Science.gov

Sample records for indian stories expressive

  1. Native Ways: California Indian Stories and Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Margolin, Malcolm, Ed.; Montijo, Yolanda, Ed.

    This collection of stories and memories, suitable for adolescents, offers a perspective on both traditional and contemporary ways of California Indians. Some stories are from old reports and books, and some are from people of today. The introduction ties the wide variety of Indians that live in California to the variety of landscape and climate.…

  2. [The Minnesota Story, American Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Schools, Minn. Task Force on Minority Cultures.

    This student booklet, one of a series of readings on minority cultures, contains nine Indian folktales. Stories included are: Minnesota is Minabozho's Land, about the way Minnesota was formed; How We Got the Rainbow; How the Birds Came to Have Their Many Colors; The Study of Coyote and Moradjawinga (Earth Wanderer); The Four Winds, A Sioux legend,…

  3. Growing Up Indian: Stories from the Life of Louie Gingras, an 82 Year Old Kootenai Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingras, Louie

    Eleven short stories from the life of Louie Gingras, an 82-year-old Kootenai Indian, illustrate many aspects of Indian culture. Accompanied by black and white drawings, ths stories describe daily life, mission schools, the Carlisle Indian School, Indian medicine, discipline for children, spiritual powers, beliefs, and several ceremonies. The book…

  4. Natosi: Strong Medicine. Indian Culture Series: Stories of the Blackfeet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roop, Peter

    Part of a series of stories about the Blackfeet Indians, the illustrated story details the capture of the first horses by the Blackfeet. In the story, young Running Crane is allowed to join a party of warriors who raid a Crow camp for horses. Running Crane uses gentleness to capture a black horse but is separated from the raiding party and must…

  5. Tsapah Talks of Pheasant and Other Stories. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level VI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Designed as supplementary reading material for Indian and non-Indian children in the elementary grades, this reader presents 19 stories and legends of the Northwest tribes. Stories in this sixth level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by Indian people of Pacific Northwest reservations. Each of the 19 stories has a title page…

  6. Sanitizing "Indians" in America's Thanksgiving Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adare-Tasiwoopa ápi, Sierra; Adams-Campbell, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Children's books about the Thanksgiving holiday offer a superlative example of America's supposedly innocent interactions with "Indians." In this essay, we describe how representations of "Indians" in children's Thanksgiving books are often used to promote a Manifest Destiny ideology, we correct basic "facts" about…

  7. Tecumseh. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schraff, Anne

    Tecumseh, famed for his skills as an orator, warrior, military strategist, and leader of his Shawnee people, has been called one of the great American leaders. In 1812 he assembled 3,000 warriors from 32 American Indian tribes in an effort to save the Indian lands from the onslaught of the white soldiers and settlers. It was the largest Indian…

  8. Osceola. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert Proctor

    Osceola was the guiding spirit and moving force behind the Second Seminole War. In 1830, when it became the official policy of the United States government to move all the Eastern Indians to a new Indian Territory west of the Mississippi River, the Seminoles resisted. Under Osceola's leadership, a thousand Seminole warriors held off the entire…

  9. Behind Closed Doors: Stories from the Kamloops Indian Residential School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jack, Agness, Ed.

    Thirty-two Canada Natives who attended the Kamloops Indian Residential School agreed to share their stories in the form of this book. In this way, their families and communities could learn and understand what happened at the school, and all Canadians could know the truth about residential schools so that history is never repeated. Kamloops Indian…

  10. Sacagawea, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skold, Betty Westrom

    Written for adolescents, this biography of the Shoshoni woman, Sacagawea, who acted as interpreter, intermediary, and guide to the Lewis and Clark Expedition emphasizes the insecurities of an American Indian woman living in the early 19th century. The known life of Sacagawea is described as involving: a period of time with the Hidatsas who had…

  11. Jim Thorpe, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reising, Robert

    Fifty years after the death of Black Hawk, the greatest warrior of the Sac and Fox tribe, his great-great-grandson was born: Jim Thorpe, one of the greatest athletes of all time. This biography opens with Black Hawk and a brief history of the Sac and Fox Indians. Then Jim's story begins, in a simple log cabin in Oklahoma, in 1888. Even in his…

  12. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level IV. Books 1-21.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Designed as supplementary reading material for Indian and non-Indian children in the elementary grades, this series of 21 booklets presents 36 stories and legends of Northwest tribes. Stories in this fourth level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by Indian people of reservations in the Pacific Northwest. Booklets range from 7 to…

  13. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level V. Books 1-18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Designed as supplementary reading material appropriate for Indian and non-Indian children in the elementary grades, this series of 18 booklets presents 26 stories and legends of Northwest tribes. Stories in this fifth level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by Indian people from reservations in the Pacific Northwest. Booklets…

  14. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level I. Books 1-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Designed as supplementary reading materials appropriate for Indian and non-Indian children in the primary grades, this series of 20 booklets presents legends and stories of Northwest tribes. Stories in this first level of a six-level series were developed by the Blackfeet, Northern Cheyenne, Skokomish, Shoshone-Bannock, Crow, and Muckleshoot…

  15. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level II. Books 1-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Designed as supplementary reading materials for Indian and non-Indian children in the primary grades, this series of 10 booklets presents 13 legends and 7 stories of Northwest tribes. Stories in this second level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by people of the Crow, Muckleshoot, Skokomish, Blackfeet, Northern Cheyenne,…

  16. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Level III. Books 1-20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    Designed as supplementary reading materials for Indian and non-Indian children in the primary grades, this series of 20 booklets presents legends and stories of Northwest tribes. Stories in this third level of the six-level series were developed cooperatively by people of the Blackfeet, Kootenai, Jamestown-Clallam, Assiniboine, Sioux,…

  17. We're Still Here: Contemporary Virginia Indians Tell Their Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waugaman, Sandra F.; Moretti-Langholtz, Danielle

    Except for discussions of the early colonial period, the American Indians of Virginia are invisible in history textbooks, leading many people to assume that the state's Indian population vanished long ago. This book shares the unique stories of some of Virginia's Indian people, providing an insight into the history, education, and cultural…

  18. [Read Aloud Stories Series: A Product of a Project to Create Stories and Beginning Reading Materials for Pre-School Indian Children in South Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Loraine; Schleif, Mabel

    The "Read Aloud Stories" series in this document consists of 10 booklets, each containing an illustrated story of Sioux origin which is intended to be read to preschool and early elementary non-proficient readers (grades 1.9 to 3.4). Each story is designed to convey a simple concept concerning the child's Indian heritage as well as to improve use…

  19. Tsapah Talks of Pheasant and Other Stories. The Indian Reading Series: Stories and Legends of the Northwest. Teacher's Manual, Level IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Robin

    This guide presents an overall plan for implementing Level VI of the Indian Reading Series, which features legends and stories of Northwest tribes in a supplementary reading and language arts development program for elementary grade Indian and non-Indian children. Introductory sections present the rationale of the program's language experience…

  20. Indian story on semen loss and related Dhat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Om; Kar, Sujit Kumar; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    India is a country of many religions and ancient cultures. Indian culture is largely directed by the Vedic culture since time immemorial. Later Indian culture is influenced by Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. Indian belief system carries the footprints of these cultures. Every culture describes human behaviors and an interpretation of each human behavior is largely influenced by the core cultural belief system. Sexuality is an important domain which is colored by different cultural colors. Like other cultures, Indian culture believes “semen” as the precious body fluid which needs to be preserved. Most Indian beliefs consider loss of semen as a threat to the individual. Ancient Indian literature present semen loss as a negative health related event. Dhat syndrome (related to semen loss) is a culture-bound syndrome seen in the natives of Indian subcontinent. This article gathers the Indian concepts related to semen loss. It also outlines belief systems behind problems of Dhat syndrome. PMID:25568479

  1. Indian story on semen loss and related Dhat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Kar, Sujit Kumar; Sathyanarayana Rao, T S

    2014-10-01

    India is a country of many religions and ancient cultures. Indian culture is largely directed by the Vedic culture since time immemorial. Later Indian culture is influenced by Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. Indian belief system carries the footprints of these cultures. Every culture describes human behaviors and an interpretation of each human behavior is largely influenced by the core cultural belief system. Sexuality is an important domain which is colored by different cultural colors. Like other cultures, Indian culture believes "semen" as the precious body fluid which needs to be preserved. Most Indian beliefs consider loss of semen as a threat to the individual. Ancient Indian literature present semen loss as a negative health related event. Dhat syndrome (related to semen loss) is a culture-bound syndrome seen in the natives of Indian subcontinent. This article gathers the Indian concepts related to semen loss. It also outlines belief systems behind problems of Dhat syndrome. PMID:25568479

  2. Robert Bennett, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mary Carroll

    As 1 in a series of 24 American Indian biographies written for youth at the secondary level, this book details the sociocultural and professional development of Robert La Follette Bennett, a Wisconsin Oneida Indian who was born in 1912 and became the second Native American to hold the position of Commissioner of Indian Affairs in the Bureau of…

  3. Maria Tallchief: The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, Marion E.

    Maria Tallchief has earned a lasting place in the history of dance as one of the world's greatest ballerinas. She is also an American Indian. She was born in 1925 in Fairfax, Oklahoma; her father was a full-blooded Osage Indian, her mother was of Scotch-Irish and Dutch ancestry. Discovery of oil on the Osage Reservation had brought wealth to all…

  4. "Starting Stories" among Older Northern Plains American Indian Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    American Indian adults have the highest smoking rate of any racial group in the nation. By the turn of the 21st century, smoking rates for the general adult population were reported to be 24%. Among adolescents in the United States, 34.8% of high school students reported they currently smoked in 1999. In comparison, American Indian adults report…

  5. Pablita Verarde: The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mary Carroll

    Pablita Velarde Hardin is a famous Tewa Indian artist, born in Santa Clara Pueblo, New Mexico in 1918. She has helped revive and reinterpret traditional Indian art forms, preserving both for the pleasure of people today and for future generations. From ancient tales told to her by her father she has written and illustrated "Old Father, the Story…

  6. Old Father Story Teller: Grandfather Stories of the Pueblo Native American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velarde, Pablita

    Pablita Velarde, renowned artist and lecturer, recalls some of the Tewa legends handed down orally through the generations. She heard her grandfather and great-grandfather relate these tales on cold winter evenings at Santa Clara Pueblo when she was a child. The six stories told by Old Father Story Teller are "The Stars," which ties the…

  7. Tomo-chi-chi, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Sara Gordon

    Tomo-chi-chi was a Creek Indian leader who did much to insure peaceful relations between the first English colonists in Georgia and the native Americans. His wisdom and dedication to peace were known and respected by the Creek people and the English colonists. He developed a lifelong friendship with General James Oglethorpe, the English founder of…

  8. Sarah Winnemucca. Raintree/Rivilo American Indian Stories Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Mary Frances

    Sarah Winnemucca was a full-blood Paiute Indian born in 1844 in Nevada. The Paiute hunted and gathered and lived in wigwams constructed of branches, brush, and hides. Sarah's grandfather, Captain Truckee, befriended the explorer John C. Fremont and went with him to California. Captain Truckee admired White people's clothing and houses and,…

  9. Michael Naranjo, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Mary Carroll

    Michael Naranjo is a Pueblo Indian who, after much searching, has become a talented sculptor. The son of a Baptist minister, Michael grew up observing nature and exploring the countryside around Santa Clara (New Mexico), his birthplace. When he was nine, his family moved to Taos, where he watched the ceremonies of the Taos Pueblos with…

  10. Crazy Horse, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milton, John R.

    A great monument is being blasted out of Thunderhead Mountain near Mount Rushmore in South Dakota. Slowly, Chief Crazy Horse emerges from the stone. One day he will sit on his Indian pony pointing over the Black Hills as though saying, "My lands are where my dead lie buried." This biography of Crazy Horse begins with sculptor Korczak Ziolkowski's…

  11. Sitting Bull, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoop, Faith Yingling

    Sitting Bull was a complex man, living in complicated times. A Hunkpapa Sioux, he grew up on the Great Plains of South Dakota. His early years, as described in this biography, were taken up with the hunt, forays against Crow Indians, and his development as a warrior and leader through the Vision Quest and Sun Dance. A man of considerable talents,…

  12. Black Hawk. The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Maggi

    Born in 1767, Black Hawk was the last great war leader of the Sauk Indians, who lived in the Rock River valley in Illinois. By age 25, he was a famed warrior and leader of his people who raided neighboring tribes until a period of peace and prosperity began about 1800. Various treaties of which the Sauk knew and understood very little deprived the…

  13. Will Rogers: The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, C. W.

    Although Will Rogers often described himself as "just a cowboy with a lot of luck," he was more than that. At one time or another he was a vaudeville entertainer, film star, world traveler, author, columnist, and after-dinner speaker. The most beloved figure of his time, this famous humorist was also part Cherokee Indian. Rogers was born in 1879…

  14. William Warren -- The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antell, Will

    Part of a series on the American Indian, the book presents the biography of William Whipple Warren, Ojibway (Chippewa) historian. Although he led an extraordinary life, Warren is a little-known historical figure. The son of an American fur trapper and a mother of French and Ojibway descent, he was born in 1825 on an island in Lake Superior. Later…

  15. "The Tools of Your Chants and Spells": Stories of Madwomen and Indian Practical Healing.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding trope in Indian psychiatry, and in popular representations of it, involves the efficacy of incantations and exorcism in healing afflictions of the mind, notably hysteria. In many accounts, from nineteenth century medical journals to twenty-first century popular films, a medicine deemed at once 'Western' and universal is granted the ability to diagnose neurotic afflictions, but rendered incapable of curing them, while bodily techniques referred to as 'Indian' are granted efficacy. In this article, I explore the subtleties and implications of this recurrent knowledge paradigm. I argue that a particular arrangement-one in which difference is established through equivalence-undergirds the terms by which medicine comes to be viewed as a cultural encounter. As these progressive formulations are often founded on stories about women's madness, I ask, what are the implications of an arguably pragmatic ethos founded on an uneven-and deeply gendered-resolution to postcolonial knowledge problems? PMID:26263046

  16. Shaping a Stories of Resilience Model from urban American Indian elders' narratives of historical trauma and resilience.

    PubMed

    Reinschmidt, Kerstin M; Attakai, Agnes; Kahn, Carmella B; Whitewater, Shannon; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette

    2016-01-01

    American Indians (AIs) have experienced traumatizing events but practice remarkable resilience to large-scale and long-term adversities. Qualitative, community-based participatory research served to collect urban AI elders' life narratives on historical trauma and resilience strategies. A consensus group of 15 elders helped finalize open-ended questions that guided 13 elders in telling their stories. Elders shared multifaceted personal stories that revealed the interconnectedness between historical trauma and resilience, and between traditional perceptions connecting past and present, and individuals, families, and communities. Based on the elders' narratives, and supported by the literature, an explanatory Stories of Resilience Model was developed. PMID:27536898

  17. [Rebus Reading Book Series: A Product of a Project to Create Stories and Beginning Reading Material for Pre-School Indian Children in South Dakota.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Loraine; Schleif, Mabel

    The "Rebus Reading Book Series" in this document consists of 10 booklets, each containing an illustrated story adopted from an Indian folk tale. The booklets, intended for use as supplementary readers, are designed to introduce readers in grades 1.7 to 2.2 to Indian cultural history as well as to improve use of English by building larger speaking…

  18. A Story within a Story: Culturally Responsive Schooling and American Indian and Alaska Native Achievement in the National Indian Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Francesca A.; Vasquez Heilig, Julian; Schram, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    There have been numerous calls to increase quantitative studies examining the role of culturally responsive schooling (CRS) on American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) achievement. The National Indian Education Study (NIES) is the only large-scale study focused on (AIAN) students' cultural experiences within the context of schools. Given…

  19. Karuk Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; Davis, Shan

    Three illustrated stories from the Karuk Indians of northwestern California are told in free English translation and in Karuk with literal English translation. Stories tell of Bluejay who pretends to be sick to get higher pay for doctoring the person she is making sick, how the Karuk learned to kill the fattest deer, and the waterdog who kills the…

  20. Sik-ki-mi. Indian Culture Series: Stories of the Blackfeet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roop, Peter

    The children's story is one of a series about the Blackfeet Tribe at the height of its power in Southern Alberta and North Central Montana. In the story, Eagle Head, a Blackfeet boy, proves his bravery as he faces the first steamboat on the Yellowstone River and recaptures his chief's favorite buffalo horse, Sik-ki-mi, in a raid on a Crow camp.…

  1. They Called It Prairie Light: The Story of Chilocco Indian School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomawaima, K. Tsianina

    Established in 1884 and operative for nearly a century, Chilocco Indian School (Oklahoma) was a federal off-reservation boarding school intended to assimilate American Indian children into mainstream American life. In contrast to previous studies detailing federal policy and practice in such boarding schools, this book draws on and analyzes…

  2. Academic Massacres: The Story of Two American Indian Women and Their Struggle to Survive Academia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trucks-Bordeaux, Tammy

    2003-01-01

    Last year, Franci, a very knowledgeable Lakota scholar and writer, arrived to teach at this author's university. The author's friend, Malea, had left, so she was pleased to see another American Indian face in the department. The past year it had become clear that Indians faced many hardships at the university, but most strikingly they continued to…

  3. Horses of Different Colors: The Plains Indians in Stories for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stott, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes the stereotypes of Plains Indians and then surveys the realities of that culture, emphasizing the physical and spiritual role of the horse. Reviews two children's books by writer-artist Paul Goble, pointing out their accurate depiction of the material and spiritual nature of the traditional Plains Indian culture. (JHZ)

  4. Stories of Success: Experiences of American Indian Students in a Peer-Mentoring Retention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shotton, Heather J.; Oosahwe, E. Star L.; Cintron, Rosa

    2007-01-01

    The postsecondary attrition rate for American Indian students is higher than of any other racial or ethnic group. It is therefore imperative to identify factors that encourage their persistence in higher education. Employing a phenomenological approach, this study explored the experiences of American Indian college students in a peer-mentoring…

  5. Technology Serves the People: The Story of a Co-operative Telemedicine Project by NASA, the Indian Health Service and the Papago People. STARPAHC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashshur, Rashid

    In the story of STARPAHC (Space Technology Applied to Rural Papago Advanced Health Care) the genesis of the telemedicine concept at NASA is traced; a brief account of the history of the Indian Health Service (IHS) and the activities of the Office of Research and Development (ORD) are given; the culture and aspirations of the Papago people are…

  6. Complex Personhood as the Context for Intimate Partner Victimization: One American Indian Woman's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sharon; Lemire, Lynne; Wisman, Mindi

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study explores one American Indian (AI) woman's experience of intimate partner violence and the subsequent murder of her abusive partner. The lens of complex personhood (Gordon, 1997) has been applied as a method for understanding "Annie's" multiple identities of AI woman, victim of intimate partner violence, mother, and…

  7. Enhancing the Ability of Creative Expression and Intercultural Understanding through Visual Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjajanto, Wahju Agung; Lund, Michael; Schelhowe, Heidi

    In our web-based platform “Wayang Authoring” children with different cultural backgrounds can create and share stories, and make experiences in culturally different storytelling. The idea of Wayang Authoring is based on the Indonesian ancient art form Wayang. The research question focuses on if and how the design of our system can support children to enhance understanding of story grammar, creative storytelling and self-expression as well as help to share cultural diversity. In this article the Wayang Authoring platform and its background is presented.

  8. Bright Eyes. The Story of Susette La Flesche, an Omaha Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Dorothy Clarke

    The document is the biography of Susette La Flesche, whose name in Omaha was Inshta Theamba (Bright Eyes). She was the daughter of a French-Indian who, in the mid-1800s, became the last head chief of the Omahas. Her heritage--the legends, songs, sacred ceremonies and ancient wisdom of her people--came into conflict with the white man's world when…

  9. Complex personhood as the context for intimate partner victimization: one American Indian woman's story.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sharon; Lemire, Lynne; Wisman, Mindi

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative case study explores one American Indian (AI) woman's experience of intimate partner violence and the subsequent murder of her abusive partner. The lens of complex personhood (Gordon, 1997) has been applied as a method for understanding "Annie's" multiple identities of AI woman, victim of intimate partner violence, mother, and convicted felon. The aim of the current case study was to uncover implicit and explicit meanings embedded in the experiences of moving from a victim of IPV to an off ender by applying a framework of hermeneutic phenomenology as the methodology. Three relational themes emerged from the interview data: "Getting out of Hand," "They're in my Footstep all the Way Now," and "What's a Miranda Right"? Lastly, this article begins an exploration into the complex link between victimization and offending as it applies to one battered woman. PMID:19340765

  10. A Victim of Its Own Success: The Story of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indian Fair, 1910-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Josh

    2006-01-01

    The Indian fair is that rare example of a government program for Indians gone terribly right. Implemented by the Office of Indian Affairs on reservations in the early 1900s, Indian fairs allowed Native people to exhibit their crops, livestock, and domestic handiwork in competition for prizes much the same way whites did at their numerous county…

  11. Indian Tales of the Northern Rockies. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Coyote, Sally; Toineeta, Joy Yellowtail

    Part of the Montana Council for Indian Education's Indian Culture Series, the book contains six folk stories recorded on reservations and by headstart teachers. The stories are: "The Owl", a Gros Ventre tale; "How the Robin Got a Red Breast", from the Flathead Tribe; "Old Man Coyote and the Wild Geese", a Crow Indian folk story; "How the Animals…

  12. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the land.…

  13. Connecting the Dots for Youth Development in American Indian Communities: A Story of the Reach for the Sky Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Stephan; Hardman, Alisha M.; Marczak, Mary S.

    2011-01-01

    This second article in "JAIE'"s new "Reports from the Field" section1 explores a culturally based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) program at a northern Minnesota Bureau of Indian Education high school. Engaging American Indian youth from disenfranchised communities in STEM programs has been challenging. Using culturally…

  14. American Indian Sports Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxendine, Joseph B.

    This book chronicles the story of sports among American Indians. Part 1 examines the nature and role of games in traditional Indian life, with five chapters on: Indian concepts of sport; ball games; foot racing; other sports; children's play; and games of chance. Part 2 looks at the emergence of Indians in modern sport, with five chapters on:…

  15. Karuk Stories #2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; And Others

    Three illustrated stories from the Karuk Indians of northwestern California are told in free English translation and in Karuk with literal English translation. English and Karuk Unifon alphabet charts are provided. Stories tell of seasonal migration of the mockingbird and the swamp robin, coyote's quest for the sun and how he determined the sun's…

  16. Story Concept: Story Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ice, Marie

    Since there is a lack of studies that reveal school age children's oral competence in story production, a five-year longitudinal descriptive study was undertaken to determine a child's sense of story as revealed by children's oral generation of stories. The specific story elements analyzed were sources of their stories, narrative form, formal…

  17. A History-Coloring Book of the Ojibway Indians, Book No. 1: The Ojibway Creation Story. A Mishomis Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banai, Edward Benton

    The Mishomis books are a chronological series depicting the ancient cultural traditions of the Ojibway People. Narrated through the medium of Mishomis, the books present stories he has heard from his grandfather. The text in the series incorporates native Obijway language along with the English narrative. In this book, the first of the series,…

  18. Stories by Our Elders. The Fort Belknap People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Minerva, Ed.

    This volume contains approximately 35 brief stories told by members of the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation. Many of the stories deal with legendary Indian heros, warriors, or cultural myths. Some, however, seem to portray actual events in the lives of the narrators themselves or their immediate ancestors. Many stories deal with Indian magic or…

  19. Racism in the electronic age: Role of online forums in expressing racial attitudes about American Indians.

    PubMed

    Steinfeldt, Jesse A; Foltz, Brad D; Kaladow, Jennifer K; Carlson, Tracy N; Pagano, Louis A; Benton, Emily; Steinfeldt, M Clint

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated racial attitudes about American Indians that are electronically expressed in newspaper online forums by examining the University of North Dakota's Fighting Sioux nickname and logo used for their athletic teams. Using a modified Consensual Qualitative Research (CQR) methodology to analyze over 1,000 online forum comments, the research team generated themes, domains, and core ideas from the data. The core ideas included (a) surprise, (b) power and privilege, (c) trivialization, and (d) denigration. The findings indicated that a critical mass of online forum comments represented ignorance about American Indian culture and even disdain toward American Indians by providing misinformation, perpetuating stereotypes, and expressing overtly racist attitudes toward American Indians. Results of this study were explained through the lens of White power and privilege, as well as through the framework of two-faced racism (Picca & Feagin, 2007). Results provide support to previous findings that indicate the presence of Native-themed mascots, nicknames, or logos can negatively impact the psychological well-being of American Indians. PMID:20658879

  20. The Portrait of Women Teachers in Indian Territory: The Story of Meta Chestnutt Sager, 1863-1948

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesar, Dana; Smith, Joan K.

    2008-01-01

    Women pioneers and frontier teachers have been the subject of numerous books and articles. Generally, the portrait has been one of self-sacrifice, dedication to God, family and home, with little or no concern for personal needs or goals. Continuing with a premise that teachers in Indian Territory used religious sanctions and faced greater peril in…

  1. As We Tell Our Stories. Living Traditions and the Algonkian Peoples of Indian New England: A New Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Lynne

    1990-01-01

    Describes a new exhibit initiative at the American Indian Archeological Institute (Washington, Connecticut), which seeks to relate Algonkian peoples' historical and contemporary art forms to each other and to the ongoing cultural context from which they spring. Describes exhibit sections: land, exchange, clay, living spaces, corn, deer, and…

  2. Stories for the Campfire: A Collection of Memorable Tales for Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Bob, Ed.; Roemmich, Bill, Ed.

    This book offers 46 children's camp stories, including stories about ghosts, adventure, other lands, humor, Indian fables, and stories with a moral. An introduction offers some background of the publication and a few tips on successful story-telling. The stories include: A Full Meal; A Fuzzy Tale; An Ameri-Indian's Ecological Lament and Prophecy;…

  3. The Flood. Second edition. Indian Culture Series DH-19.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Hap

    The booklet, illustrated with black and white photographs and drawings, contains 16 one to three page versions of the story of the great flood. Versions of the story as told by representatives of the Skokomish Indians of Western Washington, Apache Indians of New Mexico, Athabascan Indians of Alaska, Shasta Indians of California, Yakima Indians of…

  4. Indian Orphanages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marilyn Irvin

    With their traditional tribal and kinship ties, Native Americans had lived for centuries without the concept of an unwanted child. But besieged by reservation life and boarding school acculturation, many tribes, with the encouragement of whites, came to accept the need for orphanages. This book tells the story of Indian orphanages within the…

  5. Early Indian People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doermann, Elisabeth

    1979-01-01

    Using bits and pieces of the past such as charred bits of wood from campfires, broken pieces of clay pots, stone spearpoints and arrowheads, and shell or copper ornaments, the archaeologist tries to put together the story of early Indian people in the Minnesota region. A short story, one of eight articles, re-creates the kill of an Itasca bison…

  6. American Indian Authors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momaday, Natachee Scott

    Twenty-six selections by 15 contemporary American Indian authors are given in this book. The selections--legends, ceremonial chants and prayers, poems, and stories--are accompanied by topics for discussion. Some of the selections deal with the supernatural, and some tell an actual story about the author. Pictures and short biographies of each…

  7. "The Story of Running Eagle" and "The Cause of Things."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, James Willard

    The two illustrated children's stories are part of a series about the Blackfeet Indians. The first story, originally published in 1916, is the story of Weasel Woman, an orphaned girl who stole her way into a raiding party and became a successful warrior and, ultimately, a war chief named Running Eagle. The second story is a Blackfeet creation tale…

  8. Indian Tribes of Alberta. Revised, Expanded, and Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Hugh A.

    This book recounts the story of the Indians in Alberta, Canada. Pictures and maps help in the explanation of these facts. The Indians described include the: (1) Blackfoot Nation (Blackfoot, Blood, Peigan Tribes); (2) Sarcee Tribe; (3) Stoney Indians; (4) Plains Cree; (5) Woodland Cree; (6) Chipewyan Indians; (7) Beaver Indians; (8) Slavey Indians;…

  9. Pima Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Anna Moore

    The stated purpose of this book is to preserve in writing some of the Pima Indian legends that had been verbally passed from generation to generation in the past. This collection of 23 legends, which were originally used to instruct the young people of the tribe, presents in story form various aspects of American Indian life--including…

  10. The Horse and the Plains Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuessler, Raymond

    Produced by the Montana Council for Indian Education as part of its Indian Culture Series, the five short articles in the book explain how the Plains Indians got horses in legend and in fact. The stories describe the behavior codes, rules, cultural and social significance, and eventual cessation of horse raids, and the ceremony and tradition…

  11. Light-induced COP9 signalosome expression in the Indian false vampire bat Megaderma lyra.

    PubMed

    Rajan, K Emmanuvel; Rajkumar, R; Liao, Chen-Chug; Ganesh, A; Marimuthu, G

    2010-01-01

    The COP9 signalosome (CSN) is a multi-subunit protein complex conserved in plants and animals. CSN subunits have been identified as light-mediated master regulators of eukaryotic circadian clocks from fungi to animals. The Indian false vampire bat Megaderma lyra is completely adapted to an anthropic biotope and behavioral studies have reported that M. lyra exhibits light-sampling behavior to assess environmental light. LC-MS-MS results for a 36 kDa protein were analyzed using the Sequest search engine, and COP9 signalosome subunit 5 (CSN5) was pinpointed as having the highest score with 6 matching peptides. To confirm the presence of CSN5, up-regulated cDNA was amplified, sequenced, and identified as CSN5. Furthermore, semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that the level of induction of CSN5 was regulated by environmental light. We estimated the level of expression across a light-dark cycle and observed a higher level of expression at the end of the light phase. Similarly, when the animal was shifted from continuous dark to light, CSN5 expression was induced. Correspondingly, we detected the similar pattern of translated protein with JAB1 antibody. Knowledge about the circadian rhythm and its molecular mechanism in Chiroptera is very limited and this study suggests that CSN5 might be involved in the M. lyra light-signaling process. PMID:19787423

  12. A Story of a Healing Relationship: The Person-Centered Approach in Expressive Arts Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sunhee

    2010-01-01

    In expressive arts therapy, visual art, movement, music, poetry, and creative writing offer clients opportunities to explore their hidden feelings expressed in the art forms. The colors, lines, motions, or sounds expressed during the therapy session promote better understanding of the self with support of the therapist. It is crucial to have a…

  13. Health stories as connectors and subjectifiers.

    PubMed

    Frank, Arthur W

    2006-10-01

    Health circulates inside bodies, as a condition of cells, tissues and organs, and outside bodies as signs. Health stories offer people bits of a subjectivity of health: an awareness of what is interior, expressed in signs that are exterior. Three genres of health stories are described: technoluxe stories, unbearable health stories and strategic health stories. These stories call out to people, bidding to be subjectifiers of health. Stories connect people who may become patients, providers of health services, health products, images, fears and desires. Following Latour, health stories are understood as a form of plug-in: resources that provide people with an ability to recognize and connect what was disparate. PMID:16973679

  14. Story Telling in the Reading Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nessel, Denise D.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests that teachers use gothic tales, Indian legends, and other appealing stories to develop students' schema for the literature they will eventually read. Explains how to use storytelling effectively. (FL)

  15. Surface expression of the Reunion Plumehead as witnessed by tectonics in the Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cande, S. C.; Stegman, D. R.

    2012-04-01

    The arrival of a mantle plumehead at the Earth's surface is inferred to have occurred underneath India around 67 Ma, with eruption of the Deccan traps and associated hotspot track to the present day position of the Reunion plume. It was recently shown that this event had a major effect on the global motions, particularly the Indo-Atlantic plates between 68 and 45 Ma (Cande and Stegman, Nature, 2011). The primary evidence for this is the observation that the motions of the Indian and African plates appear to have been coupled during this period: when the Indian plate speeds up between 68 and 66 Ma (from 80 to 180 mm/yr relative to Africa), the convergence of Africa with Eurasia slows down and perhaps stops, and when the Indian plate slows down between 52 and 45 Ma, Africa-Eurasia convergence speeds up. The superfast motion of India (roughly 180 mm/yr) relative to Africa is well documented by seafloor spreading anomalies between 66 and 63 Ma, corresponding to the formation of the Deccan traps. Clearly, this event should have a large surface expression locally, and we have been reevaluating the tectonics of this region within this context, in particular the reorganization of mid-ocean ridge systems in response to the arrival of a mantle plumehead. A broad topographic swell associated with the mantle plumehead may have caused dynamic uplift across the region even as early as 70 Ma. Continental rifting between the Seychelles microcontinent and India occurred directly over the location of the Deccan plume. One idea is that a distinct, but short-lived, Seychelles microplate existed during this time period. India-Africa separation evolved from a two-plate system (with Seychelles part of the Indian plate) into a three-plate system (with formation of the Seychelles microplate), and finally back into a two-plate system (with the Seychelles part of the Somali plate). The suggestion that a distinct Seychelles microplate existed is largely based upon the observation that during

  16. A Happy Story: Developmental Changes in Children's Sensitivity to Facial Expressions of Varying Intensities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Xiaoqing; Maurer, Daphne

    2010-01-01

    Using 20 levels of intensity, we measured children's thresholds to discriminate the six basic emotional expressions from neutral and their misidentification rates. Combined with the results of a previous study using the same method ("Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 102" (2009) 503-521), the results indicate that by 5 years of age,…

  17. Prairie Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Amy; Blake, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Stories read aloud or written by students help science come alive and engage students as active participants in their learning. Students gain a sense of place by learning about their local ecosystem by listening to stories read aloud, doing prairie-related activities, and writing stories of their own. This article describes a prairie unit that…

  18. Kamishibai Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clouet, Dianne

    2005-01-01

    This captivating form of Japanese storytelling excites young authors and illustrators into creating stories of their own. While I?ve presented from a wide variety of literary genres over the years, the favorite of my students has always been the kamishibai. Kamishibai are Japanese stories told in a picture card format. The story is presented with…

  19. Dynamics of sex expression and chromosome diversity in Cucurbitaceae: a story in the making.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Biplab Kumar; Jha, Sumita

    2015-12-01

    The family Cucurbitaceae showcases a wide range of sexual phenotypes being variedly regulated by biological and environmental factors. In the present context, we have tried to assemble reports of cytogenetic investigations carried out in cucurbits accompanied by information on sex expression diversities and chromosomal or molecular basis of sex determination in dioecious (or other sexual types, if reported) taxa known so far. Most of the Cucurbitaceae tribes have mixed sexual phenotypes with varying range of chromosome numbers and hence, ancestral conditions become difficult to probe. Occurrence of polyploidy is rare in the family and has no influence on sexual traits. The sex determination mechanisms have been elucidated in some well-studied taxa like Bryonia,Coccinia and Cucumis showing interplay of genic, biochemical, developmental and sometimes chromosomal determinants. Substantial knowledge about genic and molecular sex differentiation has been obtained for genera like Momordica, Cucurbita and Trichosanthes. The detailed information on sex determination schemes, genomic sequences and molecular phylogenetic relationships facilitate further comprehensive investigations in the tribe Bryonieae. The discovery of organ identity genes and sex-specific sequences regulating sexual behaviour in Coccinia,Cucumis and Cucurbita opens up opportunities of relevant investigations to answer yet unaddressed questions pertaining to floral unisexuality, dioecy and chromosome evolution in the family. The present discussion brings the genera in light, previously recognized under subfamily Nhandiroboideae, where the study of chromosome cytology and sex determination mechanisms can simplify our understanding of sex expression pathways and its phylogenetic impacts. PMID:26690537

  20. Adults' judgments of fictional story quality.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Phyllis; Winship, Stephanie

    2002-04-01

    Narratives are commonly used for research and clinical purposes, but the ecological validity of our analyses needs verification. Do our macrostructural and microstructural narrative analysis methods give us an accurate picture of what would generally be considered "story quality"? We addressed this question by using 39 untrained adult judges who were presented with sets of brief stories, each set constructed to vary on a single story aspect (story grammar elements, story grammar structural pattern, referring expressions, or connectives). Judges ranked the stories in each set from best to worst. Results indicate that judges were generally sensitive to story features commonly used in narrative analyses, including characters' thoughts and feelings, goal-directedness, adequacy of referent introductions, and connectedness of clauses. However, they failed to make distinctions between stories that differed in types of connectives or referring expressions and had mixed reactions to description in stories. PMID:12003518

  1. Applying Community-Based Participatory Research Principles to the Development of a Smoking-Cessation Program for American Indian Teens: "Telling Our Story"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Kimberly; McCracken, Lyn; Dino, Geri; Brayboy, Missy

    2008-01-01

    Community-based participatory research provides communities and researchers with opportunities to develop interventions that are effective as well as acceptable and culturally competent. The present project responds to the voices of the North Carolina American Indian (AI) community and the desire for their youth to recognize tobacco addiction and…

  2. Stories That Make the World: Oral Literature of the Indian Peoples of the Inland Northwest As Told by Lawrence Aripa, Tom Yellowtail, and Other Elders. The Civilization of the American Indian Series, V. 218.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Rodney, Ed.

    Coeur d'Alene School District (Idaho) developed an American Indian oral literature curriculum component with the help of the neighboring Coeur d'Alene people. This book is based on a general background guide that provides classroom teachers with a context for understanding Coeur d'Alene narratives incorporated into the curriculum. The book also…

  3. Downriver Indians' Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; Exline, Jesse

    Yurok Indian legends in Yurok Unifon text include English translations of the entire texts in order to produce fluent reading for English speakers and a continuous text for Yurok readers. Although corresponding sentences are numbered, translation is not word-for-word or sentence-for-sentence. The five stories refer to a time when animals could…

  4. Hunting Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Frank

    Eleven stories describe traditional practices and true adventures of the Tlingit hunters of Southeast Alaska. The stories are accompanied by learning activities and discussion questions for students and are arranged under the headings of bear, mountain goat and deer, and seal and sea lion. Topics include hunting weapons and strategies, bravery,…

  5. Webcam Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clidas, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Stories, steeped in science content and full of specific information, can be brought into schools and homes through the power of live video streaming. Video streaming refers to the process of viewing video over the internet. These videos may be live (webcam feeds) or recorded. These stories are engaging and inspiring. They offer opportunities to…

  6. Ancient communion: Guidance from the ancestors. An Indian grandmother and granddaughter sharing stories on Native spirituality and Western science: Toward a theory of wholeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Fire Moon, Tandie Vera

    This study seeks to address the causes and potential solutions to the divisiveness and human destructiveness to humanity and the environment now reflected on a planetary scale. The research question is: How can Native American values enhance western thinking for the purpose of greater individual and planetary health? Fundamental research has been to develop the concept of `Integrity' as a model to explore various western concepts and Native knowledge as inter-facing systems. The model's formula integrates three major scientific theories-Relativity and Quantum Physics and Chaos, as a demonstration of the product of doing integrative thinking and research. Applying knowledge of Lakota Visionary Black Elk and other indigenous world views, this has evolved into a Unified Perceptual Field-``Toward a Theory of Wholeness.'' Study's goal is to utilize knowledge gained from this process to create greater positive choice in our fives, by designing systems that are highest functioning-creating greatest fulfillment, health and wholeness in the individual and the society. Methods of looking at data and wisdom in this study are the intuitive and analytical methodologies as defined in the Integrity Model. Part I, Visions and Stories from the DREAMTIME, reflects these knowledge quests. Within Part II, Native BASKETWEAVER Weaving New Realities, the thesis statement contains three major validations to emerge from this study: (1)The exploration inward reveals the deepest core of the material universe as the foundational, most subtle, powerful, infinitesimal quantum level of creation that we experience as our spiritual nature. (2)Trauma of physical impact by action, thought or word at early stages of human development disfigures the natural pattern of harmony, which is set into the biology/physiology-magnified and amplified in adult life, and mirrored out into space/time. (3)Early disturbance of one's perceptual intention (will/desire) weakens or breaks the natural underlying energy

  7. On the expression of psychosis in different cultures: schizophrenia in an Indian and in a Nigerian community.

    PubMed

    Katz, M M; Marsella, A; Dube, K C; Olatawura, M; Takahashi, R; Nakane, Y; Wynne, L C; Gift, T; Brennan, J; Sartorius, N

    1988-09-01

    This sub-study of the WHO Determinants of Outcome of Severe Mental Disorders research project was aimed at characterizing the behavioral and expressive qualities of schizophrenia in two highly diverse cultures. Early research has indicated that the core elements involving affect, perceptual and cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia are highly similar in form in most cultures of the world. Much of the cross-cultural literature emphasizes, however, strong differences in the ways in which schizophrenia is actually expressed and manifested in different settings. The basic methodology for psychiatric description and diagnosis in the WHO program was the Present State Examination. In five of the field centers a method for investigating the expressive quality and the social behavior of patients in their own communities through the eyes of significant others was applied. This method was then subjected to psychometric tests of cross-cultural applicability and found to be valid for comparing behavior across settings. The expressive patterns of the Indian and Nigerian patients were studied from two perspectives. Indian schizophrenics were described by family members as manifesting a more affective and "self-centered" orientation; the Nigerian patients presented with a highly suspicious, bizarre, anxious quality to the basic behavioral pattern. The main features of pathology were in general accord with the descriptions of indigenous psychiatrists. The special qualities of the psychosis in the two cultures were interpreted against the background of traditional psychopathological and anthropologic theories concerning the psychodynamics and the influence of differing social conflictual themes in the two cultures. Analysis of psychopathology in this manner was found to enhance understanding of underlying mechanisms and the role of cultural conflicts in its expression. PMID:3234016

  8. Creation of a California Tribe: Grandfather's Maidu Indian Tales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Trafzer, Lee Ann; Trafzer, Clifford E.

    This children's book relates the story of Travis and Laura and how their grandfather, a Maidu Indian, teaches them about their history and culture through stories. The book stresses the importance of storytelling as the traditional way of passing on the history of Indian peoples. As part of a school project, Travis tells his classmates the Maidu…

  9. Stroke Stories

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Stroke Rehabilitation Stroke Stories Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of ... she has returned to an active life after rehabilitation. Tedy Bruschi: The New England Patriots linebacker was ...

  10. Story Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swafford, Jane; McGinty, Robert

    1978-01-01

    A concrete approach to prime numbers is presented using rectangles and triangles to construct a building for each number so that each story represents a pair of factors and the triangular-shaped roof represents the number. (MP)

  11. A Modern Indian Speaks: Under One Flag

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bad Wound, Wayne

    1974-01-01

    Written by an Oglala Sioux Indian student for a creative writing contest, this story said that all people could live in peace with one another if they would follow the lessons given in the Bible. (AH)

  12. American Indian Literature Appropriate for Secondary and Middle-Level Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Jim

    American Indian literature deserves a more prominent place in the English language arts curriculum. Oral literature of American Indians includes didactic stories, told to maintain tribal mores and value systems; it also includes humorous and entertaining stories, as well as histories of various American Indian peoples. Anthropologists and…

  13. The Man from South: Reconsidering Navajo Students' Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benjamin, Rebecca

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes the structural and thematic elements of three stories written by a sixth-grade Navajo girl to challenge the notion that a linear pattern of growth is followed by all children as they learn to write stories. The results question the assumption that certain kinds of narratives and their American Indian authors are less able or less…

  14. Stories of Our Blackfeet Grandmothers. Blackfeet Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Running Crane, Jenny; And Others

    The text of this document was taken from a videotape of anecdotal stories told by Blackfeet elders to students at the Heart Butte School during the spring of 1983. An explanation of the transliterated Blackfeet language is presented. The stories are given in both English and Blackfeet. "No More Buffalo" describes Indian life in Montana during…

  15. [Andrea's story].

    PubMed

    Nobili, A; Tognoni, G; Staszewsky, L

    2001-01-01

    First-hand accounts of illness experiences provide important insights for other patients and their carers and can be a powerful tool for patient information and professional education. Andrea was ran over by a motor-bike while he was carried by bike and reported a complicated femur fracture. Three different representations of the story are reported and confronted: the bold chronicle of events, that sets the scenery and time sequence; Andrea's mother point of view on what happened after the accident, and during the course of the illness; and Andrea's story, told with his words and drawings. The methodological comments offered as discussion, stress how the collection of relevant patients stories can be a valuable research resource because it can offer a broad perspective which cannot be obtained by other means. PMID:11910835

  16. Indian School: Teaching the White Man's Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Michael L.

    This book for young people examines the history, purpose, and daily routine of government-operated boarding schools for American Indians and tells the personal stories, often in their own words, of several young students. Chapter 1 describes the journey to Pennsylvania of the first Indian children to attend the Carlisle school in 1879. Chapter 2…

  17. Cytochrome P450 1A1 expression in cetacean skin biopsies from the Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Jauniaux, Thierry; Farnir, Frédéric; Fontaine, Michaël; Kiszka, Jeremy; Sarlet, Michael; Coignoul, Freddy

    2011-06-01

    The study describes cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYPA1) expression in the skin of different cetacean species (Megaptera novaeangliae, n=15; Stenella attenuata, n=7 and Stenella longirostris, n=24) from the Mozambique Channel island of Mayotte. Immunohistochemical examination was performed with a monoclonal antibody against scup cytochrome CYPA1. The sex was determined using a molecular approach consisting in the genotyping sex-specific genes. CYPA1 was detected at the junction between epidermis and blubber on dolphins only, mostly in the endothelial cells. Similar observation was obtained in the dermis of one M. novaeangliae. Immunohistochemical slides were scored to evaluate the expression of the CYPA1 and a higher expression was observed in S. longirostris, suggesting a higher exposure to pollutants for this species. The difference of expression between sexes was not significant. PMID:21565363

  18. Silly Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reading Teacher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    There are many different kinds of words in the English language. Instruction in grammar and syntax helps young writers sort out when to use a plural or singular noun, or when to use an apostrophe. Silly Stories, a variation of a popular party game, reinforces the importance of word choice and conventions in writing. This article describes a…

  19. Molecular characterization of Indian isolate of peanut mottle virus and immunodiagnosis using bacterial expressed core capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Soumya, K; Yogita, M; Prasanthi, Y; Anitha, K; Kishor, P B Kavi; Jain, R K; Mandal, Bikash

    2014-01-01

    Peanut mottle virus (PeMoV), a seed borne potyvirus was recorded in India in 1978, however the virus was not characterized at molecular level. In the present study, an isolate of PeMoV infecting peanut in southern India was characterized based on host reactions and coat protein (CP) gene sequence, which revealed that the Indian isolate was very close to a peanut isolate reported from Israel and distinct from pea isolate reported from USA. The core region of CP gene that contained majority of the predicted epitopes was successfully expressed (1.75 mg/l) in Escherichia coli as a 22 kDa protein. A high titer polyclonal antibody (PAb) to the expressed core CP was produced, which efficiently detected PeMoV. The antiserum was useful in specific detection of PeMoV as it showed negligible cross reactivity with the other potyviruses e.g., peanut stripe virus, potato virus Y, papaya ringspot virus and onion yellow dwarf virus. The PAb was validated in ELISA using 1,169 field and greenhouse samples of peanut which showed 1.85-26.3 % incidence of PeMoV in peanut seed multiplication field during 2011-2012. This is the first report of immunodiagnosis of PeMoV with a PAb to recombinant core CP of PeMoV. PMID:25674600

  20. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and expression of Fein-Penaeidin from the haemocytes of Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus

    PubMed Central

    Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Shanthi, Sathappan; Chen, Jiann-Chu; Espiñeira, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    Penaeidins are members of a special family of antimicrobial peptide existing in penaeid shrimp and play an important role in the immunological defense of shrimp. Here, we report a penaeidin sequence cloned from the Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaus indicus (Fein-Penaeidin). The Fein-Penaeidin open reading frame encodes a 77 amino acid peptide including a 19 amino acid signal peptide. The deduced amino acid sequences of Fein-Penaeidin include a proline rich N-terminal domain and a carboxyl-domain that contains six cysteine residues. Structural analysis revealed an alpha-helix in its secondary structure and the predicted 3D structure indicated two-disulphide bridges in the alpha-helix. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparison with other known peaneidin suggest the gene shows high similarity to that of penaeidin from Peneaus monodon (95%), F. indicus (80%) and Fenneropenaeus chinensis (74%). Fein-Penaeidin was examined in normal and microbial challenged shrimp and was found to be constitutively expressed in haemocytes, Heart, gills, muscles, intestine, hepatopancreas and eyestalk. Bacterial challenge resulted in mRNA up-regulation, inducing expression at 6 h post injection indicating the penaeidin involved in the innate immunity. PMID:24371565

  1. Sir William Johnson and the Indians of New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Milton W.

    In order to make the vast literature about the history of Indian and white relations in New York readily accessible to teachers, students, and general readers, this booklet brings together the main points of the relationship between the Indians and Sir William Johnson. Johnson is a key figure in the Indian story of New York state during the 1770s.…

  2. Anti-HIV microRNA expression in a novel Indian cohort.

    PubMed

    Dey, Rakesh; Soni, Kartik; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Kumar, Vikram; Boobalan, Jayaseelan; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Scaria, Vinod; Solomon, Suniti; Brahmachari, Samir K; Pillai, Beena

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 replication inside host cells is known to be regulated by various host factors. Host miRNAs, by virtue of its normal functioning, also regulate HIV-1 RNA expression by either directly targeting virus mRNAs or indirectly by regulating host proteins that HIV-1 uses for own replication. Therefore, it is highly possible that with differential miRNA expression, rate of disease progression will vary in HIV-1 infected individuals. In this study we have compared expression of a panel of 13 reported anti-HIV miRNAs in human PBMCs from long term non progressors (LTNPs), regular progressors and rapid progressors. We found that LTNPs have substantial lower expression of miR-382-5p that positively correlates with viral loads. Combinatorial regulation is highly probable in dictating differential disease progression as average expression of miR-382-5p and miR-155-5p can substantially distinguish LTNP individuals from regular progressors. PMID:27320691

  3. Anti-HIV microRNA expression in a novel Indian cohort

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Rakesh; Soni, Kartik; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Kumar, Vikram; Boobalan, Jayaseelan; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Scaria, Vinod; Solomon, Suniti; Brahmachari, Samir K.; Pillai, Beena

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 replication inside host cells is known to be regulated by various host factors. Host miRNAs, by virtue of its normal functioning, also regulate HIV-1 RNA expression by either directly targeting virus mRNAs or indirectly by regulating host proteins that HIV-1 uses for own replication. Therefore, it is highly possible that with differential miRNA expression, rate of disease progression will vary in HIV-1 infected individuals. In this study we have compared expression of a panel of 13 reported anti-HIV miRNAs in human PBMCs from long term non progressors (LTNPs), regular progressors and rapid progressors. We found that LTNPs have substantial lower expression of miR-382-5p that positively correlates with viral loads. Combinatorial regulation is highly probable in dictating differential disease progression as average expression of miR-382-5p and miR-155-5p can substantially distinguish LTNP individuals from regular progressors. PMID:27320691

  4. How and Why Stories for Readers Theatre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfman, Judy

    2004-01-01

    How did the bee get his bumble? How do birds get their feathers? Why is the bluebird blue? Curious first through fifth graders want to know how and why things happen! Judy Wolfman has created 40 Readers Theatre scripts based on imaginative and creative porquoi stories that stem from multicultural folktales as well as Native American Indian legends…

  5. Hannah's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorner, Kelly

    2006-01-01

    This is the story of my daughter, Hannah. Hannah is an amazing child. She can speak, read, and write English. She can play the piano and violin and she is mainstreamed into a third grade class. Hannah was born profoundly deaf and was not diagnosed until she was almost two years old. She received a cochlear implant when she was 2 1/2 years old.…

  6. Job's story and family health.

    PubMed

    Badalamenti, Anthony F

    2009-06-01

    This paper examines the book of Job for encoded psychological meaning. Its main conclusion is that the story imagery expresses a need to rectify fatherly and parental oblivion for a child who is the object of the destructive envy of a sibling. A family dynamic is constructed from the story's repeated emphasis of Job's blamelessness and the story's position that Satan both proposes and causes Job's sufferings. The emergent family model sees Job as representing a son, Satan an envious rival, and God a father or parent(s). This paper proposes that Job's story may be reactive to a period where male authority was at risk of becoming excessive, threatening family and community health. PMID:19421870

  7. Emotional Facial and Vocal Expressions during Story Retelling by Children and Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Ruth B.; Edelson, Lisa R.; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: People with high-functioning autism (HFA) have qualitative differences in facial expression and prosody production, which are rarely systematically quantified. The authors' goals were to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze prosody and facial expression productions in children and adolescents with HFA. Method: Participants were…

  8. "Unless They Are Kept Alive": Federal Indian Schools and Student Health, 1878-1918

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dejong, David H.

    2007-01-01

    During the first decades of the federal government's Indian boarding schools, stories of morbidity and mortality among students were prevalent. In August 1915 Commissioner of Indian Affairs Cato Sells arrived in San Francisco to address the Congress of Indian Progress, an organization dedicated to the social advancement of American Indians. Waxing…

  9. Withania somnifera Dunal (Indian ginseng) impairs acquisition and expression of ethanol-elicited conditioned place preference and conditioned place aversion.

    PubMed

    Spina, Liliana; Longoni, Rosanna; Rosas, Michela; Collu, Maria; Peana, Alessandra T; Espa, Elena; Kasture, Sanjay; Cotti, Elisabetta; Acquas, Elio

    2015-11-01

    Withania somnifera Dunal (Indian Ginseng) has recently been shown to impair ethanol self-administration. In order to gain further insights on the ability of the Withania somnifera standardised root extract (WSE) to affect the motivational properties of ethanol, this study investigated whether WSE may also affect ethanol (2 g/kg)-elicited conditioned place preference (CPP) and aversion (CPA). To this end male CD-1 mice were conditioned under two distinct schedules: in backward conditioning experiments ethanol was administered before mice were placed in the conditioning apparatus (CPP) while, in forward conditioning experiments, ethanol was administered immediately after removing mice from the apparatus (CPA). Following these schedules, mice developed significant CPP and CPA, respectively. Administration of WSE significantly impaired both the acquisition (50 and 100 mg/kg) and the expression (50 mg/kg) of CPP and CPA without affecting spatial memory (50 mg/kg), as determined by a two-trial memory recognition task. Overall, the study highlights the ability of WSE to interfere with both positive and negative motivational properties of ethanol and suggests that the effects of WSE may target both ethanol's motivational properties and underpinning associative learning mechanisms. In conclusion, these results cast new light on Withania somnifera as an agent potentially useful to counteract distinct aspects of ethanol effects. PMID:26349555

  10. Timed food availability affects circadian behavior but not the neuropeptide Y expression in Indian weaverbirds exposed to atypical light environment.

    PubMed

    Singh, Devraj; Trivedi, Neerja; Malik, Shalie; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis whether daily food availability period would restore rhythmicity in individuals with disrupted circadian behavior with no effect on appetite regulation. Particularly, we investigated the effects of timed food availability on activity behavior, and Fos and neuropeptide Y expressions in Indian weaverbirds (Ploceus philippinus) under atypical light conditions. Initially, weaverbirds in 3 groups of 7-8 each were entrained to 7L:17D (25: <0.3lx) with food ad libitum. Thereafter, food availability was restricted for 7h such that it overlapped with the light period. After a week, 7L:17D was replaced with 3.5L: 3.5D (T7, group 1), 3.5L: 20.5D (T24, group 2) or constant dim light, LLdim (<0.3lx, group 3) for 5weeks. Food cycles synchronized the circadian activity behavior, albeit with group differences, but did not affect body mass, blood glucose levels or testis size. Further, Fos, not NPY mRNA or peptide, expression measured at ZT2 and ZT14 (ZT0=time of food given) showed significant group differences in the hippocampus, dorsomedial hypothalamus and infundibular nuclear complex. Another identical experiment examined after-effects of the 3 light conditions on persistence of the circadian rhythms. Weaverbirds exposed for 4weeks to identical food but different light conditions, as above, were released into the free-running condition of food ad libitum and LLdim. Circadian rhythms were decayed in birds previously exposed to T7 LD cycle. Overall, these results show that timed meal restores rhythmicity in individuals with circadian rhythm disruptions without involving neuropeptide Y, the key appetite regulatory molecule. PMID:27085910

  11. Using Stories Effectively with Infants and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birckmayer, Jennifer; Kennedy, Anne; Stonehouse, Anne

    2009-01-01

    In this excerpt from the book "From Lullabies to Literature: Stories in the Lives of Infants and Toddlers," the authors offer dos and don'ts for sharing story experiences with very young children. They include tips such as keeping groups intimate, showing pleasure and enthusiasm, being expressive, and using props. The authors suggest story…

  12. Story Map: How to Improve Writing Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidekli, Sabri

    2013-01-01

    The aim of written expression studies is to have students explain their knowledge, feelings, ideas and imaginations in a correct and effective manner. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of story map on story writing skills of first grade teacher candidates who study at the Department of Elementary Education. The…

  13. Effects of Story Reading on Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivas, Eleonora

    1996-01-01

    Reports on an experimental investigation of the effects of a systematic, story-reading-aloud program on some language variables in preschool and first-grade children. Results indicate that both age groups significantly increased their language comprehension and expressions when listening to stories read aloud, either at home or at school. (25…

  14. Powhatan, The Story of an American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nee, Kay Bonner

    Written for students in grades five and up, this biography focuses upon the later years of the Algonquin chief, Powhatan, and his efforts to achieve peace with the Jamestown, Virginia colonists around 1607. As the chief ruling over 32 separate tribes in the Powhatan Confederacy, Powhatan's dedication to peace is described in terms of the sacrifice…

  15. Popcorn Story Frames.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLella, Carol Ann

    This paper presents "popcorn story frames"--holistic outlines that facilitate comprehension when reading and writing stories, useful for outlining stories read and for creating outlines for original student stories--that are particularly useful for elementary and intermediate school students. "Popcorn" pops in a horizontal manner rather than in a…

  16. Storying Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blenkinsop, Sean; Judson, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    This paper sets out to explore the role of story in education. Through the employment of story itself as medium the discussion examines how story is currently used in educational settings. The next step is to posit story as a learning tool and curricular heavy-lifter through introduction to the theory of Imaginative Education as proposed by Kieran…

  17. Coyote in the Classroom: The Use of American Indian Oral Tradition with Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tafoya, Terry

    Stories from oral tradition such as legends, myths, and fairy tales may more fully describe reality than any newscast for young children. As Bruno Bettelheim points out, stories meet the psychological need of all human children. The Yakima Indian legend "When Mosquitos Ate People" can be used in a flannel board story telling setting with young…

  18. Utilizing Traditional Storytelling to Promote Wellness in American Indian Communities

    PubMed Central

    HODGE, FELICIA SCHANCHE; PASQUA, ANNA; MARQUEZ, CAROL A.; GEISHIRT-CANTRELL, BETTY

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing storytelling to transmit educational messages is a traditional pedagogical method practiced by many American Indian tribes. American Indian stories are effective because they present essential ideas and values in a simple, entertaining form. Different story characters show positive and negative behaviors. The stories illustrate consequences of behaviors and invite listeners to come to their own conclusions after personal reflection. Because stories have been passed down through tribal communities for generations, listeners also have the opportunity to reconnect and identify with past tribal realities. This article reports on a research intervention that is unique in promoting health and wellness through the use of storytelling. The project utilized stories to help motivate tribal members to once more adopt healthy, traditional lifestyles and practices. The authors present and discuss the stories selected, techniques used in their telling, the preparation and setting for the storytelling, and the involvement and interaction of the group. PMID:11776018

  19. Indian Government and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starblanket, Noel V.

    1981-01-01

    Accountability for Indian education must be shared among the chiefs and their councils, the Indian leaders at all levels, parents and students. This may be accomplished by Indian control of Indian education. Available from: Department of Educational Foundations, 5-109 Education North, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2G5. (ERB)

  20. Bakk'autugh Ts'uhuniy = Stories We Live By. Traditional Koyukon Athabaskan Stories Told by Catherine Attla, with Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Eliza, Ed.; And Others

    This collection of eighteen traditional stories are told in Koyukon Athabaskan, an American Indian language variety spoken in Alaska, on the left page and in English translation on the right page. Introductory sections provide background information on the oral tradition from which the stories come, the translations, the storyteller and her…

  1. Little Blaze and the Buffalo Jump. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roop, Peter

    The reader is one in a series of stories of the Blackfeet Indians which take place when the people were at the height of their power, hunting buffalo north to the North Saskatchewan River, south to the Yellowstone River, east to the Montana-North Dakota border, and west to the Rocky Mountains. The story is about Little Blaze, a young Blackfeet…

  2. "Coyote Was Walking...": Management Education in Indian Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbos, Amy Klemm; Kennedy, Deanna M.; Gladstone, Joe S.

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a Coyote story to illustrate Native American perspectives on time, teaching, and learning. Coyote stories invoke Indian Time, a traditional Native American perception of time that progresses through events rather than minutes on a clock. Coyote, a trickster, wanders and investigates, interacting with animate creatures and…

  3. The Path Tells a Story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nack, Frank

    Stories have been shared in every culture because they are a powerful means to entertain, educate, and preserve traditions or instill values. In the history of storytelling technological evolution has changed the tools available to storytellers, from primarily oral representations that have been enriched with gestures and expressions to the sophisticated forms we enjoy today, such as film or complex layered hypermedia environments. Despite these developments the traditional linear presentation of a story is still the most dominant. Yet, the first decade of the twenty-first century established a technology that finally, after many attempts, can challenge the dogma of passive linearity. It is mobile technology that makes people aware that a digital environment opens opportunities to everybody to freely socialize through and with stories relevant for the current spatial, temporal, and social context.

  4. Story Telling or Storied Telling? Media's Pedagogical Ability to Shape Narrative as a Form of "Knowing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blevins, Dean G.

    2007-01-01

    Storytellers know that stories are "formed" in their telling. Stories, whether oral or written, personal or mass communicated, ultimately express the boundaries of their medium (their "embodiment" through mediated forms). Religious Educators must always address the medium as well as the message in any theory of narrative accounting. Media often…

  5. Nitrogen-Efficient and Nitrogen-Inefficient Indian Mustard Showed Differential Expression Pattern of Proteins in Response to Elevated CO2 and Low Nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Peerzada Y; Ganie, Arshid H; Khan, Ishrat; Qureshi, Mohammad I; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Sarwat, Maryam; Iqbal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are two essential elements that influence plant growth and development. The C and N metabolic pathways influence each other to affect gene expression, but little is known about which genes are regulated by interaction between C and N or the mechanisms by which the pathways interact. In the present investigation, proteome analysis of N-efficient and N-inefficient Indian mustard, grown under varied combinations of low-N, sufficient-N, ambient [CO2], and elevated [CO2] was carried out to identify proteins and the encoding genes of the interactions between C and N. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed 158 candidate protein spots. Among these, 72 spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins are related to various molecular processes including photosynthesis, energy metabolism, protein synthesis, transport and degradation, signal transduction, nitrogen metabolism and defense to oxidative, water and heat stresses. Identification of proteins like PII-like protein, cyclophilin, elongation factor-TU, oxygen-evolving enhancer protein and rubisco activase offers a peculiar overview of changes elicited by elevated [CO2], providing clues about how N-efficient cultivar of Indian mustard adapt to low N supply under elevated [CO2] conditions. This study provides new insights and novel information for a better understanding of adaptive responses to elevated [CO2] under N deficiency in Indian mustard. PMID:27524987

  6. Nitrogen-Efficient and Nitrogen-Inefficient Indian Mustard Showed Differential Expression Pattern of Proteins in Response to Elevated CO2 and Low Nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Yousuf, Peerzada Y.; Ganie, Arshid H.; Khan, Ishrat; Qureshi, Mohammad I.; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Sarwat, Maryam; Iqbal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are two essential elements that influence plant growth and development. The C and N metabolic pathways influence each other to affect gene expression, but little is known about which genes are regulated by interaction between C and N or the mechanisms by which the pathways interact. In the present investigation, proteome analysis of N-efficient and N-inefficient Indian mustard, grown under varied combinations of low-N, sufficient-N, ambient [CO2], and elevated [CO2] was carried out to identify proteins and the encoding genes of the interactions between C and N. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed 158 candidate protein spots. Among these, 72 spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). The identified proteins are related to various molecular processes including photosynthesis, energy metabolism, protein synthesis, transport and degradation, signal transduction, nitrogen metabolism and defense to oxidative, water and heat stresses. Identification of proteins like PII-like protein, cyclophilin, elongation factor-TU, oxygen-evolving enhancer protein and rubisco activase offers a peculiar overview of changes elicited by elevated [CO2], providing clues about how N-efficient cultivar of Indian mustard adapt to low N supply under elevated [CO2] conditions. This study provides new insights and novel information for a better understanding of adaptive responses to elevated [CO2] under N deficiency in Indian mustard. PMID:27524987

  7. Regulation of gene expression by internal ribosome entry sites or cryptic promoters: the eIF4G story.

    PubMed

    Han, Baoguang; Zhang, Jian-Ting

    2002-11-01

    As an alternative to the scanning mechanism of initiation, the direct-internal-initiation mechanism postulates that the translational machinery assembles at the AUG start codon without traversing the entire 5' untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the mRNA. Although the existence of internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) in viral mRNAs is considered to be well established, the existence of IRESs in cellular mRNAs has recently been challenged, in part because when testing is carried out using a conventional dicistronic vector, Northern blot analyses might not be sensitive enough to detect low levels of monocistronic transcripts derived via a cryptic promoter or splice site. To address this concern, we created a new promoterless dicistronic vector to test the putative IRES derived from the 5'-UTR of an mRNA that encodes the translation initiation factor eIF4G. Our analysis of this 5'-UTR sequence unexpectedly revealed a strong promoter. The activity of the internal promoter relies on the integrity of a polypyrimidine tract (PPT) sequence that had been identified as an essential component of the IRES. The PPT sequence overlaps with a binding site for transcription factor C/EBPbeta. Two other transcription factors, Sp1 and Ets, were also found to bind to and mediate expression from the promoter in the 5'-UTR of eIF4G mRNA. The biological significance of the internal promoter in the eIF4G mRNA might lie in the production of an N-terminally truncated form of the protein. Consistent with the idea that the cryptic promoter we identified underlies the previously reported IRES activity, we found no evidence of IRES function when a dicistronic mRNA containing the eIF4G sequence was translated in vitro or in vivo. Using the promoterless dicistronic vector, we also found promoter activities in the long 5'-UTRs of human Sno and mouse Bad mRNAs although monocistronic transcripts were not detectable on Northern blot analyses. The promoterless dicistronic vector might therefore prove

  8. Prerana: a success story.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Prerana-Associate CEDPA, a women- and youth-focused community organization headquartered in New Delhi, has expanded its program activities with recent grants from two leading donors, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and the Rockefeller Foundation. CEDPA provides important support through grants from The Xerox Foundation, The Turner Foundation, World Bank, and the US Agency for International Development. Founded in 1976, Prerana--whose name means "Inspiration" in Hindi--has grown steadily as knowledge of its comprehensive community-based program has spread. The organization conducts the CEDPA Better Life Options health, education, and vocational skills programs for girls and young women, maternal and child health services, and integrated community-based family planning. A parallel Better Life Options program for boys and young men was recently started. With almost 20 years of experience in the private sector, Prerana provides training and assistance to other private organizations. Prerana's Better Life Options program received international recognition in UNFPA's "The State of World Population 1994." The publication featured an article by a young Indian woman who participated in the program and as a result was able to develop life skills, improve her self-esteem, and, with her husband, decide to delay parenthood. "This success story," said Prerana Executive Director Dr. Uma Agarwal (WIM 29), "is being repeated by many other girls who find support at Prerana." PMID:12288432

  9. Bilingualism without Diglossia: The Indian Community in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaish, Viniti

    2007-01-01

    This paper tells a tentative story from the preliminary findings of The Sociolinguistic Survey of Singapore, 2006 (SSS 2006). Though the main study reports on language use amongst Chinese, Malay and Indian communities, my focus is only on Indian homes. The paper reports results from five domains: school, family and friends, media, public space and…

  10. "Two People": An American Indian Narrative of Bicultural Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta

    1996-01-01

    Discusses effects of acculturation on American Indian youth in terms of bicultural competence and identity development. The narrative or life-story of a Cherokee elder who is both mainstream physician and traditional medicine man elaborates on the traditional Indian approach to "learning the Medicine," and is divided according to five stages of…

  11. Indian Resistance: The Patriot Chiefs. Jackdaw No. A 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephy, Alvin M., Jr., Comp.; Strouse, Jean, Comp.

    The story of the resistance of the American Indian to the conquest of his lands unfolds in this outline intended for senior high school students. The contents cover events from the landing of the Pilgrims on Plymouth Rock to the occupation of Alcatraz in San Francisco Bay by the Indians in 1970. Among the items included in the packet are the…

  12. Wisconsin Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nancy Oestreich

    Wisconsin encompasses an astonishingly representative illustration of the total historical development of federal Indian policy and Indian reactions to it. Wisconsin's Indian population (at least 25,000 people) is the third largest east of the Mississippi River and offers great diversity (3 major linguistic stocks, 6 broad tribal affiliations, and…

  13. Keepers of the Animals: Native American Stories and Wildlife Activities for Children and Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caduto, Michael J.; Bruchac, Joseph

    Twenty-four stories in this book provide a program of study in Native North American Indian culture. The stories introduce the concepts of wildlife ecology and environmental and stewardship issues concerning animals, habitat, and natural history. The field-tested activities encourage creative thinking and synthesis of knowledge and experience by…

  14. Under the IAIA Dome: Acclaimed Filmmaker Inspires Students to Tell Stories with New Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Janet

    2010-01-01

    The first thing J. Carlos Peinado tells his students is that every good story begins with a story. Peinado chairs the New Media Arts Department at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA, Santa Fe, New Mexico). He lives what he teaches. Before coming to IAIA, he worked as a professional filmmaker, most recently training his lens on the Fort…

  15. Hindi Stories: A Dual Language Reader for Area and Advanced Language Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1975

    The translator selected six short stories by modern Indian writers and compiled them as a reader for advanced students of Hindi and Area Studies. The Hindi text on the right-hand page is translated into English on the left. The stories were selected to include vignettes of urban and rural life and characters from both middle and lower class…

  16. Telling the Human Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  17. Oklahoma Indians and the Cultural Deprivation of an Oklahoma Cherokee Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaver, Lynda Dixon

    This paper summarizes the history of Oklahoma Indians, highlights the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, and relates the story of the family of one Oklahoma Cherokee woman, Lou Jane Morgan Jernigan. Oklahoma is the state with the largest population of Indians, largely due to federal policy in the 19th century, which forced Indians into Oklahoma (or…

  18. Stories: The Function of Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandler, Jean M.

    The differences between story grammar and story schema are outlined and discussed based on research on story understanding by children and adults. The contention of all story grammars is that stories have a relatively invariant structure despite great differences in story content. The importance of structure within folk tales, and the ways in…

  19. The Short Story as HyperStory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Charles E.

    A software application called HyperStory is a reading program for short fiction which has proved to be effective in the classroom. In 3 years of use, over 300 students have tried it out. Part of the reason for its suitability for helping students develop short story reading skills lies in the relationship between the computer technology known as…

  20. SketchStory: telling more engaging stories with data through freeform sketching.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bongshin; Kazi, Rubaiat Habib; Smith, Greg

    2013-12-01

    Presenting and communicating insights to an audience-telling a story-is one of the main goals of data exploration. Even though visualization as a storytelling medium has recently begun to gain attention, storytelling is still underexplored in information visualization and little research has been done to help people tell their stories with data. To create a new, more engaging form of storytelling with data, we leverage and extend the narrative storytelling attributes of whiteboard animation with pen and touch interactions. We present SketchStory, a data-enabled digital whiteboard that facilitates the creation of personalized and expressive data charts quickly and easily. SketchStory recognizes a small set of sketch gestures for chart invocation, and automatically completes charts by synthesizing the visuals from the presenter-provided example icon and binding them to the underlying data. Furthermore, SketchStory allows the presenter to move and resize the completed data charts with touch, and filter the underlying data to facilitate interactive exploration. We conducted a controlled experiment for both audiences and presenters to compare SketchStory with a traditional presentation system, Microsoft PowerPoint. Results show that the audience is more engaged by presentations done with SketchStory than PowerPoint. Eighteen out of 24 audience participants preferred SketchStory to PowerPoint. Four out of five presenter participants also favored SketchStory despite the extra effort required for presentation. PMID:24051808

  1. Story Book Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enfield, Mark; Mathew, Eliza

    2012-01-01

    Young children love stories, and teachers love to read stories. Young children also love to explore the motion of objects--they watch tossed balls, observe objects rolling down ramps, and are mesmerized by spinning tops. Yet it can be challenging to integrate these two loves, stories and exploring motion, in one lesson. Furthermore, while children…

  2. Story as World Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Kathy G.

    2012-01-01

    Stories are woven so tightly into the fabric of our everyday lives that it's easy to overlook their significance in framing how we think about ourselves and the world. Stories are meaning making, providing a means of structuring and reflecting on our experiences in order to understand their significance. Story is also life making, a way of…

  3. Dramatizing Short Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zilberwasser, Simona; Dar, Etti; Livny, Michal; Shotts, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a project that dealt with two short stories in a different way. The stories were part of the Oral Bagrut exam for Grade 11 students. The stories were taught in English class and concentrated on theme and vocabulary. (Author/VWL)

  4. Witness to the Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottle, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    If, as many allege, we are the stories that we tell, then these stories might well be seen as constituting a fundamental piece of the self. But stories need to be heard, just as the self requires witnesses. In the lives of most people, counselors and teachers, along with parents, represent the most significant witnesses in our lives and hence to…

  5. Imagination Express: Create Interactive Stories Fueled by the Power of Your Imagination. Destination: Rain Forest (CD-ROM disk and User's Guide).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1995

    Designed by educator-led development teams who view the computer as an enabling technology that encourages children to become active learners, this CD-ROM disk is intended for students in kindergarten through grade 6. The disk enables students to create interactive stories fueled by the power of their imaginations and create adventures set in an…

  6. Story telling: a creative therapeutic technique.

    PubMed

    Stirtzinger, R M

    1983-11-01

    This paper describes the "mutual story telling" therapy as it is used to aid the young child Joshua in finding healthy ways of dealing with conflicts that cause disruptions in his home and school life. In this therapeutic process, Joshua's stories illustrate growth in ability to integrate good and bad parts of himself, to acknowledge his own anger and to express it without fear of annihilation; to feel the ego strength necessary to allow him to explore his external world. PMID:6652608

  7. Literature of the American Indian. Abridged Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Thomas E.; Peek, Walter W.

    From ancient stories of creation to contemporary poetry and prose, this volume ranges through thousands of years of the literature of the American Indian. Chapter One of the book deals with pre-Columbian religions and features accounts of the Creation by the Cheyenne, Navajo, Omaha, Yakima, Zuni, and Uitoto. Chapter Two has as its theme folk…

  8. Counting Coup: A True Story of Basketball and Honor on the Little Big Horn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Larry

    In Plains Indian tradition, a warrior gained honor and glory by "counting coup," touching his enemy in battle and living to tell the tale. This is a modern story of counting coup that follows a talented young woman named Sharon LaForge, a gifted basketball player and a descendant of one of George Armstrong Custer's Indian scouts. Although the…

  9. Sequencing Stories in Spanish and English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steckbeck, Pamela Meza

    The guide was designed for speech pathologists, bilingual teachers, and specialists in English as a second language who work with Spanish-speaking children. The guide contains twenty illustrated stories that facilitate the learning of auditory sequencing, auditory and visual memory, receptive and expressive vocabulary, and expressive language…

  10. Narrative Analysis: Clinical Applications of Story Generation and Story Retelling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Donna DiSegna; Liles, Betty Z.

    1989-01-01

    Twenty language-disordered and 20 nonimpaired children, aged 9-11, performed story generation and story retelling tasks. For both groups, retold narratives were longer and contained more story grammar components and complete episode structures. Clause length differentiated story generation from story retelling for the language-disordered children…

  11. Hypoxia induced altered expression of heat shock protein genes (Hsc71, Hsp90α and Hsp10) in Indian Catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linnaeus, 1758) under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Mohindra, Vindhya; Tripathi, Ratnesh K; Yadav, Prabhaker; Singh, Rajeev K; Lal, Kuldeep K

    2015-07-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are typically associated with stress response and tolerance. The Indian catfish, Clarias batrachus, is a freshwater air-breathing hypoxia tolerant teleost and is potentially important catfish species for aquaculture and for its economic value as food. The present study aimed at determining the transcriptional response of three Hsps, CbHsc71, CbHsp90α and CbHsp10 in hypoxia tolerant Indian catfish, C. batrachus, under experimental and natural hypoxia. The expression profile of above three genes were studied under different periods of hypoxia, through qRT-PCR. Primers were designed from ESTs obtained through SSH libraries constructed from hypoxia treated fishes. The Hsp10 ESTs and deduced protein was in silico characterized for its ORF and for its physical and chemical properties, respectively, using GeneScan, blastp, scanprosite, superfamily and other softwares. A phylogenetic tree was constructed based on deduced amino acid sequences of Hsc71, Hsp90α, Hsp90β of Homo sapiens and other fishes along with CbHsp10 protein in MEGA4. The deduced protein sequences of CbHsp10 was found to have characteristic Hsp10 family signatures, and it is proposed for inclusion of methionine in the consensus sequences of Hsp10 family signature, after the "proline" residue. At transcription level, these genes were found to be differentially regulated under hypoxia stress, in different tissues of C. batrachus. The CbHsc71 and CbHsp90α were up-regulated after short and long-term hypoxia, whereas CbHsp10 was significantly down-regulated after short-term hypoxia. The differential expression of these Hsps may play a role in protection and survival under hypoxia induced oxidative stress in C. batrachus. PMID:25663092

  12. Characterization and expression analysis of gene encoding heme peroxidase HPX15 in major Indian malaria vector Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Kakani, Parik; Choudhury, Tania Pal; Gupta, Kuldeep; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-06-01

    The interaction of mosquito immune system with Plasmodium is critical in determining the vector competence. Thus, blocking the crucial mosquito molecules that regulate parasite development might be effective in controlling the disease transmission. In this study, we characterized a full-length AsHPX15 gene from the major Indian malaria vector Anopheles stephensi. This gene is true ortholog of Anopheles gambiae heme peroxidase AgHPX15 (AGAP013327), which modulates midgut immunity and regulates Plasmodium falciparum development. We found that AsHPX15 is highly induced in mosquito developmental stages and blood fed midguts. In addition, this is a lineage-specific gene that has identical features and 65-99% amino acids identity with other HPX15 genes present in eighteen worldwide-distributed anophelines. We discuss that the conserved HPX15 gene might serve as a common target to manipulate mosquito immunity and arresting Plasmodium development inside the vector host. PMID:26943999

  13. Recombinant expression of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin components of Indian isolate in Escherichia coli and determination of its acute toxicity level in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nagendra, Suryanarayana; Vanlalhmuaka; Verma, Sarika; Tuteja, Urmil; Thavachelvam, Kulanthaivel

    2015-12-15

    Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LeTx) is the principle factor responsible for toxaemia and anthrax related death. Lethal toxin consist of two proteins viz protective antigen (PA) and lethal factor which combines in a typical fashion similar to other toxins belonging to A-B toxin super family. The amount of LeTx required to kill a particular organism generally differs among strains owing to their geographical distributions and genetic variation. In the present study, we have cloned PA and LF genes from B. anthracis clinical isolate of Indian origin and expressed them in soluble form employing Escherichia coli expression system. Both the proteins were purified to near homogeneity level using Immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). Further we have used equal ratio of both the proteins to form LeTx and determined its acute toxicity level in Balb/c mice by graphical method of Miller and Tainter. The LD50 value of LeTx by intravenous (i.v) route was found to be 0.97 ± 0.634 mg kg(-1) Balb/c mice. This study highlights the expression of recombinant LeTx from E. coli and assessing its acute toxicity level in experimental mouse model. PMID:26472254

  14. Analysis of SLC16A11 Variants in 12,811 American Indians: Genotype-Obesity Interaction for Type 2 Diabetes and an Association With RNASEK Expression.

    PubMed

    Traurig, Michael; Hanson, Robert L; Marinelarena, Alejandra; Kobes, Sayuko; Piaggi, Paolo; Cole, Shelley; Curran, Joanne E; Blangero, John; Göring, Harald; Kumar, Satish; Nelson, Robert G; Howard, Barbara V; Knowler, William C; Baier, Leslie J; Bogardus, Clifton

    2016-02-01

    Genetic variants in SLC16A11 were recently reported to be associated with type 2 diabetes in Mexican and other Latin American populations. The diabetes risk haplotype had a frequency of 50% in Native Americans from Mexico but was rare in Europeans and Africans. In the current study, we analyzed SLC16A11 in 12,811 North American Indians and found that the diabetes risk haplotype, tagged by the rs75493593 A allele, was nominally associated with type 2 diabetes (P = 0.001, odds ratio 1.11). However, there was a strong interaction with BMI (P = 5.1 × 10(-7)) such that the diabetes association was stronger in leaner individuals. rs75493593 was also strongly associated with BMI in individuals with type 2 diabetes (P = 3.4 × 10(-15)) but not in individuals without diabetes (P = 0.77). Longitudinal analyses suggest that this is due, in part, to an association of the A allele with greater weight loss following diabetes onset (P = 0.02). Analyses of global gene expression data from adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and whole blood provide evidence that rs75493593 is associated with expression of the nearby RNASEK gene, suggesting that RNASEK expression may mediate the effect of genotype on diabetes. PMID:26487785

  15. Indian Reservations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weewish Tree, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Answers to questions asked by junior high school students about American Indian reservations are given. The areas covered include nearly every facet of reservation life from the first Federal issuance of particles of land to the American Indians to present conditions on the reservations. (AH)

  16. Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting American Indian legends, this material provides insight into the cultural background of the Dakota, Ojibwa, and Winnebago people. Written in a straightforward manner, each of the eight legends is associated with an Indian group. The legends included here are titled as follows: Minnesota is Minabozho's Land (Ojibwa); How We Got the…

  17. Story-List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Lanaii

    The program, STORY-LIST, generates alphabetized cumulative word lists by story number within a school grade. It is designed to read a group of cards until it finds a new grade/story number. Each word read is stored in an array, sorted, and an asterisk is added to each word in the array. This array is then merged with the old sorted word list and…

  18. Materials Developed from American Indian Culture-Based Curriculum Workshop (Tacoma, Washington, April 18-19, 1979). Book Three.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Disney, Dick, Comp.

    The major thrust of the third American Indian Culture-Based Curriculum Workshop was the development of ideas and materials oriented toward American Indian stories and legends in such a manner that librarians could acquire the needed skills and knowledge to ensure their authenticity and proficiency of presentations to both Indian and non-Indian…

  19. Materials Developed from American Indian Culture-Based Curriculum Workshop (Tacoma, Washington, April 25-29, 1977). Book One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Disney, Dick, Comp.

    Materials presented in this resource guide are the direct result of an American Indian Culture-Based Curriculum Development Workshop. Activities consist of nine flannelboard stories (including The Fire War, How Coyote Made the Columbia River, Legend of the Mayan Moon God); two games (American Indian Games and Indian Picture Symbol Checkerboard);…

  20. HIV, Art, a Journey Toward Healing: One Man's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellman, Julia

    2005-01-01

    This paper includes two main narrative strands--one personal and the other the result of the author's research with Joe, a member of an art class for people with HIV/AIDS in a local hospital. Both stories, Joe's and the author's, probe the mystery of disease, expression, and the search for coherence. The author's research and Joe's story weave…

  1. Producing Multimedia Stories with ESL Children: A Partnership Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Hsinyi; Fitzgerald, Gail; Park, MeeAeng

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the development of multimedia stories produced by ESL children using a children-as-designers approach. The rationale for the project was based on the use of technology to help second-language learning children express their culturally-diverse backgrounds and perspectives. Stories were produced by ten foreign-born…

  2. Implications of the Social Web Environment for User Story Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancott, Terrill; Kamthan, Pankaj; Shahmir, Nazlie

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, user stories have emerged in academia, as well as industry, as a notable approach for expressing user requirements of interactive software systems that are developed using agile methodologies. There are social aspects inherent to software development, in general, and user stories, in particular. This paper presents directions and…

  3. Keepers of the Earth. Native American Stories and Environmental Activities for Children [and] Keepers of the Earth--Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caduto, Michael J.; Bruchac, Joseph

    When children are allowed to experience stories and activities that help them to care for, and take care of other people and the Earth, they develop a conservation ethic. A collection is presented of carefully chosen North American Indian stories and hands-on activities that promote understanding and appreciation of, empathy for, and responsible…

  4. Molecular cloning of peroxinectin gene and its expression in response to peptidoglycan and Vibrio harveyi in Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus.

    PubMed

    Shanthi, Sathappan; Manju, Sivalingam; Rajakumaran, Perumal; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam

    2014-12-01

    The cDNA sequence of peroxinectin was obtained from the haemocytes of Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus using RT-PCR and RACE. Fenneropenaeus indicus peroxinectin (Fi-Pxn) sequence has an open reading frame (ORF) of 2415 bp encoding a protein of 804 amino acids with 21 residues signal sequence. The mature protein has molecular mass of 89.8 kDa with an estimated pI of 8.6. Two putative integrin-binding motifs, RGD and KGD, were observed at the basic N-terminal and C-terminal part of the mature aminoacid sequence. Fi-Pxn nucleotide sequence comparison showed high homology to mud crab Scylla serrata (89%) and to various vertebrate and invertebrate species. qRT-PCR showed peroxinectin mRNA transcript in haemocytes of F. indicus increased at 6 h post injection of peptidoglycan and Vibrio harveyi. The Fi-Pxn was mainly expressed in the tissues of haemocytes and the heart. The moulting stage responses showed Fi-Pxn expression in premoult stages D0/1 and D0/2. PMID:25072536

  5. The Story of Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grady, Marilyn L.

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author shares Elizabeth Ann Seton's story as a woman's story. Seton was born in 1774 to a New York family. Through her work in Maryland, Seton was credited with being the founder of the parochial Catholic school system in the U.S. Seton formed a group of sisters known as the Sisters of Charity of St. Joseph. The sisters…

  6. The Power of Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Edward O.

    2002-01-01

    Proposes teaching science through the power of story, pulling together scientific evidence that explains why people enjoy stories so much and describing how the brain functions by constructing narratives. Looks at how this innate human pleasure can be tapped to bring greater scientific understanding to children. (SM)

  7. Why Tell Stories?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockett, Jordan S.; Jones, Rose B.

    2009-01-01

    Storytelling was first developed as a means of transferring important historical information from one generation to another. Though stories are told today more often for entertainment and amusement, the art of storytelling remains of significant value to society. Whether the children are telling the story or simply listening to it, the benefits of…

  8. Nunatchiagmi (Stories about Buckland).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Evans

    Printed in both Inupiat and English, this 32 page booklet recounts stories of native life in Buckland, Alaska. It is printed in large type and simply written; illustrations accompany each short narrative. Several stories are told by Evans Thomas who remembers his boyhood days as he fired a shotgun for the first time, shot his first seal, broke a…

  9. Bringing the Story Alive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Ian B.

    2006-01-01

    Science is a story, a narrative, and scientists are storytellers. Teaching is quite possibly the ultimate in storytelling so if one is teaching science he/she is already storytelling. Using a story to set up a science topic is effective. One can engage the brains of the audience, paint the scene, let them realise why the idea or work is important…

  10. The Power of Story--To Teach, to Reach, to Inspire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unkovich, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Reading a story aloud is a powerful tool that can be used with students of all ages. Stories can help students learn content and create a classroom environment where it is safe to express feelings. Stories also can inspire students. And they can instill a love of reading.

  11. The Power of Story

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Don; Fox, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    A major knowledge-sharing issue that is the source of many project problems: how to communicate our intentions so that the information received is the same as the information given. One answer is conversation-the back-and-forth of statement, question, and response that gradually brings talkers and listeners to a shared understanding. Stories also offer a way to share knowledge effectively. While the story teller's intent and the listener's interpretation will not be identical, a good story reliably communicates essential knowledge so it is not only understood but absorbed and embraced. Narrative is one of the oldest knowledge-transfer systems in the world. Religion knows it. Politicians know it. Fairytales know it. Now, knowledge management practitioners are coming to know it, too. But why are stories such a powerful knowledge-transfer tool? And what kinds of knowledge do they transfer? Joseph Campbell, the mythologist, defined stories as serving four major functions: the mystical, the cosmological, the sociological, and the pedagogical. The mystical function of narrative lies in its ability to open up emotional realization that often connects with a transcendent idea such as love or forgiveness. He calls this realization "mystical" because it connects the self with the universal. What Campbell calls the cosmological function of stories relates the self to the outside world, focusing on action, on understanding cause and effect and our role in it. For the cosmological function of stories "to be up to date and really to work in the minds of people who are living in the modern scientific world," Campbell notes, "it must incorporate the modern scientific world." We must continually tell stories that demonstrate our current vision of the world. The sociological function of stories, Campbell explains, helps maintain and validate the social order of a society. Stories pass on information about power relationships, taboos, laws, and the inner workings of communities

  12. Gene expression profile of cytokines and chemokines in skin lesions from Brazilian Indians with localized cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Costa-Silva, Matheus Fernandes; Gomes, Luciana Inácia; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Rodrigues-Silva, Renata; Freire, Janaína de Moura; Quaresma, Patrícia Flávia; Pascoal-Xavier, Marcelo Antônio; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; Serakides, Rogéria; Zauli, Danielle Alves Gomes; Campi-Azevedo, Ana Carolina; Melo, Maria Norma; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa

    2014-02-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by dermotropic Leishmania species belonging to the Viannia subgenera, with Leishmania (V.) braziliensis considered the main agent in Brazil. After infection, a local inflammatory process is initiated, inducing the expression of several cytokine/chemokine genes. We evaluated the immunity to CL of patients living in the indigenous community Xakriabá, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, by performing detailed analyses of the mRNA expression of different cytokines and chemokines in CL lesions, considering the time evolution (recent or late). We also studied the profile of the inflammatory infiltrate by histopathological analysis. The histopathological features of recent CL lesions showed an intense inflammatory reaction, characterized by the presence of both mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells, whereas late CL lesions exhibited a predominance of mononuclear leukocytes. The gene expression of cytokines/chemokines in skin biopsies from the CL group showed higher transcript levels of modulatory (IL10 and TGFB1), anti-inflammatory (IL4), and pro-inflammatory (TNF, IFNG, IL12B, CCL2, CCL3, CCL5, CXCL10) biomarkers in recent lesions than in late lesions. Our findings suggest that differential gene expression of cytokines and chemokines found in skin lesions from CL patients is associated with time evolution of lesions. PMID:24084096

  13. Sense of Loss, Belonging, and Storytelling: An Anglo-Indian Narrator in "The Borrowers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawabata, Ariko

    2006-01-01

    Mary Norton's "The Borrowers" has a complicated narrative framework, through which the story of the small people, the Borrowers, is told. Once we find that the embedded story is carefully set at the turn of the nineteenth century, parallels with Burnett's "The Secret Garden" are recognized, in which a lonely Anglo-Indian child experiences some…

  14. [Stories by the elderly].

    PubMed

    Cintra, Fernanda A; Delboux Diogo, Maria José; Filomena Ceolim, Maria

    2005-10-01

    This Brazilian article bears interest for its qualitative methodology which allows us to get a feeling for the elderly of this country being able to relate the results of their lives and knowledge to our own. The lack of an educational health program for the elderly led the authors to create the Health Care Group for the Elderly (GRASI in Portuguese) in which we developed an educational program based on the social-historical perspective of L. S. Vygotsky. This current study analyzes the dynamic speeches recorded by a group of elderly in the GRASI educational program. A group of seven elderly people, from both sexes, having an age equal to or greater than 60, participated in an analysis of the content from meetings among themselves. To analyze the data obtained, in the underlying text as well as their recorded speech, the feelings and meanings of their conversations and stories were identified and separated into thematic units. The results obtained reveal that the opportunity to express their experiences regarding the transformation the elderly have lived during their lives, and to find new ways to treat health problems or how to carry out self health care, is an important resource for elderly nursing care which can lead to the development of health education programs. PMID:16304835

  15. Stories on Research, Research on Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petit, Sandrine; Mougenot, Catherine; Fleury, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with a group of researchers involved in Participatory Action Research projects on biodiversity and who volunteered to take part in a "storytelling" experiment. Their "stories" were used to describe this new type of research collective comprising various partners, including researchers and managers, focused on obtaining directly…

  16. Living with Learning Difficulties: Emma's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manners, Paula Jean; Carruthers, Emma

    2006-01-01

    This article is about Emma's experience of living with learning difficulties. Emma expresses a lot of anger, and talks about feelings of loss. This article is interesting to people with learning disabilities because they can see if their experience is like Emma's in any way. This paper presents Emma's story: her experience of living with learning…

  17. High-risk histomorphological features in retinoblastoma and their association with p53 expression: An Indian experience.

    PubMed

    Seema, Rao; Parul, Sobti; Nita, Khurana

    2014-11-01

    Introduction: Histopathological features in retinoblastoma are considered high-risk factors (HRF) for tumor progression and metastasis, thus their presence becomes an indication for adjuvant chemotherapy. Present study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of HRF in retinoblastoma and to correlate them with p53 expression. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study where 17 diagnosed cases of retinoblastoma were included. Cases were re-evaluated for various histomorphological parameters. Immuno-histochemical analysis was done with p53 antibody by Streptavidin biotin method. Results: The patients were in the age range of 1.5-50 years. Common histological features included necrosis (70.5%), calcification (64.7%), and retinal detachment (58.8%). Incidence of various morphological parameters was anterior chamber seeding (47.2%), ciliary body involvement (29.4%), iris involvement (29.4%), choroid involvement (58.8%), scleral invasion (29.4%), extrascleral invasion (11.8%), and optic nerve infiltration (23.5%). p53 expression was present in four cases out of 13 cases (30.7%) and showed a significant association with choroid invasion (P = 0.02). Discussion: The presence of HRF should alert the physician for a possible metastasis, and such patients should be kept on regular follow-up to detect an early recurrence. p53 expression, a known poor prognostic indicator, showed significant association with choroid invasion, however, no association was seen with other HRF. Conclusion: Histopathological HRF have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. The incidence of HRF is higher in developing countries as patients present with a more advanced stage of disease. p53 expression is significantly associated with choroid invasion out of all HRF. PMID:25494248

  18. Sequence and expression variation in SUPPRESSOR of OVEREXPRESSION of CONSTANS 1 (SOC1): homeolog evolution in Indian Brassicas.

    PubMed

    Sri, Tanu; Mayee, Pratiksha; Singh, Anandita

    2015-09-01

    Whole genome sequence analyses allow unravelling such evolutionary consequences of meso-triplication event in Brassicaceae (∼14-20 million years ago (MYA)) as differential gene fractionation and diversification in homeologous sub-genomes. This study presents a simple gene-centric approach involving microsynteny and natural genetic variation analysis for understanding SUPPRESSOR of OVEREXPRESSION of CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) homeolog evolution in Brassica. Analysis of microsynteny in Brassica rapa homeologous regions containing SOC1 revealed differential gene fractionation correlating to reported fractionation status of sub-genomes of origin, viz. least fractionated (LF), moderately fractionated 1 (MF1) and most fractionated (MF2), respectively. Screening 18 cultivars of 6 Brassica species led to the identification of 8 genomic and 27 transcript variants of SOC1, including splice-forms. Co-occurrence of both interrupted and intronless SOC1 genes was detected in few Brassica species. In silico analysis characterised Brassica SOC1 as MADS intervening, K-box, C-terminal (MIKC(C)) transcription factor, with highly conserved MADS and I domains relative to K-box and C-terminal domain. Phylogenetic analyses and multiple sequence alignments depicting shared pattern of silent/non-silent mutations assigned Brassica SOC1 homologs into groups based on shared diploid base genome. In addition, a sub-genome structure in uncharacterised Brassica genomes was inferred. Expression analysis of putative MF2 and LF (Brassica diploid base genome A (AA)) sub-genome-specific SOC1 homeologs of Brassica juncea revealed near identical expression pattern. However, MF2-specific homeolog exhibited significantly higher expression implying regulatory diversification. In conclusion, evidence for polyploidy-induced sequence and regulatory evolution in Brassica SOC1 is being presented wherein differential homeolog expression is implied in functional diversification. PMID:26276216

  19. Story Grammar Ability in Children with and without Language Disorder: Story Generation, Story Retelling, and Story Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Donna DiSegna; Liles, Betty Z.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty language-impaired and 20 unimpaired children, aged 9-11, generated and retold stories and answered comprehension questions. The stories produced by language-disordered children contained fewer complete story episodes, fewer main and subordinate clauses per complete episode, and a lower frequency of use of story grammar components than those…

  20. Measuring Goodness of Story Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le, Karen; Coelho, Carl; Mozeiko, Jennifer; Grafman, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article was to evaluate a new measure of story narrative performance: story completeness. It was hypothesized that by combining organizational (story grammar) and completeness measures, story "goodness" could be quantified. Method: Discourse samples from 46 typically developing adults were compared with those from 24…

  1. The Disarming Seduction of Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoy, Pat C., II

    2001-01-01

    Contends that essays are the proper rhetorical domain of stories, the place where stories most naturally belong when they are being used for the development and enlargement of ideas. Notes that stories are so powerful and distracting that when used together to make a familiar story, they can divert attention away from the essay's idea. Concludes…

  2. Childhood Tales: Selected Children's Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cacciatore, Sharen Robertson

    This collection of three "Childhood Stories," includes some of the stories used as part of the "Story Train" program, an elementary literacy program that offers students the opportunity to be published either on the Internet or on a cable television show also called "Story Train." The tales in the collection, written by the program's creator, are…

  3. Evaluation of Bar, Barnase, and Barstar recombinant proteins expressed in genetically engineered Brassica juncea (Indian mustard) for potential risks of food allergy using bioinformatics and literature searches.

    PubMed

    Siruguri, Vasanthi; Bharatraj, Dinesh Kumar; Vankudavath, Raju Naik; Mendu, Vishnu Vardhana Rao; Gupta, Vibha; Goodman, Richard E

    2015-09-01

    The potential allergenicity of Bar, Barnase, and Barstar recombinant proteins expressed in genetically engineered mustard for pollination control in plant breeding was evaluated for regulatory review. To evaluate the potential allergenicity of the Bar, Barnase and Barstar proteins amino acid sequence comparisons were made to those of known and putative allergens, and search for published evidence to the sources of the genes using the AllergenOnline.org database. Initial comparisons in 2012 were performed with version 12 by methods recommended by the Codex Alimentarius Commission and the Indian Council of Medical Research, Government of India. Searches were repeated with version 15 in 2015. A literature search was performed using PubMed to identify reports of allergy associated with the sources of the three transgenes. Potential open reading frames at the DNA insertion site were evaluated for matches to allergens. No significant sequence identity matches were identified with Bar, Barnase or Barstar proteins or potential fusion peptides at the genomic-insert junctions compared to known allergens. No references were identified that associated the sources of the genes with allergy. Based on these results we conclude that the Bar, Barnase and Barstar proteins are unlikely to present any significant risk of food allergy to consumers. PMID:26079618

  4. Indian Summer

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  5. A Little Boy Eats Too Much. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holthaus, Mary L.

    Part of the Indian Culture Series of the Montana Council for Indian Education, the book is a simple story of a young Alaskan boy who makes oil lamps and his grandmother who sews with a needle. The little boy goes to hunt by the sea because they are hungry. He catches and eats a tomcod, two seals, and a whale, then returns to the igloo having eaten…

  6. One Sister's Story

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues One Sister's Story Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... NIH/NIEHS By Tina Hall Sister Study participant One day in April, after my sister returned from ...

  7. Life Stories: Personal Portraits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John Noell, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Offers glimpses into the landscapes of people's lives. Discusses Edith Bruck's "Who Loves You Like This,""Life Stories: Profiles from 'The New Yorker'," and Hugh Sidey's "Portraits of the Presidents: Power and Personality in the Oval Office." (SG)

  8. Gout: Personal Stories

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Detecting and Treating Gout Gout: Personal Stories Past Issues / Winter 2012 Table of ... Jay Hobby Jay Hobby’s Tips for Taking on Gout Somewhere high over the Atlantic on a flight ...

  9. Five Little Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strader, William W.

    This booklet includes short descriptions of the history of the calendar, Napier's Bones, and the beginnings of algebra. The remaining two stories discuss the number nine raised to the ninth power of nine, and repeating decimals. (DT)

  10. Teaching the American Indian in the American School: An Adventure in Cultural Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Daniel

    In order to teach students about American Indian culture, it is suggested that a chronological approach be taken in terms of where it all began, what it all means, and what of the entire Indian story is pertinent to geographic education for the student of any age. Archeology dates man's arrival in North America further and further back. This…

  11. Aspects of Community Healing: Experiences of the Sault Sainte Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Beverly A.

    2003-01-01

    The Sault Sainte Marie tribe of Chippewa Indians (Michigan) facilitated community healing through a curriculum that raised awareness of harmful assimilation factors and the impact of oppression and reintroduced creation stories and the clan system to reclaim American Indian cultural identity. Thirty-two persons completed the first round of…

  12. Cumulative effect of heterologous AtWRI1 gene expression and endogenous BjAGPase gene silencing increases seed lipid content in Indian mustard Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Das, Natasha; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2016-10-01

    The production of vegetable oil in many countries of the world, including India has not been able to keep pace with the increasing requirement, leading to a very large gap in the demand-supply chain. Thus, there is an urgent need to increase the yield potential of the oilseed crops so as to enhance the storage lipid productivity. The present study describes a novel metabolic engineering ploy involving the constitutive down-regulation of endogenous ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (BjAGPase) enzyme and the seed-specific expression of WRINKLED1 transcription factor (AtWRI1) from Arabidopsis thaliana in Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) with an aim to divert the photosynthetically fixed carbon pool from starch to lipid synthesis in the seeds for the enhanced production of storage lipids in the seeds of transgenic mustard plants. The starch content, in both the vegetative leaf and developing seed tissues of the transgenic B. juncea lines exhibited a reduction by about 45-53% compared to the untransformed control, whereas the soluble sugar content was increased by 2.4 and 1.3-fold in the leaf and developing seed tissues, respectively. Consequently, the transgenic lines showed a significant enhancement in total seed lipid content ranging between 7.5 and 16.9%. The results indicate that the adopted metabolic engineering strategy was successful in significantly increasing the seed oil content. Therefore, findings of our research suggest that the metabolic engineering strategy adopted in this study for shifting the anabolic carbon flux from starch synthesis to lipid biosynthesis can be employed for increasing the storage lipid content of seeds in other plant species. PMID:27314514

  13. Multivalent Narratives and Indian Rhetoric: Insights from the "Bhagavad Gita."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stroud, Scott R.

    The "Bhagavad Gita" is a didactic dialogue inserted approximately in the middle of an immensely long Indian epic entitled the "Mahabharata." This paper examines the use of narrative in this ancient Hindu religious work, the "Bhagavad Gita"--specific attention is given to how the story in this didactic text uses dialogic events between the two main…

  14. The Violence of Collection: "Indian Killer"'s Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Janet

    2008-01-01

    At the close of Sherman Alexie's "Indian Killer," in a final chapter titled "Creation Story," a killer carries a backpack containing, among other things, "dozens of owl feathers, a scrapbook, and two bloody scalps in a plastic bag." Readers schooled in the psychopathologies of real and fictional serial killers will be familiar with the detail:…

  15. Tell Me a Story: How Children's Developing Domain Knowledge Affects Their Story Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sobel, David M.; Weisberg, Deena Skolnick

    2014-01-01

    Young children distinguish between the physical and biological domains of knowledge. The current study examines how this distinction is expressed in a story construction task. Three- and 4-year-olds were shown pairs of pictures, one that depicted a normal event and one that depicted an event that violated either physical or biological causal…

  16. Iconic Prosody in Story Reading.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Marcus; Clark, Nathaniel; Johansson Falck, Marlene

    2015-08-01

    Recent experiments have shown that people iconically modulate their prosody corresponding with the meaning of their utterance (e.g., Shintel et al., 2006). This article reports findings from a story reading task that expands the investigation of iconic prosody to abstract meanings in addition to concrete ones. Participants read stories that contrasted along concrete and abstract semantic dimensions of speed (e.g., a fast drive, slow career progress) and size (e.g., a small grasshopper, an important contract). Participants read fast stories at a faster rate than slow stories, and big stories with a lower pitch than small stories. The effect of speed was distributed across the stories, including portions that were identical across stories, whereas the size effect was localized to size-related words. Overall, these findings enrich the documentation of iconicity in spoken language and bear on our understanding of the relationship between gesture and speech. PMID:25351919

  17. What Is a Short Story?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Marilyn

    2000-01-01

    Presents 12 brief answers by editors and authors to the question of what a short story is. Includes a 23-item annotated bibliography of the best new (published between 1997 and 2000) short story collections for young adults. (RS)

  18. Urban Indian Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greymountain, Gus; And Others

    The second of a 2 phase study, this project provided information for the non-Indian population about problems and needs of urban American Indians. Phase I (1971) discussed urban Indian experiences and trends; compared differences and highlighted issues of Indian urbanization. Phase II focused entirely on the urban Indian community. The thrust was…

  19. African-American Children's Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Patricia C.

    Examination of representative stories told by black American children of West African descent in South Carolina shows that specific cultural motifs have been preserved in the oral tradition of black communities. Typical stories are tales of the supernatural, such as the Hag story about mortals who shed their skin at night to do evil deeds.…

  20. Some Fundamentals of Engaging Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Young, Raymond; Monroe, Martha C.

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that stories serve as a singularly effective replacement for direct experience, a useful but sometimes difficult environmental education technique. Argues that the effectiveness of stories is derived from their ability to engage the attention of the reader. Lists elements that can be used to create cognitively engaging stories. Contains…

  1. Preschoolers' Quarantining of Fantasy Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richert, Rebekah A.; Smith, Erin I.

    2011-01-01

    Preschool-aged children are exposed to fantasy stories with the expectation that they will learn messages in those stories that are applied to real-world situations. We examined children's transfer from fantastical and real stories. Over the course of 2 studies, 3 1/2- to 5 1/2-year-old children were less likely to transfer problem solutions from…

  2. Storytelling? Everyone Has a Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    School librarians can assume an important role in preserving and perpetuating the oral tradition. The same skills and techniques when telling a personal story can be transmitted to telling various kinds of stories from literature and history. For school librarians to be successful storytellers, they need to select stories that they like and enjoy…

  3. Cherokee Stories of the Supernatural.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scancarelli, Janine

    1996-01-01

    Stories of personal experience of supernatural events are a highly-valued form of verbal art for Cherokee speakers. Both the people who tell them and those who listen regard such stories as entertaining and instructional. These stories even reflect some of the tensions that exist between traditional Cherokee culture and modern American social…

  4. Writing Stories in the Sciences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Eunbae; Maerz, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Writing stories is advocated as an excellent means of learning the process of science; however, little is understood about students' experiences of engaging in story writing in postsecondary science courses. The study described in this article was designed to improve the practice of using stories in science by examining students' lived experience…

  5. Story Telling and Educational Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Terry

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author first places story telling in context within the broad range of effort associated with case study methods. Then, the author discusses aspects of fieldwork which underlie story telling, first moves, key questions, tricks, listening, looking and synthesis. The author concludes with evaluative criteria for story telling and…

  6. Everyone Loves a Good Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croxall, Kathy C.; Gubler, Rea R.

    2006-01-01

    Everyone loves a good story. Reading brings back pleasant memories of being read to by parents or others. Literacy is encouraged when students are continually exposed to stories and books. Teachers can encourage students to discover their parents' favorite stories and share them with the class. In this article, the authors recommend the use of…

  7. Normal Birth: Two Stories

    PubMed Central

    Scaer, Roberta M.

    2002-01-01

    The author shares two stories: one of a normal birth that took place in a hospital with a nurse-midwife in attendance and another of a home birth unexpectedly shared by many colleagues. Both are told with the goal to inform, inspire, and educate. PMID:17273292

  8. Putting Stories in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoades, Mindi

    2012-01-01

    A very successful preschool project the author did at Ohio State University's Schoenbaum Family Center combined students' interest in storytelling, drama, and multiple literacies. For this particular project, a classic children's fairy tale was used, though the project is easily adaptable for other stories, texts, content, and age levels. In this…

  9. Why Story Circle Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyon, George Ella

    2016-01-01

    If adult attention is screen scrambled, what about kids, whose brains are still developing? In a world where we are over stimulated and hyperlinked-in we are deprived of the kind of time with a person or experience that deepens and sustains us. Here, poet laureate George Ella Lyon writes that the story circle can be such an experience. A school…

  10. Stories. Artists' Workshop Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Penny; Roundhill, Clare

    This instructional resource, designed to be used by and with elementary level students, presents six works of art which tell stories. These images, created by master artists from diverse cultures and historic periods, serve as starting points for exploring various artistic techniques. Images include: "The Bayeux Tapestry" (Late 11th Century); "The…

  11. Teaching Ethics: Telling Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Ann

    1995-01-01

    In order to develop moral literacy, nursing students should be exposed to both rules- and justice-based ethics and to a feminist care perspective. They can learn to analyze and understand ethical dilemmas and to tell their own stories in order to identify the influences on their decision making. (SK)

  12. Depressive Stories for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Nicholas

    2006-01-01

    While stories with a depressing message are now common for teenagers, resistance to them remains where smaller children are concerned. But is this more a case of the publishers and providers concerned protecting their own particular image of childhood? This article looks at the case for books that also convey a sense of sadness to infants,…

  13. Tea and Telling Stories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Pamela

    2001-01-01

    The annual Women's and Girls' Tea Party and Storytelling Ceremony is held in a Berkeley redwood grove by a creek. Seeking to generate community support for creek restoration, the ceremony/celebration/site-specific performance piece uses childhood rituals and story telling to help participants connect emotionally to each other, the place, its past,…

  14. Environmental Story Sacks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Eve; Machin, Judith

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a community's attempts to raise the knowledge and awareness of environmental issues of early years pupils through the use of "Environmental Story Sacks". The results of the small scale evaluation, using a pre and post activity oral "cloze" exercise, showed that reception year pupils' response scores to questions about the…

  15. Success Stories Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthitt, Frieda; And Others

    This packet contains the stories of 20 successful alumni of Ohio's secondary vocational programs and postsecondary technical schools. They have been reproduced as loose-leaf camera-ready art. Suggested uses for these one-page biographies with accompanying photograph include the following: illustrations for use in speeches; reproduction of complete…

  16. Children Writing Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Michael

    2006-01-01

    In this book, the author reveals the creative force of children's narrative imagination and shows how this develops through childhood. He provides a new and powerful understanding of the significance of narrative for children's intellectual growth and for learning and teaching. The book explores a series of real stories written by children between…

  17. How's Your Story Arsenal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Coleen

    1992-01-01

    Principals who wax eloquent over learning outcomes or socioeconomic factors are bound to bore their audiences. This article suggests ways to put zip into speeches and illustrate important points. Story and anecdotal material ranges from "the community leader who taught for a day" to "the worst child abuse case." All highlight people trying to…

  18. Postcolonial Entanglements: Unruling Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacini-Ketchabaw, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I use Donna Haraway's philosophy to think about postcolonial encounters between different species. I follow entangled stories of the deer/settler-child figure to trouble colonialisms and untangle the histories and trajectories that we inhabit with other species through colonial histories. I shy away from generalizations and…

  19. Stories in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigenthaler, Jenny; Vihos, Lisa

    1998-01-01

    Presents four lesson plans that use paintings, illustrations, and photographs that tell a story. The lessons consider the use and characteristics of narrative. Includes work from, "The Book of Deeds of Alexander the Great," as well as the works of Georges de La Tour, Eileen Cowin, and Henry Ossawa Tanner. (MJP)

  20. Teaching Science through Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Children find comfort in stories. They are familiar, accessible and entertaining. By teaching science through narratives, we can provide that same comfort and access to scientific content to children of all ages. In this article, I will discuss how, through the use of narratives in science instruction, we can provide students with a deeper…

  1. Hmong Story Cloths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkenberg, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author provides a brief history of Hmong and traces the origin of Hmong story cloths. The Hmong, a nomadic and agrarian people, may date back 5000 years. Today they live in China, Vietnam, Thailand, and Laos, where during the Vietnam War and its aftermath, many Hmong were killed or persecuted for siding with the American…

  2. Sharing Stories: Multicultural Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imdieke, Sandra J.

    As more emphasis is placed on helping children gain a global perspective and understanding of the world, children's literature seems to be a natural vehicle for fostering that understanding. By studying the storyteller, educators can learn about literary traditions of communities, particularly traditions which reflect the use of stories. An…

  3. Telling the Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger, Donna

    1999-01-01

    Describes a roundtable on institutional change attended by 27 college and university senior business officers and other school executives in which participants used a case study of Sears, Roebuck and Company to draw parallels with higher education, then focused on "telling the story" of higher education, and finally developed plans for…

  4. [Fictions and stories].

    PubMed

    Martínez, H

    1995-12-01

    A short and interesting work, where the author of "The secret tooth", exposes some opinions about fiction and story, words he considers should not be opposed, but really on the contrary, be harmonized to contribute with their alliance for personal joy of readers. Writers like Joyce, Caillois, Updike, and others, are quoted for renewing texts with reports referred to Dentistry. PMID:11625396

  5. Keepers of Our Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasiuk, Glen

    2010-01-01

    Storytelling is an integral part of life for Indigenous Australians. Before the arrival of Europeans and continuing after; gathered around the campfire in the evening stories were and are still shared; passed from one generation to the next. In modern times, in addition to a continuing oral traditions, another method of storytelling has risen from…

  6. One river, many stories

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactive exhibition elements include opportunity to add stories, drawings, and place names to maps of the river; record & share your vision for the river with public television. The Duluth Art Institute will present the kick-off event for the month-long media focus around ...

  7. Carpe Diem: Andy's Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Richard Paul

    2002-01-01

    Presents the story of an adolescent dying from Ducheenne muscular dystrophy. A transformation in the helping relationship occurs just as the caregiver becomes overwhelmed with the youth's anger and despair. The caregiver uses his insights from battling substance abuse and pain to help transform the youth's attitude of despair to one of living each…

  8. Tell a Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kosa, Jaymie Reeber

    2008-01-01

    Storytelling is a teaching technique that has been around for thousands of years. Stories transmit values, engage the imagination, and foster community. Effective storytelling silences the room and invites every type of learner to participate. It encourages the chatty to be still and the quiet to speak up. This article discusses why storytelling…

  9. Blue Willow Story Plates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontes, Kris

    2009-01-01

    In the December 1997 issue of "SchoolArts" is a lesson titled "Blue Willow Story Plates" by Susan Striker. In this article, the author shares how she used this lesson with her middle-school students many times over the years. Here, she describes a Blue Willow plate painting project that her students made.

  10. How Stories From Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Minnie

    Four simple "how" stories from Alaskan legend are presented in large type and amply illustrated. In "How the Caribou Lost His Teeth", Siqpik's only son is eaten by the sharp-toothed caribou, so Siqpik feeds the animal sour berries to make his teeth fall out. "How the Loon Got His Spots" relates how the raven paints the loon's back with soot then…

  11. Ipnatchiami (Stories About Deering).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmun, Mamie

    Intended for use in a bilingual education program, this document is printed in both Inupiat and English. It is a collection of 32 very short tales about life in Deering, Alaska, and was developed and prepared by Marie Karmun, an Inupiat language teacher. It is printed in large type, written in simple words, and illustrated. Most of the stories are…

  12. Laughter: The Navajo Way. Humorous Stories of the People (in Navajo and English) Volume One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Alan; Dennison, Gene

    This book has been prepared for the use of teachers, ethnologists, linguists, Indian studies scholars, language students and those who have an interest in the languages and cultures of the earlier inhabitants of this continent. The stories reflect the Navajo love for and genius with words and humor. Most of the humor represented is of three basic…

  13. Come Closer around the Fire. Using Tribal Legends, Myths, and Stories in Preventing Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Multicultural Awareness, Arlington, VA.

    Intended for people working in drug abuse prevention or trying to help American Indian youth feel pride in themselves and their culture, the booklet provides specific guidelines on how to use tribal stories in preventing drug abuse. Following a brief introduction to drug abuse problems and prevention strategies, the booklet explains three kinds of…

  14. Moccasin on One Foot, High Heel on the Other: Life Story Reflections of Coreen Gladue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannini, April; Gladue, Coreen

    2009-01-01

    Drawing from life history interviews with Coreen Gladue--a Cree/Metis woman resident of British Columbia, Canada--this article uses poetic representation and visual images to tell stories about Coreen's sense of self and identity, family relations, education, and interpretation of the meanings of Canada's "Indian Act". Poems and narratives are…

  15. Student-to-Student Abuse in the Indian Residential Schools in Canada: Setting the Stage for Further Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charles, Grant; DeGagné, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The Indian residential school system in Canada was established to assimilate Aboriginal children into mainstream society by removing the "Indian within them." In the past 20 years survivors of the schools have come forward with stories of physical and sexual abuse perpetrated against them by staff. However, what is significantly less…

  16. The Varian story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Ray; Morris, Gareth A.

    2015-01-01

    This Perspective offers a personal view of the story of Varian NMR, a courageous initiative that began in the 1950s but came to an abrupt end some 60 years later. Without doubt, Varian leaves behind a priceless legacy, particularly in the field of structural chemistry. The highlights are set out in four main sections, named after the four seasons, but not necessarily in strict chronology. How did the accepted business practices influence the evolution, growth, and eventual demise of this exciting venture? How well did management handle an unconventional group of young scientific entrepreneurs? What does it all mean for the future of magnetic resonance? The subject can be viewed on two different levels, the Varian story itself, and the larger picture - the Silicon Valley phenomenon as a whole, with Varian considered as an interesting microcosm.

  17. The Varian story.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ray; Morris, Gareth A

    2015-01-01

    This Perspective offers a personal view of the story of Varian NMR, a courageous initiative that began in the 1950s but came to an abrupt end some 60 years later. Without doubt, Varian leaves behind a priceless legacy, particularly in the field of structural chemistry. The highlights are set out in four main sections, named after the four seasons, but not necessarily in strict chronology. How did the accepted business practices influence the evolution, growth, and eventual demise of this exciting venture? How well did management handle an unconventional group of young scientific entrepreneurs? What does it all mean for the future of magnetic resonance? The subject can be viewed on two different levels, the Varian story itself, and the larger picture - the Silicon Valley phenomenon as a whole, with Varian considered as an interesting microcosm. PMID:25532932

  18. Stories from the field.

    PubMed

    Caine, Julie; Pokhrel, Kabi

    2011-11-01

    "Stories From the Field" is a series of short profiles of tobacco control programs and their leaders, showcasing promising technical assistance and training models in Louisiana, Puerto Rico, the Cherokee Nation, West Virginia, the Pacific Islands, and the Virgin Islands. The series illuminates key themes of collaboration with diverse stakeholders, elimination of health disparities, building tobacco control coalitions, engaging youth to reduce commercial tobacco use, sustaining tobacco control efforts, and the use of the media to raise public awareness that are highlighted in the Health Promotion Practice Supplement Theme Issue, Training and Technical Assistance: Lessons Learned to Sustain Social Norm Changes in Tobacco Control. Common tobacco control strategies bind the stories together. Local knowledge, coalition building, community involvement, innovative partnerships, and educational outreach are at the core of all of these tobacco control projects. PMID:22068583

  19. Story telling: crafting identities

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Mary; Watson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Career guidance clients are seeking to craft new identities that better position them in their careers. The focus of the present article is on narrative career counselling's potential contribution in providing a meaningful and useful experience for career guidance clients. To illustrate the potential of narrative career counselling, the story telling approach is offered as an example to illustrate how identity can be crafted in contextually and culturally sensitive ways. PMID:24009405

  20. CORNELL STORY READING PROGRAM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MACKLIN, ELEANOR D.; AND OTHERS

    A GROUP OF 14-YEAR-OLD GIRLS FROM WORKING CLASS HOMES WHO WERE RECOMMENDED BY THEIR SCHOOL COUNSELORS PARTICIPATED IN A STORY READING PROGRAM DESIGNED TO IMPROVE THE LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT OF DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN 1 1/2 TO 2 1/2 YEARS OLD. FOR 20 MINUTES A DAY, 5 DAYS A WEEK, FOR 8 MONTHS EACH GIRL MET WITH EACH OF HER FOUR PARTICULAR CHILDREN AND…

  1. Nora’s Story

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Nora

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this column, Nora Gibbons, 16 years old, describes the home births of four of her siblings. Nora’s story captures the wonder and simplicity of home birth and demonstrates the impact the experience of being present at home birth can have on children. Nora’s joy and confidence in birth because of her experiences will influence her own birth choices. PMID:26937156

  2. Expression and characterization of a recombinant kinesin antigen from an old Indian strain (DD8) of Leishmania donovani and comparing it with a commercially available antigen from a newly isolated (KE16) strain of L. donovani.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Ramu; Dey, Ayan; Sharma, Pawan; Singh, Sarman

    2008-05-01

    Recently we had prepared a recombinant antigen (Ld-rKE16) from a newly isolated Indian strain of Leishmania donovani (MHOM/IN/KE16/1998) with high sensitivity and specificity and the same has been commercialized. While comparing the sequence data of kinesin gene of this (KE16) strain and its expressed protein with another commercially available recombinant antigen (Lc-rK39) from kinesin gene of L. chagasi we found significant genetic and amino acid variations. This prompted us to undertake the present study to unravel whether the kinesin gene and its expressed protein from another old but Indian isolate of L. donovani (MHOM/IN/DD8/1968) had any genetic and amino acid heterogeneity. Sequencing of the kinesin gene revealed that the kinesin gene of DD8 strain is 3016bp long and has immunodominant region consisting of 4.8 tandem repeats, 117 base pairs each. Further blast analysis of the immunodominant regions of 5 strains of L. donovani revealed that it has only 79% homology with L. chagasi, and 80% homology with L. infantum; while it had 82% homology with Sudan strain of L. donovani, 82% with another (Morena) strain of Indian L. donovani but highest homology of 83% with L. donovani KE16 strain of India. We also evaluated the diagnostic potential of the recombinant DD8 antigen (Ld-rDD8) and compared the results with that of Ld-rKE16. The study revealed that Ld-rKDD8 antigen was less sensitive and specific as compared to rKE16 antigen for the diagnosis of visceral and post-kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis. This was probably due to prolong in vitro culture maintenance of the DD8 strain. PMID:18374635

  3. Ghost-Story Telling: Keeping It Appropriate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weintraub, Jeff

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for telling ghost stories at camp involve considering children's fears at different ages, telling age appropriate stories, determining appropriate times for telling ghost stories, and minimizing fear when a child becomes frightened by a ghost story. Includes tips on the selection, preparation, and presentation of ghost stories. (LP)

  4. KNOW YOUR NEVADA INDIANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POEHLMAN, CHARLES H.; AND OTHERS

    THIS PUBLICATION PRESENTS THE RESULTS OF A STUDY OF THE SOCIOCULTURAL BACKGROUNDS OF THE PAIUTE, WASHOE, AND SHOSHONE INDIANS OF NEVADA. INCLUDED ARE AN OUTLINE OF GENERAL PROBLEMS PERTAINING TO INDIAN EDUCATION, SOME DISTINCT CULTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE DOMINANT NON-INDIAN SOCIETY AND THE INDIAN SOCIETY, AND THE PREHISTORIC ASPECTS OF THE…

  5. Indian Ledger Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilcoat, George W.

    1990-01-01

    Offers an innovative way to teach mid-nineteenth century North American Indian history by having students create their own Indian Ledger art. Purposes of the project are: to understand the role played by American Indians, to reveal American Indian stereotypes, and to identify relationships between cultures and environments. Background and…

  6. Indians of the Dakotas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief history of Indian tribes in the States of North and South Dakota is presented. Discussion centers around individual Indian tribes, such as Chippewas and Sioux, which are representative of early and modern Indian life in these States. A section devoted to Indians in these states today offers an indication of the present condition of the…

  7. Indian Education Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Lu Celia, Ed.

    Designed in Oklahoma as a teaching aid for teachers in Indian education, this booklet is organized according to the subject areas of the curriculum. It provides a ready resource on Indian culture and should thus be of value to teachers who work with both Indian and non-Indian students. Guidelines for curriculum development in multicultural…

  8. American Indian Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Edward, Ed.

    Written for teachers instructing both Indian and non-Indian students, the handbook provides information on American Indians in California. The handbook is presented in six chapters. Chapter 1 is devoted to terminoloy (e.g., American Indian, Native American, tribe, band, rancheria, and chief). Chapter 2 details historic and cultural changes related…

  9. Muriel Wright: Telling the Story of Oklahoma Indian Nations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cesar, Dana; Smith, Joan K.; Noley, Grayson

    2004-01-01

    The Wright family, descended from the patriarch Allen Wright, who arrived in the new Choctaw Nation after surviving the "Trail of Tears," played an important role in Oklahoma politics and society. Following removal to Oklahoma, Allen went on to become Principal Chief of the Choctaw Nation and gave the name, Oklahoma, to the southwest territory. He…

  10. Maria Tallchief. Raintree/Rivilo American Indian Stories Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdrich, Heidi Ellen

    The great American ballerina, Maria Tallchief, was born in 1925 in Fairfax, Oklahoma. Her mother was White and her father was a full-blood Osage. Her younger sister, Marjorie, also became a famous dancer. The Osage originally lived in western Missouri. They lived in lodges or tepees and were farmers and hunters. The U.S. Government moved them to…