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Sample records for independent case-control studies

  1. Consumption of groundwater as an independent risk factor of Salmonella choleraesuis infection: a case-control study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsung-Hsien; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Wan-Ching; Chen, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2009-12-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis (S. Choleraesuis) in humans can be considered as an endemic disease in certain regions of Taiwan, and the number of cases has increased in recent years. The goal of the case-control study discussed in this article was to identify the possible demographic and environmental risk factors associated with S. Choleraesuis infection in Taiwan. During the period of December 2005 to March 2007, the case-control study was conducted in human patients with Salmonella infection from two medical centers. Structured questionnaires were applied to collect information of relevant risk factors after interviewing 13 culture-confirmed S. Choleraesuis cases and 84 controls with other Salmonella serotype infection. After evaluation by univariate and multivariate statistical models, the results suggested that consumption of groundwater could be an independent risk factor associated with S. Choleraesuis in Taiwan. Therefore, appropriate health education needs to be conducted especially in areas where groundwater is used. PMID:20063610

  2. Joint and Independent Effects of Alcohol Drinking and Tobacco Smoking on Oral Cancer: A Large Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira Antunes, José Leopoldo; Toporcov, Tatiana Natasha; Biazevic, Maria Gabriela Haye; Boing, Antonio Fernando; Scully, Crispian; Petti, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking are assumed to have significant independent and joint effects on oral cancer (OC) development. This assumption is based on consistent reports from observational studies, which, however, overestimated the independent effects of smoking and drinking, because they did not account for the interaction effect in multivariable analyses. This case-control study sought to investigate the independent and the joint effects of smoking and drinking on OC in a homogeneous sample of adults. Case patients (N = 1,144) were affected by invasive oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma confirmed histologically, diagnosed between 1998 and 2008 in four hospitals of São Paulo (Brazil). Control patients (N = 1,661) were not affected by drinking-, smoking-associated diseases, cancers, upper aero-digestive tract diseases. Cumulative tobacco and alcohol consumptions were assessed anamnestically. Patients were categorized into never/ever users and never/level-1/level-2 users, according to the median consumption level in controls. The effects of smoking and drinking on OC adjusted for age, gender, schooling level were assessed using logistic regression analysis; Model-1 did not account for the smoking-drinking interaction; Model-2 accounted for this interaction and included the resultant interaction terms. The models were compared using the likelihood ratio test. According to Model-1, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for smoking, drinking, smoking-drinking were 3.50 (95% confidence interval –95CI, 2.76–4.44), 3.60 (95CI, 2.86–4.53), 12.60 (95CI, 7.89–20.13), respectively. According to Model-2 these figures were 1.41 (95CI, 1.02–1.96), 0.78 (95CI, 0.48–1.27), 8.16 (95CI, 2.09–31.78). Analogous results were obtained using three levels of exposure to smoking and drinking. Model-2 showed statistically significant better goodness-of-fit statistics than Model-1. Drinking was not independently associated with OC, while the independent

  3. Diabetes Is an Independent Risk Factor for Severe Nocturnal Hypoxemia in Obese Patients. A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lloberes, Patricia; Romero, Odile; Mesa, Jordi; Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity have become two of the main threats to public health in the Western world. In addition, obesity is the most important determinant of the sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (SAHS), a condition that adversely affects glucose metabolism. However, it is unknown whether patients with diabetes have more severe SAHS than non-diabetic subjects. The aim of this cross-sectional case-control study was to evaluate whether obese patients with T2DM are more prone to severe SAHS than obese non-diabetic subjects. Methodology/Principal Findings Thirty obese T2DM and 60 non-diabetic women closely matched by age, body mass index, waist circumference, and smoking status were recruited from the outpatient Obesity Unit of a university hospital. The exclusion criteria included chronic respiratory disease, smoking habit, neuromuscular and cerebrovascular disease, alcohol abuse, use of sedatives, and pregnancy. Examinations included a non-attended respiratory polygraphy, pulmonary function testing, and an awake arterial gasometry. Oxygen saturation measures included the percentage of time spent at saturations below 90% (CT90). A high prevalence of SAHS was found in both groups (T2DM:80%, nondiabetic:78.3%). No differences in the number of sleep apnea-hypopnea events between diabetic and non-diabetic patients were observed. However, in diabetic patients, a significantly increase in the CT90 was detected (20.2±30.2% vs. 6.8±13,5%; p = 0.027). In addition, residual volume (RV) was significantly higher in T2DM (percentage of predicted: 79.7±18.1 vs. 100.1±22.8; p<0.001). Multiple linear regression analyses showed that T2DM but not RV was independently associated with CT90. Conclusions/Significance T2DM adversely affects breathing during sleep, becoming an independent risk factor for severe nocturnal hypoxemia in obese patients. Given that SAHS is a risk factor of cardiovascular disease, the screening for SAHS in T2DM patients seems

  4. Nasopharyngeal Case-Control Study

    Cancer.gov

    A case-control study conducted in Taiwan between 1991-1994 among approximately 1,000 individuals to examine the role of viral, environmental, and genetic factors associated with the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  5. Smoking, earlier menarche and low parity as independent risk factors for gynecologic cancers in Japanese: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Megumi; Tase, Toru; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Hoshi, Shigeko; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Nagase, Satoru; Ito, Kiyoshi; Niikura, Hitoshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Minami, Yuko

    2008-12-01

    During recent decades, the incidence of gynecologic cancers, i.e., cancers of the cervix, endometrium and ovary, has increased in Japan. However, risk factors of gynecologic cancers have not been fully clarified in Japan. To investigate common and site-specific risk factors among gynecologic cancers, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study. The cases, i.e., 151 cervical, 103 endometrial and 141 ovarian cancer cases and the controls (n = 2016) were selected from female patients aged 30 and over, who were admitted to a single hospital in Miyagi Prefecture from 1997 to 2003. Information on reproductive factors, exogenous hormone use, and lifestyles including smoking was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Smoking was significantly associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer. A dose-response relationship with the number of cigarettes per day was also observed (p for trend = 0.004). Older age at menarche was associated with a decreased risk of endometrial and ovarian cancers. For these cancers, the decreased risk was detected with increasing parity number (endometrium, p for trend = 0.0001; ovary, p = 0.0002). There was no significant association between exogenous hormone use and gynecologic cancer risk. The results indicate that smoking is a major risk factor of cervical cancer. In addition, hormonal factors, which are related to early onset of menarche and low parity, are common risk factors for endometrial and ovarian cancers. The increase in female smokers and the decrease in fertility rate may contribute to the increase in gynecologic cancer incidence in Japan. PMID:19060444

  6. Association of inflammatory and other immune markers with gallbladder cancer: Results from two independent case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Koshiol, Jill; Castro, Felipe; Kemp, Troy J; Gao, Yu-Tang; Roa, Juan Carlos; Wang, Bingsheng; Nogueira, Leticia; Araya, Juan Carlos; Shen, Ming-Chang; Rashid, Asif; Hsing, Ann W; Hildesheim, Allan; Ferreccio, Catterina; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Pinto, Ligia A

    2016-07-01

    Most gallbladder cancer (GBC) cases arise in the context of gallstones, which cause inflammation, but few gallstone patients develop GBC. We explored inflammation/immune-related markers measured in bile and serum in GBC cases compared to gallstone patients to better understand how inflammatory patterns in these two conditions differ. We measured 65 immune-related markers in serum and bile from 41 GBC cases and 127 gallstone patients from Shanghai, China, and calculated age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for GBC versus gallstones. We then focused on the markers that were significantly elevated in bile and serum to replicate the findings in serum from 35 GBC cases and 31 gallstone controls from Chile. Comparing the highest versus lowest quantile, 15 markers (23%) were elevated in both serum and bile from GBC versus gallstone patients in the Shanghai study (p<0.05). The strongest OR was for CXCL8 (interleukin-8) in serum (96.8, 95% CI: 11.9-790.2). Of these 15 markers, 6 were also significantly elevated in serum from Chile (CCL20, C-reactive protein, CXCL8, CXCL10, resistin, serum amyloid A). Pooled ORs from Shanghai and Chile for these 6 markers ranged from 7.2 (95% CI: 2.8-18.4) for CXCL10 to 58.2 (95% CI: 12.4-273.0) for CXCL8. GBC is associated with inflammation above and beyond that generated by gallstones alone. This local inflammatory process is reflected systemically. Future longitudinal studies are needed to identify the key players in cancer development, which may guide translational efforts to identify individuals at high risk of developing GBC. PMID:27173614

  7. Designing case-control studies.

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, T

    1979-01-01

    Identification of confounding factors, evaluation of their influence on cause-effect associations, and the introduction of appropriate ways to account for these factors are important considerations in designing case-control studies. This paper presents designs useful for these purposes, after first providing a statistical definition of a confounding factor. Differences in the ability to identify and evaluate confounding factors and estimate disease risk between designs employing stratification (matching) and designs randomly sampling cases and controls are noted. Linear logistic models for the analysis of data from such designs are described and are shown to liberalize design requirements and to increase relative risk estimation efficiency. The methods are applied to data from a multiple factor investigation of lung cancer patients and controls. PMID:540588

  8. A case-control study of MC1R variants in Greek patients with basal cell carcinoma: increased risk independently of pigmentary characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dessinioti, Clio; Sypsa, Vana; Kypreou, Katerina; Dimisianos, Gerasimos; Kodela, Elisavet; Nikolaou, Vasiliki; Antoniou, Christina; Stratigos, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants are a major contributor to pigmentation characteristics and the modulation of sporadic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk. This is a hospital-based, case-control study to investigate the association of MC1R variants and pigmentary characteristics with the risk of BCC development in a Southern European population in Greece. In total, 141 patients with BCC and 166 controls were studied. Increased BCC risk was found for the presence of 2 or more MC1R variants (OR:3.07, 95% CI:1.13-8.34), or 2 or more variants of which at least 1 was major function (OR:7.15, 95% CI:1.37-5.52), after adjustment for the 'red hair colour' (RHC) phenotype. Increased BCC risk persisted in the presence of 2 or more MC1R variants (OR:4.15, 95% CI:1.35-12.72), after adjustment for potential confounding factors including skin color (P:0.237) and atypical nevi (OR:9.57, 95% CI:2.19-41.81, P:0.003). MC1R genotype is a risk factor for the development of BCC in Greek patients independently of pigmentary characteristics, and the combination of MC1R variants may modulate this risk. PMID:25809071

  9. Serum concentration of magnesium as an independent risk factor in migraine attacks: a matched case-control study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Assarzadegan, Farhad; Asgarzadeh, Setareh; Hatamabadi, Hamid R; Shahrami, Ali; Tabatabaey, Ali; Asgarzadeh, Morteza

    2016-09-01

    There is controversy over the role of magnesium in the etiology of migraine headaches. We aimed to evaluate and compare serum levels of magnesium between healthy individuals and those with migraine headaches during migraine attacks and between attacks to evaluate the role of magnesium in the etiology of migraine headaches. Forty patients with migraine headaches and 40 healthy individuals were enrolled in this matched case-control study. Malnutrition, digestive system disorders, history of smoking, drug abuse, and history of medications use were recorded at baseline. The pain scores of patients were measured and recorded based on a 10 cm visual analog scale. Subsequently, blood samples were collected at 8-10 in the morning to determine serum levels of magnesium. Analysis of variance, χ-test, and conditional logistic regression were used for data analysis. There were no significant differences in demographic data between the two groups. There were significant differences in magnesium serum levels between the three groups (1.09±0.2 mg/dl during migraine headaches; 1.95±0.3 mg/dl between the attacks; and 1.3±0.4 mh/dl in the control group; P<0.0001). Odds of acute migraine headaches increased 35.3 times (odds ratio=35.3; 95% confidence interval: 12.4-95.2; P=0.001) when serum levels of magnesium reached below the normal level. The odds in patients who are not in the acute attack phase were 6.9 folds higher (odds ratio=6.9; 95% confidence interval: 1.3-2.1; P=0.02). The serum level of magnesium is an independent factor for migraine headaches and patients with migraine have lower serum levels of magnesium during the migraine attacks and between the attacks compared with healthy individuals. PMID:27140442

  10. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  11. [Research progress on case-control study].

    PubMed

    Zhang, F F; Liu, Z D; Zhang, C X; Jiang, B F

    2016-04-10

    Several new varients related to the case-control designs have been developed in the recent decades, and this article briefly summarized four new designs: two-stage design, case-specular study, exposure-crossover study and case-case-time-control study. This paper involved principles of study design, requisites for application, advantages and disadvantages on all the studies. PMID:27087230

  12. C-reactive protein gene variants associated with recurrent pregnancy loss independent of CRP serum levels: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salma K; Mahmood, Naeema; Malalla, Zainab H; Alsobyani, Fanar M; Al-Kiyumi, Israa S; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2015-09-10

    The aim of this study is to investigate the association of recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) with altered C-reactive protein (CRP) serum levels, and genetic variation in CRP gene. This was a retrospective case-control study, involving 275 women with three or more consecutive pregnancy losses, and 290 age-matched control women, who were recruited from outpatient obstetrics/gynecology clinics. CRP serum levels (hs-CRP) were determined by latex-enhanced nephelometry, and CRP genotyping was done by allelic discrimination. Mean serum CRP levels were higher in RPL cases than in control women, and carriage of the (minor) T allele of rs2794520 was associated with significant increase in CRP levels (P=0.017). Minor allele frequency (MAF) of rs7553007 was significantly different between RPL cases and control women, and was associated with reduced risk of RPL after adjusting for BMI and menarche. There was a significant enrichment of minor allele-carrying genotypes of rs1130864 and rs1417938 SNPs, and reduced frequency of minor allele-carrying genotypes of rs876537, rs2794520, and rs7553007 in RPL cases, thus assigning RPL-susceptible and -protective nature to these genotypes, respectively. Carriage of (minor) T allele of only rs2794520 was associated with significant increase in CRP levels. CRP variants that influenced circulating CRP levels in chronic inflammatory conditions are also associated with RPL, pointing to CRP as RPL candidate gene. PMID:26013044

  13. Association Between TAS2R38 Gene Polymorphisms and Colorectal Cancer Risk: A Case-Control Study in Two Independent Populations of Caucasian Origin

    PubMed Central

    Carrai, Maura; Steinke, Verena; Vodicka, Pavel; Pardini, Barbara; Rahner, Nils; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Schackert, Hans K.; Görgens, Heike; Stemmler, Susanne; Betz, Beate; Kloor, Matthias; Engel, Christoph; Büttner, Reinhard; Naccarati, Alessio; Vodickova, Ludmila; Novotny, Jan; Stein, Angelika; Hemminki, Kari; Propping, Peter; Försti, Asta; Canzian, Federico; Barale, Roberto; Campa, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    Molecular sensing in the lingual mucosa and in the gastro-intestinal tract play a role in the detection of ingested harmful drugs and toxins. Therefore, genetic polymorphisms affecting the capability of initiating these responses may be critical for the subsequent efficiency of avoiding and/or eliminating possible threats to the organism. By using a tagging approach in the region of Taste Receptor 2R38 (TAS2R38) gene, we investigated all the common genetic variation of this gene region in relation to colorectal cancer risk with a case-control study in a German population (709 controls and 602 cases) and in a Czech population (623 controls and 601 cases). We found that there were no significant associations between individual SNPs of the TAS2R38 gene and colorectal cancer in the Czech or in the German population, nor in the joint analysis. However, when we analyzed the diplotypes and the phenotypes we found that the non-taster group had an increased risk of colorectal cancer in comparison to the taster group. This association was borderline significant in the Czech population, (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 0.99–1.67; Pvalue = 0.058) and statistically significant in the German population (OR = 1.36, 95% CI 1.06–1.75; Pvalue = 0.016) and in the joint analysis (OR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.12–1.61; Pvalue = 0.001). In conclusion, we found a suggestive association between the human bitter tasting phenotype and the risk of CRC in two different populations of Caucasian origin. PMID:21674048

  14. Previous gestational diabetes is independently associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness, similarly to metabolic syndrome – a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) face a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and, consequently, a higher cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to compare the carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) from young women with pGDM to those with metabolic syndrome (MS) and to healthy controls (CG) to verify whether a past history of pGDM could be independently associated with increased cIMT. Methods This is a cross-sectional study performed in two academic referral centers. Seventy-nine women with pGDM, 30 women with MS, and 60 CG aged between 18 and 47 years were enrolled. They all underwent physical examination and had blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), and triglycerides determined. The cIMT was measured by ultrasound in several carotid segments. The primary endpoint was cIMT and clinically relevant parameters included as predictors were: age, systolic blood pressure, waist, BMI, total cholesterol, LDLc, triglycerides, fasting glucose, previous history of GDM as a whole group, previous history of GDM without MS, presence of DM, presence of MS, and parity. Results cIMT was significantly higher in pGDM when compared to CG in all sites of measurements (P < 0.05) except for the right common carotid. The pGDM women showed similar cIMT measurements to MS in all sites of measurements, except for the left carotid bifurcation, where it was significantly higher than MS (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis which included classical cardiovascular risk factors and was adjusted for confounders, pGDM was shown to be independently associated with increased composite cIMT (P < 0.01). The pGDM without risk factors further showed similar cIMT to MS (P > 0.05) and an increased cIMT when compared to controls (P < 0.05). Conclusions Previous GDM was independently associated with increased composite cIMT in this young population, similarly to those with

  15. Association of interleukin-1 family cytokines single nucleotide polymorphisms with susceptibility to systemic sclerosis: an independent case-control study and a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lei; Wu, Guo-Cui; Wang, Yu-Jie; Yang, Xiao-Ke; Yang, Guo-Jun; Tao, Jin-Hui; Duan, Yu; Yan, Jun-Wei; Li, Xiang-Pei; Ye, Dong-Qing; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the association of five single nucleotide polymorphisms in interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene with susceptibility to systemic sclerosis (SSc) in a Chinese population. A total of 58 SSc patients and 113 healthy controls were enrolled. TaqMan allele discrimination assay was performed to detect the genotyping of IL-1A -889C/T (rs1800587), IL-1B -511C/T (rs16944), IL-18 -607C/A (rs1946518), IL-18 -137G/C (rs187238) and IL-33 rs7044343. The association between these SNPs and SSc risk was analyzed. Furthermore, a meta-analysis of relevant studies on the association of IL-1A -889C/T (rs1800587) and IL-1B -511C/T (rs16944) with the susceptibility to SSc was performed. Through the genotyping, significant associations for SSc were found for: IL-1A -889C/T genotype frequencies (P = 0.000), dominant model (P = 0.000), recessive model (P = 0.001) and allele T frequency (P = 0.000). Among SSc patients, dyspnea was significantly associated with IL-18 -607C/A genotype frequency and IL-33 rs7044343 allele frequency (P = 0.037, P = 0.042, respectively). In addition, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate was significantly associated with IL-18 -137G/C (rs187238) genotype and allele frequency (P = 0.019, P = 0.006, respectively). While meta-analysis showed there was no significant association between IL-1A -889C/T polymorphism and SSc, for IL-1B -511C/T (rs16944), significant associations were found in the comparison of allele C versus T (OR 1.267, 95 % CI 1.016-1.580) by combined different outcomes. Results showed that IL-1A -889C/T (rs1800587) was associated with SSc susceptibility in the Chinese population. However, this association was not supported by a meta-analysis of all relevant studies. Further investigations are required to verify our findings. PMID:27098064

  16. Cortical Grey Matter and Subcortical White Matter Brain Microstructural Changes in Schizophrenia Are Localised and Age Independent: A Case-Control Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Piras, Fabrizio; Piras, Federica; Fagioli, Sabrina; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    It is still unknown whether the structural brain impairments that characterize schizophrenia (SZ) worsen during the lifetime. Here, we aimed to describe age-related microstructural brain changes in cortical grey matter and subcortical white matter of patients affected by SZ. In this diffusion tensor imaging study, we included 69 patients diagnosed with SZ and 69 healthy control (HC) subjects, age and gender matched. We carried out analyses of covariance, with diagnosis as fixed factor and brain diffusion-related parameters as dependent variables, and controlled for the effect of education. White matter fractional anisotropy decreased in the entire age range spanned (18–65 years) in both SZ and HC and was significantly lower in younger patients with SZ, with no interaction (age by diagnosis) effect in fiber tracts including corpus callosum, corona radiata, thalamic radiations and external capsule. Also, grey matter mean diffusivity increased in the entire age range in both SZ and HC and was significantly higher in younger patients, with no age by diagnosis interaction in the left frontal operculum cortex, left insula and left planum polare and in the right temporal pole and right intracalcarine cortex. In individuals with SZ we found that localized brain cortical and white matter subcortical microstructural impairments appear early in life but do not worsen in the 18–65 year age range. PMID:24124469

  17. Case-control study of statin prevention of mould infections.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jessica N; Huycke, Mark M; Greenfield, Ronald A; Kurdgelashvili, George; Gentry, Chris A

    2011-09-01

    Invasive mould infections (IMI) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In vitro studies have demonstrated that hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) have activity against several pathogenic moulds including Zygomycetes and Aspergillus spp. The aim of our study was to determine if statin use is a preventive factor for the development of IMI. This was a retrospective case-control study of 10 United States Veterans Affairs Medical Centers that comprise the Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) 16. Cases with IMI and controls were identified from 2001 to 2008. Controls were matched by age, facility, history of transplantation, presence of chronic steroid use and presence of human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV). Two hundred and thirty-eight patients were included. Independent variables associated with the development of IMI were history of solid malignant tumours (OR 2.63, 1.41-4.87) and hypertension (OR 2.29, 1.13-4.68). Statin use within 3 months of index date was not an independent variable for prevention or development of IMI. No level of exposure to a statin drug appeared to influence the development of infection. This retrospective case-control study suggests that despite evidence of in vitro activity, statins may not decrease risk of IMI. Prospective, controlled trials may be necessary to investigate any potential clinical benefit. PMID:21554419

  18. Atrial Fibrillation on Intensive Care Unit Admission Independently Increases the Risk of Weaning Failure in Nonheart Failure Mechanically Ventilated Patients in a Medical Intensive Care Unit: A Retrospective Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yen-Han; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Tseng, Yen-Chiang; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-05-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most frequent arrhythmias in clinical practice. Previous studies have reported the influence of AF on patients with heart failure (HF). The effect of AF on the non-HF critically ill patients in a medical intensive care unit (ICU) remains largely unclear. The study aimed to investigate the impact of AF presenting on ICU admission on the weaning outcome of non-HF mechanically ventilated patients in a medical ICU.A retrospective observational case-control study was conducted over a 1-year period in a medical ICU at Taipei Veterans General Hospital, a tertiary medical center in north Taiwan. Non-HF mechanically ventilated patients who were successful in their spontaneous breathing trial and underwent ventilator discontinuation were enrolled. The primary outcome measure was the ventilator status after the first episode of ventilator discontinuation.A total of 285 non-HF patients enrolled were divided into AF (n = 62) and non-AF (n = 223) groups. Compared with the non-AF patients, the AF patients were significantly associated with old age (P = 0.002), a higher rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome causing respiratory failure (P = 0.015), a higher percentage of sepsis before liberation from mechanical ventilation (MV) (P = 0.004), and a higher serum level of blood urea nitrogen on the day of liberation from MV (P = 0.003). Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that AF independently increased the risk of weaning failure [adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 3.268; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.254-8.517; P = 0.015]. Furthermore, the AF patients were found to be independently associated with a high rate of ventilator dependence (log rank test, P = 0.026), prolonged total ventilator use (AOR, 1.979; 95% CI, 1.032-3.794; P = 0.040), increased length of ICU stay (AOR, 2.256; 95% CI, 1.049-4.849; P = 0.037), increased length of hospital stay (AOR, 2.921; 95% CI, 1.363-6.260; P = 0

  19. Temporomandibular disorders. A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.; Sanchis, Jose M.; Carbonell, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the risk factors and clinical manifestations of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) diagnosed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (axis I) versus an age and gender matched control group. Study Design: A total of 162 patients explored according to the RDC/TMD (mean age 40.6±18.8 years, range 7-90; 11.1% males and 88.9% females) were compared with 119 controls, measuring differences in TMD risk factors (sleep disturbances, stress, psychoactive medication, parafunctions, loss of posterior support, ligament hyperlaxity) and clinical variables (joint sounds, painful muscle and joint palpation, maximum aperture). Results: Myofascial pain (MFP) (single or multiple diagnoses) was the most frequent diagnosis (42%). The most common diagnostic combination was MFP plus arthralgia (16.0%). Statistically significant differences were observed in clenching (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1.4-3.8) and in maximum active aperture (MAA) on comparing the two groups both globally (TMD vs. controls) (patients 36.7±8.6 mm, controls 43.1±5.8 mm; F=45.41, p = 0.000) and on comparing according to diagnostic categories. MFP explained most of the observed differences in the risk factors: stress perception (OR=1.98;I.C.:1.01-3.89), psychoactive medication (OR=2.21; I.C.:1.12-4.37), parafunctions (OR=2.14;I.C.:1.12-4.11), and ligament laxity (OR=2.6;I.C.:1.01-6.68). Joint sounds were more frequent in patients with MFP (39.7% vs. 24.0%; χ2=4.66; p=0.03), and painful joint palpation was more common in patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR)(15.9% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 5.2; p = 0.02) and osteoarthrosis (20.8% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 7.0; p = 0.008). Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMDs in the general population. Significant differences are observed in clenching and MAA between patients and controls considered both globally and for each diagnostic category individually. The analyzed risk

  20. Risk Factors for Pancreatic Cancer: Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Manal M.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Wolff, Robert A.; Abbruzzese, James L.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas; Pisters, Peter W.; Evans, Douglas B.; Khan, Rabia; Chou, Ta-Hsu; Lenzi, Renato; Jiao, Li; Li, Donghui

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Although cigarette smoking is the most well-established environmental risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the interaction between smoking and other risk factors has not been assessed. We evaluated the independent effects of multiple risk factors for pancreatic cancer and determined whether the magnitude of cigarette smoking was modified by other risk factors in men and women. METHODS We conducted a hospital-based case-control study involving 808 patients with pathologically diagnosed pancreatic cancer and 808 healthy frequency-matched controls. Information on risk factors was collected by personal interview, and unconditional logistic regression was used to determine adjusted odds ratios (AORs) by the maximum-likelihood method. RESULTS Cigarette smoking, family history of pancreatic cancer, heavy alcohol consumption (>60 mL ethanol/day), diabetes mellitus, and history of pancreatitis were significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We found synergistic interactions between cigarette smoking and family history of pancreatic cancer (AOR 12.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6–108.9) and diabetes mellitus (AOR 9.3, 95% CI 2.0–44.1) in women, according to an additive model. Approximately 23%, 9%, 3%, and 5% of pancreatic cancer cases in this study were related to cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, heavy alcohol consumption, and family history of pancreatic cancer, respectively. CONCLUSIONS The significant synergy between these risk factors suggests a common pathway for carcinogenesis of the pancreas. Determining the underlying mechanisms for such synergies may lead to the development of pancreatic cancer prevention strategies for high-risk individuals. PMID:17764494

  1. Methodology Series Module 2: Case-control Studies.

    PubMed

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Case-Control study design is a type of observational study. In this design, participants are selected for the study based on their outcome status. Thus, some participants have the outcome of interest (referred to as cases), whereas others do not have the outcome of interest (referred to as controls). The investigator then assesses the exposure in both these groups. The investigator should define the cases as specifically as possible. Sometimes, definition of a disease may be based on multiple criteria; thus, all these points should be explicitly stated in case definition. An important aspect of selecting a control is that they should be from the same 'study base' as that of the cases. We can select controls from a variety of groups. Some of them are: General population; relatives or friends; and hospital patients. Matching is often used in case-control control studies to ensure that the cases and controls are similar in certain characteristics, and it is a useful technique to increase the efficiency of the study. Case-Control studies can usually be conducted relatively faster and are inexpensive - particularly when compared with cohort studies (prospective). It is useful to study rare outcomes and outcomes with long latent periods. This design is not very useful to study rare exposures. Furthermore, they may also be prone to certain biases - selection bias and recall bias. PMID:27057012

  2. Methodology Series Module 2: Case-control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Case-Control study design is a type of observational study. In this design, participants are selected for the study based on their outcome status. Thus, some participants have the outcome of interest (referred to as cases), whereas others do not have the outcome of interest (referred to as controls). The investigator then assesses the exposure in both these groups. The investigator should define the cases as specifically as possible. Sometimes, definition of a disease may be based on multiple criteria; thus, all these points should be explicitly stated in case definition. An important aspect of selecting a control is that they should be from the same ‘study base’ as that of the cases. We can select controls from a variety of groups. Some of them are: General population; relatives or friends; and hospital patients. Matching is often used in case-control control studies to ensure that the cases and controls are similar in certain characteristics, and it is a useful technique to increase the efficiency of the study. Case-Control studies can usually be conducted relatively faster and are inexpensive – particularly when compared with cohort studies (prospective). It is useful to study rare outcomes and outcomes with long latent periods. This design is not very useful to study rare exposures. Furthermore, they may also be prone to certain biases – selection bias and recall bias. PMID:27057012

  3. Case-control study on analgesics and nephropathy (SAN): protocol

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Garbe, Edeltraut; Lewis, Michael; van der Woude, Fokko; Graf, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Background The association between intake of non-phenacetin-containing analgesics and the occurrence of chronic renal failure is still controversially discussed. A new epidemiologic study was planned and conducted in Germany and Austria. Methods/design The objective of the international, multicenter case-control study was to evaluate the association between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and use of non-phenacetin-containing analgesics with particular emphasis on combined formulations. A targeted sample of 1000 new (incident) dialysis patients, aged less than 50 years, was planned to recruit between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2004. The age limit was chosen to avoid contamination of the study population with phenacetin-containing analgesics to the extent possible. Four control subjects per ESRD case, matched by age, sex, and region were selected from the population living in the region the case came from. Lifetime exposure to analgesics and potential renal risk factors were recorded in a single face-to-face interview. A set of aids was introduced to reinforce the memory of study participants. A standardized, pre-tested interview questionnaire (participants), a medical documentation sheet (physicians in dialysis centres), a logbook for all activities (dialysis centres) were used to collect the necessary data. Quality management consisted of the standardized procedures, (re-) training and supervision of interviewers, regular checks of all incoming data for completeness and plausibility. The study is scientifically independent and governed by a international Scientific Advisory Committee that bridged the gap between the sponsoring companies and the investigators. Also other advisory groups assisted the managing committee of the study. All relevant German and Austrian nephrological associations supported the study, and the study design was carefully reviewed and approved by the Kidney Foundation of Germany. Discussion The study is expected to answer the main

  4. On combining family and case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Pee, David; Landi, Maria T

    2008-11-01

    Studies to detect genetic association with disease can be family-based, often using families with multiple affected members, or population based, as in population-based case-control studies. If data on both study types are available from the same population, it is useful to combine them to improve power to detect genetic associations. Two aspects of the data need to be accommodated, the sampling scheme and potential residual correlations among family members. We propose two approaches for combining data from a case-control study and a family study that collected families with multiple cases. In the first approach, we view a family as the sampling unit and specify the joint likelihood for the family members using a two-level mixed effects model to account for random familial effects and for residual genetic correlations among family members. The ascertainment of the families is accommodated by conditioning on the ascertainment event. The individuals in the case-control study are treated as families of size one, and their unconditional likelihood is combined with the conditional likelihood for the families. This approach yields subject specific maximum likelihood estimates of covariate effects. In the second approach, we view an individual as the sampling unit. The sampling scheme is accommodated using two-phase sampling techniques, marginal covariate effects are estimated, and correlations among family members are accounted for in the variance calculations. The models are compared in simulations. Data from a case-control and a family study from north-eastern Italy on melanoma and a low-risk melanoma-susceptibility gene, MC1R, are used to illustrate the approaches. PMID:18454494

  5. [Orthostatic hypotension in elderly: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Krypciak, Sébastien; Liuu, Evelyne; Minard, Aurélien; Obraztsova, Anastasia; Paillaud, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is common in the elderly and is often associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Compression bandages are recommended as a first-line treatment but there is little evidence of their efficacy in literature. A case-control study involving 52 patients was carried out to test the efficacy of the bandages. In the group with orthostatic hypotension, compression improved the symptoms without correcting the blood pressure readings. PMID:26805647

  6. Case-control study of waterborne giardiasis in Reno, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Navin, T R; Juranek, D D; Ford, M; Minedew, D J; Lippy, E C; Pollard, R A

    1985-08-01

    An outbreak of Giardia lamblia gastroenteritis occurred in Reno, Nevada, in 1982, during which 324 laboratory-confirmed infections were reported. During the outbreak, Reno was supplied in part by surface water that was chemically coagulated, settled, and chlorinated, but was not filtered. Giardia cysts were recovered from the water supply, and a beaver infected with Giardia was found in one of the reservoirs. A case-control study indicated that, during the outbreak but not afterwards, persons with giardiasis drank more municipal water than did controls. Corrective measures, which included removing the infected beaver and increasing the chlorine concentration, were followed by a rapid decrease in reports of giardiasis. PMID:4014209

  7. Dose-response in case-control studies.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, G

    1980-01-01

    The evidence provided by a case-control study on the association between a disease and some factor is strengthened if the extent of exposure to the factor is categorised into several groups or measured on a continuous scale. Then dose-response relationships can be estimated. The methods available are illustrated by application to data on lung cancer and chrysotile asbestos exposure from Quebec in which there were three matched controls for each case. Regression-type models were fitted assuming that the relative risk of lung cancer was linearly related to an exposure measure; a covariate, smoking, was also included in the analysis. The data were first analysed ignoring the matching and secondly taking account of the matching. The methodology for the latter analysis has only recently been developed; formerly, matched studies were of necessity analysed as unmatched. Although, in this particular example, the unmatched and matched analyses gave similar results, this is not always the case and it is argued that, now that the methodology is available, matched case-control studies should be analysed taking proper account of the matching. PMID:7441145

  8. Cancer and polluted work places: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kjuus, H; Lislerud, A; Lyngdal, P T; Omland, H; Stave, O; Langård, S

    1982-02-01

    The possible association between selected cancers and polluted work places has been studied in a hospital-based, case-control study. By dividing all jobs in the participants working career into "polluted" and "clean", a crude measure for the total industrial exposure a worker experiences throughout his life was established. Among 103 age-matched, case-control pairs the overall estimated relative risk (RR) for exposed subjects (greater than or equal to 10 years in a polluted work place) of developing cancer compared to nonexposed (less than 10 years in a polluted work place) was 1.1. The only subgroup where a significant difference was found between the cases and the controls was the lung cancer subgroup (RR = 4.0, p = 0.02, two-tailed). When the 30 lung cancer cases were compared to an alternative control group consisting of 60 subjects matched for age and smoking habits, an estimated RR of 4.5 was found. A moderate, but not significant association between lung cancer and definite asbestos exposure was also found (RR: 2.3). As most workers are exposed to a variety of industrial agents throughout their working careers, further development of methods for characterizing combined exposures are needed, both for retrospective and prospective purposes. PMID:7068240

  9. A case-control study of risk factors for death from 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1): is American Indian racial status an independent risk factor?

    PubMed

    Hennessy, T W; Bruden, D; Castrodale, L; Komatsu, K; Erhart, L M; Thompson, D; Bradley, K; O'Leary, D R; McLaughlin, J; Landen, M

    2016-01-01

    Historically, American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations have suffered excess morbidity and mortality from influenza. We investigated the risk factors for death from 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in persons residing in five states with substantial AI/AN populations. We conducted a case-control investigation using pandemic influenza fatalities from 2009 in Alaska, Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Wyoming. Controls were outpatients with influenza. We reviewed medical records and interviewed case proxies and controls. We used multiple imputation to predict missing data and multivariable conditional logistic regression to determine risk factors. We included 145 fatal cases and 236 controls; 22% of cases were AI/AN. Risk factors (P 45 years vs. <18 years], pre-existing medical conditions (mOR 7·1), smoking (mOR 3·0), delayed receipt of antivirals (mOR 6·5), and barriers to healthcare access (mOR 5·3). AI/AN race was not significantly associated with death. The increased influenza mortality in AI/AN individuals was due to factors other than racial status. Prevention of influenza deaths should focus on modifiable factors (smoking, early antiviral use, access to care) and identifying high-risk persons for immunization and prompt medical attention. PMID:26118767

  10. Cause of Emergency Department Mortality; a Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Hossein; Bidarizerehpoosh, Farahnaz; Mirmohammadi, Farzaneh; Shahrami, Ali; Heidari, Kamran; Sabzghabaie, Anita; Keikha, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Based on previous studies, cardiovascular diseases, traffic accidents, traumas and cancers are the most important etiology of mortalities in emergency departments (ED). However, contradictory findings have been reported in relation to mortality in emergency departments. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the role of clinical factors in mortality among patients referring to an emergency department in a third-level hospital in Tehran, Iran. Methods: In the present case-control study, all the patients over 18 years of age were evaluated, referring to the ED of Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from the beginning of 2009 to the end of 2010. The patients died in the ED were placed in the case group and those discharged or hospitalized in other hospital wards in the control group. Demographic data, background diseases, and the final diagnoses were recorded. Chi-squared test, multivariate logistic regression, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient were used to evaluate the relationship between the variables mentioned above and patient mortality. Results: 2907 patients (969 (59.9% male) in the case and 1938 (62.2% male) in the control groups) were evaluated. Cardiovascular diseases (39.2%), severe traumas (18.5%), and cerebrovascular accidents (17.7%) were the most frequent etiology of patient mortality in ED. Multivariate regression analysis showed that presentation with cardiovascular complaints (OR=7.3; 95% CI: 3.5-16.1; p<0.001), a history of hypertension (OR=5.4; 95% CI: 1.2-12.3; p<0.001), severe trauma (OR=4.6; 95% CI: 2.0-13.2; p<0.001), age over 60 (OR=3.8; 95% CI: 1.8-7.8; p<0.01) and a final diagnosis of renal disease (OR=3.4; 95% CI: 2.1-6.4; p<0.001) were factors that increased the odds of mortality in patients referring to the ED. Multivariate regression analysis in patients over 60 years showed that sepsis was an independent factor increasing the risk of death (OR=2.9; 95% CI: 1.3-5.9; p=0.009). A patient’s risk of

  11. Bayesian adjustment for exposure misclassification in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Chu, Rong; Gustafson, Paul; Le, Nhu

    2010-04-30

    Poor measurement of explanatory variables occurs frequently in observational studies. Error-prone observations may lead to biased estimation and loss of power in detecting the impact of explanatory variables on the response. We consider misclassified binary exposure in the context of case-control studies, assuming the availability of validation data to inform the magnitude of the misclassification. A Bayesian adjustment to correct the misclassification is investigated. Simulation studies show that the Bayesian method can have advantages over non-Bayesian counterparts, particularly in the face of a rare exposure, small validation sample sizes, and uncertainty about whether exposure misclassification is differential or non-differential. The method is illustrated via application to several real studies. PMID:20087839

  12. Case-control association studies with matching and genomic controlling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Chung

    2004-07-01

    Family-based association studies have gained in popularity for mapping disease-susceptibility gene(s) of complex diseases. However, recruiting family controls is often more difficult than recruiting unrelated controls. The author proposes a case-control study, where the possible biases due to population stratification are controlled by matching in the design stage and by genomic controlling in the data-analytic stage. The matching is based on a set of "stratum-delineating variables," such as, race, ethnicity, nationality, ancestry, and birthplace; and the genomic controlling is based on typing a number of null markers across the genome and applying the principle of multiplicative scaling of chi-square distribution. It pays to match carefully to have a higher proportion of correctly matched sets, as computer simulation showed that this would increase the power of the study. If matching is crude, one loses power but still has the correct type I error rate after genomic controlling. Power studies showed that the numbers of affected subjects required for the pair-matched study are comparable to those required by the case-parents design, if the study was conducted in a homogeneous population. As the (control-to-case) matching ratio increases, the number of affected subjects required decreases. With matching ratio tending toward infinity, the number required shrinks roughly by half. The case-control study with matching and genomic controlling frees us from family bondage, and the genetic problem as complicated as mapping genes can now be studied using simple epidemiologic methods. PMID:15185398

  13. Biomass Fuel Smoke and Tuberculosis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Haque, M A; Barman, N; Islam, M T; Mannan, M; Khan, M H; Karim, M R; Rob, M A; Hossain, M A

    2016-01-01

    This case control study was done to ascertain the association between exposures to biomass cooking fuel smoke and pulmonary tuberculosis. Cases were all newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients, randomly collected from the Hospital (DOTS centers) Registry from January 2012 to June 2012 from two Upazillas of Sirajganj district, Bangladesh. A home visitation program was done subsequently. Healthy controls were recruited from the neighbourhood of each case through a predefined procedure. Total 276 new pulmonary tuberculosis cases and 276 neighbourhood controls were enrolled. A semi-structured questionnaire containing demographic information, smoking habits, cooking place, kitchen condition, use of biomass fuel for cooking was used for interview. Crude (unadjusted) odd ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence limits for independent variables were determined by binary logistic regression. All significant variables were entered into a multivariate conditional logistic regression model and a final fitted model was determined by backward elimination methods. In univariate analysis, member of a nuclear family {Unadjusted odd ratio (Unadj. OR) 1.570, 95% CI 1.008-2.44)}, having non-formal education (Unadj. OR 2.739, 95% CI 1.219, 6.153) or primary (Unadj. OR 3.407, 95% CI 1.492, 7.782) to secondary level (Unadj. OR 2.392, 95% CI 1.032, 5.544) education, using cow dung (Unadj. OR 3.961, 95% CI 1.267, 12.376) and biomass fuel i.e. plant origin (Unadj. OR 3.382, 95% CI 1.087, 10.518) for cooking, past smoker (Unadj. OR 2.504, 95% CI 1.061, 5.910), using open oven (Unadj. OR 3.109, 95% CI 0.995, 9.716), having small kitchen area (Unadj. OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.989, 0.999) all were significantly associated with tuberculosis. When all significant variables were entered into a multivariate conditional logistic regression model nuclear family {Adjusted odd ratio (Adj OR) 1.808, 95% CI 1.127, 2.9)}, primary level education (Adj OR 2.86, 95% CI 1.23, 6.647) and non formal

  14. Hodgkin's disease: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, S. M.; Cartwright, R. A.; Darwin, C. M.; Richards, I. D.; Roberts, B.; O'Brien, C.; Bird, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    This is the first report of a case-control epidemiological study on lymphomas and leukaemias occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84. This paper deals with the results of the Hodgkin's disease analysis comprising 248 cases and 489 controls. The results indicate support for previous work with respect to small family size and past history of infectious mononucleosis. Positive observations made in a previous pilot study are also confirmed and extended with respect to associations with certain chronic skin lesions, dental anaesthesia and familial factors. Negative associations are described with respect to X-ray exposures and cigarette smoking. It is proposed that these results fit into a general hypothesis that these conditions are the result of interaction between infectious agents and altered immunity in those persons genetically predisposed. PMID:3814482

  15. Functional Impairment in Adult Sleepwalkers: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Regis; Jaussent, Isabelle; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Montplaisir, Jacques; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the restorative quality of sleep and daytime functioning in sleepwalking adult patients in comparison with controls. Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Data were collected at the Sleep Disorders Center, Hôpital-Gui-de Chauliac, Montpellier, France between June 2007 and January 2011. Participants: There were 140 adult sleepwalkers (100 (median age 30 y, 55% male) in whom primary SW was diagnosed) who underwent 1 night of video polysomnography. All patients participated in a standardized clinical interview and completed a battery of questionnaires to assess clinical characteristics of parasomnia, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and health-related quality of life. Results were compared with those of 100 sex- and age-matched normal controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Of the sleepwalkers, 22.3% presented with daily episodes and 43.5% presented with weekly episodes. Median age at sleepwalking onset was 9 y. Familial history of sleepwalking was reported in 56.6% of sleepwalkers and violent sleep related behaviors in 57.9%, including injuries requiring medical care for at least one episode in 17%. Significant associations were found between sleepwalking and daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and altered quality of life. Early-onset sleepwalkers had higher frequency of violent behaviors and injuries. Sleepwalkers with violent behaviors had higher frequency of sleep terrors and triggering factors, with greater alteration in health-related quality of life. Conclusion: Adult sleepwalking is a potentially serious condition that may induce violent behaviors, self-injury or injury to bed partners, sleep disruption, excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and psychological distress, all of which affect health-related quality of life. Citation: Lopez R; Jaussent I; Scholz S; Bayard S; Montplaisir J; Dauvilliers Y. Functional impairment in

  16. Leptospira Exposure and Gardeners: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Guido-Arreola, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospira can be found in soil. However, it is unclear whether occupational exposure to soil may represent a risk for Leptospira infection in humans. Therefore, we sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence with the occupation of gardener, and to determine the epidemiological characteristics of gardeners associated with Leptospira exposure. Methods We performed a case-control study in 168 gardeners and 168 age- and gender-matched control subjects without gardening occupation in Durango City, Mexico. The seroprevalence of anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies in cases and controls was determined using an enzyme immunoassay. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of Leptospira exposure and the characteristics of the gardeners. Results Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 10 (6%) of 168 gardeners and in 15 (8.9%) of 168 control subjects (odds ratio (OR): 0.64; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.28 - 1.48; P = 0.40). Multivariate analysis showed that Leptospira seropositivity was positively associated with female gender (OR: 5.82; 95% CI: 1.11 - 30.46; P = 0.03), and negatively associated with eating while working (OR: 0.21; 95% CI: 0.05 - 0.87; P = 0.03). In addition, multivariate analysis showed that high anti-Leptospira levels were associated with consumption of boar meat (OR: 28.00; 95% CI: 1.20 - 648.80; P = 0.03). Conclusions This is the first case-control study of Leptospira exposure in gardeners. Results do not support an association of Leptospira exposure with the occupation of gardener. However, further studies to confirm the lack of this association are needed. The potential role of consumption of boar meat in Leptospira infection deserves further investigation. PMID:26668679

  17. Case-control study of dementia of the Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    French, L.R.; Schuman, L.M.; Mortimer, J.A.; Hutton, J.T.; Boatman, R.A.; Christians, B.

    1985-03-01

    A case-control study to assess factors of possible etiologic significance to dementia of the Alzheimer type was conducted with 78 male cases diagnosed in 1979-1982 at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota and age-race-sex-matched hospital and neighborhood controls (14 of 16 autopsied cases were histopathologically confirmed). Information was obtained on variables relevant to vital, genetic, and immunologic hypotheses, and on possible occupational and environmental exposures, drug use, psychologic stress, smoking, and alcohol consumption. The only major difference between patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and controls was a significantly greater occurrence of antecedent head trauma in the patients (odds ratio = 4.50). This finding is consistent with the literature on posttraumatic dementia but its importance is presently unclear.

  18. Sialolithiasis is associated with nephrolithiasis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuan-Chang; Hung, Shih-Han; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions This study demonstrates an association between sialolithiasis and nephrolithiasis. The results call for more awareness of this association among physicians and patients with nephrolithiasis. Objective Very few empirical studies have been conducted to explore the potential association between sialolithiasis and nephrolithiasis. As such, the association between sialolithiasis and nephrolithiasis still remains unclear. This study aimed to explore the possible association between sialolithiasis and nephrolithiasis using a population-based dataset. Methods Using data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005, this case-control study identified 966 patients with sialolithiasis as cases and 2898 sex- and age-matched subjects without sialolithiasis as controls. Conditional logistic regressions were conducted to examine the association of sialolithiasis with previously diagnosed nephrolithiasis. Results Out of 3864 sampled patients, 165 (4.27%) had prior nephrolithiasis. Using Chi-square test, it was found that there was a significant difference in the prevalence of prior nephrolithiasis between the cases and controls (10.25% vs 2.28%, p < 0.001). Moreover, by conditional logistic regression analysis, the odds ratio of prior nephrolithiasis for cases was 4.74 (95% CI = 3.41-6.58, p < 0.001) when compared to controls after adjusting for monthly income, geographic location, urbanization level of residence, diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, chronic renal disease, and tobacco use. PMID:26808906

  19. Neurocysticercotic Calcifications and Hippocampal Sclerosis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Coan, Ana Carolina; Secolin, Rodrigo; Luiz Cunha da Costa, Alberto; Cendes, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective The exact role of calcified neurocysticercotic lesions (CNLs) in epilepsy is yet unknown and controversial. Although the relationship between CNLs, epilepsy and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) has already been addressed, to our knowledge, no study has actually provided strong statistical evidence, nor reported the ODDS ratio for these associations. Therefore, we designed this case-control study to assess the likelihood of having MTLE-HS versus other forms of epilepsy in the presence of CNLs. Methods In this case-control study we included 119 consecutive patients with epilepsy and 106 disease controls (headache) with previous CT scans. We subdivided cases into MTLE-HS and other epilepsies. We used brain CT scans to define presence or absence of CNLs. After exploratory analyses, we used logistic regression to analyze the association between CNLs, epilepsy subgroups and disease controls. Results CNLs were found in 31.09% of cases and in 11.32% of controls (p<0.001). The initial analysis comparing epilepsy versus controls revealed a significant association between CNLs and epilepsy (OR = 5.32; 95%CI = 2.43-11.54; p<0.001). However, when we compared MTLE-HS versus other epilepsies versus controls we confirmed that CNLs were associated with MTLE-HS (OR = 11.27, 95%CI = 4.73-26.85; p<0.001) but other epilepsies were not. We found no difference in the CNLs load and no difference in the location of the CNLs when we compared patients with MTLE-HS, other epilepsies and disease controls. Significance The inclusion of controls allowed us to estimate the likelihood of having epilepsy in the presence of CNLs. We found that patients with CNLs were 11 times more likely to have MTLE-HS; however, the presence of CNLs did not change the odds of having other types of epilepsy. These findings raise the possibility of neurocysticercosis playing a role in the pathophysiology of MTLE-HS and need further confirmation in other series. PMID

  20. A case-control study of asthma and ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Elmasri, Wafic M; Tran, Therese H; Mulla, Zuber D

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have found inverse associations between allergy and the development of certain tumors. The authors sought to determine if there was an association between asthma and ovarian cancer. A case-control study was conducted using Florida hospital data (year 2001). Discharge diagnoses were coded using the ICD-9-CM (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification). Cases were 1,582 women whose principal discharge diagnosis was a malignant neoplasm of the ovary. Two control series were used: 4,744 women whose principal diagnosis was an upper limb bone fracture, and 21,830 women whose principal diagnosis was an acute myocardial infarction. Odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for age, race-ethnicity, Medicaid status, obesity, and smoking were calculated. Cases were 30% less likely than fracture control to be asthmatics (adjusted OR = 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.49-0.99, p = .04). Similarly, cases when compared to acute myocardial infarction controls were significantly less likely to have asthma (adjusted OR = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.45-0.87, p = .005). The results of this statewide exploratory study suggest that individuals with asthma may have a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer than nonasthmatics. PMID:20439229

  1. Occupational factors associated with astrocytomas: a case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Olin, R.G.; Ahlbom, A.; Lindberg-Navier, I.; Norell, S.E.; Spaennare, B.

    1987-01-01

    The most malignant form of all brain tumors is the supratentorial astrocytoma. Little is known about its etiology, but exogenous factors have been blamed. In this case-control study, 78 astrocytoma patients have been compared with 197 clinical and 92 population controls. An extensive questionnaire was used to gather information about occupational and residential environment exposure. Inquiries concerning groups of or individual chemicals elicited low rates of affirmative response, with negligible differences between cases and controls. However, the questions working at an airfield and living near a petrochemical plant indicated elevated risks in comparison with both control groups; so too did living near a municipal sewage treatment plant. These results focus attention on exposure to organic compounds and should be considered together with similar findings in current research. No other occupation, branch of industry, or vicinity questions showed differences between cases and controls, with the exception of living in the neighborhood of a paper mill or a saw mill, which gave moderately increased relative risks. A separate report gives the results from the nonoccupational part of the study.

  2. Violence against Women and Gastroschisis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-García, Juan Antonio; Soldin, Offie P.; Sánchez-Sauco, Miguel Felipe; Cánovas-Conesa, Alicia; Gomaríz-Peñalver, Virtudes; Jaimes-Vega, Diana Carolina; Perales, Joseph E.; Cárceles-Alvarez, Alberto; Martínez-Ros, Maria Teresa; Ruiz, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gastroschisis, a birth defect characterized by herniated fetal abdominal wall, occurs more commonly in infants born to teenage and young mothers. Ischemia of the vascular vitelline vessels is the likely mechanism of pathogenesis. Given that chronic stress and violence against women are risk factors for cardiovascular disease we explored whether these may represent risk factors for gastroschisis, when they occur during pregnancy. A case-control study was conducted, with 15 incident cases of children born with gastroschisis in the Region of Murcia, Spain, from December 2007 to June 2013. Forty concurrent controls were recruited at gestation weeks 20–24 or post-partum. All mothers of cases and controls completed a comprehensive, in-person, ‘green sheet’ questionnaire on environmental exposures. Results: Mothers of children with gastroschisis were younger, smoked more cigarettes per week relative to controls, were exposed to higher amounts of illegal drugs, and suffered from domestic violence more frequently than the controls. Multivariable logistic regression analysis highlights periconceptional ‘gender-related violence’ (OR: 16.6, 95% CI 2.7 to 101.7) and younger maternal age (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0–1.3). Conclusions: Violence against pregnant women is associated with birth defects, and should be studied in more depth as a cause-effect teratogenic. Psychosocial risk factors, including gender-based violence, are important for insuring the health and safety of the pregnant mother and the fetus. PMID:24142184

  3. Fluoride exposure and childhood osteosarcoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Gelberg, K H; Fitzgerald, E F; Hwang, S A; Dubrow, R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study tests the hypothesis that fluoride exposure in a nonoccupational setting is a risk factor for childhood osteosarcoma. METHODS. A population-based case-control study was conducted among residents of New York State, excluding New York City. Case subjects (n = 130) were diagnosed with osteosarcoma between 1978 and 1988, at age 24 years or younger. Control subjects were matched to case subjects on year of birth and sex. Exposure information was obtained by a telephone interview with the subject, parent, or both. RESULTS. Based on the parents' responses, total lifetime fluoride exposure was not significantly associated with osteosarcoma among all subjects combined or among females. However, a significant protective trend was observed among males. Protective trends were observed for fluoridated toothpaste, fluoride tablets, and dental fluoride treatments among all subjects and among males. Based on the subjects' responses, no significant associations between fluoride exposure and osteosarcoma were observed. CONCLUSIONS. Fluoride exposure does not increase the risk of osteosarcoma and may be protective in males. The protective effect may not be directly due to fluoride exposure but to other factors associated with good dental hygiene. There is also biologic plausibility for a protective effect. PMID:7503344

  4. [Occupational risks for laryngeal cancer: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Sartor, Sergio Guerra; Eluf-Neto, José; Travier, Noemie; Wünsch Filho, Victor; Arcuri, Arline Sydneia Abel; Kowalski, Luís Paulo; Boffetta, Paolo

    2007-06-01

    The most solidly established risk factors for laryngeal cancer are tobacco and alcohol. As for occupational factors, the only established carcinogen is exposure to strong inorganic acid mists. However, asbestos, pesticides, paints, gasoline, diesel engine emissions, dusts, and other factors have been reported in the literature as occupational agents that increase the risk of laryngeal cancer. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted to investigate occupational risk factors for laryngeal cancer. Detailed data on smoking, alcohol consumption, and occupational history were collected for 122 laryngeal cancers and 187 controls matched by frequency (according to sex and age). Laryngeal cancer was associated with exposure to respirable free crystalline silica (OR = 1.83; 95%CI: 1.00-3.36), soot (from coal, coke, fuel oil, or wood) (odds ratio - OR = 1.78; 95% confidence interval - 95%CI: 1.03-3.03), fumes (OR = 2.55; 95%CI: 1.14-5.67), and live animals (OR = 1.80; 95%CI: 1.02-3.19). PMID:17546338

  5. Thrombophilias and Pregnancy Complications: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Giovanni, Larciprete; Antonio, Angelucci Piero; Danilo, Celleno; Stefano, Gioia; Therese, Deaibess; Elisabetta, Romanini Maria; Letizia, Brienza; Elio, Cirese; Domenico, Arduini

    2007-01-01

    Inherited thrombophilia is believed to be a multiple gene disease with more than one defect. We wanted to determine the association between single thrombophilic patterns and a variety of pregnancy diseases. 301 pregnant women were recruited for the present case-control study and were divided into two groups: A group (176 controls) and B group (125 cases). Patients belonging to the B group had one of the following: severe preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, gestational hypertension, fetal growth restriction (FGR), intrauterine death, abruptio placentae, placenta previa, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (DIC) and preterm labour. To detect MTHFR A1298C, MTHFR C677T, Factor V Leiden, PAI-1, Mutant Prothrombin G20210A, an inverse hybridization technology was used. Plasma homocysteine, Antithrombin III and protein levels S were determined. A modified functional activated protein C resistance was assayed. MTHFR C677T and hyperhomocysteinemia were more numerous than other thrombophilias. Deficiency in AT III was significantly linked with preeclampsia (Pearson Index and p value: 0.131 and 0.022, respectively) and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy (Pearson Index and p value: 0.138 and 0.016 respectively). Activated Protein C resistance was related to abruptio placentae (Pearson Index and p value: 0.159 and 0.005 respectively). Apart from the linkage between AT III deficiency and the occurrence of preeclampsia and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, we obtained findings in contrast to some literature. In our case series, no association of preeclampsia with Factor V Leiden or with prothrombin gene mutation was found. PMID:23675040

  6. Micronutrients and oral clefts: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    McKinney, C M; Chowchuen, B; Pitiphat, W; Derouen, T; Pisek, A; Godfrey, K

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about oral clefts in developing countries. We aimed to identify micronutrient-related and environmental risk factors for oral clefts in Thailand. We tested hypotheses that maternal exposure during the periconceptional period to multivitamins or liver consumption would decrease cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL ± P) risk and that menstrual regulation supplements would increase CL ± P risk. We conducted a multisite hospital-based case-control study in Thailand. We enrolled cases with CL ± P and 2 live births as controls at birth from the same hospital. Mothers completed a questionnaire. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Eighty-six cases and 172 controls were enrolled. Mothers who took a vitamin (adjusted OR, 0.39; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.94) or ate liver (adjusted OR, 0.26; 95% CI: 0.12, 0.57) were less likely than those who did not to have an affected child. Mothers who took a menstrual regulation supplement were more likely than mothers who did not to have an affected child. Findings did not differ for infants with a family history of other anomalies or with isolated CL ± P. If replicated, our finding that liver decreases CL ± P risk could offer a low-cost primary prevention strategy. PMID:24097855

  7. Mind wandering and driving: responsibility case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Orriols, Ludivine; M’Bailara, Katia; Laborey, Magali; Contrand, Benjamin; Ribéreau-Gayon, Régis; Masson, Françoise; Bakiri, Sarah; Gabaude, Catherine; Fort, Alexandra; Maury, Bertrand; Lemercier, Céline; Cours, Maurice; Bouvard, Manuel-Pierre; Lagarde, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the association between mind wandering (thinking unrelated to the task at hand) and the risk of being responsible for a motor vehicle crash. Design Responsibility case-control study. Setting Adult emergency department of a university hospital in France, April 2010 to August 2011. Participants 955 drivers injured in a motor vehicle crash. Main outcome measures Responsibility for the crash, mind wandering, external distraction, negative affect, alcohol use, psychotropic drug use, and sleep deprivation. Potential confounders were sociodemographic and crash characteristics. Results Intense mind wandering (highly disrupting/distracting content) was associated with responsibility for a traffic crash (17% (78 of 453 crashes in which the driver was thought to be responsible) v 9% (43 of 502 crashes in which the driver was not thought to be responsible); adjusted odds ratio 2.12, 95% confidence interval 1.37 to 3.28). Conclusions Mind wandering while driving, by decoupling attention from visual and auditory perceptions, can jeopardise the ability of the driver to incorporate information from the environment, thereby threatening safety on the roads. PMID:23241270

  8. Multiple Sclerosis Associated Risk Factors: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    POOROLAJAL, Jalal; MAZDEH, Mehrdokht; SAATCHI, Mohammad; TALEBI GHANE, Elaheh; BIDERAFSH, Azam; LOTFI, Bahar; FERYADRES, Mohammad; PAJOHI, Khabat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamadan Province is one of the high-risk regions in Iran for Multiple sclerosis (MS). A majority of the epidemiological studies conducted in Iran addressing MS are descriptive. This study was conducted to assess MS and its associated risk factors in Hamadan Province, the west of Iran. Methods: This case-control study compared 100 patients with MS (case group) and 100 patients with acute infectious diseases (control group) from September 2013 to March 2014. A checklist was used to assess the demographic, medical, and family history of the patients. The Friedman-Rosenman questionnaire was also used to assess personality type. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression model with Stata 11 software program. Results: The adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimate of MS was 4.37 (95% CI: 2.33, 8.20) for females compared to males; 0.15 (95% CI: 0.06, 0.43) for people aged above 50 years compared to aged 14 to 29 years; 0.44 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.91) for overweight or obese people compared to normal weights. Crude OR indicated a significant association between the occurrence of MS and exclusive breast feeding, season of birth, and smoking. However, the association was not statistically significant after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusion: The risk of MS is significantly lower in male gender, obese/overweight, and old people. Furthermore, non-smoking, non-exclusive breast-feeding, and born in autumn may increase the risk of MS but need further investigation. However, long-term large prospective cohort studies are needed to investigate the true effect of the potential risk factors on MS. PMID:26744707

  9. Melanoma and occupation: results of a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Fritschi, L; Siemiatycki, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Associations between occupational exposures and the occurrence of cutaneous melanoma were examined as part of a large population based case-control study of 19 cancer sites. METHODS: Cases were men aged 35 to 70 years old, resident in Montreal, Canada, with a new histologically confirmed cutaneous melanoma (n = 103). There were two control groups, a randomly selected population control group (n = 533), and a cancer control group (n = 533) randomly selected from among subjects with other types of cancer in the large study. Odds ratios for the occurrence of melanoma were calculated for each exposure circumstance for which there were more than four exposed cases (85 substances, 13 occupations, and 20 industries) adjusting for age, ethnicity, and number of years of schooling. RESULTS: Significantly increased risk of melanoma was found for exposure to four substances (fabric dust, plastic dust, trichloroethylene, and a group containing paints used on surfaces other than metal and varnishes used on surfaces other than wood), three occupations (warehouse clerks, salesmen, and miners and quarrymen), and two industries (clothing and non-metallic mineral products). CONCLUSIONS: Most of the occupational circumstances examined were not associated with melanoma, nor is there any strong evidence from previous research that any of those are risk factors. For the few occupational circumstances which were associated in our data with melanoma, the statistical evidence was weak, and there is little or no supporting evidence in the scientific literature. On the whole, there is no persuasive evidence of occupational risk factors for melanoma, but the studies have been too small or have involved too much misclassification of exposure for this conclusion to be definitive. PMID:8704857

  10. Occupational Risk Factors for COPD: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Drame, Moustapha; Lebargy, Francois; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this research was to examine the occupational risk factors for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD) in a range of occupations. Methods Eleven occupations involving different types of exposure were observed in this multicenter case-control study. Controls and cases were matched for sex, age and smoking. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs). Results A total of 1,519 participants were initially recruited between September 2004 and September 2012. After matching, 547 pairs were obtained. The mean age was 56.3 +/- 10.4 years. Smelter workers were the only ones with an increased risk of COPD in this study (OR = 7.6, p < 0.0001, 95% CI [4.5, 12.9]). Physical activity was protective (OR = 0.7), while living in the city was a risk (OR = 1.6). The main used metals were cast iron, aluminum and alloys. Molds and cores were mainly made from sand and synthetic resins. Machine maintenance (65.2%), molding (49.6%), finishing (41.1%) and casting (41.0%) were the most common activities. Almost all workers (95.1%) cleaned the floors and machines with a brush or compressed air. Conclusions This study demonstrates the importance of occupational factors in the genesis of COPD, especially among smelter workers. As with the fight against smoking-related disease, the removal or substitution of recognized hazardous agents is the best way of preventing the onset of COPD. This is why it is essential to continue research on its occupational risk factors. PMID:27487078

  11. Facial dermatosis associated with Demodex: a case-control study*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ya-e; Peng, Yan; Wang, Xiang-lan; Wu, Li-ping; Wang, Mei; Yan, Hu-ling; Xiao, Sheng-xiang

    2011-01-01

    Demodex has been considered to be related with multiple skin disorders, but controversy persists. In this case-control study, a survey was conducted with 860 dermatosis patients aged 12 to 84 years in Xi’an, China to identify the association between facial dermatosis and Demodex. Amongst the patients, 539 suffered from facial dermatosis and 321 suffered from non-facial dermatosis. Demodex mites were sampled and examined using the skin pressurization method. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to analyze the association between facial dermatosis and Demodex infestation, and to identify the risk factors of Demodex infestation. The results showed that total detection rate of Demodex was 43.0%. Patients aged above 30 years had higher odds of Demodex infestation than those under 30 years. Compared to patients with neutral skin, patients with mixed, oily, or dry skin were more likely to be infested with Demodex (odds ratios (ORs) were 2.5, 2.4, and 1.6, respectively). Moreover, Demodex infestation was found to be statistically associated with rosacea (OR=8.1), steroid-induced dermatitis (OR=2.7), seborrheic dermatitis (OR=2.2), and primary irritation dermatitis (OR=2.1). In particular, ORs calculated from the severe infestation (≥5 mites/cm2) rate were significantly higher than those of the total rate. Therefore, we concluded that Demodex is associated with rosacea, steroid-induced dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and primary irritation dermatitis. The rate of severe infestation is found to be more correlated with various dermatosis than the total infestation rate. The risk factors of Demodex infestation, age, and skin types were identified. Our study also suggested that good hygiene practice might reduce the chances of demodicosis and Demodex infestation. PMID:22135150

  12. Determinants of Brushite Stone Formation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Siener, Roswitha; Netzer, Linda; Hesse, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The occurrence of brushite stones has increased during recent years. However, the pathogenic factors driving the development of brushite stones remain unclear. Methods Twenty-eight brushite stone formers and 28 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy individuals were enrolled in this case-control study. Anthropometric, clinical, 24 h urinary parameters and dietary intake from 7-day weighed food records were assessed. Results Pure brushite stones were present in 46% of patients, while calcium oxalate was the major secondary stone component. Urinary pH and oxalate excretion were significantly higher, whereas urinary citrate was lower in patients as compared to healthy controls. Despite lower dietary intake, urinary calcium excretion was significantly higher in brushite stone patients. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed pH>6.50 (OR 7.296; p = 0.035), calcium>6.40 mmol/24 h (OR 25.213; p = 0.001) and citrate excretion <2.600 mmol/24 h (OR 15.352; p = 0.005) as urinary risk factors for brushite stone formation. A total of 56% of patients exhibited distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). Urinary pH, calcium and citrate excretion did not significantly differ between patients with or without dRTA. Conclusions Hypercalciuria, a diminished citrate excretion and an elevated pH turned out to be the major urinary determinants of brushite stone formation. Interestingly, urinary phosphate was not associated with urolithiasis. The increased urinary oxalate excretion, possibly due to decreased calcium intake, promotes the risk of mixed stone formation with calcium oxalate. Neither dietary factors nor dRTA can account as cause for hypercalciuria, higher urinary pH and diminished citrate excretion. Further research is needed to define the role of dRTA in brushite stone formation and to evaluate the hypothesis of an acquired acidification defect. PMID:24265740

  13. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis: case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome, a cluster of classical cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, obesity, glucose intolerance, and dyslipidemia is highly prevalent in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of metabolic syndrome (MS) in RA patients, and to evaluate the relationships between metabolic syndrome and RA. Methods The study was conducted on 120 RA patients according to the 1987 revised American College of Rheumatology classification criteria, and 100 age and sex matched apparently healthy controls. The frequency of metabolic syndrome was assessed using six Metabolic Syndrome definitions (Joint Consensus 2009, National Cholesterol Education Programme 2004 and 2001, International Diabetes Federation, World Health Organisation and European Group for Study of Insulin Resistance). Logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of metabolic Syndrome. Results The frequency of metabolic syndrome varied from 18 to 48.6% in RA according to the definition used and was significantly higher than controls (for all definitions p<0.05). In multivariate analysis, higher ESR was independently associated with the presence of Met S (OR =1.36; CI: 1.18–2.12; p = 0.03). Glucocorticoid use, but not other disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), values remained significant independent predictors of the presence of metabolic syndrome in RA patients (OR = 1.45; CI: 1.12–2.14; p = 0.04). Conclusions In summary, the frequency of metabolic syndrome in RA varies according to the definition used and was significantly higher compared to controls (for all definitions p<0.05). Higher systemic inflammatory marker, and glucocorticoids use were independent predictors associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome in patients with RA. These findings suggest that physicians should screen for metabolic syndrome in patients with RA to control its components and therefore reduce the risk of

  14. Diet and gallbladder cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pandey, M; Shukla, V K

    2002-08-01

    Cancer of the gallbladder is rare but fatal, and has an unusual geographic and demographic distribution. Gallstones and obesity have been suggested as possible risk factors. As diet is known to influence both these factors, we carried out the present study to evaluate the possible role of diet in gallbladder carcinogenesis. A case-control study involving 64 newly diagnosed cases of gallbladder cancer and 101 cases of gallstones was carried out. The dietary evaluation was carried out by the dietary recall method based on a preset questionnaire developed specifically for the present study, keeping in mind the common dietary habits prevailing in this part of the world. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for various dietary items. A significant reduction in odds ratio was seen with the consumption of radish (OR 0.4; 95% CI 0.17-0.94), green chilli (OR 0.45; 95% CI 0.21-0.94) and sweet potato (OR 0.33; 95% CI 0.13-0.83) among vegetables, and mango (OR 0.4; 95% CI 0.16-0.99), orange (OR; 0.45; 95% CI 0.22-0.93), melon (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.14-0.64) and papaya (OR 0.44; 95% 0.2-0.64) among fruits. A reduction in odds was also seen with the consumption of cruciferous vegetables, beans, onion and turnip, however the difference was not statistically significant. On the other hand, an increase in the odds was observed with consumption of capsicum (OR 2.2), beef (OR 2.58), tea (OR 1.98), red chilli (OR 1.29) and mutton (OR 1.2), however the difference was statistically not significant. In conclusion, the results of the present study show a protective effect of vegetables and fruits on gallbladder carcinogenesis, but red meat (beef and mutton) was found to be associated with increased risk of gallbladder cancer. PMID:12195163

  15. Centering on Independent Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Stephanie

    Independent study is an instructional approach that can have enormous power in the classroom. It can be used successfully with students at all ability levels, even though it is often associated with gifted students. Independent study is an opportunity for students to study a subject of their own choosing under the guidance of a teacher. The…

  16. Snippets From the Past: Is Flint, Michigan, the Birthplace of the Case-Control Study?

    PubMed Central

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    In the summer of 1924, an outbreak of scarlet fever occurred in Flint, Michigan. Unable to trace it to the usual causes, particularly fresh milk, the Michigan Department of Health used a novel approach to disentangle the enigma: The 116 cases of scarlet fever were compared with 117 “controls” selected from neighbors of the quarantined cases and from patients at the City Health Center who had been treated for ailments unrelated to scarlet fever. The extraordinary culprit was ice cream, which had a frequent/occasional/none consumption prevalence of 60%, 34%, and 6% among the cases and 24%, 51%, and 25% among the controls, respectively. The 1925 report reads, “Detailed epidemiological investigation, by means of case histories and control histories on well persons, confirmed early suspicions and established the fact that the epidemic was spread by ice cream” (Am J Hyg. 1925;5(5):669–681). This forgotten epidemiologic study is the oldest study using the case-control design to have been resurrected thus far. The case-control study design may have been conceived simultaneously, but independently and for different purposes, in England (Janet Lane-Claypon's 1926 report on the determinants of breast cancer) and the United States. PMID:24064743

  17. Snippets from the past: is Flint, Michigan, the birthplace of the case-control study?

    PubMed

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2013-12-15

    In the summer of 1924, an outbreak of scarlet fever occurred in Flint, Michigan. Unable to trace it to the usual causes, particularly fresh milk, the Michigan Department of Health used a novel approach to disentangle the enigma: The 116 cases of scarlet fever were compared with 117 "controls" selected from neighbors of the quarantined cases and from patients at the City Health Center who had been treated for ailments unrelated to scarlet fever. The extraordinary culprit was ice cream, which had a frequent/occasional/none consumption prevalence of 60%, 34%, and 6% among the cases and 24%, 51%, and 25% among the controls, respectively. The 1925 report reads, "Detailed epidemiological investigation, by means of case histories and control histories on well persons, confirmed early suspicions and established the fact that the epidemic was spread by ice cream" (Am J Hyg. 1925;5(5):669-681). This forgotten epidemiologic study is the oldest study using the case-control design to have been resurrected thus far. The case-control study design may have been conceived simultaneously, but independently and for different purposes, in England (Janet Lane-Claypon's 1926 report on the determinants of breast cancer) and the United States. PMID:24064743

  18. Risk factors for erysipelas of the leg (cellulitis): case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Dupuy, Alain; Benchikhi, Hakima; Roujeau, Jean-Claude; Bernard, Philippe; Vaillant, Loïc; Chosidow, Olivier; Sassolas, Bruno; Guillaume, Jean-Claude; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Bastuji-Garin, Sylvie

    1999-01-01

    Objective To assess risk factors for erysipelas of the leg (cellulitis). Design Case-control study. Setting 7 hospital centres in France. Subjects 167 patients admitted to hospital for erysipelas of the leg and 294 controls. Results In multivariate analysis, a disruption of the cutaneous barrier (leg ulcer, wound, fissurated toe-web intertrigo, pressure ulcer, or leg dermatosis) (odds ratio 23.8, 95% confidence interval 10.7 to 52.5), lymphoedema (71.2, 5.6 to 908), venous insufficiency (2.9, 1.0 to 8.7), leg oedema (2.5, 1.2 to 5.1) and being overweight (2.0, 1.1 to 3.7) were independently associated with erysipelas of the leg. No association was observed with diabetes, alcohol, or smoking. Population attributable risk for toe-web intertrigo was 61%. Conclusion This first case-control study highlights the major role of local risk factors (mainly lymphoedema and site of entry) in erysipelas of the leg. From a public health perspective, detecting and treating toe-web intertrigo should be evaluated in the secondary prevention of erysipelas of the leg. Key messagesLocal factors are potential risks for erysipelas of the legLymphoedema and disruption of the cutaneous barrier exhibit the highest relative riskToe-web intertrigo has a high population attributable risk, and its detection and treatment may prevent up to 60% of cases of erysipelas of the leg PMID:10364117

  19. Sociodemographic characteristics of domestic violence in China: a population case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cao, YuPing; Yang, ShiChang; Wang, GuoQiang; Zhang, YaLin

    2014-03-01

    A population case-control study of domestic violence in China was conducted to examine the relationship between individual- and household-level characteristics and violence perpetration and victimization. Demographic comparisons were conducted between perpetrators and victims (n = 624), perpetrators and matched controls (n = 628), and perpetrator households and control households (n = 620). A multivariate model of demographic risk was tested, integrating individual- and household-level correlates of violence perpetration. Compared with victims, perpetrators were more likely to be older, male, and have lower levels of education. In the final model, violence perpetration was more likely among individuals who earned more income, contributed a lower proportion of the household income, had a family member who was unemployed or lived in households with an authoritarian or independent power structure. PMID:24176988

  20. Informed conditioning on clinical covariates increases power in case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Zaitlen, Noah; Lindström, Sara; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Cornelis, Marilyn; Genovese, Giulio; Pollack, Samuela; Barton, Anne; Bickeböller, Heike; Bowden, Donald W; Eyre, Steve; Freedman, Barry I; Friedman, David J; Field, John K; Groop, Leif; Haugen, Aage; Heinrich, Joachim; Henderson, Brian E; Hicks, Pamela J; Hocking, Lynne J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Landi, Maria Teresa; Langefeld, Carl D; Le Marchand, Loic; Meister, Michael; Morgan, Ann W; Raji, Olaide Y; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Scherf, David; Steer, Sophia; Walshaw, Martin; Waters, Kevin M; Wilson, Anthony G; Wordsworth, Paul; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Haiman, Christopher; Hunter, David J; Plenge, Robert M; Worthington, Jane; Christiani, David C; Schaumberg, Debra A; Chasman, Daniel I; Altshuler, David; Voight, Benjamin; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L

    2012-01-01

    Genetic case-control association studies often include data on clinical covariates, such as body mass index (BMI), smoking status, or age, that may modify the underlying genetic risk of case or control samples. For example, in type 2 diabetes, odds ratios for established variants estimated from low-BMI cases are larger than those estimated from high-BMI cases. An unanswered question is how to use this information to maximize statistical power in case-control studies that ascertain individuals on the basis of phenotype (case-control ascertainment) or phenotype and clinical covariates (case-control-covariate ascertainment). While current approaches improve power in studies with random ascertainment, they often lose power under case-control ascertainment and fail to capture available power increases under case-control-covariate ascertainment. We show that an informed conditioning approach, based on the liability threshold model with parameters informed by external epidemiological information, fully accounts for disease prevalence and non-random ascertainment of phenotype as well as covariates and provides a substantial increase in power while maintaining a properly controlled false-positive rate. Our method outperforms standard case-control association tests with or without covariates, tests of gene x covariate interaction, and previously proposed tests for dealing with covariates in ascertained data, with especially large improvements in the case of case-control-covariate ascertainment. We investigate empirical case-control studies of type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and end-stage kidney disease over a total of 89,726 samples. In these datasets, informed conditioning outperforms logistic regression for 115 of the 157 known associated variants investigated (P-value = 1 × 10(-9)). The improvement varied across diseases with a 16% median increase in χ(2) test statistics and a

  1. Independent Human Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Suzanne; Wilson, Gordon

    1978-01-01

    The Independent Human Studies program at Schoolcraft College offers an alternative method of earning academic credits. Students delineate an area of study, pose research questions, gather resources, synthesize the information, state the thesis, choose the method of presentation, set schedules, and take responsibility for meeting deadlines. (MB)

  2. Case-control study of the risk factors for acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus species during tigecycline therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Eun; Kang, Cheol-In; Wi, Yu Mi; Ko, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Woo Joo; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Tigecycline is an important agent in clinical practice because of its broad-spectrum activity. However, it has no activity against Pseudomonas or Proteus species. We conducted a case-control study to analyze risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas or Proteus spp. during tigecycline therapy. Placement of suction drainage at infected wound sites, ICU stay, and neurologic disease were identified as independent risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus spp. PMID:26100705

  3. Case-Control Study of the Risk Factors for Acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus Species during Tigecycline Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga Eun; Wi, Yu Mi; Ko, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Woo Joo; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Tigecycline is an important agent in clinical practice because of its broad-spectrum activity. However, it has no activity against Pseudomonas or Proteus species. We conducted a case-control study to analyze risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas or Proteus spp. during tigecycline therapy. Placement of suction drainage at infected wound sites, ICU stay, and neurologic disease were identified as independent risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus spp. PMID:26100705

  4. [Case-control studies with multinomial responses: a proposal for analysis].

    PubMed

    Mafra, Ana Carolina Cintra Nunes; Nucci, Luciana Bertoldi; Cordeiro, Ricardo; Stephan, Celso

    2010-03-01

    This study reviews articles on case-control studies in which the cases were classified in two or more types. Application of multinomial models and their adequacy for case-control studies are discussed. Among the available multinomial adjustments, we argue that the polytomous logistic model is the most suitable for obtaining epidemiological measures of risk and association in case-control studies. By way of illustration, we present an application of this model in a population-based case-control study, comparing the results with those obtained in a binomial logistic model. The multinomial approach allows investigating, in a single analysis, the occurrence of associations between covariates and more or more subclasses of cases, thus providing the epidemiologically relevant possibility of identifying individualized risk and protective factors for each subclass. PMID:20464064

  5. A Shrinkage Method for Testing the Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium in Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yong; Yuan, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Testing for the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is often used as an initial step for checking the quality of genotyping. When testing the HWE for case-control data, the impact of a potential genetic association between the marker and the disease must be controlled for otherwise the results may be biased. Li and Li (2008) proposed a likelihood ratio test (LRT) that accounts for this potential genetic association and it is more powerful than the commonly used control-only χ2 test. However, the LRT is not efficient when the marker is independent of the disease, and also requires numerical optimization to calculate the test statistic. In this article, we propose a novel shrinkage test for assessing the HWE. The proposed shrinkage test yields higher statistical power than the LRT when the marker is independent of or weakly associated with the disease, and converges to the LRT when the marker is strongly associated with the disease. In addition, the proposed shrinkage test has a closed form and can be easily used to test the HWE for large datasets that result from genome-wide association studies. We compare the performance of the shrinkage test with existing methods using simulation studies, and apply the shrinkage test to a genome-wide association dataset for Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23934751

  6. [Child abuse in Tlaxcala: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Herrada-Huidobro, A; Nazar-Beutelspacher, A; Cassaball-Núñez, M; Vega-Ramos, R; Nava-Cruz, C B

    1992-01-01

    A longitudinal, retrospective and descriptive study about child abuse was carried out in the Hospitals of the Tlaxcala Secretariat of Health, Mexico. The information was obtained from hospitalized children's charts between January first and November 30, 1991. The charts included were those belonging to zero to 14 year old children with injuries, poisoning, and II-III degrees of malnutrition. Four child-abuse criteria were established: physical, sexual, non organic malnutrition and mixed (physical and non organic malnutrition). Two control groups were defined. Different patterns were observed between accidental and non accidental injuries, malnutrition and poisoning among the case and the control groups. The study provides useful information for the integral diagnosis of child abuse in hospitalized children. PMID:1475698

  7. Study design in evidence-based surgery: What is the role of case-control studies?

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Amy M; Cox, Michael R; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard in terms of study design, however, in the surgical setting conducting RCTs can often be unethical or logistically impossible. Case-control studies should become the major study design used in surgical research when RCTs are unable to be conducted and definitely replacing case series which offer little insight into surgical outcomes and disease processes. PMID:27019801

  8. Exploratory case-control study of brain tumors in adults

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, J.D.; Craib, K.J.; Choi, B.C.; Miller, A.B.; Risch, H.A.; Howe, G.R.

    1987-04-01

    An exploratory study of brain tumors in adults was carried out using 215 cases diagnosed in Southern Ontario between 1979 and 1982, with an individually matched, hospital control series. Significantly elevated risks were observed for reported use of spring water, drinking of wine, and consumption of pickled fish, together with a significant protective effect for the regular consumption of any of several types of fruit. While these factors are consistent with a role for N-nitroso compounds in the etiology of these tumors, for several other factors related to this hypothesis, no association was observed. Occupation in the rubber industry was associated with a significant relative risk of 9.0, though no other occupational associations were seen. Two previously unreported associations were with smoking nonfilter cigarettes with a significant trend and with the use of hair dyes or sprays. The data do not support an association between physical head trauma requiring medical attention and risk of brain tumors and indicate that exposure to ionizing radiation and vinyl chloride monomer does not contribute any appreciable fraction of attributable risk in the population studied. The findings warrant further detailed investigation in future epidemiologic studies.

  9. Risk factors at medical school for subsequent professional misconduct: multicentre retrospective case-control study

    PubMed Central

    James, David

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there are risk factors in a doctor’s time at medical school that are associated with subsequent professional misconduct. Design Matched case-control study. Setting Records from medical schools and the General Medical Council (GMC). Participants 59 doctors who had graduated from any one of eight medical schools in the United Kingdom in 1958-97 and had a proved finding of serious professional misconduct in GMC proceedings in 1999-2004 (cases); 236 controls (four for each case) were selected by systematic sampling from matching graduation cohorts. Case-control status was revealed by the GMC after completion of data entry. Main outcome measure Odds ratios for being a “case,” with multivariable conditional logistic regression of potential risk factors including pre-admission characteristics and progress during the course. These data were obtained from anonymised copies of the students’ progress files held by their original medical schools. Results Univariate conditional logistic regression analysis found that cases were more likely to be men, to be of lower estimated social class, and to have had academic difficulties during their medical course, especially in the early years. Multivariable analysis showed that male sex (odds ratio 9.80, 95% confidence interval 2.43 to 39.44, P=0.001), lower social class (4.28, 1.52 to 12.09, P=0.006), and failure of early or preclinical examinations (5.47, 2.17 to 13.79, P<0.001) were independently associated with being a case. Conclusions This small study suggests that male sex, a lower socioeconomic background, and early academic difficulties at medical school could be risk factors for subsequent professional misconduct. The findings are preliminary and should be interpreted with caution. Most doctors with risk factors will not come before the GMC’s disciplinary panels. PMID:20423965

  10. The relationship between parenting, family interaction and childhood dental caries: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    de Jong-Lenters, M; Duijster, D; Bruist, M A; Thijssen, J; de Ruiter, C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to explore the relationship between parenting practices, parent-child interaction and childhood dental caries, using a sample of 5-8-year old children from the Netherlands. Cases were defined as children with four or more decayed, missing or filled teeth and controls were caries free. Cases (n = 28) and controls (n = 26) were recruited from a referral centre for paediatric dental care and a general dental practice, respectively. Parenting practices and parent-child interactions of the child's primary caregiver were observed using Structured Interaction Tasks and subsequently rated on seven dimensions: positive involvement, encouragement, problem-solving, discipline, monitoring, coercion and interpersonal atmosphere. All Structured Interaction Tasks were videotaped, and coded by trained and calibrated observers blind to the dental condition. Differences in parenting dimensions between cases and controls were analysed using multivariate analysis of variance, independent samples T-tests, χ(2)-tests and multiple logistic regression analyses. Controls had significantly higher scores on the dimensions positive involvement, encouragement, problem-solving and interpersonal atmosphere, compared to cases. Parents of controls were also less likely to show coercive behaviours. These associations remained statistically significant after adjustment for the mother's education level, tooth brushing frequency and the frequency of consuming sugary foods and drinks, except for coercion. There was no significant difference in discipline between cases and controls. In conclusion, this case-control study found a significant relationship between parenting practices, parent-child interaction quality and childhood dental caries. Our findings suggest that parenting practices may be an important factor to consider in caries preventive programs. PMID:24980791

  11. Alexithymia and Acne Vulgaris: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Baykir, Murat; Ateş, Gülfem; Ekşioğlu, Meral

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess relationship between alexithymia and acne vulgaris in young people. Methods A hundred and eleven subjects between 15 and 25 years of age referred to out-patient clinic of dermatology with acne and 78 subjects applied to family physician for complaints other than acne were included in patient and control groups of the study, respectively. A questionnaire to determine demographic characteristics, an acne classification to determine severity of acne and Toronto Alexithymic Scale (TAS) to assess alexithymia were used. Results The mean scores of TAS were 52.7±10.8 and 51.7±10.7 in patient and control groups, respectively. Alexitymia was determined in 23.4% of the subjects in acne group and in 24.4% of control group. No significant differences were found between groups in terms of alexithymia, intermediate alexitymia and three-factors of TAS. Conclusion Alexithymia does not appear to be related to acne vulgaris. PMID:22216042

  12. Trachoma and Relative Poverty: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Habtamu, Esmael; Wondie, Tariku; Aweke, Sintayehu; Tadesse, Zerihun; Zerihun, Mulat; Zewdie, Zebideru; Callahan, Kelly; Emerson, Paul M.; Kuper, Hannah; Bailey, Robin L.; Mabey, David C. W.; Rajak, Saul N.; Polack, Sarah; Weiss, Helen A.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trachoma is widely considered a disease of poverty. Although there are many epidemiological studies linking trachoma to factors normally associated with poverty, formal quantitative data linking trachoma to household economic poverty within endemic communities is very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings Two hundred people with trachomatous trichiasis were recruited through community-based screening in Amhara Region, Ethiopia. These were individually matched by age and gender to 200 controls without trichiasis, selected randomly from the same sub-village as the case. Household economic poverty was measured through (a) A broad set of asset-based wealth indicators and relative household economic poverty determined by principal component analysis (PCA, (b) Self-rated wealth, and (c) Peer-rated wealth. Activity participation data were collected using a modified ‘Stylised Activity List’ developed for the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement Survey. Trichiasis cases were more likely to belong to poorer households by all measures: asset-based analysis (OR = 2.79; 95%CI: 2.06–3.78; p<0.0001), self-rated wealth (OR, 4.41, 95%CI, 2.75–7.07; p<0.0001) and peer-rated wealth (OR, 8.22, 95% CI, 4.59–14.72; p<0.0001). Cases had less access to latrines (57% v 76.5%, p = <0.0001) and higher person-to-room density (4.0 v 3.31; P = 0.0204) than the controls. Compared to controls, cases were significantly less likely to participate in economically productive activities regardless of visual impairment and other health problems, more likely to report difficulty in performing activities and more likely to receive assistance in performing productive activities. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrated a strong association between trachomatous trichiasis and relative poverty, suggesting a bidirectional causative relationship possibly may exist between poverty and trachoma. Implementation of the full SAFE strategy in the context of general improvements

  13. Case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Deapen, D.M.; Henderson, B.E.

    1986-05-01

    The authors conducted a study of 518 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients identified between 1977 and 1979 and 518 controls to investigate putative risk factors for this disease. Occupations at risk of electrical exposure were reported more often by patients (odds ratio (OR) = 3.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-13.0) as were electrical shocks producing unconsciousness (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.0-9.9). Although an overall excess of physical trauma associated with unconsciousness was observed in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0-2.4), the effect was inversely associated with duration of the unconscious episodes, suggesting an effect of recall bias. Only slight differences were found for surgical traumata to the nervous system. Parkinsonism was reported more often among first degree relatives of cases (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.1-7.6). The frequencies of prior poliomyelitis or other central nervous system diseases were similar for patients and controls. Occupational exposure to selected toxic substances was similar for patients and controls except for the manufacture of plastics (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.0-20.5), although few details of these exposures were provided. No differences in occupations with exposure to animal skins or hides were observed.

  14. Remifentanil for tracheal tube tolerance: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Machata, A M; Illievich, U M; Gustorff, B; Gonano, C; Fässler, K; Spiss, C K

    2007-08-01

    We assessed the minimal remifentanil dosage required for tracheal tube tolerance in awake and spontaneously breathing patients after major abdominal surgery. Forty postoperative patients received remifentanil 0.1 microg.kg(-1).min(-1), which was reduced in steps of 0.025 microg.kg(-1).min(-1) every 30 min. Respiratory response subscore of comfort scale (CSRR), Ramsay sedation scale (RSS), visual analogue scale (VAS), respiratory rate, and minute ventilation were recorded. Spontaneous respiration with no or little response to ventilation (CSRR 2) in co-operative, oriented and tranquil patients (RSS 2) was defined as the main outcome and study endpoint. Thirty-one patients (77.5%) reached a CSRR 2 and RSS 2 with remifentanil 0.025 microg.kg(-1).min(-1) and nine patients (22.5%) required remifentanil 0.05 microg.kg(-1).min(-1). Analgesia was sufficient in all patients (VAS = 30). Remifentanil 0.025-0.05 microg.kg(-1).min(-1) achieves satisfactory tracheal tube tolerance in awake and spontaneously breathing patients. PMID:17635427

  15. Preoperative embolization of primary bone tumors: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Roushan; Sharma, Raju; Rastogi, Shishir; Khan, Shah Alam; Jayaswal, Arvind; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the safety and effectiveness of preoperative embolization of primary bone tumors in relation to intraoperative blood loss, intraoperative blood transfusion volume and surgical time. METHODS: Thirty-three patients underwent preoperative embolization of primary tumors of extremities, hip or vertebrae before resection and stabilization. The primary osseous tumors included giant cell tumors, aneurysmal bone cyst, osteoblastoma, chondroblastoma and chondrosarcoma. Twenty-six patients were included for the statistical analysis (embolization group) as they were operated within 0-48 h within preoperative embolization. A control group (non-embolization group, n = 28) with bone tumor having similar histological diagnosis and operated without embolization was retrieved from hospital record for statistical comparison. RESULTS: The mean intraoperative blood loss was 1300 mL (250-2900 mL), the mean intraoperative blood transfusion was 700 mL (0-1400 mL) and the mean surgical time was 221 ± 76.7 min for embolization group (group I, n = 26). Non-embolization group (group II, n = 28), the mean intraoperative blood loss was 1800 mL (800-6000 mL), the mean intraoperative blood transfusion was 1400 mL (700-8400 mL) and the mean surgical time was 250 ± 69.7 min. On comparison, statistically significant (P < 0.001) difference was found between embolisation group and non-embolisation group for the amount of blood loss and requirement of blood transfusion. There was no statistical difference between the two groups for the surgical time. No patients developed any angiography or embolization related complications. CONCLUSION: Preoperative embolization of bone tumors is a safe and effective adjunct to the surgical management of primary bone tumors that leads to reduction in intraoperative blood loss and blood transfusion volume. PMID:27158424

  16. Somatosensory abnormalities in atypical odontalgia: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    List, Thomas; Leijon, Göran; Svensson, Peter

    2008-10-15

    Somatosensory function in patients with persistent idiopathic types of orofacial pain like atypical odontalgia (AO) is not well described. This study tested the hypothesis that AO patients have significantly more somatosensory abnormalities than age- and sex-matched controls. Forty-six AO patients and 35 controls participated. Inclusion criteria for AO were pain in a region where a tooth had been endodontically or surgically treated, persistent pain >6 months, and lack of clinical and radiological findings. The examination included qualitative tests and a battery of intraoral quantitative sensory testing (QST). Most AO patients (85%) had qualitative somatosensory abnormality compared with few controls (14%). The most common qualitative abnormalities in AO patients were found with pin-prick 67.4%, cold 47.8%, and touch 46.5% compared with 11.4%, 8.6%, and 2.9%, respectively, in the control group (P<0.001). Between-group differences were seen for many intraoral QST: mechanical detection threshold, mechanical pain threshold (pinprick), dynamic mechanical allodynia (brush), dynamic mechanical allodynia (vibration), wind-up ratio, and pressure pain threshold (P<0.01). In the trigeminal area, between-group differences in thermal thresholds were nonsignificant while differences in cold detection at the thenar eminence were significant. Individual somatosensory profiles revealed complex patterns with hyper- and hyposensitivity to intraoral QST. Between-group differences in pressure pain thresholds (P<0.02) were observed at the thenar eminence. In conclusion, significant abnormalities in intraoral somatosensory function were observed in AO, which may reflect peripheral and central sensitization of trigeminal pathways. More generalized sensitization of the nociceptive system may also be part of AO pathophysiology. PMID:18571324

  17. Congenital anosmia and emotion recognition: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lemogne, Cédric; Smadja, Julien; Zerdazi, El-Hadi; Soudry, Yaël; Robin, Marion; Berthoz, Sylvie; Limosin, Frédéric; Consoli, Silla M; Bonfils, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Patients with anosmia are not able to detect volatile chemicals signaling the presence of infectious and non-infectious environmental hazards, which typically elicit disgust and fear, respectively. Social animals may compensate a loss of olfaction by taking advantage of signals of threat that are produced by their conspecifics. Among humans and other primates, body postures and facial expressions are powerful cues conveying emotional information, including fear and disgust. The aim of the present study was to examine whether humans with agenesis of the olfactory bulb, a rare disorder characterized by congenital anosmia, would be more accurate in recognizing facial expressions of fear and disgust. A total of 90 participants with no history of mental disorder or traumatic brain injury were recruited, including 17 patients with congenital anosmia (10 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 36.5 ± 14.8 years), 34 patients with acquired anosmia (18 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 57.2 ± 11.8 years) and 39 healthy subjects (22 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 36.7 ± 13.2 years). For each patient with congenital anosmia, the agenesis of the olfactory bulb was ascertained through magnetic resonance imaging. Emotion recognition abilities were examined with a dynamic paradigm in which a morphing technique allowed displaying emotional facial expressions increasing in intensity over time. Adjusting for age, education, depression and anxiety, patients with congenital anosmia required similar levels of intensity to correctly recognize fear and disgust than healthy subjects while they displayed decreased error rates for both fear (mean difference [95% confidence interval] = -28.3% [-46.3%, -10.2%], P = 0.003) and disgust (mean difference [95% confidence interval] = -15.8% [-31.5%, -0.2%], P = 0.048). Furthermore, among patients with acquired anosmia, there was a negative correlation between duration of anosmia and the rate of errors for fearful (Spearman's ρ = -0.531, P

  18. Performance of Disease Risk Score Matching in Nested Case-Control Studies: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rishi J; Glynn, Robert J; Wang, Shirley; Gagne, Joshua J

    2016-05-15

    In a case-control study, matching on a disease risk score (DRS), which includes many confounders, should theoretically result in greater precision than matching on only a few confounders; however, this has not been investigated. We simulated 1,000 hypothetical cohorts with a binary exposure, a time-to-event outcome, and 13 covariates. Each cohort comprised 2 subcohorts of 10,000 patients each: a historical subcohort and a concurrent subcohort. DRS were estimated in the historical subcohorts and applied to the concurrent subcohorts. Nested case-control studies were conducted in the concurrent subcohorts using incidence density sampling with 2 strategies-matching on age and sex, with adjustment for additional confounders, and matching on DRS-followed by conditional logistic regression for 9 outcome-exposure incidence scenarios. In all scenarios, DRS matching yielded lower average standard errors and mean squared errors than did matching on age and sex. In 6 scenarios, DRS matching also resulted in greater empirical power. DRS matching resulted in less relative bias than did matching on age and sex at lower outcome incidences but more relative bias at higher incidences. Post-hoc analysis revealed that the effect of DRS model misspecification might be more pronounced at higher outcome incidences, resulting in higher relative bias. These results suggest that DRS matching might increase the statistical efficiency of case-control studies, particularly when the outcome is rare. PMID:27189330

  19. Factors associated with syphilis infection: a comprehensive analysis based on a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Li, S-L; Lin, H-L; Lin, Z-F; Zhu, X-Z; Fan, J-Y; Gao, K; Zhang, H-L; Lin, L-R; Liu, L-L; Tong, M-L; Niu, J-J; Yang, T-C

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to comprehensively evaluate factors that influence the likelihood of syphilis infection from risk-taking behaviours and medical conditions. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by enrolling 664 syphilis inpatients (excluding 11 congenital syphilis patients) and 800 sex- and age-matched controls. Medical histories, clinical data and patient interview data were collected and subjected to logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of syphilis in the study population was 3·9% (675/17,304). By univariate analysis, syphilis infection was associated with migration between cities, marital status, smoking, reproductive history, hypertension, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (P < 0·05). A high rate of syphilis-HBV co-infection was observed in HIV-negative patients and further research revealed an association between syphilis and specific HBV serological reactivity. Syphilis was also associated with the frequency, duration and status of tobacco use. Multivariate analysis indicated that syphilis infection was independently associated with migration between cities [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·368, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·048-1·785], current smoking (aOR 1·607, 95% CI 1·177-2·195), elevated BUN (aOR 1·782, 95% CI 1·188-2·673) and some serological patterns of HBV infection. To prevent the spread of infectious diseases, inpatients and blood donors should be tested for HIV, syphilis, HBV and HCV simultaneously. PMID:26467944

  20. A Case-Control Study on the Risk Factors for Meningococcal Disease among Children in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Mpalaouras, George; Vasilopoulou, Vasiliki; Katsioulis, Antonios; Rachiotis, George; Theodoridou, Kalliopi; Tzanakaki, Georgia; Syriopoulou, Vassiliki; Theodoridou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to identify environmental or genetic risk factors that are associated with invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in children in Greece. Methods A case-control study was performed in 133 children (44 cases and 89 controls) aged between 0–14 years, who were hospitalized in a children's hospital in Athens. Demographics and possible risk factors were collected by the use of a structured questionnaire. To investigate the association of mannose binding lectin (MBL) with IMD, a frequency analysis of the haplotypes of the MBL2 gene and quantitative measurement of MBL serum protein levels were performed using Nanogen NanoChipR 400 technology and immuno-enzyme techniques, respectively. Results The multivariate analysis revealed that changes in a child's life setting (relocation or vacation, OR = 7.16), paternal smoking (OR = 4.51), upper respiratory tract infection within the previous month (OR = 3.04) and the density of people in the house/100m2 (OR = 3.16), were independent risk factors associated with IMD. Overall 18.8% of patients had a MBL2 genotype with low functionality compared to 10.1% of healthy controls, but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.189). Conclusion Prevention strategies aimed at reducing parental smoking and other risk factors identified in this study could decrease the risk of IMD among children in Greece. PMID:27351742

  1. Chinese Eye Exercises and Myopia Development in School Age Children: A Nested Case-control Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Meng-Tian; Li, Shi-Ming; Peng, Xiaoxia; Li, Lei; Ran, Anran; Meng, Bo; Sun, Yunyun; Liu, Luo-Ru; Li, He; Millodot, Michel; Wang, Ningli

    2016-01-01

    Chinese eye exercises have been implemented in China as an intervention for controlling children's myopia for over 50 years. This nested case-control study investigated Chinese eye exercises and their association with myopia development in junior middle school children. Outcome measures were the onset and progression of myopia over a two-year period. Cases were defined as 1. Myopia onset (cycloplegic spherical equivalent ≤ -0.5 diopter in non-myopic children). 2. Myopia progression (myopia shift of ≥1.0 diopter in those who were myopic at baseline). Two independent investigators assessed the quality of Chinese eye exercises performance at the end of the follow-up period. Of 260 children at baseline (mean age was 12.7 ± 0.5 years), 201 were eligible for this study. There was no association between eye exercises and the risk of myopia-onset (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.24-2.21), nor myopia progression (OR = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.41-1.53). The group who performed high quality exercises had a slightly lower myopia progression of 0.15 D than the children who did not perform the exercise over a period of 2 years. However, the limited sample size, low dosage and performance quality of Chinese eye exercises in children did not result in statistical significance and require further studies. PMID:27329615

  2. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleh Bandi, Mir Farhad; Naserbakht, Morteza; Tabasi, Abdolreza; Marghaiezadeh, Azin; Riazee Esfahani, Mohammad; Golzarian, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sleep apnea is temporary cessation or absence of breathing during sleep. Significant increase in blood pressure is clinically seen in apneic episodes. The aim of this study was to examine sleep apnea syndrome as a risk factor for non- arthritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) in a case control study. Methods: Nineteen NAION patients (9 men and 10 women) and 31 age and sex matched control participants (18 men and 13 women) were evaluated for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Full night polysomnography was performed and proportion of OSAS was compared between the NAION patients and the control group. Other risk factors for NAION such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, ischemic heart disease and tobacco consumption were also evaluated. Chi square test and independent samples t-test were used for statistical analysis. Results: OF the 19 NAION patients, 18 (95%) had OSAS, and of the control group 13 (41.9%) had OSAS. The frequency of OSAS was significantly higher among NAION patients compared to the controls (p< 0.001). The Mean Respiratory Disturbance Index (RDI) was 37.65/h SD= 37.61/h in NAION patients and it was 15.05/h SD= 11.97/h (p= 0.018) in controls. The frequency of diabetes and hypertension was significantly higher in the NAION patients than in controls. Conclusion: based on the results of this study, it seems that there is an association between NAION and OSAS. PMID:26913263

  3. Determinants of Internet addiction among adolescents: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tsitsika, Artemis; Critselis, Elena; Louizou, Amalia; Janikian, Mari; Freskou, Aliki; Marangou, Evgenia; Kormas, Georgios; Kafetzis, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Internet Addiction (IA) is associated with adverse psychosocial development and mental disorders. The study aims were to evaluate the psychosocial profiles and psychiatric comorbidities associated with IA among adolescents. A case-control study was conducted among 129 adolescents in the outpatient setting of the Adolescent Health Unit of the Second University Department of Pediatrics in Athens, Greece. The case group consisted of 86 adolescents with IA as evaluated following psychiatric interview with two independent examiners. The control group consisted of 43 adolescents without IA, frequency matched for age and gender with case group participants. The study findings indicated that adolescents with IA were significantly more likely to have divorced parents (p = 0.012) and/or dysfunctional familial relationships (p < 0.0001). The proportion of adolescents with poor academic performance (p < 0.0001) and unexcused school absences (p = 0.004) was greater among those with IA. Moreover, approximately two-thirds of the adolescents with IA were engaged in high-risk behaviors (p < 0.0001). Finally, adolescents with IA were 3.89 times more likely to present with comorbid psychiatric conditions (CI 95%: 1.19-12.70), including depression (10.5 vs. 0%; p = 0.022). Adolescent IA is associated with deterred familial functions, poor academic performance, engagement in high-risk behaviors, and an augmented likelihood for depression. PMID:21516283

  4. Chinese Eye Exercises and Myopia Development in School Age Children: A Nested Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Meng-Tian; Li, Shi-Ming; Peng, Xiaoxia; Li, Lei; Ran, Anran; Meng, Bo; Sun, Yunyun; Liu, Luo-Ru; Li, He; Millodot, Michel; Wang, Ningli

    2016-01-01

    Chinese eye exercises have been implemented in China as an intervention for controlling children’s myopia for over 50 years. This nested case-control study investigated Chinese eye exercises and their association with myopia development in junior middle school children. Outcome measures were the onset and progression of myopia over a two-year period. Cases were defined as 1. Myopia onset (cycloplegic spherical equivalent ≤ −0.5 diopter in non-myopic children). 2. Myopia progression (myopia shift of ≥1.0 diopter in those who were myopic at baseline). Two independent investigators assessed the quality of Chinese eye exercises performance at the end of the follow-up period. Of 260 children at baseline (mean age was 12.7 ± 0.5 years), 201 were eligible for this study. There was no association between eye exercises and the risk of myopia-onset (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.24–2.21), nor myopia progression (OR = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.41–1.53). The group who performed high quality exercises had a slightly lower myopia progression of 0.15 D than the children who did not perform the exercise over a period of 2 years. However, the limited sample size, low dosage and performance quality of Chinese eye exercises in children did not result in statistical significance and require further studies. PMID:27329615

  5. [Risk factors for cutaneous melanoma: case-control study in Córdoba, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Lascano, Alejandro; Kuznitzky, Raquel; Cuestas, Eduardo; Mainardi, Claudio; Albertini, Ricardo; Borello, Adriana; Kurpis, María; Campana, Ricardo; Palazzo, Emilio

    2004-01-01

    Over the past years, considerable effort has been directed toward the identification of risk factors associated with the increasing incidence of cutaneous melanoma in white populations worldwide. Limited data are available from Argentine populations concerning risk factors for malignant melanoma. A case-control study was performed in Cordoba to estimate the risk factors for cutaneous malignant melanoma. The study group comprised 65 patients and 195 controls, matched by age and sex. The following risk factors were significant in the univariate analysis: European grandparents, blonde and brown hair, fair skin tone, light colored and brown eyes, presence of freckles and melanocytic nevi, severe sunburns before the age of 18 years, recreational sun exposure, family history of malignant melanoma. In the multivariate analysis, European grandparents (OR 2.27, IC95% 1.08 to 3.46), fair skin (OR 4.99, IC95% 2.72 to 7.28), severe sunburns before the age of 18 (OR 6.47, IC95% 5.29 to 7.65), and family history of malignant melanoma (OR 1525, IC95% 1467 to 1584), remain as independent risk factors for malignant melanoma. The results of the current study are similar to those obtained in other populations. PMID:15637827

  6. Probiotic Beverage with Soy Isoflavone Consumption for Breast Cancer Prevention: A Case-control Study.

    PubMed

    Toi, Masakazu; Hirota, Saya; Tomotaki, Ai; Sato, Nobuaki; Hozumi, Yasuo; Anan, Keisei; Nagashima, Takeshi; Tokuda, Yutaka; Masuda, Norikazu; Ohsumi, Shozo; Ohno, Shinji; Takahashi, Masato; Hayashi, Hironori; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate how beverages containing Lactobacillus casei Shirota (BLS) and soy isoflavone consumption since adolescence affected the incidence of breast cancer. In a population-based case-control study, three hundred and six cases with breast cancer and 662 controls aged 40 to 55 were matched for age and residential area and included in the analyses. Diet, lifestyle and other breast cancer risk factors were investigated using the self-administered questionnaire and interview. Odds ratios (ORs) of BLS and soy isoflavone consumption for breast cancer incidence were independently and jointly estimated using a conditional logistic regression. The ORs of BLS consumption (≥ four times a week against < four times a week) was 0.65 and statistically significant (p = 0.048). The analysis of association between soy consumption and breast cancer incidence showed the more the isoflavone consumption is, the lower the odds of breast cancer becomes. Adjusted ORs for breast cancer in the second, the third and the fourth quartiles of soy consumption against the first quartile were 0.76, 0.53 and 0.48, respectively (trend test, p = 0.0002). The BLS-isoflavone interaction was not statistically significant; however, a biological interaction was suggested. Regular consumption of BLS and isoflavones since adolescence was inversely associated with the incidence of breast cancer in Japanese women. PMID:23966890

  7. Occupational exposures and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Canadian case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Karunanayake, Chandima P; McDuffie, Helen H; Dosman, James A; Spinelli, John J; Pahwa, Punam

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective was to study the association between Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) and occupational exposures related to long held occupations among males in six provinces of Canada. Methods A population based case-control study was conducted from 1991 to 1994. Males with newly diagnosed NHL (ICD-10) were stratified by province of residence and age group. A total of 513 incident cases and 1506 population based controls were included in the analysis. Conditional logistic regression was conducted to fit statistical models. Results Based on conditional logistic regression modeling, the following factors independently increased the risk of NHL: farmer and machinist as long held occupations; constant exposure to diesel exhaust fumes; constant exposure to ionizing radiation (radium); and personal history of another cancer. Men who had worked for 20 years or more as farmer and machinist were the most likely to develop NHL. Conclusion An increased risk of developing NHL is associated with the following: long held occupations of faer and machinist; exposure to diesel fumes; and exposure to ionizing radiation (radium). The risk of NHL increased with the duration of employment as a farmer or machinist. PMID:18687133

  8. Psychosocial Stress and Risk of Myocardial Infarction: A Case-Control Study in Belgrade (Serbia)

    PubMed Central

    Vujcic, Isidora; Vlajinac, Hristina; Dubljanin, Eleonora; Vasiljevic, Zorana; Matanovic, Dragana; Maksimovic, Jadranka; Sipetic, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate which psychosocial risk factors show the strongest association with occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) in the population of Belgrade in peacetime, after the big political changes in Serbia. Methods A case-control study was conducted involving 154 consecutive newly diagnosed patients with MI, and 308 controls matched by gender, age, and place of residence. Results According to conditional logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for conventional coronary risk factors, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for work-related stressful events, financial stress, deaths and diseases, and general stress were 3.78 (1.83-7.81), 3.80 (1.96-7.38), 1.69 (1.03-2.78), and 3.54 (2.01-6.22), respectively. Among individual stressful life events, the following were independently related to MI: death of a close family member, 2.21 (1.01-4.84); death of a close friend, 42.20 (3.70-481.29); major financial problems, 8.94 (1.83-43.63); minor financial problems, 4.74 (2.02-11.14); changes in working hours, 4.99 (1.64-15.22); and changes in working conditions, 30.94 (5.43-176.31). Conclusions During this political transition period , stress at work, financial stress, and stress in general as they impacted the population of Belgrade, Serbia were strongly associated with occurence of MI. PMID:27274168

  9. A case-control study of dietary and nondietary factors in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Byers, T; Marshall, J; Graham, S; Mettlin, C; Swanson, M

    1983-10-01

    A case-control study is presented that estimates ovarian cancer risk for various factors, including diet. Data collected by interview between 1957 and 1965 for 274 white women aged 30-79 years with epithelial carcinoma of the ovary are compared to data similarly collected for 1,034 hospital controls. Relative risk estimates are presented for the total group as well as for premonopausal (ages 30-49) and postmenopausal (ages 50-79) are groups. In the total group, cancer risk increased with increasing age at first marriage (P less than .01) and previous history of benign breast disease (P less than 0.1), and risk decreased with increasing number of previous pregnancies (P less than .01). In the 50- to 79-year age group, a marginally significant trend for decreasing risk with increasing obesity was observed (P less than .10). There was no significant risk (i.e., P less than .10) associated with the consumption of alcohol, cigarettes, coffee, tea, total dietary protein, vitamin C, or fat at any age. In the 30- to 49-year age group only, increased risk (P less than .01) was seen in women reporting diets low in fiber and vitamin A from fruit and vegetable sources. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the apparent protective effect of vitamin A in the 30- to 49-year age group (but not dietary fiber) was independent of the nondietary factors analyzed in this study (P less than .05). PMID:6578362

  10. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM) children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children. Methods In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50) with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354). Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline. Results The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion and Significance We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case

  11. Calibration and seasonal adjustment for matched case-control studies of vitamin D and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gail, Mitchell H; Wu, Jincao; Wang, Molin; Yaun, Shiaw-Shyuan; Cook, Nancy R; Eliassen, A Heather; McCullough, Marjorie L; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Smith-Warner, Stephanie A; Ziegler, Regina G; Carroll, Raymond J

    2016-06-15

    Vitamin D measurements are influenced by seasonal variation and specific assay used. Motivated by multicenter studies of associations of vitamin D with cancer, we formulated an analytic framework for matched case-control data that accounts for seasonal variation and calibrates to a reference assay. Calibration data were obtained from controls sampled within decile strata of the uncalibrated vitamin D values. Seasonal sine-cosine series were fit to control data. Practical findings included the following: (1) failure to adjust for season and calibrate increased variance, bias, and mean square error and (2) analysis of continuous vitamin D requires a variance adjustment for variation in the calibration estimate. An advantage of the continuous linear risk model is that results are independent of the reference date for seasonal adjustment. (3) For categorical risk models, procedures based on categorizing the seasonally adjusted and calibrated vitamin D have near nominal operating characteristics; estimates of log odds ratios are not robust to choice of seasonal reference date, however. Thus, public health recommendations based on categories of vitamin D should also define the time of year to which they refer. This work supports the use of simple methods for calibration and seasonal adjustment and is informing analytic approaches for the multicenter Vitamin D Pooling Project for Breast and Colorectal Cancer. Published 2016. This article has been contributed to by US Government employees and their work is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:27133461

  12. Regulatory Cytokine Expression and Preterm Birth: Case-Control Study Nested in a Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Thaís Basso de Brito; Thomaz, Erika Barbara Abreu Fonseca; do Nascimento, Flávia Raquel Fernandes; dos Santos, Ana Paula Silva de Azevedo; Batista, Rosângela Lucena Fernandes; Bettiol, Heloisa; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Barbieri, Marco Antônio; da Silva, Antônio Augusto Moura

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently known risk factors explain only a small fraction of preterm birth (PTB). Previous PTB is one of the most important predictors. However, this information is not available in primiparous women. Few studies have looked at associations between regulatory cytokine expression (RCE) and PTB and the results are conflicting. Objective To investigate the association of RCE–Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β)–with PTB, and to assess whether bacterial vaginosis (BV) is involved in this relationship. Methods This was a case-control study nested in a prospective cohort–called BRISA. Women with singleton pregnancies were interviewed from 22 to 25 weeks of gestational age (GA). Women were recruited from health services in São Luís, Brazil. A blood sample was collected and gynecological examination was performed. Serum IL-10 and TGF-β were determined using cytometric bead array. Nugent score >7 and/or the presence of clue cells were used for BV diagnosis. All PTB estimated by ultrasound dating performed before 20 weeks of gestational age were considered cases. Controls were selected by simple random sampling from the rest of the cohort, at a 2:1 ratio. Different models were tested, according to the main independent variable. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated by regression analyses. Results The study included 327 pregnant women, 109 cases and 218 controls. No associations were found between BV and PTB (P = 1.44; 95%CI: 0.51–3.77). Low levels of IL-10 (OR = 2.92 95%CI: 1.38–6.16) or TGF-β (OR = 16.90 95%CI: 6.42–44.51) or both simultaneously (OR = 77.16 95%CI: 7.99–744.88) were associated with increasing odds of PTB, even after adjustment for confounding. Conclusion Decreased RCE is a risk factor for PTB. This relationship, however, is not triggered by the presence of BV. Low IL-10/TGF-β levels from 22 to 25 weeks of GA could be used as early predictors of PTB. We suggest

  13. National Case-Control Study of Homicide Offending and Methamphetamine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stretesky, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use and homicide. To carry out this study, data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities were combined to create a case-control design. The main exposure measure is methamphetamine use and the…

  14. Behavioural Comorbidity in Tanzanian Children with Epilepsy: A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Kathryn; Rogathe, Jane; Hunter, Ewan; Burton, Matthew; Swai, Mark; Todd, Jim; Neville, Brian; Walker, Richard; Newton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of and risk factors for behavioural disorders in children with epilepsy from a rural district of Tanzania by conducting a community-based case-control study. Method: One hundred and twelve children aged 6 to 14 years (55 males, 57 females; median age 12y) with active epilepsy (at least two…

  15. CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF ASBESTOS IN DRINKING WATER AND CANCER RISK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The authors conducted a case-control, interview-based study of the risk of developing cancer from asbestos in drinking water. The Everett, Washington, area was selected for the study because of the unusually high concentration of chrysotile asbestos in the drinking water it draws...

  16. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  17. Analgesics use and ESRD in younger age: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, Fokke J; Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Graf, Helmut; Lewis, Michael; Moehner, Sabine; Assmann, Anita; Kühl-Habich, Doerthe

    2007-01-01

    Background An ad hoc peer-review committee was jointly appointed by Drug Authorities and Industry in Germany, Austria and Switzerland in 1999/2000 to review the evidence for a causal relation between phenacetin-free analgesics and nephropathy. The committee found the evidence as inconclusive and requested a new case-control study of adequate design. Methods We performed a population-based case-control study with incident cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under the age of 50 years and four age and sex-matched neighborhood controls in 170 dialysis centers (153 in Germany, and 17 in Austria) from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2004. Data on lifetime medical history, risk factors, treatment, job exposure and intake of analgesics were obtained in a standardized face-to-face interview using memory aids to enhance accuracy. Study design, study performance, analysis plan, and study report were approved by an independent international advisory committee and by the Drug Authorities involved. Unconditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The analysis included 907 cases and 3,622 controls who had never used phenacetin-containing analgesics in their lifetime. The use of high cumulative lifetime dose (3rd tertile) of analgesics in the period up to five years before dialysis was not associated with later ESRD. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were 0.8 (0.7 – 1.0) and 1.0 (0.8 – 1.3) for ever- compared with no or low use and high use compared with low use, respectively. The same results were found for all analgesics and for mono-, and combination preparations with and without caffeine. No increased risk was shown in analyses stratifying for dose and duration. Dose-response analyses showed that analgesic use was not associated with an increased risk for ESRD up to 3.5 kg cumulative lifetime dose (98 % of the cases with ESRD). While the large subgroup of users with a lifetime dose up to 0.5 kg (278 cases and 1365 controls) showed a

  18. Analysis of Secondary Outcomes in Nested Case-Control Study Designs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ryung S.; Kaplan, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the main perceived advantages of using a case-cohort design compared to a nested case-control design in an epidemiologic study is the ability to evaluate with the same subcohort outcomes other than the primary outcome of interest. In this paper, we show that valid inferences about secondary outcomes can also be achieved in nested case-control studies by using the inclusion probability weighting method originally proposed by Samuelsen (1997) in combination with an approximate jackknife standard error that can be computed using existing software. Simulation studies demonstrate that when the sample size is sufficient, this approach yields valid type 1 error and coverage rates for the analysis of secondary outcomes in nested case-control designs. Interestingly, the statistical power of the nested case-control design was comparable to that of the case-cohort design when the primary and secondary outcomes were positively correlated. The proposed method is illustrated with data from a cohort in Cardiovascular Health Study to study the association of C-reactive protein levels and the incidence of congestive heart failure. PMID:24919979

  19. COMPARISON OF GEOCODING METHODS USED IN CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF AIR QUALITY AND BIRTH DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Accurate geocoding of maternal residence is critical to the success of an ongoing case-control study of exposure to five criteria air pollutants and the risk of selected birth defects in seven Texas counties between 1997 and 2000. The geocoded maternal residence a...

  20. DRINKING WATER SOURCE AND RISK OF BLADDER CANCER: A CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A water source component was included in a large population based case-control interview study of artificial sweetners. Relative risk from using chlorinated surface water sources is not elevated in the exposed groups, and there is no suggestion of a duration-response relationship...

  1. Toxoplasmosis gondii and schizophrenia: a case control study in a low Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence Mexican population

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are conflicting reports concerning the association of T. gondii infection and schizophrenia. Therefore, we determined such association in a Mexican population of Mestizo ethnicity. Through a case-control study design, 50 schizophrenic patients and 150 control subjects matched by gender, age, r...

  2. CASE-CONTROL CANCER MORTALITY STUDY AND CHLORINATION OF DRINKING WATER IN LOUISIANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several Louisiana parished (counties) using the Mississippi River for their source of public drinking water have the highest mortality rates (1950-69) in the United States for several cancers. Therefore, a case-control mortality study on cancer of the liver, brain, pancreas, blad...

  3. Nutritional Status of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): A Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe-García, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have problems of food selectivity, implying risks of nutritional deficiencies. The aim was to compare intakes of macro and micronutrients and body mass index in ASD and typically developing (TD) children. In a case--control study, 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements were completed for ASD…

  4. Inflammatory Markers Are Increased in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes: The SEARCH Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K.; West, Nancy A.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.; Liese, Angela D.; Marcovina, Santica M.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Hamman, Richard F.; Dabelea, Dana

    2010-01-01

    Context: Increased inflammation may contribute to type 1 diabetes (T1D) complications. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the association of inflammation with obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in youth with T1D. Design: This was a cross-sectional study of youth with and without T1D. Setting: The study was conducted in Colorado and South Carolina. Patients: SEARCH Case-Control participants with T1D [n = 553, mean age 15 yr (range 10–22), median duration 2.7 yr] and without diabetes [n = 215, mean age 15 yr (range 10–22)]. Intervention: This was an observational study. Main Outcome Measures: IL-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), fibrinogen, and leptin were measured. Results: Inflammatory markers were evaluated by diabetes status, quartiles of glycated hemoglobin, and obesity using multiple linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, sex, study site, race/ethnicity, T1D duration, body mass index, and pubertal status. Compared with controls, youth with T1D had higher IL-6 and fibrinogen levels at all levels of glycemia and obesity, and hsCRP levels were significantly higher in youth with T1D in the top three quartiles of glycated hemoglobin (≥7.2%) and among normal-weight subjects. Leptin was lower in youth with poor glycemic control. Higher hsCRP and fibrinogen were correlated with higher total and LDL cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B in youth with T1D, whereas higher fibrinogen was correlated with higher LDL and apolipoprotein B in controls. Conclusions: T1D is characterized by excess inflammation, independent of adiposity and glycemic control. Even T1D youth in good glycemic control had higher levels of IL-6 and fibrinogen than controls. Elevated inflammatory markers were associated with an atherogenic lipid profile, which may contribute to accelerated atherosclerosis in youth with T1D. PMID:20371668

  5. Self-Efficacy After Life Skills Training: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rezayat, Fatemeh; Dehghan Nayeri, Nahid

    2013-01-01

    Background: Nursing students’ self-efficacy is a predictor for their educational progress. Students, who believe that they can be successful in their studies, are more confident. Therefore, many universities have focused on life skills training programs to improve the mental health of their students. Objectives: This study was conducted to evaluate and compare self-efficacy in two groups of nursing students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS). One group of students was trained on life skill programs, and the second group was not trained on the issue. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was conducted on two groups of nursing students in TUMS in the late 2012. The case group (n = 112) had passed life skills training course, and the control group (n = 139) was not trained on the issue. Data was collected using a questionnaire containing 12 questions about demographic features, and the Sherer’s general self-efficacy questionnaire. Data analysis was performed using independent sample t-test, Chi-square, odds ratio, and Fisher’s exact test. Results: In the untrained and trained groups, 23% and 8% of the students had very high self-efficacy, respectively. The overall mean scores of self-efficacy were 41.99 ± 9.31 and 38.99 ± 10.48 in the trained and untrained groups, respectively (P = 0.015), and the higher mean score indicates lower level of self-efficacy. A significant difference was also found between the self-efficacy and family income (P = 0.029). Conclusions: The present study showed that life skills training program did not affect self-efficacy of nursing students. Perhaps, the methods used in education were influencing and then, more effective techniques such as role-play and group discussion should be substituted in life skills training. PMID:25414884

  6. Evaluation of oxidant-antioxidant status in tissue samples in oral cancer: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Kumar Chandan; Austin, Ravi David; Shrivastava, Deepti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Imbalances between the oxidant-antioxidant status have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of lipid peroxidation and antioxidants in the tissue samples of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients of different clinical stages in comparison with the healthy controls. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was designed with 20 new histopathologically proven oral carcinoma patients and an equal number of age, sex, and tobacco chewing habit matched healthy subjects. Their tissue samples were subjected to evaluation of lipid peroxidation product and antioxidant enzymes, namely, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) using spectrophotometric methods. The data are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. The statistical comparisons between the study groups were performed by independent Student's unpaired t-test and one-way analysis of variance. Post-hoc analysis was performed for within study group comparisons. Karl Pearson correlation was performed for the biochemical parameters within the group and between the groups. For statistically significant correlations, simple linear regression was performed using SPSS (α=0.05). Results: Significant reduction in lipid peroxidation (P < 0.001) SOD and CAT (P < 0.001) was observed in the tissue of OSCC patients as compared with the healthy controls. On the other hand, reduced GSH and GPx were significantly increased in tumor samples. Conclusion: Reduced lipid peroxidation and increased activity of reduced GSH and GPx provides the suitable environment for the local growth and invasion of the tumor and metastasis in the later stages. Among the antioxidant enzymes, GSH reductase appears to have a profound role in carcinogenesis and thus it can be considered as potential prognostic marker. PMID:27076834

  7. Bayesian analysis on meta-analysis of case-control studies accounting for within-study correlation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Chu, Haitao; Luo, Sheng; Nie, Lei; Chen, Sining

    2015-12-01

    In retrospective studies, odds ratio is often used as the measure of association. Under independent beta prior assumption, the exact posterior distribution of odds ratio given a single 2 × 2 table has been derived in the literature. However, independence between risks within the same study may be an oversimplified assumption because cases and controls in the same study are likely to share some common factors and thus to be correlated. Furthermore, in a meta-analysis of case-control studies, investigators usually have multiple 2 × 2 tables. In this article, we first extend the published results on a single 2 × 2 table to allow within study prior correlation while retaining the advantage of closed-form posterior formula, and then extend the results to multiple 2 × 2 tables and regression setting. The hyperparameters, including within study correlation, are estimated via an empirical Bayes approach. The overall odds ratio and the exact posterior distribution of the study-specific odds ratio are inferred based on the estimated hyperparameters. We conduct simulation studies to verify our exact posterior distribution formulas and investigate the finite sample properties of the inference for the overall odds ratio. The results are illustrated through a twin study for genetic heritability and a meta-analysis for the association between the N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) acetylation status and colorectal cancer. PMID:22143403

  8. Determinants of mortality from severe dengue in Brazil: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Giselle Hentzy; de Fátima Duarte, Eliane; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Although increases in severity of mortality from dengue infection have been observed in Brazil, their determinants are not fully known. A case-control study was conducted by using the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, including patients with severe dengue during 2000-2005. Cases were defined as patients that died and controls were those who survived. Hierarchical multivariate logistic regression was performed. During the study period, there were 12,321 severe cases of dengue and 1,062 deaths. Factors independently associated with death included age ≥ 50 years (odds ratio [OR] = 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.59-3.29), < 4 years of schooling (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.47-2.28), a rural area (OR =2.84, 95% CI = 2.19-3.69), hospitalization (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.17-1.73), and a high hematocrit (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.85-3.28). Factors associated with a lower chance of dying were female sex (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.67-0.87), history of previous dengue (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62-0.99), positive tourniquet test result (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.33-0.66), laboratory diagnosis of dengue (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.61-0.92), and a platelet count of 50,000-100,000 cells/mm(3) (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.36-0.87). The risk profile identified in this study should serve to direct public health interventions to minimize deaths. PMID:23400577

  9. Aspirin Use Associated With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a Total Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Piao; Lin, Feng-Cheng; Lee, Johnny Kuang-Wu; Lee, Charles Tzu-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of aspirin use and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) risk is unclear. This study determined whether use of any individual compound is associated with ALS risk by conducting a total population-based case-control study in Taiwan. Methods A total of 729 patients with newly diagnosed ALS who had a severely disabling disease certificate between January 1, 2002, and December 1, 2008, comprised the case group. These cases were compared with 7290 sex-, age-, residence-, and insurance premium-matched controls. Drug use by each Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code was analyzed using conditional logistic regression models. False discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted P values were reported in order to avoid inflating false positives. Results Of the 1336 compounds, only the 266 with use cases exceeding 30 in our database were included in the screening analysis. Without controlling for steroid use, the analysis failed to reveal any compound that was inversely associated with ALS risk according to FDR criteria. After controlling for steroid use, we found use of the following compounds to be associated with ALS risk: aspirin, diphenhydramine (one of the antihistamines), and mefenamic acid (one of the NSAIDs). A multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was independently inversely associated with ALS risk after controlling for diphenhydramine, mefenamic acid, and steroid use. The inverse association between aspirin and ALS was present predominately in patients older than 55 years. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that aspirin use might reduce the risk of ALS, and the benefit might be more prominent for older people. PMID:25721071

  10. Determinants of Visceral Leishmaniasis: A Case-Control Study in Gedaref State, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Niven; Elhag, Mousab Siddig; Elbadawi, Mobarak Elnour; Hammam, Omer; Mumina, Ann; Atia, Atia Abdalla; Etard, Jean-François; Ritmeijer, Koert; Chappuis, François

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving knowledge on local determinants of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is crucial to guide the development of relevant control strategies. This study aimed to identify individual and household level determinants of primary VL in 24 highly endemic villages of Tabarak Allah hospital’s catchment area, Gedaref State, Sudan. Methods From September 2012 to July 2013, in an unmatched case-control design, 198 patients with primary VL were compared to 801 controls free of VL symptoms and with a negative VL rapid test. Using random spatial sampling, controls were selected with a distribution of age, sex and village of residence proportionate to the distribution of the target population. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Results Children and men were at higher risk of VL. Reporting VL patient(s) in the household in the previous year was the strongest VL risk factor. In a multivariate analysis, VL risk increased with household size, sleep location (outside the yard, not in the farm), evening outdoor activities in the rainy season (playing, watching TV, radio listening), use of ground nut oil as animal repellent and of smoke of Acacia seyal as indoor repellent, presence of dogs in the yard at night, Acacia nilotica in the yard’s immediate surroundings and of a forest at eye range. VL risk appeared to decrease with the use of drinking water sources other than the village water tank, a buffer distance from the adjacent house yard, and with the presence of animals other than dogs in the yard at night. In contrast with previous studies, housing factors, mosquito-net use, black cotton soil, ethnicity, socioeconomic index, presence of Balanites aegyptica and Azadirachta indica in the yard were not independent VL determinants. Discussion and conclusion Although these results do not provide evidence of causality, they provide useful suggestions for guiding further intervention studies on VL preventive measures. PMID:26544177

  11. The Relevance of Maternal Socioeconomic Characteristics for Low Birth Weight – a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Altenhöner, T.; Köhler, M.; Philippi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The number of children born underweight (low birth weight, LBW) is increasing despite extensive prevention and screening programmes. The cost is high for the health system, and affected children are burdened with health predictors that can affect them negatively throughout their lives. This study investigates to what extent socioeconomic factors, in addition to known medical causes and the health behaviour of pregnant women, influence LBW. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study 131 mothers of singletons with a birth weight ≤ 2500 g (cases) and 323 mothers of normal birth weight babies (controls) were interviewed with respect to socioeconomic status, health behaviour and stress in the workplace. Medical data were collected by specialist staff using a questionnaire. Results: Independent of medical diagnosis and health behaviour, women with lower level education (OR [95 % CI] = 2.24 [1.12; 4.51]) and those who were not working (OR [95 % CI] = 1.82 [1.10; 3.00]) were more likely to have an LBW baby. No effect was shown for immigrant background (OR [95 % CI] = 1.14 [0.59; 2.21]) or stress in the workplace (OR [95 % CI] = 1.17 [0.90; 1.51]). Discussion and Conclusion: These results show that the association between social and health inequalities starts from before birth. In order to reduce the rising number of babies born underweight, socioeconomic determinants in the care and supervision of pregnant women should systematically receive more attention to enable appropriate early preventive strategies to be implemented. PMID:27065486

  12. Serum interleukin-6 associated with hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Waka; Cologne, John B; Fujiwara, Saeko; Suzuki, Gen; Hayashi, Tomonori; Niwa, Yasuharu; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Ueda, Keiko; Tsuge, Masataka; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory markers have been associated with increased risk of several cancers, including colon, lung, breast and liver, but the evidence is inconsistent. We conducted a nested case-control study in the longitudinal cohort of atomic-bomb survivors. The study included 224 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cases and 644 controls individually matched to cases on gender, age, city and time and method of serum storage, and countermatched on radiation dose. We measured C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6 using stored sera obtained within 6 years before HCC diagnosis from 188 HCC cases and 605 controls with adequate volumes of donated blood. Analyses with adjustment for hepatitis virus infection, alcohol consumption, smoking habit, body mass index (BMI) and radiation dose showed that relative risk (RR) of HCC [95% confidence interval (CI)] in the highest tertile of CRP levels was 1.94 (0.72-5.51) compared to the lowest tertile (p = 0.20). RR of HCC (95% CI) in the highest tertile of IL-6 levels was 5.12 (1.54-20.1) compared to the lowest tertile (p = 0.007). Among subjects with BMI > 25.0 kg/m(2) , a stronger association was found between a 1-standard deviation (SD) increase in log IL-6 and HCC risk compared to subjects in the middle quintile of BMI (21.3-22.9 kg/m(2) ), resulting in adjusted RR (95% CI) of 3.09 (1.78-5.81; p = 0.015). The results indicate that higher serum levels of IL-6 are associated with increased HCC risk, independently of hepatitis virus infection, lifestyle-related factors and radiation exposure. The association is especially pronounced among subjects with obesity. PMID:23784949

  13. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrheal Disease in Ghanaian Infants and Children: An Outpatient Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Krumkamp, Ralf; Sarpong, Nimako; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Adelkofer, Julia; Loag, Wibke; Eibach, Daniel; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Tannich, Egbert; May, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diarrheal diseases are among the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in children worldwide, especially in resource-poor areas. This case-control study assessed the associations between gastrointestinal infections and diarrhea in children from rural Ghana. Methods Stool samples were collected from 548 children with diarrhea and from 686 without gastrointestinal symptoms visiting a hospital from 2007–2008. Samples were analyzed by microscopy and molecular methods. Results The organisms most frequently detected in symptomatic cases were Giardia lamblia, Shigella spp./ enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), and Campylobacter jejuni. Infections with rotavirus (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 8.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.3–16.6), C. parvum/hominis (aOR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.4–5.2) and norovirus (aOR = 2.0; 95%CI: 1.3–3.0) showed the strongest association with diarrhea. The highest attributable fractions (AF) for diarrhea were estimated for rotavirus (AF = 14.3%; 95% CI: 10.9–17.5%), Shigella spp./EIEC (AF = 10.5%; 95% CI: 3.5–17.1%), and norovirus (AF = 8.2%; 95% CI 3.2–12.9%). Co-infections occurred frequently and most infections presented themselves independently of other infections. However, infections with E. dispar, C. jejuni, and norovirus were observed more often in the presence of G. lamblia. Conclusions Diarrheal diseases in children from a rural area in sub-Saharan Africa are mainly due to infections with rotavirus, Shigella spp./EIEC, and norovirus. These associations are strongly age-dependent, which should be considered when diagnosing causes of diarrhea. The presented results are informative for both clinicians treating gastrointestinal infections as well as public health experts designing control programs against diarrheal diseases. PMID:25738935

  14. Risk factors for winter outbreak of acute diarrhoea in France: case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Letrilliart, L.; Desenclos, J. C.; Flahault, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the potential role of consumption of shellfish (particularly raw oysters) and tap water in the winter epidemic of acute diarrhoea in France. DESIGN: Population based, case-control study during the 1995-6 winter epidemic of acute diarrhoea in France. SETTING: A national network comprising 1% of general practitioners in France. SUBJECTS: 568 pairs of cases and controls consulting in general practice and interviewed by 209 doctors from 26 December 1995 to 31 January 1996. Cases and controls were matched for age, doctor, and time of consultation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adjusted relative risk of diarrhoea estimated from conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: The risk of acute diarrhoea was not increased in people who had recently eaten raw oysters (odds ratio 1.1; 95% confidence interval 0.9% to 1.4%) or other shellfish such as clams, cockles, and mussels, or in those people who usually consumed tap water rather than bottled water (0.8; 0.6% to 1.1%). The risk was, however, increased in people who had had recent contact wit ha person with diarrhoea either within the household (adjusted odds ratio 5.0) or in the workplace (3.1), and in people who lived with a child < or = 2 years of age (1.6). Recent treatment with either oral penicillin or cephalosporin was also independently associated with acute diarrhoea in winter. CONCLUSIONS: The winter epidemic of acute diarrhoea in France is probably not caused by consumption of either shellfish or tap water. A viral aetiology, however, is suggested by the speed with which the acute diarrhoea is transmitted. PMID:9448526

  15. Both Acute and Chronic Placental Inflammation Are Overrepresented in Term Stillbirths: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hulthén Varli, Ingela; Petersson, Karin; Kublickas, Marius; Papadogiannakis, Nikos

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To elucidate differences in the frequency and severity of acute chorioamnionitis (CAM) and chronic villitis in placentas from stillborns compared with liveborns at term and to evaluate other risk factors and placental findings. Design. Case-control study. Setting. All delivery wards in major Stockholm area. Population or Sample. Placentas from stillborn/case (n = 126) and liveborn/control (n = 273) neonates were prospectively collected between 2002 and 2005. Methods. CAM was assessed on a three-grade scale based on the presence and distribution of polymorphonuclear leucocytes in the chorion/amnion. The presence of vasculitis and funisitis was recorded separately. Chronic villitis was diagnosed by the presence of mononuclear cells in the villous stroma. Relevant clinical data were collected from a specially constructed, web-based database. The statistic analyses were performed using multivariable logistic regression. Results. CAM (especially severe, AOR: 7.39 CI: 3.05–17.95), villous immaturity (AOR: 7.17 CI: 2.66–19.33), villitis (<1 % AOR: 4.31 CI: 1.16–15.98; ≥1 %, AOR: 3.87 CI: 1.38–10.83), SGA (AOR: 7.52 CI: 3.06–18.48), and BMI >24.9 (AOR: 2.06 CI: 1.21–3.51) were all connected to an elevated risk of term stillbirth. Conclusions. We found that CAM, chronic villitis, villous immaturity, SGA, and maternal overweight, but not vasculitis or funisitis are independently associated with risk for stillbirth at term. PMID:22966214

  16. Neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy in very preterm babies: case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, D. J.; Hope, P. L.; Johnson, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy among very preterm babies and in particular the associations independent of the coexistence of antenatal and intrapartum factors. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Oxford health region. SUBJECTS: Singleton babies born between 1984 and 1990 at less than 32 weeks' gestation who survived to discharge from hospital: 59 with cerebral palsy and 234 randomly selected controls without cerebral palsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adverse neonatal factors expressed as odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Factors associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy after adjustment for gestational age and the presence of previously identified antenatal and intrapartum risk factors were patent ductus arteriosus (odds ratio 2.3; 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.5), hypotension (2.3; 1.3 to 4.7), blood transfusion (4.8; 2.5 to 9.3), prolonged ventilation (4.8; 2.5 to 9.0), pneumothorax (3.5; 1.6 to 7.6), sepsis (3.6; 1.8 to 7.4), hyponatraemia (7.9; 2.1 to 29.6) and total parenteral nutrition (5.5; 2.8 to 10.5). Seizures were associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy (10.0; 4.1 to 24.7), as were parenchymal damage (32; 12.4 to 84.4) and appreciable ventricular dilatation (5.4; 3.0 to 9.8) detected by cerebral ultrasound. CONCLUSION: A reduction in the rate of cerebral palsy in very preterm babies requires an integrated approach to management throughout the antenatal, intrapartum, and neonatal periods. PMID:9040385

  17. Risk Factors for Maternal Mortality in Rural Tigray, Northern Ethiopia: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Godefay, Hagos; Byass, Peter; Graham, Wendy J.; Kinsman, John; Mulugeta, Afework

    2015-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality continues to have devastating impacts in many societies, where it constitutes a leading cause of death, and thus remains a core issue in international development. Nevertheless, individual determinants of maternal mortality are often unclear and subject to local variation. This study aims to characterise individual risk factors for maternal mortality in Tigray, Ethiopia. Methods A community-based case-control study was conducted, with 62 cases and 248 controls from six randomly-selected rural districts. All maternal deaths between May 2012 and September 2013 were recruited as cases and a random sample of mothers who delivered in the same communities within the same time period were taken as controls. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent determinants of maternal mortality. Results Four independent individual risk factors, significantly associated with maternal death, emerged. Women who were not members of the voluntary Women’s Development Army were more likely to experience maternal death (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.04–4.11), as were women whose husbands or partners had below-median scores for involvement during pregnancy (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.14–4.18). Women with a pre-existing history of other illness were also at increased risk (OR 5.58, 95% CI 2.17–14.30), as were those who had never used contraceptives (OR 2.58, 95% CI 1.37–4.85). Previous pregnancy complications, a below-median number of antenatal care visits and a woman’s lack of involvement in health care decision making were significant bivariable risks that were not significant in the multivariable model. Conclusions The findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing maternal mortality need to focus on encouraging membership of the Women’s Development Army, enhancing husbands’ involvement in maternal health services, improving linkages between maternity care and other disease-specific programmes and ensuring that women with previous

  18. Bayes and empirical Bayes methods for reduced rank regression models in matched case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Langseth, Hilde; Engel, Lawrence S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Matched case-control studies are popular designs used in epidemiology for assessing the effects of exposures on binary traits. Modern studies increasingly enjoy the ability to examine a large number of exposures in a comprehensive manner. However, several risk factors often tend to be related in a non-trivial way, undermining efforts to identify the risk factors using standard analytic methods due to inflated type I errors and possible masking of effects. Epidemiologists often use data reduction techniques by grouping the prognostic factors using a thematic approach, with themes deriving from biological considerations. We propose shrinkage type estimators based on Bayesian penalization methods to estimate the effects of the risk factors using these themes. The properties of the estimators are examined using extensive simulations. The methodology is illustrated using data from a matched case-control study of polychlorinflated biphenyls in relation to the etiology of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. PMID:26575519

  19. Bayes and empirical Bayes methods for reduced rank regression models in matched case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Satagopan, Jaya M; Sen, Ananda; Zhou, Qin; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Langseth, Hilde; Engel, Lawrence S

    2016-06-01

    Matched case-control studies are popular designs used in epidemiology for assessing the effects of exposures on binary traits. Modern studies increasingly enjoy the ability to examine a large number of exposures in a comprehensive manner. However, several risk factors often tend to be related in a nontrivial way, undermining efforts to identify the risk factors using standard analytic methods due to inflated type-I errors and possible masking of effects. Epidemiologists often use data reduction techniques by grouping the prognostic factors using a thematic approach, with themes deriving from biological considerations. We propose shrinkage-type estimators based on Bayesian penalization methods to estimate the effects of the risk factors using these themes. The properties of the estimators are examined using extensive simulations. The methodology is illustrated using data from a matched case-control study of polychlorinated biphenyls in relation to the etiology of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:26575519

  20. Determining exposure underreporting in pharmacoepidemiologic case-control studies: methods and example.

    PubMed

    Lane, D A; Kramer, M S

    1999-12-01

    Many pharmacoepidemiologic case-control studies have to rely on what their subjects relate about the drugs to which they have been exposed and the durations of exposure. There is often good reason to suppose that not all exposures are actually reported and to suspect reporting rates may differ between cases and controls. We introduce two procedures designed to determine the extent of underreporting of exposures. These procedures make use of data from the case-control study itself, as well as sales, demographic and market research data for a reference population to which study subjects belong. We apply these procedures to data from the International Primary Pulmonary Hypertension Study (IPPHS) linking anorexigens with PPH. We show that exposures to the anorectic agent dexfenfluramine beginning in or before 1989 were highly significantly underrepresented in the data for IPPHS controls, relative to exposures beginning after 1989 (P<0.01); there is no corresponding evidence for relative underrepresentation of early exposure for IPPHS cases. However, data on control exposures from 1990 to 1992 are consistent with the hypothesis that these exposures were not underreported to the IPPHS. Subject to certain key modeling assumptions and the availability of some supplemental data, it is possible to investigate the extent of underreporting of exposure in a pharmacoepidemiologic case-control study and in particular to determine if study results are likely to have been affected by recall bias. PMID:10580792

  1. Drug induced immune haemolytic anaemia in the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study.

    PubMed

    Garbe, Edeltraut; Andersohn, Frank; Bronder, Elisabeth; Klimpel, Andreas; Thomae, Michael; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Hildebrandt, Martin; Späth-Schwalbe, Ernst; Grüneisen, Andreas; Mayer, Beate; Salama, Abdulgabar; Kurtal, Hanife

    2011-09-01

    Drug-induced immune haemolytic anaemia is a rare but serious condition. This study investigated the possibility of drug aetiology of immune haemolytic anaemia (IHA) in 134 patients with new onset of IHA who were identified in the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study between 2000 and 2009. Single drugs related to IHA in three or more patients and assessed more than once as a certain or probable cause of IHA in a standardized causality assessment included diclofenac, fludarabine, oxaliplatin, ceftriaxone and piperacillin. In a case-control study including all 124 IHA cases developed in outpatient care and 731 controls, significantly increased odds ratios (OR) were observed for beta-lactam antibiotics (OR=8·8; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3·2-25·2), cotrimoxazole (OR=6·5; CI 1·1-37·9), ciprofloxacin (OR=6·9, CI 1·3-38·5), fludarabine (OR=22·2; CI: 2·8-454·5) and lorazepam (OR=5·3; CI: 1·2-21·2). Excluding new onset cases with a chronic IHA disease course, an increased risk became also apparent for diclofenac with an OR of 3·1 (CI 1·3-7·0). This is the first case-control study investigating drugs as risk factors for IHA. It corroborates an increased risk for several drugs that have been implicated as a cause of IHA in the standardized causality assessment of individual cases. PMID:21749359

  2. Risk factors for neural tube defects in Riyadh City, Saudi Arabia: Case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Mustafa A M; Murshid, Waleed R; Mohamed, Ashry Gad; Ignacio, Lena C; de Jesus, Julie E; Baabbad, Rubana; El Bushra, Hassan M

    2014-01-01

    Both genetic and non-genetic environmental factors are involved in the etiology of neural tube defects (NTD) which affect 0.5-2/1000 pregnancies worldwide. This study aimed to explore the risk factors for the development of NTD in Saudi population, and highlight identifiable and preventable causes. Similar studies are scarce in similar populations ofthe Arabian Peninsula and North Africa. This is an unmatched concurrent case-control study including NTD cases born at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh during a 4-year period (2002-2006). The case-control study included 25 cases and 125 controls (case: control ratio of 1:5). Years of formal education, employment, household environment (including availability of air conditioning) and rate of parental consanguinity did not differ between mothers of cases and controls. Significantly higher proportion of mothers of cases had history of stillbirth compared to control mothers (16% vs 4.1%, P=0.02). Also family history of hydrocephalus and congenital anomalies were more prevalent in cases than controls (P values=0.0000 and 0.003, respectively). There was significant protective effect of periconceptional folic acid consumption both prior to conception (OR 0.02, 95% CI 0.00-0.07) and during the first 6 weeks of conception (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.04-0.39). Further research, including a larger cohort, is required to enable ascertainment of gene-nutrient and gene environment interactions associated with NTD in Saudi Arabia. PMID:27493405

  3. Case-control study of renal cell carcinoma in relation to occupation, smoking, and alcohol consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Brownson, R.C.

    1988-05-01

    A case-control study based on data from a cancer registry was conducted to evaluate the effects of smoking, alcohol use, and occupation on renal cell cancer risk. Information was obtained for 326 male and female cases and 978 age- and sex-matched controls. Elevated risks were identified for cigarette smokers and for men employed as truck drivers. No relationship between alcohol consumption and renal cancer was observed.

  4. Telomere Length and Ischemic Stroke in Women: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Schürks, Markus; Prescott, Jennifer; Dushkes, Rimma; De Vivo, Immaculata; Rexrode, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Telomere shortening has been implicated in cardiovascular disease. However, prospective data on the association between relative telomere length (RTL) and ischemic stroke are scarce and inconclusive. Methods We used a nested case-control design among women participating in the prospective Nurses’ Health Study. Participants provided blood samples in 1990 and were followed through 2006. Women with confirmed incident ischemic stroke were matched to controls by age, smoking, postmenopausal status, and postmenopausal hormone use. Quantitative PCR was used to determine RTL in genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the risk of ischemic stroke associated with RTL, using RTL quartiles and as dichotomous according to the median. Results Data on RTL were available from 504 case-control pairs. Results did not suggest an association between RTL and ischemic stroke. The odds ratio for ischemic stroke was 0.82 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.52–1.32) comparing lowest to the highest RTL quartile and 0.90 (95% CI 0.65–1.24) comparing RTL below the median to RTL above the median. Associations were unchanged after additional adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors. Further analyses suggested an association between RTL and fatal ischemic stroke (54 case-control pairs; lowest vs. highest quartile OR=1.99, 95%CI 0.26–14.9); however, results were statistically insignificant. Conclusion In this large nested case-control study among women RTL was not associated with ischemic stroke. In light of the varying study results in the literature on the association between telomere length and stroke additional research is warranted. PMID:23521613

  5. 77 FR 12598 - Notice Correction; A Multi-Center International Hospital-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI) The Federal Register notice published on February 24, 2012 (77 FR 11136) announcing the submission to OMB of the project titled, ``A multi-center international hospital-based case-control study of lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI)'' was submitted with...

  6. The efficacy of Japanese encephalitis vaccine in Henan, China: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Luo, D; Yin, H; Xili, L; Song, J; Wang, Z

    1994-12-01

    A population based case-control study to evaluate Japanese encephalitis (JE) vaccine efficacy was carried out in Gusi County, Henan Province, China from June to September in 1991. This study showed that the JE vaccine had a strong protective effect. The estimate of the vaccine efficacy was 78% (95% CI = 16-94%). An unimmunized child was at 4.54 times greater risk of developing JE than were fully immunized children during the study period. The present study may have underestimated the vaccine efficacy due to evaluation based on routine vaccination which might have been affected by vaccination management and the local cold chain system. PMID:7667706

  7. Healthcare Associated Infections of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Case-Control-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhenjiang; Peng, Yang; Chen, Xiaofeng; Bi, Jiaqi; Li, Ying; Ye, Xiaohua; Shi, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most widespread and dangerous pathogens in healthcare settings. We carried out this case-control-control study at a tertiary care hospital in Guangzhou, China, to examine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, risk factors and clinical outcomes of MRSA infections. Methods A total of 57 MRSA patients, 116 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) patients and 102 S. aureus negative patients were included in this study. We applied the disk diffusion method to compare the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 18 antibiotics between MRSA and MSSA isolates. Risk factors of MRSA infections were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. We used Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression analysis to assess the hospital stay duration and fatality for patients with MRSA infections. Results The MRSA group had significantly higher resistance rates for most drugs tested compared with the MSSA group. Using MSSA patients as controls, the following independent risk factors of MRSA infections were identified: 3 or more prior hospitalizations (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3–5.8, P = 0.007), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR 5.9, 95% CI 1.7–20.7, P = 0.006), and use of a respirator (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.0–12.9, P = 0.046). With the S. aureus negative patients as controls, use of a respirator (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.0–13.9, P = 0.047) and tracheal intubation (OR 8.2, 95% CI 1.5–45.1, P = 0.016) were significant risk factors for MRSA infections. MRSA patients had a longer hospital stay duration and higher fatality in comparison with those in the two control groups. Conclusions MRSA infections substantially increase hospital stay duration and fatality. Thus, MRSA infections are serious issues in this healthcare setting and should receive more attention from clinicians. PMID:26470023

  8. Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, risky behaviors, and motorcycle injuries: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Abedi, Leili; Mahini, Minoo; Amiri, Shahrokh; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the association of motorcycle traffic injuries with motorcycle riding behavior and subtypes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) while controlling for individual correlates of motorcycle traffic injuries. Methods A case-control study was carried out in 298 patients with motorcycle trauma along with 151 control patients admitted to the Shohada and Imam Reza university hospitals as the two referral specialty centers in the East Azarbyjan Province of Iran in 2013. The Persian version of the Motorcycle Riding Behavior Questionnaire and the Persian version of Conner’s Adult ADHD Rating Scales (the self-report short version) were used to assess riding behavior and screen for adult ADHD, respectively. The scale has four subscales, comprising subscale A (inattention), subscale B (hyperactivity, impulsivity), subscale C (A + C), and subscale D (ADHD index). The statistical analysis was done using Stata version 11. Results All subjects were male and aged 13–79 years. Approximately 54% of the participants were married and 13% had academic education. Approximately 18% of the motorcycle riders stated that their motorcycle riding was only for fun purposes. More than two thirds of the participants did not have a motorcycle riding license. Variables found to be significantly associated with motorcycle injuries in bivariate analysis included age, marital status, educational level, having a motorcycle riding license, using a helmet while riding, daily amount of riding, riding just for fun, riding behavior score, and ADHD scale scores. It was found in multivariate analysis that if the ADHD index (subscale D) score was used to assess the association of ADHD with motorcycle injuries, a protective role for ADHD was observed. However, the two other subscales showed a different predictive pattern for subscale A versus subscale B, with only subscale B increasing the likelihood of motorcycle traffic injuries. The score based

  9. Severity of Scorpion Stings in the Western Brazilian Amazon: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Amanda M.; Sampaio, Vanderson S.; Mendonça, Iran; Fé, Nelson F.; Sachett, Jacqueline; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos L.; Feitosa, Esaú; Wen, Fan Hui; Lacerda, Marcus; Monteiro, Wuelton

    2015-01-01

    Background Scorpion stings are a major public health problem in Brazil, with an increasing number of registered cases every year. Affecting mostly vulnerable populations, the phenomenon is not well described and is considered a neglected disease. In Brazil, the use of anti-venom formulations is provided free of charge. The associate scorpion sting case is subject to compulsory reporting. This paper describes the epidemiology and identifies factors associated with severity of scorpions stings in the state of Amazonas, in the Western Brazilian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings This study included all cases of scorpion stings in the state of Amazonas reported to the Brazilian Diseases Surveillance System from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2014. A case-control study was conducted to identify factors associated with scorpions sting severity. A total of 2,120 cases were reported during this period. The mean incidence rate in the Amazonas was 7.6 per 100,000 inhabitants/year. Scorpion stings showed a large spatial distribution in the state and represent a potential occupational health problem for rural populations. There was a positive correlation between the absolute number of cases and the altimetric river levels in the Central (p<0.001; Rs = 0.479 linear) and Southwest (p = 0.032; linear Rs = 0.261) regions of the state. Cases were mostly classified as mild (68.6%), followed by moderate (26.8%), and severe (4.6%). The overall lethality rate was 0.3%. Lethality rate among children ≤10 years was 1.3%. Age <10 years [OR = 2.58 (95%CI = 1.47–4.55; p = 0.001)], stings occurring in the rural area [OR = 1.97 (95%CI = 1.18–3.29; p = 0.033) and in the South region of the state [OR = 1.85 (95%CI = 1.17–2.93; p = 0.008)] were independently associated with the risk of developing severity. Conclusions/Significance Scorpion stings show an extensive distribution in the Western Brazilian Amazon threatening especially rural populations, children ≤10 in particular. Thus

  10. Risk factors for HIV infection among circumcised men in Uganda: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ediau, Michael; Matovu, Joseph KB; Byaruhanga, Raymond; Tumwesigye, Nazarius M; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Male circumcision (MC) reduces the risk of HIV infection. However, the risk reduction effect of MC can be modified by type of circumcision (medical, traditional and religious) and sexual risk behaviours post-circumcision. Understanding the risk behaviours associated with HIV infection among circumcised men (regardless of form of circumcision) is critical to the design of comprehensive risk reduction interventions. This study assessed risk factors for HIV infection among men circumcised through various circumcision approaches. Methods This was a case-control study which enrolled 155 cases (HIV-infected) and 155 controls (HIV-uninfected), all of whom were men aged 18–35 years presenting at the AIDS Information Center for HIV testing and care. The outcome variable was HIV sero-status. Using SPSS version 17, multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors independently associated with HIV infection. Results Overall, 83.9% among cases and 56.8% among controls were traditionally circumcised; 7.7% of cases and 21.3% of controls were religiously circumcised while 8.4% of cases and 21.9% of controls were medically circumcised. A higher proportion of cases than controls reported resuming sexual intercourse before complete wound healing (36.9% vs. 14.1%; p<0.01). Risk factors for HIV infection prior to circumcision were:being in a polygamous marriage (AOR: 6.6, CI: 2.3–18.8) and belonging to the Bagisu ethnic group (AOR: 6.1, CI: 2.6–14.0). After circumcision, HIV infection was associated with: being circumcised at >18 years (AOR: 5.0, CI: 2.4–10.2); resuming sexual intercourse before wound healing (AOR: 3.4, CI: 1.6–7.3); inconsistent use of condoms (AOR: 2.7, CI: 1.5–5.1); and having sexual intercourse under the influence of peers (AOR: 2.9, CI: 1.5–5.5). Men who had religious circumcision were less likely to have HIV infection (AOR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2–0.9) than the traditionally circumcised but there was no statistically

  11. Ethnicity and Cutaneous Melanoma in the City of Sao Paulo, Brazil: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Olinda C.; Gianini, Reinaldo José; Gonçalves, Fernanda T.; Francisco, Guilherme; Festa-Neto, Cyro; Sanches, José Antonio; Gattas, Gilka J. F.; Chammas, Roger; Eluf-Neto, José

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last century the incidence of cutaneous melanoma has increased worldwide, a trend that has also been observed in Brazil. The identified risk factors for melanoma include the pattern of sun exposure, family history, and certain phenotypic features. In addition, the incidence of melanoma might be influenced by ethnicity. Like many countries, Brazil has high immigration rates and consequently a heterogenous population. However, Brazil is unique among such countries in that the ethnic heterogeneity of its population is primarily attributable to admixture. This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of European ethnicity to the risk of cutaneous melanoma in Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings We carried out a hospital-based case-control study in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo, Brazil. We evaluated 424 hospitalized patients (202 melanoma patients and 222 control patients) regarding phenotypic features, sun exposure, and number of grandparents born in Europe. Through multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found the following variables to be independently associated with melanoma: grandparents born in Europe—Spain (OR = 3.01, 95% CI: 1.03–8.77), Italy (OR = 3.47, 95% CI: 1.41–8.57), a Germanic/Slavic country (OR = 3.06, 95% CI: 1.05–8.93), or ≥2 European countries (OR = 2.82, 95% CI: 1.06–7.47); eye color—light brown (OR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.14–3.84) and green/blue (OR = 4.62; 95% CI 2.22–9.58); pigmented lesion removal (OR = 3.78; 95% CI: 2.21–6.49); no lifetime sunscreen use (OR = 3.08; 95% CI: 1.03–9.22); and lifetime severe sunburn (OR = 1.81; 95% CI: 1.03–3.19). Conclusions Our results indicate that European ancestry is a risk factor for cutaneous melanoma. Such risk appears to be related not only to skin type, eye color, and tanning capacity but also to others specific characteristics of European populations introduced in the New World by European immigrants. PMID:22558444

  12. Association Between Helicobacter pylori Infection and Risk of Periodontal Diseases in Han Chinese: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ming; Wu, Wu-zhou; Wang, Rong; Liu, Chang-jun; Li, Bei; Shi, Xin-li; Du, Han-song; Tan, Hua-bing

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was performed to test the association between Helicobacter pylori (HP) and periodontal disease (PD). Material/Methods This was a case-control study in a comprehensive hospital, including all patients with newly diagnosed PD between 2012 and 2014 as cases and all patients without PD as controls, thorough periodontal examinations. Those who tested positive for HP were examined by means of polymerase chain reaction. Single and multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the data using SPSS 19.0 software. Results This case-control study included 212 Han Chinese non-smoking adults. The results indicated that HP-positive status significantly increased the risk of PD (2.63 times higher (odds ratio [OR]=2.63; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.48–4.67). After adjustment for age, sex, level of education, physical exercise, body mass index, and history of alcohol and diabetes mellitus, this association remained significantly (OR=2.82, 95% CI=1.55–5.13). Conclusions PD might be associated with HP infection in adults and HP infection may be a significant and independent risk factor for PD. PMID:26753766

  13. Challenges in Recruiting Aging Women Holocaust Survivors to a Case Control Study of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shai; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are underrepresented in medical research for many reasons, including recruitment difficulties. Recruitment of older adults for research studies is often a time-consuming process and can be more challenging when the study involves older adults with unique exposures to traumatic events and from minority groups. The current article provides a brief overview of (a) challenges encountered while recruiting aging women Holocaust survivors for a case control study and (b) strategies used for meeting those challenges. The case group comprised women Holocaust survivors who were recently diagnosed with breast cancer and the control group comprised healthy women from a Holocaust-survivor community in Israel. PMID:26020580

  14. Primary postpartum haemorrhage in an Australian tertiary hospital: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Henry, Amanda; Birch, Mary-Rose; Sullivan, Elizabeth A; Katz, Sue; Wang, Yueping Alex

    2005-06-01

    The present study aimed to determine the incidence of primary postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) after vaginal birth at an Australian tertiary hospital, and to investigate risk factors for primary PPH at this hospital. A case-control study of women delivering vaginally at a tertiary hospital from February to June 2003 was performed. Demographic, antenatal, intrapartum, treatment and outcome data were abstracted from patient records. The study population comprised 125 cases and 125 controls, with a primary PPH rate of 12.1 per 100 vaginal births. Risk factors on multivariate analysis were past history of PPH, second stage labour > 60 min, forceps delivery, and incomplete placenta/ragged membranes. PMID:15904450

  15. Design and methods in a multi-center case-control interview study.

    PubMed Central

    Hartge, P; Cahill, J I; West, D; Hauck, M; Austin, D; Silverman, D; Hoover, R

    1984-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study in ten areas of the United States in which a total of 2,982 bladder cancer patients and 5,782 population controls were interviewed. We employed a variety of existing and new techniques to reduce bias and to monitor the quality of data collected. We review here many of the design elements and field methods that can be generally applied in epidemiologic studies, particularly multi-center interview studies, and explain the reasons for our selection of the methods, instruments, and procedures used. PMID:6689843

  16. Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Olsson, Ann C; Kromhout, Hans; Peters, Susan; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Brüske, Irene; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil E; Gustavsson, Per; Plato, Nils; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Simonato, Lorenzo; Forastiere, Francesco; Siemiatycki, Jack; Parent, Marie-Élise; Tardón, Adonina; Boffetta, Paolo; Zaridze, David; Chen, Ying; Field, John K; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Lissowska, Jolanta; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Rudnai, Peter; Fabiánová, Eleonóra; Stanescu Dumitru, Rodica; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt

    2015-01-15

    Bricklayers may be exposed to several lung carcinogens, including crystalline silica and asbestos. Previous studies that analyzed lung cancer risk among these workers had several study design limitations. We examined lung cancer risk among bricklayers within SYNERGY, a large international pooled analysis of case-control studies on lung cancer and the joint effects of occupational carcinogens. For men ever employed as bricklayers we estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for study center, age, lifetime smoking history and employment in occupations with exposures to known or suspected lung carcinogens. Among 15,608 cases and 18,531 controls, there were 695 cases and 469 controls who had ever worked as bricklayers (OR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.28-1.68). In studies using population controls the OR was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.32-1.81, 540/349 cases/controls), while it was 1.24 (95% CI: 0.93-1.64, 155/120 cases/controls) in hospital-based studies. There was a clear positive trend with length of employment (p < 0.001). The relative risk was higher for squamous (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.42-1.98, 309 cases) and small cell carcinomas (OR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.44-2.20, 140 cases), than for adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.95-1.43, 150 cases) (p-homogeneity: 0.0007). ORs were still elevated after additional adjustment for education and in analyses using blue collar workers as referents. This study provided robust evidence of increased lung cancer risk in bricklayers. Although non-causal explanations cannot be completely ruled out, the association is plausible in view of the potential for exposure to several carcinogens, notably crystalline silica and to a lesser extent asbestos. PMID:24861979

  17. Effectiveness of reactive oral cholera vaccination in rural Haiti: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ivers, Louise C; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Teng, Jessica E; Almazor, Charles P; Jerome, J Gregory; Ternier, Ralph; Boncy, Jacques; Buteau, Josiane; Murray, Megan B; Harris, Jason B; Franke, Molly F

    2015-01-01

    Background Between April and June 2012, a reactive cholera vaccination campaign was conducted in Haiti using an oral inactivated bivalent whole-cell vaccine (BivWC). Methods We conducted a case-control study to estimate field effectiveness of the vaccine. Cases had acute watery diarrhea, sought treatment at one of three participating cholera treatment units from October 24, 2012 through March 9, 2014, and had a stool sample positive for cholera by culture. For each case, four controls (individuals who did not seek treatment for acute watery diarrhea) were matched by location of residence, calendar time, and age. We also conducted a bias-indicator case-control study to assess the likelihood of bias in the vaccine effectiveness (VE) study. Findings During the study period, 114 eligible individuals presented with acute watery diarrhea and were enrolled. 47 were analyzed as cases in the VE case-control study and 42 as cases in the bias-indicator study. In multivariable analyses, VE was 63% [95% confidence interval (CI): 8%–85%] by self-reported vaccination and 58% [95% CI: 13%–80%] for verified vaccination. Neither self-reported nor verified vaccination was significantly associated with non-cholera diarrhea (VE: 18% [95% CI: −208%–−78%] by self-report and −21% [95%CI: −238%–57%] for verified vaccination). Interpretation BivWC oral cholera vaccine was effective in protecting against cholera in Haiti during the study period –from 4 through 24 months after vaccination. Vaccination is an important component of epidemic cholera control efforts. Funding National Institutes of Health, Delivering Oral Vaccines Effectively project, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. PMID:25701994

  18. The Impact of Trachomatous Trichiasis on Quality of Life: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Habtamu, Esmael; Wondie, Tariku; Aweke, Sintayehu; Tadesse, Zerihun; Zerihun, Mulat; Zewudie, Zebideru; Gebeyehu, Wondimu; Callahan, Kelly; Emerson, Paul M.; Kuper, Hannah; Bailey, Robin L.; Mabey, David C. W.; Rajak, Saul N.; Polack, Sarah; Weiss, Helen A.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trachomatous trichiasis is thought to have a profound effect on quality of life (QoL), however, there is little research in this area. We measured vision and health-related QoL in a case-control study in Amhara Region, Ethiopia. Methodology/Principal Findings We recruited 1000 adult trichiasis cases and 200 trichiasis-free controls, matched to every fifth trichiasis case on age (+/- two years), sex and location. Vision-related quality of life (VRQoL) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were measured using the WHO/PBD-VF20 and WHOQOL-BREF questionnaires. Comparisons were made using linear regression adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic status. Trichiasis cases had substantially lower VRQoL than controls on all subscales (overall eyesight, visual symptom, general functioning and psychosocial, p<0.0001), even in the sub-group with normal vision (p<0.0001). Lower VRQoL scores in cases were associated with longer trichiasis duration, central corneal opacity, visual impairment and poor contrast sensitivity. Trichiasis cases had lower HRQoL in all domains (Physical-health, Psychological, Social, Environment, p<0.0001), lower overall QoL (mean, 34.5 v 64.6; p<0.0001) and overall health satisfaction (mean, 38.2 v 71.7; p<0.0001). This association persisted in a sub-group analysis of cases and controls with normal vision. Not having a marriage partner (p<0.0001), visual impairment (p = 0.0068), daily labouring (p<0.0001), presence of other health problems (p = 0.0018) and low self-rated wealth (p<0.0001) were independently associated with lower overall QoL scores in cases. Among cases, trichiasis caused 596 (59%) to feel embarrassed, 913 (91.3%) to worry they may lose their remaining eyesight and 681 (68.1%) to have sleep disturbance. Conclusions/Significance Trachomatous trichiasis substantially reduces vision and health related QoL and is disabling, even without visual impairment. Prompt trichiasis intervention is needed both to prevent vision loss and

  19. Factors affecting occurrence of gastric varioliform lesions: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Tian-Hui; Zheng, Ru-Hua; Gao, Qin-Yan; Kong, Xuan; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Ge, Zhi-Zheng; Chen, Ying-Xuan; Zou, Xiao-Ping; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the factors influencing the occurrence of gastric varioliform lesions (GVLs) and their possible link with gastric cancer. METHODS: A 1:1 matched case-control study was performed to retrospectively analyze data from 1638 chronic gastritis patients who had undergone gastroscopy at one of two Chinese hospitals between 2009 and 2014. Patients with GVLs (cases) were compared to those without such lesions (controls). Endoscopic and pathological findings were recorded, along with interview information on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, medical, drug and family histories, lifestyle and eating habits. The association between each factor and the occurrence of GVLs was estimated, and then multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the independent factors. RESULTS: The frequency and severity of glandular atrophy, intestinal metaplasia (IM) and low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia were significantly increased in the GVL group (P < 0.01). Overall analysis showed that H. pylori infection [3.051 (2.157, 4.317), P <0.001], allergic respiratory diseases [3.636 (2.183, 6.055), P < 0.001], work-related stress [2.019 (1.568, 2.600), P < 0.001], irregular meals [2.300 (1.462, 3.619), P < 0.001], high intake of spicy food [1.754 (1.227, 2.507), P = 0.002] and high intake of fresh fruit [0.231 (0.101, 0.529), P = 0.001] were significantly correlated with the occurrence of GVLs (positively, except for the latter). Stratified analyses indicated that pickled food consumption in patients over 50 years old [7.224 (2.360, 22.115), P = 0.001] and excessive smoking in men [2.013 (1.282, 3.163), P = 0.002] were also positively correlated, and that, for antral GVLs, vegetable consumption [0.491 (0.311, 0.776), P = 0.002] was negatively correlated. CONCLUSION: Seven risk factors and two protective factors are determined for GVLs, which were found to be associated with premalignant abnormalities. PMID:27298565

  20. Case-control study: soft-tissue sarcomas and exposure to phenoxyacetic acids or chlorophenols.

    PubMed Central

    Hardell, L.; Sandström, A.

    1979-01-01

    In 1977 a number of patients with soft-tissue sarcomas and previous exposure to phenoxyacetic acids were described. Following from these observations a matched case-control study was made. Exposure to chlorophenols was also included in this study. The results showed that exposure to phenoxyacetic acids or chlorophenols gave an approximately 6-fold increase in the risk for this type of tumour. It was not possible to determine, however, whether the carcinogenic effect was exerted by these compounds or by impurities such as chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans that in almost all cases were part of the commercial preparations. PMID:444410

  1. Risk factors for femicide-suicide in abusive relationships: results from a multisite case control study.

    PubMed

    Koziol-McLain, Jane; Webster, Daniel; McFarlane, Judith; Block, Carolyn Rebecca; Ulrich, Yvonne; Glass, Nancy; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    2006-02-01

    The killing of women by men who then take their own lives (femicide-suicide) is the most common form of homicide-suicide. This study identified femicide-suicide risk factors in an 11-city case-control study of femicide in the United States. Perpetrator, victim, relationship, and incident characteristics were analyzed for femicide-suicide cases (n = 67) and controls (n = 356, women living in the community with nonfatal physical abuse) using logistic regression modeling. Two risk factors emerged that were unique to femicide-suicides cases compared to overall femicide risk analyses: prior perpetrator suicide threats and victims having ever been married to the perpetrator. PMID:16494130

  2. Risk factors for neuroleptic malignant syndrome. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Keck, P E; Pope, H G; Cohen, B M; McElroy, S L; Nierenberg, A A

    1989-10-01

    A number of risk factors have been proposed for the development of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, but these have not been subjected to controlled study. To address this problem, we performed a case-control study comparing 18 patients with neuroleptic malignant syndrome and 36 matched neuroleptic-treated control patients with no known history of the syndrome to identify potential risk factors. Patients with neuroleptic malignant syndrome displayed significantly greater psychomotor agitation, received significantly higher doses of neuroleptics at greater rates of dosage increase, and received a greater number of intramuscular injections than controls. PMID:2572206

  3. Occupational risk factors and Alzheimer's disease: a case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Shalat, S.L.; Seltzer, B.; Baker, E.L. Jr.

    1988-12-01

    A case-control study was conducted to assess occupational exposure to organic solvents and lead as risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. All case subjects were diagnosed at a Veterans Administration Hospital in Bedford, Massachusetts. Control subjects were selected from Massachusetts voter registration lists and matched by sex, year of birth, and town of residence. Information on occupational history was assessed by mailed questionnaire sent to the spouse or next of kin of the study subject. A total of 98 case and 162 control subjects were included in the matched analysis. No apparent association of increased risk of Alzheimer's disease was observed for ever having occupational exposure to organic solvents or lead.

  4. Diesel exhaust exposure and lung cancer: a case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, N.E.L.; Wynder, E.L.

    1984-06-01

    The presence of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the particulate phase of diesel engine exhaust has raised questions concerning potential carcinogenicity of diesel exhaust exposure. A case-control study was conducted of 502 male lung cancer cases and 502 controls without tobacco-related diseases to investigate the association of occupational diesel exhaust exposure and lung cancer. Diesel exhaust exposure was appraised by job title. The results show no association between diesel exhaust exposure and risk of lung cancer. They do, however, show the strong association between smoking and lung cancer and as such highlight the importance of smoking information in studies of occupational effect on lung cancer risk.

  5. Suicide by people in a community justice pathway: population-based nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    King, Carlene; Senior, Jane; Webb, Roger T; Millar, Tim; Piper, Mary; Pearsall, Alison; Humber, Naomi; Appleby, Louis; Shaw, Jenny

    2015-08-01

    The elevated risk of suicide in prison and after release is a well-recognised and serious problem. Despite this, evidence concerning community-based offenders' suicide risk is sparse. We conducted a population-based nested case-control study of all people in a community justice pathway in England and Wales. Our data show 13% of general population suicides were in community justice pathways before death. Suicide risks were highest among individuals receiving police cautions, and those having recent, or impending prosecution for sexual offences. Findings have implications for the training and practice of clinicians identifying and assessing suicidality, and offering support to those at elevated risk. PMID:26159602

  6. A case-control study of the effect of environmental sanitation on diarrhoea morbidity in Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Young, B; Briscoe, J

    1988-01-01

    A case-control design has been applied in the evaluation of improved environmental sanitation on diarrhoeal diseases in rural Malawi. The study demonstrates the feasibility of using such an approach to evaluate two levels of water supply and sanitation service quickly and at moderate cost. Sample sizes would need to be increased substantially to evaluate multiple levels of service or to investigate interactions between water supply and sanitation. The results indicate that children living in families who use good quality water supplies and latrines experience 20% less diarrhoea as reported to the health clinics during the warm, rainy season. PMID:3418292

  7. A case-control study of the effect of environmental sanitation on diarrhoea morbidity in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Young, B; Briscoe, J

    1988-03-01

    A case-control design has been applied in the evaluation of improved environmental sanitation on diarrhoeal diseases in rural Malawi. The study demonstrates the feasibility of using such an approach to evaluate two levels of water supply and sanitation service quickly and at moderate cost. Sample sizes would need to be increased substantially to evaluate multiple levels of service or to investigate interactions between water supply and sanitation. The results indicate that children living in families who use good quality water supplies and latrines experience 20% less diarrhoea as reported to the health clinics during the warm, rainy season. PMID:3418292

  8. Pancreas cancer, tobacco smoking and consumption of alcoholic beverages: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Partanen, T J; Vainio, H U; Ojajärvi, I A; Kauppinen, T P

    1997-06-01

    A population-based case-control study investigated pancreas cancer in relation to consumption of alcoholic beverages, tobacco smoking and pancreatitis, utilizing historical proxy data for 662 decedent Finnish pancreas cancer cases and 1770 cancer controls. Tobacco smoking increased the risk, with an attributable case fraction of 0.27. The data are consistent with a joint effect of early and late stage carcinogens in tobacco smoke. Consumption of distilled beverages did not increase risk, but heavy drinking of wine or beer did. History of pancreatitis was a strong risk factor. PMID:9177454

  9. [Recurrent myocardial infarctions: specific changes in biomarkers and in myocardial remodeling (case-control study)].

    PubMed

    Volkova, E G; Malykhina, O P; Levashov, S Iu

    2007-01-01

    Basing on a case-control study (n=81) with the use of standard methods of myocardial infarction verification, examination of hemogram, troponin T, C-reactive protein, echocardiography data it was established that markers of myocardial infarction (troponin T level) and inflammation (C reactive protein level, lymphopenia) during recurrent infarctions are less pronounced than during first infarctions. Remodeling in recurrent infarctions had the following specific characteristics: increase of left ventricular end diastolic dimension, myocardial mass index, diastolic dysfunction and stroke volume with unchanged ejection fraction. PMID:18260891

  10. Case-control study on uveal melanoma (RIFA): rational and design

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Pokrzywniak, Andrea; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Bornfeld, Norbert; Stang, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Background Although a rare disease, uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with an incidence rate of up to 1.0 per 100,000 persons per year in Europe. Only a few consistent risk factors have been identified for this disease. We present the study design of an ongoing incident case-control study on uveal melanoma (acronym: RIFA study) that focuses on radiofrequency radiation as transmitted by radio sets and wireless telephones, occupational risk factors, phenotypical characteristics, and UV radiation. Methods/Design We conduct a case-control study to identify the role of different exposures in the development of uveal melanoma. The cases of uveal melanoma were identified at the Division of Ophthalmology, University of Essen, a referral centre for tumours of the eye. We recruit three control groups: population controls, controls sampled from those ophthalmologists who referred cases to the Division of Ophthalmology, University of Duisburg-Essen, and sibling controls. For each case the controls are matched on sex and age (five year groups), except for sibling controls. The data are collected from the study participants by short self-administered questionnaire and by telephone interview. During and at the end of the field phase, the data are quality-checked. To estimate the effect of exposures on uveal melanoma risk, we will use conditional logistic regression that accounts for the matching factors and allows to control for potential confounding. PMID:15318944

  11. Drug exposure and psoriasis vulgaris: case-control and case-crossover studies.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Arnon D; Bonneh, Dan Y; Reuveni, Haim; Vardy, Daniel A; Naggan, Lechaim; Halevy, Sima

    2005-01-01

    Intake of drugs is considered a risk factor for psoriasis. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between drugs and psoriasis. A case-control study including 110 patients who were hospitalized for extensive psoriasis was performed. A control group (n = 515) was defined as patients who had undergone elective surgery. A case-crossover study included 98 patients with psoriasis. Exposure to drugs was assessed during a hazard period (3 months before hospitalization) and compared to a control period in the patient's past. Data on drug sales were extracted by data mining techniques. Multivariate analyses were performed by logistic regression and conditional logistic regression. In the case-control study, psoriasis was associated with benzodiazepines (OR 6.9), organic nitrates (OR 5.0), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (OR 4.0) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (OR 3.7). In the case-crossover study, psoriasis was associated with ACE inhibitors (OR 9.9), beta-blockers (OR 9.9), dipyrone (OR 4.9) and NSAIDs (OR 2.1). Extensive psoriasis may be associated with intake of ACE inhibitors, NSAIDs or beta-blockers. PMID:16191849

  12. Does coal mine dust present a risk for lung cancer. A case-control study of U. S. coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.G.; Amandus, H.; Attfield, M.; Green, F.Y.; Vallyathan, V.

    1983-11-01

    The relationship between the risk of lung cancer mortality and coal mine dust exposure under control by cigarette smoking status is evaluated. Two case-control studies based on 317 white male lung cancer mortality cases are presented. A one-to-one matched-case design allows examination of the risk of coal mine dust exposure and cigarette smoking. A two-to-one matched-case design was employed to examine the lung cancer risk of coal mine dust exposure independent of cigarette smoking. Based upon these data, no evidence of a coal mine dust exposure-lung cancer risk was found, although the expected increased risk for lung cancer in cigarette smokers was observed. There was no evidence of an interactive effect between cigarette smoking and coal mine dust exposure. (13 refs.)

  13. Diagnostic Microbiologic Methods in the GEMS-1 Case/Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Panchalingam, Sandra; Antonio, Martin; Hossain, Anowar; Mandomando, Inacio; Ochieng, Ben; Oundo, Joseph; Ramamurthy, T.; Tamboura, Boubou; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Petri, William; Houpt, Eric; Murray, Patrick; Prado, Valeria; Vidal, Roberto; Steele, Duncan; Strockbine, Nancy; Sansonetti, Philippe; Glass, Roger I.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Tauschek, Marija; Svennerholm, Ann-Marie; Kotloff, Karen; Levine, Myron M.; Nataro, James P.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the etiology of moderate-to-severe diarrhea among children in high mortality areas of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, we performed a comprehensive case/control study of children aged <5 years at 7 sites. Each site employed an identical case/control study design and each utilized a uniform comprehensive set of microbiological assays to identify the likely bacterial, viral and protozoal etiologies. The selected assays effected a balanced consideration of cost, robustness and performance, and all assays were performed at the study sites. Identification of bacterial pathogens employed streamlined conventional bacteriologic biochemical and serological algorithms. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli were identified by application of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for enterotoxigenic, enteroaggregative, and enteropathogenic E. coli. Rotavirus, adenovirus, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia enterica, and Cryptosporidium species were detected by commercially available enzyme immunoassays on stool samples. Samples positive for adenovirus were further evaluated for adenovirus serotypes 40 and 41. We developed a novel multiplex assay to detect norovirus (types 1 and 2), astrovirus, and sapovirus. The portfolio of diagnostic assays used in the GEMS study can be broadly applied in developing countries seeking robust cost-effective methods for enteric pathogen detection. PMID:23169941

  14. Leptospira Exposure and Patients with Liver Diseases: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in patients suffering from liver disease has been poorly studied. Information about risk factors associated with infection in liver disease patients may help in the optimal planning of preventive measures. We sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence and patients with liver diseases, and to determine the characteristics of the patients with Leptospira exposure. We performed a case-control study of 75 patients suffering from liver diseases and 150 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Diagnoses of liver disease included liver cirrhosis, steatosis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and amoebic liver abscess. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti- Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 17 (22.7%) of 75 patients and in 15 (10.0%) of 150 control subjects (OR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.09-4.94; P=0.03). This is the first age- and gender-matched case control study about Leptospira seroprevalence in patients with liver diseases. Results indicate that Leptospira infection is associated with chronic and acute liver diseases. Results warrants for additional studies on the role of Leptospira exposure in chronic liver disease. PMID:27493589

  15. Leptospira Exposure and Patients with Liver Diseases: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in patients suffering from liver disease has been poorly studied. Information about risk factors associated with infection in liver disease patients may help in the optimal planning of preventive measures. We sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence and patients with liver diseases, and to determine the characteristics of the patients with Leptospira exposure. We performed a case-control study of 75 patients suffering from liver diseases and 150 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Diagnoses of liver disease included liver cirrhosis, steatosis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and amoebic liver abscess. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti- Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 17 (22.7%) of 75 patients and in 15 (10.0%) of 150 control subjects (OR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.09-4.94; P=0.03). This is the first age- and gender-matched case control study about Leptospira seroprevalence in patients with liver diseases. Results indicate that Leptospira infection is associated with chronic and acute liver diseases. Results warrants for additional studies on the role of Leptospira exposure in chronic liver disease. PMID:27493589

  16. Direct assessment of multiple testing correction in case-control association studies with related individuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuoheng

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies typically test large numbers of genetic variants in association with trait values. It is well known that linkage disequilibrium (LD) between nearby markers tends to introduce correlation among association tests. Failure to properly adjust for multiple comparisons can lead to false-positive results or missing true-positive signals. The Bonferroni correction is generally conservative in the presence of LD. The permutation procedure, although has been widely employed to adjust for correlated tests, is not applicable when related individuals are included in case-control samples. With related individuals, the dependence among relatives' genotypes can also contribute to the correlation between tests. We present a new method P(norm) to correct for multiple hypothesis testing in case-control association studies in which some individuals are related. The adjustment with P(norm) simultaneously accounts for two sources of correlations of the test statistics: (1) LD among genetic markers (2) dependence among genotypes across related individuals. Using simulated data based on the International HapMap Project, we demonstrate that it has better control of type I error and is more powerful than some of the recently developed methods. We apply the method to a genome-wide association study of alcoholism in the GAW 14 COGA data set and detect genome-wide significant association. PMID:21181898

  17. Control selection methods in recent case-control studies conducted as part of infectious disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Waldram, Alison; McKerr, Caoimhe; Gobin, Maya; Adak, Goutam; Stuart, James M; Cleary, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Successful investigation of national outbreaks of communicable disease relies on rapid identification of the source. Case-control methodologies are commonly used to achieve this. We assessed control selection methods used in recently published case-control studies for methodological and resource issues to determine if a standard approach could be identified. Neighbourhood controls were the most frequently used method in 53 studies of a range of different sizes, infections and settings. The most commonly used method of data collection was face to face interview. Control selection issues were identified in four areas: method of identification of controls, appropriateness of controls, ease of recruitment of controls, and resource requirements. Potential biases arising from the method of control selection were identified in half of the studies assessed. There is a need to develop new ways of selecting controls in a rapid, random and representative manner to improve the accuracy and timeliness of epidemiological investigations and maximise the effectiveness of public health interventions. Innovative methods such as prior recruitment of controls could improve timeliness and representativeness of control selection. PMID:25762171

  18. A low-level asbestos exposure case-control epidemiology study

    SciTech Connect

    Ocasio-Alvarex, A.

    1988-01-01

    The potential for low levels of airborne asbestos exposure in public schools and in public and commercial buildings in the United States has generated concern due to the large population at risk and the definite human carcinogenicity of asbestos at high levels. To assist in the clarification of the risk associated with low level asbestos exposure and in the decision-making in asbestos management in schools and in other buildings, a case-control study was conducted to estimate the risk relationship between low levels of asbestos exposure and pulmonary cancer among Indiana public school teachers. A total of 236 lung cancer cases and 154 controls to be used in this case-control study were identified from a previous proportionate mortality rate study which had examined over 8,000 teachers' death certificates. The controls were selected from teachers who died of chronic bronchitis, emphysema or a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The teachers' work history and their potential for asbestos exposure, as well as the reliability of the information obtained on the presence or absence of asbestos, was determined to calculate the odds ratio.

  19. Assessing risk factors of sporadic Campylobacter infection: a case-control study in Arizona.

    PubMed

    Pogreba-Brown, K; Baker, A; Ernst, K; Stewart, J; Harris, R B; Weiss, J

    2016-03-01

    Case-control studies of sporadic Campylobacter infections have predominately been conducted in non-Hispanic populations. In Arizona, rates of campylobacteriosis have been historically higher than the national average, with particularly high rates in Hispanics. In 2010, health departments and a state university collaborated to conduct a statewide case-control study to determine whether risk factors differ in an ethnically diverse region of the United States. Statistically significant risk factors in the final multivariate model were: eating cantaloupe [odds ratio (OR) 7·64], handling raw poultry (OR 4·88) and eating queso fresco (OR 7·11). In addition, compared to non-Hispanic/non-travellers, the highest risk group were Hispanic/non-travellers (OR 7·27), and Hispanic/travellers (OR 5·87, not significant). Results of this study suggest Hispanics have higher odds of disease, probably due to differential exposures. In addition to common risk factors, consumption of cantaloupe was identified as a significant risk factor. These results will inform public health officials of the varying risk factors for Campylobacter in this region. PMID:26828241

  20. Case-control study of vulvar vestibulitis risk associated with genital infections.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elaine M; Ritchie, Justine M; Galask, Rudolph; Pugh, Erica E; Jia, Jian; Ricks-McGillan, Joan

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome (VVS) associated with genital infections in a case-control study. METHODS: Diagnosed cases with VVS (n = 69) and age-frequency-matched healthy controls (n = 65) were enrolled from gynecology clinics in a university medical hospital during 1999. They were compared for potential risk factors and symptoms of disease. RESULTS: VVS cases had a significantly higher risk of physician-reported bacterial vaginosis (BV) (odds ratio, OR = 9.4), Candida albicans (OR = 5.7), pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) (OR = 11.2), trichomoniasis (OR = 20.6), and vulvar dysplasia (OR = l5.7) but no risk associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), ASCUS, cervical dysplasia, genital warts, chlamydia, genital herpes or gonorrhea. Genital symptoms reported significantly more often with VVS included vulvar burning (91 vs. 12%), dyspareunia (81 vs. 15%), vulvar itching (68 vs. 23%) and dysuria (54 vs. 19%) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: A history of genital infections is associated with an increased risk of VVS. Long-term follow-up case-control studies are needed to elucidate etiologic mechanisms, methods for prevention and effective treatment. PMID:12648313

  1. A case-control study on risk factors for unintentional childhood poisoning in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Mansori, Kamyar; Soori, Hamid; Farnaghi, Fariba; Khodakarim, Sohila; Mansouri hanis, Shiva; Khodadost, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poisoning is a major public health problem and is one of the most frequent causes of emergency hospital admissions. The aim of this study was to identify the main risk factors for unintentional childhood poisoning in Tehran, Iran and to suggest possible causes and preventative measures. Methods: In this case-control study (case, n=140; control, n=280), two controls were selected for every case. Controls were matched by age, sex, and date of hospital attendance. All children and their guardians were then interviewed by the same person using a standard questionnaire that covered the demographic, behavioral, and risk factors associated with accidental poisonings. Results: The most common type of poisoning was related to narcotics (58.6%); and among the narcotics, methadone was the most prevalent poisoning agent (74.7%). Multivariate conditional logistic regression model revealed that addiction in the family (OR=14.6; 95% CI:6.2-34.6), previous poisoning (OR=7; 95% CI:2.4- 20.2), maternal occupation (OR=4; 95% CI:1.3- 12.3), and inaccessibility of poisoning products (OR=0.03; 95% CI:0.01- 0.12) were the main risk factors in unintentional childhood poisoning. Conclusion: Addiction in the family as a risk factor and inaccessibility of poisoning products as a protecting factor were recognized to have the highest correlation with the unintentional child poisoning. These two factors were considered as priorities in health education programs. PMID:27453885

  2. Congenital malformations and maternal drinking water supply in rural South Australia: a case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, M.M.; Scragg, R.K.R.; McMichael, A.J.; Baghurst, P.A.; Dyer, K.F.

    1984-04-01

    A case-control study, carried out in the Mount Gambier region of South Australia, investigated the relationship between mothers' antenatal drinking water source and malformations in offspring. It was prompted by earlier descriptive findings of a statistically significant, and localized, increase in the perinatal mortality rate in Mount Gambier, due principally to congential malformations affecting the central nervous system and multiple organ systems. Available for statistical analysis were 218 case-control pairs, from the period 1951-1979, individually matched by hospital, maternal age (+/- 2 years), parity and date of birth (+/- 1 month). Compared with women who drank only rainwater during their pregnancy (relative risk (RR) = 1.0), women who consumed principally groundwater had a statistically significant increase in risk of bearing a malformed child (RR = 2.8). statistically significant risk increases occurred specifically for malformations of the central nervous system and musculoskeletal system. Reanalysis of the data by estimated water nitrate concentration demonstrated a nearly threefold increase in risk for women who drank water containing 5-15 ppm of nitrate, and fourfold increase in risk for those consuming >15 ppm of nitrate.

  3. Chernobyl-related thyroid cancer in children of Belarus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, L N; Anspaugh, L R; Beebe, G W; Bouville, A; Drozdovitch, V V; Garber, V; Gavrilin, Y I; Khrouch, V T; Kuvshinnikov, A V; Kuzmenkov, Y N; Minenko, V P; Moschik, K V; Nalivko, A S; Robbins, J; Shemiakina, E V; Shinkarev, S; Tochitskaya, S I; Waclawiw, M A

    1998-09-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on April 26, 1986, released approximately 2 EBq of 131I and other radioiodine isotopes that heavily contaminated southern Belarus. An increase in thyroid cancer reported in 1992 and attributed to the Chernobyl accident was challenged as possibly the result of intensive screening. We began a case-control study to test the hypothesis that the Chernobyl accident caused the increase in thyroid cancer. Records of childhood thyroid cancer in the national therapy centers in Minsk in 1992 yielded 107 individuals with confirmed pathology diagnoses and available for interview. Pathways to diagnosis were (1) routine endocrinological screening in 63, (2) presentation with enlarged or nodular thyroid in 25 and (3) an incidental finding in 19. Two sets of controls were chosen, one matched on pathway to diagnosis, the other representing the area of heavy fallout, both matched on age, sex and rural/urban residence in 1986. The 131I dose to the thyroid was estimated from ground deposition of 137Cs, ground deposition of 131I, a data bank of 1986 thyroid radiation measurements, questionnaires and interviews. Highly significant differences were observed between cases and controls (both sets) with respect to dose. The differences persisted within pathway to diagnosis, gender, age and year of diagnosis, and level of iodine in the soil, and were most marked in the southern portion of the Gomel region. The case-control comparisons indicate a strong relationship between thyroid cancer and estimated radiation dose from the Chernobyl accident. PMID:9728663

  4. Unified Analysis of Secondary Traits in Case-Control Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arpita; Wright, Fred A.; Zou, Fei

    2013-01-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that in case-control association studies, analysis of a secondary trait which ignores the original sampling scheme can produce highly biased risk estimates. Although a number of approaches have been proposed to properly analyze secondary traits, most approaches fail to reproduce the marginal logistic model assumed for the original case-control trait and/or do not allow for interaction between secondary trait and genotype marker on primary disease risk. In addition, the flexible handling of covariates remains challenging. We present a general retrospective likelihood framework to perform association testing for both binary and continuous secondary traits which respects marginal models and incorporates the interaction term. We provide a computational algorithm, based on a reparameterized approximate profile likelihood, for obtaining the maximum likelihood (ML) estimate and its standard error for the genetic effect on secondary trait, in presence of covariates. For completeness we also present an alternative pseudo-likelihood method for handling covariates. We describe extensive simulations to evaluate the performance of the ML estimator in comparison with the pseudo-likelihood and other competing methods. PMID:24409003

  5. Evaluation of an Association of Blood Homocysteine Levels With Gastric Cancer Risk From 27 Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Cheng, Yuelei; Zhu, Huirong

    2016-05-01

    High blood homocysteine levels may risk gastric cancer. However, observational studies have been plagued by chance, bias, confounding, or reverse causality. In this study, we assessed the relationship between blood homocysteine levels and gastric cancer by using a Mendelian randomization method, which is independent of nongenetic confounding.We took 2 steps to perform Mendelian randomization analysis. First, we evaluated the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T association with gastric cancer by a meta-analysis of case-control studies including 7566 patients with gastric cancer and 10 640 control subjects from 27 Case-Control studies. Second, MTHFR C677T polymorphism, which affects the blood homocysteine levels, was used as an instrumental variable to calculate the risk and estimate the association of gastric cancer with this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). We obtained an estimate to the association of blood total homocysteine levels with this SNP from a meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), which comprises a total of 44 147 individuals.In our Mendelian randomization analysis, we demonstrated a significant effect of the blood homocysteine levels on gastric cancer risk, representing an OR of 2.56 (95% CI = 2.41-2.72; P = 5.0×10) for gastric cancer per 1-SD increase in the natural log-transformed blood total homocysteine levels.We proved that there is a causal relationship between blood total homocysteine and risk of gastric cancer, and this study will add insight into the treatment and pathology research of gastric cancer. PMID:27196483

  6. Dietary and Other Risk Factors in The Aetiology of Cholelithiasis: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Daras, V.; Linos, D. A.; Kekis, V.; Tsoukas, M. M.; Golematis, V.

    1989-01-01

    We studied the effect of dietary factors and a variety of other risk factors on the development of cholelithiasis through a case control study. The study involved 96 cases and 118 age and sex matched controls. All cases and controls were interviewed with regard to a variety of risk factors and frequency of consumption of over 100 food items. Analysis was done both by chi square and a multiple logistic regression model. From all the dietry factors the only ones that showed a positive statistically signficantly (p<0.05) association was consumption of animal fat as expressed by eating all visible fat on the meat and using butter on the table. Interestingly high consumption of olive oil had a negative (protective) association with the disease. A negative association was also found with smoking and holding a job demanding hard labor. PMID:2487388

  7. Serum Taurine and Stroke Risk in Women: A Prospective, Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fen; Koenig, Karen L.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Jonas, Saran; Afanasyeva, Yelena; Wójcik, Oktawia P.; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a conditionally essential sulfur-containing amino acid, is mainly obtained from diet in humans. Experimental studies have shown that taurine’s main biological actions include bile salt conjugation, blood pressure regulation, anti-oxidation, and anti-inflammation. Methods We conducted a prospective case-control study nested in the New York University Women’s Health Study, a cohort study involving 14,274 women enrolled since 1985. Taurine was measured in pre-diagnostic serum samples of 241 stroke cases and 479 matched controls. Results There was no statistically significant association between serum taurine and stroke risk in the overall study population. The adjusted ORs for stroke were 1.0 (reference), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.59–1.28), and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.69–1.54) in increasing tertiles of taurine (64.3–126.6, 126.7–152.9, and 153.0–308.5 nmol/mL, respectively). A significant inverse association between serum taurine and stroke risk was observed among never smokers, with an adjusted OR of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.37–1.18) and 0.50 (95% CI, 0.26–0.94) for the second and third tertile, respectively (p for trend = 0.01), but not among past or current smokers (p for interaction < 0.01). Conclusions We observed no overall association between serum taurine and stroke risk, although a protective effect was observed in never smokers, which requires further investigation. Taurine, Stroke, Epidemiology, Prospective, Case-control study, NYUWHS. PMID:26866594

  8. Telomere length in blood cells and breast cancer risk: investigations in two case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-Ling; Ambrosone, Christine; Byrne, Celia; Davis, Warren; Nesline, Mary; McCann, Susan E

    2010-04-01

    Telomere dysfunction, which leads to genomic instability, is hypothesized to play a causal role in the development of breast cancer. However, the few epidemiologic studies that assessed the relationship between telomere length in blood cells and breast cancer risk have been inconsistent. We conducted two case-control studies to further understand the role of telomere length and breast cancer risk. Overall telomere lengths were measured by telomere quantitative fluorescent in situ hybridization (TQ-FISH) and telomere quantitative real-time PCR (TQ-PCR). The associations between telomere length in blood leukocytes and risk of breast cancer were examined in two breast cancer case-control studies that were conducted at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) and Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center (LCCC). Using the 50th percentile value in controls as a cut point, women who had shorter telomere length were not at significantly increased risk of breast cancer compared with women who had longer telomere length in the RPCI study (odds ratio [OR] = 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.84-2.12), in the LCCC study (OR = 1.18, 95% CI = 0.73-1.91), or in the combined RPCI and LCCC studies (OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.89-1.71). There was no significant dose-response relationship across quartiles of telomere length and no significant difference when comparing women in the lowest to highest quartile of telomere length. Overall telomere length in blood leukocytes was not significantly associated with the risk of breast cancer. PMID:19543829

  9. Influence of social factors on avoidable mortality: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Daniel; Alfonso, José Luis; Corella, Dolores; Saiz, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of socioeconomic factors on avoidable mortality at an individual level is not well known, since most studies showing this association are based on aggregate data. The purpose of this study was to determine socioeconomic differences between those patients who die of avoidable causes and those who do not die. METHODS: A matched case-control study was carried out regarding in-hospital avoidable mortality (Holland's medical care indicators) that occurred in a university hospital serving a Spanish-Mediterranean population during a 30-month period. RESULTS: We studied 82 cases of death from avoidable causes and 300 controls matched on medical care indicators and age. The variables that showed a statistically significant association with in-hospital avoidable mortality were number of diagnoses (the greater the number, the higher the risk), length of stay (patients staying seven or more days presented a lower risk), and education. Those patients with low and middle educational levels showed a greater risk of avoidable mortality (adjusted odds ratio=3.57 and 2.82, respectively) than those patients with higher levels of education. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the findings of studies based on aggregate data, our case-control analyses indicated that among several socioeconomic variables studied, educational level was significantly associated with the risk of in-hospital avoidable mortality, regardless of age and medical care indicators. Patients with low levels of education (<6 years of schooling) were at highest risk for in-hospital avoidable mortality, followed by those with middle levels of education (7-10 years of schooling). PMID:15736332

  10. High Seroprevalence of Leptospira Exposure in Meat Workers in Northern Mexico: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Saenz-Soto, Leandro; Martinez-Ramirez, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Background The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in workers occupationally exposed to raw meat has been poorly studied. This work aimed to determine the association between Leptospira exposure and the occupation of meat worker, and to determine the seroprevalence association with socio-demographic, work, clinical and behavioral characteristics of the meat workers studied. Methods We performed a case-control study in 124 meat workers and 124 age- and gender-matched control subjects in Durango City, Mexico. Sera of cases and controls were analyzed for anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Data of meat workers were obtained with the aid of a questionnaire. The association of Leptospira exposure with the characteristics of meat workers was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 22 (17.7%) of 124 meat workers and in eight (6.5%) of 124 controls (OR = 3.12; 95% CI: 1.33 - 7.33; P = 0.006). Seroprevalence of Leptospira infection was similar between male butchers (17.6%) and female butchers (18.2%) (P = 1.00). Multivariate analysis of socio-demographic, work and behavioral variables showed that Leptospira exposure was associated with duration in the activity, rural residence, and consumption of snake meat and unwashed raw fruits. Conclusions This is the first case-control study of the association of Leptospira exposure with the occupation of meat worker. Results indicate that meat workers represent a risk group for Leptospira exposure. Risk factors for Leptospira exposure found in this study may help in the design of optimal preventive measures against Leptospira infection. PMID:26858797

  11. Protective effect of intradermal BCG against leprosy; a case-control study in central Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M L; Silva, S A; Neto, J C; de Andrade, A L; Martelli, C M; Zicker, F

    1992-09-01

    A case-control study was undertaken to evaluate the protective efficacy of intradermal BCG against leprosy in a high-endemic area of leprosy in central Brazil. Sixty-two cases and 186 controls were included in the study. Cases were all newly diagnosed leprosy patients under 16 years of age attending an outpatient health service, and all of them were schoolchildren. Three controls under 16 years old, frequency matched by sex and age group, were selected from schools geographically located in the area from which the cases came. The presence of BCG was negatively associated with leprosy, indicating a 5.3 risk of leprosy for those nonvaccinated and protective efficacy of 81%. Paucibacillary patients were more likely to have a BCG scar than multibacillary patients. PMID:1474274

  12. Causal diagrams and the logic of matched case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Shahar, Eyal; Shahar, Doron J

    2012-01-01

    It is tempting to assume that confounding bias is eliminated by choosing controls that are identical to the cases on the matched confounder(s). We used causal diagrams to explain why such matching not only fails to remove confounding bias, but also adds colliding bias, and why both types of bias are removed by conditioning on the matched confounder(s). As in some publications, we trace the logic of matching to a possible tradeoff between effort and variance, not between effort and bias. Lastly, we explain why the analysis of a matched case-control study – regardless of the method of matching – is not conceptually different from that of an unmatched study. PMID:22701093

  13. Candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms and cerebral palsy: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    HE, XIAO-GUANG; PENG, QI; CHEN, YAN-HUA; HE, TING; HUANG, HUI; MA, ZE-KE; FAN, XUE-JIN; LUO, LING; LIU, SHAO-JI; LU, XIAO-MEI

    2015-01-01

    Certain genetic polymorphisms have been suggested to be associated with cerebral palsy; the candidate genes are involved in thrombophilia, inflammation and preterm labor, but the mechanism remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations between selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and cerebral palsy among children. A case-control study was conducted, including 74 infants with cerebral palsy (case group) and 99 healthy infants (control group). The distributions of the allele and genotype frequencies were examined for the total cerebral palsy patient population in addition to subgroups divided according to gestational age (preterm versus full-term). The results showed that the rs1042714 variant in adrenergic receptor β-2 (ADRB2) and heterozygosity for ADRB2 were associated with the cerebral palsy risk among the preterm infants. No significant differences in the allele or genotype frequencies were observed between the total cerebral palsy patient population and controls for the eight SNPs investigated. PMID:26623029

  14. Occupation and male lung cancer: a case-control study in northern Sweden.

    PubMed Central

    Damber, L A; Larsson, L G

    1987-01-01

    Using a case-control study comprising about 600 men with lung cancer in northern Sweden the potential risk of different occupations and groups of occupations was studied. Longitudinal data concerning occupation, employment, and smoking habits were obtained by questionnaires. Some occupational groups (underground miners, copper smelter workers, electricians, and plumbers) exposed to previously known lung carcinogenic agents such as radon daughters, arsenic, and asbestos, had considerably increased odds ratios, which persisted after adjustment for smoking. A slightly raised odds ratio was observed in a group of blue collar workers potentially exposed to lung carcinogenic agents; this rise in the group as a whole mainly disappeared after adjustment for smoking. Farmers and foresters had strikingly low odds ratios, which could only partly be explained by their more moderate smoking habits. The population aetiological fraction attributable to occupation was estimated as 9%. PMID:3620367

  15. Validation of a home safety questionnaire used in a series of case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Michael; Benford, Penny; Coupland, Carol; Clacy, Rose; Hindmarch, Paul; Majsak-Newman, Gosia; Deave, Toity; Kendrick, Denise

    2014-01-01

    Objective To measure the validity of safety behaviours, safety equipment use and hazards reported on a questionnaire by parents/carers with children aged under 5 years participating in a series of home safety case-control studies. Methods The questionnaire measured safety behaviours, safety equipment use and hazards being used as exposures in five case-control studies. Responses to questions were compared with observations made during a home visit. The researchers making observations were blind to questionnaire responses. Results In total, 162 families participated in the study. Overall agreement between reported and observed values of the safety practices ranged from 48.5% to 97.3%. Only 3 safety practices (stair gate at the top of stairs, stair gate at the bottom of stairs, stairs are carpeted) had substantial agreement based on the κ statistic (k=0.65, 0.72, 0.74, respectively). Sensitivity was high (≥70%) for 19 of the 30 safety practices, and specificity was high (≥70%) for 20 of the 30 practices. Overall for 24 safety practices, a higher proportion of respondents over-reported than under-reported safe practice (negative predictive value>positive predictive value). For six safety practices, a higher proportion of respondents under-reported than over-reported safe practice (negative predictive valuestudy found that the validity of self-reports varied with safety practice. Questions with a high specificity will be useful for practitioners for identifying households who may benefit from home safety interventions and will be useful for researchers as measures of exposures or outcomes. PMID:24591447

  16. Risk Factors of Streptococcus suis Infection in Vietnam. A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dang Trung Nghia; Le, Thi Phuong Tu; Wolbers, Marcel; Cao, Quang Thai; Nguyen, Van Minh Hoang; Tran, Vu Thieu Nga; Le, Thi Phuong Thao; Nguyen, Hoan Phu; Tran, Thi Hong Chau; Dinh, Xuan Sinh; To, Song Diep; Hoang, Thi Thanh Hang; Hoang, Truong; Campbell, James; Nguyen, Van Vinh Chau; Nguyen, Tran Chinh; Nguyen, Van Dung; Ngo, Thi Hoa; Spratt, Brian G.; Tran, Tinh Hien; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis infection, an emerging zoonosis, is an increasing public health problem across South East Asia and the most common cause of acute bacterial meningitis in adults in Vietnam. Little is known of the risk factors underlying the disease. Methods and Findings A case-control study with appropriate hospital and matched community controls for each patient was conducted between May 2006 and June 2009. Potential risk factors were assessed using a standardized questionnaire and investigation of throat and rectal S. suis carriage in cases, controls and their pigs, using real-time PCR and culture of swab samples. We recruited 101 cases of S. suis meningitis, 303 hospital controls and 300 community controls. By multivariate analysis, risk factors identified for S. suis infection as compared to either control group included eating “high risk” dishes, including such dishes as undercooked pig blood and pig intestine (OR1 = 2.22; 95%CI = [1.15–4.28] and OR2 = 4.44; 95%CI = [2.15–9.15]), occupations related to pigs (OR1 = 3.84; 95%CI = [1.32–11.11] and OR2 = 5.52; 95%CI = [1.49–20.39]), and exposures to pigs or pork in the presence of skin injuries (OR1 = 7.48; 95%CI = [1.97–28.44] and OR2 = 15.96; 95%CI = [2.97–85.72]). S. suis specific DNA was detected in rectal and throat swabs of 6 patients and was cultured from 2 rectal samples, but was not detected in such samples of 1522 healthy individuals or patients without S. suis infection. Conclusions This case control study, the largest prospective epidemiological assessment of this disease, has identified the most important risk factors associated with S. suis bacterial meningitis to be eating ‘high risk’ dishes popular in parts of Asia, occupational exposure to pigs and pig products, and preparation of pork in the presence of skin lesions. These risk factors can be addressed in public health campaigns aimed at preventing S. suis infection

  17. Case-control study of exposure to medication and the risk of injurious falls requiring hospitalization among nursing home residents.

    PubMed

    Mustard, C A; Mayer, T

    1997-04-15

    The association between injurious falls requiring hospitalization and selected classes of medications was examined in a case-control study of nursing home residents. Information for this study was obtained exclusively from four computerized administrative databases. Over the period from April 1987 to March 1992, a total of 1,560 first injurious falls occurred to 14,744 residents of Manitoba, Canada, nursing homes who were eligible for inclusion in the study. An injurious fall was defined as an injury consequent to a fall that resulted in admission to the hospital for treatment. Medication use was ascertained from prescription information contained in computerized dispensing records from community pharmacies. Three series of single controls were pair-matched to each case, implementing increasing stringent matching on age, sex, level of dependency, duration of residence, and the presence of up to five chronic disorders. Estimates of relative odds obtained from the most stringently matched case-control series identified two medication classes in which a prescription dispensed in the previous 30 days was associated with an elevated risk of injurious fall: antipsychotic agents (odds ratio = 1.31, 95 percent confidence interval 1.06-1.61) and anxiolytics/sedatives/ hypnotics (odds ratio = 1.35, 95 percent confidence interval 1.09-1.68). An unexpected protective effect was associated with the use inotropic agents (odds ratio = 0.69, 95 percent confidence interval 0.54-0.89). These results support the hypothesis that psychotropic medications are an independent risk factor for injurious falls in nursing home settings. PMID:9126000

  18. Global Assessment of the Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on Sleep through Specific Questionnaires. A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lecube, Albert; Sánchez, Enric; Gómez-Peralta, Fernando; Abreu, Cristina; Valls, Joan; Mestre, Olga; Romero, Odile; Martínez, María Dolores; Sampol, Gabriel; Ciudin, Andreea; Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is an independent risk factor for sleep breathing disorders. However, it is unknown whether T2D affects daily somnolence and quality of sleep independently of the impairment of polysomnographic parameters. Material and Methods A case-control study including 413 patients with T2D and 413 non-diabetic subjects, matched by age, gender, BMI, and waist and neck circumferences. A polysomnography was performed and daytime sleepiness was evaluated using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). In addition, 135 subjects with T2D and 45 controls matched by the same previous parameters were also evaluated through the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) to calculate sleep quality. Results Daytime sleepiness was higher in T2D than in control subjects (p = 0.003), with 23.9% of subjects presenting an excessive daytime sleepiness (ESS>10). Patients with fasting plasma glucose (FPG ≥13.1 mmol/l) were identified as the group with a higher risk associated with an ESS>10 (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.8–7.9, p = 0.0003). A stepwise regression analyses showed that the presence of T2D, baseline glucose levels and gender but not polysomnographic parameters (i.e apnea-hyoapnea index or sleeping time spent with oxigen saturation lower than 90%) independently predicted the ESS score. In addition, subjects with T2D showed higher sleep disturbances [PSQI: 7.0 (1.0–18.0) vs. 4 (0.0–12.0), p<0.001]. Conclusion The presence of T2D and high levels of FPG are independent risk factors for daytime sleepiness and adversely affect sleep quality. Prospective studies addressed to demonstrate whether glycemia optimization could improve the sleep quality in T2D patients seem warranted. PMID:27315083

  19. Congenital malformations and maternal drinking water supply in rural South Australia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dorsch, M M; Scragg, R K; McMichael, A J; Baghurst, P A; Dyer, K F

    1984-04-01

    A case-control study, carried out in the Mount Gambier region of South Australia, investigated the relationship between mothers' antenatal drinking water source and malformations in offspring. It was prompted by earlier descriptive findings of a statistically significant, and localized, increase in the perinatal mortality rate in Mount Gambier, due principally to congenital malformations affecting the central nervous system and multiple organ systems. Available for statistical analysis were 218 case-control pairs, from the period 1951-1979, individually matched by hospital, maternal age (+/- 2 years), parity and date of birth (+/- 1 month). Compared with women who drank only rainwater during their pregnancy (relative risk (RR) = 1.0), women who consumed principally groundwater had a statistically significant increase in risk of bearing a malformed child (RR = 2.8). Statistically significant risk increases occurred specifically for malformations of the central nervous system and musculoskeletal system. Reanalysis of the data by estimated water nitrate concentration demonstrated a nearly threefold increase in risk for women who drank water containing 5-15 ppm of nitrate, and a fourfold increase in risk for those consuming greater than 15 ppm of nitrate. A seasonal gradient in risk was evident among groundwater consumers, ranging from 0.9 for babies conceived in winter, 3.0 in autumn, to 7.0 and 6.3 for spring and summer conceptions, respectively. Linear logistic regression analysis, controlling for risk factors not accounted for in the study design, showed that maternal water supply, infant's sex, and mother's area of residence all contributed significantly to the risk of malformation. These results are discussed in relation to previous experimental and human descriptive studies, suggesting a plausible mechanism for nitrate-induced teratogenesis. PMID:6711537

  20. Poorer prognosis with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia: a single-center case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Fukuda, Naoko; Inokuchi, Ryota; Sato, Hajime; Nakamura, Kensuke; Iwagami, Masao; Wada, Tomoki; Jona, Masahiro; Hisasue, Takashi; Nakajima, Susumu; Yahagi, Naoki

    2015-04-01

    In ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP), automated platelet counts are lower than actual counts because of EDTA-induced aggregation. Factors contributing to the incidence of EDTA-PTCP are unknown, and no study has assessed the prognosis of EDTA-PTCP patients. This retrospective study assessed characteristics in EDTA-PTCP patients and matched controls to determine differences in prognosis. A retrospective case-control study was designed. From the University of Tokyo Hospital database, we identified patients diagnosed with EDTA-PTCP between 2009 and 2012, and performed 1:2 case:control matching for age and sex. A control group of sex- and age-matched patients was selected at random from the same database. We investigated differences in the frequency of complications, medication history, and blood transfusion history between the groups at the time of blood collection. Prognosis was evaluated using multivariate Cox regression analysis adjusting for age, sex, autoimmune disease, liver disease, and malignant tumor. We identified 104 EDTA-PTCP patients and 208 matched controls. The median age was 69.0 years (interquartile range: 54-76), with men comprising 51%. EDTA-PTCP patients had a higher frequency of malignant tumor and a lower frequency of hypertension and diabetes than controls. After adjustment for background factors, prognosis of EDTA-PTCP patients was significantly poorer than controls (hazard ratio, 11.8; 95% confidence intervals, 2.62-53.54). In conclusion, EDTA-PTCP patients had higher mortality, and EDTA-PTCP may need to be recognized as an indicator of worse prognosis. PMID:25881844

  1. Case-control study of diabetes-related genetic variants and pancreatic cancer risk in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kuruma, Sawako; Egawa, Naoto; Kurata, Masanao; Honda, Goro; Kamisawa, Terumi; Ueda, Junko; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ueno, Makoto; Nakao, Haruhisa; Mori, Mitsuru; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Wakai, Kenji; Nakamura, Kozue; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Nojima, Masanori; Takahashi, Mami; Shimada, Kazuaki; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Shogo; Lin, Yingsong

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether diabetes-related genetic variants are associated with pancreatic cancer risk. METHODS: We genotyped 7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in PPARG2 (rs1801282), ADIPOQ (rs1501299), ADRB3 (rs4994), KCNQ1 (rs2237895), KCNJ11 (rs5219), TCF7L2 (rs7903146), and CDKAL1 (rs2206734), and examined their associations with pancreatic cancer risk in a multi-institute case-control study including 360 cases and 400 controls in Japan. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect detailed information on lifestyle factors. Genotyping was performed using Fluidigm SNPtype assays. Unconditional logistic regression methods were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association between these diabetes-associated variants and pancreatic cancer risk. RESULTS: With the exception of rs1501299 in the ADIPOQ gene (P = 0.09), no apparent differences in genotype frequencies were observed between cases and controls. Rs1501299 in the ADPIOQ gene was positively associated with pancreatic cancer risk; compared with individuals with the AA genotype, the age- and sex-adjusted OR was 1.79 (95%CI: 0.98-3.25) among those with the AC genotype and 1.86 (95%CI: 1.03-3.38) among those with the CC genotype. The ORs remained similar after additional adjustment for body mass index and cigarette smoking. In contrast, rs2237895 in the KCNQ1 gene was inversely related to pancreatic cancer risk, with a multivariable-adjusted OR of 0.62 (0.37-1.04) among individuals with the CC genotype compared with the AA genotype. No significant associations were noted for other 5 SNPs. CONCLUSION: Our case-control study indicates that rs1501299 in the ADIPOQ gene may be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. These findings should be replicated in additional studies. PMID:25516658

  2. Neurocognitive performance in family-based and case-control studies of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gur, Ruben C.; Braff, David L.; Calkins, Monica E.; Dobie, Dorcas J.; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Light, Gregory A.; Nuechterlein, Keith H.; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D.; Seidman, Larry J.; Siever, Larry J.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sprock, Joyce; Stone, William S.; Sugar, Catherine A.; Swerdlow, Neal R.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Tsuang, Ming T.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Gur, Raquel E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia (SZ) are established and the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia (COGS) investigated such measures as endophenotypes in family-based (COGS-1) and case-control (COGS-2) studies. By requiring family participation, family-based sampling may result in samples that vary demographically and perform better on neurocognitive measures. Methods The Penn computerized neurocognitive battery (CNB) evaluates accuracy and speed of performance for several domains and was administered across sites in COGS-1 and COGS-2. Most tests were included in both studies. COGS-1 included 328 patients with SZ and 497 healthy comparison subjects (HCS) and COGS-2 included 1195 patients and 1009 HCS. Results Demographically, COGS-1 participants were younger, more educated, with more educated parents and higher estimated IQ compared to COGS-2 participants. After controlling for demographics, the two samples produced very similar performance profiles compared to their respective controls. As expected, performance was better and with smaller effect sizes compared to controls in COGS-1 relative to COGS-2. Better performance was most pronounced for spatial processing while emotion identification had large effect sizes for both accuracy and speed in both samples. Performance was positively correlated with functioning and negatively with negative and positive symptoms in both samples, but correlations were attenuated in COGS-2, especially with positive symptoms. Conclusions Patients ascertained through family-based design have more favorable demographics and better performance on some neurocognitive domains. Thus, studies that use case-control ascertainment may tap into populations with more severe forms of illness that are exposed to less favorable factors compared to those ascertained with family-based designs. PMID:25432636

  3. Risk of Alcohol Consumption in Bladder Cancer: Case-Control Study from a Nationwide Inpatient Database in Japan.

    PubMed

    Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Toyokawa, Satoshi; Tonooka, Akiko; Takeuchi, Takumi; Homma, Yukio; Kobayashi, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is common in Western countries, but not in Japan. Established risk factors are smoking and high-risk jobs such as printing and manufacturing. The risk of alcohol consumption in bladder cancer has been the recent focus; however, available literature on alcohol consumption and bladder cancer has been limited from Japanese population, thought to have a weak genetic tolerance to acetaldehyde. We aimed to determine whether alcohol consumption is an independent risk factor for bladder cancer among Japanese. The study was a matched case-control study from the nationwide Japanese clinical database administered by the Rosai Hospital group. We identified 739 cases of bladder cancer diagnosed between 2005 (when the database was established) and 2014 and 7,196 controls matched by sex, age, hospital, and admission period. We estimated the odds ratio of alcohol consumption for bladder cancer adjusted for the amount of smoking, high-risk occupations, and comorbidities (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, hyperuricemia, and obesity) with conditional logistic regression. The risk of bladder cancer was significantly higher in ever drinkers than in never drinkers (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.06 to 1.66). Furthermore, the risk threshold for alcohol consumption was more than 15 g of alcohol intake per day (one, 180-mL cup equivalent to 6 ounces of Japanese sake containing 23 grams of alcohol). Among Japanese, alcohol consumption may be an independent risk factor for bladder cancer, with a lower risk threshold. PMID:27098227

  4. Investigation of genetic polymorphisms and smoking in a bladder cancer case-control study in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lee E; Wiencke, John K; Bates, Michael N; Zheng, Shichun; Rey, Omar A; Smith, Allan H

    2004-08-10

    We investigated the role of glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes (M1, T1), methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHFR) 677 and 1298, and the NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) polymorphisms in a population-based bladder cancer case-control study in Argentina. Buccal cell DNA was obtained from 106 cases and 109 controls. The strongest evidence was for an interaction between NQO1 genotype and smoking. For ever smoking vs. never smoking the odds ratio was 8.6 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.7-27), in the CC genotype, and 1.3 (95% CI 0.5-3.5) in the CT and TT genotypes combined. Also, elevated bladder cancer risks associated with GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotypes were found in smokers. Having both null polymorphisms conferred the highest risks. The MTHFR 677 CT and TT polymorphisms appeared protective against bladder cancer. PMID:15219943

  5. Environmental sanitation conditions and health impact: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Heller, Léo; Colosimo, Enrico Antonio; Antunes, Carlos Mauricio de Figueiredo

    2003-01-01

    This epidemiological investigation examines the impact of several environmental sanitation conditions and hygiene practices on diarrhea occurrence among children under five years of age living in an urban area. The case-control design was employed; 997 cases and 999 controls were included in the investigation. Cases were defined as children with diarrhea and controls were randomly selected among children under five years of age. After logistic regression adjustment, the following variables were found to be significantly associated with diarrhea: washing and purifying fruit and vegetables; presence of wastewater in the street; refuse storage, collection and disposal; domestic water reservoir conditions; feces disposal from swaddles; presence of vectors in the house and flooding in the lot. The estimates of the relative risks reached values up to 2.87. The present study revealed the feasibility of developing and implementing an adequate model to establish intervention priorities in the field of environmental sanitation. PMID:12715062

  6. Case-control study of possible causative factors in mycosis fungoides

    SciTech Connect

    Tuyp, E.; Burgoyne, A.; Aitchison, T.; MacKie, R.

    1987-02-01

    A detailed case control study was carried out on 53 patients (33 males and 20 females) with histologically proven mycosis fungoides and on an age- and sex-matched control population. Possible causative factors investigated included occupation, recreation, and exposure to petrochemicals, pesticides, insecticides, and potential carcinogens. Exposure to plants of the Compositae family, tanning history, and chronic sun exposure were also investigated, as were smoking history, drug ingestion history, and other skin disease. Personal and family histories of other malignancies were also investigated. The only statistically significant difference to emerge was that the patients with mycosis fungoides had significantly more family history of atopic dermatitis. In view of the absence of any significant difference between patients and controls with regard to personal history of atopic dermatitis, this difference may be the result of multiple statistical testing rather than a phenomenon of true biological significance.

  7. A case control study on the lung cancer risk factors in north of Iran.

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Laleh; Koohdani, Fariba; Siassi, Fereydoon; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Moslemi, Dariush; Shokrzadeh, Mohammad; Safari, Farid

    2011-01-01

    In this case control study, the risk factors of lung cancer was assessed in the north of Iran. Two groups were matched for gender and age (+/- 5 years). Data were collected from 40 cases and 40 controls attending to hospitals. A public information questionnaire was used for data collection. Incidence odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals calculated using logistic regression analyses. Results showed that in adjusted odd ratio positive family history of cancer (OR = 0/19, 95% CI: 0/04-0/8) was associated with a reduction, and consumption of baked bread in traditional oven (OR = 22/6, 95% CI: 1/9-270), was associated with increase in lung cancer risk. Based on the results, smoking was not correlated with lung cancer. In conclusion, the data offers consumption of traditional oven-baked bread may enhance the risk of lung cancer but positive family history of cancer may reduce it. PMID:21699022

  8. Case-control study of diesel exhaust exposure and bladder cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wynder, E.L.; Dieck, G.S.; Hall, N.E.L.; Lahti, H.

    1985-08-01

    The relationship between bladder cancer and employment in occupations involving exposure to diesel exhaust was examined using data from a hospital-based case-control study of men aged 20 to 80 years in 18 hospitals in six US cities, from January 1981 to May 1983. In this analysis, 194 cases and 582 controls were compared according to occupation, smoking history, alcohol and coffee consumption, and various demographic variables. No difference was found in the proportion of bladder cancer cases employed in occupations with exposure to diesel exhaust compared to controls. This relationship did not change after taking smoking habits into account. Bladder cancer cases were significantly more likely to be current smokers of cigarettes than were controls.

  9. Case-control study of intracranial meningiomas in women in Los Angeles County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Preston-Martin, S.; Paganini-Hill, A.; Henderson, B.E.; Pike, M.C.; Wood, C.

    1980-07-01

    A case-control study was conducted among women in Los Angeles County to investigate possible causes of intracranial meningiomas. Questionnaires sought information from patients and from a neighbor of each one on characteristics and past experiences that might be associated with the development of this disease. Information was obtained on 188 matched patient-neighbor pairs. Three primary factors appeared to be associated with meningioma occurrence: 1) a history of head trauma (odds ratio = 2.0, p = 0.01), 2) consumption of certain cured meats (odds ratio = 2.8, p = less than 0.01), and 3) exposure to medical and dental diagnostic X-rays to the head. For diagnostic X-rays, the strongest association was with early exposure (less than 20 yr old) to full-mouth dental X-ray series (odds ratio = 4.0, p less than 0.01).

  10. Case-control study on risk factors associated with fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Vannasaeng, S; Nitiyanant, W; Vichayanrat, A

    1988-12-01

    We investigated the relation between fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes and cassava consumption in a case-control study, in which 31 cases of pancreatic diabetes were compared with 45 non-diabetic control subjects who had no pancreatic calcification. Risk of diabetes was not related to cassava consumption. We also observed no increased risk of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes associated with alcohol consumption, history of gallbladder and biliary tract diseases, ascariasis, and family history of diabetes. Lower monthly income, farmer occupation, rural residence, and low BMI were significantly (p less than 0.05) related to pancreatic diabetes. Our data suggest that consumption of cassava may not be an important risk factor for pancreatic diabetes. With limited sample size, however, cassava consumption could not be excluded as one possible cause of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes. PMID:2976643

  11. Correlation between Rotator Cuff Tears and Repeated Subacromial Steroid Injections: A Case-Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, M; Singh, B; Nicolaou, N; Ravikumar, KJ

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Concern exists regarding potential damage to the rotator cuff from repeated corticosteroid injections into the subacromial space. PATIENTS AND METHODS In this retrospective, case-controlled study, 230 consecutive patients presenting to three orthopaedic units with subacromial impingement and investigated as an end-point with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder were divided into groups having received less than three or three or more subacromial injections of corticosteroids. RESULTS With no significant difference in age and sex distribution, analysis by MRI showed no significant difference between the two groups in the incidence of rotator cuff tear (P < 1.0). CONCLUSIONS This suggests that corticosteroid use in patients with subacromial impingement should not be considered a causative factor in rotator cuff tears. PMID:19409148

  12. Alcohol and Difficulty Conceiving in the SUN Cohort: A Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Lopez-del Burgo, Cristina; Gea, Alfredo; de Irala, Jokin; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Chavarro, Jorge E; Toledo, Estefania

    2015-08-01

    The role of alcohol on fertility remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the association between alcohol and specific alcoholic beverages consumption and the risk of difficulty getting pregnant. We used a case-control study nested within the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) cohort, a prospective, dynamic and multipurpose cohort of 21,705 Spanish university graduates, followed biennially with mailed questionnaires. We identified 686 case-control pairs, matched for age and time in the cohort. Cases were women reporting difficulty getting pregnant. Controls did not consult due to difficulty conceiving and had at least one child during follow-up. After adjustment for potential confounders, we found no association between self-reported difficulty getting pregnant and the number of alcoholic beverages consumed per week, (Odds Ratio [OR] > 5 drinks/week vs. none = 1.04, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 0.72-1.51). No association between types of alcoholic beverage and difficulty conceiving (OR > 5 drinks of wine/week vs. none = 1.16, 95% CI = 0.72-1.88; OR > 5 drinks of beer/week vs. none = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.82-1.37; OR > 5 drinks of spirits/week vs. none = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.84-1.64) was observed. In conclusion, we found no association between alcohol intake and risk of consulting a physician due to difficulty conceiving. More studies are needed to clearly elucidate the effects of alcohol intake on women's fertility. In the meantime, recommendations about alcohol intake to couples trying to conceive have to be given cautiously. PMID:26225997

  13. Alcohol and Difficulty Conceiving in the SUN Cohort: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-del Burgo, Cristina; Gea, Alfredo; de Irala, Jokin; Martínez-González, Miguel A.; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Toledo, Estefania

    2015-01-01

    The role of alcohol on fertility remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the association between alcohol and specific alcoholic beverages consumption and the risk of difficulty getting pregnant. We used a case-control study nested within the Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra (SUN) cohort, a prospective, dynamic and multipurpose cohort of 21,705 Spanish university graduates, followed biennially with mailed questionnaires. We identified 686 case-control pairs, matched for age and time in the cohort. Cases were women reporting difficulty getting pregnant. Controls did not consult due to difficulty conceiving and had at least one child during follow-up. After adjustment for potential confounders, we found no association between self-reported difficulty getting pregnant and the number of alcoholic beverages consumed per week, (Odds Ratio [OR] > 5 drinks/week vs. none = 1.04, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 0.72–1.51). No association between types of alcoholic beverage and difficulty conceiving (OR > 5 drinks of wine/week vs. none = 1.16, 95% CI = 0.72–1.88; OR > 5 drinks of beer/week vs. none = 1.06, 95% CI = 0.82–1.37; OR > 5 drinks of spirits/week vs. none = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.84–1.64) was observed. In conclusion, we found no association between alcohol intake and risk of consulting a physician due to difficulty conceiving. More studies are needed to clearly elucidate the effects of alcohol intake on women’s fertility. In the meantime, recommendations about alcohol intake to couples trying to conceive have to be given cautiously. PMID:26225997

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in toll-like receptor genes and case-control association studies with bovine tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhaladhare, Ashish; Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Amit; Sonwane, Arvind; Chauhan, Anuj; Singh, Ranvir; Kumar, Pushpendra; Yadav, Ramji; Baqir, Mohd; Bhushan, Bharat; Prakash, Om

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 genes play critical roles in host recognition of Mycobacterium bovis infection and initiation of innate and adaptive immune response. The present study was aimed at exploring the association of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR2 and TLR4 genes with susceptibility/resistance against bovine tuberculosis (bTB) infection in cattle. Materials and Methods: A case-control resource population of 35 positive and 45 negative animals was developed after screening with single intradermal tuberculin test for bTB. Resource population was screened for SNPs in TLR2 and TLR4 genes using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The PROC LOGISTIC procedure of SAS 9.3 was used to find an association of allelic and genotypic frequencies with bTB. Results: In TLR2 gene, two of SNPs under study (rs55617172 and rs68268253) revealed polymorphism while in the case of TLR4 gene all four SNPs under investigation (rs8193041, rs207836014, rs8193060, and rs8193069) were found to be polymorphic in case-control population. SNP locus rs55617172 in TLR2 gene was found significantly (p<0.01) associated with susceptibility/resistance to TB in cattle. Conclusion: These findings indicate the presence of SNPs in TLR2 and TLR4 genes in our resource population. Upon validation in independent, large resource population and following biological characterization, SNP rs55617172 can be incorporated in marker panel for selection of animals with greater resistance to bTB. PMID:27284220

  15. Dietary patterns, food groups and myocardial infarction: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lockheart, Michael S K; Steffen, Lyn M; Rebnord, Hege Møklebust; Fimreite, Ragnhild Lekven; Ringstad, Jetmund; Thelle, Dag S; Pedersen, Jan I; Jacobs, David R

    2007-08-01

    Certain dietary patterns may be related to the risk of CVD. We hypothesised that a plant-centred dietary pattern would be associated with a reduced risk of first myocardial infarction (MI). A case-control study of Norwegian men and postmenopausal women (age 45-75 years) was performed. A FFQ was administered, generally within 3 d after incident MI (n 106 cases). Controls (n 105) were frequency matched on sex, age and geographic location. On the FFQ, 190 items were categorised into thirty-five food groups and an a priori healthy diet pattern score was created. We estimated OR using logistic regression with adjustment for energy intake, family history of heart disease, marital status, current smoking, education and age. Among food groups, the risk of MI was significantly higher per SD of butter and margarine (OR 1.66 (95 % CI 1.12, 2.46)), and lower per SD of tomatoes (OR 0.53 (95 % CI 0.35, 0.79)), high-fat fish (OR 0.57 (95 % CI 0.38, 0.86)), wine (OR 0.58 (95 % CI 0.41, 0.83)), salad (OR 0.59 (95 % CI 0.40, 0.87)), whole grain breakfast cereals (OR 0.64 (95 % CI 0.45, 0.90)), cruciferous vegetables (OR 0.66 (95 % CI 0.47, 0.93)) and non-hydrogenated vegetable oil (OR 0.68 (95 % CI 0.49, 0.95)). An abundance of cases were found to have a low a priori healthy diet pattern score. A dietary pattern emphasising nutrient-rich plant foods and high-fat fish and low in trans fatty acids was associated with decreased risk of MI among Norwegians. PMID:17391555

  16. A Joint Association Test for Multiple SNPs in Genetic Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Jacob, Howard; Ghosh, Soumitra; Wang, Xujing; Zeng, Zhao-Bang

    2009-01-01

    For a dense set of genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on high linkage disequilibrium within a small candidate region, a haplotype-based approach for testing association between a disease phenotype and the set of markers is attractive in reducing the data complexity and increasing the statistical power. However, due to unknown status of the underlying disease variant, a comprehensive association test may require consideration of various combinations of the SNPs, which often leads to severe multiple testing problems. In this paper, we propose a latent variable approach to test for association of multiple tightly linked SNPs in case-control studies. First, we introduce a latent variable into the penetrance model to characterize a putative disease susceptible locus (DSL) that may consist of a marker allele, a haplotype from a subset of the markers, or an allele at a putative locus between the markers. Next, through using of a retrospective likelihood to adjust for the case-control sampling ascertainment and appropriately handle the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium constraint, we develop an expectation-maximization (EM)-based algorithm to fit the penetrance model and estimate the joint haplotype frequencies of the DSL and markers simultaneously. With the latent variable to describe a flexible role of the DSL, the likelihood ratio statistic can then provide a joint association test for the set of markers without requiring an adjustment for testing of multiple haplotypes. Our simulation results also reveal that the latent variable approach may have improved power under certain scenarios comparing with classical haplotype association methods. PMID:18770519

  17. An overview of the North American residential radon and lung cancer case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Field, R William; Krewski, Daniel; Lubin, Jay H; Zielinski, Jan M; Alavanja, Michael; Catalan, Vanessa S; Klotz, Judith B; Létourneau, Ernest G; Lynch, Charles F; Lyon, Joseph L; Sandler, Dale P; Schoenberg, Janet B; Steck, Daniel J; Stolwijk, Jan A; Weinberg, Clarice; Wilcox, Homer B

    2006-04-01

    Lung cancer has held the distinction as the most common cancer type worldwide since 1985 (Parkin et al., 1993). Recent estimates suggest that lung cancer accounted for 1.2 million deaths worldwide in 2002, which represents 17.6% of the global cancer deaths (Parkin et al., 2005). During 2002, the highest lung cancer rates for men worldwide reportedly occurred in North America and Eastern Europe, whereas the highest rates in females occurred in North America and Northern Europe (Parkin et al., 2005). While tobacco smoking is the leading risk factor for lung cancer, because of the magnitude of lung cancer mortality, even secondary causes of lung cancer present a major public health concern (Field, 2001). Extrapolations from epidemiologic studies of radon-exposed miners project that approximately 18,600 lung cancer deaths per year (range 3000 to 41,000) in the United States alone are attributable to residential radon progeny exposure (National Research Council, 1999). Because of differences between the mines and the home environment, as well as differences (such as breathing rates) between miners and the general public, there was a need to directly evaluate effects of radon in homes. Seven major residential case-control radon studies have been conducted in North America to directly examine the association between prolonged radon progeny (radon) exposure and lung cancer. Six of the studies were performed in the United States including studies in New Jersey, Missouri (two studies), Iowa, and the combined states study (Connecticut, Utah, and southern Idaho). The seventh study was performed in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The residential case-control studies performed in the United States were previously reviewed elsewhere (Field, 2001). The goal of this review is to provide additional details regarding the methodologies and findings for the individual studies. Radon concentration units presented in this review adhere to the types (pCi/L or Bq/m3) presented in the

  18. Tumor-based case-control studies of infection and cancer: muddling the when and where of molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A; Wacholder, Sholom; Katki, Hormuzd A; Chaturvedi, Anil K

    2014-10-01

    We describe the "tumor-based case-control" study as a type of epidemiologic study used to evaluate associations between infectious agents and cancer. These studies assess exposure using diseased tissues from affected individuals (i.e., evaluating tumor tissue for cancer cases), but they must utilize nondiseased tissues to assess control subjects, who do not have the disease of interest. This approach can lead to exposure misclassification in two ways. First, concerning the "when" of exposure assessment, retrospective assessment of tissues may not accurately measure exposure at the key earlier time point (i.e., during the etiologic window). Second, concerning the "where" of exposure assessment, use of different tissues in cases and controls can have different accuracy for detecting the exposure (i.e., differential exposure misclassification). We present an example concerning the association of human papillomavirus with various cancers, where tumor-based case-control studies likely overestimate risk associated with infection. In another example, we illustrate how tumor-based case-control studies of Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer underestimate risk. Tumor-based case-control studies can demonstrate infection within tumor cells, providing qualitative information about disease etiology. However, measures of association calculated in tumor-based case-control studies are prone to over- or underestimating the relationship between infections and subsequent cancer risk. PMID:25063520

  19. Independent Study Course Development Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Clayton R.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses actual costs for developing independent study print courses for use in learning centers or for distance delivery, and presents a resource allocation guideline based on figures from Grant MacEwan Community College (Alberta). Topics discussed include the course writer/developer, clerical support, copyright clearance, instructional design,…

  20. Lung cancer among glass fibre production workers: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M J; Magnani, C; Pannett, B; Fletcher, A C; Winter, P D

    1988-01-01

    A cohort study among 4734 employees at an English glass fibre plant previously reported no excess of lung cancer mortality either overall or when examined in broad occupational groups. To investigate occupation in more detail, and to test the hypothesis that processes producing or using finer (respirable) fibres may be related to a higher risk of lung cancer, a nested case-control study has now been carried out. Included are 73 cases of lung cancer and 506 matched controls, for whom jobs held and processes worked on have been blindly recorded in more detail than for the cohort study. Workers known to have been employed on processes containing respirable fibres had a relative risk of lung cancer of 1.2 (95% confidence interval 0.7-2.0) compared with other workers. There was no evidence of a relationship of lung cancer to fibre diameter, duration of exposure, or time since first exposure. The results by broad occupational group were similar to those of the cohort study, and although some of the many detailed occupational categories examined had significantly raised relative risks, these did not appear to be related to exposure to respirable glass fibre. Although the study has not indicated a differential risk of lung cancer among workers exposed to finer diameter glass fibres, the exposure levels were low and the number of cases small. PMID:3179236

  1. Depressive Symptoms and Resilience among Pregnant Adolescents: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Pousada, Danny; Arroyo, Dalton; Hidalgo, Luis; Pérez-López, Faustino R.; Chedraui, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background. Data regarding depression and resilience among adolescents is still lacking. Objective. To assess depressive symptoms and resilience among pregnant adolescents. Method. Depressive symptoms and resilience were assessed using two validated inventories, the 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Short Depression Scale (CESD-10) and the 14-item Wagnild and Young Resilience Scale (RS), respectively. A case-control approach was used to compare differences between adolescents and adults. Results. A total of 302 pregnant women were enrolled in the study, 151 assigned to each group. Overall, 56.6% of gravids presented total CESD-10 scores 10 or more indicating depressed mood. Despite this, total CESD-10 scores and depressed mood rate did not differ among studied groups. Adolescents did however display lower resilience reflected by lower total RS scores and a higher rate of scores below the calculated median (P < .05). Logistic regression analysis could not establish any risk factor for depressed mood among studied subjects; however, having an adolescent partner (OR, 2.0 CI 95% 1.06–4.0, P = .03) and a preterm delivery (OR, 3.0 CI 95% 1.43–6.55, P = .004) related to a higher risk for lower resilience. Conclusion. In light of the findings of the present study, programs oriented at giving adolescents support before, during, and after pregnancy should be encouraged. PMID:21461335

  2. Depressive Symptoms and Resilience among Pregnant Adolescents: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Pousada, Danny; Arroyo, Dalton; Hidalgo, Luis; Pérez-López, Faustino R; Chedraui, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Background. Data regarding depression and resilience among adolescents is still lacking. Objective. To assess depressive symptoms and resilience among pregnant adolescents. Method. Depressive symptoms and resilience were assessed using two validated inventories, the 10-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Short Depression Scale (CESD-10) and the 14-item Wagnild and Young Resilience Scale (RS), respectively. A case-control approach was used to compare differences between adolescents and adults. Results. A total of 302 pregnant women were enrolled in the study, 151 assigned to each group. Overall, 56.6% of gravids presented total CESD-10 scores 10 or more indicating depressed mood. Despite this, total CESD-10 scores and depressed mood rate did not differ among studied groups. Adolescents did however display lower resilience reflected by lower total RS scores and a higher rate of scores below the calculated median (P < .05). Logistic regression analysis could not establish any risk factor for depressed mood among studied subjects; however, having an adolescent partner (OR, 2.0 CI 95% 1.06-4.0, P = .03) and a preterm delivery (OR, 3.0 CI 95% 1.43-6.55, P = .004) related to a higher risk for lower resilience. Conclusion. In light of the findings of the present study, programs oriented at giving adolescents support before, during, and after pregnancy should be encouraged. PMID:21461335

  3. Dietary Risk Factors for Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A Confirmatory Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Davanipour, Zoreh; Sobel, Eugene; Ziogas, Argyrios; Smoak, Carey; Bohr, Thomas; Doram, Keith; Liwnicz, Boleslaw

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study’s primary purpose was to determine whether earlier findings suggesting an association between sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of humans and specific dietary components could be replicated. The a priori hypotheses were that consumption of (i) foods likely to contain organ tissue and (ii) raw/rare meat are associated with increased sCJD risk. Study Design Population-based case-control study. Place and Duration of Study Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA; 4 years. Methodology An 11-state case-control study of pathologically confirmed, definite sCJD cases, matched controls, and a sample of control-surrogates was conducted. Ninety-six percent (106/110) of the case data was obtained in 1991-1993, prior to variant CJD publicity. Results Using control self-responses, consumption of hot dogs, sausage, pepperoni, kielbasa, “other” canned meat, poultry liver, any stomach/intestine, beef stomach/intestine, any organ tissue, and beef organ tissue was individually associated with increased sCJD risk; odds ratios (OR) ranged from 2.4 to 7.2 (0.003

  4. Vitamin C Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Published Case-Control and Cohort Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Yong-Fei; Wang, Gao-Qing; Jiang, Wei; Huang, Jing; Chen, Guo-Chong; Lu, Cai-De

    2016-01-01

    Background Observational studies inconsistently reported the relationship between vitamin C intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. We conducted a meta-analysis of published case-control and cohort studies to quantify the association. Methods Potentially eligible studies were found on PubMed and EMBASE databases through May 31, 2015. A random-effects model was assigned to compute summary point estimates with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Subgroup and meta-regression analyses were also performed to explore sources of heterogeneity. Results Our final analyses included 20 observational studies comprising nearly 5 thousand cases of pancreatic cancer. When comparing the highest with the lowest categories of vitamin C intake, the summary odds ratio/relative risk for case-control studies (14 studies), cohort studies (6 studies) and all studies combined was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.52–0.66), 0.93 (95% CI: 0.78–1.11) and 0.66 (95% CI: 0.58–0.75), respectively. The difference in the findings between case-control and cohort studies was statistically significant (P < .001). Possible publication bias was shown in the meta-analysis of case-control studies. Conclusion There is insufficient evidence to conclude any relationship between vitamin C intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. The strong inverse association observed in case-control studies may be affected by biases (eg, recall and selection biases) that particularly affect case-control studies and/or potential publication bias. Future prospective studies of vitamin C intake and pancreatic cancer are needed. PMID:26859881

  5. Risk assessment of feline tooth resorption: a Portuguese clinical case control study.

    PubMed

    Mestrinho, Lisa A; Runhau, Jens; Bragança, Mauro; Niza, Maria M R E

    2013-01-01

    Tooth resorption (TR) is one of the most common dental diseases in cats. Determination of risk factors has not yet been fully assessed and, to the best knowledge of the authors, this disease has never been studied in Portuguese cats. The objective of this case-control study was to determine type and distribution of TR lesions, evaluate risk factors, and establish relationships between variables in this disease. The study included data from 71 cats admitted for general anesthesia for various reasons. The cats were randomly selected. The inclusion criteria were availability of clinical history and owner permission. Cats with known oral disease were not excluded from the study. All cats received ultrasonic scaling and polishing of the teeth, a thorough oral examination, and full-mouth radiographs. A strong statistical relation was found between age and TR. The age group of 10 to 15-years showed an increased risk of 6.56 times for TR occurrence compared with the group 0 to 4-years of age. Presence of gingivitis in all index levels was related to an increased risk for TR. No relation was found between age or gingivitis index and lesion type. Mandibular third premolar and molar teeth were most commonly affected by TR, especially for type 1 lesions. Canine teeth were statistically more likely to have type 2 lesions. The trend for the canine teeth to be more affected with type 2 lesions needs further verification. PMID:24006716

  6. Herb-Induced Liver Injury in the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study

    PubMed Central

    Douros, Antonios; Bronder, Elisabeth; Andersohn, Frank; Klimpel, Andreas; Kreutz, Reinhold; Garbe, Edeltraut; Bolbrinker, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Herb-induced liver injury (HILI) has recently attracted attention due to increasing reports of hepatotoxicity associated with use of phytotherapeutics. Here, we present data on HILI from the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study. The study was initiated in 2000 to investigate the serious toxicity of drugs including herbal medicines. Potential cases of liver injury were ascertained in more than 180 Departments of all 51 Berlin hospitals from October 2002 to December 2011. Drug or herb intake was assessed through a standardized face-to-face interview. Drug or herbal aetiology was assessed based on the updated Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences scale. In ten of all 198 cases of hepatotoxicity included in the study, herbal aetiology was assessed as probable (once ayurvedic herb) or possible (Valeriana five times, Mentha piperita once, Pelargonium sidoides once, Hypericum perforatum once, Eucalyptus globulus once). Mean age was 56.4 ± 9.7 years, and the predominant pattern of liver injury was hepatocellular. No cases of acute liver failure or death were observed. This case series corroborates known risks for ayurvedic herbs, supports the suspected association between Valeriana use and liver injury, and indicates a hepatotoxic potential for herbs such as Pelargonium sidoides, Hypericum perforatum or Mentha piperita that were rarely associated with liver injury before. However, given that possible causality does not prove clinical significance, further studies in this field are needed. PMID:26784183

  7. Urinary strontium and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study in Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Juan; Tang, Lu-Ying; He, Jian-Rong; Su, Yi; Cen, Yu-Ling; Yu, Dan-Dan; Wu, Bang-Hua; Lin, Ying; Chen, Wei-Qing; Song, Er-Wei; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Strontium has been widely used in industries like electronic and pharmacy. It has a carcinogenic potential, however, and no study has been conducted to evaluate its effects on cancer risk. The aim of this study was to explore the possible association between strontium and breast cancer risk in a case-control study including 240 incident invasive breast cancer patients and 246 age-matched controls. We measured the urinary concentrations of strontium by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and conducted face-to-face interviews to obtain information on potential breast cancer risk factors. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the association. Creatinine-adjusted levels [median (25th, 75th) μg/g] of strontium were 155.59 (99.05, 230.70) in the breast cancer patients and 119.62 (81.97, 163.76) in the controls. Women in the highest tertile of strontium showed 124% increased risk of breast cancer, when compared with those in the lowest tertile after adjustment for the potential risk factors [OR (95% CI): 2.24 (1.42-3.81)]. This association was particularly strong for HER2 positive breast cancer [OR (95% CI): 10.92 (3.53-33.77)], and only occurred among premenopausal women. These results suggest a potential role of strontium in the development of breast cancer and urge further studies on the environmental contamination and the physiological and pathological mechanisms of strontium. PMID:22172139

  8. Herb-Induced Liver Injury in the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study.

    PubMed

    Douros, Antonios; Bronder, Elisabeth; Andersohn, Frank; Klimpel, Andreas; Kreutz, Reinhold; Garbe, Edeltraut; Bolbrinker, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Herb-induced liver injury (HILI) has recently attracted attention due to increasing reports of hepatotoxicity associated with use of phytotherapeutics. Here, we present data on HILI from the Berlin Case-Control Surveillance Study. The study was initiated in 2000 to investigate the serious toxicity of drugs including herbal medicines. Potential cases of liver injury were ascertained in more than 180 Departments of all 51 Berlin hospitals from October 2002 to December 2011. Drug or herb intake was assessed through a standardized face-to-face interview. Drug or herbal aetiology was assessed based on the updated Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences scale. In ten of all 198 cases of hepatotoxicity included in the study, herbal aetiology was assessed as probable (once ayurvedic herb) or possible (Valeriana five times, Mentha piperita once, Pelargonium sidoides once, Hypericum perforatum once, Eucalyptus globulus once). Mean age was 56.4 ± 9.7 years, and the predominant pattern of liver injury was hepatocellular. No cases of acute liver failure or death were observed. This case series corroborates known risks for ayurvedic herbs, supports the suspected association between Valeriana use and liver injury, and indicates a hepatotoxic potential for herbs such as Pelargonium sidoides, Hypericum perforatum or Mentha piperita that were rarely associated with liver injury before. However, given that possible causality does not prove clinical significance, further studies in this field are needed. PMID:26784183

  9. Assessing Incremental Value of Biomarkers with Multi-phase Nested case-control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qian M.; Zheng, Yingye; Chibnik, Lori B.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Cai, Tianxi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Accurate risk prediction models are needed to identify different risk groups for individualized prevention and treatment strategies. In the Nurses’ Health Study, to examine the effects of several biomarkers and genetic markers on the risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a three-phase nested case-control (NCC) design was conducted, in which two sequential NCC subcohorts were formed with one nested within the other, and one set of new markers measured on each of the subcohorts. One objective of the study is to evaluate clinical values of novel biomarkers in improving upon existing risk models because of potential cost associated with assaying biomarkers. In this paper, we develop robust statistical procedures for constructing risk prediction models for RA and estimating the incremental value (IncV) of new markers based on three-phase NCC studies. Our method also takes into account possible time-varying effects of biomarkers in risk modeling, which allows us to more robustly assess the biomarker utility and address the question of whether a marker is better suited for short-term or long-term risk prediction. The proposed procedures are shown to perform well in finite samples via simulation studies. PMID:26195245

  10. Simple F Test Reveals Gene-Gene Interactions in Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanjie; Yuan, Ao; Zhou, Jie; Bentley, Amy R.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.

    2012-01-01

    Missing heritability is still a challenge for Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Gene-gene interactions may partially explain this residual genetic influence and contribute broadly to complex disease. To analyze the gene-gene interactions in case-control studies of complex disease, we propose a simple, non-parametric method that utilizes the F-statistic. This approach consists of three steps. First, we examine the joint distribution of a pair of SNPs in cases and controls separately. Second, an F-test is used to evaluate the ratio of dependence in cases to that of controls. Finally, results are adjusted for multiple tests. This method was used to evaluate gene-gene interactions that are associated with risk of Type 2 Diabetes among African Americans in the Howard University Family Study. We identified 18 gene-gene interactions (P < 0.0001). Compared with the commonly-used logistical regression method, we demonstrate that the F-ratio test is an efficient approach to measuring gene-gene interactions, especially for studies with limited sample size. PMID:22837643

  11. Urinary strontium and the risk of breast cancer: A case-control study in Guangzhou, China

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Li-Juan; Tang, Lu-Ying; He, Jian-Rong; Su, Yi; Cen, Yu-Ling; Yu, Dan-Dan; Wu, Bang-Hua; Lin, Ying; Chen, Wei-Qing; Song, Er-Wei; Ren, Ze-Fang

    2012-01-15

    Strontium has been widely used in industries like electronic and pharmacy. It has a carcinogenic potential, however, and no study has been conducted to evaluate its effects on cancer risk. The aim of this study was to explore the possible association between strontium and breast cancer risk in a case-control study including 240 incident invasive breast cancer patients and 246 age-matched controls. We measured the urinary concentrations of strontium by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and conducted face-to-face interviews to obtain information on potential breast cancer risk factors. Multivariable analysis was used to estimate the association. Creatinine-adjusted levels [median (25th, 75th) {mu}g/g] of strontium were 155.59 (99.05, 230.70) in the breast cancer patients and 119.62 (81.97, 163.76) in the controls. Women in the highest tertile of strontium showed 124% increased risk of breast cancer, when compared with those in the lowest tertile after adjustment for the potential risk factors [OR (95% CI): 2.24 (1.42-3.81)]. This association was particularly strong for HER2 positive breast cancer [OR (95% CI): 10.92 (3.53-33.77)], and only occurred among premenopausal women. These results suggest a potential role of strontium in the development of breast cancer and urge further studies on the environmental contamination and the physiological and pathological mechanisms of strontium.

  12. Western dietary pattern is related to premenstrual syndrome: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Farasati, Negin; Siassi, Fereydoun; Koohdani, Fariba; Qorbani, Mostafa; Abashzadeh, Karolin; Sotoudeh, Gity

    2015-12-28

    Although premenstrual syndrome (PMS) affects a large number of women of reproductive age, the aetiology of this disorder has not yet been fully elucidated. The relationship between food intake and PMS morbidity has been investigated in several studies, but dietary patterns of PMS patients have not been taken into consideration up to now. We examined dietary patterns of 320 nurses with (n 160) and without (n 160) PMS in a case-control study. Food intakes over the past year were determined using semi-quantitative FFQ. Factor analysis was used to identify the main dietary patterns, and logistic regression was used to model the relationship between dietary patterns and PMS morbidity. Three dietary patterns were identified in the analysis: healthy, Western and traditional. After adjustment for age, BMI, menstrual cycles, physical activity and energy intake, participants in the second (OR 2·53; 95 % CI 1·18, 5·43) and third (OR 4·39; 95 % CI 1·97, 9·81) quintiles of the Western dietary pattern were more likely to experience PMS compared with those in the first quintile. The study findings therefore reveal that Western dietary pattern might be associated with PMS morbidity. However, this result should be interpreted with caution as there was no evidence of a dose-response relationship. Future studies are needed to confirm our findings in other populations. PMID:26459000

  13. Risk factors associated with death in Brazilian children with severe dengue: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    dos Remédios Freitas Carvalho Branco, Maria; de Albuquerque Luna, Expedito José; Júnior, Leônidas Lopes Braga; de Oliveira, Ricardo Villar Barbosa; Rios, Lívia Teresa Moreira; do Socorro da Silva, Maria; Medeiros, Maria Nilza Lima; Silva, Gilnara Fontinelle; Nina, Fernanda Campos Amaral Figueiredo; Lima, Taliane Jardim; Brito, Jayron Alves; de Oliveira, Avessandra Costa Cardoso; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this case-control study was to evaluate risk factors associated with death in children with severe dengue. METHODS: The clinical condition of hospitalized patients with severe dengue who died (cases, n = 18) was compared with that of hospitalized patients with severe dengue who survived (controls, n = 77). The inclusion criteria for this study were age under 13 years; hospital admission in São Luis, northeastern Brazil; and laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of dengue. RESULTS: Severe bleeding (hemoptysis), a defining criterion for dengue severity, was the factor most strongly associated with death in our study. We also found that epistaxis and persistent vomiting, both included as warning signs in the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of dengue, were strongly associated with death. No significant association was observed between any of the laboratory findings and death. CONCLUSIONS: The finding that epistaxis and persistent vomiting were also associated with death in children with severe dengue was unexpected and deserves to be explored in future studies. Because intensive care units are often limited in resource-poor settings, any information that can help to distinguish patients with severe dengue with a higher risk to progress to death may be crucial. PMID:24473560

  14. Juvenile perpetrators of homicides and attempted homicides--a case control study.

    PubMed

    Britvić, Dolores; Urlić, Ivan; Definis-Gojanović, Marija

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the influence of certain aspects of family dynamics, as well as some behavior and psychological development disorders on the occurrence of homicides and attempted homicides among juveniles in the Split Dalmatian County over a period of 10 years (1989-1998). A retrospective case-control study was performed to compare juvenile murderers and attempted murderers with minors who committed other offences, i.e. property crimes. The subjects were paired according to demographic and socio-economic background. The data obtained from County Court's files included social anamnesis, specialists' observation and psychiatric expertise results. There was a significant difference between the study group and their controls in the frequency of physical violence and parental rejection during childhood. Neuropsychological and neurophysiological abnormalities were more frequent in the experimental than in the control group. Stealing occurred more often in the control group. No significant differences were found for other studied risk factors. There is no unique type of juvenile murderer. A juvenile homicide is committed under the influence of various developmental characteristics, family milieu, and constitution combined with environmental factors and perpetrator's perception of the victim. PMID:16617589

  15. Using family members to augment genetic case-control studies of a life-threatening disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Weinberg, Clarice R; Chen, Jinbo

    2016-07-20

    Survival bias is difficult to detect and adjust for in case-control genetic association studies but can invalidate findings when only surviving cases are studied and survival is associated with the genetic variants under study. Here, we propose a design where one genotypes genetically informative family members (such as offspring, parents, and spouses) of deceased cases and incorporates that surrogate genetic information into a retrospective maximum likelihood analysis. We show that inclusion of genotype data from first-degree relatives permits unbiased estimation of genotype association parameters. We derive closed-form maximum likelihood estimates for association parameters under the widely used log-additive and dominant association models. Our proposed design not only permits a valid analysis but also enhances statistical power by augmenting the sample with indirectly studied individuals. Gene variants associated with poor prognosis can also be identified under this design. We provide simulation results to assess performance of the methods. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26866629

  16. Adipokines as Possible New Predictors of Cardiovascular Diseases: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pala, Laura; Monami, Matteo; Ciani, Silvia; Dicembrini, Ilaria; Pasqua, Alessandro; Pezzatini, Anna; Francesconi, Paolo; Cresci, Barbara; Mannucci, Edoardo; Rotella, Carlo Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims. The secretion of several adipocytokines, such as adiponectin, retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4), adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aFABP), and visfatin, is altered in subjects with abdominal adiposity; these endocrine alterations could contribute to increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of the study was to assess the relationship among adiponectin, RBP4, aFABP, and visfatin, and incident cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results. A case-control study, nested within a prospective cohort, on 2945 subjects enrolled for a diabetes screening program was performed. We studied 18 patients with incident fatal or nonfatal IHD (Ischemic Heart Disease) or CVD (Cerebrovascular Disease), compared with 18 matched control subjects. Circulating adiponectin levels were significantly lower in cases of IHD with respect to controls. Circulating RBP4 levels were significantly increased in CVD and decreased in IHD with respect to controls. Circulating aFABP4 levels were significantly increased in CVD, while no difference was associated with IHD. Circulating visfatin levels were significantly lower in cases of both CVD and IHD with respect to controls, while no difference was associated with CVD. Conclusions. The present study confirms that low adiponectin is associated with increased incidents of IHD, but not CVD, and suggests, for the first time, a major effect of visfatin, aFABP, and RBP4 in the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:21869928

  17. Dietary patterns and benign breast diseases: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tiznobeyk, Zeinab; Sheikhi Mobarakeh, Zahra; Qorbani, Mostafa; Koohdani, Fariba; Sotoudeh, Gity; Khajehnasiri, Farahnaz; Khosravi, Shahla; Doostan, Farideh

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have investigated the relation between benign breast diseases (BBD) and food intake. However, dietary patterns of these patients have not been taken into consideration up to now. The aim of this study is to determine the association between dietary patterns and BBD. In this case-control study, ninety-six patients with BBD and seventy controls were selected from women attending the Iranian Center for Breast Cancer affiliated with Academic Center for Education, Culture and Research. Demographic, physical activity and semi-quantitative FFQ were completed. The main dietary patterns were extracted by factor analysis. Two major dietary patterns emerged: Healthy dietary pattern including fish, poultry, eggs, low-fat dairy products, vegetables, legumes, nuts and seeds, whole grains, oil and mayonnaise, olives, fruits; and Unhealthy dietary pattern including red meats, organ and processed meats, high-fat dairy products, refined grains, sweets and desserts, animal and solid fats. After adjustment for age, BMI and energy intake, the participants in the highest tertile of Healthy dietary pattern (OR 0·44; 95 % CI 0·20, 0·99) were less likely to have BBD compared with those in the first tertile. After adjustment for other confounding variables, this relationship still remained close to significant level. However, higher consumption of Unhealthy dietary pattern was not associated with the risk of BBD. In conclusion, Healthy dietary pattern might be inversely associated with the risk of BBD; however, this result should be interpreted with caution. Future studies are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:27198589

  18. A Nested Case-Control Study of Association between Metabolome and Hypertension Risk

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yongchen; Wang, Ying; Xi, Lu; Li, Guoqi; Zhao, Fan; Qi, Yue; Liu, Jing; Zhao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to explore novel small metabolites that associated with hypertension risk in a population-based nested case-control study. Among 460 individuals with optimal blood pressure (<120/80 mmHg) at baseline, 55 progressed to hypertension during 5 years of follow-up. Twenty-nine cases of incident hypertension and 29 controls, matched for age, sex, and baseline systolic blood pressure, were included in this study. Serum metabolites were measured by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. t-test and logistic regression analysis were applied to investigate the association between metabolites and incident hypertension. Among the 241 metabolites identified in this study, baseline levels of 26 metabolites were significantly different between hypertension and control groups. After adjusting for body mass index, smoking, and drinking, 16 out of the 26 metabolites were still associated with hypertension risk including four amino acids. Amino acids were negatively associated with risk of future hypertension, with odds ratio (OR) ranging from 0.33 to 0.53. Two of these amino acids were essential amino acids including threonine and phenylalanine. Higher level of lyxose, a fermentation product of gut microbes, was associated with higher risk of hypertension. Our study identified multiple metabolites that associated with hypertension risk. These findings implied that low amino acid levels and gut microbiome might play an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. PMID:27119083

  19. Mitochondrial haplogroups and hypervariable region polymorphisms in schizophrenia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guo-xia; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Yun-tao; Dong, Yu-shu; Lv, Zhuang-wei; Sun, Mao; Wu, Dan; Wu, Yuan-ming

    2013-10-30

    Previous studies have detected associations between mitochondrial haplogroups and schizophrenia (SZ). However, no study has examined the relationship between major mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups and SZ in the Chinese population. The aim of this study was to assess the association between mtDNA haplogroups and SZ genesis in the Chinese Han population. We used a case-control study and sequenced the mtDNA hypervariable regions (HVR1, HVR2, and HVR3) in the Han population. We analyzed mtDNA haplogroups and HVR polymorphisms in 298 SZ patients and 298 controls. The haplotypes were classified into 10 major haplogroups: A, B, CZ, D, F, G, M, N, N9a, and R. Statistical analysis revealed that only N9a showed a nominally significant association with protection from SZ [1.68% vs. 6.38%, p=0.004, OR=0.251 (0.092-0.680); after adjustment for age and sex: p=0.006, OR=0.246 (0.090-0.669)]. Three HVR polymorphisms were found to be nominally significantly different between subjects with SZ and controls, and all except one (m.204T>C) are linked to the N9a haplogroup. Our results indicate that mtDNA haplogroup N9a might be a protective factor for SZ. PMID:23374981

  20. Severe maternal morbidity: a case-control study in Maranhao, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality and morbidity are among the top public health priorities in Brazil, being quite high, especially among the most disadvantage women. A case control study was developed to identify risk factors for severe maternal morbidity in Sao Luis, one of the poorest Brazilian State Capitals. Methods The case–control study was carried out between 01/03/2009 and 28/02/2010 in two public high-risk maternities facilities and in two intensive care units (ICUs) for referral of obstetric cases. All cases hospitalized due to complications during gestation period, childbirth or up to 42 days of puerperium and who fulfilled any of Mantel's and/or Waterstone's criteria were identified. Two controls per case were randomly selected among patients of the same clinics discharged for other reasons. Data were obtained through a structured interview as well as from medical charts and prenatal cards and included sociodemographic variables, clinical and obstetric histories, behavioral factors and exposure to stress factors during pregnancy, pre-natal assistance and obstetric complication and childbirth care. Results In the final model of the unconditional logistic regression analysis, being older than 35 years (OR=3.11; 95% CI:1.53-6.31), previous hypertension (OR=2.52; 95% CI:1.09-5.80), history of abortion (OR=1.61; 95% CI:0.97-2.68), 4–5 pre-natal consultations (OR=1.78; 95% CI:1.05-3.01) and 1–3 pre-natal consultations (OR=1.89; 95% CI:1.03-3.49) were independently associated with severe maternal morbidity. Conclusions The results corroborate the importance of reproductive healthcare, of identifying a high-risk pregnancy and of a qualified and complete prenatal care to prevent severe morbid events. Resumo Introdução A mortalidade e morbidade maternas estão entre os tópicos prioritários da Saúde Pública brasileira, especialmente na população de menor nível socioeconômico. Um estudo caso-controle foi desenvolvido para identificar os fatores de risco

  1. Factors Associated with Anti-Tuberculosis Medication Adverse Effects: A Case-Control Study in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Chung-Delgado, Kocfa; Revilla-Montag, Alejandro; Guillen-Bravo, Sonia; Velez-Segovia, Eduardo; Soria-Montoya, Andrea; Nuñez-Garbin, Alexandra; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Background Long-term exposure to anti-tuberculosis medication increases risk of adverse drug reactions and toxicity. The objective of this investigation was to determine factors associated with anti-tuberculosis adverse drug reactions in Lima, Peru, with special emphasis on MDR-TB medication, HIV infection, diabetes, age and tobacco use. Methodology and Results A case-control study was performed using information from Peruvian TB Programme. A case was defined as having reported an anti-TB adverse drug reaction during 2005–2010 with appropriate notification on clinical records. Controls were defined as not having reported a side effect, receiving anti-TB therapy during the same time that the case had appeared. Crude, and age- and sex-adjusted models were calculated using odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). A multivariable model was created to look for independent factors associated with side effect from anti-TB therapy. A total of 720 patients (144 cases and 576 controls) were analyzed. In our multivariable model, age, especially those over 40 years (OR = 3.93; 95%CI: 1.65–9.35), overweight/obesity (OR = 2.13; 95%CI: 1.17–3.89), anemia (OR = 2.10; IC95%: 1.13–3.92), MDR-TB medication (OR = 11.1; 95%CI: 6.29–19.6), and smoking (OR = 2.00; 95%CI: 1.03–3.87) were independently associated with adverse drug reactions. Conclusions Old age, anemia, MDR-TB medication, overweight/obesity status, and smoking history are independent risk factors associated with anti-tuberculosis adverse drug reactions. Patients with these risk factors should be monitored during the anti-TB therapy. A comprehensive clinical history and additional medical exams, including hematocrit and HIV-ELISA, might be useful to identify these patients. PMID:22110689

  2. Relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders, Widespread Palpation Tenderness and Multiple Pain Conditions: A Case - Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Slade, Gary; Lim, Pei Feng; Miller, Vanessa; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda

    2012-01-01

    The multiple bodily pain conditions in temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have been associated with generalized alterations in pain processing. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the presence of widespread body palpation tenderness (WPT) and the likelihood of multiple comorbid pain conditions in TMD patients and controls. This case-control study was conducted in 76 TMD subjects with WPT, 83 TMD subjects without WPT, and 181 non-TMD matched control subjects. The study population was also characterized for clinical pain, experimental pain sensitivity, and related psychological phenotypes. Results showed that (1) TMD subjects reported an average of 1.7 comorbid pain conditions compared to 0.3 reported by the control subjects (p<0.001); (2) Compared to control subjects, the odds ratio (OR) for multiple comorbid pain conditions is higher for TMD subjects with WPT [OR 8.4 (95% CI 3.1–22.8) for TMD with WPT versus OR 3.3 (95% CI 1.3–8.4) for TMD without WPT]; (3) TMD subjects with WPT presented with reduced pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in both cranial and extra-cranial regions compared to TMD subjects without WPT; and (4) TMD subjects with WPT reported increased somatic symptoms. These findings suggest that pain assessment outside of the orofacial region may prove valuable for the classification, diagnosis, and management of TMD patients. PMID:23031401

  3. Factors associated with adult poisoning in northern Malaysia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Fathelrahman, A I; Ab Rahman, A F; Zain, Z Mohd; Tengku, M A

    2006-04-01

    Data on adult risk factors associated with drug or chemical poisonings in Malaysia are scarce. The objective of the study was to identify possible risk factors associated with adult admissions to the Penang General Hospital (PGH) due to chemical poisoning and/or drug overdose. The present study was a case-control study, conducted over 18 weeks. One hundred acutely poisoned adult patients admitted to PGH during the period from September 2003 to February 2004 were considered as cases. Two hundred patients admitted to the same medical wards for other illnesses, during the same period, were matched for age and gender with the poisoned cases and thus selected as controls. McNemar test and binary logistic were used for univariate analysis and logistic regression analysis for multivariate analyses. The odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated for each predictor variable. Positive histories of psychiatric illness and previous poisoning, problems in boy/girl friend relationships, family problems, marital problems, Indian ethnicity, Chinese ethnicity, living in rented houses and living in a household with less than five people were significant risk factors associated with adult admissions due to poisoning. PMID:16696291

  4. Splenectomy Correlates With Increased Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Case-Control Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to investigate the association between splenectomy and acute pancreatitis. Methods We conducted a case-control study using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. We included 7666 subjects aged 20–84 years with first-time acute pancreatitis during the period of 1998–2011 as cases and 30 664 randomly selected subjects without acute pancreatitis as controls. Both cases and controls were matched for sex, age, and index year of acute pancreatitis diagnosis. The association of acute pancreatitis with splenectomy was examined using a multivariable unconditional logistic regression model and reported as an odds ratio and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Results After adjustment for covariables, the adjusted odds ratio of acute pancreatitis was 2.90 for subjects with splenectomy (95% CI, 1.39–6.05) compared with subjects without splenectomy. Conclusions Splenectomy is associated with acute pancreatitis. Further studies are necessary to clarify the underlying mechanism. PMID:27087607

  5. The Relationship between Iron Deficiency and Febrile Convulsion: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Kheirkhah, Davood; Madani, Mahla; Kashani, Hamed Haddad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Febrile seizure is among the most common convulsion disorders in children, which strikes 2% to 5% of children between 3 to 60 months of age. Some studies have reported that iron deficiency could be a risk factor for febrile seizure. The present study was conducted to compare the rate of iron deficiency anemia in febrile children with and without seizure. Materials and Methods: This case-control study evaluated 200 children aged 6-60 month in two 100 person groups (febrile seizure and febrile without convulsion) in Kashan. The CBC diff, serum iron and TIBC were done for all of participants. Diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia based on mentioned tests. Results: No significant differences were found in two groups regarding to the age, gender, and the disease causing the fever. The presence of iron deficiency anemia was 45% in the convulsion group and 22% in the group with fever without convulsion. The Chi Square test indicated a significant difference between two groups. Conclusions: The findings suggest that a considerable percentage of children having febrile seizure suffer from iron-deficiency anemia and low serum iron. This means the low serum iron and presence of anemia can serve as a reinforcing factor for the febrile seizure in children. PMID:26383191

  6. An exploratory case-control study of brain tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Howe, G R; Burch, J D; Chiarelli, A M; Risch, H A; Choi, B C

    1989-08-01

    An exploratory case-control study of childhood brain tumors was conducted in southern Ontario between 1977 and 1983, on 74 cases and 138 age- and sex-matched population controls. A significantly elevated risk (perhaps due to early case symptoms) was seen for skull X-rays at least 5 years prior to diagnosis, and for head or neck injuries which required medical attention. However, no evidence of an increased risk appeared for exposure to sick pets or to pesticides, maternal or paternal history of smoking, and various birth characteristics or antenatal exposure of the child, though these have previously been reported to be associated with childhood brain tumors. With respect to the hypothesis that N-nitroso compounds may be involved in the etiology of childhood brain tumors, most exposures of this type were not associated with risk, though a significant positive association was seen for consumption of beer by the mother during pregnancy, and a significant negative association was seen with consumption of fruit juice by the child. Other findings in the present study include an association with developmental problems relating to height and weight and with certain socioeconomic characteristics of the mother. Further investigation of these results in future studies is warranted. PMID:2743324

  7. Lung cancer risks of underground miners: cohort and case-control studies.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, V. E.

    1988-01-01

    All underground mines have higher radon levels than are found in surface air. Ventilation is the primary method of controlling radon levels. Fourteen cohort and seven case-control studies done on underground miners are reviewed; they include many types of ore. Only five of the studies deal with more than 100 lung cancer deaths. Variations in the attributable risk are given. Some generalizations can be drawn from these studies: the longer the follow-up, the greater is the attributable risk, even though the relative risk is reasonably constant. The induction-latent period is quite variable but is shortened by high exposure rates, by cigarette smoking, and by increasing age at start of mining. The predominant histological type of lung cancer among miners changed from small-cell undifferentiated for short follow-up time to epidermoid after long follow-up times. With short follow-up time, a multiplicative interaction between smoking and radiation was indicated, but, with long follow-up time, the two factors appear to be simply additive. This difference is probably due to the shortened latent period among cigarette smokers, not to synergism. PMID:3051699

  8. Outdoor Air Pollution and Cardiovascular Diseases in Lebanon: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nasser, Zeina; Salameh, Pascale; Dakik, Habib; Elias, Elias; Abou Abbas, Linda; Levêque, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution is increasingly considered as a serious threat for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The aim of this study is to investigate the association between outdoor pollutants and cardiovascular diseases among adults in Lebanon and to examine the possible moderator effect of cigarette smoking status on this association. A multicenter case-control study was conducted between October 2011 and October 2012. Cases were hospitalized patients diagnosed with CVD by a cardiologist while the control group subjects were free of any cardiac diseases. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, tobacco consumption, self-rated global health, pollution exposure, and other risk factors was collected using a questionnaire. The results of the logistic regression revealed that living near busy highway (OR 5.04, 95% CI (4.44–12.85), P < 0.001) and close to local diesel generator (OR 4.76, 95% CI (2.07–10.91), P < 0.001) was significantly associated with CVD. The association between the CVD and exposure to outside pollutants differed by cigarette smoking status. A clear difference was noted between nonsmokers and current smokers OR 4.6, 95% CI (1.10–19.25) and OR 10.11, 95% CI (7.33–20.23), respectively. Forthcoming studies are needed to clarify the potential link between outdoor air pollution and cardiovascular diseases in Lebanon. Public health interventions must be implemented to reduce air pollution and to improve air quality. PMID:25653681

  9. Outdoor air pollution and cardiovascular diseases in Lebanon: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nasser, Zeina; Salameh, Pascale; Dakik, Habib; Elias, Elias; Abou Abbas, Linda; Levêque, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Outdoor air pollution is increasingly considered as a serious threat for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The aim of this study is to investigate the association between outdoor pollutants and cardiovascular diseases among adults in Lebanon and to examine the possible moderator effect of cigarette smoking status on this association. A multicenter case-control study was conducted between October 2011 and October 2012. Cases were hospitalized patients diagnosed with CVD by a cardiologist while the control group subjects were free of any cardiac diseases. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, tobacco consumption, self-rated global health, pollution exposure, and other risk factors was collected using a questionnaire. The results of the logistic regression revealed that living near busy highway (OR 5.04, 95% CI (4.44-12.85), P < 0.001) and close to local diesel generator (OR 4.76, 95% CI (2.07-10.91), P < 0.001) was significantly associated with CVD. The association between the CVD and exposure to outside pollutants differed by cigarette smoking status. A clear difference was noted between nonsmokers and current smokers OR 4.6, 95% CI (1.10-19.25) and OR 10.11, 95% CI (7.33-20.23), respectively. Forthcoming studies are needed to clarify the potential link between outdoor air pollution and cardiovascular diseases in Lebanon. Public health interventions must be implemented to reduce air pollution and to improve air quality. PMID:25653681

  10. A nested case-control study of lung cancer among silica exposed workers in China.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J K; Chen, J Q; Dosemeci, M; Chen, R A; Rexing, S H; Wu, Z; Hearl, F J; McCawley, M A; Blot, W J

    1992-03-01

    In an attempt to assess whether silica induces lung cancer, a nested case-control study of 316 male lung cancer cases and 1352 controls was carried out among pottery workers and tungsten, copper-iron, and tin miners from five provinces in south central China. Exposure to dust and silica for each study subject was evaluated quantitatively by cumulative exposure measures based on historical industrial hygiene records. Measurements on confounders such as inorganic arsenic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and radon were also collected from the worksites. Information on cigarette smoking was obtained by interviews of the subjects or their next of kin. A significant trend of increasing risk of lung cancer with exposure to silica was found for tin miners, but not for miners working in tungsten or copper-iron mines. Concomitant and highly correlated exposures to arsenic and PAHs among tin miners were also found. Risk of lung cancer among pottery workers was related to exposure to silica, although the dose-response gradient was not significant. Risks of lung cancer were significantly increased among silicotic subjects in iron-copper and tin mines, but not in pottery factories or tungsten mines. The results of this study provide only limited support for an aetiological association between silica and lung cancer. PMID:1313281

  11. Case-control study of skin cancer in the rubber industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bourguet, C.C.

    1983-01-01

    A case-control study of non-melanoma skin cancer was conducted in two companies of the American rubber manufacturing industry. The study goal was to examine the association of basal and squamous cell carcinoma with seven raw materials: carbon black, dustless, extender, and lubricating oils, waxes, solvents, and the rubber stock itself. Study members were white males belonging to predefined cohorts of rubber workers. Cases were identified from hospital pathology department records. Each case was matched with four controls of the same company, and year of birth and hire (+/- one year). Company A provided 31 cases (22 squamous cell carcinoma cases) and 118 controls. Company B provided 55 cases (43 squamous cell cases) and 216 controls. Exposure was estimated using employee personnel records. In Company A, squamous cell carcinoma was associated with rubber stock, lubricating oils, and non-polycyclic chemicals. Ten years of moderate rubber stock exposure multiplied the existing relative risk by 2.96 (95% CL: 1.06-8.23). Exposure to non-polycyclic chemicals carried a relative risk of 5.5 (1.28-23.48). These chemicals are used as accelerators, antioxidants, and antiozonants. Disease was negatively associated with extender oil exposure. In Company B, jobs with heat exposure (milling, extruding, and curing) were associated with disease. Using a second control group, matched on year of birth, there was no convincing evidence that cases had longer employment duration than controls. This does not suggest an overall skin cancer risk among rubber workers.

  12. Toxoplasma Gondii Infection and Depression: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Berumen-Segovia, Luis Omar; Torres-Prieto, Yazmin Elizabeth; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Pérez-Álamos, Alma Rosa; Ortiz-Jurado, María Nalleli; Molotla-de-León, Gabriel; Beristain-García, Isabel; Rábago-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2016-06-24

    We assessed the association of Toxoplasma gondii infection and depression in a sample of psychiatric patients and control subjects without depression. We performed an age- and gender-matched case-control study of 89 patients suffering from depression attended in a public psychiatric hospital in Durango City, Mexico and 356 control subjects without depression from the general population of the same city. Participants were tested for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were found in 11 (12.4%) of the 89 cases and in 22 (6.2%) of the 356 controls (OR = 2.14; 95% CI: 1.00-4.59; P = 0.04). Anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies were found in four (19%) of 21 anti-T. gondii IgG seropositive controls but not in 11 anti-T. gondii IgG seropositive cases (P = 0.27). Patients aged 30 years old and younger had a significantly higher seroprevalence of T. gondii infection than controls of the same age group (P = 0.001). Results of the present study suggest a potential association between T. gondii infection and depression. Furthers studies to confirm our results and to determine the epidemiology of T. gondii in young depressed patients should be conducted. PMID:27429790

  13. Bladder cancer among workers in the textile industry: results of a Spanish case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, C A; Riboli, E; Lopez-Abente, G

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results from a case-control study carried out in the county of Mataro, Spain. The study was designed to investigate the possible causes of an unusually high mortality rate from bladder cancer in Mataro county as compared to Spain as a whole, and this report focuses on occupational exposures. The study is based on 57 cases who were hospitalized for or died from bladder cancer between 1978 and 1981. Two controls per case were matched for sex, age, residence, and date of either hospitalization or death. Information was collected on smoking, coffee drinking, and occupation. Occupational histories were then evaluated and coded blind by a group of occupational health physicians. Analyses were carried out by means of conditional logistic regression. Among a group of common occupational sectors, an increased risk for past employment in the textile industry (OR = 2.2; p = .038) was found. Further analyses indicated that the risk is particularly elevated (OR = 4.41; 95% confidence limits; 1.15-16.84) for subjects who worked in dyeing or printing and who were most probably exposed to azo-dyes. Exposure in the textile industry may be responsible for 16% of the bladder cancers in the Mataro area. A list of dyes commonly used in the Mataro textile industries was compiled and cross-checked with lists of substances tested or evaluated for carcinogenesis. PMID:3232687

  14. Association of selenoprotein S gene polymorphism with ischemic stroke in a Chinese case-control study.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Xia; Guan, Hong-Jun; Liu, Jian-Ping; Guo, Yu-Peng; Yang, Yong; Niu, Ying-Ying; Yao, Li-Yan; Yang, Yin-Dong; Yue, Hong-Yu; Meng, Li-Li; Cui, Xin-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Wei; Gao, Jin-Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies showed that selenoprotein S (SELS) was associated with a range of inflammatory markers, and its gene expression was influenced by a polymorphism in the promoter region. The genetic basis of the ischemic stroke has now been largely determined, so the aim of the study was to examine the role of SELS genetic variants in the ischemic stroke risk in a Chinese population. We conducted a case-control study with 239 ischemic stroke patients and 240 controls. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in SELS genes were analyzed for association with the risk of ischemic stroke in the Chinese Han population. No evidence of ischemic stroke association was observed with the SNP rs34713741. Interestingly, the strongest evidence showed that SELS SNP rs4965814 was associated with ischemic stroke (P < 0.05). We found a significant association with increased ischemic stroke risk in women carrying the CC genotype of rs4965814 [hazard ratio: 2.43(1.03-5.75)]; a similar trend was also found in men carrying the TC genotype of rs4965814 [hazard ratio: 1.81(1.06-3.08)]. SNP rs4965814 of SELS may affect the susceptibility to ischemic stroke. Understanding the inflammatory mechanisms of ischemic stroke may give new therapeutic targets to pharmacologists. PMID:25390504

  15. External radiotherapy prior to thyroid cancer: A case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Hallquist, A.; Loefroth, P.O. ); Hardell, L. )

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study previous radiotherapy of malignant diseases as a risk factor for thyroid cancer. By using the Swedish Cancer Registry all cases of thyroid cancer with another malignant disease at least one year previously and living within the catchment area of the hospital were traced. During 1959-1989 a total of 1056 cases of thyroid cancer were identified. Of these, 37 had had another previous malignant disease and they constituted the cases in this study. As controls four persons with at least two malignant diseases, thyroid cancer excluded, were selected for each case from the same cancer registry. Ten (27.0%) of the 37 patients with thyroid cancer as a second tumor had earlier been irradiated with the treatment dose including the thyroid gland as compared with 34 (24.5%) of the 139 control patients. Eight of the ten cases with previous irradiation of the thyroid gland had papillary cancer. The median latency was 13 years. The estimated radiation dose in the thyroid varied between 3 and 40 Gy. External radiotherapy gave a crude odds ratio of 1.1 with 95% confidence interval = 0.5-2.8 for thyroid cancer. The weighted odds ratio was calculated to 2.3 with confidence interval = 0.5-8.9. This case-control study gave a nonsignificantly increased odds ratio for thyroid cancer in patients with external radiotherapy including the thyroid gland. 26 refs., 4 tabs.

  16. The expression of Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) in testicular cancer: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Shapouri, Farnaz; Saeidi, Shaghayegh; Ashrafi Kakhki, Sara; Pouyan, Omid; Amirchaghmaghi, Elham; Aflatoonian, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that malfunction of immune system may causes testicular cancer. Recently, our understanding of innate immune system has been expanded, by discovery of “Toll-Like Receptors” (TLRs). Some studies have shown that polymorphisms of TLR2 and 4 may affect on the risk of cancer. Also, the role of TLRs 3 and 9 have been shown in apoptosis and metastasis of cancer cells in animal models. Objective: Little information is available about the influence of innate immunity on testicular malignancy. Therefore, expression of TLRs 2, 3, 4 and 9 as main components of innate immunity has been investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: In this case control study, TLRs gene expression was examined by RT-PCR in normal testis and testicular cancer tissues. Real time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) analysis was used to compare the relative expression of TLRs between the samples. Results: mRNAs of TLR 2, 3, 4 and 9 were expressed in all normal and cancer samples. Q-PCR reveals that cancer samples had stronger expression of these genes compared with normal ones. Conclusion: It seems that the different TLRs expression in testicular cancer cells may contribute to extensive signaling pathways involved in carcinogenesis. PMID:24639717

  17. Prevalence of Intestinal Protozoa among Saudi Patients with Chronic Renal Failure: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Hawash, Yousry A.; Dorgham, Laila Sh.; Amir, El-Amir M.; Sharaf, Osama F.

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that chronic renal failure (CRF) predisposes patients to infection with intestinal protozoa. We tested this hypothesis with a matched case-control study to determine the prevalence of these protozoa and their diarrhea associated symptoms among 50 patients with CRF (cases) from Taif, western Saudi Arabia. Fifty diarrheal patients without CRF were recruited in the study as controls. Participants were interviewed by a structured questionnaire and stool samples were collected. Samples were thoroughly examined with microscopy and three coproantigens detection kits. Enteric protozoa were detected in 21 cases and 14 controls. Blastocystis spp. were the most predominant parasite (16% in cases versus 8% in controls), followed by Giardia duodenalis (10% in cases versus 12% in controls) and Cryptosporidium spp. (10% in cases versus 6% in controls). Cyclospora cayetanensis was identified in two cases, while Entamoeba histolytica was described in one case and one control. Intestinal parasitism was positively associated with the male gender, urban residence, and travel history. Clinical symptoms of nausea/vomiting and abdominal pain were significantly varied between the parasitized cases and controls (P value ≤ 0.05). Given the results, we recommend screening all diarrheal feces for intestinal protozoa in the study's population, particularly those with CRF. PMID:26491455

  18. A Case Control Study on Risk Factors Associated with Low Birth Weight Babies in Eastern Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Bhaskar, Ravi Kumar; Deo, Krishna Kumar; Neupane, Uttam; Chaudhary Bhaskar, Subhadra; Yadav, Birendra Kumar; Pokharel, Hanoon P.; Pokharel, Paras Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background. This study was done to assess the maternal and sociodemographic factors associated with low birth weight (LBW) babies. Methods. An unmatched case control study was done involving 159 cases (mothers having LBW singleton babies) and 159 controls (mothers having normal birth weight singleton babies). Results. More than 50% of LBW babies were from the mothers with height ≤145 cm while only 9.43% of NBW babies were from the mothers with that height. Finally, after multivariate logistic regression analysis, maternal height, time of first antenatal care (ANC) visit, number of ANC visits, iron supplementation, calcium supplementation, maternal education, any illness during pregnancy, and hypertension were found as the significant predictors of LBW. However, maternal blood group AB, normal maternal Body Mass Index (BMI), mother's age of 30 or more years, and starting ANC visit earlier were found to be protective for LBW. Conclusion. Study findings suggest that selectively targeted interventions such as delay age at first pregnancy, improving maternal education and nutrition, and iron and calcium supplementation can prevent LBW in Nepal. PMID:26783406

  19. CD209 in inflammatory bowel disease: a case-control study in the Spanish population

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Concepción; Oliver, Javier; Mendoza, Juan Luis; Gómez-García, María; Taxonera, Carlos; Gómez, Luis M; López-Nevot, Miguel A; de la Concha, Emilio G; Urcelay, Elena; Martínez, Alfonso; Martín, Javier

    2007-01-01

    Background The etiology of Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and Crohn's Disease (CD), considered together as Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD), involves environmental and genetic factors. Although some genes are already known, the genetics underlying these diseases is complex and new candidates are continuously emerging. The CD209 gene is located in a region linked previously to IBD and a CD209 functional polymorphism (rs4804803) has been associated to other inflammatory conditions. Our aim was to study the potential involvement of this CD209 variant in IBD susceptibility. Methods We performed a case-control study with 515 CD patients, 497 UC patients and 731 healthy controls, all of them white Spaniards. Samples were typed for the CD209 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs4804803 by TaqMan technology. Frequency comparisons were performed using χ2 tests. Results No association between CD209 and UC or CD was observed initially. However, stratification of UC patients by HLA-DR3 status, a strong protective allele, showed that carriage of the CD209_G allele could increase susceptibility in the subgroup of HLA-DR3-positive individuals (p = 0.03 OR = 1.77 95% CI 1.04–3.02, vs. controls). Conclusion A functional variant in the CD209 gene, rs4804803, does not seem to be influencing Crohn's disease susceptibility. However, it could be involved in the etiology or pathology of Ulcerative Colitis in HLA-DR3-positive individuals but further studies are necessary. PMID:18070336

  20. Risk factors for human alveolar echinococcosis: a case-control study in Hokkaido, Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Kishi, R; Katakura, Y; Miyake, H

    2001-10-01

    A case-control study to determine the risk factors for human alveolar echinococcosis (AE) was conducted in Hokkaido, Japan. The 134 cases were either patients clinically diagnosed as having AE (N =61) or other individuals found to be seropositive for Echinococcus multilocularis although showing no abnormalities in ultrasound scans (N = 73). Two groups of case-matched controls were employed: one of 670 individuals selected from a list of residents of Hokkaido (group A) and the other of 650 subjects selected from a list of individuals who had been found seronegative in earlier investigations (group B). Because of the long latency of AE, potential risk factors were studied over two different periods: for the 0-10 and 11-20 years before the year of diagnosis/recorded seropositivity. The results of multivariate analyses, in which the cases were compared with each control group, indicated that the rearing of cattle and pigs and the use of well water were significant risk factors and that the use of tap water significantly decreased the risk of an individual having AE. Extension of the piped water supply and health education on improving the disposal of household rubbish (to keep foxes away from houses) should help reduce the risk of AE infection in the study area. PMID:11784422

  1. A case-control study of leukemia at a naval nuclear shipyard.

    PubMed

    Stern, F B; Waxweiler, R A; Beaumont, J J; Lee, S T; Rinsky, R A; Zumwalde, R D; Halperin, W E; Bierbaum, P J; Landrigan, P J; Murray, W E

    1986-06-01

    A matched case-control study was conducted of 53 leukemia deaths and of 212 controls within a previously studied cohort of 24,545 on-shore workers employed between January 1, 1952 and August 15, 1977 at the Portsmouth (New Hampshire) Naval Shipyard. The study sought to ascertain a priori whether there was an association between leukemia deaths and occupational exposure to either ionizing radiation or organic solvents. To obtain information on individual exposures, radiation dose histories and detailed work histories by job and shop were evaluated for each subject. No statistically significant associations were found either between ionizing radiation or presumed solvent exposure and myelogenous or lymphatic leukemia. However, when specific job categories and shops were examined without benefit of a priori hypotheses, two occupations, electrician and welder, were found to be associated with leukemia. For electricians, the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio (ORMH) was significantly elevated for all leukemias (ORMH = 3.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.29-6.98), particularly for lymphatic leukemia (ORMH = 6.00, 95% CI = 1.47-24.45). For welders, the odds ratio was not significantly elevated for all leukemias (ORMH = 2.25, 95% CI = 0.92-5.53), but was significantly elevated for myeloid leukemia (ORMH = 3.83, 95% CI = 1.28-11.46). These findings persisted when potential confounders were adjusted by means of a conditional logistic regression model. PMID:3458360

  2. Risk factors for pre-term birth in Iraq: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dabbagh, Samim A; Al-Taee, Wafa Y

    2006-01-01

    Background Preterm birth (PTB)is a major clinical problem associated with perinatal mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study is to identify risk factors associated with PTB in Mosul, Iraq. Methods A case-control study was conducted in Mosul, Iraq, from 1st September, 2003 to 28th February, 2004. Results A total of 200 cases of PTB and 200 controls of full-term births were screened and enrolled in the study. Forward logistic regression analysis was used in the analysis. Several significant risk associations between PTB and the following risk factors were identified: poor diet (OR = 4.33), heavy manual work (OR = 1.70), caring for domestic animals (OR = 5.06), urinary tract infection (OR = 2.85), anxiety (OR = 2.16), cervical incompetence (OR = 4.74), multiple pregnancies (OR = 7.51), direct trauma to abdomen (OR = 3.76) and abortion (OR = 6.36). Conclusion The main determinants of PTB in Iraq were low socio-economic status and factors associated with it, such as heavy manual work and caring for domestic animals, in addition to urinary tract infections and poor obstetric history. PMID:16618372

  3. Fatal pulmonary embolism in hospitalized patients: a large autopsy-based matched case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho Bricola, Solange Aparecida Petilo; Paiva, Edison Ferreira; Lichtenstein, Arnaldo; Gianini, Reinaldo José; Duarte, Jurandir Godoy; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki; Eluf-Neto, Jose; Arruda Martins, Milton

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Pulmonary embolism is an underdiagnosed major cause of death for hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to identify the conditions associated with fatal pulmonary embolism in this population. METHODS: A total of 13,074 autopsy records were evaluated in a case-control study. Patients were matched by age, sex, and year of death, and factors potentially associated with fatal pulmonary embolism were analyzed using univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: Pulmonary embolism was considered fatal in 328 (2.5%) patients. In the multivariate analysis, conditions that were more common in patients who died of pulmonary embolism were atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, and neurological surgery. Some conditions were negatively associated with fatal pulmonary embolism, including hemorrhagic stroke, aortic aneurism, cirrhosis, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and pneumonia. In the control group, patients with hemorrhagic stroke and aortic aneurism had short hospital stays (8.5 and 8.8 days, respectively), and the hemorrhage itself was the main cause of death in most of them (90.6% and 68.4%, respectively), which may have prevented the development of pulmonary embolism. Cirrhotic patients in the control group also had short hospital stays (7 days), and 50% died from bleeding complications. CONCLUSIONS: In this large autopsy study, atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, and neurological surgery were diagnoses associated with fatal pulmonary embolism. PMID:23778403

  4. Resampling Procedures for Making Inference under Nested Case-control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tianxi; Zheng, Yingye

    2013-01-01

    The nested case-control (NCC) design have been widely adopted as a cost-effective solution in many large cohort studies for risk assessment with expensive markers, such as the emerging biologic and genetic markers. To analyze data from NCC studies, conditional logistic regression (Goldstein and Langholz, 1992; Borgan et al., 1995) and maximum likelihood (Scheike and Juul, 2004; Zeng et al., 2006) based methods have been proposed. However, most of these methods either cannot be easily extended beyond the Cox model (Cox, 1972) or require additional modeling assumptions. More generally applicable approaches based on inverse probability weighting (IPW) have been proposed as useful alternatives (Samuelsen, 1997; Chen, 2001; Samuelsen et al., 2007). However, due to the complex correlation structure induced by repeated finite risk set sampling, interval estimation for such IPW estimators remain challenging especially when the estimation involves non-smooth objective functions or when making simultaneous inferences about functions. Standard resampling procedures such as the bootstrap cannot accommodate the correlation and thus are not directly applicable. In this paper, we propose a resampling procedure that can provide valid estimates for the distribution of a broad class of IPW estimators. Simulation results suggest that the proposed procedures perform well in settings when analytical variance estimator is infeasible to derive or gives less optimal performance. The new procedures are illustrated with data from the Framingham Offspring Study to characterize individual level cardiovascular risks over time based on the Framingham risk score, C-reactive protein (CRP) and a genetic risk score. PMID:24436503

  5. Risk Factors for Buruli Ulcer: A Case Control Study in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Pouillot, Régis; Matias, Gonçalo; Wondje, Christelle Mbondji; Portaels, Françoise; Valin, Nadia; Ngos, François; Njikap, Adelaïde; Marsollier, Laurent; Fontanet, Arnaud; Eyangoh, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is an infectious disease involving the skin, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. This disease is associated with areas where the water is slow-flowing or stagnant. However, the exact mechanism of transmission of the bacillus and the development of the disease through human activities is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings A case-control study to identify Buruli ulcer risk factors in Cameroon compared case-patients with community-matched controls on one hand and family-matched controls on the other hand. Risk factors identified by the community-matched study (including 163 pairs) were: having a low level of education, swamp wading, wearing short, lower-body clothing while farming, living near a cocoa plantation or woods, using adhesive bandages when hurt, and using mosquito coils. Protective factors were: using bed nets, washing clothes, and using leaves as traditional treatment or rubbing alcohol when hurt. The family-matched study (including 118 pairs) corroborated the significance of education level, use of bed nets, and treatment with leaves. Conclusions/Significance Covering limbs during farming activities is confirmed as a protective factor guarding against Buruli ulcer disease, but newly identified factors including wound treatment and use of bed nets may provide new insight into the unknown mode of transmission of M. ulcerans or the development of the disease. PMID:18160977

  6. Assessment of Vitamin K2 Levels in Osteoporotic Patients: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Noori, Akram; Lashkari, Mahin; Oveisi, Sonia; Khah, Mohamad Reza Khair; Zargar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to measure the level of Vitamin K2 (Vit K2) in osteoporotic patients and individuals with normal bone density as controls. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was done in Outpatient Department of Rheumatology at Qazvin Boo-ali Sina Hospital in 2013. Participants were 50 patients with osteoporotic densitometry measured by DEXA (T score≤ -2.5) who were matched with 48 persons in control group with normal bone density (T score> -1). The level of Vit K2 in samples was measured using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test and Chi-square test. Results: The level of Vit K2 in patients with osteoporosis was not significantly different from the control group ( Median: 75.95 vs. 71.35 nmol/L, respectively; P-value: 0.709). The authors determined cut-offs 75 percentile of vitamin K2 in all participants that was 85 nmol/L and percentages of persons in two groups were similar. Conclusion: Although Vit K2 level in patients with osteoporosis was not significantly different from the control group, further studies are necessary to confirm the association of osteoporosis and Vit K2. PMID:25363106

  7. Risk Factors Profile of Shoulder Dystocia in Oman: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khaduri, Maha M.; Abudraz, Rania Mohammed; Al-Farsi, Yahya M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the risk factor profile of shoulder dystocia and associated neonatal complications in Oman, a developing Arab country. Methods A retrospective case-control study was conducted among 111 cases with dystocia and 111 controls, identified during 1994-2006 period in a tertiary care hospital in Oman. Controls were randomly selected among women who did not have dystocia, and were matched to cases on the day of delivery. Data related to potential risk factors, delivery, and obstetric complications were collected. Results Dystocia was significantly associated with older maternal age, higher parity, larger BMI, diabetes, and previous record of dystocia. In addition, dystocia was associated more with vacuum and forceps deliveries. Routine traction (51%) was the most used manoeuvre. Among dystocia cases, 13% were associated with fetal complications of which Erb’s Palsy was the most prevalent (79%). Conclusion Our finding of significant associations with risk factors lays out the ground to develop a predictability index for shoulder dystocia, which would help in making it preventable. Further p rospective studies are required to confirm the obtained results. PMID:25337307

  8. MGMT Leu84Phe Polymorphism Contributes to Cancer Susceptibility: Evidence from 44 Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cuicui; Sun, Yan; Jia, Chuanliang; Zhang, Lijing; Salahuddin, Taufiq; Li, Xiaodong; Lang, Juntian; Song, Xicheng

    2013-01-01

    Background O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase is one of the few proteins to directly remove alkylating agents in the human DNA direct reversal repair pathway. A large number of case-control studies have been conducted to explore the association between MGMT Leu84Phe polymorphism and cancer risk. However, the results were not consistent. Methods We carried out a meta-analysis of 44 case-control studies to clarify the association between the Leu84Phe polymorphism and cancer risk. Results Overall, significant association of the T allele with cancer susceptibility was verified with meta-analysis under a recessive genetic model (P<0.001, OR=1.30, 95%CI 1.24-1.50) and TT versus CC comparison (P=0.001, OR=1.29, 95% CI 1.12-1.50). In subgroup analysis, a significant increased risk was found for lung cancer (TT versus CC, P=0.027, OR=1.67, 95% CI 1.06-2.63; recessive genetic model, P=0.32, OR=1.64, 95% CI 1.04-2.58), whereas risk of colorectal cancer was significantly low under a dominant genetic model (P=0.019, OR=0.84, 95% CI 0.72-0.97). Additionally, a significant association between TT genetic model and total cancer risk was found in the Caucasian population (TT versus CC, P=0.014, OR=1.29, 95% CI 1.05-1.59; recessive genetic model, P=0.009, OR=1.31, 95% CI 1.07-1.61), but not in the Asian population. An increased risk for lung cancer was also verified in the Caucasian population (TT versus CC, P=0.035, OR=1.62, 95% CI 1.04-2.53; recessive genetic model, P=0.048, OR=1.57, 95% CI 1.01-2.45). Conclusions These results suggest that MGMT Leu84Phe polymorphism might contribute to the susceptibility of certain cancers. PMID:24086516

  9. Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) in Dairy Cattle: A Matched Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Machado, G; Egocheaga, R M F; Hein, H E; Miranda, I C S; Neto, W S; Almeida, L L; Canal, C W; Stein, M C; Corbellini, L G

    2016-02-01

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) causes one of the most important diseases of cattle in terms of economic costs and welfare. The aims were to estimate herd prevalence and to investigate the factors associated with antibodies in bulk tank milk (BTM) in dairy herds through a matched case-control study. To estimate herd prevalence, BTM samples were randomly selected (n = 314) from a population (N = 1604). The true prevalence of BVDV was 24.3% (CI 95% = 20.1-29.3%). For the case-control study, BVDV antibody-positive herds (high antibody titres) were classified as cases (n = 21) and matched (n = 63) by milk production with herds presenting low antibody titres (ratio of 1 : 3). Three multivariable models were built: 1) full model, holding all 21 variables, and two models divided according to empirical knowledge and similarity among variables; 2) animal factor model; and 3) biosecurity model. The full model (model 1) identified: age as a culling criteria (OR = 0.10; CI 95% = 0.02-0.39; P < 0.01); farms that provided milk to other industries previously (OR = 4.13; CI 95% = 1.17-14.49; P = 0.02); and isolation paddocks for ill animals (OR = 0.14; CI 95% = 0.01-0.26; P = 0.02). The biosecurity model revealed a significant association with the use of natural mating (OR = 9.03; CI 95% = 2.14-38.03; P < 0.01); isolation paddocks for ill animals (OR = 0.06; CI 95% = 0.05-0.83; P = 0.03); years providing milk for the same industry (OR = 0.94; CI 95% = 0.91-0.97; P = 0.02); and direct contact over fences among cattle of neighbouring farms (OR = 5.78; CI 95% = 1.41-23.67; P = 0.04). We recommend the application of grouping predictors as a good choice for model building because it could lead to a better understanding of disease-exposure associations. PMID:24661884

  10. Case-control study of sudden infant death syndrome in Lithuania, 1997–2000

    PubMed Central

    Bubnaitienė, Vilija; Kalėdienė, Ramunė; Kėvalas, Rimantas

    2005-01-01

    Background To identify risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome relevant in Lithuania. Methods A nationwide case-control study surveying parents of 35 infants who died from sudden infant death syndrome during the period of 1997–2000 and parents of 145 control infants matched with SIDS infants for date of birth and for region of birth was carried out. Results Deaths incidence was greater in the warm period (60%) vs. cold period (40%). Prone and side sleeping positions both carried no increased risk of sudden infant death syndrome compared with supine because of a rare prone sleeping (4.1% of controls vs. 0% of dead infants) and more prevalent side than supine sleeping (84.8% of controls vs. 94.3% of dead infants) in the controls as well as the cases. Bed sharing for the whole night as a risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome has not been confirmed, either, as bed sharing was common only for the controls (13.8% of controls vs. 0% of dead infants). Routine sleeping environment factors such as heavy wrapping (≥4 togs) of an infant (odds ratio 8.49; 95% confidence interval 2.38 to 30.32), sleeping in a bassinet (4.22; 1.16 to 15.38) and maternal factors such as maternal education ≤12 years (4.48; 1.34 to 14.94), unplanned pregnancy (5.22; 1.49 to 18.18) and ≥2 previous live births (3.90; 1.00 to 15.10) were significantly associated with sudden infant death syndrome on multivariate analysis. Conclusion The results of this first population-based case-control study have shed some light on the epidemiology of the syndrome in Lithuania. Although the mortality of sudden infant death syndrome in Lithuania is not high, it might be lowered moreover by public informing about sudden infant death syndrome and related risk factors. Special attention must be paid to mothers with low education on potentially modifiable risk factors such as routine heavy wrapping of an infant during sleep, routine sleeping in a bassinet and unplanned pregnancy. PMID:16283946