution technique is significantly more efficient than other existing similar procedures.

  1. Non-probabilistic interval analysis method for dynamic response analysis of nonlinear systems with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiping; Ma, Lihong; Wang, Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    Effects of uncertainties on the dynamic response of the nonlinear vibration systems with general form are investigated. Based on interval mathematics, modeling the uncertain parameters as interval numbers, a non-probabilistic interval analysis method, which estimates the range of the nonlinear dynamic response with the help of Taylor series expansion, is presented, where the partial derivatives of the dynamic response with respect to uncertain parameters are considered to be interval numbers. The sensitivity matrices of dynamic response with the uncertain parameters are derived. For the presented method, only the bounds on uncertain parameters are needed, instead of probabilistic density distribution or statistical quantities. Numerical examples are used to illustrate the validity and feasibility of the presented method.

  2. Monitoring Incremental Histogram Distribution for Change Detection in Data Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastião, Raquel; Gama, João; Rodrigues, Pedro Pereira; Bernardes, João

    Histograms are a common technique for density estimation and they have been widely used as a tool in exploratory data analysis. Learning histograms from static and stationary data is a well known topic. Nevertheless, very few works discuss this problem when we have a continuous flow of data generated from dynamic environments.

  3. Soil dynamics and accelerated erosion: a sensitivity analysis of the LPJ Dynamic vegetation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchoms, Samuel; Van Oost, Kristof; Vanacker, Veerle; Kaplan, Jed O.; Vanwalleghem, Tom

    2013-04-01

    It is widely accepted that humans have become a major geomorphic force by disturbing natural vegetation patterns. Land conversion for agriculture purposes removes the protection of soils by the natural vegetation and leads to increased soil erosion by one to two orders of magnitude, breaking the balance that exists between the loss of soils and its production. Accelerated erosion and deposition have a strong influence on evolution and heterogeneity of basic soil characteristics (soil thickness, hydrology, horizon development,…) as well as on organic matter storage and cycling. Yet, since they are operating at a long time scale, those processes are not represented in state-of-art Dynamic Global Vegetation Models, which is a clear lack when exploring vegetation dynamics over past centuries. The main objectives of this paper are (i) to test the sensitivity of a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model, in terms of NPP and organic matter turnover, variations in state variables in response to accelerated erosion and (ii) to assess the performance of the model under the impact of erosion for a case-study in Central Spain. We evaluated the Lund-Postdam-Jena Dynamic Vegetation Model (LPJ DVGM) (Sitch et al, 2003) which simulates vegetation growth and carbon pools at the surface and in the soil based on climatic, pedologic and topographic variables. We assessed its reactions to changes in key soil properties that are affected by erosion such as texture and soil depth. We present the results of where we manipulated soil texture and bulk density while keeping the environmental drivers of climate, slope and altitude constant. For parameters exhibiting a strong control on NPP or SOM, a factorial analysis was conducted to test for interaction effects. The simulations show an important dependence on the clay content, especially for the slow cycling carbon pools and the biomass production, though the underground litter seems to be mostly influenced by the silt content. The fast cycling C

  4. Dynamic network data envelopment analysis for university hospitals evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Maria Stella de Castro; Rodrigues, Henrique de Castro; André, Edgard Caires Gazzola; de Azeredo, Jônatas Almeida; Lins, Marcos Pereira Estellita

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To develop an assessment tool to evaluate the efficiency of federal university general hospitals. METHODS Data envelopment analysis, a linear programming technique, creates a best practice frontier by comparing observed production given the amount of resources used. The model is output-oriented and considers variable returns to scale. Network data envelopment analysis considers link variables belonging to more than one dimension (in the model, medical residents, adjusted admissions, and research projects). Dynamic network data envelopment analysis uses carry-over variables (in the model, financing budget) to analyze frontier shift in subsequent years. Data were gathered from the information system of the Brazilian Ministry of Education (MEC), 2010-2013. RESULTS The mean scores for health care, teaching and research over the period were 58.0%, 86.0%, and 61.0%, respectively. In 2012, the best performance year, for all units to reach the frontier it would be necessary to have a mean increase of 65.0% in outpatient visits; 34.0% in admissions; 12.0% in undergraduate students; 13.0% in multi-professional residents; 48.0% in graduate students; 7.0% in research projects; besides a decrease of 9.0% in medical residents. In the same year, an increase of 0.9% in financing budget would be necessary to improve the care output frontier. In the dynamic evaluation, there was progress in teaching efficiency, oscillation in medical care and no variation in research. CONCLUSIONS The proposed model generates public health planning and programming parameters by estimating efficiency scores and making projections to reach the best practice frontier. PMID:27191158

  5. An Incremental Target-Adapted Strategy for Active Geometric Calibration of Projector-Camera Systems

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Yen; Chien, Hsiang-Jen

    2013-01-01

    The calibration of a projector-camera system is an essential step toward accurate 3-D measurement and environment-aware data projection applications, such as augmented reality. In this paper we present a two-stage easy-to-deploy strategy for robust calibration of both intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of a projector. Two key components of the system are the automatic generation of projected light patterns and the incremental calibration process. Based on the incremental strategy, the calibration process first establishes a set of initial parameters, and then it upgrades these parameters incrementally using the projection and captured images of dynamically-generated calibration patterns. The scene-driven light patterns allow the system to adapt itself to the pose of the calibration target, such that the difficulty in feature detection is greatly lowered. The strategy forms a closed-loop system that performs self-correction as more and more observations become available. Compared to the conventional method, which requires a time-consuming process for the acquisition of dense pixel correspondences, the proposed method deploys a homography-based coordinate computation, allowing the calibration time to be dramatically reduced. The experimental results indicate that an improvement of 70% in reprojection errors is achievable and 95% of the calibration time can be saved. PMID:23435056

  6. An incremental target-adapted strategy for active geometric calibration of projector-camera systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Yen; Chien, Hsiang-Jen

    2013-01-01

    The calibration of a projector-camera system is an essential step toward accurate 3-D measurement and environment-aware data projection applications, such as augmented reality. In this paper we present a two-stage easy-to-deploy strategy for robust calibration of both intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of a projector. Two key components of the system are the automatic generation of projected light patterns and the incremental calibration process. Based on the incremental strategy, the calibration process first establishes a set of initial parameters, and then it upgrades these parameters incrementally using the projection and captured images of dynamically-generated calibration patterns. The scene-driven light patterns allow the system to adapt itself to the pose of the calibration target, such that the difficulty in feature detection is greatly lowered. The strategy forms a closed-loop system that performs self-correction as more and more observations become available. Compared to the conventional method, which requires a time-consuming process for the acquisition of dense pixel correspondences, the proposed method deploys a homography-based coordinate computation, allowing the calibration time to be dramatically reduced. The experimental results indicate that an improvement of 70% in reprojection errors is achievable and 95% of the calibration time can be saved. PMID:23435056

  7. Incremental training intensities increases loads on the lower back of elite female rowers.

    PubMed

    Buckeridge, Erica M; Bull, Anthony M J; McGregor, Alison H

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar-pelvic kinematics change in response to increasing rowing stroke rates, but little is known about the effect of incremental stroke rates on changes in joint kinetics and their implications for injury. The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of incremental rowing intensities on lower limb and lumbar-pelvic kinetics. Twelve female rowers performed an incremental test on a rowing ergometer. Kinematic data of rowers' ankle, knee, hip and lumbar-pelvic joints, as well as external forces at the handle, seat and foot-stretchers of the rowing machine were recorded. Inter-segmental moments and forces were calculated using inverse dynamics and were compared across stroke rates using repeated measures ANOVA. Rowers exhibited increases in peak ankle and L5/S1 extensor moments, reductions in peak knee moments and no change in peak hip moments, with respect to stroke rate. Large shear and compressive forces were seen at L5/S1 and increased with stroke rate (P < 0.05). This coincided with increased levels of lumbar-pelvic flexion. High levels of lumbar-pelvic loading at higher stroke rates have implications with respect to injury and indicated that technique was declining, leading to increased lumbar-pelvic flexion. Such changes are not advantageous to performance and can potentially increase the risk of developing injuries. PMID:26090702

  8. Dynamic analysis method of offshore jack-up platforms in regular and random waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao; Li, Xiaoyu; Yang, Shuguang

    2012-03-01

    A jack-up platform, with its particular structure, showed obvious dynamic characteristics under complex environmental loads in extreme conditions. In this paper, taking a simplified 3-D finite element dynamic model in extreme storm conditions as research object, a transient dynamic analysis method was proposed, which was under both regular and irregular wave loads. The steps of dynamic analysis under extreme conditions were illustrated with an applied case, and the dynamic amplification factor (DAF) was calculated for each response parameter of base shear, overturning moment and hull sway. Finally, the structural response results of dynamic and static were compared and analyzed. The results indicated that the static strength analysis of the Jack-up Platforms was not enough under the dynamic loads including wave and current, further dynamic response analysis considering both computational efficiency and accuracy was necessary.

  9. Correlative Microscopy for 3D Structural Analysis of Dynamic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sangmi; Zhao, Gongpu; Ning, Jiying; Gibson, Gregory A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Zhang, Peijun

    2013-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) allows 3D visualization of cellular structures at molecular resolution in a close-to-physiological state1. However, direct visualization of individual viral complexes in their host cellular environment with cryoET is challenging2, due to the infrequent and dynamic nature of viral entry, particularly in the case of HIV-1. While time-lapse live-cell imaging has yielded a great deal of information about many aspects of the life cycle of HIV-13-7, the resolution afforded by live-cell microscopy is limited (~ 200 nm). Our work was aimed at developing a correlation method that permits direct visualization of early events of HIV-1 infection by combining live-cell fluorescent light microscopy, cryo-fluorescent microscopy, and cryoET. In this manner, live-cell and cryo-fluorescent signals can be used to accurately guide the sampling in cryoET. Furthermore, structural information obtained from cryoET can be complemented with the dynamic functional data gained through live-cell imaging of fluorescent labeled target. In this video article, we provide detailed methods and protocols for structural investigation of HIV-1 and host-cell interactions using 3D correlative high-speed live-cell imaging and high-resolution cryoET structural analysis. HeLa cells infected with HIV-1 particles were characterized first by confocal live-cell microscopy, and the region containing the same viral particle was then analyzed by cryo-electron tomography for 3D structural details. The correlation between two sets of imaging data, optical imaging and electron imaging, was achieved using a home-built cryo-fluorescence light microscopy stage. The approach detailed here will be valuable, not only for study of virus-host cell interactions, but also for broader applications in cell biology, such as cell signaling, membrane receptor trafficking, and many other dynamic cellular processes. PMID:23852318

  10. Criterion and incremental validity of the emotion regulation questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Christos A; Siegling, A B

    2015-01-01

    Although research on emotion regulation (ER) is developing, little attention has been paid to the predictive power of ER strategies beyond established constructs. The present study examined the incremental validity of the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ; Gross and John, 2003), which measures cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, over and above the Big Five personality factors. It also extended the evidence for the measure's criterion validity to yet unexamined criteria. A university student sample (N = 203) completed the ERQ, a measure of the Big Five, and relevant cognitive and emotion-laden criteria. Cognitive reappraisal predicted positive affect beyond personality, as well as experiential flexibility and constructive self-assertion beyond personality and affect. Expressive suppression explained incremental variance in negative affect beyond personality and in experiential flexibility beyond personality and general affect. No incremental effects were found for worry, social anxiety, rumination, reflection, and preventing negative emotions. Implications for the construct validity and utility of the ERQ are discussed. PMID:25814967

  11. A heuristic approach to incremental and reactive scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odubiyi, Jide B.; Zoch, David R.

    1989-01-01

    An heuristic approach to incremental and reactive scheduling is described. Incremental scheduling is the process of modifying an existing schedule if the initial schedule does not meet its stated initial goals. Reactive scheduling occurs in near real-time in response to changes in available resources or the occurrence of targets of opportunity. Only minor changes are made during both incremental and reactive scheduling because a goal of re-scheduling procedures is to minimally impact the schedule. The described heuristic search techniques, which are employed by the Request Oriented Scheduling Engine (ROSE), a prototype generic scheduler, efficiently approximate the cost of reaching a goal from a given state and effective mechanisms for controlling search.

  12. Criterion and incremental validity of the emotion regulation questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, Christos A.; Siegling, A. B.

    2015-01-01

    Although research on emotion regulation (ER) is developing, little attention has been paid to the predictive power of ER strategies beyond established constructs. The present study examined the incremental validity of the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ; Gross and John, 2003), which measures cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression, over and above the Big Five personality factors. It also extended the evidence for the measure's criterion validity to yet unexamined criteria. A university student sample (N = 203) completed the ERQ, a measure of the Big Five, and relevant cognitive and emotion-laden criteria. Cognitive reappraisal predicted positive affect beyond personality, as well as experiential flexibility and constructive self-assertion beyond personality and affect. Expressive suppression explained incremental variance in negative affect beyond personality and in experiential flexibility beyond personality and general affect. No incremental effects were found for worry, social anxiety, rumination, reflection, and preventing negative emotions. Implications for the construct validity and utility of the ERQ are discussed. PMID:25814967

  13. Incremental comprehension of spoken quantifier sentences: Evidence from brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Freunberger, Dominik; Nieuwland, Mante S

    2016-09-01

    Do people incrementally incorporate the meaning of quantifier expressions to understand an unfolding sentence? Most previous studies concluded that quantifiers do not immediately influence how a sentence is understood based on the observation that online N400-effects differed from offline plausibility judgments. Those studies, however, used serial visual presentation (SVP), which involves unnatural reading. In the current ERP-experiment, we presented spoken positive and negative quantifier sentences ("Practically all/practically no postmen prefer delivering mail, when the weather is good/bad during the day"). Different from results obtained in a previously reported SVP-study (Nieuwland, 2016) sentence truth-value N400 effects occurred in positive and negative quantifier sentences alike, reflecting fully incremental quantifier comprehension. This suggests that the prosodic information available during spoken language comprehension supports the generation of online predictions for upcoming words and that, at least for quantifier sentences, comprehension of spoken language may proceed more incrementally than comprehension during SVP reading. PMID:27346365

  14. Entropy-based incremental variational Bayes learning of Gaussian mixtures.

    PubMed

    Peñalver, Antonio; Escolano, Francisco

    2012-03-01

    Variational approaches to density estimation and pattern recognition using Gaussian mixture models can be used to learn the model and optimize its complexity simultaneously. In this brief, we develop an incremental entropy-based variational learning scheme that does not require any kind of initialization. The key element of the proposal is to exploit the incremental learning approach to perform model selection through efficient iteration over the variational Bayes optimization step in a way that the number of splits is minimized. The method starts with just one component and adds new components iteratively by splitting the worst fitted kernel in terms of evaluating its entropy. Our experimental results, on synthetic and real data sets show the effectiveness of the approach outperforming other state-of-the-art incremental component learners. PMID:24808558

  15. Making context explicit for explanation and incremental knowledge acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Brezillon, P.

    1996-12-31

    Intelligent systems may be improved by making context explicit in problem solving. This is a lesson drawn from a study of the reasons why a number of knowledge-based systems (KBSs) failed. We discuss the interest to make context explicit in explanation generation and incremental knowledge acquisition, two important aspects of intelligent systems that aim to cooperate with users. We show how context can be used to better explain and incrementally acquire knowledge. The advantages of using context in explanation and incremental knowledge acquisition are discussed through SEPIT, an expert system for supporting diagnosis and explanation through simulation of power plants. We point out how the limitations of such systems may be overcome by making context explicit.

  16. Dynamical analysis of galaxy cluster merger Abell 2146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J. A.; Canning, R. E. A.; King, L. J.; Lee, B. E.; Russell, H. R.; Baum, S. A.; Clowe, D. I.; Coleman, J. E.; Donahue, M.; Edge, A. C.; Fabian, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; McNamara, B. R.; O'Dea, C. P.; Sanders, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    We present a dynamical analysis of the merging galaxy cluster system Abell 2146 using spectroscopy obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph on the Gemini North telescope. As revealed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory, the system is undergoing a major merger and has a gas structure indicative of a recent first core passage. The system presents two large shock fronts, making it unique amongst these rare systems. The hot gas structure indicates that the merger axis must be close to the plane of the sky and that the two merging clusters are relatively close in mass, from the observation of two shock fronts. Using 63 spectroscopically determined cluster members, we apply various statistical tests to establish the presence of two distinct massive structures. With the caveat that the system has recently undergone a major merger, the virial mass estimate is M_vir= 8.5^{+4.3}_{-4.7} × 10^{14} M_{⊙} for the whole system, consistent with the mass determination in a previous study using the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich signal. The newly calculated redshift for the system is z = 0.2323. A two-body dynamical model gives an angle of 13°-19° between the merger axis and the plane of the sky, and a time-scale after first core passage of ≈0.24-0.28 Gyr.

  17. Dynamic analysis of multimesh-gear helicopter transmissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, Fred K.; Townsend, Dennis P.; Oswald, Fred B.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamic analysis of multimesh-gear helicopter transmission systems was performed by correlating analytical simulations with experimental investigations. The two computer programs used in this study, GRDYNMLT and PGT, were developed under NASA/Army sponsorship. Parametric studies of the numerical model with variations on mesh damping ratios, operating speeds, tip-relief tooth modifications, and tooth-spacing errors were performed to investigate the accuracy, application, and limitations of the two computer programs. Although similar levels of dynamic loading were predicted by both programs, the computer code GRDYNMLT was found to be superior and broader in scope. Results from analytical work were also compared with experimental data obtained from the U.S. Army's UH-60A Black Hawk 2240-kW (3000-hp) class, twin-engine helicopter transmission tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Good correlation in gear stresses was obtained between the analytical model simulated by GRDYNMLT and the experimental measurements. More realistic mesh damping can be predicted through experimental data correlation.

  18. Dynamical Analysis of bantam-Regulated Drosophila Circadian Rhythm Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Liu, Zengrong

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) interact with 3‧untranslated region (UTR) elements of target genes to regulate mRNA stability or translation, and play a crucial role in regulating many different biological processes. bantam, a conserved miRNA, is involved in several functions, such as regulating Drosophila growth and circadian rhythm. Recently, it has been discovered that bantam plays a crucial role in the core circadian pacemaker. In this paper, based on experimental observations, a detailed dynamical model of bantam-regulated circadian clock system is developed to show the post-transcriptional behaviors in the modulation of Drosophila circadian rhythm, in which the regulation of bantam is incorporated into a classical model. The dynamical behaviors of the model are consistent with the experimental observations, which shows that bantam is an important regulator of Drosophila circadian rhythm. The sensitivity analysis of parameters demonstrates that with the regulation of bantam the system is more sensitive to perturbations, indicating that bantam regulation makes it easier for the organism to modulate its period against the environmental perturbations. The effectiveness in rescuing locomotor activity rhythms of mutated flies shows that bantam is necessary for strong and sustained rhythms. In addition, the biological mechanisms of bantam regulation are analyzed, which may help us more clearly understand Drosophila circadian rhythm regulated by other miRNAs.

  19. Analysis of strawberry ripening by dynamic speckle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulone, C.; Budini, N.; Vincitorio, F. M.; Freyre, C.; López Díaz, A. J.; Ramil Rego, A.

    2013-11-01

    This work seeks to determine the age of a fruit from observation of its dynamic speckle pattern. A mobile speckle pattern originates on the fruit's surface due to the interference of the wavefronts reflected from moving scatterers. For this work we analyzed two series of photographs of a strawberry speckle pattern, at different stages of ripening, acquired with a CMOS camera. The first day, we took ten photographs at an interval of one second. The same procedure was repeated the next day. From each series of images we extracted several statistical descriptors of pixel-to-pixel gray level variation during the observation time. By comparing these values from the first to the second day we noticed a diminution of the speckle activity. This decay demonstrated that after only one day the ripening process of the strawberry can be detected by dynamic speckle pattern analysis. For this study we employed a simple new algorithm to process the data obtained from the photographs. This algorithm allows defining a global mobility index that indicates the evolution of the fruit's ripening.

  20. Nonlinear dynamical analysis for displaced orbits above a planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Xu, Shijie

    2008-12-01

    Nonlinear dynamical analysis and the control problem for a displaced orbit above a planet are discussed. It is indicated that there are two equilibria for the system, one hyperbolic (saddle) and one elliptic (center), except for the degenerate h {/z max}, a saddle-node bifurcation point. Motions near the equilibria for the nonresonance case are investigated by means of the Birkhoff normal form and dynamical system techniques. The Kolmogorov Arnold Moser (KAM) torus filled with quasiperiodic trajectories is measured in the τ 1 and τ 2 directions, and a rough algorithm for calculating τ 1 and τ 2 is proposed. A general iterative algorithm to generate periodic Lyapunov orbits is also presented. Transitions in the neck region are demonstrated, respectively, in the nonresonance, resonance, and degradation cases. One of the important contributions of the paper is to derive necessary and sufficiency conditions for stability of the motion near the equilibria. Another contribution is to demonstrate numerically that the critical KAM torus of nontransition is filled with the (1,1)-homoclinic orbits of the Lyapunov orbit.

  1. Dynamic analysis of the BMW tower in Munich

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indacochea-Beltran, Joaquin; Elgindy, Pearl; Lee, Elaine; Vignesh, Thiviya; Ansourian, Peter; Tahmasebinia, Faham; Marroquín, Fernando Alonso

    2016-08-01

    In the 1970s, world famous Austrian architect Karl Schwanzer designed an avant-garde suspended skyscraper for the new BMW headquarters. The BMW Tower was envisioned to resemble a four-cylinder motor and become a symbol for the recent flourishing success of BMW. Throughout its four decades, the BMW Tower has become the main architectural feature of modern Munich and a pride for one of the World leading car manufacturers. The structural design of the BMW Tower represented a major challenge to Germany's finest engineers because the suspended 99.5m-high structure had to whitstand not only static loading but large wind dynamic loading while having deflections within appropriate serviceability limits. Strand7 has been used to determine the stresses and deflections the structure is subjected to in order to analyse its behavior under static and dynamic loadings. Ultimately, this analysis helps to understand the nature of suspended structures in relation to the Eurocode building standards. Finally, thermal resistance has also been analysed using Strand7 to simulate a fire scenario and analyse the behaviour of the cable structure, which is the most critical building component.

  2. Analysis of protein dynamics in the pericellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrimgeour, Jan; Young, Dylan

    2015-03-01

    The pericellular matrix (PCM) is a low density, hydrated polymer coating that extends into the extracellular space from the surface of many living cells. The PCM controls access to cell and tissue surfaces, regulating a diverse set of processes from cell adhesion to protein transport and storage. The cell coat consists of a malleable backbone - the large polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) - with its structure, its material properties, and its bio-functionality tuned by a diverse set of HA binding proteins. These proteins add charge, cross-links and growth factor-like ligands into the brush. Dynamic interactions between the HA and its binding proteins can be observed using single particle tracking in a fluorescence microscope. The resulting single molecule trajectories can contain evidence of site hoping, with the proteins dynamically moving between different states of motion as they bind and unbind from the HA. Here, we present an evaluation of hidden Markov models for the analysis of such multi-mobility trajectories. Simulated trajectories are used to probe the limits of this approach for molecular trajectories of limited length and the results are used to inform the design of particle tracking experiments.

  3. Dynamic mechanical analysis of hydrogen purification substrates and membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinborn, Brandon

    Porous 420 stainless steel hydrogen purification substrates were fabricated using an ExOne R2 printer and sintered at temperatures of 1075 °C and 1100 °C for times ranging from 15 minutes to 240 minutes. Coatings of 1 micron silica beads, silica sol-gel, and palladium were applied to the sintered structure. Mechanical properties/degradation of each substrate/coating combination were evaluated using a cyclic 3-point loading condition imposed by a TA Q800 dynamic mechanical analysis unit (DMA). A constant deformation procedure was used while the required drive force for deformation and the elasticity (tan delta) were recorded throughout the cycle. Findings with respect to coating additions include: drive force increases with the addition of each coating, tan delta decreases with ceramic additions and increases with palladium addition (eventually decreases when membrane fails), and tan delta values become comparable with the addition of palladium regardless of other parameters. Findings with respect to sintering time and temperature include: drive force increases with increased sintering time and temperature, tan delta increases with increased sintering time at 1075 °C, and tan delta decreases with increased sintering time at 1100 °C. Overall, the palladium layer would likely remain intact in service due to actual force oscillations not being as extreme in service, poisoning would likely be the life limiting factor. Keywords: Sintering, dynamic mechanical properties, porous stainless steel, hydrogen purification, sol-gel.

  4. Dynamic Range Size Analysis of Territorial Animals: An Optimality Approach.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yun; Börger, Luca; Hastings, Alan

    2016-10-01

    Home range sizes of territorial animals are often observed to vary periodically in response to seasonal changes in foraging opportunities. Here we develop the first mechanistic model focused on the temporal dynamics of home range expansion and contraction in territorial animals. We demonstrate how simple movement principles can lead to a rich suite of range size dynamics, by balancing foraging activity with defensive requirements and incorporating optimal behavioral rules into mechanistic home range analysis. Our heuristic model predicts three general temporal patterns that have been observed in empirical studies across multiple taxa. First, a positive correlation between age and territory quality promotes shrinking home ranges over an individual's lifetime, with maximal range size variability shortly before the adult stage. Second, poor sensory information, low population density, and large resource heterogeneity may all independently facilitate range size instability. Finally, aggregation behavior toward forage-rich areas helps produce divergent home range responses between individuals from different age classes. This model has broad applications for addressing important unknowns in animal space use, with potential applications also in conservation and health management strategies. PMID:27622879

  5. Dynamical Systems Analysis of Fully 3D Ocean Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    Dynamical systems analysis of transport and stirring processes has been developed most thoroughly for 2D flow fields. The calculation of manifolds, turnstile lobes, transport barriers, etc. based on observations of the ocean is most often conducted near the sea surface, whereas analyses at depth, usually carried out with model output, is normally confined to constant-z surfaces. At the meoscale and larger, ocean flows are quasi 2D, but smaller scale (submesoscale) motions, including mixed layer phenomena with significant vertical velocity, may be predominantly 3D. The zoology of hyperbolic trajectories becomes richer in such cases and their attendant manifolds are much more difficult to calculate. I will describe some of the basic geometrical features and corresponding Lagrangian Coherent Features expected to arise in upper ocean fronts, eddies, and Langmuir circulations. Traditional GFD models such as the rotating can flow may capture the important generic features. The dynamical systems approach is most helpful when these features are coherent and persistent and the implications and difficulties for this requirement in fully 3D flows will also be discussed.

  6. Analysis methods for fast impurity ion dynamics data

    SciTech Connect

    Den Hartog, D.J.; Almagri, A.F.; Prager, S.C.; Fonck, R.J.

    1994-08-01

    A high resolution spectrometer has been developed and used on the MST reversed-field pinch (RFP) to measure passively impurity ion temperatures and flow velocities with 10 {mu}s temporal resolution. Such measurements of MHD-scale fluctuations are particularly relevant in the RFP because the flow velocity fluctuation induced transport of current (the ``MHD dynamo``) may produce the magnetic field reversal characteristic of an RFP. This instrument will also be used to measure rapid changes in the equilibrium flow velocity, such as occur during locking and H-mode transition. The precision of measurements made to date is <0.6 km/s. The authors are developing accurate analysis techniques appropriate to the reduction of this fast ion dynamics data. Moment analysis and curve-fitting routines have been evaluated for noise sensitivity and robustness. Also presented is an analysis method which correctly separates the flux-surface average of the correlated fluctuations in u and B from the fluctuations due to rigid shifts of the plasma column.

  7. Dynamic analysis of the human brain with complex cerebral sulci.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Jung-Ge; Huang, Bo-Wun; Ou, Yi-Wen; Yen, Ke-Tien; Wu, Yi-Te

    2016-07-01

    The brain is one of the most vulnerable organs inside the human body. Head accidents often appear in daily life and are easy to cause different level of brain damage inside the skull. Once the brain suffered intense locomotive impact, external injuries, falls, or other accidents, it will result in different degrees of concussion. This study employs finite element analysis to compare the dynamic characteristics between the geometric models of an assumed simple brain tissue and a brain tissue with complex cerebral sulci. It is aimed to understand the free vibration of the internal brain tissue and then to protect the brain from injury caused by external influences. Reverse engineering method is used for a Classic 5-Part Brain (C18) model produced by 3B Scientific Corporation. 3D optical scanner is employed to scan the human brain structure model with complex cerebral sulci and imported into 3D graphics software to construct a solid brain model to simulate the real complex brain tissue. Obtaining the normal mode analysis by inputting the material properties of the true human brain into finite element analysis software, and then to compare the simplified and the complex of brain models. PMID:27459595

  8. Dynamic analysis of Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    The dynamic response characteristics of the VAWT rotor are important factors governing the safety and fatique life of VAWT systems. The principal problems are the determination of critical rotor speeds (resonances) and the assessment of forced vibration response amplitudes. The solution to these problems is complicated by centrifugal and Coriolis effects which can have substantial influence on rotor resonant frequencies and mode shapes. This paper will describe and discuss the primary tools now in use at Sandia National Laboratories for rotor analysis. These tools include a lumped spring-mass model (VAWTDYN) and also finite-element based approaches. The discussion will center on the accuracy and completeness of current capabilities and plans for future research. As this paper is meant primarily to provide an overview, much of the detail is omitted and will be presented in a follow-on report.

  9. Dynamic analysis of Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine rotors

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic response characteristics of the VAWT rotor are important factors governing the safety and fatigue life of VAWT systems. The principal problems are the determination of critical rotor speeds (resonances) and the assessment of forced vibration response amplitudes. The solution to these problems is complicated by centrifugal and coriolis effects which can have substantial influence on rotor resonant frequencies and mode shapes. This paper will describe and discuss the primary tools now in use at Sandia National Laboratories for rotor analysis. These tools include a lumped springmass model (VAWTDYN) and also finite-element based approaches. The discussion will center on the accuracy and completeness of current capabilities and plans for future research.

  10. State machine analysis of sensor data from dynamic processes

    DOEpatents

    Cook, William R.; Brabson, John M.; Deland, Sharon M.

    2003-12-23

    A state machine model analyzes sensor data from dynamic processes at a facility to identify the actual processes that were performed at the facility during a period of interest for the purpose of remote facility inspection. An inspector can further input the expected operations into the state machine model and compare the expected, or declared, processes to the actual processes to identify undeclared processes at the facility. The state machine analysis enables the generation of knowledge about the state of the facility at all levels, from location of physical objects to complex operational concepts. Therefore, the state machine method and apparatus may benefit any agency or business with sensored facilities that stores or manipulates expensive, dangerous, or controlled materials or information.

  11. Dynamic dielectric analysis - A means for process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kranbuehl, D.; Delos, S.; Hoff, M.; Weller, L.

    1986-01-01

    The development of dynamic dielectric analysis techniques (as a 'smart' sensor for quantitative NDE) and of intelligent closed-loop cure systems is reported. The cure process of both BF3:R-catalyzed and uncatalyzed tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM)/diamine epoxy resins was studied. Measurements were made over a frequency range of six decades. The resin was monitored continuously throughout the cure process as it changed from a viscous liquid to a highly crosslinked solid. From the frequency dependence of the dielectric loss, the specific conductivity has been determined and shown to directly monitor the viscosity before the gel point is reached. Dielectric master plots of the cure process, analogous to time-temperature superposition plots for rheological data, have been developed.

  12. Effect of material uncertainties on dynamic analysis of piezoelectric fans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Swapnil; Yadav, Shubham Kumar; Mukherjee, Sujoy

    2015-04-01

    A piezofan is a resonant device that uses a piezoceramic material to induce oscillations in a cantilever beam. In this study, lumped-mass modelling is used to analyze a piezoelectric fan. Uncertainties are associated with the piezoelectric structures due to several reasons such as variation during manufacturing process, temperature, presence of adhesive layer between the piezoelectric actuator/sensor and the shim stock etc. Presence of uncertainty in the piezoelectric materials can influence the dynamic behavior of the piezoelectric fan such as natural frequency, tip deflection etc. Moreover, these quantities will also affect the performance parameters of the piezoelectric fan. Uncertainty analysis is performed using classical Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS). It is found that the propagation of uncertainty causes significant deviations from the baseline deterministic predictions, which also affect the achievable performance of the piezofan. The numerical results in this paper provide useful bounds on several performance parameters of the cooling fan and will enhance confidence in the design process.

  13. Modeling Illicit Drug Use Dynamics and Its Optimal Control Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The global burden of death and disability attributable to illicit drug use, remains a significant threat to public health for both developed and developing nations. This paper presents a new mathematical modeling framework to investigate the effects of illicit drug use in the community. In our model the transmission process is captured as a social “contact” process between the susceptible individuals and illicit drug users. We conduct both epidemic and endemic analysis, with a focus on the threshold dynamics characterized by the basic reproduction number. Using our model, we present illustrative numerical results with a case study in Cape Town, Gauteng, Mpumalanga and Durban communities of South Africa. In addition, the basic model is extended to incorporate time dependent intervention strategies. PMID:26819625

  14. A random rotor molecule: Vibrational analysis and molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Zhang, Rui-Qin; Shi, Xing-Qiang; Lin, Zijing; Van Hove, Michel A.

    2012-12-01

    Molecular structures that permit intramolecular rotational motion have the potential to function as molecular rotors. We have employed density functional theory and vibrational frequency analysis to study the characteristic structure and vibrational behavior of the molecule (4',4″″-(bicyclo[2,2,2]octane-1,4-diyldi-4,1-phenylene)-bis-2,2':6',2″-terpyridine. IR active vibrational modes were found that favor intramolecular rotation. To demonstrate the rotor behavior of the isolated single molecule, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations at various temperatures were carried out. This molecular rotor is expected to be thermally triggered via excitation of specific vibrational modes, which implies randomness in its direction of rotation.

  15. Development of test methodology for dynamic mechanical analysis instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, V. R.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical analysis instrumentation was used for the development of specific test methodology in the determination of engineering parameters of selected materials, esp. plastics and elastomers, over a broad range of temperature with selected environment. The methodology for routine procedures was established with specific attention given to sample geometry, sample size, and mounting techniques. The basic software of the duPont 1090 thermal analyzer was used for data reduction which simplify the theoretical interpretation. Clamps were developed which allowed 'relative' damping during the cure cycle to be measured for the fiber-glass supported resin. The correlation of fracture energy 'toughness' (or impact strength) with the low temperature (glassy) relaxation responses for a 'rubber-modified' epoxy system was negative in result because the low-temperature dispersion mode (-80 C) of the modifier coincided with that of the epoxy matrix, making quantitative comparison unrealistic.

  16. Sensitivity analysis for dynamic systems with time-lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Fathalla A.

    2003-02-01

    Many problems in bioscience for which observations are reported in the literature can be modelled by suitable functional differential equations incorporating time-lags (other terminology: delays) or memory effects, parameterized by scientifically meaningful constant parameters p or/and variable parameters (for example, control functions) u(t). It is often desirable to have information about the effect on the solution of the dynamic system of perturbing the initial data, control functions, time-lags and other parameters appearing in the model. The main purpose of this paper is to derive a general theory for sensitivity analysis of mathematical models that contain time-lags. In this paper, we use adjoint equations and direct methods to estimate the sensitivity functions when the parameters appearing in the model are not only constants but also variables of time. To illustrate the results, the methodology is applied numerically to an example of a delay differential model.

  17. Human pelvis loading rig for static and dynamic stress analysis.

    PubMed

    Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Bignardi, Cristina; Audenino, Alberto L

    2012-01-01

    This work is aimed at designing and constructing a loading rig for the synthetic hemi-pelvis; this system has been conceived with the goal of applying differently oriented articular forces in order to experimentally test the stress distribution and the stability of surgical reconstructions like, for example, hip arthroplasty or pelvic fixation. This device can be interfaced with a usual loading machine; it preserves the anatomy of the hemi-pelvis; it is simply constrained and it allows the simulation of all physiologic activities. Moreover, the visual accessibility of the peri-acetabular area has been guaranteed and this is imperative in order to be able to perform full-field analyses like a thermoelastic or photoelastic stress analysis. First experimental trials have shown a good repeatability of loading-unloading cycles (<1.2%), a low hysteresis (<2.4%) and a good dynamic behaviour (up to 10 Hz loading frequencies). PMID:22793862

  18. Analysis of utilization of desert habitats with dynamic simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of climate and herbivores on cool desert shrubs in north-western Utah were investigated with a dynamic simulation model. Cool desert shrublands are extensively managed as grazing lands, and are defoliated annually by domestic livestock. A primary production model was used to simulate harvest yields and shrub responses under a variety of climatic regimes and defoliation patterns. The model consists of six plant components, and it is based on equations of growth analysis. Plant responses were simulated under various combinations of 20 annual weather patterns and 14 defoliation strategies. Results of the simulations exhibit some unexpected linearities in model behavior, and emphasize the importance of both the pattern of climate and the level of plant vigor in determining optimal harvest strategies. Model behaviors are interpreted in terms of shrub morphology, physiology and ecology.

  19. An incremental community detection method for social tagging systems using locality-sensitive hashing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenyu; Zou, Ming

    2014-10-01

    An increasing number of users interact, collaborate, and share information through social networks. Unprecedented growth in social networks is generating a significant amount of unstructured social data. From such data, distilling communities where users have common interests and tracking variations of users' interests over time are important research tracks in fields such as opinion mining, trend prediction, and personalized services. However, these tasks are extremely difficult considering the highly dynamic characteristics of the data. Existing community detection methods are time consuming, making it difficult to process data in real time. In this paper, dynamic unstructured data is modeled as a stream. Tag assignments stream clustering (TASC), an incremental scalable community detection method, is proposed based on locality-sensitive hashing. Both tags and latent interactions among users are incorporated in the method. In our experiments, the social dynamic behaviors of users are first analyzed. The proposed TASC method is then compared with state-of-the-art clustering methods such as StreamKmeans and incremental k-clique; results indicate that TASC can detect communities more efficiently and effectively. PMID:24930583

  20. Factors for radical creativity, incremental creativity, and routine, noncreative performance.

    PubMed

    Madjar, Nora; Greenberg, Ellen; Chen, Zheng

    2011-07-01

    This study extends theory and research by differentiating between routine, noncreative performance and 2 distinct types of creativity: radical and incremental. We also use a sensemaking perspective to examine the interplay of social and personal factors that may influence a person's engagement in a certain level of creative action versus routine, noncreative work. Results demonstrate that willingness to take risks, resources for creativity, and career commitment are associated primarily with radical creativity; that the presence of creative coworkers and organizational identification are associated with incremental creativity; and that conformity and organizational identification are linked with routine performance. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed. PMID:21319879