Sample records for indian river lagoon

  1. Indian River Lagoon

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Water.

    Located on the eastern coast of Florida, the Indian River Lagoon is a barrier island and lagoonal system which has been impacted by human development. This site, created by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), details how the system works, its history, human impacts on the system, and the area's future. In addition, visitors can learn about the habitats, plants, and animals found in the Indian River Lagoon.

  2. NAME: Indian River Lagoon LOCATION: Brevard and Indian River Counties, Florida

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    NAME: Indian River Lagoon LOCATION: Brevard and Indian River Counties, Florida ACRES/RIVER MILES) Indian River Lagoon Program PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The goal of this project is to restore 47.5 acres of estuarine habitat in the Indian River Lagoon by removing invasive species, such as Brazilian pepper

  3. The Indian River Lagoon - Impacts from Spanish Conquistadors to Man in Space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Barile; K. Duhring

    1987-01-01

    A Spanish caravelles brought the first European adventurers and settlers to the New World depositing them on the East Florida coast. American rockets boosted space ships from the same land into another frontier, Space. Between these two events, East Florida, Cape Canaveral and the Indian River lagoon felt the impact of several waves of settlement which maintained the region's image

  4. Biodiversity of Saline and Brakish Marshes of the Indian River Lagoon: Historic and Current Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzer, Paul A.

    1995-01-01

    The Indian River Lagoon (IRL) crosses a zone of climatic transition. Historically, marshes dominated saline and brackish environments in the north of the lagoon, while mangroves became important to the south. Distribution of marsh communities was influenced by hydrology, salinity, soil characteristics, and fire, as well as periodic freezes. Marshes of the IRL have been greatly modified since the 1940s. Despite significant modifications, marsh plant species have not been lost from the region, but community and landscape patterns have been greatly modified and ecosystem processes altered.

  5. Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce: The Indian River Lagoon Species Inventory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Florida's Indian River Lagoon (IRL) is recognized as possibly the most biologically diverse estuarine system in the continental US. The Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce manages the IRL Species Inventory Project, which includes an online database of taxonomic, ecological, and life history information of species in the estuary. Researchers, educators, and resource managers are encouraged to make use of the IRL Species Inventory Project, which will be expanded as research continues. The database includes a search engine with helpful tips, species reports; alphabetized species lists, detailed descriptions of IRL habitats, and more. A photo gallery has been recently added, featuring the work of local photographers.

  6. Notes on the occurrence, distribution, and biology of elasmobranch fishes in the Indian River lagoon system, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franklin F. Snelson; Sherry E. Williams

    1981-01-01

    Fifteen species of elasmobranchs, eight sharks and seven rays, have been recorded with reasonable certainty from the Indian\\u000a River lagoon system on the central east coast of Florida. We collected four shark and six ray species during a three and one-half\\u000a year study of the northern portion of the lagoon system. Five of these appear to be year-round residents, and

  7. Feeding Habits of Indian River Lagoon Bottlenose Dolphins Assessed Using Stable Isotope and Fatty Acid Signature Analysis

    E-print Network

    Historically, the majority of diet studies on marine mammals have used stomach content and/or fecal analy- ses). The purpose of this ongoing study is to examine the inter-relationships between proximate composition. Fish were collected on a bimonthly basis in the Indian River Lagoon and were immediately frozen

  8. Surface water quality evaluation using multivariate methods and a new water quality index in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yun Qian; Kati White Migliaccio; Yongshan Wan; Yuncong Li

    2007-01-01

    Appropriate assessment of long-term water quality monitoring data is essential to evaluation of water quality and this often requires use of multivariate techniques. Our objective was to evaluate water quality in the south Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida using several multivariate techniques and a comprehensive water quality index (WQI). Clustering was used to cluster the six monitoring stations into three

  9. Seasonal Distribution and Habitat Associations of Bull Sharks in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida: A 30Year Synthesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tobey H. Curtis; Douglas H. Adams; George H. Burgess

    2011-01-01

    Many coastal shark species use shallow estuarine regions as nursery habitat, but there are considerable gaps in our understanding of the seasonal distribution and habitat use patterns of sharks within these systems. We compiled all available sampling data from the Indian River Lagoon (IRL) along Florida's central Atlantic coast to examine the distribution of bull sharks Carcharhinus leucas. The data

  10. Scales of temporal and spatial variability in the distribution of harmful algae species in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edward J. Phlips; Susan Badylak; Mary Christman; Jennifer Wolny; Julie Brame; Jay Garland; Lauren Hall; Jane Hart; Jan Landsberg; Margaret Lasi; Jean Lockwood; Richard Paperno; Doug Scheidt; Ariane Staples; Karen Steidinger

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a harmful algal bloom (HAB) monitoring effort in the Indian River Lagoon. The goal of the study was to describe spatial and temporal variability in the distribution, frequency of occurrence, and composition of HABs, along with an examination of potential driving factors, such as hydrologic conditions and nutrient concentrations. Six sampling sites in the

  11. Habitat use by fishes after tidal reconnection of an impounded estuarine wetland in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida (USA)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gregg R. Poulakis; Jonathan M. Shenker; D. Scott Taylor

    2002-01-01

    Most of the wetlands located along the Indian River Lagoon (IRL) ineast-central Florida (USA) have been impounded since the 1950's and1960's to reduce mosquito reproduction. Impounded marsh (i.e.,impoundment) dikes physically separate the wetlands from the estuary toallow artificial flooding of the impoundments during the mosquito breedingperiod (May to October). Presently, Rotational ImpoundmentManagement (RIM) is the preferred impoundment management techniquein the

  12. The impacts of the 2004 hurricanes on hydrology, water quality, and seagrass in the Central Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joel S. Steward; Robert W. Virnstein; Margaret A. Lasi; Lori J. Morris; Janice D. Miller; Lauren M. Hall; Wendy A. Tweedale

    2006-01-01

    Between August 14 and September 26, 2004, four tropical weather systems (Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne) affected the\\u000a central Indian River Lagoon (IRL). The central IRL received a prodigious amount of rainfall for the 2 mo, between 72 and 83\\u000a cm, which is a once-in-50-yr rainfall event. High stream discharges were generated that, combined with wind-suspended sediments,\\u000a significantly reduced salinities

  13. Residues of polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT in water and sediment of the Indian River Lagoon, Florida - 1977 to 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.C.; Johnson, R.S.; Bricker, J.L.

    1980-01-01

    Water and sediment samples collected during 1977 to 1978 from the Indian River lagoon between Vero Beach, Indian River County, and Fort Pierce, Saint Lucie County, Florida were analyzed for PCBs and DDT. Sample locations were chosen on the basis of proximity to major tributaries, sewage outfalls, or municipal area. Concentrations in water samples were below 0.01 ppB sigma DDT and 0.5 ppB PCBs. Small amounts of PCBs and DDT were found in most sediment samples, ranging from less than 1.0 ppB to 0.63 ppM Aroclor 1254 and from less than 0.1 ppB to 0.081 ppM sigma DDT. Samples from the Taylor Creek tributary and from the Fort Pierce power plant and municipal docking area contained higher PCB concentrations than did samples from other locations. DDT and PCB levels in most samples indicate little contamination by these compounds of the Indian River Waterway between Vero Beach and Fort Pierce.

  14. Antibiotic-Resistant Organisms Cultured from Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins ( Tursiops truncatus ) Inhabiting Estuarine Waters of Charleston, SC and Indian River Lagoon, FL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Adam M. Schaefer; Juli D. Goldstein; John S. Reif; Patricia A. Fair; Gregory D. Bossart

    2009-01-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) from estuarine waters of Indian River Lagoon, FL (IRL) and Charleston, SC (CHS) were cultured to screen for microorganism\\u000a colonization and to assess antibiotic sensitivity. Swabs (n = 909) were collected from the blowhole, gastric fluid, and feces\\u000a of 171 individual dolphins The most frequently cultured organisms were Plesiomonas shigelloides (n = 161), Aeromonas hydrophila (n = 144), Escherichia coli (n = 85), and

  15. Risk Factors for Colonization of E. coli in Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Adam M.; Bossart, Gregory D.; Mazzoil, Marilyn; Fair, Patricia A.; Reif, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Opportunistic pathogens related to degradation in water quality are of concern to both wildlife and public health. The objective of this study was to identify spatial, temporal, and environmental risk factors for E. coli colonization among Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) inhabiting the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), FL between 2003 and 2007. Age, gender, capture location, coastal human population density, proximity of sewage treatment plants, number of septic tanks, cumulative precipitation 48?hrs and 30 days prior to capture, salinity, and water temperature were analyzed as potential risk factors. Highest E. coli colonization rates occurred in the northern segments of the IRL. The risk of E. coli colonization was the highest among the youngest individuals, in counties with the highest cumulative rainfall 48?hrs and in counties with the highest number of septic systems during the year of capture. The prevalence of colonization was the highest during 2004, a year during which multiple hurricanes hit the coast of Florida. Septic tanks, in combination with weather-related events suggest a possible pathway for introduction of fecal coliforms into estuarine ecosystems. The ability of E. coli and related bacteria to act as primary pathogens or cause opportunistic infections adds importance of these findings. PMID:21977048

  16. Nitrogen limitation of growth and nutrient dynamics in a disturbed mangrove forest, Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feller, Ilka C.; Whigham, D.F.; McKee, K.L.; Lovelock, C.E.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine effects of nutrient enrichment on plant growth, nutrient dynamics, and photosynthesis in a disturbed mangrove forest in an abandoned mosquito impoundment in Florida. Impounding altered the hydrology and soil chemistry of the site. In 1997, we established a factorial experiment along a tree-height gradient with three zones, i.e., fringe, transition, dwarf, and three fertilizer treatment levels, i.e., nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), control, in Mosquito Impoundment 23 on the eastern side of Indian River. Transects traversed the forest perpendicular to the shoreline, from a Rhizophora mangle-dominated fringe through an Avicennia germinans stand of intermediate height, and into a scrub or dwarf stand of A. germinans in the hinterland. Growth rates increased significantly in response to N fertilization. Our growth data indicated that this site is N-limited along the tree-height gradient. After 2 years of N addition, dwarf trees resembled vigorously growing saplings. Addition of N also affected internal dynamics of N and P and caused increases in rates of photosynthesis. These findings contrast with results for a R. mangle-dominated forest in Belize where the fringe is N-limited, but the dwarf zone is P-limited and the transition zone is co-limited by N and P. This study demonstrated that patterns of nutrient limitation in mangrove ecosystems are complex, that not all processes respond similarly to the same nutrient, and that similar habitats are not limited by the same nutrient when different mangrove forests are compared.

  17. Measures of Water Quality in Merrit Island National Wildlife Refuge Impoundments and Adjacent Indian River Lagoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this project was to conduct preliminary investigations to determine appropriate sampling strategies to measure the flux of dissolved nutrients (specifically, NH4+, NO3-, NO2-, and PO4(3-)) and suspended particulate matter (TSS) between impoundments and the IRL in preparation for an intensive three-year monitoring program. In addition to nutrients and TSS, a variety of common water quality indicators were also measured during these preliminary studies. Six impoundments and a single restored marsh were selected for study. Over a month long period, water samples were collected weekly at selected impoundment culverts. Water was collected in duplicate as independent grab samples from both the lagoon side and within the perimeter ditch directly adjacent to the culverts. Water quality indicators inside and outside the marsh impoundments were different. Ammonium, salinity, bacteria, and chlorophyll-a were higher inside the impoundments as expected possibly as a result of the great affect of evaporation on impoundment water. Water quality indicators responded rapidly both inside and outside the impoundments as exemplified by the increase in NH4(+)-N concentrations during a horseshoe crab die-off. Water quality indicators were high variable during the month in which water samples were collected. Because the impoundments are widely spaced it is logistically unrealistic to sample each of the impoundments and associated seagrass beds on a single day, sampling must be stratified to allow patterns of material movement and the annual flux of materials to and from the impoundments to be determined.

  18. Concentrations of Saxitoxin and Tetrodotoxin in Three Species of Puffers from the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, the Location for Multiple Cases of Saxitoxin Puffer Poisoning from 2002 to 2004

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan R. Deeds; Kevin D. White; Stacey M. Etheridge; Jan H. Landsberg

    2008-01-01

    In response to multiple, unexpected cases of saxitoxin poisoning that started in January 2002, southern puffers Sphoeroides nephelus, checkered puffers S. testudineus, and bandtail puffers S. spengleri were collected from April to August 2002 from several locations in the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), Florida. Fish were analyzed for saxitoxin (STX) and tetrodotoxin (TTX) content in muscle, liver, and gonad tissues

  19. Diseases of oysters Crassostrea ariakensis and C. virginica reared in ambient waters from the Choptank River, Maryland and the Indian River Lagoon, Florida.

    PubMed

    Dungan, Christopher F; Carnegie, Ryan B; Hill, Kristina M; McCollough, Carol B; Laramore, Susan E; Kelly, Christopher J; Stokes, Nancy A; Scarpa, John

    2012-11-19

    To assess potential benefits and liabilities from a proposed introduction of Asian Suminoe oysters, susceptibilities of exotic Crassostrea ariakensis and native C. virginica oysters were compared during exposures to pathogens endemic in temperate, mesohaline waters of Chesapeake Bay and sub-tropical, polyhaline Atlantic waters of southern Florida, USA. Cohorts of diploid, sibling oysters of both species were periodically tested for diseases while reared in mesocosms receiving ambient waters from the Choptank River, Maryland (>3 yr) or the Indian River Lagoon, Florida (10 to 11 mo). Haplosporidium sp. infections (e.g. MSX disease) were not detected in oysters from either site. Perkinsus sp. infections (dermo disease) occurred among members of both oyster species at both sites, but infections were generally of low or moderate intensities. A Bonamia sp. was detected by PCR of DNAs from tissues of both oyster species following exposure to Florida waters, with maximum PCR prevalences of 44 and 15% among C. ariakensis and C. virginica oysters respectively during June 2007. Among C. ariakensis oysters sampled during April to July 2007, a Bonamia sp. was detected in 31% of oysters by PCR (range 11 to 35%) and confirmed histologically in 10% (range 0 to 15%). Among simultaneously sampled C. virginica oysters, a Bonamia sp. was detected in 7% by PCR (range 0 to 15%), but histological lesions were absent. Although this is the first report of a Bonamia sp. from Florida waters, sequences of small subunit (SSU) rDNA and in situ hybridization (ISH) assays both identified the Florida pathogen as Bonamia exitiosa, which also infects oysters in the proximate waters of North Carolina, USA. PMID:23324414

  20. Water-Quality Monitoring and Biological Integrity Assessment in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida: Status, Trends, and Loadings (1988–1994)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilbert C. Sigua; Joel S. Steward; Wendy A. Tweedale

    2000-01-01

    a   production in the central, south central, and the south segments of the lagoon. In a system as large and complex as the lagoon,\\u000a N and P limitations are potentially subject to significant spatial and temporal variability. Total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TN)\\u000a was higher in the north (1.25 mg\\/liter) and lower in the south (0.89 mg\\/liter). The reverse pattern was observed

  1. How to Love Your LagoonHow to Love Your Lagoon Educate Yourself

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    -based processes to implement protection programs with specific actions to address environmental problems. Physical Features The Indian River Lagoon is a 156-mile long estuary located on Florida's East Coast. The IRL system is comprised of three distinct water bodies, Mosquito Lagoon, Banana River, and the Indian River

  2. December 69, 2010 Gila River Indian Community

    E-print Network

    Hall, Sharon J.

    December 69, 2010 Gila River Indian Community Near Phoenix , Arizona, USA ACES, A Community, restoration, resource management, and development decisions. The primary objective of ACES is to provide ecosystem services while facilitating their effective use in planning and decision making. The first ACES

  3. Insecticide pollution of Indian rivers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satya P. Mohapatra; Vijay T. Gajbhiye; Narendra P. Agnihotri; Manju Raina

    1995-01-01

    Summary Rivers are the main source of water in India, and are particularly used for agricultural irrigation and drinking water supply. As most of the rivers pass through agricultural fields, they are subject to contamination with the different insecticides used for crop protection. Residues of persistent organochlorines, which are still used in large quantities in India, are found in water

  4. Hydrographic Study of a Highly Stratified River Mouth Estuary. Alvarado Coastal Lagoon, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perales-Valdivia, H.; Sanay, R.

    2014-12-01

    Two 24 hours surveys on high and low river discharge conditions were used to describe the hydrography and the currents at the entrance of Alvarado Coastal Lagoon, México, located at the southwestern coast of the Gulf of México. This study represent the first of this kind in this lagoon. The Alvardo Coastal Lagoon sustains several economical fisheres in the region, including the shrimp fishery. The inlet of the Alvarado Coastal Lagoon is a microtidal rivermouth estuary. In each survey, towed ADCP and hydrographic data were sampled during a diurnal tidal cycle for three across-inlet transects located near the mouth. 12 track repetitions were completed allowing to distinguish the subtidal and tidal signals. In both runoff conditions a salt wedge was present, and showed surface-bottom salinity difference up to 35 psu. During high river discharge condition the salt wedge was present only during flood tide. The thicknesses of the interface, and upper and bottom layers oscillated according the tide. The water surface layer was always toward the ocean. During low river discharge condition the salt wedge was present for the whole tidal cycle. The vertical position of the interface oscillated as the tide did but keeping a constant thickness.

  5. 1. Photographic copy of map. Map of Gila River Indian ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photographic copy of map. Map of Gila River Indian Reservation, Arizona, Showing Allotted And Irrigated Land. Department of the Interior. U.S. Indian Irrigation Service. July, 1916 (Source: National Archives, Washington, DC) - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Lands North & South of Gila River, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  6. Salmon Always Goes Up River An American Indian Epic

    E-print Network

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Salmon Always Goes Up River An American Indian Epic Retold by Rodney Frey 28 September 2000 Salmon ..................................12 Salmon is a great warrior. He's going up the Columbia River; Salmon always goes up river. Salmon to catch the salmon; it's not so good. Salmon goes over, piles up rocks, here and here. He goes up the bank

  7. Notice of release of White River germplasm Indian ricegrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White River Germplasm Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides [Roem. & Schult.] Barkworth) has been released for use in rangeland seedings. This plant material traces from a seed morph collected in northwestern Colorado in Rio Blanco County, near the White River. White River Germplasm displays go...

  8. Coastal Seawater Pollutants in the Coral Reef Lagoon of a Small Tropical Island in Development: The Mayotte Example (N Mozambique Channel, SW Indian Ocean)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard A. Thomassin; Fabrice Garcia; Luc Sarrazin; Thèrese Schembri; Emmanuel Wafo; Véronique Lagadec; Véronique Risoul; Julien Wickel

    \\u000a Mayotte Island, a small volcanic island, is surrounded by the largest coral reef lagoon of the Indian Ocean (almost 1,500\\u000a km2), with all coral reefs types represented: ribbon barrier reefs, lagoonal and fringing reefs, and also coastal mangroves.\\u000a Since 1975, Mayotte has shown an incredible development of its population (today about 180,000) and of its economy, with increases\\u000a in consumer

  9. Influence of freshwater and terrigenous material on nutrients, bacteria and phytoplankton in a high island lagoon: Mayotte, Comoro Archipelago, Indian Ocean

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eveline Vacelet; André Arnoux; Bernard A. Thomassin; Marc Travers

    1998-01-01

    Freshwater and terrigenous suspended material inputs were studied in Longoni Bay, an area of the lagoon of Mayotte (Comoro,\\u000a Indian Ocean) that is unaffected by the influence of the most populated area of the island. The influence of terrigenous material\\u000a on the lagoon waters was limited to the coastal zone and resulted in the increase of inorganic nitrogen and silica.

  10. Effects of extended absence of flooding on the fish assemblages of three floodplain lagoons in the middle São Francisco River, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paulo dos Santos Pompeu; Hugo Pereira Godinho

    2006-01-01

    In the Neotropics, a large proportion of fish communities of large rivers use floodplain as habitats for feeding, reproduction, and refuge. An evaluation was made of the effects of extended dry periods on the species richness, abundance and local extinction of fish species in three marginal lagoons in the middle São Francisco River, southeastern Brazil. The studied lagoons fail to

  11. Seasonal variability of carbon dioxide and methane in the rivers and lagoons of Ivory Coast (West Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koné, Y. J. M.; Abril, G.; Delille, B.; Borges, A. V.

    2009-04-01

    We report a data-set of carbon dioxide (CO2) and dissolved methane (CH4) in three rivers (Bia, Tanoé and Comoé) and five lagoons (Tendo, Aby, Ebrié, Potou and Grand-Lahou) of Ivory Coast (West Africa), during the four main climatic seasons (high dry season, high rainy season, low dry season and low rainy season). The surface waters of the three rivers were oversaturated in CO2 and CH4 with respect to atmospheric equilibrium, the seasonal variability of CO2 and CH4 seemed to be largely controlled by dilution during the flooding period. The strong correlation of CH4 concentrations with the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) confirm the dominance of a continental sources (from soils) for both CO2 and CH4 in these rivers. The largest CH4 over-saturations and diffusive air-water CH4 fluxes were observed in the Tendo and Aby lagoons that are permanently stratified systems (unlike the other 3 lagoons), leading to anoxic bottom waters favorable for a large CH4 production. In addition, these two stratified lagoons showed low pCO2 values due to high primary production, which suggests an efficient transfer of organic matter across the pycnocline. As a result, the stratified Tendo and Aby lagoons were respectively, a low source of CO2 to the atmosphere and a sink of atmospheric CO2 while the other 3 well-mixed lagoons were strong sources of CO2 to the atmosphere but lower sources of CH4 to the atmosphere.

  12. Indian River Poultry Farms Office Building Project 

    E-print Network

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    1973-01-01

    This leaflet describes the fungus Entomosporium, which attacks photinia and Indian hawthorn plants. The publication describes the disease cycle and recommends cultural practices to control and treat the disease....

  13. Mercury in the Moji-Guaçu river basin, S.P-Brazil: the link between marginal lagoons and river contribution, assessed by 210Pb dating profiles.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Glauco Arnold; Ferreira, José Roberto; Magalhães, Carlos Emanuel de Carvalho; da Silva, Nivaldo Carlos; Taddei, Maria Helena Tirollo

    2003-02-01

    Total mercury content was evaluated in water and suspended sediment samples of the Moji-Guaçu river and in water and bottom sediment of its 3 marginal lagoons (Catingueiro, Barrinha, and Rio das Pedras), located downstream of the sampling point in the main channel. In all situations, low Hg concentrations were found in suspended and bottom sediments. Aluminum was used as a geochemical tracer to normalize the Hg concentrations in the sediment cores from the Rio das Pedras lagoon (r = 0.92). It was estimated that the Moji-Guaçu river transports up to 19 kg Hg yr(-1), 65% in the dissolved form and 35% adsorbed onto particulate matter. Following an acute toxic stage observed in the years 1970-1980, the basin has been restored to its original conditions mainly by natural recovery and a general reduction in Hg input to the ecosystem. PMID:12691491

  14. SPRINGS AND WATER TANKS ON THE COLORADO RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION IN ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage shows springs and water tanks on Colorado River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...

  15. SPRINGS AND WATER TANKS ON GILA RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION IN ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This point coverage shows springs and water tanks on Gila River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...

  16. Climate change impact assessment on hydrology of Indian river basins

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Gosain; Sandhya Rao; Debajit Basuray

    As part of the National Communication (NATCOM) project undertaken by the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India, the present study has been taken up to quantify the impact of the cl i- mate change on the water resources of Indian river systems. The study uses the HadRM2 daily weather data to determine the spatio-temporal water availabil- ity in

  17. Analysis of Lagoonal Ecosystems in the Po River Delta Associated with Intensive Aquaculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Yu. I.; Sorokin, P. Yu.; Ravagnan, G.

    1999-03-01

    Observations on structure and functioning of coastal lagoon ecosystems experiencing a high level of eutrophication impact were accomplished in three lagoons of Ca'Pisani integrated within an experimental aquaculture enterprise variously fertilized by waste effluents discharged from and intensive fish culture plant. During August and early September an extremely dense bloom of dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarensewas recorded in these lagoons with the density of phytoplankton up to 190 g m -3of wet biomass, and primary production 2 to 6 mg Cl -1 day -1. The diel dissolved oxygen fluctuations in water column during the bloom reached 15-20 mg O 2 l -1. The wet biomass of bacterioplankton in the lagoons attained 5-9 g m -3. The microzooplankton was dominated by ciliates with biomass 1 to 19 g m -3. The daytime mesozooplankton was dominated by calanoid copepods with a biomass 0·05-0·25 g m -3, while the biomass of the demersal zooplankton at night attained 2 to 14 g m -3. In the lagoon of Ocaro, the phototrophic plankton was dominated by the symbiotic ciliate Mesodinium.The labile sulphides content in the upper layer of the bottom attained over 1 g S dm -3of wet silt. The rate of microbial sulphate reduction was 5-10 mg S dm -3day -1. The data are generalized within the energy balance in these specific anthropogenically transformed pelagic communities.

  18. A near real-time scour monitoring system at Indian River Inlet, Delaware, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Puleo; J. T. Hayden

    2009-01-01

    The Indian River Inlet is the only connection between the Atlantic Ocean and Rehoboth and Indian River Bays. The inlet has been problematic from an engineering standpoint since locals and state agencies first tried to make the opening permanent in the late 1920's. Localized scour is of particular concern to state officials due to its proximity to supporting bridge piers

  19. 40 CFR 49.22 - Federal implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...project located on the Reservation of the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian...

  20. 40 CFR 52.142 - Federal Implementation Plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Implementation Plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...Implementation Plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...the Tri-Cities landfill located on the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian...

  1. 40 CFR 49.22 - Federal implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...project located on the Reservation of the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian...

  2. 40 CFR 49.22 - Federal implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...project located on the Reservation of the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian...

  3. 78 FR 44590 - Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community-Amendment to Alcoholic Beverage Control Ordinance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ...134A2100DD/AAK300000/a0t500000.000000] Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...This notice publishes the amendment to the Salt River Pima- Maricopa Indian Community...Beverage Control Ordinance, Chapter 14, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian...

  4. 40 CFR 49.22 - Federal implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...project located on the Reservation of the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian...

  5. 40 CFR 49.22 - Federal implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...implementation plan for Tri-Cities landfill, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community...project located on the Reservation of the Salt River Pima Maricopa Indian...

  6. Studies on the toxic elements and organic degradation products in aquatic bodies and sediments around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Haulover Canal and Mosquito Lagoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghuman, G. S.; Menon, M. P.; Emeh, C. O.

    1975-01-01

    The work during the first year ending September, 1975, is reported. Indian River, Haulover Canal, Mosquito Lagoon, and other aquatic areas of discharge around Kennedy Space Center (KSC) were studied. The presentation and interpretation of data on water and sediment samples collected from Haulover Canal and Mosquito Lagoon are included. The field and laboratory data are presented and tentative conclusions were drawn in the various aspects of the study. An attempt was made to correlate the physical, chemical, and biological parameters.

  7. Swine Prospect SHOW Hosted by the Indian River County Swine Masters 4-H

    E-print Network

    Watson, Craig A.

    BARN WARS 2014 Swine Prospect SHOW Hosted by the Indian River County Swine Masters 4-H Sunday, Dec:00 am Awards Grand Champion Swine -- $300.00 Reserve Grand Champion Swine -- $150.00 Cash awards for all

  8. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition of major Indian rivers: a first global assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambs, L.; Balakrishna, K.; Brunet, F.; Probst, J. L.

    2005-11-01

    Nine major rivers have been sampled around the Indian subcontinent to give an overview of the surface water characteristics. Both 18O and deuterium have been measured to determine the origin of the water and the possible evapotranspiration process. The major ions have also been analysed to obtain complementary information. Although some basins have been studied previously (mainly in the north), this is the first attempt at a wider investigation of major Indian rivers. The results are discussed from the perspective of the hydroclimatological, geographical and geological specificity of the river basins. 18O values vary from light-isotope-enriched Himalayan rivers to heavy-isotope-enriched peninsular Indian rivers in a northwest-southeast gradient across the subcontinent. There is more evapotranspiration, leading to heavy isotope enrichment, in the peninsular (southern Deccan) rivers compared with the light-isotope-enriched snow- and glacier-melt-derived waters of the Himalayan rivers. The 18O values of Indian rivers correspond roughly to the 18O values of the rains falling over the subcontinent. However, the influence of tributaries is dominant over rainfall in rivers like the Narmada and Tapti. The Cauvery and Krishna rivers show maximum evapotranspiration and sodium pollution, as indicated by the 18O values, deuterium excess and major ion data. Copyright

  9. Teaching American Indian Geography and History with New Perspectives: The Lodge Pole River Project Example

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurt, Douglas A.; Wallace, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    A three-year institute called "The Lodge Pole River Project" was designed to change educator perceptions of American Indian historical geography and encourage the creation of balanced and culturally sensitive American Indian K-12 curriculum. This project offered unique opportunities to assess a geography institute's impact upon teacher knowledge…

  10. 76 FR 77549 - Colorado River Indian Tribes-Amendment to Health & Safety Code, Article 2. Liquor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...Amendment to Health & Safety Code, Article 2. Liquor AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs...River Tribal Health and Safety Code, Article 2. Liquor, Section 2-403(12...River Tribal Health and Safety Code, Article 2, Liquor by Ordinance No. 10-03...

  11. 75 FR 39960 - Alcoholic Beverage Control Ordinance, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community (SRPMIC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ...Bureau of Indian Affairs Alcoholic Beverage Control Ordinance, Salt River Pima-Maricopa...amendment to the Salt River Alcoholic Beverage Control Ordinance, Chapter 14, Articles I...this amendment to the Alcoholic Beverage Control Ordinance No. SRO-355-2010 on...

  12. AAACCOMPLISHMENTSCCOMPLISHMENTSCCOMPLISHMENTS 2012201220122012 FAU Harbor Branch Research Highlights INDIAN RIVER LAGOON OBSERVATORY PROGRAM ESTABLISHED

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Scientists from the FAU Harbor Branch Marine Biomedical and Biotechnology Research (MBBR) program (supported migrating. MBBR is also partnering with the University of Central Florida to identify marine microorganisms

  13. Comparative Visual Function in Predatory Fishes from the Indian River Lagoon

    E-print Network

    Kajiura, Stephen

    a shutter open longer on a camera, resulting in an increase in absolute sensitivity of the eye. The temporal sensitivity of three coastal teleost species (common snook [Centropomus undeci- malis], gray snapper [Lutjanus from 360 to 620 nm and revealed the presence of rods sensitive to dim and twilight conditions, as well

  14. 75 FR 53299 - Issuance of NPDES General Permits for Wastewater Lagoon Systems Located in Indian Country in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ...Spirit Lake Indian Reservation; the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation; the Turtle Mountain...This permit includes that portion of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation and associated...that Tribe. It does not include the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation or any...

  15. Indian River to look at outsourcing more government By Henry A. Stephens

    E-print Network

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    Indian River to look at outsourcing more government services By Henry A. Stephens Wednesday. The County Commission agreed to outsource the snack bar, however, and the next year it rebounded with $45 County Administrator Joe Baird outsourced. That followed outsourcing the golf course maintenance in 1996

  16. Indian River County Environmental Education Instructional Guide. Social Studies, Eighth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    The teaching guide presents social studies activities for eighth graders to learn about environmental concepts, problems, and responsibilities. Part of a series for teachers, students, and community members, it is based on the Indian River County environment in Florida. The introduction identifies the county's natural resources, wildlife, and…

  17. Logging the Great Lakes Indian Reservations: The Case of the Bad River Band of Ojibwe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen-Adams, Michelle M.; Langston, Nancy E.; Mladenoff, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The harvest of the Great Lakes primary forest stands (ca. 1860-1925) transformed the region's ecological, cultural, and political landscapes. Although logging affected both Indian and white communities, the Ojibwe experienced the lumber era in ways that differed from many of their white neighbors. When the 125,000-acre Bad River Reservation was…

  18. Indian River County Environmental Education Instructional Guide. Social Studies, Grade Nine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    The teaching guide presents social studies activities to help ninth graders learn about environmental concepts, problems, and responsibilities. Based on the Indian River County environment in Florida, it is part of a series for teachers, students, and community members. The introduction describes the county's geography, natural resources,…

  19. Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Council, Columbia River Basin Indian Tribes, and NOAA Fisheries

    E-print Network

    Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Council, Columbia River Basin Indian Tribes, and NOAA Fisheries Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council; 851 SW 6th of several agencies and institutions and has been published by the American Fisheries Society. It is our

  20. Indian River County Environmental Education Instructional Guide. Social Studies, Seventh Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    The guide is one in a series for teachers, students, and community members to help develop and teach environmental concepts, responsibility, and problem solving. It presents concepts and activities related to environmental education for seventh grade social studies classes. Background information is based on the Indian River County environment of…

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Variability of Domestic River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Populations: Genetic Evidence for Domestication of River Buffalo in Indian Subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Muniyandi; Nimisha, Koodali; Kumar, Satish

    2015-01-01

    River buffalo, Bubalus bubalis is a large bovine species frequently used livestock in southern Asia. It is believed that the river buffalo was domesticated from Bubalus arnee, the wild buffalo of mainland Asia, a few thousand years ago, probably during the period of Indus Valley civilization. However, the domestication history of the river buffalo has been the subject of debate for many decades mainly due to the lack of clear archeological evidence and the divisive conclusions of the genetic studies. Therefore, in order to understand the domestication history and genetic relationship among the various river buffalo populations, we analyzed 492-bp region of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of 414 river buffalo sampled from India, Pakistan, Egypt, and Iran along with the available 403 swamp buffalo sequences. The phylogenetic analyses of our study along with the archaeological evidence suggest that the river buffalo was domesticated in an atypical manner involving continuous introgression of wild animals to the domestic stocks in Indian subcontinent prior to mature phase of Indus Valley civilization (2600–1900 BC). Specifically, our data exclude Mesopotamian region as the place of domestication of the river buffalo. PMID:25900921

  2. BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES AS ECOLOGICAL INDICATORS OF WATER LEVEL CHANGES IN MARGINAL LAGOONS AT LOWER SÃO FRANCISCO FLOODPLAIN RIVER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DÉBORAH OLIVEIRA; VÍCTOR GOMES; MARCOS CALLISTO

    The diversity of benthic macroinvertebrates in marginal lagoons at the low São Francisco watershed is dependent on water flow of upstream reservoirs. These organisms inhabit the bottom of freshwater ecosystems and their presence\\/absence, abundance and species richness are ecological indicators of water level fluctuations and human impacts in the watershed. The objective of this study was to assess the taxonomic

  3. Impact of river runoff into the ocean on Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinayachandran, P. N.; Jahfer, S.; Nanjundiah, R. S.

    2015-05-01

    Rivers of the world discharge about 36000 km3 of freshwater into the ocean every year. To investigate the impact of river discharge on climate, we have carried out two 100 year simulations using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM3), one including the river runoff into the ocean and the other excluding it. When the river discharge is shut off, global average sea surface temperature (SST) rises by about 0.5°C and the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) increases by about 10% of the seasonal total with large increase in the eastern Bay of Bengal and along the west coast of India. In addition, the frequency of occurrence of La Niña-like cooling events in the equatorial Pacific increases and the correlation between ISMR and Pacific SST anomalies become stronger. The teleconnection between the SST anomalies in the Pacific and monsoon is effected via upper tropospheric meridional temperature gradient and the North African–Asian Jet axis.

  4. Sustainability of Mediterranean Deltaic and Lagoon Wetlands with Sea-Level Rise: The Importance of River Input

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Day; Carles Ibáñez; Francesco Scarton; Didier Pont; Philippe Hensel; Jason Day

    2011-01-01

    We report on a decadal trend of accretionary dynamics in the wetlands of several northwestern Mediterranean deltas and a lagoon\\u000a system, all of them with high rates of wetland loss. Wetland vertical accretion and surface elevation change were measured\\u000a at 55 riverine, marine, and impounded sites in four coastal systems: the Ebro delta, Spain; the Rhône delta, France; and the

  5. Fractionation and ecotoxicological implication of potentially toxic metals in sediments of three urban rivers and the Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Oyeyiola, Aderonke O; Davidson, Christine M; Olayinka, Kehinde O; Alo, Babajide I

    2014-11-01

    The potential environmental impact of sediment-bound Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in three trans-urban rivers in Lagos state and in the Lagos Lagoon was assessed by use of the modified Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction. The quality of the data was checked using BCR CRM 143R and BCR CRM 701. Good agreement was obtained between found and certified/indicative values. Of the rivers, the Odo-Iyaalaro, was generally the most contaminated and the Ibeshe the least. Higher concentrations of metals were generally found in the dry season compared to the wet season. Cadmium and Zn were released mostly in the acid exchangeable step of the sequential extraction, indicating that they have the greatest potential mobility and bioavailability of the analytes studied. Chromium and Cu were associated mainly with the reducible and oxidisable fractions, and Pb predominantly with the reducible and residual fractions. Sediments with the highest pseudototal analyte concentrations also released higher proportions of analytes earlier in the sequential extraction procedure. The study suggests that, during the dry season, potentially toxic metals (PTM) may accumulate in sediments in relatively labile forms that are released and can potentially be transported or bioaccumulate in the rainy season. Application of risk assessment codes and Hankanson potential risk indices indicated that Cd was the element of greatest concern in the Lagos Lagoon system. The study indicated that there is a need to strengthen environmental management and pollution control measures to reduce risk from PTM, but that even relatively simple strategies, such as seasonal restrictions on dredging and fishing, could be beneficial. PMID:25069633

  6. Dynamics of microbial planktonic food web components during a river flash flood in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Pecqueur; Francesca Vidussi; Eric Fouilland; Emilie Le Floc’h; Sebastien Mas; Cecile Roques; Christian Salles; Marie-George Tournoud; Behzad Mostajir

    2011-01-01

    Episodic river flash floods, characteristic of Mediterranean climates, are suspected to greatly affect the functioning of\\u000a microbial food webs. For the first time, the abundance, biomass and diversities of microbial food web components were studied\\u000a before and during 4 consecutive days after a flash flood that occurred in November 2008, in the surface waters of five stations\\u000a along a salinity

  7. Hydrodynamics Offshore of the North Beach of Indian River Inlet, DE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCosmo, N. R.; Puleo, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    The Indian River Inlet (IRI) on the east coast of Delaware, USA connects the Atlantic Ocean to the Indian River and Rehoboth Bays. Long-term and large-scale net alongshore sediment transport along this portion of coastline is from south to north. The north beach of IRI suffers from severe erosion due to interruption of the alongshore transport and current variability near the inlet. The magnitude of such erosion has increased over the past decade and questions have arisen as to the cause. The goal of this study is to quantify currents and wave patterns and estimate sediment transport rates at the north beach and near the inlet in an effort to determine the causes of persistent erosion. Data were obtained from October 2013 to March 2014 in the form of 3 separate 28-day deployments. Each deployment consisted of 4 proposed deployment sites. Data at each site were collected using a bottom mounted Nortek Aquadopp Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and 2 Campbell Scientific Optical Backscatter Sensors (OBS). Currents and OBS data were sampled every 120 s. Waves were sampled for approximately 17 minutes at the beginning of every hour. Data analysis from the deployments indicates the presence of several interesting trends in currents that can be linked to the persistent erosion. Current data are filtered to quantify typical current speed and direction for a tidal cycle (peak flood to peak flood) at each deployment site. The typical currents off of the north beach and up to 800 m north of the north jetty are mostly directed southward over the entire tidal cycle. This consistent southward flow implies: 1) there is no flow reversal based on tide, contrary to what might be expected at an inlet adjacent beach, 2) the typical current direction is opposite of the expectations for the known long-term large-scale net alongshore transport and 3) the consistency of this atypical current may be responsible for transporting sediment southward and away from the north beach. Currents and waves will be further analyzed for storm and non-storm conditions in order to more completely quantify the hydrodynamics of the area. Sediment data will also be analyzed in conjunction with the hydrodynamic data in order to better understand the sediment transport process.

  8. Numerical Simulation of Flow and Sediment Transport Patterns in Indian River Inlet, de, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshtpoor, M.; Puleo, J. A.; Kraus, N.

    2010-12-01

    The Indian River Inlet (IRI), the only water way which connects the Atlantic Ocean to Delaware inland bays, plays an essential role in sediment exchange between the ocean and two bays. Complex and turbulent flow patterns inside the tidal channel during high and low tide cause large quantities of sediment to move through the inlet. During ebb a tidal jet with peak velocities sometimes nearing 5 m/s emerges from the inlet veering south assisting in the formation of a semi-lunar ebb shoal that can affect shoreline evolution. Within the inlet, two scour holes have deepened significantly over the last 20 years reaching depths of 30m compared to the roughly 8-10 m depth of the channel. The scour holes presently threaten in-water piers that support a bridge across the inlet. It is believed the scour holes are a result of large-scale vertical motions initiated over a bathymetric high directly underneath the bridge and eddy shedding off the bridge piers themselves. In this study, the Coastal Modeling System (CMS) is used to simulate the 2D depth-averaged motion within the inlet-bay system. CMS includes sediment transport predictions based on advection-diffusion equations and subsequent morphological change. Preliminary results will include hydrodynamic simulations before and after scour hole growth and with and without the addition of wave forcing.

  9. Metals in sediments of San Andres lagoon, Tamaulipas, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, F.G.; Aguilera, L.G. (Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnologia, Universitaria (Mexico)); Sharma, V.K. (Texas A M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Heavy metal pollution in water is generally associated with industrial and municipal discharges into rivers, estuaries and lagoons. Once metals are in the water column, they may be taken up by organisms, deposited in the sediments or remain for some period in the water itself. The deposition rate in sediments depends on, among other factors, metal concentration in surface sediments. The concentrations of heavy metals in sediments of coastal, estuarine and lagoon environments have been determined by many workers. For the past several years, we have been interested in determining trace and heavy metal concentrations in the lagoons in Mexico to establish the levels of metal pollution. The work reported here is the completion of our ongoing study in San Andres lagoon. San Andres lagoon is located north of two industrial ports, Tampico and Altamira. In this industrial zone, the basins of the Panuco and Tamesi Rivers are localized and have industrial effluent throughout the year. All these activities and the input of the Tigre River, which runs through an agricultural and cattle-raising region, may affect the biogeochemistry of the San Andres lagoon. In the present work, we report concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn and Pb in sediments of San Andres lagoon. The measurements were made in different seasons; Rain-84 (August-September 1984); North (October-December 1984); Dry (April 1985); and Rain-85 (April-June 1985). 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. 33 CFR 334.240 - Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md. 334...Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md....

  11. 33 CFR 334.240 - Potomac River, Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md. 334...Mattawoman Creek and Chicamuxen Creek; U.S. Naval Surface Weapons Center, Indian Head Division, Indian Head, Md....

  12. Brazil: Duck Lagoon

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... in the lagoon during spring and summer. Although the lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) is found in some parts of Rio Grande do Sul, the Baird's tapir (Tapirus bairdii), is not distributed within the image area (it is ...

  13. Lockport Sewage Lagoon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, John

    1995-01-01

    Describes a student initiated stewardship project that resulted in the transformation of a sewage lagoon near the school into a place to study nature. Contains a list of 20 things that discourage a successful stewardship project. (LZ)

  14. Comparative oceanography of coastal lagoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kjerfve, Bjorn

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that physical lagoon characteristics and variability depend on the channel connecting the lagoon to the adjacent coastal ocean is evaluated. The geographical, hydrological, and oceanographic characteristics of 10 lagoon systems are described and analyzed; these oceanographic features are utilized to classify the lagoon systems. Choked lagoons (Laguna Joyuda, Coorong, Lake St.Lucia, Gippsland Lakes, Lake Songkla/Thale Luang/Thale Noi, and Lagoa dos Patos) are prevalent on coasts with high wave energy and low tidal range; restricted lagoons (Lake Pontchartrain and Laguna de Terminos) are located on low/medium wave energy coasts with a low tidal range; and leaky lagoons (Mississippi Sound and Belize Lagoon/Chetumal Bay) are connected to the ocean by wide tidal passes that transmit oceanic effects into the lagoon with a minimum of resistance. The data support the hypothesis that the nature of the connecting channel controls system functions.

  15. Modeling the Flushing Response to the Construction of a Low Crested Weir in the Banana River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saberi, A.; Weaver, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    The ADCIRC hydrodynamic model coupled with a Lagrangian Particle Tracking Model (LPTM) is applied to study circulation in the Banana River. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which constructing a low crested weir adjacent to Port Canaveral can improve flushing in this region. The Banana River a 50 km long sub-basin of the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), located on the central-east coast of Florida in Brevard County between Cape Canaveral and Merritt Island. Although Banana River has an outlet to the ocean through the Port Canaveral locks, the locks remain closed when there is no passing vessel resulting in limited circulation, long flushing time and poor water quality. Recent high mortality events of different species, e.g. dolphins, manatees and pelicans in the lagoon ecosystem, can be linked to the decline in the water quality. ADCIRC is used to simulate the hydrodynamic properties of the study area and determine the 2D depth-averaged velocity field for two separate cases: one with only tidal and another with both tidal and meteorological forces considered. Simulations are run, first to establish the baseline hydrodynamics of the unmodified system, and then to predict the effects of modifying the domain. Passive particles are placed in the Banana River portion of our domain, and the movement of these particles is tracked using LPTM for both cases. Flushing and residence time are then computed. Results indicate an improvement in flushing in both the Banana River and the central Indian River Lagoon, driven by an induced southerly current. In the portion of the Banana River to the south of the port complex, tidal flushing time is significantly reduced for the case of modified domain. In this southern region the flushing time based on 50% renewal time, is decreased from 100 days down to 15 days, after the addition of the weir to the domain.

  16. Role of the Indian Ocean sea surface temperature in shaping the natural variability in the flow of Nile River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siam, Mohamed S.; Wang, Guiling; Demory, Marie-Estelle; Eltahir, Elfatih A. B.

    2014-08-01

    A significant fraction of the inter-annual variability in the Nile River flow is shaped by El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Here, we investigate a similar role for the Indian Ocean (IO) sea surface temperature (SST) in shaping the inter-annual variability of the Nile River flow. Using observations of global SST distribution and river flow in addition to atmospheric general circulation model sensitivity experiments, we show that North and Middle IO SSTs play a significant intermediate role in the teleconnection between ENSO and the Nile flow. Applying partial coherency analyses, we demonstrate that the connection between North and Middle IO SSTs and Nile flow is strongly coupled to ENSO. During El Niño events, SST in the North and Middle IO increases in response to the warming in the Tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean and forces a Gill-type circulation with enhanced westerly low-level flow over East Africa and the Western IO. This anomalous low-level flow enhances the low-level flux of air and moisture away from the Upper Blue Nile (UBN) basin resulting in reduction of rainfall and river flow. SSTs in the South IO also play a significant role in shaping the variability of the Nile flow that is independent from ENSO. A warming over the South IO, generates a cyclonic flow in the boundary layer, which reduces the cross-equatorial meridional transport of air and moisture towards the UBN basin, favoring a reduction in rainfall and river flow. This independence between the roles of ENSO and South IO SSTs allows for development of new combined indices of SSTs to explain the inter-annual variability of the Nile flow. The proposed teleconnections have important implications regarding mechanisms that shape the regional impacts of climate change over the Nile basin.

  17. Developing a model for the mercury cycle in the Marano-Grado Lagoon (Italy)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Marano-Grado Lagoon is a wetland system of about 160 km2 located in the Northern Adriatic Sea (Italy) between the Tagliamento and the Isonzo River mouths. The lagoon morphology and biogeochemistry are primarily controlled by the exchange with the Adriatic Sea and, to a lesser...

  18. Data report for the geologic and scenic quality evaluation of selected sand and gravel sites on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, William H.; Van Gosen, Bradley S.; Arbogast, Belinda; Lindsey, David A.

    2011-01-01

    In April 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted field studies on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming, to inventory and evaluate sand and gravel deposits underlying river terraces on tribal lands along the Wind River. This report contains the results for 12 sites of sand and gravel deposits evaluated for their potential use as aggregate in Portland cement concrete, asphalt, and base course. The report provides the results of: * The USGS geologic studies and engineering tests. * A conclusion and recommendation for the best use of sand and gravel materials. * Calculations of available sand and gravel materials. * A scenic quality landscape inventory and evaluation.

  19. Geomorphic effectiveness of extraordinary floods on three large rivers of the Indian Peninsula

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vishwas S. Kale

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of extreme events is directly linked to the flood power and the total energy expended. The geomorphic effectiveness of floods is evaluated in terms of the distribution of stream power per unit boundary area (?) over time, for three very large floods of the 20th Century in the Indian Peninsula. These floods stand out as outliers when compared

  20. Geomorphic effectiveness of extraordinary floods on three large rivers of the Indian Peninsula

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vishwas S. Kale

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of extreme events is directly linked to the flood power and the total energy expended. The geomorphic effectiveness of floods is evaluated in terms of the distribution of stream power per unit boundary area (omega) over time, for three very large floods of the 20th Century in the Indian Peninsula. These floods stand out as outliers when compared

  1. Multi-centennial scale precipitation and following lagoon ecosystem fluctuation in the Holocene reconstructed by East Korean Lagoon sediment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuki, K.; Yang, D. Y.; Lim, J.; Nahm, W. H.; Nakanishi, T.; Seto, K.; Otsuka, M.; Kashima, K.

    2014-12-01

    There are lagoons in the northern east coast of the South Korea, which were formed during the transgression period in the early Holocene. These lagoons shrank about 5-30 % during the first half of 20 century due to terrestrial sediment input from soil erosion in reclamation lands. However, buried lagoonal sediments record Holocene climate change. In this study, multi-centennial scale paleo-climate and paleo-ecosystem change were investigated by analysis of this buried and present lagoon deposits. Based on the diatom assemblage analysis of the sediment in the lagoon Maeho where it is the east coast lagoons in Korea, this lagoon was formed about 8,400 years ago, and halophilic diatoms showed high peaks at three times within the last 8,400 years. Timings of these peaks were well coincident with the high-sea level periods reported in the western Japan. It is considered that sea-level of the east coast in Korea also showed high at three times during the mid-late Holocene, and then, salinity of the lagoon increased in these periods. Except for such sea-level dependent change, salinity of the lagoon Maeho showed the multi-centennial (200 or 400 years) scale periodic variation. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) also showed the clear 400 years periodicity in the mid-late Holocene. When the MS showed high value, oligohalobous diatoms showed high value. However, halophilic diatoms and number of total diatom valves increased when the MS showed low value. This correspondence probably indicates that magnetic minerals flew into the lagoon with river fresh water, and then volume of fresh water inflow has changed with 400 years cycles. Such MS cycle was also confirmed in the sediments of other lagoons. Change of fresh water inflow should be not local event, was a part of regional environmental change. These results probably indicate that the precipitation on the northeastern South Korea has changed by the 400 years cycle. On the basis of lagoon bottom sediment, it made clear that the change of diatom assemblage during the last 600 years has been well corresponded with the variation of Korean tree ring delta 14C. There is a high possibility that water quality and ecosystem in the Koran lagoons was controlled by 200-400 years periodical precipitation change, and they are further affected by the solar irradiance change may be via monsoon intensity change.

  2. Maryborough Lagoon Pocket

    E-print Network

    Greenslade, Diana

    Manumber Mill Lagoon Pocket Delaneys Creek Coalstoun Lakes Glass House Mountains Harlin Howard Nambour/MAN HOWARD AL PARADISE DAM NOOSA BAR AL MOOLOOLAH AL/TM MARODIAN TM KILKIVAN TM BROOYAR TM BAUPLE EAST TM AL KENILWORTH BRIDGE WARANA BRIDGE AL/TM BRUCE HWY TM PEACHESTER WRC TM GARDNERS FALLS TM BORUMBA DAM

  3. Nitrogen retention in the Szczecin Lagoon, Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Voss, Maren; Deutsch, Barbara; Liskow, Iris; Pastuszak, Marianna; Schulte, Ulrike; Sitek, Stanis?aw

    2010-09-01

    Nitrogen (N) retention and transformation in the Szczecin Lagoon, southern Baltic Sea, were studied by means of budget calculations and stable isotope data of dissolved and particulate matter. Two stations, one located at the main outlet of the lagoon (Swina Strait) and the other 100 km to the south, on the Oder River (Widuchowa), were sampled biweekly over the years 2000-2002. The Oder River is one of the five largest rivers draining into the Baltic Sea and the largest one discharging its waters into the western Baltic. According to our data, the Oder River carried approximately 60 kt y(-1) total N, of which 7 kt y(-1) (<12 %) are particulate organic nitrogen and 46 kt y(-1) (77 %) dissolved inorganic nitrogen. Seasonal patterns of particulate nitrogen and nitrate concentrations were similar at Widuchowa and Swina Strait station, but nitrate concentrations in the Swina Strait were much lower, pointing not only to the dilution effect but also to considerable nutrient removal capacity (especially of nitrate) in the lagoon. The loss of nitrate suggests that denitrification is the major N-removal process, whereas primary production was only a minor contributor, due to the very low particle load. Combining budget calculations with stable isotope measurements reveal unique information about nitrogen turnover processes in the lagoon. PMID:20672205

  4. Channel characteristics and planform dynamics in the Indian Terai, Sharda River.

    PubMed

    Midha, Neha; Mathur, Pradeep K

    2014-01-01

    The Sharda River creates and maintains the ecologically diverse remnant patches of rare Terai ecosystem in northern India. This study used repeat satellite imagery and geographic information system analysis to assess the planform dynamics along a 60 km length of the Sharda River between 1977 and 2001 to understand the altered dynamics and its plausible causes in this data-poor region. Analyses revealed that the Sharda River has undergone significant change corresponding to enhanced instability in terms of increased number of neck cut-offs and consistent occurrence of avulsions in subsequent shorter assessment periods. An increased channel area (8%), decreased sinuosity (15%), increased braiding intensity, and abrupt migrations were also documented. The river has migrated toward the east with its west bankline being more unstable. The maximum shifts were 2.85 km in 13 years (1977-1990), 2.33 km in next 9 years (1990-1999), and a substantial shift of 2.39 km in just 2 years (1999-2001). The altered dynamics is making the future of critical wildlife habitats in Kishanpur Wildlife Sanctuary and North Kheri Forest Division precarious and causing significant economic damage. Extensive deforestation and expansion of agriculture since the 1950s in the catchment area are presumed to have severely impacted the equilibrium of the river, which urgently needs a management plan including wildlife habitat conservation, control, and risk reduction. The present study provides a strong foundation for understanding channel changes in the Sharda River and the finding can serve as a valuable information base for effective management planning and ecological restoration. PMID:24202283

  5. Phytoplankton assemblages in lateral lagoons of a large tropical reservoir.

    PubMed

    Ferrareze, M; Nogueira, M G

    2013-02-01

    This study aimed to analyse the composition and ecological attributes of the phytoplankton assemblages in four lateral lagoons and in the main channel of Rosana Reservoir (Paranapanema River, SE Brazil). Fieldwork was carried out in September and November/2004 and January, March, May and August/2005. A total of 283 taxa was identified. Zygnemaphyta was the most specious group, followed by Chlorophyta and Bacillariophyta. Higher richness, abundance and biomass were observed in the lagoons when compared with the river-reservoir sampling point, especially during the rainy period. Cryptophyceae and Bacillariophyceae dominated numerically. Cryptomonas brasiliensis Castro, Bicudo and Bicudo was the main species of the phytoplankton in terms of abundance and frequency of occurrence. The dynamics of the most important taxa are discussed and the results showed that the phytoplankton assemblages are mainly influenced by meteorological factors and nutrient availability (the main driving forces). Correlation analyses indicated that the assemblage abundance was limited by nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus). The phytoplankton abundance influenced positively the zooplankton abundance, what indicates the prevalence of bottom-up control routes in the lateral lagoons system. The results validate the hypotheses that lateral lagoons have a prominent ecological role on the phytoplankton diversity, as already previously demonstrated for fish and zooplankton. Therefore, the incorporation of the lateral lagoons in environmental programmes should be a target strategy for the conservation of the regional aquatic biota, minimising the negative impact of the dam. PMID:23644798

  6. Effects of the Indian Ocean Temperature on Nile River Flow Volumes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Becker; M. Sultan; D. Becker

    2009-01-01

    Egypt and Sudan are heavily dependent on the Nile River for sustaining their populations. In high flow years, the Lake Nasser surface water levels rise and overflows filling surrounding natural depressions and forming additional lakes (Tushka lakes) in peak flow years. The underlying Nubian Aquifer is recharged in high flow yeas, whereas the Nubian groundwater discharges into the Nile in

  7. Para-Professional Training in Adult Education at Gila River Indian Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Joycelyn

    Major goals of the Gila River Adult Basic Education Experimental Demonstration Project in this program description are identified as: (1) improving the academic skills of hard-to-reach adult dropouts and (2) training non-degreed local residents (people 19 years old or older with an 8th grade performance level) to recruit, counsel, and teach…

  8. The Indian River Lagoon ScienceFest will be held on September 27. At the event, various organizations, including UF/IFAS Extension, will have educational interactive booths.

    E-print Network

    Florida, University of

    experiment using mosquito larvae. 3 mosquito larvae will be pipetted into each of three containers with water mosquito larvae control. · Good Bug/Bad Bug Challenge ­ a game poster where the answer is provided as in a grasshopper - photo attached. UF IFAS Extension ­ Incredible Insects · Mosquito Meltdown ­ A mini science

  9. Research and Teaching: Field Trips and Their Effect on Student Achievement and Attitudes -- A Comparison of Physical Versus Virtual Field Trips to the Indian River Lagoon

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lesley C. Garner

    2005-03-01

    This study examined the effect of physical and virtual field trips on undergraduate, nonscience majors. No significant differences were seen in achievement, attitudes, learning styles, interactions between field trip and learning styles, or students' ability to answer questions at different levels. Results imply that both field trips promote learning.

  10. A GIS for the Assessment of the Spatio-Temporal Changes of the Kotychi Lagoon, Western Peloponnese, Greece

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. P. Kalivas; V. J. Kollias; G. Karantounias

    2003-01-01

    Kotychi lagoon, located at the northwestern coast of Peloponnese, Greece, is a biotope of great ecological and financial importance,protected by the Ramsar International Convention. Kotychi lagoon hasbeen severely degraded and transformed during the past 50 years, due to agricultural activities in the surrounding areas and watercourse alterations after the construction of Pinios river dam in the late 60's. Restoration works

  11. Occurrence of Cordaitales from lower Gondwana sediments of Ib-River Coalfield, Orissa, India: An Indian scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Kamal Jeet; Goswami, Shreerup; Chandra, Shaila

    2007-03-01

    The Ib-River Coalfield in Orissa State is a part of Mahanadi Master Basin. Recent extensive investigations were conducted in this Coalfield to locate fossiliferous beds in the Lower Gondwana deposits and as a result a large cache of plant fossils were recovered from Lower Permian sediments (Barakar Formation) exposed in Jurabaga and Lajkura Collieries. The complete flora includes 23 genera representing nine orders viz., Lycopodiales, Equisetales, Sphenophyllales, Filicales, Cordaitales, Coniferales, Ginkgoales, Cycadales and Glossopteridales. Only the Cordaitales, represented by four genera i.e., Noeggerathiopsis, Cordaites, Euryphyllum and Kawizophyllum are discussed in this paper. Cordaitalean leaves are described for the first time from this coalfield; the remaining plant groups will be considered in a subsequent publication. Cordaitalean leaves attributable to Noeggerathiopsis hislopii, Noeggerathiopsis minor, Euryphyllum whittianum, Euryphyllum maithyi, Kawizophyllum dunpathriensis and Cordaites sp. constitute about 13.90% (111 specimens) of the total plant assemblage collected from this Coalfield. Of the cordaitaleans, N. hislopii is most abundant (47.75%; 53 specimens) followed by E. whittianum (40.54%; 45 specimens). A summary of the distribution of Cordaitales throughout the Indian Gondwana is also presented. Floristic composition varies stratigraphically at the two Barakar exposures (Lajkura and Jurabaga Collieries). Cordaitales are preserved only in the lowermost (4th) horizon (lower floral zone). Strata in these collieries have been assigned to the lower and upper Barakar Formation based on floristic content and an Early Permian (Artinskian) age is assigned.

  12. Lagoon Restoration Project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This project is a multiyear effort focusing on energy flow in the Palace of Fine Arts lagoon just outside the Exploratorium in San Francisco. Phase 1 was a pilot study to determine the feasibility of improving biological energy flow through the small freshwater lagoon, using the expertise and resources of an environmental artist in collaboration with museum biologists and arts department staff. The primary outcome of Phase 1 is an experimental fountain exhibit inside the museum designed by public artist Laurie Lundquist with Exploratorium staff. This fountain, with signage, functions both as a model for natural aeration and filtration systems and as a focal point for museum visitors to learn about how biological processes cycle energy through aquatic systems. As part of the study of the lagoon`s health, volunteers continued biweekly bird consus from March through September, 1994. The goal was to find out whether the poor water quality of the lagoon is affecting the birds. Limited dredging was undertaken by the city Parks and Recreation Department. However, a more peermanent solution to the lagoon`s ecological problems would require an ambitious redesign of the lagoon.

  13. Evaluation of natural radioactivity and its associated health hazard indices of a South Indian river.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, N; Mullainathan, S; Mehra, R; Chaparro, Marcos A E; Chaparro, Mauro A E

    2014-12-01

    The activity concentration of the natural radionuclides (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K was measured for sediment samples collected from thirty-three different locations along the Bharathapuzha river basin by using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. The concentrations of the natural radionuclides were found to vary from location to location, and their mean values are 19.6, 82.87 and 19.44% higher than the worldwide mean values of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K, respectively. The value of (232)Th was found to be higher than that of (226)Ra in 82% of the samples collected for this study. The calculated values of indoor gamma dose rate (DIN) ranged between 89.55 and 194.24 nGy h(-1), and the overall mean value is 63.2% higher than the recommended safe and criterion limit by UNSCEAR. The internal and external hazard indices (H(in) and H(ex)), the representative gamma index and alpha index (I(gamma) and I(alpha)), the annual gonad dose equivalent (AGDE) and the excess lifetime cancer risk (ELCR) were also calculated and compared with the international recommended values. Multivariate statistical analyses were also carried out to determine the relation between the natural radionuclides and various radiological parameters. PMID:24319106

  14. Current Patterns and the Distribution of Benthic Habitats in a Coastal Lagoon of Mauritius

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Daby

    2006-01-01

    The oceanography around Mauritius (in the Western Indian Ocean) remains largely unstudied, hence there is an acute scarcity of marine environmental data for management purposes. Rigorous water depth and current measurements were made on a system of grids inside Le Morne lagoon (in the south western part of Mauritius) in March–April 2000 to generate semi-quantitative models of general flow pattern

  15. Indian Summer

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, E. [Sho-Ban High School, Fort Hall, ID (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  16. Circulation in Enewetak Atoll lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, M.; Smith, S.V.; Stroup, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Currents at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, were measured on the reef margins, in the channels, and in the lagoon. Lagoon circulation is dominated by wind-driven downwind surface flow and an upwind middepth return flow. This wind-driven flow has the characteristics of an Ekman spiral in an enclosed sea. Lagoon flushing is accomplished primarily by surf-driven water input over the windward (eastern) reefs and southerly drift out the South Channel. Mean water residence time is 1 month, while water entering the northern portion of the atoll takes about 4 months to exit.

  17. Assessing the potential underestimation of sediment and nutrient loads to the Great Barrier Reef lagoon during floods.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jim; Karim, Fazlul; Wilkinson, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Much of the sediment and nutrient load to the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon happens during over bank floods, when discharge can be significantly underestimated by standard river gauges. This paper assesses the potential need for a flood load correction for 28 coastal rivers that discharge into the GBR lagoon. For each river, daily discharge was divided into flows above and below a 'flood' threshold to calculate the mean annual percentage flow above this threshold. Most GBR rivers potentially need a flood load correction as over 15% of their mean annual flow occurs above the minor flood level; only seven rivers need little/no correction as their flood flows were less than 5% of the mean annual flow. Improved assessment of the true load of materials to the GBR lagoon would be an important contribution to the monitoring and reporting of progress towards Reef Plan and associated marine load targets. PMID:22137568

  18. INTRODUCTION The lagoon cockle Cerastoderma glaucum (Lamel-

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -isolated, shallow, non-tidal biotopes, e.g., brackish lagoons, estuaries, bays and lakes. It was previously thought and feed in lagoons and estuaries which are often inhabited by C. glaucum overland transport

  19. Genetic differentiation in Indian Major Carp, Cirrhinus mrigala (Hamilton, 1822) from Indian Rivers, as revealed by direct sequencing analysis of mitochondrial Cytochrome b region.

    PubMed

    Behera, Bijay Kumar; Kunal, Swaraj Priyaranjan; Paria, Prasenjit; Das, Priyanka; Meena, Dharmendra Kumar; Pakrashi, Sudip; Sahoo, Amiya Kumar; Panda, Debabrata; Jena, Joykrushna; Sharma, Anil Prakash

    2015-06-01

    A 307?bp segment of Cytochrome b gene of mtDNA was sequenced and analyzed for 90 individuals of Cirrhinus mrigala collected across the three rivers, namely Ganges, Narmada and Brahmaputra. Analyses revealed the presence of 14 haplotypes with haplotype diversity (h) ranging from 0.304 to 0.692, and nucleotide diversity (?) 0.002-0.043. The majority of variation was found within the population (96.21%), and the FST value (0.035) as well as the value of exact test of population differentiation (0.893) were found to be insignificant (p?rivers of India. PMID:25909754

  20. Estimating submarine groundwater discharge around Isola La Cura, northern Venice Lagoon (Italy), by using the radium quartet

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Garcia-Solsona; P. Masqué; J. Garcia-Orellana; J. Rapaglia; A. J. Beck; J. K. Cochran; H. J. Bokuniewicz; L. Zaggia; F. Collavini

    2008-01-01

    The four naturally-occurring radium isotopes (223Ra, 224Ra, 226Ra and 228Ra) were used to estimate the submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) in the Isola La Cura marsh area in the northern Venice Lagoon (Italy). By determining the radium contributors to the study area (river, coastal ocean and sediments) the radium excess in the lagoon water was quantified through a mass balance model.

  1. Rivers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-08-15

    This video segment from IdahoPTV's D4K takes you on a trip down Idaho's Snake River near 1000 Springs and Blur Heart Springs while it explains how rivers are formed, their uses, and how they make valleys, canyons and even plains.

  2. 77 FR 3241 - Intent To Hold North Dakota Task Force Meeting as Established by the Missouri River Protection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ...River from sedimentation, and protect Indian and non-Indian historical and cultural sites along the Missouri River from erosion. DATES: North Dakota Missouri River Task Force established by the Missouri River Protection and Improvement Act of 2000...

  3. 77 FR 61723 - Felgates Creek and Indian Field Creek Along the York River in Yorktown, VA; Restricted Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ...York River in Yorktown, Virginia. Naval Weapons Station Yorktown requested the Corps of...traditionally enforced by Commander, Naval Weapons Station Yorktown. DATES: Effective date...traditionally enforced by the Commander, Naval Weapons Station Yorktown. The Corps...

  4. Ecological risk assessment of pesticide residues in coastal lagoons of Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fernando P; Villeneuve, Jean-Pierre; Cattini, Chantal; Tolosa, Immaculada; Montenegro-Guillén, S; Lacayo, Martha; Cruz, Adela

    2002-10-01

    A detailed investigation on the contamination with chlorinated hydrocarbons and organophosphorous pesticides of the coastal lagoon system of Chinandega district, Nicaragua, allowed the identification of contaminant sources and lagoon areas currently more contaminated. The discharge of rivers into the lagoons is the main transport pathway of pesticide residues; whereas atmospheric depositions are likely to be the main pathway for the introduction of PCBs into the lagoons. Analysis of water samples indicates widespread contamination with soluble organophosphorous compounds, such as dichlorvos, up to 410 ng L(-1), diazinon, up to 150 ng L(-1), and chlorpyrifos, up to 83 ng L(-1). Analyses of suspended matter for low solubility organochlorine (OC) compounds revealed very high concentrations of toxaphene, up to 17,450 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw), total DDTs up to 478 ng g(-1), Aroclor 1254, up to 119 ng g(-1) (dw), and lower concentrations for other compounds. Lagoon sediments contain high concentrations also of toxaphene, from 7.9 to 6,900 ng g(-1) (dw), and DDTs, from 1.5 to 321 ng g(-1) (dw), and lower concentrations of chlorpyrifos, hexachlorocyclohexanes, chlordane and other residues. Concentrations of OCs in soft tissues of clams are statistically correlated with the concentrations of the same compounds in bottom sediments, indicating that sediments are a source of contaminants to biota. In some areas of the lagoon system, concentration of residues in sediments are far above recommended threshold guideline values for protection of aquatic life, and may cause acute and chronic toxic effects on more sensitive aquatic species. Despite the ban on the use of toxaphene and DDT, residues of these compounds are still entering the lagoons due to erosion of, and leaching from, agriculture soils in the region. Measures for protection of the lagoon ecosystem are discussed. PMID:12400931

  5. Benthic biogeochemical cycling of mercury in two contaminated northern Adriatic coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covelli, Stefano; Emili, Andrea; Acquavita, Alessandro; Koron, Neža; Faganeli, Jadran

    2011-10-01

    Previous research recognized most of the Northern Adriatic coastal lagoon environments as contaminated by mercury (Hg) from multiple anthropogenic sources. Among them, the Pialassa Baiona (P.B.) Lagoon, located near the city of Ravenna (Italy), received between 100 and 200 tons of Hg, generated by an acetaldehyde factory in the period 1957-1977. Further east, the Grado Lagoon has been mainly affected by a long-term Hg input from the Idrija mine (western Slovenia) through the Isonzo River since the 16th century. Hg cycling at the sediment-water interface (SWI) of the two lagoons was investigated and compared by means of an in situ benthic chamber, estimating diffusive Hg and Methyl-Hg fluxes in the summer season. Major chemical features in porewaters (Fe, Mn, H 2S, dissolved inorganic (DIC) and organic carbon (DOC), nutrients) and in the solid phase (C org, N and S) were also explored to understand the general biogeochemical conditions of the system in response to benthic respiration. The daily integrated flux for the methylated Hg form was extremely low in P.B. Lagoon, accounting for only 7% of the corresponding flux calculated for the Grado Lagoon. Despite a higher sedimentary Hg content in the P.B. Lagoon (14.4-79.0 ?g g -1) compared to the Grado Lagoon (10.7-12.5 ?g g -1), the in situ fluxes of Hg in the two experimental sites appeared similar. A selective sequential extraction procedure was applied to the solid phase, showing that the stable crystalline mineral phase cinnabar (HgS) is the predominant Hg fraction (about 50%) in the Grado Lagoon surface sediments. Conversely, Hg mobilization and sequestration in the P.B. Lagoon is related to the extremely anoxic redox conditions of the system where the intense sulfate reduction, by the release of sulfur and the formation of sulfides, limits the metal recycling at the SWI and its availability for methylation processes. Thus, the environmental conditions at the SWI in the P.B. Lagoon seem to represent a natural "barrier" for the potential risk of Hg transfer to the aquatic trophic chain.

  6. Eutrophication, water management, and the functioning of dutch estuaries and coastal lagoons

    SciTech Connect

    Nienhuis, P.H. (Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Yerseke (Netherlands))

    1992-12-01

    A number of European rivers (especially the Rhine) have a prevailing influence on the nutrient cycling of most Dutch estuaries. Owing to the increased loading of the estuaries with nitrogen and phosphorous compounds, effects of eutrophication on the biological communities are most evident in the tidal Western Wadden Sea and in a nontidal brackish lagoon, Veerse Meer. Whether the relation between changed nutrient loadings and changed biomass and production of primary and secondary producers in the turbid tidal Dutch ecosystems should be considered as a causal relation is questionable. The very widespread practice of lagoon modification confuses the effects of nutrient loading. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Pesticide residue assessment in three selected agricultural production systems in the Choluteca River Basin of Honduras

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J Kammerbauer; J Moncada

    1998-01-01

    There is a basic lack of information about the presence of pesticide residues in the environment in Central America. Over the period of February 1995 to June 1997, river, well, lagoon and spring water samples, as well as soil, fish tissue, lagoon bed sediments and some foodstuffs were taken from the greater Cholutecan River Basin of Honduras and analyzed for

  8. Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, D.; Norville, C. (Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States))

    1991-07-01

    The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

  9. STREAMS ON THE COLORADO INDIAN RESERVATION IN ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streams (line features) coverage for Colorado River Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...

  10. 50 CFR 300.95 - Treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Fraser River Sockeye and Pink Salmon Fisheries § 300.95 Treaty Indian fisheries. (a...must comply with this section when fishing for sockeye and pink salmon at the treaty Indian tribe's treaty fishing places...

  11. 50 CFR 300.95 - Treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Fraser River Sockeye and Pink Salmon Fisheries § 300.95 Treaty Indian fisheries. (a...must comply with this section when fishing for sockeye and pink salmon at the treaty Indian tribe's treaty fishing places...

  12. 50 CFR 300.95 - Treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Fraser River Sockeye and Pink Salmon Fisheries § 300.95 Treaty Indian fisheries. (a...must comply with this section when fishing for sockeye and pink salmon at the treaty Indian tribe's treaty fishing places...

  13. 50 CFR 300.95 - Treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Fraser River Sockeye and Pink Salmon Fisheries § 300.95 Treaty Indian fisheries. (a...must comply with this section when fishing for sockeye and pink salmon at the treaty Indian tribe's treaty fishing places...

  14. 50 CFR 300.95 - Treaty Indian fisheries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES REGULATIONS Fraser River Sockeye and Pink Salmon Fisheries § 300.95 Treaty Indian fisheries. (a...must comply with this section when fishing for sockeye and pink salmon at the treaty Indian tribe's treaty fishing places...

  15. [Mangrove dynamics in the Cispata lagoon system (Colombian Caribbean) during last 900 years].

    PubMed

    Castaño, Ana; Urrego, Ligia; Bernal, Gladys

    2010-12-01

    The lagoon complex of Cispatá (old Sinú river delta) located at the Northwestern coast of the Colombian Caribbean, encloses one of the biggest mangrove areas in this region. This area has changed during the last 330 years because of several environmental and climatic causes, mainly changes in the position of the delta (Sinú River), which is the main freshwater source in this area, and sea level rise. We hypothesized that the climatic and geomorphologic dynamics has caused changes in the extension and composition of mangrove vegetation, especially during last 150 years. The dynamics of mangroves during the last 900 years was reconstructed based on the changes in the stratigraphy, pollen record, calcite concentrations (CaCO3) and C/N ratio, along two sediment cores from La Flotante and Navio lagoons, located in Cispatá complex. The age model was built based on lineal interpolation of 210Pb ages and changes in granulometry. Establishment and expansion of mangrove forests during the last 900 years were related to fluviomarine dynamics in the area and the lagoon formation. During the period encompassed between 1064 and 1762 A.D., the Mestizos spit was formed when marine conditions predominated in the surroundings of La Flotante Lagoon. At the site of Navío, a river dominated lagoon, terrigenous conditions dominated since 1830. Although the colonization of herbaceous pioneer vegetation started between 1142 and 1331 A.D., mangrove colonization only took place since 1717 A.D. Mangrove colonization was a result of the delta progradation. In 1849 A.D. the Sinú river delta migrated to the Cispatá bay. The eustatic sea level rise, the increase in river discharges and sedimentation rates produced the establishment of mangrove forests dominated by Rhizophora since 1849. Since 1900 a marine intrusion was recorded in both lagoons. In 1938, the migration of the delta toward its actual location in Tinajones gave place to the formation of the present lagoon system and to the expansion of mangrove forests, which reflects the balance between the high alluvial sediment input and the current sea level rise as has been recorded in similar ecosystems. PMID:21250481

  16. SWINE LAGOON EFFLUENT APPLIED TO COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utilization potential and the environmental effects of applying swine lagoon effluent to Coastal bermudagrass were evaluated for six years. Lagoon effluent was applied to 9m x 9m plots by weekly sprinkler irrigation during the growing season. Forage yield and quality, soil nu...

  17. Denitrification enzyme activity in swine wastewater lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are typically used for treatment of swine wastewater. Although these anaerobic lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple in their physical, chemical, and biological processes, they are actually very sophisticated. Recent reports of high levels of di-nitrogen emissions and h...

  18. Trace Metal Concentrations in Sediments and Fish in the Vicinity of Ash Lagoon Discharges from Coal-Combustion Plants in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benoit A. Lalonde; William Ernst; Fernand Comeau

    Metals that originate from coal-combustion residue (ash) deposited in water-filled lagoons are eventually released into the\\u000a environment. This study measured metal concentrations in sediment and fish obtained in the vicinity of two coal-combustion\\u000a ash-lagoon outfalls on the East River (Nova Scotia) and Grand Lake (New Brunswick), Canada. Of the 34 metals analysed, this\\u000a study demonstrated that sediment in the immediate

  19. Indian Government and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starblanket, Noel V.

    1981-01-01

    Accountability for Indian education must be shared among the chiefs and their councils, the Indian leaders at all levels, parents and students. This may be accomplished by Indian control of Indian education. Available from: Department of Educational Foundations, 5-109 Education North, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2G5. (ERB)

  20. Modelling water discharges and nutrient inputs into a Mediterranean lagoon (Thau, France). Impact on phytoplankton production.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plus, M.; La Jeunesse, I.; Bouraoui, F.

    2003-04-01

    The lagoon of Thau (French Mediterranean coast), is a large (75 km2) and rather deep coastal lagoon (mean depth 4 m), connected to the sea by its two extremities (residence time: about 3 months). Besides its ecological interest as a breeding and transit zone for some sea fish species, the lagoon has a notable economic importance due to shellfish cultivation with an annual oyster production of about 15 000 tons. This considerable production depends to a large extent on nutrient inputs into the ecosystem, supplied mainly from fresh water. The catchment area is about 280 Km2, including agriculture (mainly vineyards), industrial activities and urban waste. Due to the low water renewal and to the intensive shellfish farming activities the Thau lagoon is particularly sensitive to any modification in watershed outputs. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of watershed outputs on the lagoon ecosystem. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model) has been applied to the Thau lagoon catchment area in order to simulate water discharges and nutrients (ammonium, nitrate, and phosphates) inputs into the lagoon on a 10 years period (1989-1999). The model has been calibrated and validated using measured data available for the two main rivers of the watershed, representing about 50% of total freshwater inputs. The model predictions compared favourably with the measurements concerning water quantity as well as major water quality determinants (ammonium, nitrate, phosphates, and suspended matter). Then, several scenarios (e. g. changes in agricultural practices) have been run and the simulated results were used as forcing variables in a lagoon ecosystem model, previously developed for Thau. The latter is a three-dimensional model coupling both hydrodynamical and biological processes. The following state variables are simulated in the model biological part: ammonia, nitrates, phytoplankton, zooplankton, detritus, oyster biodeposits and oxygen. In addition to the inputs from the watershed, other forcing variables are: air temperature and humidity, nebulosity, wind speed and direction, oyster farming and macrophyte community. Results are presented and discussed, focusing on the impact of catchment outputs on the lagoon phytoplankton production.

  1. Response of early Ruppia cirrhosa litter breakdown to nutrient addition in a coastal lagoon affected by agricultural runoff

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margarita Menéndez

    2009-01-01

    The response of early Ruppia cirrhosa Petagna (Grande) litter decomposition to external nitrogen and phosphorus availability in La Tancada (Ebro River, NE Spain), a coastal lagoon that receives agricultural freshwater runoff from rice fields has been examined. Recently abscised dead R. cirrhosa stems were collected and 25g of fresh weight was placed in litter bags with a mesh size of

  2. Investigations in the Szczecin Lagoon during the Oder Flood (July August 1997) from a biogeochemical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenske, Christiane; Westphal, Helmut; Bachor, Alexander; Breitenbach, Elke; Meyer, Hinrich; Buchholz, Wladyslaw; Jülich, Wolf-Dieter

    1998-06-01

    Caused by both an exceptional meteorological situation, especially high precipitation, and anthropogenic factors (melioration), the level of the river Oder rose quickly within a few days in July 97. An additional 5 km3 of water were discharged during the flood. This represents about a third of the normal annual Oder discharge of 17 km3. The flow was strongly enhanced by the large difference (approx. 30 cm) between the water levels of the Szczecin Lagoon and the Baltic Sea. However, the Szczecin Lagoon (=Oderhaff) was not as much affected as the upper course of the river. The substances transported, such as nutrients and pollutants, did not cause much harm, due to strong dilution. Hygienic investigations proved the water to have bathing quality during the whole flood. In this paper results of biogeochemical investigations in the period of the Oder flood (July/August 1997) are presented and compared with long-term data.

  3. Fingerprinting of sediment transport processes in coastal lagoon: An environmental magnetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badesab, F. K.; von Dobeneck, T. F.; Briggs, R. M.; Just, J.; Bryan, K. R.; Müller, H.

    2013-12-01

    Sediment transport in a coastal lagoon is highly complex and is controlled by various processes (mixing, sorting, erosion, transport, deposition) that govern the distribution of sediments between sources and sinks. In this study, we explore the potential of environmental magnetism in combination with sedimentological methods to magnetically fingerprint sediment transport processes in New Zealand's largest barrier enclosed mesotidal estuarine lagoon. Measurements of bulk magnetic susceptibility and grain sizes of surficial samples collected from various parts of Tauranga Harbour including rivers, the estuary, and nearshore zone helped to identify and differentiate the sedimentary processes in and off the lagoon. The sediments were mainly dominated by variable proportion of titanomagnetite and yield different grain sizes. A general trend (NW - SE) of increasing magnetite concentration and decreasing physical grain sizes indicates the variability in sediment inputs and transport energy of flow. Higher values of SIRM / ? indicate the dominance of fine grained magnetite within riverine sediments. The low enriched fine-grained riverine sediments entering the basin are mostly flushed out to the open sea, while medium-coarse grained magnetite rich sediments gets trapped into the southern lagoonal basin forming enriched zones as inferred from the magnetic data. Within the lagoon, the intense mixing and sorting causes fractionation of heavy (magnetic) minerals which further leads to magnetic enhancement and coarsening of magnetic grain sizes within the tidal channel network of the southern basin. We observed two different patterns in sediment grain sizes. The northern lagoonal basin sediments are dominated by fine sand (~ 200 ?m), while the southern basin sediments are composed of mixed grain sizes (300-500 ?m). This suggests much calmer hydrodynamics conditions in the northern basin favoured accumulation of fine grained sediment while as outlined above transport is more dynamic in the southern basin. Off Tauranga Harbour, active coast- parallel transport of fine sediments results in formation of nearshore magnetite-rich belt. The fining in magnetic grain size followed by decrease in volume of fine sand mirrors NW directed alongshore sediment transport.

  4. A Trophic Model of a Sandy Barrier Lagoon at Chiku in Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.-J.; Shao, K.-T.; Kuo, S.-R.; Hsieh, H.-L.; Wong, S.-L.; Chen, I.-M.; Lo, W.-T.; Hung, J.-J.

    1999-05-01

    Using the ECOPATH 3.0 software system, a balanced trophic model of a sandy barrier lagoon with intensive fishery activities at Chiku in tropical Taiwan was constructed. The lagoon model comprised 13 compartments. Trophic levels of the compartments varied from 1·0 for primary producers and detritus to 3·6 for piscivorous fish. Hanging-cultured oysters accounted for 39% of the harvestable fishery biomass and were the most important fishery species. The most prominent group in terms of biomass and energy flow in the lagoon was herbivorous zooplankton. Manipulations of the biomass of herbivorous zooplankton would have a marked impact on most compartments. Both total system throughput and fishery yield per unit area were high when compared to other reported marine ecosystems. This appears mainly due to high planktonic primary production, which is probably promoted by enriched river discharges draining mangroves and aquaculture ponds. Consequently, more than half of the total system throughput originates from primary producers in the lagoon. Although half of the primary production was not immediately used by upper trophic levels and flowed into the detrital pool, most of the detritus was directly consumed, passed up the food web and was exported to the fishery. Thus only a small proportion of energy was recycled through detritus pathways. This mechanism produces short pathways with high trophic efficiencies at higher trophic levels. The high fishery yield in the lagoon is due to high primary production and short pathways. This is the first model of a tropical sandy barrier lagoon with intensive fishery activities and thus may serve as a basis for future comparisons and ecosystem management.

  5. Assessment of the trophic status of four coastal lagoons and one estuarine delta, eastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cotovicz Junior, Luiz Carlos; Brandini, Nilva; Knoppers, Bastiaan Adriaan; Mizerkowski, Byanka Damian; Sterza, José Mauro; Ovalle, Alvaro Ramon Coelho; Medeiros, Paulo Ricardo Petter

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems continues to be one of the major environmental issues worldwide and also of Brazil. Over the last five decades, several approaches have been proposed to discern the trophic state and the natural and cultural processes involved in eutrophication, including the multi-parameter Assessment of Estuarine Trophic Status (ASSETS) index model. This study applies ASSETS to four Brazilian lagoons (Mundaú, Manguaba, Guarapina, and Piratininga) and one estuarine delta (Paraíba do Sul River), set along the eastern Brazilian coast. The model combines three indices based on the pressure-state-response (PSR) approach to rank the trophic status and forecast the potential eutrophication of a system, to which a final ASSETS grade is established. The lagoons were classified as being eutrophic and highly susceptible to eutrophication, due primarily to their longer residence times but also their high nutrient input index. ASSETS classified the estuary of the Paraíba do Sul river with a low to moderate trophic state (e.g., largely mesotrophic) and low susceptibility to eutrophication. Its nutrient input index was high, but the natural high dilution and flushing potential driven by river flow mitigated the susceptibility to eutrophication. Eutrophication forecasting provided more favorable trends for the Mundaú and Manguaba lagoons and the Paraíba do Sul estuary, in view of the larger investments in wastewater treatment and remediation plans. The final ASSETS ranking system established the lagoons of Mundaú as "moderate," Manguaba as "bad," Guarapina as "poor," and Piratininga as "bad," whereas the Paraíba do Sul River Estuary was "good." PMID:22821328

  6. Compression and Creep of Venice Lagoon Sands

    E-print Network

    Sanzeni, Alex

    A laboratory test program was conducted to evaluate the one-dimensional (1D) compression and creep properties of intact sand (and silty-sand) samples from a deep borehole at the Malamocco Inlet to the Venice Lagoon. The ...

  7. Heavy-metal pollution of sediments from Szczecin Lagoon and the Gdansk Basin, Poland.

    PubMed

    Glasby, G P; Szefer, P; Geldon, J; Warzocha, J

    2004-09-01

    Concentrations of Al, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Ni, Zn, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Pb, Th, U, REE, Na, K, Mg, Ca, Si, P, S, Ti, Cr and Ba were determined in the <63 microm fraction of bottom sediments of the Szczecin Lagoon and the Gdansk Basin, Baltic Sea, by ICP-MS, ICP-AES and XRF methods. Sediment samples from the Szczecin Lagoon displayed somewhat higher concentrations of P, Mn, Cr, Cu and possibly Cd, Pb and Zn in those collected in October 1997 after the exceptional flooding of the Oder River than in those collected in December 2000. The data suggest that the flood resulted in the enhanced transport of redox-sensitive and anthropogenic elements in the Oder River and their subsequent redeposition mainly in the western part of Szczecin Lagoon. The sediments of the Szczecin Lagoon also appear to be the most polluted with heavy metals within the Polish Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of the Baltic Sea. Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu are anthropogenically enriched in top layers of sediment cores from the Gdansk Basin, but the decrease of these elements with depth in the core is not systematic. The rare earth element (REE) patterns in sediments from both these areas do not appear to have been greatly modified during transport from their source into the southern Baltic. Factor analysis (FA) of the compositional data shows that sediments from Szczecin Lagoon can be divided into three main groups depending on their composition. It is concluded that clay minerals and organic matter build aggregates and flocs, which effectively concentrate trace metals and sink down to form a 'fluffy layer'. PMID:15325172

  8. Osceola. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert Proctor

    Osceola was the guiding spirit and moving force behind the Second Seminole War. In 1830, when it became the official policy of the United States government to move all the Eastern Indians to a new Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River, the Seminoles resisted. Under Osceola's leadership, a thousand Seminole warriors held off the entire…

  9. Macroinvertebrates associated with Chara in a tropical coastal lagoon (Imboassica lagoon, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Edélti Faria Albertoni; Cleber Palma-Silva; Francisco de Assis Esteves

    2001-01-01

    Imboassica lagoon is an urban coastal lagoon located in the municipality of Macaé (RJ), which has been exposed to a process of artificial eutrophication through the inflow of untreated sewage, as well as artificial openings of the sandbar that separates it from the ocean, provoking drastic modifications in this ecosystem. The sampling for the analysis of the community of macroinvertebrates

  10. On the Eastern Baltic environment changes: a case study of the Curonian Lagoon area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustelnikovas, Olegas

    2008-01-01

    Sea level fluctuation, neotectonic movement, variation of sedimentation conditions, human impact play an important role in sea development. Water level fluctuation and vertical movements determine the rates of the long-term sedimentation process. The sea level rises (sinking of coasts south of 56° N), and its amplitude increases from 1.5 mm y-1 (in the beginning of the 20th century) to 3-4 mm y-1 (predicted for the 22nd century). The rise of coasts (sinking of sea level) and uplift is evident in the central and especially northern Baltic (1-9 mm y-1). These factors speed up the erosion of shallow areas, eutrophication and rapid accumulation of sedimentary matter in local lagoons. The latter processes complicate the ecological situation in the shallow (mouth) areas. Human activity takes place in the river areas, lagoons and geochemical barriers. The mentioned factors modifity the rates of sedimentation (0.6-15 mm y-1) in the Baltic Sea basin, which reach their maximum in the shallow lagoons of the Eastern Baltic (2.5-15.0 mm y-1). A synthesis of the data obtained by the author and information contained in references made it possible to make a many-sided forecast regarding a more than a thousand-year development of the Curonian Lagoon and the Eastern Baltic. A rapid transformation of coasts will take place, the nearshore basins - Viainameri (Estonia), the Gulf of Riga, the Curonian and Vistula lagoons, the Puck Bay - will shallow. Nearby new shallow lagoons will appear in the place of these basins. The Eastern Baltic lagoons (Curonian and Vistula) in future will become similar to the present state of the Polish Pomeranian coastal zone where the Leba, Gardno and other lakes which used to be vast lagoons are in the final stage of degradation. The predicted development of the Eastern Baltic will take place if the range of tectonic movements and sea level changes remains the same and there will be no human invasion with supermodern technologies into the natural processes.

  11. Spend a "Semester by the Sea" (SBTS) at FAU's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Fort Pierce, Florida on the shores of the Indian River Lagoon, one of the most biologically diverse

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    , hands-on lab instruction and intensive field studies in subtropical marine ecosystems. Study topics, oysters, aquaculture, coral, seagrass, mangroves, macroalgae, and marine natural products drug discovery. SBTS students learning from and study with the best. www.fau.edu/hboi #12;REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

  12. Phytoplankton variation and its relation to nutrients and allochthonous organic matter in a coastal lagoon on the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aké-Castillo, José A.; Vázquez, Gabriela

    2008-07-01

    In tropical and subtropical zones, coastal lagoons are surrounded by mangrove communities which are a source of high quantity organic matter that enters the aquatic system through litter fall. This organic matter decomposes, becoming a source of nutrients and other substances such as tannins, fulvic acids and humic acids that may affect the composition and productivity of phytoplankton communities. Sontecomapan is a coastal lagoon located in the southern Gulf of Mexico, which receives abundant litter fall from mangrove. To study the phytoplankton composition and its variation in this lagoon from October 2002 to October 2003, we evaluated the concentrations of dissolved folin phenol active substances (FPAS) as a measure of plant organic matter, salinity, temperature, pH, O 2, N-NH 4+, N-NO 3-, P-PO 43-, Si-SiO 2, and phytoplanktonic cell density in different mangrove influence zones including the three main rivers that feed the lagoon. Nutrients concentrations depended on freshwater from rivers, however these varied seasonally. Concentrations of P-PO 43-, N-NH 4+ and FPAS were the highest in the dry season, when maximum mangrove litter fall is reported. Variation of these nutrients seemed to depend on the internal biogeochemical processes of the lagoon. Blooms of diatoms ( Skeletonema spp., Cyclotella spp. and Chaetoceros holsaticus) and dinoflagellates ( Peridinium aff. quinquecorne, Prorocentrum cordatum) occurred seasonally and in the different mangrove influence zones. The high cell densities in these zones and the occurrence of certain species and its ordination along gradient of FPAS in a canonical correspondence analysis, suggest that plant organic matter (i.e. mangrove influence) may contribute to phytoplankton dynamics in Sontecomapan lagoon.

  13. DECAY OF ESTROGENIC ACTIVITY IN MUNICIPAL WASTEWATER LAGOONS.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogenic activity of wastewater held in municipal lagoons was monitored over an ~ three month period, using the MCF-7 cell line in a modified E-screen. One lagoon was emptied and refilled with fresh wastewater effluent over a one month period to reach levels equivalent to a second lagoon that had...

  14. Denitrification in anaerobic lagoons used to treat swine wastewater.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are commonly used for treatment of swine wastewater. Although these lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple; their physical, chemical, and biological processes are actually very complex. This study of anaerobic lagoons had twofold objectives: 1] quantify denitrification e...

  15. Regime shifts in vegetation composition of Baltic Sea coastal lagoons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kajsa Rosqvist; Johanna Mattila; Alfred Sandström; Martin Snickars; Mats Westerbom

    2010-01-01

    Vegetation communities, morphometric and water quality variables were sampled in 62 undisturbed coastal lagoons along a natural land-uplift gradient in the northern Baltic Sea. The lagoons had a morphological inlet threshold reflecting habitat isolation (i.e. the diminished connectedness of the lagoon to the sea) and located in different parts of the archipelago (corresponding to altering wave exposure). We used indirect

  16. Accuracy of lagoon gas emissions using an inverse dispersion method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring gas emissions from treatment lagoons and storage ponds poses challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques because of non-ideal wind conditions. These include those induced by trees and crops surrounding the lagoons, and lagoons with dimensions too small to establish ...

  17. Coastal lagoon habitat re-creation potential in Hampshire, England

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. E. Johnson; J. Bartlett; L. A. Nash

    2007-01-01

    The Solent region in southern England represents one of the highest concentrations of coastal lagoons and saline ponds in the UK. Four lagoon complexes within the region comprise a Special Area of Conservation (SAC), under the European Habitats Directive. The ephemeral nature of coastal lagoons presents a particular management challenge in terms of retaining designated sites in “favourable conservation status”.

  18. Inverse-dispersion technique for assessing lagoon gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring gas emissions from treatment lagoons and storage ponds poses challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques because of non-ideal wind conditions, such as those induced by trees and crops surrounding the lagoons, and lagoons with dimensions too small to establish equilib...

  19. Occurrence and removal of pharmaceutical and hormone contaminants in rural wastewater treatment lagoons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolin; Zheng, Wei; Kelly, Walton R

    2013-02-15

    Rural communities in the United States usually use a series of aerated lagoons to treat domestic wastewater. Effluents from these systems are typically discharged to receiving watersheds, which leads to a potential transfer of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and steroid hormones from sanitary sewage to the environment. The primary objectives of this study are to identify and quantify PPCPs and steroid hormones in rural sewage treatment lagoons, to investigate the removal efficiency of these emerging contaminants in the treatment processes, and to monitor their occurrence in the surrounding watershed. In this study, a method has been developed to analyze thirteen PPCPs and eight steroid hormones in various water samples. Among all of the PPCPs considered, ten chemicals were detected in sewage influents, lagoon waters of different treatment stages, or effluents at concentrations in the ng/L to low ?g/L range. Three hormones were observed in the influents at total concentrations as high as 164 ng/L, but no hormone residues were detected in the effluents. This indicates that the aerated lagoons may effectively remove hormone contaminants. With the exception of carbamazepine, removal rates for the other detected PPCPs were relatively high in the range of 88 to 100% in September with average air temperature equal to 20 °C. However, the removal efficiency of nine PPCPs in the rural wastewater treatment plant exhibited large temporal variability. The concentrations of PPCPs in the lagoon waters and effluents collected in November, with average air temperature equal to 4.4 °C, were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those samples collected in September. Occurrence of these PPCP contaminants in the surrounding watershed was also monitored. The discharge of effluents significantly elevated the PPCP concentrations in the receiving creek and increased their occurrence in the adjacent river. PMID:23314119

  20. Modeling ammonia removal in aerated facultative lagoons.

    PubMed

    Houweling, C D; Kharoune, L; Escalas, A; Comeau, Y

    2005-01-01

    A mechanistic model has been developed to model ammonia removal in aerated facultative lagoons. Flow is modeled through the water column by a continuously stirred tank reactor and exchanges between the sludge layer and the water column are simulated by a solids separator. The biological model is based on an activated sludge model with reactions added for anaerobic bacterial growth and degradation of inert organic material. Results show that the model is able to predict seasonal variation in ammonia removal as well as sludge accumulation in the lagoons. PMID:16114676

  1. The Indian Education Act in the 1980's: Quest for Equity and Quality. The 12th Annual Report to the Congress of the United States. Fiscal Year 1985.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Advisory Council on Indian Education, Washington, DC.

    The 12th annual report to Congress from the National Advisory Council on Indian Education (NACIE) details activities during fiscal year 1985 and is dedicated to all Indian youth who benefit from any federal programs that support Indian education and those Indian youths lost from the Wind River Indian Reservation because of suicide. Part I contains…

  2. Exploring new issues for coastal lagoons monitoring and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila; De Wit, Rutger

    2012-12-01

    Coastal lagoons are productive and highly vulnerable ecosystems, but their management is still problematic mostly because they constitute transitional interface between terrestrial and marine domains. The "4th European Conference on Coastal Lagoon Research - Research and Management for the conservation of coastal lagoon ecosystems, South North comparisons", was focused on the scientific research on coastal lagoons and the management for their conservation and sustainable use. Selected contributions were considered in this special issue of Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science "Research and Management for the conservation of coastal lagoon ecosystems" as they deal with three important aspects for coastal lagoons management: (1) the design of monitoring programmes using biological compartments, (2) the ecosystem functioning and the impacts of perturbations and (3) ecosystem trajectories particularly after ecosystem restoration. Here we introduce the selected papers published in this issue, place these contributions in the perspective of the science-management interface and discuss new issues for coastal lagoon management.

  3. Land application of poultry lagoon effluent

    E-print Network

    Aldrich, Lance John

    1996-01-01

    lagoons used to treat caged laying hen manure. Informed decisions can be made about the safe and practical rates of effluent application when the environmental impacts are known. Eighteen small plots were installed at the Texas A&M University Farm near...

  4. Denitrification enzyme activity in swine wastewater lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent publications of high levels of di-nitrogen emissions and high levels of potential surficial oxygen transfer indicated that large amounts of nitrogen may be removed via denitrification in anaerobic lagoons. If this denitrification is occurring via classical denitrification, the denitrification...

  5. Water quality in the inshore Great Barrier Reef lagoon: Implications for long-term monitoring and management.

    PubMed

    Schaffelke, Britta; Carleton, John; Skuza, Michele; Zagorskis, Irena; Furnas, Miles J

    2012-01-01

    Coastal and inshore areas of the Great Barrier Reef lagoon receive substantial amounts of material from adjacent developed catchments, which can affect the ecological integrity of coral reefs and other inshore ecosystems. A 5-year water quality monitoring dataset provides a 'base range' of water quality conditions for the inshore GBR lagoon and illustrates the considerable temporal and spatial variability in this system. Typical at many sites were high turbidity levels and elevated chlorophyll a and phosphorus concentrations, especially close to river mouths. Water quality variability was mainly driven by seasonal processes such as river floods and sporadic wind-driven resuspension as well as by regional differences such as land use. Extreme events, such as floods, caused large and sustained increases in water quality variables. Given the highly variable climate in the GBR region, long-term monitoring of marine water quality will be essential to detect future changes due to improved catchment management. PMID:22142496

  6. Seasonal change in a filter-feeding bivalve Musculista senhousia population of a eutrophic estuarine lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamuro, Masumi; Hiratsuka, Jun'ichi; Ishitobi, Yu

    2000-10-01

    Filter-feeding bivalves often predominate the benthic biomass of estuaries, although their population size may drastically fluctuate due to physical and biological disturbances. To examine the recovery of a mussel population after periods of severe predation and anoxia, and to estimate the amount of nutrients removed from the system through mussel production, we surveyed, over 2 years, the Musculista senhousia population in the estuarine lagoon, Lake Nakaumi, Japan. Predation by diving ducks ( Aythya fuligula, Aythya ferina and Aythya marila) during winter dramatically reduced the mussel biomass in both years, but recruitment of juvenile mussels sustained the population. Anoxia during the second summer severely reduced the mussel population, resulting in less biomass than in the autumn of the previous year. Potential annual removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from the lagoon water through burial of M. senhousia shells under oxic conditions was estimated to be 7.1 and 5.1 tons, respectively. These are equivalent to 0.7% and 4.9% of the nitrogen and phosphorous annual load entering the lagoon via the main river. Under anoxic conditions, removal would decrease to only 5.6% of the potential amount.

  7. Environmental occurrence and biota concentration of phthalate esters in Epe and Lagos Lagoons, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeogun, Aina O; Ibor, Oju R; Omogbemi, Emmanuel D; Chukwuka, Azubuike V; Adegbola, Rachel A; Adewuyi, Gregory A; Arukwe, Augustine

    2015-07-01

    The high global occurrence of phthalates in different environmental matrixes has resulted in the detection of their metabolites in human urine, blood, and breast milk, indicating a widespread human exposure. In addition, the notorious endocrine disrupting effects of phthalates have shown that they mimic or antagonize the action of endogenous hormones, consequently producing adverse effects on reproduction, growth and development. Herein, we have studied the occurrence of phthalate esters (PEs) in water, sediment and biota of two lagoons (Epe and Lagos) in Nigeria. Two fish species (Tilapia guineensis, and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus) and a crustacean (the African river prawn - Macrobrachium vollenhovenii) were analyzed for PEs levels using a HPLC method and the derived values were used for calculating bioconcentration factor (BCF), biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) and phthalate pollution index (PPI) in the biota and environment. We observed that the growth and health condition of the fish species were normal with a k-factor of >1. Sediment PE levels were compared with water, at both lagoons showing concentration pattern that is characterized as DEHP = DEP > DBP. We observed that DBP was the predominant compound in T. guineensis, C. nigrodigitatus and African prawn, at both lagoons, showing organ-specific differences in bioconcentration (BCF and BSAF) patterns in the fish species. While there were no observed consistency in the pattern of PE concentration in fish organs, elevated DBP levels in different fish organs may be related to fish habitat and degradation level of phthalates. Low concentration of DEHP, compared with DBP and DEP, was measured in fish organs and whole prawn body. The BSAF values for DEHP were lowest, and highest for DBP for all species at both lagoons, and DEHP easily accumulated more in the sediment (sediment PPI = 0.28 and 0.16 for Epe and Lagos lagoon, respectively). Overall, our findings suggest a broader environmental and human health implication of the high PE levels in these lagoons since they represent significant sources of aquatic food resources for the neighboring communities. PMID:25935094

  8. Test plan: the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, D.J.; Lombard, K.H.; Hazen, T.C.

    1997-03-31

    The remediation strategies that will be applied at the Czechowice Oil Refinery waste lagoon in Czechowice, Poland are designed, managed, and implemented under the direction of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). WSRC will be assisted in the demonstration by The Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas (IETU). This collaboration between IETU and DOE will provide the basis for international technology transfer of new and innovative remediation technologies that can be applied in Poland and the Eastern European Region as well.

  9. Long-term water monitoring in two Mediterranean lagoons as an indicator of land-use changes and intense precipitation events (Adra, Southeastern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Miguel; Benavente, José; Alcalá, Francisco J.; Paracuellos, Mariano

    2011-02-01

    During recent historical times the Adra river delta, a detrital coastal aquifer of nearly 32 km 2 located in a semi-arid, mountainous area of SE Spain, has undergone different changes caused by human activity. Within this context, both the river dynamics in the plain and the geomorphology of the coastline have at various times resulted in the formation of small lagoons. At present only two small (<0.5 km 2) lagoons exist, at the eastern edge of the aquifer, which, although closely surrounded by commercial market-garden greenhouses, are protected under international agreements. During the last 30 years of the twentieth century traditional agricultural irrigation techniques have undergone significant changes to improve their efficiency. Surface-water resources in the Adra river basin are regulated via the Beninar reservoir. In addition, the use of groundwater is increasing progressively. Both these factors affect the recharge of the coastal aquifer. To monitor these changes measurements of electrical conductivity and water level fluctuations have been recorded in these lagoons for the last 35 years (1975-2010). A comparison of the hydrochemical characteristics of the water in the lagoons and of the surrounding groundwater from 2003 to 2010 shows marked differences induced by the different hydrological dynamics in each lagoon, as well as by the hydrogeological impact of changes in land use in the delta. The increase in water demand is a consequence of the extension of irrigated areas from the fluvio-deltaic plain to its slopes, originally occupied by unirrigated crops. A reduction in irrigation return-flow is linked to the use of new irrigation techniques. These modifications affect both the recharge regime of the aquifer and its water quality. Moreover, extreme precipitation events, which are characteristic of Mediterranean semi-arid environments, can affect the lagoons' hydrological dynamics to a considerable extent. One such example is the unusually rainy period from January to March 2010 (>600 mm). This event, along with other effects, has dramatically lowered the salinity of the water in both lagoons. This case study reveals the extreme vulnerability of deltaic environments and also how lagoons can reflect anthropogenic changes over the whole river basin.

  10. 75 FR 60810 - Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the United States Bureau of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ...Potawatomi Nation, Oklahoma Cloverdale Rancheria of Pomo Indians of California Cocopah Tribe of Arizona Coeur D'Alene Tribe of the Coeur D'Alene Reservation, Idaho Cold Springs Rancheria of Mono Indians of California Colorado River...

  11. Ground-water flow and quality beneath sewage-sludge lagoons, and a comparison with the ground-water quality beneath a sludge-amended landfill, Marion County, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bobay, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    The groundwater beneath eight sewage sludge lagoons, was studied to characterize the flow regime and to determine whether leachate had infiltrated into the glacio-fluvial sediments. Groundwater quality beneath the lagoons was compared with the groundwater quality beneath a landfill where sludge had been applied. The lagoons and landfills overlie outwash sand and gravel deposits separated by discontinuous clay layers. Shallow groundwater flows away from the lagoons and discharges into the White River. Deep groundwater discharges to the White River and flows southwest beneath Eagle Creek. After an accumulation of at least 2 inches of precipitation during 1 week, groundwater flow is temporarily reversed in the shallow aquifer, and all deep flow is along a relatively steep hydraulic gradient to the southwest. The groundwater is predominantly a calcium bicarbonate type, although ammonium accounts for more than 30% of the total cations in water from three wells. Concentrations of sodium, chloride, sulfate, iron, arsenic, boron, chemical oxygen demand, total dissolved solids, and methylene-blue-active substances indicate the presence of leachate in the groundwater. Concentrations of cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, and zinc were less than detection limits. The concentrations of 16 of 19 constituents or properties of groundwater beneath the lagoons are statistically different than groundwater beneath the landfill at the 0.05 level of significance. Only pH and concentrations of dissolved oxygen and bromide are higher in groundwater beneath the landfill than beneath the lagoons. (USGS)

  12. Underwater pressure measurements in the lagoon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rollosson

    1953-01-01

    On Mike shot of Operation Ivy measurement of underwater pressures was attempted at four locations near the floor of the lagoon. Gauges were installed at distances ranging from approximately 5700 to 112,000 ft from ground zero and about 1 mile from the reef. The single usable record showed sharp pressure spikes at 0.3 and 0\\/6 sec after zero time. Although

  13. Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, D.; Norville, C. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

    1991-07-01

    The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

  14. Tracing endocrine disrupting chemicals in a coastal lagoon (Sacca di Goro, Italy): sediment contamination and bioaccumulation in Manila clams.

    PubMed

    Casatta, Nadia; Mascolo, Giuseppe; Roscioli, Claudio; Viganò, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    The Water Framework Directive, recently amended with new priority substances (2013/39/EU), is meant to regulate the health status of European aquatic environments, including transitional waters. Despite the ecological and economic importance of transitional water bodies and, in particular, of coastal lagoons, a relevant example of this type of environments, little is known about their contamination by priority substances, particularly by endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). In this study, a wide array of priority substances, all with recognised disrupting properties, was investigated in the Sacca di Goro Lagoon (Adriatic Sea, Italy), which receives freshwater from the Po River after draining the most urbanised and industrialised Italian regions. Flame retardants, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, natural and synthetic steroids, personal care products and legacy pollutants were investigated both in sediments and in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum collected from three sites in the lagoon. Sediments showed that most of the chemicals analysed could reach the lagoon ecosystem but their concentrations were below existing quality guidelines. Clams essentially reflected this condition although some concern was raised by polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs): the limit for the sum of six congeners set for biota in the European Directive (2013/39/EU) to protect human health was exceeded 4-5 times. No significant biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) were calculated. Nonylphenol, tonalide, PBDE, polychlorinated biphenyls and bisphenol A were the most abundant chemicals in clam tissues. PMID:25546459

  15. Lagoon Seepage Testing Report for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory, Butte County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Bridger Morrison

    2014-09-01

    J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) performed seepage tests on the CFA Wastewater Lagoons 1, 2, and 3 between August 26th and September 22nd, 2014. The lagoons were tested to satisfy the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16) that require all lagoons be tested at a frequency of every 10 years and the Compliance Activity CA-141-03 in the DEQ Wastewater Reuse Permit for the CFA Sewage Treatment Plant (LA-000141-03). The lagoons were tested to determine if the average seepage rates are less than 0.25 in/day, the maximum seepage rate allowed for lagoons built prior to April 15, 2007. The average seepage rates were estimated for each lagoon and are given in Table-ES1. The average seepage rates for Lagoons 1 and 2 are less than the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day. Lagoon 1 and 2 passed the seepage test and will not have to be tested again until the year 20241. However, the average seepage rate for Lagoon 3 appears to exceed the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day which means the potential source for the excessive leakage should be investigated further.

  16. 4. APACHE INDIAN LABORER WITH TEAM AND SCRAPER WORKING ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. APACHE INDIAN LABORER WITH TEAM AND SCRAPER WORKING ON THE POWER CANAL LINE FOUR MILES ABOVE LIVINGSTONE, ARIZONA Photographer: Walter J. Lubken, June 14, 1906 - Roosevelt Power Canal & Diversion Dam, Parallels Salt River, Roosevelt, Gila County, AZ

  17. 29. CROSSCUT FACILITY PROPERTY AND POWER LINE LOCATION, SHOWING INDIAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. CROSSCUT FACILITY PROPERTY AND POWER LINE LOCATION, SHOWING INDIAN BEND POND LABELLED 'SETTLING BASIN,' STEAM/DIESEL PLANT AND OTHER FEATURES. 1951 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. Schooling Experiences of Central California Indian People across Generations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tara

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study took a post-colonialist lens to record, examine and document schooling experiences of California Indian people across several generations representing three Central Valley tribes: the Mono, the Tachi Yokuts of Santa Rosa Rancheria, and the Tule River Tribe. Past and present perceptions of Indian schooling were elicited…

  19. 1. ABANDONED TURNOUT (CALLED CAPTAIN WHEEL) TO SAN TAN INDIAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. ABANDONED TURN-OUT (CALLED CAPTAIN WHEEL) TO SAN TAN INDIAN CANAL OFF OF SAN TAN FLOOD-WATER CANAL, T4S, R6E, S11/12. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - San Carlos Irrigation Project, San Tan Indian Canal, North of Gila River, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  20. 43 CFR 417.5 - Duties of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs with respect to Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...PROCEDURAL METHODS FOR IMPLEMENTING COLORADO RIVER WATER CONSERVATION MEASURES WITH LOWER BASIN CONTRACTORS AND OTHERS...water users on said Indian Reservations concerning water conservation measures and operating practices in the...

  1. 43 CFR 417.5 - Duties of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs with respect to Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...PROCEDURAL METHODS FOR IMPLEMENTING COLORADO RIVER WATER CONSERVATION MEASURES WITH LOWER BASIN CONTRACTORS AND OTHERS...water users on said Indian Reservations concerning water conservation measures and operating practices in the...

  2. 43 CFR 417.5 - Duties of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs with respect to Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...PROCEDURAL METHODS FOR IMPLEMENTING COLORADO RIVER WATER CONSERVATION MEASURES WITH LOWER BASIN CONTRACTORS AND OTHERS...water users on said Indian Reservations concerning water conservation measures and operating practices in the...

  3. 43 CFR 417.5 - Duties of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs with respect to Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...PROCEDURAL METHODS FOR IMPLEMENTING COLORADO RIVER WATER CONSERVATION MEASURES WITH LOWER BASIN CONTRACTORS AND OTHERS...water users on said Indian Reservations concerning water conservation measures and operating practices in the...

  4. 43 CFR 417.5 - Duties of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs with respect to Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...PROCEDURAL METHODS FOR IMPLEMENTING COLORADO RIVER WATER CONSERVATION MEASURES WITH LOWER BASIN CONTRACTORS AND OTHERS...water users on said Indian Reservations concerning water conservation measures and operating practices in the...

  5. Are coastal lagoons physically or biologically controlled ecosystems? Revisiting r vs. K strategies in coastal lagoons and estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Marcos, Concepción; Pérez-Ruzafa, Isabel María; Pérez-Marcos, María

    2013-11-01

    Environmental stress influences biological assemblages, with species responding to stress by adopting particular life-history strategies (e.g., r vs. K). Coastal lagoons and estuaries are considered naturally stressed and physically controlled systems with frequent environmental disturbances and fluctuations. At the same time, their transitional nature (between terrestrial, freshwater and marine) makes them especially vulnerable to human impacts and land and freshwater inputs. As a result, it is hypothesised that residents of coastal lagoons would display characteristics of r-selected species. The r-strategy involves increased reproductive effort through early reproduction, small and numerous offspring with a large dispersive capability, short lifespan and small adult body size. Together, these traits provide a selective advantage in such unpredictable or short-lived environments. Alternatively, immigrants to coastal lagoons should mostly be K-strategists, with a competitive advantage over the r-strategists, at least on a temporary time scale. These hypotheses were explored using a dataset from 73 Atlanto-Mediterranean sites: 27 estuaries, 42 coastal lagoons and 4 from the sea, obtained from published sources. A detailed analysis of the distributions of the different resident fish species according to lagoon characteristics indicated that in lagoons with a higher marine influence the families Gobiidae, Blenniidae and Syngnathidae were common, while lagoons with freshwater influence are characterized by Cyprinidae and other freshwater species. In analyzing the biological strategies of lagoon species we found that fish assemblages inhabiting marine influenced lagoons were characterized by solitary, necto-benthonic sedentary species. These species are often hermaphroditic, with benthic broods and many exhibit brooding behaviour. This suggests that marine influenced lagoons are dominated by K-strategist species, while r-strategy species will be more common in freshwater lagoons and among marine migrant species.

  6. Land Application of Poultry Lagoon Effluent L. J. Aldrich1

    E-print Network

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    1 Land Application of Poultry Lagoon Effluent by L. J. Aldrich1 , C. L. Munster2 , V. A. Haby3 , J poultry operations. Therefore, field research was conducted at College Station and Overton, TX, to evaluate the effects of poultry lagoon effluent on soil, vegetation and surface runoff quality. Two

  7. Holocene lagoonal development in the isolated carbonate platforms off Belize

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eberhard Gischler

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-one vibracores were taken in interior lagoons of Glovers Reef, Lighthouse Reef, and Turneffe Islands—three isolated carbonate platforms offshore Belize, Central America. Holocene facies successions overlying the Pleistocene limestone bedrock begin with soils, followed by mangrove peats, and marine carbonate sediments of lagoonal origin. The soils formed on top of subaerially exposed Pleistocene limestone before the Holocene transgression. Mangrove peats

  8. ROCK FILTERS FOR REMOVAL OF ALGAE FROM LAGOON EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to show that rock filtration was an effective, low cost unit process for removing algae from lagoon effluents and correspondingly upgrading lagoon treatment. Sedimentation is the primary mechanism of algal removal within rock filter. The settling...

  9. FIELD STUDY OF NUTRIENT CONTROL IN A MULTICELL LAGOON

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report covers nutrient control in a serially arranged, multicell aerated lagoon system over a three year period. The objective was to develop reliable technology for reducing phosphorus and for converting ammonia-nitrogen to nitrate-nitrogen. A six-cell lagoon was modified i...

  10. SWINE MANURE AND LAGOON EFFLUENT APPLIED TO FESCUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The utilization potential and the environmental effects of applying swine manure and swine lagoon effluent to tall fescue were evaluated for four years. Lagoon effluent was applied to 9 in. X 9 in. plots by weekly sprinkler irrigations during the growing season while swine manure...

  11. STREAMS (POLYGON FEATURES) FOR THE FORT MCDOWELL INDIAN RESERVATION IN ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streams (polygon features) coverage showing some double line rivers and river islands on the Fort McDowell Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...

  12. STREAMS (POLYGON FEATURES) COVERAGE FOR THE FORT MOJAVE INDIAN RESERVATION IN ARIZONA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streams (polygon features) coverage showing some double line rivers and river islands on the Fort Mojave Indian Reservation in Arizona. This coverage was digitized off of USGS 7.5 minute quad maps by the Phoenix office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. ...

  13. Trust and Survival: "AWOL Hunkpapa Indian Family Prisoners of War at Fort Sully, 1890-1891"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wojcik, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Two hundred twenty five Hunkpapa Indians fled from the Grand River Camp on the Standing Rock Reservation to the Cheyenne River Reservation to council with Big Foot's band when Sitting Bull was killed on December 15, 1890. These Indian families did not contribute to the number of fatalities at Wounded Knee because they were being held by the U.S.…

  14. Influence of local and global environmental parameters on the composition of cyanobacterial mats in a tropical lagoon.

    PubMed

    Echenique-Subiabre, Isidora; Villeneuve, Aurélie; Golubic, Stjepko; Turquet, Jean; Humbert, Jean-François; Gugger, Muriel

    2015-02-01

    Cyanobacteria-dominated microbial mat communities thrive widely and year round in coral reefs and tropical lagoons, with periodic massive development of benthic blooms. We studied the diversity and spatiotemporal variation of the cyanobacterial dominance in mats of the shallow lagoon of La Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean by means of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and cloning-sequencing approaches targeting the 16S rRNA gene, combined with macromorphological and micromorphological characterization of corresponding phenotypes. The mat-forming cyanobacteria were highly diversified with at least 67 distinct operational taxonomic units identified in the lagoon, encompassing the entire morphological spectrum of the phylum Cyanobacteria, but with striking dominance of Oscillatoriales and Nostocales. It appeared also that selective pressures acting at different geographical scales have an influence on the structure and composition of these mats dominated by cyanobacteria. First, large changes were observed in their diversity and composition in relation to local changes occurring in their environment. Second, from the data obtained on the richness and composition of the mats and from the comparison with similar studies in the world, tropical mats seem to display wider cyanobacterial richness than in temperate and cold areas. Moreover, these tropical mats share more species with mats in other tropical regions than with those in temperate and cold climatic regions, suggesting that marine cyanobacteria in biofilms and mats display a biogeographic structure. PMID:25260923

  15. Trophic state of Foz de Almargem coastal lagoon (Algarve, South Portugal) based on the water quality and the phytoplankton community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Susana; Gamito, Sofia; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel

    2007-01-01

    Seasonal variation of water quality and phytoplankton community was studied in Foz de Almargem coastal lagoon in order to evaluate the trophic state of the wetland. This small coastal lagoon has temporary connections to the sea, when the sand barrier is naturally or artificially opened, but for most of the year is isolated receiving just the freshwater input from small rivers. Sampling took place in three stations along a gradient of marine influence from June 2001 to July 2002. During summer and autumn, the water in the lagoon was low, influencing positively water temperature, salinity, total solids in suspension (TSS), orthophosphates, total phosphorus (TP) and pH. In winter and spring, there was an increase of nitrates, nitrites, dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and N:P ratio with the raise of water level in the lagoon. Chlorophyll a and phaeo-pigments concentrations were positively related to the previous parameters. Phytoplankton density was low and switching in dominant taxa was observed along time but the community was mainly dominated by Dinophyceae and Bacillariophyceae. Chlorophyceae and Euglenophyceae were related to higher TSS and lower DIN, salinity and TP; Cyanophyceae were stimulated by the opposite conditions. The decrease of water level jointly with the raise of salinity and TP influenced positively pico-nano flagellate algae. Cryptophyceae were positively correlated with the same factors and also TSS. Several trophic state indexes and water quality indicators have been applied and an overall analysis pointed out to a coastal lagoon with mesotrophic characteristics. During the studied period no serious eutrophication events occurred, however there were some situations of nutrient enrichment due to human activities, such as agriculture and non-treated sewage discharges, which might have favoured the development of potentially toxic phytoplankton species, namely Prorocentrum minimum.

  16. Indian Students 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Mutiny on the ?Rocked Boat?......................................... 124 An Undercover Asian American ..................................... 129 From Victims, to Perpetrators .............................................. 130... origin are considered white, where the majority of Asians lie within the ?honorary white? or ?collective black? status. Asian Americans in the ?honorary white? tier include Japanese, Chinese, Asian Indian, Korean, and Filipino Americans. Asian...

  17. Clipperton, a possible future for atoll lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpy, L.; Rodier, M.; Couté, A.; Perrette-Gallet, C.; Bley-Loëz, C.

    2010-09-01

    Closure of the Clipperton Island atoll (10°17' N 109°13' W), now a meromictic lake, is estimated to have occurred between 1839 and 1849. It was still closed in 2005. Brackish waters in the upper layer (0-10 m) were oxygenated, while saline waters in the deep layer (>20 m) were anoxic. Allowing for the methodological difficulties of earlier measurements, the physical characteristics of the lagoon did not seem to have changed significantly since the last expedition (1980). The intermediate layer between brackish and saline waters was characterized by a strong density gradient and a temperature inversion of up to 1.6°C. Microbial activity, water exchange between the deep layer and surrounding oceanic waters and the geothermal flux hypothesis are discussed. The low DIN and SRP concentrations observed in the upper layer, despite high nutrient input by seabird droppings, reflect the high nutrient uptake by primary producers as attested by the elevated overall gross primary production (6.6 g C m-2 day-1), and high suspended photosynthetic biomass (2.23 ± 0.23 ?g Chl a l-1) and production (263 ± 27 ?g C l-1 day-1). Phytoplankton composition changed in 67 years with the advent of new taxa and the disappearance of previously recorded species. The freshwater phytoplanktonic community comprised 43 taxa: 37 newly identified during the expedition and 6 previously noted; 16 species previously found were not seen in 2005. The closure of the lagoon, combined with the positive precipitation-evaporation budget characteristic of the region, has induced drastic changes in lagoon functioning compared with other closed atolls.

  18. Holocene sea-level and climatic fluctuations: Pulicat lagoon - A case study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anjum Farooqui; G. G. Vaz

    Pulicat lagoon situated in the Palar Basin, is the se c- ond largest lagoon on the east coast of India. The north-western margin of the desiccated lagoon is an irregular and elevated hard surface. Palynological studies were carried out in sedime ntary soil samples from four pits dug across this part of the lagoon. Vegetational reconstruction from peat beds at

  19. Sludge Lagoons. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Ronald M.

    This lesson describes three different types of sludge lagoons: (1) drying lagoons; (2) facultative lagoons; and (3) anaerobic lagoons. Normal operating sequence and equipment are also described. The lesson is designed to be used in sequence with the complete Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166 or as an independent lesson. The instructor's…

  20. How climate change threats water resource: the case of the Thau coastal lagoon (Mediterranean Sea, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Sellami, Haykel; Cirelli, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    The latest reports of the intergovernmental panel on climate change explained that the Mediterranean regions are especially vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. These latest are expected to have strong impacts on the management of water resources and on regional economies. The aim of this paper is to discuss impacts of climate changes on the Thau case study in relation to the evolution of water balance, water uses and adaptation to climate change. The Thau coastal lagoon is located in the Mediterranean coast in south of France in the Languedoc-Roussillon Region. Economic activities are diverse from shellfish farming, fertilizers industries to agriculture and tourism. However, tourism and shellfish farming are of major importance for local economy. If tourism is mainly turned to the Sea coast, shellfishes grow within the lagoon and rely on water quality. Previous studies have demonstrated the link between the coastal lagoon water quality and inputs of freshwater from the catchment. Thus, changes in rainfalls, runoff and water balance would not only affect water uses but also water quality. Climate changes projections are presented following the implementation of 4 downscaled climatic models. Impacts on water balance are modelled with SWAT (Soil Water Assessment Tool) for 2041-2070 compared to the 1971-2000 reference period. The decrease of precipitations and water balance will impact discharges and thus decrease the freshwater inputs to the coastal lagoon. A study of water uses conducted in interactions with stakeholders within the Thau area has permitted to assess both current and evolution of water uses. It has revealed local water resources are depleting while water demand is increasing and is planned to continue to increase in the really near future. To prevent water scarcity events, mainly due to the climate change context, the Regional authorities have connected the catchment to the Rhône river to import water. The conclusion of this study is while expected impacts of climate changes on the Thau system were expected to be linked to water balance depletion in the catchment, the main threats are now linked to the impact on water quality of the introduction of the Rhône river waters within the system. This study is conducted in the CLIMB EU-FP7 project (2010-2014).

  1. Muscogee folio, Indian Territory 

    E-print Network

    Taff, Joseph A. (Joseph Alexander), b. 1862.

    1905-01-01

    phones and the consumption of television programs and movies. Through these practices, participants attempted to displace the link between Indianness and Hindu culture and show that Catholic culture can also reflect Indianness, when Indianness is defined...

  2. Increased Bioavailability of Mercury in the Lagoons of Lomé, Togo: The Possible Role of Dredging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kissao Gnandi; Seunghee Han; M. Hassan Rezaie-Boroon; Magali Porrachia; Dimitri D. Deheyn

    2011-01-01

    Surface sediments of the lagoons of Lomé, Togo, were analyzed for mercury, methylmercury, and trace elements. Concentrations\\u000a were greater than typical for natural lagoon sediments, and with greater variability within the Eastern lagoon compared to\\u000a the Western one. The Eastern lagoon is larger and has been dredged in the past, while the Western lagoon, which also receives\\u000a major waste inputs,

  3. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public out reach was emphasized during this first year of the project. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and off-stream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements were signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Two landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and one chose OWEB as a funding source. Two landowners implemented there own enhancement measures protecting 3 miles of stream. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin. We provided input to the John Day Summary prepared for the NWPPC by ODFW. The Tribe worked with the Umatilla National Forest on the Clear Creek Dredgetailings Rehabilitation project and coordinated regularly with USFS Fisheries, Hydrology and Range staff.

  4. Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

    2003-03-01

    The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public outreach was emphasized during this first year of the project. During the past year we concentrated on satisfying landowner needs, providing cost share alternatives, providing joint projects and starting implementation. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and offstream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements have been signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Some landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and others chose OWEB as a funding source. The exact amount of stream protection due to other funding sources probably exceeds that by BPA, however most would not have entered any program without initial Tribal outreach. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin.

  5. The PAH level, distribution and composition in surface sediments from a Mediterranean lagoon: the Marano and Grado Lagoon (Northern Adriatic Sea, Italy).

    PubMed

    Acquavita, Alessandro; Falomo, Jari; Predonzani, Sergio; Tamberlich, Francesco; Bettoso, Nicola; Mattassi, Giorgio

    2014-04-15

    The Marano and Grado Lagoon is one of the best conserved transitional environment in the whole Mediterranean area. On the other hand, it suffers from industrial, agricultural and fisheries activities, which could have an important impact on its environmental quality. With the application of the WFD, the sediment chemical status was investigated. In this work, 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons included by the US EPA within the priority pollutants were considered. PAHs values ranged from non-detectable to 1056 ng g(-1) showing the highest contamination close to the Aussa-Corno River mouth, which received the industrial inputs. The contamination level was comparable to that observed in low contaminated sites of the Mediterranean region, and lower than the adjacent Gulf of Trieste. The ratios of selected PAHs congeners pointed out the prevalence of pyrolitic sources. Moreover, the application of the ERL/ERM displayed an environment, which should not have a potential biological impact. PMID:24492154

  6. Little Blaze and the Buffalo Jump. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roop, Peter

    The reader is one in a series of stories of the Blackfeet Indians which take place when the people were at the height of their power, hunting buffalo north to the North Saskatchewan River, south to the Yellowstone River, east to the Montana-North Dakota border, and west to the Rocky Mountains. The story is about Little Blaze, a young Blackfeet…

  7. Study of water chlorophyl content in the Venice Lagoon through hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfagnoli, Francesca; Bizzaro, Beatrice; Moretti, Sandro

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of the HICO Project (http://hico.coas.oregonstate.edu/), a number of radiance and reflectance images of the Venice Lagoon were used to evaluate the possibility of performing quick and reliable mapping of water quality parameters. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO™) is the first spaceborne imaging spectrometer specifically designed to sample the coastal areas, with 128 spectral bands, a 90 m spatial resolution, full spectral coverage (380 to 960 nm sampled at 5.7 nm) and a very high signal-to-noise ratio to resolve the complexity of the coastal ocean. Eutrophication is one of the major causes of water quality deterioration. The concentration of chlorophyll-a found in water can be used to trace the abundance of planktonic algae in rivers, lakes or lagoons. The Venice Lagoon, famous worldwide, represents one of the most fragile and vulnerable ecosystems, which is being constantly threatened by factors of stress, both human and natural, such as erosion, presence of urban and agricultural sources of pollution, stress from fishing, pollution produced by the industrial area of Porto Marghera and by the city of Venice itself, downwash of sediments from the hinterland and eutrophication. Traditional methods of water quality estimation are often time consuming and involve periodical sampling and plenty of laboratory analyses. In this study the possibility of using imaging spectroscopy to rapidly obtain raster-based maps of chlorophyll concentration by comparing the results obtained through five different literature bio-optical models, which permit the retrieval of mathematical relations between the water's spectral properties and physicochemical parameters; pH, dissolved oxygen, turbidity and chlorophyll concentration. Evaluation of performances is achieved by comparing the hyperspectral based maps with maps of kriged concentration values, provided by the Magistrato delle Acque di Venezia (http://www.magisacque.it/sama/sama_monitoraggi1.htm) and collected by the network of SAMANET sensors.

  8. Influence of net ecosystem metabolism in transferring riverine organic carbon to atmospheric CO 2 in a tropical coastal lagoon (Chilka Lake, India)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. V. M. Gupta; V. V. S. S. Sarma; R. S. Robin; A. V. Raman; M. Jai Kumar; M. Rakesh; B. R. Subramanian

    2008-01-01

    Studies on biogeochemical cycling of carbon in the Chilka Lake, Asia’s largest brackish lagoon on the east coast of India,\\u000a revealed, for the first time, strong seasonal and spatial variability associated with salinity distribution. The lake was\\u000a studied twice during May 2005 (premonsoon) and August 2005 (monsoon). It exchanges waters with the sea (Bay of Bengal) and\\u000a several rivers open

  9. Intermittent ephemeral river-breaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reniers, A. J.; MacMahan, J. H.; Gallagher, E. L.; Shanks, A.; Morgan, S.; Jarvis, M.; Thornton, E. B.; Brown, J.; Fujimura, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2011 we performed a field experiment in Carmel River State Beach, CA, at a time when the intermittent natural breaching of the ephemeral Carmel River occurred due to an unusually rainy period prior to the experiment associated with El Nino. At this time the river would fill the lagoon over the period of a number of days after which a breach would occur. This allowed us to document a number of breaches with unique pre- and post-breach topographic surveys, accompanying ocean and lagoon water elevations as well as extremely high flow (4m/s) velocities in the river mouth during the breaching event. The topographic surveys were obtained with a GPS-equipped backpack mounted on a walking human and show the evolution of the river breaching with a gradually widening and deepening river channel that cuts through the pre-existing beach and berm. The beach face is qualified as a steep with an average beach slope of 1:10 with significant reflection of the incident waves (MacMahan et al., 2012). The wave directions are generally shore normal as the waves refract over the deep canyon that is located offshore of the beach. The tide is mixed semi-diurnal with a range on the order of one meter. Breaching typically occurred during the low-low tide. Grain size is highly variable along the beach with layers of alternating fine and coarse material that could clearly be observed as the river exit channel was cutting through the beach. Large rocky outcroppings buried under the beach sand are also present along certain stretches of the beach controlling the depth of the breaching channel. The changes in the water level measured within the lagoon and the ocean side allows for an estimate of the volume flux associated with the breach as function of morphology, tidal elevation and wave conditions as well as an assessment of the conditions and mechanisms of breach closure, which occurred on the time scale of O(0.5 days). Exploratory model simulations will be presented at the conference examining the processes responsible for the development of the river breaching from the initial stages to a wide-open river flow and subsequent closure.

  10. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  11. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  12. Cellular Automata Modelling of Seagrass in the Orbetello Lagoon

    E-print Network

    of wigeongrass (Ruppia maritima) meadows in the Orbetello lagoon, in central Italy, where the control, and this paper presents a further refinement, with the dynamics of wigeongrass (Ruppia maritima) including

  13. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  14. Model simulations of the transport of Odra flood water through the Szczecin Lagoon into the Pomeranian Bight in July/August 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller-Navarra, S. H.; Huber, K.; Komo, H.

    1998-06-01

    The Odra flood transported large additional water masses into the Szczecin Lagoon area during a period of about one month. The dispersion of these water masses in the Szczecin Lagoon and southern Pomeranian Bight was simulated using the operational hydrodynamic model of the North Sea and Baltic Sea which is run at the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency of Germany (BSH). The model system is forced by meteorological forecast fields from the EUROPA model of the German Weather Service. As a result of the model simulation, the temporal development of the river plume can be described as follows: First the eastern part of Szczecin Lagoon, the Zalew Wielki, filled with flood water displacing “normal” runoff water from that area. After about a week, Odra flood water started to flow into the Pomeranian Bight. Its dispersion within Szczecin Lagoon was by no means uniform. The Kleines Haff, the western part of the Lagoon, was not much affected at first. When large marked water masses had already left the Zalew Wielki area throught the Swina river, maximally only about half the water volume in Kleines Haff had been replaced by Odra flood water (fig. 1). In the Pomeranian Bight, the concentration was higher at the coast of Usedom — at least initially — than at the coast of Wolin. After 30 August 1997, northwesterly winds caused “fresh” Baltic water to flow from the northern to the southern part of the Pomeranian Bight, pushing the water body marked by Odra water eastward along the coast of Wolin. At the same time, outflow began from Kleines Haff through the Peenestrom into the Greifswalder Bodden. Due to low atmospheric activity, and hence limited vertical mixing in summer, the proportion of freshwater in Baltic surface water reached about 50 % in the southern Pomeranian Bight. Near Rügen, it fell below 10 %. Later on, short periods of stronger wind caused major shifts of the water bodies concerned.

  15. Spatial and seasonal responses of precipitation in the Ganges and Brahmaputra river basins to ENSO and Indian Ocean dipole modes: implications for flooding and drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pervez, M. S.; Henebry, G. M.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the spatial and seasonal responses of precipitation in the Ganges and Brahmaputra basins as modulated by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) modes using Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) full data reanalysis of monthly global land-surface precipitation data from 1901 to 2010 with a spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5°. The GPCC monthly total precipitation climatology targeting the period 1951-2000 was used to compute gridded monthly anomalies for the entire time period. The gridded monthly anomalies were averaged for the years influenced by combinations of climate modes. Occurrences of El Niño alone significantly reduce (88% of the long-term average (LTA)) precipitation during the monsoon months in the western and southeastern Ganges Basin. In contrast, occurrences of La Niña and co-occurrences of La Niña and negative IOD events significantly enhance (110 and 109% of LTA in the Ganges and Brahmaputra Basin, respectively) precipitation across both basins. When El Niño co-occurs with positive IOD events, the impacts of El Niño on the basins' precipitation diminishes. When there is no active ENSO or IOD events (occurring in 41 out of 110 years), precipitation remains below average (95% of LTA) in the agriculturally intensive areas of Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, and Western Nepal in the Ganges Basin, whereas precipitation remains average to above average (104% of LTA) across the Brahmaputra Basin. This pattern implies that a regular water deficit is likely, especially in the Ganges Basin, with implications for the agriculture sector due to its reliance on consistent rainfall for successful production. Historically, major droughts occurred during El Niño and co-occurrences of El Niño and positive IOD events, while major flooding occurred during La Niña and co-occurrences of La Niña and negative IOD events in the basins. This observational analysis will facilitate well-informed decision making in minimizing natural hazard risks and climate impacts on agriculture, and supports development of strategies ensuring optimized use of water resources in best management practice under a changing climate.

  16. Spatial and seasonal responses of precipitation in the Ganges and Brahmaputra river basins to ENSO and Indian Ocean dipole modes: implications for flooding and drought

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pervez, Md Shahriar; Henebry, Geoffry M.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the spatial and seasonal responses of precipitation in the Ganges and Brahmaputra basins as modulated by the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) modes using Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) full data reanalysis of monthly global land-surface precipitation data from 1901 to 2010 with a spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5°. The GPCC monthly total precipitation climatology targeting the period 1951–2000 was used to compute gridded monthly anomalies for the entire time period. The gridded monthly anomalies were averaged for the years influenced by combinations of climate modes. Occurrences of El Niño alone significantly reduce (88% of the long-term average (LTA)) precipitation during the monsoon months in the western and southeastern Ganges Basin. In contrast, occurrences of La Niña and co-occurrences of La Niña and negative IOD events significantly enhance (110 and 109% of LTA in the Ganges and Brahmaputra Basin, respectively) precipitation across both basins. When El Niño co-occurs with positive IOD events, the impacts of El Niño on the basins' precipitation diminishes. When there is no active ENSO or IOD events (occurring in 41 out of 110 years), precipitation remains below average (95% of LTA) in the agriculturally intensive areas of Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, and Western Nepal in the Ganges Basin, whereas precipitation remains average to above average (104% of LTA) across the Brahmaputra Basin. This pattern implies that a regular water deficit is likely, especially in the Ganges Basin, with implications for the agriculture sector due to its reliance on consistent rainfall for successful production. Historically, major droughts occurred during El Niño and co-occurrences of El Niño and positive IOD events, while major flooding occurred during La Niña and co-occurrences of La Niña and negative IOD events in the basins. This observational analysis will facilitate well-informed decision making in minimizing natural hazard risks and climate impacts on agriculture, and supports development of strategies ensuring optimized use of water resources in best management practice under a changing climate.

  17. Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional form of a coral reef develops through interactions and feedbacks between its constituent organisms and their environment. Reef morphology therefore contains a potential wealth of ecological information, accessible if the relationships between morphology and ecology can be decoded. Traditionally, reef morphology has been attributed to external controls such as substrate topography or hydrodynamic influences. Little is known about inherent reef morphology in the absence of external control. Here we use reef growth simulations, based on observations in the cellular reefs of Western Australia’s Houtman Abrolhos Islands, to show that reef morphology is fundamentally determined by the mechanical behaviour of the reef-building organisms themselves—specifically their tendency to either remain in place or to collapse. Reef-building organisms that tend to remain in place, such as massive and encrusting corals or coralline algae, produce nodular reefs, whereas those that tend to collapse, such as branching Acropora, produce cellular reefs. The purest reef growth forms arise in sheltered lagoons dominated by a single type of reef builder, as in the branching Acropora-dominated lagoons of the Abrolhos. In these situations reef morphology can be considered a phenotype of the predominant reef building organism. The capacity to infer coral type from reef morphology can potentially be used to identify and map specific coral habitat in remotely sensed images. More generally, identifying ecological mechanisms underlying other examples of self-generated reef morphology can potentially improve our understanding of present-day reef ecology, because any ecological process capable of shaping a reef will almost invariably be an important process in real time on the living reef. PMID:26175962

  18. Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs.

    PubMed

    Blakeway, David; Hamblin, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional form of a coral reef develops through interactions and feedbacks between its constituent organisms and their environment. Reef morphology therefore contains a potential wealth of ecological information, accessible if the relationships between morphology and ecology can be decoded. Traditionally, reef morphology has been attributed to external controls such as substrate topography or hydrodynamic influences. Little is known about inherent reef morphology in the absence of external control. Here we use reef growth simulations, based on observations in the cellular reefs of Western Australia's Houtman Abrolhos Islands, to show that reef morphology is fundamentally determined by the mechanical behaviour of the reef-building organisms themselves-specifically their tendency to either remain in place or to collapse. Reef-building organisms that tend to remain in place, such as massive and encrusting corals or coralline algae, produce nodular reefs, whereas those that tend to collapse, such as branching Acropora, produce cellular reefs. The purest reef growth forms arise in sheltered lagoons dominated by a single type of reef builder, as in the branching Acropora-dominated lagoons of the Abrolhos. In these situations reef morphology can be considered a phenotype of the predominant reef building organism. The capacity to infer coral type from reef morphology can potentially be used to identify and map specific coral habitat in remotely sensed images. More generally, identifying ecological mechanisms underlying other examples of self-generated reef morphology can potentially improve our understanding of present-day reef ecology, because any ecological process capable of shaping a reef will almost invariably be an important process in real time on the living reef. PMID:26175962

  19. Holocene lagoonal development in the isolated carbonate platforms off Belize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischler, Eberhard

    2003-06-01

    Thirty-one vibracores were taken in interior lagoons of Glovers Reef, Lighthouse Reef, and Turneffe Islands—three isolated carbonate platforms offshore Belize, Central America. Holocene facies successions overlying the Pleistocene limestone bedrock begin with soils, followed by mangrove peats, and marine carbonate sediments of lagoonal origin. The soils formed on top of subaerially exposed Pleistocene limestone before the Holocene transgression. Mangrove peats developed during initial flooding of the platforms (Glovers ca. 8.5 ky, Lighthouse ca. 7 ky, Turneffe ca. 6 ky BP). As water depths increased, reefs colonized platform margins, lagoonal circulation improved thereby promoting carbonate production. The basal lagoonal carbonate sediments are characterized by shell beds and/or Halimeda packstones-grainstones. Mollusk-dominated wackestones and packstones follow upsection in Glovers and Lighthouse Reefs. At present, open circulation prevails in Glovers and Lighthouse lagoons. In contrast, organic-rich Halimeda wackestones and packstones dominate the Turneffe Islands Holocene succession. The main lagoon area of Turneffe is enclosed by mangroves, and restricted circulation prevails. Factors that explain the differences in geomorphology, circulation, and facies are variations in depth of antecedent topography and degree of exposure to waves and currents. The thickness of Holocene lagoon sediments may exceed the maximum core length of 6 m in all atolls. Holocene sedimentation rates average 0.6 m/ky, with highest rates in Turneffe (0.82 m/ky), followed by Lighthouse (0.53 m/ky), and Glovers (0.46 m/ky). Like in many other isolated carbonate platforms and atolls, lagoon floor sedimentation did not keep pace with rising sea level, leading to unfilled accommodation space. At present, Glovers has an 18 m deep lagoon, while Lighthouse and the main Turneffe lagoon are 8 m deep. It is unlikely that the lagoons will be completely filled during the Holocene sea level highstand cycle. This observation should be kept in mind when using cycle thickness as a proxy for eustatic sea level change in fossil carbonate platforms.

  20. VISTA Stares Deeply into the Blue Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This new infrared image of the Lagoon Nebula was captured as part of a five-year study of the Milky Way using ESO's VISTA telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. This is a small piece of a much larger image of the region surrounding the nebula, which is, in turn, only one part of a huge survey. Astronomers are currently using ESO's Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) to scour the Milky Way's central regions for variable objects and map its structure in greater detail than ever before. This huge survey is called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) [1]. The new infrared image presented here was taken as part of this survey. It shows the stellar nursery called the Lagoon Nebula (also known as Messier 8, see eso0936), which lies about 4000-5000 light-years away in the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). Infrared observations allow astronomers to peer behind the veil of dust that prevents them from seeing celestial objects in visible light. This is because visible light, which has a wavelength that is about the same size as the dust particles, is strongly scattered, but the longer wavelength infrared light can pass through the dust largely unscathed. VISTA, with its 4.1-metre diameter mirror - the largest survey telescope in the world - is dedicated to surveying large areas of the sky at near-infrared wavelengths deeply and quickly. It is therefore ideally suited to studying star birth. Stars typically form in large molecular clouds of gas and dust, which collapse under their own weight. The Lagoon Nebula, however, is also home to a number of much more compact regions of collapsing gas and dust, called Bok globules [2]. These dark clouds are so dense that, even in the infrared, they can block the starlight from background stars. But the most famous dark feature in the nebula, for which it is named, is the lagoon-shaped dust lane that winds its way through the glowing cloud of gas. Hot, young stars, which give off intense ultraviolet light, are responsible for making the nebula glow brightly. But the Lagoon Nebula is also home to much younger stellar infants. Newborn stars have been detected in the nebula that are so young that they are still surrounded by their natal accretion discs. Such new born stars occasionally eject jets of matter from their poles. When this ejected material ploughs into the surrounding gas short-lived bright streaks called Herbig-Haro objects [3] are formed, making the new-borns easy to spot. In the last five years, several Herbig-Haro objects have been detected in the Lagoon Nebula, so the baby boom is clearly still in progress here. Notes [1] This survey, one of six VISTA surveys currently in progress, will image the central parts of the Milky Way many times over a period of five years and will detect huge numbers of new variable objects. [2] Bart Bok was a Dutch-American astronomer who spent most of his long career in the United States and Australia. He first noticed the dark spots that now bear his name, in star formation regions and speculated that they may be associated with the earliest stages of star formation. The hidden baby stars were only observed directly when infrared imaging was possible several decades later. [3] Although not the first to see such objects, the astronomers George Herbig and Guillermo Haro were the first to study the spectra of these strange objects in detail and realise that they were not just clumps of gas and dust that reflected light, or glowed under the influence of the ultraviolet light from young stars, but were a new class of objects associated with star formation. More information The science team for VVV includes Dante Minniti (Universidad Catolica, Chile), Phil Lucas (University of Hertfordshire, UK), Ignacio Toledo (Universidad Catolica) and Maren Hempel (Universidad Catolica). ESO, the European Southern Observatory, is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world's most productive astronomical observatory. It is supported by 15 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, D

  1. Comparative Study of Wastewater Lagoon with and without Water Hyacinth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca C. Mcdonald; B. C. Wolverton

    1980-01-01

    A 3-year study was conducted on an existing, one-cell, facultative sewage lagoon having a total surface area of 3.6 ha and\\u000a receiving a BOD5 loading rate of 44 kglhald (40 Iblald). The comparative experimental periods ran from July through November for 3 consecutive\\u000a years. During the first period, water hyacinths completely covered the lagoon. The water hyacinth coverage was reduced

  2. Lagoon PFA: Feasibility for use as a binder in concrete

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. McCarthy; P. A. J. Tittle; R. K. Dhir

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes a study carried out to examine the influence of storing pulverized-fuel ash (PFA) in an excess of water,\\u000a or lagoon, on the properties of the material itself and its suitability for use as a component of the binder in concrete.\\u000a The work considered PFA slurried and stored in the laboratory (simulated lagoon PFA), and material recovered from

  3. Indian Ledger Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilcoat, George W.

    1990-01-01

    Offers an innovative way to teach mid-nineteenth century North American Indian history by having students create their own Indian Ledger art. Purposes of the project are: to understand the role played by American Indians, to reveal American Indian stereotypes, and to identify relationships between cultures and environments. Background and…

  4. Historical evolution of a micro-tidal lagoon simulated by a 2-D schematic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaldo, D.; Di Silvio, G.

    2013-11-01

    Coastal transitional environments such as estuaries, coastal inlets and tidal lagoons are the result of the interaction of several exogenous forcing factors (e.g. tidal regime, local wind and wave climate, sea-level rise, sediment supply) many of which are, in principle, variable in time over historical and geological timescales. Besides the natural variability of the external constraints, human interventions in some components of the system can either directly or indirectly affect long-term sediment dynamics in the whole system. In this paper the evolution of a schematic tidal basin, with non-uniform sediments and subject to geological and anthropogenic processes, is reproduced by means of a two dimensional morphodynamic model and qualitatively compared to the events which historically took place in the Venice Lagoon during the last four centuries; the trend for the next 200 years is also investigated. In particular, the effect on both morphology and bottom composition of river diversion, jetty construction, human-induced subsidence and channel dredging are presented and discussed.

  5. Organic pollutants in the Odra river ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Wolska, Lidia; Zygmunt, Bogdan; Namie?nik, Jacek

    2003-11-01

    The paper presents the results of the analysis of water and bottom sediment samples from different locations along the Odra river, collected during eight campaigns in the years 1997-2000. All the basic organic pollutants were determined. Pollution of water with PCBs was negligible while with PAHs was not critical. Concentrations of volatile organochlorine compounds in water were the highest in Brzeg Dolny and its surroundings. Concentrations of tetrachloroethene were exceptionally high in the Szczecin Lagoon. The Odra sediments were non-polluted or only slightly polluted with PCBs, pesticides and different classes of volatile organic pollutants. However, PAHs were present in rather large concentrations, especially in the upper course of the Odra river. The data obtained contributed to the evaluation of pollutants discharges to the Baltic sea via Szczecin Lagoon as well as to the characterization of pollution sources (point sources and area sources) in the Odra catchment area. PMID:12948540

  6. Response of early Ruppia cirrhosa litter breakdown to nutrient addition in a coastal lagoon affected by agricultural runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, Margarita

    2009-05-01

    The response of early Ruppia cirrhosa Petagna (Grande) litter decomposition to external nitrogen and phosphorus availability in La Tancada (Ebro River, NE Spain), a coastal lagoon that receives agricultural freshwater runoff from rice fields has been examined. Recently abscised dead R. cirrhosa stems were collected and 25 g of fresh weight was placed in litter bags with a mesh size of 100 ?m and 1 mm. These bags were fertilised by adding nitrogen (N), a mixture of nitrogen plus phosphorus (N + P), or phosphorus (P), or were left untreated (CT). Macroinvertebrates were retrieved from the bags and the ash-free dry weight, and carbon, and N and P content of the remaining plant material were measured after 0, 3, 7, 14, 22 and 32 days. Litter decomposition rates, k (day -1), were estimated using a simple exponential model. Litter decay was clearly accelerated by the addition of P in the fine (100 ?m) litter bags (0.042), but when N was added alone (0.0099) the decomposition rate was lower than in the CT treatments (0.022). No significant difference was observed between the N (0.0099-0.018) and N + P (0.0091-0.015) treatments in either the fine or the coarse (1 mm) litter bags. These results could be attributed to the relatively high availability of external (environmental) and internal (detritus contents) N. No significant effect of macro invertebrates was observed in the CT treatment or under N or P or N + P addition. The ratio between the decomposition rates in coarse and fine litter bags (k c/k f) was lower in disturbed Tancada lagoon (0.82) than in Cesine lagoon (2.11), a similar Mediterranean coastal water body with almost pristine conditions. These results indicate that, in addition to data on macroinvertebrate community structure, decomposition rates could also be used to assess water quality in coastal lagoons.

  7. Comparative hydrodynamics of 10 Mediterranean lagoons by means of numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umgiesser, Georg; Ferrarin, Christian; Cucco, Andrea; De Pascalis, Francesca; Bellafiore, Debora; Ghezzo, Michol; Bajo, Marco

    2014-04-01

    A comparison study between 10 Mediterranean lagoons has been carried out by means of the 3-D numerical model SHYFEM. The investigated basins are the Venice and Marano-Grado lagoons in the Northern Adriatic Sea, the Lesina and Varano lagoons in the Southern Adriatic Sea, the Taranto basin in the Ionian Sea, the Cabras Lagoon in Sardinia, the Ganzirri and Faro lagoons in Sicily, the Mar Menor in Spain, and the Nador Lagoon in Morocco. This study has been focused on hydrodynamics in terms of exchange rates, transport time scale, and mixing. Water exchange depends mainly on the inlet shape and tidal range, but also on the wind regimes in the case of multi-inlet lagoons. Water renewal time, which is mostly determined by the exchange rate, is a powerful concept that allows lagoons to be characterized with a time scale. In the case of the studied lagoons, the renewal time ranged from few days in the Marano-Grado Lagoon up to 1 year in the case of the Mar Menor. The analysis of the renewal time frequency distribution allows identifying subbasins. The numerical study proved to be a useful tool for the intercomparison and classification of the lagoons. These environments range from a leaky type to a choked type of lagoons and give a representative picture of the lagoons situated around the Mediterranean basin. Mixing efficiency turns out to be a function of the morphological complexity, but also of the forcings acting on the system.

  8. Analysis of hydrobiological pattern in the Bizerte lagoon (Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjaoui, Béchir; Harzallah, Ali; Moussa, Mahmoud; Chapelle, Annie; Solidoro, Cosimo

    2008-10-01

    This study deals with the use of a multivariate analysis method in order to understand the functioning of the Bizerte lagoon ecosystem. A set of hydrobiological parameters was collected during 10 monthly campaigns in 2004. A variant of the EOF (Empirical Orthogonal Function) technique is used to examine hydrobiological variability modes in this lagoon. The permanent features characterising the lagoon are obtained by applying the EOF technique to data after removing the annual cycle. Two major modes were obtained. The first one shows a contrast between the northern sector of the lagoon, influenced by the Mediterranean Sea, and the southern one influenced by continental waters. This mode is mostly prominent for temperature and salinity. The second mode shows a contrast between shallow waters along the coastal zones and the deep central area of the lagoon. This contrast is more pronounced towards the southwestern edge of the lagoon, a region of important freshwater input from the Tinja channel, which drifts towards the downstream area of Menzel Bourguiba. This second mode may also correspond to northward water circulation under southerly wind blowing frequently in summer. The spatial and temporal variability in the lagoon is highlighted by applying the EOF to the raw data without removing the annual cycle. A weight series is obtained for each variable by extracting the corresponding data and then projecting them on the corresponding eigenvector. Using this technique, only one mode was found dominant with more than 52% of the total variance. It was also found that the north-south contrast of temperature, salinity and phosphorous and the coast-centre contrast of Chlorophyll a are enhanced in summer. Other variables such as ammonia and nitrate also show significant annual cycles but with local patterns.

  9. Linking DNRA community structure and activity in a shallow lagoonal estuarine system

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bongkeun; Lisa, Jessica A.; Tobias, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA) and denitrification are two nitrate respiration pathways in the microbial nitrogen cycle. Diversity and abundance of denitrifying bacteria have been extensively examined in various ecosystems. However, studies on DNRA bacterial diversity are limited, and the linkage between the structure and activity of DNRA communities has yet to be discovered. We examined the composition, diversity, abundance, and activities of DNRA communities at five sites along a salinity gradient in the New River Estuary, North Carolina, USA, a shallow temporal/lagoonal estuarine system. Sediment slurry incubation experiments with 15N-nitrate were conducted to measure potential DNRA rates, while the abundance of DNRA communities was calculated using quantitative PCR of nrfA genes encoding cytochrome C nitrite reductase, commonly found in DNRA bacteria. A pyrosequencing method targeting nrfA genes was developed using an Ion Torrent sequencer to examine the diversity and composition of DNRA communities within the estuarine sediment community. We found higher levels of nrfA gene abundance and DNRA activities in sediments with higher percent organic content. Pyrosequencing analysis of nrfA genes revealed spatial variation of DNRA communities along the salinity gradient of the New River Estuary. Percent abundance of dominant populations was found to have significant influence on overall activities of DNRA communities. Abundance of dominant DNRA bacteria and organic carbon availability are important regulators of DNRA activities in the eutrophic New River Estuary. PMID:25232351

  10. Variability of Anaerobic Animal Waste Lagoon deltaN Source Signatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sadayappan Mariappan; Mary E. Exner; Glen E. Martin; Roy F. Spalding

    2009-01-01

    High ammonium-N concentrations derived from animal wastes stored and partially treated in earthen anaerobic lagoons at confined feeding facilities can seep to groundwater. ?N-NH4 values from +2.0 to +59.1‰ in 13 lagoons complicate identification of lagoon seepage as well as land-applied lagoon effluent in ground and surface waters. The spectrum of ?N values requires site-specific isotope characterization of the potential

  11. The impact of mining activities on the hypersaline Mar Menor lagoon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Dassenakis; G. Garcia; E. Diamantopoulou; J. D. Girona; E. M. Garcia-Marin; G. Filippi; V. Fioraki

    2010-01-01

    Mar Menor lagoon is one of the largest hypersaline coastal lagoons in the Mediterranean Sea. The lagoon is threatened by environmental degradation due to the urban growth around it, the intensive agriculture in its watershed and the remains of mining activities in the nearby Cartagena-La Unio´n area. The present study aims at estimating the levels of zinc and lead in

  12. Modelling water discharges and nutrient inputs into a Mediterranean lagoon (Thau, France). Impact on phytoplankton production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Plus; I. La Jeunesse; F. Bouraoui

    2003-01-01

    The lagoon of Thau (French Mediterranean coast), is a large (75 km2) and rather deep coastal lagoon (mean depth 4 m), connected to the sea by its two extremities (residence time: about 3 months). Besides its ecological interest as a breeding and transit zone for some sea fish species, the lagoon has a notable economic importance due to shellfish cultivation

  13. Catch Efficiencies of Purse and Beach Seines in Ivory Coast Lagoons

    E-print Network

    Catch Efficiencies of Purse and Beach Seines in Ivory Coast Lagoons Emmanuel Charles-Dominique ABSTRACT: Catch efficiencies of two commonly used fishing gears. in Ivory Coast lagoons, purse seine fisheries are well developed in Ivory Coast lagoons, yielding from 10,000 to 20,000 tons of commercially

  14. A PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL NUMBERS AND BIOMASS IN LANGEBAAN LAGOON

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. G. F. Mazure; G. M. Branch

    1979-01-01

    Water samples taken down the length of Langebaan lagoon reveal a decline in bacterial numbers from Saldanha Bay to the head of the lagoon, with a parallel decline in suspended particles. Bacterial biomass (x 43, 27 mg.m) was comparable to zooplankton biomass. Intertidal samples from different sediment types showed an increase of bacteria towards the southern tip of the lagoon,

  15. A system for estimating bowen ratio And evaporation from waste lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low cost system was deployed above a swine waste lagoon to obtain estimates of Bowen ratios and characterize lagoon temperatures. The system consisted of humidity and temperature sensors and anemometers deployed above the lagoon, water temperature sensors, and a meteorological station located by t...

  16. Distribution of foraminifera in the barrier reef and lagoon of British Honduras

    E-print Network

    Cebulski, Donald Edward

    1961-01-01

    lagoon Mid lagoon Hear-reef lagoon b - b' o - o' d-d' e - e' f-f' silty clay clayey silt silty clay shelly silt silty sand shelly sand sandy clay silty clay silty clay silty sand clayey silt olayey silt clayey silt shelly clay shelly...

  17. Stormwater characterization and lagoon sediment analysis, Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Final report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. G. Garland; R. W. Vaughn; P. T. Scott

    1990-01-01

    Sampling was conducted in the wastewater treatment lagoons and stormwater runoff at Grand Forks AFB. The base was concerned about whether the unlined lagoons were creating a potential groundwater contamination problem and whether their stormwater runoff met North Dakota state stream standards. Lagoon sediment did not contain Extraction Procedure hazardous chemicals. Stormwater runoff exceeded state standards for boron, phosphates, and

  18. The Indian Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Augusta

    1969-01-01

    Appraisal of Boas'"Introduction to Handbook of American Indian Languages (1911), and Powell's "Indian Linguistic Famlies of America North of Mexico (1891), as reissued by University of Nebraska, Lincoln. (AF)

  19. PNW RIVER REACH FILE DOCUMENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with Federal and state agencies, and NW Indian Tribes has produced a 1:100,000-scale River Reach data layer for the Pacific Northwest that will serve water-resource management applications for the next decade or more. The Pacific N...

  20. Eutrophication Process on Coastal Lagoons of North of Sinaloa, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo-Urias, D.; Martinez-Lopez, A.

    2007-05-01

    Coastal ecosystems in the Gulf of California support diverse and important fisheries and are reservoirs of great biological diversity. In northern Sinaloa, population growth and development, as well as increased use of these natural systems for recreation, has substantially increased the pressure placed upon marine resources. Discharge of untreated wastewaters generated by diverse human activities has been notably altered its health and integrity, principally along the lagoon's eastern shore In the late 60s, agriculture moved into a dominant role in coastal northern Sinaloa. The coastal plain encompasses more than 200,000 hectares under cultivation that now introduces large amounts of organic material, pesticides, heavy metals, and fertilizers into the lagoon systems of Topolobampo and San Ignacio-Navachiste-Macapule System at drainage discharge points and a minor grade in Colorado Lagoon. These lagoons are shallow and exhibit low water quality, lost of lagoon depth, presence of toxic substances (heavy metals) near the discharge points of wastewaters, and presence of harmful algal blooms. With the aim of evaluate the nutrients loadings (wastewaters, groundwaters) and their effects on the coastal lagoons of north of Sinaloa, the preliminary analysis of the physical, chemical and biologic variables data series are analyzed. From 1987-2007 eutrophication process is identified in Topolobampo Complex show increase tendency in annual average concentrations of DIN (Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen= NO2+NO3) from 0.5 ? M in 1987 to 2.7 ? M in 2006. Trophic Index (TRIX) values, low nutrient ratios (N: P and N: Si) and the phytoplanktonic community structure support this result. Preliminary results of nutrients loadings show a mayor contribution of wastewaters into the coastal zone.

  1. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond.

  2. Relative role of climatic factors and anthropogenic actions in the water quality and ecological dynamics of the Aveiro lagoon (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Marta; Oliveira, Anabela; Queiroga, Henrique; Brotas, Vanda; Fortunato, André B.; Manso, Maria Dolores

    2013-04-01

    The Aveiro lagoon harbours one of the largest saltmarshes in Europe, with a significant role of ecological services, supporting at the same time several economic activities that might impact its water and ecological quality. Besides the pressures associated with human activities, the impacts of climate change in estuarine ecosystems are also matter of concern worldwide. In this context, understanding the systems' natural variability, the impacts of climate change and the relative role of anthropogenic pressures is essential to ensure estuarine ecosystems' long-term management. Thus, this study evaluates the influence of climatic factors and anthropogenic pressures on the water quality and ecological dynamics of the Aveiro lagoon based on an integrated approach. This approach combines the analysis of long time series from the past 25 years and high-resolution numerical modelling of future scenarios of climate change (increase in air temperature, changes in the precipitation regimes and sea level rise) and anthropogenic interventions (dredging, a marina construction and emergency by-pass wastewater discharges) in the lagoon. The analysis of the spatial and temporal patterns of variability of the water and ecological quality in the Aveiro lagoon at different scales, based on historical data from 1985 to 2010 complemented by the campaigns performed, suggested a combined influence of the climatic variability and anthropogenic interventions. Future scenarios of climate change and anthropogenic interventions simulated revealed a larger influence of climate change when compared with the analysed anthropogenic actions. The most important variations from the reference scenario are predicted for the sea level rise scenarios, followed by the changes in the hydrological regimes scenarios, putting in evidence the main role of circulation (tide and river flow) in establishing the water quality and ecological dynamics in the lagoon. A significant decrease of chlorophyll a and nutrients is predicted in the downstream and middle areas of the channel due to sea level rise, while a significant salinity increase is predicted upstream. These changes may promote modifications in the communities' distribution and composition, affecting the food web and promoting a progression further upstream of the marine species. Results also suggest that the identified effects may be more important in shallow estuaries.

  3. The Indian Software Industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashish Arora; V. S. Arunachalam; Jai Asundi; Ronald Fernandes

    1999-01-01

    Abstract This paper reports on the results of research on the Indian software industry, carried out at Carnegie Mellon University. We use a variety of sources, including a questionnaire survey of Indian software firms, and field visits and interviews with industry participants, observers, and US based clients. The Indian software industry is remarkable in a number of respects. It is

  4. Indian Law Enforcement History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etheridge, David

    Written as a tribute to American Indian law enforcement officers and the Indian Criminal Justice System, this monographh details the history of the legislative, judicial, financial, and cultural problems associated with the development of Indian law enforcement. Citing numerous court cases, pieces of legislation, and individual and organizational…

  5. American Indian Language Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leap, William

    Prepared for the National Center for Bilingual Research, the document provides information on the "state of the art" in American Indian language education and presents a full picture of the situation exploring concepts (e.g., self-determination, Indian language diversity) and concerns (e.g., tribal reluctance to see Indian language instruction…

  6. Exploration strategy in Keg River carbonates of northwestern Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, A.H.

    1987-05-01

    The analysis of reservoir quality and seal capacity of the Middle Devonian Keg River carbonate reservoirs in northwestern Alberta requires facies studies of rock units of the Keg River Formation and of the overlying Muskeg and Sulphur Point formations. Using lithologic criteria, faunal type, and stratigraphic positions, the entire sequence is subdivided into ten major facies. The system used is that of standard facies belts with second-order modification to Wilson's terminology. These facies are (from basin to land): basin, open sea shelf, toe of slope, foreslope, organic buildup, shoal lime sand, open lagoon, restricted lagoon, tidal flats, and sabkha evaporites. The upper member of the Keg River Formation is the main hydrocarbon reservoir in the study area. It consists of floatstone, rudstone, and boundstone with wackestone, packstone, and grainstone matrix. The principal faunal constituents are crinoids, brachiopods, stromatoporoids, corals, and stachyodes. The reservoir porosity is of primary intergranular and intragranular and secondary vugular textures. The upper Keg River member is composed of two major facies: patch reefs and banks. Both facies are formed in an open lagoon environment fronted by Presqu'ile barrier to the west-northwest. Water depth was the main factor in controlling the distribution of the bank and patch reef facies. Patch reefs were developed in areas of deeper water, whereas banks were formed in shallower areas of the open lagoon. Recent analogs of the Keg River buildups are found on the Bermuda Platform and Belize Shelf. A direct relationship exists between the thickness of overlying anhydrites of the Muskeg Formation and hydrocarbon occurrences in the Keg River Formation. Generally in areas where patch reefs are developed, the thickness of the anhydrite is more than 30 ft. However, areas of bank are covered by less than 30 ft of anhydrite.

  7. Coastal lagoons as a natural sewage treatment plant and their impact on the natural stable isotope signature in nitrate (d 15N, d 18O)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, M.; Pastuszak, M.; Sitek, S.; Schulte, U.

    2003-04-01

    Eutrophication is one of the major threats to the Baltic Sea ecosystems and, therefore, various possibilities for nutrient removal scenarios are currently discussed. One approach considers a 50% decrease in nutrient inputs by all riparian countries, however, this would cost 380 Mio Euro/yr. Some countries already discharge highly treated sewage waters and any further reduction would be very costly, while other countries use only basic (mechanical) treatment procedures and further treatment could be done cost efficiently. One natural way that reduces nutrient loads and minimize inputs of nitrate, ammonium and phosphate is their transfer through coastal lagoons that act as a natural treatment plant. The residence time of river water is prolonged and that enables settlement of particles and bacterial removal of nitrate and ammonium. This study made it possible to investigate the effect the Szczecin Lagoon has on nutrient concentrations by comparing two stations - one located ca. 100 km upstream, and the other in the Swina Canal, the major outlet of the lagoon. Biweekly samples were taken at both stations. A drop in nitrate concentrations occasionally reached 90%, while the annual removal of nitrate amounted to 55%. The delta 15N and delta 18O data of nitrate were used to investigate the processes responsible for the drop in concentration. Surprisingly, the theoretical delta 15N values (calculated after Rayleigh equation) were negatively correlated with the measured ones, and delta 18O values were unusually high for the river nitrate. We therefore conclude that part of the nitrate was denitrified without fractionation as suggested by Brandes and Devol (1997). However, an additional nitrate source with low delta 15N and high delta 18O values might be also considered. For phosphate the removal was lower, reaching only 15% annually. It seems that the lagoon was more efficiently retaining nitrogen thus changing the N/P ratio of the outflowing water towards N-limitation.

  8. Lagoon Seepage Testing Procedures for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory Butte County, Idaho April 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Giesbrecht

    2014-05-01

    The lagoon seepage testing procedures are documented herein as required by the Wastewater Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16.493). The Wastewater Rules and Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 require that the procedure used for performing a seepage test be approved by IDEQ prior to conducting the seepage test. The procedures described herein are based on a seepage testing plan that was developed by J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) and has been accepted by several IDEQ offices for lagoons in Idaho.

  9. Benthic Primary Production Budget of a Caribbean Reef Lagoon (Puerto Morelos, Mexico)

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Malik S.; Jantzen, Carin; Haas, Andreas F.; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    High photosynthetic benthic primary production (P) represents a key ecosystem service provided by tropical coral reef systems. However, benthic P budgets of specific ecosystem compartments such as macrophyte-dominated reef lagoons are still scarce. To address this, we quantified individual and lagoon-wide net (Pn) and gross (Pg) primary production by all dominant functional groups of benthic primary producers in a typical macrophyte-dominated Caribbean reef lagoon near Puerto Morelos (Mexico) via measurement of O2 fluxes in incubation experiments. The photosynthetically active 3D lagoon surface area was quantified using conversion factors to allow extrapolation to lagoon-wide P budgets. Findings revealed that lagoon 2D benthic cover was primarily composed of sand-associated microphytobenthos (40%), seagrasses (29%) and macroalgae (27%), while seagrasses dominated the lagoon 3D surface area (84%). Individual Pg was highest for macroalgae and scleractinian corals (87 and 86 mmol O2 m?2 specimen area d?1, respectively), however seagrasses contributed highest (59%) to the lagoon-wide Pg. Macroalgae exhibited highest individual Pn rates, but seagrasses generated the largest fraction (51%) of lagoon-wide Pn. Individual R was highest for scleractinian corals and macroalgae, whereas seagrasses again provided the major lagoon-wide share (68%). These findings characterise the investigated lagoon as a net autotrophic coral reef ecosystem compartment revealing similar P compared to other macrophyte-dominated coastal environments such as seagrass meadows and macroalgae beds. Further, high lagoon-wide P (Pg: 488 and Pn: 181 mmol O2 m?2 lagoon area d?1) and overall Pg:R (1.6) indicate substantial benthic excess production within the Puerto Morelos reef lagoon and suggest the export of newly synthesised organic matter to surrounding ecosystems. PMID:24367570

  10. Seasonal mercury transformation and surficial sediment detoxification by bacteria of Marano and Grado lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Franco; Gallo, Michele; Marchetto, Davide; Fani, Renato; Maida, Isabel; Horvat, Milena; Fajon, Vesna; Zizek, Suzana; Hines, Mark

    2012-11-01

    Marano and Grado lagoons are polluted by mercury from the Isonzo River and a chlor-alkali plant, yet despite this contamination, clam cultivation is one of the main activities in the region. Four stations (MA, MB, MC and GD) were chosen for clam seeding and surficial sediments were monitored in autumn, winter and summer to determine the Hg detoxifying role of bacteria. Biotransformation of Hg species in surficial sediments of Marano and Grado lagoons was investigated while taking into consideration the speciation of organic matter in the biochemical classes of PRT (proteins), CHO (carbohydrates) and LIP (lipids), water-washed cations and anions, bacterial biomass, Hg-resistant bacteria, some specific microbial activities such as sulfate reduction rates, Hg methylation rates, Hg-demethylation rates, and enzymatic ionic Hg reduction. MeHg in sediments was well correlated with PRT content, whereas total Hg in sediments correlated with numbers of Hg-resistant bacteria. Correlations of the latter with Hg-demethylation rates in autumn and winter suggested a direct role Hg-resistant bacteria in Hg detoxification by producing elemental Hg (Hg0) from ionic Hg and probably also from MeHg. MeHg-demethylation rates were ˜10 times higher than Hg methylation rates, were highest in summer and correlated with high sulfate reduction rates indicating that MeHg was probably degraded in summer by sulfate-reducing bacteria via an oxidative pathway. During the summer period, aerobic heterotrophic Hg-resistant bacteria decreased to <2% compared to 53% in winter. Four Hg-resistant bacterial strains were isolated, two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus and Bacillus) and two Gram-negative (Stenotrophomonas and Pseudomonas). Two were able to produce Hg0, but just one contained a merA gene; while other two strains did not produce Hg0 even though they were able to grow at 5 ?g ml of HgCl2. Lagoon sediments support a strong sulfur cycle in summer that controls Hg methylation and demethylation. However, during winter, Hg-resistant bacteria that are capable of degrading MeHg via the mer-catalyzed reductive pathway increase in importance.

  11. A new sampler for stratified lagoon chemical and microbiological assessments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A water column sampler was needed to study stratification of nutrients and bacteria in a swine manure lagoon. Conventional samplers yielded shallow samples near the bank or required a boat. These limitations prompted development of a new sampler to collect at multiple depths with minimal disturbanc...

  12. Estimating greenhouse gas emissions from a waste lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cost-effective approach was used to investigate the relationship between emission of the greenhouse gases (GHG) CO2, CH4, and N2O and energy fluxes from a swine waste lagoon. Energy fluxes were calculated using the Penman method. The energy fluxes showed a diurnal pattern as expected of such flux...

  13. Antibiotic Resistant Bacterial Profiles of Anaerobic Swine Lagoon Effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although land application of swine manure lagoon effluent is a common and effective method of disposal, the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal can complicate already understood issues associated with its safe disposal. The aim of this study was to assess antibi...

  14. LAGOON WATER FROM CONFINED ANIMAL FEED OPERATIONS AND AMPHIBIAN DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lagoon Water from Confined Animal Feed Operations and Amphibian Development. Dumont, J. N.* and Slagle, S., Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, and Hutchins, S. R., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (NRMRL/SPRD), Ada, OK. There is some evidence that confined anima...

  15. Distribution and stability of eelgrass beds at Izembek Lagoon, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, D.H.; Markon, C.J.; Douglas, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Spatial change in eelgrass meadows, Zostera marina L., was assessed between 1978 and 1987 and between 1987 and 1995 at Izembek Lagoon, Alaska. Change in total extent was evaluated through a map to map comparison of data interpreted from a 1978 Landsat multi-spectral scanner image and 1987 black and white aerial photographs. A ground survey in 1995 was used to assess spatial change from 1987. Eelgrass beds were the predominant vegetation type in the lagoon, comprising 44-47% (15000-16000 ha) of the total area in 1978 and 1987. Izembek Lagoon contains the largest bed of seagrass along the Pacific Coast of North America and largest known single stand of eelgrass in the world. There was a high degree of overlap in the spatial distribution of eelgrass among years of change detection. The overall net change was a 6% gain between, 1978 and 1987 and a <1% gain between 1987 and 1995. The lack of significant change in eelgrass cover suggests that eelgrass meadows in Izembek Lagoon have been stable during the 17-year period of our study.

  16. Reduction of Malodorous Compounds from a Treated Swine Anaerobic Lagoon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John H. Loughrin; Ariel A. Szogi; Matias B. Vanotti

    2006-01-01

    There is a need for treatment technologies that can eliminate envi- ronmental problems associated with anaerobic lagoons. These tech- nologies must be able to capture nutrients, kill pathogens, and reduce emissions of ammonia and nuisance odors. To meet these needs, a full-scale wastewater treatment plant was installed as a demonstration project on one of three 4360-pig (Sus scrofa) production units

  17. IDENTIFYING TOTAL PHOSPHORUS SPECTRAL SIGNAL IN A TROPICAL ESTUARY LAGOON

    E-print Network

    Gilbes, Fernando

    IDENTIFYING TOTAL PHOSPHORUS SPECTRAL SIGNAL IN A TROPICAL ESTUARY LAGOON USING AN HYPERSPECTRAL phosphorus concentrations. A reflectance determination coefficient of 0.49 was obtained from the 467 to 529 phosphorus distribution map. In 1995 the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers (USCOE) developed the CH3D-WES and CE

  18. Aerated Lagoons. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This unit (which consists of a single lesson) describes the structural and operationally unique features of aerated lagoons. In addition, special troubleshooting and maintenance problems are discussed. The instructor's guide for the unit includes: (1) an overview of the lesson; (2) lesson plan; (3) lecture outline (keyed to a set of slides used…

  19. SPREADING LAGOONED SEWAGE SLUDGE ON FARMLAND: A CASE HISTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project demonstrated that land application is feasible and practical for a metropolitan treatment plant for disposal of a large volume (265,000 cu m) of stabilized, liquid sewage sludge stored in lagoons. The project involved transportation of sludge by semi-trailer tankers ...

  20. In Situ Monitoring of Malodors in a Swine Waste Lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An apparatus for the in situ quantification of malodorous compounds from animal wastewater was developed that employed a submersible magnetic stir plate and stir bar sorbtive extraction using polydimethylsiloxane-coated stir bars. Prior to deployment of the apparatus in a hog waste lagoon, experime...

  1. Cellular Automata Modelling of Seagrass in the Orbetello Lagoon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefano Marsili-Libelli; Elisabetta Giusti

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution in time and spa ce of wigeongrass (Ruppia maritima) meadows in the Orbetello lagoon, in central Italy, where the control of the submerged vegetation, with a critical coexistence between macroalgae and macrophytes, is the key management problem. While macroalgae are liable to cause dystrophic crises, m acrophytes oxygenate and stabilise the sediment and thus control

  2. Evaluation of eutrophication in the Ria Formosa coastal lagoon, Portugal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Newton; J. d. Icely; M. Falcao; A. Nobre; J. p. Nunes; J. g. Ferreira; C. Vale

    2003-01-01

    The Ria Formosa is a shallow mesotidal lagoon on the south coast of Portugal, with natural biogeochemical cycles essentially regulated by tidal exchanges at the seawater boundaries and at the sediment interface. Existing data on nutrients in the water column and the sediment, together with chlorophyll a and oxygen saturation in the water column, are compared using different models for

  3. A Field Study Training Program on Wastewater Lagoon Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water and Wastewater Technical School, Neosho, MO.

    This publication is a text and reference manual for operating personnel of both large and small wastewater lagoon systems with support from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). As a text, this inservice training manual is intended to be used in a correspondence course wherein the trainee or operator would read and study each chapter before…

  4. Methane Dynamics in Sediments from Mangrove-dominated Costal Lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P. C.; Paytan, A.; Young, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    Porewater methane and sulfate concentrations from cored sediments have been measured in two coastal mangrove ecosystems (Celestún and Chelem Lagoons) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. Methane exists in shallow sediments while sulfate is not depleted and stable carbon isotopes of methane (-87.27‰ ~ -62.08‰) imply high methane fluxes/production rates below and within the cored sediment depths. The preliminary results from a transport-reaction model show that methane emitted to the water column from these sediments could be 17.8 mg m-2 d-1 in Celestún Lagoon and much higher (565 mg m-2 d-1) in Chelem Lagoon. Since the water depths are shallow (mostly less than 100 cm), the high fluxes of methane could contribute to the atmosphere. The objectives of this study will aim to understand the biogeochemical cycles for methane and sulfate in sediments. A numerical transport-reaction model will be applied to the sedimentary geochemical data (methane, sulfate, chloride, particulate organic carbon (POC) and stable carbon isotopes of headspace methane) from the two lagoons to estimate sulfate reduction, methane oxidation and production rates and advective methane fluxes. The modeled results will be used to discuss the role of methane from mangrove areas and their potential contribution to the global methane cycle.

  5. Distribution and stability of eelgrass beds at Izembek Lagoon, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David H. Ward; Carl J. Markon; David C. Douglas

    1997-01-01

    Spatial change in eelgrass meadows, Zostera marina L., was assessed between 1978 and 1987 and between 1987 and 1995 at Izembek Lagoon, Alaska. Change in total extent was evaluated through a map to map comparison of data interpreted from a 1978 Landsat multi-spectral scanner image and 1987 black and white aerial photographs. A ground survey in 1995 was used to

  6. REDUCTION OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM TREATED ANAEROBIC SWINE LAGOONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need for treatment technologies that can effectively address environmental concerns associated with anaerobic lagoons typically used to manage manure. These technologies must be able to capture nutrients, kill pathogens, and reduce emissions of ammonia and nuisance odors. To meet these ne...

  7. PRE-PRINT VERSION | 1 Southeast Asian `Indianness'Southeast Asian `Indianness'Southeast Asian `Indianness'Southeast Asian `Indianness'

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    PRE-PRINT VERSION | 1 Southeast Asian `Indianness'Southeast Asian `Indianness'Southeast Asian `Indianness'Southeast Asian `Indianness' AAAA LocalLocalLocalLocal vs.vs.vs.vs. Trans, Taipei LACITO, Paris This article is an attempt to define the concept `(Southeast Asian) Indianness

  8. 2. Photographic copy of map. Gila River Project, General Map ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photographic copy of map. Gila River Project, General Map Showing Progress for the Fiscal Year 1927. (Source: U.S. Department of Interior. Office of Indian Affairs. Indian Irrigation Service. Annual Report, Fiscal Year 1927. Vol. I, Narrative and Photographs, District #4, RG 75, Entry 655, Box 29, National Archives, Washington, DC.) Photograph is an 8'x10' enlargement from a 4'x5' negative. - San Carlos Irrigation Project, Lands North & South of Gila River, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  9. SEPARATION OF ALGAL CELLS FROM WASTEWATER LAGOON EFFLUENTS. VOLUME I. INTERMITTENT SAND FILTRATION TO UPGRADE WASTE STABILIZATION LAGOON EFFLUENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A project to evaluate the performance characteristics of the intermittent sand filter for polishing lagoon effluents was conducted. Techniques described in the literature for summer and winter operation were applied to determine if filter effluents would consistently meet PL 92-5...

  10. Fish stock assessment of the northern New Caledonian lagoons:2 – Stocks of lagoon bottom and reef-associated fishes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michel Kulbicki; Pierre Labrosse; Yves Letourneur

    2000-01-01

    Fish stocks found on lagoon bottoms and near reefs are characterized by a high diversity and heterogeneous habitat which make stock estimation difficult. In particular, it is necessary to combine several methods in order to evaluate the major components of these stocks. The present study aimed at estimating reef fish stocks in the Northern Province of New Caledonia, a region

  11. 48 CFR 52.226-1 - Utilization of Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises. 52.226-1 Section...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises. As prescribed in 26...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises (JUN 2000) (a)...

  12. 48 CFR 52.226-1 - Utilization of Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises. 52.226-1 Section...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises. As prescribed in 26...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises (JUN 2000) (a)...

  13. 48 CFR 52.226-1 - Utilization of Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises. 52.226-1 Section...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises. As prescribed in 26...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises (JUN 2000) (a)...

  14. 48 CFR 52.226-1 - Utilization of Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises. 52.226-1 Section...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises. As prescribed in 26...Indian Organizations and Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises (JUN 2000) (a)...

  15. Response Of A Tidal Environment To Changes In The Forcing: Insights From The Southern Venice Lagoon (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roner, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; Ghinassi, M.; Fedi, M.; Bellucci, L. G.; Vigliotti, L.

    2014-12-01

    The Venice Lagoon represents an outstanding example of man-landscape co-existence, where salt marshes are currently exposed to possibly irreversible transformations due to the effects of climate changes and human activity. The increasing rate of relative sea level rise and the decreasing sediment supply are the dominant forcings controlling salt-marshes survival, as in other cases worldwide. Analysing signatures of landscape changes in the stratigraphic record is crucial to refine our knowledge of tidal landform dynamics and it is a first step to develop predictive morphodynamic models. The southern Venice lagoon is suited to analyze the response of tidal landscape to changes in environmental forcing. The upper part of the Holocene sedimentary succession accumulated as the effect of a "human-induced transgression", which caused a considerable salt-marshes contraction since the 16th century. In the southern Venice lagoon, re-directions of the Brenta River during 16th and the 19th century caused significant changes in terms of freshwater and sediment supply. To analyze the paleomorphodynamic response to these main changes, we collected 25 cores (1.0 to 1.5 m deep) along a NE-SW linear transect about 5 km long cutting through salt-marsh, tidal-flat and subtidal-platform deposits. Through sedimentological analyses we defined the spatial arrangement of swamp, salt-marsh, wave-worked and tidal-flat mud deposits along this transect. Magnetic susceptibility and organic/inorganic content were measured in the study succession, which was dated through 14C and 137Cs geochronological analyses. Our results suggest that salt-marsh sedimentation occurred above deltaic deposits since the 14th century. Salt-marsh aggradation stemmed out from both mud settling and organic accumulation, although magnetic susceptibility revealed some intervals during which the inorganic deposition dominates over organic accumulation. Salt-marsh aggradation occurred in parallel with the decrease in salt-marsh extent and the tidal-flat expansion.

  16. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  17. Salinity and eutrophication management by in situ continuous real-time monitoring and 3D modelling (hydrodynamics coupled with water quality): the case of the Berre lagoon (Mediterranean, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Laurent; Emma, Gouze

    2010-05-01

    The Berre lagoon is one of the biggest Mediterranean lagoon. It is located in the South East of France. It's a shallow semi-confined ecosystem (mean depth 6.5 m, depths greater than 8 m being restricted in the central and South parts). Its only connection to the Mediterranean Sea is the Caronte channel in the South West which allows tidal-driven water exchanges. The lagoon receives fresh water and nutrients from natural tributaries (Arc and Touloubre rivers) that drain high anthropised catchment basins. Moreover, a hydroelectric power plant became the main tributary of the lagoon since 1966: it discharged a mean of 3.3 x109 m3 of fresh water per year (equivalent to 3.4 times the volume of the lagoon) and a mean of 525 000 tons of suspended matter per year, during the period 1966 - 1993. As a consequence, the Berre lagoon became particularly unstable, showing considerable salinity drop and variations (2 to 30) depending on seasonal electricity needs. Nutrients loads by both anthropised rivers and power plant led to frequent colored waters and development of macroalgae. Haline stratification favored anoxia and led to benthos disappearance. Changes were observed in Zostera sp. meadows too. In 2004, the European Court of Justice condemned the French State for not respecting the Athens Protocol (advocating Mediterranean protection against telluric pollution) and requested managing strategies. The hydroelectric power plant (Electricité de France EDF) is not allowed from now on to discharge more than 1.2 x109 m3 of fresh water per year. Besides, EDF has to respect severe salinity constraints favorable to the establishment of a balanced ecosystem. In this context, EDF started an in situ continuous monitoring of the lagoon: CTD probes have been installed at 10 stations and currents have been measured in the Caronte channel. Moreover, the three central buoys have been real time remote transmitting to control instantaneously the impact of fresh water discharge on salinity. Since 2008, these three buoys have been also equipped with nitrate, chlorophyll and oxygen probes. Thanks to these measurements, a 3D hydrodynamic model (TELEMAC©) has been developped and validated to better qualify and quantify the relationships between the salinity of the lagoon, the fresh water inputs (from the powerplant and from the rivers), the water exchanges through the Caronte channel and the wind mixing. This model is currently used by the electricity producer to manage fresh water discharges complying with salinity indicators fixed by the European Court of Justice. Then, a biogeochemical model (DelWAQ©) coupled with the hydrodynamic model has been developped to understand the ecosystem functioning and to assess the hydroelectric powerplant implication in the eutrophication of the lagoon. Simulations reproduce quite well: 1/ the seasonal variations of nutrients, 2/ biogeochemical processes, 3/ anoxia events in connection with stratification periods at deep stations and 4/ are able to calculate nutrients budgets over a year. The results show that high primary production rates are based on high dynamical mineralization processes. The allochtonous nutrients sources are not sufficient to feed the phytoplanktonic demand (less than 1%). This models coupling is the only way to compile the physical and biogeochemical variables and processes. It's a tool aiming at a better assessment of the high complexity of the lagoon nutrients cycles. It will help us to understand the powerplant implication for the eutrophication with respect to the anthropised rivers. Moreover we would be able to test various managing scenarii (e.g. drop of nutrients loads) and to suggest new rehabilitation strategies.

  18. Crustacean zooplankton in aerated wastewater treatment lagoons as a potential feedstock for biofuel.

    PubMed

    Kring, Stefanie A; Xia, Xiaoyan; Powers, Susan E; Twiss, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Zooplankton biomass productivity was estimated for two 64,000 m3 (1.7 ha) facultative aerated wastewater treatment lagoons to evaluate potential biodiesel production from zooplankton biomass. Lagoons were monitored bi-weekly during summer 2010. Lipid accumulated by crustacean zooplankton was considered the most efficient means by which to collect lipid produced by phytoplankton owing to the greater ease in the collection of these organisms (>0.153mm) compared with unicellular algae (size <0.06 mm). In terms of biomass, the cladoceran Daphnia and the copepod Cyclops were the dominant zooplankton in these hypereutrophic lagoons, while unicellular chlorophytes dominated the phytoplankton community. Secondary productivity of these lagoons (250 g of dry weight m(-2) yr(-1)) is comparable to the secondary productivity of other sewage lagoons. The potential biodiesel production for one lagoon was estimated to be 0.04 +/- 0.02 L m(-2) yr(-1), which results in a total of 1120 +/- 560 L from two lagoons. This study showed that there are organisms present in wastewater lagoons, besides algae, that can serve as a biofuel feedstock. Additionally, this research expands the current knowledge of facultative aerated wastewater lagoon ecology and waste stream-derived biofuel. Future research should include complete life cycle and economic analyses to determine if harvesting zooplankton from wastewater lagoons is a sustainable endeavour. PMID:24350451

  19. WATER QUALITY STATUS REPORT, LITTLE SALMON RIVER, ADAMS COUNTY, IDAHO, 1976

    EPA Science Inventory

    This survey was conducted to determine the point source impact of treatment sewage discharged from the New Meadows Wastewater Treatment lagoons on the Little Salmon River (17060210). Water quality data was collected semiannually from June 1970 to May 1975. Some of this data is ...

  20. National Indian Gaming Commission

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Indian Gaming Commission is an independent federal regulatory agency, and along with regulating gaming activities on Indian lands, they are also responsible for "shielding Indian tribes from organized crime and other corrupting influences." The Commission's website is designed to inform interested parties about their ongoing activities, and visitors will find that the information here ranges from calendars of upcoming conferences to official decisions and actions taken by the Commission. First-time visitors may wish to start by looking over the FAQ section within the "About Us" area. Once there, they can find the answers to questions like "Do Indian tribes pay taxes?" and "What happens to the profits from Indian gaming operations?" Moving on, the "Laws & Regulations" area contains the text of such important documents as the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act and the Johnson Act. The site is rounded out by the "Reading Room", which contains recent and past bulletins, gaming ordinances, and a list of tribal gaming operations.

  1. Biogeochemical responses of shallow coastal lagoons to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, A.; Newton, A.; Tett, P.; Fernandes, T.

    2009-04-01

    The importance of climate change and global warming in the near future is becoming consensual within the scientific community (e.g. Kerr et al., 2008; Lloret et al., 2008). The surface temperature and sea level have increased during the last few years in the northern hemisphere (IPCC, 2007). Predictions for future changes include an increase of surface temperature and sea level for Europe. Moreover, the global warming phenomenon will also change the hydrological cycle and increase precipitation in northern and central Europe (IPCC, 2007). Sea level rise already threatens to overwhelm some lagoons, such as Venice and Moroccan lagoons (Snoussi et al., 2008). Shallow coastal lagoons are some of the most vulnerable systems that will be impacted by these changes (Eisenreich, 2005). Environmental impacts on coastal lagoons include an increase of water turbidity and therefore light attenuation. If these effects are strong enough, the lighted bottoms of shallow lagoons may loose a significant part of the benthic algal community. These communities are highly productive and are essential to control nutrient dynamics of the system by uptaking large amounts of nutrients both from the water column and from the sediments. A decrease in benthic algal communities and photosynthetic oxygen production will also contribute to increasing the vulnerability of the lagoons to hypoxia and anoxia. The flux of nutrients such as phosphate from the sediments may increase dramatically, further disrupting the nutrient balance and condition and promoting cyanobacterial blooms. Microbial activity is temperature dependent, therefore, the increase of temperature will increase the concentrations of ammonium within sediments. The release of phosphate and silicate will also increase with temperature. Coastal lagoons are valuable ecosystems and may be severely impacted, both ecologically and economically, by global change. Shallow coastal lagoons should be considered as sentinel systems and should be carefully monitored so that appropriate responses can be timely to mitigate the impacts from global change. References: Eisenreich, S.J. (2005). Climate Change and the European Water Dimension - A report to the European Water Directors. Institute for Environment and Sustainability, European Comission-Joint Research Centre. Ispra, Italy. 253pp. Kerr, R. (2008). Global warming throws some curves in the Atlantic Ocean. Science, 322, 515. IPCC (2007). Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., Qin, D., Manning, M., Chen, Z., Marquis, M., Averyt, K., Tignor, M., Miller, H. (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press. Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA, 996pp. Lloret, J., Marín, A., Marín-Guirao, L. (2008). Is coastal lagoon eutrophication likely to be aggravated by global climate change? Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 78, 403-412. Snoussi, M., Ouchani, T., Niazi, S. (2008). Vulnerability assessment of the impact of sea-level rise and flooding on the Moroccan coast: The case of the Mediterranean eastern zone. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 77, 206-213.

  2. Black Hawk. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Maggi

    Born in 1767, Black Hawk was the last great war leader of the Sauk Indians, who lived in the Rock River valley in Illinois. By age 25, he was a famed warrior and leader of his people who raided neighboring tribes until a period of peace and prosperity began about 1800. Various treaties of which the Sauk knew and understood very little deprived the…

  3. Career Education and the American Indian. Fall 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota Univ., Vermillion. School of Education.

    These materials are for use in the instruction on current occupations existing on the Standing Rock, Cheyenne River, Sisseton, Lower Brule, Crow Creek, Flandreau, Pine Ridge, Rosebud, and Yankton Sioux Indian Reservations in South Dakota. Objectives of the materials are to help learners identify the geographical locations of each of the nine Sioux…

  4. Indian Heritage: A Selected Book List for All Ages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver Public Library, CO.

    This book list, a sampling of resources from the Denver Public Library, pertains to the Indians of North America, especially those west of the Mississippi River. The annotated list is divided into two main parts: "Adult and Young Adult Books, Films, and Records" and "Children's Books, Films, and Records." The bulk of the list is adult and young…

  5. Combining radon, short-lived radium isotopes and hydrodynamic modeling to assess submarine groundwater discharge from an anthropized semiarid watershed to a Mediterranean lagoon (Mar Menor, SE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudron, Paul; Cockenpot, Sabine; Lopez-Castejon, Francisco; Radakovitch, Olivier; Gilabert, Javier; Mayer, Adriano; Garcia-Arostegui, José Luis; Martinez-Vicente, David; Leduc, Christian; Claude, Christelle

    2015-06-01

    In highly anthropized watersheds, surface water tributaries may carry unexpected high quantities of radon and radium to coastal lagoons. Investigating submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) with radionuclide tracers is therefore a complex task. In order to quantify SGD and decipher the influence of the different water sources, we combined a radon (222Rn) and short-lived radium (223Ra, 224Ra) survey with the hydrodynamic modeling of a lagoon. We applied it to the Mar Menor lagoon (SE Spain) where surface water tributaries and undocumented emissaries carry water from groundwater drainage and brines from groundwater desalinization. We identified the areas of influence of the plume of radionuclides from the river, located major areas of SGD and proposed a location for two submarine emissaries. Porewater, i.e. interstitial water from underlying sediments, was found to be the most representative SGD end member, compared to continental groundwater collected from piezometers. Mass balances in winter and summer seasons provided yearly SGD fluxes of water of 0.4-2.2 ? 108 m3/y (222Rn), 4.4-19.0 ? 108 m3/y (224Ra) and 1.3 ? 108 m3/y (223Ra, measured in winter only). Tidal pumping was identified as a main driver for recirculated saline groundwater, while fresh submarine groundwater discharge from the aquifer ranged between 2% and 23% of total SGD.

  6. Photosynthetic pigments of Zoster a noltii and Ruppia cirrhosa in some Albanian lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylli, Arjana; Babani, Fatbardha; Stamo, Iliriana

    2010-01-01

    In the coastal lagoons of Adriatic Sea Zostera noltii and Ruppia cirrhosa are plants with seeds and flowers, that colonizes the sandy bottom of lagoons. They are capable to produce oxygen with very weak light. Characterization of photosynthetic pigments of eelgrass Zostera noltii and Ruppia cirrhosa, were performed during the period 2002-2008 in some Adriatic lagoons: Kune-Vaini, Patog, Karavasta and Narta. Dynamics of chlorophylls and carotenoids during the vegetation period of these plants were characterized. As a result, the chlorophyll content of Zoostera noltii taken from the Kune- Vain lagoon is higher than at plants collected from the other lagoons. The photosynthetic pigment content of the Zostera noltii plants is higher than of Ruppia cirrhosa. The differences on the distribution of these species in the analyzed lagoons are represented in this presentation.

  7. A variational Data Assimilation algorithm to better estimate the salinity for the Berre lagoon with Telemac3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, S. M.; Piacentini, A.; Riadh, A.; Goutal, N.; Razafindrakoto, E.; Zaoui, F.; Gant, M.; Morel, T.; Duchaine, F.; Thual, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Berre lagoon is a receptacle of 1000Mm3 where salty sea water meets fresh water discharged by the hydroelectric plant at Saint-Chamas and by natural tributaries (Arc and Touloubre rivers). Improving the quality of the simulation of the hydrodynamics of the lagoon with TELEMAC 3D, EDF R&D at LNHE aims at optimizing the operation of the hydroelectric production while preserving the lagoon ecosystem. To do so and in a collaborative framework with CERFACS, a data assimilation (DA) algorithm is being implemented, using the Open-Palm coupler, to make the most of continuous (every 15 min) and in-situ salinity measurements at 4 locations in the lagoon. Preliminary studies were carried out to quantify the difference between a reference simulation and the observations on a test period. It was shown that the model is able to relatively well represent the evolution of the salinity field at the observating stations, given some adjustements on the forcing near Caronte. Still, discrepancies up to several g/l remain and could be corrected with the DA algorithm. Additionally, some numerical features should be fixed to insure the robustness of the code with respect to compiling plateforms and parallel computing. Similarly to the meteorological and oceanographic approaches, the observations are used sequentially to update the hydrodynamical state. More specifically, a 3D-FGAT algorithm is used to correct the salinity state at the beginning of an assimilation window. This variational algorithm lies on the hypothesis that the tangent linear physics can be approximated by a persistent model over a chosen time window. Sensitivity tests on a reference run showed that in order to cope with this constraint, the analysis time window should be at most 3h. For instance, it was show that a local positive salinity increment of 0.5 g/l introduced at -5m is dissipated by the numerical model over 1 day (physical and numerical diffusion mostly) (Figure a). Using an average estimate of the difference between the reference integration and the observation, a sequential (hourly) and local correction is applied to the salinity state to mimic the upcoming DA scheme as illustrated in Figure b ; the difference between simulation and observation (OmB) is reduced at each cycle (OmA). To further this study, major work is expected for the modeling of the background error covariance matrix that allows to spread the salinity correction from observation points to the whole state vector.

  8. Geoelectrical signals of geologic and hydrologic processes in a fringing reef lagoon setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kevin M.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Tait, Douglas R.; Erler, Dirk V.

    2014-09-01

    Coastal groundwater may discharge into nearshore and offshore waters forced by terrestrial fluxes, controlled by local geology, and modulated by the hydrodynamics of littoral water. We investigated the electrical signature of these features with a dense, multiscale network of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys in the Muri Lagoon of Rarotonga, Cook Islands. The ERT surveys spanned from onshore to 400 m into the lagoon and used standard electrodes on land and across the foreshore, submerged electrodes in the shallow subtidal zone, and floating electrodes towed throughout the reef lagoon by a boat. ERT surveys on land mapped a typical freshwater lens underlain by a saltwater wedge, but with possible deviations from the classical model due to an adjacent tidal creek. Further inland, ERT surveys imaged a layer of lava flow deposits that is potentially a confining hydrogeologic unit; this unit was used to constrain the expected electrical resistivity of these deposits below the lagoon. ERT surveys across the intertidal zone and into the lagoon indicated fresh groundwater and porewater salinity patterns consistent with previous small-scale studies including the seaward extension of fresh groundwater pathways to the lagoon. Electrical resistivity (ER) variations in the lagoon subsurface highlighted heterogeneities in the lagoon structure that may focus submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) through previously unknown buried lava flow deposits in the lagoon. A transition to higher ER values near the reef crest is consistent with the ER signature of porosity reduction due to ongoing differential cementation of reef deposits across the lagoon. The imaged coastal hydrostratigraphic heterogeneity may thus control terrestrial and marine porewater mixing, support SGD, and provide the pathways for groundwater and the materials it transports into the lagoon. This hydrogeophysical investigation highlighted the spatial heterogeneity of submarine coastal geology and its hydrogeologic control in a reef lagoon setting, but is likely to occur in many similar coastal settings. Ignoring geologic complexity can result in mischaracterization of SGD and other coastal groundwater processes at many spatial scales.

  9. Factors structuring temporal and spatial dynamics of macrobenthic communities in a eutrophic coastal lagoon (Óbidos lagoon, Portugal).

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Susana; Pereira, Patrícia; Pereira, Fábio; de Pablo, Hilda; Vale, Carlos; Gaspar, Miguel B

    2011-03-01

    The present work aimed to identify the main environmental drivers shaping temporal and spatial dynamics of macrobenthic communities within a eutrophic coastal lagoon. Sediments in the Óbidos lagoon showed a gradient of increasing metal contamination from the inlet area to inner branches. The mid-lower lagoon area exhibited an intermediate contaminated condition between the inlet and upstream areas, suggesting that the effects of the organic loadings into the lagoon may be reflected until this area. This transitional feature was corroborated by biological data, with macrobenthic assemblages displaying characteristics of down- and upstream areas. Macrobenthic abundance peaked in winter, which was associated with a higher nutrient availability (mainly ammonium) and the proliferation of green macroalgae in mid-lower and inner lagoon areas. However, massive macroalgae growth resulted in a sharp decrease of macrobenthic diversity and abundance in spring, particularly where the higher amounts of decaying algae were detected. Higher dissimilarities between assemblages were detected during winter (and spring, for trophic composition), while in summer, differences were highly attenuated. The least contaminated area (close to the sea inlet) experienced smaller temporal variations for environmental variables, as well as the lowest temporal biological variability. This area was dominated by carnivores, which were related with increased salinity. Deposit-feeders were numerically dominant in the lagoon, being generally spread within organically enriched sandy and muddy areas. The high concentration of chlorophyll a and suspended particulate matter in water was reflected in the abundance of deposit-feeders/suspension-feeders, taking benefit of the high primary productivity. On the other hand, deposit-feeders/herbivores responded to the decay of macroalgae mats in the sediment. Biological associations varied with the biological data used (taxonomic versus trophic group composition; abundance versus biomass), highlighting the relevance of the combination of different data analysis' approaches. In general, BIOENV analysis indicated total phosphorus, biomass of Ulva, metals and organic carbon and nitrogen as being significantly influencing benthic patterns. On the other hand, discrepancies in ecological behaviours of some taxa were also detected in the present study stressing the need for additional studies on the relationships between macrobenthic communities and environmental variables. Implications of the present results for monitoring studies are discussed. PMID:21236484

  10. Fritz Scholder: Indian/Not Indian

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-01-01

    The Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian has a beautiful online exhibit, Fritz Scholder: Indian/Not Indian which is meant to accompany the in situ exhibition in Washington D.C. and New York. Scholder's work is the subject of much debate in the world of Native Art, as his work has no obvious Native American imagery in it and he oftentimes denied he was Native American. By clicking on "Biography" near the top of the page, a list of links, "The Early Years", "The IAIA Years", and "The 70s and After" will appear. Below these links a clickable timeline also appears which advances when rolled over with the mouse. Another way to get an introduction to Scholder's life and the exhibit is to click on the "Podcasts" link near the top of the page. The first podcast listed is "Fritz Scholder: Indian/Not Indian". Visitors should also not miss looking at his bold and sometimes disturbing paintings and sculptures, under the "Works" tab near the top of the page. They can be viewed by either D.C. or New York displays, as well as by "Curator's Choice", which is the default view. Each piece of work is also accompanied by commentary offered by the curators. Just click on the artwork, and under the bottom right hand corner of the image is a speaker to click on, complete with the name of the curator doing the commentary.

  11. Benthic nutrient remineralization in a coastal lagoon ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara L. Nowicki; Scott W. Nixon

    1985-01-01

    In situ measurements of the exchange of ammonia, nitrate plus nitrite, phosphate, and dissolved organic phosphorus between sediments\\u000a and the overlying water column were made in a shallow coastal lagoon on the ocean coast of Rhode Island, U.S.A. The release\\u000a of ammonia from mud sediments in the dark (20–440 ?mol per m2 per h) averaged ten times higher than from

  12. Heavy metals distribution in sediments of Nador lagoon (Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloundi, K.; Duplay, J.

    2003-04-01

    The Nador lagoon is a paralic system, located North-East of Morocco. At the present time this ecosystem undergoes an anthropic stress induced by urban, industrial and agricultural releases, and also by fishery activity which enriches this ecosystem in organic and inorganic wastes. A geochemical study has been undertaken, first to define the areas contaminated by heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Co, Cr and V), and second to caracterize the different mineral phases, which trap these elements. Sediment samples were collected on twenty-eight stations scattered all over the lagoon, and each core (30 cm) was subdivided in two horizons (surface and depth). Mineralogical analyses as well as major and trace elements analyses were performed on surface and deep sediments. The results on major element analyses (Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Na, P) show an enrichment in halite and phosphates in the surface sediments. This highlights on one hand, low water exchange rates between the lagoon and the Mediterranean sea, and on the other hand, an increase in organic releases related to the urban, agricultural and fishery activities. The highest concentrations in inorganic micro-pollutant were recorded N-E of the lagoon and close to Nador city. With reference to the geochemical background, it can be concluded that there is a slight contamination in heavy metals. Moreover, enrichment factor calculations (EF) for heavy metals point out an increase in metal elements as following: Zn>Co>Cr>V>Cu. Sequential extractions were performed to determine the behaviour of these micro-pollutants. Thus, it was shown that carbonates, oxides and phosphates are the preferential mineral phases for trapping these heavy metals.

  13. Crustacean fish parasites from Segara Anakan Lagoon, Java, Indonesia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Asri T. Yuniar; Harry W. Palm; Thorsten Walter

    2007-01-01

    The present study is the first investigation on ectoparasites of commercial important fish from Segara Anakan, a brackish\\u000a water lagoon located at the southern coast of Java, Indonesia. Eight economically important marine fish species (Mugil cephalus, Siganus javus, Scatophagus argus, Caranx sexfasciatus, Lutjanus johnii, Eleutheronema \\u000a tetradactylum, Johnius coitor, and Epinephelus coioides) were examined for crustacean parasites. Prevalence and intensity data

  14. Coastal lagoons: “transitional ecosystems” between transitional and coastal waters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Angel Pérez-Ruzafa; Concepción Marcos; Isabel María Pérez-Ruzafa; María Pérez-Marcos

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) establishes a well differentiated typology of water bodies on the basis of scientific\\u000a and biological criteria. For coastal waters, such criteria have long been established, while for transitional waters they\\u000a are still under discussion. One of the difficulties when applying the WFD to coastal lagoons is to include them in only one\\u000a of these

  15. Temporal shifts in reef lagoon sediment composition, Discovery Bay, Jamaica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher T. Perry; Kevin G. Taylor; Philip G. Machent

    2006-01-01

    Discovery Bay, north Jamaica, forms a large (1.5km wide), deep (up to 56m) embayment that acts as a sink for reef-derived and lagoonal carbonate sediments. Since the mid-1960s, the bay has also provided a sink for inputs of bauxite sediment that are spilled during loading at a boat terminal constructed within Discovery Bay. Bauxite has accumulated across much of the

  16. Temporal shifts in reef lagoon sediment composition, Discovery Bay, Jamaica

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. T. Perry; K. G. Taylor; P. G. Machent

    2006-01-01

    Discovery Bay, north Jamaica, forms a large (1.5 km wide), deep (up to 56 m) embayment that acts as a sink for reef-derived and lagoonal carbonate sediments. Since the mid-1960s, the bay has also provided a sink for inputs of bauxite sediment that are spilled during loading at a boat terminal constructed within Discovery Bay. Bauxite has accumulated across much

  17. Comparative study of wastewater lagoon with and without water hyacinth

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.C.; Wolverton, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    A facultative sewage lagoon completely covered with water hyacinths had significant improvement in effluent quality. BOD 5 and total suspended solids (TSS) were 23 and b mg/L respectively. Without water hyacinths, the effluent BOD5 and TSS were 52 and 77 mg/L, respectively. The effluent total organic C concentration was reduced from 72 to 40 mg/L with water hyacinth coverage.

  18. Validation of Numerical Shallow Water Models for Tidal Lagoons

    SciTech Connect

    Eliason, D.; Bourgeois, A.

    1999-11-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the case of a stratified, tidally forced lagoon. This solution, especially its energetics, is useful for the validation of numerical shallow water models under stratified, tidally forced conditions. The utility of the analytical solution for validation is demonstrated for a simple finite difference numerical model. A comparison is presented of the energetics of the numerical and analytical solutions in terms of the convergence of model results to the analytical solution with increasing spatial and temporal resolution.

  19. Suicide in American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    This book reviews present knowledge about suicidal behavior in American Indians, prevention efforts in Native communities, and recommendations for understanding suicidal behavior and developing suicide prevention efforts. Data from Canadian aboriginal groups is also included. Chapter 1 explains why suicide in American Indians is of concern to…

  20. An American Indian Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tvedten, Benet, Comp.

    The anthology is intended to be a discovery for the many Americans whose superficial knowledge of the American Indians has been derived from history books, Hollywood films, and other stereotyped views of the Indian culture. Understanding and appreciation of a particular culture can be found in the stories and poetry of the people. This small…

  1. Writing American Indian History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson B.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to critique the manner in which history about American Indians has been written and propose a rationale for the rethinking of what we know about this subject. In particular, histories of education as regards the participation of American Indians is a subject that has been given scant attention over the years and when…

  2. Charters, Constitutions and By-Laws of the Indian Tribes of North America. Part II: The Indian Tribes of Wisconsin (Great Lakes Agency). Occasional Publications in Anthropology, Ethnology Series, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, George E., Comp.

    Part II of a series of publications consisting of American Indian tribal governmental documents, this volume includes charters, constitutions, and by-laws of Indian tribes of Wisconsin (Great Lakes Agency). Documents are included relative to the Bad River, Lac Courte Oreilles, Lac du Flambeau, and the Red Cliff bands of Lake Superior Chippewa…

  3. Integrated remote sensing mission in the Venice Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borfecchia, Flavio; Cimbelli, A.; De Cecco, Luigi; Della Rocca, Antonio B.; Martini, Sandro; Barbini, Roberto; Colao, Francesco; Fantoni, Roberta; Palucci, Antonio; Ribezzo, Sergio

    1997-01-01

    In this work active and passive remote sensing techniques have been merged to collect information upon the distribution of natural, anthropic and industrial pollutants in the Venetian Lagoon. Some IR and UV images, sensed by a bispectral Daedalus AA3500 scanner, on board of an Italian Guardia di Finanza aircraft flying at 3000 m, have been integrated with lidar measurements, appropriately processed and georeferenced by means of GPS receivers, in order to display large scale distributions. The lidar fluorosensor, installed on a boat, has covered many different sites of the lagoon, while measuring amounts of chlorophyll, dissolved organic matter and oil slick. Lidar data have been used to calibrate the bispectral images acquired by the airborne scanner at low height by means of appropriate regression models. The models have shown a good correlation between the two different types of collected data. Finally, small scale detailed thematic maps of the distributions of the above- mentioned bio-chemical parameters have been produced for some risk sites of the lagoon, with the characterization and localization of pollutant sources.

  4. A Comprehensive Evaluation of OEO Community Action Programs on Six Selected American Indian Reservations. Report 4 - Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James G. E.; And Others

    The impact of the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) Community Action Programs (CAP) on 6 selected American Indian reservations (Gila River and Papago, Arizona; Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico; Pine Ridge, South Dakota; Turtle Mountain, North Dakota, and White Earth Chippewa, Minnesota) are evaluated. After considering the development of Indian

  5. Helium and carbon isotopes in Indian diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, R.; Lal, D.; Craig, H.

    1990-09-01

    Helium and carbon isotope measurements in Indian diamonds (from Andhra Pradesh) were carried out using samples that included mined diamonds from primary kimberlite source rocks and alluvial diamonds from river gravel. The He and C isotope concentrations in diamonds from these two sources were compared, and the Indian diamonds were compared to those from other regions. Results indicate that most of the He-3 in the alluvial diamonds is of cosmogenic origin and that the alluvial diamonds may also have a significant He-4 component due to alpha particles implanted during storage in a secondary matrix. One diamond, a mined kimberlite specimen, was found to have the lowest He-4 content (0.018 microcc/g) so far recorded in diamonds.

  6. The effect of floods on sediment contamination in a microtidal coastal lagoon: the lagoon of Lesina, Italy.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, Raffaele; Specchiulli, Antonietta; Cassin, Daniele; Botter, Margherita; Zonta, Roberto; Fabbrocini, Adele

    2014-10-01

    The effects on the microtidal lagoon of Lesina of runoff and the discharge of water and material from agricultural activities were investigated combining chemical analyses of pollutants [11 metals and 16 priority polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs)], determination of organic matter and grain size, and performance of innovative ecotoxicological tests. For metals, enrichment factors >3 for arsenic, nickel, and copper (Cu) were observed in the eastern zone of the lagoon, which is affected by nearby urban activities with discharge of water and domestic waste and by agricultural input with waters rich in fertilizers. Cu was correlated with no other metal, and its high concentrations (?77 µg g(-1)) may result from the use of Cu-based fungicides in vineyards. Total PAHs (2,230 ± 3,150 ng g(-1)) displayed a wide range of concentrations with hot spots near freshwater inputs from the part of the catchment area exploited for wheat crops. Pyrolitic contamination also emerged, with higher-mass PAH congeners, such as asphalt, bitumen or coal, usually present in higher fractions as the dominant components. Ecotoxicological evaluations recorded moderate to high toxicity levels; the innovative MOT test bioassay showed good discriminatory ability because it identified a lagoon area whose inputs mainly depend on agricultural activities and which is impacted by metals rather than PAHs. Floods during periods of heavy rain and the discharge of water and material from agricultural activities may impact vulnerable systems, such as the lagoon of Lesina, where the presence of hot spots with remarkably high pollution values was observed. PMID:24862981

  7. A box model approach for a long-term assessment of estuarine eutrophication, Szczecin Lagoon, southern Baltic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humborg, Christoph; Fennel, Katja; Pastuszak, Marianna; Fennel, Wolfgang

    2000-07-01

    We develop a layered "box model" to evaluate the major effects of estuarine eutrophication of the Szczecin lagoon which can be compared with integrating measures (chlorophyll a (Chl a), sediment burial, sediment oxygen consumption (SOC), input and output of total nutrient loads) and use it to hindcast the period 1950-1996 (the years when major increase in nutrient discharges by the Oder River took place). The following state variables are used to describe the cycling of the limiting nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus): phytoplankton (Phy), labile and refractory detritus (D N, D Nref, D P, D Pref), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP), and oxygen (O 2). The three layers of the model include two water layers and one sediment layer. Decrease of the carrying capacity with respect to the increased supply of organic matter of the system with advancing eutrophication over the period studied is parameterized by an exponential decrease of the sediment nitrogen fluxes with increasing burial, simulating changing properties from moderate to high accumulating sediments. The seasonal variation as well as the order of magnitude of nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton stocks in the water column remains in agreement with recent observations. Calculated annual mean values of nutrient burial of 193 mmol N m -2 a -1 and 23 mmol P m -2 a -1 are supported by observed values from geological sediment records. Estimated DIN remineralization in the sediments between 100 and 550 mmol N m -2 a -1 corresponds to SOC measurements. Simulated DIP release up to 60 mmol P m -2 a -1 corresponds to recent measurements. The conceptual framework presented here can be used for a sequential box model approach connecting small estuaries like the Szczecin lagoon and the open sea, and might also be connected with river box models.

  8. Federal Financing of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loon, Eric Van

    Since over 200 million Federal dollars are disbursed annually for American Indian education under Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I, Indian Education Act Title IV, and Johnson O'Malley programs, it is difficult to understand the dismal state of Indian education. However, factors contributing to abuse of…

  9. Study of organic sulphur compounds (DMS, DMSP and CS2) in lagoon ecosystems: the case of the Venice lagoon.

    PubMed

    Gambaro, Andrea; Moret, Ivo; Piazza, Rossano; Andreoli, Carlo; Corami, Fabiana; Turetta, Clara; Cescon, Paolo

    2003-03-01

    This study of the origin and fate of dimethyl sulphide (DMS) in a particular and complex lagoon ecosystem such as that of the Venice lagoon focuses on the temporal evolutions of DMS concentrations in surface water together with those of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP), carbon disulphide (CS2), nutrients (nitrate, nitrite, ammonium, phosphate, silicate), sulphate, chlorophyll a, chlorinity, water temperature and phytoplankton (composition and density). Measurements were made from 3 March 1997 to 23 July 1998 at three stations in the central part of the Venice lagoon. The temporal trends of DMS concentration showed an absolute maximum concentration in winter (65 nmol S/l, 19/2/1998, Stn. 1; 119 nmol S/l, 19/2/1998, Stn. 2; 29 nmol S/l, 17/2/1998, Stn. 3) and two relative maxima in the spring-summer period. The spring-summer secondary maxima of DMS concentration were related to the maxima of DMSP and chlorophyll a concentrations and consequently to phytoplanktonic abundance while the winter DMS maximum showed no relation to DMSP or to chlorophyll a suggesting that the production and the fate of DMS could be different for the two periods. According to previous studies the CS2 concentration increased in the spring, achieved its maximum in summer, decreased in autumn and fell to its minimum in winter. PMID:12737485

  10. Seasonal Variation of the Macrozoobenthic Community Structure at Low Salinities in a Mediterranean Lagoon (Monolimni Lagoon, Northern Aegean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, Theodoros

    2004-09-01

    The macrozoobenthic community structure and dynamics at low salinities (0.3-6 psu) in a Mediterranean lagoon (Monolimni lagoon) were investigated. Samples were collected monthly from February 1998 to February 1999 at two sampling stations. Community structure was analyzed by means of uni- and multivariate methods. 21 taxa were collected; the amphipod Corophium orientale and the gastropod Ventrosia maritima dominated the assemblages. Total abundance peaked (50,000-60,000 individuals m-2) in mid or late autumn. Community structure showed an almost even seasonal periodicity; seasonal changes were mainly derived from the intense variation in abundance of most species and the non-occurrence of a few ones (e.g. Corophium insidiosum, Polydora ciliata) in spring and summer. Non- occurrence, which led to a depression of the most diversity indices, was possibly the only direct impact of the extremely low salinities (~0.3 psu) on community structure. The main structuring factors of the community in the deeper outer part of the lagoon were water temperature and depth, and in the innermost part, where a Ruppia maritima meadow occurred, were water temperature and predation pressure by crabs (Carcinus aestuarii) and gobies (Knipowitchia caucasica). A temporary decline in total abundance in summer followed an increase in abundance of these predators. (

  11. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: FINAL REPORT: DEVELOPMENT OF OPTIMUM TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR WASTEWATER LAGOONS PHASE II - SOLVENT EXTRACTION LABORATORY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Army surveyed innovative treatment techniques for restoration of hazardous waste lagoons and selected solvent extraction as cost-effective restoration for further study. This treatability study focuses on treatment of organic (explosive) contaminated lagoon sediments w...

  12. Long-term and high-resolution measurements of bed level changes in a temperate, microtidal coastal lagoon

    E-print Network

    on many coasts worldwide and are often found in estuaries and coastal lagoons but may also be situated accretionary and a large part of the fine-grained material found in estuaries and coastal lagoons

  13. The Salt River Project of Arizona

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1996-01-01

    This site provides information on the history of the Salt River community, its Native American Indian culture, and the impacts of water usage by and for humans. Activities topics include energy, electricity, and water energy, usage and safety. Historical references to the Salt River valley are integrated into resource materials. Resources are available free of charge for teachers and students and must be requested via email.

  14. Groundwater in steppe environments: "El Hito" Lagoon wetland as a case of study (Cuenca; Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sastre-Merlín, A.; Martínez-Pérez, S.; Molina-Navarro, E.

    2012-04-01

    El Hito Lagoon wetland, located in the interfluve of the upper basins of the Cigüela and Záncara rivers (Guadiana Basin, central Spain), configures an important element of geo-environmental heritage of Castilla-LaMancha (Natural Reserve), as well as being an area recognized as Ramsar Site and integrated in the Natura 2000 Network. It has an extension around 290 ha in the periods of maximum flooding and it is embedded in an endorheic basin of 42 Km2. The area that includes it has an arid appearance in a landscape dominated by extensive agriculture, being catalogued as "without aquifers" under its unfavorable geo-hydrological substrate. Thereby, the manifestation of the wetland has been attributed to the simple accumulation of precipitation water in the rainy periods. However, studies to date show the contribution of groundwater to the dynamics of this geo-system, showing how the lake basin behaves itself like a diffuse discharge area of groundwater flow to the endorheic in which it is located. This paper shows the most relevant data to understand the functioning of this wetland of great scientific and environmental importance, as it support interesting halophytic plant communities as well as large number of waterflow and steppe birds.

  15. Fish Larvae Abundance and Distribution in the Coastal Zone off Terminos Lagoon, Campeche (Southern Gulf of Mexico)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Sánchez-Velasco; C. Flores-Coto; B. Shirasago

    1996-01-01

    Fish larvae abundance and distribution in the coastal zone off Terminos Lagoon and their relation to the environmental features of the Lagoon inlets were analysed (1986–87). The sampling grid consisted of 24 stations extending between 0·5 and 10km off the Lagoon, including both Terminos Lagoon Inlets; El Carmen and Puerto Real. A total of 23 families and 43 species were

  16. Indian Craniometric Variability and Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with “Caucasoid” populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  17. Indian concepts on sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263

  18. Heavy-metal enrichment in surficial sediments in the Oder River discharge area: source or sink for heavy metals?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Neumann; Thomas Leipe; Graham Shimmield

    1998-01-01

    The Oder river drains a highly polluted industrial area and enters the Baltic Sea through a system of shallow lagoons. Surficial sediments in the discharge area of the Oder are highly enriched in heavy metals compared to their preindustrial background levels. Pore-water studies in short sediment cores reveal anoxic environments over the entire sediment column, except for a suboxic layer

  19. Food habits of tilapiine cichlids of the Upper Zambezi River and floodplain during the descending phase of the hydrologic cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. O. W INEMILLER; L. C. K ELSO

    2003-01-01

    Habitat use and diets of five tilapiine populations of the Upper Zambezi River Basin in Zambia, south-central Africa, were examined during the 8 month descending phase of the annual hydrological cycle. All species occurred across a range of habitats, with most individuals captured from lagoons. Tilapia rendalli, a macrophyte feeder, was the only dietary specialist. Ontogenetic diet shifts were not

  20. Influences of a Microcystis aeruginosa Kützing bloom on zooplankton populations in Jacarepaguá Lagoon (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aloysio S. Ferrão-Filho; Patricia Domingos; Sandra M. F. O. Azevedo

    2002-01-01

    Jacarepaguá Lagoon is a shallow, hypereutrophic, coastal lagoon located in Rio de Janeiro (RJ, Brazil), with recurrent blooms of cyanobacteria. This study was carried out with the aim to detect the effects of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa on zooplankton populations (especially cladocerans) in the lagoon. At two sampling stations we measured temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen and transparency, and collected

  1. REDUCTION OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM SWINE LAGOONS USING ALTERNATIVE WASTEWATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a need for treatment technologies that can effectively address environmental concerns associated with ammonia emissions from anaerobic lagoons, typically used to manage manure. To meet this need, we conducted a study to determine the effects of water quality improvement in swine lagoons on ...

  2. Modelling the submerged vegetation in the Orbetello lagoon with fuzzy cellular automata

    E-print Network

    Modelling the submerged vegetation in the Orbetello lagoon with fuzzy cellular automata E. Giusti the evolution in time and space of the submerged vegetation in the Orbetello lagoon, in central Italy, where between nutrients and the submerged vegetation in a 2-D spatial context, and this paper presents a further

  3. Effects of the Sand Bar Breaching on Typha domingensis (PERS.) in a Tropical Coastal Lagoon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anderson M. dos Santos; André M. Amado; Murilo Minello; Vinicius F. Farjalla; Francisco A. Esteves

    2006-01-01

    Coastal lagoons are usually subjected to several kinds of human impacts, especially eutrophication. The breaching of the sand bar, which separates the lagoon from the ocean, by human action, is a common process used to decrease the negative effects of eutrophication. The aims of this research were to evaluate the effects of the artificial sand bar breaching on the populations

  4. Reproductive biology of the holothurians from the major communities of the New Caledonian Lagoon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Conand

    1993-01-01

    The reproductive biology of nine species of aspidochirote holothurians from the major communities of the New Caledonian lagoon has been analysed. The data were obtained from monthly sampling from 1978 to 1982 of their populations on reef slopes and passes for Holothuria nobilis, H. fuscogilva, H. fuscopunctata and Thelenota ananas, in the inner lagoon for Stichopus variegatus, H. scabra and

  5. THE DIET OF THE CURLEW SANDPIPER AT LANGEBAAN LAGOON, SOUTH AFRICA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gillian M. Puttick

    1978-01-01

    Puttick, G. M. 1978. The diet of the Curlew Sandpiper at Langebaan Lagoon, South Africa. Ostrich 49:158-167.Nereid worms (mainly Ceratonereis erythraensis) and the hydrobiid gastropod Assiminea globulus were the most important prey items throughout the year for Curlew Sandpipers Calidris ferruginea feeding at Langebaan Lagoon. Other important items were the amphipod Urothoe grimaldi, the crabs Hymenosoma orbiculare and Cleistostoma edwardsii

  6. FLOATING COVER SYSTEMS FOR WASTE LAGOONS: POTENTIAL APPLICATION AT OLD INGER SITE, LOUISIANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazardous liquids are impounded in pits, ponds, and lagoons at many uncontrolled hazardous waste sites across the country. As the ranking, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies proceed at these sites, many of the lagoons gradually fill with rainwater and threaten to ov...

  7. Model-based decision support for integrated management and control of coastal lagoons

    E-print Network

    Mocenni, Chiara

    Model-based decision support for integrated management and control of coastal lagoons Marco Casini in the regional planning and management processes of coastal zones. Since lagoon systems are subject to various-economic and environmental characteristics of the project case studies. The proposed structure helps integrate and manage

  8. CAS EE 348E Monitoring and Management of Coastal Wetlands, Lagoons and Estuaries

    E-print Network

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    CAS EE 348E Monitoring and Management of Coastal Wetlands, Lagoons and Estuaries Spring 2014-two are located on estuaries, for a total population of about 350 million. Estuaries, lagoons and coastal wetlands provide resources, benefits, and services not just for humans but also for thousands of species of birds

  9. Estimation of Residence Time in a Shallow Back Barrier Lagoon, Hog Island Bay, Virginia, USA

    E-print Network

    Estimation of Residence Time in a Shallow Back Barrier Lagoon, Hog Island Bay, Virginia, USA David in a Shallow Lagoon 1 Corresponding Author #12;Fugate, Friedrichs, and Bilgili 2 Abstract Hog Island Bay to timescales of biologically driven chemical transformations. Introduction Hog Island Bay, Virginia

  10. Wind-Driven Surficial Oxygen Transfer and Dinitrogen Gas Emission from Treatment Lagoons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. S. Ro; P. G. Hunt; M. E. Poach

    2006-01-01

    Surficial oxygen transfer plays an important role, when analyzing the complex biochemical and physical processes responsible for ammonia and dinitrogen gas emission in animal waste treatment lagoons. This paper analyzes if currently known nitrogen biochemical pathways can explain the enigmatic dinitrogen gas emissions recently observed from the treatment lagoons, based on the amount of wind-driven oxygen that can be transferred

  11. Survival of Salmonella enterica in aerated and nonaerated wastewaters from dairy lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is the most commonly identified foodborne pathogen in produce, meat and poultry. Cattle are known reservoirs of Salmonella and the pathogen excreted in feces end up in manure flush lagoons. Salmonella enterica survival was monitored in wastewater from on-site holding lagoons equipped with...

  12. Removal of Estrogenic Compounds in Dairy Waste Lagoons by Ferrate (VI): Oxidation/Coagulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferrate(VI) was used to break down and/or remove steroidal estrogens (SE) from dairy waste lagoon effluent (DWLE). Dairy lagoon sites were sampled for estrogenic content (EC) and assayed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Effects of varying...

  13. REMOVAL OF ESTROGENIC COMPOUNDS IN DAIRY WASTE LAGOONS BY FERRATE (VI): OXIDATION/COAGULATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferrate (VI)is used as a means of breaking down and/or removing steroidal estrogens (SE) from dairy waste lagoon effluent (DWLE), to minimize the amount of SE entering groundwater/watersheds. Dairy lagoon sites were sampled for EC (estrogenic content) and assayed using High Performance Liquid Chrom...

  14. Reduction of Ammonia Emissions from Swine Lagoons Using Alternative Wastewater Treatment Technologies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. A. Szögi; M. B. Vanotti

    There is a need for treatment technologies that can effectively address environmental concerns associated with ammonia (NH ) emissions from anaerobic lagoons, typically used to manage manure. T 3 o meet this need, we conducted a study to determine the effects of water quality improvement in swine lagoons on NH3 emission rates using alternative wastewater treatments. This determination was done

  15. Reduction of malodors from swine lagoons through influent pre-treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During lagoon treatment and storage, anaerobic processes contribute to emission of volatile compounds, some of which are offensive odors. Therefore, there is major interest in developing swine manure treatment systems that can substantially reduce malodor emissions from lagoons. The effect of two pr...

  16. LONG TERM IMPACT OF SWINE LAGOON WASTEWATER ON SHALLOW GROUNDWATER NITROGEN LEVELS IN VEGETATED BUFFER SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An eight-year study was conducted to determine the impact of swine lagoon wastewater on shallow groundwater in vegetated buffer systems. Replicated 30 X 4 m plots were established at the interface of a pasture and riparian forest in 1993. Wastewater from the third lagoon of the University of Georg...

  17. Metal pollution loading, Manzalah lagoon, Nile delta, Egypt: Implications for aquaculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. R. Siegel; M. L. Slaboda; D. J. Stanley

    1994-01-01

    High cultural enrichment factors are found for Hg (13×), Pb (22.1×), and other potentially toxic metals (e.g., Sn, Zn, Cu, Ag) in the upper 20 cm of sediment cores from the southeastern Ginka subbasin of Manzalah lagoon, Nile delta, Egypt. Cores from other areas of the lagoon show little metal loading. Metal loading followed the closure of the Aswan High

  18. Environmental flow for Monsoon Rivers in India: The Yamuna River as a case study

    E-print Network

    Soni, Vikram; Singh, Diwan

    2013-01-01

    We consider the flows of Monsoon Rivers in India that will permit the river to perform all its natural functions. About 80% of the total flow for Indian rivers is during the monsoon and the remaining 20% is during the non monsoon period. By carrying out a case study of the river Yamuna in Delhi we find that at least 50% of the virgin monsoon (July to September) flow is required for the transport of the full spectrum of soil particles in the river sediment. A similar flow is needed for adequate recharge of the floodplain aquifers along river. For the non monsoon period (October to June) about 60% of the virgin flow is necessary to avoid the growth of still water algae and to support river biodiversity.

  19. Survival of Salmonella enterica in Aerated and Nonaerated Wastewaters from Dairy Lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Ravva, Subbarao V.; Sarreal, Chester Z.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is the most commonly identified foodborne pathogen in produce, meat and poultry. Cattle are known reservoirs of Salmonella and the pathogen excreted in feces ends up in manure flush lagoons. Salmonella enterica survival was monitored in wastewater from on-site holding lagoons equipped or not with circulating aerators at two dairies. All strains had poor survival rates and none proliferated in waters from aerated or settling lagoons. Populations of all three Salmonella serovars declined rapidly with decimal reduction times (D) of <2 days in aerated microcosms prepared from lagoon equipped with circulators. Populations of Salmonella decreased significantly in aerated microcosms (D = 4.2 d) compared to nonaerated waters (D = 7.4 d) and in summer (D = 3.4 d) compared to winter (D = 9.0 d). We propose holding the wastewater for sufficient decimal reduction cycles in lagoons to yield pathogen-free nutrient-rich water for crop irrigations and fertilization. PMID:25358096

  20. The physical hydrology of a lagoon system on the Pacific coast of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, N. H.; Slinn, D. J.

    1984-10-01

    The annual hydrological cycle of the Caimanero-Huizache lagoon system on the Pacific coast of Mexico was investigated during 1977-1978. There is a well defined wet season during which the lagoons fill with water derived from fluvial inputs and direct precipitation. Water is lost by evaporation and outflow to the sea, the latter process starting as the wet season progresses and being facilitated by a falling mean sea level. Evaporation exceeds in situ precipitation and during the dry season complete desiccation may be prevented by a now rising mean sea level which promotes the flow of seawater into the lagoon basin. A quantitative estimate of the magnitude of these controlling processes is presented and processes bringing about mixing in the lagoons discussed. A brief comparison is made with other lagoon systems on the Pacific coast of Mexico.

  1. NEVADA INDIAN RESERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polygon coverage of all Indian Reservations in Nevada. Reservation boundaries are compiled from multiple sources and are derived from several different source scales. Information such as reservation type, primary tribe name and location source are included with the coverage. As...

  2. REGION 9 INDIAN RESERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polygon coverage of all Indian Reservations in US EPA Region 9 (California, Arizona and Nevada). Reservation boundaries are compiled from multiple sources and are derived from several different source scales. Information such as reservation type, primary tribe name and location...

  3. ARIZONA INDIAN RESERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polygon coverage of all Indian Reservations in Arizona. Reservation boundaries are compiled from multiple sources and are derived from several different source scales. Information such as reservation type, primary tribe name and location source are included with the coverage. A...

  4. Indian Summer for Wayfarers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltenbronn, Kyra

    1977-01-01

    A recreational program involving hiking and camping emphasizes teaching young participants through archeology and adventure experiences about American Indians, their technology, and their means of survival in the wilderness. (JD)

  5. Indian Health Disparities

    MedlinePLUS

    ... on the IHS is available at ihs.gov . MORTALITY DISPARITY RATES American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ ... 2009 and U.S. All Races 2008 (Age-adjusted mortality rates per 100,000 population) AI/AN Rate ...

  6. Ready Indian Country

    MedlinePLUS

    ... tribal governments to build emergency management capability and partnerships to ensure continued survival of Tribal nations and ... region to reflect the diverse local conditions and cultures found in Alaska and Indian Country. Select a ...

  7. Investigation of lagoon lakes in Kocacay delta by using remote sensing method.

    PubMed

    Irtem, Emel; Sacin, Yener

    2012-04-01

    Coasts are areas that are under the influence of the interaction of the air, water and land and attract attention with the abundance of their natural resources and therefore are subjected to excessive usage. This excessive usage may disturb the sensitive balance of the coast ecosystem. In this study, the changes in Arapçiftligi, Poyraz, Dalyan lakes area found in Kocacay delta located in the south coast of Marmara sea was evaluated between the periods of 2000 to 2007 with remote sensing method. These lakes, located on the shores, have a very sensitive naturally dynamic balance and very importance in terms of natural surroundings and the coastal zones management plan. It must be known the change of the lakes mentioned above area according to years. Research and applications have demonstrated the advantages of remote sensing and geographic information system techiques on river,delta, lake, lagoon lake, sensitivite areas in a lakeshore, coastal erosion etc. monitoring and management. In the study, we benefited from Erdas and Intergraph-Geomedia 6.1 image processing and GIS, and also from AutoCAD 2007 and NetCAD 4.0 computer-aided design (CAD) software. For 2000, 2001, 2005 and 2007 years (4 number) Landsat-5 TM satellite images belonging to the region were used. As a result of the study, Arapçiftligi, Dalyan and Poyraz lake areas, number of islets that are seen in the lakes were given in respect to years. Arapçiftligi lake shrank 29.5% in size in the years 2000 and 2007. The fact that the lake continued to get smaller in size even in periods of high precipitation may be due to the sediment flowing from the agricultural fields established close to the lake area. Dalyan and Poyraz lakes lost 60% in terms of their surface area in the years 2000 and 2007. In 2000-2001 periods, Dalyan and Poyraz lakes increased in size by 3.2%. The reason for this could be the excessive precipitation and the fact that the seawater from Marmara sea seeps into the lake. Protection of the natural balance of the lagoons can be possible by using a monitoring programme to be set in connection with a healthy, systematic and manageable data system. PMID:23424854

  8. Ishi: A Yahi Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Yahi Indians were part of a larger tribal group called the Yana. The Yahi way of life, along with the lives of many other California Indian groups, changed when European and U.S. settlers came to California. In 1872 Ishi and his family were the last of the Yahi living in the Deer Creek (California) area. By 1911 Ishi was the last surviving…

  9. Economic evaluation of a swine farm covered anaerobic lagoon digester

    SciTech Connect

    Lusk, P. [Resource Development Associates, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-12-31

    It is helpful to evaluate anaerobic digestion technologies using objective economic criteria. Options can then be ranked in terms of their relative cost effectiveness, leading to rational deployment decisions. This study presents the results of a hypothetical pro forma economic evaluation of one type of digestion system that could commonly be found on many swine farms; a covered anaerobic lagoon. The digester was assumed to be located in North Carolina, a major swine-producing state. Electricity generation with waste heat recovery was assumed to be the major end-use application of biogas manufactured from this process.

  10. Spatial impact of the Oder river plume on water quality along the south-western Baltic coast.

    PubMed

    Schernewski, G; Neumann, T; Podsetchine, V; Siegel, H

    2001-11-01

    The Oder (Odra) river is the most important nutrient source and pollutant for the south-western Baltic Sea. Adjacent German-Polish coastal waters, the Oder (Szczecin) Lagoon and the Oder (Pomeranian) Bight therefore suffer from severe eutrophication and water quality problems. At the same time, summer (bathing) tourism is the most important economical factor in this coastal zone, especially on the islands of Usedom and Wolin. On the basis of model simulations and remote sensing data we analysed the spatial extent and variability of the Oder river plume in the lagoon and the Balic Sea in common summer situations and during the extreme Oder flood in August 1997. Water quality shows pronounced gradients between coastal waters and open Baltic Sea. In the lagoon, it usually takes more than 6 weeks until Oder water enters the large western bay, the Kleines Haff. During transport, degradation, transformation and sedimentation processes alter the water quality and prevent the inner coast of Usedom from direct impact of polluted Oder water. Ongoing nutrient supply promotes intensive algal proliferation in all parts of the lagoon and contributes to the low water transparency. Oder water passing the lagoon and entering the Baltic Sea is transported over long distances in narrow bands along the shore. Under easterly winds the water quality near well-known spas on Usedom is reduced due to Oder river plume impact. Upwelling effects can have negative impact on water quality, too. Intensive blooms of potentially toxic blue-green algae species, are the rule in the lagoon and frequent in the Oder Bight in summer. They are a hazard and limit the acceptance of swimming beaches at the inner coast of Usedom. Practical consequences of variable water quality gradients e.g. on hygienic water sampling are discussed. PMID:11759158

  11. A Mechanism Relating the Indian Ocean SSTs, ENSO, and the Nile Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siam, M.; Eltahir, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    A significant fraction of the inter-annual variability in the Nile River flow is associated with ElNino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Fluctuations of the Indian Ocean Sea Surface temperature (SST) are also associated with the Nile flow. Here, we investigate the intermediate role of Indian Ocean SSTs in the teleconnection between Nile flow and ENSO. Using the partial coherency analysis, we show that connection between the North and Middle of Indian Ocean SSTs and Nile flow is driven by ENSO. However, the South of Indian Ocean SSTs have an independent role from ENSO in shaping variability of Nile flow. This independence allows for indices of SSTs over the South of Indian Ocean and ENSO to explain about 60% of the variability of the Nile flow when they are used together. During ElNino events, the SSTs over the Indian Ocean increase following the warming of the Tropical Eastern Pacific (TEP), which forces a Matsuno-Gill circulation with enhanced westerlies winds over Indian Ocean that decreases the convergence of boundary layer air over the Upper Blue Nile (UBN) basin. On the other hand, the increased SSTs over South of Indian Ocean generate a cyclonic motion, which has a similar effect on the convergence of boundary layer air over the UBN. The proposed mechanism has an important implication in understanding the potential climate change impacts on the Nile flow induced by warming of over Indian Ocean and provide new indices for Nile flow forecast models.

  12. Enteric viruses in a mangrove lagoon, survival and shellfish incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Cardona, I.; Bermudez, M.; Billmire, E.; Hazen, T.C. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico)

    1988-12-31

    Mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) were screened for enteric viruses. For 18 months oysters were collected from Cano Boqueron, a tropical mangrove lagoon on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. This popular tourist resort has two primary sewage treatment plants which service 158 single family cabanas. In spite of the heavy seasonal input of sewage to Cano Boqueron and high densities of fecal coliform bacteria, enteric viruses were not detected in shellfish meat. Because no viruses were detected in the oysters, a virus survival study was performed. Poliovirus type 1 was placed in diffusion chambers in situ at two sites in Cano Boqueron. More than 95% of the poliovirus inactivation occurred within 24 h. Virus inactivation was significantly different by site, indicating different inactivation rates within the lagoon. Chamber studies done simultaneously with Escherichia coli did not reveal differences between sites. It is suggested that the sewage effluent had an antiviral effect in the absence of an antibacterial effect. This study demonstrates the importance for establishing microbial contamination standards for shellfish growing waters in the tropics based upon in situ studies with tropical species, e.g. mangrove oyster.

  13. Estuarine and lagoon biodiversity and their natural goods and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basset, A.; Elliott, M.; West, R. J.; Wilson, J. G.

    2013-11-01

    Assessing and monitoring ecosystem quality status and service provision of aquatic ecosystems is an increasingly important area of scientific, socio-economical and political interest. Contributions from two related meetings organized by the Estuarine & Coastal Sciences Association (ECSA) and the Euro-Mediterranean Lagoon Federation (EUROMEDLAG) address this area of interest in estuaries and lagoons, dominant types of transitional waters, by an integration of holistic and reductionistic approaches. In this context, we synthesise the key points raised by the contributions given at the two meetings to emphasise that transitional waters have emergent properties, which support their classification as an aquatic realm different from both freshwater and marine ones. They provide crucial ecosystem services, such as food provision and support for nutrient cycling, whose value and underlying mechanisms have been addressed with particular reference to estuarine ecosystems. The experimental studies show the mechanistic relationships and the responses of ecosystem functions and biodiversity to contrasting/changing environmental conditions with human activities as key drivers affecting both biodiversity conservation and ecosystem service provision.

  14. [Antimicrobial activity of Actinomycetale isolated from the lagoon in Algeria].

    PubMed

    Alliouch-Kerboua, Chérifa; Gacemi Kirane, Djamila; La Scola, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the aim of the study of the taxonomy and the antimicrobial activity, a strain of actinomycete SM2/2GF which was isolated from sediment of the lagoon El-Mellah which is situated in the city of El-Kala in the Northeast of Algeria, was tested against diverse pathogenic microorganisms and against a Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas alcaliphila which was isolated from water of the lagoon El-Mellah. The phenotypic and the molecular characteristics show that the isolate SM2/2GF belongs to the kind Streptomyces. This strain showed an antimicrobial activity against a Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas alcaliphila and the positive-Gram bacteria as Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Bacillus subtilis, Enterococcus faecalis, as well as the yeast Candida albicans. It has no activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The interesting antimicrobial activity of the strain SM2/2GF against the pathogenic microorganisms could encourage further researches on one or several bioactive molecules which it secretes. PMID:25847739

  15. Major Sources of Organic Matter in a Complex Coral Reef Lagoon: Identification from Isotopic Signatures (?13C and ?15N)

    PubMed Central

    Briand, Marine J.; Bonnet, Xavier; Goiran, Claire; Guillou, Gaël; Letourneur, Yves

    2015-01-01

    A wide investigation was conducted into the main organic matter (OM) sources supporting coral reef trophic networks in the lagoon of New Caledonia. Sampling included different reef locations (fringing, intermediate and barrier reef), different associated ecosystems (mangroves and seagrass beds) and rivers. In total, 30 taxa of macrophytes, plus pools of particulate and sedimentary OM (POM and SOM) were sampled. Isotopic signatures (C and N) of each OM sources was characterized and the composition of OM pools assessed. In addition, spatial and seasonal variations of reef OM sources were examined. Mangroves isotopic signatures were the most C-depleted (-30.17 ± 0.41 ‰) and seagrass signatures were the most C-enriched (-4.36 ± 0.72 ‰). Trichodesmium spp. had the most N-depleted signatures (-0.14 ± 0.03 ‰) whereas mangroves had the most N-enriched signatures (6.47 ± 0.41 ‰). The composition of POM and SOM varied along a coast-to-barrier reef gradient. River POM and marine POM contributed equally to coastal POM, whereas marine POM represented 90% of the POM on barrier reefs, compared to 10% river POM. The relative importance of river POM, marine POM and mangroves to the SOM pool decreased from fringing to barrier reefs. Conversely, the relative importance of seagrass, Trichodesmium spp. and macroalgae increased along this gradient. Overall, spatial fluctuations in POM and SOM were much greater than in primary producers. Seasonal fluctuations were low for all OM sources. Our results demonstrated that a large variety of OM sources sustain coral reefs, varying in their origin, composition and role and suggest that ?13C was a more useful fingerprint than ?15N in this endeavour. This study also suggested substantial OM exchanges and trophic connections between coral reefs and surrounding ecosystems. Finally, the importance of accounting for environmental characteristics at small temporal and spatial scales before drawing general patterns is highlighted. PMID:26134985

  16. Major Sources of Organic Matter in a Complex Coral Reef Lagoon: Identification from Isotopic Signatures (?13C and ?15N).

    PubMed

    Briand, Marine J; Bonnet, Xavier; Goiran, Claire; Guillou, Gaël; Letourneur, Yves

    2015-01-01

    A wide investigation was conducted into the main organic matter (OM) sources supporting coral reef trophic networks in the lagoon of New Caledonia. Sampling included different reef locations (fringing, intermediate and barrier reef), different associated ecosystems (mangroves and seagrass beds) and rivers. In total, 30 taxa of macrophytes, plus pools of particulate and sedimentary OM (POM and SOM) were sampled. Isotopic signatures (C and N) of each OM sources was characterized and the composition of OM pools assessed. In addition, spatial and seasonal variations of reef OM sources were examined. Mangroves isotopic signatures were the most C-depleted (-30.17 ± 0.41 ‰) and seagrass signatures were the most C-enriched (-4.36 ± 0.72 ‰). Trichodesmium spp. had the most N-depleted signatures (-0.14 ± 0.03 ‰) whereas mangroves had the most N-enriched signatures (6.47 ± 0.41 ‰). The composition of POM and SOM varied along a coast-to-barrier reef gradient. River POM and marine POM contributed equally to coastal POM, whereas marine POM represented 90% of the POM on barrier reefs, compared to 10% river POM. The relative importance of river POM, marine POM and mangroves to the SOM pool decreased from fringing to barrier reefs. Conversely, the relative importance of seagrass, Trichodesmium spp. and macroalgae increased along this gradient. Overall, spatial fluctuations in POM and SOM were much greater than in primary producers. Seasonal fluctuations were low for all OM sources. Our results demonstrated that a large variety of OM sources sustain coral reefs, varying in their origin, composition and role and suggest that ?13C was a more useful fingerprint than ?15N in this endeavour. This study also suggested substantial OM exchanges and trophic connections between coral reefs and surrounding ecosystems. Finally, the importance of accounting for environmental characteristics at small temporal and spatial scales before drawing general patterns is highlighted. PMID:26134985

  17. 75 FR 20776 - Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ...Indian Tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities...Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use. We have determined...adverse effect on the supply, distribution, or use of energy. The...Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC....

  18. 75 FR 10446 - Security Zone; Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ...Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities...Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use. We have determined...adverse effect on the supply, distribution, or use of energy. The...Potomac River, Washington Channel, Washington, DC....

  19. Quantification of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Feedlot Lagoons by Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Marilyn S.; Yang, Richard K.; Knapp, Charles W.; Niu, Yafen; Peak, Nicholas; Hanfelt, Margery M.; Galland, John C.; Graham, David W.

    2004-01-01

    A new real-time PCR method is presented that detects and quantifies three tetracycline resistance (Tcr) genes [tet(O), tet(W), and tet(Q)] in mixed microbial communities resident in feedlot lagoon wastewater. Tcr gene real-time TaqMan primer-probe sets were developed and optimized to quantify the Tcr genes present in seven different cattle feedlot lagoons, to validate the method, and to assess whether resistance gene concentrations correlate with free-tetracycline levels in lagoon waters. The method proved to be sensitive across a wide range of gene concentrations and provided consistent and reproducible results from complex lagoon water samples. The log10 of the sum of the three resistance gene concentrations was correlated with free-tetracycline levels (r2 = 0.50, P < 0.001; n = 18), with the geometric means of individual resistance concentrations ranging from 4- to 8.3-fold greater in lagoon samples with above-median tetracycline levels (>1.95 ?g/liter by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques) than in below-median lagoon samples. Of the three Tcr genes tested, tet(W) and tet(Q) were more commonly found in lagoon water samples. Successful development of this real-time PCR assay will permit other studies quantifying Tcr gene numbers in environmental and other samples. PMID:15574938

  20. Modeling interaction of fluid and salt in an aquifer/lagoon system.

    PubMed

    Fujinawa, Katsuyuki; Iba, Takahiro; Fujihara, Yohichi; Watanabe, Tsugihiro

    2009-01-01

    To simulate the dynamic interaction between a saline lagoon and a ground water system, a numerical model for two-dimensional, variable-density, saturated-unsaturated, and coupled flow and solute transport (saltwater intrusion by finite elements and characteristics [SIFEC]) was modified to allow the volume of water and mass of salt in the lagoon to vary with each time step. The modified SIFEC allows the stage of a lagoon to vary in accordance with a functional relation between the stage and water volume of the lagoon, and also allows the salt concentration of the lagoon to vary in accordance with the salt budget of the lagoon including chemical precipitation and dissolution of salt. The updated stage and salt concentration of the lagoon are in turn used as transient boundary conditions for the coupled flow and solute transport model. The utility of the modified model was demonstrated by applying it to the eastern Mediterranean coastal region of Turkey for assessing impacts of climate change on the subsurface environment under scenarios of sea level rise, increased evaporation, and decreased precipitation. PMID:18715262

  1. Melvil Dewey and the Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Michael

    2002-01-01

    This poem discusses Melvil Dewey's system for organizing information, focusing on information related to American Indians. Suggests instead of grouping all materials on Indians in one place they could be distributed throughout the Dewey system. (LRW)

  2. Association of American Indian Physicians

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Becoming a Member Pay Dues Job Center Programs Capacity Building Assistance Program Diabetes Impact Topics Student Programs College ... American Indian Physicians provides educational programs, health initiatives, capacity building assistance and services to American Indian and Alaska ...

  3. 48 CFR 252.226-7001 - Utilization of Indian organizations, Indian-owned economic enterprises, and native Hawaiian small...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...Indian organizations, Indian-owned economic enterprises, and native Hawaiian small...Indian organizations, Indian-owned economic enterprises, and native Hawaiian small...Indian Organizations, Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises, and Native Hawaiian...

  4. 48 CFR 252.226-7001 - Utilization of Indian organizations, Indian-owned economic enterprises, and native Hawaiian small...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...Indian organizations, Indian-owned economic enterprises, and native Hawaiian small...Indian organizations, Indian-owned economic enterprises, and native Hawaiian small...Indian Organizations, Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises, and Native Hawaiian...

  5. 48 CFR 252.226-7001 - Utilization of Indian organizations, Indian-owned economic enterprises, and native Hawaiian small...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...Indian organizations, Indian-owned economic enterprises, and native Hawaiian small...Indian organizations, Indian-owned economic enterprises, and native Hawaiian small...Indian Organizations, Indian-Owned Economic Enterprises, and Native Hawaiian...

  6. Use of deep water lagoons for reducing sewage toxicity prior to wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.R.; Zuiderveen, J.A.; Belcher, B.; McGinley, P.; Birge, W.J. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Investigations were conducted to determine the effectiveness of deep lagoons as a means of minimizing toxicity and reducing wastewater parameters. A lagoon system associated with a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was selected for study and parameters identified for monitoring included toxicity, metal concentrations, total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia. This system included two lagoons, with 7--15 day hydraulic retention times, which received municipal waste. Toxicity and other parameters were measured for raw influent water, the two lagoon outfalls, and the final WWTP effluent. In a definitive seven-day chronic test with Ceriodaphnia dubia, the NOEC of influent water was 20%, and the IC{sub 50} for reproduction was 22.3%. Outfall from the first deep water lagoon showed reduced toxicity. The NOEC and IC{sub 50} were 80 and 71.8%, respectively. Further reduction in toxicity occurred in the second lagoon. The NOEC was 80% and the IC{sub 50} was 75.9. The final effluent discharged from the treatment plant affected neither survival nor fecundity. A 7-day embryo larval test conducted with Pimephales promelas yielded similar results. NOEC values increased through the lagoon system and were 2.5, 40.0, 40.0 and 100%, respectively. Acute TIE procedures implicated both metals and ammonia as primary toxicants. In all tests a sequential reduction in toxicity was observed through the lagoons. Results of this investigation support the use of deep water lagoons as an effective and economical means of pretreating wastewater. This approach offers promise for municipal waters, industrial effluents and stormwater runoff.

  7. Indian Womanhood: Some Psychological Concepts*

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, Dhanalakshmi; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Indian womanhood today is at crossroads. The present paper discusses the status of Indian womanhood and its psychological underpinnings. It discusses how Indian women have suffered at the hands of their families and society leaving no path but to succumb to psychiatric illness. The role of mental health professionals and family members in supporting and promoting growth and development of the Indian woman is outlined. PMID:25838719

  8. Escherichia coli pollution in a Baltic Sea lagoon: a model-based source and spatial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Schippmann, Bianca; Schernewski, Gerald; Gräwe, Ulf

    2013-07-01

    Tourism around the Oder (Szczecin) Lagoon, at the southern Baltic coast, has a long tradition, is an important source of income and shall be further developed. Insufficient bathing water quality and frequent beach closings, especially in the Oder river mouth, hamper tourism development. Monitoring data gives only an incomplete picture of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria sources, spatial transport patterns, risks and does neither support an efficient bathing water quality management nor decision making. We apply a 3D ocean model and a Lagrangian particle tracking model to analyse pollution events and to obtain spatial E. coli pollution maps based on scenario simulations. Model results suggests that insufficient sewage treatment in the city of Szczecin is the major source of faecal pollution, even for beaches 20km downstream. E. coli mortality rate and emission intensity are key parameters for concentration levels downstream. Wind and river discharge play a modifying role. Prevailing southwestern wind conditions cause E. coli transport along the eastern coast and favour high concentration levels at the beaches. Our simulations indicate that beach closings in 2006 would not have been necessary according to the new EU-Bathing Water Quality Directive (2006/7/EC). The implementation of the new directive will, very likely, reduce the number of beach closings, but not the risk for summer tourists. Model results suggest, that a full sewage treatment in Szczecin would allow the establishment of new beaches closer to the city (north of Dabie lake). PMID:23337127

  9. Site characteristics and prey abundance at foraging sites used by Lesser Scaup (Aythya affinis) wintering in Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, Garth; Collazo, Jaime A.

    2009-01-01

    We examined site characteristics and prey abundances where wintering Aythya affinis (Lesser Scaup; hereafter scaup) foraged within three regions of the Indian River Lagoon system in central Florida. We observed that scaup concentrated in the Indian and Banana rivers; however, density of prey items did not differ between foraging sites and random sites. We also found that site characteristics were similar between foraging and random sites. Differences in site characteristics between random points across all three regions did not explain the distribution of Foraging scaup (no scaup foraged in the Mosquito Lagoon); however, prey densities were approximately 3 times lower in the Mosquito Lagoon region. Our study suggests that current habitat conditions within the northern Indian River Lagoon system meet the overwintering requirements of scaup; however, prey densities in the Mosquito Lagoon may have been too low to be profitable for foraging scaup during the period of our study.

  10. Facts about American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian College Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a result of living in remote rural areas, American Indians living on reservations have limited access to higher education. One-third of American Indians live on reservations, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the most recent U.S. government statistics, the overall poverty rate for American Indians/Alaska Natives, including…

  11. QUESTIONS REGARDING AMERICAN INDIAN CRIMINALITY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    STEWART, OMER C.

    FOR THE PURPOSE OF THIS DOCUMENT, AMERICAN INDIAN MEANS A SOCIAL-LEGAL GROUP. THE STATISTICS WERE OBTAINED FROM FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SOURCES. IN 1960, THERE WERE OVER 70,000 INDIAN ARRESTS OUT OF FOUR MILLION ARRESTS REPORTED TO THE F.B.I. THE PER CAPITA AMERICAN INDIAN CRIMINALITY IS NEARLY SEVEN TIMES THE NATIONAL AVERAGE, NEARLY…

  12. American Indian Teacher Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonemah, Stuart A.

    This paper describes the broad goals of an American Indian Teacher Training Program (AITTP), a master's program focusing on teaching gifted and talented Native Americans. The program is administered by American Indian Research and Development, Inc. (AIRD) through Oklahoma City University, with the goal of helping up to 10 American Indian educators…

  13. The American Indian: A Microcourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Norman; And Others

    Designed for secondary students and dealing with the concept of ethnicity in an urban setting, this microcourse on the American Indian presents general information on American Indians and an in-depth study of Indians within the Chicago, Illinois area. Included in this curriculum guide are: seven specific behavioral objectives; course content (some…

  14. Alcohol and American Indian Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, George A.

    The growing problem of teenage drinking and alcoholism in the United States, especially among Indian segments of society, increases the necessity for adequate education concerning alcoholism. This document is prepared for the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools to acquaint Indian students with social concepts of alcohol outside their cultural…

  15. Directory of American Indian Tribes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff. Inst. for Human Development.

    This directory provides general information on American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and lands. The information was compiled from several resources including the "Federal Register," the Bureau of Indian Affairs, "The Native American Almanac" (A. Hirschfelder, M. K. de Montano), the "Atlas of North American Indian Tribes" (Carl Waldman), the…

  16. Indian Issues and Party Platforms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertz, Gayle

    1992-01-01

    Presents a lesson for teaching about the development of political party platforms dealing with American Indian issues. Explains that, although Indians are part of the electorate and sometimes hold political office, Indian issues are included in political platforms rarely if ever. Includes a list of contemporary issues to be used for discussion.…

  17. Literature of the Indian Subcontinent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimock, Edward C., Jr.

    Indian literature is intimately bound up with the Indian religious system. The earliest sacred writings are the Vedas. In addition to being poetry on nature, and later on, ritual formulae for controlling the universe, the Vedas have philosophical speculation. A large part of classical Indian literature consists of writing commentaries on…

  18. The Indian Mineral Development Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Antoinette

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the objectives of the Indian Mineral Development Act of 1982 (IMDA) and the possible effects it may have on Indian mineral development. Explains how the provisions of IMDA work to provide Indian tribes with greater flexibility for the development and sale of their mineral resources. (ML)

  19. [McWilliams, Possible Wind River Basin Thrust Fault]1 Evidence of a Possible 32-Mile-Wide Thrust Fault,

    E-print Network

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    [McWilliams, Possible Wind River Basin Thrust Fault]1 Evidence of a Possible 32-Mile-Wide Thrust Fault, Wind River Basin, Fremont County Wyoming Robert G. McWilliams, Professor Emeritus, Department Indian Meadows and lower Wind River Formations. Love (1987) described in detail this fold-thrust fault

  20. Prudhoe Bay COLVILLE RIVER

    E-print Network

    Fairbanks Juneau Tok Nome Circle Barrow Prudhoe Bay TANANA RIVER LOWER YUKON KOYUKUK RIVER COPPER RIVER COLVILLE RIVER SUSITNA RIVER BARROW ALASKA CENTRAL YUKON NORTON SOUND UPPER YUKON RIVER PORCUPINE RIVER UPPER KUSKOKWIM RIVER NUSHAGAK RIVER LOWER KUSKOKWIM RIVER PRUDHOE BAY CANADA KOBUK- SELAWIK

  1. [Seasonal dynamics of genus Alexandrium (potentially toxic dinoflagellate) in the lagoon of Bizerte (North of Tunisia) and controls by the abiotic factors].

    PubMed

    Bouchouicha Smida, Donia; Sahraoui, Inès; Mabrouk, Hassine Hadj; Sakka Hlaili, Asma

    2012-06-01

    Some species of the genus Alexandrium are known as potential producers of saxitoxin, a neurotoxin that causes the paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) syndrome. Blooming of these species, especially in shellfish farms can affect the aquaculture production and harm human health. Seasonal dynamics of Alexandrium spp. abundance in relationship to environmental factors was investigated from November 2007 to February 2009 at six stations in the Bizerte lagoon, an important shellfish farming area situated in SW Mediterranean. The sampling stations represented different hydrological and trophic conditions: one station TJ (Tinja) is affected by the river plume; two stations (Chaara [Ch] and Canal [Ca]) are influenced by marine inflow (particularly in summer), industrial and urban effluents; and the three other stations (Menzel Abdelrahmen [MA], Menzel Jemil [MJ] and Douaouda [Do]) are located close to shellfish farms. Cell abundance of Alexandrium spp. varied among stations and months. Species of this genus showed a sporadic appearance, but they reached high concentration (0.67-7 × 10(5)cells L(-1)). Maximal cell density was detected in autumn (November 2007; station MA), at salinity of 37.5, temperature of 16 °C and NH(4)(+) level of 55.45 ?M. During this month, Alexandrium spp. abundance accounted for a large fraction (61%) of the harmful phytoplankton. The statistical analysis revealed that Alexandrium concentrations were positively correlated with N:P ratio and NH4+ levels. Thus, the eutrophic waters of the lagoon favour the growth of Alexandrium, which seemed to have preference for N-nutrient loading from antrophogenic activities, as ammonium. Blooms of these potential harmful algae may constitute a potential threat in this coastal lagoon of the southern Mediterranean. Consequently, it is necessary to be well vigilant and to do regular monitoring of Alexandrium species. PMID:22721562

  2. River Watch

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The National Weather Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has launched the River Watch site, providing up-to-date river forecast information for the nation's largest river basins: the Mississippi, Missouri, Illinois, and Ohio River Basins). Daily river level summaries are provided for each basin, in addition to five-day forecasts for river stage heights (in feet). This site also offers hyperlinks to river forecast sites for the other major regions of the US (Southern, Central, and Eastern Regions), and other related sites. For current information on river level conditions in the US, this is a top-notch resource, made more valuable by the geographical extent of its coverage.

  3. Tropical Indian Ocean Variability Driving Southeast Australian Droughts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummenhofer, C. C.; England, M. H.; McIntosh, P. C.; Meyers, G. A.; Pook, M. J.; Risbey, J. S.; Sen Gupta, A.; Taschetto, A. S.

    2009-04-01

    Variability in the tropical Indian Ocean has widespread effects on rainfall in surrounding countries, including East Africa, India and Indonesia. The leading mode of tropical Indian Ocean variability, the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD), is a coupled ocean-atmosphere mode characterized by sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies of opposite sign in the east and west of the basin with an associated large-scale atmospheric re-organisation. Earlier work has often focused on the positive phase of the IOD. However, we show here that the negative IOD phase is an important driver of regional rainfall variability and multi-year droughts. For southeastern Australia, we show that it is actually a lack of the negative IOD phase, rather than the positive IOD phase or Pacific variability, that provides the most robust explanation for recent drought conditions. Since 1995, a large region of Australia has been gripped by the most severe drought in living memory, the so-called "Big Dry". The ramifications for affected regions are dire, with acute water shortages for rural and metropolitan areas, record agricultural losses, the drying-out of two of Australia's major river systems and far-reaching ecosystem damage. Yet the drought's origins have remained elusive. For Southeast Australia, we show that the "Big Dry" and other iconic 20th Century droughts, including the Federation Drought (1895-1902) and World War II drought (1937-1945), are driven by tropical Indian Ocean variability, not Pacific Ocean conditions as traditionally assumed. Specifically, a conspicuous absence of characteristic Indian Ocean temperature conditions that are conducive to enhanced tropical moisture transport has deprived southeastern Australia of its normal rainfall quota. In the case of the "Big Dry", its unprecedented intensity is also related to recent above-average temperatures. Implications of recent non-uniform warming trends in the Indian Ocean and how that might affect ocean characteristics and climate in Indian Ocean rim countries are also discussed.

  4. Mississippi River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... of major cities are marked on the left-hand image; major rivers are marked on the right. The portion of the Mississippi River captured ... heavy rainfall swelled the Mississippi and Wisconsin rivers. In the early morning of April 25, two days before the right-hand image ...

  5. Merced River

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    In this image, the Merced River can be seen just upstream of Happy Isles and the USGS Benchmark Streamgage in Yosemite National Park. The Merced River is a 145 mile (233 km) long tributary of the San Joaquin River. It drains a large section of the Sierra Nevadas, including Yosemite Valley....

  6. Molecular Characterization of Swine Manure Lagoon Microbial and Antibiotic Resistant Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The differences in swine manure lagoon effluent based on differing management styles or approaches such as different stages of swine rearing determines the presence of variable antibiotic resistance determinants and functional microbial populations. These concerns determine the suitabil...

  7. Review of solutions for 3D hydrodynamic modeling applied to aquaculture in South Pacific atoll lagoons

    E-print Network

    lagoons for aquaculture applications. Mollusk (e.g. pearl oyster, clam) aquaculture is a major source this paper will serve as a guide for similar studies elsewhere and we provide guide- lines in terms of costs

  8. A Jurassic counterpart for modern kopara of the Pacific atolls: lagoonal, organic matter-rich,

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . Author Keywords: bacteria; Kimmeridgian; laminated sediments; (palaeo-) lagoonal environment 1 types of laminated sediments are compared in this paper: the Kimmeridgian bituminous laminites or Kiritimati (Christmas) Island from the Pacific Ocean. The kopara is made of laminated sediments, several tens

  9. Topographic and Base-level Control on Back-Barrier Lagoon Evolution: West Galveston Bay, TX 

    E-print Network

    Laverty, Paul H

    2014-12-02

    Estuaries are economically and ecologically significant regions that are highly sensitive to external forcing from sea-level rise, storm events, and anthropogenic change. West Galveston Bay (West Bay) is a back-barrier lagoon system located...

  10. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids)which ar...

  11. Systems tracts sedimentology in the lagoon of Mayotte associated with the Holocene transgression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinke, J.; Reijmer, J. J. G.; Thomassin, B. A.

    2003-08-01

    Twelve gravity cores from various settings within the Mayotte barrier reef-lagoon complex were studied to determine the sedimentology of the sequence stratigraphic systems tracts that formed during the Holocene transgression. Our studies focussed on the determination of physical, chemical, mineralogical and biological parameters of the sediments from specific systems tracts. These parameters determine the thickness and facies of each systems tracts and are controlled by the rate and amplitude of sea-level rise, lagoonal topography and environmental changes. The lowstand systems tract (LST) (before 11.5 ka BP) comprises ferralitic or organic-rich paleosoils in the proximal and middle lagoon and karstified Pleistocene reefal carbonates in the distal lagoon. The transgressive systems tract (TST) (11.5-7 ka BP) consists of a lower terrigenous and an upper mixed terrigenous-carbonate or carbonate-dominated unit. Locally, mangrove muds were deposited. The highstand systems tract (HST) can be divided into an early highstand (eHST) (7-1 ka BP) and a late highstand systems tract (lHST) (after 1 ka BP). In the proximal lagoonal wedge, the early highstand systems tract consists of terrigenous or mixed terrigenous-carbonate muds to sandy muds. In the middle lagoon, it shows carbonate mud to sandy mud and carbonate gravel to reefal carbonates in the distal lagoons. Terrigenous muds dominate the late highstand systems tract in the proximal lagoonal wedge. In the mid-lagoonal plain, mixed terrigenous-carbonate or carbonate mud to sandy mud dominates, while carbonate gravel to reefal carbonate prevails in the distal lagoon. For the last 9 ka, sedimentation in the lagoon of Mayotte has been spatially divided into a proximal terrigenous and a distal, carbonate-dominated province. Maximum carbonate concentrations between 4 and 1 ka BP coincide with the time of maximum solar insolation. After 1 ka BP, a general decrease in carbonate concentrations can be observed. This coincides with increased terrigenous sediment input, which results from a reduction in accommodation space and to some extent is of anthropogenic origin.

  12. Atoka folio, Indian Territory 

    E-print Network

    Taff, Joseph A. (Joseph Alexander), b. 1862.

    1902-01-01

    This thesis edits and compares two diaries written during one of the earliest Spanish expeditions into Texas during 1691-1692. The first governor of the Province of the Tejas Indians, Domingo Ter??n de los R??os, steered the military and exploratory...

  13. Downriver Indians' Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; Exline, Jesse

    Yurok Indian legends in Yurok Unifon text include English translations of the entire texts in order to produce fluent reading for English speakers and a continuous text for Yurok readers. Although corresponding sentences are numbered, translation is not word-for-word or sentence-for-sentence. The five stories refer to a time when animals could…

  14. Indian School Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Basil H.

    This autobiography relates the experiences of a young Ojibway boy who was taken from his family in 1939 at age 10 and placed in a Jesuit boarding school in northern Ontario, Canada. St. Peter Claver (later Garnier) or "Spanish," as the Indian school was known, was home to approximately 135 boys. Most of the students, who ranged in age from 4 to…

  15. Indian Reserved Water Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Traces the distribution, ownership, and water usage associated with lands in the Colville Reservation in Washington State. Cites specific cases which addressed the reserved water rights doctrine. Assesses the impact of court decisions on insuring water rights for Indians living on the Colville Reservation. (ML)

  16. The Urban Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Winona DuBray

    The document presents six articles that provide a glimpse of the uniqueness of American Indian cultural conflict, focusing on aspects of the culture which warrant special attention. Since there are over 100 tribes, an effort was made to enumerate commonalities amongst the tribal cultures in looking at issues raised in the urban areas throughout…

  17. Northwest Coast Indian Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Thomas; Knecht, Elizabeth

    The visual art forms of the Northwest Coast Indian Tribes of Alaska (Haida, Tlingit, and Tsimshian) share common distinctive design elements (formline, ovoid, U-form, and curvilinear shapes) which are referred to as the "Northern Style." Designs represent events or characters taken from the oral tradition of song and legend. Characteristics of…

  18. Indians of the Northwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Brief descriptions of the historical and cultural background of the Bannock, Cayuse, Coeur d'Alene, Kutenia, Kalispel, Palouse, Umatilla, Walla Walla, Yakima, Spokane, Klamath, Sanpoil, Nespelem, Colville, Quinault, Quileute, Makahs, Klallam, Lummi, Cowlit, Puyallup, Nisqually, and Nez Perce Indian tribes of the Northwestern United States are…

  19. INDIAN NATIONAL SCIENCE ACADEMY

    E-print Network

    Srinivasan, N.

    and bring out proceedings and monographs. The academies promote public awareness and understandingINDIAN NATIONAL SCIENCE ACADEMY Science academies play a crucial role in promoting, recognizing on critical issues. Importantly they serve as forums for interaction among scientists within and outside

  20. Indian Ayurvedic SPORTS MASSAGE

    E-print Network

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Indian Ayurvedic SPORTS MASSAGE For Information or Bookings Contact Felipe Estenos at 086 883 1404 or felipe.estenos@gmail.com at Trinity College Sports Centre Available Wednesdays Only With Felipe Estenos · Combats fatigue,tension and depression and restores emotional equilibrium · Stimulates production

  1. Indian Astronomy: History of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    From the time of A macronryabhat under dota (ca AD 500) there appeared in India a series of Sanskrit treatises on astronomy. Written always in verse, and normally accompanied by prose commentaries, these served to create an Indian tradition of mathematical astronomy which continued into the 18th century. There are as well texts from earlier centuries, grouped under the name Jyotishaveda macronn d...

  2. Full-Fledged Indian

    E-print Network

    Hart, Josh Benjamin

    2010-04-26

    Lee Stafford is in his seventh summer as a counselor at Camp Arrowdance. While Lee enjoys his status as one of the most popular staff members at camp, he begins to wonder if he's in danger of going "Full-Fledged Indian", ...

  3. Mescalero Indian Reservation 

    E-print Network

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Florida’s Spanish borderland was the result of over two hundred and fifty years of cooperation and contention among Indians, Spain, Britain, the United States and Africans who lived with them all. The borderland was shaped by the differing cultural...

  4. The Dynamics of Mercury Speciation and Transport at a Central California Coastal Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P. M.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Dimova, N. T.; Merckling, J.; Kehrlein, N. C.; Hohn, R. A.; Richardson, C. M.; Johnson, C. D.; Fisher, A. T.; Lamborg, C. H.; Flegal, A. R., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated spatial and temporal trends in total mercury and monomethylmercury (MMHg) in groundwater, lagoon water, and nearshore seawater to assess the drivers of MMHg production in a coastal lagoon system. Many West Coast streams transition from estuarine to lagoon conditions in the dry season when a sand berm develops at the stream mouth, restricting surface water exchange with the ocean. Because lagoons accumulate nutrients from their upstream watershed they are susceptible to eutrophication, which can promote the growth of anaerobic bacteria. In nearshore settings, these bacteria are primarily responsible for producing MMHg, a bioaccumulative neurotoxin. We found that MMHg concentrations in lagoon water (1 - 5 pM) were higher than in groundwater (0.2 - 1 pM) and coastal seawater (0.1 - 0.6 pM). Groundwater depth profiles combined with subsurface resistivity images suggest MMHg in lagoon water was transported through the sand berm to adjacent seawater. MMHg in seawater and groundwater followed similar trends, providing additional evidence of groundwater-surface water interaction. MMHg in groundwater directly below the lagoon was consistently higher where dissolved oxygen and NO3- decreased, implying MMHg production by anaerobic bacteria. Over a ~7-hour period we observed a 0.6 pM decrease in groundwater MMHg (1 to 0.4 pM) that coincided with a decrease in water temperature (16.5 to 13 °C). We hypothesize that microbial activity, and consequently MMHg production, were enhanced in warmer water. Because coastal lagoons support intricate food webs and serve as nurseries for a variety of organisms, processes that influence mercury speciation and transport in these ecosystems may have a disproportionate impact on nearshore mercury biogeochemical cycling.

  5. Occurrence and Diversity of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Lagoons and Groundwater Underlying Two Swine Production Facilities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Chee-Sanford; R. I. Aminov; I. J. Krapac; N. Garrigues-Jeanjean; R. I. Mackie

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR typing methods to assess the presence of tetracycline resistance determinants conferring ribosomal protection in waste lagoons and in groundwater underlying two swine farms. All eight classes of genes encoding this mechanism of resistance (tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(M), tetB(P), tet(S), tet(T), and otrA) were found in total DNA extracted from water of two lagoons. These

  6. Characterization of atmospheric ammonia emissions from swine waste storage and treatment lagoons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Viney P. Aneja; J. P. Chauhan; J. T. Walker

    2000-01-01

    Fluxes of atmospheric ammonia-nitrogen (NH3-N, where NH3-N 5 (14\\/17)NH3) from an anaerobic ;2.5 ha (1 ha 5 10,000 m 2 ) commercial hog waste storage lagoon were measured during the summer of 1997 through the spring of 1998 in order to study the seasonal variability in emissions of NH3-N and its relationship to lagoon physicochemical properties. Ammonia-nitrogen fluxes were measured

  7. Quantification of water, salt and nutrient exchange processes at the mouth of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    Sylaios, Georgios K; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A; Akratos, Christos; Haralambidou, Kiriaki

    2006-08-01

    Vassova lagoon is a typical Mediterranean (small, shallow, micro-tidal, well-mixed) coastal lagoon, receiving limited seasonal freshwater inflows from direct precipitation and underground seepage. An intensive study was carried out in order to quantify the mechanisms responsible for the intra-tidal and residual transport of water, salt, nutrients and chlorophyll at the mouth of this lagoon and to assess the lagoon's flushing behavior. Results indicated that although the system is micro-tidal, tidal effects appeared to be the dominant factor for the longitudinal distribution of physical and chemical parameters, while the associated residual flow is also important and serves as a baseline measure of overall circulation. However, analysis of the net longitudinal currents and fluxes of water, salt and nutrients revealed the importance of non-tidal effects (wind effect and precipitation incidents) in the mean tidal transport. It is shown that the Eulerian residual currents transported water and its properties inwards under southern winds, while a seaward transport was induced during precipitation incidents and northern winds. The Stokes drift effect was found an order of magnitude lower than the Eulerian current, directed towards the lagoon, proving the partially-progressive nature of the tide. Nutrients and chlorophyll-alpha loads are exported from the lagoon to the open sea during the ebb phase of the autumn and winter tidal cycles, associated with the inflow of nutrient-rich freshwater, seeped through the surrounding drainage canal. The reverse transport occurs in spring and early summer, when nutrients enter the lagoon during the flood tidal phase, from the nutrient-rich upper layer of the stratified adjacent sea. Application of a tidal prism model shows that Vassova lagoon has a mean flushing time of 7.5 days, ranging between 4 to 18 days, affected inversely by the tidal oscillation. PMID:16741822

  8. CISOCUR - Residence time modelling in the Curonian Lagoon and validation through stable isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umgiesser, Georg; Razinkovas-Baziukas, Arturas; Zemlys, Petras; Ertürk, Ali; M?žin?, Jovita

    2015-04-01

    The spatial pattern of the hydrodynamic circulation of the Curonian lagoon, the largest European coastal lagoon, is still little understood. In absence of automatic current registration data all the existing models relied mostly on such data as water levels leaving high level of uncertainty. Here we present CISOCUR, a new project financed by European Social Fund under the Global Grant measure. The project applies a new methodology that uses the carbon stable isotope (SI) ratio of C12 and C13 that characterize different water sources entering the lagoon and may be altered by internal kinetic processes. Through the tracing of these isotope ratios different water masses can be identified. This gives the possibility to validate several hypotheses of water circulation and validate hydrodynamic models. In particular it will be possible to 1) trace water masses entering the lagoon through the Nemunas and the Klaipeda strait; 2) test the hypothesis of sediment transport mechanisms inside the lagoon; 3) evaluate the importance of physical forcing on the lagoon circulation. The use of a hydrodynamic finite element model, coupled with the SI method, will allow for a realistic description of the transport processes inside the Curonian lagoon. So the main research goal is to apply the stable isotope tracers and a finite element model to determine the circulation patterns in the Curonian lagoon. Here we show how the SI analysis was used to validate the hydrodynamic model on the basis of residence time. The average residence time of the Nemunas waters is estimated through SI data and is then compared with the model data computed through standard algorithms. Seasonal changes of carbon content are taken care of through a preliminary application of a carbon kinetic model. The results are compared to literature data.

  9. Rates of sediment supply and sea-level rise in a large coastal lagoon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Ward, G.H.; White, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    Laguna Madre, Texas, is 3-7 km wide and more than 190 km long, making it one of the longest lagoons in the world. The lagoon encompasses diverse geologic and climatic regions and it is an efficient sediment trap that accumulates clastic sediments from upland, interior, and oceanic sources. The semi-arid climate and frequent tropical cyclones historically have been responsible for the greatest volume of sediment influx. On an average annual basis, eolian transport, tidal exchange, storm washover, mainland runoff, interior shore erosion, and authigenic mineral production introduce approximately one million m3 of sediments into the lagoon. Analyses of these sediment transport mechanisms and associated line sources and point sources of sediment provide a basis for: (1) estimating the long-term average annual sediment supply to a large lagoon; (2) calculating the average net sedimentation rate; (3) comparing introduced sediment volumes and associated aggradation rates with observed relative sea-level change; and (4) predicting future conditions of the lagoon. This comparison indicates that the historical average annual accumulation rate in Laguna Madre (<1 mm/yr) is substantially less than the historical rate of relative sea-level rise (~4 mm/yr). Lagoon submergence coupled with erosion of the western shore indicates that Laguna Madre is being submerged slowly and migrating westward rather than filling, as some have suggested.

  10. Trends in the variation of the sea level in the lagoons of the Southeastern Baltic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navrotskaya, S. E.; Chubarenko, B. V.

    2013-02-01

    This paper analyses the global tendency of the sea level rise (SLR) and its long term influence on the sea level upstream drainage cascade based on the example of the level's variation in the Vistula Lagoon of the Baltic Sea compared to the other lagoons and coastal regions of the southeastern part of the Baltic Sea. A steady positive trend in the water level variations was revealed; its magnitude varies significantly depending on the time period. In general, during the 100-150 year period, the rate of the SLR in the lagoons and coastal areas of the Baltic Sea (1.7-1.8 mm per year) is close to the SLR rate in the World Ocean. In the second half of the 20th century, the increased rate of the SLR in the lagoons and marine areas became stronger (up to 3.6 mm per year in the Vistula Lagoon and in 1959-2006 in the sea and exceeded the rate of global ocean SLR). It dramatically increased at the end of the last century both in the lagoons and in the sea (up to 10.0-15.0 mm per year). This is the response not only to the global climate warming but it is likely that it is also a response to the changes of the climate driving forces that influence the regimes of the local wind and precipitation in the catchment.

  11. Restoration of the eutrophic Orbetello lagoon (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy): water quality management.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Mauro; Palmieri, Roberto; Porrello, Salvatore

    2003-12-01

    The Orbetello lagoon (Tyrrhenian coast, Italy) receives treated urban and land based fishfarms wastewater. The development of severe eutrophication imposed the three main activity adoption focuses on (1) macroalgae harvesting; (2) pumping of water from the sea; (3) confining wastewater to phytotreatment ponds. The responses to these interventions were rapid and macroalgal reduction growth and seagrass return were recorded. Since 1999, a new macroalgal development was recorded. The aim of this research was to discover whether the recent macroalgal growth can be attributed to the continuing wastewater influx from the remaining persistent anthropic sources (PAS) or from the sediment nutrient release. A monitoring programme was carried out between August 1999 and July 2000 in order to measure dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus in the wastewaters entering into the lagoon and in central lagoon areas, seaweed and seagrass distribution and lagoon N, P annual budgets. The results showed higher N and P values close to PAS. The distribution of the macroalgal species confirms that the available P comes almost entirely from these remaining PAS. In conclusion, the environmental measures adopted produced a significant reduction in algal biomass development in the lagoon; the macroalgal harvesting activities produced a sediment disturbance with following oxidize conditions, which make P unavailable in the lagoon water, excepting close the PAS. PMID:14643780

  12. Will the "Real" Indians Please Stand Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pewewardy, Cornel

    1998-01-01

    Explores what it means to be an American Indian in an era in which nearly half of the identifiable Indians live off the reservations and in urban areas. As the principal definition of "Indian-ness" today, the issue of blood quantum leads to misunderstandings. Being an Indian, to the author, is being a person connected to a tribe. (SLD)

  13. Describing the environmental fate of diuron in a tropical river catchment.

    PubMed

    Camenzuli, Louise; Scheringer, Martin; Gaus, Caroline; Ng, Carla A; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2012-12-01

    The use of the herbicide diuron on sugarcane fields along the river catchments of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) in Australia is an issue of concern due to high levels of diuron reported in the GBR lagoon, and has recently led to a restriction on the use of diuron during the 2011/12 wet season. An important question in this context is how much diuron is mobilised from the agricultural area by strong rainfall and floods in the wet season and transferred to the GBR lagoon. We have set up a multimedia chemical fate model for a tropical catchment to describe the fate of diuron within the Tully River catchment, Queensland, Australia. The model includes highly variable rainfall based on meteorological data from the Tully River catchment and a flood water compartment on top of the agricultural soil that is present during times for which floods were reported. The model is driven by diuron application data estimated for the Tully River catchment and is solved for time-dependent diuron concentrations in agricultural soil and seawater. Model results show that on average 25% of the diuron applied every year is transferred to the GBR lagoon with rainwater and flood water runoff. Diuron concentrations estimated for the seawater range from 0.1 ng/L to 12 ng/L and are in good agreement with concentrations measured in the GBR lagoon. The uncertainty of the diuron concentrations estimated for seawater is approximately a factor of two and mainly derives from uncertainty in the diuron degradation half-life in soil, properties of the soil compartment such as organic matter content, and the speed of the seawater current removing diuron dissolved in seawater from the seawater compartment of the model. PMID:23026296

  14. River history and tectonics.

    PubMed

    Vita-Finzi, C

    2012-05-13

    The analysis of crustal deformation by tectonic processes has gained much from the clues offered by drainage geometry and river behaviour, while the interpretation of channel patterns and sequences benefits from information on Earth movements before or during their development. The interplay between the two strands operates at many scales: themes which have already benefited from it include the possible role of mantle plumes in the breakup of Gondwana, the Cenozoic development of drainage systems in Africa and Australia, Himalayan uplift in response to erosion, alternating episodes of uplift and subsidence in the Mississippi delta, buckling of the Indian lithospheric plate, and changes in stream pattern and sinuosity along individual alluvial channels subject to localized deformation. Developments in remote sensing, isotopic dating and numerical modelling are starting to yield quantitative analyses of such effects, to the benefit of geodymamics as well as fluvial hydrology. PMID:22474680

  15. Metal (Fe, Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd) concentration patterns in components of a macrophyte-based coastal lagoon ecosystem

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Theodora Boubonari; Theodoros Kevrekidis; Paraskevi Malea

    2009-01-01

    Information on the metal biological fate in macrophyte-based coastal lagoons is provided; this information can contribute\\u000a to the assessment of the environmental effects of metal pollution and to the development of predictive models for rational\\u000a management of coastal lagoons. Iron, Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd concentrations in the dominant invertebrate and fish species of Monolimni\\u000a Lagoon, Mediterranean Sea, as well

  16. Fish assemblages in coastal lagoons in land-uplift succession: The relative importance of local and regional environmental gradients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Snickars; Alfred Sandström; Antti Lappalainen; Johanna Mattila; Kajsa Rosqvist; Lauri Urho

    2009-01-01

    The assemblages of young-of-the-year fish were studied in coastal lagoons in an archipelago with post-glacial land-uplift, which affects environmental gradients at local and regional scale, i.e. lagoon habitat isolation and archipelago position, respectively. The categorisation of 40 undisturbed lagoons into nine habitat types based on habitat isolation and archipelago position was supported by clear relationships with spring temperature and total

  17. ENSO and Indian Ocean Dipole signatures in the history of Indian-Pakistani severe floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molini, A.; Hassan, A.; Katul, G. G.; Porporato, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    During the summer of 2010 - in conjunction with the Euro-Russian blocking producing extreme temperatures over Eastern Europe - an unusual westward path of the Indian Monsoon occurred over Pakistan, where soils were already moist for an earlier cyclonic disturbance from the Arabian Sea. These anomalous conditions resulted in a shift of Monsoonal deluges over the arid Northwestern regions of Pakistan, causing the worst flood in the history of the Indus river basin (IRB), with more than 1,500 deaths, half a million houses destroyed, and over 18 million people, about the 10% of Pakistan Population, affected. Whether similar shifts in extreme precipitation toward the arid Northwestern regions of Pakistan can become more frequent, and to what extent the occurrence of flooding events over the IRB can be fingerprinted from synoptic scale variables needs to be urgently addressed. With this premise, our analysis explores the correlation and causal relations of high stream-flow conditions in the Indus river basin and high level of monsoon rainfall over Northwestern India with ENSO and Indian Ocean Dipole. We also use conditional probabilities and return time of snow-melt and spring cyclonic rainfall events to unveil the controlling external forcing of disastrous floods in Pakistan.

  18. Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Fish and Wildlife Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Basin: Lessons Learned and Suggestions for Large-Scale Monitoring Programs Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB) to the Northwest Power and Conservation Council, Portland, Oregon, NOAA Fisheries, Seattle, Washington, Columbia River Basin Indian Tribes Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) to the Northwest Power and Conservation Council

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oregon Lyman; L. McDonald; Robert Bilby; Peter A. Bisson; Charles C. Coutant; John M. Epifanio; Daniel Goodman; Susan Hanna; Nancy Hundy; Erik Merrill; Brian Riddell; William Liss; Eric J. Loudenslager; David P. Philipp; William Smoker; Richard R. Whitney

    The year 2006 marked two milestones in the Columbia River Basin and the Pacific Northwest region's efforts to rebuild its once great salmon and steelhead runs-- the 25 th anniversary of the creation of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and the l0 th anniversary of an

  19. Storm-water characterization and lagoon sediment analysis, Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, J.G.; Vaughn, R.W.; Scott, P.T.

    1990-08-01

    Sampling was conducted in the wastewater treatment lagoons and stormwater runoff at Grand Forks AFB. The base was concerned about whether the unlined lagoons were creating a potential groundwater contamination problem and whether their stormwater runoff met North Dakota state stream standards. Lagoon sediment did not contain Extraction Procedure hazardous chemicals. Stormwater runoff exceeded state standards for boron, phosphates, and phenols and contained trace levels of methylene chloride. Characterization of lagoon influent showed it to be generally representative of domestic sewage, but also contained trace levels of boron, phenols, toluene, cyanide, chloroform, methylene chloride and ethyl benzene.

  20. Do physiography and hydrology determine the physico-chemical properties and trophic status of coastal lagoons? A comparative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roselli, L.; Cañedo-Argüelles, M.; Costa Goela, P.; Cristina, S.; Rieradevall, M.; D'Adamo, R.; Newton, A.

    2013-01-01

    Coastal lagoons are very heterogeneous systems covering a wide range of physiographical and hydrological characteristics. The hypothesis of the present investigation was that physiographical and hydrological characteristics of coastal lagoons affect their physico-chemical properties and their buffering capacity against nutrient enrichment. We compared data collected during a complete annual cycle in six coastal lagoons which were representative of the different lagoon types proposed by Kjerfve (1986) and were subjected to different anthropogenic pressures. The greater exchange of water with the sea in the leaky lagoon of Ria Formosa (type 3) reduced the seasonal differences in the physico-chemical variables and increased the buffer capacity against nutrient enrichment when compared to the restricted (type 2) and chocked (type 1) lagoon types. The lagoon types also showed important differences regarding nutrient limitation, with types 1 and 2 being P-limited and type 3 being N-limited. Our approach can be applied to other coastal lagoons representative of transitional water types in order to provide a general framework for the rational management and policy strategies of coastal lagoons.

  1. CISOCUR - Hydrodynamic circulation in the Curonian Lagoon inferred through stable isotope measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umgiesser, Georg; Razinkovas-Baziukas, Arturas; Barisevi?i?t?, Ruta; Baziuk?, Dalia; Ertürk, Ali; Gasi?nait?, Jovita; Gulbinskas, Saulius; Lubien?, Irma; Mara?kinaite, Jurgita; Petkuvien?, Jolita; Pilkaityt?, Renata; Ruginis, Tomas; Zemlys, Petras; Žilius, Mindaugas

    2013-04-01

    The spatial pattern of the hydrodynamic circulation of the Curonian lagoon, the largest European coastal lagoon, is still little understood. In absence of automatic current registration data all the existing models relied mostly on such data as water levels leaving high level of uncertainty. Here we present CISOCUR, a new project financed by the European Social Fund under the Global Grant measure. The project applies a new methodology that uses the carbon stable isotope (SI) ratio of C12 and C13 that characterize different water sources entering the lagoon and may be altered by internal kinetic processes. Through the tracing of these isotope ratios different water masses can be identified. This gives the possibility to validate several hypotheses of water circulation and validate hydrodynamic models. In particular it will be possible to 1) trace water masses entering the lagoon through the Nemunas and the Klaipeda strait; 2) test the hypothesis of sediment transport mechanisms inside the lagoon; 3) evaluate the importance of physical forcing on the lagoon circulation. The use of a hydrodynamic finite element model, coupled with the SI method, will allow for a realistic description of the transport processes inside the Curonian lagoon. So the main research goal is to apply the stable isotope tracers and a finite element model to determine the circulation patterns in the Curonian lagoon. Overall, the project will develop according to 4 main phases: 1) A pilot study to measure the isotope composition of different carbon compounds (dissolved and suspended) in different water bodies that feed water into the central lagoon. Through this pilot study the optimal study sites for the seasonal campaign will be identified as well. 2) Seasonal field campaigns in the monitoring stations identified in phase 1 to measure the carbon isotope ratio. 3) Development of a model that describes the kinetics of carbon isotopes and its transformation. 4) Application of a hydrodynamic model that includes the kinetic model and uses the data in order to describe the overall circulation patterns in the Curonian lagoon. Project activities will be carried out as common co-ordinated effort of field an SI group and the modeling group that will have to calibrate the hydrodynamic model. In this way the expertise of different groups (physicists and oceanographers) will result in added value, providing the best available expertise along the eastern coast of the Baltic.

  2. The distribution of salinity and main forcing effects in the Berre lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Bernard; Alekseenko, Elena; Chen, Paul Gang; Kharif, Christian; Kotarba, Richard; Fougere, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    The results from previous studies in lagoons and well mixed estuaries indicate that salt transport is primarily in response to advection associated with freshwater outflow, tidal diffusion, and to shear effects arising from spatial correlations of vertical and especially transverse deviations in salinity and current speed (Smith, 1994). Therefore, the inflow of fresh and salt water into coastal lagoons is an important factor influencing the structure and function of lagoonal ecosystems worldwide (Lirman et al., 2007). The predominance of marine or freshwater inflow leads to the different ecosystems. Among several lagoons located along the Mediterranean shore of France, the Berre lagoon has been under intense anthropogenic pressure for several decades (Delpy et al., 2012). Moreover, the salinity level of the Berre lagoon was varying dramatically from the 19th century up to now. In this work, a special attention is focused on the salinity variation in the Berre lagoon due to the three dominant abiotic forcing mechanisms, i.e., incoming sea tide, runoff from a hydropower and a strong wind. Four different model scenarios were considered in order to examine the impact of each forcing mechanism or combined effects, i.e. : (a) tide only, (b) runoff only, (c) combined tide and runoff, and (d) an N-NW wind, tide and runoff together. Numerical modeling and interpretation of numerical results are based on three-dimensional hydrodynamic model MARS3D. It is found that the strongest negative impact is related to the huge hydropower runoffs, inducing the desalinization of the surface and subsurface waters not only in the centre of the lagoon, but also in the entire water column in the coastal seagrass recolonization zones. In the absence of wind, the huge inputs of freshwater from the hydropower lead to a haline stratification and thus, to anoxic conditions, making most of the lagoon unproductive. On the contrary, strong winds play a positive role on the salinity level of the Berre lagoon by destroying rapidly (in a few hours) the vertical stratification, thereby reducing the risk of anoxia. The results from these model scenarios are useful to further understand the ecosystem of the Berre lagoon and to help the designers of seagrass restoration program. References Delpy F., Pagano M., Blanchot J., Carlotti F., Thibault-Botha D. : Man-induced hydrological changes, metazooplankton communities and invasive species in the Berre Lagoon (Mediterranean Sea, France). Mar. Pollut. Bull. 64 (9) : 1921-32, 2012. Lirman D., Serafy J.E. : Documenting Everglades restoration impacts on Biscayne Bay's shallowest benthic habitats. First Annual Report. CERP Monitoring and Assessment Plan Component : Activity Number 3.2.3.3. Miami, FL, 2008. Smith N.P. : Water, salt and heat balance of coastal lagoons. In B. Kjerfve (ed.), Coastal Lagoon Processes. (pp. 69-101). Amsterdam : Elsevier, 1994.

  3. 6. CLOSEUP OF U.S. INDIAN IRRIGATION SERVICE AND U.S. RECLAMATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. CLOSE-UP OF U.S. INDIAN IRRIGATION SERVICE AND U.S. RECLAMATION SERVICE BENCHMARKS ON TURNOUT STRUCTURE IN T3S, R5E, S14 - San Carlos Irrigation Project, San Tan Flood Water Canal, North Side of Gila River, Coolidge, Pinal County, AZ

  4. Drug Use, Delinquency and Alcohol Use Among Indian and Anglo Youth in Wyoming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forslund, Morris A.; And Others

    Part 1 of the report's three sections presents a general review of the published literature relevant to understanding the drug problem in the United States. Part 2 presents a summary of data obtained in an investigation into the nature and magnitude of the delinquency problem among youth living in the Wind River Indian Reservation area of Wyoming.…

  5. Mansonella ozzardi infections in Indians of the Southwestern part of the state of Bolivar, Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Godoy, G A; Volcan, G; Medrano, C; Teixeira, A; Matheus, L

    1980-05-01

    Mansonella ozzardi infections were found in 80/139 (58%) of Indians living in the forest of the upper Caura River Basin located in the southwestern part of Bolivar State, Venezuela. In four (3%) of the blood samples a second type of microfilaria which could not be identified was also found. PMID:6992608

  6. Stability of slopes below the Sherwood Uranium Mine, Spokane Indian Reservation, Northeastern Washington

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. F. Chleborad; R. L. Schuster

    1984-01-01

    The open-pit Sherwood Uranium Mine is within the Spokane Indian Reservation, in Stevens County, northeastern Washington. It is approximately 35 mi northwest of the city of Spokane. The mine overlooks the Spokane River Arm of Franklin D. Roosevelt Lake from a ridge some 600 ft above the lake. Spoil piles as high as 90 ft extend for over a mile

  7. American Indian Higher Education Consortium

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), since 1972, has been the collective spirit and voice of our nation's Tribal Colleges and Universities, advocating on behalf of individual institutions of higher education that are defined and controlled by their respective tribal nations. AIHEC's mission is to nurture, advocate, and protect American Indian history, culture, art and language, and the legal and human rights of American Indian people to their own sense of identity and heritage.

  8. West Indian Orchidaceae Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The New York Botanical Garden has recently placed online this searchable database of West Indian Orchids. Containing approximately 5,200 specimen records for the family Orchidacese (from the New York Botanical Garden's collection), the database may be searched by Family, Collector, Country, Taxon, State/Province, and other select fields. Typical returns provide information on Specimen name (scientific name), Location, Collector, Description, and Habitat.

  9. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1995 Annual Report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shaw; R. Todd

    1996-01-01

    During the 1995 - 96 project period, four new habitat enhancement projects were implemented under the Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) in the upper Umatilla River Basin. A total of 38,644 feet of high tensile smooth wire fencing was constructed along 3.6 miles of riparian corridor in

  10. Connections of Yenisei River discharge to sea surface temperatures, sea ice, and atmospheric circulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hengchun Ye; Daqing Yang; Xuebin Zhang; Tingjun Zhang

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the connections of Yenisei River discharge to sea surface temperatures (SSTs), atmospheric circulation, and Arctic sea ice coverage using historical records for the time period of 1936–1995. We found that Yenisei River discharge is negatively associated with SSTs over the northern North Atlantic and is positively correlated with SSTs over the tropical South Atlantic and Indian Oceans.

  11. Connections of Yenisei River discharge to sea surface temperatures, sea ice, and atmospheric circulation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hengchun Ye; Daqing Yang; Xuebin Zhang; Tingjun Zhang

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the connections of Yenisei River discharge to sea surface temperatures (SSTs), atmospheric circulation, and Arctic sea ice coverage using historical records for the time period of 1936-1995. We found that Yenisei River discharge is negatively associated with SSTs over the northern North Atlantic and is positively correlated with SSTs over the tropical South Atlantic and Indian Oceans.

  12. Indian Converts Collection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    First published in 1727, the remarkable book "Indian Converts, or Some account of the lives and dying speeches of a considerable number of the Christianized Indians of Martha's Vineyard" is now available in full online. Written by Experience Mayhew, the book provides remarkable insights into the lives and culture of four generations of Native Americans in colonial America. This digitized version was created at Reed College, and visitors can look through all four sections of the work, which include "Indian Ministers" and "Pious Children." Throughout the work, Mayhew details the books that different age groups were reading, provides insights into early New England pedagogy and childrearing practices, and also describes each individual in terms of their own genealogy and personal history. The truly fantastic thing about the site is that it also contains an archive with over 600 images and documents that further contextualize the work. Also, the site contains study guides designed for classroom use that cover artifact analysis, genealogy, and reading gravestones.

  13. Reconstructing Indian Population History

    PubMed Central

    Reich, David; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L.; Singh, Lalji

    2009-01-01

    India has been underrepresented in genome-wide surveys of human variation. We analyze 25 diverse groups to provide strong evidence for two ancient populations, genetically divergent, that are ancestral to most Indians today. One, the “Ancestral North Indians” (ANI), is genetically close to Middle Easterners, Central Asians, and Europeans, while the other, the “Ancestral South Indians” (ASI), is as distinct from ANI and East Asians as they are from each other. By introducing methods that can estimate ancestry without accurate ancestral populations, we show that ANI ancestry ranges from 39-71% in India, and is higher in traditionally upper caste and Indo-European speakers. Groups with only ASI ancestry may no longer exist in mainland India. However, the Andamanese are an ASI-related group without ANI ancestry, showing that the peopling of the islands must have occurred before ANI-ASI gene flow on the mainland. Allele frequency differences between groups in India are larger than in Europe, reflecting strong founder effects whose signatures have been maintained for thousands of years due to endogamy. We therefore predict that there will be an excess of recessive diseases in India, different in each group, which should be possible to screen and map genetically. PMID:19779445

  14. Intense pyrite formation under low-sulfate conditions in the Achterwasser lagoon, SW Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Thomas; Rausch, Nicole; Leipe, Thomas; Dellwig, Olaf; Berner, Zsolt; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2005-07-01

    In comparison to similar low-sulfate coastal environments with anoxic-sulfidic sediments, the Achterwasser lagoon, which is part of the Oder estuary in the SW Baltic Sea, reveals unexpectedly high pyrite concentrations of up to 7.5 wt%. Pyrite occurs mainly as framboidal grains variable in size with diameters between 1 and 20 ?m. Pyritization is not uniform down to the investigated sediment depth of 50 cm. The consumption of reactive-Fe is most efficient in the upper 20 cm of the sediment column, leading to degrees of pyritization (DOP) as high as 80 to 95%. Sediment accumulation in the Achterwasser takes place in high productivity waters. The content of organic carbon reaches values of up to 10 wt%, indicating that pyrite formation is not limited by the availability of organic matter. Although dissolved sulfate concentration is relatively low (<2 mmol/L) in the Achterwasser, the presence of H 2S in the pore water suggests that sulfate is unlikely to limit pyrite authigenesis. The lack of free Fe(II) in the pore waters combined with the possibility of a very efficient transformation of Fe-monosulfides to pyrite near the sediment/water interface suggests that pyrite formation is rather controlled by (i) the availability of reactive-Fe, which limits the FeS formation, and by (ii) the availability of an oxidant, which limits the transformation of FeS into pyrite. The ultimate source for reactive-Fe is the river Oder, which provides a high portion of reactive-Fe (˜65% of the total-Fe) in the form of suspended particulate matter. The surficial sediments of the Achterwasser are reduced, but are subject to oxidation from the overlying water by resuspension. Oxidation of the sediments produces sulfur species with oxidation states intermediate between sulfide and sulfate (e.g., thiosulfate and polysulfides), which transform FeS to FeS 2 at a significant rate. This process of FeS-recycling is suggested to be responsible for the formation of pyrite in high concentrations near the sediment surface, with DOP values between 80 and 95% even under low sulfate conditions. A postdepositional sulfidization takes place in the deeper part of the sediment column, at ˜22 cm depth, where the downward diffusion of H 2S is balanced by the upward migration of Fe(II). The vertical fluctuation of the diffusion front intensifies the pyritization of sediments. We suggest that the processes described may occur preferentially in shallow water lagoons with average net-sedimentation rates close to zero. Such environments are prone to surficial sediment resuspension, initiating oxidation of Fe-sulfides near the sediment/water interface. Subsequent FeS 2 formation as well as postdepositional sulfidization leads to a major pyrite spike at depth within the sediment profile.

  15. Hydrologic characteristics of lagoons at San Juan, Puerto Rico, during an October 1974 tidal cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gómez-Gómez, Fernando; Ellis, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Flow and water-quality changes were studied during a period of intense rainfall in the San Juan Lagoon system. The study covered a 25-hour period beginning 0900 hours 22 October, 1974. Precipitation during the study period averaged 70 millimeters. Sampling stations were located at Boca de Cangrejos, the main ocean outlet; Canal Pinones between Laguna de Pinones and Laguna La Torrecilla; Canal Suarez between Laguna San Jose, connects to Laguna La Torrecilla; and Cano de Martin Pena between Laguna San Jose and Bahia de San Juan. In addition water-elevation recording gages were installed at each lagoon. Water samples from the canal stations were analyzed for organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus species, and suspended sediment. Specific-conductance measurements were used with the chemical data to estimate the runoff contributions of nutrients. Runoff into the lagoon, system during the study period was about 2.8 million cubic meters, or about 70 percent of the average precipitation. The runoff contributed chemical loadings to the lagoons of 95,000 kilograms total-organic carbon; 2,700 kilograms of total phosphorus; and 10,000 kilograms of total Khjeldhal nitrogen. A comparison with a prior study during which there was no significant rain, show that dry-period loadings are less than 10 percent of the wet-period loadings. At the end of the study period the system had not reached equilibrium, and the lagoons retained 80 percent of the water inflows from 50 to 90 percent of the chemical loads. Nearly 95 percent of the water outflows occurred at the Boca de Cangrejos sea outlet. The three lagoons and interconnecting canals form a very complex hydraulic system that is difficult to study using traditional techniques. A model of the system will facilitate management to improve the quality of water in the lagoons.

  16. The Unare lagoon - A recent example of sequence stratigraphic control in reservoir patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Bejarano, C. (Corpoven, S.A., Puerto La Cruz (Venezuela))

    1993-02-01

    The Unare lagoon constitutes a barred coastal lagoon formed during the Holocene transgression on a moderate wave energy, microtidal coast. An extensive surface sampling and core drill program has been carried out in the lagoon in order to develop a reservoir sedimentology and sequence stratigraphic model applicable to similar subsurface deposits. During the rapid Halocene sea level rise, more than 70 m of fluvial and delta plain sediments have aggraded behind the landward stepping coastal barrier. These sediments are truncated seaward by a transgressive wave ravinement surface, and are capped by widespread lagoonal muds which accumulated between 8300 and 7250 yBP. These muds constitute the Holocene Maximum Flooding Surface which preceded the onset of the post Holocene stillstand (c. 500[approximately] yBP), probably as a result of the high rate of sediment supply and the confined nature of the lagoon which acted as an efficient sediment trap. During the post Holocene stillstand, a fluvial-dominated delta has prograded across the lagoon and attained the coastal barrier. This delta constitutes a Highstand Systems Tract. The major reservoir sands comprise distributary channel meanderbelts and the transgressive barrier. The channels form sand ribbons 5-7 m thick, and up to 2 km wide. The barrier and shoreface sands forms a strike-elongate deposits less than 5 m thick, up to 150-600 m wide, and 5-10 km long. The lagoonal facies of the Maximum Flooding Surface form a good reservoir seal overlying the aggrading transgressive fluvial and delta plain sands and muds.

  17. Fluoride tracer test for the performance analysis of a basin used as a lagooning pre-treatment facility in a WTP.

    PubMed

    Ruffino, Barbara

    2015-07-01

    The water treatment plant (WTP) of the city of Torino (NW Italy), which treats about 40?·?10(6) m(3)/year of raw water from Po river, has a 15-ha basin used as a lagooning pre-treatment facility. Since the efficiency of the lagooning process in the removal of pollutants from raw water depends on the internal hydrodynamics of the basin, the hydraulic performance of the basin was studied by combining the results of a stimulus-response tracer test with the monitoring of the tracer (fluoride) concentration throughout the basin at different times. The outcomes of the test demonstrated that the system was efficiently mixed and could be assimilated to a continuous stirred reactor presenting no flow anomalies, with an actual mean residence time (RT) of 12.7 days, compared with a nominal RT of 18 days. This assured that dissolved contaminants (such as fluoride) coming from the river were efficiently diluted before entering the WTP. The axial dispersion coefficient calculated from the RT distribution was approximately 47,300 m(2)/day. Three of the most popular formulae developed for the calculation of the axial dispersion coefficient provided results spreading over three orders of magnitude, thus showing their limitations. Finally, because of the width extent of the basin and the characteristics of its inflow, the 1-D advection-dispersion model failed in predicting the tracer concentration values in time at the outlet channel. On the contrary, the analytical solution of the 2-D advection-dispersion model proved to be suitable to fit the tracer concentration data over time at the outlet channel but it failed in describing the tracer distribution throughout the basin on the monitoring dates. PMID:25637242

  18. Indian Contribution to IPY Outreach Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, M.; Ravindra, R.

    2007-12-01

    India is involved in a major way in both the aspects, i.e. scientific as well as outreach activities, of the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. National Centre for Antarctic & Ocean Research (NCAOR, under the Ministry of Earth Sciences, Government of India) is acting as the national coordinating agency. The launching of the Indian chapter of the IPY 2007-2008 took place at NCAOR and parallely at Jawaharlal Nehru National University (JNU), New Delhi on 1st March 2007. Two Indian scientific proposals have been endorsed by IPY, which are Project id. 70 and Project id. 129. Simultaneously, India is actively involved in the outreach activities related to IPY. NCAOR had sponsored the visit of two college students to Antarctica during the 25th Indian Antarctic Expedition (IAE). A series of lectures were delivered by one of them at more than twenty schools & colleges in the rural & suburban areas of Indian state of Maharashtra regarding the wonders of Antarctica to educate the general public and popularize polar science. NCAOR is the only Indian institute that has the capability to store and sample Antarctic ice core with special Cold Room facility that is maintained at -20°C. Students from several schools and colleges and scientists/visitors from various Indian institutes/foreign countries have visited NCAOR to get first hand experience of polar research. NCAOR has also collaborated with WWF-India (World Wide Fund for Nature) for carrying out the outreach activities to schools throughout the vast expanses of India. In this regard a calendar of event was released on 1st March 2007, which lists various competitions and activities that will be held during 2007-2008. It includes competitions such as poster & model making, stamp designing, petition writing etc. for school children. The first competition, poster making & slogan writing, was held at New Delhi on April 10, 2007 and prizes were distributed by the H'ble Minister of Science & Technology and Earth Sciences on the Earth Day. Further under the aegis of IPY 2007-2008, a 14 year old Indian student from Father Agnel School, New Delhi was selected by the Canadian organization, Student On Ice, for their annual Arctic expedition that was held from August 2nd to 17th, 2007. The participants were accompanied by an international team of polar scientists, experts and educators. The participant on return will share their experiences with fellow students to introduce them to a world unknown to them. Further, NCAOR has supplied audio-visual & printed material on polar science to Nehru Science Centre (unit of National council of Science Museums, Ministry of Culture, Government of India) which is organizing exhibitions on the theme ¡§The Story of Poles¡¨ focusing on geography, environment, flora, fauna, people & importance of poles along with issues related to poles such as ozone hole, global warming etc. the exhibition will consist of graphical panels, 3D interactive exhibits, animations, charts, 3D models, computer kiosks etc. Financial sponsorship has been extended to Goa Science Centre, India & Geographical Society of the Northeast Hill Region, India for popularizing polar science and other aims of IPY to general public. Moreover, under the "Popular Book Series" initiative of the Ministry of Earth Sciences, a book entitled "Story of Antarctica" is under publication by NCAOR. Similar books on "Story of the Oceans" and "Glaciers - The Rivers of Ice" have already been published & distributed to students in different states of India. Further details can be had at the National Centre for Antarctic and Ocean Research website (www.ncaor.gov.in).

  19. Changes in Vegetation Cover over the Indian Peninsula and Implications for the Indian Monsoon System during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponton, C.; Giosan, L.; Eglinton, T. I.; Scientific Team Of Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01

    2010-12-01

    The Asian monsoon, composed of the East Asian and Indian systems affects the most densely populated region of the planet. The Indian monsoon is one of the most energetic and dynamic climate processes that occur today on Earth, but we still do not have a detailed understanding of large-scale hydrological variability over the Indian peninsula during the Holocene. Previous studies of the salinity variations in the Bay of Bengal indicate that during the last glacial maximum the Indian monsoon system was weaker and precipitation over the area was lower than today. Here we provide the first high resolution Holocene climate record for central India measured on a sediment core recovered offshore the mouth of the Godavari River, on the eastern Indian shelf. The ?13C composition of leaf waxes preserved in the core shows a large range of variation suggesting a major change in the relative proportions of C3 and C4 plant-derived wax inputs during the Holocene. Using reported values for modern plants, we estimate that C3 plants suffered a reduction in the Godavari basin from ~45% to ~15% over the Holocene. Negative excursions of ?13C leaf wax suggest that short-lived events of C3 plant resurgence (and inferred higher precipitation) punctuated the process of aridification of peninsular India. The vegetation structure and inferred aridity in central India is consistent with reconstructions of Indian monsoon precipitation and wind intensity in the Arabian Sea, salinity in the Bay of Bengal, and precipitation proxy records for the East Asian monsoon, suggesting a coherent behavior of the Asian monsoon system over the Holocene.

  20. Des Lacs River and Souris River

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

     The Des Lacs River coming in to the Souris River. Des Lacs River is the darker water, which is sediment and the Souris River is the lighter water. >Photo taken by USGS personnel on a Civil Air Patrol flight....

  1. Transitions in ancient inland freshwater resource management in Sri Lanka affect biota and human populations in and around coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Dahdouh-Guebas, F; Hettiarachchi, S; Lo Seen, D; Batelaan, O; Sooriyarachchi, S; Jayatissa, L P; Koedam, N

    2005-03-29

    The increasing anthropogenic pressure on natural environments results in impacts that affect tropical forest areas and their biodiversity. Adverse impacts on terrestrial and oceanic environments often compound in the intertidal area, where mangrove forest ecosystems thrive. In tropical coastal areas of many developing countries where people depend on wood and other mangrove forest products and services, forest degradation leads to socioeconomic problems. At the same time, increasing freshwater needs in these areas are expected to cause additional problems. On the basis of remote sensing and ground truthing complemented by colonial archival material from the Dutch East India Company (1602-1800), we report that changes to the historic system of inland freshwater management have increased dramatically in recent times. Hydrological changes, such as interbasin transfers, have resulted in a qualitative ecological and socioeconomic degradation in three coastal lagoons in southern Sri Lanka. Variations in river hydrology have caused changes in the areas suitable as mangrove habitat and, thus, have resulted in an altered distribution. However, increases in mangrove area can mask the degradation of the site in terms of floristic composition, significance of the species, and biodiversity (this effect is termed "cryptic ecological degradation"). It is important that such changes be carefully monitored to ensure biological and socioeconomic sustainability. PMID:15797030

  2. Ecosystem impacts of three sequential hurricanes (Dennis, Floyd, and Irene) on the United States' largest lagoonal estuary, Pamlico Sound, NC

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paerl, H.W.; Bales, J.D.; Ausley, L.W.; Buzzelli, C.P.; Crowder, L.B.; Eby, L.A.; Fear, J.M.; Go, M.; Peierls, B.L.; Richardson, T.L.; Ramus, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Three sequential hurricanes, Dennis, Floyd, and Irene, affected coastal North Carolina in September and October 1999. These hurricanes inundated the region with up to 1 m of rainfall, causing 50- to 500-year flooding in the watershed of the Pamlico Sound, the largest lagoonal estuary in the United States and a key West Atlantic fisheries nursery. We investigated the ecosystem-level impacts on and responses of the Sound to the floodwater discharge. Floodwaters displaced three-fourths of the volume of the Sound, depressed salinity by a similar amount, and delivered at least half of the typical annual nitrogen load to this nitrogen-sensitive ecosystem. Organic carbon concentrations in floodwaters entering Pamlico Sound via a major tributary (the Neuse River Estuary) were at least 2-fold higher than concentrations under prefloodwater conditions. A cascading set of physical, chemical, and ecological impacts followed, including strong vertical stratification, bottom water hypoxia, a sustained increase in algal biomass, displacement of many marine organisms, and a rise in fish disease. Because of the Sound's long residence time (???1 year), we hypothesize that the effects of the short-term nutrient enrichment could prove to be multiannual. A predicted increase in the frequency of hurricane activity over the next few decades may cause longer-term biogeochemical and trophic changes in this and other estuarine and coastal habitats.

  3. Review of solutions for 3D hydrodynamic modeling applied to aquaculture in South Pacific atoll lagoons.

    PubMed

    Andréfouët, S; Ouillon, S; Brinkman, R; Falter, J; Douillet, P; Wolk, F; Smith, R; Garen, P; Martinez, E; Laurent, V; Lo, C; Remoissenet, G; Scourzic, B; Gilbert, A; Deleersnijder, E; Steinberg, C; Choukroun, S; Buestel, D

    2006-10-01

    A workshop organized in French Polynesia in November 2004 allowed reviewing the current methods to model the three-dimensional hydrodynamic circulation in semi-enclosed atoll lagoons for aquaculture applications. Mollusk (e.g. pearl oyster, clam) aquaculture is a major source of income for South Pacific countries such as French Polynesia or Cook Islands. This aquaculture now requires a better understanding of circulation patterns to improve the spatial use of the lagoons, especially to define the best area to set larvae collectors. The pelagic larval duration of the relevant species (<20 days) and the size of the semi-closed lagoons (few hundreds of km2) drive the specifications of the model in terms of the spatial and temporal scale. It is considered that, in contrast with fish, mollusk larvae movements are limited and that their cycle occurs completely in the lagoon, without an oceanic stage. Atolls where aquaculture is productive are generally well-bounded, or semi-closed, without significant large and deep openings to the ocean. Nevertheless part of the lagoon circulation is driven by oceanic water inputs through the rim, ocean swells, tides and winds. Therefore, boundary conditions of the lagoon system are defined by the spatial structure of a very shallow rim (exposition and number of hoas), the deep ocean swell climate, tides and wind regimes. To obtain a realistic 3D numerical model of lagoon circulation with adequate forcing, it is thus necessary to connect in an interdisciplinary way a variety of methods (models, remote sensing and in situ data collection) to accurately represent the different components of the lagoon system and its specific boundary conditions. We review here the current methods and tools used to address these different components for a hypothetical atoll of the Tuamotu Archipelago (French Polynesia), representative of the semi-closed lagoons of the South Pacific Ocean. We hope this paper will serve as a guide for similar studies elsewhere and we provide guidelines in terms of costs for all the different stages involved. PMID:16987532

  4. [Species and size composition of fishes in Barra de Navidad lagoon, Mexican central Pacific].

    PubMed

    González-Sansón, Gaspar; Aguilar-Betancourt, Consuelo; Kosonoy-Aceves, Daniel; Lucano-Ramírez, Gabriela; Ruiz-Ramírez, Salvador; Flores-Ortega, Juan Ramón; Hinojosa-Larios, Angel; de Asís Silva-Bátiz, Francisco

    2014-03-01

    Coastal lagoons are considered important nursery areas for many coastal fishes. Barra de Navidad coastal lagoon (3.76km2) is important for local economy as it supports tourism development and artisanal fisheries. However, the role of this lagoon in the dynamics of coastal fish populations is scarcely known. Thus, the objectives of this research were: to characterize the water of the lagoon and related weather conditions, to develop a systematic list of the ichthyofauna, and to estimate the proportion of juveniles in the total number of individuals captured of most abundant species. Water and fish samples were collected between March 2011 and February 2012. Physical and chemical variables were measured in rainy and dry seasons. Several fishing gears were used including a cast net, beach purse seine and gillnets of four different mesh sizes. Our results showed that the lagoon is most of the time euhaline (salinity 30-40ups), although it can be mixopolyhaline (salinity 18-30ups) during short periods. Chlorophyll and nutrients concentrations suggested eutrophication in the lagoon. Mean water temperature changed seasonally from 24.9 degrees C (April, high tide) to 31.4 degrees C (October, low tide). Considering ichthyofauna species, a total of 36 448 individuals of 92 species were collected, 31 of them adding up to 95% of the total of individuals caught. Dominant species were Anchoa spp. (44.6%), Diapterus peruvianus (10.5%), Eucinostomus currani (8.1%), Cetengraulis mysticetus (7.8%), Mugil curema (5.2%) and Opisthonema libertate (4.5%). The lagoon is an important juvenile habitat for 22 of the 31 most abundant species. These included several species of commercial importance such as snappers (Lutjanus argentiventris, L. colorado and L. novemfasciatus), snook (Centropomus nigrescens) and white mullet (Mugil curema). Other four species seem to use the lagoon mainly as adults. This paper is the first contribution on the composition of estuarine ichthyofauna in Jalisco State, and it also constitutes the more complete reference on the detailed size composition of a set of dominant species in a coastal lagoon in the central Mexican Pacific. PMID:24912349

  5. Geographic variations in access and utilization of cancer screening services: examining disparities among American Indian and Alaska Native Elders 

    E-print Network

    Towne, Samuel D; Smith, Matthew Lee; Ory, Marcia G

    2014-06-09

    , and insurance coverage among American Indians/Alaska Natives and Whites: what role does the Indian Health Service play? Am J Public Health 2004, 94(1):53–59. PubMed PMID: 14713698; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC1449826. 19. Fox E, Health Care Reform: Tracking Tribal..., Federal & State Implementation; Available at: http://www.cms.gov/Outreach-and-Education/American-Indian- Alaska-Native/AIAN/Downloads/CMSHealthCareReform5202011.pdf (Accessed 03.03.2014). 20. Allison M, Rivers P, Fottler M: Future public health delivery...

  6. Quantification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Cantet, Franck; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Caro, Audrey; Le Mennec, Cécile; Monteil, Caroline; Quéméré, Catherine; Jolivet-Gougeon, Anne; Colwell, Rita R.; Monfort, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae are human pathogens. Little is known about these Vibrio spp. in the coastal lagoons of France. The purpose of this study was to investigate their incidence in water, shellfish and sediment of three French Mediterranean coastal lagoons using the most probable number-polymerase chain reaction (MPN-PCR). In summer, the total number of V. parahaemolyticus in water, sediment, mussels and clams collected from the three lagoons varied from 1 to >1.1 × 103 MPN/l, 0.09 to 1.1 × 103 MPN/ml, 9 to 210 MPN/g and 1.5 to 2.1 MPN/g, respectively. In winter, all samples except mussels contained V. parahaemolyticus, but at very low concentrations. Pathogenic (tdh- or trh2-positive) V. parahaemolyticus were present in water, sediment and shellfish samples collected from these lagoons. The number of V. vulnificus in water, sediment and shellfish samples ranged from 1 to 1.1 × 103 MPN/l, 0.07 to 110 MPN/ml and 0.04 to 15 MPN/g, respectively, during summer. V. vulnificus was not detected during winter. V. cholerae was rarely detected in water and sediment during summer. In summary, results of this study highlight the finding that the three human pathogenic Vibrio spp. are present in the lagoons and constitute a potential public health hazard. PMID:23770313

  7. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Meissner, Benjamin M; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Williams, C Michael; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer. PMID:24144340

  8. Late-Quaternary paleoenvironmental evolution of Lesina lagoon (southern Italy) from subsurface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci Lucchi, Marianna; Fiorini, Flavia; Luisa Colalongo, Maria; Vittorio Curzi, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    Integrated sedimentological and micropaleontological (foraminifers and ostracods) analyses of two 55 m long borehole cores (S3 and S4) drilled in the subsurface of Lesina lagoon (Gargano promontory—Italy) has yielded a facies distribution characteristic of alluvial, coastal and shallow-marine sediments. Stratigraphic correlation between the two cores, based on strong similarity in facies distribution and AMS radiocarbon dates, indicates a Late Pleistocene to Holocene age of the sedimentary succession. Two main depositional sequences were deposited during the last 60-ky. These sequences display poor preservation of lowstand deposits and record two major transgressive pulses and subsequent sea-level highstands. The older sequence, unconformably overlying a pedogenized alluvial unit, consists of paralic and marine units (dated by AMS radiocarbon at about 45-50,000 years BP) that represent the landward migration of a barrier-lagoon system. These units are separated by a ravinement surface (RS1). Above these tansgressive deposits, highstand deposition is characterised by progradation of the coastal sediments. The younger sequence, overlying an unconformity of tectonic origin, is a 10 m-thick sedimentary body, consisting of fluvial channel sediments overlain by transgressive-regressive deposits of Holocene age. A ravinement surface (RS2), truncating the transgressive (lagoonal and back-barrier) deposits in core S4, indicates shoreface retreat and landward migration of the barrier/lagoon system. The overlying beach, lagoon and alluvial deposits are the result of mid-Holocene highstand sedimentation and coastal progradation.

  9. Mississippi River

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... rainfalls on the Upper Mississippi River area of Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois. In the images above, the Mississippi travels ... from upper left to lower right from approximately La Crosse, Wisconsin to Davenport, Iowa. The Wisconsin River travels diagonally from the ...

  10. Native Americans: 23 Indian Biographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axford, Roger W.

    The lives and careers of 24 contemporary American Indians, including Dr. Louis W. Ballard (musician and composer, Cherokee and Sioux); Charles Banks Wilson (artist and historian); Veronica L. Murdock (President of the National Congress of American Indians, Mohave); Peter MacDonald, Sr. (Chairman of the Navajo Tribal Council, Navajo); and Jim…

  11. English 367: American Indian Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert W.; DeFlyer, Joseph E.

    A study guide to American Indian Literature (English 367), a 3-credit hour correspondence course available through the University of North Dakota, contains eight lessons to be used with the following six textbooks: "Black Elk Speaks,""Carriers of the Dream Wheel,""Ceremony,""The Portable North American Indian Reader,""Winter in Blood,""In the…

  12. DECISION MAKING IN EQUESTRIAN INDIAN

    E-print Network

    White, Douglas R.

    DECISION MAKING IN EQUESTRIAN INDIAN SOCIETIES: An Essay in Comparative Pragmatics THESIS SUBMITTED and complexity are presented in the first part of the thesis, as a basis of comparison with the decision-makingSl).cietal organization in the Plains and surrounding area. #12;DECISION MAKING IN EQUESTRIAN INDIAN SOCIETIES: An Essay

  13. University success for Canadian Indians

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lilly S. Walker

    1977-01-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of the {core} educational model in aiding students to adjust to and succeed in the university environment. On the basis of performance on basic skills test, personality tests, and in selection interviews, 21 status Indians (i.e., Indians who were band members, had treaty numbers, and were eligible for financial assistance from the federal govenment) were enrolled in

  14. The Indian software services industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashish Arora; V. S. Arunachalam; Jai Asundi; Ronald Fernandes

    2001-01-01

    The Indian software exports have grown in spectacular fashion. Its success has, for the most part, been a combination of resource endowments, a mixture of benign neglect and active encouragement from a normally intrusive government, and good timing. The bulk of the Indian software exports have consisted of fairly mundane services such as low level programming and maintenance. The marked

  15. Trends in Indian Health, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Health Service (PHS/HSA), Rockville, MD.

    The Indian Health Service (IHS), an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is responsible for providing health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives living on or near federal reservations (about 60 percent of the Native population). This publication is composed primarily of data tables and graphs that describe…

  16. Federal Indian Law and Policy Affecting American Indian and Alaska Native Education. Indian Education Legal Support Project "Tribalizing Indian Education."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Melody L.

    The Native American Rights Fund is the national legal defense fund for American Indian and Alaska Native tribes. Its Indian Education Legal Support Project advances Native American education by emphasizing the legal rights of tribes to control the formal education of tribal members in all types of schools--federal, state, and tribal. This booklet…

  17. California Indian Food and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This learning kit begins with a glossary of terms to help students learn about California Indians and their food. The kit explains that California Indians were the first people to live in the area now known as California, and that these tribes differed in the languages they spoke, the regions they lived in, and the foods that they ate. It explains…

  18. Human Behavior and American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Wynne DuBray; Eisenbise, Margaret DeOcampo

    Divided into five sections, the monograph is intended to make students aware that the practices customary to social work agencies are not relevant to the needs of most American Indian clientele. The first section provides an overview of the following historical, geographical, and cultural areas of American Indian tribes: California, Plateau, Great…

  19. American Indian Literacy and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene

    2004-01-01

    Literacy, which has only positive connotations in most cultures, has long been associated in Native communities with colonial education, "the reculturing and reeducation of American Indians by the secular and religious institutions of colonizing nations." Early educators imposed literacy on Indian children attending government-organized boarding…

  20. American Indians of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Bertha P.

    Designed for both the specialist and nonspecialist, the book provides a synthesis of Southwestern Indian culture based on long familiarity with the people. Chapter 1 describes the physical aspects of American Indians, land and Aboriginal inhabitants, and development of socio-religious patterns. Chapter II is about Pueblo Peoples (Tanoans,…

  1. Indian Education: An Intergenerational Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffalohead, Priscilla; Sterner, Michele

    The Indian Education Program in the Osseo School District (Minnesota) serves approximately 200 American Indian students in grades K-12 from 27 schools and a variety of tribes. The Program's intergenerational approach reflects tribal traditions in that generations learn together and grandparents, parents, and students are involved in the…

  2. Determinants of community structure for coral reef fishes in isolated coral heads at lagoonal and reef slope sites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter F. Sale; Rand Dybdahl

    1978-01-01

    Ten small isolated corals were selected as units, of habitat in each of two nearby reef sites-a lagoon and a reef slope. On six occasions over two years we collected all fishes resident in each of these corals. Collections yielded 827 fishes of 64 species from the lagoon and 525 fishes of 66 species from the slope, but at each

  3. Modelling partitioning and distribution of micropollutants in the lagoon of Venice: a first step towards a comprehensive ecotoxicological model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Carrer; G. Coffaro; M. Bocci; A. Barbanti

    2005-01-01

    The model presented in this paper integrates a large amount of recent and ad hoc collected data concerning environmental contamination from micropollutants in the lagoon of Venice. This model represents the first step in setting up of an ecotoxicological model for the Venice lagoon, to simulate fate of contaminants from abiotic matrices to organisms. Distribution and partitioning of organic and

  4. Improved process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons under varying wind speeds and gas bubbling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the lagoon water total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model using a...

  5. Aquatic birds as bioindicators of trophic changes and ecosystem deterioration in the Mar Menor lagoon (SE Spain)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia Martínez Fernández; Miguel Angel Esteve Selma; Francisco Robledano Aymerich; María Teresa Pardo Sáez; María Francisca Carreño Fructuoso

    2005-01-01

    The Mar Menor is the largest coastal lagoon in the Western Mediterranean and it is an important site for wintering and breeding waterfowl. During recent decades several hydrological and land-use changes in the watershed have increasingly threatened the conservation of the lagoon due to the development of urban areas, tourism and agriculture. A dynamic system model has been developed at

  6. International Symposium on Coastal Lagoons. (Bordeaux, France, September 8-14, 1981). Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    Lagoons and their characteristic coastal bay-mouth bars represent 15 percent of the world coastal zone. They are among the most productive ecosystems in the biosphere, this productivity resulting from the interplay of ocean and continent. An International Symposium on Coastal Lagoons (ISCOL) was held to: assess the state of knowledge in the…

  7. Trophic state of Foz de Almargem coastal lagoon (Algarve, South Portugal) based on the water quality and the phytoplankton community

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susana Coelho; Sofia Gamito; Angel Pérez-Ruzafa

    2007-01-01

    Seasonal variation of water quality and phytoplankton community was studied in Foz de Almargem coastal lagoon in order to evaluate the trophic state of the wetland. This small coastal lagoon has temporary connections to the sea, when the sand barrier is naturally or artificially opened, but for most of the year is isolated receiving just the freshwater input from small

  8. Agrochemical residues in the Altata?Ensenada del Pabellon coastal lagoon (Sinaloa, Mexico): A need for integrated coastal zone management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. P. Carvalho; S. W. Fowler; l. d. Mee; J. W. Readman

    1996-01-01

    An in?depth survey of agrochemical residues was carried out in the Altata?Ensenada del Pabellon lagoon, on the Pacific coast of Mexico. A wide variety of residues originating from the surrounding agricultural lands were found in lagoon sediments, water, and biota samples. Persistence, cycling and fate of the most common pesticides were investigated using C labelled compounds in microcosms and mesocosms

  9. Factors Influencing Academic Achievement for Salt River Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sidney

    2012-01-01

    Native American students from the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community have attended Stapley Junior High, one of 13 junior high schools in the Mesa Unified School District, since its doors opened in the fall of 1994. Over the years a variety of instructional practices have been used in an effort to improve academic outcomes for these…

  10. Late Eocene-Miocene tectono-magmatic response to the Indian- Eurasian plate collision: constraints from structural analysis, and Sr-Nd and Hf geochemistry of leucocratic intrusions along the Ailao Shan Red-River shear zone, SE Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Tang, Y.; Cao, S.; Ngyuen, Q.; Song, Z.; Tran, M.; Chen, Y.; Ji, M.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, Z.

    2010-12-01

    The over 1000 km Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) shear zone is one of the most important geological discontinuities in Southeast Asia. Great controversies remain on the nature of the shear zone and its role in shaping the tectonic framework of Southeast Asia. Our observation reveals the existence of the Paleogene high potassic alkaline rocks and calc-alkaline intrusions (>30Ma) and the late Oligocene to early Miocene calc-alkaline granitic rocks (28-21Ma). The former are concordant dykes and are generally strongly sheared into mylonitic rocks. The latter are either concordant and show weak strain fabric, or discordant and show no strain fabric. Meanwhile, they have distinct REE, Sr-Nd, Hf isotope signatures and are different in mineralizing features. The Paleogene intrusions are characterized by enriched LREE and depleted HREE without any Eu anomalies (whole rock). Whole rock Sr-Nd (87Sr/86Sr(i): 0.7069 to 0.7098; ?Nd(t): -7.98 to -3.31) and in situ Zircon Hf isotope (-0.79 to +6.2) analyses yield a binary mixing trend between the mantle- and supracrustal-derived melts for the Paleogene magma. Here our new data suggest that most of the Paleogene magmatic rocks are either sheared high potassium alkaline rocks or deformed calc-alkaline intrusions. They are identical to and are the deformed counterparts of rocks from the two Paleogene mineralizing magmatic provinces on both sides of the ASRR shear zone, i.e. the Jinping-Fan Si Pan province and the Dali-Beiya province. These two types of leucocratic rocks are formed as the result of post-collisional delamination of a thickened crust, and deformed and offset by the left lateral shearing along the ASSR shear zone. The late Oligo-Miocene calc-alkaline granitic rocks are localized within the ASRR shear zone. They are in overall concordant to the mylonitic foliation in the shear zone and preserve microstructures typical of syn- to late kinematic emplacement. They have negative Eu anomalies, variable but mostly higher Sr ratios (87Sr/86Sr(i): 0.7070 to 0.713), lower?Nd(t) (-9.27 to -6.81) and negative Hf (-10.2 to -1.1). These characteristics suggest an origin from crustal melts for the late Oligocene-early Miocene barren magmatism. Their differences in Sr-Nd isotopes from the country gneisses suggest that they are derived from a source different from the country rocks. We conclude that shearing along the ASRR shear zone is coeval with the magmatism between 28 Ma and 21 Ma. Furthermore, the tectono-magmatic relationship also suggests that the shearing was limited to the crust level, instead of the entire lithosphere. Extrusion of the crust of the Indochina block did not occur until shearing started, subsequent to the post collisional collapse. The transformation from extension-related to extrusion related tectonic regimes contributed to the transition from localized high rates sedimentation to widespread low rates deposition in the entire South China Sea.

  11. Amount and type of derelict gear from the declining black pearl oyster aquaculture in Ahe atoll lagoon, French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Andréfouët, Serge; Thomas, Yoann; Lo, Cedrik

    2014-06-15

    Pearl oyster aquaculture is a major activity in French Polynesia atoll lagoons. After the economic decline that characterized the last decade, concerns recently rose about discarded installations and materials that supported aquaculture practices and by facilities abandoned after they had to close their activities. In May 2013, a first inventory of the type and amount of pearl farms derelict gear (PFDG) was achieved on 47 sites in Ahe lagoon. Surveys were conducted within and outside the boundaries of aquaculture concessions. Twenty types of PFDG littered the lagoon floor and the water column. The most impacted areas were near abandoned grafting houses with up to nine types of PFDG. Forty-five percent of the sites were impacted, including outside concessions. While management authorities are fully aware of the problem, this first assessment is a wake-up call to stimulate the cleaning of lagoons, enhance awareness among farmers, and identify potential ecological consequences on lagoon ecosystems. PMID:24759510

  12. Enhanced stabilization of digested sludge during long-term storage in anaerobic lagoons.

    PubMed

    Lukicheva, Irina; Pagilla, Krishna; Tian, Guanglong; Cox, Albert; Granato, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this work was to study changes in anaerobically stored digested sludge under different lengths of storage time to evaluate the quality of final product biosolids. The analyses of collected data suggest the organic matter degradation occurrence in the anaerobic environment of the lagoon approximately within the first year. After that, the degradation becomes very slow, which is likely caused by unfavorable environmental conditions. The performance of lagoon aging of digested sludge was also compared to the performance of lagoon aging of anaerobically digested and dewatered sludge. It was concluded that both of these processes result in biosolids of comparative quality and that the former provides more economical solution to biosolids handling by eliminating the need for mechanical dewatering. PMID:24851324

  13. Assessment of ecological quality of coastal lagoons with a combination of phytobenthic and water quality indices.

    PubMed

    Christia, Chrysoula; Giordani, Gianmarco; Papastergiadou, Eva

    2014-09-15

    Coastal lagoons are ecotones between continents and the sea. Coastal lagoons of Western Greece, subjected to different human pressures, were classified into four different types based on their hydromorphological characteristics and monitored over a three year period for their biotic and abiotic features. Six ecological indices based on water quality parameters (TSI-Chl-a, TSI-TP, TRIX), benthic macrophytes (E-MaQI, EEI-c) and an integrated index TWQI, were applied to assess the ecological status of studied lagoons under real conditions. The trophic status ranged from oligotrophic to hypertrophic according to the index applied. The ecological quality of transitional water ecosystems can be better assessed by using indices based on benthic macrophytes as changes in abundance and diversity of sensitive and tolerant species are the first evidence of incoming eutrophication. The multi-parametric index TWQI can be considered appropriate for the ecological assessment of these ecosystems due to its robustness and the simple application procedure. PMID:25080857

  14. De-Indianizing the American Indian: An Essay on the Education of the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, David B., Jr.

    Included in this essay is a historical review of Federal policy and practice in Indian education from 1500 to 1970. The earliest period, the missionary period, is representative of the religious zeal of the 16th and 17th centuries wherein the missionaries had as their responsibility the education of the Indian--including the dual effort of…

  15. Indian Tribes as Developing Nations; A Question of Power: Indian Control of Indian Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Americans for Indian Opportunity, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    The report discusses how Indian tribes can conserve and develop their own resources at their own pace and explores the options available to them as owners of valuable natural resources. Discussed are problems encountered by tribal leaders with various government agencies; the basic precepts of the Bureau of Indian Affairs; how the problems of…

  16. Integrated modelling and management of nutrients and eutrophication in river basin - coast - sea systems: A southern Baltic Sea perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schernewski, Gerald

    2014-05-01

    The Odra river basin (area: 120,000 km2, average discharge: 550 m³/s, annual N-load 60,000 t) and the Oder (Szczecin) Lagoon (687 km²) are the eutrophication hot-spot in the south-western Baltic region. To be able to carry out large scale, spatially integrative analyses, we linked the river basin nutrient flux model MONERIS to the coastal 3D-hydrodynamic and ecosystem model ERGOM. Objectives were a) to analyse the eutrophication history in the river basin and the resulting functional changes in the coastal waters between early 1960's and today and b) to analyse the effects of nitrogen and phosphorus management scenarios in the Oder/Odra river basin on coastal and Baltic Sea water quality. The models show that an optimal river basin management with reduced nutrient loads (e.g. N-load reduction of 35%) would have positive effects on lagoon water quality and algae biomass. The availability of nutrients, N/P ratios and processes like denitrification and nitrogen-fixation would show spatial and temporal changes. It would have positive consequences for ecosystems functions, like the nutrient retention capacity, as well. However, this optimal scenario is by far not sufficient to ensure a good coastal water quality according to the European Water Framework Directive. A "good" water quality in the river will not be sufficient to ensure a "good" water quality in the coastal waters. Further, nitrogen load reductions bear the risk of increased potentially toxic, blue-green algae blooms. The presentation will a) summarize recent results (Schernewski et al. 2009, Schernewski et al. 2011, 2012), b) give an overview how the models were used to provide a comprehensive and consistent set of water quality thresholds and maximum allowable riverine loads for the Water Framework Directive and c) will show the implications for an optimised river basin - lagoon quality management.

  17. Jurisdictional Problems of Indian Controlled Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killer, Francis

    An overwhelming confusion caused by lack of knowledge exists among the general public, American Indian parents, and even Indian school boards concerning the rules, purposes, and regulations of the myriad pieces of legislation dealing with Indian education. Such confusion is used by school administrators to perpetuate the power in Bureau of Indian

  18. Indian Giving: Federal Programs for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Johnston, William B.

    Aimed at highlighting American Indian reservation conditions, outlining the scope of Federal aid to Indians, and suggesting the nature of future Indian problems and choices, this book attempts to assess the current socioeconomic status of the Indian community and its relationship with the Federal Government. Specifically, this book provides both…

  19. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  20. Effective Showcase Projects: Office of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Elementary and Secondary Education (ED), Washington, DC. Indian Education Programs.

    The Indian Education Programs supplement state, local, and tribal education efforts to improve the quality of Indian education and assure parental and community participation. Each year, the Office of Indian Education, assisted by the six regional Indian Education Technical Assistance Centers, selects effective projects to be showcased at the…

  1. Indians of the Great Lakes Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Geographic distribution of 11 American Indian tribes in the Great Lakes area is described, along with archaeological data relating to the history and customs of ancient Indian tribes residing in this region. European impact, especially French, upon early traditional Indian cultural patterns is discussed. Each of the Indian tribes living in the…

  2. Food web structure of two Mediterranean lagoons under varying degree of eutrophication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlier, Antoine; Riera, Pascal; Amouroux, Jean-Michel; Bodiou, Jean-Yves; Desmalades, Martin; Grémare, Antoine

    2008-11-01

    The food web structure and functioning of two north-western Mediterranean lagoons exhibiting contrasting degrees of eutrophication and marine influences were compared through ?13C and ?15N analysis of major potential food sources and consumers. The Lapalme Lagoon is well preserved and has kept a natural and temporary connection with the open sea. Conversely, the Canet Lagoon is heavily eutrophicated and its water exchange with the open sea has been artificially reduced. In Lapalme, all potential food sources and consumers exhibited ?15N values indicative of pristine coastal areas. Suspended particulate organic matter (POM) and sediment organic matter (SOM) pools seemed to constitute the main food sources of most primary consumers. Both primary producers and all consumers were much more 15N-enriched (by ˜ 10‰) and more 13C-depleted in Canet than in Lapalme. This reflected: (1) the assimilation of important amounts of anthropogenic nitrogen in the food web, and (2) a marked and uniform influence of 13C-depleted allochtonous sources of carbon. Based on the mean ?15N of primary consumers, we found rather similar food web lengths in both lagoons with top consumers at trophic levels 3.6 and 4.0 in Canet and Lapalme, respectively. However, the eutrophication of the Canet Lagoon resulted in a simplification of the food web structure (i.e., a single trophic pathway from a 15N-enriched fraction of the SOM pool to top predators) compared to what was observed in Lapalme Lagoon where additional 13C-enriched food sources played a significant trophic role. Moreover, some consumers of Canet tended to exploit primary producers to a larger extent (and thus to exhibit lower trophic levels) than in Lapalme.

  3. How will shallow coastal lagoons respond to climate change? A modelling investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Ana C.; Newton, Alice; Tett, Paul; Fernandes, Teresa F.

    2012-10-01

    Coastal shallow lagoons are important ecosystems in terms of their high ecological relevance. They act as buffers of the land-sea interface, providing valuable ecosystem services such as nutrient recycling, decomposition of organic matter and removal of pollutants. Lagoons are regions of restricted exchange, subject to anthropogenic pressures that result in problems such as eutrophication. Because they are shallow, submerged primary producers play a prominent role in lagoon system metabolism. Furthermore, coastal lagoons are particularly vulnerable to global climate change and may act as 'sentinel systems'. Sea level rise already threatens to overwhelm some lagoons, such as Venice and Moroccan lagoons. Recent observations and studies have shown that a global climate change, especially the warming of the climate system and the sea level rise is unequivocal (IPCC, 2007). Therefore, the dCSTT-MPB model, which deals with nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations in the water column and within the sediments, was used to explore a range of scenarios that aimed at representing these changes. The tendency of the light limitation due to the sea level rise is the potential degradation of the microphytobenthos community. This reduction would lead to stronger nitrogen fluxes from pore water to the water column, increasing significantly the nitrogen concentrations. No increase in the phytoplankton community was found because it is mainly influenced by the resuspension of microphytobenthos. High nitrogen concentration may be the first indication of an eutrophication event. Nonetheless, nitrogen may be exported to the sea and cause problems in the adjacent coastal waters. The increase in temperature did not lead to significant differences.

  4. Evaluation of the utility of water quality based indicators of estuarine lagoon condition in NSW, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanes, Peter; Coade, Geoff; Doherty, Maria; Hill, Ross

    2007-08-01

    Environmental indicators must have a predictable relationship with stressors to be of value in ecological assessments. We evaluated the information provided by commonly implemented monitoring indicators as a means of assessing of the level of ecological impact experienced by coastal lagoons in New South Wales, Australia. Existing data for environmental variables in coastal lagoons were correlated with independent estimates of catchment disturbance. There were few relationships between the monitoring variables (particularly water chemistry) and nutrient loads and catchment land use. Data from NSW catchments and lagoons were compared to analogous data from published northern hemisphere studies and it was clear that stressor variables were up to one to two orders of magnitude smaller in NSW, potentially explaining the lack of relationships with recognised indicators. Our study has highlighted the importance of using a range of indicators to assess trends in ecological condition of an estuarine ecosystem, particularly where stressor levels are not great. Using water quality as the sole means of determining lagoon condition was simply inadequate in NSW lagoons. We recommended that ecological outcome indicators such as algal abundance (macro and micro) and turbidity were most likely to show interpretable patterns at low to moderate nitrogen loadings (<40 kg Ha -1 yr -1) and that these should form the basis of estuarine trend monitoring in NSW lagoons. The demonstrated value of seagrass and macroalgal monitoring in estuaries with moderate to high nutrient loadings suggests that these indicators should not be overlooked when planning monitoring programs, recognising, however, they will not have strong discrimination at lower catchment loadings.

  5. Assessing the Impact of Animal Waste Lagoon Seepage on the Geochemistry of an Underlying Shallow Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    McNab, W W; Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K

    2006-03-07

    Dairy facilities and similar confined animal operation settings pose a significant nitrate contamination threat via oxidation of animal wastes and subsequent transport to shallow groundwater. While nitrate contamination resulting from application of animal manure as fertilizer to fields is well recognized, the impact of manure lagoon leakage on groundwater quality is less well characterized. In this study, a dairy facility located in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California has been instrumented with monitoring wells as part of a two-year multidisciplinary study to evaluate nitrate loading and denitrification associated with facility operations. Among multiple types of data collected from the site, groundwater and surface water samples have been analyzed for major cations, anions, pH, oxidation-reduction potential, dissolved organic carbon, and selected dissolved gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, Ar, Ne). Modeling of putative geochemical processes occurring within the dairy site manure lagoons shows substantial off-gassing of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in response to mineralization of organic matter. The gas ebullition appears to strip dissolved gases, including Ar and Ne, from the lagoon water leaving concentrations that are undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere. The resulting fractionated dissolved gas signature serves as an effective tracer for the lagoon water in the underlying shallow groundwater and can be used to constrain inverse geochemical models that assess mixing fractions of lagoon water and local groundwater water. Together with ion exchange and mineral equilibria reactions, identification of lagoon seepage helps explain key attributes of the local groundwater chemistry, including input and cycling of nitrogen, across the site.

  6. Biotic variation in coastal water bodies in Sussex, England: Implications for saline lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Chris B.; Vina-Herbon, Cristina; Metcalfe, Daniel J.

    2005-12-01

    Coastal water bodies are a heterogeneous resource typified by high spatial and temporal variability and threatened by anthropogenic impacts. This includes saline lagoons, which support a specialist biota and are a priority habitat for nature conservation. This paper describes the biotic variation in coastal water bodies in Sussex, England, in order to characterise the distinctiveness of the saline lagoon community and elucidate environmental factors that determine its distribution. Twenty-eight coastal water bodies were surveyed for their aquatic flora and invertebrate fauna and a suite of exploratory environmental variables compiled. Ordination and cluster analyses were used to examine patterns in community composition and relate these to environmental parameters. Biotic variation in the coastal water body resource was high. Salinity was the main environmental parameter explaining the regional distribution of taxa; freshwater and saline assemblages were evident and related to sea water ingress. Freshwater sites were indicated by the plant Myriophyllum spicatum and gastropod mollusc Lymnaea peregra, while more saline communities supported marine and brackish water taxa, notably a range of chlorophytic algae and the bivalve mollusc Cerastoderma glaucum. Site community differences were also related to bank slope and parameters describing habitat heterogeneity. A saline lagoon community was discerned within the matrix of biotic variation consisting of specialist lagoonal species with associated typically euryhaline taxa. For fauna, the latter were the molluscs Abra tenuis and Hydrobia ulvae, and the crustaceans Corophium volutator and Palaemonetes varians, and for flora they were the algae Ulva lactuca, Chaetomorpha mediterranea, Cladophora spp. and Enteromorpha intestinalis. One non-native polychaete species, Ficopomatus enigmaticus, also strongly influenced community structure within the lagoonal resource. The community was not well defined as specialist and associated taxa were distributed throughout the spectrum of sites surveyed. Implications for the identification and conservation of saline lagoons are discussed.

  7. Marine diatoms sustain growth of bivalves in a Mediterranean lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernet, Fabrice; Malet, Nathalie; Pastoureaud, Annie; Vaquer, André; Quéré, Claudie; Dubroca, Laurent

    2012-02-01

    Carbon stable isotopes and fatty acids were measured in the suspended particulate organic matter (POM) of the Thau lagoon to study its qualitative temporal changes in relation to environmental factors and to identify the food sources of bivalves over a one-yr-cycle in relation to their growth. Reciprocally, the impact of shellfish farming on POM was also studied. Oysters and mussels were sampled and measured for biometry, stable isotopes and fatty acid composition. Water samples were collected at two sites, both inside and outside of the shellfish farming area, to determine concentrations in POM, chlorophyll a (Chl a) and stable isotopes. Carbon isotopes and fatty acids in bivalves reflected seasonal changes in food sources, which varied consistently with the environment. Seasonal changes in ?13C and fatty acids in the bivalves suggested that dietary phytoplankton contribution varied according to season. Terrestrial organic matter and bacteria can contribute to the diet of bivalves during non-bloom periods. Mussels seemed to rely more on diatoms and less on terrestrial organic matter and bacteria than oysters did, particularly when phytoplankton biomass was low during the summer. Although one- and two-yr-old oysters showed similar ?13C, their fatty acid dynamics differed slightly. Periods of high growth rate in bivalves were mainly fuelled by diatoms, thus highlighting the importance of seasonal blooms of microphytoplankton during the critical period of bivalve growth and gamete production. Although there was no significant effect of shellfish farms on Chl a and POM ?13C, consistent differences indicate that stable isotopes could be used successfully to investigate the effects of bivalve aquaculture.

  8. American Indian Resources Index

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Website offers a directory of briefly annotated links to resources and Websites in Native American Studies, Texts, Culture, Literature and Background, History, Representations, Languages, and Nations. Students and researchers can find information here on everything from the representation of Laguna women in Leslie Marmon Silko's fiction to the Bureau of Indian Affairs's official definition of a "tribe," to dozens of links for Native American law and advocacy issues. All of the pages we visited had been updated in the past few months, and the site links to a page by Elaine Cubbins, graduate student at University of Arizona, "Techniques for Evaluating American Indian Web Sites," that not only serves to give a sense of the inclusion criteria of the site's authors, but provides a kind of tutorial for doing Web research related to Native Americans or Native American issues. The Website is authored by Will Karkavelas of Osaka University and is part of his larger site, Multicultural Resources, offering similar directories for African-American and Hawaiian studies.

  9. Indian transplant registry.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Sunil

    2007-07-01

    An 'Indian transplant registry' has been established over the past two years due to the efforts of the Indian Society of Organ Transplantation. This society is about 20 years old with over 450 members who are doctors and basic scientist. The registry is currently in the first phase of its development and can be partly viewed at www.transplantindia.com. The endeavor has been undertaken with the objective of having a centralized repository of information of the various transplants that are being undertaken in India. In its first phase of the registry 'Fast Fact' retrospective short datasets are being captured that include the essential details of the transplant programme. The fast fact data includes the number of transplant done yearly, the sex ratio and type of transplant. So far thirteen major institutional data has been entered in the registry. In the second phase of the registry, over twenty fields are likely to be captured and all member institutions would be encouraged to enter the data prospectively. In the third phase data would be derived with ongoing audit features.. The society and its members have supported the formation of the registry and are enthusiastic about its potential. PMID:19718330

  10. Project summary: Spreading lagooned sewage sludge on farm land: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, C.M.; Sommers, L.E.

    1995-06-01

    The City of Indianapolis, Indiana, was required to construct advanced wastewater treatment facilities at the existing Belmont Wastewater Treatment Plant. The most cost effective site for these new treatment facilities was the 10 sludge lagoons containing 420,000 cubic meters (111 million gallons) of digested sewage sludge stored for up to 50 years. The project consisted of the following major tasks: (1) obtaining approval from regulatory agencies; (2) obtaining cooperation of landowners and farmers; (3) removing, transporting, and applying the lagooned sludge to soil; and (4) monitoring the impact on crops.

  11. Discovery of a Circumstellar Disk in the Lagoon Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    Circumstellar disks of gas and dust play a crucial role in the formation of stars and planets. Until now, high-resolution images of such disks around young stars within the Orion Nebula obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) constituted the most direct proof of their existence. Now, another circumstellar disk has been detected around a star in the Lagoon Nebula - also known as Messier 8 (M8) , a giant complex of interstellar gas and dust with many young stars in the southern constellation of Sagittarius and four times more distant than the Orion Nebula. The observations were carried out by an international team of scientists led by Bringfried Stecklum (Thüringer Landessternwarte, Tautenburg, Germany) [1] who used telescopes located at the ESO La Silla observatory and also observations from the HST archive. These new results are paving the road towards exciting research programmes on star formation which will become possible with the ESO Very Large Telescope. The harsh environment of circumstellar disks The existence of circumstellar disks has been inferred from indirect measurements of young stellar objects, such as the spectral energy distribution, the analysis of the profiles of individual spectral lines and measurements of the polarisation of the emitted light [2]. Impressive images of such disks in the Orion Nebula, known as proplyds (PROto-PLanetarY DiskS), have been obtained by the HST during the recent years. They have confirmed the interpretation of previous ground-based emission-line observations and mapping by radio telescopes. Moreover, they demonstrated that those disks which are located close to hot and massive stars are subject to heating caused by the intense radiation from these stars. Subsequently, the disks evaporate releasing neutral gas which streams off. During this process, shock fronts (regions with increased density) with tails of ionised gas result at a certain distance between the disk and the hot star. These objects appear on photos as tear-drop shaped, bright-rimmed areas with the cusps of the ionised regions aligned towards the exciting star. Such a region is also a very compact source of radio emission. Clearly, the harsh environment in which these disks reside does not favour planet formation. These findings were facilitated by the fact that, at a distance of `only' 1500 lightyears (about 450 parsec), the Orion Nebula is the closest site of high-mass star formation. Furthermore, many circumstellar disks around stars in this nebula are seen in silhouette against a bright and uniform background and are therefore comparatively easy to detect. The Lagoon Nebula In principle, similar phenomena should occur in any giant molecular cloud that gives rise to the birth of massive stars. However, the detection of such disks in other clouds would be very difficult, first of all because of their much larger distance. The Lagoon Nebula (M8) is located four times further away than the Orion Nebula and it is also a site of recent high-mass star formation. Its brightest part constitutes a conspicuous region of ionised hydrogen gas (an `HII-region') dubbed `The Hourglass' because of the resemblance. The gas in this area is ionised by the action of the nearby, hot star Herschel 36 (Her 36) . High-resolution radio maps show that the emission from the ionised gas peaks at 2.7 arcsec southeast of Her 36. An early explanation was that this emission is due to an unseen, massive star that is deeply embedded in the gas and dust and which is causing an ultra-compact HII-region (UCHR), catalogued as G5.97-1.17 according to its galactic coordinates. High-resolution images from ESO During a detailed investigation of such ultra-compact HII regions, Bringfried Stecklum and his colleagues found that, unlike ordinary UCHRs, this particular object is visible on optical images obtained with the HST Wide-Field Planetary Camera (HST-WFPC). This means that, contrary to the others, it is not deeply embedded in the nebula - its light reaches us directly without suffering a high degree of absorption. They subsequently obtai

  12. 78 FR 42788 - American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ...Health Service American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Nursing Program Announcement Type: Competing...applications for the American Indians into Nursing Program (Section 112). This...

  13. Virtual River

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides two interactive exercises designed to help the user learn about river processes like discharge, flooding and flood frequency. Both exercises require the user to make observations and measurements, do simple calculations, and answer questions.

  14. River Walk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmaus, Marcyes D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a teaching approach that prompts students to help community, state, and federal agencies make decisions on the best uses of rivers and their surroundings. Includes tracking water quality and designing signs to educate the community. (YDS)

  15. Fingerprints of lagoonal life: Migration of the marine flatfish Solea solea assessed by stable isotopes and otolith microchemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierking, Jan; Morat, Fabien; Letourneur, Yves; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille

    2012-06-01

    The commercially important marine flatfish common sole (Solea solea) facultatively uses NW Mediterranean lagoons as nurseries. To assess the imprint left by the lagoonal passage, muscle carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) isotope values of S. solea juveniles caught in Mauguio lagoon in spring (shortly after arrival from the sea) and in autumn (before the return to the sea) were compared with values of juveniles from adjacent coastal marine nurseries. In addition, in the lagoon, sole otolith stable isotope (C and oxygen (O)) and elemental (11 elements) composition in spring and autumn, and the stable isotope composition (C and N) of organic matter sources in autumn, were determined. Overall, our data indicate that a distinct lagoonal signature existed. Specifically, lagoon soles showed a strong enrichment in muscle tissue 15N (>6‰) compared to their coastal relatives, likely linked to sewage inputs (see below), and a depletion in 13C (1-2‰), indicative of higher importance of 13C depleted terrestrial POM in the lagoon compared to coastal nurseries. In addition, over the time spent in the lagoon, sole otolith ?13C and ?18O values and otolith elemental composition changed significantly. Analysis of the lagoon sole foodweb based on C and N isotopes placed sediment particulate organic matter (POM) at the base. Seagrasses, formerly common but in decline in Mauguio lagoon, played a minor role in the detritus cycle. The very strong 15N enrichment of the entire foodweb (+7 to +11‰) compared to little impacted lagoons and coastal areas testified of important human sewage inputs. Regarding the S. solea migration, the analysis of higher turnover and fast growth muscle tissue and metabolically inert and slower growth otoliths indicated that soles arrived at least several weeks prior to capture in spring, and that no migrations took place in summer. In the autumn, the high muscle ?15N value acquired in Mauguio lagoon would be a good marker of recent return to the sea, whereas altered otolith ?18O values and elemental ratios hold promise as long-term markers. The combination of several complementary tracers from muscle and otoliths may present the chance to distinguish between fish from specific lagoons and coastal nurseries in the future.

  16. Indian Policy and Westward Expansion

    E-print Network

    Malin, James Claude

    1921-11-01

    was being carried out in 1 Abel, Indian Consolidation. Report of the American Historical Association. 1906. Vol. 1. p. 395. 2 Report of Indian Commissioner Medili, 1846. 2s. 29 C. Sen. doc. No. 1, pp. 217-219. Pub. doc No. 493. Cardinal Goodwin... and was used by the House Committee of Indian Affairs in drafting their legislative program. It was in the year 1834 that the first complete legislative 4 Report of Sec. of War, H. doc No. 2, Is. 22C. p. 30. Pub, doc. No. 216. Report of Sec. of War for 1832...

  17. Impact of river basin management on coastal water quality and ecosystem services: A southern Baltic estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schernewski, Gerald; Hürdler, Jens; Neumann, Thomas; Stybel, Nardine; Venohr, Markus

    2010-05-01

    Eutrophication management is still a major challenge in the Baltic Sea region. Estuaries or coastal waters linked to large rivers cannot be managed independently. Nutrient loads into these coastal ecosystems depend on processes, utilisation, structure and management in the river basin. In practise this means that we need a large scale approach and integrated models and tools to analyse, assess and evaluate the effects of nutrient loads on coastal water quality as well as the efficiency of river basin management measures on surface waters and especially lagoons and estuaries. The Odra river basin, the Szczecin Lagoon and its coastal waters cover an area of about 150,000 km² and are an eutrophication hot-spot in the Baltic region. To be able to carry out large scale, spatially integrative analyses, we linked the river basin nutrient flux model MONERIS to the coastal 3D-hydrodynamic and ecosystem model ERGOM. Objectives were a) to analyse the eutrophication history in the river basin and the resulting functional changes in the coastal waters between early 1960's and today and b) to analyse the effects of an optimal nitrogen and phosphorus management scenario in the Oder/Odra river basin on coastal water quality. The models show that an optimal river basin management with reduced nutrient loads (e.g. N-load reduction of 35 %) would have positive effects on coastal water quality and algae biomass. The availability of nutrients, N/P ratios and processes like denitrification and nitrogen-fixation would show spatial and temporal changes. It would have positive consequences for ecosystems functions, like the nutrient retention capacity, as well. However, this optimal scenario is by far not sufficient to ensure a good coastal water quality according to the European Water Framework Directive. A "good" water quality in the river will not be sufficient to ensure a "good" water quality in the coastal waters. Further, nitrogen load reductions bear the risk of increased potentially toxic, blue-green algae blooms. The presentation will summarize recent results (Behrendt et al. 2009, Schernewski et al. 2009, Schernewski et al. in press, Schernewski et al. submitted) and give an overview how Climate Change and socio-economic transformation processes in the river basin will effect coastal water quality during the next decades. The opportunities and threats of a changing lagoon ecosystem for tourism and fisheries, the major economic activities, will be shown.

  18. Nutrient-flux evaluation by the LOICZ Biogeochemical Model in Mediterranean lagoons: the case of Cabras Lagoon (Central-Western Sardinia)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. M. Padedda; A. Lugliè; G. Ceccherelli; F. Trebini; N. Sechi

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) budgeting procedure was used to evaluate the main nutrient pathways and ecosystem functions within Cabras Lagoon (Central-Western Sardinia, Italy) in 2004. The results of a simple one-box and one-layer model showed that nutrient accumulation prevailed over mobilisation for both dissolved inorganic phosphorus (annual mean of 675.69 mol d) and dissolved inorganic

  19. Spatial and inter-annual variability of the macrobenthic communities within a coastal lagoon (Óbidos lagoon) and its relationship with environmental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Susana; Moura, Ana; Gaspar, Miguel B.; Pereira, Paula; Cancela da Fonseca, Luís; Falcão, Manuela; Drago, Teresa; Leitão, Francisco; Regala, João

    2005-05-01

    The present work aims to analyse spatial and inter-annual variability in the benthic environment within the Óbidos lagoon, assessing the relationships between environmental characteristics and macrobenthic distribution patterns. Sediment samples were collected in February 2001 and 2002 for the study of macrofauna and biogeochemical parameters (sediment grain size, organic matter, organic carbon, chlorophyll a, and phaeopigments). Comparing 2001 to 2002, a general increase in the number of species, diversity and equitability indices was observed throughout the study area. Likewise, there was an increase of phytopigments and organic matter contents in the upper sediment layer. Based on the macrobenthic community patterns and environmental variables three main areas could be distinguished in both years: an outer area near the inlet mostly influenced by the sea, with very depressed number of species and abundance, and dominated by Saccocirrus papillocercus, Lekanesphaera levii, Microphthalmus similis and Nephtys cirrosa; an intermediate area located in the central part of the lagoon characterized by sandy sediment and low organic carbon, and colonized by a high diverse community with Hydrobia ulvae, Cerastoderma edule and Abra ovata as the most characteristic species; and the innermost area of the lagoon with muddy enriched sediments dominated by Heteromastus filiformis, oligochaetes, Scrobicularia plana, Cyathura carinata, Corophium acherusicum, phoronids, insect larvae and Corbula gibba. Deposit-feeders were dominant in the muddy sediments from the inner area, where suspension-feeders were also abundant. Carnivores were associated with clean sandy sediments from the inlet area and herbivores were more abundant within the central area.

  20. Facial melanoses: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Neena; Rasool, Seemab

    2011-01-01

    Facial melanoses (FM) are a common presentation in Indian patients, causing cosmetic disfigurement with considerable psychological impact. Some of the well defined causes of FM include melasma, Riehl's melanosis, Lichen planus pigmentosus, erythema dyschromicum perstans (EDP), erythrosis, and poikiloderma of Civatte. But there is considerable overlap in features amongst the clinical entities. Etiology in most of the causes is unknown, but some factors such as UV radiation in melasma, exposure to chemicals in EDP, exposure to allergens in Riehl's melanosis are implicated. Diagnosis is generally based on clinical features. The treatment of FM includes removal of aggravating factors, vigorous photoprotection, and some form of active pigment reduction either with topical agents or physical modes of treatment. Topical agents include hydroquinone (HQ), which is the most commonly used agent, often in combination with retinoic acid, corticosteroids, azelaic acid, kojic acid, and glycolic acid. Chemical peels are important modalities of physical therapy, other forms include lasers and dermabrasion. PMID:21860153

  1. Indian Country Today

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Indian Country Today website is a one-stop shop for people with an interest in the world of Native American culture. The site includes special sections dedicated to news updates in the areas of genealogy, sports, environment, politics, and so on. First-time visitors will want to look at the Editor's Picks to get started, as this contains the most salient news items as of late. The Around the Web area features stories related to Native Americans from a range of online media sources. People with a visual bent will appreciate the Our World In Pictures area, as it contains key links to images culled from across the country, including blogs, Flickr, and a range of other sources. Finally, the Things About area provides thoughtful opinion pieces on a range of topics that affect Native Americans, including higher education, federal policy changes, and environmental degradation.

  2. Indian Mars Orbiter Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Anil

    The Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) is the first interplanetary mission of India launched by Indian Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV-XL) on 5 November 2013. It departed from Earth's orbit on Dec. 1, 2013, on its 300-days journey to Mars. MOM will reach Mars on Sept. 24, 2014. The orbit of MOM around Mars is highly elliptical with periapsis ~370 km and apoapsis ~80000 km, inclination 151 degree, and orbital period 3.15 sols. The spacecraft mass is 1350 kg, with dry mass of 500 kg and science payload mass of 14 kg. The spacecraft carries five science payloads, namely: Methane Sensor for Mars (MSM), Mars Colour Camera (MCC), Lyman Alpha Photometer (LAP), Mars Exospheric Neutral Composition Analyzer (MENCA), TIR Imaging Spectrometer (TIS). This paper will present the details of the instruments, observation plan, and expected science.

  3. Effects of regional climate changes on the planktonic ecosystem and water environment in the frozen Notoro Lagoon, northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Kota; Seto, Koji; Noguchi, Takuro; Sonoda, Takeshi; Kim, JuYong

    2012-10-01

    Diatom fossils from core sediments and living diatoms from water samples of Notoro Lagoon in northern Japan were examined to evaluate natural climate effects on lagoon environmental changes. In 1974, the artificial inlet was excavated. Immediately after, the anoxic bottom water in Notoro Lagoon began to disappear due to an increasing water exchange rate. However, chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the bottom water of Notoro Lagoon gradually increased, with fluctuations, during the last 30 years. In addition, the dominant diatom assemblages in Notoro Lagoon shifted to ice-related and spring bloom taxa after the excavation. The dominant taxa of each year in the sediment core were also strongly related to the timing of lagoon ice melting. This is because the COD in Notoro Lagoon was affected by the deposited volume of blooming diatoms, which was controlled by the duration of ice cover and the timing of ice discharge to the Okhotsk Sea likely due to an air pressure pattern change over the northern North Pacific like the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). PMID:22975383

  4. Semidiurnal seiching in a shallow, micro-tidal lagoonal estuary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Luettich; Sarah D. Carr; Janelle V. Reynolds-Fleming; Crystal W. Fulcher; Jesse E. McNinch

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of current meter data in the Neuse River Estuary (NRE) associates over half of the along channel velocity variance with roughly the semi-diurnal frequency band. Velocity in this frequency range is episodic, has a typical magnitude of 10cms?1 and often reaches twice this speed. The NRE is a sub-estuary of the Albemarle–Pamlico Estuarine System (APES), which is the second

  5. Taxation and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, David

    1973-01-01

    The article explores American Indian tribal rights to tax exemptions and self-imposed taxation; general recommendations on possible tribal tax alternatives; and evaluation of the probable economic effect of taxation. (FF)

  6. Distribution, abundance, and substrate preferences of demersal reef zooplankton at Lizard Island Lagoon, Great Barrier Reef

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Alldredge; J. M. King

    1977-01-01

    Demersal zooplankton, those plankton which hide within reef sediments during the day but emerge to swim freely over the reef at night, were sampled quantitatively using emergence traps planced over the substrate at Lizard Island Lagoon, Great Barrier Reef. Densities of zooplankton emerging at night from 6 substrate types (fine, medium, and coarse sand, rubble, living coral and reef rock)

  7. Pollutant removal from municipal sewage lagoon effluents with a free-surface wetland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimberley Cameron; Chandra Madramootoo; Anna Crolla; Christopher Kinsley

    2003-01-01

    This research project was initiated to refine the knowledge available on the treatment of rural municipal wastewater by constructed wetlands. To determine the treatment capacity of a constructed wetland system receiving municipal lagoon effluents, the wetland was monitored over one treatment season, from May 19 to November 3, 2000. The wetland system consisted of a three-cell free-surface wetland, phosphorus adsorption

  8. The Sandbar Shark Summer Nursery within Bays and Lagoons of the Eastern Shore of Virginia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christina L. Conrath; John A. Musick

    2007-01-01

    We sought to examine the spatial use of coastal bays and lagoons associated with the Eastern Shore of Virginia (i.e., the Atlantic shoreline north of the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay) as nursery habitat for sandbar sharks Carcharhinus plumbeus. Generalized linear mixed models were used to examine the relationship between physical factors and the abundance of neonate and juvenile sandbar

  9. Natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon inputs to sediments of Patos Lagoon Estuary, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patricia Matheus Medeiros; Márcia Caruso Bícego; Renato Menezes Castelao; Clarissa Del Rosso; Gilberto Fillmann; Ademilson Josemar Zamboni

    2005-01-01

    The Patos Lagoon Estuary, southern Brazil, is an area of environmental interest not only because of tourism, but also because of the presence of the second major port of Brazil, with the related industrial and shipping activities. Thus, potential hydrocarbon pollution was examined in this study. Sediment samples were collected at 10 sites in the estuary, extracted, and analyzed by

  10. Natural and anthropogenic hydrocarbon inputs to sediments of Patos Lagoon Estuary, Brazil

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M arcia Caruso; Bõ ´ cegoc

    The Patos Lagoon Estuary, southern Brazil, is an area of environmental interest not only because of tourism, but also because of the presence of the second major port of Brazil, with the related industrial and shipping activities. Thus, potential hydrocarbon pollution was examined in this study. Sediment samples were collected at 10 sites in the estuary, extracted, and analyzed by

  11. Vadose Zone Monitoring of Dairy Green Water Lagoons using Soil Solution Samplers.

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, James R.; Coplen, Amy K

    2005-11-01

    Over the last decade, dairy farms in New Mexico have become an important component to the economy of many rural ranching and farming communities. Dairy operations are water intensive and use groundwater that otherwise would be used for irrigation purposes. Most dairies reuse their process/green water three times and utilize lined lagoons for temporary storage of green water. Leakage of water from lagoons can pose a risk to groundwater quality. Groundwater resource protection infrastructures at dairies are regulated by the New Mexico Environment Department which currently relies on monitoring wells installed in the saturated zone for detecting leakage of waste water lagoon liners. Here we present a proposal to monitor the unsaturated zone beneath the lagoons with soil water solution samplers to provide early detection of leaking liners. Early detection of leaking liners along with rapid repair can minimize contamination of aquifers and reduce dairy liability for aquifer remediation. Additionally, acceptance of vadose zone monitoring as a NMED requirement over saturated zone monitoring would very likely significantly reduce dairy startup and expansion costs. Acknowledgment Funding for this project was provided by the Sandia National Laboratories Small Business Assistance Program

  12. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF EXISTING AERATED LAGOON SYSTEM AT CONSOLIDATED KOSHKONONG SANITARY DISTRICT, EDGERTON, WISCONSIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerated treatment lagoons are used extensively throughout the United States to provide secondary treatment of municipal wastewaters. The data available to assess the performance of these systems are lacking partially as a result of the infrequent sampling and rather limited types...

  13. Atmospheric Pollutants and Trace Gases Odor and Gas Release from Anaerobic Treatment Lagoons for Swine Manure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Teng-Teeh Lim; Albert J. Heber; Ji-Qin Ni; Alan L. Sutton; Ping Shao

    releases are also needed to evaluate odor effects through science-based setback models (Lim et al., 2000). Odor Odor and gas release from anaerobic lagoons for treating swine is evaluated by determining odor concentration (OC), waste affect air quality in neighboring communities but rates of release are not well documented. A buoyant convective flux chamber (BCFC) intensity, and hedonic tone (HT)

  14. Cellulase and xylanase activity during the decomposition of three aquatic macrophytes in a tropical oxbow lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Sciessere, L.; Cunha-Santino, M. B.; Bianchini, I.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the connection between enzymatic activity and degradation of different fractions of organic matter, enzyme assays can be used to estimate degradation rates of particulate and dissolved organic carbon in freshwater systems. The aim of this study was to quantify and model the enzymatic degradation involving the decomposition of macrophytes, describing temporal activity of cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4 and EC 3.2.1.91) and xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) during in situ decomposition of three aquatic macrophytes (Salvinia sp., Eichhornia azurea and Cyperus giganteus) on the surface and water-sediment interface (w-s interface) of an oxbow lagoon (Óleo lagoon) within a natural Brazilian Savanna Reserve. Overall, the enzymatic degradation of aquatic macrophytes in Óleo lagoon occurred during the whole year and was initiated together with leaching. Xylanase production was ca. 5 times higher than cellulase values due to easy access to this compound by cellulolytic microorganisms. Enzymatic production and detritus mass decay were similar on the surface and w-s interface. Salvinia sp. was the most recalcitrant detritus, with low mass decay and enzymatic activity. E. azurea and C. giganteus decomposition rates and enzymatic production were high and similar. Due to the physicochemical homogeneity observed in the Óleo lagoon, the differences between the decay rates of each species are mostly related with detritus chemical quality. PMID:24031706

  15. FATE OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS IN A WASTEWATER LAND TREATMENT SYSTEM USING LAGOON IMPOUNDMENT AND SPRAY IRRIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Muskegon County Wastewater Management System (MCWMS) is one of the largest facilities of its kind treating on the average of 125 thousand cubic meters of wastewater by extended aeration, lagoon impoundment and spray irrigation. Over 70% of the influent originates from industrial ...

  16. Christmas Island lagoonal lakes, models for the deposition of carbonateevaporiteorganic laminated sediments

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    bottom surfaces providing the sediment with an important (total organic carbon 2­5%) organic contributionChristmas Island lagoonal lakes, models for the deposition of carbonate­evaporite­organic laminated organic carbon (-14 to -17), interpreted as being the result of high atmospheric CO2 demand (Geochim

  17. Transport of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity across a swine lagoon/sprayfield system.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Williams, C Michael; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2014-10-01

    The inflow, transformation, and attenuation of natural steroid hormones and phytoestrogens and estrogenic activity were assessed across the lagoon/sprayfield system of a prototypical commercial swine sow operation. Free and conjugated steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progesterone) were detected in urine and feces of sows across reproductive stages, with progesterone being the most abundant steroid hormone. Excreta also contained phytoestrogens indicative of a soy-based diet, particularly, daidzein, genistein, and equol. During storage in barn pits and the anaerobic lagoon, conjugated hormones dissipated, and androgens and progesterone were attenuated. Estrone and equol persisted along the waste disposal route. Following application of lagoon slurry to agricultural soils, all analytes exhibited attenuation within 2 days. However, analytes including estrone, androstenedione, progesterone, and equol remained detectable in soil at 2 months postapplication. Estrogenic activity in the yeast estrogen screen and T47D-KBluc in vitro bioassays generally tracked well with analyte concentrations. Estrone was found to be the greatest contributor to estrogenic activity across all sample types. This investigation encompasses the most comprehensive suite of natural hormone and phytoestrogen analytes examined to date across a livestock lagoon/sprayfield and provides global insight into the fate of these analytes in this widely used waste management system. PMID:25148584

  18. Biochar produced from anaerobically-digested fiber reduces phosphorus in dairy lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the use of biochar produced from anaerobic digester dairy fiber (ADF) to sequester phosphorus from dairy lagoons. The ADF was collected from a plugged flow digester, air dried to < 8% water content, and pelletized. Biochar was produced by slow pyrolysis in a barrel retort. The potential...

  19. Annual characterisation of four Mediterranean coastal lagoons subjected to intense human activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miguel Cañedo-Argüelles; Maria Rieradevall; Roser Farrés-Corell; Alice Newton

    In the present study the annual variability of the physico-chemical parameters of four coastal lagoons subjected to intense human activity was characterised. The trophic state indices (TSI) of Carlson (1977) and the water quality index TRIX of Vollenweider et al. (1998) were tested and compared with the water quality categories proposed by the European Environmental Agency (2009). All the parameters were

  20. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF THE EXISTING THREE-LAGOON WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT AT PAWNEE, ILLINOIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents data gathered over a one-year period of monitoring the lagoon system at Pawnee, Illinois, and compares treatment plant performance to design loading rates and the Federal secondary treatment standards. The treatment plant performed very well. Removals of BOD5...