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Sample records for independent-set optimization transitions

  1. Statistical mechanics of maximal independent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Pin, Paolo; Ramezanpour, Abolfazl

    2009-12-01

    The graph theoretic concept of maximal independent set arises in several practical problems in computer science as well as in game theory. A maximal independent set is defined by the set of occupied nodes that satisfy some packing and covering constraints. It is known that finding minimum and maximum-density maximal independent sets are hard optimization problems. In this paper, we use cavity method of statistical physics and Monte Carlo simulations to study the corresponding constraint satisfaction problem on random graphs. We obtain the entropy of maximal independent sets within the replica symmetric and one-step replica symmetry breaking frameworks, shedding light on the metric structure of the landscape of solutions and suggesting a class of possible algorithms. This is of particular relevance for the application to the study of strategic interactions in social and economic networks, where maximal independent sets correspond to pure Nash equilibria of a graphical game of public goods allocation.

  2. Maximum independent set on diluted triangular lattices.

    PubMed

    Fay, C W; Liu, J W; Duxbury, P M

    2006-05-01

    Core percolation and maximum independent set on random graphs have recently been characterized using the methods of statistical physics. Here we present a statistical physics study of these problems on bond diluted triangular lattices. Core percolation critical behavior is found to be consistent with the standard percolation values, though there are strong finite size effects. A transfer matrix method is developed and applied to find accurate values of the density and degeneracy of the maximum independent set on lattices of limited width but large length. An extrapolation of these results to the infinite lattice limit yields high precision results, which are tabulated. These results are compared to results found using both vertex based and edge based local probability recursion algorithms, which have proven useful in the analysis of hard computational problems, such as the satisfiability problem. PMID:16803003

  3. Counting independent sets using the Bethe approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Chandrasekaran, V; Gamarmik, D; Shah, D; Sin, J

    2009-01-01

    The authors consider the problem of counting the number of independent sets or the partition function of a hard-core model in a graph. The problem in general is computationally hard (P hard). They study the quality of the approximation provided by the Bethe free energy. Belief propagation (BP) is a message-passing algorithm can be used to compute fixed points of the Bethe approximation; however, BP is not always guarantee to converge. As the first result, they propose a simple message-passing algorithm that converges to a BP fixed pont for any grapy. They find that their algorithm converges within a multiplicative error 1 + {var_epsilon} of a fixed point in {Omicron}(n{sup 2}E{sup -4} log{sup 3}(nE{sup -1})) iterations for any bounded degree graph of n nodes. In a nutshell, the algorithm can be thought of as a modification of BP with 'time-varying' message-passing. Next, they analyze the resulting error to the number of independent sets provided by such a fixed point of the Bethe approximation. Using the recently developed loop calculus approach by Vhertkov and Chernyak, they establish that for any bounded graph with large enough girth, the error is {Omicron}(n{sup -{gamma}}) for some {gamma} > 0. As an application, they find that for random 3-regular graph, Bethe approximation of log-partition function (log of the number of independent sets) is within o(1) of corret log-partition - this is quite surprising as previous physics-based predictions were expecting an error of o(n). In sum, their results provide a systematic way to find Bethe fixed points for any graph quickly and allow for estimating error in Bethe approximation using novel combinatorial techniques.

  4. Agreement Measure Comparisons between Two Independent Sets of Raters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Kenneth J.; Mielke, Paul W., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a FORTRAN software program that calculates the probability of an observed difference between agreement measures obtained from two independent sets of raters. An example illustrates the use of the DIFFER program in evaluating undergraduate essays. (Author/SLD)

  5. Shortest Paths between Shortest Paths and Independent Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Marcin; Medvedev, Paul; Milanič, Martin

    We study problems of reconfiguration of shortest paths in graphs. We prove that the shortest reconfiguration sequence can be exponential in the size of the graph and that it is NP-hard to compute the shortest reconfiguration sequence even when we know that the sequence has polynomial length. Moreover, we also study reconfiguration of independent sets in three different models and analyze relationships between these models, observing that shortest path reconfiguration is a special case of independent set reconfiguration in perfect graphs, under any of the three models. Finally, we give polynomial results for restricted classes of graphs (even-hole-free and P 4-free graphs).

  6. Optimal BLS: Optimizing transit-signal detection for Keplerian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2015-08-01

    Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. We optimize the search for transit signals for both detection and computational efficiencies by assuming that the searched systems can be described by Keplerian, and propagating the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Importnantly, we mainly consider the information content of the transit signal and not any specific algorithm - and use BLS (Kovács, Zucker, & Mazeh 2002) just as a specific example.We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually.By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the transit signal parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available.

  7. Exploiting phase transitions for fusion optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svenson, Pontus

    2005-05-01

    Many optimization problems that arise in multi-target tracking and fusion applications are known to be NP-complete, ie, believed to have worst-case complexities that are exponential in problem size. Recently, many such NP-complete problems have been shown to display threshold phenomena: it is possible to define a parameter such that the probability of a random problem instance having a solution jumps from 1 to 0 at a specific value of the parameter. It is also found that the amount of resources needed to solve the problem instance peaks at the transition point. Among the problems found to display this behavior are graph coloring (aka clustering, relevant for multi-target tracking), satisfiability (which occurs in resource allocation and planning problem), and the travelling salesperson problem. Physicists studying these problems have found intriguing similarities to phase transitions in spin models of statistical mechanics. Many methods previously used to analyze spin glasses have been used to explain some of the properties of the behavior at the transition point. It turns out that the transition happens because the fitness landscape of the problem changes as the parameter is varied. Some algorithms have been introduced that exploit this knowledge of the structure of the fitness landscape. In this paper, we review some of the experimental and theoretical work on threshold phenomena in optimization problems and indicate how optimization problems from tracking and sensor resource allocation could be analyzed using these results.

  8. Beyond Maximum Independent Set: AN Extended Model for Point-Feature Label Placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haunert, Jan-Henrik; Wolff, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Map labeling is a classical problem of cartography that has frequently been approached by combinatorial optimization. Given a set of features in the map and for each feature a set of label candidates, a common problem is to select an independent set of labels (that is, a labeling without label-label overlaps) that contains as many labels as possible and at most one label for each feature. To obtain solutions of high cartographic quality, the labels can be weighted and one can maximize the total weight (rather than the number) of the selected labels. We argue, however, that when maximizing the weight of the labeling, interdependences between labels are insufficiently addressed. Furthermore, in a maximum-weight labeling, the labels tend to be densely packed and thus the map background can be occluded too much. We propose extensions of an existing model to overcome these limitations. Since even without our extensions the problem is NP-hard, we cannot hope for an efficient exact algorithm for the problem. Therefore, we present a formalization of our model as an integer linear program (ILP). This allows us to compute optimal solutions in reasonable time, which we demonstrate for randomly generated instances.

  9. Optimized pulse sequences for suppressing unwanted transitions in quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. A.; Agarwal, G. S.

    2011-01-15

    We investigate the nature of the pulse sequence so that unwanted transitions in quantum systems can be inhibited optimally. For this purpose we show that the sequence of pulses proposed by Uhrig [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 100504 (2007)] in the context of inhibition of environmental dephasing effects is optimal. We derive exact results for inhibiting the transitions and confirm the results numerically. We posit a very significant improvement by usage of the Uhrig sequence over an equidistant sequence in decoupling a quantum system from unwanted transitions. The physics of inhibition is the destructive interference between transition amplitudes before and after each pulse.

  10. Optimal Control of Transitions between Nonequilibrium Steady States

    PubMed Central

    Zulkowski, Patrick R.; Sivak, David A.; DeWeese, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems fundamentally exist out of equilibrium in order to preserve organized structures and processes. Many changing cellular conditions can be represented as transitions between nonequilibrium steady states, and organisms have an interest in optimizing such transitions. Using the Hatano-Sasa Y-value, we extend a recently developed geometrical framework for determining optimal protocols so that it can be applied to systems driven from nonequilibrium steady states. We calculate and numerically verify optimal protocols for a colloidal particle dragged through solution by a translating optical trap with two controllable parameters. We offer experimental predictions, specifically that optimal protocols are significantly less costly than naive ones. Optimal protocols similar to these may ultimately point to design principles for biological energy transduction systems and guide the design of artificial molecular machines. PMID:24386112

  11. Optimal and robust control of transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bewley, T. R.; Agarwal, R.

    1996-01-01

    Optimal and robust control theories are used to determine feedback control rules that effectively stabilize a linearly unstable flow in a plane channel. Wall transpiration (unsteady blowing/suction) with zero net mass flux is used as the control. Control algorithms are considered that depend both on full flowfield information and on estimates of that flowfield based on wall skin-friction measurements only. The development of these control algorithms accounts for modeling errors and measurement noise in a rigorous fashion; these disturbances are considered in both a structured (Gaussian) and unstructured ('worst case') sense. The performance of these algorithms is analyzed in terms of the eigenmodes of the resulting controlled systems, and the sensitivity of individual eigenmodes to both control and observation is quantified.

  12. Optimizing the search for transiting planets in long time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2014-01-01

    Context. Transit surveys, both ground- and space-based, have already accumulated a large number of light curves that span several years. Aims: The search for transiting planets in these long time series is computationally intensive. We wish to optimize the search for both detection and computational efficiencies. Methods: We assume that the searched systems can be described well by Keplerian orbits. We then propagate the effects of different system parameters to the detection parameters. Results: We show that the frequency information content of the light curve is primarily determined by the duty cycle of the transit signal, and thus the optimal frequency sampling is found to be cubic and not linear. Further optimization is achieved by considering duty-cycle dependent binning of the phased light curve. By using the (standard) BLS, one is either fairly insensitive to long-period planets or less sensitive to short-period planets and computationally slower by a significant factor of ~330 (for a 3 yr long dataset). We also show how the physical system parameters, such as the host star's size and mass, directly affect transit detection. This understanding can then be used to optimize the search for every star individually. Conclusions: By considering Keplerian dynamics explicitly rather than implicitly one can optimally search the BLS parameter space. The presented Optimal BLS enhances the detectability of both very short and very long period planets, while allowing such searches to be done with much reduced resources and time. The Matlab/Octave source code for Optimal BLS is made available. The MATLAB code is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/561/A138

  13. Composite alignment media for the measurement of independent sets of NMR residual dipolar couplings.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Ke; Tolman, Joel R

    2005-11-01

    The measurement of independent sets of NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) in multiple alignment media can provide a detailed view of biomolecular structure and dynamics, yet remains experimentally challenging. It is demonstrated here that independent sets of RDCs can be measured for ubiquitin using just a single alignment medium composed of aligned bacteriophage Pf1 particles embedded in a strained polyacrylamide gel matrix. Using this composite medium, molecular alignment can be modulated by varying the angle between the directors of ordering for the Pf1 and strained gel matrix, or by varying the ionic strength or concentration of the Pf1 particles. This approach offers significant advantages in that greater experimental control can be exercised over the acquisition of multi-alignment RDC data while a homogeneous chemical environment is maintained across all of the measured RDC data. PMID:16248635

  14. Structure, scaling, and phase transition in the optimal transport network.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Steffen; Magnasco, Marcelo O

    2007-02-23

    The structure and properties of optimal networks depend on the cost functional being minimized and on constraints to which the minimization is subject. We show here two different formulations that lead to identical results: minimizing the dissipation rate of an electrical network under a global constraint is equivalent to the minimization of a power-law cost function introduced by Banavar et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 84, 4745 (2000)10.1103/PhysRevLett.84.4745]. An explicit scaling relation between the currents and the corresponding conductances is derived, proving the potential flow nature of the latter. Varying a unique parameter, the topology of the optimized networks shows a transition from a tree topology to a very redundant structure with loops; the transition corresponds to a discontinuity in the slope of the power dissipation. PMID:17359138

  15. Efficient parallel algorithms for (5+1)-coloring and maximal independent set problems

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, A.V.; Plotkin, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    An efficient technique for breaking symmetry in parallel is described. The technique works especially well on rooted trees and on graphs with a small maximum degree. In particular, a maximal independent set can be found on a constant-degree graph in O(lg*n) time on an EREW PRAM using a linear number of processors. It is shown how to apply this technique to construct more efficient parallel algorithms for several problems, including coloring of planar graphs and (delta + 1)-coloring of constant-degree graphs. Lower bounds for two related problems are proved.

  16. GreedyMAX-type Algorithms for the Maximum Independent Set Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiecki, Piotr; Göring, Frank

    A maximum independent set problem for a simple graph G = (V,E) is to find the largest subset of pairwise nonadjacent vertices. The problem is known to be NP-hard and it is also hard to approximate. Within this article we introduce a non-negative integer valued function p defined on the vertex set V(G) and called a potential function of a graph G, while P(G) = max v ∈ V(G) p(v) is called a potential of G. For any graph P(G) ≤ Δ(G), where Δ(G) is the maximum degree of G. Moreover, Δ(G) - P(G) may be arbitrarily large. A potential of a vertex lets us get a closer insight into the properties of its neighborhood which leads to the definition of the family of GreedyMAX-type algorithms having the classical GreedyMAX algorithm as their origin. We establish a lower bound 1/(P + 1) for the performance ratio of GreedyMAX-type algorithms which favorably compares with the bound 1/(Δ + 1) known to hold for GreedyMAX. The cardinality of an independent set generated by any GreedyMAX-type algorithm is at least sum_{vin V(G)} (p(v)+1)^{-1}, which strengthens the bounds of Turán and Caro-Wei stated in terms of vertex degrees.

  17. Soil Vapor Extraction System Optimization, Transition, and Closure Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, Michael J.; Becker, Dave; Simon, Michelle A.; Oostrom, Martinus; Rice, Amy K.; Johnson, Christian D.

    2013-02-08

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a prevalent remediation approach for volatile contaminants in the vadose zone. A diminishing rate of contaminant extraction over time is typically observed due to 1) diminishing contaminant mass, and/or 2) slow rates of removal for contamination in low-permeability zones. After a SVE system begins to show indications of diminishing contaminant removal rate, SVE performance needs to be evaluated to determine whether the system should be optimized, terminated, or transitioned to another technology to replace or augment SVE. This guidance specifically addresses the elements of this type of performance assessment. While not specifically presented, the approach and analyses in this guidance could also be applied at the onset of remediation selection for a site as a way to evaluate current or future impacts to groundwater from vadose zone contamination. The guidance presented here builds from existing guidance for SVE design, operation, optimization, and closure from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment. The purpose of the material herein is to clarify and focus on the specific actions and decisions related to SVE optimization, transition, and/or closure.

  18. Transition Delay in Hypersonic Boundary Layers via Optimal Perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of nonlinear optimal streaks on disturbance growth in a Mach 6 axisymmetric flow over a 7deg half-angle cone is investigated in an e ort to expand the range of available techniques for transition control. Plane-marching parabolized stability equations are used to characterize the boundary layer instability in the presence of azimuthally periodic streaks. The streaks are observed to stabilize nominally planar Mack mode instabilities, although oblique Mack mode disturbances are destabilized. Experimentally measured transition onset in the absence of any streaks correlates with an amplification factor of N = 6 for the planar Mack modes. For high enough streak amplitudes, the transition threshold of N = 6 is not reached by the Mack mode instabilities within the length of the cone, but subharmonic first mode instabilities, which are destabilized by the presence of the streaks, reach N = 6 near the end of the cone. These results suggest a passive flow control strategy of using micro vortex generators to induce streaks that would delay transition in hypersonic boundary layers.

  19. Optimizing transition states via kernel-based machine learning.

    PubMed

    Pozun, Zachary D; Hansen, Katja; Sheppard, Daniel; Rupp, Matthias; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Henkelman, Graeme

    2012-05-01

    We present a method for optimizing transition state theory dividing surfaces with support vector machines. The resulting dividing surfaces require no a priori information or intuition about reaction mechanisms. To generate optimal dividing surfaces, we apply a cycle of machine-learning and refinement of the surface by molecular dynamics sampling. We demonstrate that the machine-learned surfaces contain the relevant low-energy saddle points. The mechanisms of reactions may be extracted from the machine-learned surfaces in order to identify unexpected chemically relevant processes. Furthermore, we show that the machine-learned surfaces significantly increase the transmission coefficient for an adatom exchange involving many coupled degrees of freedom on a (100) surface when compared to a distance-based dividing surface. PMID:22583204

  20. Rigorous location of phase transitions in hard optimization problems.

    PubMed

    Achlioptas, Dimitris; Naor, Assaf; Peres, Yuval

    2005-06-01

    It is widely believed that for many optimization problems, no algorithm is substantially more efficient than exhaustive search. This means that finding optimal solutions for many practical problems is completely beyond any current or projected computational capacity. To understand the origin of this extreme 'hardness', computer scientists, mathematicians and physicists have been investigating for two decades a connection between computational complexity and phase transitions in random instances of constraint satisfaction problems. Here we present a mathematically rigorous method for locating such phase transitions. Our method works by analysing the distribution of distances between pairs of solutions as constraints are added. By identifying critical behaviour in the evolution of this distribution, we can pinpoint the threshold location for a number of problems, including the two most-studied ones: random k-SAT and random graph colouring. Our results prove that the heuristic predictions of statistical physics in this context are essentially correct. Moreover, we establish that random instances of constraint satisfaction problems have solutions well beyond the reach of any analysed algorithm. PMID:15944693

  1. Utilizing Maximal Independent Sets as Dominating Sets in Scale-Free Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzsy, N.; Molnar, F., Jr.; Szymanski, B. K.; Korniss, G.

    Dominating sets provide key solution to various critical problems in networked systems, such as detecting, monitoring, or controlling the behavior of nodes. Motivated by graph theory literature [Erdos, Israel J. Math. 4, 233 (1966)], we studied maximal independent sets (MIS) as dominating sets in scale-free networks. We investigated the scaling behavior of the size of MIS in artificial scale-free networks with respect to multiple topological properties (size, average degree, power-law exponent, assortativity), evaluated its resilience to network damage resulting from random failure or targeted attack [Molnar et al., Sci. Rep. 5, 8321 (2015)], and compared its efficiency to previously proposed dominating set selection strategies. We showed that, despite its small set size, MIS provides very high resilience against network damage. Using extensive numerical analysis on both synthetic and real-world (social, biological, technological) network samples, we demonstrate that our method effectively satisfies four essential requirements of dominating sets for their practical applicability on large-scale real-world systems: 1.) small set size, 2.) minimal network information required for their construction scheme, 3.) fast and easy computational implementation, and 4.) resiliency to network damage. Supported by DARPA, DTRA, and NSF.

  2. A numerical scheme for optimal transition paths of stochastic chemical kinetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Di

    2008-10-01

    We present a new framework for finding the optimal transition paths of metastable stochastic chemical kinetic systems with large system size. The optimal transition paths are identified to be the most probable paths according to the Large Deviation Theory of stochastic processes. Dynamical equations for the optimal transition paths are derived using the variational principle. A modified Minimum Action Method (MAM) is proposed as a numerical scheme to solve the optimal transition paths. Applications to Gene Regulatory Networks such as the toggle switch model and the Lactose Operon Model in Escherichia coli are presented as numerical examples.

  3. Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Transitions: Optimization, Modeling Choices, and Disruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsen, Robert W.

    Many nuclear fuel cycle simulators have evolved over time to help understan the nuclear industry/ecosystem at a macroscopic level. Cyclus is one of th first fuel cycle simulators to accommodate larger-scale analysis with it liberal open-source licensing and first-class Linux support. Cyclus also ha features that uniquely enable investigating the effects of modeling choices o fuel cycle simulators and scenarios. This work is divided into thre experiments focusing on optimization, effects of modeling choices, and fue cycle uncertainty. Effective optimization techniques are developed for automatically determinin desirable facility deployment schedules with Cyclus. A novel method fo mapping optimization variables to deployment schedules is developed. Thi allows relationships between reactor types and scenario constraints to b represented implicitly in the variable definitions enabling the usage o optimizers lacking constraint support. It also prevents wasting computationa resources evaluating infeasible deployment schedules. Deployed power capacit over time and deployment of non-reactor facilities are also included a optimization variables There are many fuel cycle simulators built with different combinations o modeling choices. Comparing results between them is often difficult. Cyclus flexibility allows comparing effects of many such modeling choices. Reacto refueling cycle synchronization and inter-facility competition among othe effects are compared in four cases each using combinations of fleet of individually modeled reactors with 1-month or 3-month time steps. There are noticeable differences in results for the different cases. The larges differences occur during periods of constrained reactor fuel availability This and similar work can help improve the quality of fuel cycle analysi generally There is significant uncertainty associated deploying new nuclear technologie such as time-frames for technology availability and the cost of buildin advanced reactors

  4. Transit telescope designs optimized for multiple object spectroscopy with fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.

    1982-01-01

    Instruments to simultaneously study the spectra of many objects in the field of view of a telescope can be made using fused silica fibers. The spectrograph at the 2.3m telescope of the University of Arizona has been modified for such operation, and is used routinely to study the dynamics of galaxy clusters. Consideration has been given to how the multifiber technique can best be used to obtain spectra of the many faint objects identified by deep transit survey instruments and new space and radio telescopes. A transit survey such as that planned by McGraw et al. (1980), with CCDs at the focus of a 2m transit telescope, will identify objects down to 24th magnitude, and down to 22nd magnitude will give very complete data on variability and optical energy distribution. A telescope with much larger aperture is required for spectroscopic follow up. It is suggested that large telescopes dedicated to this type of work can be made and operated for only a fraction of the cost of a general-purpose telescope.

  5. Optimal Control of Markov Processes with Age-Dependent Transition Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Mrinal K. Saha, Subhamay

    2012-10-15

    We study optimal control of Markov processes with age-dependent transition rates. The control policy is chosen continuously over time based on the state of the process and its age. We study infinite horizon discounted cost and infinite horizon average cost problems. Our approach is via the construction of an equivalent semi-Markov decision process. We characterise the value function and optimal controls for both discounted and average cost cases.

  6. Phase transitions and optimal transport in stochastic roundabout traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulaadvand, M. Ebrahim; Maass, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    We study traffic in a roundabout model, where the dynamics along the interior lane of the roundabout are described by the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). Vehicles can enter the interior lane or exit from it via S intersecting streets with given rates, and locally modified dynamics at the junctions take into account that collisions of entering vehicles with vehicles approaching the entrance point from the interior lane should be avoided. A route matrix specifies the probabilities for vehicles to arrive from and to exit to certain intersecting streets. By subdividing the interior lane into segments between consecutive intersecting streets with effective entrance and exit rates, a classification of the stationary roundabout traffic in terms of TASEP multiphases is given, where each segment can be in either the low-density, high-density, or maximum current TASEP phase. A general methodology is developed, which allows one to calculate the multiphases and optimal throughput conditions based on a mean-field treatment. Explicit analytical results from this treatment are derived for equivalent interesting streets. The results are shown to be in good agreement with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Optimization of the deflagration to detonation transition: reduction of length and time of transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorin, R.; Zitoun, R.; Desbordes, D.

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this experimental investigation is the study of Deflagration to Detonation Transition (DDT) in tubes in order to (i) reduce both run-up distance and time of transition ( L DDT and t DDT) in connection with Pulsed Detonation Engine applications and to (ii) attempt to scale L DDT with λCJ (the detonation cellular structure width). In DDT, the production of turbulence during the long flame run-up can lead to L DDT values of several meters. To shorten L DDT, an experimental set-up is designed to quickly induce highly turbulent initial flow. It consists of a double chamber terminated with a perforated plate of high Blockage Ratio (BR) positioned at the beginning of a 26 mm inner diameter tube containing a “Shchelkin spiral” of BR ≈ 0.5. The study involves stoichiometric reactive mixtures of H2, CH4, C3H8, and C2H4 with oxygen and diluted with N2 in order to obtain the same cell width λCJ≈10 mm at standard conditions. The results show that a shock-flame system propagating with nearly the isobaric speed of sound of combustion products, called the choking regime, is rapidly obtained. This experimental set-up allows a L DDT below 40 cm for the mixtures used and a ratio L DDT/λCJ ranging from 23 to 37. The transition distance seems to depend on the reduced activation energy ( E a/ RT c) and on the normalized heat of reaction ( Q/ a 0 2). The higher these quantities are, the shorter the ratio L DDT/λCJ is.

  8. Nonlinear optimals in the asymptotic suction boundary layer: Transition thresholds and symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherubini, S.; De Palma, P.; Robinet, J.-Ch.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of a constant homogeneous wall suction on the nonlinear transient growth of localized finite amplitude perturbations in a boundary-layer flow is investigated. Using a variational technique, nonlinear optimal disturbances are computed for the asymptotic suction boundary layer (ASBL) flow, defined as those finite amplitude disturbances yielding the largest energy growth at a given target time T. It is found that homogeneous wall suction remarkably reduces the optimal energy gain in the nonlinear case. Furthermore, mirror-symmetry breaking of the shape of the optimal perturbation appears when decreasing the Reynolds number from 10 000 to 5000, whereas spanwise mirror-symmetry was a robust feature of the nonlinear optimal perturbations found in the Blasius boundary-layer flow. Direct numerical simulations show that the different evolutions of the symmetric and of the non-symmetric initial perturbations are linked to different mechanisms of transport and tilting of the vortices by the mean flow. By bisecting the initial energy of the nonlinear optimal perturbations, minimal energy thresholds for subcritical transition to turbulence have been obtained. These energy thresholds are found to be 1-4 orders of magnitude smaller than those provided in the literature for other transition scenarios. For low to moderate Reynolds numbers, the energy thresholds are found to scale with Re-2, suggesting a new scaling law for transition in the ASBL.

  9. Optimal nonlinear coherent mode transitions in Bose-Einstein condensates utilizing spatiotemporal controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocker, David; Yan, Julia; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-05-01

    Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) offer the potential to examine quantum behavior at large length and time scales, as well as forming promising candidates for quantum technology applications. Thus, the manipulation of BECs using control fields is a topic of prime interest. We consider BECs in the mean-field model of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE), which contains linear and nonlinear features, both of which are subject to control. In this work we report successful optimal control simulations of a one-dimensional GPE by modulation of the linear and nonlinear terms to stimulate transitions into excited coherent modes. The linear and nonlinear controls are allowed to freely vary over space and time to seek their optimal forms. The determination of the excited coherent modes targeted for optimization is numerically performed through an adaptive imaginary time propagation method. Numerical simulations are performed for optimal control of mode-to-mode transitions between the ground coherent mode and the excited modes of a BEC trapped in a harmonic well. The results show greater than 99 % success for nearly all trials utilizing reasonable initial guesses for the controls, and analysis of the optimal controls reveals primarily direct transitions between initial and target modes. The success of using solely the nonlinearity term as a control opens up further research toward exploring novel control mechanisms inaccessible to linear Schrödinger-type systems.

  10. Superionic phase transition in silver chalcogenide nanocrystals realizing optimized thermoelectric performance.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chong; Xu, Jie; Li, Kun; Feng, Jun; Yang, Jinlong; Xie, Yi

    2012-03-01

    Thermoelectric has long been recognized as a potentially transformative energy conversion technology due to its ability to convert heat directly into electricity. However, how to optimize the three interdependent thermoelectric parameters (i.e., electrical conductivity σ, Seebeck coefficient S, and thermal conductivity κ) for improving thermoelectric properties is still challenging. Here, we put forward for the first time the semiconductor-superionic conductor phase transition as a new and effective way to selectively optimize the thermoelectric power factor based on the modulation of the electric transport property across the phase transition. Ultra low value of thermal conductivity was successfully retained over the whole investigated temperature range through the reduction of grain size. As a result, taking monodisperse Ag(2)Se nanocrystals for an example, the maximized ZT value can be achieved around the temperature of phase transition. Furthermore, along with the effective scattering of short-wavelength phonons by atomic defects created by alloying, the alloyed ternary silver chalcogenide compounds, monodisperse Ag(4)SeS nanocrystals, show better ZT value around phase transition temperature, which is cooperatively contributed by superionic phase transition and alloying at nanoscale. PMID:22316132

  11. Optimal ultrafast laser pulse-shaping to direct photo-induced phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Bin; Portman, Jenni; Duxbury, Phillip

    Photo-induced phase transitions (PIPT) in quantum and/or complex materials are the epitome of challenging non-equilibrium many-body phenomena, that also have a wide range of potential applications. We present a computational approach to finding optimal ultrafast laser pulse shapes to control the outcome of pump-probe PIPT experiments. The Krotov approach for optimal control is combined with a Keldysh Green's function calculation to describe experimental outcomes such as photoemission, transient single particle density of states and optical responses. Results for a simple model charge density wave system will be presented. main author.

  12. Optimization of film synthesized rare earth transition metal permanent magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cadieu, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report reviews work on the optimization of film synthesized rare earth transition metal permanent magnet systems. Topics include: high coercivity in Sm-Fe-Ti-V, Sm-Fe-V, and two element systems; ThMn{sub 12} type pseudobinary SmFe{sub 12 {minus} X}T{sub X}; and sputter process control for the synthesis of precisely textured RE-TM magnetic films. (JL)

  13. Some Results on the Analysis of Stochastic Processes with Uncertain Transition Probabilities and Robust Optimal Control

    SciTech Connect

    Keyong Li; Seong-Cheol Kang; I. Ch. Paschalidis

    2007-09-01

    This paper investigates stochastic processes that are modeled by a finite number of states but whose transition probabilities are uncertain and possibly time-varying. The treatment of uncertain transition probabilities is important because there appears to be a disconnection between the practice and theory of stochastic processes due to the difficulty of assigning exact probabilities to real-world events. Also, when the finite-state process comes as a reduced model of one that is more complicated in nature (possibly in a continuous state space), existing results do not facilitate rigorous analysis. Two approaches are introduced here. The first focuses on processes with one terminal state and the properties that affect their convergence rates. When a process is on a complicated graph, the bound of the convergence rate is not trivially related to that of the probabilities of individual transitions. Discovering the connection between the two led us to define two concepts which we call 'progressivity' and 'sortedness', and to a new comparison theorem for stochastic processes. An optimality criterion for robust optimal control also derives from this comparison theorem. In addition, this result is applied to the case of mission-oriented autonomous robot control to produce performance estimate within a control framework that we propose. The second approach is in the MDP frame work. We will introduce our preliminary work on optimistic robust optimization, which aims at finding solutions that guarantee the upper bounds of the accumulative discounted cost with prescribed probabilities. The motivation here is to address the issue that the standard robust optimal solution tends to be overly conservative.

  14. Utilizing Direct Numerical Simulations of Transition and Turbulence in Design Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rai, Man M.

    2015-01-01

    Design optimization methods that use the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the associated turbulence and transition models, or other model-based forms of the governing equations, may result in aerodynamic designs with actual performance levels that are noticeably different from the expected values because of the complexity of modeling turbulence/transition accurately in certain flows. Flow phenomena such as wake-blade interaction and trailing edge vortex shedding in turbines and compressors (examples of such flows) may require a computational approach that is free of transition/turbulence models, such as direct numerical simulations (DNS), for the underlying physics to be computed accurately. Here we explore the possibility of utilizing DNS data in designing a turbine blade section. The ultimate objective is to substantially reduce differences between predicted performance metrics and those obtained in reality. The redesign of a typical low-pressure turbine blade section with the goal of reducing total pressure loss in the row is provided as an example. The basic ideas presented here are of course just as applicable elsewhere in aerodynamic shape optimization as long as the computational costs are not excessive.

  15. An optimization approach for analysing nonlinear stability with transition to turbulence in fluids as an exemplar.

    PubMed

    Kerswell, R R; Pringle, C C T; Willis, A P

    2014-08-01

    This article introduces and reviews recent work using a simple optimization technique for analysing the nonlinear stability of a state in a dynamical system. The technique can be used to identify the most efficient way to disturb a system such that it transits from one stable state to another. The key idea is introduced within the framework of a finite-dimensional set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and then illustrated for a very simple system of two ODEs which possesses bistability. Then the transition to turbulence problem in fluid mechanics is used to show how the technique can be formulated for a spatially-extended system described by a set of partial differential equations (the well-known Navier-Stokes equations). Within that context, the optimization technique bridges the gap between (linear) optimal perturbation theory and the (nonlinear) dynamical systems approach to fluid flows. The fact that the technique has now been recently shown to work in this very high dimensional setting augurs well for its utility in other physical systems. PMID:25098632

  16. An optimization approach for analysing nonlinear stability with transition to turbulence in fluids as an exemplar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerswell, R. R.; Pringle, C. C. T.; Willis, A. P.

    2014-08-01

    This article introduces and reviews recent work using a simple optimization technique for analysing the nonlinear stability of a state in a dynamical system. The technique can be used to identify the most efficient way to disturb a system such that it transits from one stable state to another. The key idea is introduced within the framework of a finite-dimensional set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and then illustrated for a very simple system of two ODEs which possesses bistability. Then the transition to turbulence problem in fluid mechanics is used to show how the technique can be formulated for a spatially-extended system described by a set of partial differential equations (the well-known Navier-Stokes equations). Within that context, the optimization technique bridges the gap between (linear) optimal perturbation theory and the (nonlinear) dynamical systems approach to fluid flows. The fact that the technique has now been recently shown to work in this very high dimensional setting augurs well for its utility in other physical systems.

  17. Constant optimization of oral drug absorption kinetics in the compartment absorption and transit models using particle swarm optimization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabowo, K.; Sumaryada, T.; Kartono, A.

    2016-01-01

    Simulation of predictive modeling oral drug namely Compartment Absorption and Transit (CAT) using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) algorithm has been performed. This research will be carried out optimization of kinetic constant value oral drug use PSO algorithm to obtain the best global transport constant values for CAT equation that can predict drug concentration in plasma. The value of drug absorption rate constant for drug atenolol 25 mg is k10, k12, k21, k13 and k31 with each value is 0.8562, 0.3736, 0.2191, 0.4334 and 1.000 have been obtained thus raising the value of the coefficient of determination of a model CAT. From the experimental data plasma drug concentrations used are Atenolol, the coefficient of determination (R2) obtained from simulations atenolol 25 mg (PSO) was 81.72% and 99.46%. Better correlation between the dependent variable as the drug concentration and explanatory variables such as mass medication, plasma volume, and rate of absorption of the drug has increased in CAT models using PSO algorithm. Based on the results of CAT models fit charts can predict drug concentration in plasma.

  18. Delineation of an Optimal Location for Oil Sand Exploration through Transition Probabilities of Composing Lithology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, M.; Jeong, J.; Park, E.; Han, W. S.; Kim, K. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Three-dimensional geostatistical studies of delineating an optimal exploitation location for oil sand in McMurray Formation, Athabasca, Canada were carried out. The area is mainly composed of unconsolidated to semi-consolidated sand where breccia, mud, clay, etc. are associated as alternating layers. For the prediction of the optimal location of steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) technique, the conventional approach of cumulating the predicted thickness of the media with higher bitumen bearing possibility (i.e. Breccia and Sand) was pursued. As an alternative measure, mean vertical extension of the permeable media was also assessed based on vertical transition rate of each media and the corresponding optimal location was decided. For the both predictions, 110 borehole data acquired from the study area were analyzed under Markovian transition probability (TP) framework and three-dimensional distributions of the composing media were predicted stochastically through an existing TP based geostatistical model. The effectiveness of the two competing measures (cumulative thickness and mean vertical extension) for SAGD applications was verified through two-dimensional dual-phase flow simulations where high temperature steam was injected in the delineated reservoirs, and the size of steam chamber was compared. The results of the two-dimensional SAGD simulation has shown that the geologic formation containing the highest mean vertical extension of permeable media is more suitable for the development of the oil sand by developing larger size of steam chamber compared to that from the highest cumulative thickness. Given those two-dimensional results, the cumulative thickness alone may not be a sufficient criterion for an optimal SAGD site and the mean vertical extension of the permeable media needs to be jointly considered for the sound selections.

  19. Excited meson radiative transitions from lattice QCD using variationally optimized operators

    SciTech Connect

    Shultz, Christian J.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2015-06-02

    We explore the use of 'optimized' operators, designed to interpolate only a single meson eigenstate, in three-point correlation functions with a vector-current insertion. These operators are constructed as linear combinations in a large basis of meson interpolating fields using a variational analysis of matrices of two-point correlation functions. After performing such a determination at both zero and non-zero momentum, we compute three-point functions and are able to study radiative transition matrix elements featuring excited state mesons. The required two- and three-point correlation functions are efficiently computed using the distillation framework in which there is a factorization between quark propagation and operator construction, allowing for a large number of meson operators of definite momentum to be considered. We illustrate the method with a calculation using anisotopic lattices having three flavors of dynamical quark all tuned to the physical strange quark mass, considering form-factors and transitions of pseudoscalar and vector meson excitations. In conclusion, the dependence on photon virtuality for a number of form-factors and transitions is extracted and some discussion of excited-state phenomenology is presented.

  20. Transit spectroscopy of exoplanets from space: how to optimize the wavelength coverage and spectral resolving power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encrenaz, T.; Tinetti, G.; Tessenyi, M.; Drossart, P.; Hartogh, P.; Coustenis, A.

    2015-12-01

    The study of exoplanets is an exploding field in astronomy. Recent discoveries have made possible the development of a new research field, the spectroscopic characterization of the exoplanetary atmospheres, using both primary and eclipse transits. A dedicated space mission will make possible the characterization of many classes of exoplanets, from the hot Jupiters to the temperate super-Earths. In this paper, we discuss how the spectral range and the spectral resolving power can be optimized for identifying a maximum number of candidate atmospheric species. Spectral modeling shows that the simultaneous observation of the whole spectral range, from 0.55 to 16 μm is ideal for (1) capturing all types of planets at different temperatures, (2) detecting the variety of chemical atmospheric compounds with some redundancy, and (3) enabling an optimal retrieval of the chemical abundances and thermal profile. Limiting the spectral interval to 11 μm would make the retrieval more difficult in the case of cold exoplanets. In the visible range, the extension down to 0.4 s at different temperatures, (2) detecting the variety of chemical atmospheric compounds with some redundancy, and (3) enabling an optimal retrieval of the chemical abundances andst candidate molecules.

  1. Limb darkening and exoplanets - II. Choosing the best law for optimal retrieval of transit parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, Néstor; Jordán, Andrés

    2016-04-01

    Very precise measurements of exoplanet transit light curves both from ground- and space-based observatories make it now possible to fit the limb-darkening coefficients in the transit-fitting procedure rather than fix them to theoretical values. This strategy has been shown to give better results, as fixing the coefficients to theoretical values can give rise to important systematic errors which directly impact the physical properties of the system derived from such light curves such as the planetary radius. However, studies of the effect of limb-darkening assumptions on the retrieved parameters have mostly focused on the widely used quadratic limb-darkening law, leaving out other proposed laws that are either simpler or better descriptions of model intensity profiles. In this work, we show that laws such as the logarithmic, square-root and three-parameter law do a better job that the quadratic and linear laws when deriving parameters from transit light curves, both in terms of bias and precision, for a wide range of situations. We therefore recommend to study which law to use on a case-by-case basis. We provide code to guide the decision of when to use each of these laws and select the optimal one in a mean-square error sense, which we note has a dependence on both stellar and transit parameters. Finally, we demonstrate that the so-called exponential law is non-physical as it typically produces negative intensities close to the limb and should therefore not be used.

  2. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on transitions for individuals with disabilities contains nine papers discussing transition programs and issues. "Transition Issues for the 1990s," by Michael J. Ward and William D. Halloran, discusses self-determination, school responsibility for transition, continued educational engagement of at-risk students, and service…

  3. Optimal design of water distribution networks by a discrete state transition algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Gao, David Y.; Simpson, Angus R.

    2016-04-01

    In this study it is demonstrated that, with respect to model formulation, the number of linear and nonlinear equations involved in water distribution networks can be reduced to the number of closed simple loops. Regarding the optimization technique, a discrete state transition algorithm (STA) is introduced to solve several cases of water distribution networks. Firstly, the focus is on a parametric study of the 'restoration probability and risk probability' in the dynamic STA. To deal effectively with head pressure constraints, the influence is then investigated of the penalty coefficient and search enforcement on the performance of the algorithm. Based on the experience gained from training the Two-Loop network problem, a discrete STA has successfully achieved the best known solutions for the Hanoi, triple Hanoi and New York network problems.

  4. Quantum Efficiency Characterization and Optimization of a Tungsten Transition-Edge Sensor for ALPS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastidon, Noëmie; Horns, Dieter; Lindner, Axel

    2016-07-01

    The ALPS II experiment, Any Light Particle Search II at DESY in Hamburg, will look for sub-eV mass new fundamental bosons (e.g., axion-like particles, hidden photons, and other weakly interacting sub-eV particles) in the next years by means of a light-shining-through-wall setup. The ALPS II photosensor is a tungsten transition-edge sensor (W-TES) optimized for 1064 nm photons. This TES, operated at 80 mK, has already allowed single infrared photon detections as well as non-dispersive spectroscopy with very low background rates. The demonstrated quantum efficiency for such TES is up to 95 % (1064 nm) as has been already demonstrated by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology. A back-to-back measurement of the ALPS TES quantum efficiency using a calibrated charge-coupled device camera has lead to a first estimation of 30 %. Improvement methods are discussed.

  5. Optimizing Transition Edge Sensors for High-Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saab, Tarek; Bandler, Simon R.; Boyce, Kevin; Chervenak, James A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E

    2006-09-07

    Transition Edge Sensors (TES) have found applications as astronomical detectors ranging from the microwave to the gamma ray energy bands. Each energy band, however, imposes a different set of requirements on the TES such as energy and timing resolution, focal plane coverage, and the mechanisms by which the signal is coupled to the detector. This paper focuses on the development of TESs optimized for the 0.1-10 keV energy range at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Such detectors are suitable candidates for some of the upcoming X-ray observatories such as NeXT and Constellation-X. Ongoing efforts at producing, characterizing, and modeling such devices, as well as the latest results, are discussed.

  6. Optimal control-based bayesian detection of clinical and behavioral state transitions.

    PubMed

    Santaniello, Sabato; Sherman, David L; Thakor, Nitish V; Eskandar, Emad N; Sarma, Sridevi V

    2012-09-01

    Accurately detecting hidden clinical or behavioral states from sequential measurements is an emerging topic in neuroscience and medicine, which may dramatically impact neural prosthetics, brain-computer interface and drug delivery. For example, early detection of an epileptic seizure from sequential electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements would allow timely administration of anticonvulsant drugs or neurostimulation, thus reducing physical impairment and risks of overtreatment. We develop a Bayesian paradigm for state transition detection that combines optimal control and Markov processes. We define a hidden Markov model of the state evolution and develop a detection policy that minimizes a loss function of both probability of false positives and accuracy (i.e., lag between estimated and actual transition time). Our strategy automatically adapts to each newly acquired measurement based on the state evolution model and the relative loss for false positives and accuracy, thus resulting in a time varying threshold policy. The paradigm was used in two applications: 1) detection of movement onset (behavioral state) from subthalamic single unit recordings in Parkinson's disease patients performing a motor task; 2) early detection of an approaching seizure (clinical state) from multichannel intracranial EEG recordings in rodents treated with pentylenetetrazol chemoconvulsant. Our paradigm performs significantly better than chance and improves over widely used detection algorithms. PMID:22893447

  7. Transitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes four articles: "Career Aspirations" (Field); "Making the Transition to a New Curriculum" (Baker, Householder); "How about a 'Work to School' Transition?" (Glasberg); and "Technological Improvisation: Bringing CNC to Woodworking" (Charles, McDuffie). (SK)

  8. Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Sandy, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This "feature issue" focuses on transition from school to adult life for persons with disabilities. Included are "success stories," brief program descriptions, and a list of resources. Individual articles include the following titles and authors: "Transition: An Energizing Concept" (Paul Bates); "Transition Issues for the 1990s" (William Halloran…

  9. Anthropogenic carbon estimates in the Weddell Sea using an optimized CFC based transit time distribution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, Oliver; Hauck, Judith; Hoppema, Mario; Rhein, Monika; Roether, Wolfgang

    2010-05-01

    We use a 20 year time series of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) observations along the Prime Meridian to determine the temporal evolution of anthropogenic carbon (Cant) in the two deep boundary currents which enter the Weddell Basin in the south and leave it in the north. The Cant is inferred from transit time distributions (TTDs), with parameters (mean transit time and dispersion) adjusted to the observed mean CFC histories in these recently ventilated deep boundary currents. We optimize that "classic" TTD approach by accounting for water exchange of the boundary currents with an old but not CFC and Cant free interior reservoir. This reservoir in turn, is replenished by the boundary currents, which we parameterize as first order mixing. Furthermore, we account for the time-dependence of the CFC and Cant source water saturation. A conceptual model of an ideal saturated mixed layer and exchange with adjacent water is adjusted to observed CFC saturations in the source regions. The time-dependence for the CFC saturation appears to be much weaker than for Cant. We find a mean transit time of 14 years and an advection/dispersion ratio of 5 for the deep southern boundary current. For the northern boundary current we find a mean transit time of 8 years and a much advection/dispersion ratio of 140. The fractions directly supplied by the boundary currents are in both cases in the order of 10%, while 90% are admixed from the interior reservoirs, which are replenished with a renewal time of about 14 years. We determine Cant ~ 11 umol/kg (reference year 2006) in the deep water entering the Weddell Sea in the south (~2.1 Sv), and 12 umol/kg for the deep water leaving the Weddell Sea in the north (~2.7 Sv). These Cant estimates are, however, upper limits, considering that the Cant source water saturation is likely to be lower than that for the CFCs. Comparison with Cant intrusion estimates based on extended multiple linear regression (using potential temperature, salinity, oxygen, and

  10. Managing the Transition: The Role of Optimism and Self-Efficacy for First-Year Australian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Stephen; Mergler, Amanda; Boman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Students making the transition from high school to university often encounter many stressors and new experiences. Many students adjust successfully to university; however, some students do not, often resulting in attrition from the university and mental health issues. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the effects that optimism,…

  11. Design and optimization of a deflagration to detonation transition (ddt) section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romo, Francisco X.

    Throughout the previous century, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have used and optimized the `traditional' combustion process called deflagration (subsonic combustion). An alternative form of combustion, detonation (supersonic combustion), can increase the thermal efficiency of the process by anywhere from 20 - 50%. Even though several authors have studied detonation waves since the 1890's and a plethora of papers and books have been published, it was not until 2008 that the first detonation-powered flight took place. It lasted for 10 seconds at 100 ft. altitude. Achieving detonation presents its own challenges: some fuels are not prone to detonate, severe vibrations caused by the cyclic nature of the engine and its intense noise are some of the key areas that need further research. Also, to directly achieve detonation either a high-energy, bulky, ignition system is required, or the combustion chamber must be fairly long (5 ft. or more in some cases). In the latter method, a subsonic flame front accelerates within the combustion chamber until it reaches supersonic speeds, thus detonation is attained. This is called deflagration-todetonation transition (DDT). Previous papers and experiments have shown that obstacles, such as discs with an orifice, located inside the combustion chamber can shorten the distance required to achieve detonation. This paper describes a hands-on implementation of a DDT device. Different disc geometries inside the chamber alter the wave characteristics at the exit of the tube. Although detonation was reached only when using pure oxygen, testing identified an obstacle configuration for LPG and air mixtures that increased pressure and wave speed significantly when compared to baseline or other obstacle configurations. Mixtures of LPG and air were accelerated to Mach 0.96 in the downstream frame of reference, which would indicate a transition to detonation was close. Reasons for not achieving detonation may include poor fuel and oxidizer mixing

  12. First Order Transition for the Optimal Search Time of Lévy Flights with Resetting.

    PubMed

    Kusmierz, Lukasz; Majumdar, Satya N; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Schehr, Grégory

    2014-11-28

    We study analytically an intermittent search process in one dimension. There is an immobile target at the origin and a searcher undergoes a discrete time jump process starting at x_{0}≥0, where successive jumps are drawn independently from an arbitrary jump distribution f(η). In addition, with a probability 0≤r<1, the position of the searcher is reset to its initial position x_{0}. The efficiency of the search strategy is characterized by the mean time to find the target, i.e., the mean first passage time (MFPT) to the origin. For arbitrary jump distribution f(η), initial position x_{0} and resetting probability r, we compute analytically the MFPT. For the heavy-tailed Lévy stable jump distribution characterized by the Lévy index 0<μ<2, we show that, for any given x_{0}, the MFPT has a global minimum in the (μ,r) plane at (μ^{*}(x_{0}),r^{*}(x_{0})). We find a remarkable first-order phase transition as x_{0} crosses a critical value x_{0}^{*} at which the optimal parameters change discontinuously. Our analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations. PMID:25494063

  13. First Order Transition for the Optimal Search Time of Lévy Flights with Resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusmierz, Lukasz; Majumdar, Satya N.; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Schehr, Grégory

    2014-11-01

    We study analytically an intermittent search process in one dimension. There is an immobile target at the origin and a searcher undergoes a discrete time jump process starting at x0≥0 , where successive jumps are drawn independently from an arbitrary jump distribution f (η ). In addition, with a probability 0 ≤r <1 , the position of the searcher is reset to its initial position x0. The efficiency of the search strategy is characterized by the mean time to find the target, i.e., the mean first passage time (MFPT) to the origin. For arbitrary jump distribution f (η ), initial position x0 and resetting probability r , we compute analytically the MFPT. For the heavy-tailed Lévy stable jump distribution characterized by the Lévy index 0 <μ <2 , we show that, for any given x0, the MFPT has a global minimum in the (μ ,r ) plane at (μ*(x0),r*(x0)). We find a remarkable first-order phase transition as x0 crosses a critical value x0* at which the optimal parameters change discontinuously. Our analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  14. Study of the Bus Dynamic Coscheduling Optimization Method under Urban Rail Transit Line Emergency

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Xuedong; Wang, Jiaxi; Chen, Shasha

    2014-01-01

    As one of the most important urban commuter transportation modes, urban rail transit (URT) has been acting as a key solution for supporting mobility needs in high-density urban areas. However, in recent years, high frequency of unexpected events has caused serious service disruptions in URT system, greatly harming passenger safety and resulting in severe traffic delays. Therefore, there is an urgent need to study emergency evacuation problem in URT. In this paper, a method of bus dynamic coscheduling is proposed and two models are built based on different evacuation destinations including URT stations and surrounding bus parking spots. A dynamic coscheduling scheme for buses can be obtained by the models. In the model solution process, a new concept—the equivalent parking spot—is proposed to transform the nonlinear model into an integer linear programming (ILP) problem. A case study is conducted to verify the feasibility of models. Also, sensitivity analysis of two vital factors is carried out to analyze their effects on the total evacuation time. The results reveal that the designed capacity of buses has a negative influence on the total evacuation time, while an increase in the number of passengers has a positive effect. Finally, some significant optimizing strategies are proposed. PMID:25530750

  15. Effect of the glass transition of coating adhesive on temperature performance of fiber optic gyroscope and its optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yueze; Wang, Tieshui; Ma, Lin; Yu, Hao; Liu, Bohan

    2015-10-01

    The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG)based on Sagnac effect has became to one of the most important sensors in developing due to light in quality, high accuracy, compact in dimension and long life and has played a very important role in both military and civil use. It is the most difficult problem that the FOG has an obvious bias drift caused by temperature change and temperature grade, so its application is limited to a great extent. Fiber coil is one of the most critical components in FOG. Here, the characteristic of temperature error of the fiber optical coil was analyzed. At first, by studying the glass transition of coating adhesive in the fiber coil, the element model of the fiber coil with the glass transition of coating adhesive in FOG was built. Then the discrete mathematics model of SHUPE error with the glass transition of coating adhesive in FOG was built. Finally, based on the temperature models mentioned above, the effects caused by the glass transition of coating adhesive on temperature performance of fiber optic gyroscope were analyzed. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that effect caused by the glass transition of coating adhesive had seriously affected the temperature performance of FOG. By optimizing the glass transition temperature of coating adhesive, the SHUPE error of fiber coils can be reduced. At the same time, the amplitude uniformity of the SHUPE error can be improved greatly to reduce the difficulty in temperature compensation.

  16. Optimization of film synthesized rare earth transition metal permanent magnet systems. Progress report, August 1, 1989--July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Cadieu, F.J.

    1990-12-31

    This report reviews work on the optimization of film synthesized rare earth transition metal permanent magnet systems. Topics include: high coercivity in Sm-Fe-Ti-V, Sm-Fe-V, and two element systems; ThMn{sub 12} type pseudobinary SmFe{sub 12 {minus} X}T{sub X}; and sputter process control for the synthesis of precisely textured RE-TM magnetic films. (JL)

  17. Role of Physical Therapists in Reducing Hospital Readmissions: Optimizing Outcomes for Older Adults During Care Transitions From Hospital to Community.

    PubMed

    Falvey, Jason R; Burke, Robert E; Malone, Daniel; Ridgeway, Kyle J; McManus, Beth M; Stevens-Lapsley, Jennifer E

    2016-08-01

    Hospital readmissions in older adult populations are an emerging quality indicator for acute care hospitals. Recent evidence has linked functional decline during and after hospitalization with an elevated risk of hospital readmission. However, models of care that have been developed to reduce hospital readmission rates do not adequately address functional deficits. Physical therapists, as experts in optimizing physical function, have a strong opportunity to contribute meaningfully to care transition models and demonstrate the value of physical therapy interventions in reducing readmissions. Thus, the purposes of this perspective article are: (1) to describe the need for physical therapist input during care transitions for older adults and (2) to outline strategies for expanding physical therapy participation in care transitions for older adults, with an overall goal of reducing avoidable 30-day hospital readmissions. PMID:26939601

  18. Optimizing route-specific marketing strategies to increase public transit ridership. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, C.A.; Lede, N.W.

    1994-03-01

    The document reflects the responses of a portion of the university community in a large urban area regarding travel mode and marketing strategies. The regular, single occupant drivers who were questioned are likely representative of those who drive alone to work in the larger community. The findings from this analysis will provide background data for many upcoming projects in the community, including the employer trip reduction requirement (part of the Clean Air Act Amendment) and a university transit program under examination by the local transit authority. The findings can also be a beginning point for other activity centers, universities and marketing departments within transit agencies.

  19. The application of density functional theory to the optimization of transition state structures. I. Organic migration reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liangyou; Ziegler, Tom

    1990-03-01

    We present here the first determination of transition state structures based on Hartree-Fock-Slater (HFS) density functional calculations. The optimization of the transition state structures utilized the analytical energy gradients evaluated by a recently developed method. The transition state structures obtained by the HFS method are similar to those determined by ab initio methods in which electron correlation is partly taken into account. The energy barrier for the CH3NC→CH3CN isomerization process, corrected for the zero-point energy, is 40.1 kcal mol-1 which is in good agreement with the experimental value of 38.4 kcal mol-1. Experimental barriers are not available for the HNC→HCN and N2H2(trans)→N2H2(cis) isomerization processes. However, the barriers calculated by the HFS method are in good accordance with the barriers obtained from electron-correlation calculations. Furthermore, the vibrational frequencies calculated by the HFS method are in good agreement either with experiments in the case of stable molecules or with electron-correlation calculations in the case of transition states. The HFS method seems in general to provide better estimates of vibrational frequencies and activation barriers than the Hartree-Fock method in which electron correlation is lacking. The later method generally afford too high values for both frequencies and activation barriers.

  20. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com Zhu, Weiliang E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com; Shi, Jiye E-mail: Jiye.Shi@ucb.com

    2015-03-28

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  1. Increasing the sampling efficiency of protein conformational transition using velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-03-01

    The application of temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulation on protein motion is limited by its huge requirement of computational resource, particularly when explicit solvent model is implemented. In the previous study, we developed a velocity-scaling optimized hybrid explicit/implicit solvent REMD method with the hope to reduce the temperature (replica) number on the premise of maintaining high sampling efficiency. In this study, we utilized this method to characterize and energetically identify the conformational transition pathway of a protein model, the N-terminal domain of calmodulin. In comparison to the standard explicit solvent REMD simulation, the hybrid REMD is much less computationally expensive but, meanwhile, gives accurate evaluation of the structural and thermodynamic properties of the conformational transition which are in well agreement with the standard REMD simulation. Therefore, the hybrid REMD could highly increase the computational efficiency and thus expand the application of REMD simulation to larger-size protein systems.

  2. Structural and magnetic phase transitions near optimal superconductivity in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hu, Ding; Lu, Xingye; Zhang, Wenliang; Luo, Huiqian; Li, Shiliang; Wang, Peipei; Chen, Genfu; Han, Fei; Banjara, Shree R.; Sapkota, A.; et al

    2015-04-17

    In this study, we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high-resolution x-ray and neutron scattering to study structural and magnetic phase transitions in phosphorus-doped BaFe2(As1-xPx)2. Thus, previous transport, NMR, specific heat, and magnetic penetration depth measurements have provided compelling evidence for the presence of a quantum critical point (QCP) near optimal superconductivity at x = 0.3. However, we show that the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural (Ts) and paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic (AF, TN) transitions in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 are always coupled and approach to TN ≈ Ts ≥ Tc (≈ 29 K) for x = 0.29 before vanishing abruptly for x ≥ 0.3. These results suggestmore » that AF order in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 disappears in a weakly first order fashion near optimal superconductivity, much like the electron-doped iron pnictides with an avoided QCP.« less

  3. Motion patterns and phase-transition of a defender-intruder problem and optimal interception strategy of the defender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiangliu; Li, Wei

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we consider a defense-intrusion interaction, in which an intruder is attracted by a protected stationary target but repulsed by a defender; while the defender tries to move towards an appropriate interception position (IP) between the intruder and the target in order to intercept the intruder and expel the intruder away from the target as maximum as possible. Intuitionally, to keep the intruder further away, one may wonder that: is it a better strategy for the defender trying to approach the intruder as near as possible? Unexpectedly and interestingly enough, this is not always the case. We first introduce the flexibility for IP selection, then investigate the system dynamics and the stable motion patterns, and characterize the phase-transition surface for the motion patterns. We show that, the phase-transition surface just defines the optimal interception strategy of the defender for IP selection; and from the perspective of mobility of agents, the optimal strategy just depends on relative mobility of the two agents.

  4. Optimization of film synthesized rare earth transition metal permanent magnet systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cadieu, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    Progress is reported in three areas: high coercivity Sm-Fe-Ti-V, Sm-Fe-Zr, and two element Sm-Fe Sm{sub 5}(Fe,T){sub 17} type crystalline phases; ThMn{sub 12} type pseudobinary SmFe{sub 12-x}T{sub x}(0{le}{times}{le}1.5); and sputter process control for the synthesis of precisely textured rare earth-transition metal magnetic films. (DLC)

  5. Phase transitions in optimal search times: How random walkers should combine resetting and flight scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, Daniel; Méndez, Vicenç

    2015-12-01

    Recent works have explored the properties of Lévy flights with resetting in one-dimensional domains and have reported the existence of phase transitions in the phase space of parameters which minimizes the mean first passage time (MFPT) through the origin [L. Kusmierz et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 220602 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.220602]. Here, we show how actually an interesting dynamics, including also phase transitions for the minimization of the MFPT, can also be obtained without invoking the use of Lévy statistics but for the simpler case of random walks with exponentially distributed flights of constant speed. We explore this dynamics both in the case of finite and infinite domains, and for different implementations of the resetting mechanism to show that different ways to introduce resetting consistently lead to a quite similar dynamics. The use of exponential flights has the strong advantage that exact solutions can be obtained easily for the MFPT through the origin, so a complete analytical characterization of the system dynamics can be provided. Furthermore, we discuss in detail how the phase transitions observed in random walks with resetting are closely related to several ideas recurrently used in the field of random search theory, in particular, to other mechanisms proposed to understand random search in space as mortal random walks or multiscale random walks. As a whole, we corroborate that one of the essential ingredients behind MFPT minimization lies in the combination of multiple movement scales (regardless of their specific origin).

  6. Phase Transitions in Combinatorial Optimization Problems: Basics, Algorithms and Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Alexander K.; Weigt, Martin

    2005-10-01

    A concise, comprehensive introduction to the topic of statistical physics of combinatorial optimization, bringing together theoretical concepts and algorithms from computer science with analytical methods from physics. The result bridges the gap between statistical physics and combinatorial optimization, investigating problems taken from theoretical computing, such as the vertex-cover problem, with the concepts and methods of theoretical physics. The authors cover rapid developments and analytical methods that are both extremely complex and spread by word-of-mouth, providing all the necessary basics in required detail. Throughout, the algorithms are shown with examples and calculations, while the proofs are given in a way suitable for graduate students, post-docs, and researchers. Ideal for newcomers to this young, multidisciplinary field.

  7. [Optimization of the transition from phase II to III of cardiac rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Keck, M

    2000-04-01

    A decisive element of reliable maintenance of the rehabilitation result achieved by patients undergoing inpatient cardiac rehabilitation has turned out to be comprehensive and successful management of the transition into the outpatient phase. This requires concrete planning and implementation of the concept, to be based on patient-related approaches and including the family physician, relatives, occupational institutions, and local and regional partners such as adult education centres, health insurances, sports clubs, psychological individual care, etc. Problem-orientated planning adapted to the individual requirements and expectations of the patient is of utmost importance. PMID:10832165

  8. New Constraints on ΩM, ΩΛ, and w from an Independent Set of 11 High-Redshift Supernovae Observed with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, R. A.; Aldering, G.; Amanullah, R.; Astier, P.; Blanc, G.; Burns, M. S.; Conley, A.; Deustua, S. E.; Doi, M.; Ellis, R.; Fabbro, S.; Folatelli, G.; Fruchter, A. S.; Garavini, G.; Garmond, S.; Garton, K.; Gibbons, R.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.; Howell, D. A.; Kim, A. G.; Lee, B. C.; Lidman, C.; Mendez, J.; Nobili, S.; Nugent, P. E.; Pain, R.; Panagia, N.; Pennypacker, C. R.; Perlmutter, S.; Quimby, R.; Raux, J.; Regnault, N.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Sainton, G.; Schaefer, B.; Schahmaneche, K.; Smith, E.; Spadafora, A. L.; Stanishev, V.; Sullivan, M.; Walton, N. A.; Wang, L.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yasuda, N.

    2003-11-01

    We report measurements of ΩM, ΩΛ, and w from 11 supernovae (SNe) at z=0.36-0.86 with high-quality light curves measured using WFPC2 on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). This is an independent set of high-redshift SNe that confirms previous SN evidence for an accelerating universe. The high-quality light curves available from photometry on WFPC2 make it possible for these 11 SNe alone to provide measurements of the cosmological parameters comparable in statistical weight to the previous results. Combined with earlier Supernova Cosmology Project data, the new SNe yield a measurement of the mass density ΩM=0.25+0.07-0.06(statistical)+/-0.04 (identified systematics), or equivalently, a cosmological constant of ΩΛ=0.75+0.06-0.07(statistical)+/-0.04 (identified systematics), under the assumptions of a flat universe and that the dark energy equation-of-state parameter has a constant value w=-1. When the SN results are combined with independent flat-universe measurements of ΩM from cosmic microwave background and galaxy redshift distortion data, they provide a measurement of w=-1.05+0.15-0.20(statistical)+/-0.09 (identified systematic), if w is assumed to be constant in time. In addition to high-precision light-curve measurements, the new data offer greatly improved color measurements of the high-redshift SNe and hence improved host galaxy extinction estimates. These extinction measurements show no anomalous negative E(B-V) at high redshift. The precision of the measurements is such that it is possible to perform a host galaxy extinction correction directly for individual SNe without any assumptions or priors on the parent E(B-V) distribution. Our cosmological fits using full extinction corrections confirm that dark energy is required with P(ΩΛ>0)>0.99, a result consistent with previous and current SN analyses that rely on the identification of a low-extinction subset or prior assumptions concerning the intrinsic extinction distribution. Based in part on

  9. Propulsion system-flight control integration and optimization: Flight evaluation and technology transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Frank W., Jr.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Myers, Lawrence P.

    1990-01-01

    Integration of propulsion and flight control systems and their optimization offers significant performance improvements. Research programs were conducted which have developed new propulsion and flight control integration concepts, implemented designs on high-performance airplanes, demonstrated these designs in flight, and measured the performance improvements. These programs, first on the YF-12 airplane, and later on the F-15, demonstrated increased thrust, reduced fuel consumption, increased engine life, and improved airplane performance; with improvements in the 5 to 10 percent range achieved with integration and with no changes to hardware. The design, software and hardware developments, and testing requirements were shown to be practical.

  10. A self-contained, automated methodology for optimal flow control validated for transition delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joslin, Ronald D.; Gunzburger, Max D.; Nicolaides, R. A.; Erlebacher, Gordon; Hussaini, M. Yousuff

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a self-contained, automated methodology for flow control along with a validation of the methodology for the problem of boundary layer instability suppression. The objective of control is to match the stress vector along a portion of the boundary to a given vector; instability suppression is achieved by choosing the given vector to be that of a steady base flow, e.g., Blasius boundary layer. Control is effected through the injection or suction of fluid through a single orifice on the boundary. The present approach couples the time-dependent Navier-Stokes system with an adjoint Navier-Stokes system and optimality conditions from which optimal states, i.e., unsteady flow fields, and control, e.g., actuators, may be determined. The results demonstrate that instability suppression can be achieved without any a priori knowledge of the disturbance, which is significant because other control techniques have required some knowledge of the flow unsteadiness such as frequencies, instability type, etc.

  11. Optimization of the transition path of the head hardening with using the genetic algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, Joanna; Kulawik, Adam

    2016-06-01

    An automated method of choice of the transition path of the head hardening in heat treatment process for the plane steel element is proposed in this communication. This method determines the points on the path of moving heat source using the genetic algorithms. The fitness function of the used algorithm is determined on the basis of effective stresses and yield point depending on the phase composition. The path of the hardening tool and also the area of the heat affected zone is determined on the basis of obtained points. A numerical model of thermal phenomena, phase transformations in the solid state and mechanical phenomena for the hardening process is implemented in order to verify the presented method. A finite element method (FEM) was used for solving the heat transfer equation and getting required temperature fields. The moving heat source is modeled with a Gaussian distribution and the water cooling is also included. The macroscopic model based on the analysis of the CCT and CHT diagrams of the medium-carbon steel is used to determine the phase transformations in the solid state. A finite element method is also used for solving the equilibrium equations giving us the stress field. The thermal and structural strains are taken into account in the constitutive relations.

  12. Optimization of crystal nucleation close to a metastable fluid-fluid phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Wedekind, Jan; Xu, Limei; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Reguera, David; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a metastable fluid-fluid critical point is thought to dramatically influence the crystallization pathway, increasing the nucleation rate by many orders of magnitude over the predictions of classical nucleation theory. We use molecular dynamics simulations to study the kinetics of crystallization in the vicinity of this metastable critical point and throughout the metastable fluid-fluid phase diagram. To quantitatively understand how the fluid-fluid phase separation affects the crystal nucleation, we evaluate accurately the kinetics and reconstruct the thermodynamic free-energy landscape of crystal formation. Contrary to expectations, we find no special advantage of the proximity of the metastable critical point on the crystallization rates. However, we find that the ultrafast formation of a dense liquid phase causes the crystallization to accelerate both near the metastable critical point and almost everywhere below the fluid-fluid spinodal line. These results unveil three different scenarios for crystallization that could guide the optimization of the process in experiments PMID:26095898

  13. Tracing the transition path between optimal strategies combinations within a competitive market of innovative industrial products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, Dimitris F.; Pollalis, Yannis A.

    2012-12-01

    In several cases, a competitive market can be simulated by a game, where each company/opponent is referred to as a player. In order to accommodate the fact that each player (alone or with alliances) is working against some others' interest, the rather conservative maximin criterion is frequently used for selecting the strategy or the combination of strategies that yield the best of the worst possible outcomes for each one of the players. Under this criterion, an optimal solution is obtained when neither player finds it beneficial to alter his strategy, which means that an equilibrium has been achieved, giving also the value of the game. If conditions change as regards a player, e.g., because of either achieving an unexpected successful result in developing an innovative industrial product or obtaining higher liquidity permitting him to increase advertisement in order to acquire a larger market share, then a new equilibrium is reached. The identification of the path between the old and the new equilibrium points may prove to be valuable for investigating the robustness of the solution by means of sensitivity analysis, since uncertainty plays a critical role in this situation, where evaluation of the payoff matrix is usually based on experts' estimates. In this work, the development of a standard methodology (including 16 activity stages and 7 decision nodes) for tracing this path is presented while a numerical implementation follows to prove its functionality.

  14. Optimization of Doppler-free magnetically induced dichroic locking spectroscopy on the 1S0-3P1 transition of a neutral mercury atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongli; Yin, Shiqi; Qian, Jun; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Yuzhu

    2013-04-01

    Doppler-free dichroic locking (DFDL) spectroscopy on the 1S0-3P1 transition of neutral mercury (Hg) atoms is observed in a 5 mm long vapour cell. The performance of the DFDL signal, such as its slope and amplitude, is investigated in detail. The optimal axial magnetic field and cell temperature (optical depth) for the observed seven transitions are also highlighted. We also demonstrate an important application of DFDL spectroscopy in the frequency stabilization of an ultraviolet laser on the transition of 200Hg.

  15. Atomic layer deposition conformality and process optimization: Transitioning from 2-dimensional planar systems to 3-dimensional nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson Cleveland, Erin Darcy

    Conformal coatings are becoming increasingly important as technology heads towards the nanoscale. The exceptional thickness control (atomic scale) and conformality (uniformity over nanoscale 3D features) of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has made it the process of choice for numerous applications found in microelectronics and nanotechnology with a wide variety of ALD processes and resulting materials. While its benefits derive from self-limited saturating surface reactions of alternating gas precursors, process optimization for ALD conformality is often difficult as process parameters, such as dosage, purge, temperature and pressure are often interdependent with one another, especially within the confines of an ultra-high aspect ratio nanopore. Therefore, processes must be optimized to achieve self-limiting saturated surfaces and avoid parasitic CVD-like reactions in order to maintain thickness control and achieve uniformity and conformality at the atomic level while preserving the desired materials' properties (electrical, optical, compositional, etc.). This work investigates novel approaches to optimize ALD conformality when transitioning from a 2D planar system to a 3D ultra-high aspect ratio nanopore in the context of a cross-flow wafer-scale reactor used to highlight deviations from ideal ALD behavior. Porous anodic alumina (PAA) is used as a versatile platform to analyze TiO2 ALD profiles via ex-situ SEM, EDS and TEM. Results of TiO2 ALD illustrate enhanced growth rates that can occur when the precursors titanium tetraisopropoxide and ozone were used at minimal saturation doses for ALD and for considerably higher doses. The results also demonstrate that ALD process recipes that achieve excellent across-wafer uniformity across full 100 mm wafers do not produce conformal films in ultra-high aspect ratio nanopores. The results further demonstrate that conformality is determined by precursor dose, surface residence time, and purge time, creating large depletion

  16. Discovery, Synthesis, and Optimization of Diarylisoxazole-3-carboxamides as Potent Inhibitors of the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sudeshna; Šileikytė, Justina; Schiavone, Marco; Neuenswander, Benjamin; Argenton, Francesco; Aubé, Jeffrey; Hedrick, Michael P.; Chung, Thomas D. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP) is a Ca2+-requiring mega-channel which, under pathological conditions, leads to the deregulated release of Ca2+ and mitochondrial dysfunction, ultimately resulting in cell death. Although the mtPTP is a potential therapeutic target for many human pathologies, its potential as a drug target is currently unrealized. Herein we describe an optimization effort initiated around hit 1, 5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl)isoxazole-3-carboxamide, which was found to possess promising inhibitory activity against mitochondrial swelling (EC50 < 0.39 µm) and showed no interference on the inner mitochondrial membrane potential (rhodamine 123 uptake EC50 > 100 µm). This enabled the construction of a series of picomolar mtPTP inhibitors that also potently increase the calcium retention capacity of the mitochondria. Finally, the therapeutic potential and in vivo efficacy of one of the most potent analogues, N-(3-chloro-2-methylphenyl)-5-(4-fluoro-3-hydroxyphenyl)isoxazole-3-carboxamide (60), was validated in a biologically relevant zebrafish model of collagen VI congenital muscular dystrophies. PMID:26286375

  17. ATAQS: A computational software tool for high throughput transition optimization and validation for selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Since its inception, proteomics has essentially operated in a discovery mode with the goal of identifying and quantifying the maximal number of proteins in a sample. Increasingly, proteomic measurements are also supporting hypothesis-driven studies, in which a predetermined set of proteins is consistently detected and quantified in multiple samples. Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a targeted mass spectrometric technique that supports the detection and quantification of specific proteins in complex samples at high sensitivity and reproducibility. Here, we describe ATAQS, an integrated software platform that supports all stages of targeted, SRM-based proteomics experiments including target selection, transition optimization and post acquisition data analysis. This software will significantly facilitate the use of targeted proteomic techniques and contribute to the generation of highly sensitive, reproducible and complete datasets that are particularly critical for the discovery and validation of targets in hypothesis-driven studies in systems biology. Result We introduce a new open source software pipeline, ATAQS (Automated and Targeted Analysis with Quantitative SRM), which consists of a number of modules that collectively support the SRM assay development workflow for targeted proteomic experiments (project management and generation of protein, peptide and transitions and the validation of peptide detection by SRM). ATAQS provides a flexible pipeline for end-users by allowing the workflow to start or end at any point of the pipeline, and for computational biologists, by enabling the easy extension of java algorithm classes for their own algorithm plug-in or connection via an external web site. This integrated system supports all steps in a SRM-based experiment and provides a user-friendly GUI that can be run by any operating system that allows the installation of the Mozilla Firefox web browser. Conclusions Targeted proteomics via SRM is a powerful

  18. Optimization of magnetostriction, coercive field and magnetic transition temperature in nanocrystalline TbDyFe+Zr/Nb multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, S. F.; Kelsch, M.; Kronmüller, H.

    1999-06-01

    The magnetostrictive properties of TbDyFe/Nb multilayers containing 2 at% Zr as an additive have been investigated after different annealing treatments for the (Terfenol-D near) composition of [Tb 0.27Dy 0.73] 0.27Fe 0.73. The multilayer structure has been produced by ion-beam sputtering on a sapphire substrate. After 10 min annealing of the multilayers at temperatures from 873 to 973 K the parallel magnetostriction increased from λ‖(0.8 T)=265 to 520 ppm accompanied by an increase of the magnetic phase transition temperature from TC=333 to 592 K, while the increase of the coercive fields from μ0Hc<5 to 75 mT lies distinctively below 100 mT. These properties are suitable for applications of giant magnetostrictive films in microsystems where values of λ>500 ppm, TC>500 K and μ0Hc≪100 mT are required. Establishing a nanocrystalline microstructure with grain sizes d< dc˜15 nm ( dc is the critical grain diameter) smaller than the exchange length is essential for the combination of intrinsic magnetic properties (increased λ and TC) with soft magnetic properties ( μ0Hc of a few mT) as typical for an amorphous microstructure. It is shown by microstructural XRD and TEM investigations that such a nanocrystalline microstructure can be realized by a suitable heat treatment of TbDyFe+Zr/Nb multilayers. Introducing Nb spacer layers effectively reduces grain growth for certain annealing temperatures while Zr is assumed to play a dominant role in forming nucleation centers of nanograins. In combination, both effects can be well used to optimize the magnetostrictive layer properties.

  19. Economical Speed and Energetically Optimal Transition Speed Evaluated by Gross and Net Oxygen Cost of Transport at Different Gradients

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Daijiro; Fukuoka, Yoshiyuki; Horiuchi, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    The oxygen cost of transport per unit distance (CoT; mL·kg-1·km-1) shows a U-shaped curve as a function of walking speed (v), which includes a particular walking speed minimizing the CoT, so called economical speed (ES). The CoT-v relationship in running is approximately linear. These distinctive walking and running CoT-v relationships give an intersection between U-shaped and linear CoT relationships, termed the energetically optimal transition speed (EOTS). This study investigated the effects of subtracting the standing oxygen cost for calculating the CoT and its relevant effects on the ES and EOTS at the level and gradient slopes (±5%) in eleven male trained athletes. The percent effects of subtracting the standing oxygen cost (4.8 ± 0.4 mL·kg-1·min-1) on the CoT were significantly greater as the walking speed was slower, but it was not significant at faster running speeds over 9.4 km·h-1. The percent effect was significantly dependent on the gradient (downhill > level > uphill, P < 0.001). The net ES (level 4.09 ± 0.31, uphill 4.22 ± 0.37, and downhill 4.16 ± 0.44 km·h-1) was approximately 20% slower than the gross ES (level 5.15 ± 0.18, uphill 5.27 ± 0.20, and downhill 5.37 ± 0.22 km·h-1, P < 0.001). Both net and gross ES were not significantly dependent on the gradient. In contrast, the gross EOTS was slower than the net EOTS at the level (7.49 ± 0.32 vs. 7.63 ± 0.36 km·h-1, P = 0.003) and downhill gradients (7.78 ± 0.33 vs. 8.01 ± 0.41 km·h-1, P < 0.001), but not at the uphill gradient (7.55 ± 0.37 vs. 7.63 ± 0.51 km·h-1, P = 0.080). Note that those percent differences were less than 2.9%. Given these results, a subtraction of the standing oxygen cost should be carefully considered depending on the purpose of each study. PMID:26383249

  20. Palliative treatment for in-transit cutaneous metastases of Merkel cell carcinoma using surface-mold computer-optimized high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Garibyan, Lilit; Cotter, Shane E; Hansen, Jorgen L; Noell, Claire; Dorosario, Andrew; O’Farrell, Desmond A; Devlin, Phillip M; Wang, Linda C

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the palliative treatment benefit of surface-mold computer-optimized high-dose-rate brachytherapy (SMBT) for in-transit cutaneous metastases of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). PATIENTS & METHODS Tenpatients with in-transit cutaneous MCC metastases were treated with SMBT at the Dana-Farber/Brigham & Women’s Cancer Center (DFBWCC) between 2006 and 2012. RESULTS The median age at diagnosis was 76 years (range 63–87 years). Seven patients had in-transit metastases on the lower extremities (70%), 2 patients on the head & neck (20%), and 1 patient on an upper extremity (10%). A total of 152 metastatic MCC lesions were treated with SMBT. All SMBT treated lesions resolved clinically within a few weeks of therapy. The median follow-up was 34 months (range 22–85 months). Two of 152 treated lesions recurred during the study period for a local control rate of 99%. Eight patients (80%) developed additional in-transit metastases outside the original SMBT fields. Five of these 8 patients underwent additional SMBT. At study conclusion, 3 patients (30%) are alive without disease, 3 patients (30%) are alive with disease, and 4 patients (40%) died of MCC. DISCUSSION SMBT offers effective and durable palliation for cutaneous metastases of MCC, although it does not appear to alter disease course. PMID:23867506

  1. SANS study of vortex lattice structural transition in optimally doped (Ba1-x K x )Fe2As2.

    PubMed

    Demirdiş, S; van der Beek, C J; Mühlbauer, S; Su, Y; Wolf, Th

    2016-10-26

    Small-angle neutron scattering on high quality single crystalline Ba1-x K x Fe2As2 reveals the transition from a low-field vortex solid phase with orientational order to a vortex polycrystal at high magnetic field. The vortex order-disorder transition is correlated with the second-peak feature in isothermal hysteresis loops, and is interpreted in terms of the generation of supplementary vortex solid dislocations. The sharp drop of the structure factor above the second peak field is explained by the dynamics of freezing of the vortex ensemble in the high field phase. PMID:27541966

  2. Optimization of the GAFF force field to describe liquid crystal molecules: the path to a dramatic improvement in transition temperature predictions.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Nicola Jane; Wilson, Mark R

    2015-10-14

    The physical properties and phase transitions of thermotropic liquid crystals are highly sensitive to small changes in chemical structure. However, these changes are challenging to model, as both the phase diagram and mesophase properties obtained from fully atomistic simulations are strongly dependent on the force field model employed, and the current generation of chemical force fields has not proved accurate enough to provide reliable predictions of transition temperatures for many liquid crystals. This paper presents a strategy for improving the nematic clearing point, TNI, in atomistic simulations, by systematic optimization of the General Amber Force Field (GAFF) for key mesogenic fragments. We show that with careful optimization of the parameters describing a series of liquid crystal fragment molecules, it is possible to transfer these parameters to larger liquid crystal molecules and make accurate predictions for nematic mesophase formation. This new force field, GAFF-LCFF, is used to predict the nematic-isotropic clearing point to within 5 °C for the nematogen 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid,1,3-bis(4-butylphenyl)ester, an improvement of 60 °C over the standard GAFF force field. PMID:26343382

  3. Optimization of film synthesized rare earth transition metal permanent magnet systems. Progress report, August 1, 1991--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cadieu, F.J.

    1992-08-01

    Progress is reported in three areas: high coercivity Sm-Fe-Ti-V, Sm-Fe-Zr, and two element Sm-Fe Sm{sub 5}(Fe,T){sub 17} type crystalline phases; ThMn{sub 12} type pseudobinary SmFe{sub 12-x}T{sub x}(0{le}{times}{le}1.5); and sputter process control for the synthesis of precisely textured rare earth-transition metal magnetic films. (DLC)

  4. In silico optimization of phase-change materials for digital memories: a survey of first-row transition-metal dopants for Ge₂Sb₂Te₅.

    PubMed

    Skelton, J M; Elliott, S R

    2013-05-22

    Phase-change materials are the alloys at the heart of an emerging class of next-generation, non-volatile digital memory technologies. However, the widely studied Ge-Sb-Te system possesses several undesirable properties, and enhancing its properties, e.g. by doping, is an area of active research. Various first-row transition-metal dopants have been shown to impart useful property enhancements, but a systematic study of the entire period has yet to be undertaken, and little has been done to investigate their interaction with the host material at the atomic level. We have carried out first-principles computer simulations of the complete phase-change cycle in Ge2Sb2Te5 doped with each of the ten first-row transition metals. In this article, we present a comprehensive survey of the electronic, magnetic and optical properties of these doped materials. We discuss in detail their atomic-level structure, and relate the microscopic behaviours of the dopant atoms to their influence on the Ge2Sb2Te5 host. By considering an entire family of similar materials, we identify trends and patterns which might be used to predict suitable dopants for optimizing materials for specific phase-change applications. The computational method employed here is general, and this materials-discovery approach could be applied in the future to study other families of potential dopants for such materials. PMID:23628772

  5. β- transitions of 16 7N9 → 16 8O8 with optimized SDI residual interaction using pnTDA and TDA approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavani, M. R.; Firoozi, B.

    2015-11-01

    Within a developed particle-hole approach, a systematic study of the β- transition from the ground state of the 16N nucleus to the ground and some exited states of the 16O nucleus has been carried out. The energy spectrum and the wave functions of pure configuration of the 16N and 16O nuclei are numerically obtained using the mean-field shell model with respect to the Woods-Saxon nuclear potential accompanying spin-orbit and Coulomb interaction. Considering SDI residual interaction, mixed configuration of ground and excited pnTDA and TDA states are extracted for the aforementioned nucleus. These energy spectra and corresponding eigenstates are highly correspondent to the experimental energy spectrum and eigenstates after adjusting the residual potential parameters using the Nelder-Mead (NM) algorithm. In this approach, the endpoint energy, log ft and the partial half-lives of some possible transitions are calculated. The obtained results using the optimized SDI approach are reasonably close to the available experimental data.

  6. Optimally combined confidence limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janot, P.; Le Diberder, F.

    1998-02-01

    An analytical and optimal procedure to combine statistically independent sets of confidence levels on a quantity is presented. This procedure does not impose any constraint on the methods followed by each analysis to derive its own limit. It incorporates the a priori statistical power of each of the analyses to be combined, in order to optimize the overall sensitivity. It can, in particular, be used to combine the mass limits obtained by several analyses searching for the Higgs boson in different decay channels, with different selection efficiencies, mass resolution and expected background. It can also be used to combine the mass limits obtained by several experiments (e.g. ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at LEP 2) independently of the method followed by each of these experiments to derive their own limit. A method to derive the limit set by one analysis is also presented, along with an unbiased prescription to optimize the expected mass limit in the no-signal-hypothesis.

  7. Flux noise due to magnetic impurities in superconducting circuits: Optimal spin texture and role of phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Rogério

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) and other superconducting circuits are limited by intrinsic flux noise with spectral density 1 /fα with α < 1 whose origin is believed to be due to spin impurities. We present a theory of flux noise in the presence of phase transitions and arbitrary spin textures in the impurity spin system. At higher temperatures we find that the spin-spin correlation length scale (describing, e.g., the average size of ferromagnetic spin clusters) greatly impacts the scaling of flux noise with wire geometry. At lower temperatures we find that flux noise is quite sensitive to the particular spin texture realized by the spin system ground state. Remarkably, we show that flux-noise is exactly equal to zero when the spins form a poloidal texture. Flux noise is nonzero for other spin textures, but gets reduced in the presence of correlated ferromagnetic fluctuations between the top and bottom wire surfaces, where the flux vectors are antiparallel. This demonstrates the idea of engineering spin textures and/or intersurface correlation as a method to reduce flux noise in superconducting circuits. This research was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (RGPIN/342982-2010, EGP/429649-2012) through its Discovery and Engage programs.

  8. Integrated Network Decompositions and Dynamic Programming for Graph Optimization (INDDGO)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-05-31

    The INDDGO software package offers a set of tools for finding exact solutions to graph optimization problems via tree decompositions and dynamic programming algorithms. Currently the framework offers serial and parallel (distributed memory) algorithms for finding tree decompositions and solving the maximum weighted independent set problem. The parallel dynamic programming algorithm is implemented on top of the MADNESS task-based runtime.

  9. Optimization on magnetic transitions and magnetostriction in TbxDyyNdz(Fe0.9Co0.1)1.93 compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, C. C.; Shi, Y. G.; Shi, D. N.; Zhou, X. G.; Fan, J. Y.; Lv, L. Y.; Tang, S. L.

    2013-10-01

    The structure, magnetic transitions, and magnetostriction of TbxDyyNdz(Fe0.9Co0.1)1.93 polycrystalline compounds have been investigated, with the ratio of x, y, and z spanning the line of minimum magnetic anisotropy. Anisotropy compensation with lower Tb content was realized in Tb0.253Dy0.657Nd0.09(Fe0.9Co0.1)1.93 compound. The spin configuration diagram accompanied with different crystal structures was constructed to illustrate the arrangement for the easy magnetization direction and crystal structure. An optimized effect on magnetostriction especially at the relatively low field of 1 kOe (197 ppm) was observed in Tb0.253Dy0.657Nd0.09(Fe0.9Co0.1)1.93 compound, which is about two times larger than that of the sample free of Nd (62 ppm). Meanwhile, the polycrystalline saturation magnetostriction (λs=945 ppm) of Tb0.253Dy0.657Nd0.09(Fe0.9Co0.1)1.93 is even much larger than that of the Ho-doped multicomponent single crystal compound Tb0.2Dy0.22Ho0.58Fe2 (λs=530 ppm). Low content of heavy rare earth Tb, high Curie temperature, and large ratio between magnetostriction and the absolute value of the first anisotropy constant λa/|K1| were obtained in Tb0.253Dy0.657Nd0.09(Fe0.9Co0.1)1.93 compound, which may make it a potential material for magnetostrictive application.

  10. PyTransit: Transit light curve modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Hannu

    2015-05-01

    PyTransit implements optimized versions of the Giménez and Mandel & Agol transit models for exoplanet transit light-curves. The two models are implemented natively in Fortran with OpenMP parallelization, and are accessed by an object-oriented python interface. PyTransit facilitates the analysis of photometric time series of exoplanet transits consisting of hundreds of thousands of data points, and of multipassband transit light curves from spectrophotometric observations. It offers efficient model evaluation for multicolour observations and transmission spectroscopy, built-in supersampling to account for extended exposure times, and routines to calculate the projected planet-to-star distance for circular and eccentric orbits, transit durations, and more.

  11. Parallel Algorithms for Graph Optimization using Tree Decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Weerapurage, Dinesh P; Sullivan, Blair D; Groer, Christopher S

    2013-01-01

    Although many NP-hard graph optimization problems can be solved in polynomial time on graphs of bounded tree-width, the adoption of these techniques into mainstream scientific computation has been limited due to the high memory requirements of required dynamic programming tables and excessive running times of sequential implementations. This work addresses both challenges by proposing a set of new parallel algorithms for all steps of a tree-decomposition based approach to solve maximum weighted independent set. A hybrid OpenMP/MPI implementation includes a highly scalable parallel dynamic programming algorithm leveraging the MADNESS task-based runtime, and computational results demonstrate scaling. This work enables a significant expansion of the scale of graphs on which exact solutions to maximum weighted independent set can be obtained, and forms a framework for solving additional graph optimization problems with similar techniques.

  12. Parallel Algorithms for Graph Optimization using Tree Decompositions

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Blair D; Weerapurage, Dinesh P; Groer, Christopher S

    2012-06-01

    Although many $\\cal{NP}$-hard graph optimization problems can be solved in polynomial time on graphs of bounded tree-width, the adoption of these techniques into mainstream scientific computation has been limited due to the high memory requirements of the necessary dynamic programming tables and excessive runtimes of sequential implementations. This work addresses both challenges by proposing a set of new parallel algorithms for all steps of a tree decomposition-based approach to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem. A hybrid OpenMP/MPI implementation includes a highly scalable parallel dynamic programming algorithm leveraging the MADNESS task-based runtime, and computational results demonstrate scaling. This work enables a significant expansion of the scale of graphs on which exact solutions to maximum weighted independent set can be obtained, and forms a framework for solving additional graph optimization problems with similar techniques.

  13. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  14. Structural and magnetic phase transitions near optimal superconductivity in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ding; Lu, Xingye; Zhang, Wenliang; Luo, Huiqian; Li, Shiliang; Wang, Peipei; Chen, Genfu; Han, Fei; Banjara, Shree R.; Sapkota, A.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.; Yamani, Z.; Niedermayer, Christof; Skoulatos, Markos; Georgii, Robert; Keller, T.; Wang, Pengshuai; Yu, Weiqiang; Dai, Pengcheng

    2015-04-17

    In this study, we use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high-resolution x-ray and neutron scattering to study structural and magnetic phase transitions in phosphorus-doped BaFe2(As1-xPx)2. Thus, previous transport, NMR, specific heat, and magnetic penetration depth measurements have provided compelling evidence for the presence of a quantum critical point (QCP) near optimal superconductivity at x = 0.3. However, we show that the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic structural (Ts) and paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic (AF, TN) transitions in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 are always coupled and approach to TN ≈ Ts ≥ Tc (≈ 29 K) for x = 0.29 before vanishing abruptly for x ≥ 0.3. These results suggest that AF order in BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 disappears in a weakly first order fashion near optimal superconductivity, much like the electron-doped iron pnictides with an avoided QCP.

  15. Transition Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Statfeld, Jenna L.

    2011-01-01

    Post-school transition is the movement of a child with disabilities from school to activities that occur after the completion of school. This paper provides information about: (1) post-school transition; (2) transition plan; (3) transition services; (4) transition planning; (5) vocational rehabilitation services; (6) services that are available…

  16. Transitioning from CRD to CDRD in Bayesian retrieval of rainfall from satellite passive microwave measurements: Part 3 - Identification of optimal meteorological tags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. A.; Leung, H. W.-Y.; Elsner, J. B.; Mehta, A. V.; Tripoli, G. J.; Casella, D.; Dietrich, S.; Mugnai, A.; Panegrossi, G.; Sanò, P.

    2013-05-01

    In the first two parts of this study we have presented a performance analysis of our new Cloud Dynamics and Radiation Database (CDRD) satellite precipitation retrieval algorithm on various convective and stratiform rainfall case studies verified with precision radar ground truth data, and an exposition of the algorithm's detailed design in conjunction with a proof-of-concept analysis vis-à-vis its theoretical underpinnings. In this third part of the study, we present the underlying analysis used to identify what we refer to as the optimal metrological and geophysical tags, which are the optimally effective atmospheric and geographic parameters that are used to refine the selection of candidate microphysical profiles used for the Bayesian retrieval. These tags enable extending beyond the conventional Cloud Radiation Database (CRD) algorithm by invoking meteorological-geophysical guidance, drawn from a simulated database, which affect and are in congruence with the observed precipitation states. This is guidance beyond the restrictive control provided by only simulated radiative transfer equation (RTE) model-derived database brightness temperature (TB) vector proximity information in seeking to relate physically consistent precipitation profile solutions to individual satellite-observed TB vectors. The first two parts of the study have rigorously demonstrated that the optimal tags effectively mitigate against solution ambiguity, where use of only a CRD framework (TB guidance only) leads to pervasive non-uniqueness problems in finding rainfall solutions. Alternatively, a CDRD framework (TB + tag guidance) mitigates against non-uniqueness problems through improved constraints. It remains to show how these optimal tags are identified. By use of three statistical analysis procedures applied to a database from 120 North American atmospheric simulations of precipitating storms (independent of the 60 simulations for the European-Mediterranean basin region used in the Parts

  17. Improved metal-insulator-transition characteristics of ultrathin VO{sub 2} epitaxial films by optimized surface preparation of rutile TiO{sub 2} substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, Koen; Aetukuri, Nagaphani; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2014-02-24

    Key to the growth of epitaxial, atomically thin films is the preparation of the substrates on which they are deposited. Here, we report the growth of atomically smooth, ultrathin films of VO{sub 2} (001), only ∼2 nm thick, which exhibit pronounced metal-insulator transitions, with a change in resistivity of ∼500 times, at a temperature that is close to that of films five times thicker. These films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition on single crystalline TiO{sub 2}(001) substrates that were treated by dipping in acetone, HCl and HF in successive order, followed by an anneal at 700–750  °C in flowing oxygen. This pretreatment removes surface contaminants, TiO{sub 2} defects, and provides a terraced, atomically smooth surface.

  18. Optimal search strategies on complex multi-linked networks

    PubMed Central

    Di Patti, Francesca; Fanelli, Duccio; Piazza, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of optimal search strategies on multi-linked networks, i.e. graphs whose nodes are endowed with several independent sets of links. We focus preliminarily on agents randomly hopping along the links of a graph, with the additional possibility of performing non-local hops to randomly chosen nodes with a given probability. We show that an optimal combination of the two jump rules exists that maximises the efficiency of target search, the optimum reflecting the topology of the network. We then generalize our results to multi-linked networks with an arbitrary number of mutually interfering link sets. PMID:25950716

  19. Network Observability Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Wang, Jianhui; Motter, Adilson E.

    2012-12-01

    In the modeling, monitoring, and control of complex networks, a fundamental problem concerns the comprehensive determination of the state of the system from limited measurements. Using power grids as example networks, we show that this problem leads to a new type of percolation transition, here termed a network observability transition, which we solve analytically for the configuration model. We also demonstrate a dual role of the network’s community structure, which both facilitates optimal measurement placement and renders the networks substantially more sensitive to “observability attacks.” Aside from their immediate implications for the development of smart grids, these results provide insights into decentralized biological, social, and technological networks.

  20. Optimization using Extremal Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan

    2001-03-01

    We explore a new heuristic for finding high-quality solutions to NP-hard optimization problems which we have recently introduced [see ``Nature's Way of Optimizing," Artificial Intelligence 119, 275-286 (2000) and cond-mat/0010337]. The method, called extremal optimization, is inspired by self-organized criticality, a concept introduced to describe emergent complexity in physical systems. Extremal optimization successively replaces extremely undesirable elements of a single sub-optimal solution with new, random ones. Large fluctuations ensue that efficiently explore many local optima. With only one adjustable parameter, its performance has proved competitive with more elaborate methods, especially near phase transitions which are believed to contain the hardest instances. In particular, extremal optimization is superior to simulated annealing in the partitioning of sparse graphs, it finds the overlap of all ground-states at the phase transition of the 3-coloring problem, and it provides independent confirmation for the ground-state energy of spin glasses, previously obtained with elaborate genetic algorithms.

  1. Models for transition clinics.

    PubMed

    Carrizosa, Jaime; An, Isabelle; Appleton, Richard; Camfield, Peter; Von Moers, Arpad

    2014-08-01

    Transition is a purposeful, planned process that addresses the medical, psychosocial, educational, and vocational needs of adolescents and young adults with chronic medical conditions, as they advance from a pediatric and family-centered to an adult, individual focused health care provider. This article describes some of the models for transition clinics or services for epilepsy in five countries (Canada, France, Colombia, Germany, and the United Kingdom). These models include joint adult and pediatric clinics, algorithm-driven service, and a check list system in the context of pediatric care. Evaluation of these models is limited, and it is not possible to choose an optimal program. The attitude and motivation of health care providers may be the most important elements. PMID:25209087

  2. Metric transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This report describes NASA's metric transition in terms of seven major program elements. Six are technical areas involving research, technology development, and operations; they are managed by specific Program Offices at NASA Headquarters. The final program element, Institutional Management, covers both NASA-wide functional management under control of NASA Headquarters and metric capability development at the individual NASA Field Installations. This area addresses issues common to all NASA program elements, including: Federal, state, and local coordination; standards; private industry initiatives; public-awareness initiatives; and employee training. The concluding section identifies current barriers and impediments to metric transition; NASA has no specific recommendations for consideration by the Congress.

  3. Dynamic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laird, Philip

    1992-01-01

    We distinguish static and dynamic optimization of programs: whereas static optimization modifies a program before runtime and is based only on its syntactical structure, dynamic optimization is based on the statistical properties of the input source and examples of program execution. Explanation-based generalization is a commonly used dynamic optimization method, but its effectiveness as a speedup-learning method is limited, in part because it fails to separate the learning process from the program transformation process. This paper describes a dynamic optimization technique called a learn-optimize cycle that first uses a learning element to uncover predictable patterns in the program execution and then uses an optimization algorithm to map these patterns into beneficial transformations. The technique has been used successfully for dynamic optimization of pure Prolog.

  4. [Humanitarian transition].

    PubMed

    Mattei, Jean-François; Troit, Virginie

    2016-02-01

    In two centuries, modern humanitarian action has experienced several fractures often linked to crises. Although its professionalism and intervention force remain indisputable, it faces, since the 2000s, a new context that limits its ability to act and confronts it with new dilemmas, even though it must deal with needs for aid of unprecedented scale. These difficulties reveal a humanitarian transition period that was not anticipated. This transition period reflects the change from a dominant paradigm of North-South solidarity of Western origin to a much more complex model. This article provides a summary of the current mutations that are dominated by the States' assertion of sovereignty. Among the possible solutions, it argues for an ethical approach and a better integration of the research carried out in the Global South, prerequisites for building a true partnership and placing the victims at the heart of the operations which involve them. PMID:26936180

  5. Eliminating Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallick, Barb; Lee, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Adults often find themselves transitioning from one activity to another in a short time span. Most of the time, they do not feel they have a lot of control over their schedules, but wish that they could carve out extended time to relax and focus on one project. Picture a group of children in the block area who have spent 15 or 20 minutes building…

  6. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009)], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects. PMID:25375546

  7. Edge orientation for optimizing controllability of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yan-Dong; Lao, Song-Yang; Hou, Lv-Lin; Bai, Liang

    2014-10-01

    Recently, as the controllability of complex networks attracts much attention, how to design and optimize the controllability of networks has become a common and urgent problem in the field of controlling complex networks. Previous work focused on the structural perturbation and neglected the role of edge direction to optimize the network controllability. In a recent work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 228702 (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.103.228702], the authors proposed a simple method to enhance the synchronizability of networks by assignment of link direction while keeping network topology unchanged. However, the controllability is fundamentally different from synchronization. In this work, we systematically propose the definition of assigning direction to optimize controllability, which is called the edge orientation for optimal controllability problem (EOOC). To solve the EOOC problem, we construct a switching network and transfer the EOOC problem to find the maximum independent set of the switching network. We prove that the principle of our optimization method meets the sense of unambiguity and optimum simultaneously. Furthermore, the relationship between the degree-degree correlations and EOOC are investigated by experiments. The results show that the disassortativity pattern could weaken the orientation for optimal controllability, while the assortativity pattern has no correlation with EOOC. All the experimental results of this work verify that the network structure determines the network controllability and the optimization effects.

  8. Dynamo Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, M. K.; Yadav, R.; Chandra, M.; Paul, S.; Wahi, P.

    2010-11-23

    In this article we review the experimental and numerical results related to the dynamo transitions. Recent experiments of Von Karman Sodium (VKS) exhibit various dynamo states including constant, time-periodic, and chaotic magnetic fields. Similarly pseudospectral simulations of dynamo show constant, time-periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic magnetic field configurations. One of the windows for the magnetic Prandtl number of unity shows period doubling route to chaos. Quasiperiodic route to chaos has been reported for the Prandtl number of 0.5. The dynamo simulations also reveal coexisting multiple attractors that were obtained for different initial conditions.

  9. Ultramaneuverable steering control algorithms for terrain transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrie, Mel W.; Koch, Ralf; Bahl, Vikas; Cripps, Don

    1999-07-01

    The Center for Self-Organizing and Intelligent Systems has built several vehicles with ultra-maneuverable steering capability. Each drive wheel on the vehicle can be independently set at any angle with respect to the vehicle body and the vehicles can rotate or translate in any direction. The vehicles are expected to operate on a wide range of terrain surfaces and problems arise in effectively controlling changes in wheel steering angles as the vehicle transitions from one extreme running surface to another. Controllers developed for smooth surfaces may not perform well on rough or 'sticky' surfaces and vice versa. The approach presented involves the development of a model of the steering motor with the static and viscous friction of the steering motor load included. The model parameters are then identified through a series of environmental tests using a vehicle wheel assembly and the model thus obtained is used for control law development. Four different robust controllers were developed and evaluated through simulation and vehicle testing. The findings of this development will be presented.

  10. Planetary transits and stellar variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigrain, Suzanne

    2005-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the detection of extrasolar planets via the transit method, and more specifically addresses issues relevant to the preparation of upcoming space missions such as CoRoT, Kepler, Eddington, aiming to detect terrestrial planets. The automated detection of transits in tens of thousands of noisy light curves is a challenging task because of the brief, shallow and rare nature of the sought-after signal. I developed a Bayesian transit detection algorithm and tested it through Monte Carlo simulations. This led to a number of improvements to the algorithm, resulting in a maximum likelihood box-fitting approach that is simpler and, for detection purposes, more effective. I also developed an empirical model of the intrinsic micro-variability of the parent stars, which constitutes one of the main performance limitations for space-based transit searches, and used this model to optimise variability filters. These tools were used to identify optimal regions of the stellar parameter space to be targeted by missions such as CoRoT and Eddington, through Monte Carlo simulations and participation in the first CoRoT blind transit detection exercise. Recently, the same tools have been used to analyse ground-based data from the University of New South Wales planet search project, leading to the identification of several potential transiting planet candidates.

  11. Dispositional Optimism

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Charles S.; Scheier, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Optimism is a cognitive construct (expectancies regarding future outcomes) that also relates to motivation: optimistic people exert effort, whereas pessimistic people disengage from effort. Study of optimism began largely in health contexts, finding positive associations between optimism and markers of better psychological and physical health. Physical health effects likely occur through differences in both health-promoting behaviors and physiological concomitants of coping. Recently, the scientific study of optimism has extended to the realm of social relations: new evidence indicates that optimists have better social connections, partly because they work harder at them. In this review, we examine the myriad ways this trait can benefit an individual, and our current understanding of the biological basis of optimism. PMID:24630971

  12. Diabetes in the Adolescent: Transitional Issues

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Sarah K.; Libman, Ingrid M.

    2013-01-01

    Content: Orchestrating a seamless transition from pediatric to adult care can be a daunting task in caring for youth with diabetes mellitus. This clinical review focuses on physical and psychosocial aspects affecting the care of adolescents and young adults with diabetes, evaluates how these aspects can be barriers in the process of transitioning these patients to adult diabetes care, and provides clinical approaches to optimizing the transition process in order to improve diabetes care and outcomes. Evidence Acquisition and Synthesis: A PubMed search identified articles related to transition to adult diabetes care and physical and psychosocial assessment of adolescents with diabetes. An Internet search for transition of diabetes care identified online transition resources. The synthesis relied on the cumulative experience of the authors. We identify barriers to successful transition and provide a checklist for streamlining the process. Conclusions: Key points in the transition to adult diabetes care include: 1) starting the process at least 1 year before the anticipated transition; 2) assessing individual patients' readiness and preparedness for adult care; 3) providing guidance and education to the patient and family; 4) utilizing transition guides and resources; and 5) maintaining open lines of communication between the pediatric and adult providers. No current single approach is effective for all patients. Challenges remain in successful transition to avoid short- and long-term complications of diabetes mellitus. PMID:24152689

  13. OPTIMIZING THROUGH CO-EVOLUTIONARY AVALANCHES

    SciTech Connect

    S. BOETTCHER; A. PERCUS

    2000-08-01

    We explore a new general-purpose heuristic for finding high-quality solutions to hard optimization problems. The method, called extremal optimization, is inspired by ''self-organized critically,'' a concept introduced to describe emergent complexity in many physical systems. In contrast to Genetic Algorithms which operate on an entire ''gene-pool'' of possible solutions, extremal optimization successively replaces extremely undesirable elements of a sub-optimal solution with new, random ones. Large fluctuations, called ''avalanches,'' ensue that efficiently explore many local optima. Drawing upon models used to simulate far-from-equilibrium dynamics, extremal optimization complements approximation methods inspired by equilibrium statistical physics, such as simulated annealing. With only one adjustable parameter, its performance has proved competitive with more elaborate methods, especially near phase transitions. Those phase transitions are found in the parameter space of most optimization problems, and have recently been conjectured to be the origin of some of the hardest instances in computational complexity. We will demonstrate how extremal optimization can be implemented for a variety of combinatorial optimization problems. We believe that extremal optimization will be a useful tool in the investigation of phase transitions in combinatorial optimization problems, hence valuable in elucidating the origin of computational complexity.

  14. Nonconvex optimization and jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallus, Yoav

    Recent work on the jamming transition of particles with short-range interactions has drawn connections with models based on minimization problems with linear inequality constraints and a concave objective. These properties reduce the continuous optimization problem to a discrete search among the corners of the feasible polytope. I will discuss results from simulations of models with and without quenched disorder, exhibiting critical power laws, scaling collapse, and protocol dependence. These models are also well-suited for study using tools of algebraic topology, which I will discuss briefly. Supported by an Omidyar Fellowship at the Santa Fe Institute.

  15. Optimized hydrogen piston engines

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.R.

    1994-05-10

    Hydrogen piston engines can be simultaneously optimized for improved thermal efficiency and for extremely low emissions. Using these engines in constant-speed, constant-load systems such as series hybrid-electric automobiles or home cogeneration systems can result in significantly improved energy efficiency. For the same electrical energy produced, the emissions from such engines can be comparable to those from natural gas-fired steam power plants. These hydrogen-fueled high-efficiency, low-emission (HELE) engines are a mechanical equivalent of hydrogen fuel cells. HELE engines could facilitate the transition to a hydrogen fuel cell economy using near-term technology.

  16. Distributed Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macready, William; Wolpert, David

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate a new framework for analyzing and controlling distributed systems, by solving constrained optimization problems with an algorithm based on that framework. The framework is ar. information-theoretic extension of conventional full-rationality game theory to allow bounded rational agents. The associated optimization algorithm is a game in which agents control the variables of the optimization problem. They do this by jointly minimizing a Lagrangian of (the probability distribution of) their joint state. The updating of the Lagrange parameters in that Lagrangian is a form of automated annealing, one that focuses the multi-agent system on the optimal pure strategy. We present computer experiments for the k-sat constraint satisfaction problem and for unconstrained minimization of NK functions.

  17. TRADES: TRAnsits and Dynamics of Exoplanetary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsato, Luca

    2016-01-01

    TRADES (TRAnsits and Dynamics of Exoplanetary Systems) simultaneously fits observed radial velocities and transit times data to determine the orbital parameters of exoplanetary systems from observational data. It uses a dynamical simulator for N-body systems that also fits the available data during the orbital integration and determines the best combination of the orbital parameters using grid search, χ2 minimization, genetic algorithms, particle swarm optimization, and bootstrap analysis.

  18. Measurement-assisted Landau-Zener transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechen, Alexander; Trushechkin, Anton

    2015-05-01

    Nonselective quantum measurements, i.e., measurements without reading the results, are often considered as a resource for manipulating quantum systems. In this work, we investigate optimal acceleration of the Landau-Zener (LZ) transitions by nonselective quantum measurements. We use the measurements of a population of a diabatic state of the LZ system at certain time instants as control and find the optimal time instants which maximize the LZ transition. We find surprising nonmonotonic behavior of the maximal transition probability with increase of the coupling parameter when the number of measurements is large. This transition probability gives an optimal approximation to the fundamental quantum Zeno effect (which corresponds to continuous measurements) by a fixed number of discrete measurements. The difficulty for the analysis is that the transition probability as a function of time instants has a huge number of local maxima. We resolve this problem both analytically by asymptotic analysis and numerically by the development of efficient algorithms mainly based on the dynamic programming. The proposed numerical methods can be applied, besides this problem, to a wide class of measurement-based optimal control problems.

  19. Embrittlement and conditions of the optimization of magnetic properties in the amorphous alloy Co69Fe3.7Cr3.8Si12.5B11 in the absence of a viscous-brittle transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil'nikov, P. S.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of the holding time upon annealing on the temperature of the viscous-brittle transition (temperature of embrittlement) T f in a cobalt-based amorphous alloy of the composition Co69Fe3.7Cr3.8Si12.5B11 with a very low saturation magnetostriction λs (<10-7) has been studied. It has been established that the dependence of the embrittlement temperature T f on the of time of holding t a can be described by an Arrhenius equation and that the embrittlement at the annealing temperatures above and below 300°C is described by different kinetic parameters. In the alloy under study, irrespective of the holding time, embrittlement occurs in a very narrow range of annealing temperatures, which does not exceed 5 K. Based on the experimental data on the evolution of the hysteresis magnetic properties upon the isochronous annealings and upon the isothermal holding, the regime of heat treatment that ensures a very high (about 50000) magnitude of the permeability µ5 ( H = 5 mOe, f = 1 kHz) without the transition of the alloy into a brittle state has been determined.

  20. Transitions: A Personal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Ann Stace

    1995-01-01

    Distinguishes between unchosen transitions (children maturing and leaving, parents aging, companies downsizing) and chosen ones (moving, divorce, marriage, career changes). Describes the steps one goes through: uneasiness, renewed energy, complaining, exploration, partial transition, and the completed transition. (JOW)

  1. Optimal Protocols and Optimal Transport in Stochastic Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, Erik; Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    Thermodynamics of small systems has become an important field of statistical physics. Such systems are driven out of equilibrium by a control, and the question is naturally posed how such a control can be optimized. We show that optimization problems in small system thermodynamics are solved by (deterministic) optimal transport, for which very efficient numerical methods have been developed, and of which there are applications in cosmology, fluid mechanics, logistics, and many other fields. We show, in particular, that minimizing expected heat released or work done during a nonequilibrium transition in finite time is solved by the Burgers equation and mass transport by the Burgers velocity field. Our contribution hence considerably extends the range of solvable optimization problems in small system thermodynamics.

  2. Prospective Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Poizner, Howard; Lynch, Gary; Gepshtein, Sergei; Greenspan, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    Human performance approaches that of an ideal observer and optimal actor in some perceptual and motor tasks. These optimal abilities depend on the capacity of the cerebral cortex to store an immense amount of information and to flexibly make rapid decisions. However, behavior only approaches these limits after a long period of learning while the cerebral cortex interacts with the basal ganglia, an ancient part of the vertebrate brain that is responsible for learning sequences of actions directed toward achieving goals. Progress has been made in understanding the algorithms used by the brain during reinforcement learning, which is an online approximation of dynamic programming. Humans also make plans that depend on past experience by simulating different scenarios, which is called prospective optimization. The same brain structures in the cortex and basal ganglia that are active online during optimal behavior are also active offline during prospective optimization. The emergence of general principles and algorithms for goal-directed behavior has consequences for the development of autonomous devices in engineering applications. PMID:25328167

  3. Optimal Fluoridation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John R.

    1975-01-01

    Optimal fluoridation has been defined as that fluoride exposure which confers maximal cariostasis with minimal toxicity and its values have been previously determined to be 0.5 to 1 mg per day for infants and 1 to 1.5 mg per day for an average child. Total fluoride ingestion and urine excretion were studied in Marin County, California, children in 1973 before municipal water fluoridation. Results showed fluoride exposure to be higher than anticipated and fulfilled previously accepted criteria for optimal fluoridation. Present and future water fluoridation plans need to be reevaluated in light of total environmental fluoride exposure. PMID:1130041

  4. Op-Ug TD Optimizer Tool Based on Matlab Code to Find Transition Depth From Open Pit to Block Caving / Narzędzie Optymalizacyjne Oparte O Kod Matlab Wykorzystane Do Określania Głębokości Przejściowej Od Wydobycia Odkrywkowego Do Wybierania Komorami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtavar, E.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, transition from open pit to block caving has been considered as a challenging problem. For this purpose, the linear integer programing code of Matlab was initially developed on the basis of the binary integer model proposed by Bakhtavar et al (2012). Then a program based on graphical user interface (GUI) was set up and named "Op-Ug TD Optimizer". It is a beneficial tool for simple application of the model in all situations where open pit is considered together with block caving method for mining an ore deposit. Finally, Op-Ug TD Optimizer has been explained step by step through solving the transition from open pit to block caving problem of a case ore deposit. W pracy tej rozważano skomplikowane zagadnienie przejścia od wybierania odkrywkowego do komorowego. W tym celu opracowano kod programowania liniowego w środowisku MATLAB w oparciu o model liczb binarnych zaproponowany przez Bakhtavara (2012). Następnie opracowano program z wykorzystujący graficzny interfejs użytkownika o nazwie Optymalizator Op-Ug TD. Jest to niezwykle cenne narzędzie umożliwiające stosowanie modelu dla wszystkich warunków w sytuacjach gdy rozważamy prowadzenie wydobycia metodą odkrywkową oraz wydobycie komorowe przy eksploatacji złóż rud żelaza. W końcowej części pracy podano szczegółową instrukcję stosowanie programu Optymalizator na przedstawionym przykładzie przejścia od wydobycia rud żelaza metodami odkrywkowymi poprzez wydobycie komorami.

  5. Gear optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Ning-Tian

    1988-01-01

    The use of formal numerical optimization methods for the design of gears is investigated. To achieve this, computer codes were developed for the analysis of spur gears and spiral bevel gears. These codes calculate the life, dynamic load, bending strength, surface durability, gear weight and size, and various geometric parameters. It is necessary to calculate all such important responses because they all represent competing requirements in the design process. The codes developed here were written in subroutine form and coupled to the COPES/ADS general purpose optimization program. This code allows the user to define the optimization problem at the time of program execution. Typical design variables include face width, number of teeth and diametral pitch. The user is free to choose any calculated response as the design objective to minimize or maximize and may impose lower and upper bounds on any calculated responses. Typical examples include life maximization with limits on dynamic load, stress, weight, etc. or minimization of weight subject to limits on life, dynamic load, etc. The research codes were written in modular form for easy expansion and so that they could be combined to create a multiple reduction optimization capability in future.

  6. Optimal protocols for slowly driven quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Zulkowski, Patrick R; DeWeese, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    The design of efficient quantum information processing will rely on optimal nonequilibrium transitions of driven quantum systems. Building on a recently developed geometric framework for computing optimal protocols for classical systems driven in finite time, we construct a general framework for optimizing the average information entropy for driven quantum systems. Geodesics on the parameter manifold endowed with a positive semidefinite metric correspond to protocols that minimize the average information entropy production in finite time. We use this framework to explicitly compute the optimal entropy production for a simple two-state quantum system coupled to a heat bath of bosonic oscillators, which has applications to quantum annealing. PMID:26465432

  7. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, Billy Joe; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    1999-01-01

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  8. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOEpatents

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  9. Neutralizer optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Mohajeri, Kayhan

    1991-01-01

    The preliminary results of a test program to optimize a neutralizer design for 30 cm xenon ion thrusters are discussed. The impact of neutralizer geometry, neutralizer axial location, and local magnetic fields on neutralizer performance is discussed. The effect of neutralizer performance on overall thruster performance is quantified, for thruster operation in the 0.5-3.2 kW power range. Additionally, these data are compared to data published for other north-south stationkeeping (NSSK) and primary propulsion xenon ion thruster neutralizers.

  10. The Managerial Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kneeland, Steven J.

    1980-01-01

    Having identified the problem of managerial transition in a previous article (CE 510 277), the author outlines a strategy for change which includes performance appraisal, definition of the management structure, and counselling for the individual in transition. (SK)

  11. Conceptualizing Transitions to Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of theories of the transition to young adulthood. It sets out the argument for conceptual renewal and discusses some implications of new patterns of transition for adult education.

  12. Glass transition(s) of ionomers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Ionomers are predominantly nonpolar polymers that contain a small amount of bonded salt groups. Microphase separation of ion-rich microdomains occurs as a consequence of the thermodynamic incompatibility of the salt groups and the polymer matrix and associative interactions between salt groups. Associations of the salt groups usually increase the glass transition of the continuous matrix phase, presumably as a consequence of the inhibition of chain mobility that accompanies physical crosslinking. The central question raised in this paper is whether the dispersed ion-rich microphase exhibits a glass transition. Although no glass transition for the microphase is detected by calorimetry, a dynamic mechanical relaxation is commonly observed above the T{sub g} of the matrix phase. This transition has some of the attributes of a glass transition, but it is not clear what is the actual relaxation process that is measured. This paper discusses the effect of the ionic groups on the matrix glass transition, the origin of the high-temperature dynamic mechanical transition, and the effects of the addition of plasticizers on the T{sub g} of the matrix and the higher temperature mechanical relaxation.

  13. Transition in Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The concept of a large disturbance bypass mechanism for the initiation of transition is reviewed and studied. This mechanism, or some manifestation thereof, is suspected to be at work in the boundary layers present in a turbine flow passage. Discussion is presented on four relevant subtopics: (1) the effect of upstream disturbances and wakes on transition; (2) transition prediction models, code development, and verification; (3) transition and turbulence measurement techniques; and (4) the hydrodynamic condition of low Reynolds number boundary layers.

  14. Transition: Terms and Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Leary, Ed

    This paper provides explanations and case examples of some terms and concepts related to transition of students with disabilities under 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Explanations and examples focus on the concepts of "statement of transition service needs" and "statement of needed transition services". The…

  15. Transitivity of Preferences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regenwetter, Michel; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.

    2011-01-01

    Transitivity of preferences is a fundamental principle shared by most major contemporary rational, prescriptive, and descriptive models of decision making. To have transitive preferences, a person, group, or society that prefers choice option "x" to "y" and "y" to "z" must prefer "x" to "z". Any claim of empirical violations of transitivity by…

  16. Diffusion with optimal resetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Martin R.; Majumdar, Satya N.

    2011-10-01

    We consider the mean time to absorption by an absorbing target of a diffusive particle with the addition of a process whereby the particle is reset to its initial position with rate r. We consider several generalizations of the model of Evans and Majumdar (2011 Phys. Rev. Lett.106 160601): (i) a space-dependent resetting rate r(x); (ii) resetting to a random position z drawn from a resetting distribution { P}(z); and (iii) a spatial distribution for the absorbing target PT(x). As an example of (i) we show that the introduction of a non-resetting window around the initial position can reduce the mean time to absorption provided that the initial position is sufficiently far from the target. We address the problem of optimal resetting, that is, minimizing the mean time to absorption for a given target distribution. For an exponentially decaying target distribution centred at the origin we show that a transition in the optimal resetting distribution occurs as the target distribution narrows.

  17. [SIAM conference on optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-10

    Abstracts are presented of 63 papers on the following topics: large-scale optimization, interior-point methods, algorithms for optimization, problems in control, network optimization methods, and parallel algorithms for optimization problems.

  18. Communication: Optimal parameters for basin-hopping global optimization based on Tsallis statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C. Wales, D. J.

    2014-08-21

    A fundamental problem associated with global optimization is the large free energy barrier for the corresponding solid-solid phase transitions for systems with multi-funnel energy landscapes. To address this issue we consider the Tsallis weight instead of the Boltzmann weight to define the acceptance ratio for basin-hopping global optimization. Benchmarks for atomic clusters show that using the optimal Tsallis weight can improve the efficiency by roughly a factor of two. We present a theory that connects the optimal parameters for the Tsallis weighting, and demonstrate that the predictions are verified for each of the test cases.

  19. On the Parameterized Complexity of Some Optimization Problems Related to Multiple-Interval Graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Minghui

    We show that for any constant t ≥ 2, K -Independent Set and K-Dominating Set in t-track interval graphs are W[1]-hard. This settles an open question recently raised by Fellows, Hermelin, Rosamond, and Vialette. We also give an FPT algorithm for K-Clique in t-interval graphs, parameterized by both k and t, with running time max { t O(k), 2 O(klogk) } ·poly(n), where n is the number of vertices in the graph. This slightly improves the previous FPT algorithm by Fellows, Hermelin, Rosamond, and Vialette. Finally, we use the W[1]-hardness of K-Independent Set in t-track interval graphs to obtain the first parameterized intractability result for a recent bioinformatics problem called Maximal Strip Recovery (MSR). We show that MSR-d is W[1]-hard for any constant d ≥ 4 when the parameter is either the total length of the strips, or the total number of adjacencies in the strips, or the number of strips in the optimal solution.

  20. Simulation of transition dynamics to high confinement in fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, A. H.; Xu, G. S.; Madsen, J.; Naulin, V.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Wan, B. N.

    2015-12-01

    The transition dynamics from the low (L) to the high (H) confinement mode in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated using a first-principles four-field fluid model. Numerical results are in agreement with measurements from the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak - EAST. Particularly, the slow transition with an intermediate dithering phase is well reproduced at proper parameters. The model recovers the power threshold for the L-H transition as well as the decrease in power threshold switching from single to double null configuration observed experimentally. The results are highly relevant for developing predictive models of the transition, essential for understanding and optimizing future fusion power reactors.

  1. Optimal quantum control via numerical pulse shape optimization for two exciton qubits confined to semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Reuble; Shi Yang, Hong Yi; Hall, Kimberley

    2015-03-01

    Optimal quantum control (OQC), which iteratively optimizes the control Hamiltonian to achieve a target quantum state, is a versatile approach for manipulating quantum systems. For optically-active transitions, OQC can be implemented using femtosecond pulse shaping which provides control over the amplitude and/or phase of the electric field. Optical pulse shaping has been employed to optimize physical processes such as nonlinear optical signals, photosynthesis, and has recently been applied to optimizing single-qubit gates in multiple semiconductor quantum dots. In this work, we examine the use of numerical pulse shape optimization for optimal quantum control of multiple qubits confined to quantum dots as a function of their electronic structure parameters. The numerically optimized pulse shapes were found to produce high fidelity quantum gates for a range of transition frequencies, dipole moments, and arbitrary initial and final states. This work enhances the potential for scalability by reducing the laser resources required to control multiple qubits.

  2. Optimal refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Hovhannisyan, Karen; Mahler, Guenter

    2010-05-01

    We study a refrigerator model which consists of two n -level systems interacting via a pulsed external field. Each system couples to its own thermal bath at temperatures Th and Tc , respectively (θ≡Tc/Th<1) . The refrigerator functions in two steps: thermally isolated interaction between the systems driven by the external field and isothermal relaxation back to equilibrium. There is a complementarity between the power of heat transfer from the cold bath and the efficiency: the latter nullifies when the former is maximized and vice versa. A reasonable compromise is achieved by optimizing the product of the heat-power and efficiency over the Hamiltonian of the two systems. The efficiency is then found to be bounded from below by ζCA=(1)/(1-θ)-1 (an analog of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency), besides being bound from above by the Carnot efficiency ζC=(1)/(1-θ)-1 . The lower bound is reached in the equilibrium limit θ→1 . The Carnot bound is reached (for a finite power and a finite amount of heat transferred per cycle) for lnn≫1 . If the above maximization is constrained by assuming homogeneous energy spectra for both systems, the efficiency is bounded from above by ζCA and converges to it for n≫1 .

  3. Optimal refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Allahverdyan, Armen E; Hovhannisyan, Karen; Mahler, Guenter

    2010-05-01

    We study a refrigerator model which consists of two n -level systems interacting via a pulsed external field. Each system couples to its own thermal bath at temperatures T h and T c, respectively (θ ≡ T c/T h < 1). The refrigerator functions in two steps: thermally isolated interaction between the systems driven by the external field and isothermal relaxation back to equilibrium. There is a complementarity between the power of heat transfer from the cold bath and the efficiency: the latter nullifies when the former is maximized and vice versa. A reasonable compromise is achieved by optimizing the product of the heat-power and efficiency over the Hamiltonian of the two systems. The efficiency is then found to be bounded from below by [formula: see text] (an analog of the Curzon-Ahlborn efficiency), besides being bound from above by the Carnot efficiency [formula: see text]. The lower bound is reached in the equilibrium limit θ → 1. The Carnot bound is reached (for a finite power and a finite amount of heat transferred per cycle) for ln n > 1. If the above maximization is constrained by assuming homogeneous energy spectra for both systems, the efficiency is bounded from above by ζ CA and converges to it for n > 1. PMID:20866207

  4. Characterizing the Superconducting-to-Normal Transition in Mo/Au Transition-Edge Sensor Bilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen J.; Bandler, Simon R.; Brown, Ari. -D.; Chervenak, Jay A.; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kelley, Richard L.; Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Porter, Frederick S.; Sadleir, John E.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing arrays of Mo/Au bilayer transition-edge sensors (TES's) for applications in future X-ray astronomy missions such as NASA's Constellation-X. The physical properties of the superconducting-to-normal transition in our TES bilayers, while often reproducible and characterized, are not well understood. The addition of normal metal features on top of the bilayer are found to change the shape and temperature of the transition, and they typically reduce the unexplained 'excess' noise. In order to understand and potentially optimize the properties of the transition, we have been studying the temperature, widths and current dependence of these transitions. We report on the characterization of devices both deposited on silicon substrates and suspended on thin silicon nitride membranes. This includes key device parameters such as the logarithmic resistance sensitivity with temperature alpha, and the logarithmic resistance sensitivity with current beta, of the phase-transition. We investigate alpha and beta as a function of current, both at fixed and varying bias points in the transition. Using Ginzburg-Landau theory for the current dependence of the superconducting transition temperature, we investigate the relationship between alpha and beta and compare our measured and theoretical estimates.

  5. Moons over Jupiter: transits and shadow transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. H.; et al.

    2003-06-01

    There is no more beautiful illustration of orbital motions than the movements of Jupiter's satellites. Every six years, their movements are most strikingly displayed, when the jovian system is presented edge-on to Earth. This means that there is a higher frequency of multiple transits over the face of the planet, as all the moons transit across the equatorial zone, whereas in other years Ganymede and Callisto transit near the poles or not at all. Also, for a few months, the satellites pass in front of each other, displaying mutual eclipses and occultations. In 2002/2003 we have been able to observe a fine series of these multiple and mutual events. On the cover, and on these pages, are some of the highest-resolution images received.

  6. Transitions in endocrinology: treatment of Turner's syndrome during transition.

    PubMed

    Gawlik, Aneta; Malecka-Tendera, Ewa

    2014-02-01

    Transition in health care for young patients with Turner's syndrome (TS) should be perceived as a staged but uninterrupted process starting in adolescence and moving into adulthood. As a condition associated with high risk of short stature, cardiovascular diseases, ovarian failure, hearing loss and hypothyroidism, TS requires the attention of a multidisciplinary team. In this review paper, we systematically searched the relevant literature from the last decade to discuss the array of problems faced by TS patients and to outline their optimal management during the time of transfer to adult service. The literature search identified 233 potentially relevant articles of which 114 were analysed. The analysis confirmed that all medical problems present during childhood should also be followed in adult life. Additionally, screening for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidaemia, and osteoporosis is needed. After discharge from the paediatric clinic, there is still a long way to go. PMID:24225028

  7. Dynamical Transition in polypeptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yunfen; Markelz, Andrea

    2008-03-01

    Two of the possible causes for the so called dynamical transition (the rapid increase in flexibility for biomolecules at ˜ 200 K) are: thermally activated side chain diffusive motions with hydration dependent activation energies; or a glass transition in the biological water directly adjacent to the biomolecule. If the transition is strictly due to side chain activation, it should not depend on protein structure. Previously we demonstrated that the dynamical transition remains after tertiary structure was removed using THz time domain dielectric spectroscopy (0.2 -2.0 THz, 0.5-5ps). Here measurements on polyalanine as a function of chain length show that the dynamical transition does not occur for peptide length shorter than 5. However, the transition is observed for 5 mer and higher. Structural and simulation studies indicate that the 5 mer transiently occupies structured forms [1,2]. These results suggest that A) the dynamical transition is not due to thermally activated side chain motion and B) secondary structure is necessary for the dynamical transition. Secondary structure possibly induces sufficient ordering in the adjacent water to result in a fragile to strong glass transition resulting in increased protein flexibility [3]. [1] KAH Wildman et al. Solid State Nucl. Magn. Reson. 24 (2003) 94-109. [2] Yuguang Mu,et al. Proteins 58, (2005) 45-52. [3] S.H. Chen et al. PNAS (2006) 9012--9016.

  8. Photoinduced phase transitions.

    PubMed

    Bennemann, K H

    2011-02-23

    Optically induced ultrafast electronic excitations with sufficiently long lifetimes may cause strong effects on phase transitions like structural and nonmetal→metal ones and on supercooling, supersaturation, etc. Examples are the transitions diamond→graphite, graphite→graphene, non-metal→metal, solid→liquid and vapor→liquid, solid. Photoinduced formation of graphene and water condensation of saturated or supersaturated vapor due to increased bonding amongst water molecules are of particular interest. These nonequilibrium transitions are an ultrafast response, on a few hundred fs time scale, to the fast low to large energy electronic excitations. The energy of the photons is converted into electronic energy via electronic excitations changing the cohesive energy. This changes the chemical potential controlling the phase transition. In view of the advances in laser optics photon induced transitions are expected to become an active area in nonequilibrium physics and phase transition dynamics. Conservation laws like energy or angular momentum conservation control the time during which the transitions occur. Since the photon induced effects result from weakening or strengthening of the bonding between the atoms or molecules transitions like solid/liquid, etc can be shifted in both directions. Photoinduced transitions will be discussed from a unified point of view. PMID:21411879

  9. Nonlinear Transient Growth and Boundary Layer Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paredes, Pedro; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Parabolized stability equations (PSE) are used in a variational approach to study the optimal, non-modal disturbance growth in a Mach 3 at plate boundary layer and a Mach 6 circular cone boundary layer. As noted in previous works, the optimal initial disturbances correspond to steady counter-rotating streamwise vortices, which subsequently lead to the formation of streamwise-elongated structures, i.e., streaks, via a lift-up effect. The nonlinear evolution of the linearly optimal stationary perturbations is computed using the nonlinear plane-marching PSE for stationary perturbations. A fully implicit marching technique is used to facilitate the computation of nonlinear streaks with large amplitudes. To assess the effect of the finite-amplitude streaks on transition, the linear form of plane- marching PSE is used to investigate the instability of the boundary layer flow modified by spanwise periodic streaks. The onset of bypass transition is estimated by using an N- factor criterion based on the amplification of the streak instabilities. Results show that, for both flow configurations of interest, streaks of sufficiently large amplitude can lead to significantly earlier onset of transition than that in an unperturbed boundary layer without any streaks.

  10. Brain Performance versus Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, Joaquín J.; Marro, J.

    2015-07-01

    We here illustrate how a well-founded study of the brain may originate in assuming analogies with phase-transition phenomena. Analyzing to what extent a weak signal endures in noisy environments, we identify the underlying mechanisms, and it results a description of how the excitability associated to (non-equilibrium) phase changes and criticality optimizes the processing of the signal. Our setting is a network of integrate-and-fire nodes in which connections are heterogeneous with rapid time-varying intensities mimicking fatigue and potentiation. Emergence then becomes quite robust against wiring topology modification—in fact, we considered from a fully connected network to the Homo sapiens connectome—showing the essential role of synaptic flickering on computations. We also suggest how to experimentally disclose significant changes during actual brain operation.

  11. Phase transitions in least-effort communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopenko, Mikhail; Ay, Nihat; Obst, Oliver; Polani, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    We critically examine a model that attempts to explain the emergence of power laws (e.g., Zipf's law) in human language. The model is based on the principle of least effort in communications—specifically, the overall effort is balanced between the speaker effort and listener effort, with some trade-off. It has been shown that an information-theoretic interpretation of this principle is sufficiently rich to explain the emergence of Zipf's law in the vicinity of the transition between referentially useless systems (one signal for all referable objects) and indexical reference systems (one signal per object). The phase transition is defined in the space of communication accuracy (information content) expressed in terms of the trade-off parameter. Our study explicitly solves the continuous optimization problem, subsuming a recent, more specific result obtained within a discrete space. The obtained results contrast Zipf's law found by heuristic search (that attained only local minima) in the vicinity of the transition between referentially useless systems and indexical reference systems, with an inverse-factorial (sub-logarithmic) law found at the transition that corresponds to global minima. The inverse-factorial law is observed to be the most representative frequency distribution among optimal solutions.

  12. Transition to Old Age (Transition to Retirement).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Simon

    Several conceptualizations and definitions of retirement have been proposed. One of them--the three-stage transition process--can be illustrated from studies in Israel: (1) leaving the old role; (2) going through the act of formal separation; and (3) adjusting to the new situation and role. Today's higher rate of survival into later years means…

  13. Modeling and Fitting Exoplanet Transit Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millholland, Sarah; Ruch, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a numerical model along with an original fitting routine for the analysis of transiting extra-solar planet light curves. Our light curve model is unique in several ways from other available transit models, such as the analytic eclipse formulae of Mandel & Agol (2002) and Giménez (2006), the modified Eclipsing Binary Orbit Program (EBOP) model implemented in Southworth’s JKTEBOP code (Popper & Etzel 1981; Southworth et al. 2004), or the transit model developed as a part of the EXOFAST fitting suite (Eastman et al. in prep.). Our model employs Keplerian orbital dynamics about the system’s center of mass to properly account for stellar wobble and orbital eccentricity, uses a unique analytic solution derived from Kepler’s Second Law to calculate the projected distance between the centers of the star and planet, and calculates the effect of limb darkening using a simple technique that is different from the commonly used eclipse formulae. We have also devised a unique Monte Carlo style optimization routine for fitting the light curve model to observed transits. We demonstrate that, while the effect of stellar wobble on transit light curves is generally small, it becomes significant as the planet to stellar mass ratio increases and the semi-major axes of the orbits decrease. We also illustrate the appreciable effects of orbital ellipticity on the light curve and the necessity of accounting for its impacts for accurate modeling. We show that our simple limb darkening calculations are as accurate as the analytic equations of Mandel & Agol (2002). Although our Monte Carlo fitting algorithm is not as mathematically rigorous as the Markov Chain Monte Carlo based algorithms most often used to determine exoplanetary system parameters, we show that it is straightforward and returns reliable results. Finally, we show that analyses performed with our model and optimization routine compare favorably with exoplanet characterizations published by groups such as the

  14. Transitioning between Clerkship Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soltys, Stephen M.; Pary, Robert J.; Robinson, Stephen W.; Markwell, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors report on succession-planning for mid-level academic positions. Method: The authors describe the process of succession-planning between clerkship directors and the smooth transition resulting in one case. Results: Gradually transitioning allowed a new faculty person to assume the clerkship-director position with minimal…

  15. Children and Transition Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Betty Ruth

    Daily transitions in early childhood centers and classrooms include periods when children are completing one activity, preparing to begin a new activity, and moving from place to place in a room or building. Transition activities involve teaching techniques that prepare learners to listen, relax, sit down, move between locations or activities, and…

  16. Matter in transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-04-01

    We explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, where a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU( N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU( N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.

  17. Transitions in Spousal Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Lynda C.; Zdaniuk, Bozena; Schulz, Richard; Jackson, Sharon; Hirsch, Calvin

    2003-01-01

    Describes transitions over 5 years among community-dwelling elderly spouses into and within caregiving roles and associated health outcomes. The trajectory of health outcomes associated with caregiving was generally downward. Those who transitioned to heavy caregiving had more symptoms of depression, and poorer self-reported health and health…

  18. Good Transitions = Great Starts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Our Children: The National PTA Magazine, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The smooth transition of outgoing and incoming board members and officers is of vital importance and can determine the PTA's success for years to come. The transition process is the responsibility of both incoming and outgoing officers and board members. It gives closure to those leaving their positions and allows those coming in to be properly…

  19. Researching Student Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voorhees, Richard A.; Smith, Gregory P.; Luan, Jing

    2006-01-01

    This article sketches a research agenda for the further study of community college student transitions. Specific techniques are depicted as are potential data sources that can be used to pursue that agenda. The role of student tracking systems in transition research is discussed as well as the applicability of national surveys to the study of…

  20. Transitions and Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilfeld, Ellen M., Ed.; Hanssen, Elizabeth, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    If children are to benefit from a healthy, supportive early childhood experience, it is important to strengthen transitions between early childhood experiences in educational and care settings and the more formal educational system. This issue of Coordinator's Notebook focuses on strengthening linkages and transitions between home, preschool, and…

  1. A Posteriori Transit Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Daniel J.; Gaudi, B. Scott

    2013-08-01

    Given the radial velocity (RV) detection of an unseen companion, it is often of interest to estimate the probability that the companion also transits the primary star. Typically, one assumes a uniform distribution for the cosine of the inclination angle i of the companion's orbit. This yields the familiar estimate for the prior transit probability of ~Rlowast/a, given the primary radius Rlowast and orbital semimajor axis a, and assuming small companions and a circular orbit. However, the posterior transit probability depends not only on the prior probability distribution of i but also on the prior probability distribution of the companion mass Mc, given a measurement of the product of the two (the minimum mass Mc sin i) from an RV signal. In general, the posterior can be larger or smaller than the prior transit probability. We derive analytic expressions for the posterior transit probability assuming a power-law form for the distribution of true masses, dΓ/dMcvpropMcα, for integer values -3 <= α <= 3. We show that for low transit probabilities, these probabilities reduce to a constant multiplicative factor fα of the corresponding prior transit probability, where fα in general depends on α and an assumed upper limit on the true mass. The prior and posterior probabilities are equal for α = -1. The posterior transit probability is ~1.5 times larger than the prior for α = -3 and is ~4/π times larger for α = -2, but is less than the prior for α>=0, and can be arbitrarily small for α > 1. We also calculate the posterior transit probability in different mass regimes for two physically-motivated mass distributions of companions around Sun-like stars. We find that for Jupiter-mass planets, the posterior transit probability is roughly equal to the prior probability, whereas the posterior is likely higher for Super-Earths and Neptunes (10 M⊕ - 30 M⊕) and Super-Jupiters (3 MJup - 10 MJup), owing to the predicted steep rise in the mass function toward smaller

  2. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations

    PubMed Central

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems. PMID:27001856

  3. Phase transitions in semidefinite relaxations.

    PubMed

    Javanmard, Adel; Montanari, Andrea; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico

    2016-04-19

    Statistical inference problems arising within signal processing, data mining, and machine learning naturally give rise to hard combinatorial optimization problems. These problems become intractable when the dimensionality of the data is large, as is often the case for modern datasets. A popular idea is to construct convex relaxations of these combinatorial problems, which can be solved efficiently for large-scale datasets. Semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations are among the most powerful methods in this family and are surprisingly well suited for a broad range of problems where data take the form of matrices or graphs. It has been observed several times that when the statistical noise is small enough, SDP relaxations correctly detect the underlying combinatorial structures. In this paper we develop asymptotic predictions for several detection thresholds, as well as for the estimation error above these thresholds. We study some classical SDP relaxations for statistical problems motivated by graph synchronization and community detection in networks. We map these optimization problems to statistical mechanics models with vector spins and use nonrigorous techniques from statistical mechanics to characterize the corresponding phase transitions. Our results clarify the effectiveness of SDP relaxations in solving high-dimensional statistical problems. PMID:27001856

  4. Predictability of critical transitions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance. PMID:26651760

  5. Extrasolar Planetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Andrew Collier

    An extrasolar planet will transit the visible hemisphere of its host star if its orbital plane lies sufficiently close to the observer's line of sight. The resulting periodic dips in stellar flux reveal key system parameters, including the density of the host star and, if radial-velocity observations are available, the surface gravitational acceleration of the planet. In this chapter I present the essential methodology for modelling the time-dependent flux variation during a transit, and its use in determining the posterior probability distribution for the physical parameters of the system. Large-scale searches for transiting systems are an efficient way of discovering planets whose bulk densities, and hence compositions, can be accessed if their masses can also be determined. I present algorithms for detrending large ensembles of light curves, for searching for transit-like signals among them. I also discuss methods for identifying diluted stellar eclipsing binaries mimicking planetary transit signals, and validation of transit candidates too faint for radial-velocity follow-up. I review the use of time-resolved spectrophotometry and high-resolution spectroscopy during transits to identify the molecular constituents of exoplanetary atmospheres.

  6. Predictability of critical transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaozhu; Kuehn, Christian; Hallerberg, Sarah

    2015-11-01

    Critical transitions in multistable systems have been discussed as models for a variety of phenomena ranging from the extinctions of species to socioeconomic changes and climate transitions between ice ages and warm ages. From bifurcation theory we can expect certain critical transitions to be preceded by a decreased recovery from external perturbations. The consequences of this critical slowing down have been observed as an increase in variance and autocorrelation prior to the transition. However, especially in the presence of noise, it is not clear whether these changes in observation variables are statistically relevant such that they could be used as indicators for critical transitions. In this contribution we investigate the predictability of critical transitions in conceptual models. We study the quadratic integrate-and-fire model and the van der Pol model under the influence of external noise. We focus especially on the statistical analysis of the success of predictions and the overall predictability of the system. The performance of different indicator variables turns out to be dependent on the specific model under study and the conditions of accessing it. Furthermore, we study the influence of the magnitude of transitions on the predictive performance.

  7. Monotonic convergent quantum optimal control method with exact equality constraints on the optimized control fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2016-05-01

    We present a monotonic convergent quantum optimal control method that can be utilized to optimize the control field while exactly enforcing multiple equality constraints for steering quantum systems from an initial state towards desired quantum states. For illustration, special consideration is given to finding optimal control fields with (i) exact zero area and (ii) exact zero area along with constant pulse fluence. The method combined with these two types of constraints is successfully employed to maximize the state-to-state transition probability in a model vibrating diatomic molecule.

  8. Momentum Injection in Tokamak Plasmas and Transitions to Reduced Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Parra, F. I.; Highcock, E. G.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Barnes, M.

    2011-03-18

    The effect of momentum injection on the temperature gradient in tokamak plasmas is studied. A plausible scenario for transitions to reduced transport regimes is proposed. The transition happens when there is sufficient momentum input so that the velocity shear can suppress or reduce the turbulence. However, it is possible to drive too much velocity shear and rekindle the turbulent transport. The optimal level of momentum injection is determined. The reduction in transport is maximized in the regions of low or zero magnetic shear.

  9. Holographic magnetic phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Lifschytz, Gilad; Lippert, Matthew

    2009-09-15

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4- and D8-branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  10. Adaptation and optimization of biological transport networks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2013-09-27

    It has been hypothesized that topological structures of biological transport networks are consequences of energy optimization. Motivated by experimental observation, we propose that adaptation dynamics may underlie this optimization. In contrast to the global nature of optimization, our adaptation dynamics responds only to local information and can naturally incorporate fluctuations in flow distributions. The adaptation dynamics minimizes the global energy consumption to produce optimal networks, which may possess hierarchical loop structures in the presence of strong fluctuations in flow distribution. We further show that there may exist a new phase transition as there is a critical open probability of sinks, above which there are only trees for network structures whereas below which loops begin to emerge. PMID:24116821

  11. Magellan in transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doody, Dave

    1993-01-01

    Aerobraking Magellan would provide the possibility of obtaining gravity field data for Venus all the way to the poles. Attempts to accomplish aerobraking, which began on May 25, 1993 in the Magellan Transition Experiment, are discussed.

  12. Geomagnetic polarity transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Ronald T.; McFadden, Phillip L.

    1999-05-01

    The top of Earth's liquid outer core is nearly 2900 km beneath Earth's surface, so we will never be able to observe it directly. This hot, dense, molten iron-rich body is continuously in motion and is the source of Earth's magnetic field. One of the most dynamic manifestations at Earth's surface of this fluid body is, perhaps, a reversal of the geomagnetic field. Unfortunately, the most recent polarity transition occurred at about 780 ka, so we have never observed a transition directly. It seems that a polarity transition spans many human lifetimes, so no human will ever witness the phenomenon in its entirety. Thus we are left with the tantalizing prospect that paleomagnetic records of polarity transitions may betray some of the secrets of the deep Earth. Certainly, if there are systematics in the reversal process and they can be documented, then this will reveal substantial information about the nature of the lowermost mantle and of the outer core. Despite their slowness on a human timescale, polarity transitions occur almost instantaneously on a geological timescale. This rapidity, together with limitations in the paleomagnetic recording process, prohibits a comprehensive description of any reversal transition both now and into the foreseeable future, which limits the questions that may at this stage be sensibly asked. The natural model for the geomagnetic field is a set of spherical harmonic components, and we are not able to obtain a reliable model for even the first few harmonic terms during a transition. Nevertheless, it is possible, in principle, to make statements about the harmonic character of a geomagnetic polarity transition without having a rigorous spherical harmonic description of one. For example, harmonic descriptions of recent geomagnetic polarity transitions that are purely zonal can be ruled out (a zonal harmonic does not change along a line of latitude). Gleaning information about transitions has proven to be difficult, but it does seem

  13. Alternative fuel transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

  14. Superconductivity in transition metals.

    PubMed

    Slocombe, Daniel R; Kuznetsov, Vladimir L; Grochala, Wojciech; Williams, Robert J P; Edwards, Peter P

    2015-03-13

    A qualitative account of the occurrence and magnitude of superconductivity in the transition metals is presented, with a primary emphasis on elements of the first row. Correlations of the important parameters of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity are highlighted with respect to the number of d-shell electrons per atom of the transition elements. The relation between the systematics of superconductivity in the transition metals and the periodic table high-lights the importance of short-range or chemical bonding on the remarkable natural phenomenon of superconductivity in the chemical elements. A relationship between superconductivity and lattice instability appears naturally as a balance and competition between localized covalent bonding and so-called broken covalency, which favours d-electron delocalization and superconductivity. In this manner, the systematics of superconductivity and various other physical properties of the transition elements are related and unified. PMID:25666075

  15. The Heliosphere in Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Justin

    2015-04-01

    The heliosphere consists of the connective tissue of particles, fields and photons that mediate our interaction with the Sun and with interstellar space. Exploration of the heliosphere yields clues to the nature of environments we cannot reach ourselves, illuminating the composition of the solar interior, or the acceleration of cosmic rays in the galaxy. The heliosphere is also a laboratory for us to understand the fundamental physics of magnetized plasma, from heating and instabilities to coupling with neutral gas and dust. This talk will review some of the most exciting recent results in the heliosphere with a focus on transitions: what we can learn by exploring transitions within the heliosphere, how the heliosphere is responding to the long term transition in solar activity, and how our very view of the heliosphere is in transition with upcoming missions such as Solar Probe Plus, Solar Orbiter and IMAP.

  16. Oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes

    SciTech Connect

    de Azevedo, Cristina G.; Vollhardt, K. Peter C.

    2002-01-18

    Synthesis, characterization, and reactivity studies of oligocyclopentadienyl transition metal complexes, namely those of fulvalene, tercyclopentadienyl, quatercyclopentadienyl, and pentacyclopentadienyl(cyclopentadienyl) are the subject of this account. Thermal-, photo-, and redox chemistries of homo- and heteropolynuclear complexes are described.

  17. Transit Timing Variations

    NASA Video Gallery

    The animation shows the difference between planet transit timing of single and multiple planet system. In tightly packed planetary systems, the gravitational pull of the planets among themselves ca...

  18. Matter in transition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anderson, Lara B.; Gray, James; Raghuram, Nikhil; Taylor, Washington

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we explore a novel type of transition in certain 6D and 4D quantum field theories, in which the matter content of the theory changes while the gauge group and other parts of the spectrum remain invariant. Such transitions can occur, for example, for SU(6) and SU(7) gauge groups, where matter fields in a three-index antisymmetric representation and the fundamental representation are exchanged in the transition for matter in the two-index antisymmetric representation. These matter transitions are realized by passing through superconformal theories at the transition point. We explore these transitions in dual F-theory and heterotic descriptions, wheremore » a number of novel features arise. For example, in the heterotic description the relevant 6D SU(7) theories are described by bundles on K3 surfaces where the geometry of the K3 is constrained in addition to the bundle structure. On the F-theory side, non-standard representations such as the three-index antisymmetric representation of SU(N) require Weierstrass models that cannot be realized from the standard SU(N) Tate form. We also briefly describe some other situations, with groups such as Sp(3), SO(12), and SU(3), where analogous matter transitions can occur between different representations. For SU(3), in particular, we find a matter transition between adjoint matter and matter in the symmetric representation, giving an explicit Weierstrass model for the F-theory description of the symmetric representation that complements another recent analogous construction.« less

  19. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  20. Stability, transition and turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussaini, M. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A glimpse is provided of the research program in stability, transition, and turbulence based on numerical simulations. This program includes both the so-called abrupt and the restrained transition processes. Attention is confined to the prototype problems of channel flow and the parallel boundary layer in the former category and the Taylor-Couette flow in the latter category. It covers both incompressible flows and supersonic flows. Some representative results are presented.

  1. A flexible transition state searching method for atmospheric reaction systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Chen, Jiao; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The precise and rapid exploration of transition states (TSs) is a major challenge when studying atmospheric reactions due to their complexity. In this work, a Monte Carlo Transition State Search Method (MCTSSM), which integrates Monte Carlo sampling technique with transition state optimization methods using an efficient computer script, has been developed for transition state searches. The efficiency and the potential application in atmospheric reactions of this method have been demonstrated by three types of test suits related to the reactions of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs): (1) OH addition, (2) OH hydrogen-abstraction, and (3) the other reactive group (e.g. Cl, O3, NO3), especially for the reaction of β-pinene-sCI (stabilized Criegee Intermediates) with water. It was shown that the application of this method with effective restricted parameters has greatly simplified the time-consuming and tedious manual search procedure for transition state (TS) of the bimolecular reaction systems.

  2. A Flexible Transition State Searching Method for Atmospheric Reaction Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xiao-Xiao; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Chen, Jiao; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The precise and rapid exploration of transition states (TSs) is a major challenge when studying atmospheric reactions due to their complexity. In this work, a Monte Carlo Transition State Search Method (MCTSSM), which integrates Monte Carlo sampling technique with transition state optimization methods using an efficient computer script, has been developed for transition state searches. The efficiency and the potential application in atmospheric reactions of this method have been demonstrated by three types of test suits related to the reactions of atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs): (1) OH addition, (2) OH hydrogen-abstraction, and (3) the other reactive group (e.g. Cl, O3, NO3), especially for the reaction of β-pinene-sCI (stabilized Criegee Intermediates) with water. It was shown that the application of this method with effective restricted parameters has greatly simplified the time-consuming and tedious manual search procedure for transition state (TS) of the bimolecular reaction systems.

  3. Effect of Transition Aerodynamics on Aeroassist Flight Experiment Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minier, Elizabeth A.; Suit, William T.

    1988-01-01

    Various transition methods are used here to study the viscous effects encountered in low density, hypersonic flight, through the transition from free molecular to continuum flow. Methods utilizing Viking data, Shuttle Orbiter data, a Potter number parameter, and a Shock Reynolds number were implemented in the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST). Simulations of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) using open loop guidance were used to assess the aerodynamic performance of the vehicle. A bank angle was found for each transition method that would result in a 200 nautical-mile apogee. Once this was done, the open loop guidance was replaced by the proposed guidance algorithm for the AFE. Simulations were again conducted using that guidance and the different transitions for comparison. For the gains used, the guidance system showed some sensitivity in apogee altitude to the transition method assumed, but the guidance was able to successfully complete the mission.

  4. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  5. Optimal control of overdamped systems.

    PubMed

    Zulkowski, Patrick R; DeWeese, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Nonequilibrium physics encompasses a broad range of natural and synthetic small-scale systems. Optimizing transitions of such systems will be crucial for the development of nanoscale technologies and may reveal the physical principles underlying biological processes at the molecular level. Recent work has demonstrated that when a thermodynamic system is driven away from equilibrium then the space of controllable parameters has a Riemannian geometry induced by a generalized inverse diffusion tensor. We derive a simple, compact expression for the inverse diffusion tensor that depends solely on equilibrium information for a broad class of potentials. We use this formula to compute the minimal dissipation for two model systems relevant to small-scale information processing and biological molecular motors. In the first model, we optimally erase a single classical bit of information modeled by an overdamped particle in a smooth double-well potential. In the second model, we find the minimal dissipation of a simple molecular motor model coupled to an optical trap. In both models, we find that the minimal dissipation for the optimal protocol of duration τ is proportional to 1/τ, as expected, though the dissipation for the erasure model takes a different form than what we found previously for a similar system. PMID:26465436

  6. Venus Transit 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, L. A.; Odenwald, S. F.

    2002-09-01

    December 6th, 1882 was the last transit of the planet Venus across the disk of the sun. It was heralded as an event of immense interest and importance to the astronomical community as well as the public at large. There have been only six such occurrences since Galileo first trained his telescope on the heavens in 1609 and on Venus in 1610 where he concluded that Venus had phases like the moon and appeared to get larger and smaller over time. Many historians consider this the final nail in the coffin of the Ptolemaic, Earth centered solar system. In addition, each transit has provided unique opportunities for discovery such as measurement and refinement of the astronomical unit, calculation of longitudes on the earth, and detection of Venus' atmosphere. The NASA Sun Earth Connection Education Forum in partnership with the Solar System Exploration Forum, DPS, and a number of NASA space missions is developing plans for an international education program centered around the June 8, 2004 Venus transit. The transit will be visible in its entirety from Europe and partially from the East Coast of the United States. We will use a series of robotic observatories including the Telescopes In Education network distributed in latitude to provide observations of the transit that will allow middle and high school students to calculate the A.U. through application of parallax. We will also use Venus transit as a probe of episodes in American history (e.g. 1769: revolutionary era, 1882: post civil war era, and 2004: modern era). Museums and planetariums in the US and Europe will offer real time viewing of the transit and conduct educational programs through professional development seminars, public lectures, and planetarium shows. We are interested in soliciting advice from the research community to coordinate professional research interests with this program.

  7. Particle Swarm Optimization Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The Particle Swarm Optimization Toolbox is a library of evolutionary optimization tools developed in the MATLAB environment. The algorithms contained in the library include a genetic algorithm (GA), a single-objective particle swarm optimizer (SOPSO), and a multi-objective particle swarm optimizer (MOPSO). Development focused on both the SOPSO and MOPSO. A GA was included mainly for comparison purposes, and the particle swarm optimizers appeared to perform better for a wide variety of optimization problems. All algorithms are capable of performing unconstrained and constrained optimization. The particle swarm optimizers are capable of performing single and multi-objective optimization. The SOPSO and MOPSO algorithms are based on swarming theory and bird-flocking patterns to search the trade space for the optimal solution or optimal trade in competing objectives. The MOPSO generates Pareto fronts for objectives that are in competition. A GA, based on Darwin evolutionary theory, is also included in the library. The GA consists of individuals that form a population in the design space. The population mates to form offspring at new locations in the design space. These offspring contain traits from both of the parents. The algorithm is based on this combination of traits from parents to hopefully provide an improved solution than either of the original parents. As the algorithm progresses, individuals that hold these optimal traits will emerge as the optimal solutions. Due to the generic design of all optimization algorithms, each algorithm interfaces with a user-supplied objective function. This function serves as a "black-box" to the optimizers in which the only purpose of this function is to evaluate solutions provided by the optimizers. Hence, the user-supplied function can be numerical simulations, analytical functions, etc., since the specific detail of this function is of no concern to the optimizer. These algorithms were originally developed to support entry

  8. RTGs on Transit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassoulas, John; McNutt, Ralph L.

    2007-01-01

    Transit, the US Navy's Navigation Satellite System was conceived at the Applied Physics Laboratory in 1957 by observing the Doppler shift while tracking Sputnik I. As spacecraft development proceeded there was concern about the ability of batteries to maintain the hermetic seal over a 5-year operational life requirement; therefore, alternate energy sources were investigated. The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) concept was pursued and resulted in the launch of SNAP 3s, providing partial power on both Transit 4A and 4B. SNAP 9s provided full power on three Transit 5BNs. All launches occurred in the early 1960s. When the U.S. conducted the high altitude nuclear test from Johnson Island, several spacecraft were lost due to artificial enhancement of charged particles in the Earth's magnetosphere resulting in rapid degradation of solar cell power production. This led to the decision to have both an RTG and Solar cell/battery design for Transit power systems; hence, a new RTG design, with a separable heat source and radiative coupling to the thermoelectric elements, was flown on TRIAD. This pioneering effort provided the impetus for future RTGs on interplanetary spacecraft. This paper describes the origin and purpose of the Transit program and provides details on the five satellites in that program that were powered by the first American RTGs used in space. The rationale and some of the challenges inherent in that use are also described.

  9. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  10. Aristos Optimization Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-03-01

    Aristos is a Trilinos package for nonlinear continuous optimization, based on full-space sequential quadratic programming (SQP) methods. Aristos is specifically designed for the solution of large-scale constrained optimization problems in which the linearized constraint equations require iterative (i.e. inexact) linear solver techniques. Aristos' unique feature is an efficient handling of inexactness in linear system solves. Aristos currently supports the solution of equality-constrained convex and nonconvex optimization problems. It has been used successfully in the areamore » of PDE-constrained optimization, for the solution of nonlinear optimal control, optimal design, and inverse problems.« less

  11. Transition and laminar instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mack, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    The linear stability theory was applied to the problem of boundary layer transition in incompressible flow. The theory was put into a form suitable for three-dimensional boundary layers; both the temporal and spatial theories were examined; and a generalized Gaster relation for three-dimensional boundary layers was derived. Numerical examples include the stability characteristics of Falkner-Skan boundary layers, the accuracy of the two-dimensional Gaster relation for these boundary layers, and the magnitude and direction of the group velocity for oblique waves in the Blasius boundary layer. Available experiments which bear on the validity of stability theory and its relation to transition are reviewed and the stability theory is applied to transition prediction. The amplitude method is described in which the wide band disturbance amplitude in the boundary layer is estimated from stability theory and an interaction relation for the initial amplitude density of the most unstable frequency.

  12. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  13. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  14. Electroweak Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Gregory Wayne

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles, and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, _ {T}, is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially sensitive function of T. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase T so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal extensions of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field. Semi-classical reasoning suggests that, when a particle receives a contribution to its mass from the vacuum expectation value of a scalar, under certain conditions, the ground state of particle number one contains a 'dimple' or shallow scalar field condensate around the particle. We argue that this is not the case. A careful analysis, taking into account quantum mechanics, shows that the semi-classical approximation is a poor one. We find that there are no energetically favored one-particle dimple solutions for perturbative couplings.

  15. UTM: Universal Transit Modeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeg, Hans J.

    2014-12-01

    The Universal Transit Modeller (UTM) is a light-curve simulator for all kinds of transiting or eclipsing configurations between arbitrary numbers of several types of objects, which may be stars, planets, planetary moons, and planetary rings. A separate fitting program, UFIT (Universal Fitter) is part of the UTM distribution and may be used to derive best fits to light-curves for any set of continuously variable parameters. UTM/UFIT is written in IDL code and its source is released in the public domain under the GNU General Public License.

  16. [Transition in diabetology].

    PubMed

    Hauschild, M; Elowe-Gruau, E; Dwyer, A; Aquarone, M-P; Unal, S; Jornayvaz, F R; Perrenoud, L; Gastaldi, G; Castellsague, M; Dirlewanger, M; Schwitzgebel, V M

    2015-02-18

    For patients with type I diabetes, transition from pediatric to adult care is a challenge due to complex treatment requirements and the physical, psychological and social changes of adolescence. Members of the care team must recognize that while these emerging adults need to develop self-management skills, this may conflict at times with the developmentally appropriate desire for increasing autonomy. The role of nursing in coordinating a successful transition is critical for maintaining continuity of patient-centered care that responds to the specific needs of these young adults. PMID:25915986

  17. Multidisciplinary Optimization for Aerospace Using Genetic Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pak, Chan-gi; Hahn, Edward E.; Herrera, Claudia Y.

    2007-01-01

    In support of the ARMD guidelines NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center is developing a multidisciplinary design and optimization tool This tool will leverage existing tools and practices, and allow the easy integration and adoption of new state-of-the-art software. Optimization has made its way into many mainstream applications. For example NASTRAN(TradeMark) has its solution sequence 200 for Design Optimization, and MATLAB(TradeMark) has an Optimization Tool box. Other packages, such as ZAERO(TradeMark) aeroelastic panel code and the CFL3D(TradeMark) Navier-Stokes solver have no built in optimizer. The goal of the tool development is to generate a central executive capable of using disparate software packages ina cross platform network environment so as to quickly perform optimization and design tasks in a cohesive streamlined manner. A provided figure (Figure 1) shows a typical set of tools and their relation to the central executive. Optimization can take place within each individual too, or in a loop between the executive and the tool, or both.

  18. Transition and the Education of the New South African Citizen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammett, Daniel; Staeheli, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    South Africa's democratic transition was a time of optimism, with immense hopes pinned on the youth who would be educated to see themselves as equal citizens. It was also a time of pragmatic decision making, not least in the education sector, which would shape the future of the country. Negotiating the imperatives of redress, development, and…

  19. Topic Transition in Educational Videos Using Visually Salient Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandhi, Ankit; Biswas, Arijit; Deshmukh, Om

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a visual saliency algorithm for automatically finding the topic transition points in an educational video. First, we propose a method for assigning a saliency score to each word extracted from an educational video. We design several mid-level features that are indicative of visual saliency. The optimal feature combination…

  20. Response-time optimization of rule-based expert systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zupan, Blaz; Cheng, Albert M. K.

    1994-03-01

    Real-time rule-based decision systems are embedded AI systems and must make critical decisions within stringent timing constraints. In the case where the response time of the rule- based system is not acceptable, it has to be optimized to meet both timing and integrity constraints. This paper describes a novel approach to reduce the response time of rule-based expert systems. Our optimization method is twofold: the first phase constructs the reduced cycle-free finite state transition system corresponding to the input rule-based system, and the second phase further refines the constructed transition system using the simulated annealing approach. The method makes use of rule-base system decomposition, concurrency, and state- equivalency. The new and optimized system is synthesized from the derived transition system. Compared with the original system, the synthesized system has fewer number of rule firings to reach the fixed point, is inherently stable, and has no redundant rules.

  1. Optimization of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Patnaik, Surya N.

    1994-01-01

    Research carried out is grouped under two topics: (1) Design Optimization, and (2) Integrated Force Method of Analysis. Design Optimization Research Topics are singularity alleviation enhances structural optimization methods, computer based design capability extended through substructure synthesis, and optimality criteria provides optimum design for a select class of structural problems. Integrated Force Method of Analysis Research Topics are boundary compatibility formulation improves stress analysis of shell structures. Brief descriptions of the four topics are appended.

  2. Control of rare events in reaction and population systems by deterministically imposed transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasin, M.; Dykman, M. I.

    2011-03-01

    We consider control of reaction and population systems by imposing transitions between states with different numbers of particles or individuals. The transitions take place at predetermined instants of time. Even where they are significantly less frequent than spontaneous transitions, they can exponentially strongly modify the rates of rare events, including switching between metastable states or population extinction. We also study optimal control of rare events. Specifically, we are interested in the optimal control of disease extinction for a limited vaccine supply. A comparison is made with control of rare events by modulating the rates of elementary transitions rather than imposing transitions deterministically. It is found that, unexpectedly, for the same mean control parameters, controlling the transitions rates can be more efficient.

  3. Families in Transition .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bundy, Michael L., Ed.; Gumaer, James, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Focuses on disrupted families and the role of the school counselor in helping children adjust. Describes characteristics of healthy families, and discusses the transition to the blended family, effects of divorce groups on children's classroom behavior, counseling children in stepfamilies, single-parent families, and parenting strengths of single…

  4. A Survey Transition Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, William; McAllister, Alex M.

    2012-01-01

    Successful outcomes for a "Transition Course in Mathematics" have resulted from two unique design features. The first is to run the course as a "survey course" in mathematics, introducing sophomore-level students to a broad set of mathematical fields. In this single mathematics course, undergraduates benefit from an introduction of proof…

  5. Variational transition state theory

    SciTech Connect

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  6. Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

  7. Tips for Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ryan O.; Morningstar, Mary E.

    2010-01-01

    The Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004 (IDEA) states that transition planning should begin at the earliest age appropriate and no later than age 16. IDEA requires schools to make collaborative efforts to provide students access to an array of postschool activities including integrated employment, postsecondary…

  8. Nursing Role Transition Preceptorship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batory, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The preceptorship clinical experience in a practical nursing (PN) program at a Midwestern community college is considered crucial to the PN students' transition from novice nurse to professional nurse. However, no research has been available to determine whether the preceptorship clinical accomplishes its purpose. A case study was conducted to…

  9. A Transiting Jupiter Analog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Henze, C.; Teachey, A.; Isaacson, H.; Petigura, E.; Marcy, G. W.; Buchhave, L. A.; Chen, J.; Bryson, S. T.; Sandford, E.

    2016-04-01

    Decadal-long radial velocity surveys have recently started to discover analogs to the most influential planet of our solar system, Jupiter. Detecting and characterizing these worlds is expected to shape our understanding of our uniqueness in the cosmos. Despite the great successes of recent transit surveys, Jupiter analogs represent a terra incognita, owing to the strong intrinsic bias of this method against long orbital periods. We here report on the first validated transiting Jupiter analog, Kepler-167e (KOI-490.02), discovered using Kepler archival photometry orbiting the K4-dwarf KIC-3239945. With a radius of (0.91+/- 0.02) {R}{{J}}, a low orbital eccentricity ({0.06}-0.04+0.10), and an equilibrium temperature of (131+/- 3) K, Kepler-167e bears many of the basic hallmarks of Jupiter. Kepler-167e is accompanied by three Super-Earths on compact orbits, which we also validate, leaving a large cavity of transiting worlds around the habitable-zone. With two transits and continuous photometric coverage, we are able to uniquely and precisely measure the orbital period of this post snow-line planet (1071.2323 ± 0.0006d), paving the way for follow-up of this K = 11.8 mag target.

  10. Youth Policy in Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timpane, Michael; And Others

    A study team was commissioned to critically review three independent reports on youth and schooling: "Youth: Transition to Adulthood"; "The Education of Adolescents"; and "The Reform of Secondary Education." The study team examined the reports in light of the most recent available social science evidence. The three reports, presenting similar…

  11. Transition at hypersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morkovin, Mark V.

    1987-01-01

    Certain conjectures on the physics of instabilities in high-speed flows are discussed and the state of knowledge of hypersonic transition summarized. The case is made for an unpressured systematic research program in this area consisting of controlled microscopic experiments, theory, and numerical simulations.

  12. Immigration and Adult Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumbaut, Ruben G.; Komaie, Golnaz

    2010-01-01

    Almost 30 percent of the more than 68 million young adults aged eighteen to thirty-four in the United States today are either foreign born or of foreign parentage. As these newcomers make their transitions to adulthood, say Ruben Rumbaut and Golnaz Komaie, they differ significantly not only from one another but also from their native-parentage…

  13. String mediated phase transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, ED; Haws, D.; Rivers, R.; Holbraad, S.

    1988-01-01

    It is demonstrated from first principles how the existence of string-like structures can cause a system to undergo a phase transition. In particular, the role of topologically stable cosmic string in the restoration of spontaneously broken symmetries is emphasized. How the thermodynamic properties of strings alter when stiffness and nearest neighbor string-string interactions are included is discussed.

  14. Learning for Life Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varmecky, Jane Hyde

    2012-01-01

    Many adults return to formal learning situations to pursue lifelong learning goals because their lives are in transition from dealing with real-life problems such as divorce and re-marriage. The purpose of this study was to describe what couples learned that contributed to the success of their subsequent marriages and how they learned it. The…

  15. Optimization of multiple flyby trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damario, L. A.; Sackett, L. L.; Stanford, R. H.; Byrnes, D. V.

    1979-01-01

    A procedure has been developed which minimizes total delta-V (instantaneous velocity change) for a multiple flyby trajectory with constraints on flyby altitude and orientation. The solution is found by varying the locations of maneuver points between each flyby to minimize the delta-Vs at the maneuver points. Each trajectory segment connecting consecutive maneuver points is found by solving an N-body analog to Lambert's problem. Multiconic techniques are used for trajectory propagation and for computation of the state transition matrix. The constrained parameter optimization problem is converted to an unconstrained problem by means of penalty functions and then solved with a quasi-Newton algorithm utilizing analytic first derivatives. This procedure has been successfully applied to Galileo satellite tour trajectories.

  16. Transit of Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Laurance R.

    1998-01-01

    During the past five years we have pursued the detection of extrasolar planets by the photometric transit method, i.e. the detection of a planet by watching for a drop in the brightness of the light as it crosses in front of a star. The planetary orbit must cross the line-of-sight and so most systems will not be lined up for such a transit to ever occur. However, we have looked at eclipsing binary systems which are already edge-on. Such systems must be very small in size as this makes the differential light change due to a transit much greater for a given planet size (the brightness difference will be proportional to the area of the transiting planet to the disc area of the star). Also, the planet forming region should be closer to the star as small stars are generally less luminous (that is, if the same thermal regime for planet formation applies as in the solar system). This led to studies of the habitable zone around other stars, as well. Finally, we discovered that our data could be used to detect giant planets without transits as we had been carefully timing the eclipses of the stars (using a GPS antenna for time) and this will drift by being offset by any giant planets orbiting around the system, as well. The best summary of our work may be to just summarize the 21 refereed papers produced during the time of this grant. This will be done is chronological order and in each section separately.

  17. A Qualitative Analysis of an Advanced Practice Nurse-Directed Transitional Care Model Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradway, Christine; Trotta, Rebecca; Bixby, M. Brian; McPartland, Ellen; Wollman, M. Catherine; Kapustka, Heidi; McCauley, Kathleen; Naylor, Mary D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe barriers and facilitators to implementing a transitional care intervention for cognitively impaired older adults and their caregivers lead by advanced practice nurses (APNs). Design and Methods: APNs implemented an evidence-based protocol to optimize transitions from hospital to home. An…

  18. Cyclone performance and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Leith, D.

    1990-12-15

    An empirical model for predicting pressure drop across a cyclone, developed by Dirgo (1988), is presented. The model was developed through a statistical analysis of pressure drop data for 98 cyclone designs. This model is used with the efficiency model of Iozia and Leith (1990) to develop an optimization curve which predicts the minimum pressure drop on the dimension ratios of the optimized cyclone for a given aerodynamic cut diameter, d{sub 50}. The effect of variation in cyclone height, cyclone diameter, and flow on the optimization is determined. The optimization results are used to develop a design procedure for optimized cyclones. 33 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Hope, optimism and delusion

    PubMed Central

    McGuire-Snieckus, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Optimism is generally accepted by psychiatrists, psychologists and other caring professionals as a feature of mental health. Interventions typically rely on cognitive-behavioural tools to encourage individuals to ‘stop negative thought cycles’ and to ‘challenge unhelpful thoughts’. However, evidence suggests that most individuals have persistent biases of optimism and that excessive optimism is not conducive to mental health. How helpful is it to facilitate optimism in individuals who are likely to exhibit biases of optimism already? By locating the cause of distress at the individual level and ‘unhelpful’ cognitions, does this minimise wider systemic social and economic influences on mental health? PMID:25237497

  20. The Transit Detection Algorithm DST and its application to CoRoT and Kepler data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, J.; Rauer, H.; Erikson, A.; Csizmadia, S.

    2011-10-01

    Transit detection algorithms are mathematical tools used to detect the presence of planets in the photometric data of transit surveys. Space missions are exploring the parameter space of transit surveys towards small planets where classical algorithms do not perform optimally, either due to the low signal to noise ratio of the signal or to its non-periodic characteristics. We present an algorithm addressing these challenges and its performance in an application to CoRoT and Kepler data.

  1. Improving care transitions: current practice and future opportunities for pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Hume, Anne L; Kirwin, Jennifer; Bieber, Heather L; Couchenour, Rachel L; Hall, Deanne L; Kennedy, Amy K; LaPointe, Nancy M Allen; Burkhardt, Crystal D O; Schilli, Kathleen; Seaton, Terry; Trujillo, Jennifer; Wiggins, Barbara

    2012-11-01

    During the past decade, patient safety issues during care transitions have gained greater attention at both the local and national level. Readmission rates to U.S. hospitals are high, often because of poor care transitions. Serious adverse drug events (ADEs) caused by an incomplete understanding of changes in complex drug regimens can be an important factor contributing to readmission rates. This paper describes the roles and responsibilities of pharmacists in ensuring optimal outcomes from drug therapy during care transitions. Barriers to effective care transitions, including inadequate communication, poor care coordination, and the lack of one clinician ultimately responsible for these transitions, are discussed. This paper also identifies specific patient populations at high risk of ADEs during care transitions. Several national initiatives and newer care transition models are discussed, including multi- and interdisciplinary programs with pharmacists as key members. Among their potential roles, pharmacists should participate on medical rounds where available, perform medication reconciliation and admission drug histories, apply their knowledge of drug therapy to anticipate and resolve problems during transitions, communicate changes in drug regimens between providers and care settings, assess the appropriateness and patient understanding of drug regimens, promote adherence, and assess health literacy. In addition, this paper identifies barriers and ongoing challenges limiting greater involvement of pharmacists from different practice settings during care transitions. Professional degree programs and residency training programs should increase their emphasis on pharmacists' roles, especially as part of interdisciplinary teams, in improving patient safety during care transitions in diverse practice settings. This paper also recommends that Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) standards include specific language regarding the exposure of students to

  2. Optimally controlling the human connectome: the role of network topology

    PubMed Central

    Betzel, Richard F.; Gu, Shi; Medaglia, John D.; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2016-01-01

    To meet ongoing cognitive demands, the human brain must seamlessly transition from one brain state to another, in the process drawing on different cognitive systems. How does the brain’s network of anatomical connections help facilitate such transitions? Which features of this network contribute to making one transition easy and another transition difficult? Here, we address these questions using network control theory. We calculate the optimal input signals to drive the brain to and from states dominated by different cognitive systems. The input signals allow us to assess the contributions made by different brain regions. We show that such contributions, which we measure as energy, are correlated with regions’ weighted degrees. We also show that the network communicability, a measure of direct and indirect connectedness between brain regions, predicts the extent to which brain regions compensate when input to another region is suppressed. Finally, we identify optimal states in which the brain should start (and finish) in order to minimize transition energy. We show that the optimal target states display high activity in hub regions, implicating the brain’s rich club. Furthermore, when rich club organization is destroyed, the energy cost associated with state transitions increases significantly, demonstrating that it is the richness of brain regions that makes them ideal targets. PMID:27468904

  3. Optimally controlling the human connectome: the role of network topology.

    PubMed

    Betzel, Richard F; Gu, Shi; Medaglia, John D; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-01-01

    To meet ongoing cognitive demands, the human brain must seamlessly transition from one brain state to another, in the process drawing on different cognitive systems. How does the brain's network of anatomical connections help facilitate such transitions? Which features of this network contribute to making one transition easy and another transition difficult? Here, we address these questions using network control theory. We calculate the optimal input signals to drive the brain to and from states dominated by different cognitive systems. The input signals allow us to assess the contributions made by different brain regions. We show that such contributions, which we measure as energy, are correlated with regions' weighted degrees. We also show that the network communicability, a measure of direct and indirect connectedness between brain regions, predicts the extent to which brain regions compensate when input to another region is suppressed. Finally, we identify optimal states in which the brain should start (and finish) in order to minimize transition energy. We show that the optimal target states display high activity in hub regions, implicating the brain's rich club. Furthermore, when rich club organization is destroyed, the energy cost associated with state transitions increases significantly, demonstrating that it is the richness of brain regions that makes them ideal targets. PMID:27468904

  4. Integrated controls design optimization

    DOEpatents

    Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl H.

    2015-09-01

    A control system (207) for optimizing a chemical looping process of a power plant includes an optimizer (420), an income algorithm (230) and a cost algorithm (225) and a chemical looping process models. The process models are used to predict the process outputs from process input variables. Some of the process in puts and output variables are related to the income of the plant; and some others are related to the cost of the plant operations. The income algorithm (230) provides an income input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of input parameters (215) of the power plant. The cost algorithm (225) provides a cost input to the optimizer (420) based on a plurality of output parameters (220) of the power plant. The optimizer (420) determines an optimized operating parameter solution based on at least one of the income input and the cost input, and supplies the optimized operating parameter solution to the power plant.

  5. Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venter, Gerhard; Sobieszczanski-Sobieski Jaroslaw

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how the search algorithm known as particle swarm optimization performs. Here, particle swarm optimization is applied to structural design problems, but the method has a much wider range of possible applications. The paper's new contributions are improvements to the particle swarm optimization algorithm and conclusions and recommendations as to the utility of the algorithm, Results of numerical experiments for both continuous and discrete applications are presented in the paper. The results indicate that the particle swarm optimization algorithm does locate the constrained minimum design in continuous applications with very good precision, albeit at a much higher computational cost than that of a typical gradient based optimizer. However, the true potential of particle swarm optimization is primarily in applications with discrete and/or discontinuous functions and variables. Additionally, particle swarm optimization has the potential of efficient computation with very large numbers of concurrently operating processors.

  6. The Mongolia experience: transitioning within transition.

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Richard G

    2009-12-01

    Although Mongolia has a long and distinguished history, as a new and emerging democracy it is experiencing the pains of transition-one that is moving the country from its pastoral and nomadic past into the 21st century. Confounded by its previous dependence on socialist Soviet Russia, the concept of a market economy seems opportunistic for some, while for those living within the traditional lifestyle of the herdsman in the countryside it is confusing and threatening to family structure and values. Adolescents and young adults are caught at the interface-not only of their own development, but by the disparities between tradition and Western values, new technology, and freedoms granted by the emerging democracy, and by the civic practice of democracy itself. Conceptually the new belongs to the young, and yet limited health and educational resources are available to modulate and focus both threats and opportunities. Using the analogy of the spirit banner of the warrior, it is the young as the warriors of the 21st century who have the energy and investment in the future that will be needed to shepherd this change. Both personal and public health, within the context of development, the psychobiological model, and the political and social ecology will be strong determinants of success. It is a parallel investment in both youth and the ideals they represent that will ensure success for the new Mongolia. PMID:20653216

  7. Alternative fuel transit buses: The Pierce Transit Success Story

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    The Pierce transit program for operating mass transit buses on compressed natural gas (CNG) is described. Cost, reliability, fuel efficiency, emission of combustion products, and future trends are discussed.

  8. A combined method for determining reaction paths, minima, and transition state geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Philippe Y.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    1997-07-01

    Mapping out a reaction mechanism involves optimizing the reactants and products, finding the transition state and following the reaction path connecting them. Transition states can be difficult to locate and reaction paths can be expensive to follow. We describe an efficient algorithm for determining the transition state, minima and reaction path in a single procedure. Starting with an approximate path represented by N points, the path is iteratively relaxed until one of the N points reached the transition state, the end points optimize to minima and the remaining points converged to a second order approximation of the steepest descent path. The method appears to be more reliable than conventional transition state optimization algorithms, and requires only energies and gradients, but not second derivative calculations. The procedure is illustrated by application to a number of model reactions. In most cases, the reaction mechanism can be described well using 5 to 7 points to represent the transition state, the minima and the path. The computational cost of relaxing the path is less than or comparable to the cost of standard techniques for finding the transition state and the minima, determining the transition vector and following the reaction path on both sides of the transition state.

  9. Optimal driving of Bose-Einstein condensates in optical cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Caneva, T.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2014-12-04

    We apply quantum optimal control to enhance the performance of the experimental setup of Ref. [1], speeding up the system dynamics at time scales of the order of the quantum speed limit. We perform a fast crossing of the quantum phase transition the system undergoes under realistic experimental conditions, and we present a new scaling-based strategy to compute optimal pulses for systems at the thermodynamical limit.

  10. Heuristic optimization of the scanning path of particle therapy beams

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, J.; Donetti, M.; Bourhaleb, F.; Ansarinejad, A.; Attili, A.; Cirio, R.; Garella, M. A.; Giordanengo, S.; Givehchi, N.; La Rosa, A.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Pecka, A.; Peroni, C.; Russo, G.; Sacchi, R.

    2009-06-15

    Quasidiscrete scanning is a delivery strategy for proton and ion beam therapy in which the beam is turned off when a slice is finished and a new energy must be set but not during the scanning between consecutive spots. Different scanning paths lead to different dose distributions due to the contribution of the unintended transit dose between spots. In this work an algorithm to optimize the scanning path for quasidiscrete scanned beams is presented. The classical simulated annealing algorithm is used. It is a heuristic algorithm frequently used in combinatorial optimization problems, which allows us to obtain nearly optimal solutions in acceptable running times. A study focused on the best choice of operational parameters on which the algorithm performance depends is presented. The convergence properties of the algorithm have been further improved by using the next-neighbor algorithm to generate the starting paths. Scanning paths for two clinical treatments have been optimized. The optimized paths are found to be shorter than the back-and-forth, top-to-bottom (zigzag) paths generally provided by the treatment planning systems. The gamma method has been applied to quantify the improvement achieved on the dose distribution. Results show a reduction of the transit dose when the optimized paths are used. The benefit is clear especially when the fluence per spot is low, as in the case of repainting. The minimization of the transit dose can potentially allow the use of higher beam intensities, thus decreasing the treatment time. The algorithm implemented for this work can optimize efficiently the scanning path of quasidiscrete scanned particle beams. Optimized scanning paths decrease the transit dose and lead to better dose distributions.

  11. Transition Planning: A Team Effort. NICHCY Transition Summary, TS10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Mary Kate

    This summary on transition planning provides ideas and information on how students, families, school personnel, service providers, and others can work together to help students with a disability make a smooth transition after leaving high school. It focuses on creative transition planning and services that use all the resources that exist in…

  12. Buckley Prize Talk: The Suprerconductor-(Metal)-Insulator Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapitulnik, Aharon

    2015-03-01

    While the classical theory of phase transitions has been extraordinarily successful, there are several reasons to exercise caution when applying this approach to the zero temperature superconducting transition. First, experimental identification of the relevant phases requires extrapolation to zero temperature, which becomes complicated, especially when one needs to identify sources of dissipation. In addition, since superconductivity may be highly inhomogeneous as appreciable superconducting order parameter may be concentrated in ``superconducting puddles'' due to disorder and/or spontaneous phase separation, the nature of the quantum phase transition to a superconducting state may be highly anomalous, where the system attempts to optimizes the formation of puddles with the Josephson coupling among them to obtain global superconductivity. In this talk we will review some of the consequences of these considerations, emphasizing the possible emergence of anomalous metallic phases close to the superconductor-insulator transition.

  13. PYTRANSIT: fast and easy exoplanet transit modelling in PYTHON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parviainen, Hannu

    2015-07-01

    We present a fast and user friendly exoplanet transit light-curve modelling package PYTRANSIT, implementing optimized versions of the Giménez and Mandel & Agol transit models. The package offers an object-oriented PYTHON interface to access the two models implemented natively in FORTRAN with OpenMP parallelization. A partial OpenCL version of the quadratic Mandel-Agol model is also included for GPU-accelerated computations. The aim of PYTRANSIT is to facilitate the analysis of photometric time series of exoplanet transits consisting of hundreds of thousands of data points, and of multipassband transit light curves from spectrophotometric observations, as a part of a researcher's programming toolkit for building complex, problem-specific analyses.

  14. Approximating random quantum optimization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, B.; Laumann, C. R.; Läuchli, A. M.; Moessner, R.; Sondhi, S. L.

    2013-06-01

    We report a cluster of results regarding the difficulty of finding approximate ground states to typical instances of the quantum satisfiability problem k-body quantum satisfiability (k-QSAT) on large random graphs. As an approximation strategy, we optimize the solution space over “classical” product states, which in turn introduces a novel autonomous classical optimization problem, PSAT, over a space of continuous degrees of freedom rather than discrete bits. Our central results are (i) the derivation of a set of bounds and approximations in various limits of the problem, several of which we believe may be amenable to a rigorous treatment; (ii) a demonstration that an approximation based on a greedy algorithm borrowed from the study of frustrated magnetism performs well over a wide range in parameter space, and its performance reflects the structure of the solution space of random k-QSAT. Simulated annealing exhibits metastability in similar “hard” regions of parameter space; and (iii) a generalization of belief propagation algorithms introduced for classical problems to the case of continuous spins. This yields both approximate solutions, as well as insights into the free energy “landscape” of the approximation problem, including a so-called dynamical transition near the satisfiability threshold. Taken together, these results allow us to elucidate the phase diagram of random k-QSAT in a two-dimensional energy-density-clause-density space.

  15. Collapse transition in proteins.

    PubMed

    Ziv, Guy; Thirumalai, D; Haran, Gilad

    2009-01-01

    The coil-globule transition, a tenet of the physics of polymers, has been identified in recent years as an important unresolved aspect of the initial stages of the folding of proteins. We describe the basics of the collapse transition, starting with homopolymers and continuing with proteins. Studies of denatured-state collapse under equilibrium are then presented. An emphasis is placed on single-molecule fluorescence experiments, which are particularly useful for measuring properties of the denatured state even under conditions of coexistence with the folded state. Attempts to understand the dynamics of collapse, both theoretically and experimentally, are then described. Only an upper limit for the rate of collapse has been obtained so far. Improvements in experimental and theoretical methodology are likely to continue to push our understanding of the importance of the denatured-state thermodynamics and dynamics for protein folding in the coming years. PMID:19081910

  16. High speed transition prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasperas, Gediminis

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this work period was to develop, maintain and exercise state-of-the-art methods for transition prediction in supersonic flow fields. Basic state and stability codes, acquired during the last work period, were exercised and applied to calculate the properties of various flowfields. The development of a code for the prediction of transition location using a currently novel method (the PSE or Parabolized Stability Equation method), initiated during the last work period and continued during the present work period, was cancelled at mid-year for budgetary reasons. Other activities during this period included the presentation of a paper at the APS meeting in Tallahassee, Florida entitled 'Stability of Two-Dimensional Compressible Boundary Layers', as well as the initiation of a paper co-authored with H. Reed of the Arizona State University entitled 'Stability of Boundary Layers'.

  17. Transitions: exploring the frontier.

    PubMed

    Corless, Inge B

    End-of-life experiences go by various terms, including near-death experiences (NDEs), death bed visions, death bed phenomena, death bed coincidences, and nearing death awareness. Death bed escorts is the term applied to the vision of deceased family members or friends who inform the dying person that they will be accompanied in the transition from life. In this article, I examine the subject of NDEs and death bed escorts, starting with the rich body of work provided by Robert and Beatrice Kastenbaum. A subject of some interest to Robert Kastenbaum, he explored this frontier in his many writings on dying, death, and bereavement. Ever the pioneer and having made the ultimate transition, he may yet be exploring new frontiers. PMID:25351590

  18. Emergence and Phase Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikkema, Arnold

    2006-05-01

    Phase transitions are well defined in physics through concepts such as spontaneous symmetry breaking, order parameter, entropy, and critical exponents. But emergence --- also exhibiting whole-part relations (such as top-down influence), unpredictability, and insensitivity to microscopic detail --- is a loosely-defined concept being used in many disciplines, particularly in psychology, biology, philosophy, as well as in physics[1,2]. I will review the concepts of emergence as used in the various fields and consider the extent to which the methods of phase transitions can clarify the usefulness of the concept of emergence both within the discipline of physics and beyond.1. Robert B. Laughlin, A Different Universe: Reinventing Physics from the Bottom Down (New York: Basic Books, 2005). 2. George F.R. Ellis, ``Physics and the Real World'', Physics Today, vol. 58, no. 7 (July 2005) pp. 49-54.

  19. Stimulated coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hung-chi Lihn

    1996-03-01

    Coherent radiation emitted from a relativistic electron bunch consists of wavelengths longer than or comparable to the bunch length. The intensity of this radiation out-numbers that of its incoherent counterpart, which extends to wavelengths shorter than the bunch length, by a factor equal to the number of electrons in the bunch. In typical accelerators, this factor is about 8 to 11 orders of magnitude. The spectrum of the coherent radiation is determined by the Fourier transform of the electron bunch distribution and, therefore, contains information of the bunch distribution. Coherent transition radiation emitted from subpicosecond electron bunches at the Stanford SUNSHINE facility is observed in the far-infrared regime through a room-temperature pyroelectric bolometer and characterized through the electron bunch-length study. To measure the bunch length, a new frequency-resolved subpicosecond bunch-length measuring system is developed. This system uses a far-infrared Michelson interferometer to measure the spectrum of coherent transition radiation through optical autocorrelation with resolution far better than existing time-resolved methods. Hence, the radiation spectrum and the bunch length are deduced from the autocorrelation measurement. To study the stimulation of coherent transition radiation, a special cavity named BRAICER is invented. Far-infrared light pulses of coherent transition radiation emitted from electron bunches are delayed and circulated in the cavity to coincide with subsequent incoming electron bunches. This coincidence of light pulses with electron bunches enables the light to do work on electrons, and thus stimulates more radiated energy. The possibilities of extending the bunch-length measuring system to measure the three-dimensional bunch distribution and making the BRAICER cavity a broadband, high-intensity, coherent, far-infrared light source are also discussed.

  20. Kondo-Anderson transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kettemann, S.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Varga, I.; Slevin, K.

    2012-03-01

    Dilute magnetic impurities in a disordered Fermi liquid are considered close to the Anderson metal-insulator transition (AMIT). Critical power-law correlations between electron wave functions at different energies in the vicinity of the AMIT result in the formation of pseudogaps of the local density of states. Magnetic impurities can remain unscreened at such sites. We determine the density of the resulting free magnetic moments in the zero-temperature limit. While it is finite on the insulating side of the AMIT, it vanishes at the AMIT, and decays with a power law as function of the distance to the AMIT. Since the fluctuating spins of these free magnetic moments break the time-reversal symmetry of the conduction electrons, we find a shift of the AMIT, and the appearance of a semimetal phase. The distribution function of the Kondo temperature TK is derived at the AMIT, in the metallic phase, and in the insulator phase. This allows us to find the quantum phase diagram in an external magnetic field B and at finite temperature T. We calculate the resulting magnetic susceptibility, the specific heat, and the spin relaxation rate as a function of temperature. We find a phase diagram with finite-temperature transitions among insulator, critical semimetal, and metal phases. These new types of phase transitions are caused by the interplay between Kondo screening and Anderson localization, with the latter being shifted by the appearance of the temperature-dependent spin-flip scattering rate. Accordingly, we name them Kondo-Anderson transitions.

  1. Radiative Transitions in Charmonium

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek; Robert Edwards; David Richards

    2005-10-01

    The form factors for the radiative transitions between charmonium mesons are investigated. We employ an anisotropic lattice using a Wilson gauge action, and domain-wall fermion action. We extrapolate the form factors to Q{sup 2} = 0, corresponding to a real photon, using quark-model-inspired functions. Finally, comparison is made with photocouplings extracted from the measured radiative widths, where known. Our preliminary results find photocouplings commensurate with these experimentally extracted values.

  2. Transition Region Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, P.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Ultraviolet emission lines emitted from the SOLAR TRANSITION REGION are often shifted from their expected rest wavelengths. Shifts of spectral lines are due to the so-called DOPPLER EFFECT, where the source of emission is moving either away from or towards the observer, causing a change in the apparent wavelength. The shifted emission lines are most often interpreted as a flow of plasma along ...

  3. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  4. NASA metric transition plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA science publications have used the metric system of measurement since 1970. Although NASA has maintained a metric use policy since 1979, practical constraints have restricted actual use of metric units. In 1988, an amendment to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 required the Federal Government to adopt the metric system except where impractical. In response to Public Law 100-418 and Executive Order 12770, NASA revised its metric use policy and developed this Metric Transition Plan. NASA's goal is to use the metric system for program development and functional support activities to the greatest practical extent by the end of 1995. The introduction of the metric system into new flight programs will determine the pace of the metric transition. Transition of institutional capabilities and support functions will be phased to enable use of the metric system in flight program development and operations. Externally oriented elements of this plan will introduce and actively support use of the metric system in education, public information, and small business programs. The plan also establishes a procedure for evaluating and approving waivers and exceptions to the required use of the metric system for new programs. Coordination with other Federal agencies and departments (through the Interagency Council on Metric Policy) and industry (directly and through professional societies and interest groups) will identify sources of external support and minimize duplication of effort.

  5. Transition mixing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, R.; White, C.

    1986-01-01

    A computer model capable of analyzing the flow field in the transition liner of small gas turbine engines is developed. A FORTRAN code has been assembled from existing codes and physical submodels and used to predict the flow in several test geometries which contain characteristics similar to transition liners, and for which experimental data was available. Comparisons between the predictions and measurements indicate that the code produces qualitative results but that the turbulence models, both K-E and algebraic Reynolds Stress, underestimate the cross-stream diffusion. The code has also been used to perform a numerical experiment to examine the effect of a variety of parameters on the mixing process in transition liners. Comparisons illustrate that geometries with significant curvature show a drift of the jet trajectory toward the convex wall and weaker wake region vortices and decreased penetration for jets located on the convex wall of the liner, when compared to jets located on concave walls. Also shown were the approximate equivalency of angled slots and round holes and a technique by which jet mixing correlations developed for rectangular channels can be used for can geometries.

  6. The Myths of Mass Transit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Catherine G.

    1982-01-01

    Criticizes eight commonly held notions about the value of mass transit systems in public transportation programs. Alternative approaches for improving the quality and quantity of urban transit systems are discussed. (AM)

  7. Youths Transitioning as Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, C. Amelia

    2014-01-01

    This chapter considers how transitions to adulthood have been historically represented and presents alternative ways of thinking about transitions to adulthood through the context of adult basic education programs.

  8. Optimizing antimicrobial therapy in children.

    PubMed

    Long, Sarah S

    2016-07-01

    Management of common infections and optimal use of antimicrobial agents are presented, highlighting new evidence from the medical literature that enlightens practice. Primary therapy of staphylococcal skin abscesses is drainage. Patients who have a large abscess (>5 cm), cellulitis or mixed abscess-cellulitis likely would benefit from additional antibiotic therapy. When choosing an antibiotic for outpatient management, the patient, pathogen and in vitro drug susceptibility as well as tolerability, bioavailability and safety characteristics of antibiotics should be considered. Management of recurrent staphylococcal skin and soft tissue infections is vexing. Focus is best placed on reducing density of the organism on the patient's skin and in the environment, and optimizing a healthy skin barrier. With attention to adherence and optimal dosing, acute uncomplicated osteomyelitis can be managed with early transition from parenteral to oral therapy and with a 3-4 week total course of therapy. Doxycycline should be prescribed when indicated for a child of any age. Its use is not associated with dental staining. Azithromycin should be prescribed for infants when indicated, whilst being alert to an associated ≥2-fold excess risk of pyloric stenosis with use under 6 weeks of age. Beyond the neonatal period, acyclovir is more safely dosed by body surface area (not to exceed 500 mg/m(2)/dose) than by weight. In addition to the concern of antimicrobial resistance, unnecessary use of antibiotics should be avoided because of potential later metabolic effects, thought to be due to perturbation of the host's microbiome. PMID:27263076

  9. The transition to agricultural sustainability

    PubMed Central

    Ruttan, Vernon W.

    1999-01-01

    The transition to sustainable growth in agricultural production during the 21st century will take place within the context of a transition to a stable population and a possible transition to a stable level of material consumption. If the world fails to successfully navigate a transition to sustainable growth in agricultural production, the failure will be due more to a failure in the area of institutional innovation than to resource and environmental constraints. PMID:10339524

  10. Visual Analytics Technology Transition Progress

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtz, Jean; Cook, Kristin A.; Whiting, Mark A.; Lemon, Douglas K.; Greenblatt, Howard

    2009-09-23

    The authors provide a description of the transition process for visual analytic tools and contrast this with the transition process for more traditional software tools. This paper takes this into account and describes a user-oriented approach to technology transition including a discussion of key factors that should be considered and adapted to each situation. The progress made in transitioning visual analytic tools in the past five years is described and the challenges that remain are enumerated.