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Sample records for independent mechanisms involving

  1. The vasorelaxant effect of gallic acid involves endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Lais Moraes; de Oliveira, Thiago Sardinha; da Costa, Rafael Menezes; de Souza Gil, Eric; Costa, Elson Alves; Passaglia, Rita de Cassia Aleixo Tostes; Filgueira, Fernando Paranaíba; Ghedini, Paulo César

    2016-06-01

    The mechanisms of action involved in the vasorelaxant effect of gallic acid (GA) were examined in the isolated rat thoracic aorta. GA exerted a relaxant effect in the highest concentrations (0.4-10mM) in both endothelium-intact and endothelium-denuded aortic rings. Pre-incubation with L-NAME, ODQ, calmidazolium, TEA, 4-aminopyridine, and barium chloride significantly reduced the pEC50 values. Moreover, this effect was not modified by indomethacin, wortmannin, PP2, glibenclamide, or paxillin. Pre-incubation of GA (1, 3, and 10mM) in a Ca(2+)-free Krebs solution attenuated CaCl2-induced contractions and blocked BAY K8644-induced vascular contractions, but it did not inhibit a contraction induced by the release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmatic reticulum stores. In addition, a Western blot analysis showed that GA induces phosphorylation of eNOS in rat thoracic aorta. These results suggest that GA induces relaxation in rat aortic rings through an endothelium-dependent pathway, resulting in eNOS phosphorylation and opening potassium channels. Additionally, the relaxant effect by an endothelium-independent pathway involves the blockade of the Ca(2+) influx via L-type Ca(2+) channels. PMID:26643780

  2. Complete catalytic cycle of cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase involves a spring-loaded mechanism.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Amlan; Kundu, Anirban; Bose, Madhuparna; Gujar, Akanksha; Mukherjee, Somnath; Das, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGM), an important enzyme in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, catalyses the isomerization of 2- and 3-phosphoglycerates by an Mn(2+)-dependent phospho-transfer mechanism via a phospho-enzyme intermediate. Crystal structures of bi-domain iPGM from Staphylococcus aureus, together with substrate-bound forms, have revealed a new conformation of the enzyme, representing an intermediate state of domain movement. The substrate-binding site and the catalytic site are present in two distinct domains in the intermediate form. X-ray crystallography complemented by simulated dynamics has enabled delineation of the complete catalytic cycle, which includes binding of the substrate, followed by its positioning into the catalytic site, phospho-transfer and finally product release. The present work describes a novel mechanism of domain movement controlled by a hydrophobic patch that is exposed on domain closure and acts like a spring to keep the protein in open conformation. Domain closing occurs after substrate binding, and is essential for phospho-transfer, whereas the open conformation is a prerequisite for efficient substrate binding and product dissociation. A new model of catalysis has been proposed by correlating the hinge-bending motion with the phospho-transfer mechanism. PMID:25611430

  3. Involvement of a joker mutation in a polymerase-independent lethal mutagenesis escape mechanism.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rubén; de la Higuera, Ignacio; Arias, Armando; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-07-01

    We previously characterized a foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) with three amino acid replacements in its polymerase (3D) that conferred resistance to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue ribavirin. Here we show that passage of this mutant in the presence of high ribavirin concentrations resulted in selection of viruses with the additional replacement I248T in 2C. This 2C substitution alone (even in the absence of replacements in 3D) increased FMDV fitness mainly in the presence of ribavirin, prevented an incorporation bias in favor of A and U associated with ribavirin mutagenesis, and conferred the ATPase activity of 2C decreased sensitivity to ribavirin-triphosphate. Since in previous studies we described that 2C with I248T was selected under different selective pressures, this replacement qualifies as a joker substitution in FMDV evolution. The results have identified a role of 2C in nucleotide incorporation, and have unveiled a new polymerase-independent mechanism of virus escape to lethal mutagenesis. PMID:27136067

  4. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation. PMID:26493746

  5. Glucose and Stress Independently Regulate Source and Sink Metabolism and Defense Mechanisms via Signal Transduction Pathways Involving Protein Phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Ehness, R.; Ecker, M.; Godt, D. E.; Roitsch, T.

    1997-01-01

    In higher plants, sugars are required not only to sustain heterotrophic growth but also to regulate the expression of a variety of genes. Environmental stresses, such as pathogen infection and wounding, activate a cascade of defense responses and may also affect carbohydrate metabolism. In this study, the relationship between sugar- and stress-activated signal transduction pathways and the underlying regulatory mechanism was analyzed. Photoautotrophically growing suspension culture cells of Chenopodium rubrum were used as a model system to study the effects of the metabolic regulator D-glucose and of different stress-related stimuli on photosynthesis, sink metabolism, and defense response by analyzing the regulation of mRNAs for representative enzymes of these pathways. Glucose as well as the fungal elicitor chitosan, the phosphatase inhibitor endothall, and benzoic acid were shown to result in a coordinated regulatory mechanism. The mRNAs for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, a key enzyme of defense response, and for the sink-specific extracellular invertase were induced. In contrast, the mRNA for the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase was repressed. This inverse regulatory pattern was also observed in experiments with wounded leaves of C. rubrum plants. The differential effect of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine on mRNA regulation demonstrates that the carbohydrate signal and the stress-related stimuli independently activate different intracellular signaling pathways that ultimately are integrated to coordinately regulate source and sink metabolism and activate defense responses. The various stimuli triggered the transient and rapid activation of protein kinases that phosphorylate the myelin basic protein. The involvement of phosphorylation in signal transduction is further supported by the effect of the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine on mRNA levels. PMID:12237349

  6. A novel COX-independent mechanism of sulindac sulfide involves cleavage of epithelial cell adhesion molecule protein.

    PubMed

    Liggett, Jason L; Min, Kyung-Won; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Baek, Seung Joon

    2014-08-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are extensively used over the counter to treat headaches and inflammation as well as clinically to prevent cancer among high-risk groups. The inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity by NSAIDs plays a role in their anti-tumorigenic properties. NSAIDs also have COX-independent activity which is not fully understood. In this study, we report a novel COX-independent mechanism of sulindac sulfide (SS), which facilitates a previously uncharacterized cleavage of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) protein. EpCAM is a type I transmembrane glycoprotein that has been implemented as an over-expressed oncogene in many cancers including colon, breast, pancreas, and prostate. We found EpCAM to be down-regulated by SS in a manner that is independent of COX activity, transcription regulation, de novo protein synthesis, and proteasomal degradation pathway. Our findings clearly demonstrate that SS drives cleavage of the extracellular portion of EpCAM near the N-terminus. This SS driven cleavage is blocked by a deleting amino acids 55-81 as well as simply mutating arginine residues at positions 80 and 81 to alanine of EpCAM. Proteolysis of EpCAM by SS may provide a novel mechanism by which NSAIDs affect anti-tumorigenesis at the post-translational level. PMID:24859349

  7. Elevated Intracellular Calcium Increases Ferritin H Expression Through an NFAT-Independent Posttranscriptional Mechanism Involving mRNA Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, Elizabeth L.; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2009-01-01

    An increase in intracellular Ca2+ is one of the initiating events in T cell activation. A calcium-mediated signaling cascade in T cells involves activation of calcineurin and the dephosphorylation and translocation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT), resulting in the transcriptional activation of target genes such as IL-2. In the present study, we found that increased intracellular calcium leads to induction of the antioxidant protein ferritin H. We previously reported that the ferritin H gene is transcriptionally activated under oxidative stress conditions through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE). The facts that the ferritin H ARE contains a composite AP1 site, and that NFAT collaborates with AP1 transcription factors, led us to test whether calcium-activated NFAT is involved in the ferritin H induction through the ARE. Treatment of Jurkat T cells with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin, increased ferritin H mRNA and protein expression. Though NFAT translocated to the nucleus and bound a consensus NFAT sequence located in the IL-2 promoter following ionomycin treatment, it did not activate ferritin H transcription despite the presence of a putative NFAT binding sequence in the ferritin H ARE. In addition, the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A treatment blocked ionomycin-mediated NFAT nuclear translocation but failed to abrogate the increase in ferritin H mRNA. Analysis of mRNA stability following actinomycin D treatment revealed that ionomycin prolongs ferritin H mRNA half-life. Taken together, these results suggest that ionomycin-mediated induction of ferritin H may occur in an NFAT-independent manner but through posttranscriptional stabilization of the ferritin H mRNA. PMID:18076382

  8. Estrogens suppress RANK ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation via a stromal cell independent mechanism involving c-Jun repression

    PubMed Central

    Shevde, Nirupama K.; Bendixen, Amy C.; Dienger, Krista M.; Pike, J. Wesley

    2000-01-01

    Loss of ovarian function following menopause results in a substantial increase in bone turnover and a critical imbalance between bone formation and resorption. This imbalance leads to a progressive loss of trabecular bone mass and eventually osteoporosis, in part the result of increased osteoclastogenesis. Enhanced formation of functional osteoclasts appears to be the result of increased elaboration by support cells of osteoclastogenic cytokines such as IL-1, tumor necrosis factor, and IL-6, all of which are negatively regulated by estrogens. We show here that estrogen can suppress receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-induced differentiation of myelomonocytic precursors into multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive osteoclasts through an estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism that does not require mediation by stromal cells. This suppression is dose-dependent, isomer-specific, and reversed by ICI 182780. Furthermore, the bone-sparing analogues tamoxifen and raloxifene mimic estrogen's effects. Estrogen blocks RANKL/M-CSF-induced activator protein-1-dependent transcription, likely through direct regulation of c-Jun activity. This effect is the result of a classical nuclear activity by estrogen receptor to regulate both c-Jun expression and its phosphorylation by c-Jun N-terminal kinase. Our results suggest that estrogen modulates osteoclast formation both by down-regulating the expression of osteoclastogenic cytokines from supportive cells and by directly suppressing RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. PMID:10869427

  9. Infection of human fetal dorsal root ganglion glial cells with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves an entry mechanism independent of the CD4 T4A epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Kunsch, C; Hartle, H T; Wigdahl, B

    1989-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been implicated in the generation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated neurological dysfunction, and it is believed that the presence of CD4 in the nervous system may be involved in the susceptibility of selected neural cell populations to HIV-1 infection. We previously demonstrated (B. Wigdahl, R. A. Guyton, and P. S. Sarin, Virology 159:440-445, 1987) that glial cells derived from human fetal dorsal root ganglion (DRG) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection and subsequently express at least a fraction of the virus genome. In contrast to HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes, which can be blocked by treatment with monoclonal antibodies directed against the HIV-1-binding region of CD4 (T4A epitope), treatment of human fetal DRG glial cells with similar antibodies resulted in only a slight reduction in HIV-1-specific gag antigen expression. In addition, preincubation of the HIV-1 inoculum prior to infection with HIV-1-neutralizing antiserum did not reduce HIV-1 gag antigen expression in these cells. Furthermore, we were unable to detect the synthesis or accumulation of the CD4 molecule in neural cell populations derived from DRG. However, a protected CD4-specific RNA fragment was detected in RNA isolated from human fetal DRG and spinal cord tissue by an RNase protection assay with a CD4-specific antisense RNA probe. RNA blot hybridization analysis of total cellular RNA isolated from human fetal DRG and spinal cord demonstrated specific hybridization to an RNA species that comigrated with the mature 3.0-kilobase CD4 mRNA as well as two unique CD4 RNA species with relative molecular sizes of approximately 5.3 and 6.7 kilobases. Furthermore, all three CD4-related RNA species were polyadenylated when isolated from human fetal spinal cord tissue. These data suggest that HIV-1 infection of human fetal DRG glial cells may proceed via a mechanism of viral entry independent of the T4A epitope of CD4. Images PMID:2479771

  10. ES936 stimulates DNA synthesis in HeLa cells independently on NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 inhibition, through a mechanism involving p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    González-Aragón, David; Alcaín, Francisco J; Ariza, Julia; Jódar, Laura; Barbarroja, Nuria; López-Pedrera, Chary; Villalba, José M

    2010-07-30

    The indolequinone ES936 (5-methoxy-1,2-dimethyl-3-[(4-nitrophenol)methyl]-indole-4,7-dione) is a potent mechanism-based inhibitor of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Here, we report that ES936 significantly stimulated thymidine incorporation in sparse cultures of human adenocarcinoma HeLa cells, but was without effect in dense cultures. Stimulation of DNA synthesis was not related with a DNA repair response because an increase in thymidine incorporation was not observed in cells treated with 2,5 bis-[1-aziridyl]-1,4 benzoquinone, a well-established antitumor quinone that causes DNA damage. Conversely, it was related with an increase of cell growth. NQO1 inhibition was not involved in ES936 stimulation of DNA synthesis, because the same response was observed in cells where NQO1 expression had been knocked down by small interfering RNA. Stimulation of DNA synthesis was reverted by treatment with ambroxol, a SOD mimetic, and by pyruvate, an efficient peroxide scavenger, supporting the involvement of alterations in cellular redox state. Pharmacological inhibition of p38 with either SB203580 or PD169316 completely abolished ES936-stimulated DNA synthesis, indicating the requirement of p38 activity. This is the first report that demonstrates the existence of an ES936-sensitive system which is separate from NQO1, modulating the redox state and cell growth in HeLa cells through a p38-dependent mechanism. Our results show that the effect ES936 exerts on DNA synthesis may be either positive or negative depending on the cellular context and growth conditions. PMID:20433816

  11. The effect of nutrition on testicular growth in mature Merino rams involves mechanisms that are independent of changes in GnRH pulse frequency.

    PubMed

    Hötzel, M J; Walkden-Brown, S W; Blackberry, M A; Martin, G B

    1995-10-01

    In mature Merino rams, changes in diet to below or above the requirements for maintenance of body weight lead to changes in gonadotrophin secretion and testicular growth. However, the effects on testicular growth persist for much longer than those on LH and FSH secretion so that the gonadal and gonadotrophin responses are poorly correlated over time. This suggests that the gonadal effects may be partly independent of changes in the hypothalamic secretion of GnRH, an hypothesis tested in this study. In a short-term experiment (November, late spring, non-breeding season), we tested whether a high frequency of exogenous GnRH pulses could override the endogenous system and mimic the change in gonadotrophins seen in rams fed a high plane of nutrition. Mature Merino rams (scrotal circumference (mean +/- S.E.M.) 33.6 +/- 0.5 cm, body weight (mean +/- S.E.M.) 59.0 +/- 0.9 kg) were fed 900 g chaff + 1.6 kg lupin grain (High diet) or 360 g chaff + 60 g lupin grain (Low diet) and infused with 8 pulses of GnRH or saline daily for 5 weeks (n = 5/group). Blood was sampled every 20 min for 12 h on days-1 and 14 relative to the start of treatments. Relative to pre-treatment levels, LH pulse frequency and FSH concentrations were decreased on day 14 in saline-infused rams fed the Low diet and increased in saline-infused rams fed the High diet (P < 0.001). In GnRH-infused rams, gonadotrophin secretion was not affected by diet and the patterns of secretion of LH and FSH were similar to those in saline-infused rams fed the High diet. This model was used for a more complete endocrine analysis in a longer experiment designed to test the hypothesis that the effect of nutrition on testicular growth is partly independent of changes in the secretion of GnRH. The same treatments were imposed for 35 days on a different group of similar rams in March (autumn, mid-breeding season). Body weight and scrotal circumference were measured weekly and blood was sampled on days -1 and 14. On days -1 and

  12. Regulation of glucose transport by insulin, bombesin, and bradykinin in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts: Involvement of protein kinase C-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Dettori, C.; Meldolesi, J. )

    1989-05-01

    Glucose transport stimulation by insulin, bombesin, and bradykinin in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts was compared with the phosphoinositide hydrolysis effects of the same stimulants in a variety of experimental paradigms known to affect generation and/or functioning of intracellular second messengers: short- and long-term treatments with phorbol dibutyrate, that cause activation and down-regulation of protein kinase C, respectively; cell loading with high (quin2), that causes clamping of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} near the resting level; poisoning with pertussis toxin, that affects the GTP binding proteins of the Go/Gi class; treatment with Ca{sup 2+} ionophores. ({sup 14}C) glucose transport stimulation by maximal (insulin) was affected by neither pertussis toxin nor protein kinase C down-regulation. This result correlates with the lack of effect of insulin on phosphoinositide hydrolysis. In contrast, part of the glucose transport responses induced by bombesin and bradykinin appeared to be mediated by protein kinase C in proportion with the stimulation induced by these peptides on the phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The protein kinase C-independent portion of the response to bradykinin was found to be inhibitable by pertussis toxin. This latter result might suggest an interaction between the bradykinin receptor and a glucose transporter, mediated by a protein of the Go/Gi class.

  13. [Immunological mechanisms involved in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, María Guadalupe; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha

    2012-05-01

    Pregnancy progresses through mechanisms that allow the embryo implantation and its development during gestation. Those mechanisms involve the immune cells that participate in the regulation of immune tolerance and response, as well as the protection conferred by Th2 cytokines and molecules expressed on trophoblast cells. Local factors expressed in the fetal interface as HLA-G, which inhibits the cytotoxicity of uterine natural killer cells and induces apoptosis of activated CD8 cells; transforming growth factor-beta, that induces tolerance, and uterine natural killer cells that are functionally different to the peripheral, as well as circulating progesterone and the glicodeline molecules that are important regulators of the immune response, also intervene in the process. From the conventional immunological point of view, pregnancy is a unique immune condition in which the fetus, semiallogenic, avoids being rejected immunologically by the mother, apparently by inducing a tolerance more than a sensitization PMID:23301425

  14. [Mechanism of angiogenesis. Ocular involvement].

    PubMed

    Mocanu, Carmen

    2003-01-01

    Over the past several years, there has been important progress in the field of intrinsec mechanisms of ocular neovascularization. Immunohistological studies succeeded a better systematization of the factors that stimulates and inhibits this process. Their presence in different ocular normal structures, without any angiogenic activity, suggests a physiological balance between VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) with stimulatory effect on angiogenesis and PEDF (pigment epithelium derived factor) with inhibitory effect. It has been discussing the possibility of modification of physiological balance between VEGF and PEDF to induce the neovascularization process. The understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms of the substances implicated in inhibition of chorioretinal neovascularization makes to be real the expectations for the development of new treatments. PMID:15083677

  15. Statistical mechanics of maximal independent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Pin, Paolo; Ramezanpour, Abolfazl

    2009-12-01

    The graph theoretic concept of maximal independent set arises in several practical problems in computer science as well as in game theory. A maximal independent set is defined by the set of occupied nodes that satisfy some packing and covering constraints. It is known that finding minimum and maximum-density maximal independent sets are hard optimization problems. In this paper, we use cavity method of statistical physics and Monte Carlo simulations to study the corresponding constraint satisfaction problem on random graphs. We obtain the entropy of maximal independent sets within the replica symmetric and one-step replica symmetry breaking frameworks, shedding light on the metric structure of the landscape of solutions and suggesting a class of possible algorithms. This is of particular relevance for the application to the study of strategic interactions in social and economic networks, where maximal independent sets correspond to pure Nash equilibria of a graphical game of public goods allocation.

  16. The independent spreaders involved SIR Rumor model in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Zhen; Tang, Shaoting; Zhang, Xiao; Zheng, Zhiming

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies of rumor or information diffusion process in complex networks show that in contrast to traditional comprehension, individuals who participate in rumor spreading within one network do not always get the rumor from their neighbors. They can obtain the rumor from different sources like online social networks and then publish it on their personal sites. In our paper, we discuss this phenomenon in complex networks by adopting the concept of independent spreaders. Rather than getting the rumor from neighbors, independent spreaders learn it from other channels. We further develop the classic "ignorant-spreaders-stiflers" or SIR model of rumor diffusion process in complex networks. A steady-state analysis is conducted to investigate the final spectrum of the rumor spreading under various spreading rate, stifling rate, density of independent spreaders and average degree of the network. Results show that independent spreaders effectively enhance the rumor diffusion process, by delivering the rumor to regions far away from the current rumor infected regions. And though the rumor spreading process in SF networks is faster than that in ER networks, the final size of rumor spreading in ER networks is larger than that in SF networks.

  17. STAT6-dependent and -independent mechanisms in Th2 polarization

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Elisabeth; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2012-01-01

    Th2 cells play a key role in directing immune responses against helminths. Additionally, Th2 cells are crucial for many types of allergic reactions. Whereas the molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of other types of Th cells are well understood, Th2 differentiation is still a controversial topic. IL-4 and its downstream transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)6 are well-known key mediators in Th2 differentiation. The fact that Th2 cells themselves are the most potent source of IL-4 suggests that additional mechanisms promoting the initiation of Th2 differentiation exist. This article gives an overview on STAT6-dependent and -independent mechanisms involved in the process of Th2 polarization, including Notch, mTORC2, IL-2/STAT5, and Wnt. Furthermore, we emphasize the role of STAT6 not only as a transcriptional activator promoting Th2 development, but also in fine-tuning alternative signaling pathways which are involved in the initiation of Th2 polarization. PMID:23041833

  18. Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Segura, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Context: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a frequent disorder characterized by progressive hair miniaturization in a very similar pattern among all affected men. The pathogenesis is related to androgen-inducible overexpression of transforming growth factor β-1 from balding dermal papilla cells, which is involved in epithelial inhibition and perifollicular fibrosis. Recent research shows that hair follicle androgen sensitivity is regulated by Hic-5, an androgen receptor co-activator which may be activated by the mechanical stimulation. Moreover, the dermis of scalp susceptible to be affected by AGA is firmly bounded to the galea aponeurotica, so the physical force exerted by the occipitofrontalis muscle is transmitted to the scalp skin. Aims: To know whether mechanical stress supported by hair follicles is involved in AGA phenomenon. Materials and Methods: It is performed with a finite element analysis of a galea model and a schematic representation of AGA progression according to Hamilton–Norwood scale in order to establish the correlation between elastic deformation in scalp and clinical progression of male pattern baldness. Results: The result was a highly significant correlation (r: −0.885, P < 0.001) that clearly identifies a mechanical factor in AGA development. Conclusions: All these data suggest that mechanical stress determines AGA patterning and a stretch-induced and androgen-mediated mechanotransduction in dermal papilla cells could be the primary mechanism in AGA pathogenesis. PMID:26622151

  19. Modality-independent neural mechanisms for novel phonetic processing.

    PubMed

    Williams, Joshua T; Darcy, Isabelle; Newman, Sharlene D

    2015-09-16

    The present study investigates whether the inferior frontal gyrus is activated for phonetic segmentation of both speech and sign. Early adult second language learners of Spanish and American Sign Language at the very beginning of instruction were tested on their ability to classify lexical items in each language based on their phonetic categories (i.e., initial segments or location parameter, respectively). Conjunction analyses indicated that left-lateralized inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior parietal lobule (SPL), and precuneus were activated for both languages. Common activation in the left IFG suggests a modality-independent mechanism for phonetic segmentation. Additionally, common activation in parietal regions suggests spatial preprocessing of audiovisual and manuovisual information for subsequent frontal recoding and mapping. Taken together, we propose that this frontoparietal network is involved in domain-general segmentation of either acoustic or visual signal that is important to novel phonetic segmentation. PMID:25988835

  20. [Signaling mechanisms involved in resolution of inflammation].

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto Rafael; Presno-Bernal, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a physiological process, which eliminates pathogens and induces repair of damaged tissue. This process is controlled by negative feedback mechanisms, but if the inflammation persists, it generates a deleterious autoimmune process or can to contribute with diseases such as obesity or cancer. The inflammation resolution involves mechanisms such as decrease of proliferation and maturation of immune cells, phagocytosis and apoptosis of immune cells, and decrease of proinflammatory mediators. Therefore, is relevant to study the physiological effects of specific receptors that participate in inflammation resolution and the design of specific agonists as conventional anti-inflammatory therapeutics, without dramatic collateral effects. In this review, we study some mechanisms associated with inflammation inhibition, particularly the transduction of receptors for ligands with anti-inflammatory effects and that are relevant for their potential therapeutic. PMID:25275846

  1. Ethylbenzene Dehydrogenase and Related Molybdenum Enzymes Involved in Oxygen-Independent Alkyl Chain Hydroxylation.

    PubMed

    Heider, Johann; Szaleniec, Maciej; Sünwoldt, Katharina; Boll, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase initiates the anaerobic bacterial degradation of ethylbenzene and propylbenzene. Although the enzyme is currently only known from a few closely related denitrifying bacterial strains affiliated to the Rhodocyclaceae, it clearly marks a universally occurring mechanism used for attacking recalcitrant substrates in the absence of oxygen. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenase belongs to subfamily 2 of the DMSO reductase-type molybdenum enzymes together with paralogous enzymes involved in the oxygen-independent hydroxylation of p-cymene, the isoprenoid side chains of sterols and even possibly n-alkanes; the subfamily also extends to dimethylsulfide dehydrogenases, selenite, chlorate and perchlorate reductases and, most significantly, dissimilatory nitrate reductases. The biochemical, spectroscopic and structural properties of the oxygen-independent hydroxylases among these enzymes are summarized and compared. All of them consist of three subunits, contain a molybdenum-bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide cofactor, five Fe-S clusters and a heme b cofactor of unusual ligation, and are localized in the periplasmic space as soluble enzymes. In the case of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, it has been determined that the heme b cofactor has a rather high redox potential, which may also be inferred for the paralogous hydroxylases. The known structure of ethylbenzene dehydrogenase allowed the calculation of detailed models of the reaction mechanism based on the density function theory as well as QM-MM (quantum mechanics - molecular mechanics) methods, which yield predictions of mechanistic properties such as kinetic isotope effects that appeared consistent with experimental data. PMID:26960184

  2. Involvement of ERK in NMDA receptor-independent cortical neurotoxicity of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kubo, Satoko; Yamasaki, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Sachi; Okamoto, Yukari; Sekimoto, Teruki; Fukatsu, Anna; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kume, Toshiaki; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Akaike, Akinori; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen sulfide causes NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity in mouse fetal cortical neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of ERK mediates the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic mechanisms are involved in the hydrogen-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a gasotransmitter, exerts both neurotoxicity and neuroprotection, and targets multiple molecules including NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NO synthase (NOS) that might affect neuronal viability. Here, we determined and characterized effects of NaHS, an H{sub 2}S donor, on cell viability in the primary cultures of mouse fetal cortical neurons. NaHS caused neuronal death, as assessed by LDH release and trypan blue staining, but did not significantly reduce the glutamate toxicity. The neurotoxicity of NaHS was resistant to inhibitors of NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NOS, and was blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but not JNK, p38 MAP kinase, PKC and Src. NaHS caused prompt phosphorylation of ERK and upregulation of Bad, followed by translocation of Bax to mitochondria and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, leading to the nuclear condensation/fragmentation. These effects of NaHS were suppressed by the MEK inhibitor. Our data suggest that the NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity of H{sub 2}S involves activation of the MEK/ERK pathway and some apoptotic mechanisms.

  3. Mechanisms of Mass-independent Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.

    2006-05-01

    Sulfur mass-independent fractionation (MIF) is believed to arise from gas-phase atmospheric reactions involving SO2 and H2S [1]. However, a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms remains elusive. Here I will discuss two MIF mechanisms for sulfur isotopes, and use existing laboratory data to place constraints on these mechanisms. The relevant laboratory data includes the following: 1) Photolysis of H2S [2]; 2) spark discharge of SO2 [3]; 3) SO2 photolysis from 190-210 nm [3]; 4) SO2 photolysis at wavelengths > 220 nm [4]. Experiments 1 and 2 yielded elemental sulfur (Sel) that exhibited primarily mass-dependent fractionation, while experiment 3 produced Sel with a large MIF signature, and experiment 4 yielded sulfate with a smaller MIF signature. One likely MIF mechanism is intramolecular disequilibrium (or non-RRKM) effects, as proposed for O + O2 -- > O3 [5]. The isoelectronic sulfur reaction, S + S2 --> S3, may also exhibit non-RRKM effects, but for several reasons that I will discuss such effects may either be reduced in magnitude or of negligible importance. A second possible source of MIF is isotope-selective photodissociation during predissociation. This process is likely in SO and SH, may occur in SO2, and unlikely in H2S, but in all cases depends on wavelength. SO2 dissociation is also likely to depend on the oxygen isotopes present, because an O isotope substitution will change SO2 symmetry. Although this may produce a MIF signature in oxygen isotopes, it's not clear that this would be accompanied by a MIF effect in S. I will present kinetics simulations of the above H2S and SO2 photolysis experiments, and show how it is possible to use the results of these experiments to constrain the mechanism of MIF for atmospheric sulfur species. For example, simulations of Sel formation by H2S photolysis predict little MIF in experiments, but possible MIF in the atmosphere. [1] J. Farquhar et al. (2000) Science 289 756-758. [2] J. Farquhar et al. (2000) Nature

  4. Fatal accidents involving independent contractors at coal mines: 1990--1998 (as of July 7, 1998)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents information on fatalities involving independent contractors that occurred in coal mining operations from January 1, 1990 through July 7, 1998. This publication includes statistics for the fatalities as well as abstracts, illustrations and best practices.

  5. Physiopathologic mechanisms involved in mare endometrosis.

    PubMed

    Rebordão, M R; Galvão, A; Szóstek, A; Amaral, A; Mateus, L; Skarzynski, D J; Ferreira-Dias, G

    2014-10-01

    Endometrosis is a degenerative chronic process, characterized by paramount fibrosis development in mare endometrium. This condition is one of the major causes of subfertility/infertility in mares. As in other organs, fibrosis might be a pathologic sequel of many chronic inflammatory diseases. However, aetiology and physiopathologic mechanisms involved in endometrial fibrosis are still controversial. This review presents new hypotheses based on our newest data. As the first line of innate immune defence, systemic neutrophils arrive in the uterus at mating or in the presence of pathogens. A novel paradigm is that neutrophils cast out their DNA in response to infectious stimuli and form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). We have shown that bacterial strains of Streptococcus zooepidemicus, Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus capitis, known to cause endometritis in mares were able to induce NETs release in vitro by equine PMN to different extents. An intriguing dilemma is the dual action of NETs. While NETs play a desirable role fighting micro-organisms in mare uterus, they may also contribute to endometrial fibrosis. A long-term in vitro exposure of mare endometrium explants to NETs components (myeloperoxidase, elastase and cathepsin G) up-regulated fibrosis markers TGFβ and Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1). Also, pro-fibrotic cytokines regulated collagen deposition and fibrosis. Changes in expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), interleukins (IL)1-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and receptors in endometrium with different degrees of fibrosis and/or inflammation were observed. A putative role of CTGF, IL and NETs components in endometrosis development should be considered. Additionally, we speculate that in sustained endometritis in mares, prostaglandins may not only cause early luteolysis or early pregnancy loss, but may also be related to endometrial fibrosis pathogenesis by stimulating collagen deposition. PMID:25277436

  6. Mechanisms Involved in Exercise-Induced Cardioprotection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliana Pereira; Lessa, Marcos Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Furthermore, research has shown that exercise, in addition to reducing cardiovascular risk factors, can also protect the heart against injury due to ischemia and reperfusion through a direct effect on the myocardium. However, the specific mechanism involved in exerciseinduced cardiac preconditioning is still under debate. Objective To perform a systematic review of the studies that have addressed the mechanisms by which aerobic exercise promotes direct cardioprotection against ischemia and reperfusion injury. Methods A search was conducted using MEDLINE, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde, and Scientific Electronic Library Online databases. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by two independent researchers, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the studies. Results The search retrieved 78 studies; after evaluating the abstracts, 30 studies were excluded. The manuscripts of the remaining 48 studies were completely read and, of these, 20 were excluded. Finally, 28 studies were included in this systematic review. Conclusion On the basis of the selected studies, the following are potentially involved in the cardioprotective response to exercise: increased heat shock protein production, nitric oxide pathway involvement, increased cardiac antioxidant capacity, improvement in ATP-dependent potassium channel function, and opioid system activation. Despite all the previous investigations, further research is still necessary to obtain more consistent conclusions. PMID:25830711

  7. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the mechanical actuation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacher, J. L.; Montgomery, A. D.; Bradway, M. W.; Slaughter, W. T.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Mechanical Actuation System (MAS) hardware. Specifically, the MAS hardware consists of the following components: Air Data Probe (ADP); Elevon Seal Panel (ESP); External Tank Umbilical (ETU); Ku-Band Deploy (KBD); Payload Bay Doors (PBD); Payload Bay Radiators (PBR); Personnel Hatches (PH); Vent Door Mechanism (VDM); and Startracker Door Mechanism (SDM). The IOA analysis process utilized available MAS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  8. Independent Passive Mechanical Behavior of Bovine Extraocular Muscle Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrew; Yoo, Lawrence; Chaudhuri, Zia; Demer, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Intramuscular innervation of horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is segregated into superior and inferior (transverse) compartments, while all EOMs are also divided into global (GL) and orbital (OL) layers with scleral and pulley insertions, respectively. We sought evidence of potential independent action by examining passive mechanical coupling between EOM compartments. Methods. Putative compartments of each of the six whole bovine anatomical EOMs were separately clamped to a physiologically controlled, dual channel microtensile load cell (5-mN force resolution) driven by independent, high-speed, linear motors having 20-nm position resolution. One channel at a time was extended or retracted by 3 to 5 mm, with the other channel stationary. Fiducials distributed on the EOM global surface enabled optical tracking of local deformation. Loading rates of 5 to 100 mm/sec were applied to explore speeds from slow vergence to saccades. Control loadings employed transversely loaded EOM and isotropic latex. Results. All EOM bellies and tendons exhibited substantial compartmental independence when loaded in the physiologic direction, both between OL and GL, and for arbitrary transverse parsings of EOM width ranging from 60%:40% to 80%:20%. Intercompartmental force coupling in the physiologic direction was less than or equal to 10% in all six EOMS even for saccadic loading rates. Coupling was much higher for nonphysiologic transverse EOM loading and isotropic latex. Optical tracking demonstrated independent strain distribution between EOM compartments. Conclusions. Substantial mechanical independence exists among physiologically loaded fiber bundles in bovine EOMs and tendons, providing biomechanical support for the proposal that differential compartmental function in horizontal rectus EOMs contributes to novel torsional and vertical actions. PMID:23188730

  9. Mechanisms underlying subunit independence in pyramidal neuron dendrites.

    PubMed

    Behabadi, Bardia F; Mel, Bartlett W

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal neuron (PN) dendrites compartmentalize voltage signals and can generate local spikes, which has led to the proposal that their dendrites act as independent computational subunits within a multilayered processing scheme. However, when a PN is strongly activated, back-propagating action potentials (bAPs) sweeping outward from the soma synchronize dendritic membrane potentials many times per second. How PN dendrites maintain the independence of their voltage-dependent computations, despite these repeated voltage resets, remains unknown. Using a detailed compartmental model of a layer 5 PN, and an improved method for quantifying subunit independence that incorporates a more accurate model of dendritic integration, we first established that the output of each dendrite can be almost perfectly predicted by the intensity and spatial configuration of its own synaptic inputs, and is nearly invariant to the rate of bAP-mediated "cross-talk" from other dendrites over a 100-fold range. Then, through an analysis of conductance, voltage, and current waveforms within the model cell, we identify three biophysical mechanisms that together help make independent dendritic computation possible in a firing neuron, suggesting that a major subtype of neocortical neuron has been optimized for layered, compartmentalized processing under in-vivo-like spiking conditions. PMID:24357611

  10. Mechanisms Involved in the Aging-Induced Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    El Assar, Mariam; Angulo, Javier; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F.; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2012-01-01

    Vascular aging is a key process determining health status of aged population. Aging is an independent cardiovascular risk factor associated to an impairment of endothelial function, which is a very early and important event leading to cardiovascular disease. Vascular aging, formerly being considered an immutable and inexorable risk factor, is now viewed as a target process for intervention in order to achieve a healthier old age. A further knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the age-related vascular dysfunction is required to design an adequate therapeutic strategy to prevent or restore this impairment of vascular functionality. Among the proposed mechanisms that contribute to age-dependent endothelial dysfunction, this review is focused on the following aspects occurring into the vascular wall: (1) the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, caused by diminished NO synthesis and/or by augmented NO scavenging due to oxidative stress, leading to peroxynitrite formation (ONOO−); (2) the possible sources involved in the enhancement of oxidative stress; (3) the increased activity of vasoconstrictor factors; and (4) the development of a low-grade pro-inflammatory environment. Synergisms and interactions between all these pathways are also analyzed. Finally, a brief summary of some cellular mechanisms related to endothelial cell senescence (including telomere and telomerase, stress-induced senescence, as well as sirtuins) are implemented, as they are likely involved in the age-dependent endothelial dysfunction, as well as in the lower vascular repairing capacity observed in the elderly. Prevention or reversion of those mechanisms leading to endothelial dysfunction through life style modifications or pharmacological interventions could markedly improve cardiovascular health in older people. PMID:22783194

  11. Epigenetic mechanisms involved in developmental nutritional programming

    PubMed Central

    Gabory, Anne; Attig, Linda; Junien, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    The ways in which epigenetic modifications fix the effects of early environmental events, ensuring sustained responses to transient stimuli, which result in modified gene expression patterns and phenotypes later in life, is a topic of considerable interest. This review focuses on recently discovered mechanisms and calls into question prevailing views about the dynamics, position and functions of epigenetic marks. Most epigenetic studies have addressed the long-term effects on a small number of epigenetic marks, at the global or individual gene level, of environmental stressors in humans and animal models. In parallel, increasing numbers of studies based on high-throughput technologies and focusing on humans and mice have revealed additional complexity in epigenetic processes, by highlighting the importance of crosstalk between the different epigenetic marks. A number of studies focusing on the developmental origin of health and disease and metabolic programming have identified links between early nutrition, epigenetic processes and long-term illness. The existence of a self-propagating epigenetic cycle has been demonstrated. Moreover, recent studies demonstrate an obvious sexual dimorphism both for programming trajectories and in response to the same environmental insult. Despite recent progress, we are still far from understanding how, when and where environmental stressors disturb key epigenetic mechanisms. Thus, identifying the original key marks and their changes throughout development during an individual’s lifetime or over several generations remains a challenging issue. PMID:22010058

  12. Transition to Independent Living and Substance Involvement of Treated and High Risk Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kypri, Kypros; McCarthy, Denis M.; Coe, Michael T.; Brown, Sandra A.

    2004-01-01

    National studies indicate that alcohol and drug involvement increases during transition from adolescence to young adulthood. The present study evaluated change in alcohol and drug use as youth move from living with their family of origin to independent living environments. Two samples of youth, those who had previously been treated for alcohol and…

  13. Glucan: mechanisms involved in its radioprotective effect

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; D'Alesandro, M.M.; Brook, I.; Blakely, W.F.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    It has generally been accepted that most biologically derived agents that are radioprotective in the hemopoietic-syndrome dose range (eg, endotoxin, Bacillus Calmette Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum, etc) exert their beneficial properties by enhancing hemopoietic recovery and hence, by regenerating the host's ability to resist life-threatening opportunistic infections. However, using glucan as a hemopoietic stimulant/radioprotectant, the authors demonstrated the host resistance to opportunistic infection is enhanced in mice even prior to the detection of significant hemopoietic regeneration. This early enhanced resistance microbial invasion in glucan-treated irradiated mice could be correlated with enhanced and/or prolonged macrophage (but not granulocyte) function. These results suggest that early after irradiation glucan may mediate its radioprotection by enhancing resistance to microbial invasion via mechanisms not necessarily predicated on hemopoietic recovery. In addition, preliminary evidence suggests that glucan can also function as an effective free-radical scavenger. Because macrophages have been shown to selectively phagocytize and sequester glucan, the possibility that these specific cells may be protected by virtue of glucan's scavenging ability is also suggested.

  14. Glucan: mechanisms involved in its radioprotective effect

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; D'Alesandro, M.M.; Brook, I.; Blakely, W.F.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1987-08-01

    It has generally been accepted that most biologically derived agents that are radioprotective in the hemopoietic-syndrome dose range (eg, endotoxin, Bacillus Calmette Guerin, Corynebacterium parvum, etc) exert their beneficial properties by enhancing hemopoietic recovery and hence, by regenerating the host's ability to resist life-threatening opportunistic infections. However, using glucan as a hemopoietic stimulant/radioprotectant, we have demonstrated that host resistance to opportunistic infection is enhanced in these mice even prior to the detection of significant hemopoietic regeneration. This early enhanced resistance to microbial invasion in glucan-treated irradiated mice could be correlated with enhanced and/or prolonged macrophage (but not granulocyte) function. These results suggest that early after irradiation glucan may mediate its radioprotection by enhancing resistance to microbial invasion via mechanisms not necessarily predicated on hemopoietic recovery. In addition, preliminary evidence suggests that glucan can also function as an effective free-radical scavenger. Because macrophages have been shown to selectively phagocytize and sequester glucan, the possibility that these specific cells may be protected by virtue of glucan's scavenging ability is also suggested.

  15. Arsenite-induced mitotic death involves stress response and is independent of tubulin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B. Frazier; McNeely, Samuel C.; Miller, Heather L.; States, J. Christopher

    2008-07-15

    Arsenite, a known mitotic disruptor, causes cell cycle arrest and cell death at anaphase. The mechanism causing mitotic arrest is highly disputed. We compared arsenite to the spindle poisons nocodazole and paclitaxel. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in interphase cells demonstrated that, while nocodazole and paclitaxel disrupt microtubule polymerization through destabilization and hyperpolymerization, respectively, microtubules in arsenite-treated cells remain comparable to untreated cells even at supra-therapeutic concentrations. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in mitotic cells showed spindle formation in arsenite- and paclitaxel-treated cells but not in nocodazole-treated cells. Spindle formation in arsenite-treated cells appeared irregular and multi-polar. {gamma}-tubulin staining showed that cells treated with nocodazole and therapeutic concentrations of paclitaxel contained two centrosomes. In contrast, most arsenite-treated mitotic cells contained more than two centrosomes, similar to centrosome abnormalities induced by heat shock. Of the three drugs tested, only arsenite treatment increased expression of the inducible isoform of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i). HSP70 and HSP90 proteins are intimately involved in centrosome regulation and mitotic spindle formation. HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG sensitized cells to arsenite treatment and increased arsenite-induced centrosome abnormalities. Combined treatment of 17-DMAG and arsenite resulted in a supra-additive effect on viability, mitotic arrest, and centrosome abnormalities. Thus, arsenite-induced abnormal centrosome amplification and subsequent mitotic arrest is independent of effects on tubulin polymerization and may be due to specific stresses that are protected against by HSP90 and HSP70.

  16. Homing orientation in salamanders: A mechanism involving chemical cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madison, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed description is given of experiments made to determine the senses and chemical cues used by salamanders for homing orientation. Sensory impairment and cue manipulative techniques were used in the investigation. All experiments were carried out at night. Results show that sense impaired animals did not home as readily as those who were blind but retained their sensory mechanism. This fact suggests that the olfactory mechanism is necessary for homing in the salamander. It was determined that after the impaired salamander regenerated its sensory mechanism it too returned home. It was concluded that homing ability in salamanders is direction independent, distant dependent, and vision independent.

  17. Uptake of fluorescent nano beads into BY2-cells involves clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Bandmann, Vera; Müller, Jasmin Daniela; Köhler, Tim; Homann, Ulrike

    2012-10-19

    To follow endocytosis in BY-2 cells we made use of fluorescent nano beads. Beads with 20nm in diameter were internalised rapidly and accumulated partially in compartments also labelled by the endocytic marker FM4-64. Studies in BY-2 cells and protoplasts revealed that larger beads (100nm) were excluded from uptake into turgescent and plasmolysed cells while protoplasts were able to internalise beads with a diameter of up to 1000nm. Endocytosis of beads was only partially inhibited by the clathrin-specific inhibitor Ikarugamycin and strongly blocked by wortmannin. These results imply that uptake of beads involves clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent endocytic mechanisms and supports the hypothesis that clathrin-independent endocytosis plays a general role in plants. PMID:23046971

  18. An ATM-independent S-phase checkpoint response involves CHK1 pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Baocheng; Guan, Jun; Iliakis, George; Wang, Ya

    2002-01-01

    After exposure to genotoxic stress, proliferating cells actively slow down the DNA replication through a S-phase checkpoint to provide time for repair. We report that in addition to the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent pathway that controls the fast response, there is an ATM-independent pathway that controls the slow response to regulate the S-phase checkpoint after ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. The slow response of S-phase checkpoint, which is resistant to wortmannin, sensitive to caffeine and UCN-01, and related to cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation, is much stronger in CHK1 overexpressed cells, and it could be abolished by Chk1 antisense oligonucleotides. These results provide evidence that the ATM-independent slow response of S-phase checkpoint involves CHK1 pathway.

  19. Sulforaphane inhibits multiple inflammasomes through an Nrf2-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Allison J; Maier, Nolan K; Leppla, Stephen H; Moayeri, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    The inflammasomes are intracellular complexes that have an important role in cytosolic innate immune sensing and pathogen defense. Inflammasome sensors detect a diversity of intracellular microbial ligands and endogenous danger signals and activate caspase-1, thus initiating maturation and release of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. These events, although crucial to the innate immune response, have also been linked to the pathology of several inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. The natural isothiocyanate sulforaphane, present in broccoli sprouts and available as a dietary supplement, has gained attention for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties. We discovered that sulforaphane inhibits caspase-1 autoproteolytic activation and interleukin-1β maturation and secretion downstream of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor leucine-rich repeat proteins NLRP1 and NLRP3, NLR family apoptosis inhibitory protein 5/NLR family caspase-1 recruitment domain-containing protein 4 (NAIP5/NLRC4), and absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2) inflammasome receptors. Sulforaphane does not inhibit the inflammasome by direct modification of active caspase-1 and its mechanism is not dependent on protein degradation by the proteasome or de novo protein synthesis. Furthermore, sulforaphane-mediated inhibition of the inflammasomes is independent of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like factor 2 (Nrf2) and the antioxidant response-element pathway, to which many of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of sulforaphane have been attributed. Sulforaphane was also found to inhibit cell recruitment to the peritoneum and interleukin-1β secretion in an in vivo peritonitis model of acute gout and to reverse NLRP1-mediated murine resistance to Bacillus anthracis spore infection. These findings demonstrate that sulforaphane inhibits the inflammasomes through a novel mechanism and contributes to

  20. Prestin forms oligomer with four mechanically independent subunits

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang; Yang, Shiming; Jia, Shuping; He, David Z.Z.

    2010-01-01

    Prestin is the motor protein of cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) with the unique capability of performing direct, rapid and reciprocal electromechanical conversion. Prestin consists of 744 amino acids with a molecular mass of ~81.4 kDa. The predicted membrane topology and molecular mass of a single prestin molecule appear inadequate to account for the size of intramembrane particles (IMPs) expressed in the OHC membrane. Although recent biochemical evidence suggests that prestin forms homo-oligomers, most likely as a tetramer, the oligomeric structure of prestin in OHCs remains unclear. We obtained the charge density of prestin in the gerbil OHCs by measuring their nonlinear capacitance (NLC). The average charge density (22,608 μm−2) measured was four times the average IMP density (5,686 μm−2) reported in the freeze-fracture study. This suggests that each IMP contains four prestin molecules, based on the general notion that each prestin transfers a single elementary charge. We subsequently compared the voltage dependency and the values of slope factor of NLC and somatic motility simultaneously measured from the same OHCs to determine whether NLC and motility are fully coupled and how prestin subunits function within the tetramer. We showed that the voltage dependency and slope factors of NLC and motility were not statistically different, suggesting that NLC and motility are fully coupled. The fact that the slope factor is the same between NLC and motility suggests that each prestin monomer in the tetramer is in parallel, each interacting independently with cytoplasmic or other partners to facilitate the mechanical response. PMID:20347723

  1. CD4-Independent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Involves Participation of Endocytosis and Cathepsin B

    PubMed Central

    Yoshii, Hiroaki; Kamiyama, Haruka; Goto, Kensuke; Oishi, Kazunori; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Hayashi, Hideki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sato, Hironori; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2011-01-01

    During a comparison of the infectivity of mNDK, a CD4-independent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strain, to various cell lines, we found that HeLa cells were much less susceptible than 293T and TE671 cells. Hybridoma cells between HeLa and 293T cells were as susceptible as 293T cells, suggesting that cellular factors enhance the mNDK infection in 293T cells. By screening a cDNA expression library in HeLa cells, cystatin C was isolated as an enhancer of the mNDK infection. Because cathepsin B protease, a natural ligand of cystatin C, was upregulated in HeLa cells, we speculated that the high levels of cathepsin B activities were inhibitory to the CD4-independent infection and that cystatin C enhanced the infection by impairing the excessive cathepsin B activity. Consistent with this idea, pretreatment of HeLa cells with 125 µM of CA-074Me, a cathepsin B inhibitor, resulted in an 8-fold enhancement of the mNDK infectivity. Because cathepsin B is activated by low pH in acidic endosomes, we further examined the potential roles of endosomes in the CD4-independent infection. Suppression of endosome acidification or endocytosis by inhibitors or by an Eps15 dominant negative mutant reduced the infectivity of mNDK in which CD4-dependent infections were not significantly impaired. Taken together, these results suggest that endocytosis, endosomal acidification, and cathepsin B activity are involved in the CD4-independent entry of HIV-1. PMID:21541353

  2. The effect of different immunosuppressants on alloantigen dependent and independent factors involved in the development of chronic rejection in an animal model.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, O.; Rigg, K.; Shehata, M.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of cyclosporine, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and SDZ RAD on an animal model of transplant arteriosclerosis involving alloantigen dependent and independent mechanisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 1 (continued) Figure 2 Figure 2 (continued) PMID:11518369

  3. Rabies virus-induced apoptosis involves caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Sarmento, Luciana; Tseggai, Tesfai; Dhingra, Vikas; Fu, Zhen F

    2006-11-01

    Previously, it has been shown that the laboratory attenuated rabies virus CVS-B2C, but not the wild-type virus SHBRV, induces apoptosis in mice and the induction of apoptosis is mediated by viral glycoprotein. Induction of apoptosis by CVS-B2C limits the spread of the virus in the CNS. In the present study, we characterized the pathways by which CVS-B2C induces apoptosis. BSR cells were infected with CVS-B2C or SHBRV and harvested at different time points for detection of apoptosis by immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Apoptosis was detected only in cells infected with CVS-B2C, but not SHBRV. Caspase activity and expression of several apoptotic proteins were analyzed by fluorometric assay and Western blotting. Activation of caspase-8 and -3, but not of caspase-9, was observed in CVS-B2C-infected cells. In addition, the level of expression of Apaf-1 did not change. Furthermore, PARP was cleaved confirming activation of downstream caspases. All these data suggest that CVS-B2C infection activates the extrinsic, but not the intrinsic, apoptotic pathway. In addition, AIF, a caspase-independent apoptotic protein was up-regulated and translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus post-infection, suggesting that apoptosis induced by CVS-B2C also involves the activation of a caspase-independent pathway. PMID:16814422

  4. Calcium-permeable ion channels involved in glutamate receptor-independent ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-hua; Inoue, Koichi; Si, Hong-fang; Xiong, Zhi-gang

    2011-01-01

    Brain ischemia is a leading cause of death and long-term disabilities worldwide. Unfortunately, current treatment is limited to thrombolysis, which has limited success and a potential side effect of intracerebral hemorrhage. Searching for new cell injury mechanisms and therapeutic interventions has become a major challenge in the field. It has been recognized for many years that intracellular Ca2+ overload in neurons is essential for neuronal injury associated with brain ischemia. However, the exact pathway(s) underlying the toxic Ca2+ loading remained elusive. This review discusses the role of two Ca2+-permeable cation channels, TRPM7 and acid-sensing channels, in glutamate-independent Ca2+ toxicity associated with brain ischemia. PMID:21552295

  5. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Sung; Frey, John W; Hornberger, Troy A

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA) may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k) T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis. PMID:23077579

  6. Hyponatraemia alters the biophysical properties of neuronal cells independently of osmolarity: a study on Ni(2+) -sensitive current involvement.

    PubMed

    Squecco, Roberta; Luciani, Paola; Idrizaj, Eglantina; Deledda, Cristiana; Benvenuti, Susanna; Giuliani, Corinna; Fibbi, Benedetta; Peri, Alessandro; Francini, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    What is the central question of this study? Hyponatraemia, an electrolyte disorder encountered in hospitalized patients, can cause neurological symptoms usually attributed to a reduction in plasma osmolarity. Here, we investigated whether low [Na(+) ] per se can cause neuronal changes independent of osmolarity, focusing on involvement of the Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger. What is the main finding and its importance? We show that hyponatraemia per se causes alterations of neuronal properties. The novel finding of Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger involvement helps us to elucidate the volume regulation following hyponatraemia. This might have relevance in a translational perspective because Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchanger could be a target for novel therapies. Hyponatraemia is the most frequent electrolyte disorder encountered in hospitalized patients, and it can cause a wide variety of neurological symptoms. Most of the negative effects of this condition on neuronal cells are attributed to cell swelling because of the reduction of plasma osmolarity, although in hyponatraemia different membrane proteins are supposed to be involved in the conservation of neuronal volume. We have recently reported detrimental effects of hyponatraemia on two different neuronal cell lines, SK-N-AS and SH-SY5Y, independent of osmotic alterations. In this study we investigated, in the same cell lines, whether hyponatraemic conditions per se can cause electrophysiological alterations and whether these effects vary over time. Accordingly, we carried out experiments in low-sodium medium in either hyposmotic [Osm(-)] or isosmotic [Osm(+)] conditions, for a short (24 h) or long time (7 days). Using a patch pipette in voltage-clamp conditions, we recorded possible modifications of cell capacitance (Cm ) and membrane conductance (Gm ). Our results indicate that in both Osm(-) and Osm(+) medium, Cm and Gm show a similar increase, but such effects are dependent on the time in culture in different ways. Notably

  7. ATP-dependent/-independent enzymatic ring reductions involved in the anaerobic catabolism of naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Christian; Johannes, Jörg; Mouttaki, Housna; Sadeghi, Masih; Golding, Bernard T; Boll, Matthias; Meckenstock, Rainer U

    2013-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are among the most hazardous environmental pollutants. However, in contrast to aerobic degradation, the respective degradation pathways in anaerobes are greatly unknown which has so far prohibited many environmental investigations. In this work, we studied the enzymatic dearomatization reactions involved in the degradation of the PAH model compounds naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene in the sulfate-reducing enrichment culture N47. Cell extracts of N47 grown on naphthalene catalysed the sodium dithionite-dependent four-electron reduction of the key intermediate 2-naphthoyl-coenzyme A (NCoA) to 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-2-naphthoyl-CoA (THNCoA). The NCoA reductase activity was independent of ATP and was, surprisingly, not sensitive to oxygen. In cell extracts in the presence of various electron donors the product THNCoA was further reduced by a two-electron reaction to most likely a conjugated hexahydro-2-naphthoyl-CoA isomer (HHNCoA). The reaction assigned to THNCoA reductase strictly depended on ATP and was oxygen-sensitive with a half-life time between 30 s and 1 min when exposed to air. The rate was highest with NADH as electron donor. The results indicate that two novel and completely different dearomatizing ring reductases are involved in anaerobic naphthalene degradation. While the THNCoA reducing activity shows some properties of ATP-dependent class I benzoyl-CoA reductases, NCoA reduction appears to be catalysed by a previously unknown class of dearomatizing aryl-carboxyl-CoA reductases. PMID:23336264

  8. Independent backup mode transfer and mechanism for digital control computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulpule, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Oscarson, Edward M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An interrupt is provided to a signal processor having a non-maskable interrupt input, in response to the detection of a request for transfer to backup software. The signal processor provides a transfer signal to a transfer mechanism only after completion of the present machine cycle. Transfer to the backup software is initiated by the transfer mechanism only upon reception of the transfer signal.

  9. Two glycosyltransferases involved in anthocyanin modification delineated by transcriptome independent component analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yonekura-Sakakibara, Keiko; Fukushima, Atsushi; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Hanada, Kousuke; Matsuda, Fumio; Sugawara, Satoko; Inoue, Eri; Kuromori, Takashi; Ito, Takuya; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Wangwattana, Bunyapa; Yamazaki, Mami; Saito, Kazuki

    2012-01-01

    To identify candidate genes involved in Arabidopsis flavonoid biosynthesis, we applied transcriptome coexpression analysis and independent component analyses with 1388 microarray data from publicly available databases. Two glycosyltransferases, UGT79B1 and UGT84A2 were found to cluster with anthocyanin biosynthetic genes. Anthocyanin was drastically reduced in ugt79b1 knockout mutants. Recombinant UGT79B1 protein converted cyanidin 3-O-glucoside to cyanidin 3-O-xylosyl(1→2)glucoside. UGT79B1 recognized 3-O-glucosylated anthocyanidins/flavonols and uridine diphosphate (UDP)-xylose, but not 3,5-O-diglucosylated anthocyanidins, indicating that UGT79B1 encodes anthocyanin 3-O-glucoside: 2′′-O-xylosyltransferase. UGT84A2 is known to encode sinapic acid: UDP-glucosyltransferase. In ugt84a2 knockout mutants, a major sinapoylated anthocyanin was drastically reduced. A comparison of anthocyanin profiles in ugt84a knockout mutants indicated that UGT84A2 plays a major role in sinapoylation of anthocyanin, and that other UGT84As contribute the production of 1-O-sinapoylglucose to a lesser extent. These data suggest major routes from cyanidin 3-O-glucoside to the most highly modified cyanidin in the potential intricate anthocyanin modification pathways in Arabidopsis. PMID:21899608

  10. A Review of Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Toxicity of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Khalili Fard, Javad; Jafari, Samira; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the use of nanomaterials has received much attention in industrial and medical fields. However, some reports have mentioned adverse effects of these materials on the biological systems and cellular components. There are several major mechanisms for cytotoxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) such as physicochemical properties, contamination with toxic element, fibrous structure, high surface charge and radical species generation. In this review, a brief key mechanisms involved in toxic effect of NPs are given, followed by the in vitro toxicity assays of NPs and prooxidant effects of several NPs such as carbon nanotubes, titanium dioxide NPs, quantum dots, gold NPs and silver NPs. PMID:26819915

  11. Mechanisms of and facility types involved in hazardous materials incidents.

    PubMed Central

    Kales, S N; Polyhronopoulos, G N; Castro, M J; Goldman, R H; Christiani, D C

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically investigate hazardous materials (hazmat) releases and determine the mechanisms of these accidents, and the industries/activities and chemicals involved. We analyzed responses by Massachusetts' six district hazmat teams from their inception through May 1996. Information from incident reports was extracted onto standard coding sheets. The majority of hazardous materials incidents were caused by spills, leaks, or escapes of hazardous materials (76%) and occurred at fixed facilities (80%). Transportation-related accidents accounted for 20% of incidents. Eleven percent of hazardous materials incidents were at schools or health care facilities. Petroleum-derived fuels were involved in over half of transportation-related accidents, and these accounted for the majority of petroleum fuel releases. Chlorine derivatives were involved in 18% of all accidents and were associated with a wide variety of facility types and activities. In conclusion, systematic study of hazardous materials incidents allows the identification of preventable causes of these incidents. PMID:9300926

  12. Glycerol dehydratation by the B12-independent enzyme may not involve the migration of a hydroxyl group: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Feliks, Mikolaj; Ullmann, G Matthias

    2012-06-21

    A combination of continuum electrostatic and density functional calculations has been employed to study the mechanism of the B(12)-independent glycerol dehydratase, a novel glycyl-radical enzyme involved in the microbial conversion of glycerol to 3-hydroxylpropionaldehyde. The calculations indicate that the dehydratation of glycerol by the B(12)-independent enzyme does not need to involve a mechanistically complicated migration of the middle hydroxyl group to one of the two terminal positions of a molecule, as previously suggested. Instead, the reaction can proceed in three elementary steps. First, a radical transfer from the catalytically active Cys433 to the ligand generates a substrate-related intermediate. Second, a hydroxyl group splits off at the middle position of the ligand and is protonated by the neighboring His164 to form a water molecule. The other active site residue Glu435 accepts a proton from one of the terminal hydroxyl groups of the ligand and a C═O double bond is created. Third, the reaction is completed by a radical back transfer from the product-related intermediate to Cys433. On the basis of our calculations, the catalytic functions of the active site residues have been suggested. Cys433 is a radical relay site; His164 and Glu435 make up a proton accepting/donating system; Asn156, His281, and Asp447 form a network of hydrogen bonds responsible for the electrostatic stabilization of the transition state. A synergistic participation of these residues in the reaction seems to be crucial for the catalysis. PMID:22626266

  13. Visuospatial Orientational Shifts: Evidence for Three Independent Mechanisms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noonan, Michael; Axelrod, Seymour

    While it is often assumed that a single mechanism underlies varied experimental evidences of selectivity, Berlyne (1969) suggested that attention-like selectivity may take place in a number of quite separate neural systems. This study examined the issue of visuospatial attention by investigating covert orientation or "looking out of the corner of…

  14. Time-independent Anisotropic Plastic Behavior by Mechanical Subelement Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes a procedure for modelling the anisotropic elastic-plastic behavior of metals in plane stress state by the mechanical sub-layer model. In this model the stress-strain curves along the longitudinal and transverse directions are represented by short smooth segments which are considered as piecewise linear for simplicity. The model is incorporated in a finite element analysis program which is based on the assumed stress hybrid element and the iscoplasticity-theory.

  15. An Independent Test of a Subresonant Mechanical Damping Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, W.; Spetzler, H. A.

    2001-12-01

    To estimate the precision and accuracy of an apparatus built to measure mechanical damping in crustal rocks, we have constructed a structure from aluminum and high-Newtonian-viscosity silicone oil. This structure is similar in design to many shock absorbers, but with no moving piston. Oil is forced from a reservoir, through a capillary, by elastic deformation of the reservoir wall. Oil returns through the capillary as the deformation relaxes under diminished load. The structure can be modeled as a linear set of elastic and viscous elements. The dynamic structural behavior of this structure was analysed mathematically, and its damping as a function of frequency was calculated. Measurements were made of the structure in the damping spectrometer using frequencies in the range 1 mHz - 100 Hz, and both sets of results are compared. The Debye peak predicted by calculation is well resolved in the measurement, and, within uncertainty, experiment and theory agree in the region of the peak. This confirms that the spectrometer is useful in this range. Further use of a calculated structure similar to this could aid in mechanical damping measurements under less favorable conditions such as under confining pressure, and possibly lead to the development of a low-frequency mechanical damping standard.

  16. Troglitazone suppresses glutamine metabolism through a PPAR-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Miriam R.; Clem, Brian F.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced glutamine metabolism is required for tumor cell growth and survival, which suggests that agents targeting glutaminolysis may have utility within anti-cancer therapies. Troglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, exhibits significant anti-tumor activity and can alter glutamine metabolism in multiple cell types. Therefore, we examined whether troglitazone would disrupt glutamine metabolism in tumor cells and whether its action was reliant on PPARγ activity. We found that troglitazone treatment suppressed glutamine uptake and the expression of the glutamine transporter, ASCT2, and glutaminase. In addition, troglitazone reduced 13C-glutamine incorporation into the TCA cycle, decreased [ATP], and resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Further, troglitazone treatment decreased tumor cell growth, which was partially rescued with the addition of the TCA-intermediate, alpha-ketoglutarate, or the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine. Importantly, troglitazone’s effects on glutamine uptake or viable cell number were found to be PPARγ-independent. In contrast, troglitazone caused a decrease in c-Myc levels, while the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, rescued c-Myc, ASCT2 and GLS1 expression, as well as glutamine uptake and cell number. Lastly, combinatorial treatment of troglitazone and metformin resulted in a synergistic decrease in cell number. Therefore, characterizing new anti-tumor properties of previously approved FDA therapies supports the potential for repurposing of these agents. PMID:25872876

  17. Troglitazone suppresses glutamine metabolism through a PPAR-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Miriam R; Clem, Brian F

    2015-08-01

    Enhanced glutamine metabolism is required for tumor cell growth and survival, which suggests that agents targeting glutaminolysis may have utility within anti-cancer therapies. Troglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, exhibits significant anti-tumor activity and can alter glutamine metabolism in multiple cell types. Therefore, we examined whether troglitazone would disrupt glutamine metabolism in tumor cells and whether its action was reliant on PPARγ activity. We found that troglitazone treatment suppressed glutamine uptake and the expression of the glutamine transporter, ASCT2, and glutaminase. In addition, troglitazone reduced 13C-glutamine incorporation into the TCA cycle, decreased [ATP], and resulted in an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). Further, troglitazone treatment decreased tumor cell growth, which was partially rescued with the addition of the TCA-intermediate, α-ketoglutarate, or the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. Importantly, troglitazone's effects on glutamine uptake or viable cell number were found to be PPARγ-independent. In contrast, troglitazone caused a decrease in c-Myc levels, while the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, rescued c-Myc, ASCT2 and GLS1 expression, as well as glutamine uptake and cell number. Lastly, combinatorial treatment of troglitazone and metformin resulted in a synergistic decrease in cell number. Therefore, characterizing new anti-tumor properties of previously approved FDA therapies supports the potential for repurposing of these agents. PMID:25872876

  18. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates. PMID:27487917

  19. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates. PMID:27487917

  20. Occipital foramina development involves localised regulation of mesenchyme proliferation and is independent of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Akbareian, Sophia E; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Macharia, Raymond G; McGonnell, Imelda M

    2015-06-01

    Cranial foramina are holes within the skull, formed during development, allowing entry and exit of blood vessels and nerves. Once formed they must remain open, due to the vital structures they contain, i.e. optic nerves, jugular vein, carotid artery, and other cranial nerves and blood vessels. Understanding cranial foramina development is essential as cranial malformations lead to the stenosis or complete closure of these structures, resulting in blindness, deafness, facial paralysis, raised intracranial pressure and lethality. Here we focus on describing early events in the formation of the jugular, carotid and hypoglossal cranial foramina that form in the mesoderm-derived, endochondral occipital bones at the base of the embryonic chick skull. Whole-mount skeletal staining of skulls indicates the appearance of these foramina from HH32/D7.5 onwards. Haematoxylin & eosin staining of sections shows that the intimately associated mesenchyme, neighbouring the contents of these cranial foramina, is initially very dense and gradually becomes sparser as development proceeds. Histological examination also revealed that these foramina initially contain relatively large-diameter nerves, which later become refined, and are closely associated with the blood vessel, which they also innervate within the confines of the foramina. Interestingly cranial foramina in the base of the skull contain blood vessels lacking smooth muscle actin, which suggests these blood vessels belong to glomus body structures within the foramina. The blood vessel shape also appears to dictate the overall shape of the resulting foramina. We initially hypothesised that cranial foramina development could involve targeted proliferation and local apoptosis to cause 'mesenchymal clearing' and the creation of cavities in a mechanism similar to joint cavitation. We find that this is not the case, and propose that a mechanism reliant upon local nerve/blood vessel-derived restriction of ossification may contribute

  1. Retinol Promotes In Vitro Growth of Proximal Colon Organoids through a Retinoic Acid-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nibe, Yoichi; Akiyama, Shintaro; Matsumoto, Yuka; Nozaki, Kengo; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Hayashi, Ayumi; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Oshima, Shigeru; Watanabe, Mamoru; Nakamura, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Retinol (ROL), the alcohol form of vitamin A, is known to control cell fate decision of various types of stem cells in the form of its active metabolite, retinoic acid (RA). However, little is known about whether ROL has regulatory effects on colonic stem cells. We examined in this study the effect of ROL on the growth of murine normal colonic cells cultured as organoids. As genes involved in RA synthesis from ROL were differentially expressed along the length of the colon, we tested the effect of ROL on proximal and distal colon organoids separately. We found that organoid forming efficiency and the expression level of Lgr5, a marker gene for colonic stem cells were significantly enhanced by ROL in the proximal colon organoids, but not in the distal ones. Interestingly, neither retinaldehyde (RAL), an intermediate product of the ROL-RA pathway, nor RA exhibited growth promoting effects on the proximal colon organoids, suggesting that ROL-dependent growth enhancement in organoids involves an RA-independent mechanism. This was confirmed by the observation that an inhibitor for RA-mediated gene transcription did not abrogate the effect of ROL on organoids. This novel role of ROL in stem cell maintenance in the proximal colon provides insights into the mechanism of region-specific regulation for colonic stem cell maintenance. PMID:27564706

  2. The phytoestrogen genistein promotes wound healing by multiple independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Emmerson, Elaine; Campbell, Laura; Ashcroft, Gillian S; Hardman, Matthew J

    2010-06-10

    Genistein has been implicated in the beneficial effects of soy on human health, particularly in the context of ageing. In post-menopausal women reduced systemic estrogen leads to a range of age-associated pathologies, including delayed cutaneous wound healing. We have previously shown that this can be reversed by estrogen replacement. However, the effect of genistein on the skin is poorly understood and crucially the influence of genistein on wound healing has not been assessed. 10-week-old ovariectomised mice were systemically treated with 17beta-estradiol or genistein. Genistein substantially accelerated wound repair, associated with a dampened inflammatory response. Unexpectedly, co-treatment with the ER antagonist ICI had little impact on the anti-inflammatory, healing promoting effects of genistein. Thus genistein's actions are only partially mediated via classical estrogen receptor-dependent signalling pathways. Indeed, we report that alternative (cell-type specific) signalling mechanisms are activated in the skin in response to genistein treatment. PMID:20193736

  3. Neurophysiological mechanisms involved in language learning in adults

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Cunillera, Toni; Mestres-Missé, Anna; de Diego-Balaguer, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the brain mechanisms involved in word learning during infancy and in second language acquisition and about the way these new words become stable representations that sustain language processing. In several studies we have adopted the human simulation perspective, studying the effects of brain-lesions and combining different neuroimaging techniques such as event-related potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging in order to examine the language learning (LL) process. In the present article, we review this evidence focusing on how different brain signatures relate to (i) the extraction of words from speech, (ii) the discovery of their embedded grammatical structure, and (iii) how meaning derived from verbal contexts can inform us about the cognitive mechanisms underlying the learning process. We compile these findings and frame them into an integrative neurophysiological model that tries to delineate the major neural networks that might be involved in the initial stages of LL. Finally, we propose that LL simulations can help us to understand natural language processing and how the recovery from language disorders in infants and adults can be accomplished. PMID:19933142

  4. Molecular mechanisms involved in plant adaptation to low K(+) availability.

    PubMed

    Chérel, Isabelle; Lefoulon, Cécile; Boeglin, Martin; Sentenac, Hervé

    2014-03-01

    Potassium is a major inorganic constituent of the living cell and the most abundant cation in the cytosol. It plays a role in various functions at the cell level, such as electrical neutralization of anionic charges, protein synthesis, long- and short-term control of membrane polarization, and regulation of the osmotic potential. Through the latter function, K(+) is involved at the whole-plant level in osmotically driven functions such as cell movements, regulation of stomatal aperture, or phloem transport. Thus, plant growth and development require that large amounts of K(+) are taken up from the soil and translocated to the various organs. In most ecosystems, however, soil K(+) availability is low and fluctuating, so plants have developed strategies to take up K(+) more efficiently and preserve vital functions and growth when K(+) availability is becoming limited. These strategies include increased capacity for high-affinity K(+) uptake from the soil, K(+) redistribution between the cytosolic and vacuolar pools, ensuring cytosolic homeostasis, and modification of root system development and architecture. Our knowledge about the mechanisms and signalling cascades involved in these different adaptive responses has been rapidly growing during the last decade, revealing a highly complex network of interacting processes. This review is focused on the different physiological responses induced by K(+) deprivation, their underlying molecular events, and the present knowledge and hypotheses regarding the mechanisms responsible for K(+) sensing and signalling. PMID:24293613

  5. Factors involved in maintaining prolonged functional independence following supratentorial glioblastoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Chaichana, Kaisorn L.; Halthore, Aditya N.; Parker, Scott L.; Olivi, Alessandro; Weingart, Jon D.; Brem, Henry; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Object The median survival duration for patients with glioblastoma is approximately 12 months. Maximizing quality of life (QOL) for patients with glioblastoma is a priority. An important, yet understudied, QOL component is functional independence. The aims of this study were to evaluate functional outcomes over time for patients with glioblastoma, as well as identify factors associated with prolonged functional independence. Methods All patients who underwent first-time resection of either a primary (de novo) or secondary (prior lower grade glioma) glioblastoma at a single institution from 1996 to 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with a Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) score ≥ 80 were included. Kaplan-Meier, log-rank, and multivariate proportional hazards regression analyses were used to identify associations (p < 0.05) with functional independence (KPS score ≥ 60) following glioblastoma resection. Results The median follow-up duration time was 10 months (interquartile range [IQR] 5.6–17.0 months). A patient’s preoperative (p = 0.02) and immediate postoperative (within 2 months) functional status was associated with prolonged survival (p < 0.0001). Of the 544 patients in this series, 302 (56%) lost their functional independence at a median of 10 months (IQR 6–16 months). Factors independently associated with prolonged functional independence were: preoperative KPS score ≥ 90 (p = 0.004), preoperative seizures (p = 0.002), primary glioblastoma (p < 0.0001), gross-total resection (p < 0.0001), and temozolomide chemotherapy (p < 0.0001). Factors independently associated with decreased functional independence were: older age (p < 0.0001), coexistent coronary artery disease (p = 0.009), and incurring a new postoperative motor deficit (p = 0.009). Furthermore, a decline in functional status was independently associated with tumor recurrence (p = 0.01). Conclusions The identification and consideration of these factors associated with prolonged

  6. Mechanisms of neutropenia involving myeloid maturation arrest in burn sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Shoup, M; Weisenberger, J M; Wang, J L; Pyle, J M; Gamelli, R L; Shankar, R

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the mechanisms that lead to the decrease in bone marrow production of neutrophils during burn sepsis. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Impaired bone marrow granulopoiesis during burn sepsis often results in neutropenia despite elevated circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). To date, neither the specific stages of neutrophil maturation involved in the bone marrow suppression nor the mechanisms for the impairment have been determined. METHODS: Peripheral blood absolute neutrophil count and G-CSF levels were determined in mice 3 days after randomization to control, burn alone, or burn plus a topical inoculation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1000 colony-forming units). Bone marrow aspirates were analyzed for their neutrophil differentiation patterns by Gr-1 antigen expression and their G-CSF receptor status. Histologic analysis of liver, lung, spleen, and wound site was performed. RESULTS: In burn sepsis, absolute neutrophil count was reduced whereas plasma G-CSF levels were elevated, and myeloid differentiation was significantly shifted toward the immature mitotic myeloid cells. Bone marrow G-CSF receptor mRNA levels and G-CSF-stimulated proliferation were substantially decreased in burn sepsis. Histologic analysis revealed no significant neutrophil infiltration into the tissues. CONCLUSIONS: In thermal injury with superimposed sepsis, neutropenia and myeloid maturation arrest, despite the elevated levels of G-CSF, correlate with the reduction in bone marrow G-CSF receptor expression. These observations may provide a potential mechanism for neutropenia in sepsis. Images Figure 5. Figure 6. Figure 8. Figure 9. PMID:9671075

  7. Slicer-independent mechanism drives small-RNA strand separation during human RISC assembly

    PubMed Central

    Park, June Hyun; Shin, Chanseok

    2015-01-01

    Small RNA silencing is mediated by the effector RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) that consists of an Argonaute protein (AGOs 1–4 in humans). A fundamental step during RISC assembly involves the separation of two strands of a small RNA duplex, whereby only the guide strand is retained to form the mature RISC, a process not well understood. Despite the widely accepted view that ‘slicer-dependent unwinding’ via passenger-strand cleavage is a prerequisite for the assembly of a highly complementary siRNA into the AGO2-RISC, here we show by careful re-examination that ‘slicer-independent unwinding’ plays a more significant role in human RISC maturation than previously appreciated, not only for a miRNA duplex, but, unexpectedly, for a highly complementary siRNA as well. We discovered that ‘slicer-dependency’ for the unwinding was affected primarily by certain parameters such as temperature and Mg2+. We further validate these observations in non-slicer AGOs (1, 3 and 4) that can be programmed with siRNAs at the physiological temperature of humans, suggesting that slicer-independent mechanism is likely a common feature of human AGOs. Our results now clearly explain why both miRNA and siRNA are found in all four human AGOs, which is in striking contrast to the strict small-RNA sorting system in Drosophila. PMID:26384428

  8. The Challenges of Lifelong Learning: Report of a Seminar Involving the New Independent States and Mongolia, February 2002. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Training Foundation, Turin (Italy).

    To help the New Independent States and Mongolia address central issues related to lifelong learning, the European Training Foundation organized a project on lifelong learning that involved the following countries: Armenia; Belarus; Georgia; Kazakhstan; Kyrgyzstan; Mongolia; the Russian Federation; Ukraine; and Uzbekistan. The project's principal…

  9. Formation Mechanism for a Hybrid Supramolecular Network Involving Cooperative Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mura, Manuela; Silly, Fabien; Burlakov, Victor; Castell, Martin R.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.; Kantorovich, Lev N.

    2012-04-01

    A novel mechanism of hybrid assembly of molecules on surfaces is proposed stemming from interactions between molecules and on-surface metal atoms which eventually got trapped inside the network pores. Based on state-of-the-art theoretical calculations, we find that the new mechanism relies on formation of molecule-metal atom pairs which, together with molecules themselves, participate in the assembly growth. Most remarkably, the dissociation of pairs is facilitated by a cooperative interaction involving many molecules. This new mechanism is illustrated on a low coverage Melamine hexagonal network on the Au(111) surface where multiple events of gold atoms trapping via a set of so-called “gate” transitions are found by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations based on transition rates obtained using ab initio density functional theory calculations and the nudged elastic band method. Simulated STM images of gold atoms trapped in the pores of the Melamine network predict that the atoms should appear as bright spots inside Melamine hexagons. No trapping was found at large Melamine coverages, however. These predictions have been supported by preliminary STM experiments which show bright spots inside Melamine hexagons at low Melamine coverages, while empty pores are mostly observed at large coverages. Therefore, we suggest that bright spots sometimes observed in the pores of molecular assemblies on metal surfaces may be attributed to trapped substrate metal atoms. We believe that this type of mechanism could be used for delivering adatom species of desired functionality (e.g., magnetic) into the pores of hydrogen-bonded networks serving as templates for their capture.

  10. An Undergraduate Organic Laboratory Project Involving Independent Synthesis of Novel Flavones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letcher, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a synthetic organic laboratory experiment which ensures independence of students but is not excessively demanding of instructor time. Each student is provided with different starting materials to prepare different flavones but use the same general procedure, the "organic synthesis" flavone preparation. Various features of this procedure…

  11. Multiple cellular mechanisms prevent chromosomal rearrangements involving repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    George, Carolyn M.; Alani, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is present in the eukaryotic genome in the form of segmental duplications, tandem and interspersed repeats, and satellites. Repetitive sequences can be beneficial by serving specific cellular functions (e.g. centromeric and telomeric DNA) and by providing a rapid means for adaptive evolution. However, such elements are also substrates for deleterious chromosomal rearrangements that affect fitness and promote human disease. Recent studies analyzing the role of nuclear organization in DNA repair and factors that suppress non-allelic homologous recombination have provided insights into how genome stability is maintained in eukaryotes. In this review we outline the types of repetitive sequences seen in eukaryotic genomes and how recombination mechanisms are regulated at the DNA sequence, cell organization, chromatin structure, and cell cycle control levels to prevent chromosomal rearrangements involving these sequences. PMID:22494239

  12. Complement involvement in periodontitis: molecular mechanisms and rational therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hajishengallis, George; Maekawa, Tomoki; Abe, Toshiharu; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a network of interacting fluid-phase and cell surface-associated molecules that trigger, amplify, and regulate immune and inflammatory signaling pathways. Dysregulation of this finely balanced network can destabilize host-microbe homeostasis and cause inflammatory tissue damage. Evidence from clinical and animal model-based studies suggests that complement is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, a polymicrobial community-induced chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. This review discusses molecular mechanisms of complement involvement in the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal microbiome and the resulting destructive inflammation, culminating in loss of periodontal bone support. These mechanistic studies have additionally identified potential therapeutic targets. In this regard, interventional studies in preclinical models have provided proof-of-concept for using complement inhibitors for the treatment of human periodontitis. PMID:26306443

  13. FMR1 Premutation: Basic Mechanisms and Clinical Involvement.

    PubMed

    Milà, Montserrat; Rodriguez-Revenga, Laia; Matilla-Dueñas, Antoni

    2016-10-01

    The wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes associated with the FMR1 premutation affect more than two million people worldwide. The clinical implications have only been recognized recently despite this disorder constitutes a relevant health problem. The present issue of The Cerebellum is focused on the "2(nd) International Conference on the FMR1 Premutation: Basic Mechanisms and Clinical Involvement" held in Sitges, Barcelona (Spain), from September 30th to October 2nd, 2015. The conference was attended by professionals from different countries in Europe, the USA, Chile, Israel, Australia, and Indonesia and covered the latest clinical and molecular findings resulting from FMR1 premutation studies. Although the pathologies associated with the FMR1 premutation are considered as rare diseases, seventy abstracts were presented. This reflects the relevance of this topic in the medical community and the growing interest among professionals from other disciplines. The major topics discussed included why and how the mRNA toxicity due to a gain of function and non-canonical RAN are responsible for disorders associated with the premutation. Several presentations addressed the impact of these mechanisms in FXTAS and FXPOI, two clinical presentations caused by the FMR1 premutation. Interestingly, a deterioration of the DNA repair machinery was first proposed as the pathogenicity cause of premutation alleles. Communications related to FXTAS and FXPOI animal models were also presented. These models facilitate studies aimed to understand disease progression and early treatment interventions. Finally, there were presentations related to psychiatric, psychological, neurological, and radiological aspects. Interesting discussion on intermediate alleles and their involvement in clinical and reproductive aspects was generated. In this regards, genetic counselling is improved by taking into account the AGG interruptions and including information about the FMR1 premutation associated

  14. Neural involvement in endometriosis: Review of anatomic distribution and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Siquara De Sousa, Ana C; Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Spinner, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Endometriosis (EM) is an infrequent cause of peripheral neuropathy, most commonly sciatic. Perineural spread has recently been introduced as an alternate explanation for cases of lumbosacral or sciatic nerve EM. We performed a literature review to collect all reported cases of peripheral and central nervous system EM in search of anatomic patterns of involvement; potentially to support the perineural spread theory. If available, intraneural invasion and presence of peritoneal EM were recorded. The search revealed 83 articles describing 365 cases of somatic peripheral nervous EM and 13 cases of central nervous EM. The most frequently involved site was the sacral plexus (57%, n = 211), followed by the sciatic nerve (39%, n = 140). Other nerves were reported in significantly smaller numbers. Ninety seven percent (97%, n = 355) of peripheral nerve cases presented with pain, 20% (n = 72) reported weakness and 31% (n = 114), numbness. Thirty four percent (34%, n = 38) had solely intraneural EM of which 89% (n = 33) had no peritoneal EM (percentage based on available information). In the central nervous system, the conus medullaris and/or cauda equina constituted the majority of cases with 54% (n = 7). Apart from perineural spread, other discussed mechanisms include retrograde menstruation with peritoneal seeding, hematogenous and lymphogenous spread, stem cell implantation either hematogenously or via retrograde menstruation with subsequent EM differentiation, and coelomic or Müllerian duct metaplasia. We believe this literature review supports perineural spread as an alternate mechanism for EM of nerve, particularly the subgroup with intraneural EM and without peritoneal disease. PMID:26296428

  15. Introduction to Special Section: Mechanical Involvement of Fluids in Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Stephen; Sibson, Richard; Bruhn, Ronald

    1995-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that fluids are intimately linked to a variety of faulting processes. These include the long term structural and compositional evolution of fault zones; fault creep; and the nucleation, propagation, arrest, and recurrence of earthquake ruptures. Besides the widely recognized physical role of fluid pressures in controlling the strength of crustal fault zones, it is also apparent that fluids can exert mechanical influence through a variety of chemical effects. The United States Geological Survey sponsored a Conference on the Mechanical Effects of Fluids in Faulting under the auspices of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program at Fish Camp, California, from June 6 to 10, 1993. The purpose of the conference was to draw together and to evaluate the disparate evidence for the involvement of fluids in faulting; to establish communication on the importance of fluids in the mechanics of faulting between the different disciplines concerned with fault zone processes; and to help define future critical investigations, experiments, and observational procedures for evaluating the role of fluids in faulting. This conference drew together a diverse group of 45 scientists, with expertise in electrical and magnetic methods, geochemistry, hydrology, ore deposits, rock mechanics, seismology, and structural geology. Some of the outstanding questions addressed at this workshop included the following: 1. What are fluid pressures at different levels within seismically active fault zones? Do they remain hydrostatic throughout the full depth extent of the seismogenic regime, or are they generally superhydrostatic at depths in excess of a few kilometers? 2. Are fluid pressures at depth within fault zones constant through an earthquake cycle, or are they time-dependent? What is the spatial variability in fluid pressures? 3. What is the role of crustal fluids in the overall process of stress accumulation, release, and transfer during the earthquake

  16. Re-examination of Dietary Amino Acid Sensing Reveals a GCN2-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Leib, David E; Knight, Zachary A

    2015-11-10

    Animals cannot synthesize nine essential amino acids (EAAs) and must therefore obtain them from food. Mice reportedly reject food lacking a single EAA within the first hour of feeding. This remarkable phenomenon is proposed to involve post-ingestive sensing of amino acid imbalance by the protein kinase GCN2 in the brain. Here, we systematically re-examine dietary amino acid sensing in mice. In contrast to previous results, we find that mice cannot rapidly identify threonine- or leucine-deficient food in common feeding paradigms. However, mice attain the ability to identify EAA-deficient food following 2 days of EAA deprivation, suggesting a requirement for physiologic need. In addition, we report that mice can rapidly identify lysine-deficient food without prior EAA deficit, revealing a distinct sensing mechanism for this amino acid. These behaviors are independent of the proposed amino acid sensor GCN2, pointing to the existence of an undescribed mechanism for rapid sensing of dietary EAAs. PMID:26526991

  17. Re-examination of Dietary Amino Acid Sensing Reveals a GCN2-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Leib, David E.; Knight, Zachary A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Animals cannot synthesize nine essential amino acids (EAAs) and must therefore obtain them from food. Mice reportedly reject food lacking a single EAA within the first hour of feeding. This remarkable phenomenon is proposed to involve post-ingestive sensing of amino acid imbalance by the protein kinase GCN2 in the brain. Here, we systematically re-examine dietary amino acid sensing in mice. In contrast to previous results, we find that mice cannot rapidly identify threonine- or leucine-deficient food in common feeding paradigms. However, mice attain the ability to identify EAA-deficient food following 2 days of EAA deprivation, suggesting a requirement for physiologic need. In addition, we report that mice can rapidly identify lysine-deficient food without prior EAA deficit, revealing a distinct sensing mechanism for this amino acid. These behaviors are independent of the proposed amino acid sensor GCN2, pointing to the existence of an undescribed mechanism for rapid sensing of dietary EAAs. PMID:26526991

  18. Voriconazole Enhances the Osteogenic Activity of Human Osteoblasts In Vitro through a Fluoride-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kahtonna C.; Sanchez, Carlos J.; Niece, Krista L.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Periostitis, which is characterized by bony pain and diffuse periosteal ossification, has been increasingly reported with prolonged clinical use of voriconazole. While resolution of clinical symptoms following discontinuation of therapy suggests a causative role for voriconazole, the biological mechanisms contributing to voriconazole-induced periostitis are unknown. To elucidate potential mechanisms, we exposed human osteoblasts in vitro to voriconazole or fluconazole at 15 or 200 μg/ml (reflecting systemic or local administration, respectively), under nonosteogenic or osteogenic conditions, for 1, 3, or 7 days and evaluated the effects on cell proliferation (reflected by total cellular DNA) and osteogenic differentiation (reflected by alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium accumulation, and expression of genes involved in osteogenic differentiation). Release of free fluoride, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was also measured in cell supernatants of osteoblasts exposed to triazoles, with an ion-selective electrode (for free fluoride) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) (for VEGF and PDGF). Voriconazole but not fluconazole significantly enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. In contrast to clinical observations, no increases in free fluoride levels were detected following exposure to either voriconazole or fluconazole; however, significant increases in the expression of VEGF and PDGF by osteoblasts were observed following exposure to voriconazole. Our results demonstrate that voriconazole can induce osteoblast proliferation and enhance osteogenic activity in vitro. Importantly, and in contrast to the previously proposed mechanism of fluoride-stimulated osteogenesis, our findings suggest that voriconazole-induced periostitis may also occur through fluoride-independent mechanisms that enhance the expression of cytokines that can augment osteoblastic activity. PMID:26324277

  19. Voriconazole Enhances the Osteogenic Activity of Human Osteoblasts In Vitro through a Fluoride-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kahtonna C; Sanchez, Carlos J; Niece, Krista L; Wenke, Joseph C; Akers, Kevin S

    2015-12-01

    Periostitis, which is characterized by bony pain and diffuse periosteal ossification, has been increasingly reported with prolonged clinical use of voriconazole. While resolution of clinical symptoms following discontinuation of therapy suggests a causative role for voriconazole, the biological mechanisms contributing to voriconazole-induced periostitis are unknown. To elucidate potential mechanisms, we exposed human osteoblasts in vitro to voriconazole or fluconazole at 15 or 200 μg/ml (reflecting systemic or local administration, respectively), under nonosteogenic or osteogenic conditions, for 1, 3, or 7 days and evaluated the effects on cell proliferation (reflected by total cellular DNA) and osteogenic differentiation (reflected by alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium accumulation, and expression of genes involved in osteogenic differentiation). Release of free fluoride, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was also measured in cell supernatants of osteoblasts exposed to triazoles, with an ion-selective electrode (for free fluoride) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) (for VEGF and PDGF). Voriconazole but not fluconazole significantly enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. In contrast to clinical observations, no increases in free fluoride levels were detected following exposure to either voriconazole or fluconazole; however, significant increases in the expression of VEGF and PDGF by osteoblasts were observed following exposure to voriconazole. Our results demonstrate that voriconazole can induce osteoblast proliferation and enhance osteogenic activity in vitro. Importantly, and in contrast to the previously proposed mechanism of fluoride-stimulated osteogenesis, our findings suggest that voriconazole-induced periostitis may also occur through fluoride-independent mechanisms that enhance the expression of cytokines that can augment osteoblastic activity. PMID:26324277

  20. The mammalian transferrin-independent iron transport system may involve a surface ferrireductase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, I; Kaplan, J

    1994-01-01

    Mammalian cells accumulate iron from ferric citrate or ferric nitrilotriacetate through the activity of a transferrin-independent iron transport system [Sturrock, Alexander, Lamb, Craven and Kaplan (1990) J. Biol. Chem. 265, 3139-3145]. The uptake system might recognize and transport ferric-anion complexes, or cells may reduce ferric iron at the surface and then transport ferrous iron. To distinguish between these possibilities we exposed cells to either [59Fe]ferric citrate or ferric [14C]citrate and determined whether accumulation of iron was accompanied by the obligatory accumulation of citrate. In HeLa cells and human skin fibroblasts the rate of accumulation of iron was three to five times greater than that of citrate. Incubation of fibroblasts with ferric citrate or ferric ammonium citrate resulted in an enhanced accumulation of iron and citrate; the molar ratio of accumulation approaching unity. A similar rate of citrate accumulation, however, was observed when ferric citrate-incubated cells were exposed to [14C]citrate alone. Further studies demonstrated the independence of iron and citrate accumulation: addition of unlabelled citrate to cells decreased the uptake of labelled citrate without affecting the accumulation of 59Fe; iron uptake was decreased by the addition of ferrous chelators whereas the uptake of citrate was unaffected; reduction of ferric iron by ascorbate increased the uptake of iron but had no effect on the uptake of citrate. When HeLa cells were depleted of calcium, iron uptake decreased, but there was little effect on citrate uptake. These results indicate that transport of iron does not require the obligatory transport of citrate and vice versa. The mammalian transferrin-independent iron transport system appears functionally similar to iron transport systems in both the bacterial and plant kingdoms which require the activities of both a surface reductase and a ferrous metal transporter. PMID:7945215

  1. An Independent Replication of the Adolescent-Community Reinforcement Approach With Justice-Involved Youth

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Craig E.; Wevodau, Amy L.; Henderson, Susan E.; Colbourn, Scholar L.; Gharagozloo, Laadan; North, Lindsey W.; Lotts, Vivian A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Substance use disorders among youth remain a serious public health problem. Although research has overwhelmingly supported the use of evidenced-based interventions, one of the primary limitations of the current evidence base is that for the vast majority of treatments, the developers of the treatments are also the ones conducting research on them, raising the possibility of allegiance bias. Methods The present study was an independently conducted randomized controlled trial (n =126) comparing an evidenced-based treatment for adolescent substance use, Adolescent-Community Reinforcement Approach (A-CRA), and assertive continuing care (ACC), to services as usual (SAU) provided by a juvenile probation department. Latent growth curve modeling was used to compare the treatments on change in substance use assessed by the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months following treatment entry. Results All youth evidenced a substantial reduction in substance use frequency and substance-related problems following treatment; however, youth treated with A-CRA/ACC evidenced a substantially greater decrease in substance-related problems. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Results are consistent with studies conducted by A-CRA/ACC model developers supporting the effectiveness of the clinical approach and, because the outcomes resulted from an independent replication, are encouraging for the transportation potential of A-CRA/ACC. PMID:26992083

  2. Identification of Cell Surface Molecules Involved in Dystroglycan-Independent Lassa Virus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Ströher, Ute; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Although O-mannosylated dystroglycan is a receptor for Lassa virus, a causative agent of Lassa fever, recent findings suggest the existence of an alternative receptor(s). Here we identified four molecules as receptors for Lassa virus: Axl and Tyro3, from the TAM family, and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial calcium-dependent lectin (LSECtin), from the C-type lectin family. These molecules enhanced the binding of Lassa virus to cells and mediated infection independently of dystroglycan. Axl- or Tyro3-mediated infection required intracellular signaling via the tyrosine kinase activity of Axl or Tyro3, whereas DC-SIGN- or LSECtin-mediated infection and binding were dependent on a specific carbohydrate and on ions. The identification of these four molecules as Lassa virus receptors advances our understanding of Lassa virus cell entry. PMID:22156524

  3. Neurophysiological determinants of theoretical concepts and mechanisms involved in pacing.

    PubMed

    Roelands, Bart; de Koning, Jos; Foster, Carl; Hettinga, Floor; Meeusen, Romain

    2013-05-01

    improve performance. The distribution of the power output reveals that after dopamine reuptake inhibition, subjects are able to maintain a higher power output compared with placebo. Manipulations of serotonin and, especially, noradrenaline, have the opposite effect and force subjects to decrease power output early in the time trial. Interestingly, after manipulation of brain serotonin, subjects are often unable to perform an end sprint, indicating an absence of a reserve capacity or motivation to increase power output. Taken together, it appears that many factors, such as ambient conditions and manipulation of brain neurotransmitters, have the potential to influence power output during exercise, and might thus be involved as regulatory mechanisms in the complex skill of pacing. PMID:23456493

  4. Examining factors involved in stress-related working memory impairments: Independent or conditional effects?

    PubMed

    Banks, Jonathan B; Tartar, Jaime L; Tamayo, Brittney A

    2015-12-01

    A large and growing body of research demonstrates the impact of psychological stress on working memory. However, the typical study approach tests the effects of a single biological or psychological factor on changes in working memory. The current study attempted to move beyond the standard single-factor assessment by examining the impact of 2 possible factors in stress-related working memory impairments. To this end, 60 participants completed a working memory task before and after either a psychological stressor writing task or a control writing task and completed measures of both cortisol and mind wandering. We also included a measure of state anxiety to examine the direct and indirect effect on working memory. We found that mind wandering mediated the relationship between state anxiety and working memory at the baseline measurement. This indirect relationship was moderated by cortisol, such that the impact of mind wandering on working memory increased as cortisol levels increased. No overall working memory impairment was observed following the stress manipulation, but increases in state anxiety and mind wandering were observed. State anxiety and mind wandering independently mediated the relationship between change in working memory and threat perception. The indirect paths resulted in opposing effects on working memory. Combined, the findings from this study suggest that cortisol enhances the impact of mind wandering on working memory, that state anxiety may not always result in stress-related working memory impairments, and that high working memory performance can protect against mind wandering. PMID:26098727

  5. Assessment of mechanisms involved in antinociception caused by sesquiterpene polygodial.

    PubMed

    Mendes, G L; Santos, A R; Malheiros, A; Filho, V C; Yunes, R A; Calixto, J B

    2000-01-01

    Polygodial, a sesquiterpene isolated from the bark of Drymis winteri given systemically, intraplantarly, or by spinal or supraspinal sites, produced antinociception when assessed in both phases of the formalin test and against capsaicin-induced pain. Polygodial, even at high doses, had no antinociceptive or antihyperalgesic effect when assessed in hot-plate assay or in glutamate-induced hyperalgesia, nor did it significantly interfere with the motor coordination of animals when tested in the rota-rod test. The polygodial antinociception assessed in the formalin test was not affected by i.p. treatment of animals with cyprodime, yohimbine, phaclofen, bicuculine, or nitric oxide precursor or by intrathecal administration of potassium channel blockers such as apamin, charybdotoxin, glibenclamide, or tetraethylammonium. In contrast, polygodial antinociception was significantly attenuated by i.p. treatment of animals with naloxone, naltrindole, 2-(3, 4-dichlorophenyl)-n-methyl-n-[(1S)-1-(3-isothiocynatophenyl)-2-(1- pry rolidinyl)ethyl]acetamide, p-chlorophenylalanine, prazosin, or by i. c.v. treatment with pertussis toxin. In addition, polygodial antinociception was not cross-tolerant to morphine, nor was its effect affected by the adrenalectomy of animals. Together, these results show that polygodial produces pronounced systemic, spinal, and supraspinal antinociception in mice, mainly preventing the neurogenic pain produced by formalin and capsaicin. The mechanism by which polygodial produces antinociception seems likely to involve an interaction with the opioid system, mainly kappa and delta subtypes, depend on the activation of G(i/o) protein sensitive to pertussis toxin, alpha(1)-adrenoceptors, and the serotoninergic system. Collectively, these results suggest that polygodial itself or its derivatives may have potential therapeutic value for the development of new analgesic drugs. PMID:10604944

  6. Insulin-like factor regulates neural induction through an IGF1 receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Shuji; Oshima, Tomomi; Onuma, Yasuko; Ito, Yuzuru; Asashima, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) signalling is required for normal embryonic growth and development. Previous reports indicated that the IGF/IGF1R/MAPK pathway contributes to neural induction and the IGF/IGF1R/PI3K/Akt pathway to eye development. Here, we report the isolation of insulin3 encoding a novel insulin-like ligand involved in neural induction. Insulin3 has a similar structure to pro-insulin and mature IGF ligands, but cannot activate the IGF1 receptor. However, similar to IGFs, Insulin3 induced the gene expression of an anterior neural marker, otx2, and enlarged anterior head structures by inhibiting Wnt signalling. Insulin3 are predominantly localised to the endoplasmic reticulum when otx2 is induced by insulin3. Insulin3 reduced extracellular Wnts and cell surface localised Lrp6. These results suggest that Insulin3 is a novel cell-autonomous inhibitor of Wnt signalling. This study provides the first evidence that an insulin-like factor regulates neural induction through an IGF1R-independent mechanism. PMID:26112133

  7. Naringenin inhibits seed germination and seedling root growth through a salicylic acid-independent mechanism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Iker; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2012-12-01

    Flavonoids fulfill an enormous range of biological functions in plants. In seeds, these compounds play several roles; for instance proanthocyanidins protect them from moisture, pathogen attacks, mechanical stress, UV radiation, etc., and flavonols have been suggested to protect the embryo from oxidative stress. The present study aimed at determining the role of flavonoids in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) seed germination, and the involvement of salicylic acid (SA) and auxin (indole-3-acetic acid), two phytohormones with the same biosynthetic origin as flavonoids, the shikimate pathway, in such a putative role. We show that naringenin, a flavanone, strongly inhibits the germination of A. thaliana seeds in a dose-dependent and SA-independent manner. Altered auxin levels do not affect seed germination in Arabidopsis, but impaired auxin transport does, although to a minor extent. Naringenin and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) impair auxin transport through the same mechanisms, so the inhibition of germination by naringenin might involve impaired auxin transport among other mechanisms. From the present study it is concluded that naringenin inhibits the germination of Arabidopsis seeds in a dose-dependent and SA-independent manner, and the results also suggest that such effects are exerted, at least to some extent, through impaired auxin transport, although additional mechanisms seem to operate as well. PMID:23031844

  8. Dichloroacetate Stimulates Glycogen Accumulation in Primary Hepatocytes through an Insulin-Independent Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lingohr, Melissa K.; Bull, Richard J.; Kato-Weinstein, Junko; Thrall, Brian D. )

    2002-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA), a by-product of water chlorination, causes liver cancer in B6C3F1 mice. A hallmark response observed in mice exposed to carcinogenic doses of DCA is an accumulation of hepatic glycogen content. To distinguish whether the in vivo glycogenic effect of DCA was dependent on insulin and insulin signaling proteins, experiments were conducted in isolated hepatocytes where insulin concentrations could be controlled. In hepatocytes isolated from male B6C3F1 mice, DCA increased glycogen levels in a dose-related manner, independently of insulin. The accumulation of hepatocellular glycogen induced by DCA was not the result of decreased glycogenolysis, since DCA had no effect on the rate of glucagon-stimulated glycogen breakdown. Glycogen accumulation caused by DCA treatment was not hindered by inhibitors of extracellular-regulated protein kinase kinase (Erk1/2 kinase or MEK) or p70 kDa S6 protein kinase (p70(S6K)), but was completely blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, LY294002 and wortmannin. Similarly, insulin-stimulated glycogen deposition was not influenced by the Erk1/2 kinase inhibitor, PD098509, or the p70(S6K) inhibitor, rapamycin. Unlike DCA-stimulated glycogen deposition, PI3K-inhibition only partially blocked the glycogenic effect of insulin. DCA did not cause phosphorylation of the downstream PI3K target protein, protein kinase B (PKB/Akt). The phosphorylation of PKB/Akt did not correlate to insulin-stimulated glycogenesis either. Similar to insulin, DCA in the medium decreased IR expression in isolated hepatocytes. The results indicate DCA increases hepatocellular glycogen accumulation through a PI3K-dependent mechanism that does not involve PKB/Akt and is, at least in part, different from the classical insulin-stimulated glycogenesis pathway. Somewhat surprisingly, insulin-stimulated glycogenesis also appears not to involve PKB/Akt in isolated murine hepatocytes.

  9. Distinct cognitive mechanisms involved in the processing of single objects and object ensembles

    PubMed Central

    Cant, Jonathan S.; Sun, Sol Z.; Xu, Yaoda

    2015-01-01

    Behavioral research has demonstrated that the shape and texture of single objects can be processed independently. Similarly, neuroimaging results have shown that an object's shape and texture are processed in distinct brain regions with shape in the lateral occipital area and texture in parahippocampal cortex. Meanwhile, objects are not always seen in isolation and are often grouped together as an ensemble. We recently showed that the processing of ensembles also involves parahippocampal cortex and that the shape and texture of ensemble elements are processed together within this region. These neural data suggest that the independence seen between shape and texture in single-object perception would not be observed in object-ensemble perception. Here we tested this prediction by examining whether observers could attend to the shape of ensemble elements while ignoring changes in an unattended texture feature and vice versa. Across six behavioral experiments, we replicated previous findings of independence between shape and texture in single-object perception. In contrast, we observed that changes in an unattended ensemble feature negatively impacted the processing of an attended ensemble feature only when ensemble features were attended globally. When they were attended locally, thereby making ensemble processing similar to single-object processing, interference was abolished. Overall, these findings confirm previous neuroimaging results and suggest that distinct cognitive mechanisms may be involved in single-object and object-ensemble perception. Additionally, they show that the scope of visual attention plays a critical role in determining which type of object processing (ensemble or single object) is engaged by the visual system. PMID:26360156

  10. The nuclease FAN1 is involved in DNA crosslink repair in Arabidopsis thaliana independently of the nuclease MUS81

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Natalie J.; Knoll, Alexander; Puchta, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is a severe genetic disorder. Mutations in one of several genes lead to defects in DNA crosslink (CL) repair in human cells. An essential step in CL repair is the activation of the pathway by the monoubiquitination of the heterodimer FANCD2/FANCI, which recruits the nuclease FAN1 to the CL site. Surprisingly, FAN1 function is not conserved between different eukaryotes. No FAN1 homolog is present in Drosophila and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The FAN1 homolog in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is involved in CL repair; a homolog is present in Xenopus but is not involved in CL repair. Here we show that a FAN1 homolog is present in plants and it is involved in CL repair in Arabidopsis thaliana. Both the virus-type replication-repair nuclease and the ubiquitin-binding ubiquitin-binding zinc finger domains are essential for this function. FAN1 likely acts upstream of two sub-pathways of CL repair. These pathways are defined by the Bloom syndrome homolog RECQ4A and the ATPase RAD5A, which is involved in error-free post-replicative repair. Mutations in both FAN1 and the endonuclease MUS81 resulted in greater sensitivity against CLs than in the respective single mutants. These results indicate that the two nucleases define two independent pathways of CL repair in plants. PMID:25779053

  11. Wolf pack spacing: Howling as a territory-independent spacing mechanism in a territorial population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrington, F.H.; Mech, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    Howling is a principle means of spacing in wolf populations. The relationship between a pack's responses to howling (replies, movements) and its location within its home range, was studied using human-simulated howling in a territorial population in northeastern Minnesota. The results indicated the responses were independent of the pack's location, or the locations of the pack and playback relation to the territory center. These results indicate that howling serves as a territory-independent spacing mechanism, that will result in the use of exclusive territories when coupled with strong, year-round site attachment, but with floating, exclusive, buffer-areas about migratory packs.

  12. Mechanisms Involved in Nematode Control by Endophytic Fungi.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Colonization of plants by particular endophytic fungi can provide plants with improved defenses toward nematodes. Evidently, such endophytes can be important in developing more sustainable agricultural practices. The mechanisms playing a role in this quantitative antagonism are poorly understood but most likely multifactorial. This knowledge gap obstructs the progress regarding the development of endophytes or endophyte-derived constituents into biocontrol agents. In part, this may be caused by the fact that endophytic fungi form a rather heterogeneous group. By combining the knowledge of the currently characterized antagonistic endophytic fungi and their effects on nematode behavior and biology with the knowledge of microbial competition and induced plant defenses, the various mechanisms by which this nematode antagonism operates or may operate are discussed. Now that new technologies are becoming available and more accessible, the currently unresolved mechanisms can be studied in greater detail than ever before. PMID:27296146

  13. Dietary restriction involves NAD⁺ -dependent mechanisms and a shift toward oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Natalie; Carmona, Juan J; Anderson, Edward; Hart, Anne C; Sinclair, David A; Blackwell, T Keith

    2014-12-01

    Interventions that slow aging and prevent chronic disease may come from an understanding of how dietary restriction (DR) increases lifespan. Mechanisms proposed to mediate DR longevity include reduced mTOR signaling, activation of the NAD⁺ -dependent deacylases known as sirtuins, and increases in NAD⁺ that derive from higher levels of respiration. Here, we explored these hypotheses in Caenorhabditis elegans using a new liquid feeding protocol. DR lifespan extension depended upon a group of regulators that are involved in stress responses and mTOR signaling, and have been implicated in DR by some other regimens [DAF-16 (FOXO), SKN-1 (Nrf1/2/3), PHA-4 (FOXA), AAK-2 (AMPK)]. Complete DR lifespan extension required the sirtuin SIR-2.1 (SIRT1), the involvement of which in DR has been debated. The nicotinamidase PNC-1, a key NAD⁺ salvage pathway component, was largely required for DR to increase lifespan but not two healthspan indicators: movement and stress resistance. Independently of pnc-1, DR increased the proportion of respiration that is coupled to ATP production but, surprisingly, reduced overall oxygen consumption. We conclude that stress response and NAD⁺ -dependent mechanisms are each critical for DR lifespan extension, although some healthspan benefits do not require NAD⁺ salvage. Under DR conditions, NAD⁺ -dependent processes may be supported by a DR-induced shift toward oxidative metabolism rather than an increase in total respiration. PMID:25257342

  14. Conference explores mechanical involvement of fluids in faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Stephen; Sibson, Richard; Bruhn, Ronald

    A growing body of evidence suggests that fluids are intimately linked to a variety of faulting processes. These include the long-term structural and compositional evolution of fault zones; fault creep; and the nucleation, propagation, arrest, and recurrence of earthquake ruptures. Besides the widely recognized physical role of fluid pressures in controlling the strength of crustal fault zones, it is also apparent that fluids can exert mechanical influence through a variety of chemical effects.To address these issues, a “Red-Book” Conference on the Mechanical Effects of Fluids in Faulting was sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey under the auspices of the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program at Fish Camp, Calif., from June 6-10, 1993. The coconvenors were Steve Hickman, Rick Sibson, and Ron Bruhn.

  15. Orosensory self-stimulation by sucrose involves brain dopaminergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Schneider, L H

    1989-01-01

    The most convincing body of evidence supporting a role for brain dopaminergic mechanisms in sweet taste reward has been obtained using the sham-feeding rat. In rats prepared with a chronic gastric fistula and tested with the cannula open, intake is a direct function of the palatability of the solution offered as well as of the state of food deprivation. Because essentially none of the ingested fluid passes on to the intestine, negative postingestive feedback is eliminated. Thus, the relative orosensory/hedonic potency of the food determines and sustains the rate of sham intake; long periods of food deprivation are not required. In this way, the sham feeding of sweet solutions may be considered a form of oral self-stimulation behavior and afford a preparation through which the neurochemical and neuranatomical substrates of sweet taste reward may be identified. The results obtained in the series of experiments summarized in this paper clearly indicate that central D-1 and D-2 receptor mechanisms are critical for the orosensory self-stimulation by sucrose in the rat. In conclusion, I suggest that such investigations of the roles of brain dopaminergic mechanisms in the sucrose sham-feeding rat preparation may further our understanding of normal and aberrant attractions to sweet fluids in humans (see Cabanac, Drewnowski, and Halmi, this volume), as an innate, positive affective response of human neonates to sucrose and the sustained positive hedonic ratings for glucose when tasted but not when consumed have demonstrated. PMID:2699194

  16. Clostridium difficile Modulates Host Innate Immunity via Toxin-Independent and Dependent Mechanism(s)

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Nazila V.; Kuehne, Sarah A.; Bryant, Clare E.; Elawad, Mamoun; Wren, Brendan W.; Minton, Nigel P.; Allan, Elaine; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of hospital and community-acquired antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and currently represents a significant health burden. Although the role and contribution of C. difficile toxins to disease pathogenesis is being increasingly understood, at present other facets of C. difficile-host interactions, in particular, bacterial-driven effects on host immunity remain less studied. Using an ex-vivo model of infection, we report that the human gastrointestinal mucosa elicits a rapid and significant cytokine response to C. difficile. Marked increase in IFN-γ with modest increase in IL-22 and IL-17A was noted. Significant increase in IL-8 suggested potential for neutrophil influx while presence of IL-12, IL-23, IL-1β and IL-6 was indicative of a cytokine milieu that may modulate subsequent T cell immunity. Majority of C. difficile-driven effects on murine bone-marrow-derived dendritic cell (BMDC) activation were toxin-independent; the toxins were however responsible for BMDC inflammasome activation. In contrast, human monocyte-derived DCs (mDCs) released IL-1β even in the absence of toxins suggesting host-specific mediation. Infected DC-T cell crosstalk revealed the ability of R20291 and 630 WT strains to elicit a differential DC IL-12 family cytokine milieu which culminated in significantly greater Th1 immunity in response to R20291. Interestingly, both strains induced a similar Th17 response. Elicitation of mucosal IFN-γ/IL-17A and Th1/Th17 immunity to C. difficile indicates a central role for this dual cytokine axis in establishing antimicrobial immunity to CDI. PMID:23922820

  17. Two-step mechanism involving active-site conformational changes regulates human telomerase DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Christopher G; Moye, Aaron L; Holien, Jessica K; Parker, Michael W; Cohen, Scott B; Bryan, Tracy M

    2015-01-15

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase maintains telomeres and is essential for cellular immortality in most cancers. Insight into the telomerase mechanism can be gained from syndromes such as dyskeratosis congenita, in which mutation of telomerase components manifests in telomere dysfunction. We carried out detailed kinetic and thermodynamic analyses of wild-type telomerase and two disease-associated mutations in the reverse transcriptase domain. Differences in dissociation rates between primers with different 3' ends were independent of DNA affinities, revealing that initial binding of telomerase to telomeric DNA occurs through a previously undescribed two-step mechanism involving enzyme conformational changes. Both mutations affected DNA binding, but through different mechanisms: P704S specifically affected protein conformational changes during DNA binding, whereas R865H showed defects in binding to the 3' region of the DNA. To gain further insight at the structural level, we generated the first homology model of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase domain; the positions of P704S and R865H corroborate their observed mechanistic defects, providing validation for the structural model. Our data reveal the importance of protein interactions with the 3' end of telomeric DNA and the role of protein conformational change in telomerase DNA binding, and highlight naturally occurring disease mutations as a rich source of mechanistic insight. PMID:25365545

  18. A Cytochrome P450-Independent Mechanism of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Albee, Ryan; Letzig, Lynda G; Lehner, Andreas F; Scott, Michael A; Buchweitz, John P; James, Laura P; Ganey, Patricia E; Roth, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Mouse hepatic parenchymal cells (HPCs) have become the most frequently used in vitro model to study mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. It is universally accepted that APAP hepatocellular injury requires bioactivation by cytochromes P450 (P450s), but this remains unproven in primary mouse HPCs in vitro, especially over the wide range of concentrations that have been employed in published reports. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that APAP-induced hepatocellular death in vitro depends solely on P450s. We evaluated APAP cytotoxicity and APAP-protein adducts (a biomarker of metabolic bioactivation by P450) using primary mouse HPCs in the presence and absence of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of P450s, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT). 1-ABT abolished formation of APAP-protein adducts at all concentrations of APAP (0-14 mM), but eliminated cytotoxicity only at small concentrations (≦5 mM), indicating the presence of a P450-independent mechanism at larger APAP concentrations. P450-independent cell death was delayed in onset relative to toxicity observed at smaller concentrations. p-Aminophenol was detected in primary mouse HPCs exposed to large concentrations of APAP, and a deacetylase inhibitor [bis (4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP)] significantly reduced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, APAP hepatocellular injury in vitro occurs by at least two mechanisms, a P450-dependent mechanism that operates at concentrations of APAP ≦ 5 mM and a P450-independent mechanism that predominates at larger concentrations and is slower in onset. p-Aminophenol most likely contributes to the latter mechanism. These findings should be considered in interpreting results from APAP cytotoxicity studies in vitro and in selecting APAP concentrations for use in such studies. PMID:26065700

  19. Mechanisms involved in quinolone resistance in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Nuno T; Assunção, Patrícia; Poveda, José B; Tavío, María M

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri is a causative agent of contagious agalactia in goats. In this study, M. mycoides subsp. capri mutants were selected for resistance to fluoroquinolones (norfloxacin, enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin) by serial passes in broth with increasing concentrations of antibiotic. Mutations conferring cross-resistance to the three fluoroquinolones were found in the quinolone resistance determining regions of the four genes encoding DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. Different mutations in the DNA gyrase GyrA subunit suggest a different mechanism of inhibition between norfloxacin and the other tested fluoroquinolones. The presence of an adenosine triphosphate-dependent efflux system was suggested through the use of the inhibitor orthovanadate. PMID:25951987

  20. Genetic mechanisms involved in the phenotype of Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Patterson, David

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of significant intellectual disability in the human population, occurring in roughly 1 in 700 live births. The ultimate cause of DS is trisomy of all or part of the set of genes located on chromosome 21. How this trisomy leads to the phenotype of DS is unclear. The completion of the DNA sequencing and annotation of the long arm of chromosome 21 was a critical step towards understanding the genetics of the phenotype. However, annotation of the chromosome continues and the functions of many genes on chromosome 21 remain uncertain. Recent findings about the structure of the human genome and of chromosome 21, in particular, and studies on mechanisms of gene regulation indicate that various genetic mechanisms may be contributors to the phenotype of DS and to the variability of the phenotype. These include variability of gene expression, the activity of transcription factors both encoded on chromosome 21 and encoded elsewhere in the genome, copy number polymorphisms, the function of conserved nongenic regions, microRNA activities, RNA editing, and perhaps DNA methylation. In this manuscript, we describe current knowledge about these genetic complexities and their likely importance in the context of DS. We identify gaps in current knowledge and suggest priorities to fill these gaps. PMID:17910086

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in leg joint morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suzanne, Magali

    2016-07-01

    In summary, the patterning of the presumptive leg depends on gradients of Dpp and Wg morphogens, which lead to the establishment of the proximo-distal axis marked by the expression of Hth, Dac and Dll in broad domains along the leg. Then, EGFR signaling specifies the tarsal region by regulating the expression of tarsal gap genes in different tarsal segments. This patterning is closely linked to the formation of rings of Notch activation in the distal part of each leg segment. These rings of Notch activation are further regulated by different mechanisms: (1) the maintenance of a sharp border of Dl expression, (2) the inhibition of N activation in cells located proximally to the ligands, thus restricting N activity specifically to the distal part of cells. This localised activation of Notch induces the expression of Dysfusion which controls the expression of both pro-apoptotic genes and RhoGTPase regulators. Finally, apoptotic cells appear within the pro-apoptotic domain, and while dying, generate a transient pulling force. This force constitutes a mechanical signal that propagates to the rest of the tissue and triggers cytoskeleton reorganisation specifically in the presumptive fold, where RhoGTPase regulators are expressed. Altogether, this complex array of patterning and signaling leads to precise cellular mapping of the developing leg to correctly position local cell shape modifications, inducing tissue folding. PMID:26845195

  2. A model to investigate the mechanisms underlying the emergence and development of independent sitting.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kathleen M; Zhang, Jing; Walley, Philip R; Rhoads, Jeffrey F; Haddad, Jeffrey M; Claxton, Laura J

    2015-07-01

    When infants first begin to sit independently, they are highly unstable and unable to maintain upright sitting posture for more than a few seconds. Over the course of 3 months, the sitting ability of infants drastically improves. To investigate the mechanisms controlling the development of sitting posture, a single-degree-of-freedom inverted pendulum model was developed. Passive muscle properties were modeled with a stiffness and damping term, while active neurological control was modeled with a time-delayed proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller. The findings of the simulations suggest that infants primarily utilize passive muscle stiffness to remain upright when they first begin to sit. This passive control mechanism allows the infant to remain upright so that active feedback control mechanisms can develop. The emergence of active control mechanisms allows infants to integrate sensory information into their movements so that they can exhibit more adaptive sitting. PMID:25442426

  3. Tracking the spatiotemporal variations of statistically independent components involving enrichment of rare-earth elements in deep-sea sediments

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Iwamori, Hikaru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea sediments have attracted much attention as a promising resource for rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY). In this study, we show statistically independent components characterising REY-enrichment in the abyssal ocean that are decoded by Independent Component Analysis of a multi-elemental dataset of 3,968 bulk sediment samples from 101 sites in the Pacific and Indian oceans. This study for the first time reconstructs the spatiotemporal variations of the geochemical signatures, including hydrothermal, hydrogenous, and biogenic calcium phosphate components that were closely involved in the formation of REY-rich mud over the past 65 million years. An underlying key factor of significant REY-enrichment is a sufficiently low sedimentation rate that enables the mud to accumulate REY from seawater. In the early Cenozoic, a remarkably small supply of aeolian dust, compared with any other time and region, facilitated the deposition of very high-grade REY-rich mud in the South Pacific. This indicates an important link between the genesis of the seafloor mineral resources and Earth’s dynamic phenomena such as climate change and plate tectonics. PMID:27444949

  4. Tracking the spatiotemporal variations of statistically independent components involving enrichment of rare-earth elements in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Iwamori, Hikaru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Deep-sea sediments have attracted much attention as a promising resource for rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY). In this study, we show statistically independent components characterising REY-enrichment in the abyssal ocean that are decoded by Independent Component Analysis of a multi-elemental dataset of 3,968 bulk sediment samples from 101 sites in the Pacific and Indian oceans. This study for the first time reconstructs the spatiotemporal variations of the geochemical signatures, including hydrothermal, hydrogenous, and biogenic calcium phosphate components that were closely involved in the formation of REY-rich mud over the past 65 million years. An underlying key factor of significant REY-enrichment is a sufficiently low sedimentation rate that enables the mud to accumulate REY from seawater. In the early Cenozoic, a remarkably small supply of aeolian dust, compared with any other time and region, facilitated the deposition of very high-grade REY-rich mud in the South Pacific. This indicates an important link between the genesis of the seafloor mineral resources and Earth’s dynamic phenomena such as climate change and plate tectonics.

  5. Tracking the spatiotemporal variations of statistically independent components involving enrichment of rare-earth elements in deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Iwamori, Hikaru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea sediments have attracted much attention as a promising resource for rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY). In this study, we show statistically independent components characterising REY-enrichment in the abyssal ocean that are decoded by Independent Component Analysis of a multi-elemental dataset of 3,968 bulk sediment samples from 101 sites in the Pacific and Indian oceans. This study for the first time reconstructs the spatiotemporal variations of the geochemical signatures, including hydrothermal, hydrogenous, and biogenic calcium phosphate components that were closely involved in the formation of REY-rich mud over the past 65 million years. An underlying key factor of significant REY-enrichment is a sufficiently low sedimentation rate that enables the mud to accumulate REY from seawater. In the early Cenozoic, a remarkably small supply of aeolian dust, compared with any other time and region, facilitated the deposition of very high-grade REY-rich mud in the South Pacific. This indicates an important link between the genesis of the seafloor mineral resources and Earth's dynamic phenomena such as climate change and plate tectonics. PMID:27444949

  6. Mechanisms of Ephrin Receptor Protein Kinase-Independent Signaling in Amphid Axon Guidance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Emily N.; Giurumescu, Claudiu A.; Chisholm, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands are key conserved regulators of axon guidance and can function in a variety of signaling modes. Here we analyze the genetic and cellular requirements for Eph signaling in a Caenorhabditis elegans axon guidance choice point, the ventral guidance of axons in the amphid commissure. The C. elegans Eph receptor EFN-1 has both kinase-dependent and kinase-independent roles in amphid ventral guidance. Of the four C. elegans ephrins, we find that only EFN-1 has a major role in amphid axon ventral guidance, and signals in both a receptor kinase-dependent and kinase-independent manner. Analysis of EFN-1 and EFN-1 expression and tissue-specific requirements is consistent with a model in which VAB-1 acts in amphid neurons, interacting with EFN-1 expressed on surrounding cells. Unexpectedly, left-hand neurons are more strongly affected than right-hand neurons by loss of Eph signaling, indicating a previously undetected left–right asymmetry in the requirement for Eph signaling. By screening candidate genes involved in Eph signaling, we find that the Eph kinase-independent pathway involves the ABL-1 nonreceptor tyrosine kinase and possibly the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway. Overexpression of ABL-1 is sufficient to rescue EFN-1 ventral guidance defects cell autonomously. Our results reveal new aspects of Eph signaling in a single axon guidance decision in vivo. PMID:23979582

  7. C-reactive protein protects mice against pneumococcal infection via both phosphocholine-dependent and phosphocholine-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gang, Toh B; Hanley, Gregory A; Agrawal, Alok

    2015-05-01

    The mechanism of action of C-reactive protein (CRP) in protecting mice against lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection is unknown. The involvement of the phosphocholine (PCh)-binding property of CRP in its antipneumococcal function previously has been explored twice, with conflicting results. In this study, using three different intravenous sepsis mouse models, we investigated the role of the PCh-binding property of CRP by employing a CRP mutant incapable of binding to PCh. The ability of wild-type CRP to protect mice against infection was found to differ in the three models; the protective ability of wild-type CRP decreased when the severity of infection was increased, as determined by measuring mortality and bacteremia. In the first animal model, in which we used 25 μg of CRP and 10(7) CFU of pneumococci, both wild-type and mutant CRP protected mice against infection, suggesting that the protection was independent of the PCh-binding activity of CRP. In the second model, in which we used 25 μg of CRP and 5 × 10(7) CFU of pneumococci, mutant CRP was not protective while wild-type CRP was, suggesting that the protection was dependent on the PCh-binding activity of CRP. In the third model, in which we used 150 μg of CRP and 10(7) CFU of pneumococci, mutant CRP was as protective as wild-type CRP, again indicating that the protection was independent of the PCh-binding activity of CRP. We conclude that both PCh-dependent and PCh-independent mechanisms are involved in the CRP-mediated decrease in bacteremia and the resulting protection of mice against pneumococcal infection. PMID:25690104

  8. Mechanisms involved in the development of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Boyette-Davis, Jessica A; Walters, Edgar T; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a debilitating and painful condition seen in patients undergoing treatment with common agents such as vincristine, paclitaxel, oxaliplatin and bortezomib. The mechanisms of this condition are diverse, and include an array of molecular and cellular contributions. Current research implicates genetic predispositions to this condition, which then may influence cellular responses to chemotherapy. Processes found to be influenced during CIPN include increased expression of inflammatory mediators, primarily cytokines, which can create cascading effects in neurons and glia. Changes in ion channels and neurotransmission, as well as changes in intracellular signaling and structures have been implicated in CIPN. This review explores these issues and suggests considerations for future research. PMID:26087973

  9. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  10. New Insights on the Mechanism of the K+-Independent Activity of Crenarchaeota Pyruvate Kinases

    PubMed Central

    De la Vega-Ruíz, Gustavo; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Guerrero-Mendiola, Carlos; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; García-Trejo, José J.; Ramírez-Silva, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Eukarya pyruvate kinases have glutamate at position 117 (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme), whereas in Bacteria have either glutamate or lysine and in Archaea have other residues. Glutamate at this position makes pyruvate kinases K+-dependent, whereas lysine confers K+-independence because the positively charged residue substitutes for the monovalent cation charge. Interestingly, pyruvate kinases from two characterized Crenarchaeota exhibit K+-independent activity, despite having serine at the equivalent position. To better understand pyruvate kinase catalytic activity in the absence of K+ or an internal positive charge, the Thermofilum pendens pyruvate kinase (valine at the equivalent position) was characterized. The enzyme activity was K+-independent. The kinetic mechanism was random order with a rapid equilibrium, which is equal to the mechanism of the rabbit muscle enzyme in the presence of K+ or the mutant E117K in the absence of K+. Thus, the substrate binding order of the T. pendens enzyme was independent despite lacking an internal positive charge. Thermal stability studies of this enzyme showed two calorimetric transitions, one attributable to the A and C domains (Tm of 99.2°C), and the other (Tm of 105.2°C) associated with the B domain. In contrast, the rabbit muscle enzyme exhibits a single calorimetric transition (Tm of 65.2°C). The calorimetric and kinetic data indicate that the B domain of this hyperthermophilic enzyme is more stable than the rest of the protein with a conformation that induces the catalytic readiness of the enzyme. B domain interactions of pyruvate kinases that have been determined in Pyrobaculum aerophilum and modeled in T. pendens were compared with those of the rabbit muscle enzyme. The results show that intra- and interdomain interactions of the Crenarchaeota enzymes may account for their higher B domain stability. Thus the structural arrangement of the T. pendens pyruvate kinase could allow charge-independent

  11. Distinctive pathological mechanisms involved in primary progressive aphasias.

    PubMed

    Leyton, Cristian E; Britton, Anna K; Hodges, John R; Halliday, Glenda M; Kril, Jillian J

    2016-02-01

    Primary progressive aphasia (PPA) comprises a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative conditions that can be classified in three cliniconeuroanatomic syndromes. Limited information exists, however, about patterns of neuropathologic spreading and microscopic changes underpinning each syndrome. We performed an analysis of a longitudinal in vivo cohort and a postmortem PPA cohort to investigate neurodegeneration over time and to quantify microscopic changes in key language brain areas. The longitudinal analyses demonstrated distinctive patterns of topological extension of brain atrophy. Although semantic variant (sv-PPA) showed an eccentric pattern, nonfluent and/or agrammatic (nfv-PPA) and logopenic (lv-PPA) variants showed additional multifocal extension. The quantitative pathology showed that sv-PPA had neuronal loss and thinning in BA 38, whereas nfv-PPA showed thinning in BA 44/45 and evidence of microscopic involvement in BA 40/22. Although lv-PPA showed neuronal loss focused on BA 40/22, imaging results demonstrated widespread left-sided brain atrophy. These analyses provide an account of the pathologic process whereby each variant has stereotypical patterns of brain atrophy extension, which is largely determined by the specific pathologic type. PMID:26827646

  12. A mechanism of paraquat toxicity involving nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian J.; Patel, Manisha; Calavetta, Lisa; Chang, Ling-Yi; Stamler, Jonathan S.

    1999-01-01

    Paraquat (PQ) is a well described pneumotoxicant that produces toxicity by redox cycling with cellular diaphorases, thereby elevating intracellular levels of superoxide (O2⨪). NO synthase (NOS) has been shown to participate in PQ-induced lung injury. Current theory holds that NO reacts with O2⨪ generated by PQ to produce the toxin peroxynitrite. We asked whether NOS might alternatively function as a PQ diaphorase and reexamined the question of whether NO/O2⨪ reactions were toxic or protective. Here, we show that: (i) neuronal NOS has PQ diaphorase activity that inversely correlates with NO formation; (ii) PQ-induced endothelial cell toxicity is attenuated by inhibitors of NOS that prevent NADPH oxidation, but is not attenuated by those that do not; (iii) PQ inhibits endothelium-derived, but not NO-induced, relaxations of aortic rings; and (iv) PQ-induced cytotoxicity is potentiated in cytokine-activated macrophages in a manner that correlates with its ability to block NO formation. These data indicate that NOS is a PQ diaphorase and that toxicity of such redox-active compounds involves a loss of NO-related activity. PMID:10535996

  13. Drug interactions involving cimetidine--mechanisms, documentation, implications.

    PubMed

    Greene, W

    1984-01-01

    In summary, cimetidine is a potent inhibitor of liver microsomal activity, which may also decrease hepatic blood flow. Other effects of the drug include inhibition of gastric secretion and intrinsic toxic properties. These effects, combined with the common use of cimetidine in clinical practice, make the risk of adverse drug interactions a relatively frequent risk in the clinical setting. Although a multitude of interactions with cimetidine has been evaluated, many of these are incompletely described or understood. At the present time, a potentially significant alteration of absorption appears to exist with only ketoconazole, elemental iron, vitamin B12 (long-term therapy), and pancreatic enzyme supplements (increased activity). Significant metabolic inhibition or decreased excretion appears to exist with warfarin, propranolol, theophylline, phenytoin, quinidine, possibly lidocaine and procainamide, and certain benzodiazepines. Other potential, but less well ascertained interactions may involve the narcotic analgesics, caffeine, ethanol, pentobarbital, imipramine, chlormethiazole, and metronidazole. In these settings, the clinician must be aware of interaction potential, and astutely monitor the patient during combination therapy. Other data indicate that concomitant administration of antacids may reduce the absorption of cimetidine, that the drug may protect against the toxic effects of acetaminophen overdose, and that combination with certain other myelosuppressants may carry a significant risk. Thus, in regard to these reports, cimetidine is a drug with complex effects on the absorption, elimination, and toxicity of other drugs. When used in the setting of multiple drug therapy, the clinician must be alert to potentially increased or decreased effects of the drugs mentioned in this review. In addition, one must be aware that other hepatically metabolised agents not mentioned here may be affected by the addition of cimetidine therapy. Because of the therapeutic

  14. Central mechanisms involved in pilocarpine-induced pressor response.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Ana C; Moreira, Thiago S; Borella, Thais L; Paulin, Renata F; Colombari, Débora S A; De Luca, Laurival A; Colombari, Eduardo; Menani, José V

    2011-10-28

    Pilocarpine (cholinergic muscarinic agonist) injected peripherally may act centrally to produce pressor responses; in the present study, using c-fos immunoreactive expression, we investigated the forebrain and brainstem areas activated by pressor doses of intravenous (i.v.) pilocarpine. In addition, the importance of vasopressin secretion and/or sympathetic activation and the effects of lesions in the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) region in awake rats were also investigated. In male Holtzman rats, pilocarpine (0.04 to 4μmol/kg b.w.) i.v. induced transitory hypotension followed by long lasting hypertension. Sympathetic blockade with prazosin (1mg/kg b.w.) i.v. or AV3V lesions (1 day) almost abolished the pressor response to i.v. pilocarpine (2μmol/kg b.w.), whereas the vasopressin antagonist (10μg/kg b.w.) i.v. reduced the response to pilocarpine. Pilocarpine (2 and 4μmol/kg b.w.) i.v. increased the number of c-fos immunoreactive cells in the subfornical organ, paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of the hypothalamus, organ vasculosum of the lamina terminalis, median preoptic nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract and caudal and rostral ventrolateral medulla. These data suggest that i.v. pilocarpine activates specific forebrain and brainstem mechanisms increasing sympathetic activity and vasopressin secretion to induce pressor response. PMID:21689994

  15. Kronecker compressive sensing-based mechanism with fully independent sampling dimensions for hyperspectral imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Rongqiang; Wang, Qiang; Shen, Yi

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new approach for Kronecker compressive sensing of hyperspectral (HS) images, including the imaging mechanism and the corresponding reconstruction method. The proposed mechanism is able to compress the data of all dimensions when sampling, which can be achieved by three fully independent sampling devices. As a result, the mechanism greatly reduces the control points and memory requirement. In addition, we can also select the suitable sparsifying bases and generate the corresponding optimized sensing matrices or change the distribution of sampling ratio for each dimension independently according to different HS images. As the cooperation of the mechanism, we combine the sparsity model and low multilinear-rank model to develop a reconstruction method. Analysis shows that our reconstruction method has a lower computational complexity than the traditional methods based on sparsity model. Simulations verify that the HS images can be reconstructed successfully with very few measurements. In summary, the proposed approach can reduce the complexity and improve the practicability for HS image compressive sensing.

  16. INVOLVEMENT OF KRAS G12A MUTATION IN THE IL-2-INDEPENDENT GROWTH OF A HUMAN T-LGL LEUKEMIA CELL LINE, PLT-2

    PubMed Central

    MIZUTANI, NAOKI; ITO, HIROMI; HAGIWARA, KAZUMI; KOBAYASHI, MISA; HOSHIKAWA, ASUKA; NISHIDA, YAYOI; TAKAGI, AKIRA; KOJIMA, TETSUHITO; SUZUKI, MOTOSHI; OSAWA, YOSUKE; OHNISHI, KAZUNORI; DAIBATA, MASANORI; MURATE, TAKASHI

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cytokine-dependent cell lines have been used to analyze the cytokine-induced cellular signaling and the mechanism of oncogenesis. In the current study, we analyzed MOTN-1 and PLT-2 cell lines established from different stages of a T-cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia patient (Daibata et al. 2004). MOTN-1 is IL-2-dependent derived from the chronic phase, whereas IL-2-independent PLT-2 is from the aggressive and terminal stage. They shared considerable chromosome abnormalities and the pattern of T-cell receptor rearrangement, presuming that the cytokine independence of PLT-2 was due to the additive genetic abnormality. Besides IL-2, IL-15 supported MOTN-1 cell growth, because these receptors share β- and γ-subunits. IL-2 activated ERK, AKT and STAT pathway of MOTN-1. STAT3 pathway of PLT-2 was also activated by IL-2, suggesting intact IL-2 induces signal transduction of PLT-2. However, ERK1/2 but not AKT, was continuously activated in PLT-2, consistent with the increased Ras-activity of PLT-2. Sequence analysis revealed KRAS G12A mutation but not NRAS and HRAS mutation of PLT-2 but not MOTN-1. Another signaling molecule affecting Ras-signaling pathway, SHP2, which has been frequently mutated in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), did not show mutation. Moreover, MEK inhibitor, PD98059, as well as farnesylation inhibitor inhibited PLT-2 cell growth. Using NIH3T3 and MOTN-1, ERK activation, increased cell proliferation and survival by KRAS G12A were shown, suggesting the important role of KRAS G12A in IL-2-independent growth of PLT-2. Taken together, KRAS G12A is important for IL-2-independent growth of PLT-2 cells and suggests the possibility of involvement of KRAS mutation with disease progression. PMID:23092099

  17. GCN2 contributes to mTORC1 inhibition by leucine deprivation through an ATF4 independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Averous, Julien; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Mesclon, Florent; Carraro, Valérie; Parry, Laurent; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Pierre, Philippe; Proud, Christopher G; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling pathways are regulated by amino acids and share common functions, in particular the control of translation. The regulation of GCN2 activity by amino acid availability relies on the capacity of GCN2 to sense the increased levels of uncharged tRNAs upon amino acid scarcity. In contrast, despite recent progress in the understanding of the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids, key aspects of this process remain unsolved. In particular, while leucine is well known to be a potent regulator of mTORC1, the mechanisms by which this amino acid is sensed and control mTORC1 activity are not well defined. Our data establish that GCN2 is involved in the inhibition of mTORC1 upon leucine or arginine deprivation. However, the activation of GCN2 alone is not sufficient to inhibit mTORC1 activity, indicating that leucine and arginine exert regulation via additional mechanisms. While the mechanism by which GCN2 contributes to the initial step of mTORC1 inhibition involves the phosphorylation of eIF2α, we show that it is independent of the downstream transcription factor ATF4. These data point to a novel role for GCN2 and phosphorylation of eIF2α in the control of mTORC1 by certain amino acids. PMID:27297692

  18. GCN2 contributes to mTORC1 inhibition by leucine deprivation through an ATF4 independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Averous, Julien; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Mesclon, Florent; Carraro, Valérie; Parry, Laurent; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Pierre, Philippe; Proud, Christopher G.; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling pathways are regulated by amino acids and share common functions, in particular the control of translation. The regulation of GCN2 activity by amino acid availability relies on the capacity of GCN2 to sense the increased levels of uncharged tRNAs upon amino acid scarcity. In contrast, despite recent progress in the understanding of the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids, key aspects of this process remain unsolved. In particular, while leucine is well known to be a potent regulator of mTORC1, the mechanisms by which this amino acid is sensed and control mTORC1 activity are not well defined. Our data establish that GCN2 is involved in the inhibition of mTORC1 upon leucine or arginine deprivation. However, the activation of GCN2 alone is not sufficient to inhibit mTORC1 activity, indicating that leucine and arginine exert regulation via additional mechanisms. While the mechanism by which GCN2 contributes to the initial step of mTORC1 inhibition involves the phosphorylation of eIF2α, we show that it is independent of the downstream transcription factor ATF4. These data point to a novel role for GCN2 and phosphorylation of eIF2α in the control of mTORC1 by certain amino acids. PMID:27297692

  19. Mechanism involved in enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by hyaluronic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Michinao; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Okinaga, Toshinori; Habu, Manabu; Yoshioka, Izumi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} In this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. {yields} MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. {yields} Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. {yields} HA enhanced BMP-2 induces osteoblastic differentiation in MG63 cells via down-regulation of BMP-2 antagonists and ERK phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Objectives: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is expected to be utilized to fill bone defects and promote healing of fractures. However, it is unable to generate an adequate clinical response for use in bone regeneration. Recently, it was reported that glycosaminoglycans, including heparin, heparan sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid (HA), regulate BMP-2 activity, though the mechanism by which HA regulates osteogenic activities has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. Materials and methods: Monolayer cultures of osteoblastic lineage MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. To determine osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cell lysates was quantified. Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by Western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. To further elucidate the role of HA in enhancement of BMP-2-induced Smad signaling, mRNA expressions of the BMP-2 receptor antagonists noggin and follistatin were detected using real-time RT-PCR. Results: BMP-2-induced ALP activation, Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation, and

  20. Diosgenin Mitigates Streptozotocin Diabetes-induced Vascular Dysfunction of the Rat Aorta: The Involved Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Roghani-Dehkordi, Farshad; Roghani, Mehrdad; Baluchnejadmojarad, Tourandokht

    2015-12-01

    Chronic diabetes mellitus finally leads to serious vascular dysfunction. Diosgenin is a natural steroidal saponin with potential cardiovascular protective effect. In this study, the protective effect of diosgenin was checked on the aorta from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Diabetic rats received diosgenin (40 mg·kg·d) for 7 weeks starting 1 week after intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). Aortic reactivity of endothelium-intact and -denuded rings to potassium chloride, phenylephrine, acetylcholine, and isosorbide dinitrate were measured and some involved mechanisms were explored. The results showed that diosgenin has a hypoglycemic effect and attenuates maximum contractile response of endothelium-intact and -denuded rings to PE. In addition, endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was greater in diosgenin-treated diabetics with no significant change for endothelium-independent relaxation to isosorbide dinitrate and addition of N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, as a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor eliminated this beneficial effect. Furthermore, diosgenin significantly attenuated aortic DNA fragmentation as an index of apoptosis and malondialdehyde content, lowered the aortic expression of angiotensin converting enzyme and transcription factor nuclear factor-κB and raised expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase with no significant effect on the activity of superoxide dismutase. Taken together, our study provides insight into the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of diosgenin as a potential therapeutic agent to mitigate vascular dysfunction in diabetes mellitus. PMID:26309100

  1. Mechanism(S) Involved in the Colon-Specific Expression of the Thiamine Pyrophosphate (Tpp) Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Nabokina, Svetlana M.; Ramos, Mel Brendan; Said, Hamid M.

    2016-01-01

    Microbiota of the large intestine synthesizes considerable amount of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in the form of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). We have recently demonstrated the existence of an efficient and specific carrier-mediated uptake process for TPP in human colonocytes, identified the TPP transporter (TPPT) involved (product of the SLC44A4 gene), and shown that expression of TPPT along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is restricted to the colon. Our aim in this study was to determine the molecular basis of the colon-specific expression of TPPT focusing on a possible epigenetic mechanism. Our results showed that the CpG island predicted in the SLC44A4 promoter is non-methylated in the human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells, but is hyper-methylated in the human duodenal epithelial HuTu80 cells (as well as in the human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE19 cells). In the mouse (where TPPT expression in the GI tract is also restricted to the colon), the CpG island predicted in the Slc44a4 promoter is non-methylated in both the jejunum and colon, thus arguing against possible contribution of DNA methylation in the colon-specific expression of TPPT. A role for histone modifications in the tissue-specific pattern of Slc44a4 expression, however, was suggested by the findings that in mouse colon, histone H3 in the 5’-regulatory region of Slc44a4 is tri-methylated at lysine 4 and acetylated at lysine 9, whereas the tri-methylation at lysine 27 modification was negligible. In contrast, in the mouse jejunum, histone H3 is hyper-trimethylated at lysine 27 (repressor mark). Similarly, possible involvement of miRNA(s) in the tissue-specific expression of TPPT was also suggested by the findings that the 3’-UTR of SLC44A4 is targeted by specific miRNAs/RNA binding proteins in non-colonic, but not in colonic, epithelial cells. These studies show, for the first time, epigenetic mechanisms (histone modifications) play a role in determining the tissue-specific pattern of expression of

  2. Mechanism(S) Involved in the Colon-Specific Expression of the Thiamine Pyrophosphate (Tpp) Transporter.

    PubMed

    Nabokina, Svetlana M; Ramos, Mel Brendan; Said, Hamid M

    2016-01-01

    Microbiota of the large intestine synthesizes considerable amount of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in the form of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). We have recently demonstrated the existence of an efficient and specific carrier-mediated uptake process for TPP in human colonocytes, identified the TPP transporter (TPPT) involved (product of the SLC44A4 gene), and shown that expression of TPPT along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is restricted to the colon. Our aim in this study was to determine the molecular basis of the colon-specific expression of TPPT focusing on a possible epigenetic mechanism. Our results showed that the CpG island predicted in the SLC44A4 promoter is non-methylated in the human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells, but is hyper-methylated in the human duodenal epithelial HuTu80 cells (as well as in the human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE19 cells). In the mouse (where TPPT expression in the GI tract is also restricted to the colon), the CpG island predicted in the Slc44a4 promoter is non-methylated in both the jejunum and colon, thus arguing against possible contribution of DNA methylation in the colon-specific expression of TPPT. A role for histone modifications in the tissue-specific pattern of Slc44a4 expression, however, was suggested by the findings that in mouse colon, histone H3 in the 5'-regulatory region of Slc44a4 is tri-methylated at lysine 4 and acetylated at lysine 9, whereas the tri-methylation at lysine 27 modification was negligible. In contrast, in the mouse jejunum, histone H3 is hyper-trimethylated at lysine 27 (repressor mark). Similarly, possible involvement of miRNA(s) in the tissue-specific expression of TPPT was also suggested by the findings that the 3'-UTR of SLC44A4 is targeted by specific miRNAs/RNA binding proteins in non-colonic, but not in colonic, epithelial cells. These studies show, for the first time, epigenetic mechanisms (histone modifications) play a role in determining the tissue-specific pattern of expression of TPPT

  3. Affirming independence: Exploring mechanisms underlying a values affirmation intervention for first-generation students.

    PubMed

    Tibbetts, Yoi; Harackiewicz, Judith M; Canning, Elizabeth A; Boston, Jilana S; Priniski, Stacy J; Hyde, Janet S

    2016-05-01

    First-generation college students (students for whom neither parent has a 4-year college degree) earn lower grades and worry more about whether they belong in college, compared with continuing-generation students (who have at least 1 parent with a 4-year college degree). We conducted a longitudinal follow-up of participants from a study in which a values-affirmation intervention improved performance in a biology course for first-generation college students, and found that the treatment effect on grades persisted 3 years later. First-generation students in the treatment condition obtained a GPA that was, on average, .18 points higher than first-generation students in the control condition, 3 years after values affirmation was implemented (Study 1A). We explored mechanisms by testing whether the values-affirmation effects were predicated on first-generation students reflecting on interdependent values (thus affirming their values that are consistent with working-class culture) or independent values (thus affirming their values that are consistent with the culture of higher education). We found that when first-generation students wrote about their independence, they obtained higher grades (both in the semester in which values affirmation was implemented and in subsequent semesters) and felt less concerned about their background. In a separate laboratory experiment (Study 2) we manipulated the extent to which participants wrote about independence and found that encouraging first-generation students to write more about their independence improved their performance on a math test. These studies highlight the potential of having FG students focus on their own independence. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27176770

  4. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the mechanical actuation subsystem, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradway, M. W.; Slaughter, W. T.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine draft failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the proposed Post 51-L NASA FMEA/CIL baseline that was available. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison was provided through additional analysis as required. These discrepancies were flagged as issues, and recommendations were made based on the FMEA data available at the time. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter Mechanical Actuation System (MAS) hardware. Specifically, the MAS hardware consists of the following components: Air Data Probe (ADP); Elevon Seal Panel (ESP); External Tank Umbilical (ETU); Ku-Band Deploy (KBD); Payload Bay Doors (PBD); Payload Bay Radiators (PBR); Personnel Hatches (PH); Vent Door Mechanism (VDM); and Startracker Door Mechanism (SDM). Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  5. Two independent killing mechanisms of Candida albicans by human neutrophils: evidence from innate immunity defects.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van Hamme, John L; Tool, Anton T J; van Houdt, Michel; Verkuijlen, Paul J J H; Herbst, Martin; Liese, Johannes G; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; Roos, Dirk; van den Berg, Timo K; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2014-07-24

    Invasive fungal infections, accompanied by high rates of mortality, represent an increasing problem in medicine. Neutrophils are the major effector immune cells in fungal killing. Based on studies with neutrophils from patients with defined genetic defects, we provide evidence that human neutrophils use 2 distinct and independent phagolysosomal mechanisms to kill Candida albicans. The first mechanism for the killing of unopsonized C albicans was found to be dependent on complement receptor 3 (CR3) and the signaling proteins phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), but was independent of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity. The second mechanism for the killing of opsonized C albicans was strictly dependent on Fcγ receptors, protein kinase C (PKC), and reactive oxygen species production by the NADPH oxidase system. Each of the 2 pathways of Candida killing required Syk tyrosine kinase activity, but dectin-1 was dispensable for both of them. These data provide an explanation for the variable clinical presentation of fungal infection in patients suffering from different immune defects, including dectin-1 deficiency, CARD9 deficiency, or chronic granulomatous disease. PMID:24948657

  6. The number of vertebrate repeats can be regulated at yeast telomeres by Rap1-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Brevet, Vanessa; Berthiau, Anne-Sophie; Civitelli, Livia; Donini, Pierluigi; Schramke, Vera; Géli, Vincent; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Gilson, Eric

    2003-04-01

    The number of telomeric DNA repeats at chromosome ends is maintained around a mean value by a dynamic balance between elongation and shortening. In particular, proteins binding along the duplex part of telomeric DNA set the number of repeats by progressively limiting telomere growth. The paradigm of this counting mechanism is the Rap1 protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate here that a Rap1-independent mechanism regulates the number of yeast telomeric repeats (TG(1-3)) and of vertebrate repeats (T(2)AG(3)) when TEL1, a yeast ortholog of the human gene encoding the ATM kinase, is inactivated. In addition, we show that a T(2)AG(3)-only telomere can be formed and maintained in humanized yeast cells carrying a template mutation of the gene encoding the telomerase RNA, which leads to the synthesis of vertebrate instead of yeast repeats. Genetic and biochemical evidences indicate that this telomere is regulated in a Rap1-independent manner, both in TEL1 and in tel1Delta humanized yeast cells. Altogether, these findings shed light on multiple repeat-counting mechanisms, which may share critical features between lower and higher eukaryotes. PMID:12660175

  7. The number of vertebrate repeats can be regulated at yeast telomeres by Rap1-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Brevet, Vanessa; Berthiau, Anne-Sophie; Civitelli, Livia; Donini, Pierluigi; Schramke, Vera; Géli, Vincent; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina; Gilson, Eric

    2003-01-01

    The number of telomeric DNA repeats at chromosome ends is maintained around a mean value by a dynamic balance between elongation and shortening. In particular, proteins binding along the duplex part of telomeric DNA set the number of repeats by progressively limiting telomere growth. The paradigm of this counting mechanism is the Rap1 protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate here that a Rap1-independent mechanism regulates the number of yeast telomeric repeats (TG1–3) and of vertebrate repeats (T2AG3) when TEL1, a yeast ortholog of the human gene encoding the ATM kinase, is inactivated. In addition, we show that a T2AG3-only telomere can be formed and maintained in humanized yeast cells carrying a template mutation of the gene encoding the telomerase RNA, which leads to the synthesis of vertebrate instead of yeast repeats. Genetic and biochemical evidences indicate that this telomere is regulated in a Rap1-independent manner, both in TEL1 and in tel1Δ humanized yeast cells. Altogether, these findings shed light on multiple repeat-counting mechanisms, which may share critical features between lower and higher eukaryotes. PMID:12660175

  8. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the mechanical actuation subsystem, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradway, M. W.; Slaughter, W. T.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine draft failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the proposed Post 51-L NASA FMEA/CIL baseline that was available. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison was provided through additional analysis as required. These discrepancies were flagged as issues, and recommendations were made based on the FMEA data available at the time. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter Mechanical Actuation System (MAS) hardware. Specifically, the MAS hardware consists of the following components: Air Data Probe (ADP); Elevon Seal Panel (ESP); External Tank Umbilical (ETU); Ku-Band Deploy (KBD); Payload Bay Doors (PBD); Payload Bay Radiators (PBR); Personnel Hatches (PH); Vent Door Mechanism (VDM); and Startracker Door Mechanism (SDM). Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Volume 2 continues the presentation of IOA analysis worksheets and contains the potential critical items list, detailed analysis, and NASA FMEA/CIL to IOA worksheet cross reference and recommendations.

  9. Prickle isoforms control the direction of tissue polarity by microtubule independent and dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Katherine A.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Planar cell polarity signaling directs the polarization of cells within the plane of many epithelia. While these tissues exhibit asymmetric localization of a set of core module proteins, in Drosophila, more than one mechanism links the direction of core module polarization to the tissue axes. One signaling system establishes a polarity bias in the parallel, apical microtubules upon which vesicles containing core proteins traffic. Swapping expression of the differentially expressed Prickle isoforms, Prickle and Spiny-legs, reverses the direction of core module polarization. Studies in the proximal wing and the anterior abdomen indicated that this results from their differential control of microtubule polarity. Prickle and Spiny-legs also control the direction of polarization in the distal wing (D-wing) and the posterior abdomen (P-abd). We report here that this occurs without affecting microtubule polarity in these tissues. The direction of polarity in the D-wing is therefore likely determined by a novel mechanism independent of microtubule polarity. In the P-abd, Prickle and Spiny-legs interpret at least two directional cues through a microtubule-polarity-independent mechanism. PMID:26863941

  10. IFNγ inhibits Th17 differentiation and function via Tbet-dependent and Tbet-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Wen-I; McWilliams, Ian L.; Harrington, Laurie E.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor Tbet is critical for the differentiation of Th1 CD4 T cells and is associated with the induction of multiple autoimmune diseases, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Herein, we demonstrate that Tbet suppresses IL-17A and Th17 differentiation both in vitro and in vivo in a cell-intrinsic manner, and that in fact, Tbet is not necessary for EAE induction. Moreover, we find that IFNγ inhibits the production of IL-17A and IL-17F in a STAT1-dependent, Tbet-independent manner. These findings illustrate multiple mechanisms utilized by developing Th1 cells to silence the Th17 program. PMID:24369297

  11. Rapid, Opioid-sensitive Mechanisms Involved in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Sensitization*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Vetter, Irina; Cheng, Wei; Peiris, Madusha; Wyse, Bruce D.; Roberts-Thomson, Sarah J.; Zheng, Jie; Monteith, Gregory R.; Cabot, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    TRPV1 is a nociceptive, Ca2+-selective ion channel involved in the development of several painful conditions. Sensitization of TRPV1 responses by cAMP-dependent PKA crucially contributes to the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. However, the pathways involved in potentiation of TRPV1 responses by cAMP-dependent PKA remain largely unknown. Using HEK cells stably expressing TRPV1 and the μ opioid receptor, we demonstrated that treatment with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin significantly increased the multimeric TRPV1 species. Pretreatment with the μ opioid receptor agonist morphine reversed this increased TRPV1 multimerization. FRET analysis revealed that treatment with forskolin did not cause multimerization of pre-existing TRPV1 monomers on the plasma membrane and that intracellular pools of TRPV1 exist mostly as monomers in this model. This suggests that increased TRPV1 multimerization occurred from an intracellular store of inactive TRPV1 monomers. Treatment with forskolin also caused an increase in TRPV1 expression on the plasma membrane not resulting from increased TRPV1 expression, and this rapid TRPV1 translocation was inhibited by treatment with morphine. Thus, potentiation of TRPV1 responses by cAMP-dependent PKA involves plasma membrane insertion of functional TRPV1 multimers formed from an intracellular store of inactive TRPV1 monomers. This potentiation occurs rapidly and can be dynamically modulated by activation of the μ opioid receptor under conditions where cAMP levels are raised, such as with inflammation. Increased translocation and multimerization of TRPV1 channels provide a cellular mechanism for finetuning of nociceptive responses that allow for rapid modulation of TRPV1 responses independent of transcriptional changes. PMID:18482991

  12. The death-associated protein DAXX is a novel histone chaperone involved in the replication-independent deposition of H3.3

    PubMed Central

    Drané, Pascal; Ouararhni, Khalid; Depaux, Arnaud; Shuaib, Muhammad; Hamiche, Ali

    2010-01-01

    The histone variant H3.3 marks active chromatin by replacing the conventional histone H3.1. In this study, we investigate the detailed mechanism of H3.3 replication-independent deposition. We found that the death domain-associated protein DAXX and the chromatin remodeling factor ATRX (α-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome protein) are specifically associated with the H3.3 deposition machinery. Bacterially expressed DAXX has a marked binding preference for H3.3 and assists the deposition of (H3.3–H4)2 tetramers on naked DNA, thus showing that DAXX is a H3.3 histone chaperone. In DAXX-depleted cells, a fraction of H3.3 was found associated with the replication-dependent machinery of deposition, suggesting that cells adapt to the depletion. The reintroduced DAXX in these cells colocalizes with H3.3 into the promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) bodies. Moreover, DAXX associates with pericentric DNA repeats, and modulates the transcription from these repeats through assembly of H3.3 nucleosomes. These findings establish a new link between the PML bodies and the regulation of pericentric DNA repeat chromatin structure. Taken together, our data demonstrate that DAXX functions as a bona fide histone chaperone involved in the replication-independent deposition of H3.3. PMID:20504901

  13. Integrin β3 and LKB1 are independently involved in the inhibition of proliferation by lovastatin in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheng-Huei; Lin, Hung-Yun; Changou, Chun A; Chen, Chun-Han; Liu, Yun-Ru; Wang, Jinghan; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Luh, Frank; Yen, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas are one of the most difficult cancers to treat. In our study, Lovastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, demonstrated anticancer properties by inhibiting cancer cell proliferation, cell migration and cell adhesion. Lovastatin inhibited the expressions of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. Furthermore, lovastatin inhibited the expressions of integrin β1 and integrin β3 but not integrin αv or integrin β5. While Lovastatin's inhibitory effects on TGFβ1, COX2, and ICAM-1 expression were independently controlled by the tumor suppressor LKB1, integrin β3 expression was not affected. Lovastatin's inhibitory effect on cell adhesion was associated with the decreased expression of integrin β3 and cell surface heterodimer integrin αvβ3. Quantitative real time PCR, fluorescent microscopy, and cell migration assays all confirmed that Lovastatin inhibits integrin αvβ3 downstream signaling including FAK activation, and β-catenin, vimentin, ZO-1, and β-actin. Overall, Lovastatin reduced tumor cell proliferation and migration by modifying the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion and other critical cellular processes. Our study highlights novel anti-cancer properties of Lovastatin and supports further exploration of statins in the context of cholangiocarcinoma therapy. PMID:26517522

  14. Integrin β3 and LKB1 are independently involved in the inhibition of proliferation by lovastatin in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng-Huei; Lin, Hung-Yun; Changou, Chun A; Chen, Chun-Han; Liu, Yun-Ru; Wang, Jinghan; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Luh, Frank; Yen, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas are one of the most difficult cancers to treat. In our study, Lovastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, demonstrated anticancer properties by inhibiting cancer cell proliferation, cell migration and cell adhesion. Lovastatin inhibited the expressions of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. Furthermore, lovastatin inhibited the expressions of integrin β1 and integrin β3 but not integrin αv or integrin β5. While Lovastatin's inhibitory effects on TGFβ1, COX2, and ICAM-1 expression were independently controlled by the tumor suppressor LKB1, integrin β3 expression was not affected. Lovastatin's inhibitory effect on cell adhesion was associated with the decreased expression of integrin β3 and cell surface heterodimer integrin αvβ3. Quantitative real time PCR, fluorescent microscopy, and cell migration assays all confirmed that Lovastatin inhibits integrin αvβ3 downstream signaling including FAK activation, and β-catenin, vimentin, ZO-1, and β-actin. Overall, Lovastatin reduced tumor cell proliferation and migration by modifying the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion and other critical cellular processes. Our study highlights novel anti-cancer properties of Lovastatin and supports further exploration of statins in the context of cholangiocarcinoma therapy. PMID:26517522

  15. Truncated mu opioid GPCR variant involvement in opioid-dependent and opioid-independent pain modulatory systems within the CNS.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Gina F; Grinnell, Steven G; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace C; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Xu, Jin; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2016-03-29

    The clinical management of severe pain depends heavily on opioids acting through mu opioid receptors encoded by the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. In addition to generating a series of prototypic seven transmembrane domain (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Oprm1 also produces a set of truncated splice variants containing only six transmembrane domains (6TM) through which selected opioids such as IBNtxA (3'-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) mediate a potent analgesia without many undesirable effects. Although morphine analgesia is independent of these 6TM mu receptor isoforms, we now show that the selective loss of the 6TM variants in a knockout model eliminates the analgesic actions of delta and kappa opioids and of α2-adrenergic compounds, but not cannabinoid, neurotensin, or muscarinic drugs. These observations were confirmed by using antisense paradigms. Despite their role in analgesia, loss of the 6TM variants were not involved with delta opioid-induced seizure activity, aversion to the kappa drug U50, 488H, or α2-mediated hypolocomotion. These observations support the existence of parallel opioid and nonopioid pain modulatory systems and highlight the ability to dissociate unwanted delta, kappa1, and α2 actions from analgesia. PMID:26976581

  16. TFIIB-facilitated recruitment of preinitiation complexes by a TAF-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hori, Roderick T; Xu, Shuping; Hu, Xianyuan; Pyo, Sung

    2004-01-01

    Gene activators contain activation domains that are thought to recruit limiting components of the transcription machinery to a core promoter. VP16, a viral gene activator, has served as a model for studying the mechanistic aspects of transcriptional activation from yeast to human. The VP16 activation domain can be divided into two modules--an N-terminal subdomain (VPN) and a C-terminal subdomain (VPC). This study demonstrates that VPC stimulates core promoters that are either independent or dependent on TAFs (TATA-box Binding Protein-Associated Factors). In contrast, VPN only activates the TAF-independent core promoter and this activity increases in a synergistic fashion when VPN is dimerized (VPN2). Compared to one copy of VPN (VPN1), VPN2 also displays a highly cooperative increase in binding hTFIIB. The increased TFIIB binding correlates with VPN2's increased ability to recruit a complex containing TFIID, TFIIA and TFIIB. However, VPN1 and VPN2 do not increase the assembly of a complex containing only TFIID and TFIIA. The VPN subdomain also facilitates assembly of a complex containing TBP:TFIIA:TFIIB, which lacks TAFs, and provides a mechanism that could function at TAF-independent promoters. Taken together, these results suggest the interaction between VPN and TFIIB potentially initiate a network of contacts allowing the activator to indirectly tether TFIID or TBP to DNA. PMID:15272087

  17. The Nigeria Independent Accountability Mechanism for maternal, newborn, and child health.

    PubMed

    Garba, Aminu Magashi; Bandali, Sarah

    2014-10-01

    Since the 2010 launch of the UN Secretary-General's Global Strategy for Women's and Children's Health, worldwide political energy coalesced around improving the health of women and children. Nigeria acted on a key recommendation emerging from the Global Strategy and became one of the first countries to establish an independent group known as the Nigeria Independent Accountability Mechanism (NIAM). NIAM aims to track efforts on progress related to Nigeria's roadmap for the health of women and children. It includes eminent people from outside government to ensure independence, and is recognized within government to analyze and report on progress. The concept of NIAM received approval at various national and international forums, as well as from the Nigeria Federal Ministry of Health. This experience provides an example of connecting expertise and groups with the government to influence and accelerate progress in maternal, newborn, and child health. Engagement between government and civil society should become the norm rather than the exception to achieve national goals. PMID:25179169

  18. Evidence for icaADBC-Independent Biofilm Development Mechanism in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Fidelma; Humphreys, Hilary; O'Gara, James P.

    2005-01-01

    Synthesis of a polysaccharide adhesin by icaADBC-encoded enzymes is currently the best-understood mechanism of staphylococcal biofilm development. In four methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates, environmental activation of icaADBC did not always correlate with increased biofilm production. Moreover, glucose-mediated biofilm development in these isolates was icaADBC independent. Apparently, an environmentally regulated, ica-independent mechanism(s) of biofilm development exists in S. aureus clinical isolates. PMID:15815035

  19. Nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors in cancer: mechanisms involved in anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Koltai, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanisms of anti-cancer activity of nelfinavir and other protease inhibitors (PIs) based on evidences reported in the published literature. Methods: We extensively reviewed the literature concerning nelfinavir (NFV) as an off target anti-cancer drug and other PIs. A classification of PIs based on anti-cancer mode of action was proposed. Controversies regarding nelfinavir mode of action were also addressed. Conclusions: The two main mechanisms involved in anti-cancer activity are endoplasmic reticulum stress-unfolded protein response pathway and Akt inhibition. However there are many other effects, partially dependent and independent of those mentioned, that may be useful in cancer treatment, including MMP-9 and MMP-2 inhibition, down-regulation of CDK-2, VEGF, bFGF, NF-kB, STAT-3, HIF-1 alfa, IGF, EGFR, survivin, BCRP, androgen receptor, proteasome, fatty acid synthase (FAS), decrease in cellular ATP concentration and upregulation of TRAIL receptor DR5, Bax, increased radiosensitivity, and autophagy. The end result of all these effects is slower growth, decreased angiogenesis, decreased invasion and increased apoptosis, which means reduced proliferation and increased cancer cells death. PIs may be classified according to their anticancer activity at clinically achievable doses, in AKT inhibitors, ER stressors and Akt inhibitors/ER stressors. Beyond the phase I trials that have been recently completed, adequately powered and well-designed clinical trials are needed in the various cancer type settings, and specific trials where NFV is tested in association with other known anti-cancer pharmaceuticals should be sought, in order to find an appropriate place for NFV in cancer treatment. The analysis of controversies on the molecular mechanisms of NFV hints to the possibility that NFV works in a different way in tumor cells and in hepatocytes and adipocytes. PMID:26097685

  20. Analyses of the involvement of PKA regulation mechanism in meiotic incompetence of porcine growing oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takanori; Fujii, Wataru; Kano, Kiyoshi; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko

    2012-09-01

    Mammalian growing oocytes (GOs) lack the ability to resume meiosis, although the molecular mechanism of this limitation is not fully understood. In the present study, we cloned cDNAs of cAMP-dependent protein-kinase (PKA) subunits from porcine oocytes and analyzed the involvement of the PKA regulation mechanism in the meiotic incompetence of GOs at the molecular level. We found a cAMP-independent high PKA activity in GOs throughout the in vitro culture using a porcine PKA assay system we established, and inhibition of the activity by injection of the antisense RNA of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKA-C) induced meiotic resumption in GOs. Then we examined the possibility that the amount of the PKA regulatory subunit (PKA-R), which can bind and inhibit PKA-C, was insufficient to suppress PKA activity in GOs because of the overexpression of two PKA-Rs, PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A. We found that neither of them affected PKA activity and induced meiotic resumption in GO although PRKAR2A could inhibit PKA activity and induce meiosis in cAMP-treated full-grown oocytes (FGOs). Finally, we analyzed the subcellular localization of PKA subunits and found that all the subunits were localized in the cytoplasm during meiotic arrest and that PKA-C and PRKAR2A, but not PRKAR1A, entered into the nucleus just before meiotic resumption in FGOs, whereas all of them remained in the cytoplasm in GOs throughout the culture period. Our findings suggest that the continuous high PKA activity is a primary cause of the meiotic incompetence of porcine GOs and that this PKA activity is not simply caused by an insufficient expression level of PKA-R, but can be attributed to more complex spatial-temporal regulation mechanisms. PMID:22674394

  1. A transcription-independent epigenetic mechanism is associated with antigenic switching in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Aresta-Branco, Francisco; Pimenta, Silvia; Figueiredo, Luisa M

    2016-04-20

    Antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei relies on periodic switching of variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs), which are transcribed monoallelically by RNA polymerase I from one of about 15 bloodstream expression sites (BES). Chromatin of the actively transcribed BES is depleted of nucleosomes, but it is unclear if this open conformation is a mere consequence of a high rate of transcription, or whether it is maintained by a transcription-independent mechanism. Using an inducible BES-silencing reporter strain, we observed that chromatin of the active BES remains open for at least 24 hours after blocking transcription. This conformation is independent of the cell-cycle stage, but dependent upon TDP1, a high mobility group box protein. For two days after BES silencing, we detected a transient and reversible derepression of several silent BESs within the population, suggesting that cells probe other BESs before commitment to one, which is complete by 48 hours. FACS sorting and subsequent subcloning confirmed that probing cells are switching intermediates capable of returning to the original BES, switch to the probed BES or to a different BES. We propose that regulation of BES chromatin structure is an epigenetic mechanism important for successful antigenic switching. PMID:26673706

  2. A transcription-independent epigenetic mechanism is associated with antigenic switching in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Aresta-Branco, Francisco; Pimenta, Silvia; Figueiredo, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei relies on periodic switching of variant surface glycoproteins (VSGs), which are transcribed monoallelically by RNA polymerase I from one of about 15 bloodstream expression sites (BES). Chromatin of the actively transcribed BES is depleted of nucleosomes, but it is unclear if this open conformation is a mere consequence of a high rate of transcription, or whether it is maintained by a transcription-independent mechanism. Using an inducible BES-silencing reporter strain, we observed that chromatin of the active BES remains open for at least 24 hours after blocking transcription. This conformation is independent of the cell-cycle stage, but dependent upon TDP1, a high mobility group box protein. For two days after BES silencing, we detected a transient and reversible derepression of several silent BESs within the population, suggesting that cells probe other BESs before commitment to one, which is complete by 48 hours. FACS sorting and subsequent subcloning confirmed that probing cells are switching intermediates capable of returning to the original BES, switch to the probed BES or to a different BES. We propose that regulation of BES chromatin structure is an epigenetic mechanism important for successful antigenic switching. PMID:26673706

  3. Mechanisms of STIM1 Activation of Store-Independent Leukotriene C4-Regulated Ca2+ Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuexin; González-Cobos, José C.; Schindl, Rainer; Muik, Martin; Ruhle, Brian; Motiani, Rajender K.; Bisaillon, Jonathan M.; Zhang, Wei; Fahrner, Marc; Barroso, Margarida; Matrougui, Khalid; Romanin, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    We recently showed, in primary vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), that the platelet-derived growth factor activates canonical store-operated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release-activated Ca2+ currents encoded by Orai1 and STIM1 genes. However, thrombin activates store-independent Ca2+ selective channels contributed by both Orai3 and Orai1. These store-independent Orai3/Orai1 channels are gated by cytosolic leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and require STIM1 downstream LTC4 action. However, the source of LTC4 and the signaling mechanisms of STIM1 in the activation of this LTC4-regulated Ca2+ (LRC) channel are unknown. Here, we show that upon thrombin stimulation, LTC4 is produced through the sequential activities of phospholipase C, diacylglycerol lipase, 5-lipo-oxygenease, and leukotriene C4 synthase. We show that the endoplasmic reticulum-resident STIM1 is necessary and sufficient for LRC channel activation by thrombin. STIM1 does not form sustained puncta and does not colocalize with Orai1 either under basal conditions or in response to thrombin. However, STIM1 is precoupled to Orai3 and Orai3/Orai1 channels under basal conditions as shown using Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging. The second coiled-coil domain of STIM1 is required for coupling to either Orai3 or Orai3/Orai1 channels and for LRC channel activation. We conclude that STIM1 employs distinct mechanisms in the activation of store-dependent and store-independent Ca2+ entry pathways. PMID:23878392

  4. Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3) Promotes Endothelial Apoptosis via a Caspase-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jian Hua; Anand-Apte, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP3) is a tumor suppressor and a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. TIMP3 exerts its anti-angiogenic effect via a direct interaction with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 (KDR) and inhibition of proliferation, migration and tube formation of endothelial cells (ECs). TIMP3 has also been shown to induce apoptosis in some cancer cells and vascular smooth muscle cells via MMP inhibition and caspase-dependent mechanisms. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanisms of TIMP3-mediated apoptosis in endothelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that mice developed smaller tumors with decreased vascularity when injected with breast carcinoma cells overexpressing TIMP3, than with control breast carcinoma cells. TIMP3 overexpression resulted in increased apoptosis in human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB435) in vivo but not in vitro. However, TIMP3 could induce apoptosis in endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro. The apoptotic activity of TIMP3 in ECs appears to be independent of MMP inhibitory activity. Furthermore, the equivalent expression of functional TIMP3 promoted apoptosis and caspase activation in endothelial cells expressing KDR (PAE/KDR), but not in endothelial cells expressing PDGF beta-receptor (PAE/β-R). Surprisingly, the apoptotic activity of TIMP3 appears to be independent of caspases. TIMP3 inhibited matrix-induced focal adhesion kinase (FAK) tyrosine phosphorylation and association with paxillin and disrupted the incorporation of β3 integrin, FAK and paxillin into focal adhesion contacts on the matrix, which were not affected by caspase inhibitors. Thus, TIMP3 may induce apoptosis in ECs by triggering a caspase-independent cell death pathway and targeting a FAK-dependent survival pathway. PMID:25558000

  5. CFTR-independent ATP release from epithelial cells triggered by mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Grygorczyk, R; Hanrahan, J W

    1997-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-mediated ATP efflux has been proposed as an autocrine mechanism for regulating chloride secretion through other types of chloride channels. Although we found in previous studies that wild-type CFTR channels bathed with high-ATP solutions do not conduct ATP at rates that can be measured with the patch-clamp technique, those experiments would not have detected very small or electroneutral ATP fluxes through CFTR or ATP efflux through other pathways that might be regulated by CFTR. To examine these possibilities, we have now used a sensitive luciferase luminometric assay to measure ATP efflux from epithelial and nonepithelial cell lines. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) stimulation did not raise external ATP concentration above the background noise in any of the cell lines tested [T84, Calu-3, 9HTEo- and sigma CFTE29o- (colonic and airway human epithelial cells, respectively), NIH/3T3 fibroblasts, and Chinese hamster ovary cells], and variations in ATP release were not correlated with CFTR expression. The rate of ATP release was unaffected by cAMP but was exquisitely sensitive to mechanical perturbations in both CFTR expressing and nonexpressing cells. Mechanically induced, CFTR-independent ATP release may be a physiologically relevant mechanism of epithelial regulation, which has not previously been fully appreciated. PMID:9124508

  6. CD8+ T Cell-Independent Immune-Mediated Mechanisms of Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Pennell, Christopher A.; Olin, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of preclinical and clinical trials focused on immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas, the prognosis for this disease remains grim. Cancer immunotherapy seeks to recruit an effective immune response to eliminate tumor cells. To date, cancer vaccines have shown only limited effectiveness because of our incomplete understanding of the necessary effector cells and mechanisms that yield efficient tumor clearance. CD8+ T cell cytotoxic activity has long been proposed as the primary effector function necessary for tumor regression. However, there is increasing evidence that indicates that components of the immune system other than CD8+ T cells play important roles in tumor eradication and control. The following review should provide an understanding of the mechanisms involved in an effective antitumor response to guide future therapeutic designs. The information provided suggests an alternate means of effective tumor clearance in malignant glioma to the canonical CD8+ cytotoxic T cell mechanism. PMID:26351148

  7. Galanin-Mediated Behavioural Hyperalgesia from the Dorsomedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Involves Two Independent Descending Pronociceptive Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Diana; Viisanen, Hanna; Wei, Hong; Almeida, Armando; Pertovaara, Antti; Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) by galanin (GAL) induces behavioural hyperalgesia. Since DMH neurones do not project directly to the spinal cord, we hypothesized that the medullary dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt), a pronociceptive region projecting to the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) and/or the serotoninergic raphe-spinal pathway acting on the spinal 5-HT3 receptor (5HT3R) could relay descending nociceptive facilitation induced by GAL in the DMH. Heat-evoked paw-withdrawal latency (PWL) and activity of SDH neurones were assessed in monoarthritic (ARTH) and control (SHAM) animals after pharmacological manipulations of the DMH, DRt and spinal cord. The results showed that GAL in the DMH and glutamate in the DRt lead to behavioural hyperalgesia in both SHAM and ARTH animals, which is accompanied particularly by an increase in heat-evoked responses of wide-dynamic range neurons, a group of nociceptive SDH neurones. Facilitation of pain behaviour induced by GAL in the DMH was reversed by lidocaine in the DRt and by ondansetron, a 5HT3R antagonist, in the spinal cord. However, the hyperalgesia induced by glutamate in the DRt was not blocked by spinal ondansetron. In addition, in ARTH but not SHAM animals PWL was increased after lidocaine in the DRt and ondansetron in the spinal cord. Our data demonstrate that GAL in the DMH activates two independent descending facilitatory pathways: (i) one relays in the DRt and (ii) the other one involves 5-HT neurones acting on spinal 5HT3Rs. In experimental ARTH, the tonic pain-facilitatory action is increased in both of these descending pathways. PMID:26565961

  8. Celecoxib exerts antitumor effects in canine mammary tumor cells via COX‑2‑independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Dai; Saito, Teruyoshi; Murata, Kanae; Kawashima, Masafumi; Asano, Ryuji

    2015-03-01

    Celecoxib plays antitumor roles via multiple mechanisms in a variety of human cancers. The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism of action of celecoxib in canine mammary tumors. We examined the antitumor effects of celecoxib in AZACB canine mammary tumor cells expressing low levels of cyclooxygenase‑2 (COX‑2) to minimize the effect of COX‑2 on its activity. Our data revealed that celecoxib inhibited cell proliferation mainly via COX‑2‑independent mechanisms. Specifically, celecoxib decreased the proportion of cells in S phase and increased G2/M arrest, which was associated with increased expression of the cyclin‑dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p21 and p27. In addition, treatment with celecoxib downregulated COX‑2 expression, and induced apoptosis via both the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. These findings suggest that celecoxib might be a useful agent for the treatment of canine mammary tumors, regardless of COX‑2 expression. In the future, it might be possible to use a combination of celecoxib and other antitumor agents to treat canine mammary tumors. PMID:25571853

  9. Worms under Pressure: Bulk Mechanical Properties of C. elegans Are Independent of the Cuticle

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, William; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cells and tissues play a well-known role in physiology and disease. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits mechanical properties that are still poorly understood, but are thought to be dominated by its collagen-rich outer cuticle. To our knowledge, we use a novel microfluidic technique to reveal that the worm responds linearly to low applied hydrostatic stress, exhibiting a volumetric compression with a bulk modulus, κ = 140 ± 20 kPa; applying negative pressures leads to volumetric expansion of the worm, with a similar bulk modulus. Surprisingly, however, we find that a variety of collagen mutants and pharmacological perturbations targeting the cuticle do not impact the bulk modulus. Moreover, the worm exhibits dramatic stiffening at higher stresses—behavior that is also independent of the cuticle. The stress-strain curves for all conditions can be scaled onto a master equation, suggesting that C. elegans exhibits a universal elastic response dominated by the mechanics of pressurized internal organs. PMID:25902429

  10. HSET overexpression fuels tumor progression via centrosome clustering-independent mechanisms in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree C G; Ogden, Angela; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bowen, Nathan J; Rudd, Katie; Gupta, Meenakshi V; Reid, Michelle D; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Walczak, Claire E; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-03-20

    Human breast tumors harbor supernumerary centrosomes in almost 80% of tumor cells. Although amplified centrosomes compromise cell viability via multipolar spindles resulting in death-inducing aneuploidy, cancer cells tend to cluster extra centrosomes during mitosis. As a result cancer cells display bipolar spindle phenotypes to maintain a tolerable level of aneuploidy, an edge to their survival. HSET/KifC1, a kinesin-like minus-end directed microtubule motor has recently found fame as a crucial centrosome clustering molecule. Here we show that HSET promotes tumor progression via mechanisms independent of centrosome clustering. We found that HSET is overexpressed in breast carcinomas wherein nuclear HSET accumulation correlated with histological grade and predicted poor progression-free and overall survival. In addition, deregulated HSET protein expression was associated with gene amplification and/or translocation. Our data provide compelling evidence that HSET overexpression is pro-proliferative, promotes clonogenic-survival and enhances cell-cycle kinetics through G2 and M-phases. Importantly, HSET co-immunoprecipitates with survivin, and its overexpression protects survivin from proteasome-mediated degradation, resulting in its increased steady-state levels. We provide the first evidence of centrosome clustering-independent activities of HSET that fuel tumor progression and firmly establish that HSET can serve both as a potential prognostic biomarker and as a valuable cancer-selective therapeutic target. PMID:25788277

  11. TIMP-1 inhibits microvascular endothelial cell migration by MMP-dependent and MMP-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Akahane, Takemi; Akahane, Manabu; Shah, Amy; Connor, Christine M; Thorgeirsson, Unnur P

    2004-12-10

    It was reported over a decade ago that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) suppresses angiogenesis in experimental models but the mechanism is still incompletely understood. This in vitro study focused on the molecular basis of TIMP-1-mediated inhibition of endothelial cell (EC) migration, a key step in the angiogenic process. Both recombinant human TIMP-1 and the synthetic MMP inhibitors, GM6001 and MMP-2-MMP-9 Inhibitor III, suppressed migration of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMVEC) in a dose-dependent fashion. The MMP-dependent inhibition of migration was associated with increased expression of the junctional adhesion proteins, VE-cadherin and PECAM-1, and VE-cadherin accumulation at cell-cell junctions. TIMP-1 also caused MMP-independent dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) (pY397) and paxillin, which was associated with reduced number of F-actin stress fibers and focal adhesions. Moreover, TIMP-1 stimulated expression of PTEN that has been shown to reduce phosphorylation of FAK and inhibit cell migration. Our data suggest that TIMP-1 inhibits HDMVEC migration through MMP-dependent stimulation of VE-cadherin and MMP-independent stimulation of PTEN with subsequent dephosphorylation of FAK and cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:15530852

  12. PARP1 enhances lung adenocarcinoma metastasis by novel mechanisms independent of DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Choi, E-B; Yang, A-Y; Kim, S C; Lee, J; Choi, J K; Choi, C; Kim, M-Y

    2016-09-01

    The role of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) in cancer has been extensively studied in the context of DNA repair, leading to clinical trials of PARP1 inhibitors in cancers defective in homologous recombination. However, the DNA repair-independent roles of PARP1 in carcinogenesis and metastasis, particularly in lung cancer metastasis, remain largely uncharacterized. Here, we report that PARP1 promotes lung adenocarcinoma relapse to the brain and bones by regulating several steps of the metastatic process in a DNA repair-independent manner. We find that PARP1 expression is associated with overall and distant metastasis-free survival in lung adenocarcinoma patients. Consistent with this, genetic knockdown and pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 significantly attenuated the metastatic potential of lung adenocarcinoma cells. Further investigation revealed that PARP1 potentiates lung adenocarcinoma metastasis by promoting invasion, anoikis resistance, extravasation and self-renewal of lung adenocarcinoma cells and also by modifying the brain microenvironment. Finally, we identified S100A4 and CLDN7 as novel transcriptional targets and clinically relevant effectors of PARP1. Collectively, our study not only revealed previously unknown functions of PARP1 in lung adenocarcinoma metastasis but also delineated the molecular mechanisms underlying the pro-metastatic function of PARP1. Furthermore, these findings provide a foundation for the potential use of PARP1 inhibitors as a new treatment option for lung adenocarcinoma patients with elevated PARP1 expression. PMID:26898760

  13. HSET overexpression fuels tumor progression via centrosome clustering-independent mechanisms in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Pannu, Vaishali; Rida, Padmashree C.G.; Ogden, Angela; Turaga, Ravi Chakra; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Bowen, Nathan J.; Rudd, Katie; Gupta, Meenakshi V.; Reid, Michelle D.; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Walczak, Claire E.; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-01-01

    Human breast tumors harbor supernumerary centrosomes in almost 80% of tumor cells. Although amplified centrosomes compromise cell viability via multipolar spindles resulting in death-inducing aneuploidy, cancer cells tend to cluster extra centrosomes during mitosis. As a result cancer cells display bipolar spindle phenotypes to maintain a tolerable level of aneuploidy, an edge to their survival. HSET/KifC1, a kinesin-like minus-end directed microtubule motor has recently found fame as a crucial centrosome clustering molecule. Here we show that HSET promotes tumor progression via mechanisms independent of centrosome clustering. We found that HSET is overexpressed in breast carcinomas wherein nuclear HSET accumulation correlated with histological grade and predicted poor progression-free and overall survival. In addition, deregulated HSET protein expression was associated with gene amplification and/or translocation. Our data provide compelling evidence that HSET overexpression is pro-proliferative, promotes clonogenic-survival and enhances cell-cycle kinetics through G2 and M-phases. Importantly, HSET co-immunoprecipitates with survivin, and its overexpression protects survivin from proteasome-mediated degradation, resulting in its increased steady-state levels. We provide the first evidence of centrosome clustering-independent activities of HSET that fuel tumor progression and firmly establish that HSET can serve both as a potential prognostic biomarker and as a valuable cancer-selective therapeutic target. PMID:25788277

  14. Melanin-concentrating hormone induces insulin resistance through a mechanism independent of body weight gain.

    PubMed

    Pereira-da-Silva, Márcio; De Souza, Cláudio T; Gasparetti, Alessandra L; Saad, Mário J A; Velloso, Lício A

    2005-07-01

    Transgenic hyperexpression of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) produces a phenotype of obesity and glucose intolerance. However, it is not known whether under this specific condition, glucose intolerance develops as a direct consequence of hyperexpressed MCH or is secondary to increased adiposity. Here, rats were treated i.c.v. with MCH or with an antisense oligonucleotide to MCH (MCH-ASO). MCH promoted an increase in blood glucose and a decrease in blood insulin levels during a glucose tolerance test. MCH also caused a decrease in the constant of glucose disappearance during an insulin tolerance test. All these effects of MCH were independent of body weight variation and were accompanied by reduced insulin receptor substrate (IRS)-1 engagement of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3-kinase) in white and brown adipose tissues, skeletal muscle and liver and by reduced Akt activation in skeletal muscle. MCH also led to a significant reduction in ERK activation in white adipose tissue. Finally, inhibition of hypothalamic MCH expression promoted a significant increase in ERK activation in brown adipose tissue. We conclude that hypothalamic MCH controls glucose homeostasis through mechanisms that are, at least in part, independent of adiposity. PMID:16002548

  15. A review of path-independent integrals in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, task 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    The path independent (P-I) integrals in elastic plastic fracture mechanics which have been proposed in recent years to overcome the limitations imposed on the J integral are reviewed. The P-I integrals considered herein are the J integral by Rice, the thermoelastic P-I integrals by Wilson and Yu and by Gurtin, the J* integral by Blackburn, the J sub theta integral by Ainsworth et al., the J integral by Kishimoto et al., and the delta T sub p and delta T* sub p integrals by Atluri et al. The theoretical foundation of these P-I integrals is examined with emphasis on whether or not path independence is maintained in the presence of nonproportional loading and unloading in the plastic regime, thermal gradients, and material inhomogeneities. The similarities, differences, salient features, and limitations of these P-I integrals are discussed. Comments are also made with regard to the physical meaning, the possibility of experimental measurement, and computational aspects.

  16. Do conscious perception and unconscious processing rely on independent mechanisms? A meta-contrast study.

    PubMed

    Peremen, Ziv; Lamy, Dominique

    2014-02-01

    There is currently no consensus regarding what measures are most valid to demonstrate perceptual processing without awareness. Likewise, whether conscious perception and unconscious processing rely on independent mechanisms or lie on a continuum remains a matter of debate. Here, we addressed these issues by comparing the time courses of subjective reports, objective discrimination performance and response priming during meta-contrast masking, under similar attentional demands. We found these to be strikingly similar, suggesting that conscious perception and unconscious processing cannot be dissociated by their time course. Our results also demonstrate that unconscious processing, indexed by response priming, occurs, and that objective discrimination performance indexes the same conscious processes as subjective visibility reports. Finally, our results underscore the role of attention by showing that how much attention the stimulus receives relative to the mask, rather than whether processing is measured by conscious discrimination or by priming, determines the time course of meta-contrast masking. PMID:24398259

  17. Design, Synthesis and In Vitro Activity of Anticancer Styrylquinolines. The p53 Independent Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Mrozek-Wilczkiewicz, Anna; Rams-Baron, Marzena; Kryštof, Vladimír; Musiol, Robert

    2015-01-01

    A group of styrylquinolines were synthesized and tested for their anti-proliferative activity. Anti-proliferative activity was evaluated against the human colon carcinoma cell lines that had a normal expression of the p53 protein (HCT116 p53+/+) and mutants with a disabled TP53 gene (HCT116 p53-/-) and against the GM 07492 normal human fibroblast cell line. A SAR study revealed the importance of Cl and OH as substituents in the styryl moiety. Several of the compounds that were tested were found to have a marked anti-proliferative activity that was similar to or better than doxorubicin and were more active against the p53 null than the wild type cells. The cellular localization tests and caspase activity assays suggest a mechanism of action through the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis in a p53-independent manner. The activity of the styrylquinoline compounds may be associated with their DNA intercalating ability. PMID:26599982

  18. Insights into Reference Point Indentation Involving Human Cortical Bone: Sensitivity to Tissue Anisotropy and Mechanical Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Granke, Mathilde; Coulmier, Aurélie; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-01-01

    Reference point indentation (RPI) is a microindentation technique involving 20 cycles of loading in “force-control” that can directly assess a patient’s bone tissue properties. Even though preliminary clinical studies indicate a capability for fracture discrimination, little is known about what mechanical behavior the various RPI properties characterize and how these properties relate to traditional mechanical properties of bone. To address this, the present study investigated the sensitivity of RPI properties to anatomical location and tissue organization as well as examined to what extent RPI measurements explain the intrinsic mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Multiple indents with a target force of 10 N were done in 2 orthogonal directions (longitudinal and transverse) per quadrant (anterior, medial, posterior, and lateral) of the femoral mid-shaft acquired from 26 donors (25–101 years old). Additional RPI measurements were acquired for 3 orthogonal directions (medial only). Independent of age, most RPI properties did not vary among these locations, but they did exhibit transverse isotropy such that resistance to indentation is greater in the longitudinal (axial) direction than in the transverse direction (radial or circumferential). Next, beam specimens (~ 2 mm × 5 mm × 40 mm) were extracted from the medial cortex of femoral mid-shafts, acquired from 34 donors (21–99 years old). After monotonically loading the specimens in three-point bending to failure, RPI properties were acquired from an adjacent region outside the span. Indent direction was orthogonal to the bending axis. A significant inverse relationship was found between resistance to indentation and the apparent-level mechanical properties. Indentation distance increase (IDI) and a linear combination of IDI and the loading slope, averaged over cycles 3 through 20, provided the best explanation of the variance in ultimate stress (r2=0.25, p=0.003) and toughness (r2=0.35, p=0

  19. Sucralose, an activator of the glucose-sensing receptor, increases ATP by calcium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Longfei; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Yuko; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Kojima, Itaru

    2016-08-31

    Sucralose is an artificial sweetener and activates the glucose-sensing receptor expressed in pancreatic β-cells. Although sucralose does not enter β-cells nor acts as a substrate for glucokinase, it induces a marked elevation of intracellular ATP ([ATP]c). The present study was conducted to identify the signaling pathway responsible for the elevation of [ATP]c induced by sucralose. Previous studies have shown that sucralose elevates cyclic AMP (cAMP), activates phospholipase C (PLC) and stimulates Ca(2+) entry by a Na(+)-dependent mechanism in MIN6 cells. The addition of forskolin induced a marked elevation of cAMP, whereas it did not affect [ATP]c. Carbachol, an activator of PLC, did not increase [ATP]c. In addition, activation of protein kinase C by dioctanoylglycerol did not affect [ATP]c. In contrast, nifedipine, an inhibitor of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel, significantly reduced [ATP]c response to sucralose. Removal of extracellular Na(+) nearly completely blocked sucralose-induced elevation of [ATP]c. Stimulation of Na(+) entry by adding a Na(+) ionophore monensin elevated [ATP]c. The monensin-induced elevation of [ATP]c was only partially inhibited by nifedipine and loading of BAPTA, both of which completely abolished elevation of [Ca(2+)]c. These results suggest that Na(+) entry is critical for the sucralose-induced elevation of [ATP]c. Both calcium-dependent and -independent mechanisms are involved in the action of sucralose. PMID:27250218

  20. Cyclooxygenase-independent mechanism of ibuprofen-induced antipyresis: the role of central vasopressin V₁ receptors.

    PubMed

    Soares, Denis M; Cristofoletti, Rodrigo; Melo, Miriam C C; Lindsey, Charles J; Veiga-Souza, Fabiane H; Fabricio, Aline S C; Souza, Glória E P

    2011-12-01

    This study compared the antipyretic effects of ibuprofen and indomethacin regarding the efficacy in blocking fevers induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS from E. coli) or pyrogenic mediators that act on prostaglandin (PG)-dependent and PG-independent pathways. The content of PGE₂ in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the dependence on central arginine vasopressin (AVP) release by both antipyretics were also compared during the reduction of LPS-induced fever. Finally, we investigated the effect of ibuprofen on hypothalamic cytokine content during LPS-induced fever. Ibuprofen (intraperitoneally, i.p.) dose-dependently inhibited the fever induced by LPS (intravenously, i.v.). Indomethacin (2 mg/kg) and ibuprofen (10 mg/kg) reduced the fever induced by i.c.v. injection of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, or arachidonic acid (AA). Ibuprofen, but not indomethacin, inhibited i.c.v. endothelin-1- and pre-formed pyrogenic factor (PFPF)-induced fever. Neither ibuprofen nor indomethacin affected fever by PGE₂ , PGF(2α) , or corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF); however, both reduced the CSF PGE₂ content after LPS. Bilateral injection of the AVP V(1) receptor antagonist d(CH2)₅ Tyr(Me)AVP into the ventral septal area blocked both ibuprofen- and indomethacin-induced antipyresis. Ibuprofen did not modify the hypothalamic increase in either IL-1β or IL-6 induced by LPS. In conclusion, although the antipyretic effect of ibuprofen involves the blockage of central production of PGE₂ and the endogenous release of AVP, differently from low dose of indomethacin, ibuprofen not only reduced the fever induced by PGE₂ -dependent, but also, that induced by PGE₂ -independent endogenous pyrogens. Moreover, ibuprofen does not affect the hypothalamic synthesis/release of IL-1β and IL-6. PMID:21077948

  1. Heat Shock Protein 70 Inhibits Apoptosis in Cancer Cells Through Simultaneous and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    DUDEJA, VIKAS; MUJUMDAR, NAMEETA; PHILLIPS, PHOEBE; CHUGH, ROHIT; BORJA–CACHO, DANIEL; DAWRA, RAJINDER K.; VICKERS, SELWYN M.; SALUJA, ASHOK K.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are highly conserved and serve a multitude of functions that mediate cell survival. HSP70, the only inducible form of the 70-kilodalton subfamily of HSPs, is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer cells and has been shown to inhibit caspase-dependent apoptosis. We aimed to elucidate the mechanism by which HSP70 inhibits apoptosis in cancer cells. Methods HSP70 expression was down-regulated in cultured pancreatic cancer cells by exposure to quercetin, triptolide, or short interfering RNAs. Intracellular Ca2+, cytosolic cathepsin B activity, caspase-3 activity, cell viability, and lysosome integrity were measured using colorimetric assays. Immunofluorescence assays were used to localize cathepsin B and Lamp2. BAPTA-AM was used to chelate intracellular Ca2+. Results Inhibition of HSP70 increased intracellular Ca2+ levels in pancreatic and colon cancer cell lines and led to loss of lysosome integrity in pancreatic cancer cells. The release of intracellular Ca2+ and lysosomal enzymes activated caspase-dependent apoptosis independently and simultaneously. Conclusions HSP70 inhibits apoptosis in cancer cells by 2 mechanisms: attenuation of cytosolic calcium and stabilization of lysosomes. HSP70-mediated cell survival might occur in other types of cancer cells. PMID:19208367

  2. A Simple E-Mail Mechanism To Enhance Reflection, Independence, and Communication in Young Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Lom, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Providing undergraduates with mentored research experiences is a critical component of contemporary undergraduate science education. Although the benefits of undergraduate research experiences are apparent, the methods for mentoring young scientists as they first begin navigating the research lab environment are reinvented in labs all over the world. Students come to research labs with varied skills, motivations, needs, and dispositions, placing each student and mentor in a unique relationship. How can we help students become aware of their own intellectual progress? How can we encourage our students to take initial steps toward independent investigation? When do we need to let setbacks happen? We have developed a simple mechanism to address these common problems. Each week, students in our labs answer a series of five questions by e-mail that improve lab communication and help students develop into mature scientists without taxing an instructor's already busy schedule. Our observations, experiences, and student feedback indicate that this approach is a useful mechanism to help faculty who mentor young scientists in the research lab. PMID:17146038

  3. Akt-dependent and independent mechanisms of mTOR regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Memmott, Regan M.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinase mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) is a critical regulator of cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. These processes contribute to tumor formation, and many cancers are characterized by aberrant activation of mTOR. Although activating mutations in mTOR itself have not been identified, deregulation of upstream components that regulate mTOR are prevalent in cancer. The prototypic mechanism of mTOR regulation in cells is through activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, but mTOR receives input from multiple signaling pathways. This review will discuss Akt-dependent and independent mechanisms of mTOR regulation in response to mitogenic signals, as well as its regulation in response to energy and nutrient-sensing pathways. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that tumors bearing genetic alterations that activate mTOR are sensitive to pharmacologic inhibition of mTOR. Elucidation of novel pathways that regulate mTOR may help identify predictive factors for sensitivity to mTOR inhibitors and could provide new therapeutic targets for inhibiting the mTOR pathway in cancer. This review will also highlight pharmacologic approaches that inhibit mTOR via activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important inhibitor of the mTOR pathway and an emerging target in cancer. PMID:19166931

  4. Calorie restriction regulates circadian clock gene expression through BMAL1 dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonal A.; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Makwana, Kuldeep; Chaudhari, Amol; Kondratov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Feeding behavior, metabolism and circadian clocks are interlinked. Calorie restriction (CR) is a feeding paradigm known to extend longevity. We found that CR significantly affected the rhythms in the expression of circadian clock genes in mice on the mRNA and protein levels, suggesting that CR reprograms the clocks both transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally. The effect of CR on gene expression was distinct from the effects of time-restricted feeding or fasting. Furthermore, CR affected the circadian output through up- or down-regulation of the expression of several clock-controlled transcriptional factors and the longevity candidate genes. CR-dependent effects on some clock gene expression were impaired in the liver of mice deficient for BMAL1, suggesting importance of this transcriptional factor for the transcriptional reprogramming of the clock, however, BMAL1- independent mechanisms also exist. We propose that CR recruits biological clocks as a natural mechanism of metabolic optimization under conditions of limited energy resources. PMID:27170536

  5. Calorie restriction regulates circadian clock gene expression through BMAL1 dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonal A; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Makwana, Kuldeep; Chaudhari, Amol; Kondratov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Feeding behavior, metabolism and circadian clocks are interlinked. Calorie restriction (CR) is a feeding paradigm known to extend longevity. We found that CR significantly affected the rhythms in the expression of circadian clock genes in mice on the mRNA and protein levels, suggesting that CR reprograms the clocks both transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally. The effect of CR on gene expression was distinct from the effects of time-restricted feeding or fasting. Furthermore, CR affected the circadian output through up- or down-regulation of the expression of several clock-controlled transcriptional factors and the longevity candidate genes. CR-dependent effects on some clock gene expression were impaired in the liver of mice deficient for BMAL1, suggesting importance of this transcriptional factor for the transcriptional reprogramming of the clock, however, BMAL1- independent mechanisms also exist. We propose that CR recruits biological clocks as a natural mechanism of metabolic optimization under conditions of limited energy resources. PMID:27170536

  6. Highly polarized Th17 cells induce EAE via a T-bet-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Grifka-Walk, Heather M.; Lalor, Stephen J.; Segal, Benjamin M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the MOG35-55 induced EAE model, autoreactive Th17 cells that accumulate in the central nervous system (CNS) acquire Th1 characteristics via a T-bet dependent mechanism. It remains to be determined whether Th17 plasticity and encephalitogenicity are causally related to each other. Here we show that IL-23 polarized Tbet−/− Th17 cells are unimpaired in either activation or proliferation, and induce higher quantities of the chemokines RANTES and CXCL2 than wildtype (WT) Th17 cells. Unlike their WT counterparts, they retain an IL-17hiIFNγneg-lo cytokine profile following adoptive transfer into syngeneic hosts. This population of highly polarized Th17 effectors is capable of mediating EAE, albeit with a milder clinical course. It has previously been reported that the signature Th1 and Th17 effector cytokines, IFNγ and IL-17, are dispensable for the development of autoimmune demyelinating disease. The current study demonstrates that the “master regulator” transcription factor, T-bet, is also not universally required for encephalitogenicity. Our results contribute to a growing body of data showing heterogeneity of myelin-reactive T cells and the independent mechanisms they employ to inflict damage to CNS tissues, complicating the search for therapeutic targets relevant across the spectrum of individuals with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23878008

  7. N-Acetyl Cysteine Mediates Protection from 2-Hydroxyethyl Methacrylate Induced Apoptosis via Nuclear Factor Kappa B–Dependent and Independent Pathways: Potential Involvement of JNK

    PubMed Central

    Paranjpe, Avina; Cacalano, Nicholas A.; Hume, Wyatt R.; Jewett, Anahid

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms by which resin based materials induce adverse effects in patients have not been completely elucidated. Here we show that 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) induces apoptotic cell death in oral keratinocytes. Functional loss and cell death induced by HEMA was significantly inhibited in the presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment. NAC also prevented HEMA mediated decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor secretion. The protective effect of NAC was partly related to its ability to induce NF-κB in the cells, since HEMA mediated inhibition of nuclear NF-κB expression and function was significantly blocked in the presence of NAC treatment. Moreover, blocking of nuclear translocation of NF-κB in oral keratinocytes sensitized these cells to HEMA mediated apoptosis. In addition, since NAC was capable of rescuing close to 50% of NF-κB knockdown cells from HEMA mediated cell death, there is, therefore, an NF-κB independent pathway of protection from HEMA mediated cell death by NAC. NAC mediated prevention of HEMA induced cell death in NF-κB knockdown cells was correlated with a decreased induction of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity since NAC inhibited HEMA mediated increase in JNK levels. Furthermore, the addition of a pharmacologic JNK inhibitor to HEMA treated cells prevented cell death and restored NF-κB knockdown cell function significantly. Therefore, NAC protects oral keratinocytes from the toxic effects of HEMA through NF-κB dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, our data suggest the potential involvement of JNK pathway in NAC mediated protection. PMID:19176594

  8. Two independent mechanical events in the interaction cycle of skeletal muscle myosin with actin.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, M; Canepari, M; Cacciafesta, P; Lombardi, V; Cicchi, R; Maffei, M; Pavone, F S; Bottinelli, R

    2006-01-01

    During skeletal muscle contraction, regular arrays of actin and myosin filaments slide past each other driven by the cyclic ATP-dependent interaction of the motor protein myosin II (the cross-bridge) with actin. The rate of the cross-bridge cycle and its load-dependence, defining shortening velocity and energy consumption at the molecular level, vary widely among different isoforms of myosin II. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have addressed this question by applying a single-molecule approach to rapidly ( approximately 300 mus) and precisely ( approximately 0.1 nm) detect acto-myosin interactions of two myosin isoforms having large differences in shortening velocity. We show that skeletal myosin propels actin filaments, performing its conformational change (working stroke) in two steps. The first step ( approximately 3.4-5.2 nm) occurs immediately after myosin binding and is followed by a smaller step ( approximately 1.0-1.3 nm), which occurs much faster in the fast myosin isoform than in the slow one, independently of ATP concentration. On the other hand, the rate of the second phase of the working stroke, from development of the latter step to dissociation of the acto-myosin complex, is very similar in the two isoforms and depends linearly on ATP concentration. The finding of a second mechanical event in the working stroke of skeletal muscle myosin provides the molecular basis for a simple model of actomyosin interaction. This model can account for the variation, in different fiber types, of the rate of the cross-bridge cycle and provides a common scheme for the chemo-mechanical transduction within the myosin family. PMID:16371472

  9. Isoflurane modulates excitability in the mouse thalamus via GABA-dependent and GABA-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ying, Shui-Wang; Werner, David F; Homanics, Gregg E; Harrison, Neil L; Goldstein, Peter A

    2009-02-01

    GABAergic neurons in the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) synapse onto thalamocortical neurons in the ventrobasal (VB) thalamus, and this reticulo-thalamocortical pathway is considered an anatomic target for general anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. A mutant mouse was engineered to harbor two amino acid substitutions (S270H, L277A) in the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)-R) alpha1 subunit; this mutation abolished sensitivity to the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in recombinant GABA(A)-Rs, and reduced in vivo sensitivity to isoflurane in the loss-of-righting-reflex assay. We examined the effects of the double mutation on GABA(A)-R-mediated synaptic currents and isoflurane sensitivity by recording from thalamic neurons in brain slices. The double mutation accelerated the decay, and decreased the (1/2) width of, evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) in VB neurons and attenuated isoflurane-induced prolongation of the eIPSC. The hypnotic zolpidem, a selective modulator of GABA(A)-Rs containing the alpha1 subunit, prolonged eIPSC duration regardless of genotype, indicating that mutant mice incorporate alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A)-Rs into synapses. In RTN neurons, which lack the alpha1 subunit, eIPSC duration was longer than in VB, regardless of genotype. Isoflurane reduced the efficacy of GABAergic transmission from RTN to VB, independent of genotype, suggesting a presynaptic action in RTN neurons. Consistent with this observation, isoflurane inhibited both tonic action potential and rebound burst firing in the presence of GABA(A)-R blockade. The suppressed excitability in RTN neurons is likely mediated by isoflurane-enhanced Ba(2+)-sensitive, but 4-aminopyridine-insenstive, potassium conductances. We conclude that isoflurane enhances inhibition of thalamic neurons in VB via GABA(A)-R-dependent, but in RTN via GABA(A)-R-independent, mechanisms. PMID:18948126

  10. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  11. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression through a MYCN independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mandriota, Stefano J.; Valentijn, Linda J.; Lesne, Laurence; Betts, David R.; Marino, Denis; Boudal-Khoshbeen, Mary; London, Wendy B.; Rougemont, Anne-Laure; Attiyeh, Edward F.; Maris, John M.; Hogarty, Michael D.; Koster, Jan; Molenaar, Jan J.; Versteeg, Rogier

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer with highly heterogeneous biology and clinical behavior, is characterized by genomic aberrations including amplification of MYCN. Hemizygous deletion of chromosome 11q is a well-established, independent marker of poor prognosis. While 11q22-q23 is the most frequently deleted region, the neuroblastoma tumor suppressor in this region remains to be identified. Chromosome bands 11q22-q23 contain ATM, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase and tumor suppressor playing a pivotal role in the DNA damage response. Here, we report that haploinsufficiency of ATM in neuroblastoma correlates with lower ATM expression, event-free survival, and overall survival. ATM loss occurs in high stage neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification. In SK-N-SH, CLB-Ga and GI-ME-N human neuroblastoma cells, stable ATM silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression in soft agar assays, and in subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. This effect is dependent on the extent of ATM silencing and does not appear to involve MYCN. Our findings identify ATM as a potential haploinsufficient neuroblastoma tumor suppressor, whose inactivation mirrors the increased aggressiveness associated with 11q deletion in neuroblastoma. PMID:26053094

  12. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression through a MYCN independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mandriota, Stefano J; Valentijn, Linda J; Lesne, Laurence; Betts, David R; Marino, Denis; Boudal-Khoshbeen, Mary; London, Wendy B; Rougemont, Anne-Laure; Attiyeh, Edward F; Maris, John M; Hogarty, Michael D; Koster, Jan; Molenaar, Jan J; Versteeg, Rogier; Ansari, Marc; Gumy-Pause, Fabienne

    2015-07-30

    Neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer with highly heterogeneous biology and clinical behavior, is characterized by genomic aberrations including amplification of MYCN. Hemizygous deletion of chromosome 11q is a well-established, independent marker of poor prognosis. While 11q22-q23 is the most frequently deleted region, the neuroblastoma tumor suppressor in this region remains to be identified. Chromosome bands 11q22-q23 contain ATM, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase and tumor suppressor playing a pivotal role in the DNA damage response. Here, we report that haploinsufficiency of ATM in neuroblastoma correlates with lower ATM expression, event-free survival, and overall survival. ATM loss occurs in high stage neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification. In SK-N-SH, CLB-Ga and GI-ME-N human neuroblastoma cells, stable ATM silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression in soft agar assays, and in subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. This effect is dependent on the extent of ATM silencing and does not appear to involve MYCN. Our findings identify ATM as a potential haploinsufficient neuroblastoma tumor suppressor, whose inactivation mirrors the increased aggressiveness associated with 11q deletion in neuroblastoma. PMID:26053094

  13. Geranylated 4-Phenylcoumarins Exhibit Anticancer Effects against Human Prostate Cancer Cells through Caspase-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Suparji, Noor Shahirah; Chan, Gomathi; Sapili, Hani; Arshad, Norhafiza M.; In, Lionel L. A.; Awang, Khalijah; Hasima Nagoor, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Geranylated 4-phenylcoumarins, DMDP-1 & -2 isolated from Mesua elegans were investigated for anticancer potential against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 resulted in cell death in a time and dose dependent manner in an MTT assay on all cancer cell lines tested with the exception of lung adenocarcinoma cells. DMDP-1 showed highest cytotoxic efficacy in PC-3 cells while DMDP-2 was most potent in DU 145 cells. Flow cytometry indicated that both coumarins were successful to induce programmed cell death after 24 h treatment. Elucidation on the mode-of-action via protein arrays and western blotting demonstrated death induced without any significant expressions of caspases, Bcl-2 family proteins and cleaved PARP, thus suggesting the involvement of caspase-independent pathways. In identifying autophagy, analysis of GFP-LC3 showed increased punctate in PC-3 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-1. In these cells decreased expression of autophagosome protein, p62 and cathepsin B further confirmed autophagy. In contrary, the DU 145 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-2 has reduced GFP-LC3 punctate although the number of cells with obvious GFP-LC3 puncta was significantly increased in the inhibitor-treated cells. The increase level of p62 suggested leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol to trigger potential downstream death mediators. This correlated with increased expression of cathepsin B and reduced expression after treatment with its inhibitor, CA074. Also auto-degradation of calpain-2 upon treatment with DMDP-1 &-2 and its inhibitor alone, calpeptin compared with the combination treatment, further confirmed involvement of calpain-2 in PC-3 and DU 145 cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 also showed up-regulation of total and phosphorylated p53 levels in a time dependent manner. Hence, DMDP-1 & -2 showed ability to activate multiple death pathways involving autophagy, lysosomal and endoplasmic reticulum death proteins which could

  14. Evolutionary Conservation of a GPCR-Independent Mechanism of Trimeric G Protein Activation

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Brantley D.; Marivin, Arthur; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Kim, Seongseop; Pepper, Judy S.; Casler, Jason; Nguyen, Lien T.; Koelle, Michael R.; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric G protein signaling is a fundamental mechanism of cellular communication in eukaryotes. The core of this mechanism consists of activation of G proteins by the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of G protein coupled receptors. However, the duration and amplitude of G protein-mediated signaling are controlled by a complex network of accessory proteins that appeared and diversified during evolution. Among them, nonreceptor proteins with GEF activity are the least characterized. We recently found that proteins of the ccdc88 family possess a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif that confers GEF activity and regulates mammalian cell behavior. A sequence similarity-based search revealed that ccdc88 genes are highly conserved across metazoa but the GBA motif is absent in most invertebrates. This prompted us to investigate whether the GBA motif is present in other nonreceptor proteins in invertebrates. An unbiased bioinformatics search in Caenorhabditis elegans identified GBAS-1 (GBA and SPK domain containing-1) as a GBA motif-containing protein with homologs only in closely related worm species. We demonstrate that GBAS-1 has GEF activity for the nematode G protein GOA-1 and that the two proteins are coexpressed in many cells of living worms. Furthermore, we show that GBAS-1 can activate mammalian Gα-subunits and provide structural insights into the evolutionarily conserved determinants of the GBA–G protein interface. These results demonstrate that the GBA motif is a functional GEF module conserved among highly divergent proteins across evolution, indicating that the GBA-Gα binding mode is strongly constrained under selective pressure to mediate receptor-independent G protein activation in metazoans. PMID:26659249

  15. Spermidine mediates degradation of ornithine decarboxylase by a non-lysosomal, ubiquitin-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, J.R.; Gerner, E.W.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism of spermidine-induced ornithine decarboxylase (OCD, E.C. 4.1.1.17) inactivation was investigated using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, maintained in serum-free medium, which display a stabilization of ODC owing to the lack of accumulation of putrescine and spermidine. Treatment of cells with 10 ..mu..M exogenous spermidine leads to rapid decay of ODC activity accompanied by a parallel decrease in enzyme protein. Analysis of the decay of (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled ODC and separation by two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed no detectable modification in ODC structure during enhanced degradation. Spermidine-mediated inactivation of ODC occurred in a temperature-dependent manner exhibiting pseudo-first-order kinetics over a temperature range of 22-37/sup 0/C. In cultures treated continuously, an initial lag was observed after treatment with spermidine, followed by a rapid decline in activity as an apparent critical concentration of intracellular spermidine was achieved. Treating cells at 22/sup 0/C for 3 hours with 10 ..mu.. M spermidine, followed by removal of exogenous polyamine, and then shifting to varying temperatures, resulted in rates of ODC inactivation identical with that determined with a continuous treatment. Arrhenius analysis showed that polyamine mediated inactivation of ODC occurred with an activation energy of approximately 16 kcal/mol. Treatment of cells with lysosomotrophic agents had no effect of ODC degradation. ODC turnover was not dependent on ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. These data support the hypothesis that spermidine regulates ODC degradation via a mechanism requiring new protein synthesis, and that this occurs via a non-lysosomal, ubiquitin-independent pathway.

  16. Evolutionary Conservation of a GPCR-Independent Mechanism of Trimeric G Protein Activation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Brantley D; Marivin, Arthur; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Kim, Seongseop; Pepper, Judy S; Casler, Jason; Nguyen, Lien T; Koelle, Michael R; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-03-01

    Trimeric G protein signaling is a fundamental mechanism of cellular communication in eukaryotes. The core of this mechanism consists of activation of G proteins by the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of G protein coupled receptors. However, the duration and amplitude of G protein-mediated signaling are controlled by a complex network of accessory proteins that appeared and diversified during evolution. Among them, nonreceptor proteins with GEF activity are the least characterized. We recently found that proteins of the ccdc88 family possess a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif that confers GEF activity and regulates mammalian cell behavior. A sequence similarity-based search revealed that ccdc88 genes are highly conserved across metazoa but the GBA motif is absent in most invertebrates. This prompted us to investigate whether the GBA motif is present in other nonreceptor proteins in invertebrates. An unbiased bioinformatics search in Caenorhabditis elegans identified GBAS-1 (GBA and SPK domain containing-1) as a GBA motif-containing protein with homologs only in closely related worm species. We demonstrate that GBAS-1 has GEF activity for the nematode G protein GOA-1 and that the two proteins are coexpressed in many cells of living worms. Furthermore, we show that GBAS-1 can activate mammalian Gα-subunits and provide structural insights into the evolutionarily conserved determinants of the GBA-G protein interface. These results demonstrate that the GBA motif is a functional GEF module conserved among highly divergent proteins across evolution, indicating that the GBA-Gα binding mode is strongly constrained under selective pressure to mediate receptor-independent G protein activation in metazoans. PMID:26659249

  17. Hyperactivity and tree-top disease induced by the baculovirus AcMNPV in Spodoptera exigua larvae are governed by independent mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houte, Stineke; Ros, Vera I. D.; van Oers, Monique M.

    2014-04-01

    Although many parasites are known to manipulate the behavior of their hosts, the mechanisms underlying such manipulations are largely unknown. Baculoviruses manipulate the behavior of caterpillar hosts by inducing hyperactivity and by inducing climbing behavior leading to death at elevated positions (tree-top disease or Wipfelkrankheit). Whether hyperactivity and tree-top disease are independent manipulative strategies of the virus is unclear. Recently, we demonstrated the involvement of the protein tyrosine phosphatase ( ptp) gene of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in the induction of hyperactivity in Spodoptera exigua larvae. Here we show that AcMNPV ptp is not required for tree-top disease, indicating that in S. exigua baculovirus-induced hyperactivity and tree-top disease are independently induced behaviors that are governed by distinct mechanisms.

  18. Deletions linked to TP53 loss drive cancer through p53–independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhengmin; Scuoppo, Claudio; Rillahan, Cory D.; Gao, Jianjiong; Spitzer, Barbara; Bosbach, Benedikt; Kastenhuber, Edward R.; Baslan, Timour; Ackermann, Sarah; Cheng, Lihua; Wang, Qingguo; Niu, Ting; Schultz, Nikolaus; Levine, Ross L.; Mills, Alea A.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations disabling the TP53 tumour suppressor gene represent the most frequent events in human cancer and typically occur through a two-hit mechanism involving a missense mutation in one allele and a ‘loss of heterozygosity’ deletion encompassing the other. While TP53 missense mutations can also contribute gain-of-function activities that impact tumour progression, it remains unclear whether the deletion event, which frequently includes many genes, impacts tumorigenesis beyond TP53 loss alone. Here we show that somatic heterozygous deletion of mouse chromosome 11B3, a 4-megabase region syntenic to human 17p13.1, produces a greater effect on lymphoma and leukaemia development than Trp53 deletion. Mechanistically, the effect of 11B3 loss on tumorigenesis involves co-deleted genes such as Eif5a and Alox15b (also known as Alox8), the suppression of which cooperates with Trp53 loss to produce more aggressive disease. Our results imply that the selective advantage produced by human chromosome 17p deletion reflects the combined impact of TP53 loss and the reduced dosage of linked tumour suppressor genes. PMID:26982726

  19. Deletions linked to TP53 loss drive cancer through p53-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Chong; Xu, Zhengmin; Scuoppo, Claudio; Rillahan, Cory D; Gao, Jianjiong; Spitzer, Barbara; Bosbach, Benedikt; Kastenhuber, Edward R; Baslan, Timour; Ackermann, Sarah; Cheng, Lihua; Wang, Qingguo; Niu, Ting; Schultz, Nikolaus; Levine, Ross L; Mills, Alea A; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-03-24

    Mutations disabling the TP53 tumour suppressor gene represent the most frequent events in human cancer and typically occur through a two-hit mechanism involving a missense mutation in one allele and a 'loss of heterozygosity' deletion encompassing the other. While TP53 missense mutations can also contribute gain-of-function activities that impact tumour progression, it remains unclear whether the deletion event, which frequently includes many genes, impacts tumorigenesis beyond TP53 loss alone. Here we show that somatic heterozygous deletion of mouse chromosome 11B3, a 4-megabase region syntenic to human 17p13.1, produces a greater effect on lymphoma and leukaemia development than Trp53 deletion. Mechanistically, the effect of 11B3 loss on tumorigenesis involves co-deleted genes such as Eif5a and Alox15b (also known as Alox8), the suppression of which cooperates with Trp53 loss to produce more aggressive disease. Our results imply that the selective advantage produced by human chromosome 17p deletion reflects the combined impact of TP53 loss and the reduced dosage of linked tumour suppressor genes. PMID:26982726

  20. Phagocytosis-dependent and independent mechanisms underlie the microglial cell damage caused by carbon nanotube agglomerates.

    PubMed

    Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Hoshikawa, Kazue; Hirose, Akihiko; Sato, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Although carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used in many fields, including energy, healthcare, environmental technology, materials, and electronics, the adverse effects of CNTs in the brain are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of CNTs on cultured microglia, as microglia are the first responders to foreign materials. We compared the effects of sonicated suspensions of 5 kinds of CNTs and their flow-through filtered with a 0.22 µm membrane filter on microglial viability. We found that sonicated suspensions caused microglial cell damage, but their flow-through did not. The number of microglial aggregates was well correlated with the extent of the damage. We also determined that the CNT agglomerates consisted of two groups: one was phagocytosed by microglia and caused microglial cell damage, and the other caused cell damage without phagocytosis. These results suggest that phagocytosis-dependent and independent mechanisms underlie the microglial cell damage caused by CNT agglomerates and it is important to conduct studies about the relationships between physical properties of nanomaterial-agglomerates and cell damage. PMID:27432236

  1. Anergy and exhaustion are independent mechanisms of peripheral T cell tolerance.

    PubMed

    Rocha, B; Grandien, A; Freitas, A A

    1995-03-01

    We studied the interactions of male-specific T cell receptor (TCR)-alpha/beta-transgenic (TG) cells with different concentrations of male antigen in vivo. We constructed mouse chimeras expressing different amounts of male antigen by injecting thymectomized, lethally irradiated mice with various ratios of male (immunoglobulin [Ig] Ha) and female (IgHb) bone marrow. These chimeras were injected with male-specific TCR-alpha/beta-trangenic cells. These experiments allowed us to monitor antigen persistence and characterize antigen-specific T cells in terms of their frequency, reactivity, and effector functions (as tested by elimination of male B cells in vivo). In the absence of antigen, virgin TG cells persisted but did not expand. Transient exposure to antigen resulted in cell expansion, followed by the persistence of increased numbers of antigen-reactive T cells. In contrast, antigen persistence was followed by two independent mechanisms of tolerance induction: anergy (at high antigen concentrations), where T cells did not differentiate into effector functions but persisted in vivo as unresponsive T cells, and exhaustion (at lower antigen concentrations), where differentiation into effector functions (B cell elimination) occurred but was followed by the disappearance of antigen-specific T cells. PMID:7869056

  2. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers-termed here escortins-to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:25144938

  3. Cinnamaldehyde modulates LPS-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome through TRPA1-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Saulo J F; Sousa, Fernanda I A B; Pereira, Domingos M S; Ferro, Thiago A F; Pereira, Ione C P; Silva, Bruna L R; Pinheiro, Aruanã J M C R; Mouchrek, Adriana Q S; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; Costa, Soraia K P; Nascimento, José L M; Grisotto, Marcos A G; da Costa, Robson; Fernandes, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a natural essential oil suggested to possess anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; and to activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels expressed on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of cinnamaldehyde in an in vivo model of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) induced by lipopolysaccharide. Swiss mice received a single oral treatment with cinnamaldehyde 1 h before LPS injection. To investigate whether cinnamaldehyde effects are dependent on TRPA1 activation, animals were treated subcutaneously with the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 5 min prior to cinnamaldehyde administration. Vehicle-treated mice were used as controls. Cinnamaldehyde ameliorated SIRS severity in LPS-injected animals. Diminished numbers of circulating mononuclear cells and increased numbers of peritoneal mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cell numbers were also observed. Cinnamaldehyde augmented the number of peritoneal Ly6C(high) and Ly6C(low) monocyte/macrophage cells in LPS-injected mice. Reduced levels of nitric oxide, plasma TNFα and plasma and peritoneal IL-10 were also detected. Additionally, IL-1β levels were increased in the same animals. TRPA1 antagonism by HC-030031 reversed the changes in the number of circulating and peritoneal leukocytes in cinnamaldehyde-treated animals, whilst increasing the levels of peritoneal IL-10 and reducing peritoneal IL-1β. Overall, cinnamaldehyde modulates SIRS through TRPA1-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:26922677

  4. Odorant receptors can mediate axonal identity and gene choice via cAMP-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Grosmaitre, Xavier; Feinstein, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Odorant receptors (ORs) control several aspects of cell fate in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), including singular gene choice and axonal identity. The mechanisms of OR-induced axon guidance have been suggested to principally rely on G-protein signalling. Here, we report that for a subset of OSNs, deleting G proteins or altering their levels of signalling does not affect axonal identity. Signalling-deficient ORs or surrogate receptors that are unable to couple to Gs/Golf still provide axons with distinct identities and the anterior–posterior targeting of axons does not correlate with the levels of cAMP produced by genetic modifications. In addition, we refine the models of negative feedback by showing that ectopic ORs can be robustly expressed without suppressing endogenous gene choice. In conclusion, our results uncover a new feature of ORs, showing that they can instruct axonal identity and regulate olfactory map formation independent of canonical G-protein signalling and cAMP production. PMID:27466441

  5. A tRNA-independent Mechanism for Transamidosome Assembly Promotes Aminoacyl-tRNA Transamidation*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gayathri N.; Fatma, Shirin; Floyd, Ashley M.; Fischer, Frederic; Chuawong, Pitak; Cruz, Amanda N.; Simari, Rachel M.; Joshi, Nilesh; Kern, Daniel; Hendrickson, Tamara L.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria lack genes encoding asparaginyl- and/or glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase and consequently rely on an indirect path for the synthesis of both Asn-tRNAAsn and Gln-tRNAGln. In some bacteria such as Thermus thermophilus, efficient delivery of misacylated tRNA to the downstream amidotransferase (AdT) is ensured by formation of a stable, tRNA-dependent macromolecular complex called the Asn-transamidosome. This complex enables direct delivery of Asp-tRNAAsn from the non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase to AdT, where it is converted into Asn-tRNAAsn. Previous characterization of the analogous Helicobacter pylori Asn-transamidosome revealed that it is dynamic and cannot be stably isolated, suggesting the possibility of an alternative mechanism to facilitate assembly of a stable complex. We have identified a novel protein partner called Hp0100 as a component of a stable, tRNA-independent H. pylori Asn-transamidosome; this complex contains a non-discriminating aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, AdT, and Hp0100 but does not require tRNAAsn for assembly. Hp0100 also enhances the capacity of AdT to convert Asp-tRNAAsn into Asn-tRNAAsn by ∼35-fold. Our results demonstrate that bacteria have adopted multiple divergent methods for transamidosome assembly and function. PMID:23258533

  6. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers—termed here escortins—to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03473.001 PMID:25144938

  7. Attenuation of natural killer cell functions by capsaicin through a direct and TRPV1-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun Sik; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Gye Eun; Cho, Mi-Hyang; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Davies, Alexander J; Oh, Seog Bae; Lee, Heuiran; Cho, Young Keol; Joo, Chul Hyun; Kwon, Seog Woon; Kim, Sun Chang; Kim, Yoo Kyum

    2014-07-01

    The assessment of the biological activity of capsaicin, the compound responsible for the spicy flavor of chili pepper, produced controversial results, showing either carcinogenicity or cancer prevention. The innate immune system plays a pivotal role in cancer pathology and prevention; yet, the effect of capsaicin on natural killer (NK) cells, which function in cancer surveillance, is unclear. This study found that capsaicin inhibited NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production (interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α). Capsaicin impaired the cytotoxicity of NK cells, thereby inhibiting lysis of standard target cells and gastric cancer cells by modulating calcium mobilization in NK cells. Capsaicin also induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells, but that effect required higher concentrations and longer exposure times than those required to trigger NK cell dysfunction. Furthermore, capsaicin inhibited the cytotoxicity of isolated NK cells and of an NK cell line, suggesting a direct effect on NK cells. Antagonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), a cognate capsaicin receptor, or deficiency in TRPV1 expression failed to prevent the defects induced by capsaicin in NK cells expressing functional TRPV1. Thus, the mechanism of action of capsaicin on NK cells is largely independent of TRPV1. Taken together, capsaicin may have chemotherapeutic potential but may impair NK cell function, which plays a central role in tumor surveillance. PMID:24743513

  8. Nicotine increases dopamine transporter function in rat striatum through a trafficking-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Lisa S.; Apparsundaram, Subbu; King-Pospisil, Kelley A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2007-01-01

    In previous in vivo voltammetry studies, acute nicotine administration increased striatal dopamine clearance. The current study aimed to determine whether nicotine also increases [3H]dopamine uptake across the time course of the previous voltammetry studies and whether dopamine transporter trafficking to the cell surface mediates the nicotine-induced augmentation of dopamine clearance in striatum. Rats were administered nicotine (0.32 mg/kg, s.c.); striatal synaptosomes were obtained 5, 10, 40 or 60 min later. Nicotine increased (25%) the Vmax of [3H]dopamine uptake at 10 and 40 min. To determine whether the increase in Vmax was due to an increase in dopamine transporter density, [3H]GBR 12935 (1-(2-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methoxy]ethyl)-4-(3-phenylpropyl)piperazine dihydrochloride) binding was performed using rat striatal membranes; no differences were found between nicotine and saline control groups at 5, 10 or 40 min post-injection, indicating that nicotine did not increase striatal dopamine transporter density; however, [3H]GBR 12935 binding assays determine both cell surface and intracellular dopamine transporter. Changes in cellular dopamine transporter localization in striatum were determined using biotinylation and subfractionation approaches; no differences between nicotine and saline control groups were observed at 10 and 40 min post-injection. These results suggest that the nicotine-induced increase in dopamine uptake and clearance in striatum may occur via a trafficking-independent mechanism. PMID:17141211

  9. Corelease of acetylcholine and GABA by an amacrine cell: Evidence for independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    O'Mally, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial resolution of the cholinergic cells was measured by illuminating the retina with moving gratings composed of light and dark bars. Retinas that were labelled with {sup 3}H-choline released acetylcholine in response to moving gratings composed of bars as small as 50 {mu}m; 300 to 800 {mu}m wide bars yielded maximal responses. Responses were obtained to gratings moving at speeds from 50 to 6000 {mu}m/sec. Three groups recently reported that the cholinergic cells also contain GABA. To confirm these findings, retinas were double-labeled with {sup 3}H-GABA and DAPI, and processed for autoradiography. The cells that accumulate DAPI were heavily labelled with silver grains due to uptake of {sup 3}H-GABA. Incubation of retinas in the presence of elevated concentrations of K{sup +} caused them to release both acetylcholine and GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA, and autoradiography showed depletion of radioactive GABA from the cholinergic amacrine cells. Retinas were double-labeled with {sup 14}C-GABA and {sup 3}H-acetylcholine, allowing simultaneous measurement of their release. The release of {sup 14}C-GABA was independent of extracellular Ca{sup ++}. Radioactive GABA synthesized endogenously from {sup 14}C-glutamate behave the same as radioactive GABA accumulated from the medium. In the same experiments, the simultaneously measured release of {sup 3}H-acetylcholine was strongly Ca{sup ++}-dependent, indicating that acetylcholine and GABA are released by different mechanisms.

  10. Localization of Presynaptic Plasticity Mechanisms Enables Functional Independence of Synaptic and Ectopic Transmission in the Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    In the cerebellar molecular layer parallel fibre terminals release glutamate from both the active zone and from extrasynaptic “ectopic” sites. Ectopic release mediates transmission to the Bergmann glia that ensheathe the synapse, activating Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors and glutamate transporters. Parallel fibre terminals exhibit several forms of presynaptic plasticity, including cAMP-dependent long-term potentiation and endocannabinoid-dependent long-term depression, but it is not known whether these presynaptic forms of long-term plasticity also influence ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia. Stimulation of parallel fibre inputs at 16 Hz evoked LTP of synaptic transmission, but LTD of ectopic transmission. Pharmacological activation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin caused LTP at Purkinje neurons, but only transient potentiation at Bergmann glia, reinforcing the concept that ectopic sites lack the capacity to express sustained cAMP-dependent potentiation. Activation of mGluR1 caused depression of synaptic transmission via retrograde endocannabinoid signalling but had no significant effect at ectopic sites. In contrast, activation of NMDA receptors suppressed both synaptic and ectopic transmission. The results suggest that the signalling mechanisms for presynaptic LTP and retrograde depression by endocannabinoids are restricted to the active zone at parallel fibre synapses, allowing independent modulation of synaptic transmission to Purkinje neurons and ectopic transmission to Bergmann glia. PMID:26171253

  11. Odorant receptors can mediate axonal identity and gene choice via cAMP-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Movahedi, Kiavash; Grosmaitre, Xavier; Feinstein, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Odorant receptors (ORs) control several aspects of cell fate in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), including singular gene choice and axonal identity. The mechanisms of OR-induced axon guidance have been suggested to principally rely on G-protein signalling. Here, we report that for a subset of OSNs, deleting G proteins or altering their levels of signalling does not affect axonal identity. Signalling-deficient ORs or surrogate receptors that are unable to couple to Gs/Golf still provide axons with distinct identities and the anterior-posterior targeting of axons does not correlate with the levels of cAMP produced by genetic modifications. In addition, we refine the models of negative feedback by showing that ectopic ORs can be robustly expressed without suppressing endogenous gene choice. In conclusion, our results uncover a new feature of ORs, showing that they can instruct axonal identity and regulate olfactory map formation independent of canonical G-protein signalling and cAMP production. PMID:27466441

  12. Histone Demethylase KDM6A Controls the Mammary Luminal Lineage through Enzyme-Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Sumin; Kang, Keunsoo; Wang, Chaochen; Robinson, Gertraud W; Ge, Kai; Hennighausen, Lothar

    2016-08-15

    Establishment of the mammary luminal cell lineage is controlled primarily by hormones and through specific transcription factors (TFs). Previous studies have linked histone methyltransferases to the differentiation of mammary epithelium, thus opening the possibility of biological significance of counteracting demethylases. We have now demonstrated an essential role for the H3K27me3 demethylase KDM6A in generating a balanced alveolar compartment. Deletion of Kdm6a in the mammary luminal cell lineage led to a paucity of luminal cells and an excessive expansion of basal cells, both in vivo and in vitro The inability to form structurally normal ducts and alveoli during pregnancy resulted in lactation failure. Mutant luminal cells did not exhibit their distinctive transcription factor pattern and displayed basal characteristics. The genomic H3K27me3 landscape was unaltered in mutant tissue, and support for a demethylase-independent mechanism came from mice expressing a catalytically inactive KDM6A. Mammary tissue developed normally in these mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments demonstrated KDM6A binding to putative enhancers enriched for key mammary TFs and H3K27ac. This study demonstrated for the first time that the mammary luminal lineage relies on KDM6A to ensure a transcription program leading to differentiated alveoli. Failure to fully implement this program results in structurally and functionally impaired mammary tissue. PMID:27215382

  13. Mechanism-independent method for predicting response to multidrug combinations in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kevin; Nishida, Satoshi; Sontag, Eduardo D.; Cluzel, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Drugs are commonly used in combinations larger than two for treating bacterial infection. However, it is generally impossible to infer directly from the effects of individual drugs the net effect of a multidrug combination. Here we develop a mechanism-independent method for predicting the microbial growth response to combinations of more than two drugs. Performing experiments in both Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) and Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria, we demonstrate that for a wide range of drugs, the bacterial responses to drug pairs are sufficient to infer the effects of larger drug combinations. To experimentally establish the broad applicability of the method, we use drug combinations comprising protein synthesis inhibitors (macrolides, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, lincosamides, and chloramphenicol), DNA synthesis inhibitors (fluoroquinolones and quinolones), folic acid synthesis inhibitors (sulfonamides and diaminopyrimidines), cell wall synthesis inhibitors, polypeptide antibiotics, preservatives, and analgesics. Moreover, we show that the microbial responses to these drug combinations can be predicted using a simple formula that should be widely applicable in pharmacology. These findings offer a powerful, readily accessible method for the rational design of candidate therapies using combinations of more than two drugs. In addition, the accurate predictions of this framework raise the question of whether the multidrug response in bacteria obeys statistical, rather than chemical, laws for combinations larger than two. PMID:22773816

  14. Pramipexole inhibits MPTP toxicity in mice by dopamine D3 receptor dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Andres D; Wong, Stephen K-F; Menniti, Frank S

    2003-08-15

    The role of dopamine D3 receptors was investigated in mediating the neuroprotective effect of the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist (S)-2-amino-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-6-propylamine-benzothiazole (pramipexole) in vivo. Pramipexole retained the ability to inhibit 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopamine depletion in mice in which the dopamine D3 receptor had been deleted. However, the neuroprotective efficacy was reduced in the dopamine D3 receptor-deleted mice compared to that in littermates expressing the wildtype receptor. Furthermore, the dopamine D3 receptor selective antagonist 2-(3-[4-(2-tert-butyl-6-trifluoromethyl-4-pyrimidinyl)-1-piperazinyl]propylthio)-4-pyrimidinol (A-437203) partially inhibited the neuroprotective effect of pramipexole in dopamine D3 receptor expressing mice but not in receptor-deleted mice. These results indicate that pramipexole protects dopamine neurons from MPTP-induced toxicity by mechanisms that are both dependent and independent of an interaction with dopamine D3 receptors. PMID:12954356

  15. Mechanisms involved in regulation of osteoclastic differentiation by mechanical stress-loaded osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneuji, Takeshi; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori; Toshinaga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Tetsu; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Effect of compressive force on osteoblasts were examined. {yields} Compressive force induced OPG expression and suppressed osteoclastogenesis. {yields} This enhancement of OPG is dependent on Wnt/Ca2+ signal pathway. -- Abstract: Mechanical stress is known to be important for regulation of bone turnover, though the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of mechanical stress on osteoblasts using a novel compression model. Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were embedded in three-dimensional (3D) gels and cultured with continuous compressive force (0-10.0 g/cm{sup 2}) for 48 h, and the conditioned medium were collected. RAW264.7 cells were then incubated with the conditioned medium for various times in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Conditioned medium was found to inhibit the differentiation of RAW264.7 cells into osteoclasts induced by RANKL via down-regulation of the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, and nuclear translocation of p50 and p65. Interestingly, the conditioned medium also had a high level of binding activity to RANKL and blocked the binding of RANK to RANKL. Furthermore, the binding activity of conditioned medium to RANKL was reduced when the 3D gel was supplemented with KN-93, an inhibitor of non-canonical Wnt/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. In addition, expression level of osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA was increased in time- and force-dependent manners, and remarkably suppressed by KN-93. These results indicate that osteoblastic cells subjected to mechanical stress produce OPG, which binds to RANKL. Furthermore, this binding activity strongly inhibited osteoclastogenesis through suppression of TRAF6 and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signaling pathway, suggesting that enhancement of OPG expression induced by mechanical stress is dependent on non-canonical Wnt

  16. NF-κB dependent and independent mechanisms of quartz-induced proinflammatory activation of lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In the initiation and progression of pulmonary inflammation, macrophages have classically been considered as a crucial cell type. However, evidence for the role of epithelial type II cells in pulmonary inflammation has been accumulating. In the current study, a combined in vivo and in vitro approach has been employed to investigate the mechanisms of quartz-induced proinflammatory activation of lung epithelial cells. In vivo, enhanced expression of the inflammation- and oxidative stress-related genes HO-1 and iNOS was found on the mRNA level in rat lungs after instillation with DQ12 respirable quartz. Activation of the classical NF-κB pathway in macrophages and type II pneumocytes was indicated by enhanced immunostaining of phospho-IκBα in these specific lung cell types. In vitro, the direct, particle-mediated effect on proinflammatory signalling in a rat lung epithelial (RLE) cell line was compared to the indirect, macrophage product-mediated effect. Treatment with quartz particles induced HO-1 and COX-2 mRNA expression in RLE cells in an NF-κB independent manner. Supernatant from quartz-treated macrophages rapidly activated the NF-κB signalling pathway in RLE cells and markedly induced iNOS mRNA expression up to 2000-fold compared to non-treated control cells. Neutralisation of TNFα and IL-1β in macrophage supernatant did not reduce its ability to elicit NF-κB activation of RLE cells. In addition the effect was not modified by depletion or supplementation of intracellular glutathione. The results from the current work suggest that although both oxidative stress and NF-κB are likely involved in the inflammatory effects of toxic respirable particles, these phenomena can operate independently on the cellular level. This might have consequences for in vitro particle hazard testing, since by focusing on NF-κB signalling one might neglect alternative inflammatory pathways. PMID:20492675

  17. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases Permits Lipopolysaccharide-Mediated Secretion of Bioactive IL-1β via a Caspase-1-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Stammler, Dominik; Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Menz, Sarah; Frick, Julia S; Sweet, Matthew J; Shakespear, Melanie R; Jantsch, Jonathan; Siegert, Isabel; Wölfle, Sabine; Langer, Julian D; Oehme, Ina; Schaefer, Liliana; Fischer, Andre; Knievel, Judith; Heeg, Klaus; Dalpke, Alexander H; Bode, Konrad A

    2015-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACi) are clinically approved anticancer drugs that have important immune-modulatory properties. We report the surprising finding that HDACi promote LPS-induced IL-1β processing and secretion in human and murine dendritic cells and murine macrophages. HDACi/LPS-induced IL-1β maturation and secretion kinetics differed completely from those observed upon inflammasome activation. Moreover, this pathway of IL-1β secretion was dependent on caspase-8 but was independent of the inflammasome components NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a carboxyl-terminal caspase-recruitment domain, and caspase-1. Genetic studies excluded HDAC6 and HDAC10 as relevant HDAC targets in this pathway, whereas pharmacological inhibitor studies implicated the involvement of HDAC11. Treatment of mice with HDACi in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model resulted in a strong increase in intestinal IL-1β, confirming that this pathway is also operative in vivo. Thus, in addition to the conventional inflammasome-dependent IL-1β cleavage pathway, dendritic cells and macrophages are capable of generating, secreting, and processing bioactive IL-1β by a novel, caspase-8-dependent mechanism. Given the widespread interest in the therapeutic targeting of IL-1β, as well as the use of HDACi for anti-inflammatory applications, these findings have substantial clinical implications. PMID:26519528

  18. Chromosomal Translocations in the Parasite Leishmania by a MRE11/RAD50-Independent Microhomology-Mediated End Joining Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Leprohon, Philippe; Hainse, Maripier; Légaré, Danielle; Masson, Jean-Yves; Ouellette, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The parasite Leishmania often relies on gene rearrangements to survive stressful environments. However, safeguarding a minimum level of genome integrity is important for cell survival. We hypothesized that maintenance of genomic integrity in Leishmania would imply a leading role of the MRE11 and RAD50 proteins considering their role in DNA repair, chromosomal organization and protection of chromosomes ends in other organisms. Attempts to generate RAD50 null mutants in a wild-type background failed and we provide evidence that this gene is essential. Remarkably, inactivation of RAD50 was possible in a MRE11 null mutant that we had previously generated, providing good evidence that RAD50 may be dispensable in the absence of MRE11. Inactivation of the MRE11 and RAD50 genes led to a decreased frequency of homologous recombination and analysis of the null mutants by whole genome sequencing revealed several chromosomal translocations. Sequencing of the junction between translocated chromosomes highlighted microhomology sequences at the level of breakpoint regions. Sequencing data also showed a decreased coverage at subtelomeric locations in many chromosomes in the MRE11-/-RAD50-/- parasites. This study demonstrates an MRE11-independent microhomology-mediated end-joining mechanism and a prominent role for MRE11 and RAD50 in the maintenance of genomic integrity. Moreover, we suggest the possible involvement of RAD50 in subtelomeric regions stability. PMID:27314941

  19. [THE ROLE OF MATERNAL DIET IN METABOLIC AND BEHAVIOURAL PROGRAMMING: REVIEW OF BIOLOGIC MECHANISMS INVOLVED].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Vázquez Berrios, Mariam; Arco González, Rocío; Blanco Velilla, Rosario Noemí; Decara Del Olmo, Juan; Suárez Pérez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Gómez de Heras, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    Over the last few years, a considerable amount of studies have focused on the effect of undernutrition and overnutrition during critical periods of offspring development and their risk of developing metabolic diseases later in life. Additionally, inadequate maternal diets have been involved in the malprogramming of brain functions and some behaviours. Several mechanisms have been associated with the process of malprogramming such as epigenetics modifications, excessive oxidative stress or hypothalamic alterations. This evidence supports the idea that nutritional prevention strategies must be considered for offspring during early development stages that include the preconceptional period. Additionally, studying involved mechanisms could be particularly useful in the search of efficient therapies against malprogramming. PMID:26667690

  20. Gas-phase Mechanisms of Sulfur Isotope Mass-independent Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in sulfur isotopes in ancient sulfur-bearing rocks (Farquhar et al. 2000a) is interpreted as evidence for gas-phase MIF processes in the early Earth atmosphere. This interpretation is made by analogy with oxygen isotope MIF in the modern atmosphere (produced during ozone formation), and by laboratory photolysis experiments on SO2 (Farquhar et al. 2001; Wing et al. 2004) that yield both elemental sulfur and sulfate with S MIF signatures at wavelengths above and below the SO2 dissociation limit. What is lacking is a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms of gas-phase S MIF. Quantification is essential in order to extract the full implications of sulfur MIF throughout Earth history, including for bacterial sulfate reduction processes which largely conserve D33S and D36S. Several sulfur MIF mechanisms are possible. The most obvious is the gas-phase thiozone reaction, which is isovalent to the ozone formation reaction. Ozone formation produces a well-known MIF signature in oxygen isotopes (Thiemens and Heidenreich 1983), and a symmetry-dependent non-RRKM mechanism has been proposed as the origin of O MIF (Gao and Marcus 2001). It is possible and perhaps likely that S3 formation also proceeds by a non-RRKM process. Data are lacking on isotopic (an even non-isotopic) rates of S3 formation, so it is not possible to make definitive statements about MIF in S3 at this time. However modeling results suggest that the vapor pressure of S2 is too low for gas-phase S3 formation to be significant. Two additional species that may exhibit a non-RRKM MIF signature are S2O2 and S4. Again, there is a lack of isotopomer-specific kinetic data for these reactions, and gas-phase formation of S4 is likely inconsequential. Perhaps the most obvious mechanism is simply the primary act of SO2 photolysis. The SO2 absorption spectrum is highly structured, with strong vibronic bands above and below the dissociation limit. In contrast H2S, with its mostly

  1. Electrophilic Nitro-fatty Acids Activate NRF2 by a KEAP1 Cysteine 151-independent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Kansanen, Emilia; Bonacci, Gustavo; Schopfer, Francisco J.; Kuosmanen, Suvi M.; Tong, Kit I.; Leinonen, Hanna; Woodcock, Steven R.; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Carlberg, Carsten; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Freeman, Bruce A.; Levonen, Anna-Liisa

    2011-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids (NO2-FAs) are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in vivo via nitric oxide (NO)- and nitrite (NO2−)-dependent reactions. Nitro-fatty acids modulate signaling cascades via reversible covalent post-translational modification of nucleophilic amino acids in regulatory proteins and enzymes, thus altering downstream signaling events, such as Keap1-Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE)-regulated gene expression. In this study, we investigate the molecular mechanisms by which 9- and 10-nitro-octadec-9-enoic acid (OA-NO2) activate the transcription factor Nrf2, focusing on the post-translational modifications of cysteines in the Nrf2 inhibitor Keap1 by nitroalkylation and its downstream responses. Of the two regioisomers, 9-nitro-octadec-9-enoic acid was a more potent ARE inducer than 10-nitro-octadec-9-enoic acid. The most OA-NO2-reactive Cys residues in Keap1 were Cys38, Cys226, Cys257, Cys273, Cys288, and Cys489. Of these, Cys273 and Cys288 accounted for ∼50% of OA-NO2 reactions in a cellular milieu. Notably, Cys151 was among the least OA-NO2-reactive of the Keap1 Cys residues, with mutation of Cys151 having no effect on net OA-NO2 reaction with Keap1 or on ARE activation. Unlike many other Nrf2-activating electrophiles, OA-NO2 enhanced rather than diminished the binding between Keap1 and the Cul3 subunit of the E3 ligase for Nrf2. OA-NO2 can therefore be categorized as a Cys151-independent Nrf2 activator, which in turn can influence the pattern of gene expression and therapeutic actions of nitroalkenes. PMID:21357422

  2. Adiponectin Regulation of Stellate Cell Activation via PPARγ-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Mahnoush S.; Shetty, Shoba; Scherer, Philipp E.; Rockey, Don C.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we elucidated the mechanism by which adiponectin modulates hepatic stellate cell activation and fibrogenesis. Adiponectin-overexpressing transgenic mice receiving thioacetamide were resistant to fibrosis, compared with controls. In contrast, adiponectin-null animals developed severe fibrosis. Expression of collagen α1(I) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) mRNAs were significantly lower in adiponectin-overexpressing mice, compared with controls. In wild-type stellate cells exposed to a lentivirus encoding adiponectin, expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), SREBP1c, and CEBPα mRNAs was significantly increased (3.2-, 4.1-, and 2.2-fold, respectively; n = 3; P < 0.05, adiponectin virus versus control), consistent with possible activation of an adipogenic transcriptional program. Troglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, strongly suppressed up-regulation of collagen α1(I) and α-SMA mRNA in stellate cells isolated from wild-type mice; however, stellate cells from adiponectin-null animals failed to respond to troglitazone. Furthermore, in isolated stellate cells in which PPARγ was depleted using an adenovirus-Cre-recombinase system and in which adiponectin was also overexpressed, collagen α1(I) and α-SMA were significantly inhibited. We conclude that the PPARγ effect on stellate cell activation and the fibrogenic cascade appears to be adiponectin-dependent; however, the inhibitory effect of adiponectin on stellate cell activation was not dependent on PPARγ, suggesting the presence of PPARγ-dependent as well as independent pathways in stellate cells. PMID:21641391

  3. Thrombospondin 2 Inhibits Microvascular Endothelial Cell Proliferation by a Caspase-independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Lucas C.; Björkblom, Benny; Hankenson, Kurt D.; Siadak, Anthony W.; Stiles, Charlotte E.; Bornstein, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The matricellular protein thrombospondin 2 (TSP2) regulates a variety of cell–matrix interactions. A prominent feature of TSP2-null mice is increased microvascular density, particularly in connective tissues synthesized after injury. We investigated the cellular basis for the regulation of angiogenesis by TSP2 in cultures of murine and human fibroblasts and endothelial cells. Fibroblasts isolated from murine and human dermis synthesize TSP2 mRNA and secrete significant amounts of immunoreactive TSP2, whereas endothelial cells from mouse lung and human dermis did not synthesize TSP2 mRNA or protein. Recombinant mouse TSP2 inhibited growth of human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) mediated by basic fibroblast growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, epidermal growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). HMVECs exposed to TSP2 in the presence of these growth factors had a decreased proportion of cells in S and G2/M phases. HMVECs cultured with a combination of basic fibroblast growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor displayed an increased proportion of nonviable cells in the presence of TSP2, but the addition of VEGF blocked this TSP2-mediated impairment of cell viability. TSP2-mediated inhibition of DNA synthesis by HMVECs in the presence of VEGF was not affected by the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk. Similar findings were obtained with TSP1. Taken together, these observations indicate that either TSP2 or TSP1 can inhibit HMVEC proliferation by inhibition of cell cycle progression and induction of cell death, but the mechanisms responsible for TSP2-mediated inhibition of cell cycle progression are independent from those leading to cell death. PMID:12058057

  4. Vasorelaxant and antihypertensive effects of formononetin through endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Tao; LIU, Rui; CAO, Yong-xiao

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the vasorelaxant effect of formononetin, an O-methylated isoflavone, in isolated arteries, and its antihypertensive activity in vivo. Methods: Arterial rings of superior mesenteric arteries, renal arteries, cerebral basilar arteries, coronary arteries and abdominal aortas were prepared from SD rats. Isometric tension of the arterial rings was recorded using a myograph system. Arterial pressure was measured using tail-cuff method in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Results: Formononetin (1–300 μmol/L) elicited relaxation in arteries of the five regions that were pre-contracted by KCl (60 mmol/L), U46619 (1 μmol/L) or phenylephrine (10 μmol/L). The formononetin-induced relaxation was reduced by removal of endothelium or by pretreatment with L-NAME (100 μmol/L). Under conditions of endothelium denudation, formononetin (10, 30, and 100 μmol/L) inhibited the contraction induced by KCl and that induced by CaCl2 in Ca2+-free depolarized medium. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, formononetin (10, 30, and 100 μmol/L) depressed the constriction caused by phenylephrine (10 μmol/L), but did not inhibit the tonic contraction in response to the addition of CaCl2 (2 mmol/L). The contraction caused by caffeine (30 mmol/L) was not inhibited by formononetin (100 μmol/L). Formononetin (10 and 100 μmol/L) reduced the change rate of Ca2+-fluorescence intensity in response to KCl (50 mmol/L). In spontaneously hypertensive rats, formononetin (5, 10, and 20 mg/kg) slowly lowered the systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure. Conclusion: Formononetin causes vasodilatation via two pathways: (1) endothelium-independent pathway, probably due to inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and intracellular Ca2+ release; and (2) endothelium-dependent pathway by releasing NO. Both the pathways may contribute to its antihypertensive effect. PMID:21818108

  5. Estrogen receptor independent neurotoxic mechanism of bisphenol A, an environmental estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoot Mo; Seong, Min Jae; Lee, Jae Woong; Lee, Yong Kyung; Kim, Tae Myoung; Nam, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Dae Joong; Yun, Young Won; Kim, Tae Seong; Han, Soon Young

    2007-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been shown to cause developmental toxicity and carcinogenic effects. BPA may have physiological activity through estrogen receptor (ER) -α and -β, which are expressed in the central nervous system. We previously found that exposure of BPA to immature mice resulted in behavioral alternation, suggesting that overexposure of BPA could be neurotoxic. In this study, we further investigated the molecular neurotoxic mechanisms of BPA. BPA increased vulnerability (decrease of cell viability and differentiation, and increase of apoptotic cell death) of undifferentiated PC12 cells and cortical neuronal cells isolated from gestation 18 day rat embryos in a concentration-dependent manner (more than 50 µM). The ER antagonists, ICI 182,780, and tamoxifen, did not block these effects. The cell vulnerability against BPA was not significantly different in the PC12 cells overexpressing ER-α and ER-β compared with PC12 cells expressing vector alone. In addition, there was no difference observed between BPA and 17-β estradiol, a well-known agonist of ER receptor in the induction of neurotoxic responses. Further study of the mechanism showed that BPA significantly activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but inhibited anti-apoptotic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. In addition, ERK-specific inhibitor, PD 98,059, reversed BPA-induced cell death and restored NF-κB activity. This study demonstrated that exposure to BPA can cause neuronal cell death which may eventually be related with behavioral alternation in vivo. However, this neurotoxic effect may not be directly mediated through an ER receptor, as an ERK/NF-κB pathway may be more closely involved in BPA-induced neuronal toxicity. PMID:17322771

  6. The Relationship between the Financial Status of Sole Community Independent Pharmacies and Their Broader Involvement with Other Rural Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Andrea; Slifkin, Rebecca; King, Jennifer; Lampman, Michelle; Richardson, Indira; Rutledge, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To document sole community pharmacists' involvement with other local health care organizations, these pharmacies' current financial status, and to determine whether financial position was associated with the provision of pharmacy services to other local health care providers. Methods: We conducted semistructured interviews with…

  7. Clustering of Two Genes Putatively Involved in Cyanate Detoxification Evolved Recently and Independently in Multiple Fungal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, M. Holly; McGary, Kriston L.; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Slot, Jason C.; Geiser, David M.; Sink, Stacy; O’Donnell, Kerry; Rokas, Antonis

    2015-01-01

    Fungi that have the enzymes cyanase and carbonic anhydrase show a limited capacity to detoxify cyanate, a fungicide employed by both plants and humans. Here, we describe a novel two-gene cluster that comprises duplicated cyanase and carbonic anhydrase copies, which we name the CCA gene cluster, trace its evolution across Ascomycetes, and examine the evolutionary dynamics of its spread among lineages of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (hereafter referred to as the FOSC), a cosmopolitan clade of purportedly clonal vascular wilt plant pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal cyanase and carbonic anhydrase genes reveals that the CCA gene cluster arose independently at least twice and is now present in three lineages, namely Cochliobolus lunatus, Oidiodendron maius, and the FOSC. Genome-wide surveys within the FOSC indicate that the CCA gene cluster varies in copy number across isolates, is always located on accessory chromosomes, and is absent in FOSC’s closest relatives. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the CCA gene cluster in 163 FOSC strains from a wide variety of hosts suggests a recent history of rampant transfers between isolates. We hypothesize that the independent formation of the CCA gene cluster in different fungal lineages and its spread across FOSC strains may be associated with resistance to plant-produced cyanates or to use of cyanate fungicides in agriculture. PMID:25663439

  8. On reaction mechanisms involved in the deuteron–induced surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Mănăilescu, C.

    2015-02-24

    An extended analysis of the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved within deuteron interaction with nuclei, namely the breakup, stripping, pick-up, pre-equilibrium emission, and evaporation from fully equilibrated compound nucleus, is presented in order to highlight the importance of the direct mechanisms still neglected in the analysis of deuteron-induced surrogate reactions. Particularly, the dominance of the breakup mechanism at low energies around the Coulomb barrier should be considered in the case of (d,x) surrogate reactions on actinide target nuclei.

  9. A theoretical study of the molecular mechanism of the GAPDH Trypanosoma cruzi enzyme involving iodoacetate inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Agnaldo Silva; Lameira, Jerônimo; Alves, Cláudio Nahum

    2011-10-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme (GAPDH) is an important biological target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents against Chagas disease. In this Letter, the inhibition mechanism of GAPDH involving iodoacetate (IAA) inhibitor was studied using the hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach and molecular dynamic simulations. Analysis of the potential energy surface and potential of mean force show that the covalent attachment of IAA inhibitor to the active site of the enzyme occurs as a concerted process. In addition, the energy terms decomposition shows that NAD+ plays an important role in stabilization of the reagents and transition state.

  10. On reaction mechanisms involved in the deuteron-induced surrogate reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Mǎnǎilescu, C.

    2015-02-01

    An extended analysis of the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved within deuteron interaction with nuclei, namely the breakup, stripping, pick-up, pre-equilibrium emission, and evaporation from fully equilibrated compound nucleus, is presented in order to highlight the importance of the direct mechanisms still neglected in the analysis of deuteron-induced surrogate reactions. Particularly, the dominance of the breakup mechanism at low energies around the Coulomb barrier should be considered in the case of (d,x) surrogate reactions on actinide target nuclei.

  11. Mechanisms involved in calcium deficiency development in tomato fruit in response to gibberellins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although gibberellins (GAs) have been shown to induce the calcium deficiency disorder, blossom-end rot (BER), development in tomato fruit (Solanum lycopersicum), the mechanisms involved remain largely unexplored. Our objectives were to better understand how GAs and a GA biosynthesis inhibitor affect...

  12. The Regulatory T Cell Lineage Factor Foxp3 Regulates Gene Expression through Several Distinct Mechanisms Mostly Independent of Direct DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Hebenstreit, Daniel; Teichmann, Sarah A.; Betz, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    The lineage factor Foxp3 is essential for the development and maintenance of regulatory T cells, but little is known about the mechanisms involved. Here, we demonstrate that an N-terminal proline-rich interaction region is crucial for Foxp3’s function. Subdomains within this key region link Foxp3 to several independent mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Our study suggests that Foxp3, even in the absence of its DNA-binding forkhead domain, acts as a bridge between DNA-binding interaction partners and proteins with effector function permitting it to regulate a large number of genes. We show that, in one such mechanism, Foxp3 recruits class I histone deacetylases to the promoters of target genes, counteracting activation-induced histone acetylation and thereby suppressing their expression. PMID:26107960

  13. Cardioprotection by H2S Donors: Nitric Oxide-Dependent and ‑Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chatzianastasiou, Athanasia; Bibli, Sofia-Iris; Andreadou, Ioanna; Efentakis, Panagiotis; Kaludercic, Nina; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Di Lisa, Fabio; Daiber, Andreas; Manolopoulos, Vangelis G; Szabó, Csaba; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a signaling molecule with protective effects in the cardiovascular system. To harness the therapeutic potential of H2S, a number of donors have been developed. The present study compares the cardioprotective actions of representative H2S donors from different classes and studies their mechanisms of action in myocardial injury in vitro and in vivo. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to H2O2 led to significant cytotoxicity, which was inhibited by sodium sulfide (Na2S), thiovaline (TV), GYY4137 [morpholin-4-ium 4 methoxyphenyl(morpholino) phosphinodithioate], and AP39 [(10-oxo-10-(4-(3-thioxo-3H-1,2-dithiol5yl)phenoxy)decyl) triphenylphospho-nium bromide]. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis prevented the cytoprotective effects of Na2S and TV, but not GYY4137 and AP39, against H2O2-induced cardiomyocyte injury. Mice subjected to left anterior descending coronary ligation were protected from ischemia-reperfusion injury by the H2S donors tested. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in vivo blocked only the beneficial effect of Na2S. Moreover, Na2S, but not AP39, administration enhanced the phosphorylation of endothelial NOS and vasodilator-associated phosphoprotein. Both Na2S and AP39 reduced infarct size in mice lacking cyclophilin-D (CypD), a modulator of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP). Nevertheless, only AP39 displayed a direct effect on mitochondria by increasing the mitochondrial Ca(2+) retention capacity, which is evidence of decreased propensity to undergo permeability transition. We conclude that although all the H2S donors we tested limited infarct size, the pathways involved were not conserved. Na2S had no direct effects on PTP opening, and its action was nitric oxide dependent. In contrast, the cardioprotection exhibited by AP39 could result from a direct inhibitory effect on PTP acting at a site different than CypD. PMID:27342567

  14. Proviral amplification of the Gypsy endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster involves env-independent invasion of the female germline.

    PubMed

    Chalvet, F; Teysset, L; Terzian, C; Prud'homme, N; Santamaria, P; Bucheton, A; Pélisson, A

    1999-05-01

    Gypsy is an infectious endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. The gypsy proviruses replicate very efficiently in the genome of the progeny of females homozygous for permissive alleles of the flamenco gene. This replicative transposition is correlated with derepression of gypsy expression, specifically in the somatic cells of the ovaries of the permissive mothers. The determinism of this amplification was studied further by making chimeric mothers containing different permissive/restrictive and somatic/germinal lineages. We show here that the derepression of active proviruses in the permissive soma is necessary and sufficient to induce proviral insertions in the progeny, even if the F1 flies derive from restrictive germ cells devoid of active proviruses. Therefore, gypsy endogenous multiplication results from the transfer of some gypsy-encoded genetic material from the soma towards the germen of the mother and its subsequent insertion into the chromosomes of the progeny. This transfer, however, is not likely to result from retroviral infection of the germline. Indeed, we also show here that the insertion of a tagged gypsy element, mutant for the env gene, occurs at high frequency, independently of the production of gypsy Env proteins by any transcomplementing helper. The possible role of the env gene for horizontal transfer to new hosts is discussed. PMID:10228177

  15. An alternative, arginase-independent pathway for arginine metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis involves guanidinobutyrase as a key enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, G; Verhoeven, M D; Mans, R; Fleury Rey, Y; Bel-Rhlid, R; van den Broek, M; Maleki Seifar, R; Ten Pierick, A; Thompson, M; Müller, V; Wahl, S A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2014-01-01

    Most available knowledge on fungal arginine metabolism is derived from studies on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which arginine catabolism is initiated by releasing urea via the arginase reaction. Orthologues of the S. cerevisiae genes encoding the first three enzymes in the arginase pathway were cloned from Kluyveromyces lactis and shown to functionally complement the corresponding deletion in S. cerevisiae. Surprisingly, deletion of the single K. lactis arginase gene KlCAR1 did not completely abolish growth on arginine as nitrogen source. Growth rate of the deletion mutant strongly increased during serial transfer in shake-flask cultures. A combination of RNAseq-based transcriptome analysis and 13C-15N-based flux analysis was used to elucidate the arginase-independent pathway. Isotopic 13C15N-enrichment in γ-aminobutyrate revealed succinate as the entry point in the TCA cycle of the alternative pathway. Transcript analysis combined with enzyme activity measurements indicated increased expression in the Klcar1Δ mutant of a guanidinobutyrase (EC.3.5.3.7), a key enzyme in a new pathway for arginine degradation. Expression of the K. lactis KLLA0F27995g (renamed KlGBU1) encoding guanidinobutyrase enabled S. cerevisiae to use guanidinobutyrate as sole nitrogen source and its deletion in K. lactis almost completely abolish growth on this nitrogen source. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this enzyme activity is widespread in fungi. PMID:24912400

  16. Modeling steady-state experiments with a scanning electrochemical microscope involving several independent diffusing species using the boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Sklyar, Oleg; Träuble, Markus; Zhao, Chuan; Wittstock, Gunther

    2006-08-17

    The BEM algorithm developed earlier for steady-state experiments in the scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) feedback mode has been expanded to allow for the treatment of more than one independently diffusing species. This allows the treatment of substrate-generation/tip-collection SECM experiments. The simulations revealed the interrelation of sample layout, local kinetics, imaging conditions, and the quality of the obtained SECM images. Resolution in the SECM SG/TC images has been evaluated, and it depends on several factors. For most practical situations, the resolution is limited by the diffusion profiles of the sample. When a dissolved compound is converted at the sample (e.g., oxygen reduction or enzymatic reaction at the sample), the working distance should be significantly larger than in SECM feedback experiments (ca. 3 r(T) for RG = 5) in order to avoid diffusional shielding of the active regions on the sample by the UME body. The resolution ability also depends on the kinetics of the active regions. The best resolution can be expected if all the active regions cause the same flux. In one simulated example, which might mimic a possible scenario of a low-density protein array, considerable compromises in the resolving power, were noted when the flux from two neighboring spots differs by more than a factor of 2. PMID:16898739

  17. Cissus sicyoides: Pharmacological Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antidiarrheal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Beserra, Fernando Pereira; de Cássia Santos, Raquel; Périco, Larissa Lucena; Rodrigues, Vinicius Peixoto; de Almeida Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Pupo, André Sampaio; da Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in anti-inflammatory and antidiarrheal actions of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the leaves of Cissus sicyoides (HECS). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by oral administration of HECS against acute model of edema induced by xylene, and the mechanisms of action were analysed by involvement of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The antidiarrheal effect of HECS was observed and we analyzed the motility and accumulation of intestinal fluid. We also analyzed the antidiarrheal mechanisms of action of HECS by evaluating the role of the opioid receptor, α2 adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor, nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2. The oral administration of HECS inhibited the edema induced by xylene and AA and was also able to significantly decrease the levels of PGE2. The extract also exhibited significant anti-diarrheal activity by reducing motility and intestinal fluid accumulation. This extract significantly reduced intestinal transit stimulated by muscarinic agonist and intestinal secretion induced by PGE2. Our data demonstrate that the mechanism of action involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of HECS is related to PGE2. The antidiarrheal effect of this extract may be mediated by inhibition of contraction by acting on the intestinal smooth muscle and/or intestinal transit. PMID:26805827

  18. Acquisition of Estrogen Independence Induces TOB1-Related Mechanisms Supporting Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Wei; Nasto, Rochelle E.; Varghese, Rency; Jablonski, Sandra A.; Serebriiskii, Ilya G; Surana, Rishi; Calvert, Valerie S.; Bebu, Ionut; Murray, Joseph; Jin, Lu; Johnson, Michael; Riggins, Rebecca; Ressom, Habtom; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Clarke, Robert; Golemis, Erica A.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to therapies targeting the estrogen pathway remains a challenge in the treatment of estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. To address this challenge, a systems biology approach was used. A library of siRNAs targeting an estrogen receptor- and aromatase-centered network identified 46 genes that are dispensable in estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells, but are selectively required for the survival of estrogen-independent MCF7-derived cells, and multiple additional estrogen-independent breast cancer cell lines. Integration of this information identified a tumor suppressor gene TOB1 as a critical determinant of estrogen-independent estrogen receptor-positive breast cell survival. Depletion of TOB1 selectively promoted G1 phase arrest and sensitivity to AKT and mTOR inhibitors in estrogen-independent cells but not estrogen-dependent cells. Phosphoproteomic profiles from reverse phase protein array analysis supported by mRNA profiling identified a significant signaling network reprogramming by TOB1 that differed in estrogen-sensitive and estrogen-resistant cell lines. These data support a novel function for TOB1 in mediating survival of estrogen-independent breast cancers. These studies also provide evidence for combining TOB1 inhibition and AKT/mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic strategy, with potential translational significance for the management of patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers. PMID:26165839

  19. Acquisition of estrogen independence induces TOB1-related mechanisms supporting breast cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y-W; Nasto, R E; Varghese, R; Jablonski, S A; Serebriiskii, I G; Surana, R; Calvert, V S; Bebu, I; Murray, J; Jin, L; Johnson, M; Riggins, R; Ressom, H; Petricoin, E; Clarke, R; Golemis, E A; Weiner, L M

    2016-03-31

    Resistance to therapies targeting the estrogen pathway remains a challenge in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. To address this challenge, a systems biology approach was used. A library of small interfering RNAs targeting an estrogen receptor (ER)- and aromatase-centered network identified 46 genes that are dispensable in estrogen-dependent MCF7 cells, but are selectively required for the survival of estrogen-independent MCF7-derived cells and multiple additional estrogen-independent breast cancer cell lines. Integration of this information identified a tumor suppressor gene TOB1 as a critical determinant of estrogen-independent ER-positive breast cell survival. Depletion of TOB1 selectively promoted G1 phase arrest and sensitivity to AKT and mammalian target of rapmycin (mTOR) inhibitors in estrogen-independent cells but not in estrogen-dependent cells. Phosphoproteomic profiles from reverse-phase protein array analysis supported by mRNA profiling identified a significant signaling network reprogramming by TOB1 that differed in estrogen-sensitive and estrogen-resistant cell lines. These data support a novel function for TOB1 in mediating survival of estrogen-independent breast cancers. These studies also provide evidence for combining TOB1 inhibition and AKT/mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic strategy, with potential translational significance for the management of patients with ER-positive breast cancers. PMID:26165839

  20. Tissue transglutaminase is involved in mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation of human ligamentum flavum cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yuan-Hung; Huang, Shih-Yung; Yang, Ruei-Cheng; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation might be the key cellular event in the calcification and ossification of ligamentum flavum. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tissue transglutaminase (TGM2) on mechanical load-induced osteogenesis of ligamentum flavum cells. Human ligamentum flavum cells were obtained from 12 patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Osteogenic phenotypes of ligamentum flavum cells, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin red-S stain, and gene expression of osteogenic makers were evaluated following the administration of mechanical load and BMP-2 treatment. The expression of TGM2 was evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Our results showed that mechanical load in combination with BMP-2 enhanced calcium deposition and ALP activity. Mechanical load significantly increased ALP and OC gene expression on day 3, whereas BMP-2 significantly increased ALP, OPN, and Runx2 on day 7. Mechanical load significantly induced TGM2 gene expression and enzyme activity in human ligamentum flavum cells. Exogenous TGM2 increased ALP and OC gene expression; while, inhibited TG activity significantly attenuated mechanical load-induced and TGM2-induced ALP activity. In summary, mechanical load-induced TGM2 expression and enzyme activity is involved in the progression of the calcification of ligamentum flavum. PMID:27115725

  1. PHTS, a novel putative tumor suppressor, is involved in the transformation reversion of HeLaHF cells independently of the p53 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Dehua; Fan, Wufang; Liu, Guohong; Nguy, Vivian; Chatterton, Jon E.; Long Shilong; Ke, Ning; Meyhack, Bernd; Bruengger, Adrian; Brachat, Arndt; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Li, Qi-Xiang . E-mail: li@immusol.com

    2006-04-01

    HeLaHF is a non-transformed revertant of HeLa cells, likely resulting from the activation of a putative tumor suppressor(s). p53 protein was stabilized in this revertant and reactivated for certain transactivation functions. Although p53 stabilization has not conclusively been linked to the reversion, it is clear that the genes in p53 pathway are involved. The present study confirms the direct role of p53 in HeLaHF reversion by demonstrating that RNAi-mediated p53 silencing partially restores anchorage-independent growth potential of the revertant through the suppression of anoikis. In addition, we identified a novel gene, named PHTS, with putative tumor suppressor properties, and showed that this gene is also involved in HeLaHF reversion independently of the p53 pathway. Expression profiling revealed that PHTS is one of the genes that is up-regulated in HeLaHF but not in HeLa. It encodes a putative protein with CD59-like domains. RNAi-mediated PHTS silencing resulted in the partial restoration of transformation (anchorage-independent growth) in HeLaHF cells, similar to that of p53 gene silencing, implying its tumor suppressor effect. However, the observed increased transformation potential by PHTS silencing appears to be due to an increased anchorage-independent proliferation rate rather than suppression of anoikis, unlike the effect of p53 silencing. p53 silencing did not affect PHTS gene expression, and vice versa, suggesting PHTS may function in a new and p53-independent tumor suppressor pathway. Furthermore, over-expression of PHTS in different cancer cell lines, in addition to HeLa, reduces cell growth likely via induced apoptosis, confirming the broad PHTS tumor suppressor properties.

  2. Picropodophyllin causes mitotic arrest and catastrophe by depolymerizing microtubules via Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Waraky, Ahmed; Akopyan, Karen; Parrow, Vendela; Strömberg, Thomas; Axelson, Magnus; Abrahmsén, Lars; Lindqvist, Arne; Larsson, Olle; Aleem, Eiman

    2014-01-01

    Picropodophyllin (PPP) is an anticancer drug undergoing clinical development in NSCLC. PPP has been shown to suppress IGF-1R signaling and to induce a G2/M cell cycle phase arrest but the exact mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The present study identified an IGF-1-independent mechanism of PPP leading to pro-metaphase arrest. The mitotic block was induced in human cancer cell lines and in an A549 xenograft mouse but did not occur in normal hepatocytes/mouse tissues. Cell cycle arrest by PPP occurred in vitro and in vivo accompanied by prominent CDK1 activation, and was IGF-1R-independent since it occurred also in IGF-1R-depleted and null cells. The tumor cells were not arrested in G2/M but in mitosis. Centrosome separation was prevented during mitotic entry, resulting in a monopolar mitotic spindle with subsequent prometaphase-arrest, independent of Plk1/Aurora A or Eg5, and leading to cell features of mitotic catastrophe. PPP also increased soluble tubulin and decreased spindle-associated tubulin within minutes, indicating that it interfered with microtubule dynamics. These results provide a novel IGF-1R-independent mechanism of antitumor effects of PPP. PMID:25268741

  3. Cancer cachexia causes skeletal muscle damage via transient receptor potential vanilloid 2‐independent mechanisms, unlike muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuyuki; Ohtake, Hitomi; Kamauchi, Shinya; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Kiyono, Tohru; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Muscle wasting during cancer cachexia contributes to patient morbidity. Cachexia‐induced muscle damage may be understood by comparing its symptoms with those of other skeletal muscle diseases, but currently available data are limited. Methods We modelled cancer cachexia in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma/colon adenocarcinoma and compared the associated muscle damage with that in a murine muscular dystrophy model (mdx mice). We measured biochemical and immunochemical parameters: amounts/localization of cytoskeletal proteins and/or Ca2+ signalling proteins related to muscle function and abnormality. We analysed intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and compared results between the two models. Involvement of Ca2+‐permeable channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) was examined by inoculating Lewis lung carcinoma cells into transgenic mice expressing dominant‐negative TRPV2. Results Tumourigenesis caused loss of body and skeletal muscle weight and reduced muscle force and locomotor activity. Similar to mdx mice, cachexia muscles exhibited myolysis, reduced sarcolemmal sialic acid content, and enhanced lysosomal exocytosis and sarcolemmal localization of phosphorylated Ca2+/CaMKII. Abnormal autophagy and degradation of dystrophin also occurred. Unlike mdx muscles, cachexia muscles did not exhibit regeneration markers (centrally nucleated fibres), and levels of autophagic proteolytic pathway markers increased. While a slight accumulation of TRPV2 was observed in cachexia muscles, Ca2+ influx via TRPV2 was not elevated in cachexia‐associated myotubes, and the course of cachexia pathology was not ameliorated by dominant‐negative inhibition of TRPV2. Conclusions Thus, cancer cachexia may induce muscle damage through TRPV2‐independent mechanisms distinct from those in muscular dystrophy; this may help treat patients with tumour‐induced muscle wasting. PMID:27239414

  4. Independent ethical review of studies involving personal medical records. Report of a working group to the Royal College of Physicians Committee on Ethical Issues in Medicine.

    PubMed

    1994-01-01

    There is a duty to use available information for the general good where this can be done without detriment. It is, in principle, ethically acceptable to use personal medical records without approaching or involving the patients concerned, provided that confidentiality and anonymity are preserved; such use does not require independent ethical approval provided that confidentiality is assured and subject to safeguards described below. Epidemiologists have a special interest in the use of personal medical records in their work (in this context the use of health-related registers and existing biological samples may be included), though access to such data involves professional staff in all medical specialties, not only those in epidemiology. The following guidance is based on a report of a working group (which included non-medical members) to the Royal College of Physicians Committee on Ethical Issues in Medicine. Activities such as medical audit, epidemiological surveillance, inquiries designed to establish indices of morbidity and mortality and outbreak investigations all constitute medical practice and as such do not require independent ethical review. Research involving access to medical records, health-related registers, or existing biological samples only, without direct patient involvement, requires neither explicit individual patient consent nor independent ethical review provided that: a) explicit consent to access a person's records is obtained either from official custodians of the records (who have a duty to satisfy themselves as to the bona fides and competence of the investigator) or from the patient's clinician: the decision to access personal medical information should not be left to the sole discretion of the investigator.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7807434

  5. Mechanisms involved in the chemoprotective effects of rosemary extract studied in human liver and bronchial cells.

    PubMed

    Offord, E A; Macé, K; Avanti, O; Pfeifer, A M

    1997-03-19

    Natural polyphenols found in rosemary have not only potent antioxidant activities but also anticarcinogenic properties. We have studied some of the molecular mechanisms involved in their chemopreventive action using in vitro human liver and bronchial cell models. Rosemary extract, or its active components, carnosol or carnosic acid are potent inhibitors of DNA adduct formation induced by benzo(a)pyrene or aflatoxin B1. At least two mechanisms are involved in the anticarcinogenic action of rosemary extract: (i) inhibition of the metabolic activation of procarcinogens catalysed by the phase I cytochrome P450 enzymes; (ii) induction of the detoxification pathway catalysed by the phase II enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase. PMID:9103309

  6. Neural Mechanisms Involved in Hypersensitive Hearing: Helping Children with ASD Who Are Overly Sensitive to Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Lucker, Jay R.; Doman, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Professionals working with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may find that these children are overly sensitive to sounds. These professionals are often concerned as to why children may have auditory hypersensitivities. This review article discusses the neural mechanisms identified underlying hypersensitive hearing in people. The authors focus on brain research to support the idea of the nonclassical auditory pathways being involved in connecting the auditory system with the emotional system of the brain. The authors also discuss brain mechanisms felt to be involved in auditory hypersensitivity. The authors conclude with a discussion of some treatments for hypersensitive hearing. These treatments include desensitization training and the use of listening therapies such as The Listening Program. PMID:26823983

  7. A centrosomal mechanism involving CDK5RAP2 and CENPJ controls brain size.

    PubMed

    Bond, Jacquelyn; Roberts, Emma; Springell, Kelly; Lizarraga, Sofia B; Lizarraga, Sophia; Scott, Sheila; Higgins, Julie; Hampshire, Daniel J; Morrison, Ewan E; Leal, Gabriella F; Silva, Elias O; Costa, Suzana M R; Baralle, Diana; Raponi, Michela; Karbani, Gulshan; Rashid, Yasmin; Jafri, Hussain; Bennett, Christopher; Corry, Peter; Walsh, Christopher A; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2005-04-01

    Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly is a potential model in which to research genes involved in human brain growth. We show that two forms of the disorder result from homozygous mutations in the genes CDK5RAP2 and CENPJ. We found neuroepithelial expression of the genes during prenatal neurogenesis and protein localization to the spindle poles of mitotic cells, suggesting that a centrosomal mechanism controls neuron number in the developing mammalian brain. PMID:15793586

  8. NOX signaling in molecular cardiovascular mechanisms involved in the blood pressure homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Santillo, Mariarosaria; Colantuoni, Antonio; Mondola, Paolo; Guida, Bruna; Damiano, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Blood pressure homeostasis is maintained by several mechanisms regulating cardiac output, vascular resistances, and blood volume. At cellular levels, reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling is involved in multiple molecular mechanisms controlling blood pressure. Among ROS producing systems, NADPH oxidases (NOXs), expressed in different cells of the cardiovascular system, are the most important enzymes clearly linked to the development of hypertension. NOXs exert a central role in cardiac mechanosensing, endothelium-dependent relaxation, and Angiotensin-II (Ang-II) redox signaling regulating vascular tone. The central role of NOXs in redox-dependent cardiovascular cell functions renders these enzymes a promising pharmacological target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. The aim of the present review is to focus on the physiological role of the cardiovascular NOX-generating ROS in the molecular and cellular mechanisms affecting blood pressure. PMID:26217233

  9. Altered rest-activity patterns evolve via circadian independent mechanisms in cave adapted balitorid loaches.

    PubMed

    Duboué, Erik R; Borowsky, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms and rest homeostasis are independent processes, each regulating important components of rest-activity patterns. Evolutionarily, the two are distinct from one another; total rest time is maintained unaffected even when circadian pacemaker cells are ablated. Throughout the animal kingdom, there exists a huge variation in rest-activity patterns, yet it is unclear how these behaviors have evolved. Here we show that four species of balitorid cavefish have greatly reduced rest times in comparison to rest times of their surface relatives. All four cave species retained biological rhythmicity, and in three of the four there is a pronounced 24-hour rhythm; in the fourth there is an altered rhythmicity of 38-40 hours. Thus, consistent changes in total rest have evolved in these species independent of circadian rhythmicity. Taken together, our data suggest that consistent reduction in total rest times were accomplished evolutionarily through alterations in rest homeostasis. PMID:22348026

  10. Peripheral and Central Mechanisms Involved in the Hormonal Control of Male and Female Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, L M; Bentley, G E; Calandra, R S; Paredes, A H; Tesone, M; Wu, T J; Micevych, P E

    2016-07-01

    Reproduction involves the integration of hormonal signals acting across multiple systems to generate a synchronised physiological output. A critical component of reproduction is the luteinising hormone (LH) surge, which is mediated by oestradiol (E2 ) and neuroprogesterone interacting to stimulate kisspeptin release in the rostral periventricular nucleus of the third ventricle in rats. Recent evidence indicates the involvement of both classical and membrane E2 and progesterone signalling in this pathway. A metabolite of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GnRH-(1-5), has been shown to stimulate GnRH expression and secretion, and has a role in the regulation of lordosis. Additionally, gonadotrophin release-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) projects to and influences the activity of GnRH neurones in birds. Stress-induced changes in GnIH have been shown to alter breeding behaviour in birds, demonstrating another mechanism for the molecular control of reproduction. Peripherally, paracrine and autocrine actions within the gonad have been suggested as therapeutic targets for infertility in both males and females. Dysfunction of testicular prostaglandin synthesis is a possible cause of idiopathic male infertility. Indeed, local production of melatonin and corticotrophin-releasing hormone could influence spermatogenesis via immune pathways in the gonad. In females, vascular endothelial growth factor A has been implicated in an angiogenic process that mediates development of the corpus luteum and thus fertility via the Notch signalling pathway. Age-induced decreases in fertility involve ovarian kisspeptin and its regulation of ovarian sympathetic innervation. Finally, morphological changes in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus influence female sexual receptivity in rats. The processes mediating these morphological changes have been shown to involve the rapid effects of E2 controlling synaptogenesis in this hypothalamic nucleus. In summary, this review highlights new

  11. A Cytochrome P450–Independent Mechanism of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Albee, Ryan; Letzig, Lynda G.; Lehner, Andreas F.; Scott, Michael A.; Buchweitz, John P.; James, Laura P.; Ganey, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse hepatic parenchymal cells (HPCs) have become the most frequently used in vitro model to study mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. It is universally accepted that APAP hepatocellular injury requires bioactivation by cytochromes P450 (P450s), but this remains unproven in primary mouse HPCs in vitro, especially over the wide range of concentrations that have been employed in published reports. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that APAP-induced hepatocellular death in vitro depends solely on P450s. We evaluated APAP cytotoxicity and APAP-protein adducts (a biomarker of metabolic bioactivation by P450) using primary mouse HPCs in the presence and absence of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of P450s, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT). 1-ABT abolished formation of APAP-protein adducts at all concentrations of APAP (0–14 mM), but eliminated cytotoxicity only at small concentrations (≦5 mM), indicating the presence of a P450-independent mechanism at larger APAP concentrations. P450-independent cell death was delayed in onset relative to toxicity observed at smaller concentrations. p-Aminophenol was detected in primary mouse HPCs exposed to large concentrations of APAP, and a deacetylase inhibitor [bis (4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP)] significantly reduced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, APAP hepatocellular injury in vitro occurs by at least two mechanisms, a P450-dependent mechanism that operates at concentrations of APAP ≦ 5 mM and a P450-independent mechanism that predominates at larger concentrations and is slower in onset. p-Aminophenol most likely contributes to the latter mechanism. These findings should be considered in interpreting results from APAP cytotoxicity studies in vitro and in selecting APAP concentrations for use in such studies. PMID:26065700

  12. Bone cell-independent benefits of raloxifene on the skeleton: A novel mechanism for improving bone material properties

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, Maxime A.; Brown, Drew M.; Hammond, Max; Wallace, Joseph M.; Du, Jiang; Deymier-Black, Alix C.; Almer, Jonathan D.; Stock, Stuart R.; Allen, Matthew R.; Burr, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Raloxifene is an FDA approved agent used to treat bone loss and decrease fracture risk. In clinical trials and animal studies, raloxifene reduces fracture risk and improves bone mechanical properties, but the mechanisms of action remain unclear because these benefits occur largely independent of changes to bone mass. Using a novel experimental approach, machined bone beams, both from mature male canine and human male donors, were depleted of living cells and then exposed to raloxifene ex vivo. Our data show that ex vivo exposure of non-viable bone to raloxifene improves intrinsic toughness, both in canine and human cortical bone beams tested by 4-point bending. These effects are cell-independent and appear to be mediated by an increase in matrix bound water, assessed using basic gravimetric weighing and sophisticated ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging. The hydroxyl groups (−OH) on raloxifene were shown to be important in both the water and toughness increases. Wide and small angle x-ray scattering patterns during 4-pt bending show that raloxifene alters the transfer of load between the collagen matrix and the mineral crystals, placing lower strains on the mineral, and allowing greater overall deformation prior to failure. Collectively, these findings provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the therapeutic effect of raloxifene and more importantly identify a cell-independent mechanism that can be utilized for novel pharmacological approaches for enhancing bone strength. PMID:24468719

  13. Bone cell-independent benefits of raloxifene on the skeleton: a novel mechanism for improving bone material properties.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Maxime A; Brown, Drew M; Hammond, Max; Wallace, Joseph M; Du, Jiang; Deymier-Black, Alix C; Almer, Jonathan D; Stock, Stuart R; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David B

    2014-04-01

    Raloxifene is an FDA approved agent used to treat bone loss and decrease fracture risk. In clinical trials and animal studies, raloxifene reduces fracture risk and improves bone mechanical properties, but the mechanisms of action remain unclear because these benefits occur largely independent of changes to bone mass. Using a novel experimental approach, machined bone beams, both from mature male canine and human male donors, were depleted of living cells and then exposed to raloxifene ex vivo. Our data show that ex vivo exposure of non-viable bone to raloxifene improves intrinsic toughness, both in canine and human cortical bone beams tested by 4-point bending. These effects are cell-independent and appear to be mediated by an increase in matrix bound water, assessed using basic gravimetric weighing and sophisticated ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging. The hydroxyl groups (OH) on raloxifene were shown to be important in both the water and toughness increases. Wide and small angle X-ray scattering patterns during 4-pt bending show that raloxifene alters the transfer of load between the collagen matrix and the mineral crystals, placing lower strains on the mineral, and allowing greater overall deformation prior to failure. Collectively, these findings provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the therapeutic effect of raloxifene and more importantly identify a cell-independent mechanism that can be utilized for novel pharmacological approaches for enhancing bone strength. PMID:24468719

  14. Differential gene expression in seasonal sympatry: mechanisms involved in diverging life histories.

    PubMed

    Fudickar, Adam M; Peterson, Mark P; Greives, Timothy J; Atwell, Jonathan W; Bridge, Eli S; Ketterson, Ellen D

    2016-03-01

    In an era of climate change, understanding the genetic and physiological mechanisms underlying flexibility in phenology and life history has gained greater importance. These mechanisms can be elucidated by comparing closely related populations that differ in key behavioural and physiological traits such as migration and timing of reproduction. We compared gene expression in two recently diverged dark-eyed Junco ( Junco hyemalis) subspecies that live in seasonal sympatry during winter and early spring, but that differ in behaviour and physiology, despite exposure to identical environmental cues. We identified 547 genes differentially expressed in blood and pectoral muscle. Genes involved in lipid transport and metabolism were highly expressed in migrant juncos, while genes involved in reproductive processes were highly expressed in resident breeders. Seasonal differences in gene expression in closely related populations residing in the same environment provide significant insights into mechanisms underlying variation in phenology and life history, and have potential implications for the role of seasonal timing differences in gene flow and reproductive isolation. PMID:26979563

  15. Review of endocrine disorders associated with environmental toxicants and possible involved mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Bahadar, Haji; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are released into environment from different sources. They are mainly used in packaging industries, pesticides and food constituents. Clinical evidence, experimental models, and epidemiological studies suggest that EDC have major risks for human by targeting different organs and systems in the body. Multiple mechanisms are involved in targeting the normal system, through estrogen receptors, nuclear receptors and steroidal receptors activation. In this review, different methods by which xenobiotics stimulate signaling pathways and genetic mutation or DNA methylation have been discussed. These methods help to understand the results of xenobiotic action on the endocrine system. Endocrine disturbances in the human body result in breast cancer, ovarian problems, thyroid eruptions, testicular carcinoma, Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, nerve damage and obesity. EDC characterize a wide class of compounds such as organochlorinated pesticides, industrial wastes, plastics and plasticizers, fuels and numerous other elements that exist in the environment or are in high use during daily life. The interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems, especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to reproductive problems, diabetes, and breast, testicular and ovarian cancers should be deeply investigated. There should also be a focus on public awareness of these EDC risks and their use in routine life. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize all evidence regarding different physiological disruptions in the body and possible involved mechanisms, to prove the association between endocrine disruptions and human diseases. PMID:26497928

  16. Gartanin Protects Neurons against Glutamate-Induced Cell Death in HT22 Cells: Independence of Nrf-2 but Involvement of HO-1 and AMPK.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Yun; Wang, Sheng-Nan; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Lan, Wen-Jian; Chen, Zi-Wei; Chen, Jing-Kao; Xie, Jian-Hui; Han, Yi-Fan; Pi, Rong-Biao; Yang, Xiao-Bo

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress mediates the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Gartanin, a natural xanthone of mangosteen, possesses multipharmacological activities. Herein, the neuroprotection capacity of gartanin against glutamate-induced damage in HT22 cells and its possible mechanism(s) were investigated for the first time. Glutamate resulted in cell death in a dose-dependent manner and supplementation of 1-10 µM gartanin prevented the detrimental effects of glutamate on cell survival. Additional investigations on the underlying mechanisms suggested that gartanin could effectively reduce glutamate-induced intracellular ROS generation and mitochondrial depolarization. We further found that gartanin induced HO-1 expression independent of nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2). Subsequent studies revealed that the inhibitory effects of gartanin on glutamate-induced apoptosis were partially blocked by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of HO-1. Finally, the protein expression of phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its downstream signal molecules, Sirtuin activator (SIRT1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), increased after gartanin treatment. Taken together, these findings suggest gartanin is a potential neuroprotective agent against glutamate-induced oxidative injury partially through increasing Nrf-2-independed HO-1 and AMPK/SIRT1/PGC-1α signaling pathways. PMID:27161377

  17. Thymus involvement in myasthenia gravis: Epidemiological and clinical impacts of different self-tolerance breakdown mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Karni, Arnon; Asmail, Ali; Drory, Vivian E; Kolb, Hadar; Kesler, Anat

    2016-09-15

    The reasons for the abrogation of self-immunological tolerance in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) may be different between those with concomitant thymic hyperplasia or thymoma, and those with no evidence of thymic involvement. We conducted a retrospective observational case series study to investigate the epidemiology as well as the clinical, serologic, and electromyographic (EMG) characteristics of individuals diagnosed as having MG. We found that the average age at MG onset of patients with either thymic hyperplasia or thymoma was much younger (by ~20years) than that of MG patients without thymic involvement. Thymic hyperplasia was more common in females than males. There were no differences in the rates of ocular MG vs. generalized MG among those three study groups. There were also no group differences in the rates of neuromuscular junction disfunction, as observed on EMG or by the results of serology tests for acetyl choline receptor antibody. Interestingly, only patients without thymic involvement had other autoimmune diseases, and most of them were females. The patients with other coexisting autoimmune disease had a similar age at MG onset as the other patients with no thymic involvement. These results shed light on the impact of epidemiological and clinical factors that result from different mechanisms of self-immunological tolerance breakdown that occurs in MG. PMID:27609276

  18. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mabb, Angela M.; Simon, Jeremy M.; King, Ian F.; Lee, Hyeong-Min; An, Lin-Kun; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc’s) that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb) genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc’s, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A) that stabilizes TOP1cc’s. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression. PMID:27231886

  19. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mabb, Angela M; Simon, Jeremy M; King, Ian F; Lee, Hyeong-Min; An, Lin-Kun; Philpot, Benjamin D; Zylka, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc's) that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb) genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc's, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A) that stabilizes TOP1cc's. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression. PMID:27231886

  20. Absorption of Carotenoids and Mechanisms Involved in Their Health-Related Properties.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Victoria-Campos, Claudia I; Ornelas-Paz, José de Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids participate in the normal metabolism and function of the human body. They are involved in the prevention of several diseases, especially those related to the inflammation syndrome. Their main mechanisms of action are associated to their potent antioxidant activity and capacity to regulate the expression of specific genes and proteins. Recent findings suggest that carotenoid metabolites may explain several processes where the participation of their parent carotenoids was unclear. The health benefits of carotenoids strongly depend on their absorption and transformation during gastrointestinal digestion. The estimation of the 'bioaccessibility' of carotenoids through in vitro models have made possible the evaluation of the effect of a large number of factors on key stages of carotenoid digestion and intestinal absorption. The bioaccessibility of these compounds allows us to have a clear idea of their potential bioavailability, a term that implicitly involves the biological activity of these compounds. PMID:27485232

  1. Mechanisms involved in Korean mistletoe lectin-induced apoptosis of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Khil, Lee-Yong; Kim, Wi; Lyu, Suyun; Park, Won Bong; Yoon, Ji-Won; Jun, Hee-Sook

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the anti-cancer mechanisms of Korean mistletoe lectin (Viscum album coloratum agglutinin, VCA) using a human colon cancer cell line (COLO). METHODS: Cytotoxic effects of VCA on COLO cells were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in vitro and tumor-killing effects in vivo. To study the mechanisms involved, the expression of various pro-caspases, anti-apoptotic proteins, and death receptors was determined by western blot. To determine which death receptor is involved in VCA-induced apoptosis of COLO cells, cytotoxicity was examined by MTT assay after treatment with agonists or antagonists of death receptors. RESULTS: VCA killed COLO cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner and induced complete regression of tumors in nude mice transplanted with COLO cells. Treatment of COLO cells with VCA activated caspase-2, -3, -8, and -9 and decreased expression of anti-apoptotic molecules including receptor interacting protein, nuclear factor-κB, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, and Akt/protein kinase B. We then examined the involvement of death receptors in VCA-induced apoptosis. Only tumor necrosis factor receptor 1, among the death receptors examined, was involved in apoptosis of COLO cells, evidenced by inhibition of VCA-induced apoptosis and decreased activation of caspases, particularly caspase-8, by tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 antagonizing antibody. CONCLUSION: VCA-induced apoptotic COLO cell death is due to the activation of caspases and inhibition of anti-apoptotic proteins, in part through the tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 signaling pathway. PMID:17569116

  2. Mechanisms regulating proteostasis are involved in sympatric speciation of the blind mole rat, Spalax galili

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Karl A.; Li, Kexin; Nevo, Eviatar; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genome-wide analysis demonstrates extensive genomic adaptive complexes involved in sympatric speciation between blind mole rats (Spalax galili) in abutting populations living in basalt and chalk soils. Among the gene ontology (GO) enrichment, musculature and metabolism stood out in basalt dwellers while nutrition and neurogenetics were highlighted in chalk residents. Measurements of mechanisms regulating protein homeostasis inspired by these GO terms suggest that at the proteomic level there is also a habitat/soil-type driven divergence with the basalt residents exhibiting higher proteasome activity whereas elevated levels of markers of autophagy are evident in the chalk inhabitants. PMID:27050459

  3. Mechanisms regulating proteostasis are involved in sympatric speciation of the blind mole rat, Spalax galili.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Karl A; Li, Kexin; Nevo, Eviatar; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide analysis demonstrates extensive genomic adaptive complexes involved in sympatric speciation between blind mole rats (Spalax galili) in abutting populations living in basalt and chalk soils. Among the gene ontology (GO) enrichment, musculature and metabolism stood out in basalt dwellers while nutrition and neurogenetics were highlighted in chalk residents. Measurements of mechanisms regulating protein homeostasis inspired by these GO terms suggest that at the proteomic level there is also a habitat/soil-type driven divergence with the basalt residents exhibiting higher proteasome activity whereas elevated levels of markers of autophagy are evident in the chalk inhabitants. PMID:27050459

  4. Dynamic transcription factor activity networks in response to independently altered mechanical and adhesive microenvironmental cues.

    PubMed

    Peñalver Bernabé, Beatriz; Shin, Seungjin; Rios, Peter D; Broadbelt, Linda J; Shea, Lonnie D; Seidlits, Stephanie K

    2016-08-01

    Multiple aspects of the local extracellular environment profoundly affect cell phenotype and function. Physical and chemical cues in the environment trigger intracellular signaling cascades that ultimately activate transcription factors (TFs) - powerful regulators of the cell phenotype. TRACER (TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRrays) was employed for large-scale, dynamic quantification of TF activity in human fibroblasts cultured on hydrogels with a controlled elastic modulus and integrin ligand density. We identified three groups of TFs: responders to alterations in ligand density alone, substrate stiffness or both. Dynamic networks of regulatory TFs were constructed computationally and revealed distinct TF activity levels, directionality (i.e., activation or inhibition), and dynamics for adhesive and mechanical cues. Moreover, TRACER networks predicted conserved hubs of TF activity across multiple cell types, which are significantly altered in clinical fibrotic tissues. Our approach captures the distinct and overlapping effects of adhesive and mechanical stimuli, identifying conserved signaling mechanisms in normal and disease states. PMID:27470442

  5. Reaction mechanisms involved in reduction of halogenated hydrocarbons using sulfated iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, S.M.; Cipollone, M.G.; Wolfe, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the mechanisms and pathways involved in the reduction of halogenated hydrocarbons represented by trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with sulfated iron aqueous media. Results suggested that iron sulfide acted as the dehalogenation center. Zero-valent iron acted as a generator for molecular hydrogen through its reaction with water. Results of experiments in which iron sulfide was replaced by other transition metal sulfides and experiments in which zero-valent iron was replaced by other sources of molecular hydrogen will be reported. The main reduction product of chloroethylene derivatives was ethyne which under the catalytic reaction of zero-valent iron was reduced further to ethene and finally to ethane. Intermediate products were identified using GC-MS. Mechanisms and pathways will be presented.

  6. Identification of genes involved in regulatory mechanism of pigments in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tarique, T M; Yang, S; Mohsina, Z; Qiu, J; Yan, Z; Chen, G; Chen, A

    2014-01-01

    Chicken is an important model organism that unites the evolutionary gap between mammals and other vertebrates and provide major source of protein from meat and eggs for all over the world population. However, specific genes underlying the regulatory mechanism of broiler pigmentation have not yet been determined. In order to better understand the genes involved in the mechanism of pigmentation in the muscle tissues of broilers, the Affymetrix microarray hybridization experiment platform was used to identify gene expression profiles at 7 weeks of age. Broilers fed canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII pigments (100 mg/kg) were used to explore gene expression profiles). Our data showed that the 7th week of age was a very important phase with regard to gene expression profiles. We identified a number of differentially expressed genes; in canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII, there were 54 (32 upregulated and 22 downregulated), 23 (15 upregulated and 8 downregulated), and 7 (5 upregulated and 2 downregulated) known genes, respectively. Our data indicate that the numbers of differentially expressed genes were more upregulated than downregulated, and several genes showed conserved signaling to previously known functions. Thus, functional characterization of differentially expressed genes revealed several categories that are involved in important biological processes, including pigmentation, growth, molecular mechanisms, fat metabolism, cell proliferation, immune response, lipid metabolism, and protein synthesis and degradation. The results of the present study demonstrate that the genes associated with canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII are key regulatory genes that control the regulatory mechanisms of pigmentation. PMID:25222226

  7. Acetylcholinesterase Regulates Skeletal In Ovo Development of Chicken Limbs by ACh-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Spieker, Janine; Ackermann, Anica; Salfelder, Anika; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid; Layer, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate limb presents an excellent model to analyze a non-neuronal cholinergic system (NNCS). Here, we first analyzed the expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by IHC and of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by ISH in developing embryonic chicken limbs (stages HH17-37). AChE outlined formation of bones, being strongest at their distal tips, and later also marked areas of cell death. At onset, AChE and ChAT were elevated in two organizing centers of the limb anlage, the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and zone of polarizing activity (ZPA), respectively. Thereby ChAT was expressed shortly after AChE, thus strongly supporting a leading role of AChE in limb formation. Then, we conducted loss-of-function studies via unilateral implantation of beads into chicken limb anlagen, which were soaked in cholinergic components. After varying periods, the formation of cartilage matrix and of mineralizing bones was followed by Alcian blue (AB) and Alizarin red (AR) stainings, respectively. Both acetylcholine (ACh)- and ChAT-soaked beads accelerated bone formation in ovo. Notably, inhibition of AChE by BW284c51, or by the monoclonal antibody MAB304 delayed cartilage formation. Since bead inhibition of BChE was mostly ineffective, an ACh-independent action during BW284c51 and MAB304 inhibition was indicated, which possibly could be due to an enzymatic side activity of AChE. In conclusion, skeletogenesis in chick is regulated by an ACh-dependent cholinergic system, but to some extent also by an ACh-independent aspect of the AChE protein. PMID:27574787

  8. Independently evolved upper jaw protrusion mechanisms show convergent hydrodynamic function in teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Staab, Katie Lynn; Holzman, Roi; Hernandez, L Patricia; Wainwright, Peter C

    2012-05-01

    A protrusible upper jaw has independently evolved multiple times within teleosts and has been implicated in the success of two groups in particular: Acanthomorpha and Cypriniformes. We use digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) to compare suction feeding flow dynamics in a representative of each of these clades: goldfish and bluegill. Using DPIV, we contrast the spatial pattern of flow, the temporal relationship between flow and head kinematics, and the contribution of jaw protrusion to the forces exerted on prey. As expected, the spatial patterns of flow were similar in the two species. However, goldfish were slower to reach maximal kinematic excursions, and were more flexible in the relative timing of jaw protrusion, other jaw movements and suction flows. Goldfish were also able to sustain flow speeds for a prolonged period of time as compared with bluegill, in part because goldfish generate lower peak flow speeds. In both species, jaw protrusion increased the force exerted on the prey. However, slower jaw protrusion in goldfish resulted in less augmentation of suction forces. This difference in force exerted on prey corresponds with differences in trophic niches and feeding behavior of the two species. The bluegill uses powerful suction to capture insect larvae whereas the goldfish uses winnowing to sort through detritus and sediment. The kinethmoid of goldfish may permit jaw protrusion that is independent of lower jaw movement, which could explain the ability of goldfish to decouple suction flows (due to buccal expansion) from upper jaw protrusion. Nevertheless, our results show that jaw protrusion allows both species to augment the force exerted on prey, suggesting that this is a fundamental benefit of jaw protrusion to suction feeders. PMID:22496281

  9. Acetylcholinesterase Regulates Skeletal In Ovo Development of Chicken Limbs by ACh-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Spieker, Janine; Ackermann, Anica; Salfelder, Anika; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid; Layer, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate limb presents an excellent model to analyze a non-neuronal cholinergic system (NNCS). Here, we first analyzed the expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by IHC and of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by ISH in developing embryonic chicken limbs (stages HH17-37). AChE outlined formation of bones, being strongest at their distal tips, and later also marked areas of cell death. At onset, AChE and ChAT were elevated in two organizing centers of the limb anlage, the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and zone of polarizing activity (ZPA), respectively. Thereby ChAT was expressed shortly after AChE, thus strongly supporting a leading role of AChE in limb formation. Then, we conducted loss-of-function studies via unilateral implantation of beads into chicken limb anlagen, which were soaked in cholinergic components. After varying periods, the formation of cartilage matrix and of mineralizing bones was followed by Alcian blue (AB) and Alizarin red (AR) stainings, respectively. Both acetylcholine (ACh)- and ChAT-soaked beads accelerated bone formation in ovo. Notably, inhibition of AChE by BW284c51, or by the monoclonal antibody MAB304 delayed cartilage formation. Since bead inhibition of BChE was mostly ineffective, an ACh-independent action during BW284c51 and MAB304 inhibition was indicated, which possibly could be due to an enzymatic side activity of AChE. In conclusion, skeletogenesis in chick is regulated by an ACh-dependent cholinergic system, but to some extent also by an ACh-independent aspect of the AChE protein. PMID:27574787

  10. A Sister-Strand Exchange Mechanism for Reca-Independent Deletion of Repeated DNA Sequences in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, S. T.; Drapkin, P. T.; Sutera-Jr., V. A.; Gluckman-Peskind, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    In the genomes of many organisms, deletions arise between tandemly repeated DNA sequences of lengths ranging from several kilobases to only a few nucleotides. Using a plasmid-based assay for deletion of a 787-bp tandem repeat, we have found that a recA-independent mechanism contributes substantially to the deletion process of even this large region of homology. No Escherichia coli recombination gene tested, including recA, had greater than a fivefold effect on deletion rates. The recA-independence of deletion formation is also observed with constructions present on the chromosome. RecA promotes synapsis and transfer of homologous DNA strands in vitro and is indispensable for intermolecular recombination events in vivo measured after conjugation. Because deletion formation in E. coli shows little or no dependence on recA, it has been assumed that homologous recombination contributes little to the deletion process. However, we have found recA-independent deletion products suggestive of reciprocal crossovers when branch migration in the cell is inhibited by a ruvA mutation. We propose a model for recA-independent crossovers between replicating sister strands, which can also explain deletion or amplification of repeated sequences. We suggest that this process may be initiated as post-replicational DNA repair; subsequent strand misalignment at repeated sequences leads to genetic rearrangements. PMID:8293969

  11. Utilizing a reference material for assessing absolute tumor mechanical properties in modality independent elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Kyu; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    There is currently no reliable method for early characterization of breast cancer response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) [1,2]. Given that disruption of normal structural architecture occurs in cancer-bearing tissue, we hypothesize that further structural changes occur in response to NAC. Consequently, we are investigating the use of modalityindependent elastography (MIE) [3-8] as a method for monitoring mechanical integrity to predict long term outcomes in NAC. Recently, we have utilized a Demons non-rigid image registration method that allows 3D elasticity reconstruction in abnormal tissue geometries, making it particularly amenable to the evaluation of breast cancer mechanical properties. While past work has reflected relative elasticity contrast ratios [3], this study improves upon that work by utilizing a known stiffness reference material within the reconstruction framework such that a stiffness map becomes an absolute measure. To test, a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel phantom and a silicone rubber mock mouse tumor phantom were constructed with varying mechanical stiffness. Results showed that an absolute measure of stiffness could be obtained based on a reference value. This reference technique demonstrates the ability to generate accurate measurements of absolute stiffness to characterize response to NAC. These results support that `referenced MIE' has the potential to reliably differentiate absolute tumor stiffness with significant contrast from that of surrounding tissue. The use of referenced MIE to obtain absolute quantification of biomarkers is also translatable across length scales such that the characterization method is mechanics-consistent at the small animal and human application.

  12. Soil biochar amendment as a climate change mitigation tool: Key parameters and mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Brassard, Patrick; Godbout, Stéphane; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2016-10-01

    Biochar, a solid porous material obtained from the carbonization of biomass under low or no oxygen conditions, has been proposed as a climate change mitigation tool because it is expected to sequester carbon (C) for centuries and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils. This review aimed to identify key biochar properties and production parameters that have an effect on these specific applications of the biochar. Moreover, mechanisms involved in interactions between biochar and soils were highlighted. Following a compilation and comparison of the characteristics of 76 biochars from 40 research studies, biochars with a lower N content, and consequently a higher C/N ratio (>30), were found to be more suitable for mitigation of N2O emissions from soils. Moreover, biochars produced at a higher pyrolysis temperature, and with O/C ratio <0.2, H/Corg ratio <0.4 and volatile matter below 80% may have high C sequestration potential. Based on these observations, biochar production and application to the field can be used as a tool to mitigate climate change. However, it is important to determine the pyrolysis conditions and feedstock needed to produce a biochar with the desired properties for a specific application. More research studies are needed to identify the exact mechanisms involved following biochar amendment to soil. PMID:27420171

  13. Co-morbidity and self medication in schizophrenia: involvement of endogenous morphine signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kream, Richard M; Kuzelova, Hana; Kralickova, Milena; Ptacek, Radek; Stefano, George B

    2012-10-01

    For over 30 years, empirical studies have demonstrated expression of chemically authentic morphine by diverse animal tissues and organs systems. De novo biosynthesis of endogenous morphine by animal cells displays striking similarities to the multi-enzyme mediated biosynthetic pathway previously characterized in great biochemical and molecular detail in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum). The committed enzyme step within this pathway involves an asymmetric Pictet-Spengler condensation of dopamine (DA) and 3,4 dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), the oxidation product of L- 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), to form the essential intermediate precursor tetrahydropapaveroline (THP). We have hypothesized that endogenous morphine is synthesized within peripheral sites via conversion of THP in a regulated biosynthetic pathway, or conversely, THP may be directly transported into the CNS and converted to endogenous morphine within a similar biosynthetic pathway. The fundamental chemical relationship of the prototype catecholamine DA and its immediate precursor L-DOPA to endogenous morphine expression indicates a novel reciprocally interactive mechanism that links catecholamine and "morphinergic" pathways in the activation and inhibition of key physiological responses, including higher order neural integration. Dysregulation of interactive DAergic and "morphinergic" signaling pathways within CNS foci may contribute to the etiological factors driving co-morbid behavioral syndromes in major psychiatric disorders. Our short review is designed to provide insights on comorbidity and self-medication in schizophrenia from a novel perspective involving endogenous morphine signaling mechanisms. PMID:22876887

  14. A Mechanism of Rapidly Reversible Cerebral Ventricular Enlargement Independent of Tissue Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zahr, Natalie M; Mayer, Dirk; Rohlfing, Torsten; Orduna, Juan; Luong, Richard; Sullivan, Edith V; Pfefferbaum, Adolf

    2013-01-01

    Ventricular enlargement, a common in vivo marker of aging, disease, and insult, is presumed to reflect atrophy of surrounding brain regions. Pathological mechanisms underlying ventricular enlargement, however, are likely specific to the condition under investigation. Here, multimodal imaging, incorporating structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MR spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), was used in rats exposed to binge ethanol (EtOH) to provide insight into a mechanism of reversible ventricular enlargement. During intoxication, MRI revealed expansion of ventricles, but volume changes in dorsal or ventral hippocampi, caudate-putamen, or thalamus were not detectible. MRS of whole-brain parenchyma showed decreases in N-acetylasparate (NAA) and tissue water T2, and increases in choline-containing compounds (Cho). DWI showed decreased diffusivity selective to the thalamus. All MR parameters returned to baseline with 7 days of recovery. Rapid recovery of ventricular volume and the absence of detectable tissue volume reductions in brain regions adjacent to ventricles argue against atrophy as a mechanism of ventricular expansion. Decreased tissue water T2 and decreased thalamic diffusivity suggest lower tissue water content and a role for both NAA and Cho, as osmolytes is proposed. Together, these data support a model of fluid redistribution during acute EtOH intoxication and recovery to account for rapid ventricular volume changes. PMID:23306181

  15. Calcium-independent metal-ion catalytic mechanism of anthrax edema factor

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yuequan; Zhukovskaya, Natalia L.; Guo, Qing; Florián, Jan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-11-18

    Edema factor (EF), a key anthrax exotoxin, has an anthrax protective antigen-binding domain (PABD) and a calmodulin (CaM)-activated adenylyl cyclase domain. Here, we report the crystal structures of CaM-bound EF, revealing the architecture of EF PABD. CaM has N- and C-terminal domains and each domain can bind two calcium ions. Calcium binding induces the conformational change of CaM from closed to open. Structures of the EF-CaM complex show how EF locks the N-terminal domain of CaM into a closed conformation regardless of its calcium-loading state. This represents a mechanism of how CaM effector alters the calcium affinity of CaM and uncouples the conformational change of CaM from calcium loading. Furthermore, structures of EF-CaM complexed with nucleotides show that EF uses two-metal-ion catalysis, a prevalent mechanism in DNA and RNA polymerases. A histidine (H351) further facilitates the catalysis of EF by activating a water to deprotonate 3'OH of ATP. Mammalian adenylyl cyclases share no structural similarity with EF and they also use two-metal-ion catalysis, suggesting the catalytic mechanism-driven convergent evolution of two structurally diverse adenylyl cyclases.

  16. Role of the endocannabinoid system in the mechanisms involved in the LPS-induced preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Bariani, María Victoria; Domínguez Rubio, Ana Paula; Cella, Maximiliano; Burdet, Juliana; Franchi, Ana María; Aisemberg, Julieta

    2015-12-01

    Prematurity is the leading cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a strong causal relationship between infection and preterm births. Intrauterine infection elicits an immune response involving the release of inflammatory mediators like cytokines and prostaglandins (PG) that trigger uterine contractions and parturition events. Anandamide (AEA) is an endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Similarly to PG, endocannabinoids are implicated in different aspects of reproduction, such as maintenance of pregnancy and parturition. Little is known about the involvement of endocannabinoids on the onset of labor in an infectious milieu. Here, using a mouse model of preterm labor induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), we explored changes on the expression of components of endocannabinoid system (ECS). We have also determined whether AEA and CB antagonists alter PG production that induces labor. We observed an increase in uterine N-acylphosphatidylethanolamine-specific phospholipase D expression (NAPE-PLD, the enzyme that synthesizes AEA) upon LPS treatment. Activity of catabolic enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) did not change significantly. In addition, we also found that LPS modulated uterine cannabinoid receptors expression by downregulating Cb2 mRNA levels and upregulating CB1 protein expression. Furthermore, LPS and AEA induced PGF2a augmentation, and this was reversed by antagonizing CB1 receptor. Collectively, our results suggest that ECS may be involved in the mechanism by which infection causes preterm birth. PMID:26347521

  17. Minocycline mechanism of neuroprotection involves the Bcl-2 gene family in optic nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Levkovitch-Verbin, Hani; Waserzoog, Yael; Vander, Shelly; Makarovsky, Daria; Ilia, Piven

    2014-10-01

    The second-generation tetracycline, minocycline, has been shown to exhibit neuroprotective therapeutic benefits in many neurodegenerative diseases including experimental glaucoma and optic nerve transection (ONT). This study investigated the mechanism underlying minocycline neuroprotection in a model of ONT. ONT was applied unilaterally in 36 Wistar rat eyes. The rats were randomly divided into a minocycline (22 mg/kg/d) treatment group and a saline treatment group (control). Treatment (minocycline or saline) was given by intraperitoneal injections initiated 3 d before ONT and continued daily until the end of the experiment. The involvement of pro-apoptotic, pro-survival and inflammatory pathways was analyzed by quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction at 4 h and 3 d after the transection in both treatment groups. The involvement of Bcl-2 protein was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. We found that Minocycline significantly increased the expression of the antiapoptotic gene bcl-2 4 h after transection (n = 8, p = 0.008) and decreased the expression of Bax at the same time point (n = 8, p = 0.03). Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα), Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein (IAP1) and Gadd45α were significantly upregulated in the retinas of eyes with ONTs compared to control (n = 10 for each gene, p = 0.02, p = 0.03, p = 0.04, respectively) but this effect was unaffected by minocycline. This study further support that the mechanism underlying minocycline neuroprotection involves the Bcl-2 gene family, suggesting that minocycline has antiapoptotic properties that support its value as a promising neuroprotective drug. PMID:24410139

  18. Cobalt Protoporphyrin Upregulates Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression Through a Heme Oxygenase-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Lin, Chingju; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chang, Pei-Chun; Wu, Ling-Hsuan; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2016-09-01

    Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) is a potent HO-1 inducer and generally known to be an antioxidant in various cell types. Little is known about the CoPP-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and its downstream signaling in microglial cells. In current study, CoPP caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in COX-2 expression in microglial cells. Furthermore, activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase (ASK) 1/MAP kinase involved in CoPP-induced COX-2 expression in microglia. CoPP also induced P2X7 receptor activation, and treatment of P2X7 inhibitors effectively reduced CoPP-induced COX-2 expression. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) 1 is reported to be involved in modulating anti-inflammatory response through negative regulation of transcription factors. Interestingly, treatment with CoPP markedly induced PIAS1 degradation which is regulated by PI3K, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3α/β (GSK3α/β) signaling pathways. These results suggest that CoPP induces COX-2 expression through activating P2X7 receptors and ASK1/MAP kinases as well as PIAS1 degradation signaling pathways. Our study provides a new insight into the regulatory effect of CoPP on neuroinflammation in microglial cells. PMID:26255181

  19. The hydrogen tunneling splitting in malonaldehyde: A full-dimensional time-independent quantum mechanical method.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Ren, Yinghui; Bian, Wensheng

    2016-08-21

    The accurate time-independent quantum dynamics calculations on the ground-state tunneling splitting of malonaldehyde in full dimensionality are reported for the first time. This is achieved with an efficient method developed by us. In our method, the basis functions are customized for the hydrogen transfer process which has the effect of greatly reducing the size of the final Hamiltonian matrix, and the Lanczos method and parallel strategy are used to further overcome the memory and central processing unit time bottlenecks. The obtained ground-state tunneling splitting of 24.5 cm(-1) is in excellent agreement with the benchmark value of 23.8 cm(-1) computed with the full-dimensional, multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach on the same potential energy surface, and we estimate that our reported value has an uncertainty of less than 0.5 cm(-1). Moreover, the role of various vibrational modes strongly coupled to the hydrogen transfer process is revealed. PMID:27544107

  20. An overview of potential molecular mechanisms involved in VSMC phenotypic modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Yan-Qin; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-02-01

    The fully differentiated medial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of mature vessels keep quiescent and contractile. However, VSMC can exhibit the plasticity in phenotype switching from a differentiated and contractile phenotype to a dedifferentiated state in response to alterations in local environmental cues, which is called phenotypic modulation or switching. Distinguishing from its differentiated state expressing more smooth muscle (SM)-specific/selective proteins, the phenotypic modulation in VSMC is characterized by an increased rate of proliferation, migration, synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins and decreased expression of SM contractile proteins. Although it has been well demonstrated that phenotypic modulation of VSMC contributes to the occurrence and progression of many proliferative vascular diseases, little is known about the details of the molecular mechanisms of VSMC phenotypic modulation. Growing evidence suggests that variety of molecules including microRNAs, cytokines and biochemical factors, membrane receptors, ion channels, cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix play important roles in controlling VSMC phenotype. The focus of the present review is to provide an overview of potential molecular mechanisms involved in VSMC phenotypic modulation in recent years. To clarify VSMC differentiation and phenotypic modulation mechanisms will contribute to producing cell-based therapeutic interventions for aberrant VSMC differentiation-related diseases. PMID:26708152

  1. Neurodegenerative mutants in Drosophila: a means to identify genes and mechanisms involved in human diseases?

    PubMed

    Kretzschmar, Doris

    2005-11-01

    There are 50 ways to leave your lover (Simon 1987) but many more to kill your brain cells. Several neurodegenerative diseases in humans, like Alzheimer's disease, have been intensely studied but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are still unknown for most of them. For those syndromes where associated gene products have been identified their biochemistry and physiological as well as pathogenic function is often still under debate. This is in part due to the inherent limitations of genetic analyses in humans and other mammals and therefore experimentally accessible invertebrate in vivo models, such as Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, have recently been introduced to investigate neurodegenerative syndromes. Several laboratories have used transgenic approaches in Drosophila to study the human genes associated with neurodegenerative diseases. This has added substantially to our understanding of the mechanisms leading to neurodegenerative diseases in humans. The isolation and characterization of Drosophila mutants, which display a variety of neurodegenerative phenotypes, also provide valuable insights into genes, pathways, and mechanisms causing neurodegeneration. So far only about two dozen such mutants have been described but already their characterization reveals an involvement of various cellular functions in neurodegeneration, ranging from preventing oxidative stress to RNA editing. Some of the isolated genes can already be associated with human neurodegenerative diseases and hopefully the isolation and characterization of more of these mutants, together with an analysis of homologous genes in vertebrate models, will provide insights into the genetic and molecular basis of human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:16187075

  2. Mitochondrial DNA replication proceeds via a ‘bootlace’ mechanism involving the incorporation of processed transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Aurelio; Kazak, Lawrence; Wood, Stuart R.; Yasukawa, Takehiro; Jacobs, Howard T.; Holt, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    The observation that long tracts of RNA are associated with replicating molecules of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that the mitochondrial genome of mammals is copied by an unorthodox mechanism. Here we show that these RNA-containing species are present in living cells and tissue, based on interstrand cross-linking. Using DNA synthesis in organello, we demonstrate that isolated mitochondria incorporate radiolabeled RNA precursors, as well as DNA precursors, into replicating DNA molecules. RNA-containing replication intermediates are chased into mature mtDNA, to which they are thus in precursor–product relationship. While a DNA chain terminator rapidly blocks the labeling of mitochondrial replication intermediates, an RNA chain terminator does not. Furthermore, processed L-strand transcripts can be recovered from gel-extracted mtDNA replication intermediates. Therefore, instead of concurrent DNA and RNA synthesis, respectively, on the leading and lagging strands, preformed processed RNA is incorporated as a provisional lagging strand during mtDNA replication. These findings indicate that RITOLS is a physiological mechanism of mtDNA replication, and that it involves a ‘bootlace' mechanism, in which processed transcripts are successively hybridized to the lagging-strand template, as the replication fork advances. PMID:23595151

  3. Interdicting Gq Activation in Airway Disease by Receptor-Dependent and Receptor-Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Lam, Hong; An, Steven S; Tall, Gregory G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Gαqβγ heterotrimer (Gq), an important mediator in the pathology of airway disease, plays a central role in bronchoconstriction and airway remodeling, including airway smooth muscle growth and inflammation. Current therapeutic strategies to treat airway disease include the use of muscarinic and leukotriene receptor antagonists; however, these pharmaceuticals demonstrate a limited clinical efficacy as multiple Gq-coupled receptor subtypes contribute to these pathologies. Thus, broadly inhibiting the activation of Gq may be an advantageous therapeutic approach. Here, we investigated the effects of broadly inhibiting Gq activation in vitro and ex vivo using receptor-dependent and receptor-independent strategies. P4pal-10 is a protease activated receptor 4-derived pepducin that exhibits efficacy toward multiple Gq-coupled receptors. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that P4pal-10 selectively inhibits all G protein coupling to several Gq-coupled receptors, including protease activated receptor 1, muscarinic acetylcholine M3, and histamine H1 receptors, while demonstrating no direct effect on Gq. We also evaluated the ability of FR900359, also known as UBO-QIC, to directly inhibit Gq activation. FR900359 inhibited spontaneous Gαq nucleotide exchange, while having little effect on Gαsβγ, Gαiβγ, or Gα12/13βγ heterotrimer activity. Both P4pal-10 and FR900359 inhibited Gq-mediated intracellular signaling and primary human airway smooth muscle growth, whereas only FR900359 effectively interdicted agonist-promoted airway contraction in human precision cut lung slices. These studies serve as a proof of concept that the broad-based inhibition of Gq activation may be a useful therapeutic approach to treat multiple common pathologies of airway disease. PMID:26464325

  4. Autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins induce joint pain independent of inflammation via a chemokine-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wigerblad, Gustaf; Bas, Duygu B; Fernades-Cerqueira, Cátia; Krishnamurthy, Akilan; Rogoz, Katarzyna; Kato, Jungo; Sandor, Katalin; Su, Jie; Jimenez–Andrade, Juan Miguel; Finn, Anja; Bersellini Farinotti, Alex; Amara, Khaled; Lundberg, Karin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Malmström, Vivianne; Catrina, Anca I; Klareskog, Lars; Svensson, Camilla I

    2016-01-01

    Objective An interesting and so far unexplained feature of chronic pain in autoimmune disease is the frequent disconnect between pain and inflammation. This is illustrated well in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) where pain in joints (arthralgia) may precede joint inflammation and persist even after successful anti-inflammatory treatment. In the present study, we have addressed the possibility that autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA), present in RA, may be directly responsible for the induction of pain, independent of inflammation. Methods Antibodies purified from human patients with RA, healthy donors and murinised monoclonal ACPA were injected into mice. Pain-like behaviour was monitored for up to 28 days, and tissues were analysed for signs of pathology. Mouse osteoclasts were cultured and stimulated with antibodies, and supernatants analysed for release of factors. Mice were treated with CXCR1/2 (interleukin (IL) 8 receptor) antagonist reparixin. Results Mice injected with either human or murinised ACPA developed long-lasting pronounced pain-like behaviour in the absence of inflammation, while non-ACPA IgG from patients with RA or control monoclonal IgG were without pronociceptive effect. This effect was coupled to ACPA-mediated activation of osteoclasts and release of the nociceptive chemokine CXCL1 (analogue to human IL-8). ACPA-induced pain-like behaviour was reversed with reparixin. Conclusions The data suggest that CXCL1/IL-8, released from osteoclasts in an autoantibody-dependent manner, produces pain by activating sensory neurons. The identification of this new pain pathway may open new avenues for pain treatment in RA and also in other painful diseases associated with autoantibody production and/or osteoclast activation. PMID:26613766

  5. Cellular Metabolism and Dose Reveal Carnitine-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anna; Bennett, Natalie; MacDonald, Amber; Johnstone, Megan; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fiber has been suggested to suppress colorectal cancer development, although the mechanisms contributing to this beneficial effect remain elusive. Butyrate, a fermentation product of fiber, has been shown to have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on colorectal cancer cells. The metabolic fate of butyrate in the cell is important in determining whether, it acts as an HDAC inhibitor or is consumed as a short-chain fatty acid. Non-cancerous colonocytes utilize butyrate as the primary energy source whereas cancerous colonocytes increase glucose utilization through the Warburg effect. In this study, we show that butyrate oxidation is decreased in cancerous colonocytes compared to non-cancerous colonocytes. We demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells utilize both a carnitine-dependent and carnitine-independent mechanism that contributes to butyrate oxidation. The carnitine-dependent mechanism is contingent on butyrate concentration. Knockdown of CPT1A in colorectal cancer cells abolishes butyrate oxidation. In terms of selectivity, the carnitine-dependent mechanism only regulated butyrate oxidation, as acetate and propionate oxidation were carnitine-independent. Carnitine decreased the action of butyrate as an HDAC inhibitor and suppressed induction of H3 acetylation by butyrate in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, diminished oxidation of butyrate is associated with decreased HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation. In relation to the mechanism, we find that dichloroacetate, which decreases phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, increased butyrate oxidation and that this effect was carnitine-dependent. In conclusion, these data suggest that colorectal cancer cells decrease butyrate oxidation through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is carnitine-dependent, and provide insight into why butyrate shows selective effects toward colorectal cancer cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1804-1813, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26661480

  6. Telomere Dysfunction Triggers Palindrome Formation Independently of Double-Strand Break Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Raykov, Vasil; Marvin, Marcus E.; Louis, Edward J.; Maringele, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Inverted chromosome duplications or palindromes are linked with genetic disorders and malignant transformation. They are considered by-products of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair: the homologous recombination (HR) and the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Palindromes near chromosome ends are often triggered by telomere losses. An important question is to what extent their formation depends upon DSB repair mechanisms. Here we addressed this question using yeast genetics and comparative genomic hybridization. We induced palindrome formation by passaging cells lacking any form of telomere maintenance (telomerase and telomere recombination). Surprisingly, we found that DNA ligase 4, essential for NHEJ, did not make a significant contribution to palindrome formation induced by telomere losses. Moreover RAD51, important for certain HR-derived mechanisms, had little effect. Furthermore RAD52, which is essential for HR in yeast, appeared to decrease the number of palindromes in cells proliferating without telomeres. This study also uncovered an important role for Rev3 and Rev7 (but not for Pol32) subunits of polymerase ζ in the survival of cells undergoing telomere losses and forming palindromes. We propose a model called short-inverted repeat-induced synthesis in which DNA synthesis, rather than DSB repair, drives the inverted duplication triggered by telomere dysfunction. PMID:27334270

  7. Mullerian inhibiting substance inhibits ovarian cell growth through an Rb-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ha, T U; Segev, D L; Barbie, D; Masiakos, P T; Tran, T T; Dombkowski, D; Glander, M; Clarke, T R; Lorenzo, H K; Donahoe, P K; Maheswaran, S

    2000-11-24

    Müllerian inhibiting substance (MIS), a transforming growth factor-beta family member, causes regression of the Müllerian duct in male embryos. MIS overexpression in transgenic mice ablates the ovary, and MIS inhibits the growth of ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro, suggesting a key role for this hormone in postnatal development of the ovary. This report describes a mechanism for MIS-mediated growth inhibition in both a human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line and a cell line derived from normal ovarian surface epithelium, which is the origin of human epithelial ovarian cancers. MIS-treated cells accumulated in the G(1) phase of the cell cycle and subsequently underwent apoptosis. MIS up-regulated the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16 through an MIS type II receptor-mediated mechanism and inhibited growth in the absence of detectable or inactive Rb protein. Prolonged treatment with MIS down-regulated the Rb-related protein p130 and increased the Rb family-regulated transcription factor E2F1, overexpression of which inhibited growth. These findings demonstrate that p16 is required for MIS-mediated growth inhibition in ovarian epithelial cells and tumor cells and suggest that up-regulation of E2F1 also plays a role in this process. PMID:10958795

  8. Telomere Dysfunction Triggers Palindrome Formation Independently of Double-Strand Break Repair Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Raykov, Vasil; Marvin, Marcus E; Louis, Edward J; Maringele, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Inverted chromosome duplications or palindromes are linked with genetic disorders and malignant transformation. They are considered by-products of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair: the homologous recombination (HR) and the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Palindromes near chromosome ends are often triggered by telomere losses. An important question is to what extent their formation depends upon DSB repair mechanisms. Here we addressed this question using yeast genetics and comparative genomic hybridization. We induced palindrome formation by passaging cells lacking any form of telomere maintenance (telomerase and telomere recombination). Surprisingly, we found that DNA ligase 4, essential for NHEJ, did not make a significant contribution to palindrome formation induced by telomere losses. Moreover RAD51, important for certain HR-derived mechanisms, had little effect. Furthermore RAD52, which is essential for HR in yeast, appeared to decrease the number of palindromes in cells proliferating without telomeres. This study also uncovered an important role for Rev3 and Rev7 (but not for Pol32) subunits of polymerase ζ in the survival of cells undergoing telomere losses and forming palindromes. We propose a model called short-inverted repeat-induced synthesis in which DNA synthesis, rather than DSB repair, drives the inverted duplication triggered by telomere dysfunction. PMID:27334270

  9. Mechanisms Involved in the Nociception Triggered by the Venom of the Armed Spider Phoneutria nigriventer

    PubMed Central

    Gewehr, Camila; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Trevisan, Gabriela; Dalmolin, Gerusa Duarte; Rigo, Flávia Karine; de Castro Júnior, Célio José; Cordeiro, Marta Nascimento; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The frequency of accidental spider bites in Brazil is growing, and poisoning due to bites from the spider genus Phoneutria nigriventer is the second most frequent source of such accidents. Intense local pain is the major symptom reported after bites of P. nigriventer, although the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms involved in nociception triggered by the venom of Phoneutria nigriventer (PNV). Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty microliters of PNV or PBS was injected into the mouse paw (intraplantar, i.pl.). The time spent licking the injected paw was considered indicative of the level of nociception. I.pl. injection of PNV produced spontaneous nociception, which was reduced by arachnid antivenin (ArAv), local anaesthetics, opioids, acetaminophen and dipyrone, but not indomethacin. Boiling or dialysing the venom reduced the nociception induced by the venom. PNV-induced nociception is not dependent on glutamate or histamine receptors or on mast cell degranulation, but it is mediated by the stimulation of sensory fibres that contain serotonin 4 (5-HT4) and vanilloid receptors (TRPV1). We detected a kallikrein-like kinin-generating enzyme activity in tissue treated with PNV, which also contributes to nociception. Inhibition of enzymatic activity or administration of a receptor antagonist for kinin B2 was able to inhibit the nociception induced by PNV. PNV nociception was also reduced by the blockade of tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ channels, acid-sensitive ion channels (ASIC) and TRPV1 receptors. Conclusion/Significance Results suggest that both low- and high-molecular-weight toxins of PNV produce spontaneous nociception through direct or indirect action of kinin B2, TRPV1, 5-HT4 or ASIC receptors and voltage-dependent sodium channels present in sensory neurons but not in mast cells. Understanding the mechanisms involved in nociception caused by PNV are of interest not only for

  10. GABAergic signaling by AgRP neurons prevents anorexia via a melanocortin-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus contains two anatomically and functionally distinct populations of neurons – the agouti-related peptide (AgRP)- and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons that integrate various nutritional, hormonal, and neuronal signals to regulate food intake and energy expenditure, and thereby help achieve energy homeostasis. AgRP neurons, also co-release neuropeptide Y and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to promote feeding and inhibit metabolism through at least three possible mechanisms: (1) suppression of the melanocortin signaling system through competitive binding of AgRP with the melanocortin 4 receptors; (2) neuropeptide Y-mediated inhibition of post-synaptic neurons that reside in hypothalamic nuclei; (3) GABAergic inhibition of POMC neurons in their post-synaptic targets including the parabrachial nucleus (parabrachial nucleus), a brainstem structure that relays gustatory and visceral sensory information. Acute ablation of AgRP neurons in adult mice by the action of diphtheria toxin (DT) results in precipitous reduction of food intake, and eventually leads to starvation within 6 days of DT treatment. Chronic delivery of bretazenil, a GABAA receptor partial agonist, into the parabrachial nucleus is sufficient to restore feeding and body weight when AgRP neurons are ablated, whereas chronic blockade of melanocortin 4 receptor signaling is inadequate. This review summarizes the physiological roles of a neural circuitry regulated by AgRP neurons in control of feeding behavior with particular emphasis of the GABA output to the parabrachial nucleus. We also describe a compensatory mechanism that is gradually engaged after ablation of AgRP neurons that allows mice to continue eating without them. PMID:21211531

  11. Cardiopulmonary dysfunction in the Osteogenesis imperfecta mouse model Aga2 and human patients are caused by bone-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Frank; Cohrs, Christian M.; Flor, Armando; Lisse, Thomas S.; Przemeck, Gerhard K. H.; Horsch, Marion; Schrewe, Anja; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Ivandic, Boris; Katus, Hugo A.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Reisenberg, Catherine; Chaney, Hollis; Fuchs, Helmut; Hans, Wolfgang; Beckers, Johannes; Marini, Joan C.; Hrabé de Angelis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited connective tissue disorder with skeletal dysplasia of varying severity, predominantly caused by mutations in the collagen I genes (COL1A1/COL1A2). Extraskeletal findings such as cardiac and pulmonary complications are generally considered to be significant secondary features. Aga2, a murine model for human OI, was systemically analyzed in the German Mouse Clinic by means of in vivo and in vitro examinations of the cardiopulmonary system, to identify novel mechanisms accounting for perinatal lethality. Pulmonary and, especially, cardiac fibroblast of perinatal lethal Aga2/+ animals display a strong down-regulation of Col1a1 transcripts in vivo and in vitro, resulting in a loss of extracellular matrix integrity. In addition, dysregulated gene expression of Nppa, different types of collagen and Agt in heart and lung tissue support a bone-independent vicious cycle of heart dysfunction, including hypertrophy, loss of myocardial matrix integrity, pulmonary hypertension, pneumonia and hypoxia leading to death in Aga2. These murine findings are corroborated by a pediatric OI cohort study, displaying significant progressive decline in pulmonary function and restrictive pulmonary disease independent of scoliosis. Most participants show mild cardiac valvular regurgitation, independent of pulmonary and skeletal findings. Data obtained from human OI patients and the mouse model Aga2 provide novel evidence for primary effects of type I collagen mutations on the heart and lung. The findings will have potential benefits of anticipatory clinical exams and early intervention in OI patients. PMID:22589248

  12. Comparison of conventional mechanical ventilation and synchronous independent lung ventilation (SILV) in the treatment of unilateral lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hurst, J M; DeHaven, C B; Branson, R D

    1985-08-01

    Eight patients presenting with severe unilateral pulmonary injury responded poorly to conventional mechanical ventilation. Synchronous independent lung ventilation (SILV) was employed to provide support of ventilation and oxygenation without creating the ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) mismatch observed during conventional ventilation. All patients demonstrated improved oxygenation (mean increase, 80 torr) during SILV with the FIO2 unchanged from previous therapy. Invasive hemodynamic monitoring in five of eight patients showed no difference in the commonly measured cardiopulmonary parameters with the two forms of mechanical ventilation. Peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), and pressure change secondary to tidal volume delivery to the uninvolved lung were significantly less during SILV. SILV is an effective method of improving oxygenation in patients with severe unilateral pulmonary injury. PMID:3894680

  13. Integrated innate mechanisms involved in airway allergic inflammation to the serine protease subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Florsheim, Esther; Yu, Shuang; Bragatto, Ivan; Faustino, Lucas; Gomes, Eliane; Ramos, Rodrigo N; Barbuto, José Alexandre M; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-05-15

    Proteases are recognized environmental allergens, but little is known about the mechanisms responsible for sensing enzyme activity and initiating the development of allergic inflammation. Because usage of the serine protease subtilisin in the detergent industry resulted in an outbreak of occupational asthma in workers, we sought to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation to subtilisin and to determine the immunological mechanisms involved in type 2 responses. By using a mouse model of allergic airway disease, we have defined in this study that s.c. or intranasal sensitization followed by airway challenge to subtilisin induces prototypic allergic lung inflammation, characterized by airway eosinophilia, type 2 cytokine release, mucus production, high levels of serum IgE, and airway reactivity. These allergic responses were dependent on subtilisin protease activity, protease-activated receptor-2, IL-33R ST2, and MyD88 signaling. Also, subtilisin stimulated the expression of the proallergic cytokines IL-1α, IL-33, thymic stromal lymphopoietin, and the growth factor amphiregulin in a human bronchial epithelial cell line. Notably, acute administration of subtilisin into the airways increased lung IL-5-producing type 2 innate lymphoid cells, which required protease-activated receptor-2 expression. Finally, subtilisin activity acted as a Th2 adjuvant to an unrelated airborne Ag-promoting allergic inflammation to inhaled OVA. Therefore, we established a murine model of occupational asthma to a serine protease and characterized the main molecular pathways involved in allergic sensitization to subtilisin that potentially contribute to initiate allergic airway disease. PMID:25876764

  14. Mechanisms Involved in Glucocorticoid Induction of Pituitary GH Expression During Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Ellestad, Laura E.; Puckett, Stefanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones are involved in functional differentiation of GH-producing somatotrophs. Glucocorticoid treatment prematurely induces GH expression in mammals and birds in a process requiring protein synthesis and Rat sarcoma (Ras) signaling. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms through which glucocorticoids initiate GH expression during embryogenesis, taking advantage of the unique properties of chicken embryos as a developmental model. We determined that stimulation of GH expression occurred through transcriptional activation of GH, rather than enhancement of mRNA stability, and this process requires histone deacetylase activity. Through pharmacological inhibition, we identified the ERK1/2 pathway as a likely downstream Ras effector necessary for glucocorticoid stimulation of GH. However, we also found that chronic activation of ERK1/2 activity with a constitutively active mutant or stimulatory ligand reduced initiation of GH expression by glucocorticoid treatment. Corticosterone treatment of cultured embryonic pituitary cells increased ERK1/2 activity in an apparent cyclical manner, with a rapid increase within 5 minutes, followed by a reduction to near-basal levels at 3 hours, and a subsequent increase again at 6 hours. Therefore, we conclude that ERK1/2 signaling must be strictly controlled for maximal glucocorticoid induction of GH to occur. These results are the first in any species to demonstrate that Ras- and ERK1/2-mediated transcriptional events requiring histone deacetylase activity are involved in glucocorticoid induction of pituitary GH during embryonic development. This report increases our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid recruitment of somatotrophs during embryogenesis and should provide insight into glucocorticoid-induced developmental changes in other tissues and cell types. PMID:25560830

  15. Involvement of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 in goniothalamin-induced TP53-dependent and -independent apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma-derived cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Lih-Ren; Li, Chien-Feng; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to investigate the upstream apoptotic mechanisms that were triggered by a styrylpyrone derivative, goniothalamin (GTN), in tumor protein p53 (TP53)-positive and -negative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-derived cells. Effects of GTN were evaluated by the flow cytometry, alkaline comet assay, immunocytochemistry, small-hairpin RNA interference, mitochondria/cytosol fractionation, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting analysis and caspase 3 activity assays in two HCC-derived cell lines. Results indicated that GTN triggered phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1, also known as NOXA)-mediated apoptosis via TP53-dependent and -independent pathways. In TP53-positive SK-Hep1 cells, GTN furthermore induced TP53 transcription-dependent and -independent apoptosis. After GTN treatment, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, formation of DNA double-strand breaks, transactivation of TP53 and/or PMAIP1 gene, translocation of TP53 and/or PMAIP1 proteins to mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, cleavage of caspases and induction of apoptosis in both cell lines were sustained. GTN might represent a novel class of anticancer drug that induces apoptosis in HCC-derived cells through PMAIP1 transactivation regardless of the status of TP53 gene. - Highlights: > Goniothalamin (GTN) induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinomas-derived cells. > The apoptosis induced by GTN is PMAIP1-dependent, regardless of TP53 status. > The apoptosis induced by GTN might be TP53 transcription-dependent or -independent. > GTN-induced apoptosis is mitochondria- and caspases-mediated.

  16. Trypanosoma brucei TIF2 and TRF Suppress VSG Switching Using Overlapping and Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jehi, Sanaa E; Nanavaty, Vishal; Li, Bibo

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei causes debilitating human African trypanosomiasis and evades the host's immune response by regularly switching its major surface antigen, VSG, which is expressed exclusively from subtelomeric loci. We previously showed that two interacting telomere proteins, TbTRF and TbTIF2, are essential for cell proliferation and suppress VSG switching by inhibiting DNA recombination events involving the whole active VSG expression site. We now find that TbTIF2 stabilizes TbTRF protein levels by inhibiting their degradation by the 26S proteasome, indicating that decreased TbTRF protein levels in TbTIF2-depleted cells contribute to more frequent VSG switching and eventual cell growth arrest. Surprisingly, although TbTIF2 depletion leads to more subtelomeric DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that are both potent VSG switching inducers and detrimental to cell viability, TbTRF depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs inside subtelomeric VSG expression sites. Furthermore, expressing an ectopic allele of F2H-TbTRF in TbTIF2 RNAi cells allowed cells to maintain normal TbTRF protein levels for a longer frame of time. This resulted in a mildly better cell growth and partially suppressed the phenotype of increased VSG switching frequency but did not suppress the phenotype of more subtelomeric DSBs in TbTIF2-depleted cells. Therefore, TbTIF2 depletion has two parallel effects: decreased TbTRF protein levels and increased subtelomeric DSBs, both resulting in an acute increased VSG switching frequency and eventual cell growth arrest. PMID:27258069

  17. Trypanosoma brucei TIF2 and TRF Suppress VSG Switching Using Overlapping and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jehi, Sanaa E.; Nanavaty, Vishal; Li, Bibo

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei causes debilitating human African trypanosomiasis and evades the host’s immune response by regularly switching its major surface antigen, VSG, which is expressed exclusively from subtelomeric loci. We previously showed that two interacting telomere proteins, TbTRF and TbTIF2, are essential for cell proliferation and suppress VSG switching by inhibiting DNA recombination events involving the whole active VSG expression site. We now find that TbTIF2 stabilizes TbTRF protein levels by inhibiting their degradation by the 26S proteasome, indicating that decreased TbTRF protein levels in TbTIF2-depleted cells contribute to more frequent VSG switching and eventual cell growth arrest. Surprisingly, although TbTIF2 depletion leads to more subtelomeric DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that are both potent VSG switching inducers and detrimental to cell viability, TbTRF depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs inside subtelomeric VSG expression sites. Furthermore, expressing an ectopic allele of F2H-TbTRF in TbTIF2 RNAi cells allowed cells to maintain normal TbTRF protein levels for a longer frame of time. This resulted in a mildly better cell growth and partially suppressed the phenotype of increased VSG switching frequency but did not suppress the phenotype of more subtelomeric DSBs in TbTIF2-depleted cells. Therefore, TbTIF2 depletion has two parallel effects: decreased TbTRF protein levels and increased subtelomeric DSBs, both resulting in an acute increased VSG switching frequency and eventual cell growth arrest. PMID:27258069

  18. Ascidian eggs block polyspermy by two independent mechanisms: one at the egg plasma membrane, the other involving the follicle cells.

    PubMed

    Lambert, C; Goudeau, H; Franchet, C; Lambert, G; Goudeau, M

    1997-09-01

    Many ascidians live in clumps and usually release sperm before the eggs. Consequently, eggs are often spawned into dense clouds of sperm. Because fertilization by more than a single sperm is lethal, ascidians have evolved at least two successive blocks to polyspermy: the rapid release of a glycosidase that inhibits sperm binding to the vitelline coat (VC) and a subsequent change in membrane potential that prevents supernumerary sperm-egg fusion. This paper shows that (1) these two blocks can be uncoupled by the use of suramin, and (2) most of the glycosidase appears to be from the follicle cells, which are accessory cells on the outside of the egg VC. Phallusia mammillata eggs initially bind numerous sperm but, after the glycosidase is released, only a few additional sperm bind. Intact eggs in 20 microM suramin release glycosidase, but the electrical response is inhibited; sperm swim actively and bind to the VC but fail to penetrate. Suramin treatment is completely reversible; intact eggs exhibit the electrical response an average of 11 minutes after the drug is washed out. Sperm must contact the follicle cells before passing through the VC; eggs with the VC removed and fertilized in the presence of 20 microM suramin show the electrical response 35% of the time, thus VC removal enhances sperm entry. Like the intact eggs, 100% of the naked eggs respond electrically to fertilization after the drug is washed out. Follicle cells that are isolated by calcium magnesium free seawater and then returned to complete seawater release N-acetylglucosaminidase activity in response to sperm. Thus, these eggs have two blocks to polyspermy that operate in sequence: an early first block resulting from enzymatic modification of the VC by N-acetylglucosaminidase released primarily from follicle cells and a second electrical block operating at the egg plasma membrane level and requiring sperm-egg fusion. PMID:9266770

  19. Lipin 2 binds phosphatidic acid by the electrostatic hydrogen bond switch mechanism independent of phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Eaton, James M; Takkellapati, Sankeerth; Lawrence, Robert T; McQueeney, Kelley E; Boroda, Salome; Mullins, Garrett R; Sherwood, Samantha G; Finck, Brian N; Villén, Judit; Harris, Thurl E

    2014-06-27

    Lipin 2 is a phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) responsible for the penultimate step of triglyceride synthesis and dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA) to generate diacylglycerol. The lipin family of PA phosphatases is composed of lipins 1-3, which are members of the conserved haloacid dehalogenase superfamily. Although genetic alteration of LPIN2 in humans is known to cause Majeed syndrome, little is known about the biochemical regulation of its PAP activity. Here, in an attempt to gain a better general understanding of the biochemical nature of lipin 2, we have performed kinetic and phosphorylation analyses. We provide evidence that lipin 2, like lipin 1, binds PA via the electrostatic hydrogen bond switch mechanism but has a lower rate of catalysis. Like lipin 1, lipin 2 is highly phosphorylated, and we identified 15 phosphosites. However, unlike lipin 1, the phosphorylation of lipin 2 is not induced by insulin signaling nor is it sensitive to inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin. Importantly, phosphorylation of lipin 2 does not negatively regulate either membrane binding or PAP activity. This suggests that lipin 2 functions as a constitutively active PA phosphatase in stark contrast to the high degree of phosphorylation-mediated regulation of lipin 1. This knowledge of lipin 2 regulation is important for a deeper understanding of how the lipin family functions with respect to lipid synthesis and, more generally, as an example of how the membrane environment around PA can influence its effector proteins. PMID:24811178

  20. Lipin 2 Binds Phosphatidic Acid by the Electrostatic Hydrogen Bond Switch Mechanism Independent of Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, James M.; Takkellapati, Sankeerth; Lawrence, Robert T.; McQueeney, Kelley E.; Boroda, Salome; Mullins, Garrett R.; Sherwood, Samantha G.; Finck, Brian N.; Villén, Judit; Harris, Thurl E.

    2014-01-01

    Lipin 2 is a phosphatidic acid phosphatase (PAP) responsible for the penultimate step of triglyceride synthesis and dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid (PA) to generate diacylglycerol. The lipin family of PA phosphatases is composed of lipins 1–3, which are members of the conserved haloacid dehalogenase superfamily. Although genetic alteration of LPIN2 in humans is known to cause Majeed syndrome, little is known about the biochemical regulation of its PAP activity. Here, in an attempt to gain a better general understanding of the biochemical nature of lipin 2, we have performed kinetic and phosphorylation analyses. We provide evidence that lipin 2, like lipin 1, binds PA via the electrostatic hydrogen bond switch mechanism but has a lower rate of catalysis. Like lipin 1, lipin 2 is highly phosphorylated, and we identified 15 phosphosites. However, unlike lipin 1, the phosphorylation of lipin 2 is not induced by insulin signaling nor is it sensitive to inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin. Importantly, phosphorylation of lipin 2 does not negatively regulate either membrane binding or PAP activity. This suggests that lipin 2 functions as a constitutively active PA phosphatase in stark contrast to the high degree of phosphorylation-mediated regulation of lipin 1. This knowledge of lipin 2 regulation is important for a deeper understanding of how the lipin family functions with respect to lipid synthesis and, more generally, as an example of how the membrane environment around PA can influence its effector proteins. PMID:24811178

  1. Molecular Characterization of HIV-1 Subtype C gp-120 Regions Potentially Involved in Virus Adaptive Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cenci, Alessandra; D'Avenio, Giuseppe; Tavoschi, Lara; Chiappi, Michele; Becattini, Simone; Narino, Maria del Pilar; Picconi, Orietta; Bernasconi, Daniela; Fanales-Belasio, Emanuele; Vardas, Eftyhia; Sukati, Hosea; Presti, Alessandra Lo; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Monini, Paolo; Ensoli, Barbara; Grigioni, Mauro; Buttò, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The role of variable regions of HIV-1 gp120 in immune escape of HIV has been investigated. However, there is scant information on how conserved gp120 regions contribute to virus escaping. Here we have studied how molecular sequence characteristics of conserved C3, C4 and V3 regions of clade C HIV-1 gp120 that are involved in HIV entry and are target of the immune response, are modulated during the disease course. We found an increase of “shifting” putative N-glycosylation sites (PNGSs) in the α2 helix (in C3) and in C4 and an increase of sites under positive selection pressure in the α2 helix during the chronic stage of disease. These sites are close to CD4 and to co-receptor binding sites. We also found a negative correlation between electric charges of C3 and V4 during the late stage of disease counteracted by a positive correlation of electric charges of α2 helix and V5 during the same stage. These data allow us to hypothesize possible mechanisms of virus escape involving constant and variable regions of gp120. In particular, new mutations, including new PNGSs occurring near the CD4 and CCR5 binding sites could potentially affect receptor binding affinity and shield the virus from the immune response. PMID:24788065

  2. Evolution of oropharyngeal patterning mechanisms involving Dlx and endothelins in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Takio, Yoko; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Takechi, Masaki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2010-05-01

    In jawed vertebrates, the Dlx code, or nested expression patterns of Dlx genes, specify the dorsoventral polarity of pharyngeal arches, downstream of endothelin-1 (Edn-1) and its effectors, Bapx1 (Nkx3.2) and dHand (Hand2). To elucidate the evolution of the specification mechanism of the oropharyngeal skeletal system, lamprey homologs of Dlx, Edn, endothelin receptor (Ednr), Bapx1, and dHand were identified. Our analysis suggested that the Edn gene family emerged at the advent of vertebrates, and that gene duplications leading to the different Edn gnathostome subtypes (Edn1-3) occurred before the cyclostome-gnathostome split. This timing of gene duplications, giving rise to multiple subtypes, was also implied for Dlx, Ednr, Hand, and Bapx. In lamprey embryos, nested expressions of Dlx genes were not observed in pharyngeal arches, nor was any focal expression of Bapx1, known in gnathostomes to specify the jaw joint. The dHand homolog, however, was expressed more intensively ventrally, as in gnathostomes. Lamprey homologs of Edn-1 and EdnrA were also shown to be expressed as described in mice, indicating involvement of this signaling pathway in the craniofacial patterning early in vertebrate evolution. These results suggest that the last common ancestor of all the extant vertebrates would have possessed basic gene repertoires involved in oropharyngeal patterning in gnathostomes, but the elaborate genetic program leading to the Dlx code is likely to have been acquired uniquely in gnathostomes. PMID:20171204

  3. Post-ictal analgesia: involvement of opioid, serotoninergic and cholinergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Castro-Souza, C; Segato, E N; Nora, J E; Herrero, C F; Tedeschi-Filho, W; Garcia-Cairasco, N

    2001-01-12

    The neural mechanisms involved in post-ictal analgesia remain to be elucidated. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) is used experimentally to induce seizure in animal subjects. This non-competitive antagonist blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) flux. The aim of this work is to study the neurochemical basis of the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test, in eight rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significant increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), at least for 30 min of the post-ictal period. Peripheral administration of naloxone (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg), atropine (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg), methysergide (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) and ketanserine (1 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. However, while naloxone antagonized analgesia 15 and 25 min post convulsions, the other drugs caused a blockade of the post-ictal analgesia in a relatively greater period of time. These results indicate that endogenous opioids, serotonin and acetylcholine may be involved in post-ictal analgesia. PMID:11150491

  4. Effect of diet and fenfluramine on thermogenesis in the rat: possible involvement of serotonergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, N J; Stock, M J

    1987-01-01

    A single injection of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT, 1 mg/kg, s.c.) in rats stimulated resting oxygen consumption (Vo2) by 21 percent; this was reduced (to 8 percent) by pretreatment with hexamethonium (5 mg/kg, s.c.). DL-fenfluramine injection (20 mg/kg, s.c.) stimulated metabolic rate (Vo2) by about 40 percent, but caused only 11 and 15 per cent increases in animals pretreated with hexamethonium or metergoline (5 mg/kg, s.c.), respectively. Interscapular brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity, assessed from mitochondrial GDP-binding, was increased by 96 per cent in intact tissue 1 h after fenfluramine injection; this response was completely prevented by surgical sympathectomy of interscapular BAT. Metergoline significantly inhibited (by 46 percent) the acute thermic response (postprandial rise in Vo2) to a 40-kJ meal in normal rats, and depressed resting Vo2 in protein-deficient rats by 18 percent, but did not affect resting Vo2 in control animals. BAT activity (mitochondrial GDP-binding) was elevated by 56 per cent in rats fed the low-protein diet, but this difference was almost completely abolished by prior treatment with metergoline. These data demonstrate a potent thermogenic effect of fenfluramine which apparently involves serotonergic pathways and activation of sympathetic outflow to BAT, and indicate that acute thermic responses to food and chronic thermogenic responses to low-protein diets may also involve serotonergic mechanisms. PMID:3667065

  5. Key diffusion mechanisms involved in regulating bidirectional water permeation across E. coli outer membrane lectin

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Shivangi; Kolimi, Narendar; Nair, Sanjana Anilkumar; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2016-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) are major bacterial virulent determinants that facilitate host immune evasion. E. coli group1 K30CPS is noncovalently attached to bacterial surface by Wzi, a lectin. Intriguingly, structure based phylogenetic analysis indicates that Wzi falls into porin superfamily. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further shed light on dual role of Wzi as it also functions as a bidirectional passive water specific porin. Such a functional role of Wzi was not realized earlier, due to the occluded pore. While five water specific entry points distributed across extracellular & periplasmic faces regulate the water diffusion involving different mechanisms, a luminal hydrophobic plug governs water permeation across the channel. Coincidently, MD observed open state structure of “YQF” triad is seen in sugar-binding site of sodium-galactose cotransporters, implicating its involvement in K30CPS surface anchorage. Importance of Loop 5 (L5) in membrane insertion is yet another highlight. Change in water diffusion pattern of periplasmic substitution mutants suggests Wzi’s role in osmoregulation by aiding in K30CPS hydration, corroborating earlier functional studies. Water molecules located inside β-barrel of Wzi crystal structure further strengthens the role of Wzi in osmoregulation. Thus, interrupting water diffusion or L5 insertion may reduce bacterial virulence. PMID:27320406

  6. Exercise- and nutrient-controlled mechanisms involved in maintenance of the musculoskeletal mass.

    PubMed

    Rennie, M J

    2007-11-01

    The mechanisms of maintenance of the protein mass of muscle and associated connective tissue and bone are becoming more accessible as a result of the use of a combination of well-established techniques for measurement of protein turnover and measurement of protein expression and phosphorylation state of signalling molecules involved in anabolic and catabolic responses. Amino acids, hormones and physical activity appear to be the major short-term physiological regulators of muscle mass, mainly through their actions on protein synthesis and breakdown, on a time scale of minutes to hours, with duration of changes in gene expression up to weeks. Amino acids are the main components in the diet regulating protein turnover, having marked effects in stimulating muscle protein synthesis and with almost no effect on muscle protein breakdown. Branched-chain amino acids, and in particular leucine, simulate protein synthesis via signalling pathways involving mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) in a dose-response manner. Insulin has little effect on protein synthesis in human muscle, but it has a marked inhibitory effect on protein breakdown. The amino acid simulation of anabolism is not dependent on the presence of insulin, IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor-1) or growth hormone. Exercise not only stimulates protein synthesis in muscle, but also in tendon; and disuse atrophy is accompanied by marked decreases of both muscle and tendon collagen protein synthesis. Bone collagen synthesis appears to be nutritionally regulated by the availability of amino acids, but not lipid or glucose. PMID:17956336

  7. Mechanisms involved in the pressor response to noradrenaline microinjection into the supraoptic nucleus of unanesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Busnardo, Cristiane; Tavares, Rodrigo Fiacadori; Corrêa, Fernando Morgan Aguiar

    2009-01-28

    We report on the cardiovascular effects of noradrenaline (NA) microinjection into the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus (SON) as well as the central and peripheral mechanisms involved in their mediation. Microinjections of NA 1, 3, 10, 30 or 45 nmol/100 nL into the SON caused dose-related pressor and bradycardiac response in unanesthetized rats. The response to NA 10 nmol was blocked by SON pretreatment with 15 nmol of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist RX821002 and not affected by pretreatment with equimolar dose of the selective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist WB4101, suggesting that local alpha(2)-adrenoceptors mediate these responses. Pretreatment of the SON with the nonselective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol 15 nmol did not affect the pressor response to NA microinjection of into the SON. Moreover, the microinjection of the 100 nmol of the selective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor agonist methoxamine (MET) into the SON did not cause cardiovascular response while the microinjection of the selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists BHT920 (BHT, 100 nmol) or clonidine (CLO, 5 nmol) caused pressor and bradycardiac responses, similar to that observed after the microinjection of NA. The pressor response to NA was potentiated by intravenous pretreatment with the ganglion blocker pentolinium and was blocked by intravenous pretreatment with the V(1)-vasopressin receptor antagonist dTyr(CH2)5(Me)AVP, suggesting an involvement of circulating vasopressin in this response. In conclusion, our results suggest that pressor responses caused by microinjections of NA into the SON involve activation of local alpha(2)-adrenoceptor receptors and are mediated by vasopressin release into circulation. PMID:19059010

  8. LeuX tRNA-dependent and -independent mechanisms of Escherichia coli pathogenesis in acute cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Thomas J.; Mysorekar, Indira U.; Chen, Swaine L.; Walker, Jennifer N.; Jones, Jennifer M.; Pinkner, Jerome S.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Seed, Patrick C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) contain multiple horizontally acquired pathogenicity-associated islands (PAI) implicated in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection. In a murine model of cystitis, type 1 pili-mediated bladder epithelial invasion and intracellular proliferation are key events associated with UPEC virulence. In this study, we examined the mechanisms by which a conserved PAI contributes to UPEC pathogenesis in acute cystitis. In the human UPEC strain UTI89, spontaneous excision of PAI IIUTI89 disrupts the adjacent leuX tRNA locus. Loss of wild-type leuX-encoded tRNA5Leu significantly delayed, but did not eliminate, FimB recombinase-mediated phase variation of type 1 pili. FimX, an additional FimB-like, leuX-independent recombinase, was also found to mediate type 1 pili phase variation. However, whereas FimX activity is relatively slow in vitro, it is rapid in vivo as a non-piliated strain lacking the other fim recombinases rapidly expressed type 1 pili upon experimental infection. Finally, we found that disruption of leuX, but not loss of PAI IIUTI89 genes, reduced bladder epithelial invasion and intracellular proliferation, independent of type 1 piliation. These findings indicate that the predominant mechanism for preservation of PAI IIUTI89 during the establishment of acute cystitis is maintenance of wild-type leuX, and not PAI IIUTI89 gene content. PMID:18036139

  9. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Serum Retinol-Binding Protein Develop Progressive Retinal Degeneration through a Retinoid-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mei; Otalora, Laura; Martin, Ashley A.; Moiseyev, Gennadiy; Vanlandingham, Phillip; Wang, Qilong; Farjo, Rafal; Yeganeh, Alexander; Quiambao, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) is the sole specific transport protein for retinol in the blood, but it is also an adipokine with retinol-independent, proinflammatory activity associated with obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Moreover, two separate studies reported that patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy have increased serum RBP4 levels compared to patients with mild or no retinopathy, yet the effect of increased levels of RBP4 on the retina has not been studied. Here we show that transgenic mice overexpressing RBP4 (RBP4-Tg mice) develop progressive retinal degeneration, characterized by photoreceptor ribbon synapse deficiency and subsequent bipolar cell loss. Ocular retinoid and bisretinoid levels are normal in RBP4-Tg mice, demonstrating that a retinoid-independent mechanism underlies retinal degeneration. Increased expression of pro-interleukin-18 (pro-IL-18) mRNA and activated IL-18 protein and early-onset microglia activation in the retina suggest that retinal degeneration is driven by a proinflammatory mechanism. Neither chronic systemic metabolic disease nor other retinal insults are required for RBP4 elevation to promote retinal neurodegeneration, since RBP4-Tg mice do not have coincident retinal vascular pathology, obesity, dyslipidemia, or hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that elevation of serum RBP4 levels could be a risk factor for retinal damage and vision loss in nondiabetic as well as diabetic patients. PMID:26055327

  10. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2, and 36SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ33S/δ34S and Δ36S/Δ33S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  11. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A; Johnson, Matthew S; Danielache, Sebastian O; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-10-29

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of (32)SO2, (33)SO2, (34)SO2, and (36)SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ(33)S/δ(34)S and Δ(36)S/Δ(33)S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  12. Lipopolysaccharide augments aflatoxin B(1)-induced liver injury through neutrophil-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Barton, C C; Ganey, P E; Roth, R A

    2000-11-01

    Exposure to small, noninjurious doses of the inflammagen, bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) augments the toxicity of certain hepatotoxicants including aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)). Mediators of inflammation, in particular neutrophils (PMNs), are responsible for tissue injury in a variety of animal models. This study was conducted to examine the role of PMNs in the pathogenesis of hepatic injury after AFB(1)/LPS cotreatment. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats (250-350 g) were treated with either 1 mg AFB(1)/kg, ip or its vehicle (0.5% DMSO/saline), and 4 h later with either E. coli LPS (7. 4 x 10(6) EU/kg, iv) or its saline vehicle. Over a course of 6 to 96 h after AFB(1) administration, rats were killed and livers were stained immunohistochemically for PMNs. LPS resulted in an increase in PMN accumulation in the liver that preceded the onset of liver injury. To assess if PMNs contributed to the pathogenesis, an anti-PMN antibody was administered to reduce PMN numbers in blood and liver, and injury was evaluated. Hepatic parenchymal cell injury was evaluated as increased alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities in serum and from histologic examination of liver sections. Biliary tract alterations were evaluated as increased concentration of serum bile acids and activities of gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and 5'-nucleotidase (5'-ND) in serum. Neutrophil depletion protected against hepatic parenchymal cell injury caused by AFB(1)/LPS cotreatment but not against markers of biliary tract injury. This suggests that LPS augments AFB(1) hepatotoxicity through two mechanisms: one of which is PMN-dependent, and another that is not. PMID:11053557

  13. A role of nitric oxide mechanism involved in the protective effects of venlafaxine in sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Garg, Ruchika

    2008-12-12

    The present study was designed to explore the possible nitric oxide mechanism in protective effect of venlafaxine in sleep deprivation in mice. Laca mice were sleep deprived for period of 72 h using grid suspended over water method. Venlafaxine (2.5, 5 and 10mg/kg, ip), l-arginine (50mg/kg, ip), l-NAME (10mg/kg, ip) and methylene blue (10mg/kg, ip) were administered for 5 days, starting 2 days before 72-h sleep deprivation. Various behavioral tests (plus maze, zero maze, mirror chamber tests for anxiety, and actophotometer test) followed by oxidative stress parameters (malondialdehyde level, glutathione, catalase, nitrite and protein) were assessed. The present study showed that venlafaxine (5 and 10mg/kg, ip) drug treatment significantly reversed 72-h sleep deprivation caused anxiety like behavior, impairment in locomotor activity and oxidative damage (increased lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels and depleted reduced glutathione and catalase activity) as compared to control. l-NAME (10mg/kg) and methylene blue (10mg/kg) pretreatment with lower dose of venlafaxine (5mg/kg) potentiated the protective effect of venlafaxine (5mg/kg). However, l-arginine (50mg/kg) pretreatment with venlafaxine (5mg/kg) reversed the protective effect of venlafaxine. Results of present study suggest that nitric oxide mechanism is involved in the protective effect of venlafaxine against sleep-deprivation-induced behavior alteration and oxidative damage in mice. PMID:18674568

  14. Protein Machineries Involved in the Attachment of Heme to Cytochrome c: Protein Structures and Molecular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Travaglini-Allocatelli, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Cytochromes c (Cyt c) are ubiquitous heme-containing proteins, mainly involved in electron transfer processes, whose structure and functions have been and still are intensely studied. Surprisingly, our understanding of the molecular mechanism whereby the heme group is covalently attached to the apoprotein (apoCyt) in the cell is still largely unknown. This posttranslational process, known as Cyt c biogenesis or Cyt c maturation, ensures the stereospecific formation of the thioether bonds between the heme vinyl groups and the cysteine thiols of the apoCyt heme binding motif. To accomplish this task, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have evolved distinctive protein machineries composed of different proteins. In this review, the structural and functional properties of the main maturation apparatuses found in gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells will be presented, dissecting the Cyt c maturation process into three functional steps: (i) heme translocation and delivery, (ii) apoCyt thioreductive pathway, and (iii) apoCyt chaperoning and heme ligation. Moreover, current hypotheses and open questions about the molecular mechanisms of each of the three steps will be discussed, with special attention to System I, the maturation apparatus found in gram-negative bacteria. PMID:24455431

  15. Damage mechanism involved in the solid particle erosion of CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Alun R.; Field, John E.

    2001-09-01

    Sophisticated electro-optic sensors are employed on aircraft and missiles, and it is essential to protect them from relatively high-speed impacts with airborne dust particles. A loss in transmission caused by such an event can impair guidance, and catastrophic failure may occur. Protection is afforded by the installation of a hard cover that is transparent in the relevant regime. Diamond is potentially by far the most attractive window material due to excellent optical and mechanical properties, but it is difficult to shape. Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond is a polycrystalline synthetic with properties that approach those of single crystal diamond, and it can be more easily shaped. The aims of the present research were to quantify the erosion and transmission losses, and to understand the material removal mechanisms involved. Steady-state erosion rates were obtained for CVD diamond of different grain sizes, using 300-600 micrometers quartz erodent at velocities between 60 and 140 m/s. Images of CVD diamond at various stages of erosion, obtained using an optical microscope and an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), reveal that erosion initially occurs at grain boundaries and that so-called micro-features also have some influence on erosion.

  16. Inflammatory mechanisms involved in brain injury following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    XIANG, YANXIAO; ZHAO, HUA; WANG, JIALI; ZHANG, LUETAO; LIU, ANCHANG; CHEN, YUGUO

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest (CA) is a leading cause of fatality and long-term disability worldwide. Recent advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have improved survival rates; however, the survivors are prone to severe neurological injury subsequent to successful CPR following CA. Effective therapeutic options to protect the brain from CA remain limited, due to the complexities of the injury cascades caused by global cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Although the precise mechanisms of neurological impairment following CA-initiated I/R injury require further clarification, evidence supports that one of the key cellular pathways of cerebral injury is inflammation. The inflammatory response is orchestrated by activated glial cells in response to I/R injury. Increased release of danger-associated molecular pattern molecules and cellular dysfunction in activated microglia and astrocytes contribute to ischemia-induced cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory cytokines generation, and ultimately to delayed death of neurons. Furthermore, cytokines and adhesion molecules generated within activated microglia, as well as astrocytes, are involved in the innate immune response; modulate influx of peripheral immune and inflammatory cells into the brain, resulting in neurological injury. The present review discusses the molecular aspects of immune and inflammatory mechanisms in global cerebral I/R injury following CA and CPR, and the potential therapeutic strategies that target neuroinflammation and the innate immune system. PMID:27330748

  17. Functional responses and molecular mechanisms involved in histone-mediated platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Carestia, A; Rivadeneyra, L; Romaniuk, M A; Fondevila, C; Negrotto, S; Schattner, M

    2013-11-01

    Histones are highly alkaline proteins found in cell nuclei and they can be released by either dying or inflammatory cells. The recent observations that histones are major components of neutrophil extracellular traps and promote platelet aggregation and platelet-dependent thrombin generation have shown that these proteins are potent prothrombotic molecules. Because the mechanism(s) of platelet activation by histones are not completely understood, we explored the ability of individual recombinant human histones H1, H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 to induce platelet activation as well as the possible molecular mechanisms involved. All histones were substrates for platelet adhesion and spreading and triggered fibrinogen binding, aggregation, von Willebrand factor release, P-selectin and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure and the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates; however, H4 was the most potent. Histone-mediated fibrinogen binding, P-selectin and PS exposure and the formation of mixed aggregates were potentiated by thrombin. Histones induced the activation of ERK, Akt, p38 and NFκB. Accordingly, histone-induced platelet activation was significantly impaired by pretreatment of platelets with inhibitors of ERK (U 0126), PI3K/Akt (Ly 294002), p38 (SB 203580) and NFκB (BAY 11-7082 and Ro 106-9920). Preincubation of platelets with either aspirin or dexamethasone markedly decreased fibrinogen binding and the adhesion mediated by histones without affecting P-selectin exposure. Functional platelet responses induced by H3 and H4, but not H1, H2A and H2B, were partially mediated through interaction with Toll-like receptors -2 and -4. Our data identify histones as important triggers of haemostatic and proinflammatory platelet responses, and only haemostatic responses are partially inhibited by anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23965842

  18. Multiple mechanisms involved in the large-spectrum therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Moreira, Fabricio Araújo; Gomes, Felipe Villela; Del Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-12-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major phytocannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant. It lacks the psychotomimetic and other psychotropic effects that the main plant compound Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being able, on the contrary, to antagonize these effects. This property, together with its safety profile, was an initial stimulus for the investigation of CBD pharmacological properties. It is now clear that CBD has therapeutic potential over a wide range of non-psychiatric and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and psychosis. Although the pharmacological effects of CBD in different biological systems have been extensively investigated by in vitro studies, the mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic potential are still not clear. Here, we review recent in vivo studies indicating that these mechanisms are not unitary but rather depend on the behavioural response being measured. Acute anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects seem to rely mainly on facilitation of 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission in key brain areas related to defensive responses, including the dorsal periaqueductal grey, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial prefrontal cortex. Other effects, such as anti-compulsive, increased extinction and impaired reconsolidation of aversive memories, and facilitation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis could depend on potentiation of anandamide-mediated neurotransmission. Finally, activation of TRPV1 channels may help us to explain the antipsychotic effect and the bell-shaped dose-response curves commonly observed with CBD. Considering its safety profile and wide range of therapeutic potential, however, further studies are needed to investigate the involvement of other possible mechanisms (e.g. inhibition of adenosine uptake, inverse agonism at CB2 receptor, CB1 receptor antagonism, GPR55 antagonism, PPARγ receptors agonism, intracellular (Ca(2+)) increase, etc.), on CBD behavioural effects. PMID:23108553

  19. Photosynthesis Is Not Involved in the Mechanism of Action of Acifluorfen in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Stephen O.; Kenyon, William H.

    1986-01-01

    The possible role of photosynthesis in the mechanism of action of the herbicide acifluorfen (2-chloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy-2-nitrobenzoate; AF) was examined. The sensitivity to AF of cotyledons of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) which had been grown under far red light (FR) and white light were compared. FR grown tissues which were photosynthetically imcompetent were hypersensitive to AF under white light and had approximately the same relative response to AF under blue and red light as green, white-light-grown tissues. Ultrastructural damage was apparent in FR-grown, AF-treated tissues within an hour after exposure to white light, with cytoplasmic and plastidic disorganization occurring simultaneously. In cucumber cotyledon tissue which had been greening for various time periods, there was no correlation between photosynthetic capacity and herbicidal efficacy of AF. PSII inhibitors (atrazine and DCMU) and the photophosphorylation inhibitor, tentoxin, had no effect on AF activity. Atrazine did not reduce AF activity at any concentration or light intensity tested, indicating that there is no second, photosynthetic-dependent mechanism of action operating at low AF concentrations or low fluence rates. Carbon dioxide-dependent O2 evolution of intact chloroplasts of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) had an AF I50 of 125 micromolar compared to 1000 micromolar for cucumber, whereas AF was much more herbicidally active in tissues of cucumber than of spinach. Differences in activity could not be accounted for by differences in uptake of AF. Our results indicate that there is no photosynthetic involvement in the mechanism of action of AF in cucumber. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664919

  20. Crosstalk of Signaling Mechanisms Involved in Host Defense and Symbiosis Against Microorganisms in Rice.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Akira; Shimamoto, Ko; Kawano, Yoji

    2016-08-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops, feeding about half population in the world. Rice pathogens cause enormous damage to rice production worldwide. In plant immunity research, considerable progress has recently been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity. Using genome sequencing and molecular techniques, a number of new MAMPs and their receptors have been identified in the past two decades. Notably, the mechanisms for chitin perception via the lysine motif (LysM) domain-containing receptor OsCERK1, as well as the mechanisms for bacterial MAMP (e.g. flg22, elf18) perception via the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain-containing receptors FLS2 and EFR, have been clarified in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. In chitin signaling in rice, two direct substrates of OsCERK1, Rac/ROP GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factor OsRacGEF1 and receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase OsRLCK185, have been identified as components of the OsCERK1 complex and are rapidly phosphorylated by OsCERK1 in response to chitin. Interestingly, OsCERK1 also participates in symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in rice and plays a role in the recognition of short-chitin molecules (CO4/5), which are symbiotic signatures included in AMF germinated spore exudates and induced by synthetic strigolactone. Thus, OsCERK1 contributes to both immunity and symbiotic responses. In this review, we describe recent studies on pathways involved in rice immunity and symbiotic signaling triggered by interactions with microorganisms. In addition, we describe recent advances in genetic engineering by using plant immune receptors and symbiotic microorganisms to enhance disease resistance of rice. PMID:27499679

  1. Multiple mechanisms involved in the large-spectrum therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Moreira, Fabricio Araújo; Gomes, Felipe Villela; Del Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major phytocannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant. It lacks the psychotomimetic and other psychotropic effects that the main plant compound Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being able, on the contrary, to antagonize these effects. This property, together with its safety profile, was an initial stimulus for the investigation of CBD pharmacological properties. It is now clear that CBD has therapeutic potential over a wide range of non-psychiatric and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and psychosis. Although the pharmacological effects of CBD in different biological systems have been extensively investigated by in vitro studies, the mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic potential are still not clear. Here, we review recent in vivo studies indicating that these mechanisms are not unitary but rather depend on the behavioural response being measured. Acute anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects seem to rely mainly on facilitation of 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission in key brain areas related to defensive responses, including the dorsal periaqueductal grey, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial prefrontal cortex. Other effects, such as anti-compulsive, increased extinction and impaired reconsolidation of aversive memories, and facilitation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis could depend on potentiation of anandamide-mediated neurotransmission. Finally, activation of TRPV1 channels may help us to explain the antipsychotic effect and the bell-shaped dose-response curves commonly observed with CBD. Considering its safety profile and wide range of therapeutic potential, however, further studies are needed to investigate the involvement of other possible mechanisms (e.g. inhibition of adenosine uptake, inverse agonism at CB2 receptor, CB1 receptor antagonism, GPR55 antagonism, PPARγ receptors agonism, intracellular (Ca2+) increase, etc.), on CBD behavioural effects. PMID:23108553

  2. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Aging of the T-cell Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Moro-García, Marco Antonio; Alonso-Arias, Rebeca; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    T-lymphocytes play a central role in the effector and regulatory mechanisms of the adaptive immune response. Upon exiting the thymus they begin to undergo a series of phenotypic and functional changes that continue throughout the lifetime and being most pronounced in the elderly. The reason postulated for this is that the dynamic processes of repeated interaction with cognate antigens lead to multiple division cycles involving a high degree of cell differentiation, senescence, restriction of the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire, and cell cycle arrest. This cell cycle arrest is associated with the loss of telomere sequences from the ends of chromosomes. Telomere length is reduced at each cell cycle, and critically short telomeres recruit components of the DNA repair machinery and trigger replicative senescence or apoptosis. Repetitively stimulated T-cells become refractory to telomerase induction, suffer telomere erosion and enter replicative senescence. The latter is characterized by the accumulation of highly differentiated T-cells with new acquired functional capabilities, which can be caused by aberrant expression of genes normally suppressed by epigenetic mechanisms in CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells. Age-dependent demethylation and overexpression of genes normally suppressed by DNA methylation have been demonstrated in senescent subsets of T-lymphocytes. Thus, T-cells, principally CD4+CD28null T-cells, aberrantly express genes, including those of the KIR gene family and cytotoxic proteins such as perforin, and overexpress CD70, IFN-γ, LFA-1 and others. In summary, owing to a lifetime of exposure to and proliferation against a variety of pathogens, highly differentiated T-cells suffer molecular modifications that alter their cellular homeostasis mechanisms. PMID:23730199

  3. Dimerization of the 3'UTR of bicoid mRNA involves a two-step mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wagner, C; Palacios, I; Jaeger, L; St Johnston, D; Ehresmann, B; Ehresmann, C; Brunel, C

    2001-10-26

    The proper localization of bicoid (bcd) mRNA requires cis-acting signals within its 3' untranslated region (UTR) and trans-acting factors such as Staufen. Dimerization of bcd mRNA through intermolecular base-pairing between two complementary loops of domain III of the 3'UTR was proposed to be important for particle formation in the embryo. The participation in the dimerization process of each domain building the 3'UTR was evaluated by thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of various mutated and truncated RNAs. Although sequence complementarity between the two loops of domain III is required for initiating mRNA dimerization, the initial reversible loop-loop complex is converted rapidly into an almost irreversible complex. This conversion involves parts of RNA outside of domain III that promote initial recognition, and dimerization can be inhibited by sense or antisense oligonucleotides only before conversion has proceeded. Injection of the different bcd RNA variants into living Drosophila embryos shows that all elements that inhibit RNA dimerization in vitro prevent formation of localized particles containing Staufen. Particle formation appeared to be dependent on both mRNA dimerization and other element(s) in domains IV and V. Domain III of bcd mRNA could be substituted by heterologous dimerization motifs of different geometry. The resulting dimers were converted into stable forms, independently of the dimerization module used. Moreover, these chimeric RNAs were competent in forming localized particles and recruiting Staufen. The finding that the dimerization domain of bcd mRNA is interchangeable suggests that dimerization by itself, and not the precise geometry of the intermolecular interactions, is essential for the localization process. This suggests that the stabilizing interactions that are formed during the second step of the dimerization process might represent crucial elements for Staufen recognition and localization. PMID:11676536

  4. Wnt5a promotes cancer cell invasion and proliferation by receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Kensaku; Sato, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsujimoto, Ikuko; Nakamura, Masahiro; Hattori, Kazunari; Sato, Yuji; Dohi, Keiji; Hirata, Michinari; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a activates the Wnt/β-catenin-independent pathway and its overexpression is associated with tumor aggressiveness enhancing invasive activity. For this action, Wnt5a-induced receptor endocytosis with clathrin is required. Wnt5a expression was previously believed to be associated with cancer cell motility but not proliferation. Recently, it was reported that Wnt5a is also implicated in cancer cell proliferation, but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we generated a neutralizing anti-Wnt5a monoclonal antibody (mAb5A16) to investigate the mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates cancer cell proliferation. Wnt5a stimulated both invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, including HeLaS3 cervical cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells although Wnt5a promoted invasion but not proliferation in other cancer cells such as KKLS gastric cancer cells. mAb5A16 did not affect the binding of Wnt5a to its receptor, but it suppressed Wnt5a-induced receptor-mediated endocytosis. mAb5A16 inhibited invasion but not proliferation of HeLaS3 and A549 cells. Wnt5a activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and Wnt5a-dependent cancer cell proliferation was dependent on SFKs, yet blockade of receptor-mediated endocytosis did not affect cancer cell proliferation and SFK activity. These results suggest that Wnt5a promotes invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:25622531

  5. Involvement of medullary GABAergic system in extraterritorial neuropathic pain mechanisms associated with inferior alveolar nerve transection.

    PubMed

    Okada-Ogawa, Akiko; Nakaya, Yuka; Imamura, Yoshiki; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Shinoda, Masamichi; Kita, Kozue; Sessle, Barry J; Iwata, Koichi

    2015-05-01

    In order to determine if the functional changes in the GABAergic system in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) are involved in the mechanisms underlying extraterritorial neuropathic pain in the orofacial region following inferior alveolar nerve transection (IANX), mechanical noxious behavior, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) immunohistochemistry and single neuronal activity were analyzed in vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT)-VenusA rats expressing fluorescent protein and the VGAT in Vc neurons. The number of VGAT-VenusA positive neurons was significantly reduced in IANX rats than naive and sham rats at 7days after nerve transection. The number of VGAT-VenusA positive pERK-immunoreactive (IR) cells was significantly increased in IANX rats at 21days after IAN transection compared with naive and sham rats. The background activity and mechanical-evoked responses of Vc nociceptive neurons were significantly depressed after intrathecal application of the GABA receptor agonist muscimol in sham rats but not in IANX rats. Furthermore, the expression of potassium-chloride co-transporter 2 (KCC2) in the Vc was significantly reduced in IANX rats compared with sham rats. The head-withdrawal threshold (HWT) to mechanical stimulation of the whisker pad skin was significantly decreased in IANX rats compared with sham rats on days 7 and 21 after IANX. The significant reduction of the HWT and significant increase in the number of VGAT-VenusA negative pERK-IR cells were observed in KCC2 blocker R-DIOA-injected rats compared with vehicle-injected rats on day 21 after sham treatment. These findings revealed that GABAergic Vc neurons might be reduced in their number at the early period after IANX and the functional changes might occur in GABAergic neurons from inhibitory to excitatory at the late period after IANX, suggesting that the neuroplastic changes occur in the GABAergic neuronal network in the Vc due to morphological and functional changes at

  6. Ubiquitin-specific Protease 15 Negatively Regulates Virus-induced Type I Interferon Signaling via Catalytically-dependent and -independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huan; Wang, Dang; Zhong, Huijuan; Luo, Rui; Shang, Min; Liu, Dezhi; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-01-01

    Viral infection triggers a series of signaling cascades, which converge to activate the transcription factors nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), thereby inducing the transcription of type I interferons (IFNs). Although not fully characterized, these innate antiviral responses are fine-tuned by dynamic ubiquitination and deubiquitination processes. In this study, we report ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) 15 is involved in regulation of the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-dependent type I IFN induction pathway. Knockdown of endogenous USP15 augmented cellular antiviral responses. Overexpression of USP15 inhibited the transcription of IFN-β. Further analyses identified histidine 862 as a critical residue for USP15’s catalytic activity. Interestingly, USP15 specifically removed lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains from RIG-I among the essential components in RIG-I-like receptor-dependent pathway. In addition, we demonstrated that in contrast to USP15 de-ubiquitinating (DUB) activity, USP15-mediated inhibition of IFN signaling was not abolished by mutations eliminating the catalytic activity, indicating that a fraction of USP15-mediated IFN antagonism was independent of the DUB activity. Catalytically inactive USP15 mutants, as did the wild-type protein, disrupted virus-induced interaction of RIG-I and IFN-β promoter stimulator 1. Taken together, our data demonstrate that USP15 acts as a negative regulator of RIG-I signaling via DUB-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:26061460

  7. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs) in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd), which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX), Williams syndrome (WS), Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS). A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23425632

  8. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Junlin; Zhao, Guifang; Gao, Xiaocai

    2013-01-01

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs) in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd), which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX), Williams syndrome (WS), Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS). A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23425632

  9. Thiol–disulfide exchange is involved in the catalytic mechanism of peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, W. Todd; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Honek, John F.; Matthews, Brian W.

    2000-01-01

    Peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase (MsrA; EC 1.8.4.6) reverses the inactivation of many proteins due to the oxidation of critical methionine residues by reducing methionine sulfoxide, Met(O), to methionine. MsrA activity is independent of bound metal and cofactors but does require reducing equivalents from either DTT or a thioredoxin-regenerating system. In an effort to understand these observations, the four cysteine residues of bovine MsrA were mutated to serine in a series of permutations. An analysis of the enzymatic activity of the variants and their free sulfhydryl states by mass spectrometry revealed that thiol–disulfide exchange occurs during catalysis. In particular, the strictly conserved Cys-72 was found to be essential for activity and could form disulfide bonds, only upon incubation with substrate, with either Cys-218 or Cys-227, located at the C terminus. The significantly decreased activity of the Cys-218 and Cys-227 variants in the presence of thioredoxin suggested that these residues shuttle reducing equivalents from thioredoxin to the active site. A reaction mechanism based on the known reactivities of thiols with sulfoxides and the available data for MsrA was formulated. In this scheme, Cys-72 acts as a nucleophile and attacks the sulfur atom of the sulfoxide moiety, leading to the formation of a covalent, tetracoordinate intermediate. Collapse of the intermediate is facilitated by proton transfer and the concomitant attack of Cys-218 on Cys-72, leading to the formation of a disulfide bond. The active site is returned to the reduced state for another round of catalysis by a series of thiol—disulfide exchange reactions via Cys-227, DTT, or thioredoxin. PMID:10841552

  10. The mechanism involved in the loss of PTEN expression in NSCLC tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jingfeng; Peng, Xianjing; Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Chen, Yuxiang

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation stimulates PTEN reexpression in NSCLC independent of p53 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN reexpression is mediated by miR-29b overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29b regulates Dnmts expression in NSCLC tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target therapy could be established by overexpressing miR-29b expression. -- Abstract: Loss of PTEN expression is observed in most non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). However, the mechanism by which PTEN expression is regulated in NSCLC has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts), microRNA-29b (miR-29b), and anti-miR-29b inhibitor in PTEN promoter methylation and PTEN gene expression in H358 NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. PTEN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. PTEN and Dnmts protein levels were measured by Western blot. miR-29b expression was detected by Northern blot. A xenograft H358 tumor mouse model was established by subcutaneously inoculating H358 cells into the right hind limbs of nude mice. We found that radiation induced cell apoptosis and hypomethylation in PTEN promoter, PTEN and miR-29b expression, and downregulation of Dnmt1, 3a and 3b expression in H358 tumor cells. The effect of radiation on gene expression and apoptosis was blocked by anti-miR-29b inhibitor. In the xenograft H358 tumor model, anti-miR-29b inhibitor reversed radiation-induced tumor growth delay, PTEN reexpression and downregulation of Dnmts expression. Our study suggested that miR-29b is an upstream molecule of PTEN. miR-29b regulates PTEN gene expression through downregulating Dnmts expression and subsequently induces hypomethylation in PTEN promoter. Targeting therapy could be established in NSCLC by upregulating miR-29b expression.

  11. Two Mechanisms Involved in Trigeminal CGRP Release: Implications for Migraine Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Paul L.; Masterson, Caleb G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to better understand the cellular mechanisms involved in proton stimulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) secretion from cultured trigeminal neurons by investigating the effects of two anti-migraine therapies, onabotulinumtoxin A and rizatriptan. Background Stimulated CGRP release from peripheral and central terminating processes of trigeminal ganglia neurons is implicated in migraine pathology by promoting inflammation and nociception. Based on models of migraine pathology, several inflammatory molecules including protons are thought to facilitate sensitization and activation of trigeminal nociceptive neurons and stimulate CGRP secretion. Despite the reported efficacy of triptans and onabotulinumtoxinA to treat acute and chronic migraine, respectively, a substantial number of migraneurs do not get adequate relief with these therapies. A possible explanation is that triptans and onabutulinumtoxinA are not able to block proton mediated CGRP secretion. Methods CGRP secretion from cultured primary trigeminal ganglia neurons was quantitated by radioimmunoassay while intracellular calcium and sodium levels were measured in neurons via live cell imaging using Fura2-AM and SBFI-AM, respectively. The expression of ASIC3 was determined by immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis. In addition, the involvement of ASICs in mediating proton stimulation of CGRP was investigated using the potent and selective ASIC3 inhibitor APETx2. Results While KCl caused a significant increase in CGRP secretion that was significantly repressed by treatment with EGTA, onabotulinumtoxinA, and rizatriptan, the stimulatory effect of protons (pH 5.5) was not suppressed by EGTA, onabotulinumtoxinA, or rizatriptan. In addition, while KCl caused a transient increase in intracellular calcium levels that was blocked by EGTA, no appreciable change in calcium levels was observed with proton treatment. However, protons did significantly increase the

  12. Structure and Mechanism of Enzymes Involved in Biosynthesis and Breakdown of the Phosphonates Fosfomycin, Dehydrophos, and Phosphinothricin

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Satish K.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid increase in the mechanistic and structural information on enzymes that are involved in the biosynthesis and breakdown of naturally occurring phosphonates. This review focuses on these recent developments with an emphasis on those enzymes that have been characterized crystallographically in the past five years, including proteins involved in the biosynthesis of phosphinothricin, fosfomycin, and dehydrophos and proteins involved in resistance mechanisms. PMID:20854789

  13. Neural Correlates of Successful and Unsuccessful Strategical Mechanisms Involved in Uncertain Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Giustiniani, Julie; Gabriel, Damien; Nicolier, Magali; Monnin, Julie; Haffen, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The ability to develop successful long-term strategies in uncertain situations relies on complex neural mechanisms. Although lesion studies have shown some of the mechanisms involved, it is still unknown why some healthy subjects are able to make the right decision whereas others are not. The aim of our study was to investigate neurophysiological differences underlying this ability to develop a successful strategy in a group of healthy subjects playing a monetary card game called the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). In this task, subjects have to win and earn money by choosing between four decks of cards, two were advantageous in the long term and two disadvantageous. Twenty healthy right-handed subjects performed the IGT while their cerebral activity was recorded by electroencephalography. Based on their behavioral performances, two groups of subjects could clearly be distinguished: one who selected the good decks and thus succeeded in developing a Favorable strategy (9 subjects) and one who remained Undecided (11 subjects). No neural difference was found between each group before the selection of a deck, but in both groups a greater negativity was found emerging from the right superior frontal gyrus 600 ms before a disadvantageous selection. During the processing of the feedback, an attenuation of the P200 and P300 waveforms was found for the Undecided group, and a P300 originating from the medial frontal gyrus was found in response to a loss only in the Favorable group. Our results suggest that undecided subjects are hyposensitive to the valence of the cards during gambling, which affects the feedback processing. PMID:26086196

  14. Semiquinone intermediates are involved in the energy coupling mechanism of E. coli complex I.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Madhavan; Leung, Steven A; Inaba, Yuta; Elguindy, Mahmoud M; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2015-08-01

    Complex I (NADH:quinone oxidoreductase) is central to cellular aerobic energy metabolism, and its deficiency is involved in many human mitochondrial diseases. Complex I translocates protons across the membrane using electron transfer energy. Semiquinone (SQ) intermediates appearing during catalysis are suggested to be key for the coupling mechanism in complex I. However, the existence of SQ has remained controversial due to the extreme difficulty in detecting unstable and low intensity SQ signals. Here, for the first time with Escherichia coli complex I reconstituted in proteoliposomes, we successfully resolved and characterized three distinct SQ species by EPR. These species include: fast-relaxing SQ (SQNf) with P1/2 (half-saturation power level)>50mW and a wider linewidth (12.8 G); slow-relaxing SQ (SQNs) with P1/2=2-3mW and a 10G linewidth; and very slow-relaxing SQ (SQNvs) with P1/2= ~0.1mW and a 7.5G linewidth. The SQNf signals completely disappeared in the presence of the uncoupler gramicidin D or squamotacin, a potent E. coli complex I inhibitor. The pH dependency of the SQNf signals correlated with the proton-pumping activities of complex I. The SQNs signals were insensitive to gramicidin D, but sensitive to squamotacin. The SQNvs signals were insensitive to both gramicidin D and squamotacin. Our deuterium exchange experiments suggested that SQNf is neutral, while SQNs and SQNvs are anion radicals. The SQNs signals were lost in the ΔNuoL mutant missing transporter module subunits NuoL and NuoM. The roles and relationships of the SQ intermediates in the coupling mechanism are discussed. PMID:25868873

  15. Vascular oxidative stress upregulates angiotensin II type I receptors via mechanisms involving nuclear factor kappa B.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Siddhartha R; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F; Banday, Anees Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The association of oxidative stress with hypertension is well known. However, a causal role of oxidative stress in hypertension is unclear. Vascular angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) upregulation is a prominent contributor to pathogenesis of hypertension. However, the mechanisms causing this upregulation are unknown. Oxidative stress is an important regulator of protein expression via activation of transcription factors such as nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB). The present study was carried out to test the hypothesis that oxidative stress contributes to vascular AT1R upregulation via NFκB in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). HASMC exposed to oxidative stress exhibited a robust increase in AT1R mRNA in HASMC. Furthermore, oxidative stress failed to upregulate AT1Rs in the presence of either an antioxidant catalase or siRNA against p65 subunit of NFκB. To test the role of oxidative stress and NFκB in hypertension, prehypertensive SHR were treated with NFκB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate from 5 weeks to 11-12 weeks of age. At 11-12 weeks of age, SHR exhibited increased NFκB expression, AT1R upregulation and exaggerated Ang II-induced vasoconstriction as compared to age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. PDTC treatment of SHR lowered NFκB expression, normalized AT1R expression and Ang II-induced vasoconstriction. More importantly, PDTC treatment significantly attenuated hypertension development in SHR. In conclusion, vascular oxidative can upregulate AT1R, via mechanisms involving NFκB, and contribute to the development of hypertension. PMID:25198883

  16. Monocrotaline pyrrole-induced endothelial cell megalocytosis involves a Golgi blockade mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mehul; Patel, Kirit; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2005-04-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids initiate disease in the lung (pulmonary hypertension), liver (veno-occlusive disease and cirrhosis), and kidneys (afferent arteriolar block and mesangiolysis) by inducing a megalocytotic phenotype in target endothelial and parenchymal cells. A "hit-and-run" type of exposure to the bioactive pyrrolizidine results, within 2-3 days, in enlarged cells with large nuclei and enlarged Golgi and endoplasmic reticulum, while the cells remain in G2/M block. In the present study, we recapitulated monocrotaline pyrrole (MCTP)-induced megalocytosis in cultures of bovine pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC), human Hep3B hepatocytes, human type II-like alveolar epithelial cells (A549), and human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) and investigated the subcellular mechanism involved. There was an inverse relationship between reduction in caveolin (Cav)-1 levels and stimulation of promitogenic STAT3 and ERK1/2 cell signaling. In megalocytotic PAEC, the Golgi scaffolding protein GM130 was shifted from membranes with heavy density to those with a lighter density. This lighter Golgi fraction was enriched for hypo-oligomeric Cav-1, indicating dysfunctional trafficking of cargo. Immunofluorescence imaging studies confirmed the trapping of Cav-1 in a GM130-positive Golgi compartment. There was an increase in Ser25 phosphorylation of GM130 (typically a prelude to Golgi fragmentation and mitosis) and increased association between pGM130, cdc2 kinase, and Cav-1. Nevertheless, megalocytotic MCTP-treated cells showed reduced entry into mitosis upon stimulation with 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), reduced 2-ME-induced Golgi fragmentation, and a slowing of Golgi reassembly after nocodazole-induced fragmentation. These data suggest that a disruption of the trafficking and mitosis sensor functions of the Golgi may represent the subcellular mechanism leading to MCTP-induced megalocytosis ("the Golgi blockade hypothesis"). PMID:15561761

  17. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  18. Energy Taxis toward Host-Derived Nitrate Supports a Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1-Independent Mechanism of Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Chávez, Fabian; Lopez, Christopher A.; Zhang, Lillian F.; García-Pastor, Lucía; Chávez-Arroyo, Alfredo; Lokken, Kristen L.; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium can cross the epithelial barrier using either the invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) or a T3SS-1-independent mechanism that remains poorly characterized. Here we show that flagellum-mediated motility supported a T3SS-1-independent pathway for entering ileal Peyer’s patches in the mouse model. Flagellum-dependent invasion of Peyer’s patches required energy taxis toward nitrate, which was mediated by the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein (MCP) Tsr. Generation of nitrate in the intestinal lumen required inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which was synthesized constitutively in the mucosa of the terminal ileum but not in the jejunum, duodenum, or cecum. Tsr-mediated invasion of ileal Peyer’s patches was abrogated in mice deficient for Nos2, the gene encoding iNOS. We conclude that Tsr-mediated energy taxis enables S. Typhimurium to migrate toward the intestinal epithelium by sensing host-derived nitrate, thereby contributing to invasion of Peyer’s patches. PMID:27435462

  19. Prostate-Derived ETS Factor Regulates Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition through Both SLUG-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Victoria J.; Turner, David P.; Yordy, John S.; McCarragher, Brent; Shriver, Marey R.; Szalai, Gabor; Watson, Patricia M.; LaRue, Amanda C.; Moussa, Omar; Watson, Dennis K.

    2011-01-01

    The 5-year survival rate is very low when breast cancer becomes metastatic. The metastatic process is governed by a network of molecules of which SLUG is known to play a major role as a regulator of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Prostate-derived ETS factor (PDEF) has been proposed as a tumor suppressor, possibly through inhibition of invasion and metastasis; therefore, understanding the mechanism of PDEF regulation may help to better understand its role in breast cancer progression. This study shows for the first time that the transcription factor SLUG is a direct target of PDEF in breast cancer. We show that the expression of PDEF is able to suppress/dampen EMT through the negative regulation of SLUG. In addition, we show that PDEF is also able to regulate downstream targets of SLUG, namely E-cadherin, in both SLUG-dependent and -independent manners, suggesting a critical role for PDEF in regulating EMT. PMID:21779485

  20. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Pathogenesis of Alphavirus-Induced Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Da Poian, Andrea T.

    2013-01-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV), Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), Sindbis virus (SINV), Mayaro virus (MAYV), O'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV), and Barmah Forest virus (BFV), cause incapacitating and long lasting articular disease/myalgia. Outbreaks of viral arthritis and the global distribution of these diseases point to the emergence of arthritogenic alphaviruses as an important public health problem. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms involved in alphavirus-induced arthritis, exploring the recent data obtained with in vitro systems and in vivo studies using animal models and samples from patients. The factors associated to the extension and persistence of symptoms are highlighted, focusing on (a) virus replication in target cells, and tissues, including macrophages and muscle cells; (b) the inflammatory and immune responses with recruitment and activation of macrophage, NK cells and T lymphocytes to the lesion focus and the increase of inflammatory mediators levels; and (c) the persistence of virus or viral products in joint and muscle tissues. We also discuss the importance of the establishment of novel animal models to test new molecular targets and to develop more efficient and selective drugs to treat these diseases. PMID:24069610

  1. A nucleoside triphosphate-regulated, 3' exonucleolytic mechanism is involved in turnover of yeast mitochondrial RNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Min, J; Zassenhaus, H P

    1993-01-01

    We have employed cell-free transcription reactions with mitochondria isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to study the mechanism of RNA turnover. The specificity of RNA turnover was preserved in these preparations, as were other RNA-processing reactions, including splicing, 3' end formation of mRNAs, and maturation of rRNAs. Turnover of nascent RNAs was found to occur exonucleolytically; endonucleolytic cleavage products were not detected during turnover of the omega intron RNA, which was studied in detail. However, these experiments still leave open the possibility that endonucleolytic cleavage products with very short half-lives are kinetic intermediates in the decay of omega RNA. Exonucleolytic turnover was regulated by nucleotide triphosphates and required their hydrolysis. A unique signature of this regulation was that any one of the eight standard ribo- or deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates supported RNA turnover. A novel hybrid selection protocol was used to determine the turnover rates of the 5', middle, and 3' portions of one mitochondrial transcript, the omega intron RNA. The results suggested that degradation along that transcript occurred with a 3'-->5' polarity. The similarity between features of mitochondrial RNA turnover and the properties of a nucleotide triphosphate-dependent 3' exoribonuclease that has been purified from yeast mitochondria suggests that this single enzyme is a key activity whose regulation is involved in the specificity of mitochondrial RNA turnover. Images PMID:7691792

  2. Mechanisms involved in Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens removal during activated sludge wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Orruño, Maite; Garaizabal, Idoia; Bravo, Zaloa; Parada, Claudia; Barcina, Isabel; Arana, Inés

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater treatment reduces environmental contamination by removing gross solids and mitigating the effects of pollution. Treatment also reduces the number of indicator organisms and pathogens. In this work, the fates of two coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens, were analyzed in an activated sludge process to determine the main mechanisms involved in the reduction of pathogenic microorganisms during wastewater treatment. These bacteria, modified to express green fluorescent protein, were inoculated in an activated sludge unit and in batch systems containing wastewater. The results suggested that, among the different biological factors implied in bacterial removal, bacterivorous protozoa play a key role. Moreover, a representative number of bacteria persisted in the system as free-living or embedded cells, but their distribution into liquid or solid fractions varied depending on the bacterium tested, questioning the real value of bacterial indicators for the control of wastewater treatment process. Additionally, viable but nonculturable cells constituted an important part of the bacterial population adhered to solid fractions, what can be derived from the competition relationships with native bacteria, present in high densities in this environment. These facts, taken together, emphasize the need for reliable quantitative and qualitative analysis tools for the evaluation of pathogenic microbial composition in sludge, which could represent an undefined risk to public health and ecosystem functions when considering its recycling. PMID:25044599

  3. Hippocampal molecular mechanisms involved in the enhancement of fear extinction caused by exposure to novelty.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Furini, Cristiane Regina Guerino; Benetti, Fernando; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2014-03-25

    Exposure to a novel environment enhances the extinction of contextual fear. This has been explained by tagging of the hippocampal synapses used in extinction, followed by capture of proteins from the synapses that process novelty. The effect is blocked by the inhibition of hippocampal protein synthesis following the novelty or the extinction. Here, we show that it can also be blocked by the postextinction or postnovelty intrahippocampal infusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphono pentanoic acid; the inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), autocamtide-2-related inhibitory peptide; or the blocker of L-voltage-dependent calcium channels (L-VDCCs), nifedipine. Inhibition of proteasomal protein degradation by β-lactacystin has no effect of its own on extinction or on the influence of novelty thereon but blocks the inhibitory effects of all the other substances except that of rapamycin on extinction, suggesting that their action depends on concomitant synaptic protein turnover. Thus, the tagging-and-capture mechanism through which novelty enhances fear extinction involves more molecular processes than hitherto thought: NMDA receptors, L-VDCCs, CaMKII, and synaptic protein turnover. PMID:24591622

  4. Molecular mechanisms involved in muscle wasting in cancer and ageing: cachexia versus sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Argilés, Josep M; Busquets, Sílvia; Felipe, Antonio; López-Soriano, Francisco J

    2005-05-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize and evaluate the different mechanisms and catabolic mediators involved in cancer cachexia and ageing sarcopenia since they may represent targets for future promising clinical investigations. Cancer cachexia is a syndrome characterized by a marked weight loss, anorexia, asthenia and anemia. In fact, many patients who die with advanced cancer suffer from cachexia. The degree of cachexia is inversely correlated with the survival time of the patient and it always implies a poor prognosis. Unfortunately, at the clinical level, cachexia is not treated until the patient suffers from a considerable weight loss and wasting. At this point, the cachectic syndrome is almost irreversible. The cachectic state is often associated with the presence and growth of the tumour and leads to a malnutrition status due to the induction of anorexia. In recent years, age-related diseases and disabilities have become of major health interest and importance. This holds particularly for muscle wasting, also known as sarcopenia, that decreases the quality of life of the geriatric population, increasing morbidity and decreasing life expectancy. The cachectic factors (associated with both depletion of fat stores and muscular tissue) can be divided into two categories: of tumour origin and humoural factors. In conclusion, more research should be devoted to the understanding of muscle wasting mediators, both in cancer and ageing, in particular the identification of common mediators may prove as a good therapeutic strategies for both prevention and treatment of wasting both in disease and during healthy ageing. PMID:15743680

  5. Mechanisms involved in Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens removal during activated sludge wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Orruño, Maite; Garaizabal, Idoia; Bravo, Zaloa; Parada, Claudia; Barcina, Isabel; Arana, Inés

    2014-10-01

    Wastewater treatment reduces environmental contamination by removing gross solids and mitigating the effects of pollution. Treatment also reduces the number of indicator organisms and pathogens. In this work, the fates of two coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens, were analyzed in an activated sludge process to determine the main mechanisms involved in the reduction of pathogenic microorganisms during wastewater treatment. These bacteria, modified to express green fluorescent protein, were inoculated in an activated sludge unit and in batch systems containing wastewater. The results suggested that, among the different biological factors implied in bacterial removal, bacterivorous protozoa play a key role. Moreover, a representative number of bacteria persisted in the system as free-living or embedded cells, but their distribution into liquid or solid fractions varied depending on the bacterium tested, questioning the real value of bacterial indicators for the control of wastewater treatment process. Additionally, viable but nonculturable cells constituted an important part of the bacterial population adhered to solid fractions, what can be derived from the competition relationships with native bacteria, present in high densities in this environment. These facts, taken together, emphasize the need for reliable quantitative and qualitative analysis tools for the evaluation of pathogenic microbial composition in sludge, which could represent an undefined risk to public health and ecosystem functions when considering its recycling. PMID:25044599

  6. First Independent Replication of the Involvement of LARS2 in Perrault Syndrome by Whole-Exome Sequencing of an Italian Family

    PubMed Central

    Soldà, Giulia; Caccia, Sonia; Robusto, Michela; Chiereghin, Chiara; Castorina, Pierangela; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Duga, Stefano; Asselta, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Perrault syndrome (MIM #233400) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ovarian dysgenesis and primary ovarian insufficiency in females, and progressive hearing loss in both genders. Recently, mutations in five genes (HSD17B4, HARS2, CLPP, LARS2, and C10ORF2) were found to be responsible for Perrault syndrome, although they do not account for all cases of this genetically heterogeneous condition. We used whole-exome sequencing to identify pathogenic variants responsible for Perrault syndrome in an Italian pedigree with two affected siblings. Both patients were compound heterozygous for two novel missense variants within the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LARS2), NM_015340.3:c.899C>T(p.Thr300Met) and c.1912G>A(p.Glu638Lys). Both variants co-segregated with the phenotype in the family. p.Thr300 and p.Glu638 are evolutionary conserved residues, and are located respectively within the editing domain and immediately before the catalytically important KMSKS motif. Homology modeling using as template the E. coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase provided further insights on the possible pathogenic effects of the identified variants. This represents the first independent replication of the involvement of LARS2 mutations in Perrault syndrome, contributing valuable information for the further understanding of this disease. PMID:26657938

  7. First independent replication of the involvement of LARS2 in Perrault syndrome by whole-exome sequencing of an Italian family.

    PubMed

    Soldà, Giulia; Caccia, Sonia; Robusto, Michela; Chiereghin, Chiara; Castorina, Pierangela; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Duga, Stefano; Asselta, Rosanna

    2016-04-01

    Perrault syndrome (MIM #233400) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ovarian dysgenesis and primary ovarian insufficiency in females, and progressive hearing loss in both genders. Recently, mutations in five genes (HSD17B4, HARS2, CLPP, LARS2 and C10ORF2) were found to be responsible for Perrault syndrome, although they do not account for all cases of this genetically heterogeneous condition. We used whole-exome sequencing to identify pathogenic variants responsible for Perrault syndrome in an Italian pedigree with two affected siblings. Both patients were compound heterozygous for two novel missense variants within the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LARS2): NM_015340.3:c.899C>T(p.Thr300Met) and c.1912G>A(p.Glu638Lys). Both variants cosegregated with the phenotype in the family. p.Thr300 and p.Glu638 are evolutionarily conserved residues, and are located, respectively, within the editing domain and immediately before the catalytically important KMSKS motif. Homology modeling using as template the E. coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase provided further insights on the possible pathogenic effects of the identified variants. This represents the first independent replication of the involvement of LARS2 mutations in Perrault syndrome, contributing valuable information for the further understanding of this disease. PMID:26657938

  8. Cadmium-induced glutathionylation of actin occurs through a ROS-independent mechanism: Implications for cytoskeletal integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Choong, Grace; Liu, Ying; Xiao, Weiqun; Templeton, Douglas M.

    2013-10-15

    Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in rat mesangial cells, and we have previously shown that this involves a complex interplay involving activation of kinase signaling, protein translocation, and disruption of focal adhesions. Here we investigate the role that glutathionylation of actin plays in Cd{sup 2+}-associated cytoskeletal reorganization. Low concentrations of Cd{sup 2+} (0.5–2 μM) caused an increase in actin glutathionylation by 6 h, whereas at higher concentrations glutathionylation remained at basal levels. Although oxidation with diamide increased glutathionylation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not involved in the Cd{sup 2+}-dependent effect, as only Cd{sup 2+} concentrations above 2 μM were sufficient to increase ROS. However, low [Cd{sup 2+}] increased total glutathione levels without affecting the ratio of reduced/oxidized glutathione, and inhibition of glutathione synthesis suppressed actin glutathionylation. Cadmium increased the activity of the enzyme glutaredoxin, which influences the equilibrium between glutathionylated and deglutathionylated proteins and thus may influence levels of glutathionylated actin. Together these observations show that cadmium-dependent effects on actin glutathionylation are affected by glutathione metabolism and not by direct effects of ROS on thiol chemistry. In vitro polymerization assays with glutathionylated actin show a decreased rate of polymerization. In contrast, immunofluorescence of cytoskeletal structure in intact cells suggests that increases in actin glutathionylation accompanying increased glutathione levels occurring under low Cd{sup 2+} exposure are protective in vivo, with cytoskeletal disruption ensuing only when higher Cd{sup 2+} concentrations increase ROS levels and prevent an increase in actin–glutathione conjugates. - Highlights: • Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in mesangial cells. • Cadmium induces glutathionylation of actin at low concentrations.

  9. The TLR7 agonist imiquimod induces bronchodilation via a nonneuronal TLR7-independent mechanism: a possible role for quinoline in airway dilation.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Olivia J; Manson, Martijn L; Starkhammar, Magnus; Fuchs, Barbara; Adner, Mikael; Kumlien Georén, Susanna; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2016-06-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7 agonists are known to reduce allergic airway inflammation. Their recently reported ability to rapidly relax airways has further increased their interest in the treatment of pulmonary disease. However, the mechanisms behind this effect are not fully understood. The present study, therefore, aimed to determine whether airway smooth muscle (ASM)-dependent mechanisms could be identified. TLR7 agonists were added to guinea pig airways following precontraction with carbachol in vitro or histamine in vivo. Pharmacological inhibitors were used to dissect conventional pathways of bronchodilation; tetrodotoxin was used or bilateral vagotomy was performed to assess neuronal involvement. Human ASM cells (HASMCs) were employed to determine the effect of TLR7 agonists on intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) mobilization. The well-established TLR7 agonist imiquimod rapidly relaxed precontracted airways in vitro and in vivo. This relaxation was demonstrated to be independent of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and cAMP signaling, as well as neuronal activity. A limited role for prostanoids could be detected. Imiquimod induced [Ca(2+)]i release from endoplasmic reticulum stores in HASMCs, inhibiting histamine-induced [Ca(2+)]i The TLR7 antagonist IRS661 failed to inhibit relaxation, and the structurally dissimilar agonist CL264 did not relax airways or inhibit [Ca(2+)]i This study shows that imiquimod acts directly on ASM to induce bronchorelaxation, via a TLR7-independent release of [Ca(2+)]i The effect is paralleled by other bronchorelaxant compounds, like chloroquine, which, like imiquimod, but unlike CL264, contains the chemical structure quinoline. Compounds with quinoline moieties may be of interest in the development of multifunctional drugs to treat pulmonary disease. PMID:27084847

  10. PKC activation increases Ca2+ sensitivity of permeabilized lymphatic muscle via myosin light chain 20 phosphorylation-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Patrick J.; Nepiyushchikh, Zhanna V.; Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Wang, Wei; Davis, Michael J.; Zawieja, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The contractile activity of muscle cells lining the walls of collecting lymphatics is responsible for generating and regulating flow within the lymphatic system. Activation of PKC signaling contributes to the regulation of smooth muscle contraction by enhancing sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca2+. It is currently unknown whether PKC signaling contributes to the regulation of lymphatic muscle contraction. We hypothesized that the activation of PKC signaling would increase the sensitivity of the lymphatic myofilament to Ca2+. To test this hypothesis, we determined the effects of PKC activation with phorbol esters [PMA or phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu)] on the contractile behavior of α-toxin-permeabilized rat mesenteric and cervical lymphatics or the thoracic duct. The addition of PMA or PDBu induced a significant increase in the contractile force of submaximally activated α-toxin-permeabilized lymphatic muscle independent of a change in intracellular Ca2+ concentration, and the Ca2+-force relationship of lymphatic muscle was significantly left shifted, indicating greater myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. Phorbol esters increased the maximal rate of force development, whereas the rate of relaxation was reduced. Western blot and immunohistochemistry data indicated that the initial rapid increase in tension development after stimulation by PDBu was associated with myosin light chain (MLC)20 phosphorylation; however, the later, steady-state Ca2+ sensitization of permeabilized lymphatic muscle was not associated with increased phosphorylation of MLC20 at Ser19, 17-kDa C-kinase-potentiated protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor at Thr38, or caldesmon at Ser789. Thus, these data indicate that PKC-dependent Ca2+ sensitization of lymphatic muscle may involve MLC20 phosphorylation-dependent and -independent mechanism(s). PMID:24414065

  11. Vascular Endothelium-Dependent and Independent Actions of Oleanolic Acid and Its Synthetic Oleanane Derivatives as Possible Mechanisms for Hypotensive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Madlala, Hlengiwe P.; Metzinger, Thomas; van Heerden, Fanie R.; Mubagwa, Kanigula; Dessy, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Plant-derived oleanolic acid (OA) and its related synthetic derivatives (Br-OA and Me-OA) possess antihypertensive effects in experimental animals. The present study investigated possible underlying mechanisms in rat isolated single ventricular myocytes and in vascular smooth muscles superfused at 37°C. Methods Cell shortening was assessed at 1 Hz using a video-based edge-detection system and the L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL) was measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in single ventricular myocytes. Isometric tension was measured using force transducer in isolated aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries. Vascular effects were measured in endothelium-intact and denuded vessels in the presence of various enzyme or channel inhibitors. Results OA and its derivatives increased cell shortening in cardiomyocytes isolated from normotensive rats but had no effect in those isolated from hypertensive animals. These triterpenes also caused relaxation in aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries pre-contracted with either phenylephrine or KCl-enriched solution. The relaxation was only partially inhibited by endothelium denudation, and also partly inhibited by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin, with no additional inhibitory effect of the NO synthase inhibitor, N-ω-Nitro-L-arginine. A combination of both ATP-dependent channel inhibition by glibenclaminde and voltage-dependent K+ channel inhibition by 4-aminopyridine was necessary to fully inhibit the relaxation. Conclusion These data indicate that the effects of OA and its derivatives are mediated via both endothelium-dependent and independent mechanisms suggesting the involvement of COX in the endothelium-dependent effects and of vascular muscle K+ channels in the endothelium-independent effects. Finally, our results support the view that the antihypertensive action of OA and its derivatives is due to a decrease of vascular resistance with no negative inotropic effect on the heart. PMID:26799746

  12. Mammary blood flow and metabolic activity are linked by a feedback mechanism involving nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cieslar, S R L; Madsen, T G; Purdie, N G; Trout, D R; Osborne, V R; Cant, J P

    2014-01-01

    To test which, if any, of the major milk precursors can elicit a rapid change in the rate of mammary blood flow (MBF) and to define the time course and magnitude of such changes, 4 lactating cows were infused with glucose, amino acids, or triacylglycerol into the external iliac artery feeding one udder half while iliac plasma flow (IPF) was monitored continuously by dye dilution. Adenosine and saline were infused as positive and negative controls, respectively, and insulin was infused to characterize the response to a centrally produced anabolic hormone. To test the roles of cyclooxygenase, NO synthase and ATP-sensitive K (KATP) channels in nutrient-mediated changes in blood flow, their respective inhibitors-indomethacin, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME), and glibenclamide-were infused simultaneously with glucose. Each day, 1 infusate was given twice to each cow, over a 20-min period each time, separated by a 20-min washout period. In addition, each treatment protocol was administered on 2 separate days. A 73% increase in IPF during adenosine infusion showed that the mammary vasodilatory response was quadratic in time, with most changes occurring in the first 5min. Glucose infusion decreased IPF by 9% in a quadratic manner, most rapidly in the first 5min, indicating that a feedback mechanism of local blood flow control, likely through adenosine release, was operative in the mammary vasculature. Amino acid infusion increased IPF 9% in a linear manner, suggesting that mammary ATP utilization was stimulated more than ATP production. This could reflect a stimulation of protein synthesis. Triacylglycerol only tended to decrease IPF and insulin did not affect IPF. A lack of IPF response to glibenclamide indicates that KATP channels are not involved in MBF regulation. Indomethacin and L-NAME both depressed IPF. In the presence of indomethacin, glucose infusion caused a quadratic 9% increase in IPF. Indomethacin is an inhibitor of mitochondrial

  13. Study of the Genes and Mechanism Involved in the Radioadaptive Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Pushan R.

    2009-01-01

    The radioadaptive response is a phenomenon where exposure to a prior low dose of radiation reduces the level of damage induced by a subsequent high radiation dose. The molecular mechanism behind this is still not well understood. Learning more about the radioadaptive response is critical for long duration spaceflight since astronauts are exposed to low levels of cosmic radiation. The micronucleus assay was used to measure the level of damage caused by radiation. Although cells which were not washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) after a low priming dose of 5cGy did not show adaptation to the challenge dose, washing the cells with PBS and giving the cells fresh media after the low dose did allow radioadaptation to occur. This is consistent with the results of a previous publication by another research group. In the present study, genes involved in DNA damage signaling and the oxidative stress response were studied using RT PCR techniques in order to look at changes in expression level after the low dose with or without washing. Our preliminary results indicate that upregulation of oxidative stress response genes ANGPTL7, NCF2, TTN, and SRXN1 may be involved in the radioadaptive response. The low dose of radiation alone was found to activate the oxidative stress response genes GPR156 and MTL5, whereas, washing the cells alone caused relatively robust upregulation of the oxidative stress response genes DUSP1 and PTGS2. Washing after the priming dose showed some changes in the expression level of several DNA damage signaling genes. In addition, we studied whether washing the cells after the priming dose has an effect on the level of nitric oxide in both the media and cells, since nitric oxide levels are known to increase in the media of the cells after a high dose of radiation only if the cells were already exposed to a low priming dose. Based on this preliminary study, we propose that washing the cells after priming exposure actually eliminates some factor

  14. Gardenin B-induced cell death in human leukemia cells involves multiple caspases but is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Javier; Saavedra, Ester; Del Rosario, Henoc; Perdomo, Juan; Loro, Juan F; Cifuente, Diego A; Tonn, Carlos E; García, Celina; Quintana, José; Estévez, Francisco

    2016-08-25

    Flavonoids have attracted great interest due to their possible anticancer activities. Here we investigated the antiproliferative activity of the flavonoids isolated from Baccharis scandens against human leukemia cell lines and found that the methoxyflavonoid gardenin B was the most cytotoxic compound against HL-60 and U-937 cells, showing IC50 values between 1.6 and 3.0 μM, but had no significant cytotoxic effects against quiescent or proliferating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These effects on viability were accompanied by the concentration- and time-dependent appearance of apoptosis as evidenced by DNA fragmentation, formation of apoptotic bodies and a sub-G1 ratio increase. Comparative studies with the best-studied bioflavonoid quercetin indicate that gardenin B is a more cytotoxic and more apoptotic inducer than quercetin. Cell death induced by gardenin B was associated with: (i) a significant induction of caspase-2, -3, -8 and -9 activities; (ii) cleavage of the initiator caspases (caspase-2, -8 and -9), of the executioner caspase-3, and of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase; and (iii) a concentration-dependent reactive oxygen species generation. In conclusion, apoptosis induced by gardenin B is associated with activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways of cell death and occurs through a mechanism that is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:27423764

  15. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Induces Proliferation, Survival, and Migration in A549 Lung Cancer Cells by Activating the ERK Signaling Pathway through a Transcription-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Quintero Barceinas, Reyna Sara; García-Regalado, Alejandro; Aréchaga-Ocampo, Elena; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; González-De la Rosa, Claudia Haydée

    2015-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been used as an antineoplastic because of its ability to promote proliferation, inhibition, and differentiation, primarily in leukemia; however, in other types of cancer, such as lung cancer, treatment with ATRA is restricted because not all the patients experience the same results. The ERK signaling pathway is dysregulated in cancer cells, including lung cancer, and this dysregulation promotes proliferation and cell invasion. In this study, we demonstrate that treatment with ATRA can activate the ERK signaling pathway by a transcription-independent mechanism through a signaling cascade that involves RARα and PI3K, promoting growth, survival, and migration in lung cancer cells. Until now, this mechanism was unknown in lung cancer cells. The inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway restores the beneficial effects of ATRA, reduces proliferation, increases apoptosis, and blocks the cell migration process in lung cancer cells. In conclusion, our results suggest that the combination of ATRA with ERK inhibitor in clinical trials for lung cancer is warranted. PMID:26557664

  16. High-mobility group boxes mediate cell proliferation and radiosensitivity via retinoblastoma-interaction-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Li; Meng, Qing-Hui; Jiao, Yang; Xu, Jia-Ying; Ge, Chun-Min; Zhou, Ju-Ying; Rosen, Eliot M; Wang, Hai-Chao; Fan, Sai-Jun

    2012-06-01

    Our previous studies have shown that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) could physically associate with the retinoblastoma (RB) protein via an LXCXE (leucine-X-cysteine-X-glutamic; X=any amino acid) motif. An identical LXCXE motif is present in the HMGB1-3 protein sequences, whereas a near-consensus LXCXD (leucine-X-cysteine-X-asparagine; X=any amino acid) motif is found in the HMGB4 protein. In this study, we have demonstrated that like HMGB1, HMGB2-3 also associated with the RB in vitro and in vivo, as evidenced by glutathione-s-transferase capture and immunoprecipitation-Western blot assays. A point mutation of the LXCXE or LXCXD motif led to disruption of RB:HMGB1-4 interactions. Enforced expression of HMGB1-3 or HMGB4 by adenoviral-vector-mediated gene transfer resulted in significant inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation through an LXCXE- or LXCXD-dependent mechanism and an increased radiosensitivity through an LXCXE- or LXCXD-independent mechanism. These results suggest an important role of the LXCXE/D motif in RB:HMGB1-4 association and modulation of cancer cell growth, but not radiosensitivity. PMID:22655796

  17. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    oxidative stress. Recently these concepts have become widely accepted. The versatility of ozone in treating vascular and degenerative diseases as well as skin lesions, hernial disc and primary root carious lesions in children is emphasized. Further researches able to elucidate whether the mechanisms of action of ozone therapy involve nuclear transcription factors, such as Nrf2, NFAT, AP-1, and HIF-1α are warranted. PMID:22185664

  18. Geophysical Survey To Understand Failure Mechanisms Involved On Deep Seated Landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebourg, T.; Tric, E.; Guglielmi, Y.; Cappa, F.; Charmoille, A.; Bouissou, S.

    2003-04-01

    The understanding of rupture processes involve on deep seated landslides and hence the prediction of such phenomenon is difficult for two main reasons. The first one, arise from the difficulty in estimating the mechanical behaviour of the whole mountain which is very different from that of a rock sample we can study on laboratory. This is mainly true in the upper part of slope subjected to weathering (Lebourg and al., 2002). The second reason, is due to the necessity of taking into account both the 3D geometry of the phenomenon and geological discontinuities affecting the mountain slide. We propose to show geophysical research on a deep seated landslide and the way we use to integreted then into numerical models. One of main problem of study deep seatted landslides with geophysical survey is the size of the landslide and the deep of the slope. The landslides we studied are located in the French Alps (Clapière landslide and Rocbillière landslide). It concern various geological formation, triggered by hydrological sollicitations. Our geophysical methods allow us to obtain 2D and 3D imagery of the geological structures, but also the shearing surface and the hydrological system used in the numerical and physical modeling. The research of the hydrogeological system can become one of the must importante result for the administration. After the first geophysical survey, we can quantify the hydrogeological level who can initiate or accelerate the paroxism of the landslide. Numerical model and prediction can also propose a 'surveillance' on the geophysical pseudo-dynamic prospecting. Our results showed also the importance of the weathering and the complexe chenalisation of the water whithin the slope, in the initiation of the movement. Our futur goal is to study the relative influence of the mechanical behaviour of the mountain, the behaviour of the wheathering zone, faults and intial topography of the mountain on landslide to determine the key parameter controlling this

  19. Structurally diverse c-Myc inhibitors share a common mechanism of action involving ATP depletion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabo; Sharma, Lokendra; Lu, Jie; Finch, Paul; Fletcher, Steven; Prochownik, Edward V

    2015-06-30

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein is deregulated in a large proportion of diverse human cancers. Considerable effort has therefore been directed at identifying pharmacologic inhibitors as potential anti-neoplastic agents. Three such groups of small molecule inhibitors have been described. The first is comprised of so-called "direct" inhibitors, which perturb Myc's ability to form productive DNA-binding heterodimers in association with its partner, Max. The second group is comprised of indirect inhibitors, which largely function by targeting the BET-domain protein BRD4 to prevent the proper formation of transcriptional complexes that assemble in response to Myc-Max DNA binding. Thirdly, synthetic lethal inhibitors cause the selective apoptosis of Myc over-expressing either by promoting mitotic catastrophe or altering Myc protein stability. We report here a common mechanism by which all Myc inhibitors, irrespective of class, lead to eventual cellular demise. This involves the depletion of ATP stores due to mitochondrial dysfunction and the eventual down-regulation of Myc protein. The accompanying metabolic de-regulation causes neutral lipid accumulation, cell cycle arrest, and an attempt to rectify the ATP deficit by up-regulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). These responses are ultimately futile due to the lack of functional Myc to support the requisite anabolic response. Finally, the effects of Myc depletion on ATP levels, cell cycle arrest, differentiation and AMPK activation can be mimicked by pharmacologic inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain without affecting Myc levels. Thus, all Myc inhibitors promote a global energy collapse that appears to underlie many of their phenotypic consequences. PMID:26036281

  20. Role of enzymatic activity in muscle damage and cytotoxicity induced by Bothrops asper Asp49 phospholipase A2 myotoxins: are there additional effector mechanisms involved?

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Obando, Diana; Díaz, Cecilia; Angulo, Yamileth; Gutiérrez, José María

    2014-01-01

    Viperid venoms often contain mixtures of Asp49 and Lys49 PLA2 myotoxin isoforms, relevant to development of myonecrosis. Given their difference in catalytic activity, mechanistic studies on each type require highly purified samples. Studies on Asp49 PLA2s have shown that enzyme inactivation using p-bromophenacyl bromide (p-BPB) drastically affects toxicity. However, based on the variable levels of residual toxicity observed in some studies, it has been suggested that effector mechanisms independent of catalysis may additionally be involved in the toxicity of these enzymes, possibly resembling those of the enzymatically inactive Lys49 myotoxins. A possibility that Lys49 isoforms could be present in Asp49 PLA2 preparations exists and, if undetected in previous studies, could explain the variable residual toxicity. This question is here addressed by using an enzyme preparation ascertained to be free of Lys49 myotoxins. In agreement with previous reports, inactivation of the catalytic activity of an Asp49 myotoxin preparation led to major inhibition of toxic effects in vitro and in vivo. The very low residual levels of myotoxicity (7%) and cytotoxicity (4%) observed can be attributed to the low, although detectable, enzyme remaining active after p-BPB treatment (2.7%), and would be difficult to reconcile with the proposed existence of additional catalytic-independent toxic mechanisms. These findings favor the concept that the effector mechanism of toxicity of Asp49 PLA2 myotoxins from viperids fundamentally relies on their ability to hydrolyze phospholipids, arguing against the proposal that membrane disruption may also be caused by additional mechanisms that are independent of catalysis. PMID:25276503

  1. Mechanical prophylaxis is a heparin-independent risk for anti–platelet factor 4/heparin antibody formation after orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bito, Seiji; Migita, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Mashio; Shinohara, Kazuhito; Sato, Tomotaro; Tonai, Takeharu; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Kazuhiko; Kubota, Chikara; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Mori, Toshihito; Ikeda, Kazuo; Ota, Shusuke; Minamizaki, Takeshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Shiota, Naofumi; Kamei, Masataka; Motokawa, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating antibodies, which recognize platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes, induce spontaneous heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) syndrome or fondaparinux-associated HIT without exposure to unfractionated heparin (UFH) or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). This condition mostly occurs after major orthopedic surgery, implying that surgery itself could trigger this immune response, although the mechanism is unclear. To investigate how surgery may do so, we performed a multicenter, prospective study of 2069 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or hip arthroplasty. Approximately half of the patients received postoperative thromboprophylaxis with UFH, LMWH, or fondaparinux. The other half received only mechanical thromboprophylaxis, including dynamic (intermittent plantar or pneumatic compression device), static (graduated compression stockings [GCSs]), or both. We measured anti-PF4/heparin immunoglobulins G, A, and M before and 10 days after surgery using an immunoassay. Multivariate analysis revealed that dynamic mechanical thromboprophylaxis (DMT) was an independent risk factor for seroconversion (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-3.02; P = .001), which was confirmed with propensity-score matching (OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.17-3.37; P = .018). For TKA, the seroconversion rates in patients treated with DMT but no anticoagulation and in patients treated with UFH or LMWH without DMT were similar, but significantly higher than in patients treated with only GCSs. The proportion of patients with ≥1.4 optical density units appeared to be higher among those treated with any anticoagulant plus DMT than among those not treated with DMT. Our study suggests that DMT increases risk of an anti-PF4/heparin immune response, even without heparin exposure. This trial was registered to www.umin.ac.jp/ctr as #UMIN000001366. PMID:26659923

  2. Mechanical prophylaxis is a heparin-independent risk for anti-platelet factor 4/heparin antibody formation after orthopedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bito, Seiji; Miyata, Shigeki; Migita, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Mashio; Shinohara, Kazuhito; Sato, Tomotaro; Tonai, Takeharu; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Kishi, Kazuhiko; Kubota, Chikara; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Mori, Toshihito; Ikeda, Kazuo; Ota, Shusuke; Minamizaki, Takeshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Shiota, Naofumi; Kamei, Masataka; Motokawa, Satoru

    2016-02-25

    Platelet-activating antibodies, which recognize platelet factor 4 (PF4)/heparin complexes, induce spontaneous heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) syndrome or fondaparinux-associated HIT without exposure to unfractionated heparin (UFH) or low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH). This condition mostly occurs after major orthopedic surgery, implying that surgery itself could trigger this immune response, although the mechanism is unclear. To investigate how surgery may do so, we performed a multicenter, prospective study of 2069 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or hip arthroplasty. Approximately half of the patients received postoperative thromboprophylaxis with UFH, LMWH, or fondaparinux. The other half received only mechanical thromboprophylaxis, including dynamic (intermittent plantar or pneumatic compression device), static (graduated compression stockings [GCSs]), or both. We measured anti-PF4/heparin immunoglobulins G, A, and M before and 10 days after surgery using an immunoassay. Multivariate analysis revealed that dynamic mechanical thromboprophylaxis (DMT) was an independent risk factor for seroconversion (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-3.02; P = .001), which was confirmed with propensity-score matching (OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.17-3.37; P = .018). For TKA, the seroconversion rates in patients treated with DMT but no anticoagulation and in patients treated with UFH or LMWH without DMT were similar, but significantly higher than in patients treated with only GCSs. The proportion of patients with ≥1.4 optical density units appeared to be higher among those treated with any anticoagulant plus DMT than among those not treated with DMT. Our study suggests that DMT increases risk of an anti-PF4/heparin immune response, even without heparin exposure. This trial was registered to www.umin.ac.jp/ctr as #UMIN000001366. PMID:26659923

  3. Genetic mechanisms involved in the evolution of the cephalopod camera eye revealed by transcriptomic and developmental studies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coleoid cephalopods (squids and octopuses) have evolved a camera eye, the structure of which is very similar to that found in vertebrates and which is considered a classic example of convergent evolution. Other molluscs, however, possess mirror, pin-hole, or compound eyes, all of which differ from the camera eye in the degree of complexity of the eye structures and neurons participating in the visual circuit. Therefore, genes expressed in the cephalopod eye after divergence from the common molluscan ancestor could be involved in eye evolution through association with the acquisition of new structural components. To clarify the genetic mechanisms that contributed to the evolution of the cephalopod camera eye, we applied comprehensive transcriptomic analysis and conducted developmental validation of candidate genes involved in coleoid cephalopod eye evolution. Results We compared gene expression in the eyes of 6 molluscan (3 cephalopod and 3 non-cephalopod) species and selected 5,707 genes as cephalopod camera eye-specific candidate genes on the basis of homology searches against 3 molluscan species without camera eyes. First, we confirmed the expression of these 5,707 genes in the cephalopod camera eye formation processes by developmental array analysis. Second, using molecular evolutionary (dN/dS) analysis to detect positive selection in the cephalopod lineage, we identified 156 of these genes in which functions appeared to have changed after the divergence of cephalopods from the molluscan ancestor and which contributed to structural and functional diversification. Third, we selected 1,571 genes, expressed in the camera eyes of both cephalopods and vertebrates, which could have independently acquired a function related to eye development at the expression level. Finally, as experimental validation, we identified three functionally novel cephalopod camera eye genes related to optic lobe formation in cephalopods by in situ hybridization analysis of

  4. Mass-independent isotope effect in the earliest processed solids in the solar system: a possible chemical mechanism.

    PubMed

    Marcus, R A

    2004-11-01

    (ads) and other adsorbed metal atoms or metallic monoxides to form CAIs. The latter are thereby mass-independently poor in (17)O and (18)O. Some O (ads) used to form the minerals are necessarily in excess of the XO (ads), because of the stoichiometry of the mineral, and modify the fractionation pattern. This effect is incorporated into the mechanistic and mathematical scheme. A merit of this chemical mechanism for the oxygen isotope anomaly is that only one oxygen reservoir is required in the solar nebula. It also does not require a sequestering of intermediate products which could undergo isotopic exchange, hence undoing the original isotopic fractionations. The gas phase source of adsorbed O atoms in this environment is either O or H(2)O. As inferred from data on the evaporation of Mg(2)SiO(4) taken as an example, the source of O (ads) is primarily H(2)O rather than O and is accompanied by the evolution of H(2). Nonisotopic kinetic experiments can determine more sharply the mechanism of condensed phase growth of these minerals. Laboratory tests are proposed to test the existence of a surface eta effect on the growing CAI surfaces at these high temperatures. PMID:15511139

  5. Lithium chloride attenuates BMP-2 signaling and inhibits osteogenic differentiation through a novel WNT/GSK3- independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Khavandgar, Zohreh; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Murshed, Monzur

    2011-02-01

    Lithium inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase3 (GSK3) activity has been shown to mimic the canonical WNT signaling. Analogous to WNT, lithium prevents GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of cytosolic transcription factor β-catenin and its subsequent degradation by the proteasome complex. Although stabilization of β-catenin in osteoblasts has been shown to promote bone mass accrual in a mouse model, several studies reported inhibitory effects of lithium supplements on the osteogenic differentiation of cultured mesenchymal stem cells. One possible explanation for these apparent contradictory findings might be that lithium affects the differentiation of osteoblast progenitors through additional signaling events, which independently or in concert with WNT signaling, affect the bone resorption activities in vivo. In the current study, we used murine MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts and a pluripotent mesenchymal cell line C2C12 to investigate lithium effects during the early stages of osteoblast differentiation. We demonstrate here that lithium inhibits BMP-2 signaling to affect osteogenic differentiation in both cell lines. Lithium treatment reduces BMP-2-induced SMAD 1,5,8 phosphorylation in both MC3T3-E1 and C2C12 cells without affecting their dephosphorylation. Additionally, in MC3T3-E1 cells, lithium attenuates BMP-2-induced osteogenic differentiation through GSK3 inhibition; while in C2C12 cells, these negative effects of lithium ions on BMP-2 signaling do not rely on GSK3 inhibition or activation of canonical WNT signaling. Our work suggests the presence of a novel GSK3/WNT-independent mechanism of lithium action during the early stages of osteogenic differentiation. PMID:20932949

  6. Sequestosome 1/p62 links familial ALS mutant SOD1 to LC3 via an ubiquitin-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Jozsef; Strom, Anna-Lena; Kwinter, David M.; Kilty, Renee; Zhang, Jiayu; Shi, Ping; Fu, Weisi; Wooten, Marie W.; Zhu, Haining

    2009-01-01

    The p62/sequestosome 1 protein has been identified as a component of pathological protein inclusions in neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). P62 has also been implicated in autophagy, a process of mass degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles. Autophagy is a critical pathway for degrading misfolded and/or damaged proteins, including the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) mutants linked to familial ALS. We previously reported that p62 interacted with ALS mutants of SOD1 and that the ubiquitin-association (UBA) domain of p62 was dispensable for the interaction. In this study, we identified two distinct regions of p62 that were essential to its binding to mutant SOD1: the N-terminal PB1 domain (residues 1-104) and a separate internal region (residues 178–224) termed here as SOD1 mutant interaction region (SMIR). The PB1 domain is required for appropriate oligomeric status of p62 and the SMIR is the actual region interacting with mutant SOD1. Within the SMIR, the conserved W184, H190 and positively charged R183, R186, K187 and K189 residues are critical to the p62-mutant SOD1 interaction since substitution of these residues with alanine resulted in significantly abolished binding. In addition, SMIR and the p62 sequence responsible for the interaction with LC3, a protein essential for autophagy activation, are independent of each other. In cells lacking p62, the existence of mutant SOD1 in acidic autolysosomes decreased, suggesting that p62 can function as an adaptor between mutant SOD1 and the autophagy machinery. This study provides a novel molecular mechanism by which mutant SOD1 can be recognized by p62 in an ubiquitin-independent fashion and targeted for the autophagy-lysosome degradation pathway. PMID:19765191

  7. LY294002 inhibits glucocorticoid-induced COX-2 gene expression in cardiomyocytes through a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Haipeng; Xu Beibei; Sheveleva, Elena; Chen, Qin M.

    2008-10-01

    Glucocorticoids induce COX-2 expression in rat cardiomyocytes. While investigating whether phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) plays a role in corticosterone (CT)-induced COX-2, we found that LY294002 (LY29) but not wortmannin (WM) attenuates CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p85 subunit of PI3K failed to inhibit CT from inducing COX-2 expression. CT did not activate PI3K/AKT signaling pathway whereas LY29 and WM decreased the activity of PI3K. LY303511 (LY30), a structural analogue and a negative control for PI3K inhibitory activity of LY29, also suppressed COX-2 induction. These data suggest PI3K-independent mechanisms in regulating CT-induced COX-2 expression. LY29 and LY30 do not inhibit glucocorticoid receptor transactivity. Both compounds have been reported to inhibit Casein Kinase 2 activity and modulate potassium and calcium levels independent of PI3K, while LY29 has been reported to inhibit mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR), and DNA-dependent Protein Kinase (DNA-PK). Inhibitor of Casein Kinase 2 (CK2), mTOR or DNA-PK failed to prevent CT from inducing COX-2 expression. Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a potassium channel blocker, and nimodipine, a calcium channel blocker, both attenuated CT from inducing COX-2 gene expression. CT was found to increase intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration, which can be inhibited by LY29, TEA or nimodipine. These data suggest a possible role of calcium instead of PI3K in CT-induced COX-2 expression in cardiomyocytes.

  8. DDT and its metabolites alter gene expression in human uterine cell lines through estrogen receptor-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Frigo, Daniel E; Burow, Matthew E; Mitchell, Kamron A; Chiang, Tung-Chin; McLachlan, John A

    2002-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting organochlorines, such as the pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), bind to and activate estrogen receptors (ERs), thereby eliciting estrogen-like effects. Although ERs function predominantly through activation of transcription via estrogen-responsive elements, both ERs, alpha and ss, can interact with various transcription factors such as activator protein-1 (AP-1). Additionally, estrogens may regulate early signaling events, suggesting that the biological effects of environmental estrogens may not be mediated through classic ER (alpha and ss) activity alone. We hypothesized that known environmental estrogens, such as DDT and its metabolites, activate AP-1-mediated gene transactivation through both ER-dependent and ER-independent means. Using two Ishikawa human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line variants that we confirmed to be estrogen responsive [Ishikawa(+)] and estrogen unresponsive [Ishikawa(-)], we generated stably transfected AP-1 luciferase cell lines to identify the role of an estrogen-responsive mechanism in AP-1-mediated gene expression by various stimuli. Our results demonstrate that DDT and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) were the most potent activators of AP-1 activity; 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) acetic acid failed to activate. Although stimulated in both Ishikawa(+) and Ishikawa(-) cells by DDT and its congeners, AP-1 activation was more pronounced in the estrogen-unresponsive Ishikawa(-) cells. In addition, DDT, DDD, and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) could also stimulate AP-1 activity in the estrogen-unresponsive human embryonic kidney 293 cells using a different promoter context. Thus, our data demonstrate that DDT and its metabolites activate the AP-1 transcription factor independent of ER (alpha or ss) status. PMID:12460804

  9. KU-0060648 inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cells through DNA-PKcs-dependent and DNA-PKcs-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Mu-Xin; Tang, Min; Ruan, Ting-Yan; Xu, Jun-Ying; Zhou, Xiao-zhong; Chen, Gang; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Here we tested anti-tumor activity of KU-0060648 in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) models. Our results demonstrated that KU-0060648 was anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic in established (HepG2, Huh-7 and KYN-2 lines) and primary human HCC cells, but was non-cytotoxic to non-cancerous HL-7702 hepatocytes. DNA-PKcs (DNA-activated protein kinase catalytic subunit) is an important but not exclusive target of KU-0060648. DNA-PKcs knockdown or dominant negative mutation inhibited HCC cell proliferation. On the other hand, overexpression of wild-type DNA-PKcs enhanced HepG2 cell proliferation. Importantly, KU-0060648 was still cytotoxic to DNA-PKcs-silenced or -mutated HepG2 cells, although its activity in these cells was relatively weak. Further studies showed that KU-0060648 inhibited PI3K-AKT-mTOR activation, independent of DNA-PKcs. Introduction of constitutively-active AKT1 (CA-AKT1) restored AKT-mTOR activation after KU-0060648 treatment in HepG2 cells, and alleviated subsequent cytotoxicity. In vivo, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of KU-0060648 significantly inhibited HepG2 xenograft growth in nude mice. AKT-mTOR activation was also inhibited in xenografted tumors. Finally, we showed that DNA-PKcs expression was significantly upregulated in human HCC tissues. Yet miRNA-101, an anti-DNA-PKcs miRNA, was downregulated. Over-expression of miR-101 in HepG2 cells inhibited DNA-PKcs expression and cell proliferation. Together, these results indicate that KU-0060648 inhibits HCC cells through DNA-PKcs-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PMID:26933997

  10. Molecular mechanisms of nutlin-induced apoptosis in multiple myeloma: evidence for p53-transcription-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Saha, Manujendra N; Jiang, Hua; Chang, Hong

    2010-09-15

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable plasma cell malignancy in which p53 is rarely mutated. Thus, activation of the p53 pathway by a small molecule inhibitor of the p53-MDM2 interaction, nutlin, in MM cells retaining wild type p53 is an attractive therapeutic strategy. Recently we reported that nutlin plus velcade (a proteasome inhibitor) displayed a synergistic response in MM. However, the mechanism of the p53-mediated apoptosis in MM has not been fully understood. Our data show that nutlin-induced apoptosis correlated with reduction in cell viability, upregulation of p53, p21 and MDM2 protein levels with a simultaneous increase in pro-apoptotic targets PUMA, Bax and Bak and downregulation of anti-apoptotic targets Bcl2 and survivin and activation of caspase in MM cells harboring wild type p53. Nutlin-induced apoptosis was inhibited when activation of caspase was blocked by the caspase inhibitor. Nutlin caused mitochondrial translocation of p53 where it binds with Bcl2, leading to cytochrome C release. Moreover, blocking the transcriptional arm of p53 by the p53-specific transcriptional inhibitor, pifithrin-α, not only inhibited nutlin-induced upregulation of p53-transcriptional targets but also augmented apoptosis in MM cells, suggesting an association of transcription-independent pathway of apoptosis. However, inhibitor of mitochondrial translocation of p53, PFT-μ, did not prevent nutlin-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the p53 transcription-dependent pathway was also operational in nutlin-induced apoptosis in MM. Our study provides the evidence that nutlin-induced apoptosis in MM cells is mediated by transcription-dependent and -independent pathways and supports further clinical evaluation of nutlin as a novel therapeutic agent in MM. PMID:20595817

  11. Involvement of DNA-PKcs in the Type I IFN Response to CpG-ODNs in Conventional Dendritic Cells in TLR9-Dependent or -Independent Manners

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chi; Spies, Narrissa P.; Gong, Ting; Jones, Can Xin; Chu, Wen-Ming

    2015-01-01

    CpG-ODNs activate dendritic cells (DCs) to produce interferon alpha (IFNα) and beta (IFNβ). Previous studies demonstrated that Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) deficient DCs exhibited a residual IFNα response to CpG-A, indicating that yet-unidentified molecules are also involved in induction of IFNα by CpG-A. Here, we report that the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) but not Ku70 deficient BMDCs showed defective IFNα and IFNβ responses to CpG-A or CpG-B. Loss of both DNA-PKcs and TLR9 further reduced the IFNα response to CpG-A. These DNA-PKcs and TLR9 effects were mediated by their downstream Akt/mTORC1 pathway and downstream events IRAK1 and IKKα. Loss of DNA-PKcs, TLR9, MyD88 or IRAK4 impaired phosphorylation of Akt(S473), S6K, S6, IRAK1, or IKKα in BMDCs in response to CpG-ODNs. The residual IFNα and IFNβ in DNA-PKcs-deficient BMDCs were partially responsible for the induction of IL-6 and IL-12 by CpG-ODNs and their stimulatory effect was blocked by IFNAR1 neutralizing antibodies. Further analysis indicated that CpG-ODN associated with DNA-PKcs and Ku70, and induced DNA-PKcs’s interaction with TRAF3. Intriguingly, DNA-PKcs but not Ku70 expression level was reduced in TLR9-deficient BMDCs. Taken together, our data suggest that DNA-PKcs is an important mediator in the type I IFN response to CpG-ODNs in TLR9-dependent or -independent fashions. PMID:25812014

  12. Insulin Protects Hepatic Lipotoxicity by Regulating ER Stress through the PI3K/Akt/p53 Involved Pathway Independently of Autophagy Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Hua; Sun, Zongxiang; Liu, Yunyun; Liu, Lei; Hao, Liuyi; Ye, Yaxin; Feng, Rennan; Li, Jie; Li, Ying; Chu, Xia; Li, Songtao; Sun, Changhao

    2016-01-01

    The detrimental role of hepatic lipotoxicity has been well-implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Previously, we reported that inhibiting autophagy aggravated saturated fatty acid (SFA)-induced hepatotoxicity. Insulin, a physiological inhibitor of autophagy, is commonly increased within NAFLD mainly caused by insulin resistance. We therefore hypothesized that insulin augments the sensitivity of hepatocyte to SFA-induced lipotoxicity. The present study was conducted via employing human and mouse hepatocytes, which were exposed to SFAs, insulin, or their combination. Unexpectedly, our results indicated that insulin protected hepatocytes against SFA-induced lipotoxicity, based on the LDH, MTT, and nuclear morphological measurements, and the detection from cleaved-Parp-1 and -caspase-3 expressions. We subsequently clarified that insulin led to a rapid and short-period inhibition of autophagy, which was gradually recovered after 1 h incubation in hepatocytes, and such extent of inhibition was insufficient to aggravate SFA-induced lipotoxicity. The mechanistic study revealed that insulin-induced alleviation of ER stress contributed to its hepatoprotective role. Pre-treating hepatocytes with insulin significantly stimulated phosphorylated-Akt and reversed SFA-induced up-regulation of p53. Chemical inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α robustly prevented palmitate-induced cell death. The PI3K/Akt pathway blockade by its special antagonist abolished the protective role of insulin against SFA-induced lipotoxicity and p53 up-regulation. Furthermore, we observed that insulin promoted intracellular TG deposits in hepatocytes in the present of palmitate. However, blocking TG accumulation via genetically silencing DGAT-2 did not prevent insulin-protected lipotoxicity. Our study demonstrated that insulin strongly protected against SFA-induced lipotoxicity in hepatocytes mechanistically through alleviating ER stress via a PI3K/Akt/p53 involved pathway but independently from autophagy

  13. Hypoxic repression of CYP7A1 through a HIF-1α- and SHP-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Yunwon; Park, Bongju; Park, Hyunsung

    2016-01-01

    Liver cells experience hypoxic stress when drug-metabolizing enzymes excessively consume O2 for hydroxylation. Hypoxic stress changes the transcription of several genes by activating a heterodimeric transcription factor called hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/β (HIF-1α/β). We found that hypoxic stress (0.1% O2) decreased the expression of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in bile acid biosynthesis. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component of bile acids, represses CYP7A1 by activating a transcriptional repressor named small heterodimer partner (SHP). We observed that hypoxia decreased the levels of both CDCA and SHP, suggesting that hypoxia repressed CYP7A1 without inducing SHP. The finding that overexpression of HIF-1α increased the activity of the CYP7A1 promoter suggested that hypoxia decreased the expression of CYP7A1 in a HIF-1-independent manner. Thus, the results of this study suggested that hypoxia decreased the activity of CYP7A1 by limiting its substrate O2, and by decreasing the transcription of CYP7A1. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 173-178] PMID:26521940

  14. The receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase LAR promotes R7 photoreceptor axon targeting by a phosphatase-independent signaling mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Hofmeyer, Kerstin; Treisman, Jessica E.

    2009-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs) control many aspects of nervous system development. At the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), regulation of synapse growth and maturation by the RPTP LAR depends on catalytic phosphatase activity and on the extracellular ligands Syndecan and Dally-like. We show here that the function of LAR in controlling R7 photoreceptor axon targeting in the visual system differs in several respects. The extracellular domain of LAR important for this process is distinct from the domains known to bind Syndecan and Dally-like, suggesting the involvement of a different ligand. R7 targeting does not require LAR phosphatase activity, but instead depends on the phosphatase activity of another RPTP, PTP69D. In addition, a mutation that prevents dimerization of the intracellular domain of LAR interferes with its ability to promote R7 targeting, although it does not disrupt phosphatase activity or neuromuscular synapse growth. We propose that LAR function in R7 is independent of its phosphatase activity, but requires structural features that allow dimerization and may promote the assembly of downstream effectors. PMID:19889974

  15. Novel naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium compound pellets based on acid-independent mechanism: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Kan, Shuling; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the novel naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium compound pellets (novel-NAP/EMZ) depending on EMZ acid-independent mechanism which has been proved to be predominate in the mechanism of co-therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets, composed of NAP colon-specific pellets (NAP-CSPs) and EMZ modified-release pellets (EMZ-MRPs), were prepared by fluid-bed coating technology with desired in vitro release profiles. The resulting pellets were filled into hard gelatin capsules for in vivo evaluation in rats and compared with the reference compound pellets, consisted of NAP enteric-coated pellets (NAP-ECPs) and EMZ immediate-release pellets (EMZ-IRPs). The reference compound pellets were prepared simulating the drug delivery system of VIMOVO(®). In vivo pharmacokinetics, EMZ-MRPs had significantly larger AUC0-t (p < 0.01), 1.67 times more than that of EMZ-IRPs, and prolonged mean residence time (7.55 ± 0.12 h) than that of IRPs (1.46 ± 0.39 h). NAP-CSPs and NAP-ECPs showed similar AUC0-t. Compared to the reference compound pellets, the novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets did not show distinct differences in histological mucosal morphology. However, biochemical tests exhibited enhanced total antioxidant capacity, increased nitric oxide content and reduced malondialdehyde level for novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets, indicating that the acid-independent action took effect. The gastric pH values of novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets were at a low and stable level, which could ensure normal physiological range of human gastric pH. As a result, the novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets may be a more suitable formulation with potential advantages by improving bioavailability of drug and further reducing undesirable gastrointestinal damages. PMID:26902772

  16. Mechanisms involved in the spontaneous occurrence of diploid-triploid chimerism in the mink (Mustela vison) and chicken (Gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Fechheimer, N S; Isakova, G K; Belyaev, D K

    1983-01-01

    Diploid-triploid chimeras have been observed both in man and in a number of laboratory and livestock animals. The mechanism(s) of their origin remains enigmatic. One approach is to calculate for each proposed mechanism the expected frequencies of zygotes bearing different gonosomic complements in the two cell lines. Observed samples are then compared with the expectations. The mechanisms that have been considered include: (1) fertilization of a blastomere, (2) absorption of the second polar body into a blastomere, (3) fertilization of the first polar body, (4) independent fertilization of both nuclei in binucleated oocytes, (5) fertilization of the second polar body as well as the egg, and (6) fusion of two eggs. The sample of minks comprised three preimplantation embryos, nine postimplantation embryos, and three neonatal pups, with gonosomic complements of 7 XX/XXX, 3 XX/XXY, 4XY/XXY, and 1 XY/XYY; the chicks comprised 13 embryos at 1 day of incubation, 1 embryo at 4 days, and one adult bird, with gonosomic complements of 5 ZZ/ZZZ, 1 ZZ/ZZW, 1 ZW/ZZZ, 3 ZW/ZZW, and 5 ZW/ZWW. If it is assumed that within each species all, or most, of the 2n/3n chimeras arise from the same mechanism, then the occurrence of a type that has an expected frequency of zero for a given proposed mechanism effectively eliminates that mechanism as a source. All of the chicks could have resulted from only one mechanism, viz., independent fertilization of both nuclei in binucleated oocytes. The sample of minks could have resulted from the same mechanism or from fertilization of a blastomere of a two-cell, 2n embryo. PMID:6578004

  17. The Relationship between Self-Determination and Quality of Life among Individuals with Disabilities Involved with a Center for Independent Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekemeier, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities have historically been compromised in their ability to assert independence with respect to concepts of independent living and self-determination. In turn this may potentially impact an individual's overall quality of life. Community integration and availability of a full quality of life and to be self-determined has…

  18. Mechanisms involved in the psychological distress of Black Caribbeans in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govia, Ishtar O.

    The mental health of ethnic minorities in the United States is of urgent concern. The accelerated growth of groups of ethnic minorities and immigrants in the United States and the stressors to which they are exposed, implores academic researchers to investigate more deeply health disparities and the factors that exacerbate or minimize such inequalities. This dissertation attended to that concern. It used data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL), the first survey with a national representative sample of Black Caribbeans, to explore mechanisms that involved in the psychological distress of Black Caribbeans in the United States. In a series of three studies, the dissertation investigated the role and consequence of (1) chronic discrimination, immigration factors, and closeness to ethnic and racial groups; (2) personal control and social support; and (3) family relations and social roles in the psychological distress of Black Caribbeans. Study 1 examined how the associations between discrimination and psychological distress were buffered or exacerbated by closeness to ethnic group and closeness to racial group. It also examined how these associations differed depending on immigration factors. Results indicated that the buffering or exacerbating effect of ethnic and racial group closeness varied according to the type of discrimination (subtle or severe) and were more pronounced among those born in the United States. Using the stress process framework, Study 2 tested moderation and mediation models of the effects of social support and personal control in the association between discrimination and distress. Results from a series of analyses on 579 respondents suggested that personal control served as a mediator in this relationship and that emotional support exerted a direct distress deterring function. Study 3 investigated sex differences in the associations between social roles, intergenerational family relationship perceptions and distress. Results

  19. The involvement of nucleosomes in Giemsa staining of chromosomes. A new hypothesis on the banding mechanism.

    PubMed

    van Duijn, P; van Prooijen-Knegt, A C; van der Ploeg, M

    1985-01-01

    A new hypothesis is proposed on the involvement of nucleosomes in Giemsa banding of chromosomes. Giemsa staining as well as the concomitant swelling can be explained as an insertion of the triple charged hydrophobic dye complex between the negatively-charged super-coiled helical DNA and the denatured histone cores of the nucleosomes still present in the fixed chromosomes. New cytochemical data and recent results from biochemical literature on nucleosomes are presented in support of this hypothesis. Chromosomes are stained by the Giemsa procedure in a purple (magenta) colour. Giemsa staining of DNA and histone (isolated or in a simple mixture) in model experiments results in different colours, indicating that a higher order configuration of these chromosomal components lies at the basis of the Giemsa method. Cytophotometry of Giemsa dye absorbance of chromosomes shows that the banding in the case of saline pretreatment is due to a relative absence of the complex in the faintly coloured bands (interbands). Pretreatment with trypsin results in an increase in Giemsa dye uptake in the stained bands. Cytophotometric measurements of free phosphate groups before and after pretreatment with saline, reveal a blocking of about half of the free phosphate groups indicating that a substantial number of free amino groups is still present in the fixed chromosomes. Glutaraldehyde treatment inhibited Giemsa-banding irreversibly while the formaldehyde-induced disappearance of the bands could be restored by a washing procedure. These results correlate with those of biochemical nucleosome studies using the same aldehydes. Based on these findings and on the known properties of nucleosomes, a mechanism is proposed that explains the collapse of the chromosome structure when fixed chromosomes are transferred to aqueous buffer solutions. During homogeneous Giemsa staining reswelling of the unpretreated chromosome is explained by insertion of the hydrophobic Giemsa complex between the

  20. Study of the possible mechanisms involved in the mucosal immune system activation by lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Perdigón, G; Vintiñi, E; Alvarez, S; Medina, M; Medici, M

    1999-06-01

    The induction of a mucosal immune response is not easy due to the development of oral tolerance, but under some conditions, bacteria can activate this immune system. Antigens administered orally can interact with M cells of Peyer's patches or bind to the epithelial cells. We have demonstrated that certain lactic acid bacteria are able to induce specific secretory immunity, and others will enhance the gut inflammatory immune response. The aim of this work was to establish the reason for these different behaviors and to define possible mechanisms involved in the interaction of lactic acid bacteria at the intestinal level. We studied IgA+ and IgM+ B cells comparatively in bronchus and intestine and CD4+ T cells and IgA anti-lactic acid bacteria antibodies in the intestinal fluid, induced by oral administration of Lactobacillus casei, Lb. delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Lb. acidophilus, Lb. plantarum, Lb. rhamnosus, Lactococcus lactis, and Streptococcus salivarius ssp. thermophilus. The increase in the IgA+ B cells in the bronchus means that these lactic acid bacteria were able to induce the IgA cycle by interaction with M cells from Peyer's patches or intestinal epithelial cells. The IgM+ cells increased when the stimulus did not induce the switch from IgM+ to IgA+. The increase in the CD4+ cells suggests interaction of Peyer's patches and enhancement of the B- and T-cell migration. The anti-lactic acid bacteria antibody is related to the processing and presentation of the microorganisms to the immune cells. We demonstrated that Lb. casei and Lb. plantarum were able to interact with Peyer's patch cells and showed an increase in IgA-, CD4+ cells, and antibodies specific for the stimulating strain. Lactobacillus acidophilus induced gut mucosal activation by interaction with the epithelial cells without increase in the immune cells associated with the bronchus. Although Lb. rhamnosus and Strep. salivarius ssp. thermophilus interact with epithelial cells, they also induced

  1. Activation of Akt pathway by transcription-independent mechanisms of retinoic acid promotes survival and invasion in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is currently being used in clinical trials for cancer treatment. The use of ATRA is limited because some cancers, such as lung cancer, show resistance to treatment. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that regulate resistance to ATRA treatment. Akt is a kinase that plays a key role in cell survival and cell invasion. Akt is often activated in lung cancer, suggesting its participation in resistance to chemotherapy. In this study, we explored the hypothesis that activation of the Akt pathway promotes resistance to ATRA treatment at the inhibition of cell survival and invasion in lung cancer. We aimed to provide guidelines for the proper use of ATRA in clinical trials and to elucidate basic biological mechanisms of resistance. Results We performed experiments using the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. We found that ATRA treatment promotes PI3k-Akt pathway activation through transcription-independent mechanisms. Interestingly, ATRA treatment induces the translocation of RARα to the plasma membrane, where it colocalizes with Akt. Immunoprecipitation assays showed that ATRA promotes Akt activation mediated by RARα-Akt interaction. Activation of the PI3k-Akt pathway by ATRA promotes invasion through Rac-GTPase, whereas pretreatment with 15e (PI3k inhibitor) or over-expression of the inactive form of Akt blocks ATRA-induced invasion. We also found that treatment with ATRA induces cell survival, which is inhibited by 15e or over-expression of an inactive form of Akt, through a subsequent increase in the levels of the active form of caspase-3. Finally, we showed that over-expression of the active form of Akt significantly decreases expression levels of the tumor suppressors RARβ2 and p53. In contrast, over-expression of the inactive form of Akt restores RARβ2 expression in cells treated with ATRA, indicating that activation of the PI3k-Akt pathway inhibits the expression of ATRA target genes

  2. Nitric oxide attenuates matrix metalloproteinase-9 production by endothelial cells independent of cGMP- or NFκB-mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Meschiari, Cesar A; Izidoro-Toledo, Tatiane; Gerlach, Raquel F; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2013-06-01

    Cardiovascular diseases involve critical mechanisms including impaired nitric oxide (NO) levels and abnormal matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. While NO downregulates MMP expression in some cell types, no previous study has examined whether NO downregulates MMP levels in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that NO donors could attenuate MMP-9 production by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) as a result of less NFκB activation or cyclic GMP (cGMP)-mediated mechanisms. We studied the effects of DetaNONOate (10-400 μM) or SNAP (50-400 μM) on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA; 10 nM)-induced increases in MMP-9 activity (by gel zymography) or concentrations (by ELISA) as well as on a tissue inhibitor of MMPs' (TIMP)-1 concentrations (by ELISA) in the conditioned medium of HUVECs incubated for 24 h with these drugs. We also examined whether the irreversible inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase ODQ modified the effects of SNAP or whether 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable analog of cGMP) influenced PMA-induced effects on MMP-9 expression. Total and phospho-NFκB p65 concentrations were measured in HUVEC lysates to assess NFκB activation. Both NO donors attenuated PMA-induced increases in MMP-9 activity and concentrations without significantly affecting TIMP-1 concentrations. This effect was not modified by ODQ, and 8-bromo-cGMP did not affect MMP-9 concentrations. While PMA increased phospho-NFκB p65 concentrations, SNAP had no influence on this effect. In conclusion, this study shows that NO donors may attenuate imbalanced MMP expression and activity in endothelial cells independent of cGMP- or NFκB-mediated mechanisms. Our results may offer an important pharmacological strategy to approach cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23456480

  3. Lipoic acid stimulates cAMP production via G protein-coupled receptor-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Salinthone, Sonemany; Schillace, Robynn V; Tsang, Catherine; Regan, John W; Bourdette, Dennis N; Carr, Daniel W

    2011-07-01

    Lipoic acid (LA) is a naturally occurring fatty acid that exhibits anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and is being pursued as a therapeutic for many diseases including multiple sclerosis, diabetic polyneuropathy and Alzheimer's disease. We previously reported on the novel finding that racemic LA (50:50 mixture of R-LA and S-LA) stimulates cAMP production, activates prostanoid EP2 and EP4 receptors and adenylyl cyclases (AC), and suppresses activation and cytotoxicity in NK cells. In this study, we present evidence that furthers our understanding of the mechanisms of action of LA. Using various LA derivatives, such as dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA), S,S-dimethyl lipoic acid (DMLA) and lipoamide (LPM), we discovered that only LA is capable of stimulating cAMP production in NK cells. Furthermore, there is no difference in cAMP production after stimulation with either R-LA, S-LA or racemic LA. Competition and synergistic studies indicate that LA may also activate AC independent of the EP2 and EP4 receptors. Pretreatment of PBMCs with KH7 (a specific peptide inhibitor of soluble AC) and the calcium inhibitor (Bapta) prior to LA treatment resulted in reduced cAMP levels, suggesting that soluble AC and calcium signaling mediate LA stimulation of cAMP production. In addition, pharmacological inhibitor studies demonstrate that LA also activates other G protein-coupled receptors, including histamine and adenosine but not the β-adrenergic receptors. These novel findings provide information to better understand the mechanisms of action of LA, which can help facilitate the use of LA as a therapeutic for various diseases. PMID:21036588

  4. Troglitazone attenuates TGF-β1-induced EMT in alveolar epithelial cells via a PPARγ-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Beiyun; Buckley, Stephen T; Patel, Vipul; Liu, Yixin; Luo, Jiao; Krishnaveni, Manda Sai; Ivan, Mihaela; DeMaio, Lucas; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Crandall, Edward D; Borok, Zea

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists are effective antifibrotic agents in a number of tissues. Effects of these agents on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of primary alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) and potential mechanisms underlying effects on EMT have not been well delineated. We examined effects of troglitazone, a synthetic PPARγ agonist, on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced EMT in primary rat AEC and an alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cell line (RLE-6TN). TGF-β1 (2.5 ng/mL) induced EMT in both cell types, as evidenced by acquisition of spindle-like morphology, increased expression of the mesenchymal marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and downregulation of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Concurrent treatment with troglitazone (or rosiglitazone), ameliorated effects of TGF-β1. Furthermore, following stimulation with TGF-β1 for 6 days, troglitazone reversed EMT-related morphological changes and restored both epithelial and mesenchymal markers to control levels. Treatment with GW9662 (an irreversible PPARγ antagonist), or overexpression of a PPARγ dominant negative construct, failed to inhibit these effects of troglitazone in AEC. Troglitazone not only attenuated TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, but also inhibited nuclear translocation of β-catenin, phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 and upregulation of the EMT-associated transcription factor SNAI1. These results demonstrate inhibitory actions of troglitazone on TGF-β1-induced EMT in AEC via a PPARγ-independent mechanism likely through inhibition of β-catenin-dependent signaling downstream of TGF-β1, supporting a role for interactions between TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways in EMT. PMID:22745681

  5. Troglitazone Attenuates TGF-β1-Induced EMT in Alveolar Epithelial Cells via a PPARγ-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vipul; Liu, Yixin; Luo, Jiao; Krishnaveni, Manda Sai; Ivan, Mihaela; DeMaio, Lucas; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Crandall, Edward D.; Borok, Zea

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists are effective antifibrotic agents in a number of tissues. Effects of these agents on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of primary alveolar epithelial cells (AEC) and potential mechanisms underlying effects on EMT have not been well delineated. We examined effects of troglitazone, a synthetic PPARγ agonist, on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-induced EMT in primary rat AEC and an alveolar epithelial type II (AT2) cell line (RLE-6TN). TGF-β1 (2.5 ng/mL) induced EMT in both cell types, as evidenced by acquisition of spindle-like morphology, increased expression of the mesenchymal marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and downregulation of the tight junctional protein zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Concurrent treatment with troglitazone (or rosiglitazone), ameliorated effects of TGF-β1. Furthermore, following stimulation with TGF-β1 for 6 days, troglitazone reversed EMT-related morphological changes and restored both epithelial and mesenchymal markers to control levels. Treatment with GW9662 (an irreversible PPARγ antagonist), or overexpression of a PPARγ dominant negative construct, failed to inhibit these effects of troglitazone in AEC. Troglitazone not only attenuated TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Akt and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β, but also inhibited nuclear translocation of β-catenin, phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 and upregulation of the EMT-associated transcription factor SNAI1. These results demonstrate inhibitory actions of troglitazone on TGF-β1-induced EMT in AEC via a PPARγ-independent mechanism likely through inhibition of β-catenin-dependent signaling downstream of TGF-β1, supporting a role for interactions between TGF-β and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways in EMT. PMID:22745681

  6. Another look at the mechanism involving trimeric dUTPases in Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island induction involves novel players in the party

    PubMed Central

    Maiques, Elisa; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Donderis, Jorge; Ciges-Tomas, J. Rafael; Alite, Christian; Bowring, Janine Z.; Humphrey, Suzanne; Penadés, José R.; Marina, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We have recently proposed that the trimeric staphylococcal phage encoded dUTPases (Duts) are signaling molecules that act analogously to eukaryotic G-proteins, using dUTP as a second messenger. To perform this regulatory role, the Duts require their characteristic extra motif VI, present in all the staphylococcal phage coded trimeric Duts, as well as the strongly conserved Dut motif V. Recently, however, an alternative model involving Duts in the transfer of the staphylococcal islands (SaPIs) has been suggested, questioning the implication of motifs V and VI. Here, using state-of the-art techniques, we have revisited the proposed models. Our results confirm that the mechanism by which the Duts derepress the SaPI cycle depends on dUTP and involves both motifs V and VI, as we have previously proposed. Surprisingly, the conserved Dut motif IV is also implicated in SaPI derepression. However, and in agreement with the proposed alternative model, the dUTP inhibits rather than inducing the process, as we had initially proposed. In summary, our results clarify, validate and establish the mechanism by which the Duts perform regulatory functions. PMID:27112567

  7. Uterine Rbpj is required for embryonic-uterine orientation and decidual remodeling via Notch pathway-independent and -dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Kong, Shuangbo; Wang, Bingyan; Cheng, Xiaohong; Chen, Yongjie; Wu, Weiwei; Wang, Qiang; Shi, Junchao; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Shumin; Lu, Jinhua; Lydon, John P; DeMayo, Francesco; Pear, Warren S; Han, Hua; Lin, Haiyan; Li, Lei; Wang, Hongmei; Wang, Yan-ling; Li, Bing; Chen, Qi; Duan, Enkui; Wang, Haibin

    2014-01-01

    Coordinated uterine-embryonic axis formation and decidual remodeling are hallmarks of mammalian post-implantation embryo development. Embryonic-uterine orientation is determined at initial implantation and synchronized with decidual development. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling these events remain elusive despite its discovery a long time ago. In the present study, we found that uterine-specific deletion of Rbpj, the nuclear transducer of Notch signaling, resulted in abnormal embryonic-uterine orientation and decidual patterning at post-implantation stages, leading to substantial embryo loss. We further revealed that prior to embryo attachment, Rbpj confers on-time uterine lumen shape transformation via physically interacting with uterine estrogen receptor (ERα) in a Notch pathway-independent manner, which is essential for the initial establishment of embryo orientation in alignment with uterine axis. While at post-implantation stages, Rbpj directly regulates the expression of uterine matrix metalloproteinase in a Notch pathway-dependent manner, which is required for normal post-implantation decidual remodeling. These results demonstrate that uterine Rbpj is essential for normal embryo development via instructing the initial embryonic-uterine orientation and ensuring normal decidual patterning in a stage-specific manner. Our data also substantiate the concept that normal mammalian embryonic-uterine orientation requires proper guidance from developmentally controlled uterine signaling. PMID:24971735

  8. Immunostimulatory DNA-based vaccines induce cytotoxic lymphocyte activity by a T-helper cell-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cho, H J; Takabayashi, K; Cheng, P M; Nguyen, M D; Corr, M; Tuck, S; Raz, E

    2000-05-01

    Immunostimulatory DNA sequences (ISS) contain unmethylated CpG dinucleotides within a defined motif. Immunization with ISS-based vaccines has been shown to induce high antigen-specific cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) activity and a Th1-biased immune response. We have developed a novel ISS-based vaccine composed of ovalbumin (OVA) chemically conjugated to ISS-oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN). Protein-ISS conjugate (PIC) is more potent in priming CTL activity and Th1-biased immunity than other ISS-based vaccines. Cytotoxic lymphocyte activation by ISS-ODN-based vaccines is preserved in both CD4-/- and MHC class II-/- gene-deficient animals. Furthermore, PIC provides protection against a lethal burden of OVA-expressing tumor cells in a CD8+ cell-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that PIC acts through two unique mechanisms: T-helper-independent activation of CTL and facilitation of exogenous antigen presentation on MHC class I. This technology may have clinical applications in cancer therapy and in stimulating host defense in AIDS and chronic immunosuppression. PMID:10802617

  9. Bombesin stimulates cholecystokinin secretion through mitogen-activated protein-kinase-dependent and -independent mechanisms in the enteroendocrine STC-1 cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Némoz-Gaillard, E; Cordier-Bussat, M; Filloux, C; Cuber, J C; Van Obberghen, E; Chayvialle, J A; Abello, J

    1998-01-01

    Bombesin has been reported to stimulate cholecystokinin (CCK) secretion from rat duodeno-jejunal I-cells. Bombesin was shown to activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in cell types such as Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts and rat pancreatic acinar cells. No information is available on whether MAPK is activated in intestinal endocrine cells upon bombesin stimulation. This was studied by using the CCK-producing enteroendocrine cell line STC-1. Bombesin stimulated markedly and transiently both p42(MAPK) and p44(MAPK), with a maximum at 2 min, and a decrease to basal levels within 10 min. As expected, bombesin stimulated MAPK kinase 1 (MEK-1) activity. Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) with PMA also stimulated p42(MAPK), p44(MAPK) and MEK-1. Treatment of cells with PD 098059 (at 10 microM or 30 microM), which selectively inhibits MEK phosphorylation, blocked bombesin-induced p42(MAPK) and p44(MAPK) activation for at least 90 min. However, PD 098059 inhibited bombesin- and PMA-stimulated CCK secretion during the first 15 min, but failed to significantly reduce CCK release at later times. Inhibition of PKC with staurosporine, or PKC down-regulation by prolonged treatment with PMA, both drastically decreased MEK-1, p42(MAPK) and p44(MAPK) activation upon bombesin stimulation. Additionally, PKC activation appeared to be required for both MAPK-dependent (early) and -independent (late) CCK responses to bombesin. It is concluded that the early CCK secretory response of STC-1 cells to bombesin involves MAPK pathway activation through a PKC-dependent mechanism, whereas the late phase of bombesin-induced CCK secretion, that also requires PKC, appears to result from a MAPK-independent process. PMID:9512470

  10. Oct-1 Potentiates CREB-Driven Cyclin D1 Promoter Activation via a Phospho-CREB- and CREB Binding Protein-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Boulon, Séverine; Dantonel, Jean-Christophe; Binet, Virginie; Vié, Annick; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Hipskind, Robert A.; Philips, Alexandre

    2002-01-01

    Cyclin D1, the regulatory subunit for mid-G1 cyclin-dependent kinases, controls the expression of numerous cell cycle genes. A cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE), located upstream of the cyclin D1 mRNA start site, integrates mitogenic signals that target the CRE-binding factor CREB, which can recruit the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP). We describe an alternative mechanism for CREB-driven cyclin D1 induction that involves the ubiquitous POU domain protein Oct-1. In the breast cancer cell line MCF-7, overexpression of Oct-1 or its POU domain strongly increases transcriptional activation of cyclin D1 and GAL4 reporter genes that is specifically dependent upon CREB but independent of Oct-1 DNA binding. Gel retardation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirm that POU forms a complex with CREB bound to the cyclin D1 CRE. In solution, CREB interaction with POU requires the CREB Q2 domain and, notably, occurs with CREB that is not phosphorylated on Ser 133. Accordingly, Oct-1 also potently enhances transcriptional activation mediated by a Ser133Ala CREB mutant. Oct-1/CREB synergy is not diminished by the adenovirus E1A 12S protein, a repressor of CBP coactivator function. In contrast, E1A strongly represses CBP-enhanced transactivation by CREB phosphorylated on Ser 133. Our observation that Oct-1 potentiates CREB-dependent cyclin D1 transcriptional activity independently of Ser 133 phosphorylation and E1A-sensitive coactivator function offers a new paradigm for the regulation of cyclin D1 induction by proliferative signals. PMID:12391146

  11. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents. PMID:26804251

  12. Independent Mechanisms Target SMCHD1 to Trimethylated Histone H3 Lysine 9-Modified Chromatin and the Inactive X Chromosome.

    PubMed

    Brideau, Nicholas J; Coker, Heather; Gendrel, Anne-Valerie; Siebert, C Alistair; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen; Poot, Raymond A; Nesterova, Tatyana B; Brockdorff, Neil

    2015-12-01

    The chromosomal protein SMCHD1 plays an important role in epigenetic silencing at diverse loci, including the inactive X chromosome, imprinted genes, and the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus. Although homology with canonical SMC family proteins suggests a role in chromosome organization, the mechanisms underlying SMCHD1 function and target site selection remain poorly understood. Here we show that SMCHD1 forms an active GHKL-ATPase homodimer, contrasting with canonical SMC complexes, which exist as tripartite ring structures. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrates that SMCHD1 homodimers structurally resemble prokaryotic condensins. We further show that the principal mechanism for chromatin loading of SMCHD1 involves an LRIF1-mediated interaction with HP1γ at trimethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3)-modified chromatin sites on the chromosome arms. A parallel pathway accounts for chromatin loading at a minority of sites, notably the inactive X chromosome. Together, our results provide key insights into SMCHD1 function and target site selection. PMID:26391951

  13. Independent Mechanisms Target SMCHD1 to Trimethylated Histone H3 Lysine 9-Modified Chromatin and the Inactive X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Brideau, Nicholas J.; Coker, Heather; Gendrel, Anne-Valerie; Siebert, C. Alistair; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen; Poot, Raymond A.; Nesterova, Tatyana B.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal protein SMCHD1 plays an important role in epigenetic silencing at diverse loci, including the inactive X chromosome, imprinted genes, and the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus. Although homology with canonical SMC family proteins suggests a role in chromosome organization, the mechanisms underlying SMCHD1 function and target site selection remain poorly understood. Here we show that SMCHD1 forms an active GHKL-ATPase homodimer, contrasting with canonical SMC complexes, which exist as tripartite ring structures. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrates that SMCHD1 homodimers structurally resemble prokaryotic condensins. We further show that the principal mechanism for chromatin loading of SMCHD1 involves an LRIF1-mediated interaction with HP1γ at trimethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3)-modified chromatin sites on the chromosome arms. A parallel pathway accounts for chromatin loading at a minority of sites, notably the inactive X chromosome. Together, our results provide key insights into SMCHD1 function and target site selection. PMID:26391951

  14. Swarming mechanisms in the yellow fever mosquito: aggregation pheromones involved in the mating behavior of Aedes aegypti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosquitoes of various species mate in swarms comprised of tens to thousands flying males. Yet little information is known about mosquito swarming mechanism. Discovering chemical cues involved in mosquito biology leads to better adaptation of disease control interventions. In this study, we aimed ...

  15. DNA-histone complexes as ligands amplify cell penetration and nuclear targeting of anti-DNA antibodies via energy-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zannikou, Markella; Bellou, Sofia; Eliades, Petros; Hatzioannou, Aikaterini; Mantzaris, Michael D; Carayanniotis, George; Avrameas, Stratis; Lymberi, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    We have generated three monoclonal cell-penetrating antibodies (CPAbs) from a non-immunized lupus-prone (NZB × NZW)F1 mouse that exhibited high anti-DNA serum titres. These CPAbs are polyreactive because they bind to DNA and other cellular components, and localize mainly in the nucleus of HeLa cells, albeit with a distinct nuclear labelling profile. Herein, we have examined whether DNA-histone complexes (DHC) binding to CPAbs, before cell entry, could modify the cell penetration of CPAbs or their nuclear staining properties. By applying confocal microscopy and image analysis, we found that extracellular binding of purified CPAbs to DHC significantly enhanced their subsequent cell-entry, both in terms of percentages of positively labelled cells and fluorescence intensity (internalized CPAb amount), whereas there was a variable effect on their nuclear staining profile. Internalization of CPAbs, either alone or bound to DHC, remained unaltered after the addition of endocytosis-specific inhibitors at 37° or assay performance at 4°, suggesting the involvement of energy-independent mechanisms in the internalization process. These findings assign to CPAbs a more complex pathogenetic role in systemic lupus erythematosus where both CPAbs and nuclear components are abundant. PMID:26447818

  16. Cholesterol stimulation of HDL binding to human endothelial cells EAhy 926 and skin fibroblasts: evidence for a mechanism independent of cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bernini, F; Bellosta, S; Corsini, A; Maggi, F M; Fumagalli, R; Catapano, A L

    1991-04-24

    The properties of the HDL binding site on the permanent human cell line EAhy 926 were studied. This cell line presents with highly differentiated functions of vascular endothelium. EAhy 926 cells possess HDL3 saturable binding sites with a Kd of about 20 micrograms/ml, which were up-regulated by cholesterol and were pronase- and EDTA-insensitive. Furthermore, HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from EAhy 926 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the HDL-binding site in EAhy 926 cells is similar to that present in fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells. Up-regulation of HDL binding by cholesterol did not require de novo synthesis of HDL 'receptor' protein, as shown by the lack of effect of cycloheximide and alpha-amanitin and also occurred in fixed, non-living cells. Similar results were obtained using human skin fibroblasts. From these data we conclude that: (a) EAhy 926 cells are a good model for studying the HDL interaction with endothelial cells; (b) a mechanism independent of cellular metabolism is involved in the cholesterol-mediated up-regulation of HDL binding sites in EAhy 926 cells and human skin fibroblasts. PMID:1851638

  17. Evidence for the stochastic independence of the blue-yellow, red-green and luminance detection mechanisms revealed by subthreshold summation.

    PubMed

    Mullen, K T; Sankeralli, M J

    1999-02-01

    We investigated the manner in which the outputs of the three postreceptoral mechanisms (red-green, blue-yellow and luminance) combine to determine contrast threshold. We used a subthreshold summation paradigm to test whether the combination of the postreceptoral mechanism outputs could be described by a probability summation model which assumes stochastic independence of the mechanisms, and determined the best fitting summation exponent. Stimuli were Gaussian enveloped 1 c/d sinusoidal gratings represented in a 3D cardinal space transformed from cone contrast axes, and normalized to detection threshold. The use of this space avoids the presence of elongated threshold contours, allowing a reliable model fit to include the less sensitive blue-yellow and luminance mechanisms. Our results were well fitted by the probability summation model and hence support the underlying stochastic independence of the three postreceptoral mechanisms. PMID:10341960

  18. A Mechanism for Land-Atmosphere Feedback Involving Planetary Wave Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Chang, Yehui; Schubert, Siegfried D.

    2014-01-01

    While the ability of land surface conditions to influence the atmosphere has been demonstrated in various modeling and observational studies, the precise mechanisms by which land-atmosphere feedback occurs are still largely unknown particularly the mechanisms that allow land moisture state in one region to affect atmospheric conditions in another. Such remote impacts are examined here in the context of atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations, leading to the identification of one potential mechanism: the phase-locking and amplification of a planetary wave through the imposition of a spatial pattern of soil moisture at the land surface. This mechanism, shown here to be relevant in the AGCM, apparently also operates in nature, as suggested by supporting evidence found in reanalysis data.

  19. Molecules and mechanisms involved in the generation and migration of cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Miranda, Luis R; Parnavelas, John G; Chiara, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    The GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-containing interneurons of the neocortex are largely derived from the ganglionic eminences in the subpallium. Numerous studies have previously defined the migratory paths travelled by these neurons from their origins to their destinations in the cortex. We review here results of studies that have identified many of the genes expressed in the subpallium that are involved in the specification of the subtypes of cortical interneurons, and the numerous transcription factors, motogenic factors and guidance molecules that are involved in their migration. PMID:20360946

  20. Glucose-independent renoprotective mechanisms of the tissue dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, saxagliptin, in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Uchii, Masako; Kimoto, Naoya; Sakai, Mariko; Kitayama, Tetsuya; Kunori, Shunji

    2016-07-15

    Although previous studies have shown an important role of renal dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibition in ameliorating kidney injury in hypertensive rats, the renal distribution of DPP-4 and mechanisms of renoprotective action of DPP-4 inhibition remain unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of the DPP-4 inhibitor saxagliptin on DPP-4 activity in renal cells (using in situ DPP-4 staining) and on renal gene expression related to inflammation and fibrosis in the renal injury in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl-S) rats. Male rats fed a high-salt (8% NaCl) diet received vehicle (water) or saxagliptin (12.7mg/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Blood pressure (BP), serum glucose and 24-h urinary albumin and sodium excretions were measured, and renal histopathology was performed. High salt-diet increased BP and urinary albumin excretion, consequently resulting in glomerular sclerosis and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Although saxagliptin did not affect BP and blood glucose levels, it significantly ameliorated urinary albumin excretion. In situ staining showed DPP-4 activity in glomerular and tubular cells. Saxagliptin significantly suppressed DPP-4 activity in renal tissue extracts and in glomerular and tubular cells. Saxagliptin also significantly attenuated the increase in inflammation and fibrosis-related gene expressions in the kidney. Our results demonstrate that saxagliptin inhibited the development of renal injury independent of its glucose-lowering effect. Glomerular and tubular DPP-4 inhibition by saxagliptin was associated with improvements in albuminuria and the suppression of inflammation and fibrosis-related genes. Thus, local glomerular and tubular DPP-4 inhibition by saxagliptin may play an important role in its renoprotective effects in Dahl-S rats. PMID:27063445

  1. The potassium–chloride cotransporter 2 promotes cervical cancer cell migration and invasion by an ion transport-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei-Chun; Akerman, Colin J; Newey, Sarah E; Pan, Jiliu; Clinch, Nicholas W V; Jacob, Yves; Shen, Meng-Ru; Wilkins, Robert J; Ellory, J Clive

    2011-01-01

    Abstract K+–Cl− cotransporters (KCCs) play a fundamental role in epithelial cell function, both in the context of ionic homeostasis and also in cell morphology, cell division and locomotion. Unlike other ubiquitously expressed KCC isoforms, expression of KCC2 is widely considered to be restricted to neurons, where it is responsible for maintaining a low intracellular chloride concentration to drive hyperpolarising postsynaptic responses to the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine. Here we report a novel finding that KCC2 is widely expressed in several human cancer cell lines including the cervical cancer cell line (SiHa). Membrane biotinylation assays and immunostaining showed that endogenous KCC2 is located on the cell membrane of SiHa cells. To elucidate the role of KCC2 in cervical tumuorigenesis, SiHa cells with stable overexpression or knockdown of KCC2 were employed. Overexpression of KCC2 had no significant effect on cell proliferation but dramatically suppressed cell spreading and stress fibre organization, while knockdown of KCC2 showed opposite effects. In addition, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)-induced cell migration and invasiveness were significantly increased by overexpression of KCC2. KCC2-induced cell migration and invasion were not dependent on KCC2 transport function since overexpression of an activity-deficient mutant KCC2 still increased IGF-1-induced cell migration and invasion. Moreover, overexpression of KCC2 significantly diminished the number of focal adhesions, while knockdown of KCC2 increased their number. Taken together, our data establish that KCC2 expression and function are not restricted to neurons and that KCC2 serves to increase cervical tumourigenesis via an ion transport-independent mechanism. PMID:21911617

  2. Generation of 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2alpha) in isolated rat kidney glomeruli by a radical-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Klein, T; Neuhaus, K; Reutter, F; Nüsing, R M

    2001-07-01

    Isoprostanes comprise a group of free radical-catalyzed products of arachidonic acid. However, there is recent evidence pointing towards an enzyme-dependent formation of isoprostanes. With the use of isolated rat glomeruli we addressed the mechanisms of isoprostane generation. Synthesis of prostanoids and isoprostanes, including 8-epi-PGF(2alpha), was studied under conditions favouring radical formation. Cultured glomeruli formed different prostanoids including 8-epi-PGF(2alpha). Upon LPS challenge cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 expression was enhanced, and this was paralleled by a 2 - 9-fold increase in prostanoid formation, including isoprostanes. Addition of COX-isoform unselective inhibitors (diclofenac, indomethacin) or a selective inhibitor (NS-398) suppressed the synthesis of prostanoids, 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) and total isoprostane fraction; however, inhibition of the latter was less pronounced. Antioxidants such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), or dimethylurea exhibited an only minimal inhibitory effect on 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) synthesis. Moreover, ROS-generating drugs (menadione, methylviologen) or NADPH-driven radical formation were unable to cause the generation of significant amounts of 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) by rat glomeruli. In contrast, the total isoprostane fraction could be increased by menadione addition. These data provide further evidence for a radical-independent, but COX-dependent formation of 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) in renal tissue. Regarding the other isoprostanes, both radicals and COX enzymes contribute to their formation. Based on our data we assume that elevated release of vasoactive 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) has to be expected under conditions when the prostanoid system in the kidney is stimulated, e.g. under inflammatory conditions. Regarding renal oxidative injuries, the usefulness of 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) as a representative marker molecule of oxidative stress has to be questioned. PMID:11429387

  3. TAR-independent transactivation by Tat in cells derived from the CNS: a novel mechanism of HIV-1 gene regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, J P; Pomerantz, R; Bagasra, O; Chowdhury, M; Rappaport, J; Khalili, K; Amini, S

    1992-01-01

    The Tat protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is essential for productive infection and is a potential target for antiviral therapy. Tat, a potent activator of HIV-1 gene expression, serves to greatly increase the rate of transcription directed by the viral promoter. This induction, which seems to be an important component in the progression of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), may be due to increased transcriptional initiation, increased transcriptional elongation, or a combination of these processes. Much attention has been focused on the interaction of Tat with a specific RNA target termed TAR (transactivation responsive) which is present in the leader sequence of all HIV-1 mRNAs. This interaction is believed to be an important component of the mechanism of transactivation. In this report we demonstrate that in certain CNS-derived cells Tat is capable of activating HIV-1 through a TAR-independent pathway. A Tat-responsive element is found upstream within the viral promoter that in glial-derived cell lines allows transactivation in the absence of TAR. Deletion mapping and hybrid promoter constructs demonstrate that the newly identified Tat-responsive element corresponds to a sequence within the viral long terminal repeat (LTR) previously identified as the HIV-1 enhancer, or NF-kappa B domain. DNA band-shift analysis reveals NF-kappa B binding activity in glial cells that differs from that present in T lymphoid cells. Further, we observe that TAR-deleted mutants of HIV-1 demonstrate normal late gene expression in glial cells as evidenced by syncytia formation and production of viral p24 antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:1505523

  4. Leptin Acts via Lateral Hypothalamic Area Neurotensin Neurons to Inhibit Orexin Neurons by Multiple GABA-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Goforth, Paulette B.; Leinninger, Gina M.; Patterson, Christa M.

    2014-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin modulates neural systems appropriately for the status of body energy stores. Leptin inhibits lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) orexin (OX; also known as hypocretin)-producing neurons, which control feeding, activity, and energy expenditure, among other parameters. Our previous results suggest that GABAergic LHA leptin receptor (LepRb)-containing and neurotensin (Nts)-containing (LepRbNts) neurons lie in close apposition with OX neurons and control Ox mRNA expression. Here, we show that, similar to leptin, activation of LHA Nts neurons by the excitatory hM3Dq DREADD (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drugs) hyperpolarizes membrane potential and suppresses action potential firing in OX neurons in mouse hypothalamic slices. Furthermore, ablation of LepRb from Nts neurons abrogated the leptin-mediated inhibition, demonstrating that LepRbNts neurons mediate the inhibition of OX neurons by leptin. Leptin did not significantly enhance GABAA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission, and GABA receptor antagonists did not block leptin-mediated inhibition of OX neuron activity. Rather, leptin diminished the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs onto OX neurons. Furthermore, leptin indirectly activated an ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel in OX neurons, which was required for the hyperpolarization of OX neurons by leptin. Although Nts did not alter OX activity, galanin, which is coexpressed in LepRbNts neurons, inhibited OX neurons, whereas the galanin receptor antagonist M40 (galanin-(1–12)-Pro3-(Ala-Leu)2-Ala amide) prevented the leptin-induced hyperpolarization of OX cells. These findings demonstrate that leptin indirectly inhibits OX neurons by acting on LHA LepRbNts neurons to mediate two distinct GABA-independent mechanisms of inhibition: the presynaptic inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission and the opening of KATP channels. PMID:25143620

  5. Antioxidant administration attenuates mechanical ventilation-induced rat diaphragm muscle atrophy independent of protein kinase B (PKB Akt) signalling.

    PubMed

    McClung, J M; Kavazis, A N; Whidden, M A; DeRuisseau, K C; Falk, D J; Criswell, D S; Powers, S K

    2007-11-15

    Oxidative stress promotes controlled mechanical ventilation (MV)-induced diaphragmatic atrophy. Nonetheless, the signalling pathways responsible for oxidative stress-induced muscle atrophy remain unknown. We tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress down-regulates insulin-like growth factor-1-phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase-protein kinase B serine threonine kinase (IGF-1-PI3K-Akt) signalling and activates the forkhead box O (FoxO) class of transcription factors in diaphragm fibres during MV-induced diaphragm inactivity. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to one of five experimental groups: (1) control (Con), (2) 6 h of MV, (3) 6 h of MV with infusion of the antioxidant Trolox, (4) 18 h of MV, (5) 18 h of MV with Trolox. Following 6 h and 18 h of MV, diaphragmatic Akt activation decreased in parallel with increased nuclear localization and transcriptional activation of FoxO1 and decreased nuclear localization of FoxO3 and FoxO4, culminating in increased expression of the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligases, muscle atrophy factor (MAFbx) and muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF-1). Interestingly, following 18 h of MV, antioxidant administration was associated with attenuation of MV-induced atrophy in type I, type IIa and type IIb/IIx myofibres. Collectively, these data reveal that the antioxidant Trolox attenuates MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy independent of alterations in Akt regulation of FoxO transcription factors and expression of MAFbx or MuRF-1. Further, these results also indicate that differential regulation of diaphragmatic IGF-1-PI3K-Akt signalling exists during the early and late stages of MV. PMID:17916612

  6. Salt-induced cardiac hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis are due to a blood pressure-independent mechanism in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Daniele N; Katayama, Isis A; Oliveira, Ivone B; Rosa, Kaleizu T; Furukawa, Luzia N S; Coelho, Michella S; Casarini, Dulce E; Heimann, Joel C

    2010-10-01

    High salt intake is a known cardiovascular risk factor and is associated with cardiac alterations. To better understand this effect, male Wistar rats were fed a normal (NSD: 1.3% NaCl), high 4 (HSD4: 4%), or high 8 (HSD8: 8%) salt diet from weaning until 18 wk of age. The HSD8 group was subdivided into HSD8, HSD8+HZ (15 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) hydralazine in the drinking water), and HSD8+LOS (20 mg . kg(-1) . d(-1) losartan in the drinking water) groups. The cardiomyocyte diameter was greater in the HSD4 and HSD8 groups than in the HSD8+LOS and NSD groups. Interstitial fibrosis was greater in the HSD4 and HSD8 groups than in the HSD8+HZ and NSD groups. Hydralazine prevented high blood pressure (BP) and fibrosis, but not cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Losartan prevented high BP and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, but not fibrosis. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT(1)) protein expression in both ventricles was greater in the HSD8 group than in the NSD group. Losartan, but not hydralazine, prevented this effect. Compared with the NSD group, the binding of an AT(1) conformation-specific antibody that recognizes the activated form of the receptor was lower in both ventricles in all other groups. Losartan further lowered the binding of the anti-AT(1) antibody in both ventricles compared with all other experimental groups. Angiotensin II was greater in both ventricles in all groups compared with the NSD group. Myocardial structural alterations in response to HSD are independent of the effect on BP. Salt-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis possibly are due to different mechanisms. Evidence from the present study suggests that salt-induced AT(1) receptor internalization is probably due to angiotensin II binding. PMID:20724490

  7. Deubiquitylating enzyme USP9x regulates radiosensitivity in glioblastoma cells by Mcl-1-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wolfsperger, F; Hogh-Binder, S A; Schittenhelm, J; Psaras, T; Ritter, V; Bornes, L; Huber, S M; Jendrossek, V; Rudner, J

    2016-01-01

    that USP9x can control survival and radiosensitivity in glioblastoma cells by Mcl-1-dependent and Mcl-1-independent mechanisms. PMID:26775694

  8. Sensitizing Children to the Social and Emotional Mechanisms Involved in Racism: A Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triliva, Sofia; Anagnostopoulou, Tanya; Vleioras, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the results of an intervention aiming to sensitize children to the social and emotional processes involved in racism. The intervention was applied and evaluated in 10 Greek elementary schools. The goals and the intervention methods of the program modules are briefly outlined and the results of the program…

  9. Cumulative asbestos exposure for US automobile mechanics involved in brake repair (circa 1950s-2000).

    PubMed

    Finley, Brent L; Richter, Richard O; Mowat, Fionna S; Mlynarek, Steve; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Warmerdam, John M; Sheehan, Patrick J

    2007-11-01

    We analyzed cumulative lifetime exposure to chrysotile asbestos experienced by brake mechanics in the US during the period 1950-2000. Using Monte Carlo methods, cumulative exposures were calculated using the distribution of 8-h time-weighted average exposure concentrations for brake mechanics and the distribution of job tenure data for automobile mechanics. The median estimated cumulative exposures for these mechanics, as predicted by three probabilistic models, ranged from 0.16 to 0.41 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cm(3)) year for facilities with no dust-control procedures (1970s), and from 0.010 to 0.012 f/cm(3) year for those employing engineering controls (1980s). Upper-bound (95%) estimates for the 1970s and 1980s were 1.96 to 2.79 and 0.07-0.10 f/cm(3) year, respectively. These estimates for US brake mechanics are consistent with, but generally slightly lower than, those reported for European mechanics. The values are all substantially lower than the cumulative exposure of 4.5 f/cm(3) year associated with occupational exposure to 0.1 f/cm(3) of asbestos for 45 years that is currently permitted under the current occupational exposure limits in the US. Cumulative exposures were usually about 100- to 1,000-fold less than those of other occupational groups with asbestos exposure for similar time periods. The cumulative lifetime exposure estimates presented here, combined with the negative epidemiology data for brake mechanics, could be used to refine the risk assessments for chrysotile-exposed populations. PMID:17495871

  10. Mechanisms of relaxant activity of the nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator BAY 41-2272 in rat tracheal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Toque, Haroldo A; Mónica, Fabíola Z T; Morganti, Rafael P; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2010-10-25

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase is expressed in airway smooth muscle, and agents that stimulate this enzyme activity cause airway smooth muscle relaxation and bronchodilation. The compound 5-Cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine (BAY 41-2272) is a potent nitric oxide (NO)-independent soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator, but little is known about its effects in airway smooth muscle. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the relaxations of rat tracheal smooth muscle induced by BAY 41-2272. Tracheal rings were mounted in 10-ml organ baths for isometric force recording. BAY 41-2272 concentration-dependently relaxed carbachol-precontracted tracheal rings (pEC(50)=6.68+/-0.14). Prior incubation with the NO synthesis inhibitor l-NAME (100 microM) or the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (10 microM) caused significant rightward shifts in the concentration-response curves to BAY 41-2272. Sodium nitroprusside caused concentration-dependent relaxations, which were greatly potentiated by BAY 41-2272 and completely inhibited by ODQ. In addition, BAY 41-2272 shifted to the right the tracheal contractile responses to either carbachol (0.01-1 microM) or electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1-32 Hz). BAY 41-2272 (1 microM) also caused a marked rightward shift and decreased the maximal contractile responses to extracellular CaCl2, and such effect was not modified by pretreatment with ODQ. In addition, BAY 41-2272 (up to 1 microM) significantly increased the cGMP levels, and that was abolished by ODQ. Our results indicate that BAY 41-2272 causes cGMP-dependent rat tracheal smooth muscle relaxations in a synergistic fashion with exogenous NO. BAY 41-2272 has also an additional mechanism independently of soluble guanylyl cyclase activation possibly involving Ca(2+) entry blockade. PMID:20670622

  11. Peripheral mechanisms of neuropathic pain – involvement of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-mediated demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in pain research provide a clear picture for the molecular mechanisms of acute pain; substantial information concerning plasticity that occurs during neuropathic pain has also become available. The peripheral mechanisms responsible for neuropathic pain are found in the altered gene/protein expression of primary sensory neurons. With damage to peripheral sensory fibers, a variety of changes in pain-related gene expression take place in dorsal root ganglion neurons. These changes, or plasticity, might underlie unique neuropathic pain-specific phenotype modifications – decreased unmyelinated-fiber functions, but increased myelinated A-fiber functions. Another characteristic change is observed in allodynia, the functional change of tactile to nociceptive perception. Throughout a series of studies, using novel nociceptive tests to characterize sensory-fiber or pain modality-specific nociceptive behaviors, it was demonstrated that communication between innocuous and noxious sensory fibers might play a role in allodynia mechanisms. Because neuropathic pain in peripheral and central demyelinating diseases develops as a result of aberrant myelination in experimental animals, demyelination seems to be a key mechanism of plasticity in neuropathic pain. More recently, we discovered that lysophosphatidic acid receptor activation initiates neuropathic pain, as well as possible peripheral mechanims of demyelination after nerve injury. These results lead to further hypotheses of physical communication between innocuous Aβ- and noxious C- or Aδ-fibers to influence the molecular mechanisms of allodynia. PMID:18377664

  12. CFTR regulates outwardly rectifying chloride channels through an autocrine mechanism involving ATP.

    PubMed

    Schwiebert, E M; Egan, M E; Hwang, T H; Fulmer, S B; Allen, S S; Cutting, G R; Guggino, W B

    1995-06-30

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions to regulate both Cl- and Na+ conductive pathways; however, the cellular mechanisms whereby CFTR acts as a conductance regulator are unknown. CFTR and outwardly rectifying Cl- channels (ORCCs) are distinct channels but are linked functionally via an unknown regulatory mechanism. We present results from whole-cell and single-channel patch-clamp recordings, short-circuit current recordings, and [gamma-32P]ATP release assays of normal, CF, and wild-type or mutant CFTR-transfected CF airway cultured epithelial cells wherein CFTR regulates ORCCs by triggering the transport of the potent agonist, ATP, out of the cell. Once released, ATP stimulates ORCCs through a P2U purinergic receptor-dependent signaling mechanism. Our results suggest that CFTR functions to regulate other Cl- secretory pathways in addition to itself conducting Cl-. PMID:7541313

  13. BCR-ABL negative myeloproliferative neoplasia: a review of involved molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Koopmans, Suzanne M; Schouten, Harry C; van Marion, Ariënne M W

    2015-02-01

    The clonal bone marrow stem cell disorders essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) belong to the group of Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative neoplasia (Ph- MPN). In 2005 the JAK2(V617F) mutation was discovered which has generated more insight in the pathogenetic mechanism of the MPNs. More mutations have been detected in MPN patients since. However, the underlying cause of MPN has not been discovered so far. The mechanism of increased angiogenesis in MPNs and the development of fibrosis in the bone marrow in PMF patients and in some ET and PV patients is still not known. This review will focus on the most important molecular pathogenetic mechanisms in MPN patients. PMID:25196073

  14. Tibolone protects astrocytic cells from glucose deprivation through a mechanism involving estrogen receptor beta and the upregulation of neuroglobin expression.

    PubMed

    Avila-Rodriguez, Marco; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Hidalgo-Lanussa, Oscar; Baez, Eliana; Gonzalez, Janneth; Barreto, George E

    2016-09-15

    Tibolone, a synthetic steroid used for the prevention of osteoporosis and the treatment of climacteric symptoms in post-menopausal women, may exert tissue selective estrogenic actions acting on estrogen receptors (ERs). We previously showed that tibolone protects human T98G astroglial cells against glucose deprivation (GD). In this study we have explored whether the protective effect of tibolone on these cells is mediated by ERs. Experimental studies showed that both ERα and ERβ were involved in the protection by tibolone on GD cells, being ERβ preferentially involved on these actions over ERα. Tibolone increased viability of GD cells by a mechanism fully blocked by an ERβ antagonist and partially blocked by an ERα antagonist. Furthermore, ERβ inhibition prevented the effect of tibolone on nuclear fragmentation, ROS and mitochondrial membrane potential in GD cells. The protective effect of tibolone was mediated by neuroglobin. Tibolone upregulated neuroglobin in T98G cells and primary mouse astrocytes by a mechanism involving ERβ and neuroglobin silencing prevented the protective action of tibolone on GD cells. In summary, tibolone protects T98G cells by a mechanism involving ERβ and the upregulation of neuroglobin. PMID:27250720

  15. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Regulates Cell Migration in a Myosin Regulatory Light Chain Phosphorylation-independent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Tao, Tao; Wen, Cheng; He, Wei-Qi; Qiao, Yan-Ning; Gao, Yun-Qian; Chen, Xin; Wang, Pei; Chen, Cai-Ping; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Hua-Qun; Ye, An-Pei; Peng, Ya-Jing; Zhu, Min-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has long been implicated in the myosin phosphorylation and force generation required for cell migration. Here, we surprisingly found that the deletion of MLCK resulted in fast cell migration, enhanced protrusion formation, and no alteration of myosin light chain phosphorylation. The mutant cells showed reduced membrane tether force and fewer membrane F-actin filaments. This phenotype was rescued by either kinase-dead MLCK or five-DFRXXL motif, a MLCK fragment with potent F-actin-binding activity. Pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that the absence of MLCK led to attenuated formation of transmembrane complexes, including myosin II, integrins and fibronectin. We suggest that MLCK is not required for myosin phosphorylation in a migrating cell. A critical role of MLCK in cell migration involves regulating the cell membrane tension and protrusion necessary for migration, thereby stabilizing the membrane skeleton through F-actin-binding activity. This finding sheds light on a novel regulatory mechanism of protrusion during cell migration. PMID:25122766

  16. Mechanisms involved in the recent large reductions in US road fatalities.

    PubMed

    Sivak, M

    2009-06-01

    Road fatalities in the USA have recently decreased, and these reductions are greater than the corresponding reductions in the amount of driving. A multiple regression analysis was performed on monthly data from January 2007 through December 2008. The dependent variable was the number of road fatalities. The independent variables were distance driven, proportion of driving on rural roads, and the average price of unleaded gasoline as a proxy for the proportion of leisure driving. The results suggest that the larger-than-expected fall in road fatalities is partly a consequence of the disproportional decreases in rural driving (which is more risky than urban driving) and leisure driving (which is more risky than commuter driving). PMID:19494101

  17. Investigation of cellular mechanisms involved in apoptosis induced by a synthetic naphthylchalcone in acute leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Maioral, Mariana Franzoni; Moraes, Ana Carolina Rabello de; Sgambatti, Karen Ristau; Mascarello, Alessandra; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; Nunes, Ricardo José; Santos da Silva, Maria Cláudia

    2016-09-01

    We have previously reported the cytotoxic effects of chalcone A1, derived from 1-naphthaldehyde, in leukemia cell lines. On the basis of these findings, the main aim of this study was to elucidate some of the molecular mechanisms involved in apoptosis induced by chalcone A1 toward K562 and Jurkat cells. In both cell lines, chalcone A1 decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, increased the expression of Bax proapoptotic protein, and decreased the expression of Bcl-2 antiapoptotic protein (resulting in the inversion of the Bcl-2/Bax ratio), which indicates the involvement of the intrinsic pathway. In addition, chalcone A1 increased the expression of FasR in Jurkat cells, which also indicates the involvement of the extrinsic pathway in this cell line. The results also showed an increased expression of effector caspase-3 and cleaved PARP-1 and a decreased expression of IAP protein survivin, which are consistent with apoptotic cell death. The decreased expression of Ki67 suggests that the mechanism involved in cell death induced by chalcone A1 also involves a decrease in cell proliferation. In ex-vivo experiments, chalcone A1 reduced the cell viability of blast cells collected from eight patients with different types of acute leukemia, confirming the cytotoxicity results found in vitro. The results obtained so far are very promising and further studies need to be carried out so that chalcone A1 can be used as a prototype for the development of new antileukemia agents. PMID:27337110

  18. "Coding" and "Decoding": hypothesis for the regulatory mechanism involved in heparan sulfate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Wang, Fengshan; Sheng, Juzheng

    2016-06-16

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is widely distributed in mammalian tissues in the form of HS proteoglycans, which play essential roles in various physiological and pathological processes. In contrast to the template-guided processes involved in the synthesis of DNA and proteins, HS biosynthesis is not believed to involve a template. However, it appears that the final structure of HS chains was strictly regulated. Herein, we report research based hypothesis that two major steps, namely "coding" and "decoding" steps, are involved in the biosynthesis of HS, which strictly regulate its chemical structure and biological activity. The "coding" process in this context is based on the distribution of sulfate moieties on the amino groups of the glucosamine residues in the HS chains. The sulfation of these amine groups is catalyzed by N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase, which has four isozymes. The composition and distribution of sulfate groups and iduronic acid residues on the glycan chains of HS are determined by several other modification enzymes, which can recognize these coding sequences (i.e., the "decoding" process). The degree and pattern of the sulfation and epimerization in the HS chains determines the extent of their interactions with several different protein factors, which further influences their biological activity. PMID:27088396

  19. Biodegradation of endocrine-disrupting compounds by ligninolytic fungi: mechanisms involved in the degradation.

    PubMed

    Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2015-12-01

    Without any doubt, endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) represent an environmental risk for wildlife and human beings. Endocrine-disrupting effects were found for many chemicals in products for personal use, industrial compounds and even in classical persistent organic pollutants (POPs). In order to understand the fate of EDCs in the environment, it is highly important to identify and to clarify the biodegradation mechanisms that can lead to their decomposition. Ligninolytic fungi (LF) are interesting microorganisms that are capable of participating in a variety of versatile decomposition mechanisms. The microorganisms represent a useful model group and, moreover, LF or their enzymes can be actively used for decontamination. Potential optimization of the decontamination process provides another important reason why it is necessary for understanding the mechanisms of EDC transformation. This minireview summarizes current knowledge about the LF biodegradation mechanisms of the most important micropollutants (xenoestrogens), including nonylphenols, bisphenol A and 17α-ethinylestradiol and polychlorinated biphenyls as POPs with endocrine-disrupting potency. Generally, LF exhibit the ability to either polymerize the target pollutants or to substantially decompose the original structure using ligninolytic enzymes and cytochrome P-450. Moreover, most of the transformation processes are accompanied by reduction of the endocrine-disrupting activity or ecotoxicity. PMID:24650234

  20. Involvement of breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2) in the biliary excretion mechanism of fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tomohiro; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki; Merino, Gracia; Alvarez, Ana I; Schinkel, Alfred H; Sugiyama, Yuichi

    2007-10-01

    Fluoroquinolones are effective antibiotics for the treatment of bile duct infections. It has been shown that the biliary excretion of grepafloxacin is partly accounted for by multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2/ABCC2), whereas neither MRP2 nor P-glycoprotein is involved in the biliary excretion of ulifloxacin. In the present study, we examined the involvement of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) in the biliary excretion of fluoroquinolones (grepafloxacin, ulifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin). In Madin-Darby canine kidney II cells expressing human BCRP or mouse Bcrp, the basal-to-apical transport of grepafloxacin and ulifloxacin was greater than that of the mock control, which was inhibited by a BCRP inhibitor, 3-(6-isobutyl-9-methoxy-1,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4,6,7,12,12a-octahydropyrazino[1',2':1,6]pyrido[3,4-b]indol-3-yl)-propionic acid tert-butyl ester (Ko143). Plasma and bile concentrations of fluoroquinolones were determined in wild-type and Bcrp(-/-) mice after i.v. bolus injection. The cumulative biliary excretion of fluoroquinolones was significantly reduced in Bcrp(-/-) mice, resulting in a reduction of the biliary excretion clearances to 86, 50, 40, and 16 of the control values, for ciprofloxacin, grepafloxacin, ofloxacin, and ulifloxacin, respectively. Preinfusion of sulfobromophthalein significantly inhibited the biliary excretion of grepafloxacin in Bcrp(-/-) mice. There was no change in the tissue/plasma concentration ratios of fluoroquinolones in the liver or brain, whereas those in the kidney were increased 3.6- and 1.5-fold for ciprofloxacin and grepafloxacin, respectively, in Bcrp(-/-) mice but were unchanged for ofloxacin and ulifloxacin. The present study shows that BCRP mediates the biliary excretion of fluoroquinolones and suggests that it is also involved in the tubular secretion of ciprofloxacin and grepafloxacin. PMID:17639028

  1. Residual Force Enhancement Following Eccentric Contractions: A New Mechanism Involving Titin.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W; Schappacher, G; DuVall, M; Leonard, T R; Herzog, J A

    2016-07-01

    Eccentric muscle properties are not well characterized by the current paradigm of the molecular mechanism of contraction: the cross-bridge theory. Findings of force contributions by passive structural elements a decade ago paved the way for a new theory. Here, we present experimental evidence and theoretical support for the idea that the structural protein titin contributes to active force production, thereby explaining many of the unresolved properties of eccentric muscle contraction. PMID:27252165

  2. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine dependence and reward: participation of the endogenous opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Trigo, José Manuel; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary component of tobacco that maintains the smoking habit and develops addiction. The adaptive changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors produced by repeated exposure to nicotine play a crucial role in the establishment of dependence. However, other neurochemical systems also participate in the addictive effects of nicotine including glutamate, cannabinoids, GABA and opioids. This review will cover the involvement of these neurotransmitters in nicotine addictive properties, with a special emphasis on the endogenous opioid system. Thus, endogenous enkephalins and beta-endorphins acting on mu-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine rewarding effects, whereas opioid peptides derived from prodynorphin participate in nicotine aversive responses. An upregulation of mu-opioid receptors has been reported after chronic nicotine treatment that could counteract the development of nicotine tolerance, whereas the downregulation induced on kappa-opioid receptors seems to facilitate nicotine tolerance. Endogenous enkephalins acting on mu-opioid receptors also play a role in the development of physical dependence to nicotine. In agreement with these actions of the endogenous opioid system, the opioid antagonist naltrexone has shown to be effective for smoking cessation in certain subpopulations of smokers. PMID:20170672

  3. Possible mechanism of psoralen phototoxicity not involving direct interaction with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, J.D.; Lee, E.; Yurkow, E.J.; Laskin, D.L.; Gallo, M.A.

    1985-09-01

    Psoralens in combination with ultraviolet light (UVA; 320-400 nm) are used in the photochemical treatment of a variety of skin diseases including vitiligo, a skin depigmentational disorder, and psoriasis, a disease of accelerated epidermal cell proliferation. Although it is generally assumed that the major site of action of the psoralens is DNA, the authors have obtained evidence that another site may be the primary target for these compounds. They have identified specific, saturable, high-affinity binding sites for 8-methoxypsoralen on HeLa cells and have detected specific binding of 8-methoxypsoralen to four other human cell lines and five mouse cell lines. In HeLa cells, specific binding is reversible and independent of the ability of the compound to intercalate into DNA. In addition, binding sites become covalently modified by the psoralen after UVA exposure. Specific binding of 8-(methyoxy-/sup 3/H)methoxypsoralen constitutes 79% of the label bound to the cells. Scatchard analysis indicated two classes of psoralen binding sites. Based on these findings, the authors hypothesize that specific binding sites for psoralens on mammalian cells mediate, at least in part, psoralen-induced phototoxicity.

  4. Diffusional and transcriptional mechanisms involved in laccases production by Pleurotus ostreatus CP50.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Alejandre, Karen I; Flores, Noemí; Tinoco-Valencia, Raunel; Caro, Mario; Flores, Celia; Galindo, Enrique; Serrano-Carreón, Leobardo

    2016-04-10

    The independent effects of hydrodynamic stress (assessed as the Energy Dissipation/Circulation Function, EDCF) and dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) on the growth, morphology and laccase production by Pleurotus ostreatus CP50 were studied using a 3(2) factorial design in a 10L reactor. A bell-shape function for fungus growth between 8 and 22% DOT was observed, as well as a significant negative effect on laccase production and the expression of poxc, the gene encoding for the most abundant laccase produced by P. ostreatus CP50. Increasing EDCF from 1 to 21 kW/m(3)s, had a positive effect on fungus growth, whereas no effect on poxc gene expression was observed. However, the increase in EDCF favored the specific laccase production due to the generation of smaller pellets with less diffusional limitations and increased metabolically active biomass. The results show, for the first time, that hydrodynamic effects on growth and laccase production are mainly physical and diffusional, while the influence of the dissolved oxygen is at transcriptional level. PMID:26924241

  5. FcγRIIB-Independent Mechanisms Controlling Membrane Localization of the Inhibitory Phosphatase SHIP in Human B Cells.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Samantha D; Ray, Arnab; Hou, Sen; Vaughan, Andrew T; Cragg, Mark S; Marshall, Aaron J

    2016-09-01

    SHIP is an important regulator of immune cell signaling that functions to dephosphorylate the phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate at the plasma membrane and mediate protein-protein interactions. One established paradigm for SHIP activation involves its recruitment to the phospho-ITIM motif of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. Although SHIP is essential for the inhibitory function of FcγRIIB, it also has critical modulating functions in signaling initiated from activating immunoreceptors such as B cell Ag receptor. In this study, we found that SHIP is indistinguishably recruited to the plasma membrane after BCR stimulation with or without FcγRIIB coligation in human cell lines and primary cells. Interestingly, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis reveals differential mobility of SHIP-enhanced GFP depending on the mode of stimulation, suggesting that although BCR and FcγRIIB can both recruit SHIP, this occurs via distinct molecular complexes. Mutagenesis of a SHIP-enhanced GFP fusion protein reveals that the SHIP-Src homology 2 domain is essential in both cases whereas the C terminus is required for recruitment via BCR stimulation, but is less important with FcγRIIB coligation. Experiments with pharmacological inhibitors reveal that Syk activity is required for optimal stimulation-induced membrane localization of SHIP, whereas neither PI3K or Src kinase activity is essential. BCR-induced association of SHIP with binding partner Shc1 is dependent on Syk, as is tyrosine phosphorylation of both partners. Our results indicate that FcγRIIB is not uniquely able to promote membrane recruitment of SHIP, but rather modulates its function via formation of distinct signaling complexes. Membrane recruitment of SHIP via Syk-dependent mechanisms may be an important factor modulating immunoreceptor signaling. PMID:27456487

  6. Food-Derived Bioactives Can Protect the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Cortisol with Antioxidant-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ruijters, Erik J. B.; Haenen, Guido R. M. M.; Willemsen, Mathijs; Weseler, Antje R.; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory diseases the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids (GCs) is often decreased, leading to GC resistance. Inflammation is related with increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to oxidative stress which is thought to contribute to the development of GC resistance. Plant-derived compounds such as flavonoids are known for their ability to protect against ROS. In this exploratory study we screened a broad range of food-derived bioactives for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in order to investigate whether their antioxidant effects are associated with the ability to preserve the anti-inflammatory effects of cortisol. The anti-inflammatory potency of the tested compounds was assessed by measuring the oxidative stress–induced GC resistance in human macrophage-like cells. Cells were pre-treated with H2O2 (800 µM) with and without bioactives and then exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) (10 ng/mL) and cortisol (100 nM). The level of inflammation was deducted from the concentration of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in the medium. Intracellular oxidative stress was measured using the fluorescent probe 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH). We found that most of the dietary bioactives display antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action through the protection of the cortisol response. All compounds, except for quercetin, revealing antioxidant activity also protect the cortisol response. This indicates that the antioxidant activity of compounds plays an important role in the protection of the GC response. However, next to the antioxidant activity of the bioactives, other mechanisms also seem to be involved in this protective, anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:26891295

  7. Food-Derived Bioactives Can Protect the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Cortisol with Antioxidant-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ruijters, Erik J B; Haenen, Guido R M M; Willemsen, Mathijs; Weseler, Antje R; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-01

    In chronic inflammatory diseases the anti-inflammatory effect of glucocorticoids (GCs) is often decreased, leading to GC resistance. Inflammation is related with increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to oxidative stress which is thought to contribute to the development of GC resistance. Plant-derived compounds such as flavonoids are known for their ability to protect against ROS. In this exploratory study we screened a broad range of food-derived bioactives for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in order to investigate whether their antioxidant effects are associated with the ability to preserve the anti-inflammatory effects of cortisol. The anti-inflammatory potency of the tested compounds was assessed by measuring the oxidative stress-induced GC resistance in human macrophage-like cells. Cells were pre-treated with H₂O₂ (800 µM) with and without bioactives and then exposed to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) (10 ng/mL) and cortisol (100 nM). The level of inflammation was deducted from the concentration of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in the medium. Intracellular oxidative stress was measured using the fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCFH). We found that most of the dietary bioactives display antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action through the protection of the cortisol response. All compounds, except for quercetin, revealing antioxidant activity also protect the cortisol response. This indicates that the antioxidant activity of compounds plays an important role in the protection of the GC response. However, next to the antioxidant activity of the bioactives, other mechanisms also seem to be involved in this protective, anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:26891295

  8. Involvement of three mechanisms in the alteration of cytokine responses by sodium methyldithiocarbamate

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, Stephen B. . E-mail: spruet@LSUHSC.edu; Fan, Ruping; Zheng, Qiang

    2006-06-01

    Sodium methyldithiocarbamate (SMD) is the third most abundantly used conventional pesticide in the U.S. We recently reported that it alters the induction of cytokine production mediated though Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 at relevant dosages in mice. Its chemical properties and evidence from the literature suggest thee potential mechanisms of action for this compound. It could either act as a free radical scavenger (by means of its free S{sup -}group) or promote oxidation by breaking down to form methylisothiocyanate, which can deplete glutathione. It is a potent copper chelator and may affect the availability of copper to a number of copper-dependent enzymes (including some signaling molecules). SMD induces a classical neuroendocrine stress response characterized by elevated serum corticosterone concentrations, which could affect cytokine production. Although each of these mechanisms could potentially contribute to altered cytokine responses, direct evidence is lacking. The present study was conducted to obtain such evidence. The role of redox balance was investigated by pretreating mice with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), which increases cellular glutathione concentrations, before administration of SMD. NAC exacerbated the SMD-induced suppression of IL-12 and the SMD-induced enhancement of IL-10 in the serum. The role of copper chelation was investigated by comparing the effects of SMD with an equimolar dose to SMD that was administered in the form of a copper chelation complex. Addition of copper significantly decreased the action of SMD on IL-12 production but not on IL-10 production. The role of the stress response was investigated by pretreating mice with antagonists of corticosterone and catecholamines. This treatment partially prevented the action of SMD on IL-10 and IL-12 in the peritoneal fluid. The results suggest that all of the proposed mechanisms have some role in the alteration of cytokine production by SMD.

  9. Mechanisms involved in cardiac sensitization by volatile anesthetics: general applicability to halogenated hydrocarbons?

    PubMed

    Himmel, Herbert M

    2008-01-01

    An increased sensitivity of the heart to catecholamines or cardiac sensitization is a recognized risk during acute human exposure to halogenated hydrocarbons used as solvents, foam-blowing or fire-extinguishing agents, refrigerants, and aerosol propellants. Although cardiac sensitization to such "industrial" halocarbons can result in serious arrhythmia and death, research into its mechanistic basis has been limited, whereas the literature on volatile anesthetics (e.g., halothane, chloroform) is comparably extensive. A review of the literature on halocarbons and related volatile anesthetics was conducted. The available experimental evidence suggests that volatile anesthetics at physiologically relevant concentrations interact predominantly with the main repolarizing cardiac potassium channels hERG and I(Ks), as well as with calcium and sodium channels at slightly higher concentrations. On the level of the heart, inhibition of these ion channels is prone to alter both action potential shape (triangulation) and electrical impulse conduction, which may facilitate arrhythmogenesis by volatile anesthetics per se and is potentiated by catecholamines. Action potential triangulation by regionally heterogeneous inhibition of calcium and potassium channels will facilitate catecholamine-induced afterdepolarizations, triggered activity, and enhanced automaticity. Inhibition of cardiac sodium channels will reduce conduction velocity and alter refractory period; this is potentiated by catecholamines and promotes reentry arrhythmias. Other cardiac and/or neuronal mechanisms might also contribute to arrhythmogenesis. The few scattered in vitro data available for halocarbons (e.g., FC-12, halon 1301, trichloroethylene) suggest inhibition of cardiac sodium (conduction), calcium and potassium channels (triangulation), extraneuronal catecholamine reuptake, and various neuronal ion channels. Therefore, it is hypothesized that halocarbons promote cardiac sensitization by similar

  10. The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor.

    SciTech Connect

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2007-03-01

    Muscle contraction is driven by a cycle of conformational changes in the myosin II head. After myosin binds ATP and releases from the actin fibril, myosin prepares for the next power stroke by rotating back the converter domain that carries the lever arm by 60{sup o}. This recovery stroke is coupled to the activation of myosin ATPase by a mechanism that is essential for an efficient motor cycle. The mechanics of this coupling have been proposed to occur via two distinct and successive motions of the two helices that hold the converter domain: in a first phase a seesaw motion of the relay helix, followed by a piston-like motion of the SH1 helix in a second phase. To test this model, we have determined the principal motions of these structural elements during equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the crystallographic end states of the recovery-stroke by using principal component analysis. This reveals that the only principal motions of these two helices that make a large-amplitude contribution towards the conformational change of the recovery stroke are indeed the predicted seesaw and piston motions. Moreover, the results demonstrate that the seesaw motion of the relay helix dominates in the dynamics of the pre-recovery stroke structure, but not in the dynamics of the post-recovery stroke structure, and vice versa for the piston motion of the SH1 helix. This is consistent with the order of the proposed two-phase model for the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke. Molecular movies of these principal motions are available at http://www.iwr.uni-heidelberg.de/groups/biocomp/fischer.

  11. GR-127935-sensitive mechanism mediating hypotension in anesthetized rats: are 5-HT5B receptors involved?

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Maldonado, Carolina; López-Sánchez, Pedro; Anguiano-Robledo, Liliana; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Terrón, José A

    2015-04-01

    The 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR-127935, inhibits hypotensive responses produced by the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT7 receptor agonist, and 5-HT5A/5B receptor ligand, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), in rats. This work further characterized the above mechanism using more selective 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptor antagonists. Also, expression of 5-HT5A and 5-HT5B receptor mRNAs in blood vessels was searched by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Decreases in diastolic blood pressure induced by 5-CT (0.001-10 μg/kg, intravenously) were analyzed in anesthetized rats that had received intravenous vehicle (1 mL/kg), SB-224289 (5-HT1B antagonist; 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg), BRL15572 (5-HT1D antagonist; 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg), SB-224289 + BRL15572 (0.3 mg/kg, each), or SB-224289 + BRL15572 (0.3 mg/kg, each) + GR-127935 (1 mg/kg). Because only the latter treatment inhibited 5-CT-induced hypotension, suggestive of a mechanism unrelated to 5-HT1B/1D receptors, the effects of antagonists/ligands at 5-HT5A (SB-699551, 1 mg/kg), 5-HT6 (SB-399885, 1 mg/kg), and 5-HT1B/1D/5A/5B/7 receptors (ergotamine, 0.1 mg/kg) on 5-CT-induced hypotension were tested. Interestingly, only ergotamine blocked 5-CT-induced responses; this effect closely paralleled that of SB-224289 + BRL-15572 + GR-127935. Neither did ergotamine nor GR-127935 inhibit hypotensive responses induced by the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP-44. Faint but clear bands corresponding to 5-HT5A and 5-HT5B receptor mRNAs in aorta and mesenteric arteries were detected. Results suggest that the GR-127935-sensitive mechanism mediating hypotension in rats is unrelated to 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT5A, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors. This mechanism, however, resembles putative 5-HT5B receptors. PMID:25502305

  12. Antinociceptive action of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi) in mice: possible mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Khanna, N; Bhatia, Jagriti

    2003-10-01

    The alcoholic leaf extract of Ocimum sanctum (OS, Tulsi) was tested for analgesic activity in mice. In the glacial acetic acid (GAA)-induced writhing test, OS (50, 100 mg/kg, i.p.; and 50, 100, 200 mg/kg, p.o.) reduced the number of writhes. OS (50, 100 mg/kg, i.p.) also increased the tail withdrawal latency in mice. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p.), an opioid antagonist, and DSP-4 (50 mg/kg, i.p.), a central noradrenaline depletor, attenuated the analgesic effect of OS in both the experimental models, whereas, PCPA (300 mg/kg, i.p.), a serotonin synthesis inhibitor, potentiated the action of OS on tail flick response in mice. The results of our study suggest that the analgesic action of OS is exerted both centrally as well as peripherally and involves an interplay between various neurotransmitter systems. PMID:12963158

  13. SIGNALING MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN THE ACUTE EFFECTS OF ESTRADIOL ON 5-HT CLEARANCE

    PubMed Central

    Benmansour, Saloua; Privratsky, Anthony A.; Adeniji, Opeyemi S.; Frazer, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol was found previously to have an antidepressant-like effect and to block the ability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to have an antidepressant-like effect. The antidepressant-like effect of estradiol was due to estrogen receptor β (ERβ) and/or GPR30 activation whereas estradiol’s blockade of the effect of an SSRI was mediated by ERα. This study focuses on investigating signaling pathways as well as interacting receptors associated with these two effects of estradiol. In vivo chronoamperometry was used to measure serotonin transporter (SERT) function. The effect of local application of estradiol or selective agonists for ERα (PPT) or ERβ (DPN) into the CA3 region of the hippocampus of ovariectomized (OVX) rats on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) clearance as well as on the ability of fluvoxamine to slow 5-HT clearance was examined after selective blockade of signaling pathways or that of interacting receptors. Estradiol- or DPN-induced slowing of 5-HT clearance mediated by ERβ was blocked after inhibition of MAPK/ERK1/2 but not of PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. This effect also involved interactions with TrkB, and IGF-1 receptors. Estradiol’s or PPT’s inhibition of the fluvoxamine-induced slowing of 5-HT clearance mediated by ERα, was blocked after inhibition of either MAPK/ERK1/2 or PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. This effect involved interactions with the IGF-1 receptor and with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 but not with TrkB. This study illustrates some of the signaling pathways required for the effects of estradiol on SERT function and particularly shows that ER subtypes elicit different as well as common signaling pathways for their actions. PMID:24423185

  14. Mechanisms of Prescription Drug Diversion Among Drug-Involved Club- and Street-Based Populations

    PubMed Central

    Inciardi, James A.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Cicero, Theodore J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Prescription drug diversion involves the unlawful channeling of regulated pharmaceuticals from legal sources to the illicit marketplace, and can occur along all points in the drug delivery process, from the original manufacturing site to the wholesale distributor, the physician's office, the retail pharmacy, or the patient. However, empirical data on diversion are limited. Method In an attempt to develop a better understanding of how specific drug-using populations are diverting prescription opioids and other medications, or obtaining controlled drugs that have already been diverted, qualitative interviews and focus group data were collected on four separate populations of prescription drug abusers in Miami, Florida—club drug users, street-based illicit drug users, methadone maintenance patients, and HIV positive individuals who abuse and/or divert drugs. Results Sources of abused prescription drugs cited by focus group participants were extremely diverse, including their physicians and pharmacists; parents and relatives; “doctor shopping”; leftover supplies following an illness or injury; personal visits to Mexico, South America and the Caribbean; prescriptions intended for the treatment of mental illness; direct sales on the street and in nightclubs; pharmacy and hospital theft; through friends or acquaintances; under-the-door apartment flyers advertising telephone numbers to call; and “stealing from grandma's medicine cabinet.” Conclusion While doctor shoppers, physicians and the Internet receive much of the attention regarding diversion, the data reported in this paper suggest that there are numerous active street markets involving patients, Medicaid recipients and pharmacies as well. In addition, there are other data which suggest that the contributions of residential burglaries, pharmacy robberies and thefts, and “sneak thefts” to the diversion problem may be understated. PMID:17305688

  15. Signaling mechanisms involved in the acute effects of estradiol on 5-HT clearance.

    PubMed

    Benmansour, Saloua; Privratsky, Anthony A; Adeniji, Opeyemi S; Frazer, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Estradiol was found previously to have an antidepressant-like effect and to block the ability of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) to have an antidepressant-like effect. The antidepressant-like effect of estradiol was due to estrogen receptor β (ERβ) and/or GPR30 activation, whereas estradiol's blockade of the effect of an SSRI was mediated by ERα. This study focuses on investigating signaling pathways as well as interacting receptors associated with these two effects of estradiol. In vivo chronoamperometry was used to measure serotonin transporter (SERT) function. The effect of local application of estradiol or selective agonists for ERα (PPT) or ERβ (DPN) into the CA3 region of the hippocampus of ovariectomized (OVX) rats on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) clearance as well as on the ability of fluvoxamine to slow 5-HT clearance was examined after selective blockade of signaling pathways or that of interacting receptors. Estradiol- or DPN-induced slowing of 5-HT clearance mediated by ERβ was blocked after inhibition of MAPK/ERK1/2 but not of PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. This effect also involved interactions with TrkB, and IGF-1 receptors. Estradiol's or PPT's inhibition of the fluvoxamine-induced slowing of 5-HT clearance mediated by ERα, was blocked after inhibition of either MAPK/ERK1/2 or PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. This effect involved interactions with the IGF-1 receptor and with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1, but not with TrkB. This study illustrates some of the signaling pathways required for the effects of estradiol on SERT function, and particularly shows that ER subtypes elicit different as well as common signaling pathways for their actions. PMID:24423185

  16. Metal Ion Involvement in the Allosteric Mechanism of Escherichia coli Aspartate Transcarbamoylase

    PubMed Central

    Cockrell, Gregory M.; Kantrowitz, Evan R.

    2012-01-01

    E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) allosterically regulates pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis. The enzyme is inhibited by CTP and can be further inhibited by UTP, although UTP alone has little or no influence on activity; however, the mechanism for the synergistic inhibition is still unknown. In order to determine how UTP is able to synergistically inhibit ATCase in the presence of CTP, we determined a series of X-ray structures of ATCase•nucleotide complexes. Analysis of the X-ray structures revealed that (1) CTP and dCTP bind in a very similar fashion, (2) UTP, in the presence of dCTP or CTP, binds at a site that does not overlap the CTP/dCTP site, (3) the triphosphates of the two nucleotides are parallel to each other with a metal ion, in this case Mg2+, coordinated between the β and γ phosphates of the two nucleotides. Kinetic experiments showed that the presence of a metal ion such as Mg2+ is required for synergistic inhibition. Together these results explain how the binding of UTP can enhance the binding of CTP and why UTP binds more tightly in the presence of CTP. A mechanism for the synergistic inhibition of ATCase is proposed in which the presence of UTP stabilizes the T state even more than CTP alone. These results also call into question many of the past kinetic and binding experiments of ATCase with nucleotides as the presence of metal contamination was not considered important. PMID:22906065

  17. Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neurotoxicity of opioid and psychostimulant drugs.

    PubMed

    Cunha-Oliveira, Teresa; Rego, Ana Cristina; Oliveira, Catarina R

    2008-06-01

    Substance abuse and addiction are the most costly of all the neuropsychiatric disorders. In the last decades, much progress has been achieved in understanding the effects of the drugs of abuse in the brain. However, efficient treatments that prevent relapse have not been developed. Drug addiction is now considered a brain disease, because the abuse of drugs affects several brain functions. Neurological impairments observed in drug addicts may reflect drug-induced neuronal dysfunction and neurotoxicity. The drugs of abuse directly or indirectly affect neurotransmitter systems, particularly dopaminergic and glutamatergic neurons. This review explores the literature reporting cellular and molecular alterations reflecting the cytotoxicity induced by amphetamines, cocaine and opiates in neuronal systems. The neurotoxic effects of drugs of abuse are often associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis and inhibition of neurogenesis, among other mechanisms. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie brain dysfunction observed in drug-addicted individuals may contribute to improve the treatment of drug addiction, which may have social and economic consequences. PMID:18440072

  18. Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Shrinkage and Growth Involve Downregulation of Cofilin via Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Barbara; Saffin, Jean-Michel; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    A current model posits that cofilin-dependent actin severing negatively impacts dendritic spine volume. Studies suggested that increased cofilin activity underlies activity-dependent spine shrinkage, and that reduced cofilin activity induces activity-dependent spine growth. We suggest instead that both types of structural plasticity correlate with decreased cofilin activity. However, the mechanism of inhibition determines the outcome for spine morphology. RNAi in rat hippocampal cultures demonstrates that cofilin is essential for normal spine maintenance. Cofilin-F-actin binding and filament barbed-end production decrease during the early phase of activity-dependent spine shrinkage; cofilin concentration also decreases. Inhibition of the cathepsin B/L family of proteases prevents both cofilin loss and spine shrinkage. Conversely, during activity-dependent spine growth, LIM kinase stimulates cofilin phosphorylation, which activates phospholipase D-1 to promote actin polymerization. These results implicate novel molecular mechanisms and prompt a revision of the current model for how cofilin functions in activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:24740405

  19. The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor

    SciTech Connect

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2006-12-01

    Muscle contraction is driven by a cycle of conformational changes in the myosin II head. After myosin binds ATP and releases from the actin fibril, myosin prepares for the next power stroke by rotating back the converter domain that carries the lever arm by {approx}60 degrees. This recovery stroke is coupled to the activation of myosin's ATPase by a mechanism that is essential for an efficient motor cycle. The mechanics of this coupling have been proposed to occur via two distinct and successive motions of the two helices that hold the converter domain: in a first phase a see-saw motion of the relay helix, followed by a piston/seesaw motion of the SH1 helix in a second phase. To test this model, we have determined the principal motions of these structural elements during equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the crystallographic end states of the recovery stroke by using Principal Component Analysis. This reveals that the only principal motions of these two helices that make a large amplitude contribution towards the conformational change of the recovery stroke are indeed the predicted seesaw and piston motions.

  20. Mechanical Properties Involved in the Micro-forming of Ultra-thin Stainless Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Cong-Hanh; Thuillier, Sandrine; Manach, Pierre-Yves

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to characterize the mechanical behavior of an ultra-thin stainless steel, of 0.15-mm thickness, that is commonly used in the manufacturing of miniature connectors. The main focus is the relationship between some microstructural features, like grain size and surface roughness, and the macroscopic mechanical behavior investigated in uniaxial tension and simple shear. In tension, adaptations to the very small sheet thickness, in order to hold the specimen under the grips, are presented. Yield stress, initial elastic modulus, and evolution of the loading-unloading slope with plastic deformation were evaluated. Moreover, the kinematic contribution to the hardening was characterized by monotonic and cyclic simple shear test and reproduced by a mixed hardening law implemented in Abaqus finite element code. Then, the evolution of surface roughness with plastic strain, both in tension and simple shear, was analyzed. It was shown that in the case of an ultra-thin sheet, the stress levels, calculated either from an average thickness or when considering the effect of the surface roughness, exhibit a significant difference. Finally, the influence of surface roughness on the fracture of a tensile specimen was also investigated.

  1. Modulation of a voltage-gated Na+ channel by sevoflurane involves multiple sites and distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Annika F.; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Halogenated inhaled general anesthetic agents modulate voltage-gated ion channels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Many general anesthetic agents regulate voltage-gated Na+ (NaV) channels, including the commonly used drug sevoflurane. Here, we investigated the putative binding sites and molecular mechanisms of sevoflurane action on the bacterial NaV channel NaChBac by using a combination of molecular dynamics simulation, electrophysiology, and kinetic analysis. Structural modeling revealed multiple sevoflurane interaction sites possibly associated with NaChBac modulation. Electrophysiologically, sevoflurane favors activation and inactivation at low concentrations (0.2 mM), and additionally accelerates current decay at high concentrations (2 mM). Explaining these observations, kinetic modeling suggests concurrent destabilization of closed states and low-affinity open channel block. We propose that the multiple effects of sevoflurane on NaChBac result from simultaneous interactions at multiple sites with distinct affinities. This multiple-site, multiple-mode hypothesis offers a framework to study the structural basis of general anesthetic action. PMID:24753583

  2. Mechanisms involved in the antinociception induced by spinal administration of inosine or guanine in mice.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Enderson D; Schallenberger, Cristhine; Böhmer, Ana Elisa; Hansel, Gisele; Fagundes, Aécio C; Milman, Michael; Silva, Marcos D P; Oses, Jean P; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Portela, Luís V; Elisabetsky, Elaine; Souza, Diogo O; Schmidt, André P

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that adenine-based purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. Recently, we have demonstrated that guanine-based purines may produce some antinociceptive effects against chemical and thermal pain in mice. The present study was designed to investigate the antinociceptive effects of intrathecal (i.t.) administration of inosine or guanine in mice. Additionally, investigation into the mechanisms of action of these purines, their general toxicity and measurements of CSF purine levels were performed. Animals received an i.t. injection of vehicle (30mN NaOH), inosine or guanine (up to 600nmol) and submitted to several pain models and behavioural paradigms. Guanine and inosine produced dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the tail-flick, hot-plate, intraplantar (i.pl.) glutamate, i.pl. capsaicin and acetic acid pain models. Additionally, i.t. inosine inhibited the biting behaviour induced by spinal injection of capsaicin and i.t. guanine reduced the biting behaviour induced by spinal injection of glutamate or AMPA. Intrathecal administration of inosine (200nmol) induced an approximately 115-fold increase on CSF inosine levels. This study provides new evidence on the mechanism of action of extracellular guanine and inosine presenting antinociceptive effects following spinal administration. These effects seem to be related, at least partially, to the modulation of A1 adenosine receptors. PMID:26712379

  3. A Cell-Regulatory Mechanism Involving Feedback between Contraction and Tissue Formation Guides Wound Healing Progression

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Javierre, Etelvina; García-Aznar, José Manuel; Gómez-Benito, María José

    2014-01-01

    Wound healing is a process driven by cells. The ability of cells to sense mechanical stimuli from the extracellular matrix that surrounds them is used to regulate the forces that cells exert on the tissue. Stresses exerted by cells play a central role in wound contraction and have been broadly modelled. Traditionally, these stresses are assumed to be dependent on variables such as the extracellular matrix and cell or collagen densities. However, we postulate that cells are able to regulate the healing process through a mechanosensing mechanism regulated by the contraction that they exert. We propose that cells adjust the contraction level to determine the tissue functions regulating all main activities, such as proliferation, differentiation and matrix production. Hence, a closed-regulatory feedback loop is proposed between contraction and tissue formation. The model consists of a system of partial differential equations that simulates the evolution of fibroblasts, myofibroblasts, collagen and a generic growth factor, as well as the deformation of the extracellular matrix. This model is able to predict the wound healing outcome without requiring the addition of phenomenological laws to describe the time-dependent contraction evolution. We have reproduced two in vivo experiments to evaluate the predictive capacity of the model, and we conclude that there is feedback between the level of cell contraction and the tissue regenerated in the wound. PMID:24681636

  4. Modeling of glycerol-3-phosphate transporter suggests a potential 'tilt' mechanism involved in its function.

    PubMed

    Tsigelny, Igor F; Greenberg, Jerry; Kouznetsova, Valentina; Nigam, Sanjay K

    2008-10-01

    Many major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters have similar 12-transmembrane alpha-helical topologies with two six-helix halves connected by a long loop. In humans, these transporters participate in key physiological processes and are also, as in the case of members of the organic anion transporter (OAT) family, of pharmaceutical interest. Recently, crystal structures of two bacterial representatives of the MFS family--the glycerol-3-phosphate transporter (GlpT) and lac-permease (LacY)--have been solved and, because of assumptions regarding the high structural conservation of this family, there is hope that the results can be applied to mammalian transporters as well. Based on crystallography, it has been suggested that a major conformational "switching" mechanism accounts for ligand transport by MFS proteins. This conformational switch would then allow periodic changes in the overall transporter configuration, resulting in its cyclic opening to the periplasm or cytoplasm. Following this lead, we have modeled a possible "switch" mechanism in GlpT, using the concept of rotation of protein domains as in the DynDom program17 and membranephilic constraints predicted by the MAPAS program.(23) We found that the minima of energies of intersubunit interactions support two alternate positions consistent with their transport properties. Thus, for GlpT, a "tilt" of 9 degrees -10 degrees rotation had the most favorable energetics of electrostatic interaction between the two halves of the transporter; moreover, this confirmation was sufficient to suggest transport of the ligand across the membrane. We conducted steered molecular dynamics simulations of the GlpT-ligand system to explore how glycerol-3-phosphate would be handled by the "tilted" structure, and obtained results generally consistent with experimental mutagenesis data. While biochemical data remain most consistent with a single-site alternating access model, our results raise the possibility that, while the

  5. Increased zinc and copper availability in organic waste amended soil potentially involving distinct release mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tella, Marie; Bravin, Matthieu N; Thuriès, Laurent; Cazevieille, Patrick; Chevassus-Rosset, Claire; Collin, Blanche; Chaurand, Perrine; Legros, Samuel; Doelsch, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed at determining the fate of trace elements (TE) following soil organic waste (OW) application. We used a unique combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyses, to determine TE speciation, with incubation experiments for in situ monitoring of TE availability patterns over a time course with the technique of the diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT). We showed that copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) availability were both increased in OW-amended soil, but their release was controlled by distinct mechanisms. Zn speciation in OW was found to be dominated by an inorganic species, i.e. Zn sorbed on Fe oxides. Zn desorption from Fe oxides could explain the increase in Zn availability in OW-amended soil. Cu speciation in OW was dominated by organic species. Cu release through the mineralization of organic carbon from OW was responsible for the increase in Cu availability. PMID:26854699

  6. Anticonvulsants Teratogenic Mechanism Involves Alteration of Bioelectrically-controlled Processes in the Embryo. A hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Levin, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Maternal use of anticonvulsants during the first trimester of pregnancy has been associated with an elevated risk of major congenital malformations in the offspring. Whether the increased risk is caused by the specific pharmacological mechanisms of certain anticonvulsants, the underlying epilepsy, or common genetic or environmental risk factors shared by epilepsy and malformations is controversial. We hypothesize that anticonvulsant therapies during pregnancy that attain more successful inhibition of neurotransmission might lead to both better seizure control in the mother and stronger alteration of bioelectrically-controlled processes in the embryo that result in structural malformations. If our theory were correct, development of pharmaceuticals that do not alter cell resting transmembrane voltage levels could result in safer drugs. PMID:24815983

  7. Calcium ion involvement in growth inhibition of mechanically stressed soybean (Glycine max) seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    A 40-50% reduction in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Century 84] hypocotyl elongation occurred 24 h after application of mechanical stress. Exogenous Ca2+ at 10 mM inhibited growth by 28% if applied with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 to the zone of maximum hypocotyl elongation. La3+ was even more inhibitory than Ca2+, especially above 5 mM. Treatment with ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) alone had no effect on growth of non-stressed seedlings at the concentrations used but negated stress-induced growth reduction by 36% at 4 mM when compared to non-treated, stressed controls. Treatment with EDTA was ineffective in negating stress-induced growth inhibition. Calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium, chlorpromazine, and 48/80 also negated stress-induced growth reduction by 23, 50, and 35%, respectively.

  8. Myco-Biocontrol of Insect Pests: Factors Involved, Mechanism, and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Sardul Singh; Sharma, Anil K.; Beniwal, Vikas; Goel, Gunjan; Batra, Priya; Kumar, Anil; Jaglan, Sundeep; Sharma, A. K.; Malhotra, Sonal

    2012-01-01

    The growing demand for reducing chemical inputs in agriculture and increased resistance to insecticides have provided great impetus to the development of alternative forms of insect-pest control. Myco-biocontrol offers an attractive alternative to the use of chemical pesticides. Myco-biocontrol agents are naturally occurring organisms which are perceived as less damaging to the environment. Their mode of action appears little complex which makes it highly unlikely that resistance could be developed to a biopesticide. Past research has shown some promise of the use of fungi as a selective pesticide. The current paper updates us about the recent progress in the field of myco-biocontrol of insect pests and their possible mechanism of action to further enhance our understanding about the biological control of insect pests. PMID:22567344

  9. Peripheral mechanisms involved in the pressor and bradycardic effects of centrally administered arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Cenk; Yalcin, Murat

    2008-06-01

    In the current study, we aimed to determine the cardiovascular effects of arachidonic acid and peripheral mechanisms mediated these effects in normotensive conscious rats. Studies were performed in male Sprague Dawley rats. Arachidonic acid was injected intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) at the doses of 75, 150 or 300 microg and it caused dose- and time-dependent increase in mean arterial pressure and decrease in heart rate in normal conditions. Maximal effects were observed 10 min after 150 and 300 microg dose of arachidonic acid and lasted within 30 min. In order to evaluate the role of main peripheral hormonal mechanisms in those cardiovascular effects, plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, vasopressin levels and renin activity were measured after arachidonic acid (150 microg; i.c.v.) injection. Centrally injected arachidonic acid increased plasma levels of all these hormones and renin activity. Intravenous pretreatments with prazosin (0.5 mg/kg), an alpha1 adrenoceptor antagonist, [beta-mercapto-beta,beta-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl1, O-Me-Tyr2-Arg8]-vasopressin (10 microg/kg), a vasopressin V1 receptor antagonist, or saralasin (250 microg/kg), an angiotensin II receptor antagonist, partially blocked the pressor response to arachidonic acid (150 microg; i.c.v.) while combined administration of these three antagonists completely abolished the effect. Moreover, both individual and combined antagonist pretreatments fully blocked the bradycardic effect of arachidonic acid. In conclusion, our findings show that centrally administered arachidonic acid increases mean arterial pressure and decreases heart rate in normotensive conscious rats and the increases in plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, vasopressin levels and renin activity appear to mediate the cardiovascular effects of the drug. PMID:18571395

  10. Mechanisms involved in the antinociception induced by systemic administration of guanosine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, AP; Böhmer, AE; Schallenberger, C; Antunes, C; Tavares, RG; Wofchuk, ST; Elisabetsky, E; Souza, DO

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: It is well known that adenine-based purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. However, less attention has been given to the potential effects of guanine-based purines on pain transmission. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral (p.o.) administration of guanosine on mice pain models. Additionally, investigation into the mechanisms of action of guanosine, its potential toxicity and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) purine levels were also assessed. Experimental approach: Mice received an i.p. or p.o. administration of vehicle (0.1 mM NaOH) or guanosine (up to 240 mg·kg−1) and were evaluated in several pain models. Key results: Guanosine produced dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the hot-plate, glutamate, capsaicin, formalin and acetic acid models, but it was ineffective in the tail-flick test. Additionally, guanosine produced a significant inhibition of biting behaviour induced by i.t. injection of glutamate, AMPA, kainate and trans-ACPD, but not against NMDA, substance P or capsaicin. The antinociceptive effects of guanosine were prevented by selective and non-selective adenosine receptor antagonists. Systemic administration of guanosine (120 mg·kg−1) induced an approximately sevenfold increase on CSF guanosine levels. Guanosine prevented the increase on spinal cord glutamate uptake induced by intraplantar capsaicin. Conclusions and implications: This study provides new evidence on the mechanism of action of the antinociceptive effects after systemic administration of guanosine. These effects seem to be related to the modulation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. PMID:20132210

  11. Molecular mechanism of lysosomal sialidase deficiency in galactosialidosis involves its rapid degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradova, M V; Michaud, L; Mezentsev, A V; Lukong, K E; El-Alfy, M; Morales, C R; Potier, M; Pshezhetsky, A V

    1998-01-01

    Galactosialidosis is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by the combined deficiency of lysosomal sialidase and beta-galactosidase secondary to the deficiency of cathepsin A/protective protein, which is associated with sialidase and beta-galactosidase in a high-molecular weight (1.27MDa) complex. Clinical phenotypes of patients as well as the composition of compounds which are stored in patient's tissues implicate sialidase deficiency as the underlying pathogenic defect. The recent cloning and sequencing of lysosomal sialidase [Pshezhetsky, Richard, Michaud, Igdoura, Wang, Elsliger, Qu, Leclerc, Gravel, Dallaire and Potier (1997), Nature Genet. 15, 316-320] allowed us to study the molecular mechanism of sialidase deficiency in galactosialidosis. By Western blotting, using antibodies against the recombinant human enzyme, and by NH2-terminal sequencing, we showed that sialidase is synthesized as a 45.5 kDa precursor and after the cleavage of the 47-amino acid signal peptide and glycosylation becomes a 48.3 kDa mature active enzyme present in the 1.27 kDa complex. Transgenic expression of sialidase in cultured skin fibroblasts from normal controls and from galactosialidosis patients, followed by immunofluorescent and immunoelectron microscopy showed that in both normal and affected cells the expressed sialidase was localized on lysosomal and plasma membranes, but the amount of sialidase found in galactosialidosis cells was approximately 5-fold reduced. Metabolic labelling studies demonstrated that the 48.3 kDa mature active form of sialidase was stable in normal fibroblasts (half-life approximately 2.7 h), whereas in galactosialidosis fibroblasts the enzyme was rapidly converted (half-life approximately 30 min) into 38.7 and 24 kDa catalytically inactive forms. Altogether our data provide evidence that the molecular mechanism of sialidase deficiency in galactosialidosis is associated with abnormal proteolytic cleavage and fast degradation. PMID:9480870

  12. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yidan; Zhao, Guang; Tu, Shen; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females) in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed. PMID:26309232

  13. Therapeutic targeting of myeloid-derived suppressor cells involves a novel mechanism mediated by clusterin.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junmin; Donatelli, Sarah S; Gilvary, Danielle L; Tejera, Melba M; Eksioglu, Erika A; Chen, Xianghong; Coppola, Domenico; Wei, Sheng; Djeu, Julie Y

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) constitute a key checkpoint that impedes tumor immunity against cancer. Chemotherapeutic intervention of MDSCs has gained ground as a strategy for cancer therapy but its mechanism remains obscure.We report here a unique mechanism by which monocytic (M)-MDSCs are spared, allowing them to polarize towards M1 macrophages for reactivation of immunity against breast cancer. We first demonstrated that curcumin, like docetaxel (DTX), can selectively target CD11b(+)Ly6G(+)Ly6C(low) granulocytic (G)-MDSCs, sparing CD11b(+)Ly6G(-)Ly6C(high) M-MDSCs, with reduced tumor burden in 4T1-Neu tumor-bearing mice. Curcumin treatment polarized surviving M-MDSCs toward CCR7(+) Dectin-1(-)M1 cells, accompanied by IFN-γ production and cytolytic function in T cells. Selective M-MDSC chemoresistence to curcumin and DTX was mediated by secretory/cytoplasmic clusterin (sCLU). sCLU functions by trapping Bax from mitochondrial translocation, preventing the apoptotic cascade. Importantly, sCLU was only found in M-MDSCs but not in G-MDSCs. Knockdown of sCLU in M-MDSCs and RAW264.7 macrophages was found to reverse their natural chemoresistance. Clinically, breast cancer patients possess sCLU expression only in mature CD68(+) macrophages but not in immature CD33(+) immunosuppressive myeloid cells infiltrating the tumors. We thus made the seminal discovery that sCLU expression in M-MDSCs accounts for positive immunomodulation by chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27405665

  14. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yidan; Zhao, Guang; Tu, Shen; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females) in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed. PMID:26309232

  15. Therapeutic targeting of myeloid-derived suppressor cells involves a novel mechanism mediated by clusterin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Junmin; Donatelli, Sarah S.; Gilvary, Danielle L.; Tejera, Melba M.; Eksioglu, Erika A.; Chen, Xianghong; Coppola, Domenico; Wei, Sheng; Djeu, Julie Y.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) constitute a key checkpoint that impedes tumor immunity against cancer. Chemotherapeutic intervention of MDSCs has gained ground as a strategy for cancer therapy but its mechanism remains obscure.We report here a unique mechanism by which monocytic (M)-MDSCs are spared, allowing them to polarize towards M1 macrophages for reactivation of immunity against breast cancer. We first demonstrated that curcumin, like docetaxel (DTX), can selectively target CD11b+Ly6G+Ly6Clow granulocytic (G)-MDSCs, sparing CD11b+Ly6G−Ly6Chigh M-MDSCs, with reduced tumor burden in 4T1-Neu tumor-bearing mice. Curcumin treatment polarized surviving M-MDSCs toward CCR7+ Dectin-1−M1 cells, accompanied by IFN-γ production and cytolytic function in T cells. Selective M-MDSC chemoresistence to curcumin and DTX was mediated by secretory/cytoplasmic clusterin (sCLU). sCLU functions by trapping Bax from mitochondrial translocation, preventing the apoptotic cascade. Importantly, sCLU was only found in M-MDSCs but not in G-MDSCs. Knockdown of sCLU in M-MDSCs and RAW264.7 macrophages was found to reverse their natural chemoresistance. Clinically, breast cancer patients possess sCLU expression only in mature CD68+ macrophages but not in immature CD33+ immunosuppressive myeloid cells infiltrating the tumors. We thus made the seminal discovery that sCLU expression in M-MDSCs accounts for positive immunomodulation by chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27405665

  16. Cellular entry of ebola virus involves uptake by a macropinocytosis-like mechanism and subsequent trafficking through early and late endosomes.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mohammad F; Kolokoltsov, Andrey A; Albrecht, Thomas; Davey, Robert A

    2010-01-01

    Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV), a highly pathogenic zoonotic virus, poses serious public health, ecological and potential bioterrorism threats. Currently no specific therapy or vaccine is available. Virus entry is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. However, current knowledge of the ZEBOV entry mechanism is limited. While it is known that ZEBOV enters cells through endocytosis, which of the cellular endocytic mechanisms used remains unclear. Previous studies have produced differing outcomes, indicating potential involvement of multiple routes but many of these studies were performed using noninfectious surrogate systems such as pseudotyped retroviral particles, which may not accurately recapitulate the entry characteristics of the morphologically distinct wild type virus. Here we used replication-competent infectious ZEBOV as well as morphologically similar virus-like particles in specific infection and entry assays to demonstrate that in HEK293T and Vero cells internalization of ZEBOV is independent of clathrin, caveolae, and dynamin. Instead the uptake mechanism has features of macropinocytosis. The binding of virus to cells appears to directly stimulate fluid phase uptake as well as localized actin polymerization. Inhibition of key regulators of macropinocytosis including Pak1 and CtBP/BARS as well as treatment with the drug EIPA, which affects macropinosome formation, resulted in significant reduction in ZEBOV entry and infection. It is also shown that following internalization, the virus enters the endolysosomal pathway and is trafficked through early and late endosomes, but the exact site of membrane fusion and nucleocapsid penetration in the cytoplasm remains unclear. This study identifies the route for ZEBOV entry and identifies the key cellular factors required for the uptake of this filamentous virus. The findings greatly expand our understanding of the ZEBOV entry mechanism that can be applied to development of new therapeutics as well as

  17. Bortezomib sensitises TRAIL-resistant HPV-positive head and neck cancer cells to TRAIL through a caspase-dependent, E6-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bullenkamp, J; Raulf, N; Ayaz, B; Walczak, H; Kulms, D; Odell, E; Thavaraj, S; Tavassoli, M

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is causative for a new and increasing form of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs). Although localised HPV-positive cancers have a favourable response to radio-chemotherapy (RT/CT), the impact of HPV in advanced or metastatic HNSCC remains to be defined and targeted therapeutics need to be tested for cancers resistant to RT/CT. To this end, we investigated the sensitivity of HPV-positive and -negative HNSCC cell lines to TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), which induces tumour cell-specific apoptosis in various cancer types. A clear correlation was observed between HPV positivity and resistance to TRAIL compared with HPV-negative head and neck cancer cell lines. All TRAIL-resistant HPV-positive cell lines tested were sensitised to TRAIL-induced cell death by treatment with bortezomib, a clinically approved proteasome inhibitor. Bortezomib-mediated sensitisation to TRAIL was associated with enhanced activation of caspase-8, -9 and -3, elevated membrane expression levels of TRAIL-R2, cytochrome c release and G2/M arrest. Knockdown of caspase-8 significantly blocked cell death induced by the combination therapy, whereas the BH3-only protein Bid was not required for induction of apoptosis. XIAP depletion increased the sensitivity of both HPV-positive and -negative cells to TRAIL alone or in combination with bortezomib. In contrast, restoration of p53 following E6 knockdown in HPV-positive cells had no effect on their sensitivity to either single or combination therapy, suggesting a p53-independent pathway for the observed response. In summary, bortezomib-mediated proteasome inhibition sensitises previously resistant HPV-positive HNSCC cells to TRAIL-induced cell death through a mechanism involving both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. The cooperative effect of these two targeted anticancer agents therefore represents a promising treatment strategy for RT/CT-resistant HPV

  18. Mechanisms involved in the intestinal absorption of dietary vitamin A and provitamin A carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Earl H

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin A is an essential nutrient for humans and is converted to the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, and to the hormone, retinoic acid. Vitamin A in animal-derived foods is found as long chain acyl esters of retinol and these are digested to free fatty acids and retinol before uptake by the intestinal mucosal cell. The retinol is then reesterified to retinyl esters for incorporation into chlylomicrons and absorbed via the lymphatics or effluxed into the portal circulation facilitated by the lipid transporter, ABCA1. Provitamin A carotenoids such as β-carotene are found in plant-derived foods. These and other carotenoids are transported into the mucosal cell by scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Provitamin A carotenoids are partly converted to retinol by oxygenase and reductase enzymes and the retinol so produced is available for absorption via the two pathways described above. The efficiency of vitamin A and carotenoid intestinal absorption is determined by the regulation of a number of proteins involved in the process. Polymorphisms in genes for these proteins lead to individual variability in the metabolism and transport of vitamin A and carotenoids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Retinoid and Lipid Metabolism. PMID:21718801

  19. Evolutionary mechanisms involved in the virulence of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), a piscine orthomyxovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Markussen, Turhan Jonassen, Christine Monceyron Numanovic, Sanela Braaen, Stine Hjortaas, Monika Nilsen, Hanne Mjaaland, Siri

    2008-05-10

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus causing a multisystemic, emerging disease in Atlantic salmon. Here we present, for the first time, detailed sequence analyses of the full-genome sequence of a presumed avirulent isolate displaying a full-length hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene (HPR0), and compare this with full-genome sequences of 11 Norwegian ISAV isolates from clinically diseased fish. These analyses revealed the presence of a virulence marker right upstream of the putative cleavage site R{sub 267} in the fusion (F) protein, suggesting a Q{sub 266} {yields} L{sub 266} substitution to be a prerequisite for virulence. To gain virulence in isolates lacking this substitution, a sequence insertion near the cleavage site seems to be required. This strongly suggests the involvement of a protease recognition pattern at the cleavage site of the fusion protein as a determinant of virulence, as seen in highly pathogenic influenza A virus H5 or H7 and the paramyxovirus Newcastle disease virus.

  20. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J.; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  1. HSP27 Alleviates Cardiac Aging in Mice via a Mechanism Involving Antioxidation and Mitophagy Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shenglan; Wang, Yana; Zhang, Xiaojin; Kong, Qiuyue; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua; Ding, Zhengnian

    2016-01-01

    Aging-induced cardiac dysfunction is a prominent feature of cardiac aging. Heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) protects cardiac function against ischemia or chemical challenge. We hypothesized that HSP27 attenuates cardiac aging. Transgenic (Tg) mice with cardiac-specific expression of the HSP27 gene and wild-type (WT) littermates were employed in the experiments. Echocardiography revealed a significant decline in the cardiac function of old WT mice compared with young WT mice. In striking contrast, the aging-induced impairment of cardiac function was attenuated in old Tg mice compared with old WT mice. Levels of cardiac aging markers were lower in old Tg mouse hearts than in old WT mouse hearts. Less interstitial fibrosis and lower contents of reactive oxygen species and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins were detected in old Tg hearts than in old WT hearts. Furthermore, old Tg hearts demonstrated lower accumulation of LC3-II and p62 than old WT hearts. Levels of Atg13, Vps34, and Rab7 were also higher in old Tg hearts than in old WT hearts. Additionally, old Tg hearts had higher levels of PINK1 and Parkin than old WT hearts, suggesting that mitophagy was activated in old Tg hearts. Taken together, HSP27 alleviated cardiac aging and this action involved antioxidation and mitophagy activation. PMID:27110324

  2. Multiple cellular and molecular mechanisms are involved in human Aβ clearance by transplanted adult astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pihlaja, Rea; Koistinaho, Jari; Kauppinen, Riitta; Sandholm, Jouko; Tanila, Heikki; Koistinaho, Milla

    2011-11-01

    Astrocytes and microglia are able to degrade potentially neurotoxic β-amyloid (Aβ) deposits typical for Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. Contrary to microglia, astrocytes degrade human Aβ from tissue sections in vitro without any additional stimulation, but it has remained unclear whether transplanted astrocytes are able to clear deposited human Aβ in vivo. We transplanted adult mouse astrocytes into the hippocampi of transgenic mice mimicking AD and observed their fate, effects on microglial responses, and Aβ clearance. After 2-months follow-up time, we discovered a significant reduction in Aβ burden compared with AD mice infused with PBS only. The remaining Aβ deposits were fragmented and most of the Aβ immunoreactivity was seen within the transplanted astrocytes. Concomitant to Aβ reduction, both CD68 and CD45 immunoreactivities were significantly upregulated but phagocytic microglia were often surrounding and engulfing Aβ burdened, TUNEL-positive astrocytes rather than co-localizing with Aβ alone. Astrocytes are known to degrade Aβ also by secreting proteases involved in Aβ catabolism. To study the contribution of neprilysin (NEP), angiotensin-converting enzyme-1 (ACE-1), and endothelin-converting enzyme-2 (ECE-2) in human Aβ clearance, we utilized an ex vivo assay to demonstrate that adult astrocytes respond to human Aβ by upregulating NEP expression. Further, incubation of adult astrocytes with known inhibitors of NEP, ACE-1, or ECE-2 significantly inhibited the removal of human Aβ from the tissue suggesting an important role for these proteases in Aβ clearance by adult astrocytes ex vivo. PMID:21826742

  3. Functional involvement of G8 in the hairpin ribozyme cleavage mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pinard, Robert; Hampel, Ken J.; Heckman, Joyce E.; Lambert, Dominic; Chan, Philip A.; Major, Francois; Burke, John M.

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic determinants for the cleavage and ligation reactions mediated by the hairpin ribozyme are integral to the polyribonucleotide chain. We describe experiments that place G8, a critical guanosine, at the active site, and point to an essential role in catalysis. Cross-linking and modeling show that formation of a catalytic complex is accompanied by a conformational change in which N1 and O6 of G8 become closely apposed to the scissile phosphodiester. UV cross-linking, hydroxyl-radical footprinting and native gel electrophoresis indicate that G8 variants inhibit the reaction at a step following domain association, and that the tertiary structure of the inactive complex is not measurably altered. Rate–pH profiles and fluorescence spectroscopy show that protonation at the N1 position of G8 is required for catalysis, and that modification of O6 can inhibit the reaction. Kinetic solvent isotope analysis suggests that two protons are transferred during the rate-limiting step, consistent with rate-limiting cleavage chemistry involving concerted deprotonation of the attacking 2′-OH and protonation of the 5′-O leaving group. We propose mechanistic models that are consistent with these data, including some that invoke a novel keto–enol tautomerization. PMID:11707414

  4. Genes and molecular mechanisms involved in the epileptogenesis of idiopathic absence epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Yalçın, Ozlem

    2012-03-01

    Idiopathic absence epilepsies (IAE), that have high prevalence particularly among children and adolescents, are complex disorders mainly caused by genetic factors. Childhood absence epilepsy and juvenile absence epilepsy are among the most common subtypes of IAEs. While the role of ion channels has been the primary focus of epilepsy research, the analysis of mutation and association in both patients with absence epilepsies and animal models revealed the involvement of GABA receptors and calcium channels, but also of novel non-ion channel proteins in inducing spike wave discharges (SWD). Functional studies on a mutated variant of these proteins also support their role in the epileptogenesis of absence seizures. Studies in animal models point to both the thalamus and cortex as the origin of SWDs: the abnormalities in the components of these circuits leading to seizure activity. This review examines the current research on mutations and susceptibility alleles determined in the genes that code for the subunits of GABA receptors (GABRG2, GABRA1, GABRB3, GABRA5, GABA(B1) and GABA(B2)), calcium channels (CACNA1A, CACNA1G, CACNA1H, CACNA1I, CACNAB4, CACNAG2 and CACNG3), and novel non-ion channel proteins, taking into account the results of functional studies on these variants. PMID:22206818

  5. Modelling and pathway identification involving the transport mechanism of a complex metabolic system in batch culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jinlong; Zhang, Xu; Zhu, Xi; Feng, Enmin; Yin, Hongchao; Xiu, Zhilong

    2014-06-01

    The bio-dissimilation of glycerol to 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) can be characterized by a complex metabolic system of interactions among biochemical fluxes, metabolic compounds, key enzymes and genetic regulation. In this paper, in consideration of the fact that the transport ways of 1,3-PD and glycerol with different weights across cell membrane are still unclear in batch culture, we consider 121 possible metabolic pathways and establish a novel mathematical model which is represented by a complex metabolic system. Taking into account the difficulty in accurately measuring the concentration of intracellular substances and the absence of equilibrium point for the metabolic system of batch culture, the novel approach used here is to define quantitatively biological robustness of the intracellular substance concentrations for the overall process of batch culture. To determine the most possible metabolic pathway, we take the defined biological robustness as cost function and establish an identification model, in which 1452 system parameters and 484 pathway parameters are involved. Simultaneously, the identification model is subject to the metabolic system, continuous state constraints and parameter constraints. As such, solving the identification model by a serial program is a very complicated task. We propose a parallel migration particle swarm optimization algorithm (MPSO) capable of solving the identification model in conjunction with the constraint transcription and smoothing approximation techniques. Numerical results show that the most possible metabolic pathway and the corresponding metabolic system can reasonably describe the process of batch culture.

  6. Phospholipase A{sub 2} is involved in the mechanism of activation of neutrophils by polychlorinated biphenyls

    SciTech Connect

    Tithof, P.K.; Schiamberg, E.; Ganey, P.E.; Peters-Golden, M.

    1996-01-01

    Aroclor 1242, a mixture of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), activates neutrophils to produce superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by a mechanism that involves phospholipase C-dependent hydrolysis of membrane phosphoinositides; however, subsequent signal transduction mechanisms are unknown. This study determines whether phospholipase A{sub 2}-dependent release of arachidonic acid is involved in PCB-induced O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production. O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production was measured in vitro in glycogen-elicited, rat neutrophils in the presence and absence of the inhibitors of phospholipase A{sub 2}: quinacrine, 4-bromophenacyl bromide (BPB), and manoalide. All three agents significantly decreased the amount of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} detected during stimulation of neutrophils with Aroclor 1242. Similar inhibition occurred when neutrophils were activated with the classical stimuli, formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) or phorbol myristate acetate. The effects of BPB and manoalide were not a result of cytotoxicity or other nonspecific effects. Significant release of {sup 3}H-arachidonic acid preceded O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production in neutrophils stimulated with Aroclor 1242 or fMLP. Manoalide, at a concentration that abolished O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, also inhibited the release of {sup 3}H-arachidonate. Aspirin, zileuton, or WEB 2086 did not affect Aroclor 1242-induced O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production, suggesting that eicosanoids and platelet-activating factor are not needed for neutrophil activation by PCBs. Activation of phos-pholipase A{sub 2} and O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} production do not appear to involve the Ah receptor. These data suggest that Aroclor 1242 stimulates neutrophils to produce O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} by a mechanism that involves phospholipase A{sub 2}-dependent release of arachiodonic acid. 49 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Relieving DELLA Repression of Stem Elongation and Flowering, Evidence for a Proteolysis Independent Mechanism for GA signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GA stimulates germination, stem elongation, and flowering by lifting DELLA protein repression of these responses via both proteolysis dependent and independent pathways. There are five members of the DELLA protein family in Arabidopsis with partially overlapping functions. GA biosynthesis lifts DELL...

  8. Involvement of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and inflammasome pathway in molecular mechanisms of fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Robert, Sacha; Gicquel, Thomas; Victoni, Tatiana; Valença, Samuel; Barreto, Emiliano; Bailly-Maître, Béatrice; Boichot, Elisabeth; Lagente, Vincent

    2016-08-01

    Fibrosis is a basic connective tissue lesion defined by the increase in the fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM) components in tissue or organ. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a major group of proteases known to regulate the turn-over of ECM and so they are suggested to be important in tissue remodelling observed during fibrogenic process associated with chronic inflammation. Tissue remodelling is the result of an imbalance in the equilibrium of the normal processes of synthesis and degradation of ECM components markedly controlled by the MMPs/TIMP imbalance. We previously showed an association of the differences in collagen deposition in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice with a reduced molar pro-MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio. Using the carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) preclinical model of liver fibrosis in mice, we observed a significant increase in collagen deposition with increased expression and release of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 both at 24 h and 3 weeks later. This suggests an early altered regulation of matrix turnover involved in the development of fibrosis. We also demonstrated an activation of NLRP3-inflammasome pathway associated with the IL-1R/MyD88 signalling in the development of experimental fibrosis both in lung and liver. This was also associated with an increased expression of purinergic receptors mainly P2X7 Finally, these observations emphasize those effective therapies for these disorders must be given early in the natural history of the disease, prior to the development of tissue remodelling and fibrosis. PMID:27247426

  9. Sex differences in cerebellar mechanisms involved in pain-related safety learning.

    PubMed

    Labrenz, Franziska; Icenhour, Adriane; Thürling, Markus; Schlamann, Marc; Forsting, Michael; Timmann, Dagmar; Elsenbruch, Sigrid

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that the cerebellum contributes to the central processing of pain, including pain-related learning and memory processes. As a complex experience with multiple emotional and cognitive facets, the response to pain and its underlying neural correlates differ between men and women. However, it remains poorly understood whether and to what extent sex differences exist in the cerebellar contribution to pain-related associative learning processes. In the present conditioning study with experimental abdominal pain as unconditioned stimuli (US), we assessed sex-dependent differences in behavioral and neural responses to conditioned warning and safety cues in healthy volunteers. The results revealed that in response to visual stimuli signaling safety from abdominal pain (CS(-)), women showed enhanced cerebellar activation in lobules I-IV, V, VI, VIIIa, IX and X as well as Crus II and the dentate nucleus, which are mostly representative of somatomotor networks. On the other hand, men showed enhanced neural activation in lobules I-IV, VI, VIIb, VIIIb, IX as well as Crus I and II in response to CS(-), which are representative of frontoparietal and ventral attention networks. No sex differences were observed in response to pain-predictive warning signals (CS(+)). Similarly, men and women did not differ in behavioral measures of conditioning, including conditioned changes in CS valence and contingency awareness. Together, we could demonstrate that the cerebellum is involved in associative learning processes of conditioned anticipatory safety from pain and mediates sex differences in the underlying neural processes. Given the high prevalence of chronic pain conditions in women, these results may contribute to improve our understanding of the acquisition and manifestation of chronic abdominal pain syndromes. PMID:26004678

  10. Involvement of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and inflammasome pathway in molecular mechanisms of fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Sacha; Gicquel, Thomas; Victoni, Tatiana; Valença, Samuel; Barreto, Emiliano; Bailly-Maître, Béatrice; Boichot, Elisabeth; Lagente, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is a basic connective tissue lesion defined by the increase in the fibrillar extracellular matrix (ECM) components in tissue or organ. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a major group of proteases known to regulate the turn-over of ECM and so they are suggested to be important in tissue remodelling observed during fibrogenic process associated with chronic inflammation. Tissue remodelling is the result of an imbalance in the equilibrium of the normal processes of synthesis and degradation of ECM components markedly controlled by the MMPs/TIMP imbalance. We previously showed an association of the differences in collagen deposition in the lungs of bleomycin-treated mice with a reduced molar pro-MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio. Using the carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) preclinical model of liver fibrosis in mice, we observed a significant increase in collagen deposition with increased expression and release of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 both at 24 h and 3 weeks later. This suggests an early altered regulation of matrix turnover involved in the development of fibrosis. We also demonstrated an activation of NLRP3-inflammasome pathway associated with the IL-1R/MyD88 signalling in the development of experimental fibrosis both in lung and liver. This was also associated with an increased expression of purinergic receptors mainly P2X7. Finally, these observations emphasize those effective therapies for these disorders must be given early in the natural history of the disease, prior to the development of tissue remodelling and fibrosis. PMID:27247426

  11. A systems toxicology approach to elucidate the mechanisms involved in RDX species-specific sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Warner, Christopher M; Gust, Kurt A; Stanley, Jacob K; Habib, Tanwir; Wilbanks, Mitchell S; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Perkins, Edward J

    2012-07-17

    Interspecies uncertainty factors in ecological risk assessment provide conservative estimates of risk where limited or no toxicity data is available. We quantitatively examined the validity of interspecies uncertainty factors by comparing the responses of zebrafish (Danio rerio) and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) to the energetic compound 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), a known neurotoxicant. Relative toxicity was measured through transcriptional, morphological, and behavioral end points in zebrafish and fathead minnow fry exposed for 96 h to RDX concentrations ranging from 0.9 to 27.7 mg/L. Spinal deformities and lethality occurred at 1.8 and 3.5 mg/L RDX respectively for fathead minnow and at 13.8 and 27.7 mg/L for zebrafish, indicating that zebrafish have an 8-fold greater tolerance for RDX than fathead minnow fry. The number and magnitude of differentially expressed transcripts increased with increasing RDX concentration for both species. Differentially expressed genes were enriched in functions related to neurological disease, oxidative-stress, acute-phase response, vitamin/mineral metabolism and skeletal/muscular disorders. Decreased expression of collagen-coding transcripts were associated with spinal deformity and likely involved in sensitivity to RDX. Our work provides a mechanistic explanation for species-specific sensitivity to RDX where zebrafish responded at lower concentrations with greater numbers of functions related to RDX tolerance than fathead minnow. While the 10-fold interspecies uncertainty factor does provide a reasonable cross-species estimate of toxicity in the present study, the observation that the responses between ZF and FHM are markedly different does initiate a call for concern regarding establishment of broad ecotoxicological conclusions based on model species such as zebrafish. PMID:22697906

  12. Mechanisms involved in enhancement of the expression and function of aggrecanases by hyaluronan oligosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Nobunori; Hida, Daisuke; Knudson, Cheryl B.; Knudson, Warren

    2011-01-01

    Objective Small hyaluronan (HA) oligosaccharides serve as competitive receptor antagonists to displace HA from the cell surface and induce cell signaling events. In articular chondrocytes this cell signaling is mediated by the HA receptor CD44 and induces stimulation of genes involved in matrix degradation such as matrix metalloproteinases as well as matrix repair genes including collagen type II, aggrecan and HA synthase-2. The objective of this study was to determine changes in the expression and function of aggrecanases after disruption of chondrocyte CD44-HA interactions. Methods Bovine articular chondrocytes or bovine cartilage tissue were pre-treated with a variety of inhibitors of major signaling pathways prior to the addition of HA oligosaccharides. Changes in aggrecanase were monitored by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis of ADAMTS4, ADAMTS5 and aggrecan proteolytic fragments. To test the interactions between ADAMTS4 and MT4-MMP, protein lysates purified from stimulated chondrocytes were subjected to co-immunoprecipitation. Results Disruption of chondrocyte CD44-HA interactions with HA oligosaccharides induced the transcription of ADAMTS4 and ADAMTS5 in time- and dose-dependent manner. The association of GPI-anchored MT4-MMP with ADAMTS4 was also induced in articular chondrocytes by HA oligosaccharides. Inhibition of the NF-κB pathway blocked HA oligosaccharides-mediated stimulation of aggrecanases. Conclusions Disruptive changes in chondrocyte-matrix interactions by HA oligosaccharides induce matrix degradation and elevate aggrecanases via the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:21905012

  13. Permeability of membranes to amino acids and modified amino acids: mechanisms involved in translocation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Deamer, D. W. (Principal Investigator); Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    The amino acid permeability of membranes is of interest because they are one of the key solutes involved in cell function. Membrane permeability coefficients (P) for amino acid classes, including neutral, polar, hydrophobic, and charged species, have been measured and compared using a variety of techniques. Decreasing lipid chain length increased permeability slightly (5-fold), while variations in pH had only minor effects on the permeability coefficients of the amino acids tested in liposomes. Increasing the membrane surface charge increased the permeability of amino acids of the opposite charge, while increasing the cholesterol content decreased membrane permeability. The permeability coefficients for most amino acids tested were surprisingly similar to those previously measured for monovalent cations such as sodium and potassium (approximately 10(-12)-10(-13) cm s-1). This observation suggests that the permeation rates for the neutral, polar and charged amino acids are controlled by bilayer fluctuations and transient defects, rather than partition coefficients and Born energy barriers. Hydrophobic amino acids were 10(2) more permeable than the hydrophilic forms, reflecting their increased partition coefficient values. External pH had dramatic effects on the permeation rates for the modified amino acid lysine methyl ester in response to transmembrane pH gradients. It was established that lysine methyl ester and other modified short peptides permeate rapidly (P = 10(-2) cm s-1) as neutral (deprotonated) molecules. It was also shown that charge distributions dramatically alter permeation rates for modified di-peptides. These results may relate to the movement of peptides through membranes during protein translocation and to the origin of cellular membrane transport on the early Earth.

  14. Involvement of general control nonderepressible kinase 2 in cancer cell apoptosis by posttranslational mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chen; Lin, Ma; Jinjun, Bian; Su, Feng; Dan, Cao; Yan, Chen; Jie, Yang; Jin, Zhang; Zi-Chun, Hua; Wu, Yin

    2015-03-15

    General control nonderepressible kinase 2 (GCN2) is a promising target for cancer therapy. However, the role of GCN2 in cancer cell survival or death is elusive; further, small molecules targeting GCN2 signaling are not available. By using a GCN2 level-based drug screening assay, we found that GCN2 protein level critically determined the sensitivity of the cancer cells toward Na(+),K(+)-ATPase ligand-induced apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo, and this effect was largely dependent on C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) induction. Further analysis revealed that GCN2 is a short-lived protein. In A549 lung carcinoma cells, cellular β-arrestin1/2 associated with GCN2 and maintained the GCN2 protein level at a low level by recruiting the E3 ligase NEDD4L and facilitating consequent proteasomal degradation. However, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase ligand treatment triggered the phosphorylation of GCN2 at threonine 899, which increased the GCN2 protein level by disrupting the formation of GCN2-β-arrestin-NEDD4L ternary complex. The enhanced GCN2 level, in turn, aggravated Na(+),K(+)-ATPase ligand-induced cancer cell apoptosis. Our findings reveal that GCN2 can exert its proapoptotic function in cancer cell death by posttranslational mechanisms. Moreover, Na(+),K(+)-ATPase ligands emerge as the first identified small-molecule drugs that can trigger cancer cell death by modulating GCN2 signaling. PMID:25589675

  15. Auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles involves two mechanisms with different pH optima

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Although rapid auxin-induced growth of coleoptile sections can persist for at least 18 hours, acid-induced growth lasts for a much shorter period of time. Three theories have been proposed to explain this difference in persistence. To distinguish between these theories, the pH dependence for auxin-induced growth of oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles has been determined early and late in the elongation process. Coleoptile sections from which the outer epidermis was removed to facilitate buffer entry were incubated, with or without 10 micromolar indoleacetic acid, in 20 millimolar buffers at pH 4.5 to 7.0 to maintain a fixed wall pH. During the first 1 to 2 hours after addition of auxin, elongation occurs by acid-induced extension (i.e. the pH optimum is <5 and the elongation varies inversely with the solution pH). Auxin causes no additional elongation because the buffers prevent further changes in wall pH. After 60 to 90 minutes, a second mechanism of auxin-induced growth, whose pH optimum is 5.5 to 6.0, predominates. It is proposed that rapid growth responses to changes in auxin concentration are mediated by auxin-induced changes in wall pH, whereas the prolonged, steady-state growth rate is controlled by a second, auxin-mediated process whose pH optimum is less acidic.

  16. Effects of nitric oxide on magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus involve multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, M.P.; Cedraz-Mercez, P.L.; Varanda, W.A.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological evidence indicates that the supraoptic nucleus (SON) is an important region for integrating information related to homeostasis of body fluids. Located bilaterally to the optic