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Sample records for indian subcontinent cluster

  1. Literature of the Indian Subcontinent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimock, Edward C., Jr.

    Indian literature is intimately bound up with the Indian religious system. The earliest sacred writings are the Vedas. In addition to being poetry on nature, and later on, ritual formulae for controlling the universe, the Vedas have philosophical speculation. A large part of classical Indian literature consists of writing commentaries on…

  2. Integrative Oncology in Indian Subcontinent: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Janardhanan, Sunitha; Jeevakarunyam, Sathiyajeeva; Jeddy, Nadheem; Eagappan, Senthil

    2015-01-01

    Integrative oncology is a combination of one where complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) with conventional cancer treatment modalities is used to manage symptoms, control side-effects and improve the state of mental wellbeing. The ancient Indian medicinal approach in cancer treatment and management has a wide array of herbs and practices. There is an increasing demand for traditional and natural medicine by the cancer patients. The conventional oncologic surgeons and physicians should be aware of the role of cCAM that are available in Indian subcontinent and provide a treatment that focuses on the physical and mental state of wellness in combating cancer. PMID:25954692

  3. Imaging the Indian subcontinent beneath the Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Pelkum, Vera; Monsalve, Gaspar; Sheehan, Anne; Pandey, M R; Sapkota, Som; Bilham, Roger; Wu, Francis

    2005-06-30

    The rocks of the Indian subcontinent are last seen south of the Ganges before they plunge beneath the Himalaya and the Tibetan plateau. They are next glimpsed in seismic reflection profiles deep beneath southern Tibet, yet the surface seen there has been modified by processes within the Himalaya that have consumed parts of the upper Indian crust and converted them into Himalayan rocks. The geometry of the partly dismantled Indian plate as it passes through the Himalayan process zone has hitherto eluded imaging. Here we report seismic images both of the decollement at the base of the Himalaya and of the Moho (the boundary between crust and mantle) at the base of the Indian crust. A significant finding is that strong seismic anisotropy develops above the decollement in response to shear processes that are taken up as slip in great earthquakes at shallower depths. North of the Himalaya, the lower Indian crust is characterized by a high-velocity region consistent with the formation of eclogite, a high-density material whose presence affects the dynamics of the Tibetan plateau. PMID:15988523

  4. Complex network analysis of extreme precipitation over the Indian subcontinent.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    The Indian monsoon is a large scale pattern in the climate system of the Earth. The motivation of our work was to reveal spatial structures in strong precipitation over the Indian subcontinent, and their evolution during the year, because it is crucial as for understanding of monsoon regularities as well for India's agriculture and economy. We present an analysis of extreme rainfall over the Indian peninsula and Sri Lanka. Using the method of event synchronization we constructed networks of extreme rainfall events(heavier than the 90-th percentile) for three time periods: during the Indian summer monsoon (ISM, June-September), the Northeast monsoon (NEM, October - December, so called winter monsoon) and period before the summer monsoon (January - May). Obtained networks show how extreme rainfall for specific areas in India is synchronized with extreme rainfall for other areas in India. Analysis of degree centrality of the networks reveals clusters of extreme rainfall events in India which are strongly connected to maximal number of other areas with extreme rainfall events, e.g., North Pakistan and the Eastern Ghats. Additionally, betweenness centrality shows areas that are important in the sense of water transport in the networks (e.g. the Himalayas, Western Ghats, Eastern Ghats etc.). By comparison of networks before the summer monsoon, during summer and winter monsoon season we determined how spatial patterns of rainfalls synchronization change during the year. These changes play a crucial role in the organization of the rainfall all over the Indian subcontinent.

  5. Cancer control efforts in the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Desai, Praful B

    2002-03-01

    The Indian subcontinent in South Asia occupies 2.4% of the world land mass and is home to 16.5% of the world population. At present, it is roughly estimated that approximately 1 million new cancer cases per annum will be recorded and at any given time there will be 3 million cancer patients in India. Nevertheless, cancer is not a frequent disease for the Indian population. Cancer statistics demonstrate that cancers frequently observed in India are lifestyle dependent, with offending factors such as tobacco usage, low socio-economic status, multiple pregnancies and poor sexual hygiene. These factors are closely related to the population living in rural surroundings and they are targets for cancer prevention. Low socio-economic status and low literacy rates ensure that most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease. It is very difficult for these patients to achieve a cure and they are always treated by palliative care with much cost and morbidity. Therefore, it is reasonable to postulate that the strategy for cancer control in India should be focused on health education for the rural population and the creation of an infrastructure for cancer management. These systems with appropriate low-cost technology might be able to be duplicated as a model for developing countries with low capital inputs. PMID:11959872

  6. Meningococcal disease among children of Indian subcontinent ethnic origin.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J M; Doughty, I; Marshall, R; Benson, J

    2000-06-10

    The rate of meningococcal septicaemia and meningitis was significantly lower in children of Indian subcontinent ethnic origin than in children of other origins over 12 years in the Blackburn area of the UK. PMID:10885362

  7. The history of introduction of the African baobab (Adansonia digitata, Malvaceae: Bombacoideae) in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Karen L.; Rangan, Haripriya; Kull, Christian A.; Murphy, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the pathways of introduction of the African baobab, Adansonia digitata, to the Indian subcontinent, we examined 10 microsatellite loci in individuals from Africa, India, the Mascarenes and Malaysia, and matched this with historical evidence of human interactions between source and destination regions. Genetic analysis showed broad congruence of African clusters with biogeographic regions except along the Zambezi (Mozambique) and Kilwa (Tanzania), where populations included a mixture of individuals assigned to at least two different clusters. Individuals from West Africa, the Mascarenes, southeast India and Malaysia shared a cluster. Baobabs from western and central India clustered separately from Africa. Genetic diversity was lower in populations from the Indian subcontinent than in African populations, but the former contained private alleles. Phylogenetic analysis showed Indian populations were closest to those from the Mombasa-Dar es Salaam coast. The genetic results provide evidence of multiple introductions of African baobabs to the Indian subcontinent over a longer time period than previously assumed. Individuals belonging to different genetic clusters in Zambezi and Kilwa may reflect the history of trafficking captives from inland areas to supply the slave trade between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries. Baobabs in the Mascarenes, southeast India and Malaysia indicate introduction from West Africa through eighteenth and nineteenth century European colonial networks. PMID:26473060

  8. The history of introduction of the African baobab (Adansonia digitata, Malvaceae: Bombacoideae) in the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Bell, Karen L; Rangan, Haripriya; Kull, Christian A; Murphy, Daniel J

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the pathways of introduction of the African baobab, Adansonia digitata, to the Indian subcontinent, we examined 10 microsatellite loci in individuals from Africa, India, the Mascarenes and Malaysia, and matched this with historical evidence of human interactions between source and destination regions. Genetic analysis showed broad congruence of African clusters with biogeographic regions except along the Zambezi (Mozambique) and Kilwa (Tanzania), where populations included a mixture of individuals assigned to at least two different clusters. Individuals from West Africa, the Mascarenes, southeast India and Malaysia shared a cluster. Baobabs from western and central India clustered separately from Africa. Genetic diversity was lower in populations from the Indian subcontinent than in African populations, but the former contained private alleles. Phylogenetic analysis showed Indian populations were closest to those from the Mombasa-Dar es Salaam coast. The genetic results provide evidence of multiple introductions of African baobabs to the Indian subcontinent over a longer time period than previously assumed. Individuals belonging to different genetic clusters in Zambezi and Kilwa may reflect the history of trafficking captives from inland areas to supply the slave trade between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries. Baobabs in the Mascarenes, southeast India and Malaysia indicate introduction from West Africa through eighteenth and nineteenth century European colonial networks. PMID:26473060

  9. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India. PMID:27606290

  10. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M.; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India. PMID:27606290

  11. Polycystic ovary syndrome in the Indian Subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Allahbadia, Gautam N; Merchant, Rubina

    2008-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex, multifaceted, heterogeneous disorder that affects approximately 5 to 10% of women of reproductive age. It is characterized by hyperandrogenism, polycystic ovaries, and chronic anovulation along with insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, abdominal obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia as frequent metabolic traits (metabolic syndrome) that culminate in serious long-term consequences such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, endometrial hyperplasia, and coronary artery disease. It is one of the most common causes of anovulatory infertility. However, the heterogeneous clinical features of PCOS may change throughout the life span, starting from adolescence to postmenopausal age, largely influenced by obesity and metabolic alterations, and the phenotype of women with PCOS is variable, depending on the ethnic background. The etiology of PCOS is yet to be elucidated; however, it is believed that in utero fetal programming may have a significant role in the development of PCOS phenotype in adult life. Though a woman may be genetically predisposed to developing PCOS, it is only the interaction of environmental factors (obesity) with the genetic factors that results in the characteristic metabolic and menstrual disturbances and the final expression of the PCOS phenotype. Irrespective of geographic locations, a rapidly increasing prevalence of polycystic ovarian insulin resistance syndrome, excess body fat, adverse body fat patterning, hypertriglyceridemia, and obesity-related disease, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, have been reported in Asian Indians, suggesting that primary prevention strategies should be initiated early in this ethnic group. In lieu of the epidemic increase in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes mellitus in most industrialized countries including China and India owing to Westernization, urbanization, and mechanization, and evidence suggesting a pathogenetic role of obesity in the development of PCOS

  12. Efficacy, Safety and Cost of Insecticide Treated Wall Lining, Insecticide Treated Bed Nets and Indoor Wall Wash with Lime for Visceral Leishmaniasis Vector Control in the Indian Sub-continent: A Multi-country Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Das, Pradeep; Ghosh, Debashis; Priyanka, Jyoti; Matlashewski, Greg; Kroeger, Axel; Upfill-Brown, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background We investigated the efficacy, safety and cost of lime wash of household walls plus treatment of sand fly breeding places with bleach (i.e. environmental management or EM), insecticide impregnated durable wall lining (DWL), and bed net impregnation with slow release insecticide (ITN) for sand fly control in the Indian sub-continent. Methods This multi-country cluster randomized controlled trial had 24 clusters in each three sites with eight clusters per high, medium or low sand fly density stratum. Every cluster included 45–50 households. Five households from each cluster were randomly selected for entomological measurements including sand fly density and mortality at one, three, nine and twelve months post intervention. Household interviews were conducted for socioeconomic information and intervention acceptability assessment. Cost for each intervention was calculated. There was a control group without intervention. Findings Sand fly mortality [mean and 95%CI] ranged from 84% (81%-87%) at one month to 74% (71%-78%) at 12 months for DWL, 75% (71%-79%) at one month to 49% (43%-55%) at twelve months for ITN, and 44% (34%-53%) at one month to 22% (14%-29%) at twelve months for EM. Adjusted intervention effect on sand fly density measured by incidence rate ratio ranged from 0.28 (0.23–0.34) at one month to 0.62 (0.51–0.75) at 12 months for DWL; 0.72 (0.62–0.85) at one month to 1.02 (0.86–1.22) at 12 months for ITN; and 0.89 (0.76–1.03) at one months to 1.49 (1.26–1.74) at 12 months for EM. Household acceptance of EM was 74% compared to 94% for both DWL and ITN. Operational cost per household in USD was about 5, 8, and 2 for EM, DWL and ITN, respectively. Minimal adverse reactions were reported for EM and ITN while 36% of households with DWL reported transient itching. Interpretation DWL is the most effective, durable and acceptable control method followed by ITN. The Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) Elimination Program in the Indian sub-continent

  13. Case for resurgence of radical perineal prostatecomy in Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Rajeev; Khattar, Nikhil; Nayyar, Rishi; Kathuria, Sachin; Narang, Vineet; Kaushal, Devashish

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Radical perineal prostatectomy was the first surgery described for prostatic carcinoma (Young, 1904) but it lost its eminent status after Walsh's description in 1982 of anatomic radical retropubic prostatectomy followed by the enthusiasm in laparoscopy and now robotics. It made resurgence after it was realized in early 1990s that the pelvic lymph node dissection is needed only in selected cases. Last decade witnessed over 80 publications addressing the results and advances in the perineal approach. Strangely, centres from the subcontinent have chosen to ignore this resurgence. We describe our early experience with the technique in 35 patients and present the case for its more widespread usage. Patients and Methods: Thirty five patients of clinically localized carcinoma prostate were operated by perineal route in our institution from December 2006 onwards. All patients had serum prostate specific antigen levels less than 10 ng/ml. Results: Operating time was 2 to 3.5 hours (mean 2.5 hours). Rectal injury occurred in three patients but was closed primarily in all and none required a colostomy. Mean duration of hospital stay was four days. The disease was organ confined in 25(71%). Positive margins were seen in 5(14%) patients. Biochemical recurrence occurred in 17% patients at one year. Seventy six percent patients had achieved continence at one year. Conclusions: As the world is taking note of radical perineal prostatectomy again, with a very small learning curve, minimal invasion and good oncological control urologists from Indian subcontinent should also embrace this procedure in view of the relative limited resources available. PMID:23449760

  14. Gene flow from the Indian subcontinent to Australia: evidence from the Y chromosome.

    PubMed

    Redd, Alan J; Roberts-Thomson, June; Karafet, Tatiana; Bamshad, Michael; Jorde, Lynn B; Naidu, J M; Walsh, Bruce; Hammer, Michael F

    2002-04-16

    Phenotypic similarities between Australian Aboriginal People and some tribes of India were noted by T.H. Huxley during the voyage of the Rattlesnake (1846-1850). Anthropometric studies by Birdsell led to his suggestion that a migratory wave into Australia included populations with affinities to tribal Indians. Genetic evidence for an Indian contribution to the Australian gene pool is contradictory; most studies of autosomal markers have not supported this hypothesis (; and references therein). On the other hand, affinities between Australian Aboriginal People and southern Indians were suggested based on maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA. Here, we show additional DNA evidence in support of Huxley's hypothesis of an Indian-Australian connection using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and short tandem repeats (STRs) on the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY). Phylogenetic analyses of STR variation associated with a major Australian SNP lineage indicated tight clustering with southern Indian/Sri Lankan Y chromosomes. Estimates of the divergence time for these Indian and Australian chromosomes overlap with important changes in the archaeological and linguistic records in Australia. These results provide strong evidence for an influx of Y chromosomes from the Indian subcontinent to Australia that may have occurred during the Holocene. PMID:11967156

  15. Evolutionary genomics of epidemic visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Hideo; Downing, Tim; Van den Broeck, Frederik; Sanders, Mandy J; Rijal, Suman; Sundar, Shyam; Mannaert, An; Vanaerschot, Manu; Berg, Maya; De Muylder, Géraldine; Dumetz, Franck; Cuypers, Bart; Maes, Ilse; Domagalska, Malgorzata; Decuypere, Saskia; Rai, Keshav; Uranw, Surendra; Bhattarai, Narayan Raj; Khanal, Basudha; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar; Sharma, Smriti; Stark, Olivia; Schönian, Gabriele; De Koning, Harry P; Settimo, Luca; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Roy, Syamal; Ostyn, Bart; Boelaert, Marleen; Maes, Louis; Berriman, Matthew; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Cotton, James A

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania donovani causes visceral leishmaniasis (VL), the second most deadly vector-borne parasitic disease. A recent epidemic in the Indian subcontinent (ISC) caused up to 80% of global VL and over 30,000 deaths per year. Resistance against antimonial drugs has probably been a contributing factor in the persistence of this epidemic. Here we use whole genome sequences from 204 clinical isolates to track the evolution and epidemiology of L. donovani from the ISC. We identify independent radiations that have emerged since a bottleneck coincident with 1960s DDT spraying campaigns. A genetically distinct population frequently resistant to antimonials has a two base-pair insertion in the aquaglyceroporin gene LdAQP1 that prevents the transport of trivalent antimonials. We find evidence of genetic exchange between ISC populations, and show that the mutation in LdAQP1 has spread by recombination. Our results reveal the complexity of L. donovani evolution in the ISC in response to drug treatment. PMID:27003289

  16. Evolutionary genomics of epidemic visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Hideo; Downing, Tim; Van den Broeck, Frederik; Sanders, Mandy J; Rijal, Suman; Sundar, Shyam; Mannaert, An; Vanaerschot, Manu; Berg, Maya; De Muylder, Géraldine; Dumetz, Franck; Cuypers, Bart; Maes, Ilse; Domagalska, Malgorzata; Decuypere, Saskia; Rai, Keshav; Uranw, Surendra; Bhattarai, Narayan Raj; Khanal, Basudha; Prajapati, Vijay Kumar; Sharma, Smriti; Stark, Olivia; Schönian, Gabriele; De Koning, Harry P; Settimo, Luca; Vanhollebeke, Benoit; Roy, Syamal; Ostyn, Bart; Boelaert, Marleen; Maes, Louis; Berriman, Matthew; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Cotton, James A

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania donovani causes visceral leishmaniasis (VL), the second most deadly vector-borne parasitic disease. A recent epidemic in the Indian subcontinent (ISC) caused up to 80% of global VL and over 30,000 deaths per year. Resistance against antimonial drugs has probably been a contributing factor in the persistence of this epidemic. Here we use whole genome sequences from 204 clinical isolates to track the evolution and epidemiology of L. donovani from the ISC. We identify independent radiations that have emerged since a bottleneck coincident with 1960s DDT spraying campaigns. A genetically distinct population frequently resistant to antimonials has a two base-pair insertion in the aquaglyceroporin gene LdAQP1 that prevents the transport of trivalent antimonials. We find evidence of genetic exchange between ISC populations, and show that the mutation in LdAQP1 has spread by recombination. Our results reveal the complexity of L. donovani evolution in the ISC in response to drug treatment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12613.001 PMID:27003289

  17. Seasonal variability of aerosol optical depth over Indian subcontinent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prasad, A.K.; Singh, R.P.; Singh, A.; Kafatos, M.

    2005-01-01

    Ganga basin extends 2000 km E-W and about 400 km N-S and is bounded by Himalayas in the north. This basin is unequivocally found to be affected by high aerosols optical depth (AOD) (>0.6) throughout the year. Himalayas restricts movement of aerosols toward north and as a result dynamic nature of aerosol is seen over the Ganga basin. High AOD in this region has detrimental effects on health of more than 460 million people living in this part of India besides adversely affecting clouds formation, monsoonal rainfall pattern and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Severe drought events (year 2002) in Ganga basin and unexpected failure of monsoon several times, occurred in different parts of Indian subcontinent. Significant rise in AOD (18.7%) over the central part of basin (Kanpur region) have been found to cause substantial decrease in NDVI (8.1%) since 2000. A negative relationship is observed between AOD and NDVI, magnitude of which differs from region to region. Efforts have been made to determine general distribution of AOD and its dominant departure in recent years spatially using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. The seasonal changes in aerosol optical depth over the Indo-Gangetic basin is found to very significant as a result of the increasing dust storm events in recent years. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  18. Stingless bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Meliponini) of the Indian subcontinent: Diversity, taxonomy and current status of knowledge.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Claus

    2013-01-01

    Eight named species of stingless bees are known from the Indian subcontinent: Lepidotrigona arcifera (Cockerell), Lisotrigona cacciae (Nurse), Lisotrigona mohandasi Jobiraj & Narendran, Tetragonula aff. laeviceps (Smith), Tetragonula bengalensis (Cameron), Tetragonula gressitti (Sakagami), Tetragonula iridipennis (Smith), Tetragonula praeterita (Walker), and Tetragonula ruficornis (Smith). Lectotypes are newly designated for T. bengalensis and T. ruficornis. Keys, comparative notes, and illustrations for species identification are provided. The distribution of stingless bees throughout the Indian subcontinent are summarized and concluding that they are found in most parts of the Indian subcontinent, except at higher elevation or the drier interior regions. Additional collections and studies are urgently needed to clearly define the species limits of the complex "iridipennis" species group. PMID:26295116

  19. On the driving forces of the Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-04-01

    During the breakup of the supercontinent Pangea, the Indian subcontinent became isolated from the southern part of Pangea, called Gondwanaland, at around 130 Ma, moved northwards, and eventually collided with Eurasia to form the Himalayas at around 40-50 Ma. The reason why the Indian subcontinent moved at such a high speed of up to c. 20 cm/yr remains a controversial issue in geodynamics. Here, numerical simulation of 3-D spherical mantle convection with an Earth-like Rayleigh number is reported, considering the assembly of highly viscous continental blocks with the configuration of Pangea, to determine the geodynamic mechanisms of the Pangea breakup, the subsequent continental drift, and the high-speed northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean. References: [1] Yoshida, M., Effects of various lithospheric yield stresses and different mantle-heating modes on the breakup of the Pangea supercontinent, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41(9), 3060-3067, doi:10.1002/2014GL060023, 2014. [2] Yoshida, M. and Y. Hamano, Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection, Submitted to Scientific Reports, 2015

  20. Cancer mortality in Indian and British ethnic immigrants from the Indian subcontinent to England and Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Swerdlow, A. J.; Marmot, M. G.; Grulich, A. E.; Head, J.

    1995-01-01

    Risk of cancer mortality from 1973 to 1985 in persons born in the Indian subcontinent who migrated to England and Wales was analysed by ethnicity, and compared with cancer mortality in the England and Wales native population, using data from England and Wales death certificates. There were substantial highly significant raised risks in Indian ethnic migrants for cancers of the mouth and pharynx, gall bladder, and liver in each sex, larynx and thyroid in males, and oesophagus in females. There were also substantial raised risks in these migrants of each sex for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and myeloma. For the mouth and pharynx, and liver in each sex, and gall bladder in females, there were also raised risks of lesser magnitude in British ethnic migrants. For colon and rectal cancer and cutaneous melanoma in each sex, ovarian cancer in women and bladder cancer in men, there were appreciable significantly reduced risks in the Indian ethnic migrants not shared by those of British ethnicity. Appreciable raised risks in British ethnic migrants not shared by those of Indian ethnicity occurred for nasopharyngeal cancer in males, soft tissue malignancy in both sexes and non-melanoma skin cancer in males. In migrants of both ethnicities there were appreciable significantly raised risks in each sex for leukaemia and decreased risks in each sex for gastric cancer, for lung cancer except in females of British ethnicity and in males for testicular cancer. The results suggest the need for public health measures to combat the high risks of oral and pharyngeal cancers and liver cancer in the Indian ethnic immigrant population of England and Wales, by prevention of betel quid chewing and hepatitis transmission respectively. The data also imply that early exposures or early acquired behaviours in India, or exposures during migration, may increase the risk of leukaemia and reduce the risks of gastric and testicular cancers in the migrants irrespective of their ethnicity. Aetiological

  1. The application of remote sensing techniques for air pollution analysis and climate change on Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palve, S. N.; Nemade, P. D., Dr.; Ghude, S. D., Dr.

    2016-06-01

    India is home to an extraordinary variety of climatic regions, ranging from tropical in the south to temperate and alpine in the Himalayan north, where elevated regions receive sustained winter snowfall. The subcontinent is characterized by high levels of air pollution due to intensively developing industries and mass fuel consumption for domestic purposes. The main tropospheric pollutants (O3, NO2, CO, formaldehyde (HCHO) and SO2) and two major greenhouse gases (tropospheric O3 and methane (CH4)) and important parameters of aerosols, which play a key role in climate change and affecting on the overall well-being of subcontinent residents. In light of considering these facts this paper aims to investigate possible impact of air pollutants over the climate change on Indian subcontinent. Satellite derived column aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a cost effective way to monitor and study aerosols distribution and effects over a long time period. AOD is found to be increasing rapidly since 2000 in summer season that may cause adverse effect to the agricultural crops and also to the human health. Increased aerosol loading may likely affect the rainfall which is responsible for the observed drought conditions over the Indian subcontinent. Carbon monoxide is emitted into the atmosphere by biomass burning activities and India is the second largest contributor of CO emissions in Asia. The MOPITT CO retrievals at 850 hPa show large CO emission from the IG region. The development of convective activity associated with the ASM leads to large scale vertical transport of the boundary layer CO from the Indian region into the upper troposphere. TCO over the Indian subcontinent during 2007 has a systematic and gradual variation, spatial as well as temporal. Higher amount of TCO in the northern latitudes and simultaneous lower TCO at near equatorial latitudes indicates depletion of ozone near the equator and accumulation at higher latitudes within the subcontinent. In addition, changes

  2. CONTAINMENT OF HIGHLY CONCENTRATED ARSENIC-LADEN SPENT REGENERANT ON THE INDIAN SUBCONTINENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Phase II EPA P3 project encompasses the following two activities in the Indian subcontinent: Continued installation of arsenic removal units in rural villages and extension of sustainable arsenic-laden waste disposal practices. For ten years, Lehigh University and Benga...

  3. Chloroplast DNA Phylogeography of Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) in Indian Subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Pooja

    2014-01-01

    Ocimum tenuiflorum L., holy basil “Tulsi”, is an important medicinal plant that is being grown and traditionally revered throughout Indian Subcontinent for thousands of years; however, DNA sequence-based genetic diversity of this aromatic herb is not yet known. In this report, we present our studies on the phylogeography of this species using trnL-trnF intergenic spacer of plastid genome as the DNA barcode for isolates from Indian subcontinent. Our pairwise distance analyses indicated that genetic heterogeneity of isolates remained quite low, with overall mean nucleotide p-distance of 5 × 10−4. However, our sensitive phylogenetic analysis using maximum likelihood framework was able to reveal subtle intraspecific molecular evolution of this species within the subcontinent. All isolates except that from North-Central India formed a distinct phylogenetic clade, notwithstanding low bootstrap support and collapse of the clade in Bayesian Inference. North-Central isolates occupied more basal position compared to other isolates, which is suggestive of its evolutionarily primitive status. Indian isolates formed a monophyletic and well-supported clade within O. tenuiflorum clade, which indicates a distinct haplotype. Given the vast geographical area of more than 3 million km2 encompassing many exclusive biogeographical and ecological zones, relatively low rate of evolution of this herb at this locus in India is particularly interesting. PMID:24523650

  4. Chloroplast DNA phylogeography of holy basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum) in Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Bast, Felix; Rani, Pooja; Meena, Devendra

    2014-01-01

    Ocimum tenuiflorum L., holy basil "Tulsi", is an important medicinal plant that is being grown and traditionally revered throughout Indian Subcontinent for thousands of years; however, DNA sequence-based genetic diversity of this aromatic herb is not yet known. In this report, we present our studies on the phylogeography of this species using trnL-trnF intergenic spacer of plastid genome as the DNA barcode for isolates from Indian subcontinent. Our pairwise distance analyses indicated that genetic heterogeneity of isolates remained quite low, with overall mean nucleotide p-distance of 5 × 10(-4). However, our sensitive phylogenetic analysis using maximum likelihood framework was able to reveal subtle intraspecific molecular evolution of this species within the subcontinent. All isolates except that from North-Central India formed a distinct phylogenetic clade, notwithstanding low bootstrap support and collapse of the clade in Bayesian Inference. North-Central isolates occupied more basal position compared to other isolates, which is suggestive of its evolutionarily primitive status. Indian isolates formed a monophyletic and well-supported clade within O. tenuiflorum clade, which indicates a distinct haplotype. Given the vast geographical area of more than 3 million km(2) encompassing many exclusive biogeographical and ecological zones, relatively low rate of evolution of this herb at this locus in India is particularly interesting. PMID:24523650

  5. Implications of the Projected Future Climate on Water Resources in the Indian Sub-continent Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, H. L.; Mishra, V.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainability of water resources is vital for agricultural and socio-economic development in India. In the recent few decades, India has been witnessing erratic nature of the Indian summer monsoon, which accounts for about 80% of the total annual rainfall. While there is a large uncertainty in the precipitation projections during the summer monsoon from the regional and global climate models, we need to understand sensitivity of water resources in the Indian sub-continental river basins under the projected future climate. This is particularly important as the Indian sub-continent is one of the most populated regions of the world. We evaluated changes in water budget in the 18 Indian sub-continental basins under the projected future climate using the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model. The VIC model was calibrated and evaluated using the observed streamflow as well as satellite derived evapotranspiration and soil moisture. After the successful calibration and evaluation, we performed a sensitivity analysis for the water balance variables. Finally, we used downscaled and bias corrected climate forcings to develop scenarios of changes in water balance under the future climate. Despite the intermodal variation, Indian basins are projected to experience wetter and warmer climate in future. Results indicate positive changes in evapotranspiration and runoff under the projected future climate; however, increases in total runoff are projected to be significant in most of the basins in the sub-continent.

  6. Continuity of Microblade Technology in the Indian Subcontinent Since 45 ka: Implications for the Dispersal of Modern Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sheila; Chauhan, Naveen; Singhvi, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    We extend the continuity of microblade technology in the Indian Subcontinent to 45 ka, on the basis of optical dating of microblade assemblages from the site of Mehtakheri, (22° 13' 44″ N Lat 76° 01' 36″ E Long) in Madhya Pradesh, India. Microblade technology in the Indian Subcontinent is continuously present from its first appearance until the Iron Age (~3 ka), making its association with modern humans undisputed. It has been suggested that microblade technology in the Indian Subcontinent was developed locally by modern humans after 35 ka. The dates reported here from Mehtakheri show this inference to be untenable and suggest alternatively that this technology arrived in the Indian Subcontinent with the earliest modern humans. It also shows that modern humans in Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia were associated with differing technologies and this calls into question the “southern dispersal” route of modern humans from Africa through India to SE Asia and then to Australia. We suggest that modern humans dispersed from Africa in two stages coinciding with the warmer interglacial conditions of MIS 5 and MIS 3. Competitive interactions between African modern humans and Indian archaics who shared an adaptation to tropical environments differed from that between modern humans and archaics like Neanderthals and Denisovans, who were adapted to temperate environments. Thus, while modern humans expanded into temperate regions during warmer climates, their expansion into tropical regions, like the Indian Subcontinent, in competition with similarly adapted populations, occurred during arid climates. Thus modern humans probably entered the Indian Subcontinent during the arid climate of MIS 4 coinciding with their disappearance from the Middle East and Northern Africa. The out of phase expansion of modern humans into tropical versus temperate regions has been one of the factors affecting the dispersal of modern humans from Africa during the period 200–40 ka. PMID

  7. Continuity of microblade technology in the Indian Subcontinent since 45 ka: implications for the dispersal of modern humans.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sheila; Chauhan, Naveen; Singhvi, Ashok K

    2013-01-01

    We extend the continuity of microblade technology in the Indian Subcontinent to 45 ka, on the basis of optical dating of microblade assemblages from the site of Mehtakheri, (22° 13' 44″ N Lat 76° 01' 36″ E Long) in Madhya Pradesh, India. Microblade technology in the Indian Subcontinent is continuously present from its first appearance until the Iron Age (~3 ka), making its association with modern humans undisputed. It has been suggested that microblade technology in the Indian Subcontinent was developed locally by modern humans after 35 ka. The dates reported here from Mehtakheri show this inference to be untenable and suggest alternatively that this technology arrived in the Indian Subcontinent with the earliest modern humans. It also shows that modern humans in Indian Subcontinent and SE Asia were associated with differing technologies and this calls into question the "southern dispersal" route of modern humans from Africa through India to SE Asia and then to Australia. We suggest that modern humans dispersed from Africa in two stages coinciding with the warmer interglacial conditions of MIS 5 and MIS 3. Competitive interactions between African modern humans and Indian archaics who shared an adaptation to tropical environments differed from that between modern humans and archaics like Neanderthals and Denisovans, who were adapted to temperate environments. Thus, while modern humans expanded into temperate regions during warmer climates, their expansion into tropical regions, like the Indian Subcontinent, in competition with similarly adapted populations, occurred during arid climates. Thus modern humans probably entered the Indian Subcontinent during the arid climate of MIS 4 coinciding with their disappearance from the Middle East and Northern Africa. The out of phase expansion of modern humans into tropical versus temperate regions has been one of the factors affecting the dispersal of modern humans from Africa during the period 200-40 ka. PMID:23840912

  8. Analysis of spatial flow patterns across the Indian subcontinent via multi-basin hydrological modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Arheimer, Berit

    2016-04-01

    In here, we use examples from the recent HYPE hydrological model set-up across 6010 subbasins for the Indian subcontinent, named India-HYPE v1.0 (Pechlivanidis and Arheimer, 2015), and demonstrate the potential of multi-basin modelling for process understanding and comparative hydrology. We analyse the flow characteristics in all modelled 6010 subbasins and group them based on similarities in 12 flow signatures to gain insights in spatial patterns of flow generating processes. We applied a k-means clustering approach within the 12-dimensional space (consisting of the 12 calculated flow signatures) to categorise the subbasins based on their combined similarity in flow signatures. To highlight the hydrological insights gained during model identification, we conducted the clustering analysis on two different steps of the model calibration and explored the sensitivity of calibration on the spatial patterns of flow signatures. Analysis resulted into six different classes of varying size with different distribution in signatures. Although the classes are geographically distinct, their flow response is dependent on the physiographic and climatic characteristics at the regional scale. Factors including for instance the dominance of snow/ice processes, volume in precipitation and evaporation rates affect the catchment functioning and hence drive the clustering. Catchments in the Himalayan region and the Western Ghats respond similarly and are characterised by high mean annual specific runoff values and variable flow regime. Response of the catchments in the tropical zone is characterised by high peaks, while catchments in the dry regions show very strong flow variability and respond quickly to rainfall. Finally, model parameterisation can affect the spatial pattern of clusters in terms of catchment functioning. In particular, clusters after calibration seem to have a consistent spatial structure; this also justifies the validity of parameter regionalisation approaches based

  9. A taxonomic review of the genus Antodynerus de Saussure, 1855 (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Eumeninae) from the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Girish P; Carpenter, James M

    2013-01-01

    The genus Antodynerus de Saussure, 1855 is reviewed from the Indian subcontinent. Three species with one additional subspecies are present, namely Antodynerus flavescens flavescens (Fabricius, 1775), A. f. karachiensis Giordani Soika, 1970, A. limbatus (de Saussure, 1852), and A. punctatipennis (de Saussure, 1853). The parasitic association of strepsipteran insects and the symbiotic association of mites are reported for the first time in the genus Antodynerus. The distribution of A. f. flavescens (Fabricius) and A. limbatus (de Saussure) in the Indian states is augmented. The latter species is newly recorded from China (Tibet). A key to species of the Indian subcontinent is provided. PMID:25277569

  10. Regional groundwater storage changes in the Indian subcontinent: The role of anthropogenic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanja, S. N.; Mukherjee, A.; Rodell, M.; Velicogna, I.; Pangaluru, K.; Famiglietti, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    A large number of people around the globe depend on groundwater as a source of fresh water. Groundwater dependence will be further intensified by the world's exponentially increasing population and climate change. Therefore, quantification of groundwater storage (GWS) changes is a critical issue in the densely populated regions of the world. Approximately, 90% of groundwater withdrawals are associated with irrigational activities in the Indian subcontinent. We used a combination of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations, hydrological data from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) together with groundwater level measurements and ERA-Interim precipitation, for the period 2003-2012 to estimate regional GWS changes and to regionally evaluate the anthropogenic and climatic forcing control on the observed changes. Rapid GWS depletion (>10 mm/year) has been observed in the northern and eastern parts of the Indian subcontinent. Most of the groundwater depleted regions coincide with the highly fertile alluvial aquifers of Ganges-Brahmaputra basin, which is subjected to intense groundwater withdrawals associated with crop irrigation. Our GWS change estimates are consistent with ground-based water level measurements (n> 13,000) from the region. Over this ten year period, GWS data show little to moderate replenishments in southern and western regions of Indian subcontinent, probably because of advanced water resource management in these areas. Precipitation is the key factor controlling the renewability of groundwater resources, however, precipitation during the period was generally near normal to historical levels, suggesting strong anthropogenic influence on GWS change in the northern and eastern parts of India during the study period.

  11. SPINK1 Is a Susceptibility Gene for Fibrocalculous Pancreatic Diabetes in Subjects from the Indian Subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Zahid; Mohan, Viswananthan; Ali, Liaquat; Allotey, Rebecca; Barakat, Khalid; Faruque, M. Omar; Deepa, Raj; McDermott, Michael F.; Jackson, Alan E.; Cassell, Paul; Curtis, David; Gelding, Susan V.; Vijayaravaghan, Shanti; Gyr, Niklaus; Whitcomb, David C.; Khan, A. K. Azad; Hitman, Graham A.

    2002-01-01

    Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes (FCPD) is a secondary cause of diabetes due to chronic pancreatitis. Since the N34S variant of the SPINK1 trypsin inhibitor gene has been found to partially account for genetic susceptibility to chronic pancreatitis, we used a family-based and case-control approach in two separate ethnic groups from the Indian subcontinent, to determine whether N34S was associated with susceptibility to FCPD. Clear excess transmission of SPINK1 N34S to the probands with FCPD in 69 Bangladeshi families was observed (P<.0001; 20 transmissions and 2 nontransmissions). In the total study group (Bangladeshi and southern Indian) the N34S variant was present in 33% of 180 subjects with FCPD, 4.4% of 861 nondiabetic subjects (odds ratio 10.8; P<.0001 compared with FCPD), 3.7% of 219 subjects with type 2 diabetes, and 10.6% of 354 subjects with early-onset diabetes (aged <30 years) (P=.02 compared with the ethnically matched control group). These results suggest that the N34S variant of SPINK1 is a susceptibility gene for FCPD in the Indian subcontinent, although, by itself, it is not sufficient to cause disease. PMID:12187509

  12. Postmortem sperm retrieval in context of developing countries of Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Sikary, Asit Kumar; Murty, O. P.; Bardale, Rajesh V.

    2016-01-01

    There was a request for postmortem sperm retrieval (PMSR) from the wife of a deceased, but we had to decline. We have no guideline in place for the procedure in such cases. When we explored the international scenario on the issue of PMSR, we found that most of the developed countries have their guidelines about it, whether to allow or not to. There is not guideline available in developing countries, as such, for the procedure and various medical, legal, and social issues related thereto. In this article, we have explored the status of postmortem retrieval and feasibility of the procedure in developing countries of Indian subcontinent. PMID:27382231

  13. Postmortem sperm retrieval in context of developing countries of Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Sikary, Asit Kumar; Murty, O P; Bardale, Rajesh V

    2016-01-01

    There was a request for postmortem sperm retrieval (PMSR) from the wife of a deceased, but we had to decline. We have no guideline in place for the procedure in such cases. When we explored the international scenario on the issue of PMSR, we found that most of the developed countries have their guidelines about it, whether to allow or not to. There is not guideline available in developing countries, as such, for the procedure and various medical, legal, and social issues related thereto. In this article, we have explored the status of postmortem retrieval and feasibility of the procedure in developing countries of Indian subcontinent. PMID:27382231

  14. Assessment of the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent in CMIP5 models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Ayantika, D. C.; Pandithurai, G.; Niranjan, K.

    2014-04-01

    This paper examines the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent as represented in 21 models from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations, wherein model simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) is compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The objective of the study is to provide an assessment of the capability of various global models, participating in CMIP5 project, in capturing the realistic spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent. Results from our analysis show that majority of the CMIP5 models (excepting HADGEM2-ES, HADGEM2-CC) seriously underestimates the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent, in particular over Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP). Since IGP region is dominated by anthropogenic activities, high population density, and wind driven transport of dust and other aerosol species, MODIS observations reveal high AOD values over this region. Though the representation of black carbon (BC) loading in many models is fairly good, the dust loading is observed to be significantly low in majority of the models. The presence of pronounced dust activity over northern India and dust being one of the major constituent of aerosol species, the biases in dust loading has a great impact on the AOD of that region. We found that considerable biases in simulating the 850 hPa wind field (which plays important role in transport of dust from adjacent deserts) would be the possible reason for poor representation of dust AOD and in turn total AOD over Indian region in CMIP5 models. In addition, aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) underestimated/overestimated in most of the models. However, spatial distribution of ARF in multi-model ensemble mean is comparable reasonably well with observations with bias in magnitudes. This analysis emphasizes the fundamental need to improve the representation of aerosol species in current state of

  15. Assessment of the Aerosol Distribution Over Indian Subcontinent in CMIP5 Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Pandithurai, G.

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines the aerosol distribution over Indian subcontinent as represented in 21 models from Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) simulations, wherein model simulated aerosol optical depth (AOD) is compared with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) satellite observations. The objective of the study is to provide an assessment of the capability of various global models, participating in CMIP5 project, in capturing the realistic spatial and temporal distribution of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent. Results from our analysis show that majority of the CMIP5 models seriously underestimates the spatio-temporal variability of aerosol species over the Indian subcontinent, in particular over Indo-Gangetic Plains(IGP). Though the representation of black carbon (BC) loading in many models is fairly good, the dust loading is observed to be significantly low in majority of the models. The presence of pronounced dust activity over northern India and dust being one of the major constituent of aerosol species, the biases in dust loading has a great impact on the AOD of that region. We found that considerable biases in simulating the 850 hPa wind field (which plays important role in transport of dust from adjacent deserts) would be the possible reason for poor representation of dust AOD and in turn total AOD over Indian region in CMIP5 models. In addition, aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) underestimated/overestimated in most of the models. However, spatial distribution of ARF in multi-model ensemble mean is comparable reasonably well with observations with bias in magnitudes. This analysis emphasizes the fundamental need to improve the representation of aerosol species in current state of the art climate models. As reported in Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report (AR4), the level of scientific understanding (LOSU) of climatic impact of aerosols is medium-low. For better understanding of

  16. Global effects on Ionospheric Weather over the Indian subcontinent at Sunrise and Sunset

    SciTech Connect

    Basak, Tamal; Pal, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.

    2010-10-20

    Study of Very Low Frequency (VLF) electromagnetic wave is very important for knowing the behavior of the Ionospheric layers due to Sunrise-Sunset, Earthquakes, Solar flares, Solar eclipses and other terrestrial and extra terrestrial radiations. We study the properties of the variation of the VLF signal strength theoretically all over Indian sub-continent. As an example, we concentrate on the VLF signal transmitted by Indian Naval Transmitter VTX at Vijayanarayanam (Latitude 08 deg. 23', Longitude 77 deg. 45') near the southern tip of Indian subcontinent. As has been noticed, several receiving stations placed during the VLF campaign in all over India, the VLF signal strength varies significantly with place and time. To understand the diurnal and seasonal variation of the received signal, a complete knowledge of physics of intensity distribution of the VLF signal is essential. The spatial variation of VLF signal plays an important role in selecting future VLF stations. In the wave-hop theoretical model presented here, horizontally stratified ionospheric layers have been considered. The VLF wave emitted by the transmitter has both the ground wave and the sky wave components. The ground wave attenuates during propagation. The sky wave component experiences reflections by the ionosphere on its way to the receiver and its attenuation depends on the degree of ionization. Intensity variation occurs at a given receiver location for interference among singly and multiply reflected waves. This has been simulated considering some simplified and justifiable assumptions. This spatial variation wave-hop theoretical model developed here has been compared with LWPC code generated results.

  17. Globalization and Multilingualism: Case Studies of Indigenous Culture-Based Education from the Indian Sub-Continent and Their Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Navin Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents some of the major program initiatives honoring Indigenous knowledge, culture, heritage, arts, and skills through curricular reforms and culturally appropriate educational practices on the Indian sub-continent. It presents case studies of Indigenous culture-based education, with reference to mother tongue and multicultural…

  18. First myocardial infarction in patients of Indian subcontinent and European origin: comparison of risk factors, management, and long term outcome.

    PubMed Central

    Shaukat, N.; Lear, J.; Lowy, A.; Fletcher, S.; de Bono, D. P.; Woods, K. L.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare long term outcome after first myocardial infarction among British patients originating from the Indian subcontinent and from Europe. DESIGN: Matched pairs study. SETTING: Coronary care unit in central Leicester. SUBJECTS: 238 pairs of patients admitted during 1987-93 matched for age (within 2 years), sex, date of admission (within 3 months), type of infarction (Q/non-Q), and site of infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of angina, reinfarction, or death during follow up of 1-7 years. RESULTS: Patients of Indian subcontinent origin had a higher prevalence of diabetes (35% v 9% in patients of European origin, P < 0.001), lower prevalence of smoking (39% v 63%, P < 0.001), longer median delay from symptom onset to admission (5 hours v 3 hours, P < 0.01), and lower use of thrombolysis (50% v 66%, P < 0.001). During long term follow up (median 39 months), mortality was higher in patients of Indian subcontinent origin (unadjusted hazard ratio = 2.1, 95% confidence interval 1.3 to 3.4, P = 0.002). After adjustment for smoking, history of diabetes, and thrombolysis the estimated hazard ratio fell slightly to 2.0 (1.1 to 3.6, P = 0.02). Patients of Indian subcontinent origin had almost twice the incidence of angina (54% v 29%; P < 0.001) and almost three times the risk of reinfarction during follow up (34% v 12.5% at 3 years, P < 0.001). The unadjusted hazard ratio for reinfarction in patients of Indian subcontinent origin was 2.8 (1.8 to 4.4, P < 0.001). Adjustment for smoking, history of diabetes, and thrombolysis made little difference to the hazard ratio. Coronary angiography was performed with similar frequency in the two groups; triple vessel disease was the commonest finding in patients of Indian subcontinent origin and single vessel disease the commonest in Europeans (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients of Indian subcontinent origin are at substantially higher risk of mortality and of further coronary events than Europeans after first

  19. Biotic interchange between the Indian subcontinent and mainland Asia through time

    PubMed Central

    Klaus, Sebastian; Morley, Robert J.; Plath, Martin; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Li, Jia-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Biotic interchange after the connection of previously independently evolving floras and faunas is thought to be one of the key factors that shaped global biodiversity as we see it today. However, it was not known how biotic interchange develops over longer time periods of several million years following the secondary contact of different biotas. Here we present a novel method to investigate the temporal dynamics of biotic interchange based on a phylogeographical meta-analysis by calculating the maximal number of observed dispersal events per million years given the temporal uncertainty of the underlying time-calibrated phylogenies. We show that biotic influx from mainland Asia onto the Indian subcontinent after Eocene continental collision was not a uniform process, but was subject to periods of acceleration, stagnancy and decrease. We discuss potential palaeoenvironmental causes for this fluctuation. PMID:27373955

  20. Surgical management in treatment of Jehovah's witness in trauma surgery in Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Nishant; Kumari, Renu

    2014-01-01

    The Jehovah's Witness religion is a Christian movement, founded in the US in the 1870s, with 7 million followers worldwide with only 0.002% in India. There is minimal to complete absence of awareness about the existence of this community in our society. Astonishing is that fact that among medical professionals, there is almost no awareness about this unique population, regarding the fact that they completely refuse of blood transfusion even if it leads to their death. This is integral to their faith. Besides legal and ethical issues in treating these group of patients, the biggest challenge exist even in the western world is their management in trauma scenario where few options exist. We have discussed the issues and recommendations in management in trauma scenario in our Indian subcontinent. PMID:25114433

  1. Biotic interchange between the Indian subcontinent and mainland Asia through time.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Sebastian; Morley, Robert J; Plath, Martin; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Li, Jia-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Biotic interchange after the connection of previously independently evolving floras and faunas is thought to be one of the key factors that shaped global biodiversity as we see it today. However, it was not known how biotic interchange develops over longer time periods of several million years following the secondary contact of different biotas. Here we present a novel method to investigate the temporal dynamics of biotic interchange based on a phylogeographical meta-analysis by calculating the maximal number of observed dispersal events per million years given the temporal uncertainty of the underlying time-calibrated phylogenies. We show that biotic influx from mainland Asia onto the Indian subcontinent after Eocene continental collision was not a uniform process, but was subject to periods of acceleration, stagnancy and decrease. We discuss potential palaeoenvironmental causes for this fluctuation. PMID:27373955

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Combination Therapies for Visceral Leishmaniasis in the Indian Subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Meheus, Filip; Balasegaram, Manica; Olliaro, Piero; Sundar, Shyam; Rijal, Suman; Faiz, Md. Abul; Boelaert, Marleen

    2010-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis is a systemic parasitic disease that is fatal unless treated. We assessed the cost and cost-effectiveness of alternative strategies for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent. In particular we examined whether combination therapies are a cost-effective alternative compared to monotherapies. Methods and Findings We assessed the cost-effectiveness of all possible mono- and combination therapies for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent (India, Nepal and Bangladesh) from a societal perspective using a decision analytical model based on a decision tree. Primary data collected in each country was combined with data from the literature and an expert poll (Delphi method). The cost per patient treated and average and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios expressed as cost per death averted were calculated. Extensive sensitivity analysis was done to evaluate the robustness of our estimations and conclusions. With a cost of US$92 per death averted, the combination miltefosine-paromomycin was the most cost-effective treatment strategy. The next best alternative was a combination of liposomal amphotericin B with paromomycin with an incremental cost-effectiveness of $652 per death averted. All other strategies were dominated with the exception of a single dose of 10mg per kg of liposomal amphotericin B. While strategies based on liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome) were found to be the most effective, its current drug cost of US$20 per vial resulted in a higher average cost-effectiveness. Sensitivity analysis showed the conclusion to be robust to variations in the input parameters over their plausible range. Conclusions Combination treatments are a cost-effective alternative to current monotherapy for VL. Given their expected impact on the emergence of drug resistance, a switch to combination therapy should be considered once final results from clinical trials are available. PMID:20838649

  3. Diurnal variation in the initiation of rainfall over the Indian subcontinent during two different monsoon seasons of 2008 and 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen Roy, Shouraseni; Sen Roy, Soma

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, the diurnal variations in the time of initiation of rainfall, during two contrasting monsoon seasons of 2008 (below normal) and 2009 (normal) over the Indian subcontinent and surrounding oceanic areas has been analyzed. Harmonic analysis was used to detect the spatial variation of the diurnal cycle of the time of initiation of rainfall, as obtained at half-hourly intervals from the Kalpana 1 satellite. In general, the diurnal cycle in the time of initiation is strongest in regions where convective clouds are predominant, while it is weaker in regions where the clouds are predominantly stratiform with long-lived medium to high cloud cover. In the interior of the subcontinent, the time of maximum mainly occurred in the afternoon to evening hours, with a distinct southeast to northwest gradation. Substantial spatial variations were detected in the diurnal patterns between a normal and below normal monsoon years. Spatially, rainfall is initiated later in 2009 compared to 2008 over most of the interior of the Indian subcontinent. The most distinct difference was observed over the core monsoon region in central India, where the diurnal patterns were stronger in 2009 compared to 2008. On the other hand, over the oceans surrounding the Indian subcontinent, the initiation times are generally earlier in 2009.

  4. Continuity of mammalian fauna over the last 200,000 y in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Patrick; Delson, Eric; Miracle, Preston; Ditchfield, Peter; Roberts, Richard G.; Jacobs, Zenobia; Blinkhorn, James; Ciochon, Russell L.; Fleagle, John G.; Frost, Stephen R.; Gilbert, Christopher C.; Gunnell, Gregg F.; Harrison, Terry; Korisettar, Ravi; Petraglia, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian extinction worldwide during the Late Pleistocene has been a major focus for Quaternary biochronology and paleoecology. These extinctions have been variably attributed to the impacts of climate change and human interference. However, until relatively recently, research has been largely restricted to the Americas, Europe, and Australasia. We present the oldest Middle–Late Pleistocene stratified and numerically dated faunal succession for the Indian subcontinent from the Billasurgam cave complex. Our data demonstrate continuity of 20 of 21 identified mammalian taxa from at least 100,000 y ago to the present, and in some cases up to 200,000 y ago. Comparison of this fossil record to contemporary faunal ranges indicates some geographical redistribution of mammalian taxa within India. We suggest that, although local extirpations occurred, the majority of taxa survived or adapted to substantial ecological pressures in fragmented habitats. Comparison of the Indian record with faunal records from Southeast and Southwest Asia demonstrates the importance of interconnected mosaic habitats to long-term faunal persistence across the Asian tropics. The data presented here have implications for mammalian conservation in India today, where increasing ecological circumscription may leave certain taxa increasingly endangered in the most densely populated region of the world. PMID:24711426

  5. First report of Perkinsus beihaiensis in Crassostrea madrasensis from the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Sanil, N K; Suja, G; Lijo, J; Vijayan, K K

    2012-04-26

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Perkinsus are considered important pathogens responsible for mass mortalities in many wild and farmed bivalve populations. The present study was initiated to screen populations of the Indian edible oyster Crassostrea madrasensis, a promising candidate for aquaculture along the Indian coasts, for the presence of Perkinsus spp. The study reports the presence of P. beihaiensis for the first time in C. madrasensis populations from the Indian subcontinent and south Asia. Samples collected from the east and west coasts of India were subjected to Ray's fluid thioglycollate medium (RFTM) culture and histology which indicated the presence of Perkinsus spp. PCR screening of the tissues using specific primers amplified the product specific to the genus Perkinsus. The taxonomic affinities of the parasites were determined by sequencing both internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and actin genes followed by basic local alignment search tool (BLAST) analysis. Analysis based on the ITS sequences showed 98 to 100% identity to Perkinsus spp. (P. beihaiensis and Brazilian Perkinsus sp.). The pairwise genetic distance values and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that 2 of the present samples belonged to the P. beihaiensis clade while the other 4 showed close affinities with the Brazilian Perkinsus sp. clade. The genetic divergence data, close affinity with the Brazilian Perkinsus sp., and co-existence with P. beihaiensis in the same host species in the same habitat show that the remaining 4 samples exhibit some degree of variation from P. beihaiensis. As expected, the sequencing of actin genes did not show any divergence among the samples studied. They probably could be intraspecific variants of P. beihaiensis having a separate lineage in the process of evolution. PMID:22535871

  6. Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-01-01

    Since around 200 Ma, the most notable event in the process of the breakup of Pangea has been the high speed (up to 20 cm yr(-1)) of the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations of 3-D spherical mantle convection approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean. PMID:25673102

  7. Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-01-01

    Since around 200 Ma, the most notable event in the process of the breakup of Pangea has been the high speed (up to 20 cm yr−1) of the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations of 3-D spherical mantle convection approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean. PMID:25673102

  8. Pangea breakup and northward drift of the Indian subcontinent reproduced by a numerical model of mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hamano, Yozo

    2015-02-01

    Since around 200 Ma, the most notable event in the process of the breakup of Pangea has been the high speed (up to 20 cm yr-1) of the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent. Our numerical simulations of 3-D spherical mantle convection approximately reproduced the process of continental drift from the breakup of Pangea at 200 Ma to the present-day continental distribution. These simulations revealed that a major factor in the northward drift of the Indian subcontinent was the large-scale cold mantle downwelling that developed spontaneously in the North Tethys Ocean, attributed to the overall shape of Pangea. The strong lateral mantle flow caused by the high-temperature anomaly beneath Pangea, due to the thermal insulation effect, enhanced the acceleration of the Indian subcontinent during the early stage of the Pangea breakup. The large-scale hot upwelling plumes from the lower mantle, initially located under Africa, might have contributed to the formation of the large-scale cold mantle downwelling in the North Tethys Ocean.

  9. Indian National GNSS Programme: Crustal deformation measurements in the Indian Sub-continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mithila; Bansal, Brijesh K.

    2012-05-01

    The Indian National GNSS Programme was launched about one and half decades ago with a view to provide a boost to crustal deformation measurements for constraining the movement of Indian plate, identifying the regions of strain accumulation, and to estimate the convergence rates across some identified faults/boundaries. Under this programme, a network of 50 permanent GPS receivers has been established, which is fully functional for the last about 8 yrs. The network has generated very important data sets, which in turn have helped in the estimation of Indian plate motion, regions and rate of strain accumulation, rate of convergence across some identified faults, etc. The measurements have also been utilized in monitoring co-seismic and postseismic deformation related to recent earthquakes that occurred in India and adjoining regions, such as the 2001 Bhuj, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman and 2005 Kashmir earthquake. This article presents some salient results obtained for specific corridors in the Himalaya, Indo-Burmese arc region, Andaman-Nicobar Island region and Indian plate interior region.

  10. Premonsoon estimates of convective available potential energy over the oceanic region surrounding the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alappattu, Denny P.; Kunhikrishnan, P. K.

    2009-04-01

    Convective available potential energy (CAPE) and convective inhibition energy (CIN) are important parameters in determining the stability of the atmosphere for moist convection. This paper presents the estimates of CAPE and CIN during the premonsoon season over the oceanic region surrounding the Indian subcontinent. The high-resolution radiosonde data used in this study were collected as a part of the Integrated Campaign for Aerosols gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB; March-May 2006), which covered the Bay of Bengal, Arabian Sea, and parts of North Indian Ocean. We discuss the spatiotemporal variability of CAPE and CIN during the premonsoon period and investigate the role of boundary layer, as well as free tropospheric parameters in controlling the CAPE and CIN values. During the convective event of 9 April the sensors on board the ship recorded 4 mm of rain and an overall reduction of CAPE by 620 J kg-1 was seen. This corroborates with the concept that CAPE generated by the nonconvective processes is consumed by the convection for its intensification. However, the observed reduction in CAPE after this convective event is much less compared to the monsoon season reported elsewhere. CIN was found to be anticorrelated with the free convection depth (FCD), which is the distance through which the parcel ascends by its own buoyancy. Thus the variability in CAPE and CIN is found to be interlinked through the FCD. Apart from this, contribution to total CAPE from various levels are also estimated, which shows that the CAPE in the middle levels contributes most toward the total CAPE. Our investigations show that although the CAPE and CIN are related to the tropospheric parameters like temperature lapse rate, the variability in CAPE and CIN is essentially determined by the moisture in the atmospheric boundary layer. As the equivalent potential temperature (θE) in the ABL increases, CAPE increases, favoring the development of convection.

  11. The impact of climate change on water resources: Assessment at the scale of the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechlivanidis, Ilias; Olsson, Jonas; Bosshard, Thomas; Sharma, Devesh; Sharma, Kc; Arheimer, Berit

    2015-04-01

    The large increase in the atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases has led to the global climate change phenomenon which is expected to have a strong impact on water resources on local, regional and global scales. The Indian subcontinent is vulnerable to climate change since the region is characterized by a strong hydro-climatic gradient due to monsoon and the geographic features, and hence poses extraordinary challenges to understand, quantify and predict future availability in water resources. In here, the impact of climate change on the hydro-climatology of the subcontinent is investigated by comparing statistics of current and projected future fluxes resulting from three emission scenarios (RCP2.6, RCP4.5, and RCP8.5). The use of different emission scenarios allows for the definition of uncertainty of future impacts. Climate projections from the CORDEX-South Asia framework have been bias-corrected using the DBS (Distribution Based Scaling) method and used to force the HYPE (HYdrological Predictions for the Environment) hydrological model to generate projections of evapotranspiration, runoff, soil moisture deficit, snow depth, and applied irrigation water to soil. In addition, we assess the changes on high and low flows from all river systems as well as the changes in the annual cycles. Overall, the high uncertainty in the climate projections is propagated in the hydrological impact model, and as a result the spatiotemporal distribution of change is subject to the climate projection. In general, results from all scenarios indicate a -20 to +50% change in long-term average precipitation and evapotranspiration, yet a higher change (-100 to +100%) in runoff. Analysis of annual cycles showed that climate change impacts vary between seasons whereas the effect is dependent on the region's hydro-climatic gradient. Future scenarios project a graduate increase in temperature from 1 up to 76°C on average, which further affects the need for irrigation and snow

  12. Dust pattern over Indian subcontinent based on NAAPS model, satellite and surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, R.; Husar, R. B.; Sethi, V.; Westphal, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the results of an integrated analysis of dust pattern over the Indian subcontinent using NRL Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS), multiple satellite sensors and surface based aerosol measurements. The satellite datasets include MODIS AOT and OMI Aerosol Index. The surface measurements include RSPM from Indian regulatory PM network (NAMP). The analysis methodology deals with spatial patterns, seasonality as well as the vertical distribution as a function of space and time. Based on the NAAPS model, the highest average surface dust concentrations of about 300 μg/m3 are observed over the dust source regions, north Gujarat- Pakistan border and over south Afghanistan- Pakistan border. The monsoon season has lowest surface dust concentrations over most of India, except the source regions. In the post-monsoon and winter seasons, the highest surface dust concentrations of about 150μg/m3 are observed over Indo-Gangetic basin (IGB). The location of highest concentration shift from West IGB in post monsoon to East IGB in winter. The spatial patterns in columnar dust concentration is the highest (AOT=0.4) near Pakistan border in North West Rajasthan, in summer and monsoon, while the surface dust concentration is highest over north Gujarat- Pakistan border. This indicates that the dust is more spread out at higher elevations than at the surface. The spatial pattern of dust AOT in winter and post-monsoon matches with that of surface concentrations, indicating that the dust is confined to the surface layer IGB. Unlike surface concentrations, a significant dust AOT of 0.2 is observed even in monsoon season over most part of India.The NAAPS average dust vertical profile shows elevated dust layer covering most part of India during monsoon season, reaching about 100 μg/m3 over the west at about 2 km elevation (about 0.75 sigma units). The satellite data, MODIS AOT and OMI Aerosol Index corroborate the NAAPS simulations of dust AOT. MODIS AOT show

  13. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-02-01

    Every year the monsoonal circulation over the Indian subcontinent gives rise to a variety of cloud types that differ considerably in their ability to heat or cool the atmosphere. These clouds in turn affect monsoon dynamics via their radiative impacts, both at the surface and in the atmosphere. New generation of satellites carrying active radar and lidar sensors are allowing realistic quantification of cloud radiative heating (CRH) by resolving the vertical structure of the atmosphere in an unprecedented detail. Obtaining this information is a first step in closing the knowledge gap in our understanding of the role that different clouds play as regulators of the monsoon and vice versa. Here, we use collocated CloudSat-CALIPSO data sets to understand following aspects of cloud-radiation interactions associated with Indian monsoon circulation. (1) How does the vertical distribution of CRH evolve over the Indian continent throughout monsoon season? (2) What is the absolute contribution of different clouds types to the total CRH? (3) How do active and break periods of monsoon affect the distribution of CRH? And finally, (4) what are the net radiative effects of different cloud types on surface heating? In general, the vertical structure of CRH follows the northward migration and the retreat of monsoon from May to October. It is found that the alto- and nimbostratus clouds intensely warm the middle troposphere and equally strongly cool the upper troposphere. Their warming/cooling consistently exceeds ±0.2 K day-1 (after weighing by vertical cloud fraction) in monthly mean composites throughout the middle and upper troposphere respectively, with largest impact observed in June, July and August. Deep convective towers cause considerable warming in the middle and upper troposphere, but strongly cool the base and inside of the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Such cooling is stronger during active (-1.23 K day-1) monsoon conditions compared to break periods (-0.36 K day-1

  14. Tracing the geographic origin of traded leopard body parts in the indian subcontinent with DNA-based assignment tests.

    PubMed

    Mondol, Samrat; Sridhar, Vanjulavalli; Yadav, Prasanjeet; Gubbi, Sanjay; Ramakrishnan, Uma

    2015-04-01

    Illicit trade in wildlife products is rapidly decimating many species across the globe. Such trade is often underestimated for wide-ranging species until it is too late for the survival of their remaining populations. Policing this trade could be vastly improved if one could reliably determine geographic origins of illegal wildlife products and identify areas where greater enforcement is needed. Using DNA-based assignment tests (i.e., samples are assigned to geographic locations), we addressed these factors for leopards (Panthera pardus) on the Indian subcontinent. We created geography-specific allele frequencies from a genetic reference database of 173 leopards across India to infer geographic origins of DNA samples from 40 seized leopard skins. Sensitivity analyses of samples of known geographic origins and assignments of seized skins demonstrated robust assignments for Indian leopards. We found that confiscated pelts seized in small numbers were not necessarily from local leopards. The geographic footprint of large seizures appeared to be bigger than the cumulative footprint of several smaller seizures, indicating widespread leopard poaching across the subcontinent. Our seized samples had male-biased sex ratios, especially the large seizures. From multiple seized sample assignments, we identified central India as a poaching hotspot for leopards. The techniques we applied can be used to identify origins of seized illegal wildlife products and trade routes at the subcontinent scale and beyond. PMID:25376464

  15. Present-day groundwater recharge estimation in parts of the Indian Sub-Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhanja, S. N.; Mukherjee, A.; Wada, Y.; Scanlon, B. R.; Taylor, R. G.; Rodell, M.; Malakar, P.

    2015-12-01

    Large part of global population has been dependent on groundwater as a source of fresh water. The demand would further increase with increasing population and stress associated with climate change. We tried to provide regional-scale groundwater recharge estimates in a large part of Indian Sub-Continent. A combination of ground-based, satellite-based and numerical model simulated recharge estimates were presented in the densely populated region. Three different methods: an intense network of observational wells (n>13,000 wells), a satellite (TRMM) and global land-surface model (CLM) outputs, and a global-scale hydrological model (PCR GLOBWB) were employed to calculate recharge estimates. Groundwater recharge values exhibit large spatial variations over the entire region on the basis of aquifer hydrogeology, precipitation and groundwater withdrawal patterns. Groundwater recharge estimates from all three estimation techniques were found to be higher (>300 mm/year) in fertile planes of Indus-Ganges-Brahmaputra (IGB) river basins. A combination of favorable hydrogeologic conditions (porosity, permeability etc.), comparatively higher rates of precipitation, and return flow from rapidly withdrawn irrigation water might influence occurrence of high recharge rates. However, central and southern study area experiences lower recharge rates (<200 mm/year), might be associated with unfavorable hydrogeologic conditions associated with cratonic provinces. Statistical analysis of inter-comparison between the three different recharge estimates show good matches in some of the areas. Recharge estimates indicate dynamic nature of groundwater recharge as a function of precipitation, land use pattern, and hydrogeologic parameters. On a first hand basis, the estimates will help policy makers to understand groundwater recharge process over the densely populated region and finally would facilitate to implement sustainable policy for securing water security.

  16. Species and genetic diversity in the genus Drosophila inhabiting the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bashisth N

    2015-06-01

    Biodiversity is the sum total of all living things on the earth with particular reference to the profound variety in structure,function and genetic constitution. It includes both number and frequency of species or genes in a given assemblage and the variety of resulting ecosystems in a region. It is usually considered at three different levels: genetic, species and ecological diversities. Genus Drosophila belongs to the family Drosophilidae (class Insecta, order Diptera), characterized by rich species diversity at global level and also in India, which is a megadiverse country. At global level, more than 1500 species have been described and several thousands estimated. Hawaiian Islands are particularly rich in species diversity with more than 500 species which provides a unique opportunity to study evolution in genus Drosophila. About 150 species of Drosophila have been reported from India. Certain species of Drosophila found in India have been investigated for genetic diversity within the species. In this regard, Drosophila ananassae is noteworthy. It is a cosmopolitan and domestic species with common occurrence in India and is endowed with many genetic peculiarities. Population genetics and evolutionary studies in this species have revealed as to how genetic diversity within a species play an important role in adaptation of populations to varying environments. In addition, the work carried on D. melanogaster, D. nasuta, D. bipectinata and certain other species in India has shown that these species vary in degree and pattern of genetic diversity, and have evolved different mechanisms for adjusting to their environments. The ecological adaptations to various kinds of stress studied in certain species of Drosophila inhabiting the Indian subcontinent are also discussed. PMID:26174688

  17. Operational Retrieval of aerosol optical depth over Indian subcontinent and Indian Ocean using INSAT-3D/Imager product validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, M. K.; Rastogi, G.; Chauhan, P.

    2014-11-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) over Indian subcontinent and Indian Ocean region is derived operationally for the first time from the geostationary earth orbit (GEO) satellite INSAT-3D Imager data at 0.65 μm wavelength. Single visible channel algorithm based on clear sky composites gives larger retrieval error in AOD than other multiple channel algorithms due to errors in estimating surface reflectance and atmospheric property. However, since MIR channel signal is insensitive to the presence of most aerosols, therefore in present study, AOD retrieval algorithm employs both visible (centred at 0.65 μm) and mid-infrared (MIR) band (centred at 3.9 μm) measurements, and allows us to monitor transport of aerosols at higher temporal resolution. Comparisons made between INSAT-3D derived AOD (τI) and MODIS derived AOD (τM) co-located in space (at 1° resolution) and time during January, February and March (JFM) 2014 encompasses 1165, 1052 and 900 pixels, respectively. Good agreement found between τI and τM during JFM 2014 with linear correlation coefficients (R) of 0.87, 0.81 and 0.76, respectively. The extensive validation made during JFM 2014 encompasses 215 co-located AOD in space and time derived by INSAT 3D (τI) and 10 sun-photometers (τA) that includes 9 AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) and 1 handheld sun-photometer site. INSAT-3D derived AOD i.e. τI, is found within the retrieval errors of τI = ±0.07 ±0.15τA with linear correlation coefficient (R) of 0.90 and root mean square error equal (RMSE) to 0.06. Present work shows that INSAT-3D aerosol products can be used quantitatively in many applications with caution for possible residual clouds, snow/ice, and water contamination.

  18. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, E.; Devasthale, A.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Tjernström, M.

    2015-10-01

    Clouds forming during the summer monsoon over the Indian subcontinent affect its evolution through their radiative impact as well as the release of latent heat. While the latter is previously studied to some extent, comparatively little is known about the radiative impact of different cloud types and the vertical structure of their radiative heating/cooling effects. Therefore, the main aim of this study is to partly fill this knowledge gap by investigating and documenting the vertical distributions of the different cloud types associated with the Indian monsoon and their radiative heating/cooling using the active radar and lidar sensors onboard CloudSat and CALIPSO. The intraseasonal evolution of clouds from May to October is also investigated to understand pre-to-post monsoon transitioning of their radiative heating/cooling effects. The vertical structure of cloud radiative heating (CRH) follows the northward migration and retreat of the monsoon from May to October. Throughout this time period, stratiform clouds radiatively warm the middle troposphere and cool the upper troposphere by more than ±0.2 K day-1 (after weighing by cloud fraction), with the largest impacts observed in June, July and August. During these months, the fraction of high thin cloud remains high in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). Deep convective towers cause considerable radiative warming in the middle and upper troposphere, but strongly cool the base and inside of the TTL. This cooling is stronger during active (-1.23 K day-1) monsoon periods compared to break periods (-0.36 K day-1). The contrasting radiative warming effect of high clouds in the TTL is twice as large during active periods than in break periods. These results highlight the increasing importance of CRH with altitude, especially in the TTL. Stratiform (made up of alto- and nimbostratus clouds) and deep convection clouds radiatively cool the surface by approximately -100 and -400 W m-2 respectively while warming the

  19. Women who jump into wells: reflections on suicidality in women from conflict regions of the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Guzder, Jaswant

    2011-11-01

    This paper examines narratives of women from the Indian subcontinent, including Canadian refugee claimants, emerging from the conflict regions of Pakistan, Punjab, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka, who have presented suicidal ideation or attempts or died by suicide. The focus is on the relationship of suicide and suicide behavior to particular systemic stressors related to familial, social, and group agendas. The vulnerability of individual women is presented in the context of gender issues, deeply embedded group trauma, historical legacies, and intragenerational dynamics, as well as acute stressors that contribute to the underlying distress of these women. PMID:22123835

  20. Acute Coronary Syndrome in Indian Subcontinent Patients Residing in the Middle East: Results From Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events II.

    PubMed

    Panduranga, Prashanth; Sulaiman, Kadhim J; Al-Zakwani, Ibrahim; Alhabib, Khalid F; Hersi, Ahmad; Suwaidi, Jassim Al; Alsheikh-Ali, Alawi A; Almahmeed, Wael; Saif, Shukri Al; Al-Faleh, Hussam; Al-Lawati, Jawad; Asaad, Nidal; Al-Motarreb, Ahmed; Amin, Haitham

    2015-10-01

    We compared baseline characteristics, clinical presentation, and in-hospital outcomes between Middle Eastern Arabs and Indian subcontinent patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Of the 7930 patients enrolled in Gulf Registry of Acute Coronary Events II (RACE II), 23% (n = 1669) were from the Indian subcontinent. The Indian subcontinent patients, in comparison with the Middle Eastern Arabs, were younger (49 vs 60 years; P < .001), more were males (96% vs 80%; P < .001), had lower proportion of higher Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score (8% vs 27%; P < .001), and less likely to be associated with diabetes (34% vs 42%; P < .001), hypertension (36% vs 51%; P < .001), and hyperlipidemia (29% vs 39%; P < .001) but more likely to be smokers (55% vs 29%; P < .001). After multivariable adjustment, the Middle Eastern Arabs were less likely to be associated with in-hospital congestive heart failure (odds ratio [OR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.50-0.86; P = .003) but more likely to be associated with recurrent ischemia (OR 1.33; 95% CI: 1.03-1.71; P = .026) when compared to the Indian subcontinent patients. Despite the baseline differences, there were largely no significant differences in in-hospital outcomes between the Indians and the Middle Eastern Arabs. PMID:25381144

  1. Spatio-temporal variability of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) over the Indian subcontinent derived from geodetic GPS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayan, M.; Kannoth, S.; Varghese, G.; Earnest, A.; Jade, S.; Bhatt, B. C.; Gupta, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    We present, for the first time, Ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) computed from dual frequency GPS data observed by Indian geodetic GPS network and neighboring IGS stations for more than a decade (2001-2012) (figure 1). Indian geodetic GPS network has more than 30 stations well spread across the Indian subcontinent, primarily, to study the tectonics of the Indian plate. Each station has geodetic grade dual frequency GPS receiver which are operated in continuous mode by making observations at every 30s since 2001. The ionospheric TEC presented here is computed from the code and phase GPS measurements using the software IONODETECT developed at CSIR 4PI. This decadal scale ionospheric data set covers from maxima of 23rd to maxima of 24th solar cycle with a broad spatial coverage from 35S to 56N and 38E to 134E (figure1). The GPS TEC computed at every 30 seconds over each sub-ionospheric point correlates well with International Reference Ionosphere(IRI) 2012 model in longer time scale, however, a strong spatio-temporal dependence in correlation is clearly observed. In addition a site specific, nearly systematic night time bias between GPS TEC and IRI-12 is noted. The advantage of using the systematic bias for correcting Differential Code Bias (DCB) in computing GPS TEC is discussed. We also discuss in detail the equatorial ionospheric processes and regional characteristics of Equatorial Ionization Anomaly (EIA) through latitudinal, diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variability of decadal scale GPS TEC computed over Indian subcontinent. EIA anomaly crust maxima during local noon on 30th November 2004 is clearly visible in the figure 1. The TEC variations associated with solar flares and solar maxima and minima during the solar cycles are also discussed to understand the impact of space weather on equatorial and mid latitude ionosphere as well as on navigation. Vertical TEC (VTEC) at each sub ionospheric pierce points (SIP) on 30th November 2004 from 0UTC to

  2. Visceral Leishmaniasis on the Indian Subcontinent: Modelling the Dynamic Relationship between Vector Control Schemes and Vector Life Cycles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a disease caused by two known vector-borne parasite species (Leishmania donovani, L. infantum), transmitted to man by phlebotomine sand flies (species: Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia), resulting in ≈50,000 human fatalities annually, ≈67% occurring on the Indian subcontinent. Indoor residual spraying is the current method of sand fly control in India, but alternative means of vector control, such as the treatment of livestock with systemic insecticide-based drugs, are being evaluated. We describe an individual-based, stochastic, life-stage-structured model that represents a sand fly vector population within a village in India and simulates the effects of vector control via fipronil-based drugs orally administered to cattle, which target both blood-feeding adults and larvae that feed on host feces. Principle findings Simulation results indicated efficacy of fipronil-based control schemes in reducing sand fly abundance depended on timing of drug applications relative to seasonality of the sand fly life cycle. Taking into account cost-effectiveness and logistical feasibility, two of the most efficacious treatment schemes reduced population peaks occurring from April through August by ≈90% (applications 3 times per year at 2-month intervals initiated in March) and >95% (applications 6 times per year at 2-month intervals initiated in January) relative to no control, with the cumulative number of sand fly days occurring April-August reduced by ≈83% and ≈97%, respectively, and more specifically during the summer months of peak human exposure (June-August) by ≈85% and ≈97%, respectively. Conclusions Our model should prove useful in a priori evaluation of the efficacy of fipronil-based drugs in controlling leishmaniasis on the Indian subcontinent and beyond. PMID:27537774

  3. Prospects of control and eradication of capripox from the Indian subcontinent: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Bhanuprakash, V; Hosamani, M; Singh, R K

    2011-09-01

    Sheeppox and goatpox, two endemic capripox infections in India, pose a significant economic threat to small ruminant productivity in the subcontinent. Vaccination of all susceptible sheep and goats is the feasible and sustainable means of control. Availability of effective live attenuated vaccines that are inherently thermostable and development of improved diagnostics provide the opportunities to initiate effective control measures for capripox. All animals older than 4 months can be vaccinated with the current homologous vaccines using a single vaccination by intradermal or subcutaneous routes. The success of the control program needs to be monitored by active surveillance particularly for the presence of virus, as sero-monitoring does not enable the differentiation of infection and vaccination. And also the sero-conversion following capripox vaccination is not detectable enough by the available tools. Sustained control efforts call for socio-economic and political stability, adequate infrastructure and logistic support to store and transport vaccines for reaching out vaccines to the remote end users. Availability of veterinary services, improved extension services for increased awareness among farmers, contribute significantly to the control campaigns. Poor vaccination coverage and in-adequate infrastructure in major parts of the country are some of the major elements that come in the way of effective implementation of building herd immunity through immunization. PMID:21699920

  4. Multi-year model simulations of mineral dust distribution and transport over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijikumar, S.; Aneesh, S.; Rajeev, K.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol distribution over the Arabian Sea and the Indian subcontinent during the northern hemispheric summer is dominated by mineral dust transport from the West Asian desert regions. The radiative impact of these dust plumes is expected to have a prominent role in regulating the Asian Summer Monsoon circulation. While satellite observations have provided information in the spatial distribution of aerosols over the oceanic regions during the season, their utility over the land is rather limited. This study examines the transport of mineral dust over the West Asian desert, the Indian subcontinent and the surrounding oceanic regions during the summer monsoon season with the help of a regional scale model, WRF-Chem. Geographical locations of prominent dust sources, altitude ranges of mineral dust transport and their inter-annual variations are examined in detail. Multi-year model simulations were carried out during 2007 to 2012 with a model integration from 15 May to 31 August of each year. Six-year seasonal mean (June to August) vertically integrated dust amount from 1000 to 300 hPa level shows prominent dust loading over the eastern parts of Arabian desert and the northwestern part of India which are identified as two major sources of dust production. Large latitudinal gradient in dust amount is observed over the Arabian Sea with the largest dust concentration over the northwestern part and is primarily caused by the prevailing northwesterly wind at 925 hPa level from the Arabian desert. The model simulations clearly show that most of the dust distributed over the Indo-Gangetic plane originates from the Rajasthan desert located in the northwestern part of India, whereas dust observed over the central and south peninsular India and over the Arabian Sea are mainly transported from the Arabian desert. Abnormal dust loading is observed over the north Arabian Sea during June 2008. This has been produced as a result of the low pressure system (associated with the onset of

  5. Multi-year model simulations of mineral dust distribution and transport over the Indian subcontinent during summer monsoon seasons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sijikumar, S.; Aneesh, S.; Rajeev, K.

    2016-08-01

    Aerosol distribution over the Arabian Sea and the Indian subcontinent during the northern hemispheric summer is dominated by mineral dust transport from the West Asian desert regions. The radiative impact of these dust plumes is expected to have a prominent role in regulating the Asian Summer Monsoon circulation. While satellite observations have provided information in the spatial distribution of aerosols over the oceanic regions during the season, their utility over the land is rather limited. This study examines the transport of mineral dust over the West Asian desert, the Indian subcontinent and the surrounding oceanic regions during the summer monsoon season with the help of a regional scale model, WRF-Chem. Geographical locations of prominent dust sources, altitude ranges of mineral dust transport and their inter-annual variations are examined in detail. Multi-year model simulations were carried out during 2007 to 2012 with a model integration from 15 May to 31 August of each year. Six-year seasonal mean (June to August) vertically integrated dust amount from 1000 to 300 hPa level shows prominent dust loading over the eastern parts of Arabian desert and the northwestern part of India which are identified as two major sources of dust production. Large latitudinal gradient in dust amount is observed over the Arabian Sea with the largest dust concentration over the northwestern part and is primarily caused by the prevailing northwesterly wind at 925 hPa level from the Arabian desert. The model simulations clearly show that most of the dust distributed over the Indo-Gangetic plane originates from the Rajasthan desert located in the northwestern part of India, whereas dust observed over the central and south peninsular India and over the Arabian Sea are mainly transported from the Arabian desert. Abnormal dust loading is observed over the north Arabian Sea during June 2008. This has been produced as a result of the low pressure system (associated with the onset of

  6. A study on chaotic behaviour of equatorial/low latitude ionosphere over Indian subcontinent, using GPS-TEC time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unnikrishnan, K.; Ravindran, Sudha

    2010-09-01

    The deterministic chaotic behaviour of ionosphere, over Indian subcontinent falling under equatorial/low latitude region, -0.3 to 22.19°N (geomagnetic), was studied using GPS-TEC time series. The values of Lyapunov exponent are low at Thiruvananthapuram and Agatti (-0.30 and 2.38°N, geomagnetic, respectively), and thereafter increase through Bangalore and Hyderabad (4.14 and 8.54°N, geomagnetic, respectively), and attain maximum at Mumbai (10.09°N, geomagnetic), which is near/at the edge of an anomaly crest. The values of correlation dimension computed for TEC time series are in the range 3.1-3.6, which indicate that equatorial/low latitude ionosphere can be described with four variables. Entropy values estimated for TEC time series show no appreciable latitudinal variabilites. The values of non-linear prediction error exhibit a trough, around the latitude sector, 4.14-16.15°N (Geomagnetic). Based on the values of the above quantifiers, the features of chaotic behaviour of equatorial/low latitude ionosphere are briefly discussed.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA Variability of Domestic River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Populations: Genetic Evidence for Domestication of River Buffalo in Indian Subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Muniyandi; Nimisha, Koodali; Kumar, Satish

    2015-01-01

    River buffalo, Bubalus bubalis is a large bovine species frequently used livestock in southern Asia. It is believed that the river buffalo was domesticated from Bubalus arnee, the wild buffalo of mainland Asia, a few thousand years ago, probably during the period of Indus Valley civilization. However, the domestication history of the river buffalo has been the subject of debate for many decades mainly due to the lack of clear archeological evidence and the divisive conclusions of the genetic studies. Therefore, in order to understand the domestication history and genetic relationship among the various river buffalo populations, we analyzed 492-bp region of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of 414 river buffalo sampled from India, Pakistan, Egypt, and Iran along with the available 403 swamp buffalo sequences. The phylogenetic analyses of our study along with the archaeological evidence suggest that the river buffalo was domesticated in an atypical manner involving continuous introgression of wild animals to the domestic stocks in Indian subcontinent prior to mature phase of Indus Valley civilization (2600–1900 BC). Specifically, our data exclude Mesopotamian region as the place of domestication of the river buffalo. PMID:25900921

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Variability of Domestic River Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Populations: Genetic Evidence for Domestication of River Buffalo in Indian Subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Muniyandi; Nimisha, Koodali; Kumar, Satish

    2015-05-01

    River buffalo, Bubalus bubalis is a large bovine species frequently used livestock in southern Asia. It is believed that the river buffalo was domesticated from Bubalus arnee, the wild buffalo of mainland Asia, a few thousand years ago, probably during the period of Indus Valley civilization. However, the domestication history of the river buffalo has been the subject of debate for many decades mainly due to the lack of clear archeological evidence and the divisive conclusions of the genetic studies. Therefore, in order to understand the domestication history and genetic relationship among the various river buffalo populations, we analyzed 492-bp region of mitochondrial DNA control region sequences of 414 river buffalo sampled from India, Pakistan, Egypt, and Iran along with the available 403 swamp buffalo sequences. The phylogenetic analyses of our study along with the archaeological evidence suggest that the river buffalo was domesticated in an atypical manner involving continuous introgression of wild animals to the domestic stocks in Indian subcontinent prior to mature phase of Indus Valley civilization (2600-1900 BC). Specifically, our data exclude Mesopotamian region as the place of domestication of the river buffalo. PMID:25900921

  9. Emission, absorption and group delay of microwaves in the atmosphere in relation to water vapour content over the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. K.; Gupta, A. K. D.; Karmakar, P. K.; Barman, S. D.; Bhattacharya, A. B.; Purkait, N.; Gupta, M. K. D.; Sehra, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    The advent of satellite communication for global coverage has apparently indicated a renewed interest in the studies of radio wave propagation through the atmosphere, in the VHF, UHF and microwave bands. The extensive measurements of atmosphere constituents, dynamics and radio meterological parameters during the Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP) have opened up further the possibilities of studying tropospheric radio wave propagation parameters, relevant to Earth/space link design. The three basic parameters of significance to radio propagation are thermal emission, absorption and group delay of the atmosphere, all of which are controlled largely by the water vapor content in the atmosphere, particular at microwave bands. As good emitters are also good absorbers, the atmospheric emission as well as the absorption attains a maximum at the frequency of 22.235 GHz, which is the peak of the water vapor line. The group delay is practically independent of frequency in the VHF, UHF and microwave bands. However, all three parameters exhibit a similar seasonal dependence originating presumably from the seasonal dependence of the water vapor content. Some of the interesting results obtained from analyses of radiosonde data over the Indian subcontinent collected by the India Meteorological Department is presented.

  10. Health-seeking behaviour, diagnostics and transmission dynamics in the control of visceral leishmaniasis in the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Medley, Graham F; Hollingsworth, T Déirdre; Olliaro, Piero L; Adams, Emily R

    2015-12-01

    Countries in the Indian subcontinent have committed to reducing the incidence of kala-azar, a clinical manifestation of visceral leishmaniasis, to below 1 in 10,000 by 2020. We address the role of timing of use and accuracy of diagnostics in kala-azar control and elimination. We use empirical data on health-seeking behaviour and health-system performance from the Indian state of Bihar, Bangladesh and Nepal to parameterize a mathematical model. Diagnosis of cases is key to case management, control and surveillance. Treatment of cases prevents onward transmission, and we show that the differences in time to diagnosis in these three settings explain the observed differences in incidence. Shortening the time from health-care seeking to diagnosis is likely to lead to dramatic reductions in incidence in Bihar, bringing the incidence down to the levels seen in Bangladesh and Nepal. The results emphasize the importance of maintaining population and health-system awareness, particularly as transmission and disease incidence decline. We explore the possibility of diagnosing patients before the onset of clinical kala-azar (before 14 days fever), and show that this could have a marked impact on incidence, even for a moderately sensitive test. However, limited specificity (that results in false positives) is a major barrier to such a strategy. Diagnostic tests of high specificity used at an early stage of active infection, even if sensitivity is only moderate, could have a key role in the control of kala-azar, and prevent its resurgence when paired with the passive health-care system and tests of high sensitivity, such as the test for rK39 antibody response. PMID:26633763

  11. Predicting potential distribution of poorly known species with small database: the case of four-horned antelope Tetracerus quadricornis on the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Krishna Prasad; Ludwig, Tobias; Storch, Ilse

    2016-04-01

    Information gaps on the distribution of data deficient and rare species such as four-horned antelope (FHA) in Nepal may impair their conservation. We aimed to empirically predict the distribution of FHA in Nepal with the help of data from the Indian subcontinent. Additionally, we wanted to identify core areas and gaps within the reported range limits and to assess the degree of isolation of known Nepalese populations from the main distribution areas in India. The tropical part of the Indian subcontinent (65°-90° eastern longitude, 5°-30° northern latitude), that is, the areas south of the Himalayan Mountains. Using MaxEnt and accounting for sampling bias, we developed predictive distribution models from environmental and topographical variables, and known presence locations of the study species in India and Nepal. We address and discuss the use of target group vs. random background. The prediction map reveals a disjunct distribution of FHA with core areas in the tropical parts of central to southern-western India. At the scale of the Indian subcontinent, suitable FHA habitat area in Nepal was small. The Indo-Gangetic Plain isolates Nepalese from the Indian FHA populations, but the distribution area extends further south than proposed by the current IUCN map. A low to intermediate temperature seasonality as well as low precipitation during the dry and warm season contributed most to the prediction of FHA distribution. The predicted distribution maps confirm other FHA range maps but also indicate that suitable areas exist south of the known range. Results further highlight that small populations in the Nepalese Terai Arc are isolated from the Indian core distribution and therefore might be under high extinction risk. PMID:27069584

  12. TEC measurement and IRI 2012 prediction over the Indian subcontinent in the low solar activity year 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Pradip; Hazarika, Rumajyoti

    The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) model has undergone periodic revisions in order to improve its prediction capability. However, comparison with measurements has brought out some inadequacies in the IRI, particularly with respect to diurnal and solar cycle variations at equatorial and low latitudes. The TEC measured simultaneously using NOVATEL receivers at 10 different locations over India during the low solar activity year 2005 are used to examine the predictability of the latest version of the IRI. The stations are distributed in latitude along 77°E and in longitude along 23°N and selected in order to study the latitudinal and longitudinal distribution of measured and model TEC over the Indian subcontinent. Maximum daytime (1000-1400 LT) TEC over India was observed in the month of April at Kolkata (22.5°N, 88.2°E) while minimum TEC was measured at Shimla (31.1°N, 77.1°E) in July. Measured TEC in Equinox I (March, April) was higher than that in Equinox II (September, October) at all locations. Thus equinoctial asymmetry was prevalent across the Indian latitude longitude sector during this year. In the solstices, TEC in summer (May-August) was higher than the TEC in winter (November-February) at the locations along the equatorial anomaly crest. But within the crest and equator, anomalous solsticial behaviour with higher wintertime TEC as compared to that in summer was observed. TEC predicted by the IRI 2012 (with NeQuick option, URSI coefficients) differ from measured TEC at all locations. The amount of offset between the model and measurement varies with local time and location. Minimum divergence was seen at Bhopal (23.0°N, 77.2°E) and Raipur (21.0°N, 81.5°E) The model overestimates TEC at Ahmedabad (23.0°N, 72.5°E) and Shimla and underestimates the same at Kolkata (22.5°N, 88.2°E)and Aizwal( 23.5°N, 93.0°E), Hyderabad (17.5°N, 78.5°E) and Bangalore (13.0°N, 77.5°E). It is inferred that IRI 2012 is unable to capture the temporal

  13. Characterization of Different Land Classes and Disaster Monitoring Using Microwave Land Emissivity for the Indian Subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Korak; Raju, Suresh; Antony, Tinu; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    Despite the ability of satellite borne microwave radiometers to measure the atmospheric pa-rameters, liquid water and the microphysical properties of clouds, they have serious limitations over the land owing its large and spatially heterogeneous emissivity compared to the relatively low and homogenous oceans. This calls for determination of the spatial maps of land-surface emissivity with accuracies better than ˜2%. In this study, the characterization of microwave emissivity of different land surface classes over the Indian region is carried out with the forth-coming Indo-French microwave satellite program Megha-Tropiques in focus. The land emissivity is retrieved using satellite microwave radiometer data from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) at 10, 19, 22, 37 and 85 GHz. After identify-ing the clear sky daily data, the microwave radiative transfer computation, is applied to the respective daily atmospheric profile for deducing the upwelling and downwelling atmospheric radiations. This, along with the skin temperature data, is used to retrieve land emission from satellites data. The emissivity maps of placecountry-regionIndia for three months representing winter (January) and post-monsoon (September-October) seasons of 2008 at V and H polar-izations of all the channels (except for 22 GHz) are generated. Though the land emissivity values in V-polarization vary between 0.5 and ˜1, some land surface classes such as the desert region, marshy land, fresh snow covered region and evergreen forest region, etc, show distinct emissivity characteristics. On this basis few typical classes having uniform physical properties over sufficient area are identified. Usually the Indian desert region is dry and shows low emis-sivity (˜0.88 in H-polarisation) and high polarization difference, V-H (˜0.1). Densely vegetated zones of tropical rain forests exhibit high emissivity values (˜0.95) and low polarization dif-ference (lt;0.01). The

  14. Hemostatic interference of Indian king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) Venom. Comparison with three other snake venoms of the subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Gowtham, Yashonandana J; Kumar, M S; Girish, K S; Kemparaju, K

    2012-06-01

    Unlike Naja naja, Bungarus caeruleus, Echis carinatus, and Daboia/Vipera russellii venoms, Ophiophagus hannah venom is medically ignored in the Indian subcontinent. Being the biggest poisonous snake, O. hannah has been presumed to inject several lethal doses of venom in a single bite. Lack of therapeutic antivenom to O. hannah bite in India makes any attempt to save the victim a difficult exercise. This study was initiated to compare O. hannah venom with the above said venoms for possible interference in hemostasis. Ophiophagus hannah venom was found to actively interfere in hemostatic stages such as fibrin clot formation, platelet activation/aggregation, and fibrin clot dissolution. It decreased partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin clotting time (TCT). These activities are similar to that shown by E. carinatus and D. russellii venoms, and thus O. hannah venom was found to exert procoagulant activity through the common pathway of blood coagulation, while N. naja venom increased aPTT and TCT but not PT, and hence it was found to exert anticoagulant activity through the intrinsic pathway. Venoms of O. hannah, E. carinatus, and D. russellii lack plasminogen activation property as they do not hydrolyze azocasein, while they all show plasmin-like activity by degrading the fibrin clot. Although N. naja venom did not degrade azocasein, unlike other venoms, it showed feeble plasmin-like activity on fibrin clot. Venom of E. carinatus induced clotting of human platelet rich plasma (PRP), while the other three venoms interfered in agonist-induced platelet aggregation in PRP. Venom of O. hannah least inhibited the ADP induced platelet aggregation as compared to D. russellii and N. naja venoms. All these three venoms showed complete inhibition of epinephrine-induced aggregation at varied doses. However, O. hannah venom was unique in inhibiting thrombin induced aggregation. PMID:22817464

  15. Studies of the Correlation Between Ionospheric Anomalies and Seismic Activities in the Indian Subcontinent

    SciTech Connect

    Sasmal, S.; Chakrabarti, S. K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2010-10-20

    The VLF (Very Low Frequency) signals are long thought to give away important information about the Lithosphere-Ionosphere coupling. It is recently established that the ionosphere may be perturbed due to seismic activities. The effects of this perturbation can be detected through the VLF wave amplitude. There are several methods to find this correlations and these methods can be used for the prediction of these seismic events. In this paper, first we present a brief history of the use of VLF propagation method for the study of seismo-ionospheric correlations. Then we present different methods proposed by us to find out the seismo-ionospheric correlations. At the Indian Centre for Space Physics, Kolkata we have been monitoring the VTX station at Vijayanarayanam from 2002. In the initial stage, we received 17 kHz signal and latter we received 18.2 kHz signal. In this paper, first we present the results for the 17 kHz signal during Sumatra earthquake in 2004 obtained from the terminator time analysis method. Then we present much detailed and statistical analysis using some new methods and present the results for 18.2 kHz signal. In order to establish the correlation between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes, we need to understand what are the reference signals throughout the year. We present the result of the sunrise and sunset terminators for the 18.2 kHz signal as a function of the day of the year for a period of four years, viz, 2005 to 2008 when the solar activity was very low. In this case, the signal would primarily be affected by the Sun due to normal sunrise and sunset effects. Any deviation from this standardized calibration curve would point to influences by terrestrial (such as earthquakes) and extra-terrestrial (such as solar activities and other high energy phenomena). We present examples of deviations which occur in a period of sixteen months and show that the correlations with seismic events is significant and typically the highest deviation

  16. A review of the genus Paraleptomenes Giordani Soika, 1970 (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Eumeninae: Odynerini) from the Indian subcontinent,with the description of a new species from the eastern Himalayas.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Girish P; Carpenter, James M; Sharma, Gaurav

    2014-01-01

    The genus Paraleptomenes Giordani Soika, 1970 is reviewed for the Indian subcontinent. A new species Paraleptomenes darugiriensis Kumar, Carpenter & Sharma, sp. nov. is described. The male of P. rufoniger Giordani Soika, 1994 is described for the first time. The distribution records of P. humbertianus (de Saussure, 1867), P. miniatus mephitis (Cameron, 1901), P. miniatus miniatus (de Saussure, 1855), and P. rufoniger Giordani Soika, 1994 in the Indian states are augmented. A key to species of the Indian subcontinent and a world checklist of species are provided. PMID:24870998

  17. Evaluation of soil moisture- precipitation feedback theories: Statistical approach using a convection permitting model over Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Mansi; Parker, Douglas J.; Webster, Stuart; Birch, Cathryn E.; Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Marsham, John H.

    2014-05-01

    In South Asia, precipitation is mostly convective. An important control on the rainfall is the interaction of the atmosphere with land conditions. The purpose of this study is to test the usability of various existing theories (Haiden 1997, Findell and Eltahir 2003a, Taylor et al 2012) in the context of soil moisture - precipitation feedback mechanisms over the South Asian region during the monsoon season. To test these theories we have evaluated the relationships between soil moisture, fluxes and rainfall in a convection-permitting atmospheric model (UK Met Office Unified Model), run with 4km grid-spacing. Since, more generalized conditions have been tested, so some other parameters like wind convergence and the impact of topography have also been examined, to get a deeper insight into the problem. Four different sub-domains of the Indian subcontinent have been chosen, which fulfil various topographic and soil moisture conditions. Various statistical analyses have been performed in the immediate vicinity of a region that has received afternoon rainfall, using i) antecedent soil moisture, ii) topography, iii) the Convective Triggering Potential-Humidity Index (CTP-HI) framework (Findell and Eltahir 2003a) and other parameters. From soil moisture analysis it has been found that the different regions have different preferences for afternoon rainfall. The North Indian, comparatively flat, and the South Indian complex terrain domains have more dry advantage rainfall events (i.e. there is a preference for rainfall to fall over comparatively dry region relative to surrounding) whereas for Central India, which has complex orography, there is a wet advantage. Further analysis of complex domain with topographic analysis showed that over the Central domain, rainfall has two peaks; one over low-lying orography and the other over high-lying orography. For the higher land, rainfall has more preference over wet soil, whereas over the lower land both dry and wet soil has a

  18. Implication of vector characteristics of Phlebotomus argentipes in the kala-azar elimination programme in the Indian sub-continent

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rajib; Kumar, Vijay; Mondal, Dinesh; Das, Murari Lal; Das, Pradeep; Dash, Aditya Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), also known as kala-azar in the Indian sub-continent (ISC), is a major public health concern in Bangladesh, India, and Nepal, where it is caused by Leishmania donovani transmitted by the sand fly Phlebotomus argentipes. Various ecological parameters including air temperature, rainfall, wind speed, relative humidity, soil moisture, pH, and organic carbon are known to influence the oviposition of female sand flies, as well as the survival and development of larvae. However, more detailed knowledge on vector behavior, such as biting times, breeding places, and preferred hosts are needed to design optimal evidence-based vector control interventions. Methods In order to facilitate rational decisions regarding VL vector control, a systematic review was conducted to identify the prevailing practice and knowledge gaps in relation to vector bionomics and behavior. Search terms included ‘sand fly bionomics’, ‘habitat’, and ‘visceral leishmaniasis/kala-azar vector control’ using the Boolean operator AND to identify the country of interest, namely: Bangladesh, India, and Nepal. Both PubMed and Google search engines were used. Additional unpublished documents in the three countries were also analyzed. Results Information on the life cycle of VL vectors, their breeding behavior, infection rate with L. donovani, feeding behavior, and seasonal variation are useful for designing vector control operations. Unfortunately, none of the studies on the life cycle of P. argentipes was conducted in field settings of the ISC, so the publications from other locations had to be used for determining the duration of life cycle and development from egg to adult. However, information about breeding places, seasonal variation of vector densities, and 47 out of the selected 51 papers are available from the ISC and can be used for intelligent design of control operations. Conclusion Vector control services should undertake routine insecticide

  19. Timing and Nature of Appearance of C4 Plants in the Indian Subcontinent: Clue from Isotopic Ratios of Biomarker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, P.

    2014-12-01

    Appearance and expansion of C4 plants during the late Miocene was first documented from Siwalik Group of sediments using carbon isotope ratio of soil carbonates. It was proposed that C4 plants appeared drastically in response to change in hydrological cycle. Subsequently, various workers documented evolution and expansion of C4 plants from different Siwalik sections of India, Nepal and Pakistan. Although evolution and expansion of C4 plants was documented in all these studies but nature and timing of expansion of C4 plants showed variations from section to sections. Even from same section, the results varied with change in proxies. The hydrological changes also differ regionally. One of the reasons of differences in results was lack of modern data set from the Indian subcontinent. For example, in many cases δ18O values of New Delhi rainwater has been considered as reference data set and applied to site of investigation with some corrections. The average δ13C values of C3 and C4 plants was considered as -27‰ and -12.5‰ respectively, but modern C3 plants in the Gangetic plain is almost 2.5‰ lower than the value used in those studies. Additional problem raised as preservation of pristine isotopic character of soil organic matter is also apprehensive. To resolve all these issues, the δ13C value of long chain alkane have been used to reconstruct C3-C4 plants after isotopic characterization of modern plants and their biomarker from the Gangetic plain which is equivalent to the past Siwalik flood plain. Additionally, δD values of long chain alkane were also measured. Variations of d13C values of long chain alkane with time show presence of C4 plants in Siwalik from 11 Ma ago and since then gradual increase in C4 plants till 6 Ma followed by a sharp increase. The statistically significant correlation between δD and δ13C values of long chain alkane show that positive impact of hydrological change on abundance of C3-C4 plants.

  20. mtDNA from the early Bronze Age to the Roman period suggests a genetic link between the Indian subcontinent and Mesopotamian cradle of civilization.

    PubMed

    Witas, Henryk W; Tomczyk, Jacek; Jędrychowska-Dańska, Krystyna; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Płoszaj, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Ancient DNA methodology was applied to analyse sequences extracted from freshly unearthed remains (teeth) of 4 individuals deeply deposited in slightly alkaline soil of the Tell Ashara (ancient Terqa) and Tell Masaikh (ancient Kar-Assurnasirpal) Syrian archaeological sites, both in the middle Euphrates valley. Dated to the period between 2.5 Kyrs BC and 0.5 Kyrs AD the studied individuals carried mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to the M4b1, M49 and/or M61 haplogroups, which are believed to have arisen in the area of the Indian subcontinent during the Upper Paleolithic and are absent in people living today in Syria. However, they are present in people inhabiting today's Tibet, Himalayas, India and Pakistan. We anticipate that the analysed remains from Mesopotamia belonged to people with genetic affinity to the Indian subcontinent since the distribution of identified ancient haplotypes indicates solid link with populations from the region of South Asia-Tibet (Trans-Himalaya). They may have been descendants of migrants from much earlier times, spreading the clades of the macrohaplogroup M throughout Eurasia and founding regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or just merchants moving along trade routes passing near or through the region. None of the successfully identified nuclear alleles turned out to be ΔF508 CFTR, LCT-13910T or Δ32 CCR5. PMID:24040024

  1. Tectonically driven late Paleocene (57.9-54.7 Ma) transgression and climatically forced latest middle Eocene (41.3-38.0 Ma) regression on the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, B. P.; Singh, Y. Raghumani; Andotra, D. S.; Patra, A.; Srivastava, V. K.; Guruaribam, Venus; Sijagurumayum, Umarani; Singh, G. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cenozoic era was the turning point in the geological history of the Indian subcontinent when India experienced maximum isolation before it collided with Asia and there occurred a great mountain building activity shaping the Himalaya. In the Cenozoic era, the sedimentation commenced in the late Paleocene (∼57.9 Ma) in the pericratonic basins of the western India as well as the foreland basins of the Himalaya that marks the beginning of a major transgression on the Indian subcontinent. Till now, it is not sure whether this transgression was forced by tectonics or climate. We have interpreted that the primary driver for this transgression was the tectonics that marks the beginning of the India-Asia convergence. A major regression of similar magnitude occurred during latest middle Eocene (41.3-38.0 Ma) that corresponds to global sea-level fall. This regression is global and can be identified even in the Cenozoic basins developed within the African plate. It is interpreted that this regression was driven by the global cooling during latest middle Eocene/late Eocene possibly associated with the nucleation of the Antarctica ice-sheets coupled with the uplift of the Himalaya.

  2. mtDNA from the Early Bronze Age to the Roman Period Suggests a Genetic Link between the Indian Subcontinent and Mesopotamian Cradle of Civilization

    PubMed Central

    Witas, Henryk W.; Tomczyk, Jacek; Jędrychowska-Dańska, Krystyna; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Płoszaj, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Ancient DNA methodology was applied to analyse sequences extracted from freshly unearthed remains (teeth) of 4 individuals deeply deposited in slightly alkaline soil of the Tell Ashara (ancient Terqa) and Tell Masaikh (ancient Kar-Assurnasirpal) Syrian archaeological sites, both in the middle Euphrates valley. Dated to the period between 2.5 Kyrs BC and 0.5 Kyrs AD the studied individuals carried mtDNA haplotypes corresponding to the M4b1, M49 and/or M61 haplogroups, which are believed to have arisen in the area of the Indian subcontinent during the Upper Paleolithic and are absent in people living today in Syria. However, they are present in people inhabiting today’s Tibet, Himalayas, India and Pakistan. We anticipate that the analysed remains from Mesopotamia belonged to people with genetic affinity to the Indian subcontinent since the distribution of identified ancient haplotypes indicates solid link with populations from the region of South Asia-Tibet (Trans-Himalaya). They may have been descendants of migrants from much earlier times, spreading the clades of the macrohaplogroup M throughout Eurasia and founding regional Mesopotamian groups like that of Terqa or just merchants moving along trade routes passing near or through the region. None of the successfully identified nuclear alleles turned out to be ΔF508 CFTR, LCT-13910T or Δ32 CCR5. PMID:24040024

  3. Visceral leishmaniasis on the Indian sub-continent: a multi-centre study of the costs of three interventions for the control of the sandfly vector, Phlebotomus argentipes.

    PubMed

    Das, M; Banjara, M; Chowdhury, R; Kumar, V; Rijal, S; Joshi, A; Akhter, S; Das, P; Kroeger, A

    2008-12-01

    The sandflies that transmit the parasites causing human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) can be controlled by several methods, including indoor residual spraying (IRS), the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN) and ecological vector management (EVM). The financial costs of each of these three methods of sandfly control have recently been assessed and compared, in a multi-centre study based on the Indian sub-continent. In each of the four study sites (two in Nepal and one each in India and Bangladesh), 24 neighbourhoods were randomly selected in districts with high incidences of VL. The costs of the three interventions were then prospectively assessed in each study neighbourhood, in the local currency, and then converted to U.S. dollars at the prevailing exchange rate in the country concerned. The costs of IRS, which ranged from U.S.$2.4-11.7 (mean = U.S.$5.9) per household-year, were greater than those of LLIN (U.S.$3.5-5.1/household-year, with a mean of U. S.$4.5) but less than those of EVM (U. S.$5.0- 14.0/household-year, with a mean of U.S.$8.7). These results indicate that LLIN and IRS may be the cheaper options for the control of sandflies on the Indian sub-continent, and that EVM should perhaps only be taken up as a complimentary and voluntary method. Various combinations of these interventions (based on country-specific social and economic factors) may, however, be the best and most cost-effective choice. PMID:19000390

  4. Prediction and error growth in the daily forecast of precipitation from the NCEP CFSv2 over the subdivisions of Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Dhruva Kumar; Rai, Shailendra; Sahai, A. K.; Abhilash, S.; Shahi, N. K.

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the forecast skill and predictability of various indices of south Asian monsoon as well as the subdivisions of the Indian subcontinent during JJAS season for the time domain of 2001-2013 using NCEP CFSv2 output. It has been observed that the daily mean climatology of precipitation over the land points of India is underestimated in the model forecast as compared to observation. The monthly model bias of precipitation shows the dry bias over the land points of India and also over the Bay of Bengal, whereas the Himalayan and Arabian Sea regions show the wet bias. We have divided the Indian landmass into five subdivisions namely central India, southern India, Western Ghat, northeast and southern Bay of Bengal regions based on the spatial variation of observed mean precipitation in JJAS season. The underestimation over the land points of India during mature phase was originated from the central India, southern Bay of Bengal, southern India and Western Ghat regions. The error growth in June forecast is slower as compared to July forecast in all the regions. The predictability error also grows slowly in June forecast as compared to July forecast in most of the regions. The doubling time of predictability error was estimated to be in the range of 3-5 days for all the regions. Southern India and Western Ghats are more predictable in the July forecast as compared to June forecast, whereas IMR, northeast, central India and southern Bay of Bengal regions have the opposite nature.

  5. Diagnostic tests for kala-azar: a multi-centre study of the freeze-dried DAT, rK39 strip test and KAtex in East Africa and the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Boelaert, M; El-Safi, S; Hailu, A; Mukhtar, M; Rijal, S; Sundar, S; Wasunna, M; Aseffa, A; Mbui, J; Menten, J; Desjeux, P; Peeling, R W

    2008-01-01

    Three diagnostic tests for visceral leishmaniasis (VL), the freeze-dried direct agglutination test (FD-DAT), the rK39 dipstick and a urine latex antigen test (KAtex), were evaluated for use in primary care in East Africa and the Indian subcontinent. Clinical suspects were prospectively recruited and tissue, blood and urine samples were taken. Direct microscopic examination of tissue smear, and FD-DAT, rK39 and KAtex were performed. Sensitivity and specificity with 95% credible intervals were estimated using Bayesian latent class analysis. On the Indian subcontinent both the FD-DAT and the rK39 strip test exceeded the 95% sensitivity and 90% specificity target, but not so in East Africa. Sensitivity of the FD-DAT was high in Ethiopia and Kenya but lower in Sudan, while its specificity was below 90% in Kenya. Sensitivity of the rK39 was below 80% in the three countries, and its specificity was only 70% in Ethiopia. KAtex showed moderate to very low sensitivity in all countries. FD-DAT and rK39 can be recommended for clinical practice on the Indian subcontinent. In East Africa, their clinical use should be carefully monitored. More work is needed to improve existing formats, and to develop better VL diagnostics. PMID:17942129

  6. The early (pre-11 Ma) existence and disparate response of C4 plant in the Indian sub-continent: Evidences from n-alkane isotopic ratios of NW Indian Siwalik paleosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Sambit; Sanyal, Prasanta; Kumar, Rohtash

    2016-04-01

    The appearance and expansion of C4 plant during the late Miocene was first documented from Siwalik sections of Indian sub-continent using carbon isotope ratio of soil carbonate, soil organic matter and fossil tooth enamel. The timing and nature of C4 plant evolution documented from different Siwalik sections of Indian sub-continent were not equivocal. Even from a particular region, the timing and nature of ecological shift was interpreted differently. The lack of modern data set from the Indian sub-continent might be one of the reasons for differences in results. Moreover the pristine isotopic character of soil organic matter and soil carbonate are prone to alteration during diagenesis. To resolve all the issues, NW Siwalik paleosol (n = 74) derived leaf wax long chain n-alkane δ13C value, a robust proxy, has been used to reconstruct exact timing of C4 plant appearance and its nature of expansion. The average long chain n-alkane δ13C value of modern C3-C4 plants surviving in the Gangetic plain have been used as reference to understand the past vegetation survived in the Siwalik floodplain. The paleosol derived long chain n-alkane δ13C values from Naladkhad (11.6 to 8.8 Ma) and Ranital (11.1 to 6.9 Ma) sections of Kangra sub-basin indicate presence of ˜ 40 % C4 plants at ˜11 Ma. Such significant abundance of C4 plants at ˜11 Ma indicate an early appearance of C4 plants compared to the previously published data. The abundance of C4 plants have increased gradually both in Ranital (9.7 Ma to 6.9 Ma) and Jabbarkhad (6.2 Ma to 2.7 Ma) sections of Kangra sub-basin whereas the C4 plant abundance showed large fluctuations in the Haripur Khol section (5.7 Ma to 1.6 Ma) of Subathu sub-basin. The paleosol derived leaf wax long chain n-alkane δD values measured from the Kangra and Subathu sub-basin indicate three phases of high monsoon at ˜ 9 Ma, ˜5.5 Ma and ˜ 3.5 Ma. The varied response of C4 plant abundance with monsoonal rainfall amount and fluvial architectural

  7. Y-chromosome diversity suggests southern origin and Paleolithic backwave migration of Austro-Asiatic speakers from eastern Asia to the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Liao, Shiyu; Qi, Xuebin; Liu, Jiewei; Kampuansai, Jatupol; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Zhaohui; Serey, Bun; Sovannary, Tuot; Bunnath, Long; Seang Aun, Hong; Samnom, Ham; Kangwanpong, Daoroong; Shi, Hong; Su, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of an Asian-specific Y-chromosome lineage (O2a1-M95)—the dominant paternal lineage in Austro-Asiatic (AA) speaking populations, who are found on both sides of the Bay of Bengal—led to two competing hypothesis of this group’s geographic origin and migratory routes. One hypothesis posits the origin of the AA speakers in India and an eastward dispersal to Southeast Asia, while the other places an origin in Southeast Asia with westward dispersal to India. Here, we collected samples of AA-speaking populations from mainland Southeast Asia (MSEA) and southern China, and genotyped 16 Y-STRs of 343 males who belong to the O2a1-M95 lineage. Combining our samples with previous data, we analyzed both the Y-chromosome and mtDNA diversities. We generated a comprehensive picture of the O2a1-M95 lineage in Asia. We demonstrated that the O2a1-M95 lineage originated in the southern East Asia among the Daic-speaking populations ~20–40 thousand years ago and then dispersed southward to Southeast Asia after the Last Glacial Maximum before moving westward to the Indian subcontinent. This migration resulted in the current distribution of this Y-chromosome lineage in the AA-speaking populations. Further analysis of mtDNA diversity showed a different pattern, supporting a previously proposed sex-biased admixture of the AA-speaking populations in India. PMID:26482917

  8. PTSD in post-road traffic accident patients requiring hospitalization in Indian subcontinent: A review on magnitude of the problem and management guidelines.

    PubMed

    Undavalli, Chaitanya; Das, Piyush; Dutt, Taru; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kashyap, Rahul

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic events after a road traffic accident (RTA) can be physical and/or psychological. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the major psychological conditions which affect accident victims. Psychological issues may not be addressed in the emergency department(ED) immediately. There have been reports about a mismatch between the timely referrals from ED to occupational or primary care services for these issues. If left untreated, there may be adverse effects on quality of life (QOL) and work productivity. Hospital expenses, loss of income, and loss of work could create a never ending cycle for financial difficulties and burden in trauma victims. The aim of our review is to address the magnitude of PTSD in post-RTA hospitalized patients in Indian subcontinent population. We also attempted to emphasis on few management guidelines. A comprehensive search was conducted on major databases with Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) term 'PTSD or post-traumatic stress' and Emergency department and vehicle or road or highway or automobile or car or truck or trauma and India. Out of 120 studies, a total of six studies met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Our interpretation of the problem is that; hospital expenditure due to trauma, time away from work during hospitalization, and reduction in work performance, are three major hits that can lead RTA victims to financial crisis. Proposed management guidelines are; establish a coordinated triage, implementing a screening tool in the ED, and provide psychological counseling. PMID:25400398

  9. The El Niño Southern Oscillation and the historic malaria epidemics on the Indian subcontinent and Sri Lanka: an early warning system for future epidemics?

    PubMed

    Bouma, M J; van der Kaay, H J

    1996-02-01

    The recurrent great malaria epidemics which occurred in the Punjab province of former British India and Ceylon before the introduction of residual insecticides have been related to excessive and failing monsoon rains respectively. In the arid Punjab, rainfall facilitated breeding and increased the lifespan of the mosquito vector and, in the wet part of Ceylon, failing monsoon rains caused rivers to pool, creating more favourable breeding conditions. The periodic fluctuations in monsoon rainfall and epidemic malaria are here explained in relation to the El Niño Southern Oscillation. In the Punjab, epidemic malaria between 1868 and 1943 correlates significantly (r = 0.34, P < 0.005) with the sea surface temperature anomalies in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific, a parameter of the oscillation, and epidemics were significantly more prevalent in a year with a wet monsoon following a dry El Niño year than in other years. In Ceylon, epidemics were significantly more prevalent during El Niño years, when the same south-west monsoon tends to fail. With the reduced reliance on residual insecticides and the recurrence of epidemic malaria on the Indian subcontinent, advances made in predicting El Niño events may be used to forecast high and low risk years for future malaria epidemics. PMID:8673827

  10. Y-chromosome diversity suggests southern origin and Paleolithic backwave migration of Austro-Asiatic speakers from eastern Asia to the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Liao, Shiyu; Qi, Xuebin; Liu, Jiewei; Kampuansai, Jatupol; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Zhaohui; Serey, Bun; Sovannary, Tuot; Bunnath, Long; Seang Aun, Hong; Samnom, Ham; Kangwanpong, Daoroong; Shi, Hong; Su, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of an Asian-specific Y-chromosome lineage (O2a1-M95)--the dominant paternal lineage in Austro-Asiatic (AA) speaking populations, who are found on both sides of the Bay of Bengal--led to two competing hypothesis of this group's geographic origin and migratory routes. One hypothesis posits the origin of the AA speakers in India and an eastward dispersal to Southeast Asia, while the other places an origin in Southeast Asia with westward dispersal to India. Here, we collected samples of AA-speaking populations from mainland Southeast Asia (MSEA) and southern China, and genotyped 16 Y-STRs of 343 males who belong to the O2a1-M95 lineage. Combining our samples with previous data, we analyzed both the Y-chromosome and mtDNA diversities. We generated a comprehensive picture of the O2a1-M95 lineage in Asia. We demonstrated that the O2a1-M95 lineage originated in the southern East Asia among the Daic-speaking populations ~20-40 thousand years ago and then dispersed southward to Southeast Asia after the Last Glacial Maximum before moving westward to the Indian subcontinent. This migration resulted in the current distribution of this Y-chromosome lineage in the AA-speaking populations. Further analysis of mtDNA diversity showed a different pattern, supporting a previously proposed sex-biased admixture of the AA-speaking populations in India. PMID:26482917

  11. Gondwana to Asia: Plate tectonics, paleogeography and the biological connectivity of the Indian sub-continent from the Middle Jurassic through latest Eocene (166 35 Ma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Jason R.; Aitchison, Jonathan C.

    2008-06-01

    Using the most up-to-the-date information available, we present a considerably revised plate tectonic and paleogeographic model for the Indian Ocean bordering continents, from Gondwana's Middle Jurassic break-up through to India's collision with Asia in the middle Cenozoic. The landmass framework is then used to explore the sometimes complex and occasionally counter-intuitive patterns that have been observed in the fossil and extant biological records of India, Madagascar, Africa and eastern Eurasia, as well those of the more distal continents. Although the paleogeographic model confirms the traditional view that India became progressively more isolated from the major landmasses during the Cretaceous and Paleocene, it is likely that at various times minor physiographic features (principally ocean islands) provided causeways and/or stepping-stone trails along which land animals could have migrated to/from the sub-continent. Aside from a likely link (albeit broken by several marine gaps) to Africa for much of this time (it is notable, that the present-day/recent biota of Madagascar indicates that the ancestors of five land-mammal orders, plus bats, crossed the > 400-km-wide Mozambique Channel at different times in the Cenozoic), it is possible that the Kerguelen Plateau connected India and Australia-Antarctica in the mid-Cretaceous (approximately 115-90 Ma). Later, the Seychelles-Mascarene Plateau and nearby elevated sea-floor areas could have allowed faunas to pass between southern India and Madagascar in the Late Cretaceous, from around 85-65 Ma, with an early Cenozoic extension to this path forming as a result of the Reunion hot-spot trace islands growing on the ocean floor to the SSW of India. The modelling also suggests that India's northward passage towards Asia, with eventual collision at 35 Ma, involved the NE corner of the sub-continent making a glancing contact with Sumatra, followed by Burma from ~ 57 Ma (late Paleocene) onwards, a scenario which is

  12. Seasonal variation of vertical distribution of aerosol single scattering albedo over Indian sub-continent: RAWEX aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh Babu, S.; Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Krishna Moorthy, K.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the vertical distribution of aerosols and its seasonality (especially the single scattering albedo, SSA) extensive profiling of aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients have been carried out using an instrumented aircraft from seven base stations spread across the Indian mainland during winter 2012 and spring/pre-monsoon 2013 under the Regional Aerosol Warming Experiment (RAWEX). Spatial variation of the vertical profiles of the asymmetry parameter, the wavelength exponent of the absorption coefficient and the single scattering albedo, derived from the measurements, are used to infer the source characteristics of winter and pre-monsoon aerosols as well as the seasonality of free tropospheric aerosols. The relatively high value of the wavelength exponent of absorption coefficient over most of the regions indicates the contribution from biomass burning and dust aerosols up to lower free tropospheric altitudes. A clear enhancement in aerosol loading and its absorbing nature is seen at lower free troposphere levels (above the planetary boundary layer) over the entire mainland during spring/pre-monsoon season compared to winter, whereas concentration of aerosols within the boundary layer showed a decrease from winter to spring. This could have significant implications on the aerosol heating structure over the Indian region and hence the regional climate.

  13. Assessment of Aerosol Radiative Impact over Oceanic Regions Adjacent to Indian Subcontinent using Multi-Satellite Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Satheesh, S. K.; Vinoj, V.; Krishnamoorthy, K.

    2010-10-01

    Using data from Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, we have retrieved regional distribution of aerosol column single scattering albedo (parameter indicative of the relative dominance of aerosol absorption and scattering effects), a most important, but least understood aerosol property in assessing its climate impact. Consequently we provide improved assessment of short wave aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) (on both regional and seasonal scales) estimates over this region. Large gradients in north-south ARF were observed as a consequence of gradients in single scattering albedo as well as aerosol optical depth. The highest ARF (-37 W m-2 at the surface) was observed over the northern Arabian Sea during June to August period (JJA). In general, ARF was higher over northern Bay of Bengal (NBoB) during winter and pre-monsoon period, whereas the ARF was higher over northern Arabian Sea (NAS) during the monsoon and post- monsoon period. The largest forcing observed over NAS during JJA is the consequence of large amounts of desert dust transported from the west Asian dust sources. High as well as seasonally invariant aerosol single scattering albedos (~0.98) were observed over the southern Indian Ocean region far from continents. The ARF estimates based on direct measurements made at a remote island location, Minicoy (8.3°N, 73°E) in the southern Arabian Sea are in good agreement with the estimates made following multisatellite analysis.

  14. Remototrachyna, a newly recognized tropical lineage of lichens in the Hypotrachyna clade (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota), originated in the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Divakar, Pradeep K; Lumbsch, H Thorsten; Ferencova, Zuzana; Del Prado, Ruth; Crespo, Ana

    2010-04-01

    Biogeographical studies of lichens used to be complicated because of the large distribution ranges of many species. Molecular systematics has revitalized lichen biogeography by improving species delimitation and providing better information about species range limitations. This study focuses on the major clade of tropical parmelioid lichens, which share a chemical feature, the presence of isolichenan in the cell wall, and a morphological feature, microscopic pores in the uppermost layer. Our previous phylogenetic studies revealed that the largest genus in this clade, Hypotrachyna, is polyphyletic with a clade mainly distributed in South and East Asia clustering distant from the core of the genus. To divide the Hypotrachyna clade into monophyletic groups and to reevaluate morphological and chemical characters in a phylogenetic context, we sampled ITS, nuclear large subunit (nuLSU) and mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) rDNA sequences from 77 species. We are erecting the new genus Remototrachyna for a core group of 15 former Hypotrachyna species. The segregation of Remototrachyna from Hypotrachyna receives support from morphological and chemical data, as well from maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of the DNA. We used a likelihood approach to study the geographic range evolution of Remototrachyna and Bulbothrix, which are sister groups. This analysis suggests that the ancestral range of Remototrachyna was restricted to India and that subsequent long-distance dispersal is responsible for the pantropical occurrence of two species of Remototrachyna. PMID:21622420

  15. Model-Based Investigations of Different Vector-Related Intervention Strategies to Eliminate Visceral Leishmaniasis on the Indian Subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Picado, Albert; Ostyn, Bart; Sundar, Shyam; Rijal, Suman; Boelaert, Marleen; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Eichner, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The elimination of infectious diseases requires reducing transmission below a certain threshold. The Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) Elimination Initiative in Southeast Asia aims to reduce the annual VL incidence rate below 1 case per 10,000 inhabitants in endemic areas by 2015 via a combination of case management and vector control. Using a previously developed VL transmission model, we investigated transmission thresholds dependent on measures reducing the sand fly density either by killing sand flies (e.g., indoor residual spraying and long-lasting insecticidal nets) or by destroying breeding sites (e.g., environmental management). Model simulations suggest that elimination of VL is possible if the sand fly density can be reduced by 67% through killing sand flies, or if the number of breeding sites can be reduced by more than 79% through measures of environmental management. These results were compared to data from two recent cluster randomised controlled trials conducted in India, Nepal and Bangladesh showing a 72% reduction in sand fly density after indoor residual spraying, a 44% and 25% reduction through the use of long-lasting insecticidal nets and a 42% reduction after environmental management. Based on model predictions, we identified the parameters within the transmission cycle of VL that predominantly determine the prospects of intervention success. We suggest further research to refine model-based predictions into the elimination of VL. PMID:24762676

  16. Sustainable Development in Indian Automotive Component Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, E.

    2013-01-01

    India is the world's second fastest growing auto market and boasts of the sixth largest automobile industry after China, the US, Germany, Japan and Brazil. The Indian auto component industry recorded its highest year-on-year growth of 34.2 % in 2010-2011, raking in revenue of US 39.9 billion; major contribution coming from exports at US five billion and fresh investment from the US at around US two billion. For inclusive growth and sustainable development most of the auto components manufacturers has adopted the cluster development approach. The objective is to study the technical efficiency (θ), peer weights (λ i ), input slacks (S-) and output slacks (S+) of four Auto Component Clusters (ACC) in India. The methodology adopted is using Data Envelopment Analysis of Input Oriented Banker Charnes Cooper Model by taking number of units and number of employments as inputs and sales and exports in crores as an outputs. The non-zero λ i 's represents the weights for efficient clusters. The S > 0 obtained for one ACC reveals the excess no. of units (S-) and employment (S-) and shortage in sales (S+) and exports (S+). However the variable returns to scale are increasing for three clusters, constant for one more cluster and with nil decrease. To conclude, for inclusive growth and sustainable development, the inefficient ACC should increase their turnover and exports, as decrease in no. of enterprises and employment is practically not possible. Moreover for sustainable development, the ACC should strengthen infrastructure interrelationships, technology interrelationships, procurement interrelationships, production interrelationships and marketing interrelationships to increase productivity and efficiency to compete in the world market.

  17. Collision-induced tectonism along the northwestern margin of the Indian subcontinent as recorded in the Upper Paleocene to Middle Eocene strata of central Pakistan (Kirthar and Sulaiman Ranges)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, P.D.; Johnson, E.A.; Khan, I.H.

    1998-01-01

    Outcrop data from the Upper Paleocene to Middle Eocene Ghazij Formation of central Pakistan provide information about the depositional environments, source areas, and paleogeographic and tectonic settings along the northwestern margin of the Indian subcontinent during the closing of the Tethys Ocean. In this region, in the lower part of the exposed stratigraphic sequence, are various marine carbonate-shelf deposits (Jurassic to Upper Paleocene). Overlying these strata is the Ghazij, which consists of marine mudstone (lower part), paralic sandstone and mudstone (middle part), and terrestrial mudstone and conglomerate (upper part). Petrographic examination of sandstone samples from the middle and upper parts reveals that rock fragments of the underlying carbonate-shelf deposits are dominant; also present are volcanic rock fragments and chromite grains. Paleocurrent measurements from the middle and upper parts suggest that source areas were located northwest of the study area. We postulate that the source areas were uplifted by the collision of the subcontinent with a landmass during the final stages of the closing of the Tethys Ocean. Middle Eocene carbonate-shelf deposits that overlie the Ghazij record a return to marine conditions prior to the Miocene to Pleistocene sediment influx denoting the main collision with Eurasia.

  18. Investigation on the monthly variation of cirrus optical properties over the Indian subcontinent using cloud-aerosol lidar and infrared pathfinder satellite observation (Calipso)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaman, Reji K.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.; Krishnakumar, V.

    2016-05-01

    Cirrus clouds have been identified as one of the atmospheric component which influence the radiative processes in the atmosphere and plays a key role in the Earth Radiation Budget. CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation) is a joint NASA-CNES satellite mission designed to provide insight in understanding of the role of aerosols and clouds in the climate system. This paper reports the study on the variation of cirrus cloud optical properties of over the Indian sub - continent for a period of two years from January 2009 to December 2010, using cloud-aerosol lidar and infrared pathfinder satellite observations (Calipso). Indian Ocean and Indian continent is one of the regions where cirrus occurrence is maximum particularly during the monsoon periods. It is found that during the south-west monsoon periods there is a large cirrus cloud distribution over the southern Indian land masses. Also it is observed that the north-east monsoon periods had optical thick clouds hugging the coast line. The summer had large cloud formation in the Arabian Sea. It is also found that the land masses near to the sea had large cirrus presence. These cirrus clouds were of high altitude and optical depth. The dependence of cirrus cloud properties on cirrus cloud mid-cloud temperature and geometrical thickness are generally similar to the results derived from the ground-based lidar. However, the difference in macrophysical parameter variability shows the limits of space-borne-lidar and dissimilarities in regional climate variability and the nature and source of cloud nuclei in different geographical regions.

  19. Prehypertension--a hidden risk of Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Yavagal, Suresh T; Amarkhed, Basavaprabhu; Halkati, Prabhu C; Patted, Suresh V; Porwal, Sanjay C; Ambar, Sameer; Patil, Ravikant

    2013-02-01

    Prehypertension as an entity has been given Importance after JNC VII report. The magnitude of this problem in India and the importance of recognising prehypertension is slowly growing and getting established. Under these circumstances it was decided to study the prevalence of prehypertension in the city of Belgaum in Karnataka and the literature was reviewed. The objective of this study was to find out the prevalence of prehypertension in the urban population of Belgaum above thirty years of age. The urban population of Belgaum city was screened for prehypertension and hypertension by measuring blood pressure of all individuals aged 30 years and above. Blood pressure of 52196 persons was checked and the data was analysed. JNC VII criteria was used for defining hypertension, prehypertension and normal blood pressure. Among 52196 persons prehypertension was present in 41.1%, 67.1% were in the age group of 30-50 years. The prevalence was similar in both male and female population. Thirty-three percent of diabetic population had prehypertension. About 22.8% of prehypertensives were obese. Prehypertension is highly prevalent in urban population of India, more often seen in persons below 50 years of age. This study recognises the importance of detection of prehypertension and emphasises the need for mass education on life style modification to prevent the development of hypertension and its complications. PMID:24003569

  20. Population genetic structure of Indian shad, Tenualosa ilisha inferred from variation in mitochondrial DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Behera, B K; Singh, N S; Paria, P; Sahoo, A K; Panda, D; Meena, D K; Das, P; Pakrashi, S; Biswas, D K; Sharma, A P

    2015-09-01

    Indian shad, Tenualosa ilisha, is a commercially important anadromous fish representing major catch in Indo-pacific region. The present study evaluated partial Cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene sequence of mtDNA in T. ilisha for determining genetic variation from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea origins. The genomic DNA extracted from T. ilisha samples representing two distant rivers in the Indian subcontinent, the Bhagirathi (lower stretch of Ganges) and the Tapi was analyzed. Sequencing of 307 bp mtDNA Cytochrome b gene fragment revealed the presence of 5 haplotypes, with high haplotype diversity (Hd) of 0.9048 with variance 0.103 and low nucleotide diversity (π) of 0.14301. Three population specific haplotypes were observed in river Ganga and two haplotypes in river Tapi. Neighbour-joining tree based on Cytochrome b gene sequences of T. ilisha showed that population from Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea origins belonged to two distinct clusters. PMID:26521565

  1. Analysis of MAGSAT and surface data of the Indian region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agarwal, G. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Techniques and significant results of an analysis of MAGSAT and surface data of the Indian region are described. Specific investigative tasks included: (1) use of the multilevel data at different altitudes to develop a model for variation of magnetic anomaly with altitude; (2) development of the regional model for the description of main geomagnetic field for the Indian sub-continent using MAGSAT and observatory data; (3) development of regional mathematical model of secular variations over the Indian sub-continent; and (4) downward continuation of the anomaly field obtained from MAGSAT and its combination with the existing observatory data to produce a regional anomaly map for elucidating tectonic features of the Indian sub-continent.

  2. Atmospheric circulation feedback on west Asian dust and Indian monsoon rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskaoutis, Dimitris; Houssos, Elias; Gautam, Ritesh; Singh, Ramesh; Rashki, Alireza; Dumka, Umesh

    2016-04-01

    Classification of the atmospheric circulation patterns associated with high aerosol loading events over the Ganges valley, via the synergy of Factor and Cluster analysis techniques, has indicated six different synoptic weather patterns, two of which mostly occur during late pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons (May to September). The current study focuses on examining these two specific clusters that are associated with different mean sea level pressure (MSLP), geopotential height at 700 hPa (Z700) and wind fields that seem to affect the aerosol (mostly dust) emissions and precipitation distribution over the Indian sub-continent. Furthermore, the study reveals that enhanced aerosol presence over the Arabian Sea is positively associated with increased rainfall over the Indian landmass. The increased dust over the Arabian Sea and rainfall over India are associated with deepening of the northwestern Indian and Arabian lows that increase thermal convection and convergence of humid air masses into Indian landmass, resulting in larger monsoon precipitation. For this cluster, negative MSLP and Z700 anomalies are observed over the Arabian Peninsula that enhance the dust outflow from Arabia and, concurrently, the southwesterly air flow resulting in increase in monsoon precipitation over India. The daily precipitation over India is found to be positively correlated with the aerosol loading over the Arabian Sea for both weather clusters, thus verifying recent results from satellite observations and model simulations concerning the modulation of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall by the Arabian dust. The present work reveals that in addition to the radiative impacts of dust on modulating the monsoon rainfall, differing weather patterns favor changes in dust emissions, accumulation as well as rainfall distribution over south Asia.

  3. The Southern Oscillation in Surface Circulation and Climate over the Tropical Atlantic, Eastern Pacific, and Indian Oceans as Captured by Cluster Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolter, Klaus

    1987-04-01

    Clusters of sea level pressure (SLP), surface wind, cloudiness, and sea surface temperature (SST) in the domain of the tropical Atlantic, eastern Pacific, and Indian Oceans are introduced and discussed in terms of general circulation and climate. They appear to capture well the large-scale degrees of freedom of the seasonal fields. In the Atlantic and, to a lesser extent, in the eastern Pacific, most analyzed fields group into zonally oriented `trade wind' clusters. These are separated distinctly by the near-equatorial trough axis. By contrast the Indian Ocean features strong interhemispheric connections associated with the monsoon systems of boreal summer and, to a lesser degree, of boreal winter.The usefulness of clusters thus established is elucidated with respect to the Southern Oscilation (SO). General circulation changes associated with this planetary pressure seesaw are deduced from correlation maps of surface field clusters for January/February and July/August. During the positive SO phase (i.e., anomalously high pressure over the eastern Pacific and anomalously low pressure over Indonesia), both the Atlantic and eastern Pacific near-equatorial troughs are inferred to be shifted towards the north from July/August SLP, wind, and cloudiness fields. While eastern Pacific trade winds are weakened in both seasons in the positive SO phase, the Atlantic trades appear strengthened at the same time in the winter hemisphere only. Over the Indian Ocean, the monsoon circulation seems to be strengthened during the positive SO phase, with the summer monsoon displaying a more complex picture. Its SLP, cloudiness and SST fields support an enhanced southwest monsoon, while its surface winds appear largely inconclusive. SST is lowered during the positive SO phase in all three tropical oceans.Since all major tropical circulation components over the Atlantic, eastern Pacific, and Indian Ocean participate in the Southern Oscillation, as is evidenced by field significance tests

  4. Application of Factor Analysis on the Financial Ratios of Indian Cement Industry and Validation of the Results by Cluster Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Anupam; Bandyopadhyay, Gautam; Chakraborty, B. N.

    2010-10-01

    Financial ratio analysis is an important and commonly used tool in analyzing financial health of a firm. Quite a large number of financial ratios, which can be categorized in different groups, are used for this analysis. However, to reduce number of ratios to be used for financial analysis and regrouping them into different groups on basis of empirical evidence, Factor Analysis technique is being used successfully by different researches during the last three decades. In this study Factor Analysis has been applied over audited financial data of Indian cement companies for a period of 10 years. The sample companies are listed on the Stock Exchange India (BSE and NSE). Factor Analysis, conducted over 44 variables (financial ratios) grouped in 7 categories, resulted in 11 underlying categories (factors). Each factor is named in an appropriate manner considering the factor loads and constituent variables (ratios). Representative ratios are identified for each such factor. To validate the results of Factor Analysis and to reach final conclusion regarding the representative ratios, Cluster Analysis had been performed.

  5. Indian story on semen loss and related Dhat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Kar, Sujit Kumar; Sathyanarayana Rao, T S

    2014-10-01

    India is a country of many religions and ancient cultures. Indian culture is largely directed by the Vedic culture since time immemorial. Later Indian culture is influenced by Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. Indian belief system carries the footprints of these cultures. Every culture describes human behaviors and an interpretation of each human behavior is largely influenced by the core cultural belief system. Sexuality is an important domain which is colored by different cultural colors. Like other cultures, Indian culture believes "semen" as the precious body fluid which needs to be preserved. Most Indian beliefs consider loss of semen as a threat to the individual. Ancient Indian literature present semen loss as a negative health related event. Dhat syndrome (related to semen loss) is a culture-bound syndrome seen in the natives of Indian subcontinent. This article gathers the Indian concepts related to semen loss. It also outlines belief systems behind problems of Dhat syndrome. PMID:25568479

  6. Indian story on semen loss and related Dhat syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Om; Kar, Sujit Kumar; Sathyanarayana Rao, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    India is a country of many religions and ancient cultures. Indian culture is largely directed by the Vedic culture since time immemorial. Later Indian culture is influenced by Buddhism, Islam, and Christianity. Indian belief system carries the footprints of these cultures. Every culture describes human behaviors and an interpretation of each human behavior is largely influenced by the core cultural belief system. Sexuality is an important domain which is colored by different cultural colors. Like other cultures, Indian culture believes “semen” as the precious body fluid which needs to be preserved. Most Indian beliefs consider loss of semen as a threat to the individual. Ancient Indian literature present semen loss as a negative health related event. Dhat syndrome (related to semen loss) is a culture-bound syndrome seen in the natives of Indian subcontinent. This article gathers the Indian concepts related to semen loss. It also outlines belief systems behind problems of Dhat syndrome. PMID:25568479

  7. Schistosome Infections: An Indian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is an endemic helminthic disease of human. Schistosomes display considerable biodiversity in habitat, host range, and epidemiology globally. In spite of the noticeable presence of sero-positivity for schistosomal antibody and passage of schistosome eggs in human faeces, Indian subcontinent has always been considered as a low risk region for human schistosomiasis. Several species has been described in India which may have association with human infection and cercarial rash. Although sporadic cases are not uncommon, the status of human schistosomiasis in India is not well investigated. In this review different aspect of schistosomal infection in human in India has been described briefly. PMID:25859459

  8. Isotopic Evidence That Dragonflies (Pantala flavescens) Migrating through the Maldives Come from the Northern Indian Subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Hobson, Keith A.; Anderson, R. Charles; Soto, David X.; Wassenaar, Leonard I.

    2012-01-01

    Large numbers of the Globe Skimmer dragonfly (Pantala flavescens) appear in the Maldives every October–December. Since they cannot breed on these largely waterless islands, it has recently been suggested that they are “falling out” during a trans-oceanic flight from India to East Africa. In addition, it has been suggested that this trans-oceanic crossing is just one leg of a multi-generational migratory circuit covering about 14,000–18,000 km. The dragonflies are presumed to accomplish this remarkable feat by riding high-altitude winds associated with the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). While there is considerable evidence for this migratory circuit, much of that evidence is circumstantial. Recent developments in the application of stable isotope analyses to track migratory dragonflies include the establishment of direct associations between dragonfly wing chitin δ2H values with those derived from long-term δ2H precipitation isoscapes. We applied this approach by measuring wing chitin δ2H values in 49 individual Pantala flavescens from the November–December migration through the Maldives. Using a previously established spatial calibration algorithm for dragonflies, the mean wing δ2H value of −117±16 ‰ corresponded to a predicted mean natal ambient water source of −81 ‰, which resulted in a probabilistic origin of northern India, and possibly further north and east. This strongly suggests that the migratory circuit of this species in this region is longer than previously suspected, and could possibly involve a remarkable trans-Himalayan high-altitude traverse. PMID:23285106

  9. Evaluating Precipitation from Orbital Data Products of TRMM and GPM over the Indian Subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaluxmi, I.; Kumar, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly growing records of microwave based precipitation data made available from various earth observation satellites have instigated a pressing need towards evaluating the associated uncertainty which arise from different sources such as retrieval error, spatial/temporal sampling error and sensor dependent error. Pertaining to microwave remote sensing, most of the studies in literature focus on gridded data products, fewer studies exist on evaluating the uncertainty inherent in orbital data products. Evaluation of the latter are essential as they potentially cause large uncertainties during real time flood forecasting studies especially at the watershed scale. The present study evaluates the uncertainty of precipitation data derived from the orbital data products of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite namely the 2A12, 2A25 and 2B31 products. Case study results over the flood prone basin of Mahanadi, India, are analyzed for precipitation uncertainty through these three facets viz., a) Uncertainty quantification using the volumetric metrics from the contingency table [Aghakouchak and Mehran 2014] b) Error characterization using additive and multiplicative error models c) Error decomposition to identify systematic and random errors d) Comparative assessment with the orbital data from GPM mission. The homoscedastic random errors from multiplicative error models justify a better representation of precipitation estimates by the 2A12 algorithm. It can be concluded that although the radiometer derived 2A12 precipitation data is known to suffer from many sources of uncertainties, spatial analysis over the case study region of India testifies that they are in excellent agreement with the reference estimates for the data period considered [Indu and Kumar 2015]. References A. AghaKouchak and A. Mehran (2014), Extended contingency table: Performance metrics for satellite observations and climate model simulations, Water Resources Research, vol. 49, 7144-7149; J. Indu and D. Nagesh Kumar (2015), Evaluation of Precipitation Retrievals from Orbital Data Products of TRMM over a Subtropical basin in India, IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, in press, doi: 10.1109/TGRS.2015.2440338.

  10. Planetary Boundary Layer and aerosol interactions over the Indian sub-continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, M. N.; Patil, S. D.; Waghmare, R. T.; Dharmaraj, T.

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols, both natural as well as anthropogenic, affect the radiative forcing of Earth's climate and reduce surface albedo. The Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) height, which depends upon surface heat budget, is analyzed considering the increase in green house gases (GHGs) from pre-industrial to post-industrial era. The PBL climatology shows deeper PBL during pre-monsoon and summer monsoon seasons as compared to post-monsoon and winter. The PBL height has decreased in post-industrial decade compared to pre-industrial decade. The PBL height reduction is due to increasing aerosol and GHGs' concentrations in the recent decades, which causes surface warming and upper tropospheric cooling. Similarly, due to higher loading of the volcanic aerosol injected from the low latitude eruptions, the atmospheric circulation has been affected.

  11. Results of VLF campaigns in Summer, Winter and during Solar Eclipse in Indian Subcontinent and Beyond

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Sasmal, S.; Mondal, S. K.; Pal, S.

    2010-10-20

    VLF propagation effects are generally understood in terms of the earth-ionosphere waveguide. However, details of the theory are still incomplete. Particularly important are the newly emerging fields of VLF Astronomy where the ionosphere is treated as a giant detector for extraterrestrial energetic phenomena and the subject of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling where the the disturbances of this giant detector is influenced by terrestrial events, especially earthquakes and other seismic activities. We review the activities of our group in these fields. In particular, we concentrate on the results of the VLF campaigns we conducted using over a dozen receiving stations in Summer, in Winter and during the Total Solar eclipse in July, 2009. We also discuss briefly the results we obtained in Antarctica and their implications.

  12. Primary Otomycosis in the Indian Subcontinent: Predisposing Factors, Microbiology, and Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kotigadde, Subbannayya; Shekhar, Manisha; Thada, Nikhil Dinaker; Prabhu, Prashanth; D' Souza, Tina; Prasad, Kishore Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To define otomycosis and determine the predisposing factors and microbiology in primary otomycosis. Study Design. Prospective study of two years and review of the literature. Setting. Academic Department of Otolaryngology in a coastal city in India. Patients. 150 immunocompetent individuals of whom 100 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of otomycosis are considered as the study group and 50 consecutive patients with no otomycosis are considered as the control group. Results and Observations. Instillation of coconut oil (42%), use of topical antibiotic eardrops (20%), and compulsive cleaning of external ear with hard objects (32%) appeared to be the main predisposing factors in otomycosis. Aspergilli were the most common isolates (80%) followed by Penicillium (8%), Candida albicans (4%), Rhizopus (1%), and Chrysosporium (1%), the last being reported for the first time in otomycosis. Among aspergilli, A. niger complex (38%) was the most common followed by A. fumigatus complex (27%) and A. flavus complex (15%). Bacterial isolates associated with fungi in otomycosis were S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and Proteus spp. In 42% of healthy external ears fungi were isolated. Conclusion. Aspergillus spp. were the most common fungi isolated, followed by Penicillium. Otomycotic ears are often associated with bacterial isolates when compared to normal ears. Fungi are also present in a significant number of healthy external auditory canals and their profiles match those in cases of otomycosis. The use of terms “primary” and “secondary” otomycosis is important to standardize reporting. PMID:24949016

  13. Transmission Dynamics of Visceral Leishmaniasis in the Indian Subcontinent – A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Boelaert, Marleen; Matlashewski, Greg; Mondal, Dinesh; Arana, Byron; Kroeger, Axel; Olliaro, Piero

    2016-01-01

    Background As Bangladesh, India and Nepal progress towards visceral leishmaniasis (VL) elimination, it is important to understand the role of asymptomatic Leishmania infection (ALI), VL treatment relapse and post kala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) in transmission. Methodology/ Principal Finding We reviewed evidence systematically on ALI, relapse and PKDL. We searched multiple databases to include studies on burden, risk factors, biomarkers, natural history, and infectiveness of ALI, PKDL and relapse. After screening 292 papers, 98 were included covering the years 1942 through 2016. ALI, PKDL and relapse studies lacked a reference standard and appropriate biomarker. The prevalence of ALI was 4–17-fold that of VL. The risk of ALI was higher in VL case contacts. Most infections remained asymptomatic or resolved spontaneously. The proportion of ALI that progressed to VL disease within a year was 1.5–23%, and was higher amongst those with high antibody titres. The natural history of PKDL showed variability; 3.8–28.6% had no past history of VL treatment. The infectiveness of PKDL was 32–53%. The risk of VL relapse was higher with HIV co-infection. Modelling studies predicted a range of scenarios. One model predicted VL elimination was unlikely in the long term with early diagnosis. Another model estimated that ALI contributed to 82% of the overall transmission, VL to 10% and PKDL to 8%. Another model predicted that VL cases were the main driver for transmission. Different models predicted VL elimination if the sandfly density was reduced by 67% by killing the sandfly or by 79% by reducing their breeding sites, or with 4–6y of optimal IRS or 10y of sub-optimal IRS and only in low endemic setting. Conclusion/ Significance There is a need for xenodiagnostic and longitudinal studies to understand the potential of ALI and PKDL as reservoirs of infection. PMID:27490264

  14. Seasonal and optical characterisation of cirrus clouds over Indian sub-continent using LIDAR

    SciTech Connect

    Jayeshlal, G. S. Satyanarayana, Malladi Dhaman, Reji K. Motty, G. S.

    2014-10-15

    Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is an important remote sensing technique to study about the cirrus clouds. The subject of cirrus clouds and related climate is challenging one. The received scattered signal from Lidar contains information on the physical and optical properties of cirrus clouds. The Lidar profile of the cirrus cloud provides information on the optical characteristics like depolarisation ratio, lidar ratio and optical depth, which give knowledge about possible phase, structure and orientation of cloud particle that affect the radiative budgeting of cirrus clouds. The findings from the study are subjected to generate inputs for better climatic modelling.

  15. Lidar studies of particulates in the UTLS region at a tropical station over the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, Bijoy V.; Sunilkumar, S. V.; Parameswaran, K.

    2009-04-01

    Characteristics of particulate matter in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region during the volcanic quiescent period of 1998-2003 are studied using dual polarization lidar observations at the tropical station Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E). This study revealed a pronounced summer-winter contrast of the particulate backscatter coefficient (βa) in the LS region with relatively high values during winter and low values during summer. High values of βa (>10-6 m-1 sr-1) in the UT region during summer are closely associated with the manifestation of semitransparent cirrus clouds in this region. High values of volume depolarization ratio (VDR) exceeding 0.04 and increasing up to 0.6 usually encountered in the UT region during this period could be due to the presence of relatively large nonspherical ice particles. These values in the LS region, which are relatively small (<0.04), indicate that the particles in this region are relatively small and more or less spherical in nature. The present study shows that convective activity prevailing in the troposphere significantly influences the microphysical properties of particulates in the UTLS region. Convective available potential energy and outgoing longwave radiation, which are good representative indices for tropospheric convection, show good correlation with VDR in the lower stratosphere during summer and weak correlation during winter. The role of vertical transport from troposphere to stratosphere is also investigated using the vertical wind obtained from mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar data. This study shows that the seasonal variation of mean backscatter coefficient matches well with the corresponding variation in mean vertical mass flux. These results suggest that highly nonspherical particles associated with cirrus clouds forming in the upper troposphere and subsequent uplift across the tropopause aided by strong convection in the troposphere during the summer monsoon period are responsible for the increased VDR observed in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region, while the transport of air from troposphere to stratosphere, which is more pronounced during winter, is responsible for the increase in backscatter coefficient in the lower stratosphere.

  16. Summer rainfall over the southwestern Tibetan Plateau controlled by deep convection over the Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Wenhao; Lin, Yanluan; Wright, Jonathon S.; Ming, Yi; Xie, Yuanyu; Wang, Bin; Luo, Yong; Huang, Wenyu; Huang, Jianbin; Wang, Lei; Tian, Lide; Peng, Yiran; Xu, Fanghua

    2016-03-01

    Despite the importance of precipitation and moisture transport over the Tibetan Plateau for glacier mass balance, river runoff and local ecology, changes in these quantities remain highly uncertain and poorly understood. Here we use observational data and model simulations to explore the close relationship between summer rainfall variability over the southwestern Tibetan Plateau (SWTP) and that over central-eastern India (CEI), which exists despite the separation of these two regions by the Himalayas. We show that this relationship is maintained primarily by `up-and-over' moisture transport, in which hydrometeors and moisture are lifted by convective storms over CEI and the Himalayan foothills and then swept over the SWTP by the mid-tropospheric circulation, rather than by upslope flow over the Himalayas. Sensitivity simulations confirm the importance of up-and-over transport at event scales, and an objective storm classification indicates that this pathway accounts for approximately half of total summer rainfall over the SWTP.

  17. Primary otomycosis in the Indian subcontinent: predisposing factors, microbiology, and classification.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sampath Chandra; Kotigadde, Subbannayya; Shekhar, Manisha; Thada, Nikhil Dinaker; Prabhu, Prashanth; D' Souza, Tina; Prasad, Kishore Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To define otomycosis and determine the predisposing factors and microbiology in primary otomycosis. Study Design. Prospective study of two years and review of the literature. Setting. Academic Department of Otolaryngology in a coastal city in India. Patients. 150 immunocompetent individuals of whom 100 consecutive patients with a clinical diagnosis of otomycosis are considered as the study group and 50 consecutive patients with no otomycosis are considered as the control group. Results and Observations. Instillation of coconut oil (42%), use of topical antibiotic eardrops (20%), and compulsive cleaning of external ear with hard objects (32%) appeared to be the main predisposing factors in otomycosis. Aspergilli were the most common isolates (80%) followed by Penicillium (8%), Candida albicans (4%), Rhizopus (1%), and Chrysosporium (1%), the last being reported for the first time in otomycosis. Among aspergilli, A. niger complex (38%) was the most common followed by A. fumigatus complex (27%) and A. flavus complex (15%). Bacterial isolates associated with fungi in otomycosis were S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, and Proteus spp. In 42% of healthy external ears fungi were isolated. Conclusion. Aspergillus spp. were the most common fungi isolated, followed by Penicillium. Otomycotic ears are often associated with bacterial isolates when compared to normal ears. Fungi are also present in a significant number of healthy external auditory canals and their profiles match those in cases of otomycosis. The use of terms "primary" and "secondary" otomycosis is important to standardize reporting. PMID:24949016

  18. Summer rainfall over the southwestern Tibetan Plateau controlled by deep convection over the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Wenhao; Lin, Yanluan; Wright, Jonathon S.; Ming, Yi; Xie, Yuanyu; Wang, Bin; Luo, Yong; Huang, Wenyu; Huang, Jianbin; Wang, Lei; Tian, Lide; Peng, Yiran; Xu, Fanghua

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of precipitation and moisture transport over the Tibetan Plateau for glacier mass balance, river runoff and local ecology, changes in these quantities remain highly uncertain and poorly understood. Here we use observational data and model simulations to explore the close relationship between summer rainfall variability over the southwestern Tibetan Plateau (SWTP) and that over central-eastern India (CEI), which exists despite the separation of these two regions by the Himalayas. We show that this relationship is maintained primarily by ‘up-and-over' moisture transport, in which hydrometeors and moisture are lifted by convective storms over CEI and the Himalayan foothills and then swept over the SWTP by the mid-tropospheric circulation, rather than by upslope flow over the Himalayas. Sensitivity simulations confirm the importance of up-and-over transport at event scales, and an objective storm classification indicates that this pathway accounts for approximately half of total summer rainfall over the SWTP. PMID:26948491

  19. Zolpidem-induced Hallucinations: A Brief Case Report from the Indian Subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurvinder Pal; Loona, Neeraj

    2013-01-01

    We are reporting a case of zolpidem-induced hallucinations in a 20-year-old patient. The duration of this phenomenon was brief, 15-20 minutes. Our case suggests that clinicians must be aware of this phenomenon while prescribing zolpidem. PMID:24049236

  20. Spectrum of chronic small bowel diarrhea with malabsorption in Indian subcontinent: is the trend really changing?

    PubMed Central

    Ingle, Meghraj; Rathi, Chetan; Poddar, Prateik; Pandav, Nilesh; Sawant, Prabha

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to document the recent etiological spectrum of chronic diarrhea with malabsorption and also to compare features that differentiate tropical sprue from parasitic infections, the two most common etiologies of malabsorption in the tropics. Methods We analyzed 203 consecutive patients with malabsorption. The etiological spectrum and factors that differentiated tropical sprue from parasitic infections were analyzed. Results The most common etiology was tropical sprue (n=98, 48.3%) followed by parasitic infections (n=25, 12.3%) and tuberculosis (n=22, 10.8%). Other causes were immunodeficiency (n=15, 7.3%; 12 with human immunodeficiency virus and 3 with hypogammaglobulinemia), celiac disease (n=11, 5.4%), Crohn's disease (n=11, 5.4%), small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (n=11, 5.4%), hyperthyroidism (n=4, 1.9%), diabetic diarrhea (n=4, 1.9%), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=3, 1.4%), metastatic carcinoid (n=1, 0.5%) and Burkitt's lymphoma (n=1, 0.5%). On multivariate analysis, features that best differentiated tropical sprue from parasitic infections were larger stool volume (P=0.009), severe weight loss (P=0.02), knuckle hyperpigmentation (P=0.008), low serum B12 levels (P=0.05), high mean corpuscular volume (P=0.003), reduced height or scalloping of the duodenal folds on endoscopy (P=0.003) and villous atrophy on histology (P=0.04). Presence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms like bloating, nausea and vomiting predicted parasitic infections (P=0.01). Conclusions Tropical sprue and parasitic infections still dominate the spectrum of malabsorption in India. Severe symptoms and florid malabsorption indicate tropical sprue while the presence of upper GI symptoms indicates parasitic infections. PMID:26884738

  1. Impact of energy sector of the Indian sub-continent on environment

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, S.; Narasimhan, K.S.

    1998-07-01

    India is second largest populous country and third in coal consumption. At present, the total energy consumption is around 550 million tonne oil equivalent. The ambitious program for economic development is expected to enhance the energy consumption several fold. For a reasonable growth, it is estimated that the level will touch 1,300 million tonne oil equivalent by the year 2020. Energy consumption of such a magnitude will have significant impact on global environment due to major pollutants like oxides of carbon, sulfur and nitrogen. Also, the energy mix has substantial intake from non-commercial sources, mainly fuel wood. In this paper options open to meet the increased energy needs are considered and impact on environment is projected. It is observed that one way of meeting the energy needs and at the same time contain pollution is by adopting clean coal technologies. This will particularly contain oxides of sulfur and nitrogen significantly.

  2. Summer rainfall over the southwestern Tibetan Plateau controlled by deep convection over the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenhao; Lin, Yanluan; Wright, Jonathon S; Ming, Yi; Xie, Yuanyu; Wang, Bin; Luo, Yong; Huang, Wenyu; Huang, Jianbin; Wang, Lei; Tian, Lide; Peng, Yiran; Xu, Fanghua

    2016-01-01

    Despite the importance of precipitation and moisture transport over the Tibetan Plateau for glacier mass balance, river runoff and local ecology, changes in these quantities remain highly uncertain and poorly understood. Here we use observational data and model simulations to explore the close relationship between summer rainfall variability over the southwestern Tibetan Plateau (SWTP) and that over central-eastern India (CEI), which exists despite the separation of these two regions by the Himalayas. We show that this relationship is maintained primarily by 'up-and-over' moisture transport, in which hydrometeors and moisture are lifted by convective storms over CEI and the Himalayan foothills and then swept over the SWTP by the mid-tropospheric circulation, rather than by upslope flow over the Himalayas. Sensitivity simulations confirm the importance of up-and-over transport at event scales, and an objective storm classification indicates that this pathway accounts for approximately half of total summer rainfall over the SWTP. PMID:26948491

  3. Aerosol indirect effects from ground-based retrievals over the rain shadow region in Indian subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harikishan, G.; Padmakumari, B.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Pandithurai, G.; Min, Q. L.

    2016-03-01

    Aerosol-induced changes in cloud microphysical and radiative properties have been studied for the first time using ground-based and airborne observations over a semiarid rain shadow region. The study was conducted for nonprecipitating, ice-free clouds during monsoon (July to September) and postmonsoon (October) months, when cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations over the region of interest increased monotonically and exhibited characteristics of continental origin. A multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer and microwave radiometric profiler were used to retrieve the cloud optical depth and liquid water path (LWP), respectively, from which cloud effective radius (CER) was obtained. CER showed wide variability from 10-18 µm and a decreasing trend toward the postmonsoon period. During monsoon, the estimated first aerosol indirect effect (AIE) increased from 0.01 to 0.23 with increase in LWP. AIE at different super saturations (SS) showed maximum value (significant at 95%) at 0.4% SS and higher LWP bin (250-300 g/m2). Also, statistically significant AIE values were found at 0.6% and 0.8% SSs but at lower LWP bin (200-250 g/m2). The relationship between CCN and CER showed high correlation at 0.4% SS at higher LWP bin, while at higher SSs good correlations were observed at lower LWPs. Data combined from ground-based and aircraft observations showed dominance of microphysical effect at aerosol concentrations up to 1500 cm-3 and radiative effect at higher concentrations. This combined cloud microphysical and aerosol radiative effect is more prominent during postmonsoon period due to an increase in aerosol concentration.

  4. Potential emission flux to aerosol pollutants over Bengal Gangetic plain through combined trajectory clustering and aerosol source fields analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. Bharath; Verma, S.

    2016-09-01

    A hybrid source-receptor analysis was carried out to evaluate the potential emission flux to winter monsoon (WinMon) aerosols over Bengal Gangetic plain urban (Kolkata, Kol) and semi-urban atmospheres (Kharagpur, Kgp). This was done through application of fuzzy c-mean clustering to back-trajectory data combined with emission flux and residence time weighted aerosols analysis. WinMon mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and angstrom exponent (AE) at Kol (AOD: 0.77; AE: 1.17) were respectively slightly higher than and nearly equal to that at Kgp (AOD: 0.71; AE: 1.18). Out of six source region clusters over Indian subcontinent and two over Indian oceanic region, the cluster mean AOD was the highest when associated with the mean path of air mass originating from the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian sea clusters at Kol and that from the Indo-Gangetic plain (IGP) cluster at Kgp. Spatial distribution of weighted AOD fields showed the highest potential source of aerosols over the IGP, primarily over upper IGP (e.g. Punjab, Haryana), lower IGP (e.g. Uttarpradesh) and eastern region (e.g. west Bengal, Bihar, northeast India) clusters. The emission flux contribution potential (EFCP) of fossil fuel (FF) emissions at surface (SL) of Kol/Kgp, elevated layer (EL) of Kol, and of biomass burning (BB) emissions at SL of Kol were primarily from upper, lower, upper/lower IGP clusters respectively. The EFCP of FF/BB emissions at Kgp-EL/SL, and that of BB at EL of Kol/Kgp were mainly from eastern region and Africa (AFR) clusters respectively. Though the AFR cluster was constituted of significantly high emission flux source potential of dust emissions, the EFCP of dust from northwest India (NWI) was comparable to that from AFR at Kol SL/EL.

  5. Indian Monsoon Depression: Climatology and Variability

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Huang, Wan-Ru

    2012-03-09

    The monsoon climate is traditionally characterized by large seasonal rainfall and reversal of wind direction (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Most importantly this rainfall is the major source of fresh water to various human activities such as agriculture. The Indian subcontinent resides at the core of the Southeast Asian summer monsoon system, with the monsoon trough extended from northern India across Indochina to the Western Tropical Pacific (WTP). Large fraction of annual rainfall occurs during the summer monsoon season, i.e., June - August with two distinct maxima. One is located over the Bay of Bengal with rainfall extending northwestward into eastern and central India, and the other along the west coast of India where the lower level moist wind meets the Western Ghat Mountains (Saha and Bavardeckar 1976). The rest of the Indian subcontinent receives relatively less rainfall. Various weather systems such as tropical cyclones and weak disturbances contribute to monsoon rainfall (Ramage 1971). Among these systems, the most efficient rain-producing system is known as the Indian monsoon depression (hereafter MD). This MD is critical for monsoon rainfall because: (i) it occurs about six times during each summer monsoon season, (ii) it propagates deeply into the continent and produces large amounts of rainfall along its track, and (iii) about half of the monsoon rainfall is contributed to by the MDs (e.g., Krishnamurti 1979). Therefore, understanding various properties of the MD is a key towards comprehending the veracity of the Indian summer monsoon and especially its hydrological process.

  6. A Cluster-Randomized Trial to Evaluate a Mother-Daughter Dyadic Educational Intervention for Increasing HPV Vaccination Coverage in American Indian Girls.

    PubMed

    Winer, Rachel L; Gonzales, Angela A; Noonan, Carolyn J; Buchwald, Dedra S

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated whether delivering educational presentations on human papillomavirus (HPV) to American Indian mothers affected HPV vaccination rates in their adolescent daughters. In March-April 2012, we recruited Hopi mothers or female guardians with daughters aged 9-12 years for a cluster-randomized intervention study on the Hopi Reservation. Participants attended mother-daughter dinners featuring educational presentations for mothers on either HPV (intervention) or juvenile diabetes (control) and completed baseline surveys. Eleven months later, we surveyed mothers on their daughters' HPV vaccine uptake. We also reviewed aggregated immunization reports from the Indian Health Service to assess community-level HPV vaccination coverage from 2007 to 2013. Ninety-seven mother-daughter dyads participated; nine mothers reported that their daughters completed the three-dose HPV vaccination series before recruitment. Among the remaining mothers, 63 % completed the follow-up survey. Adjusting for household income, the proportion of daughters completing vaccination within 11 months post-intervention was similar in the intervention and control groups (32 vs. 28 %, adjusted RR = 1.2, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.6-2.3). Among unvaccinated daughters, those whose mothers received HPV education were more likely to initiate vaccination (50 vs. 27 %, adjusted RR = 2.6, 95 % CI 1.4-4.9) and complete three doses (adjusted RR = 4.0, 95 % CI 1.2-13.1) than girls whose mothers received diabetes education. Community-level data showed that 80 % of girls aged 13-17 years and 20 % of girls aged 11-12 completed the vaccination series by 2013. HPV vaccine uptake in Hopi girls aged 13-17 years is significantly higher than the U.S. national average. Brief educational presentations on HPV delivered to American Indian mothers might increase HPV vaccination rates in daughters aged 9-12 years. PMID:26399648

  7. Indian Independence and the Question of Pakistan. [Student Text and] Teacher Resource Book. Choices for the 21st Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Sarah Cleveland

    This document includes a student text and a teacher resource book. The student booklet provides an overview of the history of the Indian subcontinent, focuses on key events leading up to partition, and explores the origins of the conflict in Kashmir. It notes that to understand the conflict in Kashmir, people must examine the period of British…

  8. Equitable utilisation of Indian community based health insurance scheme among its rural membership: cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Tara; Chatterjee, Mirai; Gandhi, Fenil; Jayswal, Rupal; Patel, Falguni; Morris, Saul S; Mills, Anne J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To evaluate alternative strategies for improving the uptake of benefits of a community based health insurance scheme by its poorest members. Design Prospective cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Self Employed Women's Association (SEWA) community based health insurance scheme in rural India. Participants 713 claimants at baseline (2003) and 1440 claimants two years later among scheme members in 16 rural sub-districts. Interventions After sales service with supportive supervision, prospective reimbursement, both packages, and neither package, randomised by sub-district. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was socioeconomic status of claimants relative to members living in the same sub-district. Secondary outcomes were enrolment rates in SEWA Insurance, mean socioeconomic status of the insured population relative to the general rural population, and rate of claim submission. Results Between 2003 and 2005, the mean socioeconomic status of SEWA Insurance members (relative to the rural population of Gujarat) increased significantly. Rates of claims also increased significantly, on average by 21.6 per 1000 members (P<0.001). However, differences between the intervention groups and the standard scheme were not significant. No systematic effect of time or interventions on the socioeconomic status of claimants relative to members in the same sub-district was found. Conclusions Neither intervention was sufficient to ensure that the poorer members in each sub-district were able to enjoy the greater share of the scheme benefits. Claim submission increased as a result of interventions that seem to have strengthened awareness of and trust in a community based health insurance scheme. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT00421629. PMID:17526594

  9. Indian Government and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starblanket, Noel V.

    1981-01-01

    Accountability for Indian education must be shared among the chiefs and their councils, the Indian leaders at all levels, parents and students. This may be accomplished by Indian control of Indian education. Available from: Department of Educational Foundations, 5-109 Education North, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada, T6G 2G5. (ERB)

  10. Anatomy of Indian heatwaves.

    PubMed

    Ratnam, J V; Behera, Swadhin K; Ratna, Satyaban B; Rajeevan, M; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    India suffers from major heatwaves during March-June. The rising trend of number of intense heatwaves in recent decades has been vaguely attributed to global warming. Since the heat waves have a serious effect on human mortality, root causes of these heatwaves need to be clarified. Based on the observed patterns and statistical analyses of the maximum temperature variability, we identified two types of heatwaves. The first-type of heatwave over the north-central India is found to be associated with blocking over the North Atlantic. The blocking over North Atlantic results in a cyclonic anomaly west of North Africa at upper levels. The stretching of vorticity generates a Rossby wave source of anomalous Rossby waves near the entrance of the African Jet. The resulting quasi-stationary Rossby wave-train along the Jet has a positive phase over Indian subcontinent causing anomalous sinking motion and thereby heatwave conditions over India. On the other hand, the second-type of heatwave over the coastal eastern India is found to be due to the anomalous Matsuno-Gill response to the anomalous cooling in the Pacific. The Matsuno-Gill response is such that it generates northwesterly anomalies over the landmass reducing the land-sea breeze, resulting in heatwaves. PMID:27079921

  11. Anatomy of Indian heatwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-04-01

    India suffers from major heatwaves during March-June. The rising trend of number of intense heatwaves in recent decades has been vaguely attributed to global warming. Since the heat waves have a serious effect on human mortality, root causes of these heatwaves need to be clarified. Based on the observed patterns and statistical analyses of the maximum temperature variability, we identified two types of heatwaves. The first-type of heatwave over the north-central India is found to be associated with blocking over the North Atlantic. The blocking over North Atlantic results in a cyclonic anomaly west of North Africa at upper levels. The stretching of vorticity generates a Rossby wave source of anomalous Rossby waves near the entrance of the African Jet. The resulting quasi-stationary Rossby wave-train along the Jet has a positive phase over Indian subcontinent causing anomalous sinking motion and thereby heatwave conditions over India. On the other hand, the second-type of heatwave over the coastal eastern India is found to be due to the anomalous Matsuno-Gill response to the anomalous cooling in the Pacific. The Matsuno-Gill response is such that it generates northwesterly anomalies over the landmass reducing the land-sea breeze, resulting in heatwaves.

  12. Anatomy of Indian heatwaves

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, J. V.; Behera, Swadhin K.; Ratna, Satyaban B.; Rajeevan, M.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    India suffers from major heatwaves during March-June. The rising trend of number of intense heatwaves in recent decades has been vaguely attributed to global warming. Since the heat waves have a serious effect on human mortality, root causes of these heatwaves need to be clarified. Based on the observed patterns and statistical analyses of the maximum temperature variability, we identified two types of heatwaves. The first-type of heatwave over the north-central India is found to be associated with blocking over the North Atlantic. The blocking over North Atlantic results in a cyclonic anomaly west of North Africa at upper levels. The stretching of vorticity generates a Rossby wave source of anomalous Rossby waves near the entrance of the African Jet. The resulting quasi-stationary Rossby wave-train along the Jet has a positive phase over Indian subcontinent causing anomalous sinking motion and thereby heatwave conditions over India. On the other hand, the second-type of heatwave over the coastal eastern India is found to be due to the anomalous Matsuno-Gill response to the anomalous cooling in the Pacific. The Matsuno-Gill response is such that it generates northwesterly anomalies over the landmass reducing the land-sea breeze, resulting in heatwaves. PMID:27079921

  13. Astronomy of Indian Cities, Temples, and Pilgrimage Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKim Malville, J.

    Throughout the Indian subcontinent, there are regions where culture and geography join to create a landscape that is infused with meaning and power. These sites are often tirthas, places of extensive mythological associations where many believe that spirit can cross between different realms. Tirthas may be important fords of rivers, summits of hills where the heaven and the earth seem unusually close, or locations where Hindu deities have entered the world. Many contain a symbolic cosmology or visual astronomical sightlines, primarily to the solstices. Two tirthas are discussed: Varanasi, the most important pilgrimage destination for the whole of Hindu India, and Vijayanagara, once a major pilgrimage center of southern India, which became the capital city of the Hindu empire that controlled the southern part of the subcontinent. The concept of self-organized criticality is introduced as a useful technique for analyzing pilgrimage systems.

  14. Cloud regime evolution in the Indian monsoon intraseasonal oscillation: Connection to large-scale dynamical conditions and the atmospheric water budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Wong, Sun; Fetzer, Eric J.

    2015-11-01

    We examine the intraseasonal oscillation (ISO) of the Indian summer monsoon to establish the connections of cloud regimes to large-scale dynamical states defined by dynamical convergence and moisture advection. Over the Indian subcontinent, the developing phase toward ISO peaks (rainfall maximum) is associated with positive anomalies of moisture advection leading in 4-6 days to positive anomalies of dynamical convergence, triggering abrupt transitions from shallow cumulus to deep convections in 1-2 days. The decaying phase toward ISO troughs (rainfall minima) is associated with negative anomalies of moisture advection and decreasing dynamical convergence, accompanying opposite transitions in cloud regimes. Due to northward propagation of anomalies, processes over the Indian Ocean are similar but lead those over the subcontinent by ~10 days. During the transitions cirrus clouds always accompany but lag deep convective clouds by ~10 days. Over the equatorial Indian Ocean cirrus clouds are modulated by equatorial waves.

  15. Wisconsin Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Nancy Oestreich

    Wisconsin encompasses an astonishingly representative illustration of the total historical development of federal Indian policy and Indian reactions to it. Wisconsin's Indian population (at least 25,000 people) is the third largest east of the Mississippi River and offers great diversity (3 major linguistic stocks, 6 broad tribal affiliations, and…

  16. The satellite-determined thermal structure of heat low during Indian south-west monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prakash C.; Desai, Pranav S.

    One of the important climatic features of the south-west (SW) monsoon period in the Indian subcontinent is the appearance of a shallow heat low centred around Pakistan region. The details of this system are not easy to observe, as the region lies mostly over a desert area. However, satellite soundings provide a frequent and synoptic view of the system. We have undertaken a study of the properties of this system through lower level and upper level thermal structure around the region using NOAA temperature soundings. The results for the months of April, May and June in the year 1982 are presented here. The temperature changes in the region are studied in relation to the date of the onset of SW-monsoon and its activity in the Indian sub-continent.

  17. Pharmacologic overview of Withania somnifera, the Indian Ginseng.

    PubMed

    Dar, Nawab John; Hamid, Abid; Ahmad, Muzamil

    2015-12-01

    Withania somnifera, also called 'Indian ginseng', is an important medicinal plant of the Indian subcontinent. It is widely used, singly or in combination, with other herbs against many ailments in Indian Systems of Medicine since time immemorial. Withania somnifera contains a spectrum of diverse phytochemicals enabling it to have a broad range of biological implications. In preclinical studies, it has shown anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, anti-stress, neuroprotective, cardioprotective, and anti-diabetic properties. Additionally, it has demonstrated the ability to reduce reactive oxygen species, modulate mitochondrial function, regulate apoptosis, and reduce inflammation and enhance endothelial function. In view of these pharmacologic properties, W. somnifera is a potential drug candidate to treat various clinical conditions, particularly related to the nervous system. In this review, we summarize the pharmacologic characteristics and discuss the mechanisms of action and potential therapeutic applications of the plant and its active constituents. PMID:26306935

  18. Phylogeography and domestication of Indian river buffalo

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satish; Nagarajan, Muniyandi; Sandhu, Jasmeet S; Kumar, Niraj; Behl, Vandana

    2007-01-01

    Background The water buffalo- Bubalus bubalis holds tremendous potential in livestock sector in many Asian countries, particularly India. The origin, domestication and genetic structure of the Indian river buffalo are poorly understood. Therefore, to understand the relationship among the maternal lineages of Indian river buffalo breeds and their domestication process, we analysed mitochondrial D-loop region of 217 animals representing eight breeds from eight different locations in India along with published sequences of Mediterranean buffalo. Results The maximum parsimony tree showed one major clade with six internal branches. Reduced median network revealed expansion from more than one set of haplotypes indicating complex domestication events for this species. In addition, we found several singleton haplotypes. Using rho statistics, we obtained a time estimate of 6300 years BP for the expansion of one set of hapltoypes of the Indian domestic buffalo. A few breed specific branches in the network indicated an ancient time depth of differentiation of some of the maternal lineages of river buffalo breeds. The multidimensional display of breed pairwise FST values showed significant breed differentiation. Conclusion Present day river buffalo is the result of complex domestication processes involving more than one maternal lineage and a significant maternal gene flow from the wild populations after the initial domestication events. Our data are consistent with the available archaeological information in supporting the proposition that the river buffalo was likely to be domesticated in the Western region of the Indian subcontinent, specifically the present day breeding tracts of the Mehsana, Surati and Pandharpuri breeds. PMID:17915036

  19. Use of microwave satellite data to study variations in rainfall over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, Barry B.; Martin, David W.; Auvine, Brian; Olson, William S.

    1990-01-01

    The University of Wisconsin Space Science and Engineering Center mapped rainfall over the Indian Ocean using a newly developed Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) rain-retrieval algorithm. The short-range objective was to characterize the distribution and variability of Indian Ocean rainfall on seasonal and annual scales. In the long-range, the objective is to clarify differences between land and marine regimes of monsoon rain. Researchers developed a semi-empirical algorithm for retrieving Indian Ocean rainfall. Tools for this development have come from radiative transfer and cloud liquid water models. Where possible, ground truth information from available radars was used in development and testing. SMMR rainfalls were also compared with Indian Ocean gauge rainfalls. Final Indian Ocean maps were produced for months, seasons, and years and interpreted in terms of historical analysis over the sub-continent.

  20. Two new species of the genus Pterygosoma (Acariformes: Pterygosomatidae) parasitizing agamid lizards (Sauria: Agamidae) from the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Fajfer, Monika

    2016-06-01

    Two new species of scale-mites parasitizing lizards of the family Agamidae (Sauria) are described: Pterygosoma blandfordi n. sp. from Psammophilus blanfordanus (Stoliczka) (Agamidae: Draconinae) from South India and Pterygosoma balochistani n. sp. from Laudakia nupta nupta (De Filippi) (Agamidae: Agaminae) from Pakistan. Pterygosoma blandfordi n. sp. (female) differs from P. foliosetis Jack, 1961 by the shape of the idiosoma which is much wider than long (vs. rounded idiosoma in P. foliosetis), the presence of 110-139 pairs of the dorsal anterolateral setae (vs. presence of about 35 pairs of these setae), 20-26 pairs of the peripheral setae (vs. 10-19 pairs), 3 pairs of the genital setae (vs. 1 pair), 6 pairs of the pseudoanal setae (vs. 4 pairs), the absence of leg setae vGII and presence of setae vGIV (vs. presence of setae vGII and absence of setae vGIV). P. balochistani n. sp. (female) differs from P. persicum Hirst, 1917 by the chelicerae 325-350 long (vs. 190-230 long in P. persicum), the fixed cheliceral digit bearing small tines (vs. spinous fixed cheliceral digit), presence of subcapitular setae n (vs. absence of setae n), serrate peripheral setae (vs. smooth peripheral setae), presence of leg setae vGII-III (vs. absence of setae vGII-III), 4 pairs of the genital setae (vs. 3 pairs) and 7 pairs of the pseudoanal serrate setae (vs. 9-11 pairs of filiform setae ps). PMID:27078658

  1. Application of satellite observations for identifying regions of dominant sources of nitrogen oxides over the Indian Subcontinent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghude, Sachin D.; Kulkarni, Santosh H.; Jena, Chinmay; Pfister, Gabriele G.; Beig, G.; Fadnavis, S.; van der A, R. J.

    2013-01-01

    We used SCIAMACHY (10:00 LT) and OMI (13:30 LT) tropospheric NO2 columns to study diurnal and seasonal patterns in NO2 concentrations over India. Using characteristics of seasonal variability in tropospheric NO2 columns, we present a simple methodology to identify the dominant NOx source category for specific regions in India. Regions where the dominant source category is classified as biomass burning are found generally to agree with the ATSR fire count distribution. Relating OMI NO2 columns to surface NOx emission, we find that biomass burning emission account for an average flux of 1.55 × 1011 molecules cm-2 s-1 during the peak burning period. Furthermore, extrapolating this estimated flux to the total burned area for the year 2005, biomass burning is estimated to account for 72 Gg of N emissions. Additional analysis of fire events in Northeast India shows a marked increase in TES retrieved O3 concentrations, suggesting significant photochemical ozone formation during the peak biomass burning period. Regions where the dominant source type was categorized as anthropogenic are in good agreement with the distribution of major industrial regions and urban centers in India. Tropospheric NO2 columns over these anthropogenic source regions increased by 3.8% per year between 2003 and 2011, which is consistent with the growth in oil and coal consumption in India. The OMI-derived surface NO2 mixing ratios are indirectly validated with the surface in situ measurements (correlation r = 0.85, n = 88) obtained from the air quality monitoring network in Delhi during August 2010 to January 2011. Most of the OMI-derived surface NO2 values agree with surface-based measurements, supporting the direct utility of OMI observation for emission estimates. Finally, we use OMI NO2 columns to estimate NOx emissions for selected large cites and major thermal power plants in India and compare these estimates with the INTEX-B and EDGAR emission inventory. We find that, for a few locations, OMI-derived emission show fair agreement; however, for many locations, NOx emissions differ from INTEX-B and EDGAR inventories.

  2. Genetic Markers for SSG Resistance in Leishmania donovani and SSG Treatment Failure in Visceral Leishmaniasis Patients of the Indian Subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Vanaerschot, Manu; Decuypere, Saskia; Downing, Tim; Imamura, Hideo; Stark, Olivia; De Doncker, Simonne; Roy, Syamal; Ostyn, Bart; Maes, Louis; Khanal, Basudha; Boelaert, Marleen; Schönian, Gabriele; Berriman, Matthew; Chappuis, François; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Sundar, Shyam; Rijal, Suman

    2012-01-01

    The current standard to assess pentavalent antimonial (SSG) susceptibility of Leishmania is a laborious in vitro assay of which the result has little clinical value because SSG-resistant parasites are also found in SSG-cured patients. Candidate genetic markers for clinically relevant SSG-resistant parasites identified by full genome sequencing were here validated on a larger set of clinical strains. We show that 3 genomic locations suffice to specifically detect the SSG-resistant parasites found only in patients experiencing SSG treatment failure. This finding allows the development of rapid assays to monitor the emergence and spread of clinically relevant SSG-resistant Leishmania parasites. PMID:22753945

  3. Toolkit for Monitoring and Evaluation of Indoor Residual Spraying for Visceral Leishmaniasis Control in the Indian Subcontinent: Application and Results

    PubMed Central

    Huda, M. Mamun; Mondal, Dinesh; Kumar, Vijay; Das, Pradeep; Sharma, S. N.; Das, Murari Lal; Roy, Lolita; Gurung, Chitra Kumar; Banjara, Megha Raj; Akhter, Shireen; Maheswary, Narayan Prosad; Kroeger, Axel; Chowdhury, Rajib

    2011-01-01

    Background. We field tested and validated a newly developed monitoring and evaluation (M&E) toolkit for indoor residual spraying to be used by the supervisors at different levels of the national kala-azar elimination programs in Bangladesh, India and Nepal. Methods. Methods included document analysis, in-depth interviews, direct observation of spraying squads, and entomological-chemical assessments (bioassay, susceptibility test, chemical analysis of insecticide residues on sprayed surfaces, vector density measurements at baseline, and three follow-up surveys). Results. We found that the documentation at district offices was fairly complete; important shortcomings included insufficient training of spraying squads and supervisors, deficient spray equipment, poor spraying performance, lack of protective clothing, limited coverage of houses resulting in low bioavailability of the insecticide on sprayed surfaces, and reduced vector susceptibility to DDT in India, which limited the impact on vector densities. Conclusion. The M&E toolkit is a useful instrument for detecting constraints in IRS operations and to trigger timely response. PMID:21811510

  4. Identification of tipping elements of the Indian Summer Monsoon using climate network approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Surovyatkina, Elena; Kurths, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of the rainfall is a vital question for more than one billion of people inhabiting the Indian subcontinent. Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) rainfall is crucial for India's economy, social welfare, and environment and large efforts are being put into predicting the Indian Summer Monsoon. For predictability of the ISM, it is crucial to identify tipping elements - regions over the Indian subcontinent which play a key role in the spatial organization of the Indian monsoon system. Here, we use climate network approach for identification of such tipping elements of the ISM. First, we build climate networks of the extreme rainfall, surface air temperature and pressure over the Indian subcontinent for pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon seasons. We construct network of extreme rainfall event using observational satellite data from 1998 to 2012 from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM 3B42V7) and reanalysis gridded daily rainfall data for a time period of 57 years (1951-2007) (Asian Precipitation Highly Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards the Evaluation of Water Resources, APHRODITE). For the network of surface air temperature and pressure fields, we use re-analysis data provided by the National Center for Environmental Prediction and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR). Second, we filter out data by coarse-graining the network through network measures, and identify tipping regions of the ISM. Finally, we compare obtained results of the network analysis with surface wind fields and show that occurrence of the tipping elements is mostly caused by monsoonal wind circulation, migration of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and Westerlies. We conclude that climate network approach enables to select the most informative regions for the ISM, providing realistic description of the ISM dynamics with fewer data, and also help to identify tipping regions of the ISM. Obtained tipping elements deserve a

  5. Indian Reservations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weewish Tree, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Answers to questions asked by junior high school students about American Indian reservations are given. The areas covered include nearly every facet of reservation life from the first Federal issuance of particles of land to the American Indians to present conditions on the reservations. (AH)

  6. Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting American Indian legends, this material provides insight into the cultural background of the Dakota, Ojibwa, and Winnebago people. Written in a straightforward manner, each of the eight legends is associated with an Indian group. The legends included here are titled as follows: Minnesota is Minabozho's Land (Ojibwa); How We Got the…

  7. Profiling of Human Acquired Immunity Against the Salivary Proteins of Phlebotomus papatasi Reveals Clusters of Differential Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Geraci, Nicholas S.; Mukbel, Rami M.; Kemp, Michael T.; Wadsworth, Mariha N.; Lesho, Emil; Stayback, Gwen M.; Champion, Matthew M.; Bernard, Megan A.; Abo-Shehada, Mahmoud; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V.; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo; Hanafi, Hanafi A.; Fawaz, Emadeldin Y.; El-Hossary, Shabaan S.; Wortmann, Glenn; Hoel, David F.; McDowell, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    Phlebotomus papatasi sand flies are among the primary vectors of Leishmania major parasites from Morocco to the Indian subcontinent and from southern Europe to central and eastern Africa. Antibody-based immunity to sand fly salivary gland proteins in human populations remains a complex contextual problem that is not yet fully understood. We profiled the immunoreactivities of plasma antibodies to sand fly salivary gland sonicates (SGSs) from 229 human blood donors residing in different regions of sand fly endemicity throughout Jordan and Egypt as well as 69 US military personnel, who were differentially exposed to P. papatasi bites and L. major infections in Iraq. Compared with plasma from control region donors, antibodies were significantly immunoreactive to five salivary proteins (12, 26, 30, 38, and 44 kDa) among Jordanian and Egyptian donors, with immunoglobulin G4 being the dominant anti-SGS isotype. US personnel were significantly immunoreactive to only two salivary proteins (38 and 14 kDa). Using k-means clustering, donors were segregated into four clusters distinguished by unique immunoreactivity profiles to varying combinations of the significantly immunogenic salivary proteins. SGS-induced cellular proliferation was diminished among donors residing in sand fly-endemic regions. These data provide a clearer picture of human immune responses to sand fly vector salivary constituents. PMID:24615125

  8. Genetic diversity analysis of Zingiber Officinale Roscoe by RAPD collected from subcontinent of India

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Kamran; Ahmad, Altaf; Chaudhary, Anis; Mujeeb, Mohd.; Ahmad, Sayeed; Amir, Mohd.; Mallick, N.

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken for the assessment of 12 accessions of Zingiber officinale Rosc. collected from subcontinent of India by RAPD markers. DNA was isolated using CTAB method. Thirteen out of twenty primers screened were informative and produced 275 amplification products, among which 261 products (94.90%) were found to be polymorphic. The percentage polymorphism of all 12 accessions ranged from 88.23% to 100%. Most of the RAPD markers studied showed different levels of genetic polymorphism. The data of 275 RAPD bands were used to generate Jaccard’s similarity coefficients and to construct a dendrogram by means of UPGMA. Results showed that ginger undergoes genetic variation due to a wide range of ecological conditions. This investigation was an understanding of genetic variation within the accessions. It will also provide an important input into determining resourceful management strategies and help to breeders for ginger improvement program. PMID:24600309

  9. Androgenic alopecia in women: an Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Midha, Reshmi

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to investigate androgenic alopecia (AA) utilizing clinical and investigative procedures to establish the pattern of AA in the Indian subcontinent. A total of 35 consecutive women presenting with AA were included. After obtaining informed consent, a detailed history/examination, hair pull test, trichogram, and a scalp biopsy were performed in patients. AA classification was attempted across Ludwig and Norwood guidelines. Of 35 women, 16 had grade I, 10 had grade II, and 1 had grade III Ludwig classification. In addition, 6 other women had Christmas tree baldness: 1 each of fronto-parietal and male pattern baldness. Several investigations including hormonal profile were inconclusive; however, hair pull test and trichogram may be helpful in understanding the sequence in AA in women. AA has infrequently been reported, particularly India and in Asia in general. PMID:24517037

  10. High Prevalence of Abdominal, Intra-Abdominal and Subcutaneous Adiposity and Clustering of Risk Factors among Urban Asian Indians in North India

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Swati; Misra, Anoop; Misra, Ranjita; Goel, Kashish; Bhatt, Surya Prakash; Rastogi, Kavita; Vikram, Naval K.; Gulati, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of abdominal obesity including intra-abdominal and subcutaneous adiposity along with other cardiometabolic risk factors in urban Asian Indians living in New Delhi. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional epidemiological descriptive study with 459 subjects (217 males and 242 females), representing all socio-economic strata in New Delhi. The anthropometric profile [body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and skinfold thickness], fasting blood glucose (FBG) and lipid profile were recorded. Percent body fat (%BF), total abdominal fat (TAF), intra-abdominal adipose tissue (IAAT) and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SCAT) were quantified using predictive equations for Asian Indians. Results The overall prevalence of obesity was high [by BMI (>25 kg/m2), 50.1%]. The prevalence of abdominal obesity (as assessed by WC) was 68.9%, while that assessed by TAF was 70.8%. Increased IAAT was significantly higher in females (80.6%) as compared to males (56.7%) (p = 0.00) with overall prevalence being 69.3%. The overall prevalence of high SCAT was 67.8%, more in males (69.1%) vs. females (66.5%, p = 0.5). The prevalence of type 2 diabetes, the metabolic syndrome and hypertension was 8.5%, 45.3% and 29.2%, respectively. Hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia and low levels of HDL-c were prevalent in 42.7%, 26.6% and 37% of the subjects, respectively. The prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia was significantly higher in males (p = 0.007); however, low levels of HDL-c were more prevalent in females as compared to males (p = 0.00). Conclusion High prevalence of generalized obesity, abdominal obesity (by measurement of WC, TAF, IAAT and SCAT) and dysmetabolic state in urban Asian Indians in north India need immediate public health intervention. PMID:21949711

  11. Clustering of cardiac risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome and associations with psychosocial distress in a young Asian Indian population.

    PubMed

    Suchday, Sonia; Bellehsen, Mayer; Friedberg, Jennifer P; Almeida, Maureen; Kaplan, Erica

    2014-08-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a precursor for coronary heart disease. However, its pathophysiology is not clear, its phenotypic expression may vary by region; also, the phenotypic manifestation may be exacerbated by psychosocial distress and family history. The purpose of the current study was to assess the factor structure of the metabolic syndrome in young urban Asian Indians. Asian Indian youth (N = 112) were evaluated for body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio, blood pressure (systolic: SBP; diastolic: DBP), blood sugar, triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, psychosocial distress and family health history. Factor analyses were computed on components of the metabolic syndrome. Three factors were identified for the entire sample: hemodynamic-obesity (SBP, DBP, waist-hip ratio), Lipid (cholesterol, triglyceride), and insulin-obesity (blood sugar, BMI, insulin). Similar to previous research with this population, three distinct factors with no overlap were identified. Factors did not correlate with psychosocial distress or family history. Lack of correlation with family history and psychosocial distress may be a function of the young age and demographics of the sample. PMID:23775637

  12. Pleistocene Indian Monsoon Rainfall Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yirgaw, D. G.; Hathorne, E. C.; Giosan, L.; Collett, T. S.; Sijingeo, A. V.; Nath, B. N.; Frank, M.

    2014-12-01

    The past variability of the Indian Monsoon is mostly known from records of wind strength over the Arabian Sea. Here we investigate proxies for fresh water input and runoff in a region of strong monsoon precipitation that is a major moisture source for the east Asian Monsoon. A sediment core obtained by the IODP vessel JOIDES Resolution and a gravity core from the Alcock Seamount complex in the Andaman Sea are used to examine the past monsoon variability on the Indian sub-continent and directly over the ocean. The current dataset covers the last glacial and deglacial but will eventually provide a Pleistocene record. We utilise the ecological habitats of G. sacculifer and N. dutertrei to investigate the freshwater-induced stratification with paired Mg/Ca and δ18O analyses to estimate seawater δ18O (δ18Osw). During the last 60 kyrs, Ba/Ca ratios and δ18Osw values generally agree well between the two cores and suggest the weakest surface runoff and monsoon during the LGM and strongest monsoon during the Holocene. The difference in δ18O between the species, interpreted as a proxy for upper ocean stratification, implies stratification developed around 37 ka and remained relatively constant during the LGM, deglacial and Holocene. To investigate monsoon variability for intervals in the past, single shell Mg/Ca and δ18O analyses have been conducted. Mg/Ca ratios from individual shells of N. dutertrei suggest relatively small changes in temperature. However, individual N. dutertrei δ18O differ greatly between the mid-Holocene and samples from the LGM and a nearby core top. The mid-Holocene individuals have a greater range and large skew towards negative values indicating greater fresh water influence.

  13. Bhasma : The ancient Indian nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Sahu, Chandan Kumar; Haldar, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Ayurveda and other Indian system of medicine use metals, but their use is also amply described in Chinese and Egyptian civilization in 2500 B.C. Bhasma are unique ayurvedic metallic/minerals preparation, treated with herbal juice or decoction and exposed for Ayurveda, which are known in Indian subcontinent since 7(th) century A.D. and widely recommended for treatment of a variety of chronic ailments. Animal's derivative such as horns, shells, feathers, metallic, nonmetallic and herbals are normally administered as Bhasma. A Bhasma means an ash obtained through incineration; the starter material undergoes an elaborate process of purification and this process is followed by the reaction phase, which involves incorporation of some other minerals and/or herbal extract. There are various importance of Bhasma like maintaining optimum alkalinity for optimum health, neutralizing harmful acids that lead to illness; because Bhasma do not get metabolized so they don't produce any harmful metabolite, rather it breakdowns heavy metals in the body. Methods including for Bhasma preparation are parpati, rasayoga, sindora, etc., Bhasma which contain Fe, Cu, S or other manufacturing process plays a specific role in the final product(s). Particle size (1-2 μ) reduced significantly, which may facilitate absorption and assimilation of the drug into the body system. Standardization of Bhasma is utmost necessary to confirm its identity and to determine its quality, purity safety, effectiveness and acceptability of the product. But the most important challenges faced by these formulations are the lack of complete standardization by physiochemical parameters. PMID:24696811

  14. Bhasma : The ancient Indian nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Dilipkumar; Sahu, Chandan Kumar; Haldar, Arindam

    2014-01-01

    Ayurveda and other Indian system of medicine use metals, but their use is also amply described in Chinese and Egyptian civilization in 2500 B.C. Bhasma are unique ayurvedic metallic/minerals preparation, treated with herbal juice or decoction and exposed for Ayurveda, which are known in Indian subcontinent since 7th century A.D. and widely recommended for treatment of a variety of chronic ailments. Animal's derivative such as horns, shells, feathers, metallic, nonmetallic and herbals are normally administered as Bhasma. A Bhasma means an ash obtained through incineration; the starter material undergoes an elaborate process of purification and this process is followed by the reaction phase, which involves incorporation of some other minerals and/or herbal extract. There are various importance of Bhasma like maintaining optimum alkalinity for optimum health, neutralizing harmful acids that lead to illness; because Bhasma do not get metabolized so they don’t produce any harmful metabolite, rather it breakdowns heavy metals in the body. Methods including for Bhasma preparation are parpati, rasayoga, sindora, etc., Bhasma which contain Fe, Cu, S or other manufacturing process plays a specific role in the final product(s). Particle size (1-2 μ) reduced significantly, which may facilitate absorption and assimilation of the drug into the body system. Standardization of Bhasma is utmost necessary to confirm its identity and to determine its quality, purity safety, effectiveness and acceptability of the product. But the most important challenges faced by these formulations are the lack of complete standardization by physiochemical parameters. PMID:24696811

  15. Dynamics of changing impacts of tropical Indo-Pacific variability on Indian and Australian rainfall

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ziguang; Cai, Wenju; Lin, Xiaopei

    2016-01-01

    A positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and a warm phase of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) reduce rainfall over the Indian subcontinent and southern Australia. However, since the 1980s, El Niño’s influence has been decreasing, accompanied by a strengthening in the IOD’s influence on southern Australia but a reversal in the IOD’s influence on the Indian subcontinent. The dynamics are not fully understood. Here we show that a post-1980 weakening in the ENSO-IOD coherence plays a key role. During the pre-1980 high coherence, ENSO drives both the IOD and regional rainfall, and the IOD’s influence cannot manifest itself. During the post-1980 weak coherence, a positive IOD leads to increased Indian rainfall, offsetting the impact from El Niño. Likewise, the post-1980 weak ENSO-IOD coherence means that El Niño’s pathway for influencing southern Australia cannot fully operate, and as positive IOD becomes more independent and more frequent during this period, its influence on southern Australia rainfall strengthens. There is no evidence to support that greenhouse warming plays a part in these decadal fluctuations. PMID:27546030

  16. Dynamics of changing impacts of tropical Indo-Pacific variability on Indian and Australian rainfall.

    PubMed

    Li, Ziguang; Cai, Wenju; Lin, Xiaopei

    2016-01-01

    A positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) and a warm phase of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) reduce rainfall over the Indian subcontinent and southern Australia. However, since the 1980s, El Niño's influence has been decreasing, accompanied by a strengthening in the IOD's influence on southern Australia but a reversal in the IOD's influence on the Indian subcontinent. The dynamics are not fully understood. Here we show that a post-1980 weakening in the ENSO-IOD coherence plays a key role. During the pre-1980 high coherence, ENSO drives both the IOD and regional rainfall, and the IOD's influence cannot manifest itself. During the post-1980 weak coherence, a positive IOD leads to increased Indian rainfall, offsetting the impact from El Niño. Likewise, the post-1980 weak ENSO-IOD coherence means that El Niño's pathway for influencing southern Australia cannot fully operate, and as positive IOD becomes more independent and more frequent during this period, its influence on southern Australia rainfall strengthens. There is no evidence to support that greenhouse warming plays a part in these decadal fluctuations. PMID:27546030

  17. Indian Summer

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper focuses on preserving and strengthening two resources culturally and socially important to the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribe on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho; their young people and the Pacific-Northwest Salmon. After learning that salmon were not returning in significant numbers to ancestral fishing waters at headwater spawning sites, tribal youth wanted to know why. As a result, the Indian Summer project was conceived to give Shoshone-Bannock High School students the opportunity to develop hands-on, workable solutions to improve future Indian fishing and help make the river healthy again. The project goals were to increase the number of fry introduced into the streams, teach the Shoshone-Bannock students how to use scientific methodologies, and get students, parents, community members, and Indian and non-Indian mentors excited about learning. The students chose an egg incubation experiment to help increase self-sustaining, natural production of steelhead trout, and formulated and carried out a three step plan to increase the hatch-rate of steelhead trout in Idaho waters. With the help of local companies, governmental agencies, scientists, and mentors students have been able to meet their project goals, and at the same time, have learned how to use scientific methods to solve real life problems, how to return what they have used to the water and land, and how to have fun and enjoy life while learning.

  18. Mutualistic interactions between granivorous heteromyid rodents and a preferred food resource, Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Granivorous heteromyid rodent species and Indian ricegrass (Achnatherum hymenoides) are both widely distributed throughout North American deserts. The vast majority (~95%) of Indian ricegrass seedling recruitment occurs from seed clusters cached in shallowly-buried scatterhoards by heteromyids, espe...

  19. Lithospheric structure of the southern African subcontinent from surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raveloson, A.; Nyblade, A.; Mulibo, G.; Mangongolo, A.; Tugume, F.

    2012-12-01

    In this study the lithospheric structure of the southern African subcontinent is examined using a new 3D shear wave velocity model. The lithospheric structure of Africa consists of several Archean cratons and Proterozoic mobile belts. Many intracratonic and rift basin are found within both the Archean and Protozoic terrains. We investigate the 3D shear wave velocity structure of the lithosphere by tomographically modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion curves. Rayleigh waves group velocities from 10 to 125 s period were determined by using multiple-filter and phase-matched techniques. We used seismic events with a magnitude greater than 4.5 and depth shallower than 100 km recorded from 1990 to 2011 on many stations belonging to temporary or permanent networks. We used events and stations within the African plate in an effort to minimize the contributions from outside structure. We constructed the 3D S wave model in two steps. In the first step we measured group velocities of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves. In the second stage we extracted a dispersion curve from the group velocity maps and inverted them to obtain 1D shear wave velocity models. The 1D models are then combined at a regular spatial interval to create a 3D shear wave velocity model. New features revealed in our model include a region of lower wave speeds beneath the cuvette central separating several Archean blocks of the Congo craton and a region of fast lithosphere in northern Mozambique associated with the Ruvuma microplate.

  20. North Equatorial Indian Ocean Convection and Indian Summer Monsoon June Progression: a Case Study of 2013 and 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Bhupendra Bahadur

    2016-06-01

    The consecutive summer monsoons of 2013 and 2014 over the Indian subcontinent saw very contrasting onsets and progressions during the initial month. While the 2013 monsoon saw the timely onset and one of the fastest progressions during the recent decades, 2014 had a delayed onset and a slower progression phase. The monthly rainfall of June 2013 was +34 %, whereas in 2014 it was -43 % of its long-period average. The progress/onset of monsoon in June is influenced by large-scale circulation and local feedback processes. But, in 2013 (2014), one of the main reasons for the timely onset and fastest progression (delayed onset and slower progression) was the persistent strong (weak) convection over the north equatorial Indian Ocean during May. This resulted in a strong (weak) Hadley circulation with strong (weak) ascent and descent over the north equatorial Indian Ocean and the South Indian Ocean, respectively. The strong (weak) descent over the south Indian Ocean intensified (weakened) the Mascarene High, which in turn strengthened (weakened) the cross-equatorial flow and hence the monsoonal circulation.

  1. Career Cluster Activity Book, Intermediate Level. Learn About the Fifteen Career Clusters and Color the Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White Hawk, Sharon, Ed.

    Simple black and white illustrations portray one occupation for each of 15 career clusters. Directed toward the Indian student and showing Indians at work in the occupations depicted, the illustrations are intended to create an awareness, understanding, and motivation for Indian students to become involved in work, both on and off the reservation.…

  2. Indian Orphanages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Marilyn Irvin

    With their traditional tribal and kinship ties, Native Americans had lived for centuries without the concept of an unwanted child. But besieged by reservation life and boarding school acculturation, many tribes, with the encouragement of whites, came to accept the need for orphanages. This book tells the story of Indian orphanages within the…

  3. Anaphylaxis to scorpion antivenin and its management following envenomation by Indian red scorpion, Mesobuthus tamulus

    PubMed Central

    Bhoite, Rahul Ramesh; Bhoite, Girija Ramesh; Bagdure, Dayanand N.; Bawaskar, Himmatrao S.

    2015-01-01

    Mesobuthus tamulus is an Indian red scorpion that is responsible for numerous cases of scorpion stings in the Indian subcontinent. Antivenin, vasodilators, and benzodiazepines are medications of choice in the treatment of scorpion bites. Adverse reactions such as anaphylaxis to antivenin have been infrequently described in the literature. We, herein, present a case of a 42-year-old man stung by Indian red scorpion while gardening at home in India, who presented with extreme pain at the sting site and signs of cardio-toxicity. He was treated with scorpion antivenin and vasodilators but developed anaphylaxis to antivenin. We discuss management strategies. Anaphylaxis to antivenin should be on the differential during management of scorpion bites because classical signs of anaphylaxis may be absent. PMID:26430342

  4. Anaphylaxis to scorpion antivenin and its management following envenomation by Indian red scorpion, Mesobuthus tamulus.

    PubMed

    Bhoite, Rahul Ramesh; Bhoite, Girija Ramesh; Bagdure, Dayanand N; Bawaskar, Himmatrao S

    2015-09-01

    Mesobuthus tamulus is an Indian red scorpion that is responsible for numerous cases of scorpion stings in the Indian subcontinent. Antivenin, vasodilators, and benzodiazepines are medications of choice in the treatment of scorpion bites. Adverse reactions such as anaphylaxis to antivenin have been infrequently described in the literature. We, herein, present a case of a 42-year-old man stung by Indian red scorpion while gardening at home in India, who presented with extreme pain at the sting site and signs of cardio-toxicity. He was treated with scorpion antivenin and vasodilators but developed anaphylaxis to antivenin. We discuss management strategies. Anaphylaxis to antivenin should be on the differential during management of scorpion bites because classical signs of anaphylaxis may be absent. PMID:26430342

  5. Wyoming Indians, Unit II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming Indians provides concepts, activities, Indian stories, and resources for elementary school students. Indian values and contributions are summarized. Concepts include the incorrectness of the term "Indian," the Indians' democratic society and sophisticated culture, historical events, and conflicts with whites over the land.…

  6. Urban Indian Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greymountain, Gus; And Others

    The second of a 2 phase study, this project provided information for the non-Indian population about problems and needs of urban American Indians. Phase I (1971) discussed urban Indian experiences and trends; compared differences and highlighted issues of Indian urbanization. Phase II focused entirely on the urban Indian community. The thrust was…

  7. Mean state and interannual variability of the Indian summer monsoon simulation by NCEP CFSv2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Ravi P.; Huang, Bohua

    2016-06-01

    The capability of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction climate forecast system version 2 (CFSv2) in simulating the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) is evaluated in the context of the global monsoon in the Indo-Pacific domain and its variability. Although the CFSv2 captures the ISM spatial structure qualitatively, it demonstrates a severe dry bias over the Indian subcontinent. The weaker model monsoon may be related to an excessive surface convergence over the equatorial Indian Ocean, which reduces the moisture transport toward the Indian subcontinent. The excessively low equatorial pressure is in turn a part of a tropical-wise bias with the largest errors in the central and eastern equatorial Pacific associated with the cold sea surface temperature bias and an overly strong inter-tropical convergence zone. In this sense, the model bias in the tropical Pacific influences those in the Indian Ocean-ISM region substantially. The leading mode of the June-September averaged CFSv2 rainfall anomalies covering the ISM and its adjacent oceanic regions is qualitatively similar to that of the observations, characterized by a spatial pattern of strong anomalies over either side of the Indian peninsula as well as center of opposite sign over Myanmar. However, the model fails to reproduce the northward expansion of rainfall anomalies from Myanmar, leading to opposite anomalies over northeast India and Himalayas region. A substantial amount of the anomalous fluctuation is attributed to the El Niño and the Southern Oscillation (ENSO), although the model variability depends more strongly on ENSO. The active regional influences in the observations may contribute to its baroclinic vertical structure of the geopotential height anomalies in the ISM region, compared with the predominantly barotropic one in CFSv2. Model ENSO deficiencies also affects its ISM simulation significantly.

  8. Reconstructing the Indian Origin and Dispersal of the European Roma: A Maternal Genetic Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal, Isabel; Valente, Cristina; Gusmão, Alfredo; Alves, Cíntia; Gomes, Verónica; Goios, Ana; Parson, Walther; Calafell, Francesc; Alvarez, Luis; Amorim, António; Gusmão, Leonor

    2011-01-01

    Previous genetic, anthropological and linguistic studies have shown that Roma (Gypsies) constitute a founder population dispersed throughout Europe whose origins might be traced to the Indian subcontinent. Linguistic and anthropological evidence point to Indo-Aryan ethnic groups from North-western India as the ancestral parental population of Roma. Recently, a strong genetic hint supporting this theory came from a study of a private mutation causing primary congenital glaucoma. In the present study, complete mitochondrial control sequences of Iberian Roma and previously published maternal lineages of other European Roma were analyzed in order to establish the genetic affinities among Roma groups, determine the degree of admixture with neighbouring populations, infer the migration routes followed since the first arrival to Europe, and survey the origin of Roma within the Indian subcontinent. Our results show that the maternal lineage composition in the Roma groups follows a pattern of different migration routes, with several founder effects, and low effective population sizes along their dispersal. Our data allowed the confirmation of a North/West migration route shared by Polish, Lithuanian and Iberian Roma. Additionally, eleven Roma founder lineages were identified and degrees of admixture with host populations were estimated. Finally, the comparison with an extensive database of Indian sequences allowed us to identify the Punjab state, in North-western India, as the putative ancestral homeland of the European Roma, in agreement with previous linguistic and anthropological studies. PMID:21264345

  9. Imaging Lithospheric Structure beneath the Indian continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, S.; Montagner, J. P.; Mangalampally, R. K.; Stutzmann, E.; Burgos, G.; Kumar, P.; Davuluri, S.

    2015-12-01

    The lithospheric structure and thickness to the LAB are the most debated issues, especially beneath continents. In this context, the structure and thickness of the Indian lithosphere has been controversial. Paleomagnetic data reveals that the Indian continent moved northwards at exceptionally high speeds (18-20 cm/year) and subsequently slowed down to 4-5 cm/year after its collision with Asia ≈40 Myr ago. This super mobility has been explained by an unusually thin Indian lithosphere (≈100 km; Kumar et al., 2007) in contradiction with the thick lithosphere that commonly underlies old cratonic nuclei. It is pertinent to note that the thermobarometric estimates on the ultramafic xenoliths from 65 Myr kimberlites of the Central India (Babu et al. 2009) suggest an approximately 175 km thick lithosphere. Also, recent results of P and S wave travel time tomography of India suggest that the lithospheric roots are not uniformly thick on a regional scale. Although high velocity roots typical of Precambrian shields are preserved beneath a few cratons of the Indian shield, they seem to have suffered attrition, in the plume ravaged regions like the NDVP and the Southern SGT (Singh et al., 2014). We assembled a new massive surface wave database towards obtaining 3D isotropic and anisotropic models for the Indian sub-continent, using surface waves. This necessitated processing of data from more than 500 seismic broadband stations across India and surrounding regions. Surface waves group and phase dispersion measurements are performed in a broad frequency range (16-250s). Our phase velocity anomaly maps recover most of the known geological structures. The cratons are associated with high velocity (4-6%) anomalies till 200 sec, with the WDC being faster than the EDC. Slow velocities in NW India and very high velocity anomalies (6-8%) beneath the central part of the Indo-Gangetic plains are possibly associated with the subducting Indian lithosphere. The LAB depths inferred from

  10. Interannual variability of the Indian summer monsoon associated with the air-sea feedback in the northern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Ravi P.; Huang, Bohua

    2016-03-01

    Using observation-based analyses, this study identifies the leading interannual pattern of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) independent of ENSO and examines the potential mechanisms of its formation. For this purpose, an objective procedure is used to isolate the variability of the summer precipitation associated with the contemporary ENSO state and in previous winter-spring, which influence the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) region in opposite ways. It is shown that the leading pattern of these ENSO-related monsoon rainfall anomalies reproduces some major ISMR features and well represents its connections to the global-scale ENSO features in both lower and upper troposphere. On the other hand, the leading pattern derived from the precipitation anomalies with the ENSO component removed in the ISM and surrounding region also accounts for a substantial amount of the monsoon precipitation centered at the eastern coast of the subtropical Arabian Sea, extending into both the western Indian Ocean and the Indian subcontinent. The associated atmospheric circulation change is regional in nature, mostly confined in the lower to mid troposphere centered in the Arabian Sea, with a mild connection to an opposite tendency centered at the South China Sea. Further analyses show that this regional pattern is associated with a thermodynamic air-sea feedback during early to mid summer season. Specifically, before the monsoon onset, an anomalous atmospheric high pressure over the Arabian Sea causes excessive shortwave radiation to the sea surface and increases SST in May. The warm SST anomalies peak in June and reduce the sea level pressure. The anomalous cyclonic circulation generates regional convection and precipitation, which also induces subsidence and anticyclonic circulation over the South China Sea. The combined cyclonic-anticyclonic circulation further transport moisture from the western Pacific into the Indian Ocean and causes its convergence into the Arabian Sea. As a

  11. Extensive Variation and Sub-Structuring in Lineage A mtDNA in Indian Sheep: Genetic Evidence for Domestication of Sheep in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sachin; Kumar Jr, Satish; Kolte, Atul P.; Kumar, Satish

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies on mitochondrial DNA analysis of sheep from different regions of the world have revealed the presence of two major- A and B, and three minor- C, D and E maternal lineages. Lineage A is more frequent in Asia and lineage B is more abundant in regions other than Asia. We have analyzed mitochondrial DNA sequences of 330 sheep from 12 different breeds of India. Neighbor-joining analysis revealed lineage A, B and C in Indian sheep. Surprisingly, multidimensional scaling plot based on FST values of control region of mtDNA sequences showed significant breed differentiation in contrast to poor geographical structuring reported earlier in this species. The breed differentiation in Indian sheep was essentially due to variable contribution of two major lineages to different breeds, and sub- structuring of lineage A, possibly the latter resulting from genetic drift. Nucleotide diversity of this lineage was higher in Indian sheep (0.014 ± 0.007) as compared to that of sheep from other regions of the world (0.009 ± 0.005 to 0.01 ± 0.005). Reduced median network analysis of control region and cytochrome b gene sequences of Indian sheep when analyzed along with available published sequences of sheep from other regions of the world showed that several haplotypes of lineage A were exclusive to Indian sheep. Given the high nucleotide diversity in Indian sheep and the poor sharing of lineage A haplotypes between Indian and non-Indian sheep, we propose that lineage A sheep has also been domesticated in the east of Near East, possibly in Indian sub-continent. Finally, our data provide support that lineage B and additional lineage A haplotypes of sheep might have been introduced to Indian sub-continent from Near East, probably by ancient sea trade route. PMID:24244282

  12. Effects of Aerosols over the Indian Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Aerosols that contain black carbon both absorb and reflect incoming sunlight. Even as these atmospheric particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface, they increase the amount of solar energy absorbed in the atmosphere, thus making it possible to both cool the surface and warm the atmosphere. The images above show satellite measurements of the region studied during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX)a vast region spanning the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal (west to east), and from the foot of the Himalayan Mountains, across the Indian subcontinent to the southern Indian Ocean (north to south). The Aerosol images show aerosol pollution (brownish pixels) in the lower atmosphere over the INDOEX study area, as measured by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra. These were composited from March 14-21, 2001. The Albedo images show the total solar energy reflected back to space, as measured by Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) aboard Terra. White pixels show high values, greens are intermediate values, and blues are low. Note how the aerosols, particularly over the ocean, increase the amount of energy reflected back to space. The Atmospheric Warming images show the absorption of the black carbon aerosols in the atmosphere. Where the aerosols are most dense, the absorption is highest. Red pixels indicate the highest levels of absorption, blues are low. The Surface Cooling images show that the aerosol particles reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface. Dark pixels show where the aerosols exert their cooling influence on the surface (or a high magnitude of negative radiative forcing). The bright pixels show where there is much less aerosol pollution and the incoming sunlight is relatively unaffected.

  13. Interleukin-1 Gene Cluster Polymorphisms and Their Association with Coronary Artery Disease: Separate Evidences from the Largest Case-Control Study amongst North Indians and an Updated Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Nakul; Kumar, Sudeep; Sharma, Ajay Kumar; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2016-01-01

    Several researchers have reported significant association of numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) residing in the interleukin-1 (IL-1) gene cluster with coronary artery disease (CAD). However, their association status amongst North Indian ancestry (NIA) have never been systematically assessed. Despite a published meta-analysis on this subject, their association status worldwide as well as amongst different major ancestral subgroups still remains unclear. We therefore decided to prospectively test the association of 11 IL-1 gene cluster SNPs with CAD, vide a case-control study amongst a cohort of NIA and attempted to validate our results with the help of an updated meta-analysis of all relevant published association studies. Included studies were segregated into ancestral subgroups and association statuses for each subgroup were determined. A total of 323 cases and 400 healthy, age and sex matched controls belonging to NIA were prospectively enrolled and subsequently genotyped for 11 selected IL-1 gene cluster SNPs. Although results for none of the evaluated IL-1 gene cluster SNPs reached the adjusted level of significance (p<0.0045), clear trends of association were seen for IL1B -511 C>T and IL1RN 86bp VNTR in several of the constructed genetic models (p range = 0.01–0.044 and 0.005–0.034 respectively). The presence of >1, ‘T’ (minor) allele of IL1B -511 C>T in a genotype seemed to provide protection against CAD (OR = 0.62, p = 0.044), while the presence of >1, ‘C’ (major) allele seemed to increase the risk of CAD (OR = 1.36, p = 0.041). The minor allele (allele 2) of IL1RN 86bp VNTR and its homozygous genotype (2/2 genotype) also seemed to carry an increased risk for CAD (OR = 1.62, p = 0.005 and OR = 2.25, p = 0.031 respectively). On the other hand, several haplotype combinations constructed out of IL1B and IL1RN gene variants clearly showed statistically significant associations with CAD (p<0.0045). Our meta-analysis was conducted for 8

  14. Breast cancer: An overview of published Indian data

    PubMed Central

    Rangarajan, Bharath; Shet, Tanuja; Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Nair, Nita S.; Sairam, R. Madhu; Hingmire, Sachin S.; Bajpai, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    The Incidence of breast cancer has been steadily increasing in the last two decades, more so in urban areas of the sub-continent. Cancer ceters across the country have large numbers of patients being treated with multiple publications in this field. Inspite of paucity of prospective data and randomised clinical trials from India, there are large number of retrospective publications on various aspects of the disease including pathology, radiology, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, palliative care and alternatitive treatment modalities. These published data provide an insight into the trends of breast cancer in the country and this comprehensive data review of Indian data will provide a basis for designing trials relevant to our population and planning health care. PMID:27606288

  15. Breast cancer: An overview of published Indian data.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Bharath; Shet, Tanuja; Wadasadawala, Tabassum; Nair, Nita S; Sairam, R Madhu; Hingmire, Sachin S; Bajpai, Jyoti

    2016-01-01

    The Incidence of breast cancer has been steadily increasing in the last two decades, more so in urban areas of the sub-continent. Cancer ceters across the country have large numbers of patients being treated with multiple publications in this field. Inspite of paucity of prospective data and randomised clinical trials from India, there are large number of retrospective publications on various aspects of the disease including pathology, radiology, surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, palliative care and alternatitive treatment modalities. These published data provide an insight into the trends of breast cancer in the country and this comprehensive data review of Indian data will provide a basis for designing trials relevant to our population and planning health care. PMID:27606288

  16. Molecular Characterization and Meta-Analysis of Gut Microbial Communities Illustrate Enrichment of Prevotella and Megasphaera in Indian Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bhute, Shrikant; Pande, Pranav; Shetty, Sudarshan A.; Shelar, Rahul; Mane, Sachin; Kumbhare, Shreyas V.; Gawali, Ashwini; Makhani, Hemal; Navandar, Mohit; Dhotre, Dhiraj; Lubree, Himangi; Agarwal, Dhiraj; Patil, Rutuja; Ozarkar, Shantanu; Ghaskadbi, Saroj; Yajnik, Chittaranjan; Juvekar, Sanjay; Makharia, Govind K.; Shouche, Yogesh S.

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome has varied impact on the wellbeing of humans. It is influenced by different factors such as age, dietary habits, socio-economic status, geographic location, and genetic makeup of individuals. For devising microbiome-based therapies, it is crucial to identify population specific features of the gut microbiome. Indian population is one of the most ethnically, culturally, and geographically diverse, but the gut microbiome features remain largely unknown. The present study describes gut microbial communities of healthy Indian subjects and compares it with the microbiota from other populations. Based on large differences in alpha diversity indices, abundance of 11 bacterial phyla and individual specific OTUs, we report inter-individual variations in gut microbial communities of these subjects. While the gut microbiome of Indians is different from that of Americans, it shared high similarity to individuals from the Indian subcontinent i.e., Bangladeshi. Distinctive feature of Indian gut microbiota is the predominance of genus Prevotella and Megasphaera. Further, when compared with other non-human primates, it appears that Indians share more OTUs with omnivorous mammals. Our metagenomic imputation indicates higher potential for glycan biosynthesis and xenobiotic metabolism in these subjects. Our study indicates urgent need of identification of population specific microbiome biomarkers of Indian subpopulations to have more holistic view of the Indian gut microbiome and its health implications. PMID:27242691

  17. American Indian Sports Heritage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxendine, Joseph B.

    This book chronicles the story of sports among American Indians. Part 1 examines the nature and role of games in traditional Indian life, with five chapters on: Indian concepts of sport; ball games; foot racing; other sports; children's play; and games of chance. Part 2 looks at the emergence of Indians in modern sport, with five chapters on:…

  18. Indian Ledger Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilcoat, George W.

    1990-01-01

    Offers an innovative way to teach mid-nineteenth century North American Indian history by having students create their own Indian Ledger art. Purposes of the project are: to understand the role played by American Indians, to reveal American Indian stereotypes, and to identify relationships between cultures and environments. Background and…

  19. Indians of the Dakotas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief history of Indian tribes in the States of North and South Dakota is presented. Discussion centers around individual Indian tribes, such as Chippewas and Sioux, which are representative of early and modern Indian life in these States. A section devoted to Indians in these states today offers an indication of the present condition of the…

  20. KNOW YOUR NEVADA INDIANS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    POEHLMAN, CHARLES H.; AND OTHERS

    THIS PUBLICATION PRESENTS THE RESULTS OF A STUDY OF THE SOCIOCULTURAL BACKGROUNDS OF THE PAIUTE, WASHOE, AND SHOSHONE INDIANS OF NEVADA. INCLUDED ARE AN OUTLINE OF GENERAL PROBLEMS PERTAINING TO INDIAN EDUCATION, SOME DISTINCT CULTURAL DIFFERENCES BETWEEN THE DOMINANT NON-INDIAN SOCIETY AND THE INDIAN SOCIETY, AND THE PREHISTORIC ASPECTS OF THE…

  1. American Indian Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Edward, Ed.

    Written for teachers instructing both Indian and non-Indian students, the handbook provides information on American Indians in California. The handbook is presented in six chapters. Chapter 1 is devoted to terminoloy (e.g., American Indian, Native American, tribe, band, rancheria, and chief). Chapter 2 details historic and cultural changes related…

  2. Indian Education Curriculum Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wise, Lu Celia, Ed.

    Designed in Oklahoma as a teaching aid for teachers in Indian education, this booklet is organized according to the subject areas of the curriculum. It provides a ready resource on Indian culture and should thus be of value to teachers who work with both Indian and non-Indian students. Guidelines for curriculum development in multicultural…

  3. Multi-decadal Variation of the Indian Monsoon Rainfall: Implications of ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pothuri, D.; Nuernberg, D.; Mohtadi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Scientific consensus exists on the inverse relationship between the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Monsoon Rainfall. Conversely, recent historical records of 140 years revealed that the relationship between Indian Monsoon and ENSO has broken down (Kumar et al., 1999). Indian Monsoon rainfall variability on decadal time scale was reconstructed by using seawater oxygen isotopes (d18Ow) estimated from oxygen isotopes and Mg/Ca ratios of Globigerinoides ruber from a sediment core in the Bay of Bengal. A comparison of Indian Monsoon rainfall variability on decadal time scale with the number of ENSO events over last 2000 years reveals an inverse relationship between the monsoon rainfall in the Indian Subcontinent and ENSO Events. Furthermore, d18Ow variations reveal increased monsoon rainfall during Roman Warm Period (RWP) and Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and larger monsoon rainfall fluctuations during the Little Ice Age (LIA). Therefore, our study suggests that on decadal time scale ENSO affects the Indian Monsoon Rainfall through the stronger Walker Circulation and associated tropical convection process.

  4. Cultural Practices in American Indian Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanchez-Way, Ruth; Johnson, Sandie

    2000-01-01

    Describes effective substance abuse prevention programs created by American Indians that combine cultural components with other proven prevention strategies. Components of successful cultural interventions are family, not school, administration; a focus on peer clusters rather than individuals or entire peer groups; incorporation of spirituality,…

  5. Modern Indian Psychology. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryde, John F.

    Written on the basis of senior Indian verbal relatings collected over a 23-year span, this revised edition on modern Indian psychology incorporates suggestions from Indian students and their teachers, Indian and non-Indian social studies experts, and other Indian people. The book contains 6 major divisions: (1) "Culture and Indian Values" relates…

  6. Design and baseline characteristics of the PODOSA (Prevention of Diabetes & Obesity in South Asians) trial: a cluster, randomised lifestyle intervention in Indian and Pakistani adults with impaired glycaemia at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Anne; Bhopal, Raj S; Bhopal, Ruby; Forbes, John F; Gill, Jason M R; McKnight, John; Murray, Gordon; Sattar, Naveed; Sharma, Anu; Wallia, Sunita; Wild, Sarah; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the design and baseline population characteristics of an adapted lifestyle intervention trial aimed at reducing weight and increasing physical activity in people of Indian and Pakistani origin at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Design Cluster, randomised controlled trial. Setting Community-based in Edinburgh and Glasgow, Scotland, UK. Participants 156 families, comprising 171 people with impaired glycaemia, and waist sizes ≥90 cm (men) and ≥80 cm (women), plus 124 family volunteers. Interventions Families were randomised into either an intensive intervention of 15 dietitian visits providing lifestyle advice, or a light (control) intervention of four visits, over a period of 3 years. Outcome measures The primary outcome is a change in mean weight between baseline and 3 years. Secondary outcomes are changes in waist, hip, body mass index, plasma blood glucose and physical activity. The cost of the intervention will be measured. Qualitative work will seek to understand factors that motivated participation and retention in the trial and families’ experience of adhering to the interventions. Results Between July 2007 and October 2009, 171 people with impaired glycaemia, along with 124 family volunteers, were randomised. In total, 95% (171/196) of eligible participants agreed to proceed to the 3-year trial. Only 13 of the 156 families contained more than one recruit with impaired glycaemia. We have recruited sufficient participants to undertake an adequately powered trial to detect a mean difference in weight of 2.5 kg between the intensive and light intervention groups at the 5% significance level. Over half the families include family volunteers. The main participants have a mean age of 52 years and 64% are women. Conclusions Prevention of Diabetes & Obesity in South Asians (PODOSA) is one of the first community-based, randomised lifestyle intervention trials in a UK South Asian population. The main trial results will

  7. Water vapor budget of the Indian monsoon depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Chen, Tsing-Chang

    2005-10-01

    Estimations by previous studies show that a minor amount of the Indian monsoon rainfall is contributed by Indian monsoon depressions (IMDs). In contrast, other studies found that approximately half of the summer monsoon rainfall in the northern Indian subcontinent is generated by IMDs. IMDs occur an average of six times during the summer season and provide a crucial water source to the agricultural activity over this region. The large disparity in the estimation of the IMD contribution to the Indian rainfall by previous studies requires a more accurate water vapor budget analysis of the IMD with quality data. For this reason, a composite analysis of the IMD is performed using the ERA-40 reanalysis and four precipitation data sets (the Global Precipitation Climatology Project, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, the GEOS precipitation index at the Goddard Space Flight Center and surface station observations) for the period of 1979 2002. Important findings of this study are: (i) about 45 55% of the total Indian rainfall is produced by the IMD; (ii) the rainfall maximum in the west south-west sector of IMDs is largely maintained by convergence of atmospheric water vapor flux. The convergence of water vapor flux is largely coupled with the lower-tropospheric divergent circulation. Thus, the IMD water vapor budget is modulated by the 30 60 and 10 20 d monsoon modes through changes of water vapor convergence/divergence. The magnitude of this modulation on the IMD water vapor budget is close to a quarter of the summer-mean water vapor budget over the Bay of Bengal and north-eastern India.

  8. CARIBIC measurements of methane and other trace gases in the easterly outflow of the Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhee, T.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Schuck, T. J.; Slemr, F.; Zahn, A.

    2009-04-01

    Indian monsoon is one of the most important global meteorological phenomena in the tropics. In particular during Indian summer monsoon, deep convection occurring in Intertropical Convergence Zone located in the Indian subcontinent brings the polluted surface air to high altitude, perturbing clean free troposphere and/or the lowermost stratosphere. CARIBIC (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container, www.caribic-atmosphere.com) conducted atmospheric chemical composition measurements at 8-11 km using an automated instrumental package. Monthly regular flights between Germany and the Maldives or Sri Lanka from November 1997 until April 2001 provides an opportunity to investigate spatial and temporal variation of a variety of atmospheric chemical composition. In summer large enhancement of CH4 was observed in the easterly jet flowing from northern Indian subcontinent between 20°N and 30°N. At the same latitudes, other trace gases (CO, O3, NHMCs, CH3Cl) also show an increase, suggesting the influence of surface air masses driven by deep convection to the chemical composition at high altitude. Seasonal variation of CH4 reveals clear enhancement in summer which is opposite to background observations in the marine boundary layer. This reflects the impact of Indian summer monsoon to the chemical composition of free troposphere. Aided by temporal and spatial variation of other trace gases measured in CARIBIC, we will discuss the source regions of this CH4 plume and estimate the amount of trace gases delivered to the flight altitudes during Indian summer monsoon.

  9. Forecasting the Indian summer monsoon intraseasonal oscillations using genetic algorithm and neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Suneet; Pandey, Avinash C.

    2011-08-01

    The correct and timely forecast of the Indian summer monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillations (ISOs) is very important. It has great impact on the agriculture and economy of the Indian subcontinent region. The applicability of Genetic Algorithm (GA) is demonstrated for nonlinear curve fitting of the inherently chaotic and noisy Lorenz time series and the ISO data. A robust method is developed for the very long-range prediction of the ISO using a feed-forward time delay backpropagation Artificial Neural Network (ANN). Using an iterative one-step-ahead prediction strategy, five years (120 pentads) of advanced prediction is made for the ISO data with good forecast skill. It is shown that a hybrid GA-ANN model may be used as an early forecast model followed by ANN only model as a more reliable model.

  10. Assessing the impact of the Indian Ocean tsunami on households: a modified domestic assets index approach.

    PubMed

    Arlikatti, Sudha; Peacock, Walter Gillis; Prater, Carla S; Grover, Himanshu; Sekar, Arul S Gnana

    2010-07-01

    This paper offers a potential measurement solution for assessing disaster impacts and subsequent recovery at the household level by using a modified domestic assets index (MDAI) approach. Assessment of the utility of the domestic assets index first proposed by Bates, Killian and Peacock (1984) has been confined to earthquake areas in the Americas and southern Europe. This paper modifies and extends the approach to the Indian sub-continent and to coastal surge hazards utilizing data collected from 1,000 households impacted by the Indian Ocean tsunami (2004) in the Nagapattinam district of south-eastern India. The analyses suggest that the MDAI scale is a reliable and valid measure of household living conditions and is useful in assessing disaster impacts and tracking recovery efforts over time. It can facilitate longitudinal studies, encourage cross-cultural, cross-national comparisons of disaster impacts and inform national and international donors of the itemized monetary losses from disasters at the household level. PMID:20298262

  11. Tipping elements of the Indian monsoon: Prediction of onset and withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Surovyatkina, Elena; Bookhagen, Bodo; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Forecasting the onset and withdrawal of the Indian summer monsoon is crucial for the life and prosperity of more than one billion inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent. However, accurate prediction of monsoon timing remains a challenge, despite numerous efforts. Here we present a method for prediction of monsoon timing based on a critical transition precursor. We identify geographic regions—tipping elements of the monsoon—and use them as observation locations for predicting onset and withdrawal dates. Unlike most predictability methods, our approach does not rely on precipitation analysis but on air temperature and relative humidity, which are well represented both in models and observations. The proposed method allows to predict onset 2 weeks earlier and withdrawal dates 1.5 months earlier than existing methods. In addition, it enables to correctly forecast monsoon duration for some anomalous years, often associated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation.

  12. Long-term prediction of the Indian monsoon onset and withdrawal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Surovyatkina, Elena; Bookhagen, Bodo; Kurths, Juergen

    2016-04-01

    Forecasting the onset and withdrawal of the Indian summer monsoon is crucial for life and prosperity of more than one billion inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent. However, accurate prediction of monsoon timing remains a challenge, despite numerous efforts. Here, we present a method for prediction of monsoon timing based on a critical transition precursor. We identify geographic regions - tipping elements of the monsoon - and use them as observation locations for predicting onset and withdrawal dates. Unlike most predictability methods, our approach does not rely on precipitation analysis, but on air temperature and relative humidity, which are well represented both in models and observations. The proposed method allows to predict onset two weeks earlier and withdrawal dates 1.5 months earlier than existing methods. In addition, it enables to correctly forecast monsoon duration for some anomalous years, often associated with El-Niño-Southern Oscillation.

  13. Dissecting the influence of Neolithic demic diffusion on Indian Y-chromosome pool through J2-M172 haplogroup.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sakshi; Singh, Ashish; Rajkumar, Raja; Sampath Kumar, Katakam; Kadarkarai Samy, Subburaj; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Singh, Amita; Ahmed Sheikh, Shahnawaz; Peddada, Vidya; Khanna, Vinee; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Pandit, Aridaman; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2016-01-01

    The global distribution of J2-M172 sub-haplogroups has been associated with Neolithic demic diffusion. Two branches of J2-M172, J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 make a considerable part of Y chromosome gene pool of the Indian subcontinent. We investigated the Neolithic contribution of demic dispersal from West to Indian paternal lineages, which majorly consists of haplogroups of Late Pleistocene ancestry. To accomplish this, we have analysed 3023 Y-chromosomes from different ethnic populations, of which 355 belonged to J2-M172. Comparison of our data with worldwide data, including Y-STRs of 1157 individuals and haplogroup frequencies of 6966 individuals, suggested a complex scenario that cannot be explained by a single wave of agricultural expansion from Near East to South Asia. Contrary to the widely accepted elite dominance model, we found a substantial presence of J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 haplogroups in both caste and tribal populations of India. Unlike demic spread in Eurasia, our results advocate a unique, complex and ancient arrival of J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 haplogroups into Indian subcontinent. PMID:26754573

  14. Dissecting the influence of Neolithic demic diffusion on Indian Y-chromosome pool through J2-M172 haplogroup

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sakshi; Singh, Ashish; Rajkumar, Raja; Sampath Kumar, Katakam; Kadarkarai Samy, Subburaj; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Singh, Amita; Ahmed Sheikh, Shahnawaz; Peddada, Vidya; Khanna, Vinee; Veeraiah, Pandichelvam; Pandit, Aridaman; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2016-01-01

    The global distribution of J2-M172 sub-haplogroups has been associated with Neolithic demic diffusion. Two branches of J2-M172, J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 make a considerable part of Y chromosome gene pool of the Indian subcontinent. We investigated the Neolithic contribution of demic dispersal from West to Indian paternal lineages, which majorly consists of haplogroups of Late Pleistocene ancestry. To accomplish this, we have analysed 3023 Y-chromosomes from different ethnic populations, of which 355 belonged to J2-M172. Comparison of our data with worldwide data, including Y-STRs of 1157 individuals and haplogroup frequencies of 6966 individuals, suggested a complex scenario that cannot be explained by a single wave of agricultural expansion from Near East to South Asia. Contrary to the widely accepted elite dominance model, we found a substantial presence of J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 haplogroups in both caste and tribal populations of India. Unlike demic spread in Eurasia, our results advocate a unique, complex and ancient arrival of J2a-M410 and J2b-M102 haplogroups into Indian subcontinent. PMID:26754573

  15. Potential role of the February-March Southern Annular Mode on the Indian summer monsoon rainfall: a new perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhu, Amita; Kripalani, R. H.; Preethi, B.; Pandithurai, G.

    2016-08-01

    Relationship between the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) and the India summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) has been examined based on the data period 1949-2013. While the entire data period indicates a significant increasing trend in SAM, recent decades 1983-2013 indicate no trend. The relationship between the two strengthened considerably since 1983. Results reveal that the February-March SAM is significantly related with the subsequent ISMR. A positive (negative) SAM during February-March is favorable (unfavorable) for the ensuing summer monsoon rainfall over the Indian sub-continent. The delayed response is relayed through the central Pacific Ocean. We propose a hypothesis that states: when a negative (positive) phase of February-March SAM occurs, it gives rise to an anomalous meridional circulation in a longitudinally locked air-sea coupled system over the central Pacific that persists up to the subsequent boreal summer and propagates from the sub-polar latitudes to the equatorial latitudes inducing a warming (cooling) effect over the central equatorial Pacific region. In turn, this effect concomitantly weakens (strengthens) the monsoon rainfall over the Indian sub-continent. Thus, the February-March SAM could possibly serve as a new precursor to foreshadow the subsequent behavior of the Indian summer monsoon.

  16. Dynamics of solitary waves observed over the North Indian Ocean during the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szantai, André; Drobinski, Philippe; DéSalmand, FrançOise

    2011-03-01

    During the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) experiment (January-March 1999), mesoscale solitary waves have been observed and tracked over the North Indian Ocean on a series of Meteosat-5 satellite images. These solitary waves have a horizontal wavelength of 10-15 km and propagate westward at low level at a speed of 10-18 m/s. Unlike similar wave phenomena observed mainly over land, they have a long lifetime, which can exceed 48 h. A key element explaining the existence and longevity of the solitary waves is the presence of an inversion layer, acting as a waveguide and separating the boundary layer into two sublayers: a lower layer over the ocean (marine boundary layer) and an upper layer originating from the Indian subcontinent (land plume layer). Profiles from radiosondes launched from the Ron Brown and from dropsondes from the Hercules C-130 airplane helped to determine this waveguide structure. A suggested mechanism leading to the generation of solitary waves is a collision between the sea breeze in the vicinity of the West Indian coast and the easterly/northeasterly winter monsoon winds, with a possible contribution of convection reinforced by topography (Western Ghats range), during the local afternoon. Another phenomenon related to sea breeze and local convection in this coastal area, the injection of "bubbles" of moisture into the drier upper boundary layer, has also been identified on European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analyses. These bubbles form daily during the afternoon and drift westward over the North Indian Ocean at latitudes around 12°N and progressively subside and dissipate or become integrated into larger air masses.

  17. The Genetic Heritage of the Earliest Settlers Persists Both in Indian Tribal and Caste Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kivisild, T.; Rootsi, S.; Metspalu, M.; Mastana, S.; Kaldma, K.; Parik, J.; Metspalu, E.; Adojaan, M.; Tolk, H.-V.; Stepanov, V.; Gölge, M.; Usanga, E.; Papiha, S. S.; Cinnioğlu, C.; King, R.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.; Underhill, P. A.; Villems, R.

    2003-01-01

    Two tribal groups from southern India—the Chenchus and Koyas—were analyzed for variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), the Y chromosome, and one autosomal locus and were compared with six caste groups from different parts of India, as well as with western and central Asians. In mtDNA phylogenetic analyses, the Chenchus and Koyas coalesce at Indian-specific branches of haplogroups M and N that cover populations of different social rank from all over the subcontinent. Coalescence times suggest early late Pleistocene settlement of southern Asia and suggest that there has not been total replacement of these settlers by later migrations. H, L, and R2 are the major Indian Y-chromosomal haplogroups that occur both in castes and in tribal populations and are rarely found outside the subcontinent. Haplogroup R1a, previously associated with the putative Indo-Aryan invasion, was found at its highest frequency in Punjab but also at a relatively high frequency (26%) in the Chenchu tribe. This finding, together with the higher R1a-associated short tandem repeat diversity in India and Iran compared with Europe and central Asia, suggests that southern and western Asia might be the source of this haplogroup. Haplotype frequencies of the MX1 locus of chromosome 21 distinguish Koyas and Chenchus, along with Indian caste groups, from European and eastern Asian populations. Taken together, these results show that Indian tribal and caste populations derive largely from the same genetic heritage of Pleistocene southern and western Asians and have received limited gene flow from external regions since the Holocene. The phylogeography of the primal mtDNA and Y-chromosome founders suggests that these southern Asian Pleistocene coastal settlers from Africa would have provided the inocula for the subsequent differentiation of the distinctive eastern and western Eurasian gene pools. PMID:12536373

  18. Improvising on an Indian Flute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Martha Mead

    1984-01-01

    The Indian flute can be used by teachers to supplement classroom study of Indian culture. Indians used it as a personal instrument. Describes how an Indian flute can be made, and suggests improvising bird calls and melodies on it. (CS)

  19. "Indian Education in the Bureau of Indian Affairs."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, James E.

    The role of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in American Indian education is discussed in this speech. At the present time, this role is limited to federally recognized Indians living on reservations or Indian trust land; for other Indian students, the BIA's role is that of an advocate, helping Indian people get what they want and need in regard…

  20. The Indian Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Augusta

    1969-01-01

    Appraisal of Boas'"Introduction to Handbook of American Indian Languages (1911), and Powell's "Indian Linguistic Famlies of America North of Mexico (1891), as reissued by University of Nebraska, Lincoln. (AF)

  1. 78 FR 16685 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate, and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate, and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. ]...

  2. 75 FR 1384 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Numbers:...

  3. Indian Education Project: An Abridgment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Sharon

    Synthesizing two priority proposals identified by the Indian Education Project of Michigan, this report outlines a proposal for establishing an Indian Education Center (staffed by American Indians and advised by a University Advisory Committee made up of Indian parents and the Indian community) to meet the needs of Indian students and…

  4. Indians of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    A brief historical review of the Cherokee Indians from the mid-sixteenth century to modern day depicts an industrious tribe adversely affected by the settlement movement only to make exceptional economic advancements with the aid of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Civic pride and self-leadership among the Cherokee Indians in North Carolina has…

  5. Canada's Indians. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, James

    Over a half million people in Canada today are identifiably of Native ancestry, legally categorized as Inuit (Eskimos), status Indians, or nonstatus Indians. Status Indians comprise 573 bands with total membership of about 300,000 people, most of whom live on 2,242 reserves. They are the direct responsibility of the federal government and have…

  6. National Indian Education Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Karen Kay

    2006-01-01

    This report includes information from the National Indian Education Study of American Indian/Alaska Native students in grades 4 and 8 on the 2005 National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP) in reading and mathematics. The national sample includes both public and private schools (i.e. Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Defense Education…

  7. Indian Law Enforcement History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etheridge, David

    Written as a tribute to American Indian law enforcement officers and the Indian Criminal Justice System, this monographh details the history of the legislative, judicial, financial, and cultural problems associated with the development of Indian law enforcement. Citing numerous court cases, pieces of legislation, and individual and organizational…

  8. Urban American Indian Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, Josea

    This document begins by dispelling several misperceptions about American Indians that are especially pernicious to older American Indians living in cities, and then goes on to discuss what is known about urban American Indian elders and the implications for planning and service delivery for Area Agencies on Aging and contractor agencies. It notes…

  9. Minnesota Indian Resources Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Catherine M., Comp.; And Others

    The second edition of the directory of organizations operating in the Indian communities throughout the State of Minnesota is an attempt to compile all current information on resources available to the Minnesota Indian. The introductory section discusses the problems faced by the Indian American in urban sectors with reference to their life styles…

  10. 77 FR 21568 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pregraduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Overview Information: Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health...

  11. Satellite based classification (haze, fog) and affected area estimation over Indo - Pak Sub-Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghauri, Badar; Zafar, Sumaira

    2016-07-01

    Northern Pakistan and bordering Indian Punjab experience intense smog and fog during fall and winters. Environmentalists have been raising their voices over the situation and demanded control over regional emissions to save the livelihood of millions of dwellers whose trade, commerce and agriculture is at stake because of long smog/ fog spells.. This paper estimates the area affected by haze, smog and fog during 2006- 2010. MODIS (geo-referenced MODIS subsets India1, 2 &3) of the area in Pakistan and India from 2006 to 2010 for the period October to February) were analyzed using state of the art software ENVI 4.2 and ArcGIS 10.2. This process resulted in area belonging to each class that is; haze, smog and fog. On the basis of density, haze and fog cover was determined. Variations in fog cover, its density and identification of location of fog initiation process were also determined using near real time (30 minutes) METEOSAT-7 IODC data where actually fog formation started and then extended to the area of favorable conditions. Haze has been noticed to intensify due to massive burning of agricultural waste (rice husk) in India and Pakistan towards the end of October each year. MODIS thermal anomalies/fire data (MYD 14) were also used to verify this activity on the ground, which results in hazy conditions at regional level during fall months. Haze-affected area during 2006 to 2010 in Pakistan ranged from 155,000 Km2 to 354,000 Km2 and in India it ranged from 333,000 Km2 to 846,000 Km2. Similarly winter fog cover during this period in Pakistan varied from 136,000 Km2 to 381,000 Km2 and in India it was estimated at 327,000 Km2 to 566,000 Km2. This phenomenon was more prominent in India than in Pakistan where and fog cover was at least twice than that was observed in Pakistan. It has been noted that area covered by fog, smog and haze doubled during the study period in the region. Atmospheric dimming during autumn/ fall also reduces the mixing height leading to greater

  12. CONVEYING AN EMPATHIC UNDERSTANDING OF THE CIVILIZATION OF THE INDIAN-PAKISTANI SUBCONTINENT THROUGH THE USE OF AN INTEGRATED SERIES OF SELECT FILMS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LEVISON, MELVIN E.

    THIS PROJECT TESTED A METHOD FOR DEVELOPING "AUDIO-VISUAL LITERACY" AND, AT THE SAME TIME, AN EMPATHIC UNDERSTANDING OF ANOTHER CIVILIZATION THROUGH THE USE OF A SERIES OF SELECT FILMS. THE POPULATION CONSISTED OF 28 TEACHERS IN AN IN-SERVICE COURSE AND CLASSES LATER TAUGHT BY IN-SERVICE TRAINED TEACHERS IN FIVE SECONDARY SCHOOLS--THREE IN SLUM…

  13. Onset, advance and withdrawal of southwest monsoon over Indian subcontinent: A study from precipitable water measurement using ground based GPS receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puviarasan, N.; Sharma, A. K.; Ranalkar, Manish; Giri, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Southwest monsoon (SWM) normally sets over Kerala by 1st June. It subsequently advances northwards and covers the entire country by 15th July. Prior knowledge of determination of date of onset of monsoon (DOM) is vital for many applications. However, accurate determination of DOM avoiding false or 'bogus' onset still remains a challenge to meteorological community. An incorrect identification of onset may lead to declaration of early onset. India Meteorological Department (IMD) has traditionally adopted an objective method to declare onset and withdrawal of monsoon based on rainfall over some specific stations in addition to wind field and Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) from a bounded region. An augmentation of existing criteria of monsoon onset using high temporal resolution tropospheric precipitable water (PW) content over a station obtained through ground based GPS receiver is proposed. It has been shown that variation of PW content is an indicator of the state of monsoon and can potentially be included in operational criteria for declaring onset and withdrawal of monsoon. In the paper, we present daily variation of PW during SWM at five stations viz. Chennai, Kolkata, Guwahati, Mumbai and Delhi. The superposed epoch analysis of PW variation for 13 days with respect to arrival and withdrawal date of SWM reveals that over Kolkata at the time of arrival of monsoon the PW (mm)/SD (Standard Deviation) increases from 48.62/2.5 (day -6) to 61.4/1.9 (day 0) and on withdrawal it decreases from 48.62/4.56 (day -6) to 22.55 mm/4.0 (day 0). Similarly in Guwahati, Mumbai and Delhi the value of PW/SD increase from 53.81/4.2, 43.10/7.2 and 44.6/5.0 mm to 62.74/1.5, 62.09/1.6 and 61.88/2.3 mm and on withdrawal it reduces to 27.12/4.2, 25.94/2.6 and 20.46/4.6 mm respectively. It is also noticed that there is a sharp variation of PW from day -2 to day 0, which indicates GPS PW can be considered as a precursor for monsoon arrival and withdrawal.

  14. Aquarius salinity and wind retrieval using the cap algorithm and application to water cycle observation in the Indian ocean and subcontinent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument developed to map the ocean surface salinity field from space. The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open oc...

  15. Evaluation of Impacts of Landuse Changes on Air Quality in Hyderabad Metropolis Using Remote Sensing and GIS - A Case Study from Indian Sub-Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuppala, P.; S. S, A.; Mareddy, A.

    2004-12-01

    Around the world cities in developing countries are rapidly growing as more and more people become urban dwellers resulting in increased level of air pollution caused by changes in transportation, energy production and industrial activities. Air quality is an issue of critical importance in view of the accumulating evidence showing the adverse effects of pollution on human health, agricultural crops, manmade environments and ecosystems. An integrated study for identification of appropriate sites for representative evaluation of air pollution, novel means of monitoring air quality, identifying the predominant sources of pollution, effective assessment of air quality and evaluation of different management strategies essential for the development of a healthy and livable region is carried out for Hyderabad metropolis in India using Remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) based assessment tools. Correlation studies between the concentration level of pollutants in urban air and urban land use are also dealt with. Municipal Corporation of Hyderabad (MCH) is divided into eleven planning zones out of which the present study area i.e. Zone I & IIA comprises of industrial, highly commercial and densely populated areas, apart from medium and sparse residential areas making it environmentally sensitive. Sampling locations were identified based on the land use/ land cover of the region and air samples were collected from areas having varying land use patterns using a high volume air sampler. The samples were then analyzed for the presence of Sulphur oxides(SO--x), Oxides of Nitrogen(NO--x), Total Suspended Particulate Matter(TSPM) and Respirable Suspended Particulate Matter(RSPM) using standard protocols and maps showing spatial distribution of SOx, NO--x, TSPM & RSPM were prepared using curve fitting technique of Arc/Info & ArcView GIS software. Air Quality Index (AQI), indicating the overall quality of air and extent of pollution is also calculated, based on which the entire study area is classified into severely, highly, moderately and lightly polluted areas. Concentration of SOx and NOx were observed to be within limits, while particulate pollutants exceeded the standards prescribed by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB). The major cause of pollution in the study area is attributed to the increasing vehicular movements and presence of commercial and public related activities such as shopping malls. It is observed for the category of severe air pollution that 42% of pollution is from dense residential areas, 19% from medium residential and 1% load of pollution from other public related activities. Based on the results obtained suitable remedial measures to combat the increasing urban air pollution are suggested in the study area. Key words: Air pollution, Remote sensing, Geographical Information System, Spatial distribution, Air quality index.

  16. Descriptions of eight new species of Phaelota (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) with a new generic synonymy and a key to species of Indian subcontinent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Six new species of Phaelota Jacoby from India viz. P. assamensis, P. kottigehara, P. maculipennis, P. mauliki, P. saluki, and P. viridipennis and two new species from Sri Lanka viz. P. ogloblini and P. schereri are described and illustrated. Thrylaea Jacoby is treated as a new junior synonym of Phae...

  17. Molecular phylogeny of Indian horse breeds with special reference to Manipuri pony based on mitochondrial D-loop.

    PubMed

    Devi, Kshetrimayum Miranda; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2013-10-01

    Manipuri pony is the geographically distant breed of horse from the five recognized horse breeds found in the Indian subcontinent. The phylogenetic relationship of Manipuri pony with the other breeds is unknown. The diversity in the mitochondrial (mt) DNA D-loop region is employed as an important tool to understand the origin and genetic diversification of domestic horses and to examine genetic relationships among breeds around the world. This study was carried out to understand the maternal lineages of Manipuri pony using the 247 bp region of the mtDNA D-loop. The dataset comprised of eleven numbers of self developed sequences of Manipuri pony, 59 and 35 number of retrieved sequences of Indian horse breeds and other worldwide breeds respectively. A total of 35 haplotypes was identified with a high level of genetic diversity in the Indian breeds. A total of seven major mtDNA haplogroups (A-G) was identified in the Indian horse breeds that indicated the abundance of mtDNA diversity and multiple origins of maternal lineages in them. The majority of the studied sequences of Indian breeds (33.3 %) were grouped into haplogroup D and least (3.9 %) in haplogroup E. The Manipuri breed showed the least FST distance (0.03866) with the most diverged Indian breeds and with Thoroughbred horse among the worldwide. This study indicated a close association between Manipuri pony and Thoroughbred. PMID:24068432

  18. Holocene Climatic Variability in the Indian Monsoon Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Praveen Kumar; Anoop, Ambili; Menzel, Philip; Gaye, Birgit; Basavaiah, Nathani; Jehangir, Arshid; Prasad, Sushma

    2013-04-01

    The available data on Holocene climate variability from Asia indicates spatio-temporal changes in the precipitation over this vast region. Detailed information on the timing, duration, regionality, and causes of these fluctuations is not well understood, especially over the Indian subcontinent. My work focuses on long core sediments from lake Tso Moriri (78°14'-78°25'N and 32°40'-33°02'E; altitude: 4500 m) situated in climatically sensitive zone of NW Himalayas affected by both mid-latitude westerlies and Indian summer monsoon. Two cores ca.7 m were retrieved from the lake at different water depths (ca. 40m and 105m) in July 2011. Investigations reveal marked changes in grain size, lamination quality, mineralogy, organic and carbonate content suggesting changes in lake level, direction of inflow, and biological productivity that in turn are influenced by regional climate. As the lake lies in a tectonically active region, I have also undertaken detailed geomorphometric (knick-point, Hack index), and drainage pattern analysis of the major inflowing streams to decipher the active tectonics in the region. Sharp changes in river course and slope gradient indicates the presence of an active N-S trending fault in western flank of the lake. The data from lake Tso Moriri will be compared with other high-resolution records from lake Lonar and stalagmites in NE India to reconstruct the forcing mechanism of Holocene climatic variability.

  19. Crustal structure of Precambrian terranes in the southern African subcontinent with implications for secular variation in crustal genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachingwe, Marsella; Nyblade, Andrew; Julià, Jordi

    2015-07-01

    New estimates of crustal thickness, Poisson's ratio and crustal shear wave velocity have been obtained for 39 stations in Angola, Botswana, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Tanzania and Zambia by modelling P-wave receiver functions using the H-κ stacking method and jointly inverting the receiver functions with Rayleigh-wave phase and group velocities. These estimates, combined with similar results from previous studies, have been examined for secular trends in Precambrian crustal structure within the southern African subcontinent. In both Archean and Proterozoic terranes we find similar Moho depths [38-39 ± 3 km SD (standard deviation)], crustal Poisson's ratio (0.26 ± 0.01 SD), mean crustal shear wave velocity (3.7 ± 0.1 km s-1 SD), and amounts of heterogeneity in the thickness of the mafic lower crust, as defined by shear wave velocities ≥4.0 km s-1. In addition, the amount of variability in these crustal parameters is similar within each individual age grouping as between age groupings. Thus, the results provide little evidence for secular variation in Precambrian crustal structure, including between Meso- and Neoarchean crust. This finding suggests that (1) continental crustal has been generated by similar processes since the Mesoarchean or (2) plate tectonic processes have reworked and modified the crust through time, erasing variations in structure resulting from crustal genesis.

  20. Integrated approaches towards drug development from Ayurveda and other Indian system of medicines.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Wahile, Atul

    2006-01-01

    Biodiversity of natural resources has served not only for the primary human needs but also for health care, since time immemorial. The Indian subcontinent, with the history of one of the oldest civilization, harbors many traditional health care systems. Their development was supported by the diverse biodiversity in flora and fauna due to variations in geographical landscaping. Ayurveda, whose history goes back to 5000 b.c., is one of the ancient health care systems. The Ayurveda was developed through daily life experiences with the mutual relationship between mankind and nature. The ancient text of Ayurveda reports more than 2000 plant species for their therapeutic potentials. Besides Ayurveda, other traditional and folklore systems of health care were developed in the different time periods in Indian subcontinent, where more than 7500 plant species were used. According to a WHO estimate, about 80% of the world population relies on traditional systems of medicines for primary health care, where plants form the dominant component over other natural resources. Renewed interest of developing as well as developed countries in the natural resources has opened new horizons for the exploration of natural sources with the perspectives of safety and efficacy. The development of these traditional systems of medicines with the perspectives of safety, efficacy and quality will help not only to preserve this traditional heritage but also to rationalize the use of natural products in the health care. Until recent past, the nature was considered as a compendium for templates of new chemical entities (NCEs). The plant species mentioned in the ancient texts of these Ayurveda and other Indian systems of medicines may be explored with the modern scientific approaches for better leads in the health care. PMID:16271286

  1. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  2. Indianization of psychiatry utilizing Indian mental concepts

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Ajit; Kate, Natasha; Grover, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Most of the psychiatry practice in India is guided by the western concepts of mental health and illness, which have largely ignored the role of religion, family, eastern philosophy, and medicine in understanding and managing the psychiatric disorders. India comprises of diverse cultures, languages, ethnicities, and religious affiliations. However, besides these diversities, there are certain commonalities, which include Hinduism as a religion which is spread across the country, the traditional family system, ancient Indian system of medicine and emphasis on use of traditional methods like Yoga and Meditation for controlling mind. This article discusses as to how mind and mental health are understood from the point of view of Hinduism, Indian traditions and Indian systems of medicine. Further, the article focuses on as to how these Indian concepts can be incorporated in the practice of contemporary psychiatry. PMID:23858244

  3. Monsoon low-level jet over the gateway of Indian summer monsoon: a comparative study for two distinct monsoon years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Suresh; Kottayil, Ajil; Mohanakumar, K.

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution radiosonde measurements are used to study the characteristics and dynamics of monsoon low-level jet at the monsoon onset region of Cochin (10.04° N; 76.32° E) in India under two contrasting monsoon years, 2013 and 2015. The core speed and core height of the low-level jet is significantly higher during the strong monsoon year of 2013 than for the monsoon-deficient year of 2015. The average core heights for these years are seen to exist at 2.03 and 2.20 km, respectively. The low-level jet-modulated parameters such as moisture flux, momentum flux and kinetic energy flux show higher values during monsoon of 2013 as compared to 2015. Among the monsoon low-level jet parameters, the moisture flux has the strongest influence on the observed rainfall over Cochin. Also, an exponential function is seen to best explain the moisture flux-rainfall relationship. The weakening of monsoon during 2015 is attributed most likely to an eastward shift of the core convective activity from the Indian subcontinent as revealed from satellite observation of the upper tropospheric humidity. A close association is seen between the rainfall over Cochin and the convective activity over the Indian subcontinent. Observational studies such as this, which links monsoon rainfall, monsoon low-level jet parameters and convective activity, are expected to enhance the understanding of monsoon processes in general and subsequently improve the forecasting skill of models.

  4. Isentropic analysis of the Indian Summer Monsoon circulation and its implications for the active and break periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauluis, O. M.; Sandeep, S.; Ravindran, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The atmospheric flow during the Indian Summer Monsoon here is analyzed in isentropic coordinates in two different ways. First, the lateral mass transport fo air is separated in terms of both the potential temperature and equivalent potential temperature. This approach, originally developed to analyze the global meridional circulation, makes it possible to identify the thermodynamic properties of the inflow and outflow. It is shown here how the properties of various air masses, such as the inflow of warm moist air in the boundary layer, upper tropospheric outflow, and midlatitudes dry air intrusion, can be systematically identified. Second, we analyze the vertical overturning in terms of terms of the equivalent potential temperature of the ascending and subsiding air parcels over the indian subcontinent, which allows us to further infer the thermodynamic transformation occurring during the monsoon. This technique is first used to look at the evolution of the flow through the seasonal cycle. We then further analyze the circulation patterns associated with monsoon breaks and active periods. In doing so, we identify midtropospheric in usions of dry air from the midlatitudes as a key precursor of monsoon breaks. The meteorological conditions associated for such intrusion to reach the subcontinent are then discussed.

  5. Cross-reactivity and neutralization of Indian King cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) venom by polyvalent and monovalent antivenoms.

    PubMed

    Gowtham, Yashonandana J; Mahadeswaraswamy, Y H; Girish, K S; K, Kemparaju

    2014-07-01

    The venom of the largest venomous snake, the king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah), is still out of league for the production of therapeutic polyvalent antivenom nor it is characterized immunologically in the Indian subcontinent. In the present study, the king cobra venom is comparatively studied for the cross-reactivity/reactivity and toxicity neutralization by the locally available equine therapeutic polyvalent BSV and VB antivenoms, and monovalent antivenom (OH-IgG) prepared in rabbit. None of the two therapeutic antivenoms procured from two different firms showed any signs of cross-reactivity in terms of antigen-antibody precipitin lines in immunodouble diffusion assay; however, a weak and an insignificant cross-reactivity pattern was observed in ELISA and Western blot studies. Further, both BSV and VB antivenoms failed to neutralize proteolytic, hyaluronidase and phospholipase activities as well as toxic properties such as edema, myotoxicity and lethality of the venom. As expected, OH-IgG showed strong reactivity in immunodouble diffusion, ELISA and in Western blot analysis and also neutralized both enzyme activities as well as the toxic properties of the venom. Thus, the study provides insight into the likely measures that are to be taken in cases of accidental king cobra bites for which the Indian subcontinent is still not prepared for. PMID:24815989

  6. The Indian Child Welfare Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Katy Jo

    The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (I.C.W.A.) is federal legislation which preempts state law whenever Indian children may be removed from their families. The I.C.W.A. permits Indian tribal courts to decide the future of Indian children, establishes minimum federal standards for removal of Indian children from their families, requires that…

  7. 75 FR 38834 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...: Under Section 11 of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C....

  8. 76 FR 42722 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Assistant... of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 (IGRA), Public Law 100-497, 25 U.S.C. 2710, the...

  9. 76 FR 165 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of 1992... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  10. Anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus in Indian population: A cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Jerina; Mishra, Pravash Ranjan; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Many authors have reported the anatomical variation of abductor pollicis longus (APL) around the wrist and its association with de Quervain tenosynovitis (DQT), first carpo-metacarpal arthritis, and trapezio-metacarpal subluxation. From Indian subcontinent, there is only one original article and a few case reports on the variability of APL tendon insertion. Materials and Methods: Fifty formaldehyde preserved cadaveric wrists were dissected to look for the anatomical variation of APL in the Indian population. Results: The APL was found with single tendon in 2, double in 31, triple in 8, and quadruple in 8 extremities. A maximum of 6 tendon-slips were found in one cadaveric wrist. In all hands, the APL had at least one attachment to first metacarpal bone and in 46 hands (92%), there was second insertion to the trapezium bone. Of all tendon-slips of APL (n = 126), 44% of tendons (68 tendons) were inserted into the base of the first metacarpal bone. This was followed by the insertion into the trapezium in 42% tendons (52 tendons). Conclusion: Bi-tendinous APL is commonly observed on the dorsal compartment of the wrist in Indian population and these tendon-slips are commonly attached to the first metacarpal base and trapezium. This variation must be understood by the Indian Orthopedic surgeons as the response to treatment of DQT and reason for first carpo-metacarpal arthritis can be dependent on this anatomical variation. PMID:26538762

  11. The effect of absorbing aerosols on Indian monsoon circulation and rainfall: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanap, S. D.; Pandithurai, G.

    2015-10-01

    Aerosol, an uncertain component of the climate system, has attracted wide attention among the researchers due to its role in hydrological cycle and radiation budget in a changing climate. According to IPCC 5th assessment report, current understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interaction is low to moderate, as a result they are not well represented in the climate models, and in turn are recognized as major uncertainties in the future climate projections. In South Asian monsoon regions, the aerosol forcing response to water cycle is even more complicated. Substantial amount of transported dust from Middle East countries and adjacent deserts get accumulated over Indian subcontinent (mainly North India and Indo Gangetic Plains; IGP) and further coated with black carbon (BC) produced from local emission, which make the atmospheric physics and chemistry of the aerosol more complex over the region. Here we review earlier studies and recapitulate our current understanding of absorbing aerosols on Indian monsoon circulation and rainfall from observational evidences and variety of numerical model simulations. This review begins with current understanding of the absorbing aerosols and interactions with Indian summer monsoon, followed by discussion on various working hypotheses, observational and modeling perspective, local and remote impacts. The key open questions and suggestions for future research priorities are delineated to improve the current understanding about the relationship between absorbing aerosols and Indian summer monsoon.

  12. More-frequent extreme northward shifts of eastern Indian Ocean tropical convergence under greenhouse warming.

    PubMed

    Weller, Evan; Cai, Wenju; Min, Seung-Ki; Wu, Lixin; Ashok, Karumuri; Yamagata, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) in the tropical eastern Indian Ocean exhibits strong interannual variability, often co-occurring with positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD) events. During what we identify as an extreme ITCZ event, a drastic northward shift of atmospheric convection coincides with an anomalously strong north-minus-south sea surface temperature (SST) gradient over the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. Such shifts lead to severe droughts over the maritime continent and surrounding islands but also devastating floods in southern parts of the Indian subcontinent. Understanding future changes of the ITCZ is therefore of major scientific and socioeconomic interest. Here we find a more-than-doubling in the frequency of extreme ITCZ events under greenhouse warming, estimated from climate models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 that are able to simulate such events. The increase is due to a mean state change with an enhanced north-minus-south SST gradient and a weakened Walker Circulation, facilitating smaller perturbations to shift the ITCZ northwards. PMID:25124737

  13. Lack of Dependence of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Extremes on Temperature: An Observational Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Vittal, H.; Ghosh, Subimal; Karmakar, Subhankar; Pathak, Amey; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    The intensification of precipitation extremes in a warming world has been reported on a global scale and is traditionally explained with the Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relation. The relationship is observed to be valid in mid-latitudes; however, the debate persists in tropical monsoon regions, with the extremes of the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) being a prime example. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the dependence of ISMR extremes on both the 2 m surface air temperature over India and on the sea surface temperature over the tropical Indian Ocean. Remarkably, the ISMR extremes exhibit no significant association with temperature at either spatial scale: neither aggregated over the entire India/Tropical Indian Ocean area nor at the grid levels. We find that the theoretical C-C relation overestimates the positive changes in precipitation extremes, which is also reflected in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) simulations. We emphasize that the changing patterns of extremes over the Indian subcontinent need a scientific re-evaluation, which is possible due to availability of the unique long-term in-situ data. This can aid bias correction of model projections of extremes whose value for climate adaptation can hardly be overemphasized, especially for the developing tropical countries. PMID:27485661

  14. Lack of Dependence of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Extremes on Temperature: An Observational Evidence.

    PubMed

    Vittal, H; Ghosh, Subimal; Karmakar, Subhankar; Pathak, Amey; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    The intensification of precipitation extremes in a warming world has been reported on a global scale and is traditionally explained with the Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relation. The relationship is observed to be valid in mid-latitudes; however, the debate persists in tropical monsoon regions, with the extremes of the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) being a prime example. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the dependence of ISMR extremes on both the 2 m surface air temperature over India and on the sea surface temperature over the tropical Indian Ocean. Remarkably, the ISMR extremes exhibit no significant association with temperature at either spatial scale: neither aggregated over the entire India/Tropical Indian Ocean area nor at the grid levels. We find that the theoretical C-C relation overestimates the positive changes in precipitation extremes, which is also reflected in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) simulations. We emphasize that the changing patterns of extremes over the Indian subcontinent need a scientific re-evaluation, which is possible due to availability of the unique long-term in-situ data. This can aid bias correction of model projections of extremes whose value for climate adaptation can hardly be overemphasized, especially for the developing tropical countries. PMID:27485661

  15. Lack of Dependence of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Extremes on Temperature: An Observational Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittal, H.; Ghosh, Subimal; Karmakar, Subhankar; Pathak, Amey; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2016-08-01

    The intensification of precipitation extremes in a warming world has been reported on a global scale and is traditionally explained with the Clausius-Clapeyron (C-C) relation. The relationship is observed to be valid in mid-latitudes; however, the debate persists in tropical monsoon regions, with the extremes of the Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR) being a prime example. Here, we present a comprehensive study on the dependence of ISMR extremes on both the 2 m surface air temperature over India and on the sea surface temperature over the tropical Indian Ocean. Remarkably, the ISMR extremes exhibit no significant association with temperature at either spatial scale: neither aggregated over the entire India/Tropical Indian Ocean area nor at the grid levels. We find that the theoretical C-C relation overestimates the positive changes in precipitation extremes, which is also reflected in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) simulations. We emphasize that the changing patterns of extremes over the Indian subcontinent need a scientific re-evaluation, which is possible due to availability of the unique long-term in-situ data. This can aid bias correction of model projections of extremes whose value for climate adaptation can hardly be overemphasized, especially for the developing tropical countries.

  16. Congenital malaria in a neonate: case report with a comprehensive review on differential diagnosis, treatment and prevention in Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Rai, Preeti; Majumdar, Kaushik; Sharma, Sunita; Chauhan, Richa; Chandra, Jagdish

    2015-06-01

    Although malaria in pregnancy, lactation and congenital malaria can be a disease burden in the endemic zones of Africa and Indian sub-continent, it is still epidemiologically less investigated in India. As it may lead to considerable maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality, awareness and timely intervention is necessary for desirable outcome and prevention of the condition. Very few reports of congenital malaria are available in the literature from an endemic country like India. Herein we describe a case of congenital malaria from north India in a 21-day neonate. Clinical presentation of this condition in the neonate may offer a considerable diagnostic challenge, and differentiation from vector borne malaria in infants may be important from the management point of view. Hence a review of the differential diagnosis, management and prevention of congenital malaria has been attempted in the Indian perspective. PMID:26064034

  17. The great Indian haze revisited: aerosol distribution effects on microphysical and optical properties of warm clouds over peninsular India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanti, R.; Ghosh, S.

    2010-03-01

    The Indian subcontinent is undergoing a phase of rapid urbanisation. Inevitable fallout of this process is a concomitant increase in air pollution much of which can be attributed to the infamous great Indian haze phenomena. One observes that the aerosol size distributions vary considerably along the Bay of Bengal (BOB), Arabian Sea (AS) and the Indian Ocean (IO), although, the dynamical attributes are very similar, particularly over the BOB and the AS during this season. Unlike major European studies (e.g. Aerosol Characterization Experiment-2, Ghosh et al., 2005), there are no cloud microphysical modelling studies to complement these observational results for the Indian sub-continent. Ours is the first modelling study over this important region where a time-tested model (O'Dowd et al., 1999a; Ghosh et al., 2007; Rap et al., 2009) is used to obtain cloud microphysical and optical properties from observed aerosol size distributions. Un-activated aerosol particles and very small cloud droplets have to be treated specially to account for non-ideal effects-our model does this effectively yielding realistic estimate of cloud droplet number concentrations (Nc). Empirical relationships linking aerosol concentration to (Nc) yield a disproportionately higher Nc suggesting that such empirical formulations should be used with caution. Our modelling study reveals that the cloud's microphysical and optical properties are very similar along the AS and the BOB despite them having disparate dry aerosol spectral distributions. This is non-intuitive, as one would expect changes in microphysical development with widely different aerosol distributions. There is some increase in cloud droplet numbers with increased haze concentrations but much less than a simple proportion would indicate.

  18. The American Indian: A Natural Philosopher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunge, Robert P.

    1978-01-01

    Describes American Indian philosophy, Indian attitudes on man's place in the cosmos, Indian socio-political practice, Indian moral values and community philosophy, and the differences between "white" and Indian culture. (RK)

  19. Protecting American Indian Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischler, Ronald S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The passage of the Indian Child Welfare Act has caused concern and misunderstanding among social workers. The Act is seen as a victory for tribal sovereignty but must be viewed within the context of American Indian culture and child rearing practices. (Author/JAC)

  20. Contemporary American Indian Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Sidner

    2009-01-01

    In his keynote address to the Fifth Annual American Indian Studies Consortium in 2005 David Wilkins began by commenting on earlier attempts to formally organize such a gathering in ways that might help establish and accredit Indian studies programs. He said he had the sense that the thrust of earlier meetings "was really an opportunity for Native…

  1. The Tarascan Indian House.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Joyce

    1989-01-01

    This lesson plan introduces K-grade three students to Mexican Indian architecture. Students will become familiar with the cultural context of the Indian treasure house; discuss the use of wood as the sole building material; compare the treasure house with present day structures; and create miniature treasure houses using wood materials. (GEA)

  2. America's Indian Statues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gridley, Marion E., Comp.

    A comprehensive compilation of facts and photographs of statues honoring or memorializing the American Indians is presented in this paperback. The vignettes accompanying the photographs are the result of extensive research. Examples of the American Indian statues include "The Signal of Peace,""The Protest,"" The Medicine Man,""Appeal to the Great…

  3. The (East) Indian Woman.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidoo, Josephine

    The focus of this paper is on the social, cultural, and psychological problems women of East Indian origin share with other immigrant women in Canada. Also examined are problems that are unique to the East Indian woman and the ways in which she deals with the challenges, conflicting cultural values, and expectations that confront her. The…

  4. Pima Indian Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Anna Moore

    The stated purpose of this book is to preserve in writing some of the Pima Indian legends that had been verbally passed from generation to generation in the past. This collection of 23 legends, which were originally used to instruct the young people of the tribe, presents in story form various aspects of American Indian life--including…

  5. The Omaha Indians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Briefly recounting the history of the Omaha American Indians, this article makes a plea for relocation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs local Agency in Macy near the Omaha reservation, suggesting that the Returned Students movement is a response to this need for the Agency's relocation. (JC)

  6. Indians of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Briefly describing each tribe within Arizona's four major American Indian groups, this handbook presents information relative to the cultural background and socioeconomic development of the following tribes: (1) Athapascan Tribes (Navajos and Apaches); (2) Pueblo Indians (Hopis); (3) Desert Rancheria Tribes (Pimas, Yumas, Papagos, Maricopas,…

  7. Indian Inuit Pottery '73

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tawow, 1974

    1974-01-01

    A unique exhibit of Canadian Native Ceramics which began touring various art galleries in September 1973 is described both verbally and photographically. The Indian Inuit Pottery '73 display, part of the 1973 International Ceramics Exhibition, includes 110 samples of craftsmanship from Indian and Inuit artists across Canada. (KM)

  8. Indians in Careers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollow, Kitty, Ed.; Heuving, Jeanne, Ed.

    Every student in high school is faced with the question of what to do after graduation. American Indian students, whether on or off reservations, need ideas as to what is available to them. This compilation of interviews with 10 individuals who are maintaining their "Indian identity" and making contributions in the working world provides role…

  9. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  10. Evidence for long-lived subduction of an ancient tectonic plate beneath the southern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, N. A.; Myers, S. C.; Johannesson, G.; Matzel, E.; Grand, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Ancient subducted tectonic plates have been observed in past seismic images of the mantle beneath North America and Eurasia, and it is likely that other ancient slab structures have remained largely hidden, particularly in the seismic-data-limited regions beneath the vast oceans in the Southern Hemisphere. Here we present a new global tomographic image, which shows a slab-like structure beneath the southern Indian Ocean with coherency from the upper mantle to the core-mantle boundary region—a feature that has never been identified. We postulate that the structure is an ancient tectonic plate that sank into the mantle along an extensive intraoceanic subduction zone that migrated southwestward across the ancient Tethys Ocean in the Mesozoic Era. Slab material still trapped in the transition zone is positioned near the edge of East Gondwana at 140 Ma suggesting that subduction terminated near the margin of the ancient continent prior to breakup and subsequent dispersal of its subcontinents.

  11. Allele frequency for Cystic fibrosis in Indians vis-a/-vis global populations.

    PubMed

    Bepari, Karnajit Kumar; Malakar, Arup Kumar; Paul, Prosenjit; Halder, Binata; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. This gene encodes a protein involved in epithelial anion channel. Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-limiting genetic disorder in Caucasians; it also affects other ethnic groups like the Blacks and the Native Americans. Cystic fibrosis is considered to be rare among individuals from the Indian subcontinent. We analyzed a total of 29 world׳s populations for cystic fibrosis on the basis of gene frequency and heterozygosity. Among 29 countries Switzerland revealed the highest gene frequency and heterozygosity for CF (0.022, 0.043) whereas Japan recorded the lowest values (0.002, 0.004) followed by India (0.004, 0.008). Our analysis suggests that the prevalence of cystic fibrosis is very low in India. PMID:26339151

  12. Cervical Footprint Anthropometry in Indian Population: Implications on Design of Artificial Disc Replacement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vishwanath Mahabaleshwar; Bangalore, Shashidhar Kantharajanna; Saraf, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Purpose To accurately measure the dimensions of cervical endplates based on computed tomography (CT) scans in Indian population and assess accuracy of match with currently available cervical disc prostheses. Overview of Literature The dimensions of currently available cervical disc replacement implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae endplates for Caucasian population. To author's knowledge, similar study has not been published for patients from Indian subcontinent. Methods CT scans of cervical spine of patients from Indian subcontinent were collected and reviewed. Seventy patients (54 men and 16 women; aged 18–56 years with average of 37 years) who underwent CT scans of cervical spine were included in study. 3D CT scans of sub axial cervical spine (C3 to C7) were analyzed. The anterior-posterior (AP) and central mediolateral (CML) dimensions of superior and inferior endplates from C3 to C7 were measured using digital measuring system. Results A total of 560 endplates of 70 patients were included in the study. The AP diameter of cervical endplates ranged from 0.87 to 2.47 cm. The CML diameters ranged from 0.84 to 2.98 cm. For levels C3/C4 and C4/C5 for AP dimension Prestige-LP (90.5%) and Prodisc-C (89%) discs showed higher percentage of matching than Discover discs (58.5%). For CML diameter, Prestige-LP (69.5%), Prodisc-C (70%) and Discover (39.5%) discs showed almost similar matching with measured endplates. For levels C5/C6 and C6/C7 for AP dimension, Prestige-LP (67.25%), Prodisc-C (49.35%) and Discover (51.5%) discs showed similar matching. For CML diameter Prestige-LP (32%), Prodisc-C (27.5%) and Discover (42.2%) discs showed poor matching with measured endplates. Conclusions This study indicates need for redesign of cervical disc prostheses to match Indian patients. The collected anthropometric dimensions from this study may be used to design and develop indigenous artificial total disc

  13. O the Interannual Variability of the Indian Monsoon and the Southern Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming Chin

    The mechanisms of the interannual variability of the Indian monsoon and the Southern Oscillation are investigated from observations in the Indian Ocean sector. On this diagnostic basis, a statistical forecasting scheme is developed for all-India rainfall anomalies. A good summer monsoon is characterized by the following aspects. (1) Arabian Sea: higher sea surface temperature (SST) in the pre-monsoon season but lower SST in the monsoon and post -monsoon seasons, lower sea level pressure (SLP) throughout the year, strong surface wind and more cloudiness from the pre-monsoon through the post-monsoon seasons; (2) Indian subcontinent: higher surface temperature in the pre-monsoon season but lower surface temperature afterward, decreased lower-tropospheric constant pressure topographies and higher in the North but lower in the South upper-tropospheric topographies, stronger lower-tropospheric inflow from the South and upper-tropospheric outflow toward the South, and more northward position of the upper-air ridge; and (3) Tibetan Plateau: a warm and dry concurrent summer and a warm and wet preceding winter. An early monsoon onset is heralded by oceanic -atmospheric conditions around the Indian subcontinent similar to those for a good monsoon year. However, conditions immediately following an early monsoon onset are characterized in the Arabian Sea by high SST, strong surface wind, less cloudiness, and high SLP, and in India by an anomalously cold and then warm surface environment. A cool equatorial Pacific Ocean episode of the southern Oscillation is characterized in the Indian Ocean by higher SST in the antecedent seasons but lower SST in the concurrent and following seasons, lower SLP from the preceding throughout the following seasons, stronger surface wind in the western part of the ocean but weaker surface wind in the eastern part during the summer, and more cloudiness. Both large positive values of the Southern Oscillation index and its tendency foreshadow a good

  14. Cornell Courts a Subcontinent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selingo, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    India is increasingly showing up on the travel schedules of college presidents nationwide. Like American corporations that began coming to India more than a decade ago to tap the brain power of its millions of inexpensive, well-educated engineers, software writers, and medical technicians, American higher-education institutions are flocking here…

  15. Information About Indians of Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toothman, Maryann; Jensen, Denise

    An intermediate or junior high level unit on Indians indigenous to Iowa focuses on history, culture, and cultural conflict between the Indians and white Americans. Many of the materials can be adapted for use in other states or for a more general unit on American Indians. Twenty lessons cover the location of Iowa; prehistoric Iowa; Indian society…

  16. 75 FR 68823 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Amendment. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the Amendments to the Class III Gaming Compact (Amendment) between the State of Oregon and the Siletz Indians...

  17. 78 FR 11221 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-15

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the gaming..., 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  18. 78 FR 15738 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the gaming..., 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  19. 77 FR 76513 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Amended Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  20. 77 FR 43110 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  1. 75 FR 38833 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approved Compact between... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy...

  2. 75 FR 8108 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the Tribal-State Compact between the Pyramid Lake Paiute Indian Tribe and the State of Nevada Governing Class III...

  3. 75 FR 55823 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  4. 75 FR 61511 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming..., 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  5. 76 FR 8375 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the Gaming..., 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  6. 76 FR 52968 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  7. 75 FR 68618 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewas (``Tribe'') and the State of Wisconsin Gaming Compact of... CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant...

  8. 77 FR 45371 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  9. 77 FR 59641 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of...

  10. 76 FR 65208 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an Approval of the Gaming..., Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic...

  11. 76 FR 33341 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of Gaming... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian Gaming, Office of the...

  12. 78 FR 44146 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Class III Amended and Restated Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians and...

  13. 78 FR 26801 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of an amendment to the Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin and...

  14. 76 FR 56466 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an approval of the gaming...: September 13, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Paula L. Hart, Director, Office of Indian...

  15. New Indian Tribalism. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckmann, Kathleen

    The purposes of this paper are to identify the problems Washington State Indians face and to provide considerations that might assist in promoting the welfare and well-being of American Indians. It is stated that the major barrier to the Indian's success in American society is the attitude of the Anglo towards the Indian. Thus, the programs and…

  16. Federal Financing of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loon, Eric Van

    Since over 200 million Federal dollars are disbursed annually for American Indian education under Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Elementary Secondary Education Act Title I, Indian Education Act Title IV, and Johnson O'Malley programs, it is difficult to understand the dismal state of Indian education. However, factors contributing to abuse of…

  17. Indian concepts on sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Thakurata, Rajarshi Guha

    2013-01-01

    India is a vast country depicting wide social, cultural and sexual variations. Indian concept of sexuality has evolved over time and has been immensely influenced by various rulers and religions. Indian sexuality is manifested in our attire, behavior, recreation, literature, sculptures, scriptures, religion and sports. It has influenced the way we perceive our health, disease and device remedies for the same. In modern era, with rapid globalization the unique Indian sexuality is getting diffused. The time has come to rediscover ourselves in terms of sexuality to attain individual freedom and to reinvest our energy to social issues related to sexuality. PMID:23858263

  18. What Problems Do American Indians Have with English?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A literature survey to determine problems American Indians experience with English focused on problems solvable through computer presentation of materials. Recommendations included practice in selected minimally contrasting vowel pairs/consonant pairs, final consonants/consonant clusters, irregular plural nouns, verb tense forms, determiners,…

  19. Indian Ocean ridge seismicity observed with a permanent hydroacoustic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Jeffrey A.; Bowman, J. Roger

    2005-03-01

    The distribution of earthquakes along the Indian Ocean ridge system between January 18 and October 20, 2003 is investigated using data from two hydrophone stations of the International Monitoring System's global network. Coherent array processing of earthquake-induced hydroacoustic T-waves is used to determine precise arrival times and back azimuths that allow automatic location of the earthquakes. We observed 4725 events throughout the Indian Ocean Basin. Here, we examine 1146 earthquakes from the Central and Southeast Indian Ridge. Source level estimates from the hydroacoustic signals indicate that the hydroacoustic network is at least one magnitude unit more sensitive than the seismic network for Indian Ocean ridge earthquakes. The seismicity primarily clusters at ridge transform offsets. Events are observed off the ridge axis near Boomerang and St. Pierre Seamounts, the active expression of the Amsterdam-St. Paul Hotspot. Seismic gaps are observed at several ridge segments with anomalous bathymetric highs.

  20. Future projections of Indian Ocean SSTs and its impact on monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelliyil Sabeerali, Cherumadanakadan; Ravindran, Ajayamohan

    2016-04-01

    Assessing the future projections of the Indian Ocean (IO) Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) under the global warming scenario has a paramount societal impact considering its potential to alter the seasonal mean rainfall over the Indian subcontinent. Observations show a pronounced warming in the western tropical IO compared to other ocean basins. Here, we explore the projections of boreal summer SSTs over the IO using the Representative Concentration Pathways 8.5 (RCP8.5) scenarios of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase5 (CMIP5) simulations. Consistent with observations, most of the CMIP5 models show a faster warming rate over the western tropical IO compared to other ocean basins. Model simulations indicate a shift in the mean Walker circulation with an anomalous ascending motion over the central equatorial Pacific and an anomalous descending motion over the eastern tropical IO. As a consequence of this, a negative SST skewness is evident in the eastern tropical IO which leads to the increased frequency of positive Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events. Mechanisms responsible for this pronounced western IO warming is studied by analyzing the changes in the mean thermocline depth and circulation features. The impact of these changes in IO SST on seasonal mean monsoon precipitation and circulation in a warming scenario and its associated mechanisms are also investigated.

  1. Exploring domestic violence and social distress in Australian-Indian migrants through community theater.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Manjula; Colucci, Erminia

    2016-02-01

    In many parts of the world, young adult women have higher levels of common mental disorders than men. The exacerbation of domestic violence (DV) by migration is a salient social determinant of poor mental health. Ecological models describe factors contributing to DV as operating at individual, family, cultural, and societal levels. We explored the interplay among these factors in an Indian community living in Melbourne, Australia, in a qualitative participatory action research study using a modified Forum Theater approach. We here present findings on connections between migration, societal factors, and social/family/cultural factors in DV. The study captured the voices of women living in the community as they describe how DV contributes to their emotional difficulties. Improved understanding of the sociocultural dynamics of DV and the associated social distress in this migrant Indian community can be used to guide the development of culturally sensitive prevention and response programs to assist migrant women from the Indian subcontinent who present with psychopathology and suicidal behaviors associated with DV. PMID:26341404

  2. Different impacts of mega-ENSO and conventional ENSO on the Indian summer rainfall: developing phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wu, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yefan

    2016-04-01

    Mega-El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a boarder version of conventional ENSO, is found to be a main driving force of Northern Hemisphere summer monsoon rainfall including the Indian summer rainfall (ISR). The simultaneous impacts of "pure" mega-ENSO and "pure" conventional ENSO events on the ISR in its developing summer remains unclear. This study examines the different linkages between mega-ENSO-ISR and conventional ENSO-ISR. During the developing summer of mega-El Niño, negative rainfall anomalies are seen over the northeastern Indian subcontinent, while the anomalous rainfall pattern is almost the opposite for mega-La Niña; as for the conventional ENSO, the approximate "linear opposite" phenomenon vanishes. Furthermore, the global zonal wave trains anomalous are found at mid-latitude zones, with a local triple circulation pattern over the central-east Eurasia during mega-ENSO events, which might be an explanation of corresponding rainfall response over the Indian Peninsula. Among 106-year historical run (1900-2005) of 9 state-of-the-art models from the Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), HadGEM2-ES performs a promising skill in simulating the anomalous circulation pattern over mid-latitude and central-east Eurasia while CanESM2 cannot. Probably, it is the models' ability of capturing the mega-ENSO-ISR linkage and the characteristic of mega-ENSO that make the difference.

  3. Demographic loss, genetic structure and the conservation implications for Indian tigers

    PubMed Central

    Mondol, Samrat; Bruford, Michael W.; Ramakrishnan, Uma

    2013-01-01

    India is home to approximately 60 per cent of the world's remaining wild tigers, a species that has declined in the last few centuries to occupy less than 7 per cent of its former geographical range. While Indian tiger numbers have somewhat stabilized in recent years, they remain low and populations are highly fragmented. Therefore, the application of evidence-based demographic and genetic management to enhance the remaining populations is a priority. In this context, and using genetic data from historical and modern tigers, we investigated anthropogenic impacts on genetic variation in Indian tigers using mitochondrial and nuclear genetic markers. We found a very high number of historical mitochondrial DNA variants, 93 per cent of which are not detected in modern populations. Population differentiation was higher in modern tigers. Simulations incorporating historical data support population decline, and suggest high population structure in extant populations. Decreased connectivity and habitat loss as a result of ongoing fragmentation in the Indian subcontinent has therefore resulted in a loss of genetic variants and increased genetic differentiation among tiger populations. These results highlight that anthropogenic fragmentation and species-specific demographic processes can interact to alter the partitioning of genetic variation over very short time scales. We conclude that ongoing strategies to maximize the size of some tiger populations, at the expense of losing others, is an inadequate conservation strategy, as it could result in a loss of genetic diversity that may be of adaptive significance for this emblematic species. PMID:23677341

  4. 25 CFR 502.12 - Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian lands. 502.12 Section 502.12 Indians NATIONAL INDIAN GAMING COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL PROVISIONS DEFINITIONS OF THIS CHAPTER § 502.12 Indian lands. Indian lands means: (a) Land within the limits of an Indian reservation; or (b)...

  5. 76 FR 8743 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-Graduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-Graduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. ] CFDA Numbers: 93.971, 93.123, and 93.972. DATES:...

  6. 78 FR 78976 - Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate and Indian Health...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Health Professions Preparatory, Indian Health Professions Pre-graduate and Indian Health Professions Scholarship Programs Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Numbers: 93.971, 93.123, AND 93.972 Key...

  7. Indian craniometric variability and affinities.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with "Caucasoid" populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  8. Indian Craniometric Variability and Affinities

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Pathmanathan; Bulbeck, David; Pathmanathan, Gayathiri; Rathee, Suresh Kanta

    2013-01-01

    Recently published craniometric and genetic studies indicate a predominantly indigenous ancestry of Indian populations. We address this issue with a fuller coverage of Indian craniometrics than any done before. We analyse metrical variability within Indian series, Indians' sexual dimorphism, differences between northern and southern Indians, index-based differences of Indian males from other series, and Indians' multivariate affinities. The relationship between a variable's magnitude and its variability is log-linear. This relationship is strengthened by excluding cranial fractions and series with a sample size less than 30. Male crania are typically larger than female crania, but there are also shape differences. Northern Indians differ from southern Indians in various features including narrower orbits and less pronounced medial protrusion of the orbits. Indians resemble Veddas in having small crania and similar cranial shape. Indians' wider geographic affinities lie with “Caucasoid” populations to the northwest, particularly affecting northern Indians. The latter finding is confirmed from shape-based Mahalanobis-D distances calculated for the best sampled male and female series. Demonstration of a distinctive South Asian craniometric profile and the intermediate status of northern Indians between southern Indians and populations northwest of India confirm the predominantly indigenous ancestry of northern and especially southern Indians. PMID:24455409

  9. Indian Alcoholism and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Wayne; Patch, Kenneth

    1981-01-01

    Educational programs about alcohol should be presented in the formal school setting for Indian youth and in the communities for the general population. The primary outcome of these programs would be the development of self-management skills. (Author)

  10. ARIZONA INDIAN RESERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polygon coverage of all Indian Reservations in Arizona. Reservation boundaries are compiled from multiple sources and are derived from several different source scales. Information such as reservation type, primary tribe name and location source are included with the coverage. A...

  11. REGION 9 INDIAN RESERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polygon coverage of all Indian Reservations in US EPA Region 9 (California, Arizona and Nevada). Reservation boundaries are compiled from multiple sources and are derived from several different source scales. Information such as reservation type, primary tribe name and location...

  12. NEVADA INDIAN RESERVATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polygon coverage of all Indian Reservations in Nevada. Reservation boundaries are compiled from multiple sources and are derived from several different source scales. Information such as reservation type, primary tribe name and location source are included with the coverage. As...

  13. Indian Summer for Wayfarers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltenbronn, Kyra

    1977-01-01

    A recreational program involving hiking and camping emphasizes teaching young participants through archeology and adventure experiences about American Indians, their technology, and their means of survival in the wilderness. (JD)

  14. Tourism and Indian Exploitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Lawrence

    1977-01-01

    A cursory review of Federal support to the Eastern Cherokees shows that the Cherokee Historical Association and not the Cherokee Indians are the recipients and beneficiaries of many Federal grants. (JC)

  15. Ishi: A Yahi Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    The Yahi Indians were part of a larger tribal group called the Yana. The Yahi way of life, along with the lives of many other California Indian groups, changed when European and U.S. settlers came to California. In 1872 Ishi and his family were the last of the Yahi living in the Deer Creek (California) area. By 1911 Ishi was the last surviving…

  16. Restricted Genetic Variation in Populations of Achatina (Lissachatina) fulica outside of East Africa and the Indian Ocean Islands Points to the Indian Ocean Islands as the Earliest Known Common Source

    PubMed Central

    Fontanilla, Ian Kendrich C.; Sta. Maria, Inna Mikaella P.; Garcia, James Rainier M.; Ghate, Hemant; Naggs, Fred; Wade, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    The Giant African Land Snail, Achatina ( = Lissachatina) fulica Bowdich, 1822, is a tropical crop pest species with a widespread distribution across East Africa, the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, the Pacific, the Caribbean, and North and South America. Its current distribution is attributed primarily to the introduction of the snail to new areas by Man within the last 200 years. This study determined the extent of genetic diversity in global A. fulica populations using the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene. A total of 560 individuals were evaluated from 39 global populations obtained from 26 territories. Results reveal 18 distinct A. fulica haplotypes; 14 are found in East Africa and the Indian Ocean islands, but only two haplotypes from the Indian Ocean islands emerged from this region, the C haplotype, now distributed across the tropics, and the D haplotype in Ecuador and Bolivia. Haplotype E from the Philippines, F from New Caledonia and Barbados, O from India and Q from Ecuador are variants of the emergent C haplotype. For the non-native populations, the lack of genetic variation points to founder effects due to the lack of multiple introductions from the native range. Our current data could only point with certainty to the Indian Ocean islands as the earliest known common source of A. fulica across the globe, which necessitates further sampling in East Africa to determine the source populations of the emergent haplotypes. PMID:25203830

  17. Ionospheric perturbations associated with 26th December 2004 Indian ocean tsunami: A detailed investigation through Indian Geodetic GNSS network observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannoth, S.; Vijayan, M.; Earnest, A.; Jade, S.

    2013-12-01

    Ionospheric perturbations associated with Indian ocean tsunami triggered by the 26th December 2004 was reported by Liu et el. (2006), Lognonne (2006), Das gupta et al. (2006) and many authors numerically modelled this ionospheric perturbations [e.g. Occhipinti et al. (2006)]. All those previous reports and observations are from few IGS stations in this region other than Das gupta et al. (2006). Das gupta et al.(2006) reported the TEC enhancement associated with the earthquake from observations of few Indian GPS stations. However, no detailed analysis using Indian GPS stations segregating the ionospheric perturbations associated with tsunami is reported so far. Observations from the regional network and detailed analysis will help to to refine the numerical models as well as to understand the physics of tsunamigenic ionospheri perturbations. In this paper, We present a detailed investigation on perturbations in the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) induced by the gravity waves generated by open ocean Tsunami triggered by the 26th December 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake using observations from Indian Geodetic GNSS network. Indian geodetic GNSS network consists of more than twenty continuous mode geodetic GNSS stations spread across Indian subcontinent. GPS code and phase observations from all these stations and IGS stations in this region have been used to estimate TEC and geometry-free differential TEC (dTEC) representing ionospheric perturbation using the software IONODETECT developed at CSIR 4PI. The non-tsunamigenic perturbations have been filtered out from the geometry-free dTEC using a bandpass filter ranging 0.3 to 3.3mHz following Lognonne et al (2006). We also show the applicability of data from low elevation observations which are usually discarded to avoid noise due to multi-paths (multipath-free perturbation signals are ensured through multi-PRN multi-receiver combination). Using low elevation observations, for the first time, we present

  18. Detection of arecoline by simple high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method in Indian nontobacco pan masala

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Anjan; Hazra, Alok Kumar; Sur, Tapas Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Chewing the habit of blended pan masala containing areca nut with or without tobacco is a common practice in the Indian subcontinent. Arecoline, a pyridine alkaloid presence in areca nut alarmed for oral carcinogenesis and strictly prohibited in the western world. However, in India using blended pan masala is very popular among young and old individuals. In this context, we aimed to detect arecoline in Indian blended nontobacco pan masala sold in Kolkata using a simple densitometric high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method and for alarming their use in common people. Eleven popularly Indian blended nontobacco pan masala were collected from the territory of Kolkata and isolated arecoline, following solvent extraction method derived for pyridine alkaloid. The quantitative analysis of arecoline was measured using automated software-based HPTLC instruments and validated the method according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. Arecoline was detected in all 11 blended nontobacco pan masala samples in a range of minimum 130 to maximum 415 μg/g dry samples. Arecoline is hazardous carcinogenic compound, so the use of Indian blended nontobacco pan masala should be restricted. Further, the method was found suitable for routine quantitative analysis of arecoline in areca nut containing substances. PMID:26605162

  19. Detection of arecoline by simple high-performance thin-layer chromatographic method in Indian nontobacco pan masala.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Anjan; Hazra, Alok Kumar; Sur, Tapas Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Chewing the habit of blended pan masala containing areca nut with or without tobacco is a common practice in the Indian subcontinent. Arecoline, a pyridine alkaloid presence in areca nut alarmed for oral carcinogenesis and strictly prohibited in the western world. However, in India using blended pan masala is very popular among young and old individuals. In this context, we aimed to detect arecoline in Indian blended nontobacco pan masala sold in Kolkata using a simple densitometric high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) method and for alarming their use in common people. Eleven popularly Indian blended nontobacco pan masala were collected from the territory of Kolkata and isolated arecoline, following solvent extraction method derived for pyridine alkaloid. The quantitative analysis of arecoline was measured using automated software-based HPTLC instruments and validated the method according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. Arecoline was detected in all 11 blended nontobacco pan masala samples in a range of minimum 130 to maximum 415 μg/g dry samples. Arecoline is hazardous carcinogenic compound, so the use of Indian blended nontobacco pan masala should be restricted. Further, the method was found suitable for routine quantitative analysis of arecoline in areca nut containing substances. PMID:26605162

  20. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  1. Resources for Teaching About American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Lynn

    1987-01-01

    Lists selected resources for teaching about American Indians available from the ERIC database. Topics of resources include Navajo history, Pacific Northwest history, Indians of Oklahoma, Indian traditions, Plains Indian culture, and Pawnee history. (AEM)

  2. Young Once, Indian Forever: Youth Gangs in Indian Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, James; Lim, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Not unlike mainstream society of the United States, Indian Country faces new challenges regarding the values, mores, and behavior of its young people. Since their first encounters with European explorers, American Indians have fought to preserve their culture and traditions. Federal policies that addressed the "Indian problem" by establishing…

  3. The Horse and the Plains Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuessler, Raymond

    Produced by the Montana Council for Indian Education as part of its Indian Culture Series, the five short articles in the book explain how the Plains Indians got horses in legend and in fact. The stories describe the behavior codes, rules, cultural and social significance, and eventual cessation of horse raids, and the ceremony and tradition…

  4. Indian Tales of the Northern Rockies. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Old Coyote, Sally; Toineeta, Joy Yellowtail

    Part of the Montana Council for Indian Education's Indian Culture Series, the book contains six folk stories recorded on reservations and by headstart teachers. The stories are: "The Owl", a Gros Ventre tale; "How the Robin Got a Red Breast", from the Flathead Tribe; "Old Man Coyote and the Wild Geese", a Crow Indian folk story; "How the Animals…

  5. Strong Endemism of Bloom-Forming Tubular Ulva in Indian West Coast, with Description of Ulva paschima Sp. Nov. (Ulvales, Chlorophyta)

    PubMed Central

    Bast, Felix; John, Aijaz Ahmad; Bhushan, Satej

    2014-01-01

    Ulva intestinalis and Ulva compressa are two bloom-forming morphologically-cryptic species of green seaweeds widely accepted as cosmopolitan in distribution. Previous studies have shown that these are two distinct species that exhibit great morphological plasticity with changing seawater salinity. Here we present a phylogeographic assessment of tubular Ulva that we considered belonging to this complex collected from various marine and estuarine green-tide occurrences in a ca. 600 km stretch of the Indian west coast. Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic reconstructions using ITS nrDNA revealed strong endemism of Indian tubular Ulva, with none of the Indian isolates forming part of the already described phylogenetic clades of either U. compressa or U. intestinalis. Due to the straightforward conclusion that Indian isolates form a robust and distinct phylogenetic clade, a description of a new bloom-forming species, Ulva paschima Bast, is formally proposed. Our phylogenetic reconstructions using Neighbor-Joining method revealed evolutionary affinity of this new species with Ulva flexuosa. This is the first molecular assessment of Ulva from the Indian Subcontinent. PMID:25329833

  6. Strong Endemism of bloom-forming tubular Ulva in Indian West Coast, with description of Ulva paschima Sp. Nov. (Ulvales, Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Bast, Felix; John, Aijaz Ahmad; Bhushan, Satej

    2014-01-01

    Ulva intestinalis and Ulva compressa are two bloom-forming morphologically-cryptic species of green seaweeds widely accepted as cosmopolitan in distribution. Previous studies have shown that these are two distinct species that exhibit great morphological plasticity with changing seawater salinity. Here we present a phylogeographic assessment of tubular Ulva that we considered belonging to this complex collected from various marine and estuarine green-tide occurrences in a ca. 600 km stretch of the Indian west coast. Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Inference phylogenetic reconstructions using ITS nrDNA revealed strong endemism of Indian tubular Ulva, with none of the Indian isolates forming part of the already described phylogenetic clades of either U. compressa or U. intestinalis. Due to the straightforward conclusion that Indian isolates form a robust and distinct phylogenetic clade, a description of a new bloom-forming species, Ulva paschima Bast, is formally proposed. Our phylogenetic reconstructions using Neighbor-Joining method revealed evolutionary affinity of this new species with Ulva flexuosa. This is the first molecular assessment of Ulva from the Indian Subcontinent. PMID:25329833

  7. 78 FR 10203 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Chippewa-Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Indian Reservation... Chippewa-Cree Indians of the Rocky Boy's Reservation and the State of Montana submitted a Class III...

  8. Hamlin Garland and the Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underhill, Lonnie E.

    1974-01-01

    Written to stimulate interest in an evaluation of Hamlin Garland's total production of work on the American Indian, this article suggests a reevaluation of some of Garland's work in light of the current interest in American Indian studies. (JC)

  9. Teaching about Indians? Use the Real Stuff!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldkamp-Price, Betsy; Smith, David Lee

    1994-01-01

    Provides suggestions for teaching students about American Indians. Teachers need to learn more about Indians; confront misconceptions and stereotypes; have students make Indian crafts and foods; play Indian games; learn about contemporary Indian culture; be critical of resources; and contact local Indian or cultural groups. (MDM)

  10. Indian womanhood: some psychological concepts.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Dhanalakshmi; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Indian womanhood today is at crossroads. The present paper discusses the status of Indian womanhood and its psychological underpinnings. It discusses how Indian women have suffered at the hands of their families and society leaving no path but to succumb to psychiatric illness. The role of mental health professionals and family members in supporting and promoting growth and development of the Indian woman is outlined. PMID:25838719

  11. Indian Womanhood: Some Psychological Concepts*

    PubMed Central

    De Sousa, Dhanalakshmi; De Sousa, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Indian womanhood today is at crossroads. The present paper discusses the status of Indian womanhood and its psychological underpinnings. It discusses how Indian women have suffered at the hands of their families and society leaving no path but to succumb to psychiatric illness. The role of mental health professionals and family members in supporting and promoting growth and development of the Indian woman is outlined. PMID:25838719

  12. Indian Child Welfare in Montana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dull Knife Memorial Coll., Lame Deer, MT.

    This report is based upon a 1985-86 survey conducted by the Dull Knife Memorial College Indian Child Welfare Project. A series of workshops were conducted throughout Montana to acquaint providers of services for abused and neglected Indian children with the requirements of and issues associated with the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978.…

  13. The American Indian: A Microcourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glick, Norman; And Others

    Designed for secondary students and dealing with the concept of ethnicity in an urban setting, this microcourse on the American Indian presents general information on American Indians and an in-depth study of Indians within the Chicago, Illinois area. Included in this curriculum guide are: seven specific behavioral objectives; course content (some…

  14. Directory of American Indian Tribes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff. Inst. for Human Development.

    This directory provides general information on American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and lands. The information was compiled from several resources including the "Federal Register," the Bureau of Indian Affairs, "The Native American Almanac" (A. Hirschfelder, M. K. de Montano), the "Atlas of North American Indian Tribes" (Carl Waldman), the…

  15. Title IV: Improving Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Kipp A.

    The Indian Education Act of 1972, Title IV, has improved Native American education by emphasizing Native American control; it comes after 400 years of Euro-American involvement in Indian education during which assimilation was the primary goal. In 1568 Jesuit priests began "civilizing" and Christianizing the "savage" Indians; in 1794 the first…

  16. The Indian in American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Virgil J.

    The treatment of American Indians is discussed historically with reference to the 4 principal methods used to create or perpetuate false impressions: obliteration, defamation, disembodiment, and disparagement. Indian contributions to American civilization are cited in contrast with historical references to Indians in textbooks. The author suggests…

  17. 78 FR 33435 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Amendments. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of an Agreement to Amend the Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact between the Salt River Pima- Maricopa...

  18. 78 FR 54670 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Yankton Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  19. 77 FR 30550 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... of Approval in the Federal Register on February 23, 2010 (47 FR 44678). This agreement allows for the... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval by the...

  20. 78 FR 17427 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval of the agreement between the Northern Cheyenne Tribe and the State of Montana concerning Class III Gaming (Compact)....

  1. 76 FR 49505 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes an extension of the Tribal-State gaming compact between the Oglala Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES: Effective...

  2. 76 FR 49505 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Tribal-State... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC...

  3. 77 FR 41200 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes approval by the Department of an extension to the Class III Gaming Compact between the State of California and the...

  4. 77 FR 76514 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Approval of the Amendment to the Amended and Restated Tribal-State Compact for Regulation of Class III...

  5. 78 FR 62649 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact taking effect. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the Class III Gaming... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC...

  6. 78 FR 54908 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Class III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Wiyot Tribe and the State of California. DATES:...

  7. 77 FR 5566 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Tribal--State Class III Gaming Compact Taking Effect. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the Tribal-State... Gaming, Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary--Policy and Economic Development, Washington, DC...

  8. 78 FR 17428 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Class III Tribal- State Gaming Compact between the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe and the State of...

  9. 78 FR 17427 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of Approved Amended Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of the Amended Gaming Compact between the Sisseton-Wahpeton Sioux Tribe and the State of North Dakota; the Amended Gaming...

  10. 78 FR 62650 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  11. 78 FR 62649 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Approved Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This notice publishes the approval of an amendment to the Class III Tribal-State Gaming Compact (Amendment), between the Tunica- Biloxi Tribe...

  12. 78 FR 78377 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Indian Gaming AGENCY: Bureau of Indian Affairs, Interior. ] ACTION: Notice of extension of Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact. SUMMARY: This publishes notice of the extension of the Class III gaming compact between the Yankton Sioux Tribe and the State of South Dakota. DATES:...

  13. Facts about American Indian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian College Fund, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a result of living in remote rural areas, American Indians living on reservations have limited access to higher education. One-third of American Indians live on reservations, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. According to the most recent U.S. government statistics, the overall poverty rate for American Indians/Alaska Natives, including…

  14. A History of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon; Eder, Jeanne

    The goal of assimilating American Indians into an alien culture seemed inevitable as superior weaponry and foreign diseases conquered the Indians. Only in the 20th century has serious consideration been given to allowing Indians to choose their own destiny. Using many excerpts from historical accounts, this book describes educational efforts by…

  15. Resisting the Script of Indian Education: Zitkala Sa and the Carlisle Indian School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enoch, Jessica

    2002-01-01

    Offers a "definition" of Zitkala Sa as an Indian teacher who, at the turn of the 20th century, challenged and countered educational norms that silenced Indian voices and erased Indian culture. Examines her autobiographical essays, "Impressions of an Indian Childhood,""The School Days of an Indian Girl," and "An Indian Teacher among Indians," in…

  16. Sequencing and analysis of a South Asian-Indian personal genome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background With over 1.3 billion people, India is estimated to contain three times more genetic diversity than does Europe. Next-generation sequencing technologies have facilitated the understanding of diversity by enabling whole genome sequencing at greater speed and lower cost. While genomes from people of European and Asian descent have been sequenced, only recently has a single male genome from the Indian subcontinent been published at sufficient depth and coverage. In this study we have sequenced and analyzed the genome of a South Asian Indian female (SAIF) from the Indian state of Kerala. Results We identified over 3.4 million SNPs in this genome including over 89,873 private variations. Comparison of the SAIF genome with several published personal genomes revealed that this individual shared ~50% of the SNPs with each of these genomes. Analysis of the SAIF mitochondrial genome showed that it was closely related to the U1 haplogroup which has been previously observed in Kerala. We assessed the SAIF genome for SNPs with health and disease consequences and found that the individual was at a higher risk for multiple sclerosis and a few other diseases. In analyzing SNPs that modulate drug response, we found a variation that predicts a favorable response to metformin, a drug used to treat diabetes. SNPs predictive of adverse reaction to warfarin indicated that the SAIF individual is not at risk for bleeding if treated with typical doses of warfarin. In addition, we report the presence of several additional SNPs of medical relevance. Conclusions This is the first study to report the complete whole genome sequence of a female from the state of Kerala in India. The availability of this complete genome and variants will further aid studies aimed at understanding genetic diversity, identifying clinically relevant changes and assessing disease burden in the Indian population. PMID:22938532

  17. Native Indian Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jules, Felicity

    1988-01-01

    Identifies valued qualities and behaviors of Indian leaders through a literature review and unstructured interviews with three British Columbian tribal elders. Develops a model of Native leadership emphasizing connection to the people, wisdom, humility, personal integrity, service orientation, and the facilitator role. Contains 22 references. (SV)

  18. Indians of New Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    The booklet gives a general introduction to American Indians in New Mexico. Covering historical background and present status, reports are given for these tribes: the 19 Pueblos (i.e., Acoma, Cochiti, Isleta, Jemez, Laguna, and Zuni), the Jicarilla and Mescalero Apaches, and the Navajos. Also included are 26 places of interest such as Acoma…

  19. American Indian Recipes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnoe, Katherine J.; Skjervold, Christian, Ed.

    Presenting some 60 to 70 Native American recipes, this document includes a brief introduction and a suggested reading list (15 citations related to American Indian foods). The introduction identifies five regional Native American cuisines as follows: in the Southwest, peppers and beans were made into chili, soups, guacamole, and barbecue sauces by…

  20. Early Indian People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doermann, Elisabeth

    1979-01-01

    Using bits and pieces of the past such as charred bits of wood from campfires, broken pieces of clay pots, stone spearpoints and arrowheads, and shell or copper ornaments, the archaeologist tries to put together the story of early Indian people in the Minnesota region. A short story, one of eight articles, re-creates the kill of an Itasca bison…

  1. Indian Reserved Water Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Frank M.

    1986-01-01

    Traces the distribution, ownership, and water usage associated with lands in the Colville Reservation in Washington State. Cites specific cases which addressed the reserved water rights doctrine. Assesses the impact of court decisions on insuring water rights for Indians living on the Colville Reservation. (ML)

  2. Indian Astronomy: History of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercier, R.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    From the time of A macronryabhat under dota (ca AD 500) there appeared in India a series of Sanskrit treatises on astronomy. Written always in verse, and normally accompanied by prose commentaries, these served to create an Indian tradition of mathematical astronomy which continued into the 18th century. There are as well texts from earlier centuries, grouped under the name Jyotishaveda macronn d...

  3. Indians of the Northwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Brief descriptions of the historical and cultural background of the Bannock, Cayuse, Coeur d'Alene, Kutenia, Kalispel, Palouse, Umatilla, Walla Walla, Yakima, Spokane, Klamath, Sanpoil, Nespelem, Colville, Quinault, Quileute, Makahs, Klallam, Lummi, Cowlit, Puyallup, Nisqually, and Nez Perce Indian tribes of the Northwestern United States are…

  4. Downriver Indians' Legends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Ruth, Ed.; Exline, Jesse

    Yurok Indian legends in Yurok Unifon text include English translations of the entire texts in order to produce fluent reading for English speakers and a continuous text for Yurok readers. Although corresponding sentences are numbered, translation is not word-for-word or sentence-for-sentence. The five stories refer to a time when animals could…

  5. Eastern American Indian Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Robert K.

    Identification of social and cultural commonalities among American Indians of the eastern U.S. reveal 4 geographical areas--(1) the eastern seaboard (the largest group in both number of distinct groups and population); (2) the inland area; (3) Louisiana (a combination of inland and seaboard characteristics); (4) the eastern Great Lakes area…

  6. Indian School Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Basil H.

    This autobiography relates the experiences of a young Ojibway boy who was taken from his family in 1939 at age 10 and placed in a Jesuit boarding school in northern Ontario, Canada. St. Peter Claver (later Garnier) or "Spanish," as the Indian school was known, was home to approximately 135 boys. Most of the students, who ranged in age from 4 to…

  7. Indians of Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    Maps, photographs, and illustrations are included in this introductory history of Indians in Washington state. The tribal groups of the area are classified by geographic and cultural region as Coastal, Puget Sound, and Plateau tribes, and the majority of the resource booklet provides information about the history and culture of each group.…

  8. Great Indian Chiefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastron, Allen

    Brief biographies and pen and ink portraits of over 40 chiefs and other distinguised American Indians comprise this book. Each page contains a full page portrait and a biography that notes tribal affiliation, important dates, geographical location, major accomplishments, and dealings with other tribes, white settlers, and the United States or…

  9. Indians of Maine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine State Dept. of Health and Welfare, Augusta.

    The relationships between the Penobscot and Passamaquoddy Indian Tribes and the State of Maine began in the 1820's. Treaties have left the Penobscot tribe with ownership of 146 islands in the Penobscot River while the Passamaquoddy tribe lives on land owned by the State. Both tribes presently have trust funds derived from the sale of land, and use…

  10. Indians of Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Brief descriptions of the historical and cultural background of the Navajo, Apache, Hopi, Pima, Papago, Yuma, Maricopa, Mohave, Cocopah, Havasupai, Hualapai, Yavapai, and Paiute Indian tribes of Arizona are presented. Further information is given concerning the educational, housing, employment, and economic development taking place on the…

  11. American Indian Authors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Momaday, Natachee Scott

    Twenty-six selections by 15 contemporary American Indian authors are given in this book. The selections--legends, ceremonial chants and prayers, poems, and stories--are accompanied by topics for discussion. Some of the selections deal with the supernatural, and some tell an actual story about the author. Pictures and short biographies of each…

  12. Indians of North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Published by the U.S. Department of the Interior, this brief booklet on the historical development of the Cherokee Nation emphasizes the Tribe's relationship with the Bureau of Indian Affairs and its improved economy. Citing tourism as the major tribal industry, tribal enterprises are named and described (a 61 unit motor court in existence since…

  13. The Urban Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Winona DuBray

    The document presents six articles that provide a glimpse of the uniqueness of American Indian cultural conflict, focusing on aspects of the culture which warrant special attention. Since there are over 100 tribes, an effort was made to enumerate commonalities amongst the tribal cultures in looking at issues raised in the urban areas throughout…

  14. American Indian Education: One Indian Teacher's View or New Directions in Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiger, Flo

    1987-01-01

    Flo Wiger, Chairperson, Department of American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota/Minneapolis, shares her experiences and views on Indian Education. Dropout rates; higher enrollment; more relevant curricula; increased Indian faculty and staff availability; and community, tribal, and governmental involvement are included. Educational change to…

  15. Indian aerosols: present status.

    PubMed

    Mitra, A P; Sharma, C

    2002-12-01

    This article presents the status of aerosols in India based on the research activities undertaken during last few decades in this region. Programs, like International Geophysical Year (IGY), Monsoon Experiment (MONEX), Indian Middle Atmospheric Program (IMAP) and recently conducted Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), have thrown new lights on the role of aerosols in global change. INDOEX has proved that the effects of aerosols are no longer confined to the local levels but extend at regional as well as global scales due to occurrence of long range transportation of aerosols from source regions along with wind trajectories. The loading of aerosols in the atmosphere is on rising due to energy intensive activities for developmental processes and other anthropogenic activities. One of the significant observation of INDOEX is the presence of high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in the near persistent winter time haze layer over tropical Indian Ocean which have probably been emitted from the burning of fossil-fuels and biofuels in the source region. These have significant bearing on the radiative forcing in the region and, therefore, have potential to alter monsoon and hydrological cycles. In general, the SPM concentrations have been found to be on higher sides in ambient atmosphere in many Indian cities but the NOx concentrations have been found to be on lower side. Even in the haze layer over Indian Ocean and surrounding areas, the NOx concentrations have been reported to be low which is not conducive of O3 formation in the haze/smog layer. The acid rain problem does not seem to exist at the moment in India because of the presence of neutralizing soil dust in the atmosphere. But the high particulate concentrations in most of the cities' atmosphere in India are of concern as it can cause deteriorated health conditions. PMID:12492171

  16. Back to Gondwanaland: can ancient vicariance explain (some) Indian Ocean disjunct plant distributions?

    PubMed

    Pirie, Michael D; Litsios, Glenn; Bellstedt, Dirk U; Salamin, Nicolas; Kissling, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Oceans, or other wide expanses of inhospitable environment, interrupt present day distributions of many plant groups. Using molecular dating techniques, generally incorporating fossil evidence, we can estimate when such distributions originated. Numerous dating analyses have recently precipitated a paradigm shift in the general explanations for the phenomenon, away from older geological causes, such as continental drift, in favour of more recent, long-distance dispersal (LDD). For example, the 'Gondwanan vicariance' scenario has been dismissed in various studies of Indian Ocean disjunct distributions. We used the gentian tribe Exaceae to reassess this scenario using molecular dating with minimum (fossil), maximum (geological), secondary (from wider analyses) and hypothesis-driven age constraints. Our results indicate that ancient vicariance cannot be ruled out as an explanation for the early origins of Exaceae across Africa, Madagascar and the Indian subcontinent unless a strong assumption is made about the maximum age of Gentianales. However, both the Gondwanan scenario and the available evidence suggest that there were also several, more recent, intercontinental dispersals during the diversification of the group. PMID:26063747

  17. Mannose-binding Lectin (MBL) as a susceptible host factor influencing Indian Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Anshuman; Antony, Justin S; Gai, Prabhanjan; Sundaravadivel, Pandarisamy; Van, Tong Hoang; Jha, Aditya Nath; Singh, Lalji; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-12-01

    Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL), caused by Leishmania donovani is endemic in the Indian sub-continent. Mannose-binding Lectin (MBL) is a complement lectin protein that binds to the surface of Leishmania promastigotes and results in activation of the complement lectin cascade. We utilized samples of 218 VL patients and 215 healthy controls from an Indian population. MBL2 functional variants were genotyped and the circulating MBL serum levels were measured. MBL serum levels were elevated in patients compared to the healthy controls (adjusted P=0.007). The MBL2 promoter variants -78C/T and +4P/Q were significantly associated with relative protection to VL (-78C/T, OR=0.7, 95% CI=0.5-0.96, adjusted P=0.026 and +4P/Q, OR=0.66, 95% CI=0.48-0.9, adjusted P=0.012). MBL2*LYQA haplotypes occurred frequently among controls (OR=0.69, 95% CI=0.5-0.97, adjusted P=0.034). MBL recognizes Leishmania and plays a relative role in establishing L. donovani infection and subsequent disease progression. In conclusion, MBL2 functional variants were associated with VL. PMID:26297290

  18. Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on Blood Pressure in Indians: Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Punia, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. High blood pressure (BP) is one of the most important modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, which accounts for one in every eight deaths worldwide. It has been predicted that, by 2020, there would be 111% increase in cardiovascular deaths in India. Aerobic exercise in the form of brisk walking, jogging, running, and cycling would result in reduction in BP. Many meta-analytical studies from western world confirm this. However, there is no such review from Indian subcontinent. Objective. Our objective is to systematically review and report the articles from India in aerobic exercise on blood pressure. Methodology. Study was done in March 2016 in Google Scholar using search terms “Aerobic exercise” AND “Training” AND “Blood pressure” AND “India.” This search produced 3210 titles. Results. 24 articles were identified for this review based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Total of 1107 subjects participated with median of 25 subjects. Studies vary in duration from +3 weeks to 12 months with each session lasting 15–60 minutes and frequency varies from 3 to 8 times/week. The results suggest that there was mean reduction of −05.00 mmHg in SBP and −03.09 mmHg in DBP after aerobic training. Conclusion. Aerobic training reduces the blood pressure in Indians. PMID:27493989

  19. Effect of Aerobic Exercise Training on Blood Pressure in Indians: Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Punia, Sonu; Kulandaivelan, Sivachidambaram; Singh, Varun; Punia, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. High blood pressure (BP) is one of the most important modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, which accounts for one in every eight deaths worldwide. It has been predicted that, by 2020, there would be 111% increase in cardiovascular deaths in India. Aerobic exercise in the form of brisk walking, jogging, running, and cycling would result in reduction in BP. Many meta-analytical studies from western world confirm this. However, there is no such review from Indian subcontinent. Objective. Our objective is to systematically review and report the articles from India in aerobic exercise on blood pressure. Methodology. Study was done in March 2016 in Google Scholar using search terms "Aerobic exercise" AND "Training" AND "Blood pressure" AND "India." This search produced 3210 titles. Results. 24 articles were identified for this review based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. Total of 1107 subjects participated with median of 25 subjects. Studies vary in duration from +3 weeks to 12 months with each session lasting 15-60 minutes and frequency varies from 3 to 8 times/week. The results suggest that there was mean reduction of -05.00 mmHg in SBP and -03.09 mmHg in DBP after aerobic training. Conclusion. Aerobic training reduces the blood pressure in Indians. PMID:27493989

  20. Contribution of Monthly and Regional Rainfall to the Strength of Indian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Ali, M.; Bourassa, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall (ISMR: June-September) has both temporal and spatial variability causing floods/droughts in different seasons/locations leading to a strong or weak monsoon. Here, we present the contribution of all-India monthly, seasonal and regional rainfall to the ISMR, with special reference to the strong and weak monsoons. For this purpose, rainfall data provided by the India Meteorological Department (IMD: http://www.imd.gov.in/section/nhac/dynamic/Monsoon_frame.htm) for 1901-2013 have been used. The IMD divided the Indian sub-continent into four homogeneous regions of northwest India (NWI), northeast India (NEI), central India (CI), and south peninsula India (SPIN). Rainfall during July-August contributes the most to the total seasonal rainfall, whether it is a strong or weak monsoon. Although the NEI has the maximum area-weighted rainfall, its contribution is the least toward a strong or weak monsoon. The rainfall in the remaining three regions (NWI, CI, and SPIN) controls whether an ISMR is strong or weak. Compared to the monthly rainfall, the regional rainfall dominates the strong or weak rainfall periods.

  1. Variability in AIRS CO2 during active and break phases of Indian summer monsoon.

    PubMed

    Revadekar, J V; Ravi Kumar, K; Tiwari, Yogesh K; Valsala, Vinu

    2016-01-15

    Due to human activities, the atmospheric concentration of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) has been rising extensively since the Industrial Revolution. Indian summer monsoon (ISM) has a dominant westerly component from ocean to land with a strong tendency to ascend and hence may have role in CO2 distribution in lower and middle troposphere over Indian sub-continent. A substantial component of ISM variability arises from the fluctuations on the intra-seasonal scale between active and break phases which correspond to strong and weak monsoon circulation. In view of the above, an attempt is made in this study to examine the AIRS/AQUA satellite retrieved CO2 distribution in response to atmospheric circulation with focus on active and break phase. Correlation analysis indicates the increase in AIRS CO2 linked with strong monsoon circulation. Study also reveals that anomalous circulation pattern during active and break phase show resemblance with high and low values of AIRS CO2. Homogeneous monsoon regions of India show substantial increase in CO2 levels during active phase. Hilly regions of India show strong contrast in CO2 and vertical velocity during active and break phases. PMID:26476061

  2. Back to Gondwanaland: can ancient vicariance explain (some) Indian Ocean disjunct plant distributions?

    PubMed Central

    Pirie, Michael D.; Litsios, Glenn; Bellstedt, Dirk U.; Salamin, Nicolas; Kissling, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Oceans, or other wide expanses of inhospitable environment, interrupt present day distributions of many plant groups. Using molecular dating techniques, generally incorporating fossil evidence, we can estimate when such distributions originated. Numerous dating analyses have recently precipitated a paradigm shift in the general explanations for the phenomenon, away from older geological causes, such as continental drift, in favour of more recent, long-distance dispersal (LDD). For example, the ‘Gondwanan vicariance’ scenario has been dismissed in various studies of Indian Ocean disjunct distributions. We used the gentian tribe Exaceae to reassess this scenario using molecular dating with minimum (fossil), maximum (geological), secondary (from wider analyses) and hypothesis-driven age constraints. Our results indicate that ancient vicariance cannot be ruled out as an explanation for the early origins of Exaceae across Africa, Madagascar and the Indian subcontinent unless a strong assumption is made about the maximum age of Gentianales. However, both the Gondwanan scenario and the available evidence suggest that there were also several, more recent, intercontinental dispersals during the diversification of the group. PMID:26063747

  3. Influence of upper ocean on Indian summer monsoon rainfall: studies by observation and NCEP climate forecast system (CFSv2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.; Pokhrel, Samir; Rahman, H.; Dhakate, A.; Saha, Subodh K.; Pentakota, S.; Gairola, R. M.

    2015-05-01

    This study explores the role played by ocean processes in influencing Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) and compares the observed findings with National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)-coupled model Climate Forecast System, version 2 (CFSv2). The excess and deficit ISMR clearly brings out the distinct signatures in sea surface height (SSH) anomaly, thermocline and mixed layer depth over north Indian Ocean. CFSv2 is successful in simulating SSH anomalies, especially over Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal region. CFSv2 captures observed findings of SSH anomalies during flood and drought (e.g., Rossby wave propagation which reaches western Bay of Bengal (BoB) during flood years, Rossby wave propagation which did not reach western BoB during drought). It highlights the ability of CFSv2 to simulate the basic ocean processes which governs the SSH variability. These differences are basically generated by upwelling and downwelling caused by the equatorial and coastal Kelvin and Rossby waves, thereby causing difference in SSH anomaly and thermocline, and subsequently modifying the convection centers, which dictates precipitation over the Indian subcontinent region. Since the observed SSH anomaly and thermal structure show distinct characteristic features with respect to strong and weak ISMR variability, the assimilation of real ocean data in terms of satellite products (like SSHA from AVISO/SARAL) bestow great promise for the future improvement.

  4. Influence of upper ocean on Indian summer monsoon rainfall: studies by observation and NCEP climate forecast system (CFSv2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.; Pokhrel, Samir; Rahman, H.; Dhakate, A.; Saha, Subodh K.; Pentakota, S.; Gairola, R. M.

    2016-08-01

    This study explores the role played by ocean processes in influencing Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) and compares the observed findings with National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)-coupled model Climate Forecast System, version 2 (CFSv2). The excess and deficit ISMR clearly brings out the distinct signatures in sea surface height (SSH) anomaly, thermocline and mixed layer depth over north Indian Ocean. CFSv2 is successful in simulating SSH anomalies, especially over Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal region. CFSv2 captures observed findings of SSH anomalies during flood and drought (e.g., Rossby wave propagation which reaches western Bay of Bengal (BoB) during flood years, Rossby wave propagation which did not reach western BoB during drought). It highlights the ability of CFSv2 to simulate the basic ocean processes which governs the SSH variability. These differences are basically generated by upwelling and downwelling caused by the equatorial and coastal Kelvin and Rossby waves, thereby causing difference in SSH anomaly and thermocline, and subsequently modifying the convection centers, which dictates precipitation over the Indian subcontinent region. Since the observed SSH anomaly and thermal structure show distinct characteristic features with respect to strong and weak ISMR variability, the assimilation of real ocean data in terms of satellite products (like SSHA from AVISO/SARAL) bestow great promise for the future improvement.

  5. Homogeneous clusters over India using probability density function of daily rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Ashwini

    2016-04-01

    The Indian landmass has been divided into homogeneous clusters by applying the cluster analysis to the probability density function of a century-long time series of daily summer monsoon (June through September) rainfall at 357 grids over India, each of approximately 100 km × 100 km. The analysis gives five clusters over Indian landmass; only cluster 5 happened to be the contiguous region and all other clusters are dispersed away which confirms the erratic behavior of daily rainfall over India. The area averaged seasonal rainfall over cluster 5 has a very strong relationship with Indian summer monsoon rainfall; also, the rainfall variability over this region is modulated by the most important mode of climate system, i.e., El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). This cluster could be considered as the representative of the entire Indian landmass to examine monsoon variability. The two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test supports that the cumulative distribution functions of daily rainfall over cluster 5 and India as a whole do not differ significantly. The clustering algorithm is also applied to two time epochs 1901-1975 and 1976-2010 to examine the possible changes in clusters in a recent warming period. The clusters are drastically different in two time periods. They are more dispersed in recent period implying the more erroneous distribution of daily rainfall in recent period.

  6. 78 FR 42788 - American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Nursing; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Nursing Program Announcement Type: Competing Continuation. Funding... (OPHS) is accepting competitive cooperative agreement applications for the American Indians into...

  7. Indian scales and inventories.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, S

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, traits and processes. As an illustrative sample, this article assembles a bibliographic survey of about 105 out of 2582 research papers (4.07%) scanned through 51 back dated volumes covering 185 issues related to clinimetry as reviewed across a span of over fifty years (1958-2009) in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. A content analysis of the contributions across distinct categories of mental measurements is explained before linkages are proposed for future directions along these lines. PMID:21836709

  8. Indian scales and inventories

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, S.

    2010-01-01

    This conceptual, perspective and review paper on Indian scales and inventories begins with clarification on the historical and contemporary meanings of psychometry before linking itself to the burgeoning field of clinimetrics in their applications to the practice of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Clinimetrics is explained as a changing paradigm in the design, administration, and interpretation of quantitative tests, techniques or procedures applied to measurement of clinical variables, traits and processes. As an illustrative sample, this article assembles a bibliographic survey of about 105 out of 2582 research papers (4.07%) scanned through 51 back dated volumes covering 185 issues related to clinimetry as reviewed across a span of over fifty years (1958-2009) in the Indian Journal of Psychiatry. A content analysis of the contributions across distinct categories of mental measurements is explained before linkages are proposed for future directions along these lines. PMID:21836709

  9. INDIAN PEAKS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Speltz, Charles N.

    1984-01-01

    The Indian Peaks Wilderness northwest of Denver is partly within the Colorado Mineral Belt, and the southeast part of it contains all the geologic characteristics associated with the several nearby mining districts. Two deposits have demonstrated mineral resources, one of copper and the other of uranium; both are surrounded by areas with probable potential. Two other areas have probable resource potential for copper, gold, and possibly molydenum. Detailed gravity and magnetic studies in the southeast part of the Indian Peaks Wilderness might detect in the subsurface igneous bodies that may be mineralized. Physical exploration such as drilling would be necessary to determine more precisely the copper resources at the Roaring Fork locality and uranium resources at Wheeler Basin.

  10. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  11. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  12. Will the "Real" Indians Please Stand Up?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pewewardy, Cornel

    1998-01-01

    Explores what it means to be an American Indian in an era in which nearly half of the identifiable Indians live off the reservations and in urban areas. As the principal definition of "Indian-ness" today, the issue of blood quantum leads to misunderstandings. Being an Indian, to the author, is being a person connected to a tribe. (SLD)

  13. 25 CFR 273.45 - Indian preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian preference. 273.45 Section 273.45 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM EDUCATION CONTRACTS UNDER JOHNSON-O'MALLEY ACT General Contract Requirements § 273.45...

  14. 25 CFR 273.45 - Indian preference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indian preference. 273.45 Section 273.45 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM EDUCATION CONTRACTS UNDER JOHNSON-O'MALLEY ACT General Contract Requirements § 273.45...

  15. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  16. Analysis of Tropical Cyclone Tracks in the North Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, A.; Paliwal, M.; Mohapatra, M.

    2011-12-01

    Cyclones are regarded as one of the most dangerous meteorological phenomena of the tropical region. The probability of landfall of a tropical cyclone depends on its movement (trajectory). Analysis of trajectories of tropical cyclones could be useful for identifying potentially predictable characteristics. There is long history of analysis of tropical cyclones tracks. A common approach is using different clustering techniques to group the cyclone tracks on the basis of certain characteristics. Various clustering method have been used to study the tropical cyclones in different ocean basins like western North Pacific ocean (Elsner and Liu, 2003; Camargo et al., 2007), North Atlantic Ocean (Elsner, 2003; Gaffney et al. 2007; Nakamura et al., 2009). In this study, tropical cyclone tracks in the North Indian Ocean basin, for the period 1961-2010 have been analyzed and grouped into clusters based on their spatial characteristics. A tropical cyclone trajectory is approximated as an open curve and described by its first two moments. The resulting clusters have different centroid locations and also differently shaped variance ellipses. These track characteristics are then used in the standard clustering algorithms which allow the whole track shape, length, and location to be incorporated into the clustering methodology. The resulting clusters have different genesis locations and trajectory shapes. We have also examined characteristics such as life span, maximum sustained wind speed, landfall, seasonality, many of which are significantly different across the identified clusters. The clustering approach groups cyclones with higher maximum wind speed and longest life span in to one cluster. Another cluster includes short duration cyclonic events that are mostly deep depressions and significant for rainfall over Eastern and Central India. The clustering approach is likely to prove useful for analysis of events of significance with regard to impacts.

  17. Indian Ocean analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Gary

    1992-01-01

    The background and goals of Indian Ocean thermal sampling are discussed from the perspective of a national project which has research goals relevant to variation of climate in Australia. The critical areas of SST variation are identified. The first goal of thermal sampling at this stage is to develop a climatology of thermal structure in the areas and a description of the annual variation of major currents. The sampling strategy is reviewed. Dense XBT sampling is required to achieve accurate, monthly maps of isotherm-depth because of the high level of noise in the measurements caused by aliasing of small scale variation. In the Indian Ocean ship routes dictate where adequate sampling can be achieved. An efficient sampling rate on available routes is determined based on objective analysis. The statistical structure required for objective analysis is described and compared at 95 locations in the tropical Pacific and 107 in the tropical Indian Oceans. XBT data management and quality control methods at CSIRO are reviewed. Results on the mean and annual variation of temperature and baroclinic structure in the South Equatorial Current and Pacific/Indian Ocean Throughflow are presented for the region between northwest Australia and Java-Timor. The mean relative geostrophic transport (0/400 db) of Throughflow is approximately 5 x 106 m3/sec. A nearly equal volume transport is associated with the reference velocity at 400 db. The Throughflow feeds the South Equatorial Current, which has maximum westward flow in August/September, at the end of the southeasterly Monsoon season. A strong semiannual oscillation in the South Java Current is documented. The results are in good agreement with the Semtner and Chervin (1988) ocean general circulation model. The talk concludes with comments on data inadequacies (insufficient coverage, timeliness) particular to the Indian Ocean and suggestions on the future role that can be played by Data Centers, particularly with regard to quality

  18. 76 FR 58076 - Designation of the Indian Mujahideen, Also Known as Indian Mujahedeen, Also Known as Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... Known as Islamic Security Force-Indian Mujahideen (ISF-IM), as a Foreign Terrorist Organization Pursuant... known as Indian Mujahidin, also known as Islamic Security Force-Indian Mujahideen (ISF-IM). Therefore,...

  19. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  20. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  1. Hyponatremia of non-small cell lung cancer: Indian experience

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Chinmoy K.; Dey, Subhashis; Mukhopadhyay, Ashis

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hyponatremia is a hazardous complication of lung cancer and its treatment. It is seen at presentation in approximately 15% of patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 1% of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Platinum compounds used as first-line agents along with taxols frequently cause hyponatremia. Till date there is no data on its prevalence in patients with advanced lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent. Aim: This study was undertaken to find out its incidence before and after institution of chemotherapy and to observe the results of treatment of hyponatremia in a group of lung cancer patient. Materials and Methods: Forty patients with advanced lung cancer (25 patients with stage III disease and 15 with stage IV disease) were included in the study. Variables looked at included, but were not limited to, serum sodium, serum albumin, serum alkaline phosphatase, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and hemoglobin. These variables were measured as per the standard clinical laboratory procedure. No ethics approval was required as these parameters are routinely measured in such patients. Results: In the chemo-naïve state, one out of five cases with SCLC (20%) had hyponatremia at presentation; among the 35 cases of NSCLC, 7 patients (20%) had hyponatremia at presentation, which is in sharp contrast to earlier reports of 1% prevalence of hyponatremia in this group. Among the 27 cases who died within 6 months, 11 had hyponatremia; this finding was statistically highly significant. Conclusion: In India, NSCLC patients are at high risk of having hyponatremia at presentation and this is significantly associated with a worse outcome. PMID:22557779

  2. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  3. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  4. Indians as Resources: The Changing Relationship between Indians and Anthropologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Michael M.

    1986-01-01

    Traditional academic or curatorial associations with North American Indians--treating them as informants, subjects, students, or specimens--is no longer sufficient because these associations imply unequal relations with anthropologists and curators in the superior position. Indians now want, expect, and demand equality; and new relationships are…

  5. Is rheumatoid arthritis in Indians associated with HLA antigens sharing a DR beta 1 epitope?

    PubMed Central

    Ollier, W E; Stephens, C; Awad, J; Carthy, D; Gupta, A; Perry, D; Jawad, A; Festenstein, H

    1991-01-01

    HLA class II antigens were identified in a group of 44 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) originating largely from the north or northeast of the Indian subcontinent and resident now in east London. Compared with 67 locally typed east London Asian controls, the prevalence of three HLA-DR antigens was raised in the patients: DR1 18.2% v 6.0% chi 2 = 3.99, DR4 20.5% v 11.9% chi 2 = 1.48, and DRw10 27.3% v 8.9% chi 2 = 6.56. These differences were also found when the patients with RA were compared with a larger control group of 110 northern Indians: DR1 18.2% v 7.2% chi 2 = 4.02, DR4 20.5% v 7.2% chi 2 = 5.56, and DRw10 27.3% v 8.1% chi 2 = 9.7. Twenty five (57%) of the patients expressed at least one of these antigens. All patients were also characterised for HLA-Dw types by mixed lymphocyte culture typing. The prevalence of the HLA-DR4 associated Dw types in the patients was: Dw4 2.3%, Dw10 0%, Dw14 11.4%, and Dw15 6.8%. The DR beta 1 chains of DR1 and DRw10 together with the Dw types of DR4 other than Dw10 share amino acid residues in a region of the third hypervariable region considered to be critical in antigen presentation. It is concluded that RA in Indians is associated with these HLA antigens, and data from this study support the hypothesis of a cross reactive epitope common to HLA specificities associated with RA. PMID:1710441

  6. A Large Scale Index to Characterize the Indian Summer Monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, F. G.; Carvalho, L. V.; Jones, C.; Bookhagen, B.

    2012-12-01

    Seasonal rainfall associated with the Indian summer monsoon is the primary water source for the central and eastern Himalaya, while the western Himalaya receives significant amounts of precipitation during the winter season. Typically, the monsoon season begins in the eastern lowlands during June, migrates northwest across the Ganges plains, is bounded by the Himalayan orographic barrier to the north, and lasts until approximately mid-October. By the end of the monsoon season, the accumulated rainfall contributes to over 80% of the total annual precipitation in the central and eastern Himalayan regions. Consequently, the seasonal variability of mountain runoff depends on the onset, duration, and intensity of the monsoon and short-to-long term variations in these factors play a fundamental role in the region's hydrologic cycle. The objective task of this research is to develop detailed diagnostic analyses to characterize climatological variability of the summer monsoon system over high Asian mountains during 1979-present. Primarily, we apply a combined empirical orthogonal function to seasonal variations in circulation, temperature and moisture. Previous research has shown that important mechanisms of monsoonal variability include low level (surface - 850 hPa) specific humidity, temperature, zonal and meridional wind components, and precipitation. This project utilizes daily CFSR reanalysis data for the aforementioned variables from 1979 to 2010 at a one-degree spatial resolution over the Indian sub-continent (5°-45°N and 60°-90°E). We also employ precipitation data from various sources including APHRODITE, TRMM, GPCP, and station data to comprehensively investigate the validity of our index through various precipitation data acquisition methods. Based on the time coefficient of the second EOF of surface level humidity, temperature, and zonal and meridional wind, we construct the proposed monsoon index and define the onset, demise, and intraseasonal variations

  7. Tishomingo folio, Indian Territory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taff, Joseph A.

    1903-01-01

    The Tishomingo quadrangle is bounded by meridians 96° 30' and 97° and parallels 34° and 34° 30', and occupies one-quarter of a square degree of the earth's surface.  It is 34.5 miles long north and south and 28.58 miles wide, and contains about 986 square miles.  It lies in the southeastern part of the Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory, the eastern edge being nearly 3 miles west of the Choctaw-Chickasaw boudary line, and the southern side about 3 miles north of the nearest approach of Red River.

  8. Zika virus: Indian perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Devendra T.; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N.; Yadav, Pragya D.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective. PMID:27487998

  9. Zika virus: Indian perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mourya, Devendra T; Shil, Pratip; Sapkal, Gajanan N; Yadav, Pragya D

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZiV), a mosquito borne Flavivirus like dengue (DEN) and chikungunya (CHIK), in Brazil in 2014 and its spread to various countries have led to a global health emergency. Aedes aegypti is the major vector for ZiV. Fast dissemination of this virus in different geographical areas posses a major threat especially to regions where the population lacks herd immunity against the ZiV and there is abundance of Aedes mosquitoes. In this review, we focus on current global scenario, epidemiology, biology, diagnostic challenges and remedial measures for ZiVconsidering the Indian perspective. PMID:27487998

  10. Historicizing Indian psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-04-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge. PMID:20711299

  11. Historicizing Indian psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Amit Ranjan

    2005-01-01

    Our historical endeavour to map Indian psychiatry has largely remained linear, positivistic and evolutionary. Whether it starts from the ancient times or modern, it shows our past as a tale of victory for the western science, without questioning the borrowed paradigm. The use of historical methods for serious enquiry of psychiatry has been ignored. Emergence of a new genre of historicism that is critical of both colonialism and psychiatry as a universal science, has raised hopes to critically review the emergence of psychiatric knowledge. PMID:20711299

  12. English 367: American Indian Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Robert W.; DeFlyer, Joseph E.

    A study guide to American Indian Literature (English 367), a 3-credit hour correspondence course available through the University of North Dakota, contains eight lessons to be used with the following six textbooks: "Black Elk Speaks,""Carriers of the Dream Wheel,""Ceremony,""The Portable North American Indian Reader,""Winter in Blood,""In the…

  13. 77 FR 76514 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians. DATES: Effective Date: December 28, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION..., the Coyote Valley Band of Pomo Indians and the State of California submitted Amendment I to the Class... Amendment to the Tribal-State Compact between the State of California and the Coyote Valley Band of...

  14. Hemoglobin patterns in American Indians.

    PubMed

    POLLITZER, W S; CHERNOFF, A I; HORTON, L L; FROEHLICH, M

    1959-01-23

    Two populations of North Carolina have been analyzed for hemoglobin patterns by paper electrophoresis. Of 534 Cherokee Indians, both mixed and full bloods, all showed normal hemoglobin. Lumbee Indians of less certain ethnic status had 1.7 percent of hemoglobin S, an equal amount of hemoglobin C, and one possible hemoglobin D trait among 1332 bloods studied. PMID:13624709

  15. American Indian Youth Suicide Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFromboise, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the prevalence of suicide and suicidal ideation among American Indian adolescents. Unique risk and protective factors, and historical trauma and associated symptoms, are explored in the context of American Indian adolescent suicide. The need for culturally-sensitive interventions are necessary, and an example of a…

  16. American Indians of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Bertha P.

    Designed for both the specialist and nonspecialist, the book provides a synthesis of Southwestern Indian culture based on long familiarity with the people. Chapter 1 describes the physical aspects of American Indians, land and Aboriginal inhabitants, and development of socio-religious patterns. Chapter II is about Pueblo Peoples (Tanoans,…

  17. Teaching English to American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyhner, Jon

    Many practices in Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools were negative, but this paper emphasizes the positive efforts that were made throughout their history, especially in regard to teaching English. The Carlisle Indian School, which opened in 1879, encouraged the use of English through an English language student newspaper and frequently…

  18. Handbook for Indian Parent Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Louise; Gelardi, Sal

    The 1980 handbook defines parental involvement and elaborates on the functions and authority of parent committees. Funding sources which are most likely to require American Indian parent committees are identified as: Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Title I; Johnson-O'Malley; and Indian Education, Title IV-A. Information is provided on:…

  19. American Indian Literacy and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene

    2004-01-01

    Literacy, which has only positive connotations in most cultures, has long been associated in Native communities with colonial education, "the reculturing and reeducation of American Indians by the secular and religious institutions of colonizing nations." Early educators imposed literacy on Indian children attending government-organized boarding…

  20. NEW APPROACH TO INDIAN EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRYDE, JOHN F.

    RECENT RESEARCH INDICATES THAT THE EXCESSIVE NATIONAL INDIAN DROPOUT RATE IS NOT WHOLLY ATTRIBUTABLE TO THE VALUE CONFLICT CREATED WHEN INDIAN YOUTH ENTER THE AMERICAN EDUCATION SYSTEM, BUT IS ALSO RELATED TO THE IDENTIFICATION PROBLEM EXPERIENCED BY THESE YOUNGSTERS. THE OBJECTIVE OF THIS RESEARCH WAS TO DETERMINE THE POSSIBLE CAUSES OF WHAT IS…

  1. 77 FR 59641 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Approved Amendment to the Tribal-State Compact between the State of Oregon and the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua... engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. On July 12, 2012, the State of Oregon and the Cow... February 8, 2007. Amendment I re-configures the Board of Trustees of the Cow Creek Umpqua Indian...

  2. Trends in Indian Health, 1996.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Health Service (PHS/HSA), Rockville, MD.

    The Indian Health Service (IHS), an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is responsible for providing health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives living on or near federal reservations (about 60 percent of the Native population). This publication is composed primarily of data tables and graphs that describe…

  3. "Red Power" and Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, G. Louis

    The document is the result of research conducted on 14 Indian reservations and one settlement in the Southwest, Midwest, West, and Pacific Northwest by Illinois State University in the summer of 1970. Some 124 Indians were interviewed, many of whom were leaders and participants in various Red Power organizations. As noted, the dominant impression…

  4. Education and the Urban Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Joann Sebastian

    Due to the Federal relocation programs, American Indian migration to urban areas has intensified over the past 20 years. The Indian who moves from the reservation to the city encounters an alien culture and, consequently, experiences immense difficulties in securing employment, housing, health services, and fair, unprejudiced treatment from law…

  5. California Indian Food and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2001

    This learning kit begins with a glossary of terms to help students learn about California Indians and their food. The kit explains that California Indians were the first people to live in the area now known as California, and that these tribes differed in the languages they spoke, the regions they lived in, and the foods that they ate. It explains…

  6. The Carlisle Indian Industrial School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlee, Anita

    The Carlisle Indian Industrial School was the first off-reservation boarding school and began the social experiment of assimilation of Native Americans into American culture. For almost 40 years, from 1879 to 1918, the school sought to civilize "savage" Indian children. Richard H. Pratt, founder of the school, believed that the school was the…

  7. Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Walter P.; McGregor, Tony L.

    This paper describes the use of Keresan Pueblo Indian Sign Language (KPISL) in one small, Keresan-speaking pueblo in central New Mexico, where 15 out of 650 tribal members have severe to profound hearing loss (twice the national average). KPISL did not originate for the same purposes as the Plains Indian Sign Language, (PISL) which was developed…

  8. Astronomy in Indian Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, V. B.

    Tradition of astronomy in India goes back to ancient times. Many festivals and rituals are associated with astronomical phenomena. Indian children start learning rudiments of astronomy from primary classes. But primary teachers are not equipped to handle this subject so not much learning actually takes place. The first serious interface with astronomy occurs when children reach class X when they are 15 years old. Till last year astronomy was there in class XII also but it has now been dropped. This is a serious setback for the study of astronomy. In class X astronomy forms part of general science. Since children at this stage are not proficient in physics and mathematics the subject remains descriptive though there are useful activities for children to do. However the teachers are not equipped to handle this subject and there is no help in the form of visual material. So the subject remains neglected. The Indian astronomical community can help by training teachers and providing visual material. It must also urge authorities to reintroduce astronomy in class XII if astronomy is to flourish in India. Moreover India needs to network with developing countries share experiences with them and evolve a strategy that promotes astronomy.

  9. West Indian amblyopia.

    PubMed Central

    Fasler, J. J.; Rose, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    A series of 21 patients admitted to St Thomas' Hospital, Medical Ophthalmology Unit, with a diagnosis of West Indian or West African amblyopia is reported. Patients were investigated for haematological, biochemical, serological, and radiological abnormalities and particular attention was paid to dietary history. Patients admitted in recent years also underwent neurophysiological investigations. No definite correlation between visual loss and dietary or family history was found, and there was no evidence that the improvement in vision which occurred in just under half the patients on follow-up was related to treatment with hydroxocobalamin or multivitamins. Visual-evoked responses in 4 patients showed a prolonged latency suggesting optic nerve demyelination, while in only one case was the electro-oculogram definitely subnormal. These findings contrast with those in 'toxic' amblyopias and suggest that the syndrome of West Indian amblyopoa may be due to bilateral optic nerve demyelination of unknown aetiology rather than the effect of toxic substances or nutritional deficiency on the retina. PMID:7443605

  10. Indian Tribes as Developing Nations; A Question of Power: Indian Control of Indian Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Americans for Indian Opportunity, Inc., Albuquerque, NM.

    The report discusses how Indian tribes can conserve and develop their own resources at their own pace and explores the options available to them as owners of valuable natural resources. Discussed are problems encountered by tribal leaders with various government agencies; the basic precepts of the Bureau of Indian Affairs; how the problems of…

  11. Growing Up Indian: Stories from the Life of Louie Gingras, an 82 Year Old Kootenai Indian. Indian Culture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gingras, Louie

    Eleven short stories from the life of Louie Gingras, an 82-year-old Kootenai Indian, illustrate many aspects of Indian culture. Accompanied by black and white drawings, ths stories describe daily life, mission schools, the Carlisle Indian School, Indian medicine, discipline for children, spiritual powers, beliefs, and several ceremonies. The book…

  12. Report on Indian Education--Task Force Five: Indian Education--Final Report to the American Indian Policy Review Commission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheirbeck, Helen Maynor; And Others

    The report of the Task Force on Indian Education to the American Indian Policy Review Commission delineates the interweaving of past policies and practices with present needs and concerns of Indian education. Reviewing 400 years of Indian education, the report was compiled from federal, state, local, and private records, public hearings,…

  13. Metagenomic Exploration of Viruses throughout the Indian Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Hernan A.; Fadrosh, Douglas W.; Brami, Daniel; Thiagarajan, Mathangi; McCrow, John P.; Tovchigrechko, Andrey; Yooseph, Shibu; Venter, J. Craig

    2012-01-01

    The characterization of global marine microbial taxonomic and functional diversity is a primary goal of the Global Ocean Sampling Expedition. As part of this study, 19 water samples were collected aboard the Sorcerer II sailing vessel from the southern Indian Ocean in an effort to more thoroughly understand the lifestyle strategies of the microbial inhabitants of this ultra-oligotrophic region. No investigations of whole virioplankton assemblages have been conducted on waters collected from the Indian Ocean or across multiple size fractions thus far. Therefore, the goals of this study were to examine the effect of size fractionation on viral consortia structure and function and understand the diversity and functional potential of the Indian Ocean virome. Five samples were selected for comprehensive metagenomic exploration; and sequencing was performed on the microbes captured on 3.0-, 0.8- and 0.1 µm membrane filters as well as the viral fraction (<0.1 µm). Phylogenetic approaches were also used to identify predicted proteins of viral origin in the larger fractions of data from all Indian Ocean samples, which were included in subsequent metagenomic analyses. Taxonomic profiling of viral sequences suggested that size fractionation of marine microbial communities enriches for specific groups of viruses within the different size classes and functional characterization further substantiated this observation. Functional analyses also revealed a relative enrichment for metabolic proteins of viral origin that potentially reflect the physiological condition of host cells in the Indian Ocean including those involved in nitrogen metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. A novel classification method, MGTAXA, was used to assess virus-host relationships in the Indian Ocean by predicting the taxonomy of putative host genera, with Prochlorococcus, Acanthochlois and members of the SAR86 cluster comprising the most abundant predictions. This is the first study to holistically

  14. Bromide content of sea-salt aerosol particles collected over the Indian Ocean during INDOEX 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, R.; von Glasow, R.; Sander, R.; Andreae, M. O.; Crutzen, P. J.

    2002-10-01

    Bromide can be depleted from sea-salt aerosol particles in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and converted to reactive gas-phase species like Br, BrO, and HOBr, which affect ozone chemistry. Air pollution can enhance the bromine release from sea-salt aerosols and thus inject additional bromine into the MBL. During the winter monsoon the northern Indian Ocean is strongly affected by air pollution from the Indian subcontinent and Asia. As part of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), aerosol particles were sampled with stacked filter units (SFU) on the NCAR Hercules C-130 aircraft during February-March 1999. We determined the vertical and latitudinal distribution of the major inorganic aerosol components (NH4+, Na+, K+, Mg2+, Ca2+, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-) and the Br- content of the coarse aerosol to examine the role of the bromine release on the gas-phase chemistry in the marine boundary layer over the tropical Indian Ocean. The aerosol mass and composition varied significantly with air mass origin and sampling location. In the northern part of the Indian Ocean (5°-15°N, 66°-73°E), high concentrations of pollution-derived inorganic species were found in the marine boundary layer extending from the sea surface to about 1.2 km above sea level. In this layer, the average mass concentration of all aerosol species detected by our technique was comparable to pollution levels observed in industrialized regions. In the Southern Hemisphere (1°-9°S, 66°- 73°E), the aerosol concentrations rapidly declined to remote background levels. A chloride loss from the coarse aerosol particles was observed in parallel to the latitudinal gradient of the non sea salt SO42- burden. In most of the samples, Br- was depleted from the sea-salt aerosols. However, we found an enrichment in bromide in aerosols affected by air masses originating over strong pollution sources in India (Bombay, Calcutta). In these cases the additional pollution-derived Br from organo-halogen additives in petrol

  15. Detailed Analysis of Indian Summer Monsoon Rainfall Processes with Modern/High-Quality Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Mehta, Amita V.; Yang, Song

    2007-01-01

    -annually), (2) time series at these different time scales taken as area-averages over the hierarchy of relevant space scales (Indian sub-Division, Indian sub-continent, and Circumambient Indian Ocean), (3) principal autocorrelation and cross-correlation structures over various monsoon space-time domains, (4) diurnally modulated amplitude-phase properties of rain rates over different monsoon space-time domains, (5) foremost rain rate probability distributions intrinsic to monsoon precipitation, and (6) behavior of extreme events including occurrences of flood and drought episodes throughout the course of inter-annual monsoon processes.

  16. Indian Monsoon: complex network analysis, spatial patterns and the prospects for prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Bookhagen, Bodo; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Juergen

    2014-05-01

    The Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) is a global climate phenomenon that affects half of the world's population. The prediction of the Indian Summer Monsoon rainfall and its extremes remains an important concern. In our study we aim to determine spatial distribution of patterns of extreme rainfall and their synchronization, because the understanding of the structure of the spatial heterogeneity of extreme rainfall is crucial for Indian agriculture and economy. We use complex networks to identify dominant spatial patterns that govern the organization of extreme rainfall during the ISM season. We construct networks of extreme rainfall events during the ISM, the pre-monsoon, and the post-monsoon period from satellite-derived (TRMM, Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission, product 3B42 V7) and rain-gauge interpolated (APHRODITE) datasets. The structure of the networks is determined by the level of synchronization of extreme rainfall events between different grid cells throughout the Indian subcontinent. Through the analysis of various complex-network metrics, we describe typical repetitive patterns that can be used as indicators of the ISM variability: North Pakistan (NP), Western Ghats (WG), Eastern Ghats (EG), and Tibetan Plateau (TP). These patterns appear during the pre-monsoon season, evolve during the ISM season, and disappear during the post-monsoon season. We compare obtained results with wind fields, temperature, and pressure networks in this region derived from re-analysis data provided by the National Center for Environmental Prediction and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR). The areas of Eastern Ghats, Western Ghats, and Tibetan Plateau were previously known as areas that influence the ISM dynamics. These patterns occur because of the intricate topography of this region. The Western Ghats pattern, specifically, the Kerala region, is commonly used by climatologists for the prediction of the onset of the ISM (Pai and Nair, 2009). However, North

  17. SVM clustering

    PubMed Central

    Winters-Hilt, Stephen; Merat, Sam

    2007-01-01

    Background Support Vector Machines (SVMs) provide a powerful method for classification (supervised learning). Use of SVMs for clustering (unsupervised learning) is now being considered in a number of different ways. Results An SVM-based clustering algorithm is introduced that clusters data with no a priori knowledge of input classes. The algorithm initializes by first running a binary SVM classifier against a data set with each vector in the set randomly labelled, this is repeated until an initial convergence occurs. Once this initialization step is complete, the SVM confidence parameters for classification on each of the training instances can be accessed. The lowest confidence data (e.g., the worst of the mislabelled data) then has its' labels switched to the other class label. The SVM is then re-run on the data set (with partly re-labelled data) and is guaranteed to converge in this situation since it converged previously, and now it has fewer data points to carry with mislabelling penalties. This approach appears to limit exposure to the local minima traps that can occur with other approaches. Thus, the algorithm then improves on its weakly convergent result by SVM re-training after each re-labeling on the worst of the misclassified vectors – i.e., those feature vectors with confidence factor values beyond some threshold. The repetition of the above process improves the accuracy, here a measure of separability, until there are no misclassifications. Variations on this type of clustering approach are shown. Conclusion Non-parametric SVM-based clustering methods may allow for much improved performance over parametric approaches, particularly if they can be designed to inherit the strengths of their supervised SVM counterparts. PMID:18047717

  18. American Indian Education: Separation, Amalgamation, or What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zephier, Richard

    This essay examines American Indian education from a historical perspective and analyzes the role of the school as an institution in an Indian community. Since the arrival of the white man in America, Indians have faced a world of cultural conflict. Throughout the history of Indian education, their values and way of life have been demeaned. The…

  19. Minnesota Indian Education Hearings Report, November 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Ramona

    Summarizing the analyses of testimonies presented before the Minnesota Subcommittee on Indian Education by both Indians and nonIndians concerned and/or involved with national, state, or local Indian education, this report focuses on findings at the statewide and individual site levels (Minneapolis, St. Paul, Red Wing, Cass Lake, Duluth, White…

  20. Washington Irving and the American Indian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Daniel F., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Some modern scholars feel that Washington Irving vacillated between romanticism and realism in his literary treatment of the American Indian. However, a study of all his works dealing with Indians, placed in context with his non-Indian works, reveals that his attitude towards Indians was intelligent and enlightened for his time. (CM)

  1. American Indian Studies Is for Everyone.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Champagne, Duane

    1996-01-01

    Reviews issues related to American Indian studies programs from Native and non-Native perspectives. Discusses who should study American Indians, the value of American Indian studies for Native and non-Native students, the feasibility of Indian advisory boards for funding agencies and mass media producers, and issues of scholarly review. (SV)

  2. Indian Giving: Federal Programs for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitan, Sar A.; Johnston, William B.

    Aimed at highlighting American Indian reservation conditions, outlining the scope of Federal aid to Indians, and suggesting the nature of future Indian problems and choices, this book attempts to assess the current socioeconomic status of the Indian community and its relationship with the Federal Government. Specifically, this book provides both…

  3. American Indians Today: Answers to Your Questions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This booklet attempts to answer briefly the most common questions about American Indians asked by students, people who believe they have Indian ancestors, individuals who want to visit or volunteer to work on a reservation, or those who want to know the current Indian policy. Separate sections outline President Reagan's American Indian policy;…

  4. Facial melanoses: Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Neena; Rasool, Seemab

    2011-01-01

    Facial melanoses (FM) are a common presentation in Indian patients, causing cosmetic disfigurement with considerable psychological impact. Some of the well defined causes of FM include melasma, Riehl's melanosis, Lichen planus pigmentosus, erythema dyschromicum perstans (EDP), erythrosis, and poikiloderma of Civatte. But there is considerable overlap in features amongst the clinical entities. Etiology in most of the causes is unknown, but some factors such as UV radiation in melasma, exposure to chemicals in EDP, exposure to allergens in Riehl's melanosis are implicated. Diagnosis is generally based on clinical features. The treatment of FM includes removal of aggravating factors, vigorous photoprotection, and some form of active pigment reduction either with topical agents or physical modes of treatment. Topical agents include hydroquinone (HQ), which is the most commonly used agent, often in combination with retinoic acid, corticosteroids, azelaic acid, kojic acid, and glycolic acid. Chemical peels are important modalities of physical therapy, other forms include lasers and dermabrasion. PMID:21860153

  5. Development of a regional tropospheric delay model for GPS-based navigation with emphasis to the Indian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswaran, K.; Saha, Korak; Suresh Raju, C.

    2008-08-01

    The accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), aimed to support precise positioning for aircraft navigation globally by coordinating different regional augmentation systems, is limited by the extent to which the atmospheric propagation delay of microwave signals can be modeled. An algorithm is developed for modeling the tropospheric delay based on mean meteorological parameters. A Region-specific Tropospheric Delay (RTD) model is developed exclusively for the Indian region using meteorological data from the Indian subcontinent, as a part of GPS Aided Geo Augmented Navigation (GAGAN) program. The applicability of this model is examined in the context of the global model used in Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), developed employing meteorological data mostly from North American continent, by comparing the estimated zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) with those obtained from regional models employing measured atmospheric parameters at the surface. The rms deviation of ZTD estimated using RTD model from that of the surface model is found to be ˜5 cm. A further validation by comparing with GPS measurements from two IGS stations at Bangalore and Hyderabad showed that predictions made using the RTD model are within an rms deviation of ±5 cm while those using WAAS model is ±7 cm. Maximum value of the residual error for RTD model is ˜15 cm, which corresponds to a ˜0.5 m error in the vertical coordinates for the lowest satellite elevation angles usually encountered.

  6. Seroprevalence and determinants of Kaposi sarcoma-associated human herpesvirus 8 in Indian HIV-infected males.

    PubMed

    Munawwar, Arshi; Sharma, Surendra K; Gupta, Somesh; Singh, Sarman

    2014-12-01

    In India Kaposi's sarcoma is rarely seen in AIDS patients. Hence the current belief is that the incidence of human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) is very low in this subcontinent, most probably due to the heterosexual route of HIV transmission. However, there is a scarcity of data on the prevalence of HHV-8 in India. In India the primary mode of HIV transmission is the heterosexual route. Therefore we aimed to determine the prevalence of antibodies against HHV-8 in North Indian HIV-infected men naive of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In a prospective study, 165 Indian adult males were recruited from an ART clinic. Blood samples were collected before administering any antiretroviral drug. The sera were tested for antibodies against HHV-8 using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit, which detects IgG antibodies to lytic antigens of HHV-8. All positive samples were confirmed for the presence of anti-HHV-8 antibodies using an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The IFA kit is intended to detect primary, latent, persistent, or reactivated infection of HHV-8. Of the 165 males, 43 (26.06%) were positive by ELISA while 26 (15.8%) were also positive by IFA. Seroprevalence decreased with increasing age (p<0.05). Factors independently associated with HHV-8 infection were younger age group and alcohol consumption. These findings suggest that even in a heterosexual population, HHV-8 can be transmitted frequently. PMID:25375960

  7. Genome sequence of Ensifer sp. TW10; a Tephrosia wallichii (Biyani) microsymbiont native to the Indian Thar Desert

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Nisha; Gehlot, Hukam S; Kaushik, Muskan; Choudhary, Sunil; Tiwari, Ravi; Tian, Rui; Hill, Yvette; Bräu, Lambert; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Liolios, Konstantinos; Huntemann, Marcel; Palaniappan, Krishna; Pati, Amrita; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Ensifer sp. TW10 is a novel N2-fixing bacterium isolated from a root nodule of the perennial legume Tephrosia wallichii Graham (known locally as Biyani) found in the Great Indian (or Thar) desert, a large arid region in the northwestern part of the Indian subcontinent. Strain TW10 is a Gram-negative, rod shaped, aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, species of root nodule bacteria (RNB) that promiscuously nodulates legumes in Thar Desert alkaline soil. It is fast growing, acid-producing, and tolerates up to 2% NaCl and capable of growth at 40oC. In this report we describe for the first time the primary features of this Thar Desert soil saprophyte together with genome sequence information and annotation. The 6,802,256 bp genome has a GC content of 62% and is arranged into 57 scaffolds containing 6,470 protein-coding genes, 73 RNA genes and a single rRNA operon. This genome is one of 100 RNB genomes sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:24976887

  8. Improvements in the representation of the Indian summer monsoon in the NCEP climate forecast system version 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombardi, Rodrigo J.; Schneider, Edwin K.; Marx, Lawrence; Halder, Subhadeep; Singh, Bohar; Tawfik, Ahmed B.; Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Kinter, James L.

    2015-11-01

    A new triggering mechanism for deep convection based on the heated condensation framework (HCF) is implemented into the National Centers for Environmental Prediction climate forecast system version 2 (CFSv2). The new trigger is added as an additional criterion in the simplified Arakawa-Schubert scheme for deep convection. Seasonal forecasts are performed to evaluate the influence of the new triggering mechanism in the representation of the Indian summer monsoon in the CFSv2. The HCF trigger improves the seasonal representation of precipitation over the Indian subcontinent. The new triggering mechanism leads to a significant, albeit relatively small, improvement in the bias of seasonal precipitation totals. In addition, the new trigger improves the representation of the seasonal precipitation cycle including the monsoon onset, and the probability distribution of precipitation intensities. The mechanism whereby the HCF improves convection over India seems to be related not only to a better representation of the background state of atmospheric convection but also to an increase in the frequency in which SAS is triggered. As a result, there was an increase in convective precipitation over India favored by the availability of moist convective instability. The increase in precipitation intensity leads to a reduction in the dry bias.

  9. Status of NCEP CFS vis-a-vis IPCC AR4 models for the simulation of Indian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, Samir; Dhakate, Ashish; Chaudhari, Hemantkumar S.; Saha, Subodh K.

    2013-01-01

    National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Coupled Forecast System (CFS) is selected to play a lead role for monsoon research (seasonal prediction, extended range prediction, climate prediction, etc.) in the ambitious Monsoon Mission project of Government of India. Thus, as a prerequisite, a detail analysis for the performance of NCEP CFS vis-a-vis IPCC AR4 models for the simulation of Indian summer monsoon (ISM) is attempted. It is found that the mean monsoon simulations by CFS in its long run are at par with the IPCC models. The spatial distribution of rainfall in the realm of Indian subcontinent augurs the better results for CFS as compared with the IPCC models. The major drawback of CFS is the bifurcation of rain types; it shows almost 80-90 % rain as convective, contrary to the observation where it is only 50-65 %; however, the same lacuna creeps in other models of IPCC as well. The only respite is that it realistically simulates the proper ratio of convective and stratiform rain over central and southern part of India. In case of local air-sea interaction, it outperforms other models. However, for monsoon teleconnections, it competes with the better models of the IPCC. This study gives us the confidence that CFS can be very well utilized for monsoon studies and can be safely used for the future development for reliable prediction system of ISM.

  10. Best outcomes for Indian children.

    PubMed

    Porter, Loa L; Zink, Patina Park; Gebhardt, Angela R; Ells, Mark; Graef, Michelle I

    2012-01-01

    The Wisconsin Department of Children and Families and the Midwest Child Welfare Implementation Center are collaborating with Wisconsin's tribes and county child welfare agencies to improve outcomes for Indian children by systemically implementing the Wisconsin Indian Child Welfare Act (WICWA). This groundbreaking collaboration will increase practitioners' understanding of the requirements of WICWA and the need for those requirements, enhance communication and coordination between all stakeholders responsible for the welfare of Indian children in Wisconsin; it is designed to effect the systemic integration of the philosophical underpinnings of WICWA. PMID:23444793

  11. Perceived Personal and Societal Forms of Locus of Control Measures among American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimble, Joseph E.; Richardson, Susan S.

    1983-01-01

    Multidimensionality of locus of control was measured among 740 American Indians, aged 17 to 81 (median age of 19), in five sites; four clusters emerged: personal control, race ideology, control ideology, and fate ideology. Control ideology accounted for the most internal responses, personal control for the most external responses. (MH)

  12. Patterns and Impact of Comorbidity and Multimorbidity among Community-Resident American Indian Elders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Robert; Kerby, Dave S.; Hennessy, Catherine Hagan

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to suggest a new approach to identifying patterns of comorbidity and multimorbidity. Design and Methods: A random sample of 1,039 rural community-resident American Indian elders aged 60 years and older was surveyed. Comorbidity was investigated with four standard approaches, and with cluster analysis. Results:…

  13. Host status of litchi and rambutan to the West Indian fruit fly (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit of litchi, (Litchi chinensis) and rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum) were collected from the field in 2006 and 2007 and monitored for the emergence of West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua. Fruit clusters of rambutan and litchi, with a piece of the peel removed to allow access to ovipositing f...

  14. Community Participation in Public Schools: Impact of Information Campaigns in Three Indian States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Priyanka; Goyal, Sangeeta; Sundararaman, Venkatesh

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of a community-based information campaign on school performance from a cluster randomized control trial in 610 villages. The campaign consisted of eight or nine public meetings in each of 340 treatment villages across three Indian states to disseminate information to the community about its state-mandated roles and…

  15. Study of tropospheric delay over Indian region from MODIS, NCEP/NCAR data and ground based water vapor measurements at Kolkata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Souvik; Das, Saurabh; Maitra, Animesh

    2015-09-01

    A priori estimation of delays with error variance of atmospheric radio wave propagation is important for precise position estimation and integrity of the system like Global Positioning System (GPS). Tropospheric effects are less severe than the ionospheric counterpart, but behave in a complex manner, making it difficult to isolate them. In this present paper, a ground based radiometer has been utilized to study the characteristics of tropospheric delay and compared it with the MODIS satellite observations over Kolkata (22.57°N, 88.37°E). Results indicate a good agreement between radiometer and MODIS data except the monsoon months. A climatology of spatial and temporal variation of dry and wet tropospheric delay over the Indian subcontinent have also been estimated using MODIS data and NCEP-NCAR reanalysis data for 2008-2012. The spatial variations of dry delay over Indian region are observed to be in the range of 120-250 cm with limited seasonal variability. However, the wet delay varies from 20 cm in winter months to 45 cm during monsoon period in the coastal and central Indian region. Further analysis reveals that the contribution of wet delays in total delay is significant only along the Indo-Gangetic plain. This indicates that extra precaution is needed in handling tropospheric delay for this region due to fast varying nature of water vapor.

  16. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained...

  17. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained or...

  18. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained...

  19. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained...

  20. 25 CFR 153.5 - Children of competent Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Children of competent Indians. 153.5 Section 153.5 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER DETERMINATION OF COMPETENCY: CROW INDIANS § 153.5 Children of competent Indians. Children of competent Indians who have attained...

  1. 25 CFR 140.24 - Cash payments only to Indians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cash payments only to Indians. 140.24 Section 140.24 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES LICENSED INDIAN TRADERS § 140.24 Cash payments only to Indians. Traders must not pay Indians in tokens, tickets, store...

  2. Indians and Southern Colonial Statutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawashima, Yasuhide

    1974-01-01

    Southern statutes, with their dual nature of uniformity and diversity, were doubtlessly an essential source of law for the examination of complex legal relations between American Indians and Anglo Americans in the colonial South. (FF)

  3. Taxation and the American Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunt, David

    1973-01-01

    The article explores American Indian tribal rights to tax exemptions and self-imposed taxation; general recommendations on possible tribal tax alternatives; and evaluation of the probable economic effect of taxation. (FF)

  4. 76 FR 11258 - Indian Gaming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-01

    ... engaging in Class III gaming activities on Indian lands. The compact authorizes up to 2,000 video lottery terminals, up to 70 table games, and establishes the Oregon Benefit Fund to receive payments from...

  5. Evidence for long-lived subduction of an ancient tectonic plate beneath the southern Indian Ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, N. A.; Myers, S. C.; Johannesson, G.; Matzel, E.; Grand, S. P.

    2015-11-14

    In this study, ancient subducted tectonic plates have been observed in past seismic images of the mantle beneath North America and Eurasia, and it is likely that other ancient slab structures have remained largely hidden, particularly in the seismic-data-limited regions beneath the vast oceans in the Southern Hemisphere. Here we present a new global tomographic image, which shows a slab-like structure beneath the southern Indian Ocean with coherency from the upper mantle to the core-mantle boundary region—a feature that has never been identified. We postulate that the structure is an ancient tectonic plate that sank into the mantle along an extensive intraoceanic subduction zone that migrated southwestward across the ancient Tethys Ocean in the Mesozoic Era. Slab material still trapped in the transition zone is positioned near the edge of East Gondwana at 140 Ma suggesting that subduction terminated near the margin of the ancient continent prior to breakup and subsequent dispersal of its subcontinents.

  6. Evidence for long-lived subduction of an ancient tectonic plate beneath the southern Indian Ocean

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Simmons, N. A.; Myers, S. C.; Johannesson, G.; Matzel, E.; Grand, S. P.

    2015-11-14

    In this study, ancient subducted tectonic plates have been observed in past seismic images of the mantle beneath North America and Eurasia, and it is likely that other ancient slab structures have remained largely hidden, particularly in the seismic-data-limited regions beneath the vast oceans in the Southern Hemisphere. Here we present a new global tomographic image, which shows a slab-like structure beneath the southern Indian Ocean with coherency from the upper mantle to the core-mantle boundary region—a feature that has never been identified. We postulate that the structure is an ancient tectonic plate that sank into the mantle along anmore » extensive intraoceanic subduction zone that migrated southwestward across the ancient Tethys Ocean in the Mesozoic Era. Slab material still trapped in the transition zone is positioned near the edge of East Gondwana at 140 Ma suggesting that subduction terminated near the margin of the ancient continent prior to breakup and subsequent dispersal of its subcontinents.« less

  7. Association of Ficolin-2 Serum Levels and FCN2 Genetic Variants with Indian Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Sundaravadivel, Pandarisamy; Tong, Hoang Van; Meyer, Christian G.; Jalli, Reshma D.; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-01-01

    Background Visceral leishmaniasis (VL), one of the neglected tropical diseases, is endemic in the Indian subcontinent. Ficolins are circulating serum proteins of the lectin complement system and involved in innate immunity. Methods We have estimated ficolin-2 serum levels and analyzed the functional variants of the encoding gene FCN2 in 218 cases of VL and in 225 controls from an endemic region of India. Results Elevated levels of serum ficolin-2 were observed in VL cases compared to the controls (adjusted P<0.0001). The genetic analysis revealed that the FCN2 structural variant +6359 C>T (p.T236M) was associated with VL (OR=2.2, 95% CI=1.23-7.25, P=0.008) and with high ficolin-2 serum levels. We also found that the FCN2*AAAC haplotype occurred more frequently among healthy controls when compared to cases (OR=0.59, 95%CI=0.37-0.94, P=0.023). Conclusions Our findings indicate that the FCN2 variant +6359C>T is associated with the occurrence of VL and that ficolin-2 serum levels are elevated in Leishmania infections. PMID:25965808

  8. First record of the African-Indian centipede genus Digitipes Attems, 1930 (Scolopendromorpha: Otostigminae) from Myanmar, and the systematic position of a new species based on molecular phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Siriwut, Warut; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Sutcharit, Chirasak; Tongkerd, Piyoros; Panha, Somsak

    2015-01-01

    The first Southeast Asian record of the scolopendrid centipede Digitipes Attems, 1930, has been collected and analyzed based on a new species from Myanmar, males possessing a distomedial process on the ultimate leg femur that is diagnostic of the genus. Digitipes kalewaensis n. sp., described herein, is distinguished from other members of Digitipes by its 2.5 to 2.7 dorsally glabrous antennal articles, an unusually long basal suture on the tooth-plates, absence of a lateral spine on the coxopleural process, and a lack of median and dorso-median spines on the ultimate leg prefemur. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses of two molecular markers (mitochondrial COI and 16S rRNA) supported the proposal of a new species from Myanmar. The phylogenetic tree identifies Digitipes barnabasi from the Western Ghats, India, in a polytomy with members of other genera of Otostigminae (Otostigmus, Ethmostigmus and Rhysida) and a robust Indian-Burmese Digitipes clade in which D. kalewaensis n. sp. is resolved as sister group to a clade composed of most Indian species. Available molecular dates for the diversification of Indian Digitipes are consistent with introduction of the genus into SE Asia when the Indian subcontinent made contact with Myanmar in the early Palaeogene. PMID:25781815

  9. Euthanasia: An Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Vinod K.; Basu, S.; Sarkhel, S.

    2012-01-01

    In our society, the palliative care and quality of life issues in patients with terminal illnesses like advanced cancer and AIDS have become an important concern for clinicians. Parallel to this concern has arisen another controversial issue-euthanasia or “mercy –killing” of terminally ill patients. Proponents of physician-assisted suicide (PAS) feel that an individual's right to autonomy automatically entitles him to choose a painless death. The opponents feel that a physician's role in the death of an individual violates the central tenet of the medical profession. Moreover, undiagnosed depression and possibility of social ‘coercion’ in people asking for euthanasia put a further question mark on the ethical principles underlying such an act. These concerns have led to strict guidelines for implementing PAS. Assessment of the mental state of the person consenting to PAS becomes mandatory and here, the role of the psychiatrist becomes pivotal. Although considered illegal in our country, PAS has several advocates in the form of voluntary organizations like “death with dignity” foundation. This has got a fillip in the recent Honourable Supreme Court Judgment in the Aruna Shaunbag case. What remains to be seen is how long it takes before this sensitive issue rattles the Indian legislature. PMID:22988327

  10. Relationship between tropospheric temperature and Indian summer monsoon rainfall as simulated by RegCM3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattnayak, K. C.; Panda, S. K.; Saraswat, Vaishali; Dash, S. K.

    2016-05-01

    Relationship between rainfall and tropospheric temperature (TT) has been examined over the Indian subcontinent during four seasons of the year using Regional Climate Model Version 3.0 (RegCM3). The model has been integrated at 55 km horizontal resolution over India during the years 1980-2000 with prescribed lateral boundary forcing from the 40 years re-analysis (ERA40) of the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts. Results of this study show that RegCM3 in general is able to capture the spatial distributions of rainfall in all the seasons as compared to the corresponding IMD0.5 gridded rainfall. The model has simulated warmer TT over the Himalayan region in all the seasons as compared to ERA40. However, it is well captured over the peninsular India and the oceanic regions. In the model, larger warming by about 0.5 °C over the northwest and Central India in the summer monsoon months might have lead to lower surface pressure there. Also, the vertical extent of the monsoon trough is found to be up to 500 hPa in the model as compared to that in NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. As a consequence, the simulated monsoon circulation and rainfall are stronger than those observed. The two most important rainfall seasons, the summer monsoon and winter are reasonably well simulated with correlation coefficients (CC) of 0.60 and 0.59 respectively significant at 99 % confidence level with the corresponding observed values of IMD0.5. Further, Indian summer monsoon rainfall (ISMR) and TT during the contrasting monsoon years are also close to their respective observed values. Temporal CCs between the TT over Tibet, Pakistan and Central India during the summer monsoon season and gridded ISMR values reveals that the TT over Pakistan has been better correlated with the ISMR than those over Tibet and Central India. This relationship has been well supported by the model simulations.

  11. Genotype-phenotype analysis of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome in fifteen Indian families.

    PubMed

    Vikkath, Narendranath; Valiyaveedan, Sindhu; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Radhakrishnan, Natasha; Pillai, Gopal S; Nair, Vasantha; Pooleri, Ginil Kumar; Mathew, Georgie; Menon, Krishnakumar N; Ariyannur, Prasanth S; Pillai, Ashok B

    2015-12-01

    The general prevalence of the familial multi-organ tumor disorder, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), was estimated to be 1 in 25-40,000 in western studies two decades back. Few studies were done in Indian sub-continent, amidst a surge in clinical reports on VHL specific manifestations. The syndrome is correlated with mutations of the gene VHL (located in Chr 3p25.3). We aimed to conduct a prospective case series describing phenotypic and genotypic characteristics in Indian population. The VHL-specific clinical and radiological features were collected from patients and family members. Genotypic changes such as deletion/duplication or point mutation in the VHL locus were identified using sequencing and MLPA. Thirty-one subjects, from fifteen families with diagnosed VHL, were included in the study. Multicystic pancreas was found in 71% (22/31), CNS hemangioblastoma in 68% (21/31), renal cell carcinoma and retinal angiomas in 23% (7/31) each, pheochromocytoma in 9.7% (3/31) of the population and endolymphatic sac tumor in one subject. Four families (9 subjects) had full length deletion of VHL, three families (4 subjects) had a deletion of exon 3, eight families (18 subjects) had different exonic, splice-site and intronic point mutations and one subject had a de novo in-frame indel in exon 1. Multicystic pancreas and CNS hemangioblastomas were the most common manifestations in our population. The phenotypic expression patterns in terms of tumorigenesis, tissue tropism and penetrance in comparison to the genotypic features were found to be different from previous correlative studies. PMID:25952756

  12. Chromosome Numbers and Genome Size Variation in Indian Species of Curcuma (Zingiberaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Leong-Škorničková, Jana; Šída, Otakar; Jarolímová, Vlasta; Sabu, Mamyil; Fér, Tomáš; Trávníček, Pavel; Suda, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Genome size and chromosome numbers are important cytological characters that significantly influence various organismal traits. However, geographical representation of these data is seriously unbalanced, with tropical and subtropical regions being largely neglected. In the present study, an investigation was made of chromosomal and genome size variation in the majority of Curcuma species from the Indian subcontinent, and an assessment was made of the value of these data for taxonomic purposes. Methods Genome size of 161 homogeneously cultivated plant samples classified into 51 taxonomic entities was determined by propidium iodide flow cytometry. Chromosome numbers were counted in actively growing root tips using conventional rapid squash techniques. Key Results Six different chromosome counts (2n = 22, 42, 63, >70, 77 and 105) were found, the last two representing new generic records. The 2C-values varied from 1·66 pg in C. vamana to 4·76 pg in C. oligantha, representing a 2·87-fold range. Three groups of taxa with significantly different homoploid genome sizes (Cx-values) and distinct geographical distribution were identified. Five species exhibited intraspecific variation in nuclear DNA content, reaching up to 15·1 % in cultivated C. longa. Chromosome counts and genome sizes of three Curcuma-like species (Hitchenia caulina, Kaempferia scaposa and Paracautleya bhatii) corresponded well with typical hexaploid (2n = 6x = 42) Curcuma spp. Conclusions The basic chromosome number in the majority of Indian taxa (belonging to subgenus Curcuma) is x = 7; published counts correspond to 6x, 9x, 11x, 12x and 15x ploidy levels. Only a few species-specific C-values were found, but karyological and/or flow cytometric data may support taxonomic decisions in some species alliances with morphological similarities. Close evolutionary relationships among some cytotypes are suggested based on the similarity in homoploid genome sizes and geographical grouping

  13. Consistent response of Indian summer monsoon to Middle East dust in observations and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.; Wei, J.; Yang, Z.-L.; Pu, B.; Huang, J.

    2015-06-01

    The response of the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) circulation and precipitation to Middle East dust aerosols on sub-seasonal timescales is studied using observations and the Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem). Satellite data shows that the ISM rainfall in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and Pakistan are closely associated with Middle East dust aerosols. The physical mechanism behind this dust-ISM rainfall connection is examined through ensemble simulations with and without dust emission. Each ensemble includes 16 members with various physical and chemical schemes to consider the model uncertainties in parameterizing shortwave radiation, the planetary boundary layer, and aerosol chemical mixing rules. Experiments show that dust aerosols increase rainfall by about 0.44 mm day-1 (~ 10%) in coastal southwest India, central and northern India, and northern Pakistan, a pattern consistent with the observed relationship. The ensemble mean rainfall response over India shows much stronger spatial correlation with the observed rainfall response than any of the ensemble members. The largest modeling uncertainties are from the boundary layer schemes, followed by shortwave radiation schemes. In WRF-Chem, the dust AOD over the Middle East shows the strongest correlation with the ISM rainfall response when dust AOD leads rainfall response by about 11 days. Further analyses show that the increased ISM rainfall is related to the enhanced southwesterly flow and moisture transport from the Arabian Sea to the Indian subcontinent, which are associated with the development of an anomalous low pressure system over the Arabian Sea, the southern Arabian Peninsula, and the Iranian Plateau due to dust-induced heating in the lower troposphere (800-500 hPa). This study demonstrates a thermodynamic mechanism that links remote desert dust emission in the Middle East to the ISM circulation and precipitation variability on sub-seasonal timescales

  14. The role of ocean salinity in the water cycle associated with Indian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, W.; Yueh, S. H.; Liu, W. T.

    2014-12-01

    Indian monsoon is one of the most important of all tropical climate systems. Its onset and spatial/temporal variability have strong economic impact and may cause severe human suffering. Using sea surface salinity (SSS) data from Aquarius/SAC-D satellite mission, we study the seasonal and interannual variability of SSS, to identify the potential sources for the monsoon moisture supply. Preliminary analysis shows the rainfall integrated over India subcontinent, which often used as an indicator for the monsoon onset and intensity, is correlated higher with Aquarius SSS in Indian Ocean than the state-of-art estimate of evaporation (OAflux) minus precipitation (GPCP), indicating the important role of the oceanic processes. We also examine the relative importance of salinity tendency (dSSS/dt) and salinity advection at various stages of the monsoon. Ocean current data from OSCAR project is used to estimate the salinity advection. The role of ocean processes relative to other components of the water cycle is investigated in conjunction with data from multiple satellite missions. The atmospheric integrated moisture transport (IMT) is derived from ocean vector wind (OceanSAT2) and atmospheric precipitable water (SSMIS F17). Moisture in and out of the continent can be estimated by integrating IMT along the coasts, providing a quantitative description of moisture supply in the water budget. We analyze how IMT is influenced by oceanic processes and further related with large-scale circulation. This study underscores the importance of continuous good-quality and high-resolution spacebased observations towards the characterization, understanding, and prediction of the global water cycle.

  15. Renewable energy in Indian country

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    On June 25--27, 1995, at Mesa Verde National Park in southwestern Colorado, the Center for Resource Management (CRM), organized and sponsored a conference in conjunction with the Navajo Nation, EPA, and Bechtel Group, Inc., to deal with issues associated with developing renewable energy resources on Indian lands. Due to the remoteness of many reservation homes and the cost of traditional power line extensions, a large percentage of the Indian population is today without electricity or other energy services. In addition, while they continue to develop energy resources for export, seeing only minimal gain in their own economies, Indian people are also subject to the health and environmental consequences associated with proximity to traditional energy resource development. Renewable energy technologies, on the other hand, are often ideally suited to decentralized, low-density demand. These technologies--especially solar and wind power--have no adverse health impacts associated with generation, are relatively low cost, and can be used in applications as small as a single home, meeting power needs right at a site. Their minimal impact on the environment make them particularly compatible with American Indian philosophies and lifestyles. Unfortunately, the match between renewable energy and Indian tribes has been hampered by the lack of a comprehensive, coordinated effort to identify renewable energy resources located on Indian lands, to develop practical links between Indian people`s needs and energy producers, and to provide the necessary training for tribal leaders and members to plan, implement, and maintain renewable energy systems. Summaries of the presentations are presented.

  16. Predicting Indian Summer Monsoon onset through variations of surface air temperature and relative humidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbova, Veronika; Surovyatkina, Elena; Kurths, Jurgen

    2015-04-01

    Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) rainfall has an enormous effect on Indian agriculture, economy, and, as a consequence, life and prosperity of more than one billion people. Variability of the monsoonal rainfall and its onset have a huge influence on food production, agricultural planning and GDP of the country, which on 22% is determined by agriculture. Consequently, successful forecasting of the ISM onset is a big challenge and large efforts are being put into it. Here, we propose a novel approach for predictability of the ISM onset, based on critical transition theory. The ISM onset is defined as an abrupt transition from sporadious rainfall to spatially organized and temporally sustained rainfall. Taking this into account, we consider the ISM onset as is a critical transition from pre-monsoon to monsoon, which take place in time and also in space. It allows us to suggest that before the onset of ISM on the Indian subcontinent should be areas of critical behavior where indicators of the critical transitions can be detected through an analysis of observational data. First, we identify areas with such critical behavior. Second, we use detected areas as reference points for observation locations for the ISM onset prediction. Third, we derive a precursor for the ISM onset based on the analysis of surface air temperature and relative humidity variations in these reference points. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of this precursor on two observational data sets. The proposed approach allows to determine ISM onset in advance in 67% of all considered years. Our proposed approach is less effective during the anomalous years, which are associated with weak/strong monsoons, e.g. El-Nino, La-Nina or positive Indian Ocean Dipole events. The ISM onset is predicted for 23 out of 27 normal monsoon years (85%) during the past 6 decades. In the anomalous years, we show that time series analysis in both areas during the pre-monsoon period reveals indicators whether the

  17. CARTILAGE CELL CLUSTERS

    PubMed Central

    Lotz, Martin K.; Otsuki, Shuhei; Grogan, Shawn P.; Sah, Robert; Terkeltaub, Robert; D’Lima, Darryl

    2010-01-01

    The formation of new cell clusters is a histological hallmark of arthritic cartilage but the biology of clusters and their role in disease are poorly understood. This is the first comprehensive review of clinical and experimental conditions associated with cluster formation. Genes and proteins that are expressed in cluster cells, the cellular origin of the clusters, mechanisms that lead to cluster formation and the role of cluster cells in pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:20506158

  18. Evaluation of the impact of AIRS profiles on prediction of Indian summer monsoon using WRF variational data assimilation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Attada; Parekh, Anant; Kumar, Prashant; Gnanaseelan, C.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the impact of temperature and moisture profiles from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the prediction of the Indian summer monsoon, using the variational data assimilation system annexed to the Weather Research and Forecasting model. In this study, three numerical experiments are carried out. The first is the control and includes no assimilation; in the second, named Conv, assimilation of conventional Global Telecommunication System data is performed. The third one, named ConvAIRS, is identical to the Conv except that it also includes assimilation of AIRS profiles. The initial fields of tropospheric temperature and water vapor mixing ratio showed significant improvement over the model domain. Assimilation of AIRS profiles has significant impact on predicting the seasonal mean monsoon characteristics such as tropospheric temperature, low-level moisture distribution, easterly wind shear, and precipitation. The vertical structure of the root-mean-square error is substantially affected by the assimilation of AIRS profiles, with smaller errors in temperature, humidity, and wind magnitude. The consequent improved representation of moisture convergence in the boundary layer (deep convection as well) causes an increase in precipitation forecast skill. The fact that the monsoonal circulation is better captured, thanks to an improved representation of thermal gradients, which in turn leads to more realistic moisture transport, is particularly noteworthy. Several previous data impact studies with AIRS and other sensors have focused on the short or medium range of the forecast. The demonstrated improvement in all the predicted fields associated with the Indian summer monsoon, consequent to the month long assimilation of AIRS profiles, is an innovative finding with large implications to the operational seasonal forecasting capabilities over the Indian subcontinent.

  19. Profile: American Indian/Alaska Native

    MedlinePlus

    ... million American Indians and Alaska Natives. Typically, this urban clientele has less accessibility to hospitals; health clinics ... IHS and tribal health programs. Studies on the urban American Indian and Alaska Native population have documented ...

  20. Self-Confidence of Selected Indian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, James C.

    1974-01-01

    The article discusses a study that determined if selected primary and junior high Indian students' self-confidence was related to grade level and to the number of years enrolled in a particular Bureau of Indian Affairs boarding school. (KM)

  1. Accidental Deaths Among British Columbia Indians

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, N.; Hole, L. W.; Barclay, W. S.

    1966-01-01

    A statistical and epidemiological review of British Columbia native Indian and non-Indian mortality revealed that accidents were the leading cause of death among Indians but ranked only fourth among non-Indians. Comparison of accidental death rates by age and sex showed that, without exception, the rates among Indians were considerably higher than the corressponding rates for non-Indians. While the Indians represented some 2% of the total population of British Columbia, they accounted for over 10% of the total accident fatalities, 29% of drownings, and 21% of fatal burns. Socioeconomic, environmental and psychosocial factors and excessive drinking are considered the chief causes responsible for this rather unusual epidemiological phenomenon. This study revealed certain hazardous conditions which are specific to the Indian's present way of life. In the authors' opinion the recognition of these specific hazards is imperative for the planning of effective preventive campaigns. PMID:5902238

  2. 76 FR 35221 - Epidemiology Program for American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and Urban Indian Communities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-16

    ... June 8, 2011, in FR Doc. 2011-14131, on page 33318, in the first column, last complete sentence in the... Urban Indian Communities; Correction AGENCY: Indian Health Service, HHS. ACTION: Notice; correction... American Indian/Alaska Native Tribes and urban Indian communities. The document contained one...

  3. American Indian Stereotypes: The Truth Behind the Hype. An Indian Education Curriculum Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stutzman, Esther

    This curriculum guide dispels the stereotypes of American Indians that humiliate and degrade real Indian culture and add fuel to the fire of racism and prejudice. It begins with a timeline of American Indian history from 15,000 B.C. to the present, and compares it to a historical timeline of Europe-Asia. The stereotype of the savage Indian is…

  4. New Directions in Indian Purpose: Reflections on the American Indian Chicago Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Educational Services, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The "Declaration of Indian Purpose" produced by the American Indian Chicago Conference in 1961 needs to be recognized and extended to meet the needs and common political concerns of American Indians today. This publication provides the complete text and the appendices to this earlier document, and includes papers in which Indian academics and…

  5. 75 FR 35070 - American Indians Into Medicine; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Medicine; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Medicine Program Announcement Type: New. Funding Opportunity Number: HHS... American Indians into Medicine Program. This program is authorized under the authority of 25 U.S.C....

  6. American Indian History and Writing from Home: Constructing an Indian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fixico, Donald L.

    2009-01-01

    If the typical premise of American Indian history is actually the history of Indian-white relations, then the "other" side of the coin must be turned over for understanding an Indian point of view and what is called "writing from home." Conceptually, "writing from home" is the challenge of historians who are American Indian and who write history…

  7. 75 FR 36414 - American Indians Into Psychology; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service American Indians Into Psychology; Notice of Competitive Grant Applications for American Indians Into Psychology Program Announcement Type: New. Funding Opportunity Number... Indians into Psychology Program. This program is authorized under the authority of ``25 U.S.C....

  8. A Study of the Indian Health Service and Indian Tribal Involvement in Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Press, Daniel S.; And Others

    Addressing American Indians and the Indian Health Service (IHS), this report focuses on the process of Indian involvement and self-determination in health, emphasizing improvement of the effectiveness and responsiveness of Indian health services. Data derived from written documents, statistical figures, and personal interviews with over 200 people…

  9. The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978: Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Barbara Brooks

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (ICWA), intended to stabilize Indian families by reducing the number of Indian children placed in non-Indian adoptive or foster homes. The act established minimum federal standards for removal of Indian children and outlined procedures that aid their placement in homes reflecting Indian culture.…

  10. 25 CFR 273.15 - Establishment of Indian Education Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Establishment of Indian Education Committee. 273.15 Section 273.15 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT PROGRAM EDUCATION CONTRACTS UNDER JOHNSON-O'MALLEY ACT Application Process § 273.15 Establishment of Indian...

  11. 25 CFR 137.8 - Indian lands excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Indian lands excluded. 137.8 Section 137.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS, SAN CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.8 Indian lands excluded. This public...

  12. 25 CFR 137.8 - Indian lands excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Indian lands excluded. 137.8 Section 137.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS, SAN CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.8 Indian lands excluded. This public...

  13. 25 CFR 137.8 - Indian lands excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Indian lands excluded. 137.8 Section 137.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS, SAN CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.8 Indian lands excluded. This public...

  14. 25 CFR 137.8 - Indian lands excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Indian lands excluded. 137.8 Section 137.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS, SAN CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.8 Indian lands excluded. This public...

  15. Indian Tribes of Alberta. Revised, Expanded, and Updated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Hugh A.

    This book recounts the story of the Indians in Alberta, Canada. Pictures and maps help in the explanation of these facts. The Indians described include the: (1) Blackfoot Nation (Blackfoot, Blood, Peigan Tribes); (2) Sarcee Tribe; (3) Stoney Indians; (4) Plains Cree; (5) Woodland Cree; (6) Chipewyan Indians; (7) Beaver Indians; (8) Slavey Indians;…

  16. 25 CFR 137.8 - Indian lands excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Indian lands excluded. 137.8 Section 137.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES REIMBURSEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION COSTS, SAN CARLOS INDIAN IRRIGATION PROJECT, ARIZONA § 137.8 Indian lands excluded. This public...

  17. A Museum of the Indian, Not for the Indian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lujan, James

    2005-01-01

    There has been some controversy brewing around the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI). A bit of it is due to the dismay over the exclusion of so many tribes, which in time will be remedied, given that the exhibits are supposed to rotate every couple of years. But more fundamental is the debate over the museum's deliberate…

  18. Community Colleges. Haskell Indian Junior College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Donna

    1974-01-01

    Haskell Indian Junior College in Lawrence, Kansas is the only degree-granting junior college under the authority of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. As a government-supported institution of higher education, the school is unique in another way: each of its students, who receive free room, board and tuition, must be one-fourth Indian blood. (Author)

  19. American Indian Elderly: A National Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Indian Council on Aging, Albuquerque, NM.

    The first research effort undertaken to document conditions of life of older Indian and Alaskan Native people (aged 45 and older) nationwide was completed by the National Indian Council on Aging in 1980. Data were derived from results of a detailed survey administered to a random sample of 712 older Indians and Alaskan Natives from urban and rural…

  20. American Indian Health Careers Handbook. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Don, Ed.

    Designed to inform Indian students about health career opportunities, this handbook prepared by the Association of American Indian Physicians describes the great need for more American Indians as health professionals and gives information on specific health fields, preparation for health professions, and assistance available (financial and other).…

  1. The Comprehensive View of Indian Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaegi, Gerda

    Relating historical conflicts between Indians and whites, the document explained how education was originally aimed at "civilizing" and domesticating the Canadian Indian. This philosophy, used extensively by church groups that established the original Indian schools, alienated children from both the white society and the educational process.…

  2. Indian Family Adjustment to Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Lee Anne; Keltner, Bette

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the community response of how American Indian families adapt to having school age children with disabilities in two diverse American Indian communities. An ethnographic design was utilized to construct a taxonomy about family adjustment of American Indian families with disabilities. Community Assessment…

  3. New Potentials for Modern Indian Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Wallace G.

    Recently American Indians have experienced an unprecedented renaissance in community spirit. Capitalizing upon this spirit, Indian economic development should be directed toward particular community needs, utilizing Indian leadership to determine needed training and development programs. There is no question but that the majority of Indian…

  4. Indian Adolescent Mental Health. OTA Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    The Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs is considering legislation to improve mental health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives. This report is in response to the Committee's request for information on the mental health needs of Indian adolescents and the services available to them. The section on mental health problems among…

  5. 7 CFR 25.500 - Indian reservations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 25.500 Indian reservations. (a) An area in an Indian reservation shall be treated as nominated by a State and a local government if it is nominated by the reservation governing body. (b) For purposes of paragraph (a) of this section, a reservation governing body must be the governing body of an Indian...

  6. Indian Education: Funding Sources for Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockart, Barbetta L.

    Although provisions in countless treaties have mandated Indian educational services, federal and state governments were for many years unenthusiastic about accepting the responsibility for educating the Indian people. Inadequately funded educational services provided by the Bureau of Indian Affairs did little to reflect the realities and needs of…

  7. State Responsibilities for American Indians -- Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diamond, Tom

    The Tiguas of El Paso, Texas; the Coushattas of Louisiana; and the Tortugas of Las Cruces, New Mexico share a common background in that they represent American Indian tribes who, having lost their land base, have been abandoned by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and have experienced recent circumstances of poverty. Since Indian rights stem from…

  8. Exemplary Programs in Indian Education. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavers, Dean, Ed.

    This directory profiles 16 exemplary programs serving American Indian students in elementary and secondary schools, colleges, and community adult education programs. An introduction discusses what "exemplary" means, the history of Indian education, the lack of Indian programs in the National Diffusion Network's (NDN) directory of exemplary…

  9. Indian Education; Annual Report, 1968-1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montana State Dept. of Public Instruction, Helena.

    Information is provided on education for Montana Indian tribes during 1968-69. Indian students attending institutions of higher education through the aid of Federal funds are listed by name, and breakdowns of funds allocated by the Johnson O'Malley Act are given. Tables provide statistics on Indian enrollment, attendance, and graduates, as well as…

  10. Indian Voices: The Native American Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Historical Society, San Francisco, CA.

    The Convocation of American Indian scholars was conceived, organized, and directed by the American Indian Historical Society. The first convocation was held at Princeton University in 1970. Unlike conventions, the convocations are called when emergencies in Indian life exist, when changes are needed, and when new directions are emerging. This…

  11. American Indian Doctors Today. Volume Two.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beiswenger, James N., Ed.

    The Indians Into Medicine Program presents an additional 44 brief biographies of American Indian health professionals (7 women and 37 men) from 29 different tribal groups, to acquaint young Indian people with potential careers in health professions (4 of the biographies appeared in Volume One). The biographical sketches contain information on:…

  12. National Council on Indian Opportunity: Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Indian Opportunity, Washington, DC.

    Explanatory statements by acting executive director of the National Council on Indian Opportunity noted (1) that the council was formed to involve Indian people in Federal policy and the program-formulation process and (2) that principal functions of the NCIO were to encourage full use of Federal programs to benefit Indians, to encourage…

  13. The Destruction of American Indian Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Steven, Ed.

    Responding to the need for a comprehensive source of information regarding the separation of American Indian children from their families, this book presents essays which: examine the Indian child-welfare crisis in contemporary, legal, and historical perspectives; document the human cost of the crisis to Indian parents, children, and communities;…

  14. Moral Leadership in Education: An Indian Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sapre, Padmakar M.; Ranade, Mridula D.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses reasons for emergence of management concepts in Indian education. Reviews Western literature on leadership and offers an Indian perspective on leadership. Provides overview of the lives of three famous Indian leaders who demonstrated the essence of moral leadership: Swami Vivekananda, Rabindranath Tagore, and Mahatma Gandhi. Draws…

  15. 300 Years of Canadian Indian Education Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dooner, Terrence

    1978-01-01

    Accenting the education policies of the Canadian government, this article discusses the European educational policy of Christianization as a prerequisite to civilization and education. The provincial or local legislature assumed jurisdictional responsibility for Indians until the 1972 Indian Control of Indian Education Policy Statement moved…

  16. American Indian Self-Image Workshop Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainer, Howard T.

    A self-image workshop manual for American Indians aims to help Indian people set goals and excel in whatever they plan in life. A section entitled "Are You an Eagle?" tells of the significance of eagles in traditional American Indian Culture, discusses those who merit an eagle feather for accomplishment, and lists characteristics of eagles (and…

  17. Educating Native American (Indians): Better Programs Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Dorrance D.

    The intention of this paper was to inform readers about educating Native Americans and what could be done to better meet the Indians' needs. To present this, the paper covered the history of Indian education, the present, and the future. Indians were initially educated to force them to change, assimilate, and become acculturized, rather than to…

  18. Indian Health Trends and Services, 1974 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Washington, DC. Div. of Indian Health.

    The American Indian Health Service (AIHS), subsidiary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, is dedicated to elevating the health status of Indian and Alaskan Native peoples by: developing modern health facilities; encouraging Indian acquaintance with and participation in existing programs; being responsive to the concept of…

  19. Circumstance Adverbials in Registers of Indian English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balasubramanian, Chandrika

    2009-01-01

    This is a corpus-based investigation of "also" and "too" in 11 registers of Indian English. The corpus used for this study is a combination of a Corpus of Contemporary Indian English (CCIE), and certain sections of ICE-India. The study: (1) determines the proportions of "also" and "too" with respect to each other in the Indian corpus; (2) compares…

  20. Jurisdictional Problems of Indian Controlled Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killer, Francis

    An overwhelming confusion caused by lack of knowledge exists among the general public, American Indian parents, and even Indian school boards concerning the rules, purposes, and regulations of the myriad pieces of legislation dealing with Indian education. Such confusion is used by school administrators to perpetuate the power in Bureau of Indian…