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Sample records for indium borides

  1. In{sub 3}Ir{sub 3}B, In{sub 3}Rh{sub 3}B and In{sub 5}Ir{sub 9}B{sub 4}, the first indium platinum metal borides

    SciTech Connect

    Kluenter, Wilhelm; Jung, Walter . E-mail: walter.jung@uni-koeln.de

    2006-09-15

    The first indium platinum metal borides have been synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction data. In{sub 3}Ir{sub 3}B and In{sub 3}Rh{sub 3}B are isotypic. They crystallize with the hexagonal space group P6-bar 2m and Z=1. The lattice constants are a=685.78(1)pm, c=287.30(1)pm for In{sub 3}Ir{sub 3}B and a=678.47(3)pm, c=288.61(6)pm for In{sub 3}Rh{sub 3}B. The structure which is derived from the Fe{sub 2}P type is characterized by columns of boron centered triangular platinum metal prisms inserted in a three-dimensional indium matrix. The indium atoms are on split positions. In{sub 5}Ir{sub 9}B{sub 4} (hexagonal, space group P6-bar 2m, a=559.0(2)pm, c=1032.6(3)pm, Z=1) crystallizes with a structure derived from the CeCo{sub 3}B{sub 2} type. The structure can be interpreted as a layer as well as a channel structure. In part the indium atoms are arranged at the vertices of a honeycomb net (Schlaefli symbol 6{sup 3}) separating slabs consisting of double layers of triangular Ir{sub 6}B prisms, and in part they form a linear chain in a hexagonal channel formed by iridium prisms and indium atoms of the honeycomb lattice.

  2. Gradient boride layers formed by diffusion carburizing and laser boriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulka, M.; Makuch, N.; Dziarski, P.; Mikołajczak, D.; Przestacki, D.

    2015-04-01

    Laser boriding, instead of diffusion boriding, was proposed to formation of gradient borocarburized layers. The microstructure and properties of these layers were compared to those-obtained after typical diffusion borocarburizing. First method of treatment consists in diffusion carburizing and laser boriding only. In microstructure three zones are present: laser borided zone, hardened carburized zone and carburized layer without heat treatment. However, the violent decrease in the microhardness was observed below the laser borided zone. Additionally, these layers were characterized by a changeable value of mass wear intensity factor thus by a changeable abrasive wear resistance. Although at the beginning of friction the very low values of mass wear intensity factor Imw were obtained, these values increased during the next stages of friction. It can be caused by the fluctuations in the microhardness of the hardened carburized zone (HAZ). The use of through hardening after carburizing and laser boriding eliminated these fluctuations. Two zones characterized the microstructure of this layer: laser borided zone and hardened carburized zone. Mass wear intensity factor obtained a constant value for this layer and was comparable to that-obtained in case of diffusion borocarburizing and through hardening. Therefore, the diffusion boriding could be replaced by the laser boriding, when the high abrasive wear resistance is required. However, the possibilities of application of laser boriding instead of diffusion process were limited. In case of elements, which needed high fatigue strength, the substitution of diffusion boriding by laser boriding was not advisable. The surface cracks formed during laser re-melting were the reason for relatively quickly first fatigue crack. The preheating of the laser treated surface before laser beam action would prevent the surface cracks and cause the improved fatigue strength. Although the cohesion of laser borided carburized layer was

  3. Borides in Thin Film Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitterer, Christian

    1997-10-01

    The borides of transition and rare-earth metals are considered for application as wear- and corrosion-resistant, decorative or thermionic coatings. After a review of physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques used for the deposition of these coatings, a survey of investigations to apply these coatings is given. As a result of the strong directionality of covalent boron-boron bonds, boride coatings show an increasing tendency to amorphous film growth with increasing B/Meatomic ratio and, for rare-earth hexaborides, with decreasing metallic radius of the rare-earth metal. Mechanical and optical properties are strongly influenced by the crystallographic structure of the boride phase. Because of their high hardness combined with good adhesion, crystalline films based on the diborides of transition metals seem to be promising candidates for wear resistant coatings on cutting tools. Alloying of these films with nitrogen by reactive PVD processes results in the formation of extremely fine-grained multiphase hard coatings with excellent tribological and corrosion behavior, thus offering new applications in the coating of engineering components. Because of their distinct colorations, some of the hexaborides of rare-earth elements may be used as decorative coatings on consumer products like wristwatch casings or eyeglass frames. Another promising field is the development of thermionic coatings based on rare-earth hexaborides, which may offer the possibility of the production of inexpensive and simple high emission filaments.

  4. Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Moussa, D.; Wilde, S.B.

    1987-02-02

    A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic field which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

  5. Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Moussa, David; Wilde, Stephen B.

    1991-01-01

    A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic fields which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

  6. Kinetics of electrochemical boriding of low carbon steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartal, G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Krumdick, G.; Erdemir, A.; Timur, S.

    2011-05-01

    In this study, the growth kinetics of the boride layers forming on low carbon steel substrates was investigated during electrochemical boriding which was performed at a constant current density of 200 mA/cm 2 in a borax based electrolyte at temperatures ranging from 1123 K to 1273 K for periods of 5-120 min. After boriding, the presence of both FeB and Fe 2B phases were confirmed by the X-ray diffraction method. Cross-sectional microscopy revealed a very dense and thick morphology for both boride phases. Micro hardness testing of the borided steel samples showed a significant increase in the hardness of the borided surfaces (i.e., up to (1700 ± 200) HV), while the hardness of un-borided steel samples was approximately (200 ± 20) HV. Systematic studies over a wide range of boriding time and temperature confirmed that the rate of the boride layer formation is strongly dependent on boriding duration and has a parabolic character. The activation energy of boride layer growth for electrochemical boriding was determined as (172.75 ± 8.6) kJ/mol.

  7. The fracture toughness of borides formed on boronized cold work tool steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Ugur; Sen, Saduman

    2003-06-15

    In this study, the fracture toughness of boride layers of two borided cold work tool steels have been investigated. Boriding was carried out in a salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid, ferro-silicon and aluminum. Boriding was performed at 850 and 950 deg. C for 2 to 7 h. The presence of boride phases were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness and fracture toughness of borides were measured via Vickers indenter. Increasing of boriding time and temperature leads to reduction of fracture toughness of borides. Metallographic examination showed that boride layer formed on cold work tool steels was compact and smooth.

  8. Investigation of the fracture mechanics of boride composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, L.; Clougherty, E. V.; Nesor, H.

    1971-01-01

    Fracture energies of WC-6Co, Boride 5 (ZrB2+SiC), Boride 8(ZrB2+SiC+C) and Boride 8-M2(ZrB2+SiC+C) were measured by slow bend and impact tests of notched charpy bars. Cobalt bonded tungsten carbide exhibited impact energies of 0.76 ft-lb or 73.9 in-lb/square inch. Boride 5 and the Boride 8 exhibit impact energies one third and one quarter of that observed for WC-6Co comparing favorably with measurements for SiC and Si3N4. Slow bend-notched bar-fracture energies for WC-6Co were near 2.6 in-lb/square inch or 1/20 the impact energies. Slow bend energies for Boride 8-M2, Boride 8 and Boride 5 were 58%, 42% and 25% of the value observed for WC-6Co. Fractograph showed differences for WC-6Co where slow bend testing resulted in smooth transgranular cleavage while samples broken by impact exhibited intergranular failures. By contrast the boride fractures showed no distinction based on testing method. Fabrication studies were conducted to effect alteration of the boride composites by alloying and introduction of graphite cloth.

  9. Fracture Microindentation on boride layers on AISI 1020 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, M.; Thanu, A. Justin; Arjun, S. L.; Velmurugan, U.; Gopalakrishnan, P.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an attempt has been made to enhance the fracture toughness (Kc) of boride layer using multi-component (Ni, Cr and B) laser bonding. The fracture toughness of continuously pack borided, interrupted pack borided and multi-component (Ni, Cr and B) laser borided steel specimens was measured using Vickers microindentation fracture toughness test as per ASTM E384 standard. The fracture toughness of continuously pack borided layer was - 3.3 MPa.m1/2. The fracture toughness of interrupted boride layer was in the range of - 4.9 MPa.m1/2. The fracture toughness of multi-component (Ni, Cr and B) laser borided layer was in the range of 13.8 - 18.3 MPa.m1/2. A significant improvement in fracture toughness of laser treated specimens was observed from the experimental results. This may be due to better distribution of boron, nickel, chromium and other alloying elements due to laser treatment and relatively more uniform boride layer as compared with continuously pack borided layer and interrupted pack borided layer.

  10. Electrochemical Evaluation of Corrosion on Borided and Non-borided Steels Immersed in 1 M HCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejía-Caballero, I.; Martínez-Trinidad, J.; Palomar-Pardavé, M.; Romero-Romo, M.; Herrera-Hernández, H.; Herrera-Soria, O.; Campos Silva, I.

    2014-08-01

    In this study the corrosion resistances of AISI 1018 and AISI 304 borided and non-borided steels were estimated using polarization resistance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Boriding of the steel samples was conducted using the powder-pack method at 1223 K with 6 h of exposure. Structural examinations of the surfaces of the borided steels showed the presence of a Fe2B layer with isolated FeB teeth on the AISI 1018 steel, whereas a compact layer of FeB/Fe2B was formed on the AISI 304 steel. Polarization resistance and EIS of the borided and non-borided steels surfaces were performed in a corrosive solution of 1 M HCl. The EIS data were analyzed during 43 days of exposure to the acid solution. Impedance curves obtained during this period for the borided and non-borided steels were modeled using equivalent electrical circuits. The results of both electrochemical techniques indicated that boride layers formed at the steel surfaces effectively protect the samples from the corrosive effects of HCl. The main corrosion processes observed on the boride layers were pitting and crevice corrosion.

  11. Colloidal nickel boride catalyst for hydrogenation of olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Y.; Fujishige, S.

    1981-04-01

    Colloidal nickel boride was prepared from nickel(II) chloride by reduction with sodium borohydride in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone in ethanol. Hydrogenation of various olefins was examined over the colloidal catalyst at 30/sup 0/C and atmospheric pressure. The colloidal nickel boride was much more effective than the precipitated nickel boride prepared in the absence of polyvinylpyrrolidone as a hydrogenation catalyst, especially for isopropenyl compounds. Additional amines and sodium acetate were slightly inhibitive to the colloidal catalyst, while, being strongly promotive to the precipitated catalyst. The colloidal nickel boride was superior to the charcoal-supported metals of the platinum group in catalytic activity for ..cap alpha..-methylstyrene.

  12. Investigation of the diffusion kinetics of borided stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayali, Yusuf

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the kinetics of borides formed on AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels was investigated. Boronizing treatment was carried out using Ekabor-II powders at the processing temperatures of 1123, 1173 and 1223 K for 2, 4 and 6 h. The phases of the boride layers of borided AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels were FeB, Fe2B, CrB and NiB, respectively. The thickness of the boride layer formed on the borided steels ranged from 4.6 to 64 μm depending on the boriding temperature, boriding time and alloying elements of the stainless steels. Depending on the chemical composition, temperature and layer thickness, the activation energies of boron in AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels were found to be 206.161, 234.641 and 222.818 kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetics of growth of the boride layers formed on the AISI 420, AISI 304 and AISI 304L stainless steels and the thickness of the boride layers were investigated.

  13. Mechanism of boriding from pastes in a glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Isakov, S.A.; Al'tshuler, S.A.

    1987-09-01

    The authors investigate the boridation of steel 45 from the standpoint of the glow-discharge dissociation of a borax paste and the plasma arc spraying of the resulting boron into the steel. The effects of process parameters on the impregnation of boron into the steel and its phase behavior in the boridation process are discussed.

  14. The influence of carbon content in the borided Fe-alloys on the microstructure of iron borides

    SciTech Connect

    Kulka, M. . E-mail: coolka@sol.put.poznan.pl; Pertek, A. . E-mail: pertek@sol.put.poznan.pl; Klimek, L. . E-mail: kemilk@p.lodz.pl

    2006-04-15

    This paper presents the results of Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the borided layers produced on substrate of varying carbon content. Two types of materials were investigated: borided Armco iron of very low carbon content and borocarburized chromium- and nickel-based steels of high carbon content beneath iron borides. The tetragonal phase Fe{sub 2}B was identified in all materials studied. It was difficult to obtain an EBSD pattern from iron boride (FeB) because of its presence at low depths below the surface, and because of the rounded corners of the specimens. EBSD provided information on the orientation of Fe{sub 2}B crystals. In case of the low-carbon Armco iron the crystallographic orientation was constant along the full length of the Fe{sub 2}B needle. The EBSPs obtained from borocarburized steel indicate that the crystallographic orientation of the Fe{sub 2}B phase changes along the length of the needle. This is the result of hindered boron diffusion due to boriding of the carburized substrate. The increased resistance to friction wear of borocarburized layers arises from two reasons. One is the decreased microhardness gradient between the iron borides and the substrate, which causes a decrease in the brittleness of the iron borides and an improved distribution of internal stresses in the diffusion layer. The second is the changeable crystallographic orientation of iron borides, which leads to the lower texture and porosity of borided layers. These advantageous properties of the borocarburized layer can be obtained if the carbon content beneath the iron borides is no more than about 1.0-1.2 wt.% C.

  15. Boriding of high carbon high chromium cold work tool steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhammad, W.

    2014-06-01

    High-carbon high-chromium cold work tool steels are widely used for blanking and cold forming of punches and dies. It is always advantageous to obtain an increased wear resistant surface to improve life and performance of these steels. In this connection boriding of a high-carbon high-chromium cold work die steel, D3, was conducted in a mixture of 30% B4C, 70% borax at 950 °C for two, four and six hours. Case depth of the borided layer obtained was between 40 to 80 μm. After boriding, the surface hardness achieved was between 1430 to 1544 HV depending upon the process time. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the formation of a duplex compound layer consisting of FeB and Fe2B. It is generally considered that FeB is undesirable because of its inherent brittleness. Post boriding treatment (homogenization) transformed the compound layer into single-phase layer of Fe2B, while surface hardness decreased to 1345-1430 HV. Pin-on-disc wer test showed that wear resistance of the borided samples was superior as compared to non-borided material and increased with boriding time.

  16. Method of making an icosahedral boride structure

    DOEpatents

    Hersee, Stephen D.; Wang, Ronghua; Zubia, David; Aselage, Terrance L.; Emin, David

    2005-01-11

    A method for fabricating thin films of an icosahedral boride on a silicon carbide (SiC) substrate is provided. Preferably the icosahedral boride layer is comprised of either boron phosphide (B.sub.12 P.sub.2) or boron arsenide (B.sub.12 As.sub.2). The provided method achieves improved film crystallinity and lowered impurity concentrations. In one aspect, an epitaxially grown layer of B.sub.12 P.sub.2 with a base layer or substrate of SiC is provided. In another aspect, an epitaxially grown layer of B.sub.12 As.sub.2 with a base layer or substrate of SiC is provided. In yet another aspect, thin films of B.sub.12 P.sub.2 or B.sub.12 As.sub.2 are formed on SiC using CVD or other vapor deposition means. If CVD techniques are employed, preferably the deposition temperature is above 1050.degree. C., more preferably in the range of 1100.degree. C. to 1400.degree. C., and still more preferably approximately 1150.degree. C.

  17. Synthesis and properties of nanoscale titanium boride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, K. A.; Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the scientific and technological grounds for plasma synthesis of titanium diboride, including thermodynamic and kinetic conditions of boride formation when titanium and titanium dioxide are interacting with products resulting from boron gasification in the nitrogen - hydrogen plasma flow, and two variations of its behavior using the powder mixtures: titanium - boron and titanium dioxide - boron. To study these technology variations, the mathematical models were derived, describing the relation between element contents in the synthesized products of titanium and free boron and basic parameters. The probable mechanism proposed for forming titanium diboride according to a "vapour - melt - crystal" pattern was examined, covering condensation of titanium vapour in the form of aerosol, boriding of nanoscale melt droplets by boron hydrides and crystallization of titanium - boron melt. The comprehensive physical - chemical certification of titanium diboride was carried out, including the study of its crystal structure, phase and chemical composition, dispersion, morphology and particle oxidation. Technological application prospects for use of titanium diboride nanoscale powder as constituent element in the wettable coating for carbon cathodes having excellent physical and mechanical performance and protective properties.

  18. Pack-boriding of Fe-Mn binary alloys: Characterization and kinetics of the boride layers

    SciTech Connect

    Bektes, M.; Calik, A.; Ucar, N.; Keddam, M.

    2010-02-15

    In this work, the boronizing of Fe-Mn binary alloys at 0.42, 0.76 and 0.94 wt.% Mn was carried out in a solid medium using the powder pack method. In this method, commercial Ekabor-II boron source and activator (ferro-silicon) were thoroughly mixed to form the boriding medium. The samples were boronized in an electrical resistance furnace for exposure times of 2, 4, 6 and 8 h at 1173 K under atmospheric pressure and a series of boronized samples in the temperature range 1073-1373 K for 3 h. After the furnace process, boronized samples were removed from the furnace and cooled in air. Afterwards, the boride layers generated by the pack-boronizing process were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, XRD analysis, Vickers microhardness and tensile testing. The generated boride layers, showing a saw-tooth morphology, had a surface microhardness in the range 1400-1270 HV0.1. It was shown that the values of yield stresses and ultimate tensile stresses were increased as the Mn content increases in the boronized Fe-Mn binary alloys. In contrast, the values of elongations determined from the stress-strain curves were decreased. Furthermore, it was found that the calculated mean value of the activation energy of boron diffusion was close to 119 J/mol.

  19. Certain physical properties of cobalt and nickel borides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostetskiy, I. I.; Lvov, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity, the thermal conductivity, and the thermal emf of cobalt and nickel borides were studied. In the case of the nickel borides the magnetic susceptibility and the Hall coefficient were determined at room temperature. The results are discussed with allowance for the current carrier concentration, the effect of various mechanisms of current-carrier scattering and the location of the Fermi level in relation to the 3d band.

  20. Ultralow friction behavior of borided steel surfaces after flash annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Bindal, C.; Erdemir, A.

    1996-02-01

    In this letter, we describe the ultralow friction mechanism of borided steel surfaces subjected to a short-duration, or {open_quote}{open_quote}flash,{close_quote}{close_quote} annealing procedure. In this procedure, a borided steel surface is exposed to high temperature (600 to 800{degree}C) for a short time (3 to 5 min) and then cooled to room temperature in open air. During the high-temperature exposure, boron atoms within the borided layer diffuse to the surface and react spontaneously with oxygen in air. The reaction product is a thin boron oxide film. During cooling, the boron oxide reacts spontaneously with moisture in the surrounding air to form a thin boric acid film. The sliding friction coefficient of a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} ball against this flash-annealed surface is about 0.06, but is 0.5 and higher against the unborided or borided-only surfaces. Mechanistically, we propose that the ultralow friction behavior of the borided and flash-annealed surface is due mainly to the layered-crystal structure of the boric acid film that forms on the sliding surface. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. The characterization of boride layer on the St37 iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Soegijono, Bambang

    2012-06-01

    The property such as microhardness of boride layer formed on St37 iron was investigated. Boronizing was carried out in a solid medium consisting of nano size powders of 50% B4C as a donor, 45% SiC as a diluent, and 5% KBF4 as an activator treated at the temperature of 1000°C for 8 hours. The phases that were formed on the substrate was found as Fe2B and FeB layer that had smooth and flate shape morphology. The hardness of boride layer on St37 was over 2000 HV, while the hardness of untreated St37 iron was about 123,82 HV. Depending on process time and temperature, the depth of boride layer ranges from 20 to 60 μm, leading to a diffusion controlled process.

  2. Superconductivity and magnetism of complex rhodium borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhanov, G. S.; Lachenkov, S. A.; Khlybov, E. P.; Dankin, D. G.; Kulikova, L. F.

    2013-05-01

    A number of complex rhodium borides with an LuRu4B4-type structure is synthesized; these are DyRh4B4 (samples HP) with T c ≈ 4.5 K, DyRh3.8Ru0.2B4 (samples AM) with T c ≈ 4.5 K, Dy0.8Er0.2Rh3.8Ru0.2B4 (samples AM) with T c ≈ 6.3 K, and HoRh3.8Ru0.2B4 (samples AM) with T c ≈ 6.0 K. The temperature dependence of upper critical field B c2( T) for all the samples under study exhibits an anomalous behavior. In all cases, the curve B c2( T) demonstrates a point of inflection, after which the curve deviates from the classical parabolic law abruptly upward for DyRh4B4 and DyRh3.8Ru0.2B4 (the 1st group of compounds) and downward for the Dy0.8Er0.2Rh3.8Ru0.2B4 and HoRh3.8Ru0.2B4 compounds (the 2nd group). These compounds are found to be characterized by of the following phase transitions: paramagnet → ferrimagnet → superconductor (retained ferrimagnetism) → antiferromagnet (retained superconductivity). The latter transition to the antiferromagnetic state occurs only in the compounds of the 1st group. It is found that, for the DyRh3.8Ru0.2B4 compound, no traditional Meissner effect is observed but the so-called Volleben effect (paramagnetic Meissner effect) takes place.

  3. Subminiature eddy current transducers for studying boride coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. F.; Ishkov, A. V.; Malikov, V. N.; Sagalakov, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Strengthening of parts and units of machines, increased reliability and longer service life is an important task of modern mechanical engineering. The main objects of study in the work were selected steel 65G and 50HGA, wear-resistant boride coatings ternary system Fe-B-Fe n B which were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and eddy-current nondestructive methods.

  4. Development and application of high strength ternary boride base cermets

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ken-ichi . E-mail: u4381@toyokohan.co.jp

    2006-09-15

    Reaction boronizing sintering is a novel strategy to form a ternary boride coexisting with a metal matrix in a cermet during liquid phase sintering. This new sintering technique has successfully developed world first ternary boride base cermets with excellent mechanical properties such as Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2}, Mo{sub 2}NiB{sub 2} and WCoB base ones. In these cermets Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} and Mo{sub 2}NiB{sub 2} base ones consist of a tetragonal M {sub 3}B{sub 2} (M: metal)-type complex boride as a hard phase and a transition metal base matrix. The cermets have already been applied to wear resistant applications such as injection molding machine parts, can making tools, and hot copper extruding dies, etc. This paper focuses on the characteristics, effects of the additional elements on the mechanical properties and structure, and practical applications of the ternary boride base cermets. - Graphical abstract: TRS and hardness of Ni-5B-51Mo-17.5Cr and Ni-5B-51Mo-12.5Cr-5V-xMn mass% cermets as functions of Mn content (Fig. 17)

  5. Metals fact sheet - indium

    SciTech Connect

    1994-01-01

    Indium is generally found in concentrations averaging 10 to 20 ppm in sphalerite and chalcopyrite ores associated with zinc, copper, lead and tin deposits. Indium is recovered as a by-product of base metal mining by open pit, underground and other methods. After the recovery of zinc by the electrolytic process (copper concentrate by flotation, and lead and tin by electrolysis), indium antimonide slimes left on the anode and the indium-containing spent electrolyte become the input material for the processing of indium. Sulfuric acid is combined with the residues and heated to form sulfates which are then leached with water to filter off the remaining tin, lead and antimony. The indium in solution is recovered by cementation on aluminum, washed, melted, and refined into a metal.

  6. Nanosize cobalt boride particles: Control of the size and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, C.; Pileni, M. P.

    1997-02-01

    Cobalt boride is obtained by the reduction of cobalt (2-ethyl hexyl) sulfosuccinate, Co(AOT) 2, by sodium borohydride either in reverse micelles or in a diphasic system. In Co(AOT) 2/Na(AOT)/H 2O reverse micellar solution, the size and polydispersity of the Co 2B particles is controlled by the size of the water droplets, which increases from 4 to 7.5 nm by increasing the water content. In a diphasic system of Co(AOT) 2/isooctane and sodium borohydride in aqueous solution, large and polydisperse particles of cobalt boride are formed (˜ 10 nm), and their magnetization properties are presented. The smallest particles are in a superparamagnetic regime at room temperature, whereas the largest particles show ferromagnetic behavior.

  7. Single crystal studies on Co-containing {tau}-borides Co{sub 23-x}M{sub x}B{sub 6} (M=Al, Ga, Sn, Ti, V, Ir) and the boron-rich {tau}-boride Co{sub 12.3}Ir{sub 8.9}B{sub 10.5}

    SciTech Connect

    Kotzott, Dominik; Ade, Martin; Hillebrecht, Harald

    2009-03-15

    Single crystals of the cubic {tau}-Borides Co{sub 23-x}M{sub x}B{sub 6} (M=Al, Ga, Sn) were synthesised from the elements at temperatures between 1200 and 1500 deg. C. According to the structure refinements one (Ga, Sn: 8c) or two (Al: 4a and 8c) of the four independent metal sites show a mixed occupation Co/M resulting in the compositions Co{sub 20.9}Al{sub 2.1}B{sub 6}, Co{sub 21.9}Ga{sub 1.1}B{sub 6}, and Co{sub 21.4}Sn{sub 1.6}B{sub 6}, respectively. Melts with Indium gave access to Co{sub 23}B{sub 6} as the first binary {tau}-boride (Fm3-barm,a=10.4618(13) A, 104 refl., 14 param., R{sub 1}(F)=0.0132, wR{sub 2}(F{sup 2})=0.0210). With M=Ir mixed occupations occur for all sites and the boron content varies. The composition for the boron-poor single crystal was Co{sub 16.2}Ir{sub 6.8}B{sub 6}. A higher Ir-content enables the uptake of additional boron resulting in a composition Co{sub 12.3}Ir{sub 8.9}B{sub 10.5}. This can be explained be the substitution of metal atoms on the 8c-site by B{sub 4}-tetrahedra. A boron-rich phase was observed for the first time for a {tau}-boride of cobalt. All compositions were confirmed by EDX measurements. - Graphical Abstract: Single crystal investigations on {tau}-borides Co/M/B with M = Al, Ga, In, Sn, V, Ti, Ir explained the substitution processes. Furthermore the yielded the first binary boride, Co{sub 23}B{sub 6}, and a boron-rich Co{sub 12.3}Ir{sub 8.9}B{sub 10.5} containing B{sub 4}-tetrahedra.

  8. Indium fluoride glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    Fluoride glasses are the only material that transmit light from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and can be drawn into industrial optical fibers. The mechanical and optical properties of new indium fluoride glass fibers have been investigated. Multimode fiber 190 microns, has very high mechanical strength greater than 100 kpsi and optical loss as low as 45 dB/km between 2 and 4 microns. Unlike chalcogenide glass fibers, indium fluoride fiber has a wide transmission window from 0.3 to 5.5 microns without any absorption peak. Indium fluoride glass fibers are the technology of choice for all application requiring transmission up to 5 micron such as infrared contour measure (IRCM) and chemical sensing. Furthermore, Indium fluoride glasses have low phonon energy and can be heavily doped and co-doped whit rare-earth elements. Therefore they are very promising candidates for infrared fiber lasers.

  9. Microstructural characterization and some mechanical properties of gas-borided Inconel 600-alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuch, N.; Kulka, M.

    2014-09-01

    The excellent resistance of Ni-based alloys to corrosion and oxidation is well-known. Boriding can be applied to these alloys in order to obtain suitable wear protection. In this paper, two-stage gas boronizing in N2-H2-BCl3 atmosphere is proposed for the producing the boride layer on Inconel®600-alloy. This process consists in two stages alternately repeated: saturation by boron and diffusion annealing. Such a gas boriding is applied in order to accelerate the saturation by boron and its diffusion. It turns out to be more effective because of eliminating the excess of boron, diffusing into the substrate, during the second stage. Microstructure and some mechanical properties of the produced layer are presented. Microstructural characterization is studied with using an optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and x-ray diffraction. The diffusion zone consists of the mixture of nickel and chromium borides, occurring in the compact boride zone and in the area located beneath, at grain boundaries. The improved hardness and wear resistance characterize the layer. The formed boride layer is significantly thicker than those-obtained by the pack-boronizing or paste process at comparable temperature and time. Simultaneously, the measured depth of layer is slightly smaller than that-reported for electrolytic boriding.

  10. Characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by powder metallurgy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Selva Kumar, M.; Chandrasekar, P.; Chandramohan, P.; Mohanraj, M.

    2012-11-15

    In this work, a detailed characterisation of titanium-titanium boride composites processed by three powder metallurgy techniques, namely, hot isostatic pressing, spark plasma sintering and vacuum sintering, was conducted. Two composites with different volume percents of titanium boride reinforcement were used for the investigation. One was titanium with 20% titanium boride, and the other was titanium with 40% titanium boride (by volume). Characterisation was performed using X-ray diffraction, electron probe micro analysis - energy dispersive spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy, image analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The characterisation results confirm the completion of the titanium boride reaction. The results reveal the presence of titanium boride reinforcement in different morphologies such as needle-shaped whiskers, short agglomerated whiskers and fine plates. The paper also discusses how mechanical properties such as microhardness, elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio are influenced by the processing techniques as well as the volume fraction of the titanium boride reinforcement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ti-TiB composites were processed by HIP, SPS and vacuum sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The completion of Ti-TiB{sub 2} reaction was confirmed by XRD, SEM and EPMA studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hardness and elastic properties of Ti-TiB composites were discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Processing techniques were compared with respect to their microstructure.

  11. Processing and properties of some alumina-boride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Edirisinghe, M.J.

    1995-10-01

    Alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) test bars containing a small (5--10%) volume of titanium diboride (TiB{sub 2}) or zirconium diboride (ZrB{sub 2}) particles have been pressed and sintered (pressureless) in an argon atmosphere. The microstructure of the sintered bodies was characterized by X-ray diffraction and a range of microscopical techniques and shows that 3 ppm (by volume) of oxygen present in the argon caused the boride particles in the surface regions of the test bars to oxidize during sintering, to a greater extent in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiB{sub 2} composites. Mechanisms of oxidation are discussed. The boride particles retarded the densification of the composites, to a greater extent in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrB{sub 2} bodies. However, densification in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrB{sub 2} system was enhanced by sintering in an Ar-4% H{sub 2} atmosphere. The decrease in flexural strength due to the retardation of sintering has been overcome in both types of composites.

  12. Reactive Boride Brazing on Low-Alloy Automotive Grade Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanisamy, B.; Upadhyaya, A.

    2011-11-01

    Brazing is a widely used process to improve the performance of steels used in automotive applications. The substrate material is often exposed to harsh conditions in these applications and may affect the service life of the component. Reactive boride brazing aims to improve the mechanical properties of the substrate material by forming a ceramic-metal composite coating in a single-step process in situ. In this study, sintered Ancor 4300 low-alloy steel is used as the substrate with chromium-rich braze and chromium-lean braze materials. The mechanical properties of the brazed samples were studied in detail using microindentation hardness measurements and the transverse rupture test. The results indicate that the brazed superlayer has a 10 times higher hardness. There was a significant improvement in the transverse rupture strength of the steel brazed with the chromium-rich boride as compared to the pure substrate material. In an effort to reduce processing time, green compacts of the substrate were also directly brazed and yielded favorable results.

  13. Discovery of elusive structures of multifunctional transition-metal borides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yongcheng; Wu, Zhaobing; Yuan, Xun; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhang, Peihong

    2016-01-14

    A definitive determination of crystal structures is an important prerequisite for designing and exploiting new functional materials. Even though tungsten and molybdenum borides (TMBx) are the prototype for transition-metal light-element compounds with multiple functionalities, their elusive crystal structures have puzzled scientists for decades. Here, we discover that the long-assumed TMB2 phases with the simple hP3 structure (hP3-TMB2) are in fact a family of complex TMB3 polytypes with a nanoscale ordering along the axial direction. Compared with the energetically unfavorable and dynamically unstable hP3-TMB2 phase, the energetically more favorable and dynamically stable TMB3 polytypes explain the experimental structural parameters, mechanical properties, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns better. We demonstrate that such a structural and compositional modification from the hP3-TMB2 phases to the TMB3 polytypes originates from the relief of the strong antibonding interaction between d electrons by removing one third of metal atoms systematically. These results resolve the longstanding structural mystery of this class of metal borides and uncover a hidden family of polytypic structures. Moreover, these polytypic structures provide an additional hardening mechanism by forming nanoscale interlocks that may strongly hinder the interlayer sliding movements, which promises to open a new avenue towards designing novel superhard nanocomposite materials by exploiting the coexistence of various polytypes. PMID:26660270

  14. The Electronic Properties of Metal Borides and Borocarbides: Differences and Similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassoued, Souheila; Gautier, Régis; Halet, Jean-François

    The bonding and structural arrangement in a few representative ring- or chain-containing solid-state metal borides and boride carbides are analyzed with respect to the electron count of the non-metal entities. Similarities and differences between them are emphasized. More specifically, the bonding in some layered ternary borides of RETB4 formula (RE = rare-earth metal and T = transition metal) is first analyzed and compared to that of the metal boride carbide ScB2C2, which contains a similar non-metal arrangement. Oxidation states are proposed for the boron or boron-carbon networks encountered in these compounds. It seems that they are electron-richer than graphite-like boron networks. In a second part, the bonding in linear boron and boron-carbon chains encapsulated in channels of LiB or RE xByCz is discussed and compared. Cumulenic bond character is favored in these chains.

  15. An alternative method of gas boriding applied to the formation of borocarburized layer

    SciTech Connect

    Kulka, M. Makuch, N.; Pertek, A.; Piasecki, A.

    2012-10-15

    The borocarburized layers were produced by tandem diffusion processes: carburizing followed by boriding. An alternative method of gas boriding was proposed. Two-stage gas boronizing in N{sub 2}-H{sub 2}-BCl{sub 3} atmosphere was applied to the formation of iron borides on a carburized substrate. This process consisted in two stages, which were alternately repeated: saturation by boron and diffusion annealing. The microstructure and microhardness of produced layer were compared to those-obtained in case of continuous gas boriding in H{sub 2}-BCl{sub 3} atmosphere, earlier used. The first objective of two-stage boronizing, consisting in acceleration of boron diffusion, has been efficiently implemented. Despite the lower temperature and shorter duration of boronizing, about 1.5 times larger iron borides' zone has been formed on carburized steel. Second objective, the absolute elimination of brittle FeB phase, has failed. However, the amount of FeB phase has been considerably limited. Longer diffusion annealing should provide the boride layer with single-phase microstructure, without FeB phase. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alternative method of gas boriding in H{sub 2}-N{sub 2}-BCl{sub 3} atmosphere was proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The process consisted in two stages: saturation by boron and diffusion annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These stages of short duration were alternately repeated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The acceleration of boron diffusion was efficiently implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amount of FeB phase in the boride zone was limited.

  16. Nanosized Borides and Carbides for Electroplating. Metal-Matrix Coatings: Specifications, Performance Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskiy, S. G.; Il’yashchenko, D. P.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper summarizes experience of application of nano-sized carbides and borides of titanium and chromium, silicon carbide as components of electro-depositable coating compositions based on nickel, zinc, and chromium. Basic physical and mechanical properties of the coatings are determined. Technological and economic evaluation is completed; practicability of high-cost nano-diamonds substitution for nano-sized borides and carbides is justified.

  17. Indium sealing techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.; Haldemann, P.

    1972-01-01

    Gold films are used as an alloying flux to form 5-micron-thick indium film seals at temperatures below 300 C. Pyrex was sealed to quartz, ULE, CER-VIT, Irtran 2, Ge, GaAs, Invar, Kovar, Al, and Cu. The seals can also be used as current feedthroughs and graded seals.

  18. Plasma boriding of a cobalt-chromium alloy as an interlayer for nanostructured diamond growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Jubinsky, Matthew; Catledge, Shane A.

    2015-02-01

    Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond coatings can potentially improve the wear resistance of cobalt-chromium medical implant surfaces, but the high cobalt content in these alloys acts as a catalyst to form graphitic carbon. Boriding by high temperature liquid baths and powder packing has been shown to improve CVD diamond compatibility with cobalt alloys. We use the microwave plasma-enhanced (PE) CVD process to deposit interlayers composed primarily of the borides of cobalt and chromium. The use of diborane (B2H6) in the plasma feedgas allows for the formation of a robust boride interlayer for suppressing graphitic carbon during subsequent CVD of nano-structured diamond (NSD). This metal-boride interlayer is shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt for improving nucleation and adhesion of NSD coatings on a CoCrMo alloy. Migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer is significantly reduced and undetectable on the surface of the subsequently-grown NSD coating. The effects of PECVD boriding are compared for a range of substrate temperatures and deposition times and are evaluated using glancing-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Boriding of CoCrMo results in adhered nanostructured diamond coatings with low surface roughness.

  19. Respirable Indium Exposures, Plasma Indium, and Respiratory Health Among Indium-Tin Oxide (ITO) Workers

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Kristin J.; Virji, M. Abbas; Park, Ji Young; Stanton, Marcia L.; Edwards, Nicole T.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Carey, Brenna; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B.; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Background Workers manufacturing indium-tin oxide (ITO) are at risk of elevated indium concentration in blood and indium lung disease, but relationships between respirable indium exposures and biomarkers of exposure and disease are unknown. Methods For 87 (93%) current ITO workers, we determined correlations between respirable and plasma indium and evaluated associations between exposures and health outcomes. Results Current respirable indium exposure ranged from 0.4 to 108 μg/m3 and cumulative respirable indium exposure from 0.4 to 923 μg-yr/m3. Plasma indium better correlated with cumulative (rs = 0.77) than current exposure (rs = 0.54) overall and with tenure ≥1.9 years. Higher cumulative respirable indium exposures were associated with more dyspnea, lower spirometric parameters, and higher serum biomarkers of lung disease (KL-6 and SP-D), with significant effects starting at 22 μg-yr/m3, reached by 46% of participants. Conclusions Plasma indium concentration reflected cumulative respirable indium exposure, which was associated with clinical, functional, and serum biomarkers of lung disease. PMID:27219296

  20. Indium Sorption to Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. J.; Sacco, S. A.; Hemond, H.; Hussain, F. A.; Runkel, R. L.; Walton-Day, K. E.; Kimball, B. A.; Shine, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Indium is an increasingly important metal in semiconductors and electronics, and its use is growing rapidly as a semiconductive coating (as indium tin oxide) for liquid crystal displays (LCDs) and flat panel displays. It also has uses in important energy technologies such as light emitting diodes (LEDs) and photovoltaic cells. Despite its rapid increase in use, very little is known about the environmental behavior of indium, and concerns are being raised over the potential health effects of this emerging metal contaminant. One source of indium to the environment is acid mine drainage from the mining of lead, zinc, and copper sulfides. In our previous studies of a stream in Colorado influenced by acid mine drainage from lead and zinc mining activities, indium concentrations were found to be 10,000 times those found in uncontaminated rivers. However, the speciation and mobility of indium could not be reliably modeled because sorption constants to environmental sorbents have not been determined. In this study, we generate sorption constants for indium to ferrihydrite in the laboratory over a range of pHs, sorbent to sorbate ratios, and ionic strengths. Ferrihydrite is one of the most important sorbents in natural systems, and sorption to amorphous iron oxides such as ferrihydrite is thought to be one of the main removal mechanisms of metals from the dissolved phase in aqueous environments. Because of its relatively low solubility, we also find that indium hydroxide precipitation can dominate indium's partitioning at micromolar concentrations of indium. This precipitation may be important in describing indium's behavior in our study stream in Colorado, where modeling sorption to iron-oxides does not explain the complete removal of indium from the dissolved phase when the pH of the system is artificially raised to above 8. This study contributes much-needed data about indium's aqueous behavior, in order to better understand its fate, transport, and impacts in the

  1. Precursors for formation of copper selenide, indium selenide, copper indium diselenide, and/or copper indium gallium diselenide films

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Calvin J; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S

    2014-11-04

    Liquid-based precursors for formation of Copper Selenide, Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Diselenide, and/or copper Indium Galium Diselenide include copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent. These liquid-based precursors can be deposited in liquid form onto substrates and treated by rapid thermal processing to form crystalline copper selenide and indium selenide films.

  2. The Growth Behavior of Titanium Boride Layers in α and β Phase Fields of Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Hu, Lingyun; Shuang, Yajing; Liu, Jianhua; Lai, Yanqing; Jiang, Liangxing; Li, Jie

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the commercially pure titanium was successfully electrochemical borided in a borax-based electrolyte. The process was carried out at a constant cathodic current density of 300 mA cm-2 and at temperatures of 1123 K and 1223 K (850 °C and 950 °C) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5 hours. The growth behavior of titanium boride layers in the α phase field of titanium was compared with that in the β phase field. After boriding, the presence of both the TiB2 top layer and TiB whisker sub-layer was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope. The relationship between the thickness of boride layers and boriding time was found to have a parabolic character in both α and β phase fields of titanium. The TiB whiskers showed ultra-fast growth rate in the β phase field. Its growth rate constant was found to be as high as 3.2002 × 10-13 m2 s-1. Besides, the chemical resistance of the TiB2 layer on the surface of titanium substrate was characterized by immersion tests in molten aluminum.

  3. Metal boride catalysts for indirect liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1983-February 29, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1984-04-12

    During the sixth quarter four boron-promoted cobalt catalysts were prepared by a new boriding process using diborane gas as the boriding agent. These catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis, BET, H/sub 2/ chemisorption, and x-ray diffraction. Temperature-programmed desorption spectra of H/sub 2/ were obtained for a sodium-promoted cobalt boride and a sodium-promoted Co/SiO/sub 2/. Four cobalt catalysts (unsupported, boron-promoted, sodium-promoted, and doubly-promoted) were tested for CO hydrogenation activity and selectivity at 1 atm and 3 to 4 temperatures in the range of 190 to 240/sup 0/C. About 10% of the surface of cobalt boride consists of reduced metallic cobalt. The addition of sodium to cobalt increases its binding energy with H/sub 2/ and its activation energy for H/sub 2/ adsorption. Boron does not affect the activity of cobalt; sodium decreases it by a factor of 10. Cobalt boride produces lighter hydrocarbon products relative to cobalt; sodium-promoted cobalt produces heavier products, more alcohols, and more CO/sub 2/. 29 references, 10 figures, 4 tables.

  4. The Growth Behavior of Titanium Boride Layers in α and β Phase Fields of Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiaojun; Hu, Lingyun; Shuang, Yajing; Liu, Jianhua; Lai, Yanqing; Jiang, Liangxing; Li, Jie

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the commercially pure titanium was successfully electrochemical borided in a borax-based electrolyte. The process was carried out at a constant cathodic current density of 300 mA cm-2 and at temperatures of 1123 K and 1223 K (850 °C and 950 °C) for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 5 hours. The growth behavior of titanium boride layers in the α phase field of titanium was compared with that in the β phase field. After boriding, the presence of both the TiB2 top layer and TiB whisker sub-layer was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope. The relationship between the thickness of boride layers and boriding time was found to have a parabolic character in both α and β phase fields of titanium. The TiB whiskers showed ultra-fast growth rate in the β phase field. Its growth rate constant was found to be as high as 3.2002 × 10-13 m2 s-1. Besides, the chemical resistance of the TiB2 layer on the surface of titanium substrate was characterized by immersion tests in molten aluminum.

  5. Kinetics of borided 31CrMoV9 and 34CrAlNi7 steels

    SciTech Connect

    Efe, Goezde Celebi; Ipek, Mediha; Ozbek, Ibrahim; Bindal, Cuma

    2008-01-15

    In this study, kinetics of borides formed on the surface of 31CrMoV9 and 34CrAlNi7 steels borided in solid medium consisting of Ekabor II at 850-900-950 deg. C for 2, 4, 6 and 8 h were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy examinations showed that borides formed on the surface of borided steels have columnar morphology. The borides formed in the coating layer confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis are FeB, Fe{sub 2}B, CrB, and Cr{sub 2}B. The hardnesses of boride layers are much higher than that of matrix. It was found that depending on process temperature and time the fracture toughness of boride layers ranged from 3.93 to 4.48 MPa m{sup 1/2} for 31CrMoV9 and from 3.87 to 4.40 MPa m{sup 1/2} for 34CrAlNi7 steel. Activation energy, growth rate and growth acceleration of boride layer calculated according to these kinetic studies revealed that lower activation energy results in the fast growth rate and high growth acceleration.

  6. Mineral of the month: indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Micheal W.

    2004-01-01

    Indium was discovered in Germany in 1863. Although it is a lustrous silver-white color, the finders named the new material for the “indigo” spectral lines the mineral created on the spectrograph. Indium ranks 61st in abundance in Earth’s crust and is about three times more abundant than silver or mercury.

  7. Nano-Disperse Borides and Carbides: Plasma Technology Production, Specific Properties, Economic Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galevskii, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskii, S. G.; Tomas, K. I.; Zubkov, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    The experience of production and study on properties of nano-disperse chromium and titanium borides and carbides, and silicon carbide has been generalized. The structure and special service aspects of utilized plasma-metallurgical complex equipped with a three-jet direct-flow reactor with a capacity of 150 kW have been outlined. Processing, heat engineering and service life characteristics of the reactor are specified. The synthesis parameters of borides and carbides, as well as their basic characteristics in nano-disperse condition and their production flow diagram are outlined. Engineering and economic performance of synthesizing borides in laboratory and industrial conditions is assessed, and the respective segment of the international market as well. The work is performed at State Siberian Industrial University as a project part of the State Order of Ministry of Science and Education of the Russian Federation No. 11.1531/2014/K.

  8. Boride-based nano-laminates with MAX-phase-like behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Telle, Rainer . E-mail: telle@ghi.rwth-aachen.de; Momozawa, Ai; Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-09-15

    MAX-phases being usually composed of transition metals, group A elements and carbon/nitrogen are considered interesting materials for many applications because of their tremendous bulk modulus, 'reversible' plasticity, and machinability. This is mainly due to their unique kind of bonding comprising covalent, ionic as well as metallic bonds providing 'easy' planes of rupture and deformability due to the layered crystal structures. In transition metal boride systems, similar types of bonding are available. In particular the W{sub 2}B{sub 5}-structure type and its stacking variations allow the synthesis of strongly layered crystal structures exhibiting unique delamination phenomena. The paper presents ab initio calculations showing the similarities of bonding between the ternary carbides and the corresponding ternary or quaternary borides. Formation of boride-based nano-laminates from auxiliary liquid phases, from the melt as well as during sintering and precipitation from supersaturated solid solutions will be discussed by means of SEM and TEM studies. The role of impurities weakening the interlayer bonding will be addressed in particular. The pronounced cleavage parallel to the basal plane gives rise for crack deflection and pull-out mechanisms if the laminates are dispersed in brittle matrices such as boron carbide, silicon carbide or other transition metal borides. - Graphical abstract: Some transition metal borides crystallise in a layered structure of alternating stacks of metal and boron atoms giving rise for strongly anisotropic properties. Their preferred cleavage parallel and the deformability perpendicular to the basal plan are similar to the peculiar mechanical behaviour recently described for MAX-phases. Ab initio calculations of the crystal structure prove the weak bonds between the layers for a variety of borides which can be used to reinforce ceramic materials on a nano-scale level.

  9. Surface hardening of steel by boriding in a cold rf plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finberg, I.; Avni, R.; Grill, A.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    Scanning electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry, Auger electron spectroscopy, and microhardness measurements, are used to study the surfaces of 4340-steel samples that have been borided in a cold RF plasma which had been initiated in a gas mixture of 2.7 percent diborane in Ar. As a result of the dislocation of the diborane in the plasma, boron is deposited on the surface of the steel substrate and two crystalline phases, tetragonal Fe2B and orthorhombic FeB, are formed. The formation of boride phases then increases the surface microhardness from 2650 MPa to a maximum value of 7740 MPa.

  10. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2016-02-01

    Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W2CoB2 with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600-730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  11. Surface hardening of St41 low carbon steel by using the hot-pressing powder-pack boriding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutrisno, Soegijono, Bambang

    2014-03-01

    This research describes a powder-pack boriding process by using hot-pressing technic for St41 low carbon steel which will improve the hardness on the substrate by forming boride layer solid solution. Those method can reduce the operational cost of the research if it is compared by the conventional method with the asmospheric condition both vacuum system and gas inert condition. The concept of boriding by hot-pressing technic was verified in a laboratory scale. Welldefined and reusedable technic was achieved by using the stainless steel 304 as the container and sealed with a 5 ton pressure. This container was filled boronizing powder consisting of 5%B4C, 90%SiC, and 5%KBF4 to close the St41 low carbon steel specimen inside the container. The St41 boriding specimen was treated at the temperature of 900°C for 8 hours. The boride layer on the substrate was found as FeB and Fe2B phase with the hardness about 1800 HV. This value was more than ten times if compared with the untreated specimen that only had the hardness of 123 HV. Depend on heat treatment temperature, heat treatment time, and powder-pack boriding pressure, the depth of boride layer range from 127 to 165 μm, leading to a diffusion controlled process.

  12. Superabrasive boride and a method of preparing the same by mechanical alloying and hot pressing

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Bruce A.; Harringa, Joel L.; Russell, Alan M.

    2002-08-13

    A ceramic material which is an orthorhombic boride of the general formula: AlMgB.sub.14 :X, with X being a doping agent. The ceramic is a superabrasive, and in most instances provides a hardness of 40 GPa or greater.

  13. Ultra-Fast Boriding in High-Temperature Materials Processing Industries

    SciTech Connect

    2008-12-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose main objective is to further develop, optimize, scale-up, and commercialize an ultra-fast boriding (also referred to as “boronizing”) process that can provide much higher energy efficiency, productivity, and near-zero emissions in many of the high-temperature materials processing industries.

  14. Structures and stability of novel transition-metal (M =Co ,Rh ,Co and Ir ) borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yachun; Wu, Lailei; Lin, Yangzheng; Hu, Qingyang; Li, Zhiping; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Yunkun; Gou, Huiyang; Yao, Yansun; Zhang, Jingwu; Gao, Faming; Mao, Ho-kwang

    2015-11-01

    Recent progress of high-pressure technology enables the synthesis of novel metal borides with diverse compositions and interesting properties. A precise characterization of these borides, however, is sometimes hindered by multiphase intergrowth and grain-size limitation in the synthesis process. Here, we theoretically explored new transition-metal borides (M =Co , Rh, and Ir) using a global structure searching method and discovered a series of stable compounds in this family. The predicted phases display a rich variety of stoichiometries and distinct boron networks resulting from the electron-deficient environments. Significantly, we identified a new Ir B1.25 structure as the long-sought structure of the first synthesized Ir-B compound. The simulated x-ray diffraction pattern of the proposed Ir B1.25 structure matches well with the experiment, and the convex hull calculation establishes its thermodynamic stability. Results of the present paper should advance the understanding of transition-metal borides and stimulate experimental explorations of these new and promising materials.

  15. Niobium boride layers deposition on the surface AISI D2 steel by a duplex treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, O.; Pazarlioglu, S.; Sen, S.; Sen, U.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigated the possibility of deposition of niobium boride layers on the surface of AISI D2 steel by a duplex treatment. At the first step of duplex treatment, boronizing was performed on AISI D2 steel samples at 1000oC for 2h and then pre-boronized samples niobized at 850°C, 900°C and 950°C using thermo-reactive deposition method for 1-4 h. The presence of the niobium boride layers such as NbB, NbB2 and Nb3B4 and also iron boride phases such as FeB, Fe2B were examined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro-hardness measurements were realized. Experimental studies showed that the depth of the coating layers increased with increasing temperature and times and also ranged from 0.42 µm to 2.43 µm, depending on treatment time and temperature. The hardness of the niobium boride layer was 2620±180 HV0.005.

  16. Niobium boride layers deposition on the surface AISI D2 steel by a duplex treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kon, O.; Pazarlioglu, S.

    2015-03-30

    In this paper, we investigated the possibility of deposition of niobium boride layers on the surface of AISI D2 steel by a duplex treatment. At the first step of duplex treatment, boronizing was performed on AISI D2 steel samples at 1000{sup o}C for 2h and then pre-boronized samples niobized at 850°C, 900°C and 950°C using thermo-reactive deposition method for 1–4 h. The presence of the niobium boride layers such as NbB, NbB{sub 2} and Nb{sub 3}B{sub 4} and also iron boride phases such as FeB, Fe{sub 2}B were examined by X-ray diffraction analysis. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and micro-hardness measurements were realized. Experimental studies showed that the depth of the coating layers increased with increasing temperature and times and also ranged from 0.42 µm to 2.43 µm, depending on treatment time and temperature. The hardness of the niobium boride layer was 2620±180 HV{sub 0.005}.

  17. Indium Second-Surface Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T.

    1982-01-01

    Second-surface mirrors are formed by vapor deposition of indium onto glass. Mirrors have reflectances comparable to those of ordinary silver or aluminized mirrors and are expected to show superior corrosion resistance. Mirrors may be used in solar concentrators.

  18. Potential and limitations of microanalysis SEM techniques to characterize borides in brazed Ni-based superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Vargas, J.; Siredey-Schwaller, N.; Noyrez, P.; Mathieu, S.; Bocher, P.; and others

    2014-08-15

    Brazed Ni-based superalloys containing complex phases of different Boron contents remain difficult to characterize at the micrometer scale. Indeed Boron is a light element difficult to measure precisely. The state-of-the-art microanalysis systems have been tested on a single crystal MC2 based metal brazed with BNi-2 alloy to identify boride precipitates. Effort has been made to evaluate the accuracy in Boron quantitation. Energy-dispersive and wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy attached to a Scanning Electron Microscope have first been used to determine the elemental composition of Boron-free phases, and then applied to various types of borides. Results have been compared to the ones obtained using a dedicated electron probe microanalysis, considered here as the reference technique. The most accurate method to quantify Boron using EDS is definitely by composition difference. A precision of 5 at.% could be achieved with optimized data acquisition and post-processing schemes. Attempts that aimed at directly quantifying Boron with various standards using EDS or coupled EDS/WDS gave less accurate results. Ultimately, Electron Backscatter Diffraction combined with localized EDS analysis has proved invaluable in conclusively identifying micrometer sized boride precipitates; thus further improving the characterization of brazed Ni-based superalloys. - Highlights: • We attempt to accurately identify Boron-rich phases in Ni-based superalloys. • EDS, WDS, EBSD systems are tested for accurate identification of these borides. • Results are compared with those obtained by electron probe microanalysis. • Boron was measured with EDS by composition difference with a precision of 5 at. %. • Additional EBSD in phase identification mode conclusively identifies the borides.

  19. Additive-assisted synthesis of boride, carbide, and nitride micro/nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bo; Yang, Lishan; Heng, Hua; Chen, Jingzhong; Zhang, Linfei; Xu, Liqiang; Qian, Yitai; Yang, Jian

    2012-10-15

    General and simple methods for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides are highly desirable, since those materials have unique physical properties and promising applications. Here, a series of boride (TiB{sub 2}, ZrB{sub 2}, NbB{sub 2}, CeB{sub 6}, PrB{sub 6}, SmB{sub 6}, EuB{sub 6}, LaB{sub 6}), carbide (SiC, TiC, NbC, WC) and nitride (TiN, BN, AlN, MgSiN{sub 2}, VN) micro/nanocrystals were prepared from related oxides and amorphous boron/active carbon/NaN{sub 3} with the assistance of metallic Na and elemental S. In-situ temperature monitoring showed that the reaction temperature could increase quickly to {approx}850 Degree-Sign C, once the autoclave was heated to 100 Degree-Sign C. Such a rapid temperature increase was attributed to the intense exothermic reaction between Na and S, which assisted the formation of borides, carbides and nitrides. The as-obtained products were characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, and HRTEM techniques. Results in this report will greatly benefit the future extension of this approach to other compounds. - Graphical abstract: An additive-assisted approach is successfully developed for the syntheses of borides, carbides and nitrides micro/nanocrystals with the assistance of the exothermic reaction between Na and S. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An additive-assisted synthesis strategy is developed for a number of borides, carbides and nitrides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction mechanism is demonstrated by the case of SiC nanowires. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of SiC nanowires is initiated by the exothermic reaction of Na and S.

  20. Improving the Adhesion Resistance of the Boride Coatings to AISI 316L Steel Substrate by Diffusion Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos-Silva, I.; Bernabé-Molina, S.; Bravo-Bárcenas, D.; Martínez-Trinidad, J.; Rodríguez-Castro, G.; Meneses-Amador, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, new results about the practical adhesion resistance of boride coating/substrate system formed at the surface of AISI 316 L steel and improved by means of a diffusion annealing process are presented. First, the boriding of AISI 316 L steel was performed by the powder-pack method at 1173 K with different exposure times (4-8 h). The diffusion annealing process was conducted on the borided steels at 1273 K with 2 h of exposure using a diluent atmosphere of boron powder mixture. The mechanical behavior of the boride coating/substrate system developed by both treatments was established using Vickers and Berkovich tests along the depth of the boride coatings, respectively. Finally, for the entire set of experimental conditions, the scratch tests were performed with a continuously increasing normal force, in which the practical adhesion resistance of the boride coating/substrate system was represented by the critical load. The failure mechanisms developed over the surface of the scratch tracks were analyzed; the FeB-Fe2B/substrate system exhibited an adhesive mode, while the Fe2B/substrate system obtained by the diffusion annealing process showed predominantly a cohesive failure mode.

  1. The coexistence of silicon borides with boron-saturated silicon: Metastability of SiB{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Aselage, T.L.

    1998-07-01

    The silicon-rich end of the Si-B phase diagram, defining the silicon boride(s) that coexist in equilibrium with boron-saturated silicon, is poorly known. Understanding this equilibrium has implications for the processing of p{sup +} silicon wafers, whose boron concentrations are near the solubility limit. Additionally, silicon boride precipitates produced by boron-ion-implantation and annealing of crystalline silicon have recently been shown to be efficient internal getters of transition metal ions. The experiments described in this paper probe the stability of these silicon borides. A phase with a boron-carbide-like structure, SiB{sub 3}, grows from boron-saturated silicon in both the solid and the liquid state. However, SiB{sub 3} is not found to be stable in either circumstance. Rather, SiB{sub 3} is a metastable phase whose formation is driven by the relative ease of its nucleation and growth. The silicon boride that exists in stable equilibrium with boron-saturated silicon is SiB{sub 6}. A qualitative understanding of the metastability of SiB{sub 3} comes from recognizing the conflict between the bonding requirements of icosahedral borides such as SiB{sub 3} and the size mismatch between silicon and boron atoms. {copyright} {ital 1998 Materials Research Society.}

  2. Selection of peptides binding to metallic borides by screening M13 phage display libraries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Metal borides are a class of inorganic solids that is much less known and investigated than for example metal oxides or intermetallics. At the same time it is a highly versatile and interesting class of compounds in terms of physical and chemical properties, like semiconductivity, ferromagnetism, or catalytic activity. This makes these substances attractive for the generation of new materials. Very little is known about the interaction between organic materials and borides. To generate nanostructured and composite materials which consist of metal borides and organic modifiers it is necessary to develop new synthetic strategies. Phage peptide display libraries are commonly used to select peptides that bind specifically to metals, metal oxides, and semiconductors. Further, these binding peptides can serve as templates to control the nucleation and growth of inorganic nanoparticles. Additionally, the combination of two different binding motifs into a single bifunctional phage could be useful for the generation of new composite materials. Results In this study, we have identified a unique set of sequences that bind to amorphous and crystalline nickel boride (Ni3B) nanoparticles, from a random peptide library using the phage display technique. Using this technique, strong binders were identified that are selective for nickel boride. Sequence analysis of the peptides revealed that the sequences exhibit similar, yet subtle different patterns of amino acid usage. Although a predominant binding motif was not observed, certain charged amino acids emerged as essential in specific binding to both substrates. The 7-mer peptide sequence LGFREKE, isolated on amorphous Ni3B emerged as the best binder for both substrates. Fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirmed the specific binding affinity of LGFREKE expressing phage to amorphous and crystalline Ni3B nanoparticles. Conclusions This study is, to our knowledge, the first to identify peptides that

  3. Indium oxide based fiber optic SPR sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Sarika; Sharma, Navneet K.

    2016-05-01

    Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensor using indium oxide layer is presented and theoretically studied. It has been found that with increase in thickness of indium oxide layer beyond 170 nm, the sensitivity of SPR sensor decreases. 170 nm thick indium oxide layer based SPR sensor holds maximum sensitivity.

  4. Indium Foil Serves As Thermally Conductive Gasket

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eastman, G. Yale; Dussinger, Peter M.

    1993-01-01

    Indium foil found useful as gasket to increase thermal conductance between bodies clamped together. Deforms to fill imperfections on mating surfaces. Used where maximum temperature in joint less than melting temperature of indium. Because of low melting temperature of indium, most useful in cryogenic applications.

  5. Friction and wear of radiofrequency-sputtered borides, silicides, and carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of several refractory compound coatings were examined. These compounds were applied to 440 C bearing steel surfaces by radiofrequency (RF) sputtering. The refractory compounds were the titanium and molybdenum borides, the titanium and molybdenum silicides, and the titanium, molybdenum, and boron carbides. Friction testing was done with a pin-on-disk wear apparatus at loads from 0.1 to 5.0 newtons. Generally, the best wear properties were obtained when the coatings were bias sputtered onto 440 C disks that had been preoxidized. Adherence was improved because of the better bonding of the coatings to the iron oxide formed during preoxidation. As a class the carbides provided wear protection to the highest loads. Titanium boride coatings provided low friction and good wear properties to moderate loads.

  6. Formation of copper-indium-selenide and/or copper-indium-gallium-selenide films from indium selenide and copper selenide precursors

    DOEpatents

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Van Hest, Maikel; Ginley, David S.; Nekuda, Jennifer A.

    2011-11-15

    Liquid-based indium selenide and copper selenide precursors, including copper-organoselenides, particulate copper selenide suspensions, copper selenide ethylene diamine in liquid solvent, nanoparticulate indium selenide suspensions, and indium selenide ethylene diamine coordination compounds in solvent, are used to form crystalline copper-indium-selenide, and/or copper indium gallium selenide films (66) on substrates (52).

  7. Heat capacity and thermal expansion of icosahedral lutetium boride LuB66

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, V V; Avdashchenko, D V; Matovnikov, A V; Mitroshenkov, N V; Bud’ko, S L

    2014-01-07

    The experimental values of heat capacity and thermal expansion for lutetium boride LuB66 in the temperature range of 2-300 K were analysed in the Debye-Einstein approximation. It was found that the vibration of the boron sub-lattice can be considered within the Debye model with high characteristic temperatures; low-frequency vibration of weakly connected metal atoms is described by the Einstein model.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of an Alumina Forming Nanolaminated Boride: MoAlB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, Sankalp; Zapata-Solvas, Eugenio; Ly, Alexander; Lu, Jun; Elkassabany, Omar; Huon, Amanda; Lee, William E.; Hultman, Lars; May, Steve J.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-05-01

    The ‘MAlB’ phases are nanolaminated, ternary transition metal borides that consist of a transition metal boride sublattice interleaved by monolayers or bilayers of pure aluminum. However, their synthesis and properties remain largely unexplored. Herein, we synthesized dense, predominantly single-phase samples of one such compound, MoAlB, using a reactive hot pressing method. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of two Al layers in between a Mo-B sublattice. Unique among the transition metal borides, MoAlB forms a dense, mostly amorphous, alumina scale when heated in air. Like other alumina formers, the oxidation kinetics follow a cubic time-dependence. At room temperature, its resistivity is low (0.36–0.49 μΩm) and – like a metal – drops linearly with decreasing temperatures. It is also a good thermal conductor (35 Wm‑1K‑1 at 26 °C). In the 25–1300 °C temperature range, its thermal expansion coefficient is 9.5 × 10‑6 K‑1. Preliminary results suggest the compound is stable to at least 1400 °C in inert atmospheres. Moderately low Vickers hardness values of 10.6 ± 0.3 GPa, compared to other transition metal borides, and ultimate compressive strengths up to 1940 ± 103 MPa were measured at room temperature. These results are encouraging and warrant further study of this compound for potential use at high temperatures.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of an Alumina Forming Nanolaminated Boride: MoAlB.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sankalp; Zapata-Solvas, Eugenio; Ly, Alexander; Lu, Jun; Elkassabany, Omar; Huon, Amanda; Lee, William E; Hultman, Lars; May, Steve J; Barsoum, Michel W

    2016-01-01

    The 'MAlB' phases are nanolaminated, ternary transition metal borides that consist of a transition metal boride sublattice interleaved by monolayers or bilayers of pure aluminum. However, their synthesis and properties remain largely unexplored. Herein, we synthesized dense, predominantly single-phase samples of one such compound, MoAlB, using a reactive hot pressing method. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of two Al layers in between a Mo-B sublattice. Unique among the transition metal borides, MoAlB forms a dense, mostly amorphous, alumina scale when heated in air. Like other alumina formers, the oxidation kinetics follow a cubic time-dependence. At room temperature, its resistivity is low (0.36-0.49 μΩm) and - like a metal - drops linearly with decreasing temperatures. It is also a good thermal conductor (35 Wm(-1)K(-1) at 26 °C). In the 25-1300 °C temperature range, its thermal expansion coefficient is 9.5 × 10(-6 )K(-1). Preliminary results suggest the compound is stable to at least 1400 °C in inert atmospheres. Moderately low Vickers hardness values of 10.6 ± 0.3 GPa, compared to other transition metal borides, and ultimate compressive strengths up to 1940 ± 103 MPa were measured at room temperature. These results are encouraging and warrant further study of this compound for potential use at high temperatures. PMID:27220751

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of an Alumina Forming Nanolaminated Boride: MoAlB

    PubMed Central

    Kota, Sankalp; Zapata-Solvas, Eugenio; Ly, Alexander; Lu, Jun; Elkassabany, Omar; Huon, Amanda; Lee, William E.; Hultman, Lars; May, Steve J.; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2016-01-01

    The ‘MAlB’ phases are nanolaminated, ternary transition metal borides that consist of a transition metal boride sublattice interleaved by monolayers or bilayers of pure aluminum. However, their synthesis and properties remain largely unexplored. Herein, we synthesized dense, predominantly single-phase samples of one such compound, MoAlB, using a reactive hot pressing method. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy confirmed the presence of two Al layers in between a Mo-B sublattice. Unique among the transition metal borides, MoAlB forms a dense, mostly amorphous, alumina scale when heated in air. Like other alumina formers, the oxidation kinetics follow a cubic time-dependence. At room temperature, its resistivity is low (0.36–0.49 μΩm) and – like a metal – drops linearly with decreasing temperatures. It is also a good thermal conductor (35 Wm−1K−1 at 26 °C). In the 25–1300 °C temperature range, its thermal expansion coefficient is 9.5 × 10−6 K−1. Preliminary results suggest the compound is stable to at least 1400 °C in inert atmospheres. Moderately low Vickers hardness values of 10.6 ± 0.3 GPa, compared to other transition metal borides, and ultimate compressive strengths up to 1940 ± 103 MPa were measured at room temperature. These results are encouraging and warrant further study of this compound for potential use at high temperatures. PMID:27220751

  11. Direct Hydrogenation Magnesium Boride to Magnesium Borohydride: Demonstration of >11 Weight Percent Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Severa, Godwin; Ronnebro, Ewa; Jensen, Craig M.

    2010-11-16

    We here for the first time demonstrate direct hydrogenation of magnesium boride, MgB2, to magnesium borohydride, Mg(BH4)2 at 900 bar H2-pressures and 400°C. Upon 14.8wt% hydrogen release, the end-decomposition product of Mg(BH4)2 is MgB2, thus, this is a unique reversible path here obtaining >11wt% H2 which implies promise for a fully reversible hydrogen storage material.

  12. Distinct surface hydration behaviors of boron-rich boride thin film coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xinhong; Liu, Wei; Ouyang, Jun; Tian, Yun

    2014-08-01

    In this work, the surface boron chemical states and surface hydration behaviors of the as-deposited and annealed boron-rich boride thin film coatings, including AlMgB14, TiB2 and AlMgB14-TiB2, were systematically studied by use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. The XPS results indicate that boron at annealed AlMgB14 film surface can be oxidized; surprisingly, such oxidation does not lead to the formation of boric acid in ambient air. Instead, boric acid can be produced at the surface of annealed TiB2 film and AlMgB14-TiB2 film. It is shown, via the water contact angle measurements, that these boride films exhibit distinct surface wettability characteristics, which are believed to result in the observed surface hydration processes. Furthermore, we found anatase TiO2 formation plays a major role in the surface wetting behaviors for these boride films.

  13. Structure of superhard tungsten tetraboride: a missing link between MB2 and MB12 higher borides.

    PubMed

    Lech, Andrew T; Turner, Christopher L; Mohammadi, Reza; Tolbert, Sarah H; Kaner, Richard B

    2015-03-17

    Superhard metals are of interest as possible replacements with enhanced properties over the metal carbides commonly used in cutting, drilling, and wear-resistant tooling. Of the superhard metals, the highest boride of tungsten--often referred to as WB4 and sometimes as W(1-x)B3--is one of the most promising candidates. The structure of this boride, however, has never been fully resolved, despite the fact that it was discovered in 1961--a fact that severely limits our understanding of its structure-property relationships and has generated increasing controversy in the literature. Here, we present a new crystallographic model of this compound based on refinement against time-of-flight neutron diffraction data. Contrary to previous X-ray-only structural refinements, there is strong evidence for the presence of interstitial arrangements of boron atoms and polyhedral bonding. The formation of these polyhedral--slightly distorted boron cuboctahedra--appears to be dependent upon the defective nature of the tungsten-deficient metal sublattice. This previously unidentified structure type has an intermediary relationship between MB2 and MB12 type boride polymorphs. Manipulation of the fractionally occupied metal and boron sites may provide insight for the rational design of new superhard metals. PMID:25733870

  14. Structure of superhard tungsten tetraboride: A missing link between MB2 and MB12 higher borides

    PubMed Central

    Lech, Andrew T.; Turner, Christopher L.; Mohammadi, Reza; Tolbert, Sarah H.; Kaner, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    Superhard metals are of interest as possible replacements with enhanced properties over the metal carbides commonly used in cutting, drilling, and wear-resistant tooling. Of the superhard metals, the highest boride of tungsten—often referred to as WB4 and sometimes as W1–xB3—is one of the most promising candidates. The structure of this boride, however, has never been fully resolved, despite the fact that it was discovered in 1961—a fact that severely limits our understanding of its structure–property relationships and has generated increasing controversy in the literature. Here, we present a new crystallographic model of this compound based on refinement against time-of-flight neutron diffraction data. Contrary to previous X-ray–only structural refinements, there is strong evidence for the presence of interstitial arrangements of boron atoms and polyhedral bonding. The formation of these polyhedra—slightly distorted boron cuboctahedra—appears to be dependent upon the defective nature of the tungsten-deficient metal sublattice. This previously unidentified structure type has an intermediary relationship between MB2 and MB12 type boride polymorphs. Manipulation of the fractionally occupied metal and boron sites may provide insight for the rational design of new superhard metals. PMID:25733870

  15. Corrosion behavior of titanium boride composite coating fabricated on commercially pure titanium in Ringer's solution for bioimplant applications.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Bose; Singh, Raghuvir; Pathak, Lokesh Chandra

    2015-03-01

    The boriding of commercially pure titanium was performed at 850°C, 910°C, and 1050°C for varied soaking periods (1, 3 and 5h) to enhance the surface properties desirable for bioimplant applications. The coating developed was characterized for the evolution of phases, microstructure and morphology, microhardness, and consequent corrosion behavior in the Ringer's solution. Formation of the TiB2 layer at the outermost surface followed by the TiB whiskers across the borided CpTi is unveiled. Total thickness of the composite layer on the substrates borided at 850, 910, and 1050°C for 5h was found to be 19.1, 26.4, and 18.2μm respectively which includes <3μm thick TiB2 layer. The presence of TiB2 phase was attributed to the high hardness ~2968Hv15gf of the composite coating. The anodic polarization studies in the simulated body fluid unveiled a reduction in the pitting corrosion resistance after boriding the CpTi specimens. However, this value is >0.55VSCE (electrochemical potential in in-vivo physiological environment) and hence remains within the safe region. Both the untreated and borided CpTi specimens show two passive zones associated with different passivation current densities. Among the CpTi borided at various times and temperatures, a 3h treated shows better corrosion resistance. The corrosion of borided CpTi occurred through the dissolution of TiB2. PMID:25579920

  16. PREFACE: The 16th International Symposium on Boron, Borides and Related Materials (ISBB 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takaho

    2009-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains invited and contributed peer-reviewed papers that were presented at the 16th International Symposium on Boron, Borides and Related Materials (ISBB 2008), which was held on 7-12 September 2008, at Kunibiki Messe, Matsue, Japan. This triennial symposium has a half-century long history starting from the 1st meeting in 1959 at Asbury Park, New Jersey. We were very pleased to organize ISBB 2008, which gathered chemists, physicists, materials scientists as well as diamond and high-pressure researchers. This meeting had a strong background in the boron-related Japanese research history, which includes the discovery of superconductivity in MgB2 and development of Nd-Fe-B hard magnets and of YB66 soft X-ray monochromator. The scope of ISBB 2008 spans both basic and applied interdisciplinary research that is centered on boron, borides and related materials, and the collection of articles defines the state of the art in research on these materials. The topics are centered on: 1. Preparation of new materials (single crystals, thin films, nanostructures, ceramics, etc) under normal or extreme conditions. 2. Crystal structure and chemical bonding (new crystal structures, nonstoichiometry, defects, clusters, quantum-chemical calculations). 3. Physical and chemical properties (band structure, phonon spectra, superconductivity; optical, electrical, magnetic, emissive, mechanical properties; phase diagrams, thermodynamics, catalytic activity, etc) in a wide range of temperatures and pressures. 4. Applications and prospects (thermoelectric converters, composites, ceramics, coatings, etc) There were a few discoveries of new materials, such as nanomaterials, and developments in applications. Many contributions were related to 4f heavy Fermion systems of rare-earth borides. Exotic mechanisms of magnetism and Kondo effects have been discussed, which may indicate another direction of development of boride. Two special sessions

  17. Nanomechanical Characterization of Indium Nano/Microwires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanomechanical properties of indium nanowires like structures fabricated on quartz substrate by trench template technique, measured using nanoindentation. The hardness and elastic modulus of wires were measured and compared with the values of indium thin film. Displacement burst observed while indenting the nanowire. ‘Wire-only hardness’ obtained using Korsunsky model from composite hardness. Nanowires have exhibited almost same modulus as indium thin film but considerable changes were observed in hardness value. PMID:20596474

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Low-Cost Superhard Transition-Metal Borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaner, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The increasing demand for high-performance cutting and forming tools, along with the shortcomings of traditional tool materials such as diamond (unable to cut ferrous materials), cubic boron nitride (expensive) and tungsten carbide (relatively-low hardness), has motivated the search for new superhard materials for these applications. This has led us to a new class of superhard materials, dense refractory transition-metal borides, which promise to address some of the existing problems of conventional superhard materials. For example, we have synthesized rhenium diboride (ReB2) using arc melting at ambient pressure. This superhard material has demonstrated an excellent electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties, including a Vickers hardness of 48.0 GPa (under an applied load of 0.49 N). To further increase the hardness and lower the materials costs, we have begun exploring high boron content metal borides including tungsten tetraboride (WB4) . We have synthesized WB4 by arc melting and studied its hardness and high-pressure behavior. With a similar Vickers hardness (43.3 GPa under a load of 0.49 N) and bulk modulus (326-339 GPa) to ReB2, WB4 offers a lower cost alternative and has the potential to be used in cutting tools. To further enhance the hardness of this superhard metal, we have created the binary and ternary solid solutions of WB4 with Cr, Mn and Ta, the results of which show a hardness increase of up to 20 percent. As with other metals, these metallic borides can be readily cut and shaped using electric discharge machining (EDM).

  19. Physical, chemical, and catalytic properties of borided cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.

    1987-01-01

    Unsupported and alumina-supported borided cobalt catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of anhydrous cobalt acetate at 25/sup 0/C using B/sub 2/H/sub 6//THF or NaBH/sub 4//diglyme solution as the reducing agent. These catalysts were further activated in H/sub 2/ at 250/sup 0/C prior to use. The physical and chemical properties of these catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis, BET surface area measurements, H/sub 2/ and CO adsorption measurements, X-ray Diffraction, and Temperature Programmed Desorption of CO. The catalytic properties of these catalysts for hydrogenation of CO to hydrocarbons were investigated at 160 - 300/sup 0/C, 1 and 10 atm, and H/sub 2//CO ratio of 2 in a differential conversion range of less than 8%. The data show that unsupported, Na-free, borided cobalt is much more active than Na-containing borided cobalt and pure cobalt on a site basis. Similarly, CoB/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is more than an order of magnitude more active than Co/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is more than an order of magnitude more active than Co/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ but has similar selectivity; its selectivity for C/sub 5//sup +/ hydrocarbons, however, is very high (> 75 wt%) at low reaction temperatures (e.g. 170/sup 0/C) or at low H/sub 2//CO ratios (e.g. less than or equal to 1). The observed changes in catalytic and adsorption behavior are consistent with an electron-donor model in which boron atoms donate electrons to cobalt. Na was found to lower catalytic activity of cobalt while increasing selectivity for light hydrocarbons, olefins, and CO/sub 2/ products.

  20. Indentation strength of ultraincompressible rhenium boride, carbide, and nitride from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Chenpeng; Sun, Hong; Tse, John S.; Chen, Changfeng

    2012-07-01

    Using a recently developed first-principles approach for determining indentation strength [Z. Pan, H. Sun, and C. Chen, Phys. Rev. Lett.0031-9007 PRLTAO10.1103/PhysRevLett.98.135505 98, 135505 (2007); Z. Pan, H. Sun, and C. Chen, Phys. Rev. Lett.0031-9007 PRLTAO10.1103/PhysRevLett.102.055503 102, 055503 (2009)], we performed calculations of the ideal strength of hexagonal Re, Re3N, Re2N, Re2C, Re2B, and ReB2 in various shear deformation directions beneath the Vickers indentor. Our results show that the normal compressive pressure beneath the indentor weakens the strength of these electron-rich rhenium boride, carbide, and nitride compounds that belong to a distinct class of ultraincompressible and ultrahard materials. The reduction of indentation strength in these materials stems from lateral bond and volume expansions driven by the normal compressive pressure mediated by the high-density valence electrons in these structures. We compare the calculated indentation strength to the Poisson's ratio, which measures the lateral structural expansion, for the rhenium boride, carbide, and nitride compounds as well as diamond and cubic boron nitride. Our analysis indicates that although the normal pressure beneath the indentor generally leads to more significant reduction of indentation strength in materials with larger Poisson's ratios, crystal and electronic structures also play important roles in determining the structural response under indentation. The present study reveals structural deformation modes and the underlying atomistic mechanisms in transition-metal boride, carbide, and nitride compounds under the Vickers indentation. The results are distinctive from those of the traditional covalent superhard materials. The insights obtained from this work have important implications for further exploration and design of ultrahard materials.

  1. Metal-boride catalysts for indirect liquefaction. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1, 1982-February 28, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bartholomew, C.H.

    1983-03-15

    Four iron-boride catalysts were prepared. Washing with methanol did not change the iron phase composition as did water. Potassium borohydride reduction produces essentially the same iron phases as sodium borohydride reduction. Solution phase reductions with NH/sub 3/BH/sub 3/ were not productive. Reduction of ferric citrate with sodium borohydride produced a highly magnetic Fe/sub 2/B which was easily washed. Reduction of cobalt boride catalysts at a low temperature resulted in a catalyst with unusual selectivities in CO hydrogenation, i.e. the product contained more than 95% C/sub 5/-C/sub 16/ hydrocarbons. However, this catalyst deactivated rapidly.

  2. Electroplating of the superconductive boride MgB2 from molten salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Hideki; Yoshii, Kenji; Nishida, Kenji; Imai, Motoharu; Kitazawa, Hideaki

    2005-02-01

    An electroplating technique of the superconductive boride MgB2 onto graphite substrates is reported. Films of MgB2 with a thickness of tens micrometer were fabricated on the planar and curved surfaces of graphite substrates by means of electrolysis on a mixture of magnesium chloride, potassium chloride, sodium chloride, and magnesium borate fused at 600 °C under an Ar atmosphere. The electrical resistivity and magnetization measurements revealed that the electroplated MgB2 films undergo a superconducting transition with the critical temperature (Tc) of 36 K.

  3. Improved carbides and new borides for HVOF and their coating properties

    SciTech Connect

    Froning, M.J.; Keller, H.

    1995-12-31

    In the presented paper, investigations on HVOF coatings produced from a new family of powders will be discussed. The influence of microstructure, composition and production methods will be discussed in view of powder properties and resulting coating properties. New boride powders and coatings will be compared with regard to their properties deposition, efficiency, hardness, surface roughness, bond strength, and wear against commercial WC-Co and cr3C2-NiCr coatings. Additionally, improved WC- and CrC-based powders and coatings will be compared with regard to oxidation and erosion resistance.

  4. Infiltration processing of boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal cermets

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, Danny C.; Landingham, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    A chemical pretreatment method is used to produce boron carbide-, boron-, and boride-reactive metal composites by an infiltration process. The boron carbide or other starting constituents, in powder form, are immersed in various alcohols, or other chemical agents, to change the surface chemistry of the starting constituents. The chemically treated starting constituents are consolidated into a porous ceramic precursor which is then infiltrated by molten aluminum or other metal by heating to wetting conditions. Chemical treatment of the starting constituents allows infiltration to full density. The infiltrated precursor is further heat treated to produce a tailorable microstructure. The process at low cost produces composites with improved characteristics, including increased toughness, strength.

  5. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum–nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum–nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum–nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum–nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon. PMID:27503412

  6. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum-nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-08-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum-nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum-nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum-nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon.

  7. Amorphous nickel boride membrane on a platinum-nickel alloy surface for enhanced oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    He, Daping; Zhang, Libo; He, Dongsheng; Zhou, Gang; Lin, Yue; Deng, Zhaoxiang; Hong, Xun; Wu, Yuen; Chen, Chen; Li, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    The low activity of the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells is a major barrier for electrocatalysis, and hence needs to be optimized. Tuning the surface electronic structure of platinum-based bimetallic alloys, a promising oxygen reduction reaction catalyst, plays a key role in controlling its interaction with reactants, and thus affects the efficiency. Here we report that a dealloying process can be utilized to experimentally fabricate the interface between dealloyed platinum-nickel alloy and amorphous nickel boride membrane. The coating membrane works as an electron acceptor to tune the surface electronic structure of the platinum-nickel catalyst, and this composite catalyst composed of crystalline platinum-nickel covered by amorphous nickel boride achieves a 27-times enhancement in mass activity relative to commercial platinum/carbon at 0.9 V for the oxygen reduction reaction performance. Moreover, this interactional effect between a crystalline surface and amorphous membrane can be readily generalized to facilitate the 3-times higher catalytic activity of commercial platinum/carbon. PMID:27503412

  8. Process for Patterning Indium for Bump Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denis, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    An innovation was created for the Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor for integration of low-temperature detector chips with a silicon backshort and a silicon photonic choke through flipchip bonding. Indium bumps are typically patterned using liftoff processes, which require thick resist. In some applications, it is necessary to locate the bumps close to high-aspect-ratio structures such as wafer through-holes. In those cases, liftoff processes are challenging, and require complicated and time-consuming spray coating technology if the high-aspect-ratio structures are delineated prior to the indium bump process. Alternatively, processing the indium bumps first is limited by compatibility of the indium with subsequent processing. The present invention allows for locating bumps arbitrarily close to multiple-level high-aspect-ratio structures, and for indium bumps to be formed without liftoff resist. The process uses the poor step coverage of indium deposited on a silicon wafer that has been previously etched to delineate the location of the indium bumps. The silicon pattern can be processed through standard lithography prior to adding the high-aspect-ratio structures. Typically, high-aspectratio structures require a thick resist layer so this layer can easily cover the silicon topography. For multiple levels of topography, the silicon can be easily conformally coated through standard processes. A blanket layer of indium is then deposited onto the full wafer; bump bonding only occurs at the high points of the topography.

  9. Investigation of composition and chemical state of elements in iron boride by the method of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyoshin, V. G.; Kharlamov, A. I.; Prokopenko, V. M.

    1981-06-01

    The composition and chemical state of iron and boron in the surface layer of iron boride under different kinds of pretreatment of samples have been investigated by the method of X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. It has been found that in the initial sample there is oxygen chemically combined with iron and boron atoms. Upon heating (450°C) in hydrogen, in argon, and in vacuo there occurs removal of oxygen only from iron atoms (no pure iron was found to be formed). Boron oxidizes and there probably appears a new surface combination of boron with oxygen in which the bonding energy of 1 s electrons is higher than that in B 2O 3. Treatment of the iron boride surface with argon ions and with protons ensures uniform removal of oxygen from iron and boron atoms. It has been found that thermal treatment of iron boride leads to depletion of iron atoms from the sample surface layer, and pickling with argon ions and with protons leads to strong enrichment. Iron boride samples subjected to Ar + and H + bombardment tend to undergo significant oxidation when subsequently exposed to air at room temperature.

  10. Synthesis of transition metal borides layers under pulsed electron-beams treatment in a vacuum for surface hardening of instrumental steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milonov, A. S.; Danzheev, B. A.; Smirnyagina, N. N.; Dasheev, D. E.; Kim, T. B.; Semenov, A. P.

    2015-11-01

    The saturation of the surface layers of metals and alloys with boron is conducted for increasing their surface hardness, wear resistance, etc. Multicomponent layers containing in its composition borides of refractory metals, as a rule, are formed by the methods of chemical- thermal processing in the interaction of boriding component with refractory one or by the method of saturation of refractory metal impurities or alloy with boron. In this work, we studied the features of vanadium and iron borides formation on the surface of instrumental steels U8A and R18 under the influence of intense electron beams in continuous and pulse modes.

  11. A Kinetic Study of Indium Leaching from Indium-Bearing Zinc Ferrite Under Microwave Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Linye; Mo, Jiamei; Li, Xuanhai; Pan, Liuping; Liang, Xinyuan; Wei, Guangtao

    2013-12-01

    To obtain information about leaching reaction and kinetics of indium from indium-bearing materials under microwave heating (MH), leaching of indium from indium-bearing zinc ferrite (IBZF) has been investigated. IBZF samples under MH and under conventional heating (CH) were studied by X-ray diffraction and specific surface area. Compared with that of CH, the effect of MH and the effects of various control parameters on indium leaching were studied. The results showed that compared with CH, MH enhanced the indium leaching from IBZF and increased the leaching rate. The leaching behavior of indium from IBZF was analyzed by unreacted shrinking core model, and the regression of kinetic equations showed that leaching of indium from IBZF obeyed the model very well. The activation energies under MH and under CH were 77.374 kJ/mol and 53.555 kJ/mol, respectively; the ratio of frequency factor K 0(MH)/ K 0(CH) was 10,818.36. The activation mechanism involved in leaching of indium under MH was mainly the increase of reactant energy and effective collision, which caused by the thermal and nonthermal microwave effect. Compared with the activation energy, the effective collision played a more important role in the acceleration of leaching of indium.

  12. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  13. Preparation and sintering of refractory metal borides, carbides and nitrides of high purity

    SciTech Connect

    Sane, A.Y.

    1987-09-15

    The method of preparing a consolidated and purified Group IVb, Vb, or VIb refractory metal boride, carbide, nitride, or mixture, combination or cermet thereof by means of aided, reduced pressure and elevated temperature conditions is described. It consists of: (a) establishing a composition for a second stage reaction step of reaction sintering and adapted for enhanced production of desired product; (b) providing sintering aid at least in part together with the composition and resting the composition upon the sintering aid, which aid is solid at normal pressure and temperatures and aids via the vapor phase at the pressure and temperature conditions of the second stage reaction step; (c) reducing the pressure around the composition; (d) heating the composition at a temperature for sintering; while (e) establishing sintering aid atmosphere in contact with the composition; and (f) maintaining the heating for a time sufficient to consolidate the composition, and thereby prepare a consolidate and purified product.

  14. Valence fluctuations of europium in the boride Eu4Pd29+x B8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumeniuk, Roman; Schnelle, Walter; Ahmida, Mahmoud A.; Abd-Elmeguid, Mohsen M.; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Tsirlin, Alexander A.; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Geibel, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    We synthesized a high-quality sample of the boride Eu4Pd29+x B8 (x  =  0.76) and studied its structural and physical properties. Its tetragonal structure was solved by direct methods and confirmed to belong to the Eu4Pd29B8 type. All studied physical properties indicate a valence fluctuating Eu state, with a valence decreasing continuously from about 2.9 at 5 K to 2.7 at 300 K. Maxima in the T dependence of the susceptibility and thermopower at around 135 K and 120 K, respectively, indicate a valence fluctuation energy scale on the order of 300 K. Analysis of the magnetic susceptibility evidences some inconsistencies when using the ionic interconfigurational fluctuation (ICF) model, thus suggesting a stronger relevance of hybridization between 4f and valence electrons compared to standard valence-fluctuating Eu systems.

  15. Identification of delamination failure of boride layer on common Cr-based steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taktak, Sukru; Tasgetiren, Suleyman

    2006-10-01

    Adhesion is an important aspect in the reliability of coated components. With low-adhesion of interfaces, different crack paths may develop depending on the local stress field at the interface and the fracture toughness of the coating, substrate, and interface. In the current study, an attempt has been made to identify the delamination failure of coated Cr-based steels by boronizing. For this reason, two commonly used steels (AISI H13, AISI 304) are considered. The steels contain 5.3 and 18.3 wt.% Cr, respectively. Boriding treatment is carried out in a slurry salt bath consisting of borax, boric acid, and ferrosilicon at a temperature range of 800 950 °C for 3, 5, and 7 h. The general properties of the boron coating are obtained by mechanical and metallographic characterization tests. For identification of coating layer failure, some fracture toughness tests and the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test are used.

  16. A new tetragonal boride phase in FeAl+B type alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Pierron, X.; Baker, I.

    1997-12-31

    The structure and composition of a previously unreported second phase were investigated in both Fe-43Al-0.12B and Fe-48Al-0.12B alloys. Energy dispersive x-ray and electron energy loss spectroscopy showed that the precipitates contained boron and were enriched in iron. This new boride phase had a tetragonal symmetry, with a{sub t} = 4a{sub B2} and c{sub t} = a{sub B2}, where a{sub B2} is the matrix lattice parameter. The effect of iron content and heat treatments on the microstructure of those two boron-doped FeAl alloys are discussed.

  17. Valence fluctuations of europium in the boride Eu4Pd(29+x)B8.

    PubMed

    Gumeniuk, Roman; Schnelle, Walter; Ahmida, Mahmoud A; Abd-Elmeguid, Mohsen M; Kvashnina, Kristina O; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas; Geibel, Christoph

    2016-03-23

    We synthesized a high-quality sample of the boride Eu4Pd(29+x)B8 (x  =  0.76) and studied its structural and physical properties. Its tetragonal structure was solved by direct methods and confirmed to belong to the Eu4Pd29B8 type. All studied physical properties indicate a valence fluctuating Eu state, with a valence decreasing continuously from about 2.9 at 5 K to 2.7 at 300 K. Maxima in the T dependence of the susceptibility and thermopower at around 135 K and 120 K, respectively, indicate a valence fluctuation energy scale on the order of 300 K. Analysis of the magnetic susceptibility evidences some inconsistencies when using the ionic interconfigurational fluctuation (ICF) model, thus suggesting a stronger relevance of hybridization between 4f and valence electrons compared to standard valence-fluctuating Eu systems. PMID:26895077

  18. Cobalt-Boride: An efficient and robust electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Suraj; Patel, Nainesh; Miotello, Antonio; Kothari, D. C.

    2015-04-01

    This work presents Cobalt-Boride (Co-B) as a non-noble, efficient and robust electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction (HER) active in aqueous solution of wide pH values. In neutral solution, amorphous Co-B nanoparticles (30-50 nm size) generate high current density (10 mA/cm2) at low overpotential (250 mV) with Tafel slope of 75 mV/dec following Volmer-Heyrovsky reaction mechanism. Highly active Co surface sites created by electronic transfer from B to Co (as inferred from XPS analysis and supported by theoretical calculations) are responsible for this significant HER activity in wide range of pH (4-9) values. Stability and reusability tests also demonstrate the robust nature of the catalyst.

  19. Refractory Boride Formation and Microstructure Evolution during Solidification of Titanium-Boron and Titanium Aluminum-Boron Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyman, Mark Edward

    1990-01-01

    gamma-TiAl alloys targeted for use as a structural material in advanced aerospace applications lack adequate creep strength at high temperatures. Incorporation of hard refractory second phase particles (e.g. TiB _2) exhibiting large aspect ratios (i.e. needles) can increase creep strength by constraining the plastic flow of the matrix during high temperature service. Matrix microstructure evolution and refractory boride formation in binary Ti-B and Ti-(25-52) at% Al and <= ~ 6 at% B alloys during conventional solidification is examined. The effects of rapid solidification processing (RSP) on microstructure evolution and boride morphology in ternary alloys is examined in electromagnetically levitated droplets processed via gas and splat quenching. A liquidus projection near the Ti-Al edge binary is deduced from a combination of computer modelling efforts and experimental evidence. The primary fields of crystallization sequentially traversed with increasing Al content starting from the Ti-B edge binary are: TiB to Ti_3B_4 to TiB_2 and beta to alpha to gamma for B-rich (i.e. ~5 at% B) and dilute alloys, respectively. A monovariant line of the type, L to M + TiB_2 (where M = beta, alpha , and gamma) was found to run slightly below the ~1 at% B isoconcentration line near the equiatomic TiAl composition. Matrix microstructure evolution and boride formation in these ternary alloys can be explained using the proposed liquidus projection for the Ti-Al-B system. TiB_2 forms in Ti-Al-B alloys (i.e. >= 35 at% Al) with various morphologies--blocky, plate/needle and flakes--and are extensively characterized by TEM and SEM. Their growth mechanisms leading to their various morphologies is discussed. Aside from the boride phases formed, the solidification microstructures of the Ti-Al -B alloys of interest showed essentially the same constituent phases as those of binary Ti-Al alloys of similar composition. Characterization of supercooled ternary droplets dilute in B (i.e. <=1 at% B

  20. PREFACE: The 16th International Symposium on Boron, Borides and Related Materials (ISBB 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takaho

    2009-07-01

    This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series contains invited and contributed peer-reviewed papers that were presented at the 16th International Symposium on Boron, Borides and Related Materials (ISBB 2008), which was held on 7-12 September 2008, at Kunibiki Messe, Matsue, Japan. This triennial symposium has a half-century long history starting from the 1st meeting in 1959 at Asbury Park, New Jersey. We were very pleased to organize ISBB 2008, which gathered chemists, physicists, materials scientists as well as diamond and high-pressure researchers. This meeting had a strong background in the boron-related Japanese research history, which includes the discovery of superconductivity in MgB2 and development of Nd-Fe-B hard magnets and of YB66 soft X-ray monochromator. The scope of ISBB 2008 spans both basic and applied interdisciplinary research that is centered on boron, borides and related materials, and the collection of articles defines the state of the art in research on these materials. The topics are centered on: 1. Preparation of new materials (single crystals, thin films, nanostructures, ceramics, etc) under normal or extreme conditions. 2. Crystal structure and chemical bonding (new crystal structures, nonstoichiometry, defects, clusters, quantum-chemical calculations). 3. Physical and chemical properties (band structure, phonon spectra, superconductivity; optical, electrical, magnetic, emissive, mechanical properties; phase diagrams, thermodynamics, catalytic activity, etc) in a wide range of temperatures and pressures. 4. Applications and prospects (thermoelectric converters, composites, ceramics, coatings, etc) There were a few discoveries of new materials, such as nanomaterials, and developments in applications. Many contributions were related to 4f heavy Fermion systems of rare-earth borides. Exotic mechanisms of magnetism and Kondo effects have been discussed, which may indicate another direction of development of boride. Two special sessions

  1. Mineral resource of the month: indium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tolcin, Amy C.

    2011-01-01

    Geologically, the occurrence of indium minerals is rare. The element most often occurs as a sulfide inclusion or substitutes in other base-metal minerals, including cassiterite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and stannite. Indium’s abundance in the crust is estimated to be 0.05 parts per million, which makes it more abundant than silver, but it is so widely disseminated that it does not occur in high enough concentrations to form mineable deposits. Therefore, indium is most often recovered from byproduct residues produced during the refining of lead and zinc. But only about one-quarter of the indium mined worldwide is refined into metal, as many indium-bearing concentrates are sent to refineries that do not have the capability of recovering the metal.

  2. Indium Single-Ion Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagourney, Warren

    2001-01-01

    A single laser-cooled indium ion is a promising candidate for an ultimate resolution optical time or frequency standard. It can be shown that single ions from group IIIA of the periodic table (indium, thallium, etc.) can have extremely small systematic errors. In addition to being free from Doppler, transit-time and collisional shifts, these ions are also quite insensitive to perturbations from ambient magnetic and electric fields (mainly due to the use of a J=0-0 transition for spectroscopy). Of all group IIIA ions, indium seems to be the most practical, since it is heavy enough to have a tolerable intercombination cooling transition rate and (unlike thallium) has transitions which are easily accessible with frequency multiplied continuous-wave lasers. A single indium ion standard has a potential inaccuracy of one part in 10(exp 18) for integration times of 10(exp 6) seconds. We have made substantial progress during the grant period in constructing a frequency standard based upon a single indium ion. At the beginning of the grant period, single indium ions were being successfully trapped, but the lasers and optical systems were inadequate to achieve the desired goal. We have considerably improved the stability of the dye laser used to cool the ions and locked it to a molecular resonance line, making it possible to observe stable cooling-line fluorescence from a single indium ion for reasonable periods of time, as required by the demands of precision spectroscopy. We have substantially improved the single-ion fluorescence signal with significant benefits for the detection efficiency of forbidden transitions using the 'shelving' technique. Finally, we have constructed a compact, efficient UV 'clock' laser and observed 'clock' transitions in single indium ions using this laser system. We will elaborate on these accomplishments.

  3. Quantification of indium in steel using PIXE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, A.; Miranda, J.; Rickards, J.; Cheang, J. C.

    1989-04-01

    The quantitative analysis of steel for endodontics tools was carried out using low-energy protons (≤ 700 keV). A computer program for a thick-target analysis which includes enhancement due to secondary fluorescence was used. In this experiment the L-lines of indium are enhanced due to the proximity of other elements' K-lines to the indium absorption edge. The results show that the ionization cross section expression employed to evaluate this magnitude is important.

  4. Interlayer utilization (including metal borides) for subsequent deposition of NSD films via microwave plasma CVD on 316 and 440C stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballinger, Jared

    Diamond thin films have promising applications in numerous fields due to the extreme properties of diamonds in conjunction with the surface enhancement of thin films. Biomedical applications are numerous including temporary implants and various dental and surgical instruments. The unique combination of properties offered by nanostructured diamond films that make it such an attractive surface coating include extreme hardness, low obtainable surface roughness, excellent thermal conductivity, and chemical inertness. Regrettably, numerous problems exist when attempting to coat stainless steel with diamond generating a readily delaminated film: outward diffusion of iron to the surface, inward diffusion of carbon limiting necessary surface carbon precursor, and the mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion yielding substantial residual stress. While some exotic methods have been attempted to overcome these hindrances, the most common approach is the use of an intermediate layer between the stainless steel substrate and the diamond thin film. In this research, both 316 stainless steel disks and 440C stainless steel ball bearings were tested with interlayers including discrete coatings and graded, diffusion-based surface enhancements. Titanium nitride and thermochemical diffusion boride interlayers were both examined for their effectiveness at allowing for the growth of continuous and adherent diamond films. Titanium nitride interlayers were deposited by cathodic arc vacuum deposition on 440C bearings. Lower temperature diamond processing resulted in improved surface coverage after cooling, but ultimately, both continuity and adhesion of the nanostructured diamond films were unacceptable. The ability to grow quality diamond films on TiN interlayers is in agreement with previous work on iron and low alloy steel substrates, and the similarly seen inadequate adhesion strength is partially a consequence of the lacking establishment of an interfacial carbide phase

  5. Pt-B System Revisited: Pt2B, a New Structure Type of Binary Borides. Ternary WAl12-Type Derivative Borides.

    PubMed

    Sologub, Oksana; Salamakha, Leonid; Rogl, Peter; Stöger, Berthold; Bauer, Ernst; Bernardi, Johannes; Giester, Gerald; Waas, Monika; Svagera, Robert

    2015-11-16

    On the basis of a detailed study applying X-ray single-crystal and powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy analysis, it was possible to resolve existing uncertainties in the Pt-rich section (≥65 atom % Pt) of the binary Pt-B phase diagram above 600 °C. The formation of a unique structure has been observed for Pt2B [X-ray single-crystal data: space group C2/m, a = 1.62717(11) nm, b = 0.32788(2) nm, c = 0.44200(3) nm, β = 104.401(4)°, RF2 = 0.030]. Within the homogeneity range of "Pt3B", X-ray powder diffraction phase analysis prompted two structural modifications as a function of temperature. The crystal structure of "hT-Pt3B" complies with the hitherto reported structure of anti-MoS2 [space group P63/mmc, a = 0.279377(2) nm, c = 1.04895(1) nm, RF = 0.075, RI = 0.090]. The structure of the new "[Formula: see text]T-Pt3B" is still unknown. The formation of previously reported Pt∼4B has not been confirmed from binary samples. Exploration of the Pt-rich section of the Pt-Cu-B system at 600 °C revealed a new ternary compound, Pt12CuB6-y [X-ray single-crystal data: space group Im3̅, a = 0.75790(2) nm, y = 3, RF2 = 0.0129], which exhibits the filled WAl12-type structure accommodating boron in the interstitial trigonal-prismatic site 12e. The isotypic platinum-aluminum-boride was synthesized and studied. The solubility of copper in binary platinum borides has been found to attain ∼7 atom % Cu for Pt2B but to be insignificant for "[Formula: see text]T-Pt3B". The architecture of the new Pt2B structure combines puckered layers of boron-filled and empty [Pt6] octahedra (anti-CaCl2-type fragment) alternating along the x axis with a double layer of boron-semifilled [Pt6] trigonal prisms interbedded with a layer of empty tetrahedra and tetragonal pyramids (B-deficient α-T[Formula: see text]I fragment). Assuming boron vacancies ordering (space group R3), the Pt12CuB6-y structure exhibits serpentine-like columns of edge

  6. Pre-irradiation spatial distribution and stability of boride particles in rapidly solidified boron-doped stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kanani, N.; Arnberg, L.; Harling, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    The time temperature behavior of boride particles has been studied in rapidly solidified ultra low carbon and nitrogen modified 316 stainless steel with 0.088% boron and 0.45% zirconium. The results show that the as-splat-cooled specimens exhibit precipitates at the grain boundaries and triple junctions. For temperatures up to about 750/sup 0/C no significant microstructural changes occur for short heat treatment times. In the temperature range of 750 to 950/sup 0/C, however, particles typically 100 to 500 A in diameter containing Zr and B are formed within the grains. Higher temperatures enhance the formation of such particles and give rise to particle networks. The results show that a fine and uniform distribution of the boride particles almost exclusively within the grains can be achieved if proper annealing conditions are chosen. This type of distribution is an important requirement for the homogeneous production of helium during neutron irradiation in fast reactors.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of nitrogen-phosphorus-based fire retardants modified by boride/propanetriol flyeidyl ether complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Haijiao; Ma, Linrong; Zhang, Shifeng; Li, Jianzhang

    2015-07-01

    A Boride/propanetriol glyeidyl ether (B/PTGE) complex was employed to intensify the fire resistance capabilities of nitrogen-phosphorus (NP) fire retardants by reacting with phosphoric acid and urea to yield nitrogen-phosphorus-boron-PTGE fire retardants. The effects of NPB-PTGE fire retardants on wooden properties were characterized by limit oxygen index (LOI), cone calorimetry, X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results depict that the fire resistance of the B/PTGE complex modified by NP-based fire retardants was improved significantly. The PTGE was at 10% boride at 2%, and the treated wood has the LOI of 52%, which is 11.46% higher compared with woods treated with NP fire retardant.

  8. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  9. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  10. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  11. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  12. 40 CFR 421.190 - Applicability: Description of the secondary indium subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... secondary indium subcategory. 421.190 Section 421.190 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Secondary Indium Subcategory § 421.190 Applicability: Description of the secondary indium... indium at secondary indium facilities processing spent electrolyte solutions and scrap indium metal...

  13. Thermal Stability of Chelated Indium Activable Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Chrysikopoulos, Costas; Kruger, Paul

    1986-01-21

    The thermal stability of indium tracer chelated with organic ligands ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) was measured for reservoir temperatures of 150, 200, and 240 C. Measurements of the soluble indium concentration was made as a function of time by neutron activation analysis. From the data, approximate thermal decomposition rates were estimated. At 150 C, both chelated tracers were stable over the experimental period of 20 days. At 200 C, the InEDTA concentration remained constant for 16 days, after which the thermal decomposition occurred at a measured rate constant of k = 0.09 d{sup -1}. The thermal decomposition of InNTA at 200 C showed a first order reaction with a measured rate constant of k = 0.16 d{sup -1}. At 240 C, both indium chelated tracers showed rapid decomposition with rate constants greater than 1.8 d{sup -1}. The data indicate that for geothermal reservoir with temperatures up to about 200 C, indium chelated tracers can be used effectively for transit times of at least 20 days. These experiments were run without reservoir rock media, and do not account for concomitant loss of indium tracer by adsorption processes.

  14. Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1982-12-28

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  15. Indium: bringing liquid-crystal displays into focus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, Celestine N.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to more abundant industrial metals such as lead and zinc, information about the behavior and toxicity of indium in the environment is limited. However, many indium compounds have been proven to be toxic to animals.

  16. Indium-111 leukocyte scanning and fracture healing

    SciTech Connect

    Mead, L.P.; Scott, A.C.; Bondurant, F.J.; Browner, B.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the specificity of indium-111 leukocyte scans for osteomyelitis when fractures are present. Midshaft tibial osteotomies were performed in 14 New Zealand white rabbits, seven of which were infected postoperatively with Staphylococcus aureus per Norden's protocol. All 14 rabbits were scanned following injection with 75 microCi of indium 111 at 72 h after osteotomy and at weekly intervals for 4 weeks. Before the rabbits were killed, the fracture sites were cultured to document the presence or absence of infection. The results of all infected osteotomy sites were positive, whereas no positive scans were found in the noninfected osteotomies. We concluded from this study that uncomplicated fracture healing does not result in a positive indium-111 leukocyte scan.

  17. Suppression of Boride Formation in Transient Liquid Phase Bonding of Pairings of Parent Superalloy Materials with Different Compositions and Grain Structures and Resulting Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuer, Susanne; Singer, Robert F.

    2014-07-01

    Two Ni-based superalloys, columnar grained Alloy 247 and single-crystal PWA1483, are joined by transient liquid phase bonding using an amorphous brazing foil containing boron as a melting point depressant. At lower brazing temperatures, two different morphologies of borides develop in both base materials: plate-like and globular ones. Their ratio to each other is temperature dependent. With very high brazing temperatures, the deleterious boride formation in Alloy 247 can be totally avoided, probably because the three-phase-field moves to higher alloying element contents. For the superalloy PWA1483, the formation of borides cannot be completely avoided at high brazing temperatures as incipient melting occurs. During subsequent solidification of these areas, Chinese-script-like borides precipitate. The mechanical properties (tensile tests at room and elevated temperatures and short-term creep rupture tests at elevated temperatures) for brazed samples without boride precipitation are very promising. Tensile strengths and creep times to 1 pct strain are comparable, respectively, higher than the ones of the weaker parent material for all tested temperatures and creep conditions (from 90 to 100 pct rsp. 175 to 250 pct).

  18. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10391 - Copper gallium indium selenide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Copper gallium indium selenide. 721... Substances § 721.10391 Copper gallium indium selenide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as copper gallium indium selenide (PMN...

  1. Preliminary investigation of zirconium boride ceramals for gas-turbine blade applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Charles A

    1953-01-01

    Zirconium boride ZrB2 ceramals were investigated for possible gas-turbine-blade application. Included in the study were thermal shock evaluations of disks, preliminary turbine-blade operation, and observations of oxidation resistance. Thermal shock disks of the following three compositions were studied: (a) 97.5 percent ZrB2 plus 2.5 percent B by weight; (b) 92.5 percent ZrB2 plus 7.5 percent B by weight; and (c) 100 percent ZrB2. Thermal shock disks were quenched from temperatures of 1800 degrees, 2000 degrees, 2200 degrees, and 2400 degrees F. The life of turbine blades containing 93 percent ZrB2 plus 7 percent B by weight was determined in gas-turbine tests. The blades were run at approximately 1600 degrees F and 15,000 to 26,000 rpm. The thermal shock resistance of the 97.5 percent ZrB2 plus 2.5 percent boron ceramals compares favorably with that of TiC plus Co and TiC plus Ni ceramals. Oxidation of the disks during the thermal shock evaluation was slight for the comparatively short time (8.3 hr) up through 2000 degrees F. Oxidation of a specimen was severe, however, after 100 hours at 2000 degrees F. The turbine blade performance evaluation of the 93 percent ZrB2 plus 7 percent B composition was preliminary in scope ; no conclusions can be drawn.

  2. Mechanical properties of laser-deposited composite boride coating using nanoindentation

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.; Dahotre, N.B.

    2000-02-01

    Nanoindentation proves to be an effective technique to measure mechanical properties of composite materials, as it has high spatial resolution that enables estimation of properties even from fine grains, particles, and precipitates. The elastic modulus, E, of the composite boride coating deposited on AISI 1010 steel using the laser surface engineering (LSE) process has been computed using the nanoindentation technique. The highest E value of 477.3 GPa was achieved for coating in a sample that contained 0.69 volume fraction of TiB{sub 2} particles in the coating after processing with the highest laser traverse speed of 33 mm/s. A comparison between the theoretical and experimental computation of the elastic modulus suggests that theoretical elastic modulus values are lower than computed elastic modulus, as the latter includes the effect of dissolution of fine TiB{sub 2} particles in Fe matrix and metastable phase formation such as Fe{sub a}B{sub b} and Ti{sub m}B{sub n}. Dissolution of fine TiB{sub 2} particles in the Fe matrix in the coating region has been corroborated by transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrographs and corresponding energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) analysis and selected area diffraction (SAD) pattern.

  3. High borides: determining the features and details of lattice dynamics from neutron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, P. A.

    2015-04-01

    We review wide-ranging research that combines inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy with phenomenological and ab initio calculations to study the lattice dynamics and specifics of the electron-phonon interaction in three-dimensional boron cluster network systems M B_6 and M B12 ( M= {La}, {Sm}, and {Yb}, {Lu}, {Zr}). A close similarity is found between the atomic vibration spectra of these systems, which is fundamentally due to a strong hierarchy of interatomic interaction in these systems and which manifests itself both in the shape of the low-energy phonon dispersion and in the position of the high-energy edge of the spectrum. Manifestations of strong electron-phonon interactions in the lattice vibration spectra of borides are studied in detail and their relation to the nature and features of the valence-unstable state of rare-earth ions is examined. Resonance nonadiabaticity and magnetovibration interaction effects in spin- and valence-fluctuating systems are given special attention.

  4. Electronic spectra and magnetic properties of RB6, RB12 and RB2C2 borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranovskiy, A. E.; Grechnev, G. E.; Logosha, A. V.; Svechkarev, I. V.; Filippov, V. B.; Shitsevalova, N. Yu.; Oga, O. J.; Eriksson, O.

    2006-01-01

    The electronic structures of R B6, R B12 and R B2C2 borides are studied ab initio by using the full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital method. This study includes the promising materials for spin electronics with reported high temperature ferromagnetism, namely, doped divalent hexaborides CaB6, SrB6, BaB6, and the CaB2C2 compound, as well as Kondo semiconductors, SmB6 and YbB12. For CaB6 and SrB6 a semiconducting band structure has been obtained, whereas a semimetallic ground state is revealed for CaB2C2 and doped hexaborides. For YB6, LaB6, CaB2C2 and the semimetallic Ba1-x Lax B6 alloys we have performed spin-polarized band structure calculations in an external field to evaluate the induced spin and orbital magnetic moments. These calculations indicate a feasibility of the field-induced weak ferromagnetic phase in CaB2C2 and the La doped hexaborides. The LSDA and GGA calculations for different spin configurations of YbB12 point to a possibility of antiferromagnetic coupling between Yb3+ ions. For SmB6 and YbB12 our LSDA, GGA, and LSDA+U calculations have not revealed the hybridization gap for configurations with trivalent Sm3+ and Yb3+.

  5. Charge-Driven Structural Transformation and Valence Versatility of Boron Sheets in Magnesium Borides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yufeng; Ban, Chunmei; Xu, Qiang; Wei, Suhuai; Dillon, Anne C.; National Renewable Energy Laboratory Team

    2011-03-01

    We show here that boron sheets exhibit highly versatile valence and the layered boron materials may hold the promise for a high energy-density magnesium-ion battery. Practically, boron is superior to previously known multi-valence materials, especially transition metal compounds, which are heavy, expensive, and often not benign. Based on Density Functional Theory simulations, we have predicted a series of stable magnesium borides MgBx with a broad range of stoichiometries, 2 x <= 16, by removing magnesium atoms from MgB2. The layered boron structures are preserved through an in-plane topological transformation between the hexagonal lattice domains and triangular domains. The process can be reversibly switched as the charge transfer changes with Mg insertion/extraction. The mechanism of such a charge-driven transformation originates from the versatile valence state of boron in its planar form. The discovery of these new physical phenomena suggests the design of a high-capacity magnesium-boron battery. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under subcontract number DE-AC36-08GO28308 through: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of the Vehicle Technologies Program.

  6. Transport in indium-decorated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandni, U.; Henriksen, Erik A.; Eisenstein, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The electronic-transport properties of single-layer graphene that has a dilute coating of indium adatoms have been investigated. Our studies establish that isolated indium atoms donate electrons to graphene and become a source of charged impurity scattering, affecting the conductivity as well as magnetotransport properties of the pristine graphene. Notably, a positive magnetoresistance is observed over a wide density range after In doping. The low-field magnetoresistance carries signatures of quantum interference effects which are significantly altered by the adatoms.

  7. Sinterless Formation Of Contacts On Indium Phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1995-01-01

    Improved technique makes it possible to form low-resistivity {nearly equal to 10(Sup-6) ohm cm(Sup2)} electrical contacts on indium phosphide semiconductor devices without damaging devices. Layer of AgP2 40 Angstrom thick deposited on InP before depositing metal contact. AgP2 interlayer sharply reduces contact resistance, without need for sintering.

  8. Study of the doping of thermally evaporated zinc oxide thin films with indium and indium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palimar, Sowmya; Bangera, Kasturi V.; Shivakumar, G. K.

    2013-12-01

    The present paper reports observations made on investigations carried out to study structural, optical and electrical properties of thermally evaporated ZnO thin films and their modulations on doping with metallic indium and indium oxide separately. ZnO thin film in the undoped state is found to have a very good conductivity of 90 Ω-1 cm-1 with an excellent transmittance of up to 90 % in the visible region. After doping with metallic indium, the conductivity of the film is found to be 580 Ω-1 cm-1, whereas the conductivity of indium oxide-doped films is increased up to 3.5 × 103 Ω-1 cm-1. Further, the optical band gap of the ZnO thin film is widened from 3.26 to 3.3 eV when doped with indium oxide and with metallic indium it decreases to 3.2 eV. There is no considerable change in the transmittance of the films after doping. All undoped and doped films were amorphous in nature with smooth and flat surface without significant modifications due to doping.

  9. The oxidation and surface speciation of indium and indium oxides exposed to atmospheric oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, Zachary M.; Wulfsberg, Steven M.; Frith, Matthew G.; Bocarsly, Andrew B.; Bernasek, Steven L.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic indium and its oxides are useful in electronics applications, in transparent conducting electrodes, as well as in electrocatalytic applications. In order to understand more fully the speciation of the indium and oxygen composition of the indium surface exposed to atmospheric oxidants, XPS, HREELS, and TPD were used to study the indium surface exposed to water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. Clean In and authentic samples of In2O3 and In(OH)3 were examined with XPS to provide standard spectra. Indium was exposed to O2 and H2O, and the ratio of O2 - to OH- in the O1s XPS region was used to monitor oxidation and speciation of the surface. HREELS and TPD indicate that water dissociates on the indium surface even at low temperature, and that In2O3 forms at higher temperatures. Initially, OH- is the major species at the surface. Pure In2O3 is also OH- terminated following water exposure. Ambient pressure XPS studies of water exposure to these surfaces suggest that high water pressures tend to passivate the surface, inhibiting extensive oxide formation.

  10. Nano-Borides and Silicide Dispersed Composite Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Laser-Assisted HVOF Spray Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2014-10-01

    The study concerned a detailed microstructural investigation of nano-borides (Cr2B and Ni3B) and nano-silicide (Ni2Si) dispersed γ-nickel composite coating on AISI 304 stainless steel by HVOF spray deposition of the NiCrBSi precursor powder and subsequent laser surface melting. A continuous wave diode laser with an applied power of 3 kW and scan speed of 20 mm/s in argon shroud was employed. The characterization of the surface in terms of microstructure, microtexture, phases, and composition were carried out and compared with the as-coated (high-velocity oxy-fuel sprayed) surface. Laser surface melting led to homogenization and refinement of microstructures with the formation of few nano-silicides of nickel along with nano-borides of nickel and chromium (Ni3B, Cr2B, and Cr2B3). A detailed microtexture analysis showed the presence of no specific texture in the as-sprayed and laser-melted surface of Cr2B and Ni3B phases. The average microhardness was improved to 750-900 VHN as compared to 250 VHN of the as-received substrate. Laser surface melting improved the microhardness further to as high as 1400 VHN due to refinement of microstructure and the presence of silicides.

  11. Indium-111 autologous leukocyte imaging in pancreatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.R.; Spence, R.A.; Laird, J.D.; Ferguson, W.R.; Kennedy, T.L.

    1986-03-01

    Thirty-nine patients with acute pancreatitis have been assessed using a prognostic factor grading system, abdominal ultrasound, and autologous leukocyte imaging. Both prognostic factor grading and leukocyte imaging can accurately assess the severity of the disease early in its course. All patients with a negative indium-labeled leukocyte image recovered without sequelae, whereas five of the 12 patients with a positive image developed complications, including two deaths. Abdominal ultrasound is of no value in assessing severity, but is a useful method of detecting those patients with gallstone-associated disease. In patients with suspected abscess formation following acute pancreatitis, indium leukocyte imaging does not differentiate between fat necrosis and abscess formation. In this situation, computerized tomography should be carried out before laparotomy is undertaken.

  12. Sorption of indium (III) onto carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alguacil, F J; Lopez, F A; Rodriguez, O; Martinez-Ramirez, S; Garcia-Diaz, I

    2016-08-01

    Indium has numerous applications in different industrial sectors and is not an abundant element. Therefore appropriate technology to recover this element from various process wastes is needed. This research reports high adsorption capacity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) for In(III). The effects of pH, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of MWCNT on In(III) adsorption were investigated and discussed in detail. The pH increases improves the adsorption capacity for In(III). The Langmuir adsorption model is the best fit with the experimental data. For the kinetic study, the adsorption onto MWCNT could be fitted to pseudo second-order. The adsorption of indium(III) can be described to a mechanism which consists of a film diffusion controlled process. Metal desorption can be achieved with acidic solutions. PMID:27085001

  13. The Wyckoff positional order and polyhedral intergrowth in the M3B2- and M5B3-type boride precipitated in the Ni-based superalloys.

    PubMed

    Hu, X B; Zhu, Y L; Sheng, N C; Ma, X L

    2014-01-01

    Ni-based single superalloys play a crucial role in the hottest parts of jet engines. However, due to the complex geometry and macro-segregation during the solidification process, the cast defect such as stray grains is inevitable. Therefore, the transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding which can join several small single crystalline castings together is gradually believed to be an effective method for improving the yields of production of the complex components. The melting point depressant element B is always added into the interlayer filler material. Consequently, borides including the M3B2 and M5B3 phase usually precipitate during the TLP bonding process. So a comprehensive knowledge of the fine structural characteristics of the borides is very critical for an accurate evaluation of the TLP bonding process. In this work, by means of the aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy, we show, at an atomic scale, the Wyckoff positional order phenomenon of the metal atoms in the unit cell of M3B2- and M5B3-type boride. Meanwhile, the defect along the (001) plane of the above two types of boride are determined to be the polyhedral intergrowth with complex configurations. PMID:25482386

  14. Surface decoration through electrostatic interaction leading to enhanced reactivity: Low temperature synthesis of nanostructured chromium borides (CrB and CrB{sub 2})

    SciTech Connect

    Menaka,; Kumar, Bharat; Kumar, Sandeep; Ganguli, A.K.

    2013-04-15

    The present study describes a novel low temperature route at ambient pressure for the synthesis of nanocrystalline chromium borides (CrB and CrB{sub 2}) without using any flux or additives. The favorable and intimate mixing of nanoparticles of chromium acetate (Cr source) and boron forms an active chromium–boron precursor which decomposes at much lower temperature (400 °C) to form CrB (which is ∼1000 °C less than the known ambient pressure synthesis). The chromium acetate nanoparticles (∼5 nm) decorate the larger boron particles (150–200 nm) due to electrostatic interactions resulting from opposing surface charges of boron (zeta potential:+48.101 mV) and chromium acetate (zeta potential:−4.021 mV) in ethanolic medium and is evident in the TEM micrographs. The above method leads to the formation of pure CrB film like structure at 400 °C and nanospheres (40–60 nm) at 600 °C. Also, chromium diboride (CrB{sub 2}) nanoparticles (25 nm) could be obtained at 1000 °C. - Graphical abstract: Variation of surface charge of reactants, precursor and the products, chromium borides (CrB and CrB{sub 2}). Highlights: ► Novel borothermal reduction process for synthesis of chromium boride. ► Significant lowering of reaction temperature to obtain nanocrystalline chromium boride. ► Enhanced reactivity due to appropriate surface interactions.

  15. The Wyckoff positional order and polyhedral intergrowth in the M3B2- and M5B3-type boride precipitated in the Ni-based superalloys

    PubMed Central

    Hu, X. B.; Zhu, Y. L.; Sheng, N. C.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-01-01

    Ni-based single superalloys play a crucial role in the hottest parts of jet engines. However, due to the complex geometry and macro-segregation during the solidification process, the cast defect such as stray grains is inevitable. Therefore, the transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding which can join several small single crystalline castings together is gradually believed to be an effective method for improving the yields of production of the complex components. The melting point depressant element B is always added into the interlayer filler material. Consequently, borides including the M3B2 and M5B3 phase usually precipitate during the TLP bonding process. So a comprehensive knowledge of the fine structural characteristics of the borides is very critical for an accurate evaluation of the TLP bonding process. In this work, by means of the aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy, we show, at an atomic scale, the Wyckoff positional order phenomenon of the metal atoms in the unit cell of M3B2- and M5B3-type boride. Meanwhile, the defect along the (001) plane of the above two types of boride are determined to be the polyhedral intergrowth with complex configurations. PMID:25482386

  16. The Wyckoff positional order and polyhedral intergrowth in the M3B2- and M5B3-type boride precipitated in the Ni-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X. B.; Zhu, Y. L.; Sheng, N. C.; Ma, X. L.

    2014-12-01

    Ni-based single superalloys play a crucial role in the hottest parts of jet engines. However, due to the complex geometry and macro-segregation during the solidification process, the cast defect such as stray grains is inevitable. Therefore, the transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding which can join several small single crystalline castings together is gradually believed to be an effective method for improving the yields of production of the complex components. The melting point depressant element B is always added into the interlayer filler material. Consequently, borides including the M3B2 and M5B3 phase usually precipitate during the TLP bonding process. So a comprehensive knowledge of the fine structural characteristics of the borides is very critical for an accurate evaluation of the TLP bonding process. In this work, by means of the aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy, we show, at an atomic scale, the Wyckoff positional order phenomenon of the metal atoms in the unit cell of M3B2- and M5B3-type boride. Meanwhile, the defect along the (001) plane of the above two types of boride are determined to be the polyhedral intergrowth with complex configurations.

  17. Electroplated indium bump arrays and the bonding reliability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiuping, Huang; Gaowei, Xu; Gang, Quan; Yuan, Yuan; Le, Luo

    2010-11-01

    A novel electroplating indium bumping process is described, as a result of which indium bump arrays with a pitch of 100 μm and a diameter of 40 μm were successfully prepared. UBM (under bump metallization) for indium bumping was investigated with an XRD technique. The experimental results indicate that Ti/Pt (300 Å / 200 Å) has an excellent barrier effect both at room temperature and at 200 °C. The bonding reliability of the indium bumps was evaluated by a shear test. Results show that the shear strength of the indium bump significantly increases after the first reflow and then changes slowly with increasing reflow times. Such a phenomenon may be caused by the change in textures of the indium after reflow. The corresponding flip-chip process is also discussed in this paper.

  18. The toxicology of indium tin oxide.

    PubMed

    Bomhard, Ernst M

    2016-07-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) is a technologically important semiconductor. An increasing number of cases of severe lung effects (characterized by pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and/or interstitial fibrosis) in ITO-exposed workers warrants a review of the toxicological hazards. Short- and long-term inhalation studies in rats and mice revealed persistent alveolar proteinosis, inflammation and fibrosis in the lungs down to concentrations as low as 0.01mg/m(3). In rats, the incidences of bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas and carcinomas were significantly increased at all concentrations. In mice, ITO was not carcinogenic. A few bronchiolo-alveolar adenomas occurring after repeated intratracheal instillation of ITO to hamsters have to be interpreted as treatment-related. In vitro and in vivo studies on the formation of reactive oxygen species suggest epigenetic effects as cause of the lung tumor development. Repeated intratracheal instillation of ITO to hamsters slightly affected the male sexual organs, which might be interpreted as a secondary effect of the lung damage. Epidemiological and medical surveillance studies, serum/blood indium levels in workers as well as data on the exposure to airborne indium concentrations indicate a need for measures to reduce exposure at ITO workplaces. PMID:27343753

  19. Structural and Physical Properties Diversity of New CaCu5-Type Related Europium Platinum Borides

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Three novel europium platinum borides have been synthesized by arc melting of constituent elements and subsequent annealing. They were characterized by X-ray powder and single-crystal diffraction: EuPt4B, CeCo4B type, P6/mmm, a = 0.56167(2) nm, c = 0.74399(3) nm; Eu3Pt7B2, Ca3Al7Cu2 type as an ordered variant of PuNi3, R3̅m, a = 0.55477(2) nm, c = 2.2896(1) nm; and Eu5Pt18B6–x, a new unique structure type, Fmmm, a = 0.55813(3) nm, b = 0.95476(5) nm, c = 3.51578(2) nm. These compounds belong to the CaCu5 family of structures, revealing a stacking sequence of CaCu5-type slabs with different structural units: CaCu5 and CeCo3B2 type in EuPt4B; CeCo3B2 and Laves MgCu2 type in Eu3Pt7B2; and CaCu5-, CeCo3B2-, and site-exchange ThCr2Si2-type slabs in Eu5Pt18B6–x. The striking motif in the Eu5Pt18B6–x structure is the boron-centered Pt tetrahedron [BPt4], which build chains running along the a axis and plays a decisive role in the structure arrangement by linking the terminal fragments of repeating blocks of fused Eu polyhedra. Physical properties of two compounds, EuPt4B and Eu3Pt7B2, were studied. Both compounds were found to order magnetically at 36 and 57 K, respectively. For EuPt4B a mixed-valence state of the Eu atom was confirmed via magnetic and specific heat measurements. Moreover, the Sommerfeld value of the specific heat of Eu3Pt7B2 was found to be extraordinarily large, on the order of 0.2 J/mol K2. PMID:23540751

  20. InP (Indium Phosphide): Into the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandhorst, Henry W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Major industry is beginning to be devoted to indium phosphide and its potential applications. Key to these applications are high speed and radiation tolerance; however the high cost of indium phosphide may be an inhibitor to progress. The broad applicability of indium phosphide to many devices will be discussed with an emphasis on photovoltaics. Major attention is devoted to radiation tolerance and means of reducing cost of devices. Some of the approaches applicable to solar cells may also be relevant to other devices. The intent is to display the impact of visionary leadership in the field and enable the directions and broad applicability of indium phosphide.

  1. Method to Improve Indium Bump Bonding via Indium Oxide Removal Using a Multi-Step Plasma Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, H. Frank (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Vasquez, Richard P. (Inventor); Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Dickie, Matthew R. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shouleh (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A process for removing indium oxide from indium bumps in a flip-chip structure to reduce contact resistance, by a multi-step plasma treatment. A first plasma treatment of the indium bumps with an argon, methane and hydrogen plasma reduces indium oxide, and a second plasma treatment with an argon and hydrogen plasma removes residual organics. The multi-step plasma process for removing indium oxide from the indium bumps is more effective in reducing the oxide, and yet does not require the use of halogens, does not change the bump morphology, does not attack the bond pad material or under-bump metallization layers, and creates no new mechanisms for open circuits.

  2. The influence of random indium alloy fluctuations in indium gallium nitride quantum wells on the device behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tsung-Jui; Wu, Yuh-Renn; Shivaraman, Ravi; Speck, James S.

    2014-09-21

    In this paper, we describe the influence of the intrinsic indium fluctuation in the InGaN quantum wells on the carrier transport, efficiency droop, and emission spectrum in GaN-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). Both real and randomly generated indium fluctuations were used in 3D simulations and compared to quantum wells with a uniform indium distribution. We found that without further hypothesis the simulations of electrical and optical properties in LEDs such as carrier transport, radiative and Auger recombination, and efficiency droop are greatly improved by considering natural nanoscale indium fluctuations.

  3. J/{psi} production in indium-indium collisions at SPS energies

    SciTech Connect

    Pillot, P.; Ducroux, L.; Guichard, A.; Tieulent, R.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Keil, M.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.

    2006-01-12

    The NA60 experiment collected data on dimuon production in indium-indium collisions at 158 GeV/c per incident nucleon, in year 2003, to contribute to the clarification of several questions raised by previous experiments studying high-energy heavy-ion physics at the CERN SPS in search of the quark gluon plasma. Among these previous results stands the observation, by NA50, that the production yield of J/{psi} mesons is suppressed in central Pb-Pb collisions beyond the normal nuclear absorption defined by proton-nucleus data. By comparing the centrality dependence of the suppression pattern between different colliding systems, S-U, Pb-Pb and In-In, we should be able to identify the corresponding scaling variable, and the physics mechanism driving the suppression. In this paper, we will present the ratio of J/{psi} and Drell-Yan production cross-sections in indium-indium collisions, in three centrality bins, and how these values compare to previous measurements. We will also present a study of the transverse momentum distributions of the J/{psi} mesons, in seven centrality bins.

  4. Influence of indium concentration on the structural and optoelectronic properties of indium selenide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Li, Shasha; Yu, Zhou; Liu, Lian; Yan, Chuanpeng; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2014-12-01

    We have grown indium selenide thin films using magnetron sputtering method. The influence of indium concentration on the structural, optical and electrical properties was studied. The concentration of indium in indium selenide thin films was varied by adjusting the sputtering power from 40 to 80 W while keeping the substrate temperature and argon pressure constant. The β-phase, which only exists at elevated temperatures in bulk single crystals, can persist at room temperature in the In-rich films. The β-phase thin film with smaller band gap has an electrical resistivity about four orders of magnitude lower than that of the γ-In2Se3 thin film, which is also stable at room temperature. Furthermore, the single-phase γ-In2Se3 thin film was then assembled in visible-light photodetector which shows a fast, reversible, and stable response. These results indicate the possibility of using γ-In2Se3 thin film in various next-generation photoelectric and optical-memory applications.

  5. Aqueous sol-gel routes to conducting films of indium oxide and indium-tin-oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Carole C.; McGiveron, J. K.; Harrison, Philip G.

    2000-05-01

    Thin films of indium tin oxide (ITO) are of interest because of their high transparency and low electrical resistivity. Applications include use as electrodes for liquid crystal display and as heat mirrors for solar energy devices. We have developed totally aqueous routes to indium oxide (IO) and ITO materials because, (1) the particulate sols afford a longer shelf life than for alkoxyide derived materials, (2) organics do not have to be removed from the films by baking, and (3) the starting materials are cheaper than the corresponding alkoxides. Indium and mixed indium/tin sols have been prepared form inorganic solutions and treated with alkali to produce white thixotropic sols ca. 0.64 in Mz+ ions. This films were prepared by spinning on low iron or pure silica slides previously cleaned with DECON and washed with distilled water. Films were subsequently heated at 773K in air, or 1173K in air or nitrogen. The film with the lowest resistivity contained ca. 5 percent Sn and had an average optical transmittance between 400 and 600nm of 95 percent. The film was non-porous, smooth in texture, approximately 300nm thick and had a band gap energy of 3.22eV.

  6. Studies of indium amides and nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Purdy, A.P.; Berry, A.D.

    1993-12-31

    A reaction between InI{sub 3} and 3 eq. of KNH{sub 2} in liquid NH{sub 3} forms indium(III) amide (In(NH{sub 2}){sub 3}) a white, nearly insoluble compound. Indium(III) amide readily combines with KNH{sub 2} in liquid NH{sub 3} to form the mixed metal amide K{sub 2}In(NH{sub 2}){sub 5}. Other potassium and sodium derivatives MxIn(NH{sub 2}){sub 3+x} derivatives were prepared in a similar manner, but not all were obtained pure in the solid state. An impure tri-lithium derivative (Li{sub 3}In(NH{sub 2}){sub 6}) was obtained by adding a KNH{sub 2} solution (6 eq) to a solution of InI{sub 3} and 3 eq of LiI. Pyrolysis (in vacuo 25-300{degrees}C, under N{sub 2} 300-400{degrees}C) of In(NH{sub 2}){sub 3} or MxIn(NH{sub 2}){sub x+3} (M = Na, K) to 400{degrees}C results in the formation of InN, but indium metal is also formed from some of the mixed metal amides. The product from thermal decomposition of Li{sub 3}In(NH{sub 2}){sub 6} under vacuum was tentatively identified as the ternary nitride Li{sub 3}InN{sub 2}. Products were characterized by elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, and powder x-ray diffraction experiments.

  7. Two-Step Plasma Process for Cleaning Indium Bonding Bumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Harold F.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Jones, Todd J.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    A two-step plasma process has been developed as a means of removing surface oxide layers from indium bumps used in flip-chip hybridization (bump bonding) of integrated circuits. The two-step plasma process makes it possible to remove surface indium oxide, without incurring the adverse effects of the acid etching process.

  8. Rapid solidification of indium: Modeling subcooling

    SciTech Connect

    Le Bot, C. Delaunay, D.

    2008-05-15

    This paper deals with the study of crystallization kinetics. A pure metal - indium - is subjected to different cooling rates by analyzing phenomena with a differential scanning calorimeter. Thanks to the thermal flux obtained by this device and to the temperature determined with a thermocouple inside the metal sample, and according to the modified Avrami theory, the aim was to determine a temperature dependent function K which links thermodynamic properties to a macroscopic model of crystallization kinetics. Experiments highlight the recalescence phenomenon and show that this function has a shape similar to that of the nucleation rate.

  9. Fabrication, structure and mechanical properties of indium nanopillars

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Gyuhyon; Kim, Ju-Young; Budiman, Arief Suriadi; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Chen, Kai; Burek, Michael J.; Greer, Julia R.; Tsui, Ting Y.

    2010-01-01

    Solid and hollow cylindrical indium pillars with nanoscale diameters were prepared using electron beam lithography followed by the electroplating fabrication method. The microstructure of the solid-core indium pillars was characterized by scanning micro-X-ray diffraction, which shows that the indium pillars were annealed at room temperature with very few dislocations remaining in the samples. The mechanical properties of the solid pillars were characterized using a uniaxial microcompression technique, which demonstrated that the engineering yield stress is {approx}9 times greater than bulk and is {approx}1/28 of the indium shear modulus, suggesting that the attained stresses are close to theoretical strength. Microcompression of hollow indium nanopillars showed evidence of brittle fracture. This may suggest that the failure mode for one of the most ductile metals can become brittle when the feature size is sufficiently small.

  10. Fluxless indium and silver-indium bonding processes for photonics and high-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, William Wilson

    A fluxless oxidation-free bonding technology using multilayer composite solders based on indium, or low melting temperature indium. alloys such as Ag-In, In-Sn and Au-In has been developed and studied. This technology eliminates the need of flux and scrubbing motion that are used in conventional soldering processes, and still produces good quality joints. By depositing multilayer composite materials in high vacuum, we eliminate the formation of an oxide layer thus removing the origin of the problem---solder oxidation. To understand the oxidation kinetics in the bonding process, I have modeled the oxidation rate of tin, which follows a parabolic growth law. For completeness of the oxidation model, I incorporated the temperature dependency of Henry's coefficient in the oxidation model. To prevent the solder material from oxidation when exposing to atmosphere, I have developed a technique, which utilizes the in-situ formation of stable intermetallic compound on the outer surface, or a gold layer to protect the bonding materials. The bonding is achieved by means of solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) and in-situ compound formation. The first alloy system that I studied is indium-silver. GaAs and silicon dice have been successfully bonded on silicon or glass substrates. The bonding quality is examined by a Scanning Acoustic Microscope (SAM). The results confirm that void-free joints are achieved. Cross-sections of the joint are examined using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. The results reveal that the joint is composed of AuIn2, AgIn2-intermetallic compound and pure indium. From the Ag-In phase diagram, as indium composition is reduced to 25 wt. %, the solidus temperature jumps from 144 to above 695°C. By modifying the design of the multilayer composite, we developed a 210°C process to produce 700°C joints. All the well-bonded devices, before or after annealing, exceed the shear test force requirement of 2

  11. Indium antimonide large-format detector arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mike; Greiner, Mark

    2011-06-01

    Large format infrared imaging sensors are required to achieve simultaneously high resolution and wide field of view image data. Infrared sensors are generally required to be cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures in less than 10 min thousands of times during their lifetime. The challenge is to remove mechanical stress, which is due to different materials with different coefficients of expansion, over a very wide temperature range and at the same time, provide a high sensitivity and high resolution image data. These challenges are met by developing a hybrid where the indium antimonide detector elements (pixels) are unconnected islands that essentially float on a silicon substrate and form a near perfect match to the silicon read-out circuit. Since the pixels are unconnected and isolated from each other, the array is reticulated. This paper shows that the front side illuminated and reticulated element indium antimonide focal plane developed at L-3 Cincinnati Electronics are robust, approach background limited sensitivity limit, and provide the resolution expected of the reticulated pixel array.

  12. Tumour scanning with indium-111 dihaematoporphyrin ether.

    PubMed Central

    Quastel, M. R.; Richter, A. M.; Levy, J. G.

    1990-01-01

    Photofrin II (dihaematoporphyrin ether/ester, DHE) was labelled with indium-111 and its biodistribution in tumour bearing mice compared with that of 111In chloride. The uptake and clearance of 111In labelled DHE differed markedly from that of indium-111 chloride in that the former was not taken up by the tissues as much as the latter. Scintillation scanning with a gamma-camera showed marked uptake of both 111In agents at the site of the tumour, but a much lower tissue background (excluding the abdominal organs) for the mice given 111In DHE. Tumour:muscle ratios of dissected tissues were 2-3 times higher in 111In DHE treated animals as compared to the uptake of 111In chloride. There was a distinct difference in the pattern of distribution of the two 111In preparations in the tissues. The major accumulation of 111In chloride was in the kidneys, whereas the highest uptake of 111In DHE was in the liver, the organ in which unlabelled porphyrins accumulate. Extraction and testing of materials from tumours of 111In DHE treated animals indicated that most of the tumour extractable 111In had remained associated with the porphyrin in vivo up to 4 days after injection. Images Figure 1 PMID:2147858

  13. Discovery of Cadmium, Indium, and Tin Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, Stephanie; Thoennessen, Michael

    2009-10-01

    As of today, no comprehensive study has been made covering the initial observations and identifications of isotopes. A project has been undertaken at MSU to document the discovery of all the known isotopes. The criteria defining discovery of a given isotope is the publication of clear mass and element assignment in a refereed journal. Prior to the current work the documentation of the discovery of eleven elements had been completed^1. These elements are cerium^2, arsenic, gold, tungsten, krypton, silver, vanadium, einsteinium, iron, barium, and cobalt. We will present the new documentation for the cadmium, indium, and tin isotopes. Thirty-seven cadmium isotopes, thirty-eight indium isotopes, and thirty-eight tin isotopes have been discovered so far. The description for each discovered isotope includes the year of discovery, the article published on the discovery, the article's author, the method of production, the method of identification, and any previous information concerning the isotope discovery. A summary and overview of all ˜500 isotopes documented so far as a function of discovery year, method and place will also be presented. ^1http://www.nscl.msu.edu/˜thoennes/2009/discovery.htm ^2J.Q. Ginepro, J. Snyder, and M. Thoennessen, At. Data Nucl. Data. Tables, in press (2009), doi:10.1016/j.adt.2009.06.002

  14. Patterning of Indium Tin Oxide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Immer, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    A relatively rapid, economical process has been devised for patterning a thin film of indium tin oxide (ITO) that has been deposited on a polyester film. ITO is a transparent, electrically conductive substance made from a mixture of indium oxide and tin oxide that is commonly used in touch panels, liquid-crystal and plasma display devices, gas sensors, and solar photovoltaic panels. In a typical application, the ITO film must be patterned to form electrodes, current collectors, and the like. Heretofore it has been common practice to pattern an ITO film by means of either a laser ablation process or a photolithography/etching process. The laser ablation process includes the use of expensive equipment to precisely position and focus a laser. The photolithography/etching process is time-consuming. The present process is a variant of the direct toner process an inexpensive but often highly effective process for patterning conductors for printed circuits. Relative to a conventional photolithography/ etching process, this process is simpler, takes less time, and is less expensive. This process involves equipment that costs less than $500 (at 2005 prices) and enables patterning of an ITO film in a process time of less than about a half hour.

  15. Convection sensitivity and thermal analyses for indium and indium-lead mixing experiment (74-18)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourgeois, S. V.; Doty, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    Sounding rocket Experiment 74-18 was designed to demonstrate the effects of the Black Brandt rocket acceleration levels (during the low-g coast phase of its flight) on the motion of a liquid metal system to assist in preflight design. Some post flight analyses were also conducted. Preflight studies consisted of heat transfer analysis and convection sensitivity and convection modeling analyses which aided in the: (1) final selection of fluid materials (indium-lead melts rather than paraffins); (2) design and timing of heater and quench system; and (3) preflight predictions of the degree of lead penetration into the pure indium segment of the fluid. Postflight studies involved: (1) updating the convection sensitivity calculations by utilizing actual flight gravity levels; and (2) modeling the mixing in the flight samples.

  16. High-efficiency indium tin oxide/indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, X.; Wanlass, M. W.; Gessert, T. A.; Emery, K. A.; Coutts, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Improvements in the performance of indium tin oxide (ITO)/indium phosphide solar cells have been realized by the dc magnetron sputter deposition of n-ITO onto an epitaxial p/p(+) structure grown on commercial p(+) bulk substrates. The highest efficiency cells were achieved when the surface of the epilayer was exposed to an Ar/H2 plasma before depositing the bulk of the ITO in a more typical Ar/O2 plasma. With H2 processing, global efficiencies of 18.9 percent were achieved. It is suggested that the excellent performance of these solar cells results from the optimization of the doping, thickness, transport, and surface properties of the p-type base, as well as from better control over the ITO deposition procedure.

  17. The effect of prenatal indium chloride exposure on chondrogenic ossification.

    PubMed

    Ungváry, G; Tátrai, E; Szakmáry, E; Náray, M

    2001-03-01

    Daily indium chloride doses of control (0) or 400 mg/kg were administered orally to pregnant Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats by gavage, on d 20 of gestation. Indium concentration was determined in the maternal and fetal blood, livers, kidneys, skulls, and femurs by atomic absorption spectrometry. Further groups of pregnant rats were treated with control (0) or 400 mg/kg indium chloride orally, during the whole gestation period. The fetuses were examined on d 21 of gestation, using histological and histochemical methods. Four hours after the administration indium concentration was found to be significant in the blood, liver, and kidneys of the dams. Twenty-four hours later it increased in the blood but not in the liver and kidney. Fetal indium concentrations were 40-50% of the maternal levels due to a barrier of the placenta. In the skull and the femur, indium was already detectable at 4 h after the administration, and by the end of 24 h, metal concentration was several times higher than that at 4 h, indicating accumulation. Furthermore, it was found that the birefringency of collagen detectable by picrosirius red staining in polarized light around the chondrocytes disappeared and became irregular. In the matrix of the epiphyseal cartilage, the regular, birefringent network demonstrable by Rivanol reaction became irregular and hardly recognizable. In the cytoplasm of the chondrocytes, the diffuse, evenly distributed positive Ricinus communis agglutinin reaction became irregular or disappeared. Similar but much weaker changes were observed with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin stainings. It was concluded that the missing femur and micromelia diagnosed by alizarin staining is the consequence of a specific toxic effect of indium that inhibits chondrogenic ossification. No similar histochemical changes were observed in the bones of the skull developing by desmogenic ossification, despite the presence of indium. Data indicate that the mechanisms of the effects of indium

  18. Reflectance of metallic indium for solar energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Hasegawa, T.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in order to compile quantitative data on the reflective properties of metallic indium. The fabricated samples were of sufficiently high quality that differences from similar second-surface silvered mirrors were not apparent to the human eye. Three second-surface mirror samples were prepared by means of vacuum deposition techniques, yielding indium thicknesses of approximately 1000 A. Both hemispherical and specular measurements were made. It is concluded that metallic indium possesses a sufficiently high specular reflectance to be potentially useful in many solar energy applications.

  19. Electrodeposition of Indium Bumps for Ultrafine Pitch Interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yingtao; Liu, Changqing; Hutt, David; Stevens, Bob

    2014-02-01

    Electroplating is a promising method to produce ultrafine pitch indium bumps for assembly of pixel detectors in imaging applications. In this work, the process of indium bumping through electrodeposition was demonstrated and the influences of various current waveforms on the bump morphology, microstructure and height uniformity were investigated. Electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure of electroplated indium bumps and a Zygo white light interferometer was utilised to evaluate the height uniformity. The results indicated that the bump uniformities on wafer, pattern and feature scales were improved by using unipolar pulse and bipolar pulse reverse current waveforms.

  20. Determination of indium in rocks by substoichiometric radioisotope dilution analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenland, L. Paul; Campbell, E.Y.

    1973-01-01

    Rocks containing 10-140 ng of indium per g are decomposed with hydrofluoric and nitric acids in the presence of 114In. Indium is separated from other constituents by sequential extractions of the bromide, cupferronate, and acetylacetonate, and is then reacted with a substoichiometric amont of EDTA. Excess of indium is removed by acetylacetone extraction and the specific activity of the complexed fraction is determined by counting 114In. Analyses of the U.S.G.S. standard rocks are reported. These show good agreement with previous neutron activation analyses. Repetitive rock analyses indicated an analytical precision of ??4-7%. ?? 1973.

  1. High quality factor indium oxide mechanical microresonators

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolomé, Javier Cremades, Ana; Piqueras, Javier

    2015-11-09

    The mechanical resonance behavior of as-grown In{sub 2}O{sub 3} microrods has been studied in this work by in-situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) electrically induced mechanical oscillations. Indium oxide microrods grown by a vapor–solid method are naturally clamped to an aluminum oxide ceramic substrate, showing a high quality factor due to reduced energy losses during mechanical vibrations. Quality factors of more than 10{sup 5} and minimum detectable forces of the order of 10{sup −16} N/Hz{sup 1/2} demonstrate their potential as mechanical microresonators for real applications. Measurements at low-vacuum using the SEM environmental operation mode were performed to study the effect of extrinsic damping on the resonators behavior. The damping coefficient has been determined as a function of pressure.

  2. Indium antimonide based HEMT for RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subash, T. D.; Gnanasekaran, T.

    2014-11-01

    We report on an indium antimonide high electron mobility transistor with record cut-off frequency characteristics. For high frequency response it is important to minimize parasitic resistance and capacitance to improve short-channel effects. For analog applications adequate pinch-off behavior is demonstrated. For proper device scaling we need high electron mobility and high electron density. Toward this end, the device design features and simulation are carried out by the Synopsys TCAD tool. A 30 nm InSb HEMT exhibits an excellent cut-off frequency of 586 GHz. To the knowledge of the authors, the obtained cut-off frequency is the highest ever reported in any FET on any material system.

  3. Processing development of 4 tantalum carbide-hafnium carbide and related carbides and borides for extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Osama Gaballa Bahig

    Carbides, nitrides, and borides ceramics are of interest for many applications because of their high melting temperatures and good mechanical properties. Wear-resistant coatings are among the most important applications for these materials. Materials with high wear resistance and high melting temperatures have the potential to produce coatings that resist degradation when subjected to high temperatures and high contact stresses. Among the carbides, Al4SiC4 is a low density (3.03 g/cm3), high melting temperature (>2000°C) compound, characterized by superior oxidation resistance, and high compressive strength. These desirable properties motivated this investigation to (1) obtain high-density Al4SiC4 at lower sintering temperatures by hot pressing, and (2) to enhance its mechanical properties by adding WC and TiC to the Al4SiC4. Also among the carbides, tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide have outstanding hardness; high melting points (3880°C and 3890°C respectively); good resistance to chemical attack, thermal shock, and oxidation; and excellent electronic conductivity. Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC 5) is a 4-to-1 ratio of TaC to HfC with an extremely high melting point of 4215 K (3942°C), which is the highest melting point of all currently known compounds. Due to the properties of these carbides, they are considered candidates for extremely high-temperature applications such as rocket nozzles and scramjet components, where the operating temperatures can exceed 3000°C. Sintering bulk components comprised of these carbides is difficult, since sintering typically occurs above 50% of the melting point. Thus, Ta4 HfC5 is difficult to sinter in conventional furnaces or hot presses; furnaces designed for very high temperatures are expensive to purchase and operate. Our research attempted to sinter Ta4HfC5 in a hot press at relatively low temperature by reducing powder particle size and optimizing the powder-handling atmosphere, milling conditions, sintering

  4. Indium foil with beryllia washer improves transistor heat dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, J.; John, J. E. A.

    1964-01-01

    Indium foil, used as an interface material in transistor mountings, greatly reduces the thermal resistance of beryllia washers. This method improves the heat dissipation of power transistors in a vacuum environment.

  5. Clinical imaging with indium-111 leukocytes: uptake in bowel infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, H.W.; Cuthbert, I.; Richards, J.R.

    1981-08-01

    Leukocytes labeled with indium-111 accumulated in an area of small-bowel infarction, mimicking a paracolic abscess. Evidence of subacute bowel obstruction should alert the nuclear medicine physician to the former possibility.

  6. Doping of indium phosphide with group IV elements

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharenkov, L.F.; Samorukov, B.E.; Zykov, A.M.

    1985-06-01

    This paper studies the doping of single crystals of indium phosphide (InP) with group IV elements using data obtained by measuring the total charge concentration of additives and carriers. Single crystals of indium phosphide were grown by the Czochralski method from liquid melts with a liquid hermetic seal in quartz cubicles. The total impurity concentration was determined by atomic-absorption analysis with + or - 10% error. In order to explain the behavior of germanium and tin in indium phosphide, the authors consider the bond energies of additives in indium phosphide and their tetrahedral radii. The authors conclude that the established higher amphoteric character of germanium with respect to tin is probably explained by the moduli of elasticity of the doped crystal.

  7. Status of indium phosphide solar cell development at Spire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, M. B.; Keavney, C. J.; Vernon, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    On-going development of indium phosphide solar cells for space applications is presented. The development is being carried out with a view towards both high conversion efficiency and simplicity of manufacture. The cell designs comprise the ion-implanted cell, the indium tin oxide top contact cell, and the epitaxial cell grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Modelling data on the limit to the efficiency are presented and comparison is made to measured performance data.

  8. Determination of indium in standard rocks by neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Johansen, O; Steinnes, E

    1966-08-01

    A rapid neutron activation method for the determination of indium in rocks, based on 54 min (116m)In, is described. The method has been applied to a series of geochemical standards including granite G-1 and diabase W-1. The precision is better than +/- 5% for samples containing more than 5 x 10(-10)g indium. Good agreement with previously published values for G-1 and W-1 has been obtained. PMID:18959988

  9. Development of indium bumping technology through AZ9260 resist electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qiuping; Xu, Gaowei; Yuan, Yuan; Cheng, Xiao; Luo, Le

    2010-05-01

    Indium bumping is very critical technology in the application of high-density interconnection between a FPA (focal plane array) and a Si ROIC (read-out integrated circuit) by flip-chip bonding. In this paper, the indium BGA (ball grid array) chips are prepared with an electroplating method on the Si substrate. With such a method, the first difficulty arises in removing the seed layer. Two ways, including IBE (ion beam etching) and lift-off, are adopted to overcome it. The results show that the lift-off process is effective but not IBE. During the reflow process, many indium bumps fall off the substrate. Two ways are tried to solve this problem: one is to optimize the reflow profile and the other is to thicken the wetting layer. The results show that these two ways can effectively improve such status. The barrier effects of the UBM (under bump metallization) for indium, which are Ti/Pt (300 Å/200 Å) and Ti/Pt/Au/Ep Au (300 Å/200 Å/1000 Å/4 µm), are also investigated. Experimental results indicate that both of them can be used in application of integration of the FPA and ROIC. Reliability of indium bumps with these two kinds of UBM is evaluated by the shear test. The results show that their shear strength has a significant increase after reflow. For the indium bump with UBM of Ti/Pt/Au/Ep Au (300 Å/200 Å/1000 Å/4 µm), IMC (intermetallic compounds) at the interface of Au-In can strengthen the indium bump but may change the plasticity of indium.

  10. Analysis of the production of ATLAS indium bonded pixel modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, G.; Andreazza, A.; Bulgheroni, A.; Corda, G.; Di Gioia, S.; Fiorello, A.; Gemme, C.; Koziel, M.; Manca, F.; Meroni, C.; Nechaeva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Rossi, L.; Rovani, A.; Ruscino, E.

    2006-09-01

    The ATLAS collaboration is currently building 1500 pixel modules using the indium bump bonding technique developed by SELEX Sistemi Integrati (former AMS). The indium deposition and flip-chip process are described together with an overview of the chip stripping machine that allows defective modules to be reworked. The production is half-way through at the time of this writing. This paper also discusses the problems encountered during production and the adopted solutions.

  11. Recovery of indium from LCD screens of discarded cell phones.

    PubMed

    Silveira, A V M; Fuchs, M S; Pinheiro, D K; Tanabe, E H; Bertuol, D A

    2015-11-01

    Advances in technological development have resulted in high consumption of electrical and electronic equipment (EEE), amongst which are cell phones, which have LCD (liquid crystal display) screens as one of their main components. These multilayer screens are composed of different materials, some with high added value, as in the case of the indium present in the form of indium tin oxide (ITO, or tin-doped indium oxide). Indium is a precious metal with relatively limited natural reserves (Dodbida et al., 2012), so it can be profitable to recover it from discarded LCD screens. The objective of this study was to develop a complete process for recovering indium from LCD screens. Firstly, the screens were manually removed from cell phones. In the next step, a pretreatment was developed for removal of the polarizing film from the glass of the LCD panels, because the adherence of this film to the glass complicated the comminution process. The choice of mill was based on tests using different equipment (knife mill, hammer mill, and ball mill) to disintegrate the LCD screens, either before or after removal of the polarizing film. In the leaching process, it was possible to extract 96.4 wt.% of the indium under the following conditions: 1.0M H2SO4, 1:50 solid/liquid ratio, 90°C, 1h, and stirring at 500 rpm. The results showed that the best experimental conditions enabled extraction of 613 mg of indium/kg of LCD powder. Finally, precipitation of the indium with NH4OH was tested at different pH values, and 99.8 wt.% precipitation was achieved at pH 7.4. PMID:25922168

  12. Indium acetate toxicity in male reproductive system in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuo-Hsin; Chen, Hsiu-Ling; Leung, Chung-Man; Chen, Hsin-Pao; Hsu, Ping-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Indium, a rare earth metal characterized by high plasticity, corrosion resistance, and a low melting point, is widely used in the electronics industry, but has been reported to be an environmental pollutant and a health hazard. We designed a study to investigate the effects of subacute exposure of indium compounds on male reproductive function. Twelve-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into test and control groups, and received weekly intraperitoneal injections of indium acetate (1.5 mg/kg body weight) and normal saline, respectively, for 8 weeks. Serum indium levels, cauda epididymal sperm count, motility, morphology, chromatin DNA structure, mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative stress, and testis DNA content were investigated. The indium acetate-treated group showed significant reproductive toxicity, as well as an increased percentage of sperm morphology abnormality, chromatin integrity damage, and superoxide anion generation. Furthermore, positive correlations among sperm morphology abnormalities, chromatin DNA damage, and superoxide anion generation were also noted. The results of this study demonstrated the toxic effect of subacute low-dose indium exposure during the period of sexual maturation on male reproductive function in adulthood, through an increase in oxidative stress and sperm chromatin DNA damage during spermiogenesis, in a rodent model. PMID:25044390

  13. On the transferability of electron density in binary vanadium borides VB, V3B4 and VB2.

    PubMed

    Terlan, Bürgehan; Akselrud, Lev; Baranov, Alexey I; Borrmann, Horst; Grin, Yuri

    2015-12-01

    Binary vanadium borides are suitable model systems for a systematic analysis of the transferability concept in intermetallic compounds due to chemical intergrowth in their crystal structures. In order to underline this structural relationship, topological properties of the electron density in VB, V3B4 and VB2 reconstructed from high-resolution single-crystal X-ray diffraction data as well as derived from quantum chemical calculations, are analysed in terms of Bader's Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules [Bader (1990). Atoms in Molecules: A Quantum Theory, 1st ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press]. The compounds VB, V3B4 and VB2 are characterized by a charge transfer from the metal to boron together with two predominant atomic interactions, the shared covalent B-B interactions and the polar covalent B-M interactions. The resembling features of the crystal structures are well reflected by the respective B-B interatomic distances as well as by ρ(r) values at the B-B bond critical points. The latter decrease with an increase in the corresponding interatomic distances. The B-B bonds show transferable electron density properties at bond critical points depending on the respective bond distances. PMID:26634735

  14. Mechanism and kinetics of sodium borohydride hydrolysis over crystalline nickel and nickel boride and amorphous nickel-boron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhijie; Mao, Xikang; Zi, Qin; Zhang, Rongrong; Dou, Tao; Yip, Alex C. K.

    2014-12-01

    The initial hydrogen generation turnover rates during the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride over nickel catalysts (crystalline nickel (Ni), crystalline nickel boride (Ni3B), and amorphous nickel-boron (Ni-B) nanoparticles) were measured to investigate the reaction kinetics and mechanisms by varying the reactant concentrations and reaction temperatures. Nickel catalysts with and without boron follow different hydrolysis pathways; hydroxide ions are involved in the activation of reactant molecules over Ni3B and Ni-B catalysts. This study explicitly reports the zero-order and first-order reaction kinetics with respect to the reactant concentration over Ni, Ni3B and Ni-B catalysts. The initial hydrogen generation turnover rates and activation energies determined from the experimental data indicate that the amorphous Ni-B nanoparticles exhibit the highest turnover rate and lowest activation energy for the hydrolysis of borohydride among the investigated catalysts. This study provides a general strategy for the development of borohydride hydrolysis catalysts via the modification of a metal catalyst using boron, which causes the crystalline structure to become amorphous and leads to electron-rich, highly undercoordinated metal atoms at the surface.

  15. Transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs useful as water gas shift catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Patt, Jeremy; Moon, Dong Ju; Phillips, Cory

    2003-09-23

    Mono- and bimetallic transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs (e.g. oxycarbides) for use as water gas shift catalysts are described. In a preferred embodiment, the catalysts have the general formula of M1.sub.A M2.sub.B Z.sub.C O.sub.D, wherein M1 is selected from the group consisting of Mo, W, and combinations thereof; M2 is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, and combinations thereof; Z is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, boron, and combinations thereof; A is an integer; B is 0 or an integer greater than 0; C is an integer; O is oxygen; and D is 0 or an integer greater than 0. The catalysts exhibit good reactivity, stability, and sulfur tolerance, as compared to conventional water shift gas catalysts. These catalysts hold promise for use in conjunction with proton exchange membrane fuel cell powered systems.

  16. Precipitation of Niobium Boride Phases at the Base Metal/Weld Metal Interface in Dissimilar Weld Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Výrostková, Anna; Kepič, Ján; Homolová, Viera; Falat, Ladislav

    2015-07-01

    In this work, the analysis of failure mechanism in the heat affected zone is described in dissimilar weld joints between advanced martensitic steel T92 and Ni-base weld metal. The joints were treated with two different post-weld heat treatments and tested. For the creep, tensile, and Charpy impact tests, the samples with interfacially located notch were used. Moreover long term aging at 625 °C was applied before the tensile and notch toughness tests. Decohesion fractures ran along carbides at the T92 BM/WM interfaces in case of the modified PWHT, whereas type IV cracking was the prevailing failure mechanism after the classical PWHT in the creep test. In the notch tensile and Charpy impact tests, with the notch at T92 base metal/weld metal interface, fractures ran along the interface with a hard phase on the fracture surface along with the ductile dimple and brittle quasi-cleavage fracture. The phase identified as niobium boride (either NbB and/or Nb3B2) was produced during welding at the end of the solidification process. It was found in the welds regardless of the post-weld heat treatment and long-term aging.

  17. Indium Antimonide Nanowires: Synthesis and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafa, Muhammad; Akbar, Sadaf; Gao, Lei; Fakhar-e-Alam, Muhammad; Wang, Zhiming M.

    2016-03-01

    This article summarizes some of the critical features of pure indium antimonide nanowires (InSb NWs) growth and their potential applications in the industry. In the first section, historical studies on the growth of InSb NWs have been presented, while in the second part, a comprehensive overview of the various synthesis techniques is demonstrated briefly. The major emphasis of current review is vapor phase deposition of NWs by manifold techniques. In addition, author review various protocols and methodologies employed to generate NWs from diverse material systems via self-organized fabrication procedures comprising chemical vapor deposition, annealing in reactive atmosphere, evaporation of InSb, molecular/ chemical beam epitaxy, solution-based techniques, and top-down fabrication method. The benefits and ill effects of the gold and self-catalyzed materials for the growth of NWs are explained at length. Afterward, in the next part, four thermodynamic characteristics of NW growth criterion concerning the expansion of NWs, growth velocity, Gibbs-Thomson effect, and growth model were expounded and discussed concisely. Recent progress in device fabrications is explained in the third part, in which the electrical and optical properties of InSb NWs were reviewed by considering the effects of conductivity which are diameter dependent and the applications of NWs in the fabrications of field-effect transistors, quantum devices, thermoelectrics, and detectors.

  18. Fabrication challenges for indium phosphide microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwak, N. P.; Fan, X. Z.; Ghodssi, R.

    2015-04-01

    From the inception of III-V microsystems, monolithically integrated device designs have been the motivating drive for this field, bringing together the utility of single-chip microsystems and conventional fabrication techniques. Indium phosphide (InP) has a particular advantage of having a direct bandgap within the low loss telecommunication wavelength (1550 nm) range, able to support passive waveguiding and optical amplification, detection, and generation depending on the exact alloy of In, P, As, Ga, or Al materials. Utilizing epitaxy, one can envision the growth of a substrate that contains all of the components needed to establish a single-chip optical microsystem, containing detectors, sources, waveguides, and mechanical structures. A monolithic InP MEMS system has, to our knowledge, yet to be realized due to the significant difficulties encountered when fabricating the integrated devices. In this paper we present our own research and consolidate findings from other research groups across the world to give deeper insight into the practical aspects of InP monolithic microsystem development: epitaxial growth of InP-based alloys, etching techniques, common MEMS structures realized in InP, and future applications. We pay special attention to shedding light on considerations that must be taken when designing and fabricating a monolithic InP MEMS device.

  19. Indium Antimonide Nanowires: Synthesis and Properties.

    PubMed

    Shafa, Muhammad; Akbar, Sadaf; Gao, Lei; Fakhar-E-Alam, Muhammad; Wang, Zhiming M

    2016-12-01

    This article summarizes some of the critical features of pure indium antimonide nanowires (InSb NWs) growth and their potential applications in the industry. In the first section, historical studies on the growth of InSb NWs have been presented, while in the second part, a comprehensive overview of the various synthesis techniques is demonstrated briefly. The major emphasis of current review is vapor phase deposition of NWs by manifold techniques. In addition, author review various protocols and methodologies employed to generate NWs from diverse material systems via self-organized fabrication procedures comprising chemical vapor deposition, annealing in reactive atmosphere, evaporation of InSb, molecular/ chemical beam epitaxy, solution-based techniques, and top-down fabrication method. The benefits and ill effects of the gold and self-catalyzed materials for the growth of NWs are explained at length. Afterward, in the next part, four thermodynamic characteristics of NW growth criterion concerning the expansion of NWs, growth velocity, Gibbs-Thomson effect, and growth model were expounded and discussed concisely. Recent progress in device fabrications is explained in the third part, in which the electrical and optical properties of InSb NWs were reviewed by considering the effects of conductivity which are diameter dependent and the applications of NWs in the fabrications of field-effect transistors, quantum devices, thermoelectrics, and detectors. PMID:27009531

  20. Independent Composition and Size Control for Highly Luminescent Indium-Rich Silver Indium Selenide Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Yarema, Olesya; Yarema, Maksym; Bozyigit, Deniz; Lin, Weyde M M; Wood, Vanessa

    2015-11-24

    Ternary I-III-VI nanocrystals, such as silver indium selenide (AISe), are candidates to replace cadmium- and lead-based chalcogenide nanocrystals as efficient emitters in the visible and near IR, but, due to challenges in controlling the reactivities of the group I and III cations during synthesis, full compositional and size-dependent behavior of I-III-VI nanocrystals is not yet explored. We report an amide-promoted synthesis of AISe nanocrystals that enables independent control over nanocrystal size and composition. By systematically varying reaction time, amide concentration, and Ag- and In-precursor concentrations, we develop a predictive model for the synthesis and show that AISe sizes can be tuned from 2.4 to 6.8 nm across a broad range of indium-rich compositions from AgIn11Se17 to AgInSe2. We perform structural and optical characterization for representative AISe compositions (Ag0.85In1.05Se2, Ag3In5Se9, AgIn3Se5, and AgIn11Se17) and relate the peaks in quantum yield to stoichiometries exhibiting defect ordering in the bulk. We optimize luminescence properties to achieve a record quantum yield of 73%. Finally, time-resolved photoluminescence measurements enable us to better understand the physics of donor-acceptor emission and the role of structure and composition in luminescence. PMID:26370776

  1. Indium-granulocyte scanning in the painful prosthetic joint

    SciTech Connect

    Pring, D.J.; Henderson, R.G.; Keshavarzian, A.; Rivett, A.G.; Krausz, T.; Coombs, R.R.; Lavender, J.P.

    1986-07-01

    The value of indium-111-labeled granulocyte scanning to determine the presence of infection was assessed in 50 prosthetic joints (41 of which were painful) in 40 patients. Granulocytes were obtained from the patients' blood and labeled in plasma with indium 111 tropolonate. Abnormal accumulation of indium 111 in the region of the prosthesis was noted. Proven infection occurred in 11 prostheses, and all of the infections were detected by indium-111-labeled granulocyte scanning. Nineteen were not infected (including nine asymptomatic controls) and only two produced false-positive scans. This represents a specificity of 89.5%, sensitivity of 100%, and overall accuracy of 93.2%. These results compare favorably with plain radiography. There was no radiologic evidence of infection in three of the infected prostheses, and 10 of the noninfected prostheses had some radiologic features that suggested sepsis. We conclude that indium-granulocyte scanning can reliably detect or exclude infection in painful prosthetic joints and should prove useful in clinical management.

  2. Highly Conducting Transparent Indium-Doped Zinc Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Budhi; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2014-09-01

    Highly conducting transparent indium-doped zinc oxide (IZO) thin films have been achieved by controlling different growth parameters using radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The structural, electrical, and optical properties of the IZO thin films have been investigated for varied indium content and growth temperature ( T G) in order to find out the optimum level of doping to achieve the highest conducting transparent IZO thin films. The highest mobility and carrier concentration of 11.5 cm2/V-s and 3.26 × 1020 cm-3, respectively, have been achieved in IZO doped with 2% indium. It has been shown that as T G of the 2% IZO thin films increase, more and more indium atoms are substituted into Zn sites leading to shift in (002) peaks towards higher angles which correspond to releasing the stress within the IZO thin film. The minimum resistivity of 5.3 × 10-4 Ω-cm has been achieved in 2% indium-doped IZO grown at 700°C.

  3. Higher borides and oxygen-enriched Mg-B-O inclusions as possible pinning centers in nanostructural magnesium diboride and the influence of additives on their formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhna, Tatiana; Gawalek, Wolfgang; Savchuk, Yaroslav; Tkach, Vasiliy; Danilenko, Nikolay; Wendt, Michael; Dellith, Jan; Weber, Harold; Eisterer, Michael; Moshchil, Viktor; Sergienko, Nina; Kozyrev, Artem; Nagorny, Peter; Shapovalov, Andrey; Melnikov, Vladimir; Dub, Sergey; Litzkendorf, Doris; Habisreuther, Tobias; Schmidt, Christa; Mamalis, Athanasios; Sokolovsky, Vladimir; Sverdun, Vladimir; Karau, Fridrich; Starostina, Alexandra

    2010-10-01

    The study of high pressure (2 GPa) synthesized MgB 2-based materials allows us to conclude that higher borides (with near MgB 12 stoichiometry) and oxygen-enriched Mg-B-O inclusions can be pinning centers in nanostructural magnesium diboride matrix (with average grain sizes of 15-37 nm). It has been established that additions of Ti or SiC as well as manufacturing temperature can affect the size, amount and distribution of these inclusions in the material structure and thus, influence critical current density. The superconducting behavior of materials with near MgB 12 stoichiometry of matrix is discussed.

  4. Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Tom; Ghosh, Amal K.

    1984-03-13

    A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

  5. Site-preferential design of itinerant ferromagnetic borides: experimental and theoretical investigation of MRh6B3 (M = Fe, Co).

    PubMed

    Misse, Patrick R N; Gillessen, Michael; Fokwa, Boniface P T

    2011-10-17

    Single-phase polycrystalline samples of the compounds MRh(6)B(3) (M = Fe, Co) as well as single crystals of CoRh(6)B(3) have been synthesized by arc-melting the elements under a purified argon atmosphere in a water-cooled copper crucible. The characterization of the new phases was achieved by using single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction as well as EDX measurements. The two phases are isotypic and crystallize in the hexagonal Th(7)Fe(3) structure type (space group P6(3)mc, no. 186, Z = 2). In this structure, the magnetically active atoms (Fe, Co) are preferentially found on only one of the three available rhodium sites, and together with rhodium they build a three-dimensional network of interconnected (Rh/M)(3) triangles. Magnetic properties investigations show that both phases order ferromagnetically below Curie temperatures of 240 K (for FeRh(6)B(3)) and 150 K (for CoRh(6)B(3)). First-principles DFT calculations correctly reproduce not only the lattice parameters but also the ground state magnetic ordering in the two phases. These calculations also show that the long-range magnetic ordering in both phases occurs via indirect ferromagnetic coupling between the iron atoms mediated by rhodium. This magnetic structural model also predicts the saturation magnetizations to be 4.02 μ(B) for FeRh(6)B(3) (3.60 μ(B) found experimentally) and 2.75 μ(B) for CoRh(6)B(3). Furthermore, both phases are predicted to be metallic conductors as expected for these intermetallic borides. PMID:21905755

  6. Effect of higher borides and inhomogeneity of oxygen distribution on critical current density of undoped and doped magnesium diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prikhna, T. A.; Gawalek, W.; Tkach, V. M.; Danilenko, N. I.; Savchuk, Ya M.; Dub, S. N.; Moshchil, V. E.; Kozyrev, A. V.; Sergienko, N. V.; Wendt, M.; Melnikov, V. S.; Dellith, J.; Weber, H.; Eisterer, M.; Schmidt, Ch; Habisreuther, T.; Litzkendorf, D.; Vajda, J.; Shapovalov, A. P.; Sokolovsky, V.; Nagorny, P. A.; Sverdun, V. B.; Kosa, J.; Karau, F.; Starostina, A. V.

    2010-06-01

    The effect of doping with Ti, Ta, SiC in complex with synthesis temperature on the amount and distribution of structural inhomogeneities in MgB2 matrix of high-pressure-synthesized-materials (2 GPa) which can influence pinning: higher borides (MgB12) and oxygen-enriched Mg-B-O inclusions, was established and a mechanism of doping effect on jc increase different from the generally accepted was proposed. Near theoretically dense SiC-doped material exhibited jc= 106 A/cm2 in 1T field and Hirr =8.5 T at 20 K. The highest jc in fields above 9, 6, and 4 T at 10, 20, and 25 K, respectively, was demonstrated by materials synthesized at 2 GPa, 600 °C from Mg and B without additions (at 20 K jc= 102 A/cm2 in 10 T field). Materials synthesized from Mg and B taken up to 1:20 ratio were superconductive. The highest jc (6×104 A/cm2 at 20 K in zero field, Hirr= 5 T) and the amount of SC phase (95.3% of shielding fraction), Tc being 37 K were demonstrated by materials having near MgB12 composition of the matrix. The materials with MgB12 matrix had a doubled microhardness of that with MgB2 matrix (25±1.1 GPa and 13.08±1.07 GPa, at a load of 4.9 N, respectively).

  7. Anomalous effect of vanadium boride seeding on thermoelectric properties of YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N

    SciTech Connect

    Prytuliak, A.; Maruyama, S.; Mori, T.

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► We doped YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N; the long awaited n-type counterpart to p-type boron carbide. ► VB{sub 2} seeding of YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N showed striking results. ► Thermal treatment effects led to VB{sub 2} being intrinsically doped. ► Large increase of both Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity was obtained. - Abstract: Vanadium boride seeded YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N were synthesized and the thermoelectric properties investigated. YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N is representative of the series of rare earth borocarbonitrides which is the potential long awaited n-type counterpart to p-type boron carbide. VB{sub 2} seeded samples of YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N were prepared using VB{sub 2} directly as an initial additive and V{sub 2}O{sub 3} which also results in formation of vanadium diboride in the final product. The resistivity and Seebeck coefficient of samples were measured in the temperature range of 323 K to 1073 K. A dramatic effect of thermal treatment on the Seebeck coefficient of VB{sub 2} seeded samples was observed, and it is indicated that there is possible partial intrinsic doping of vanadium into YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N. VB{sub 2} is revealed to be a promising additive to improve the thermoelectric properties of YB{sub 22}C{sub 2}N. An enhancement of more than 220% of the maximum absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient was obtained while the resistivity was also reduced considerably.

  8. Indium-111-Photofrin-II scintillation scan

    SciTech Connect

    Origitano, T.C.; Karesh, S.M.; Reichman, O.H.; Henkin, R.E.; Caron, M.J.

    1989-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy is under intense investigation as an adjuvant treatment for malignant glial tumors of the central nervous system. Photofrin-II (HpD-II) is currently the most actively investigated photosensitizing agent. A crucial issue regarding the safe and efficacious usage of HpD-II-based photodynamic therapy is the individual in vivo kinetics of tumor uptake and retention, compared with normal brain clearance. The optimal time for photoactivation of sensitized tumor must be known to ensure a high target-to-nontarget ratio, resulting in the maximal tumor destruction while preserving normal brain. Our laboratory developed a radionuclide scan based on 111indium (111In)-labeled HpD-II to evaluate HpD-II localization and clearance noninvasively within a canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma. Synthesis of the 111In-HpD-II complex in greater than 90% yield is achieved by a simple, rapid labeling method. Radiochemical purity and stability were verified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Using the canine model of intracerebral gliosarcoma, we followed the uptake of 111In-HpD-II in tumors with serial scintillation scanning. Localization of the tumor by 111In-HpD-II has been verified by contrast-enhanced computed tomographic scan followed by gross and histological examination of the enhancing brain region. Total body biodistribution of 111In-HpD-II at various times after injection has been evaluated. The ratio of uptake in tumor compared with surrounding brain peaked at 72 hours after injection. The knowledge of regional distribution and concentration of a photosensitizing agent within a tumor mass and surrounding brain allows for the most efficacious timing and localization of a photoactivating source.

  9. Materials flow of indium in the United States in 2008 and 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goonan, Thomas G.

    2012-01-01

    Indium is a material that has many applications. It is used by anyone who watches television or views a computer screen. It is found in solar energy arrays and in soldering applications that are required to be lead free. In 2009, about 550 metric tons (t) of indium metal was produced from primary sources world-wide; it was estimated that the United States consumed about 110 t of indium metal (20 percent of world primary production). However, when imports of consumer products that contain indium are considered, the United States consumed about 200 t of indium (36 percent of world primary production). When one considers the recovery from the low-efficiency sputtering process that coats indium-tin oxide onto glass and other surfaces, the recycling rate (within the manufacturing process that uses indium-tin oxide in flat panel displays approaches 36 percent. However, indium recovery from old scrap generated from end-of-life consumer products is not sufficiently economic to add significantly to secondary production. Between 1988 and 2010, indium prices averaged $381 per kilogram (in constant 2000 dollars). However, prices have been quite volatile (deviating from the average of $381 per kilogram by ±$199 per kilogram, a 52 percent difference from the average), reflecting short-term disequilibrium of supply and demand but also responsiveness of supply to demand. The dynamics of zinc smelting govern the primary supply of indium because indium is a byproduct of zinc smelting. Secondary indium supply, which accounts for about one-half of total indium supply, is governed by indium prices and technological advances in recovery. Indium demand is expected to grow because the number and volume of cutting edge technology applications that depend on indium are expected to grow.

  10. Indium oxide inverse opal films synthesized by structure replication method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amrehn, Sabrina; Berghoff, Daniel; Nikitin, Andreas; Reichelt, Matthias; Wu, Xia; Meier, Torsten; Wagner, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    We present the synthesis of indium oxide (In2O3) inverse opal films with photonic stop bands in the visible range by a structure replication method. Artificial opal films made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) spheres are utilized as template. The opal films are deposited via sedimentation facilitated by ultrasonication, and then impregnated by indium nitrate solution, which is thermally converted to In2O3 after drying. The quality of the resulting inverse opal film depends on many parameters; in this study the water content of the indium nitrate/PMMA composite after drying is investigated. Comparison of the reflectance spectra recorded by vis-spectroscopy with simulated data shows a good agreement between the peak position and calculated stop band positions for the inverse opals. This synthesis is less complex and highly efficient compared to most other techniques and is suitable for use in many applications.

  11. Synthesis and conductivity of indium-doped tin pyrophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, Fernando H; Mukundan, Rangachary; Brosha, Eric L

    2008-01-01

    We have synthesized indium-doped tin pyrophosphates as high-temperature anhydrous proton conductors. The ratio of tin to indium was varied using two different synthetic methods. The first is a high-temperature reaction in which a paste containing the reactants in excess phosphoric acid was heated for various amounts of time at various temperatures. The second method is a solution precipitation procedure followed by calcination, which offers several advantages over traditional synthetic techniques. These advantages inc 1 ude better stoichiometric control, lower temperature requirements, and chemically uniform products. Several phosphate sources were investigated, including phosphoric acid, pyrophosphoric acid, and potassium pyrophosphate. The resulting indium-doped tin pyrophosphates had good proton conductivity over a wide temperature range with no humidification.

  12. Mobility of indium on the ZnO(0001) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Heinhold, R.; Reeves, R. J.; Allen, M. W.; Williams, G. T.; Evans, D. A.

    2015-02-02

    The mobility of indium on the Zn-polar (0001) surface of single crystal ZnO wafers was investigated using real-time x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A sudden transition in the wettability of the ZnO(0001) surface was observed at ∼520 °C, with indium migrating from the (0001{sup ¯}) underside of the wafer, around the non-polar (11{sup ¯}00) and (112{sup ¯}0) sidewalls, to form a uniform self-organized (∼20 Å) adlayer. The In adlayer was oxidized, in agreement with the first principles calculations of Northrup and Neugebauer that In{sub 2}O{sub 3} precipitation can only be avoided under a combination of In-rich and Zn-rich conditions. These findings suggest that unintentional In adlayers may form during the epitaxial growth of ZnO on indium-bonded substrates.

  13. Mobility of indium on the ZnO(0001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinhold, R.; Reeves, R. J.; Williams, G. T.; Evans, D. A.; Allen, M. W.

    2015-02-01

    The mobility of indium on the Zn-polar (0001) surface of single crystal ZnO wafers was investigated using real-time x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A sudden transition in the wettability of the ZnO(0001) surface was observed at ˜520 °C, with indium migrating from the ( 000 1 ¯ ) underside of the wafer, around the non-polar ( 1 1 ¯ 00 ) and ( 11 2 ¯ 0 ) sidewalls, to form a uniform self-organized (˜20 Å) adlayer. The In adlayer was oxidized, in agreement with the first principles calculations of Northrup and Neugebauer that In2O3 precipitation can only be avoided under a combination of In-rich and Zn-rich conditions. These findings suggest that unintentional In adlayers may form during the epitaxial growth of ZnO on indium-bonded substrates.

  14. Diffusion parameters of indium for silicon process modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilyalli, I. C.; Rich, T. L.; Stevie, F. A.; Rafferty, C. S.

    1996-11-01

    The diffusion parameters of indium in silicon are investigated. Systematic diffusion experiments in dry oxidizing ambients at temperatures ranging from 800 to 1050 °C are conducted using silicon wafers implanted with indium. Secondary-ion-mass spectrometry (SIMS) is used to analyze the dopant distribution before and after heat treatment. The oxidation-enhanced diffusion parameter [R. B. Fair, in Semiconductor Materials and Process Technology Handbook, edited by G. E. McGuire (Noyes, Park Ridge, NJ, 1988); A. M. R. Lin, D. A. Antoniadis, and R. W. Dutton, J. Electrochem. Soc. Solid-State Sci. Technol. 128, 1131 (1981); D. A. Antoniadis and I. Moskowitz, J. Appl. Phys. 53, 9214 (1982)] and the segregation coefficient at the Si/SiO2 interface [R. B. Fair and J. C. C. Tsai, J. Electrochem. Soc. Solid-State Sci. Technol. 125, 2050 (1978)] (ratio of indium concentration in silicon to that in silicon dioxide) are extracted as a function of temperature using SIMS depth profiles and the silicon process simulator PROPHET [M. Pinto, D. M. Boulin, C. S. Rafferty, R. K. Smith, W. M. Coughran, I. C. Kizilyalli, and M. J. Thoma, in IEDM Technical Digest, 1992, p. 923]. It is observed that the segregation coefficient of indium at the Si/SiO2 interface is mIn≪1, similar to boron; however, unlike boron, the segregation coefficient of indium at the Si/SiO2 interface decreases with increasing temperature. Extraction results are summarized in analytical forms suitable for incorporation into other silicon process simulators. Finally, the validity of the extracted parameters is verified by comparing the simulated and measured SIMS profiles for an indium implanted buried-channel p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor [I. C. Kizilyalli, F. A. Stevie, and J. D. Bude, IEEE Electron Device Lett. (1996)] process that involves a gate oxidation and various other thermal processes.

  15. Transition properties of low-lying states in atomic indium

    SciTech Connect

    Sahoo, B. K.; Das, B. P.

    2011-07-15

    We present here the results of our relativistic many-body calculations of various properties of the first six low-lying excited states of indium. The calculations were performed using the relativistic coupled-cluster method in the framework of the singles, doubles, and partial triples approximation. The lifetime of the [4p{sup 6}]5s{sup 2}5p{sub 3/2} state in this atom is determined. Our results could be used to shed light on the reliability of the lifetime measurements of the excited states of atomic indium that we have considered in the present work.

  16. Equation of state of liquid Indium under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Huaming E-mail: mo.li@gatech.edu; Li, Mo E-mail: mo.li@gatech.edu; Sun, Yongli

    2015-09-15

    We apply an equation of state of a power law form to liquid Indium to study its thermodynamic properties under high temperature and high pressure. Molar volume of molten indium is calculated along the isothermal line at 710K within good precision as compared with the experimental data in an externally heated diamond anvil cell. Bulk modulus, thermal expansion and internal pressure are obtained for isothermal compression. Other thermodynamic properties are also calculated along the fitted high pressure melting line. While our results suggest that the power law form may be a better choice for the equation of state of liquids, these detailed predictions are yet to be confirmed by further experiment.

  17. Equation of state of liquid Indium under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huaming; Sun, Yongli; Li, Mo

    2015-09-01

    We apply an equation of state of a power law form to liquid Indium to study its thermodynamic properties under high temperature and high pressure. Molar volume of molten indium is calculated along the isothermal line at 710K within good precision as compared with the experimental data in an externally heated diamond anvil cell. Bulk modulus, thermal expansion and internal pressure are obtained for isothermal compression. Other thermodynamic properties are also calculated along the fitted high pressure melting line. While our results suggest that the power law form may be a better choice for the equation of state of liquids, these detailed predictions are yet to be confirmed by further experiment.

  18. Method for labelling leucocytes with indium In-111 oxine

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminsky, D.

    1992-03-03

    This patent describes an improved method for radio-labelling leucocytes with Indium In-111 oxine. It comprises separating the leucocytes from whole blood for obtaining separated leucocytes mixed with residual red blood cells; and then labelling the separated leucocytes with Indium In-111 oxine; wherein the improvement comprises the following further step: depleting residual red blood cells from the separated leucocytes by resuspending the leucocytes in an isotonic saline solution, then rocking the resuspended leucocytes for causing the leucocytes to preferentially settle out, and then removing residual red blood cells which remain suspended within the supernatant isotonic saline solution.

  19. Uptake of indium-111-labeled leukocytes by brain metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, S.; Husain, M.M.; Adametz, J.R.; Pallin, J.S.; Angtuaco, T.L.; Boyd, C.M.

    1987-04-01

    Uptake of indium-labeled leukocytes was seen in two cases of histologically proven brain metastasis. In one, this led to misdiagnosis of the lesion as an abscess. On histological evaluation, a large number of white blood cells or macrophages was seen at the neoplastic sites. Reasons for leukocyte accumulation around metastatic brain neoplasms are discussed. In contrast to the current reports that indium-labeled leukocyte scans can differentiate intracranial infection from tumor, these cases demonstrate their lack of specificity in the detection of brain abscess.

  20. Deep Subgap Feature in Amorphous Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide. Evidence Against Reduced Indium

    SciTech Connect

    Sallis, Shawn; Quackenbush, Nicholas F.; Williams, Deborah S.; Senger, Mikell; Woicik, Joseph C.; White, Bruce E.; Piper, Louis F.

    2015-01-14

    Amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) is the archetypal transparent amorphous oxide semiconductor. In spite of the gains made with a-IGZO over amorphous silicon in the last decade, the presence of deep subgap states in a-IGZO active layers facilitate instabilities in thin film transistor properties under negative bias illumination stress. Several candidates could contribute to the formation of states within the band gap. We present evidence against In+ lone pair active electrons as the origin of the deep subgap features. No In+ species are observed, only In0 nano-crystallites under certain oxygen deficient growth conditions. Our results further support under coordinated oxygen as the source of the deep subgap states.

  1. Indium tin oxide and indium phosphide heterojunction nanowire array solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, Masatoshi Nakai, Eiji; Fukui, Takashi; Tomioka, Katsuhiro

    2013-12-09

    Heterojunction solar cells were formed with a position-controlled InP nanowire array sputtered with indium tin oxide (ITO). The ITO not only acted as a transparent electrode but also as forming a photovoltaic junction. The devices exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 0.436 V, short-circuit current of 24.8 mA/cm{sup 2}, and fill factor of 0.682, giving a power conversion efficiency of 7.37% under AM1.5 G illumination. The internal quantum efficiency of the device was higher than that of the world-record InP cell in the short wavelength range.

  2. A Simple Kinetic Model for the Growth of Fe2B Layers on AISI 1026 Steel During the Powder-pack Boriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Rentería, M. A.; Ortiz-Domínguez, M.; Keddam, M.; Damián-Mejía, O.; Elias-Espinosa, M.; Flores-González, M. A.; Medina-Moreno, S. A.; Cruz-Avilés, A.; Villanueva-Ibañez, M.

    2015-02-01

    This work focused on the determination of boron diffusion coefficient through the Fe2B layers on AISI 1026 steel using a mathematical model. The suggested model solves the mass balance equation at the (Fe2B/substrate) interface. This thermochemical treatment was carried out in the temperature range of 1123-1273 K for a treatment time ranging from 2 to 8 h. The generated boride layers were characterized by different experimental techniques such as light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, XRD analysis and the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C indentation technique. As a result, the boron activation energy for AISI 1026 steel was estimated as 178.4 kJ/mol. Furthermore, this kinetic model was validated by comparing the experimental Fe2B layer thickness with the predicted one at a temperature of 1253 K for 5 h of treatment. A contour diagram relating the layer thickness to the boriding parameters was proposed to be used in practical applications.

  3. Hybrid aluminum and indium conducting filaments for nonpolar resistive switching of Al/AlOx/indium tin oxide flexible device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Wang, Jer-Chyi; Zhang, Zhigang; Ye, Yu-Ren; Pan, Liyang; Xu, Jun; Lai, Chao-Sung

    2014-02-01

    The nonpolar resistive switching characteristics of an Al/AlOx/indium tin oxide (ITO) device on a plastic flexible substrate are investigated. By analyzing the electron diffraction spectroscopy results and thermal coefficient of resistivity, it is discovered that the formation of aluminum and indium conducting filaments in AlOx film strongly depends on the polarity of the applied voltage. The metal ions arising from the Al and ITO electrodes respectively govern the resistive switching in corresponding operation polarity. After 104 times of mechanical bending, the device can perform satisfactorily in terms of resistance distribution, read sequence of high and low resistive states, and thermal retention properties.

  4. p-type conduction in sputtered indium oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Stankiewicz, Jolanta; Alcala, Rafael; Villuendas, Francisco

    2010-05-10

    We report p-type conductivity in intrinsic indium oxide (IO) films deposited by magnetron sputtering on fused quartz substrates under oxygen-rich ambient. Highly oriented (111) films were studied by x-ray diffraction, optical absorption, and Hall effect measurements. We fabricated p-n homojunctions on these films.

  5. Technique for depositing silicon dioxide on indium arsenide improves adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Planar array processing of indium arsenide wafers includes dicing into a prescribed geometry, then cleaning and drying, and finally pre-oxidizing in an oxygen atmosphere at 500 degrees C. The last step forms an oxide interface between the InAs surface and a glow discharge deposited layer of silicon dioxide.

  6. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  7. Properties and composition of anodic oxide layers of indium antimonide

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, I.N.; Gat'ko, L.E.; Nikitina, N.G.

    1985-09-01

    In recent years a number of optoelectronic devices based on narrowgap semiconductors of the AIIIBV type have been developed. One of the factors preventing widespread production of such devices is the inadequate study of the effect of the technology on the properties of insulator-semiconductor systems, of which anodic oxide films (AOF)--indium antimonide--are most promising. In this work the authors studied the dielectric properties and chemical composition of indium antimonide AOF as a function of their thicknesses and conditions of formation. It is determined that anodic indium antimonide oxide layers 90-110nm thick have high dielectric properties. It is also determined that an increase of the film thickness above 80100nm is accompanied by a decrease in the relative antimony content. The ratio of indium and antimony in oxide layers depends on the electrical conditions of oxidation of the semiconductor: the relative antimony content increases as a result of a decrease in the field intensity under conditions of constant voltage.

  8. Sub-micronewton thrust measurements of indium field emission thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemer, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The performance of three indium field emission thrusters (In-FETs) developed by the Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf (ARCS) have been measured up to 200 muN, 2 mA, and 20 W using a submicronewton resolution thrust stand.

  9. Detection of accessory spleens with indium 111-labeled autologous platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, H.H., II; Varki, A.; Heaton, W.A.; Siegel, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    In two patients with recurrent immune thrombocytopenia, accessory splenic tissue was demonstrated by radionuclide imaging following administration of indium 111-labeled autologous platelets. In one of these patients, no accessory splenic tissue was seen on images obtained with technetium 99m sulfur colloid. This new technique provides a simple means for demonstrating accessory spleens and simultaneously evaluating the life-span of autologous platelets.

  10. Indium segregation measured in InGaN quantum well layer

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhen; Jiang, Yang; Wang, Wenxin; Cheng, Liwen; Li, Wei; Lu, Wei; Jia, Haiqiang; Liu, Wuming; Zhou, Junming; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The indium segregation in InGaN well layer is confirmed by a nondestructive combined method of experiment and numerical simulation, which is beyond the traditional method. The pre-deposited indium atoms before InGaN well layer growth are first carried out to prevent indium atoms exchange between the subsurface layer and the surface layer, which results from the indium segregation. The uniform spatial distribution of indium content is achieved in each InGaN well layer, as long as indium pre-deposition is sufficient. According to the consistency of the experiment and numerical simulation, the indium content increases from 16% along the growth direction and saturates at 19% in the upper interface, which cannot be determined precisely by the traditional method. PMID:25339386

  11. Cross-current leaching of indium from end-of-life LCD panels.

    PubMed

    Rocchetti, Laura; Amato, Alessia; Fonti, Viviana; Ubaldini, Stefano; De Michelis, Ida; Kopacek, Bernd; Vegliò, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    Indium is a critical element mainly produced as a by-product of zinc mining, and it is largely used in the production process of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. End-of-life LCDs represent a possible source of indium in the field of urban mining. In the present paper, we apply, for the first time, cross-current leaching to mobilize indium from end-of-life LCD panels. We carried out a series of treatments to leach indium. The best leaching conditions for indium were 2M sulfuric acid at 80°C for 10min, which allowed us to completely mobilize indium. Taking into account the low content of indium in end-of-life LCDs, of about 100ppm, a single step of leaching is not cost-effective. We tested 6 steps of cross-current leaching: in the first step indium leaching was complete, whereas in the second step it was in the range of 85-90%, and with 6 steps it was about 50-55%. Indium concentration in the leachate was about 35mg/L after the first step of leaching, almost 2-fold at the second step and about 3-fold at the fifth step. Then, we hypothesized to scale up the process of cross-current leaching up to 10 steps, followed by cementation with zinc to recover indium. In this simulation, the process of indium recovery was advantageous from an economic and environmental point of view. Indeed, cross-current leaching allowed to concentrate indium, save reagents, and reduce the emission of CO2 (with 10 steps we assessed that the emission of about 90kg CO2-Eq. could be avoided) thanks to the recovery of indium. This new strategy represents a useful approach for secondary production of indium from waste LCD panels. PMID:25997989

  12. Optimization of Indium Bump Morphology for Improved Flip Chip Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Todd J.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Blazejewski, Edward; Dickie, Matthew R.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Greer, Harold F.

    2011-01-01

    Flip-chip hybridization, also known as bump bonding, is a packaging technique for microelectronic devices that directly connects an active element or detector to a substrate readout face-to-face, eliminating the need for wire bonding. In order to make conductive links between the two parts, a solder material is used between the bond pads on each side. Solder bumps, composed of indium metal, are typically deposited by thermal evaporation onto the active regions of the device and substrate. While indium bump technology has been a part of the electronic interconnect process field for many years and has been extensively employed in the infrared imager industry, obtaining a reliable, high-yield process for high-density patterns of bumps can be quite difficult. Under the right conditions, a moderate hydrogen plasma exposure can raise the temperature of the indium bump to the point where it can flow. This flow can result in a desirable shape where indium will efficiently wet the metal contact pad to provide good electrical contact to the underlying readout or imager circuit. However, it is extremely important to carefully control this process as the intensity of the hydrogen plasma treatment dramatically affects the indium bump morphology. To ensure the fine-tuning of this reflow process, it is necessary to have realtime feedback on the status of the bumps. With an appropriately placed viewport in a plasma chamber, one can image a small field (a square of approximately 5 millimeters on each side) of the bumps (10-20 microns in size) during the hydrogen plasma reflow process. By monitoring the shape of the bumps in real time using a video camera mounted to a telescoping 12 magnifying zoom lens and associated optical elements, an engineer can precisely determine when the reflow of the bumps has occurred, and can shut off the plasma before evaporation or de-wetting takes place.

  13. Plasma Treatment to Remove Carbon from Indium UV Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Harold F.; Nikzad, Shouleh; Beasley, Matthew; Gantner, Brennan

    2012-01-01

    The sounding rocket experiment FIRE (Far-ultraviolet Imaging Rocket Experiment) will improve the science community fs ability to image a spectral region hitherto unexplored astronomically. The imaging band of FIRE (.900 to 1,100 Angstroms) will help fill the current wavelength imaging observation hole existing from approximately equal to 620 Angstroms to the GALEX band near 1,350 Angstroms. FIRE is a single-optic prime focus telescope with a 1.75-m focal length. The bandpass of 900 to 1100 Angstroms is set by a combination of the mirror coating, the indium filter in front of the detector, and the salt coating on the front of the detector fs microchannel plates. Critical to this is the indium filter that must reduce the flux from Lymanalpha at 1,216 Angstroms by a minimum factor of 10(exp -4). The cost of this Lyman-alpha removal is that the filter is not fully transparent at the desired wavelengths of 900 to 1,100 Angstroms. Recently, in a project to improve the performance of optical and solar blind detectors, JPL developed a plasma process capable of removing carbon contamination from indium metal. In this work, a low-power, low-temperature hydrogen plasma reacts with the carbon contaminants in the indium to form methane, but leaves the indium metal surface undisturbed. This process was recently tested in a proof-of-concept experiment with a filter provided by the University of Colorado. This initial test on a test filter showed improvement in transmission from 7 to 9 percent near 900 with no process optimization applied. Further improvements in this performance were readily achieved to bring the total transmission to 12% with optimization to JPL's existing process.

  14. Use of and occupational exposure to indium in the United States.

    PubMed

    Hines, Cynthia J; Roberts, Jennifer L; Andrews, Ronnee N; Jackson, Matthew V; Deddens, James A

    2013-01-01

    Indium use has increased greatly in the past decade in parallel with the growth of flat-panel displays, touchscreens, optoelectronic devices, and photovoltaic cells. Much of this growth has been in the use of indium tin oxide (ITO). This increased use has resulted in more frequent and intense exposure of workers to indium. Starting with case reports and followed by epidemiological studies, exposure to ITO has been linked to serious and sometimes fatal lung disease in workers. Much of this research was conducted in facilities that process sintered ITO, including manufacture, grinding, and indium reclamation from waste material. Little has been known about indium exposure to workers in downstream applications. In 2009-2011, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) contacted 89 potential indium-using companies; 65 (73%) responded, and 43 of the 65 responders used an indium material. Our objective was to identify current workplace applications of indium materials, tasks with potential indium exposure, and exposure controls being used. Air sampling for indium was either conducted by NIOSH or companies provided their data for a total of 63 air samples (41 personal, 22 area) across 10 companies. Indium exposure exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) of 0.1 mg/m(3) for certain methods of resurfacing ITO sputter targets, cleaning sputter chamber interiors, and in manufacturing some inorganic indium compounds. Indium air concentrations were low in sputter target bonding with indium solder, backside thinning and polishing of fabricated indium phosphide-based semiconductor devices, metal alloy production, and in making indium-based solder pastes. Exposure controls such as containment, local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and tool-mounted LEV can be effective at reducing exposure. In conclusion, occupational hygienists should be aware that the manufacture and use of indium materials can result in indium air concentrations that exceed the NIOSH

  15. Use of and Occupational Exposure to Indium in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hines, Cynthia J.; Roberts, Jennifer L.; Andrews, Ronnee N.; Jackson, Matthew V.; Deddens, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Indium use has increased greatly in the past decade in parallel with the growth of flat-panel displays, touchscreens, optoelectronic devices, and photovoltaic cells. Much of this growth has been in the use of indium tin oxide (ITO). This increased use has resulted in more frequent and intense exposure of workers to indium. Starting with case reports and followed by epidemiological studies, exposure to ITO has been linked to serious and sometimes fatal lung disease in workers. Much of this research was conducted in facilities that process sintered ITO, including manufacture, grinding, and indium reclamation from waste material. Little has been known about indium exposure to workers in downstream applications. In 2009–2011, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) contacted 89 potential indium-using companies; 65 (73%) responded, and 43 of the 65 responders used an indium material. Our objective was to identify current workplace applications of indium materials, tasks with potential indium exposure, and exposure controls being used. Air sampling for indium was either conducted by NIOSH or companies provided their data for a total of 63 air samples (41 personal, 22 area) across 10 companies. Indium exposure exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) of 0.1 mg/m3 for certain methods of resurfacing ITO sputter targets, cleaning sputter chamber interiors, and in manufacturing some inorganic indium compounds. Indium air concentrations were low in sputter target bonding with indium solder, backside thinning and polishing of fabricated indium phosphide-based semiconductor devices, metal alloy production, and in making indium-based solder pastes. Exposure controls such as containment, local exhaust ventilation (LEV), and tool-mounted LEV can be effective at reducing exposure. In conclusion, occupational hygienists should be aware that the manufacture and use of indium materials can result in indium air concentrations that exceed the NIOSH

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy growth of indium nitride and indium gallium nitride materials for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trybus, Elaissa

    The objective of the proposed research is to establish the technology for material growth by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and fabrication of indium gallium nitride/gallium nitride (InxGa1-xN/GaN) heterojunction solar cells. InxGa1-xN solar cells have the potential to span 90% of the solar spectrum, however there has been no success with high indium (In) incorporation and only limited success with low In incorporation InxGa1-xN. Therefore, this present work focuses on 15--30% In incorporation leading to a bandgap value of 2.3--2.8 eV. This work will exploit the revision of the indium nitride (InN) bandgap value of 0.68 eV, which expands the range of the optical emission of nitride-based devices from ultraviolet to near infrared regions, by developing transparent In xGa1-xN solar cells outside the visible spectrum. Photovoltaic devices with a bandgap greater than 2.0 eV are attractive because over half the available power in the solar spectrum is above the photon energy of 2.0 eV. The ability of InxGa1-xN materials to optimally span the solar spectrum offers a tantalizing solution for high-efficiency photovoltaics. This work presents results confirming the revised bandgap of InN grown on germanium (Ge) substrates and the effects of oxygen contamination on the bandgap. This research adds to the historical discussion of the bandgap value of InN. Using the metal modulated epitaxy (MME) technique in a new, ultra-clean refurbished MBE system, an innovative growth regime is established where In and Ga phase separation is diminished by increasing the growth rate for In xGa1-xN. The MME technique modulates the metal shutters with a fixed duty cycle while maintaining a constant nitrogen flux and proves effective for improving crystal quality and p-type doping. InxGa 1-xN/GaN heterojunction solar cells require p-type doping to create the p-n subcell collecting junction, which facilitates current collection through the electrostatic field created by spatially separated ionized

  17. MOCVD growth of gallium nitride with indium surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Dong Jin

    In this thesis research, the effect of indium surfactant on Ga-polar and N-polar GaN films grown at 950 °C by MOCVD on various substrates such as Si-face SiC, bulk GaN, Si(111), and C-face SiC was studied to investigate the stress relaxation mechanism, structural, and optical properties of GaN films which were modified by the indium surfactant. The effect of indium surfactant on GaN films grown on SiC was studied first. In the 1.8 microm thick Ga-polar GaN films grown on lattice-mismatched Si-face SiC substrates utilizing indium surfactant at 950 °C, inverted hexagonal pyramid surface defects, so-called V-defects which consist of six (1011) planes, formed at threading dislocations on the GaN surface, which gave rise to the relaxation of compressive misfit stress in an elastic way. Simultaneously, enhanced surface mobility of Ga and N adatoms with indium surfactant lead to improved 2D growth, which may be contradictory to the formation of surface defects like V-defects. In order to find the driving force for V-defect formation in the presence of indium, a nucleation and growth model was developed, taking into consideration the strain, surface, and dislocation energies modified by indium surfactant. This model found that the V-defect formation can be energetically preferred since indium reduces the surface energy of the (1011) plane, which gives rise to the V-defect formation and growth that can overcome the energy barrier at the critical radius of the V-defect. These Ga-polar GaN films were found to be unintentionally doped with Si. Thus, an investigation into the effect of intentional Si doping at a constant TMIn flow rate on GaN films was also performed. Si turned out to be another important factor in the generation of V-defects because Si may be captured at the threading dislocation cores by forming Si -- N bonds, acting as a mask to locally prevent GaN growth. This behavior appeared to assist the initiation of the V-defect which enables V-defects to easily

  18. Cross-current leaching of indium from end-of-life LCD panels

    SciTech Connect

    Rocchetti, Laura; Amato, Alessia; Fonti, Viviana; Ubaldini, Stefano; De Michelis, Ida; Kopacek, Bernd; Vegliò, Francesco; Beolchini, Francesca

    2015-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • End-of-life LCD panels represent a source of indium. • Several experimental conditions for indium leaching have been assessed. • Indium is completely extracted with 2 M sulfuric acid at 80 °C for 10 min. • Cross-current leaching improves indium extraction and operating costs are lowered. • Benefits to the environment come from reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions and reagents use. - Abstract: Indium is a critical element mainly produced as a by-product of zinc mining, and it is largely used in the production process of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. End-of-life LCDs represent a possible source of indium in the field of urban mining. In the present paper, we apply, for the first time, cross-current leaching to mobilize indium from end-of-life LCD panels. We carried out a series of treatments to leach indium. The best leaching conditions for indium were 2 M sulfuric acid at 80 °C for 10 min, which allowed us to completely mobilize indium. Taking into account the low content of indium in end-of-life LCDs, of about 100 ppm, a single step of leaching is not cost-effective. We tested 6 steps of cross-current leaching: in the first step indium leaching was complete, whereas in the second step it was in the range of 85–90%, and with 6 steps it was about 50–55%. Indium concentration in the leachate was about 35 mg/L after the first step of leaching, almost 2-fold at the second step and about 3-fold at the fifth step. Then, we hypothesized to scale up the process of cross-current leaching up to 10 steps, followed by cementation with zinc to recover indium. In this simulation, the process of indium recovery was advantageous from an economic and environmental point of view. Indeed, cross-current leaching allowed to concentrate indium, save reagents, and reduce the emission of CO{sub 2} (with 10 steps we assessed that the emission of about 90 kg CO{sub 2}-Eq. could be avoided) thanks to the recovery of indium

  19. Fibrotic gene expression coexists with alveolar proteinosis in early indium lung.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shuhei; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Kiyosawa, Hidenori; Suganuma, Narufumi

    2016-08-01

    Occupational inhalation of indium compounds can cause the so-called "indium lung disease". Most affected individuals show pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease. In animal experiments, inhalation of indium tin oxide or indium oxide has been shown to cause lung damage. However, the mechanisms by which indium compounds lead to indium lung disease remain unknown. In this study, we constructed a mouse model of indium lung disease and analyzed gene expression in response to indium exposure. Indium oxide (In2O3, 10 mg/kg, primary particle size <100 nm) was administered intratracheally to C57BL/6 mice (male, 8 weeks of age) twice a week for 8 weeks. Four weeks after the final instillation, histopathological analysis exhibited periodic acid-Schiff positive material in the alveoli, characteristic of PAP. Comprehensive gene expression analysis by RNA-Seq, however, revealed expression of fibrosis-related genes, such as surfactant associated protein D, surfactant associated protein A1, mucin 1, and collagen type I and III, was significantly increased, indicating that fibrotic gene expression progresses in early phase of indium lung. These data supported the latest hypothesis that PAP occurs as an acute phase response and is replaced by fibrosis after long-term latency. PMID:27308969

  20. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of radiofrequency-sputtered titanium, carbide, molybdenum carbide, and titanium boride coatings and their friction properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Radiofrequency sputtered coatings of titanium carbide, molybdenum carbide and titanium boride were tested as wear resistant coatings on stainless steel in a pin on disk apparatus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the sputtered films with regard to both bulk and interface composition in order to obtain maximum film performance. Significant improvements in friction behavior were obtained when properly biased films were deposited on deliberately preoxidized substrates. XPS depth profile data showed thick graded interfaces for bias deposited films even when adherence was poor. The addition of 10 percent hydrogen to the sputtering gas produced coatings with thin poorly adherent interfaces. Results suggest that some of the common practices in the field of sputtering may be detrimental to achieving maximum adherence and optimum composition for these refractory compounds.

  1. Metallic Borides, La2Re3B7 and La3Re2B5, Featuring Extensive Boron-Boron Bonding.

    PubMed

    Bugaris, Daniel E; Malliakas, Christos D; Chung, Duck Young; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-02-15

    La2Re3B7 and La3Re2B5 have been synthesized in single-crystalline form from a molten La/Ni eutectic at 1000 °C in the first example of the flux crystal growth of ternary rare-earth rhenium borides. Both compounds crystallize in their own orthorhombic structure types, with La2Re3B7 (space group Pcca) having lattice parameters a = 7.657(2) Å, b = 6.755(1) Å, and c = 11.617(2) Å, and La3Re2B5 (space group Pmma) having lattice parameters a = 10.809(2) Å, b = 5.287(1) Å, and c = 5.747(1) Å. The compounds possess three-dimensional framework structures that are built up from rhenium boride polyhedra and boron-boron bonding. La3Re2B5 features fairly common B2 dumbbells, whereas La2Re3B7 has unique one-dimensional subunits composed of alternating triangular B3 and trans-B4 zigzag chain fragments. Also observed in La3Re2B5 is an unusual coordination of B by an octahedron of La atoms. Electronic band structure calculations predict that La2Re3B7 is a semimetal, which is observed in the electrical resistivity data as measured on single crystals, with behavior obeying the Bloch-Grüneisen model and a room-temperature resistivity ρ300 K of ∼375 μΩ cm. The electronic band structure calculations also suggest that La3Re2B5 is a regular metal. PMID:26812202

  2. Indium Phosphide Nanocrystals Formed in Silica by Sequential Ion Implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Denmark, D.; Ueda, A.; Shao, C. L.; Wu, M. H.; Mu, R.; White, Clark W; Vlahovic, B.; Muntele, C. I.; Ila, Dr. Daryush; Liu, Y. C.

    2005-01-01

    Fused silica substrates were implanted with: (1) phosphorus only, (2) indium only, and (3) phosphorus plus indium ions. Vibrational and electronic characterizations have been performed on the P only and In only samples to obtain an understanding of the thermal annealing behavior in order to obtain a meaningful guide for the fabrication of InP quantum dots (QDs) formed by sequential ion implantation of In and P in SiO{sub 2}. Thermal annealing procedures for InP synthesis have been established and InP quantum dots are confirmed by TEM, XRD and far infrared measurements. Far IR spectra show a single resonance at 323 cm{sup -1} rather than two absorption peaks in its counterpart of bulk InP crystals. The single band absorption is attributed to the surface phonon of InP quantum dots which will appear between transverse optical (TO) and longitudinal optical (LO) phonon modes of the bulk.

  3. Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, A.S.; Chu, J.-H.; Toney, M.F.; Geballe, T.H.; Fisher, I.R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2010-02-15

    The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

  4. Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, A.S.

    2010-05-03

    The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

  5. Absorption of ac fields in amorphous indium-oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovadyahu, Z.

    2014-08-01

    Absorption data from applied ac fields in Anderson-localized amorphous indium-oxide (InxO) films are shown to be frequency and disorder dependent. The absorption shows a roll-off at a frequency which is much lower than the electron-electron scattering rate of the material when it is in the diffusive regime. This is interpreted as evidence for discreteness of the energy spectrum of the deeply localized regime. This is consistent with recent many-body localization scenarios. As the metal-insulator transition is approached, the absorption shifts to higher frequencies. Comparing with the previously obtained results on the crystalline version of indium-oxide (In2O3-x) implies a considerably higher inelastic electron-phonon scattering rate in the amorphous material. The range over which the absorption versus frequency decreases may indicate that a wide distribution of localization length is a common feature in these systems.

  6. Determination of series resistance of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving

    1991-01-01

    The series resistance of a solar cell is an important parameter, which must be minimized to achieve high cell efficiencies. The cell series resistance is affected by the starting material, its design, and processing. The theoretical approach proposed by Jia, et. al., is used to calculate the series resistance of indium phosphide solar cells. It is observed that the theoretical approach does not predict the series resistance correctly in all cases. The analysis was modified to include the use of effective junction ideality factor. The calculated results were compared with the available experimental results on indium phosphide solar cells processed by different techniques. It is found that the use of process dependent junction ideality factor leads to better estimation of series resistance. An accurate comprehensive series resistance model is warranted to give proper feedback for modifying the cell processing from the design state.

  7. Oxygen-free atomic layer deposition of indium sulfide

    DOEpatents

    Martinson, Alex B.; Hock, Adam S.; McCarthy, Robert; Weimer, Matthew S.

    2016-07-05

    A method for synthesizing an In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor including cooling a mixture comprised of diisopropylcarbodiimide and diethyl ether to approximately -30.degree. C., adding methyllithium drop-wise into the mixture, allowing the mixture to warm to room temperature, adding indium(III) chloride as a solid to the mixture to produce a white solid, dissolving the white solid in pentane to form a clear and colorless solution, filtering the mixture over a celite plug, and evaporating the solution under reduced pressure to obtain a solid In(III) N,N'-diisopropylacetamidinate precursor. This precursor has been further used to develop a novel atomic layer deposition technique for indium sulfide by dosing a reactor with the precursor, purging with nitrogen, dosing with dilute hydrogen sulfide, purging again with nitrogen, and repeating these steps to increase growth.

  8. Preparation Of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Films For Solar Cells

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.; Contreras, Miguel A.; Keane, James; Tennant, Andrew L. , Tuttle, John R.; Ramanathan, Kannan; Noufi, Rommel

    1998-08-08

    High quality thin films of copper-indium-gallium-diselenide useful in the production of solar cells are prepared by electrodepositing at least one of the constituent metals onto a glass/Mo substrate, followed by physical vapor deposition of copper and selenium or indium and selenium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film to approximately Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2. Using an AC voltage of 1-100 KHz in combination with a DC voltage for electrodeposition improves the morphology and growth rate of the deposited thin film. An electrodeposition solution comprising at least in part an organic solvent may be used in conjunction with an increased cathodic potential to increase the gallium content of the electrodeposited thin film.

  9. Preparation and photoluminescence study of mesoporous indium hydroxide nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Changyu; Lian, Suoyuan; Liu, Yang; Liu, Shouxin; Kang, Zhenhui

    2010-02-15

    Mesoporous indium hydroxide nanorods were successfully synthesized by a mild one-step one-pot method. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy with selected area electron diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption, ultraviolet-visible absorption and photoluminescence, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy showed that there were some pores in the samples, which were mainly composed of rod-like shapes with length of 300 nm and diameter of 90 nm. N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption measurements confirmed that the prepared powder was mesoporous with average pore diameter of 3.1 nm. The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy analysis indicated that the band gap energy of the samples was 5.15 eV. Photoluminescence spectrum showed that there were two strong emissions under ultraviolet light irradiation. The growth mechanism of indium hydroxide nanorods and the role of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide were also discussed.

  10. Pressed boride cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolski, W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of emission cathodes made from lanthanum, yttrium, and gadolinium hexaborides are presented. Maximum thermal emission was obtained from lanthanum hexaboride electrodes. The hexaboride cathodes operated stably under conditions of large current density power draw, at high voltages and poor vacuum. A microtron electron gun with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode is described.

  11. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy in Wegener's granulomatosis involving the spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Morayati, S.J.; Fink-Bennett, D.

    1986-12-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 44-yr-old man to exclude an occult abscess. Four- and twenty-four-hour images of the abdomen revealed splenic photopenia except for a rim of activity medially. A subsequent computed tomography (CT) study demonstrated necrosis or hemorrhage of the spleen except for a medial rim. Exploratory laparotomy demonstrated necrotizing vasculitis with granuloma formation consistent with Wegener's granulomatosis and a rim of viable splenic tissue corresponding to the radionuclide and CT studies.

  12. Indium Helps Strengthen Al/Cu/Li Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, Linda B.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments on Al/Cu/Li alloys focus specifically on strengthening effects of minor additions of In and Cd. Indium-bearing alloy combines low density with ability to achieve high strength through heat treatment alone. Tensile tests on peak-aged specimens indicated that alloy achieved yield strength approximately 15 percent higher than baseline alloy. Alloy highly suitable for processing to produce parts of nearly net shape, with particular applications in aircraft and aerospace vehicles.

  13. Effect of strain on indium incorporation in heteroepitaxial (indium, gallium) nitride nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewoldt, David A.

    2011-12-01

    One of the challenges facing LED lighting today is the achievement of low-cost true white lighting. Ideally, multiple LEDs of different colors, blue, red and green, would be utilized in order to achieve white light. Currently, the quality of green LEDs is low when compared to the red and blue counterparts. Green emission from LEDs is difficult to achieve due to phase segregation that occurs during growth of the (In,Ga)N LED structure, which separates into compositions of high and low InN concentration and prevents the moderate composition required for green emission. On the nanoscale, strain effects in the (In,Ga)N material system give rise to shifts in optical properties. Relieving strain allows for the incorporation of additional indium nitride, which shifts the wavelength of light emitted by the structure. In order to control strain effects, growth templates were fabricated by several methods (PAA, FIB, EBL). A robust process for fabrication of pores down to 25 nm in diameter has been developed in order to investigate this effect. From this process, a template using e-beam lithography has been created and then growth of (In,Ga)N on this template in a metallorganic chemical vapor deposition system was performed. As (In,Ga)N grows from the GaN substrate, it is naturally strained due to the lattice mismatch. Lateral growth out of the templates relieves strain by allowing the rods to expand as they grow out of the prepared pores. The effect of the diameter of pores on the emission characteristics has been analyzed and a strong logarithmic trend was discovered correlating emission wavelength to pore diameter. In addition to allowing control over the wavelength of emission based on pore diameter, the process that has been developed and demonstrated will allow a distribution of pore sizes that could facilitate color mixing.

  14. Polycrystalline indium phosphide on silicon by indium assisted growth in hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Sun, Yan-Ting; Pietralunga, Silvia M.; Zani, Maurizio; Tagliaferri, Alberto; Lourdudoss, Sebastian

    2014-07-01

    Polycrystalline InP was grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by using indium (In) metal as a starting material in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. In metal was deposited on silicon substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The deposited In resulted in islands of different size and was found to be polycrystalline in nature. Different growth experiments of growing InP were performed, and the growth mechanism was investigated. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, Scanning Auger microscopy for surface and compositional analyses, powder X-ray diffraction for crystallinity, and micro photoluminescence for optical quality assessment were conducted. It is shown that the growth starts first by phosphidisation of the In islands to InP followed by subsequent selective deposition of InP in HVPE regardless of the Si substrate orientation. Polycrystalline InP of large grain size is achieved and the growth rate as high as 21 μm/h is obtained on both substrates. Sulfur doping of the polycrystalline InP was investigated by growing alternating layers of sulfur doped and unintentionally doped InP for equal interval of time. These layers could be delineated by stain etching showing that enough amount of sulfur can be incorporated. Grains of large lateral dimension up to 3 μm polycrystalline InP on Si with good morphological and optical quality is obtained. The process is generic and it can also be applied for the growth of other polycrystalline III-V semiconductor layers on low cost and flexible substrates for solar cell applications.

  15. Polycrystalline indium phosphide on silicon by indium assisted growth in hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Metaferia, Wondwosen; Sun, Yan-Ting Lourdudoss, Sebastian; Pietralunga, Silvia M.; Zani, Maurizio; Tagliaferri, Alberto

    2014-07-21

    Polycrystalline InP was grown on Si(001) and Si(111) substrates by using indium (In) metal as a starting material in hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) reactor. In metal was deposited on silicon substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The deposited In resulted in islands of different size and was found to be polycrystalline in nature. Different growth experiments of growing InP were performed, and the growth mechanism was investigated. Atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, Scanning Auger microscopy for surface and compositional analyses, powder X-ray diffraction for crystallinity, and micro photoluminescence for optical quality assessment were conducted. It is shown that the growth starts first by phosphidisation of the In islands to InP followed by subsequent selective deposition of InP in HVPE regardless of the Si substrate orientation. Polycrystalline InP of large grain size is achieved and the growth rate as high as 21 μm/h is obtained on both substrates. Sulfur doping of the polycrystalline InP was investigated by growing alternating layers of sulfur doped and unintentionally doped InP for equal interval of time. These layers could be delineated by stain etching showing that enough amount of sulfur can be incorporated. Grains of large lateral dimension up to 3 μm polycrystalline InP on Si with good morphological and optical quality is obtained. The process is generic and it can also be applied for the growth of other polycrystalline III–V semiconductor layers on low cost and flexible substrates for solar cell applications.

  16. Crystalline Indium Sulphide thin film by photo accelerated deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhanya, A. C.; Preetha, K. C.; Deepa, K.; Remadevi, T. L.

    2015-02-01

    Indium sulfide thin films deserve special attention because of its potential application as buffer layers in CIGS based solar cells. Highly transparent indium sulfide (InS) thin films were prepared using a novel method called photo accelerated chemical deposition (PCD). Ultraviolet source of 150 W was used to irradiate the solution. Compared to all other chemical methods, PCD scores its advantage for its low cost, flexible substrate and capable of large area of deposition. Reports on deposition of high quality InS thin films at room temperature are very rare in literature. The precursor solution was initially heated to 90°C for ten minutes and then deposition was carried out at room temperature for two hours. The appearance of the film changed from lemon yellow to bright yellow as the deposition time increased. The sample was characterized for its structural and optical properties. XRD profile showed the polycrystalline behavior of the film with mixed phases having crystallite size of 17 nm. The surface morphology of the films exhibited uniformly distributed honey comb like structures. The film appeared to be smooth and the value of extinction coefficient was negligible. Optical measurements showed that the film has more than 80% transmission in the visible region. The direct band gap energy was 2.47eV. This method is highly suitable for the synthesis of crystalline and transparent indium sulfide thin films and can be used for various photo voltaic applications.

  17. Effect of preparation conditions on physic-chemical properties of tin-doped nanocrystalline indium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovskaya, T. D.; Sachkov, V. I.; Zhek, V. V.; Nefedov, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigation of phase formation and change of concentration of free electrons (Ne) in indium tin oxide system during heat treatment of coprecipitated hydroxides of indium and tin from nitric and hydrochloric solutions and also, for comparison melts of salts nitrates by an alkaline reactant (NH4OH) are considered.The performed investigation allowed to set the optimal condition of preparation of polycrystalline tin-doped indium oxide with maximal electron concentration.

  18. Optimization of indium bump preparation in infrared focal plane array fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Zhijin; Si, Junjie; Wang, Wei; Wang, Haizhen; Wang, Liwen

    2014-11-01

    Optimization of indium bump preparation in infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) fabrication is presented. Reasons of bringing defective pixels during conventional lift-off and cleanout process in fabrication of indium bump are discussed. IRFPAs are characterized by IRFPA test-bench. Results show that defective pixels of InSb IRFPA are owing to indium bumps connecting through indium residue on the surface of wafer. The characteristic and configuration of defective pixels of InSb IRFPA are given and analyzed. A method of reducing defective pixels through optimizing liftoff and cleanout process in InSb IRFPA is proposed. Results prove that this method is effective.

  19. Method for enhancing the solubility of boron and indium in silicon

    DOEpatents

    Sadigh, Babak; Lenosky, Thomas J.; Diaz de la Rubia, Tomas; Giles, Martin; Caturla, Maria-Jose; Ozolins, Vidvuds; Asta, Mark; Theiss, Silva; Foad, Majeed; Quong, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    A method for enhancing the equilibrium solubility of boron and indium in silicon. The method involves first-principles quantum mechanical calculations to determine the temperature dependence of the equilibrium solubility of two important p-type dopants in silicon, namely boron and indium, under various strain conditions. The equilibrium thermodynamic solubility of size-mismatched impurities, such as boron and indium in silicon, can be raised significantly if the silicon substrate is strained appropriately. For example, for boron, a 1% compressive strain raises the equilibrium solubility by 100% at 1100.degree. C.; and for indium, a 1% tensile strain at 1100.degree. C., corresponds to an enhancement of the solubility by 200%.

  20. Ultrasonic-Assisted Acid Leaching of Indium from Blast Furnace Sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xingmei; Li, Liaosha; Wu, Zhaojin; Lü, Huihong; Lü, Jia

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasonic-assisted acid leaching was used to improve extraction of indium from blast furnace sludge. The effects of solid-liquid ratio, leaching temperature, and leaching time on extraction of indium were investigated and three leaching methods of high temperature acid leaching (HL), ultrasonic acid leaching (UL), and high temperature-ultrasonic acid leaching (HUL) were compared. The results show that extraction of indium increases with leaching time for all the methods. UL exhibits the lowest indium extraction. For HL, extraction of indium reaches 32.6 pct when the leaching time is 4 hours, and after 4 hours, the extraction increases slowly. Leaching temperature has a more positive effect on extraction of indium than ultrasonic. HUL can lead to a higher extraction of indium than high temperature acid leaching and UL, and extraction of indium reaches 40.4 pct when the leaching time is 2 hours. After 2 hours, no obvious increase occurs. HUL not only increases extraction of indium but also reduces the leaching time which can improve production efficiency.

  1. Thermodynamics of Indium Dissolution Behavior in FeO-Bearing Metallurgical Slags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yun Soon; Park, Joo Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Indium solubility in the FeO-SiO2-Al2O3-5CaO-MgOsat slag system was measured at 1573 K (1300 °C) to confirm the thermodynamic dissolution behavior of indium at atm. The indium solubility in FeO-bearing slags increased with increasing oxygen partial pressure and decreased with increasing basicity which is in proportion to the activity of FeO. The dissolution of indium in FeO-bearing slags was confirmed to progress according to the following reaction: The enthalpy change for the dissolution of indium in FeO-bearing slag was about -181 kJ/mol, indicating that indium dissolution is exothermic. The indium solubility in the FeO-SiO2-Al2O3-5CaO-MgOsat slag system was minimized as a function of alumina content at a given FeO/SiO2 ratio, which can be explained by the amphoteric behavior of Al2O3 in the slag system. To improve indium recovery by lowering indium loss to the slag phase during the pyro-recycling of In-containing materials using FeO-bearing metallurgical slags, a lower oxygen potential and lower silica content are highly favorable.

  2. The electronic structure, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of Mo{sub 2}XB{sub 2} and MoX{sub 2}B{sub 4} (X = Fe, Co, Ni) ternary borides

    SciTech Connect

    He, TianWei; Jiang, YeHua E-mail: jfeng@seas.harvard.edu; Zhou, Rong; Feng, Jing E-mail: jfeng@seas.harvard.edu

    2015-08-21

    The mechanical properties, electronic structure and thermodynamic properties of the Mo{sub 2}XB{sub 2} and MoX{sub 2}B{sub 4} (X = Fe, Co, Ni) ternary borides were calculated by first-principles methods. The elastic constants show that these ternary borides are mechanically stable. Formation enthalpy of Mo{sub 2}XB{sub 2} and MoX{sub 2}B{sub 4} (X = Fe, Co, Ni) ternary borides are at the range of −118.09 kJ/mol to −40.14 kJ/mol. The electronic structures and chemical bonding characteristics are analyzed by the density of states. Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} has the largest shear and Young's modulus because of its strong chemical bonding, and the values are 204.3 GPa and 500.3 GPa, respectively. MoCo{sub 2}B{sub 4} shows the lowest degree of anisotropy due to the lack of strong direction in the bonding. The Debye temperature of MoFe{sub 2}B{sub 4} is the largest among the six phases, which means that MoFe{sub 2}B{sub 4} possesses the best thermal conductivity. Enthalpy shows an approximately linear function of the temperature above 300 K. The entropy of these compounds increase rapidly when the temperature is below 450 K. The Gibbs free energy decreases with the increase in temperature. MoCo{sub 2}B{sub 4} has the lowest Gibbs free energy, which indicates the strongest formation ability in Mo{sub 2}XB{sub 2} and MoX{sub 2}B{sub 4} (X = Fe, Co, Ni) ternary borides.

  3. Ternary Borides Cr2AlB2, Cr3AlB4, and Cr4AlB6: The First Members of the Series (CrB2)nCrAl with n = 1, 2, 3 and a Unifying Concept for Ternary Borides as MAB-Phases.

    PubMed

    Ade, Martin; Hillebrecht, Harald

    2015-07-01

    Single crystals of the ternary borides Cr2AlB2, Cr3AlB4, Cr4AlB6, MoAlB, WAlB, Mn2AlB2, and Fe2AlB2 were grown from the elements with an excess of Al. Structures were refined by X-ray methods on the basis of single crystal data. All compounds crystallize in orthorhombic space groups. In each case boron atoms show the typical trigonal prisms BM6. The BM6-units are linked by common rectangular faces forming B-B-bonds. Thus, zigzag chains of boron atoms are obtained for MoAlB, WAlB, and M2AlB2 (M = Cr, Mn, Fe); chains of hexagons for Cr3AlB4; and double chains of hexagons for Cr4AlB6. The same subunits are known for the binary borides CrB, Cr3B4, Cr2B3, and β-WB, too. The boride partial structures are separated by single layers of Al-atoms in the case of the chromium compounds and double layers for WAlB, i.e., W2Al2B2. All crystal structures can be described using a unified building set principle with quadratic 4(4)-nets of metal atoms. The different compositions and crystal structures are obtained by different numbers of metal layers in the corresponding parts according to the formula (MB)2Aly(MB2)x. This principle is an extension of a scheme which was developed for the boridecarbides of niobium. Furthermore, there is a close similarity to the group of ternary carbides MAl(MC)n, so-called MAX-phases. Therefore, they might be named as "MAB-phases". The pronounced two-dimensionality and the mixture of strong covalent and metallic interactions make MAB-phases to promising candidates for interesting material properties. All compositions were confirmed by EDX measurements. Additionally, microhardness measurements were performed. PMID:26069993

  4. Intracellular accumulation of indium ions released from nanoparticles induces oxidative stress, proinflammatory response and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yosuke; Sonoda, Akinari; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Makita, Yoji; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Horie, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Due to the widespread use of indium tin oxide (ITO), it is important to investigate its effect on human health. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of ITO nanoparticles (NPs), indium chloride (InCl3) and tin chloride (SnCl3) using human lung epithelial A549 cells. Transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were employed to study cellular ITO NP uptake. Interestingly, greater uptake of ITO NPs was observed, as compared with soluble salts. ITO NP species released could be divided into two types: 'indium release ITO' or 'tin release ITO'. We incubated A549 cells with indium release ITO, tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2 and investigated oxidative stress, proinflammatory response, cytotoxicity and DNA damage. We found that intracellular reactive oxygen species were increased in cells incubated with indium release ITO, but not tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2. Messenger RNA and protein levels of the inflammatory marker, interleukin-8, also increased following exposure to indium release ITO. Furthermore, the alkaline comet assay revealed that intracellular accumulation of indium ions induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that the accumulation of ionic indium, but not ionic tin, from ITO NPs in the intracellular matrix has extensive cellular effects. PMID:26378248

  5. Synthesis and use of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium and indium

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2000-01-01

    Salts of (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are described. The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions have the formula [ER'R"R'"F].sup..crclbar. wherein E is aluminum, gallium, or indium, wherein F is fluorine, and wherein R', R", and R'" is each a fluorinated phenyl, fluorinated biphenyl, or fluorinated polycyclic group.

  6. Indium phosphide space solar cell research: Where we are and where we are going

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Flood, D. J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1995-01-01

    Indium phosphide is considered to be a strong contender for many photovoltaic space applications because of its radiation resistance and its potential for high efficiency. An overview of recent progress is presented, and possible future research directions for indium phosphide space solar cells are discussed. The topics considered include radiation damage studies and space flight experiments.

  7. Materials recovery from waste liquid crystal displays: A focus on indium.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Danilo; Forte, Federica; De Carolis, Roberta; Grosso, Mario

    2015-11-01

    In the present work the recovery of indium and of the polarizing film from waste liquid crystal displays was experimentally investigated in the laboratory. First of all, the polarizing film was removed by employing a number of different techniques, including thermal and chemical treatments. Leaching of indium was then performed with HCl 6N, which allowed solubilisation of approximately 90% In (i.e. 260 mg In per kg of glass) at room temperature, without shredding. Indium recovery from the aqueous phase was then investigated through solvent extraction with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based aqueous biphasic systems. Indium extraction tests through the PEG-ammonium sulphate-water system were conducted as a function of PEG concentration, salt concentration and molecular weight of PEG, using 1,10 phenanthroline as a ligand. The experimental results demonstrated that indium partitioning between the bottom (salt-rich) and the top (PEG-rich) phase is quite independent on the composition of the system, since 80-95% indium is extracted in the bottom phase and 5-20% in the top phase; it was also found that when PEG concentration is increased, the ratio between the bottom and the upper phase volumes decreases, resulting in an increase of indium concentration in the bottom phase (at [PEG]=25% w/w, indium concentration in the bottom phase is ∼30% higher than the initial concentration before the extraction). PMID:26239936

  8. Ab initio calculation of the thermal conductivity of indium antimonide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Alonso L.; Xu, Bin; Hellman, Olle; Romero, Aldo H.; Verstraete, Matthieu J.

    2014-12-01

    A theoretical study based on the density functional theory and the temperature-dependent effective potential method is performed to analyze the changes in the phonon band structure as a function of temperature for indium antimonide. In particular, we show changes in the thermal expansion coefficient and the thermal resistivity that agree rather well with experimental measurements. From the theoretical side, we show a weak dependence with respect to the chosen thermostat used to obtain the inter-atomic force constants, which strengthens our conclusions.

  9. Hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon electrodes connected by indium phosphide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P.; VJ, Logeeswaran; Saif Islam, M.; Li, Xuema; Straznicky, Joseph; Wang, Shih-Yuan; Stanley Williams, R.; Chen, Yong

    2007-09-01

    The authors report the connection of two planar hydrogenated silicon (Si:H) electrodes by intersecting and bridging indium phosphide nanowires (InP NWs). A simple metal-semiconductor-metal photoconductor was used as a test vehicle to measure electrical and optical characteristics of the connected InP NWs. This implementation of III-V compound semiconductor nanowires on Si:H combines the characteristics of a direct bandgap semiconductor with the flexible fabrication processes of non-single-crystal silicon platforms that do not require single-crystal substrates.

  10. Liquid phase synthesis of copper indium diselenide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Jakhmola, Priyanka; Agarwal, Garima; Jha, Prafulla K.; Bhatnagar, S. P.

    2014-04-24

    Nanoparticles of Copper Indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}), belongs to I-III-VI{sub 2} family has been synthesized via liquid phase route using ethylenediamine as a solvent. Characterization of as-grown particles is done by XRD, HRTEM, DLS, optical microscopy and UV-Vis spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction pattern confirmed that the CuInSe2 nanoparticles obtained reveals chalcopyrite structure. Particle size evaluated from dynamic light scattering of as grown particle possessing radius of 90 nm. The bandgap of 1.05eV is obtained from UV-Vis spectrum which will applicable to the solar cell devices.

  11. Study of indium tin oxide films exposed to atomic axygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Paul G.; De, Bhola N.; Woollam, John A.; Coutts, T. J.; Li, X.

    1989-01-01

    A qualitative simulation of the effects of atomic oxygen has been conducted on indium tin oxide (ITO) films prepared by dc sputtering onto room-temperature substrates, by exposing them to an RF-excited oxygen plasma and characterizing the resulting changes in optical, electrical, and structural properties as functions of exposure time with ellipsometry, spectrophotometry, resistivity, and X-ray measurements. While the films thus exposed exhibit reduced resistivity and optical transmission; both of these effects, as well as partial crystallization of the films, may be due to sample heating by the plasma. Film resistivity is found to stabilize after a period of exposure.

  12. Detection of deep venous thrombosis by indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Alonzo, W.A. Jr.; Alavi, A.

    1986-05-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte ((/sup 111/In)WBC) scintigraphy has been used successfully for detection of inflammation. Occasionally, noninflammatory collections of white blood cells such as hematomas or hemorrhage have been localized. We report a case in which unsuspected femoral deep venous thrombosis was diagnosed on an (/sup 111/In)WBC leukocyte scan performed for detection of osteomyelitis. Readers are advised to avoid interpreting all vascular (/sup 111/In)WBC localization as necessarily infectious. This may be of particular significance in patients with vascular grafts.

  13. Radiation damage in proton irradiated indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    1986-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells exposed to 10 MeV proton irradiations were found to have significantly greater radiation resistance than either GaAs or Si. Performance predictions were obtained for two proton dominated orbits and one in which both protons and electrons were significant cell degradation factors. Array specific power was calculated using lightweight blanket technology, a SEP array structure, and projected cell efficiencies. Results indicate that arrays using fully developed InP cells should out-perform those using GaAs or Si in orbits where radiation is a significant cell degradation factor.

  14. Indium phosphide solar cells for laser power beaming applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Lasers can be used to transmit power to photovoltaic cells. Solar cell efficiencies are enhanced significantly under monochromatic light, and therefore a laser beam of proper wavelength could be a very effective source of illumination for a solar array operating at very high efficiencies. This work reviews the modeling studies made on indium phosphide solar cells for such an application. These cells are known to be very radiation resistant and have a potential for high efficiency. Effects of cell series resistance, laser intensity, and temperature on cell performance have been discussed.

  15. Size-dependent electrical conductivity of indium zinc oxide deposited by RF magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Heo, Young-Woo; Pearton, S J; Norton, D P

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the size-dependent electrical conductivities of indium zinc oxide stripes with different widths from 50 nm to 4 microm and with the same thickness of 50 nm deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. The size of the indium zinc oxide stripes was controlled by e-beam lithography. The distance of the two Ti/Au Ohmic electrodes along the indium zinc oxide stripes was kept constant at 25 microm. The electrical conductivity decreased as the size of the indium zinc oxide stripes decreased below a critical width (80 nm). The activation energy, derived from the electric conductivity versus temperature measurement, was dependent on the dimensions of indium zinc oxide stripes. These results can be understood as stemming from surface charge trapping from the absorption of oxygen and/or water vapor, which leads to an increase in the energy difference between the conduction energy band and the Fermi energy. PMID:22849102

  16. Sputtering of the gallium-indium eutectic alloy in the liquid phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumke, M. F.; Tombrello, T. A.; Weller, R. A.; Housley, R. M.; Cirlin, E. H.

    1983-01-01

    Watson and Haff (1980) have discussed a theory which is designed to explain quantitatively isotopic fractionation effects observed during sputtering of simple or complex targets. This theory is based on the assumption that most of the atoms sputtered from a surface originate in the top monolayer. The present investigation is mainly concerned with a direct experimental test of that assumption. The sputtering of both solid and liquid phases of gallium, indium, and the gallium-indium eutectic alloy is studied. Results obtained with the aid of ion scattering and Auger spectroscopy show that, in agreement with rough theoretical expectations, the surface monolayer of a gallium-indium alloy with 16.5 percent indium in bulk contains more than 94 percent indium, while the next layer can be only slightly enriched.

  17. Limitations of indium leukocyte imaging for the diagnosis of spine infections

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, J.L.; Brown, M.L.; McLeod, R.; Fitzgerald, R.H. Jr. )

    1991-02-01

    The usefulness of indium-111 white blood cell (WBC) scintigraphy in the detection of spine sepsis was studied in 22 patients who had open or percutaneous biopsies for microbiologic diagnosis. The indium images in 18 patients with vertebral infection were falsely negative in 15 (83%) and truly positive in 3 (17%). All four patients with negative cultures and histology had true-negative scans. The indium-111 WBC imaging results yielded a sensitivity of 17%, a specificity of 100%, and an accuracy rate of 31%. Prior antibiotic therapy was correlated with a high incidence of false-negative scans and photon-deficient indium-111 WBC uptake. The usefulness of indium-111 WBC scintigraphy for the diagnosis of vertebral infection may be limited to those patients who have not been treated with antibiotics previously.

  18. The study of selective heating of indium bump in MCT infrared focal plane array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Cao, Lan; Zhuang, Fulong; Hu, Xiaoning; Gong, Haimei

    2012-10-01

    Generally the electrical interconnectivity between The Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) infrared focal plane array (IRFPA) device and circuit takes the flip chip technology using indium bump as a connection medium. In order to improve the reliability of the interconnectivity indium melting is a common packaging technique at present. This technique is called reflow soldering. The heating is transferred to the indium bump by heating the device and circuit. This heating process will persist about 10 minutes resulting in the MCT material going through a 10 minutes high temperature baking course. This baking process will strongly degenerate the characteristic of the MCT device. Under this circumstance this article gives a new heating technique for indium bump which is call induction heating melting technique. This method realizes the selective heating. While the indium bump is melted by the conduction heating the semiconductor material such as MCT can't be heated.

  19. Effect of doping of tin on optoelectronic properties of indium oxide: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Madhvendra Nath

    2015-06-24

    Indium tin oxide is widely used transparent conductor. Experimentally observed that 6% tin doping in indium oxide is suitable for optoelectronic applications and more doping beyond this limit degrades the optoelectronic property. The stoichiometry (In{sub 32-x}Sn{sub x}O{sub 48+x/2}; x=0-6) is taken to understand the change in lattice parameter, electronic structure, and optical property of ITO. It is observed that lattice parameter increases and becomes constant after 6% tin doping that is in good agreement of the experimental observation. The electronic structure calculation shows that the high tin doping in indium oxide adversely affects the dispersive nature of the bottom of conduction band of pure indium oxide and decreases the carrier mobility. Optical calculations show that transmittance goes down upto 60% for the tin concentration more than 6%. The present paper shows that how more than 6% tin doping in indium oxide adversely affects the optoelectronic property of ITO.

  20. Synthesis and structure of undoped and indium-doped thermoelectric lead telluride nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Undoped and indium (In)-doped lead telluride (PbTe) nanostructures were synthesized via solvothermal/hydrothermal route. The crystalline structure of the as-prepared undoped and In-doped PbTe samples was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) which indicated the formation of face-centered single-phase cubic crystal. A first principle calculation on indium doping shows that the indium atoms are more likely to replace lead (Pb) rather than to take the interstitial sites. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis confirms that indium is incorporated into the PbTe matrix of the indium-doped PbTe samples. The effects of surfactant and synthesis temperature on the structure and morphology of the undoped PbTe were also investigated; it was found that PbTe nanostructures synthesized with the addition of surfactants exhibited uniform shapes and their size increased with the synthesis temperature. PMID:24872808

  1. Effects of a powered air-purifying respirator intervention on indium exposure reduction and indium related biomarkers among ITO sputter target manufacturing workers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hung-Hsin; Chen, Chang-Yuh; Lan, Cheng-Hang; Chang, Cheng-Ping; Peng, Chiung-Yu

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs) worn by the workers, and to investigate the effect of this application on exposure and preclinical effects in terms of workplace measuring and biomarker monitoring in ITO sputter target manufacturing plants and workers, respectively. Fifty-four workers were recruited and investigated from 2010-2012, during which PAPRs were provided to on-site workers in September 2011. Each worker completed questionnaires and provided blood and urine samples for analysis of biomarkers of indium exposure and preclinical effects. Area and personal indium air samples were randomly collected from selected worksites and from participants. The penetration percentage of the respirator (concentration inside respirator divided by concentration outside respirator) was 6.6%. Some biomarkers, such as S-In, SOD, GPx, GST, MDA, and TMOM, reflected the decrease in exposure and showed lower levels, after implementation of PAPRs. This study is the first to investigate the efficacy of PAPRs for reducing indium exposure. The measurement results clearly showed that the implementation of PAPRs reduces levels of indium-related biomarkers. These findings have practical applications for minimizing occupational exposure to indium and for managing the health of workers exposed to indium. PMID:26771526

  2. Early Changes in Clinical, Functional, and Laboratory Biomarkers in Workers at Risk of Indium Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Kristin J.; Virji, M. Abbas; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Carey, Brenna; Healey, Terrance; Kreiss, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Occupational exposure to indium compounds, including indium–tin oxide, can result in potentially fatal indium lung disease. However, the early effects of exposure on the lungs are not well understood. Objectives To determine the relationship between short-term occupational exposures to indium compounds and the development of early lung abnormalities. Methods Among indium–tin oxide production and reclamation facility workers, we measured plasma indium, respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function, chest computed tomography, and serum biomarkers of lung disease. Relationships between plasma indium concentration and health outcome variables were evaluated using restricted cubic spline and linear regression models. Measurements and Main Results Eighty-seven (93%) of 94 indium–tin oxide facility workers (median tenure, 2 yr; median plasma indium, 1.0 μg/l) participated in the study. Spirometric abnormalities were not increased compared with the general population, and few subjects had radiographic evidence of alveolar proteinosis (n = 0), fibrosis (n = 2), or emphysema (n = 4). However, in internal comparisons, participants with plasma indium concentrations ≥1.0 μg/l had more dyspnea, lower mean FEV1 and FVC, and higher median serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 and surfactant protein-D levels. Spline regression demonstrated nonlinear exposure response, with significant differences occurring at plasma indium concentrations as low as 1.0 μg/l compared with the reference. Associations between health outcomes and the natural log of plasma indium concentration were evident in linear regression models. Associations were not explained by age, smoking status, facility tenure, or prior occupational exposures. Conclusions In indium–tin oxide facility workers with short-term, low-level exposure, plasma indium concentrations lower than previously reported were associated with lung symptoms, decreased spirometric parameters, and increased serum biomarkers of lung

  3. Theoretical Study of Indium Compounds of Interest for Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardelino, B. H.; Moore, C. E.; Cardelino, C. A.; Frazier, D. O.; Backmann, K. J.

    2000-01-01

    The structural. electronic and therinochemical properties of indium compounds which are of interest in halide transport and organometallic chemical vapor deposition processes have been studied by ab initio and statistical mechanics methods. The compounds reported include: indium halides and hydrides (InF, InCl, InCl3, InH, InH2, InH3); indium clusters (In2, In3); methylindium, dimethylindium, and their hydrogen derivatives [In(CH3), In(CH3)H, In(CH3)H2, In(CH3)2, In(CH3)2H]; dimethyl-indium dimer [In2(CH3)4], trimethyl-indium [In(CH3)3]; dehydrogenated methyl, dimethyl and trimethylindium [In(CH3)2CH2, In(CH3)CH2, In(CH2)], trimethylindium adducts with ammonia, trimethylamine and hydrazine [(CH3)3In:NH3, (CH3)3In:N(CH3)3, (CH3)3In:N(H2)N(H2)]; dimethylamino-indium and methylimino-indium [In(CH3)2(NH2), In(CH3)(NH)]; indium nitride and indium nitride dimer (InN, In2N2), indium phosphide, arsenide and antimonide ([InP, InAs, InSb). The predicted electronic properties are based on density functional theory calculations; the calculated thermodynamic properties are reported following the format of the JANAF (Joint Army, Navy, NASA, Air Force) Tables. Equilibrium compositions at two temperatures (298 and 1000 K) have been analyzed for groups of competing simultaneous reactions.

  4. Recent developments in indium phosphide space solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinker, David J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments and progress in indium phosphide solar cell research for space application are reviewed. Indium phosphide homojunction cells were fabricated in both the n + p and p + n configurations with total area efficiencies of 17.9 and 15.9 percent (air mass 0 and 25 C) respectively. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition, liquid phase epitaxy, ion implantation and diffusion techniques were employed in InP cell fabrication. A theoretical model of a radiation tolerant, high efficiency homojunction cell was developed. A realistically attainable AM0 efficiency of 20.5 percent was calculated using this model with emitter and base doping of 6 x 10 to the 17th power and 5 x 10 to the 16th power/cu cm, respectively. Cells of both configurations were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons and 37 MeV protons. For both proton and electron irradiation, the n + p cells are more radiation resistant at higher fluences than the p + n cells. The first flight module of four InP cells was assembled for the Living Plume Shield III satellite.

  5. Photoluminescence of monovalent indium centres in phosphate glass

    PubMed Central

    Masai, Hirokazu; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okumura, Shun; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Ina, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    Valence control of polyvalent cations is important for functionalization of various kinds of materials. Indium oxides have been used in various applications, such as indium tin oxide in transparent electrical conduction films. However, although metastable In+ (5 s2 configuration) species exhibit photoluminescence (PL), they have attracted little attention. Valence control of In+ cations in these materials will be important for further functionalization. Here, we describe In+ species using PL and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. Three absorption bands in the UV region are attributed to the In+ centre: two weak forbidden bands (1S0 → 3P1, 1S0 → 3P2) and a strong allowed band (1S0 → 1P1). The strongest PL excitation band cannot be attributed to the conventional allowed transition to the singlet excited state. Emission decay of the order of microseconds suggests that radiative relaxation occurs from the triplet excitation state. The XAFS analysis suggests that these In+ species have shorter In–O distances with lower coordination numbers than in In2O3. These results clearly demonstrate that In+ exists in a metastable amorphous network, which is the origin of the observed luminescent properties.

  6. Recent developments in indium phosphide space solar cell research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinker, David J.; Weinberg, Irving

    1987-01-01

    Recent developments and progress in indium phosphide solar cell research for space application are reviewed. Indium phosphide homojunction cells were fabricated in both the n+p and p+n configurations with total area efficiencies of 17.9 and 15.9% (air mass 0 and 25 C) respectively. Organometallic chemical vapor deposition, liquid phase epitaxy, ion implantation and diffusion techniques were employed in InP cell fabrication. A theoretical model of a radiation tolerant, high efficiency homojunction cell was developed. A realistically attainable AMO efficiency of 20.5% was calculated using this model with emitter and base doping of 6 x 10 to the 17th power and 5 x 10 the the 16th power/cu cm respectively. Cells of both configurations were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons and 37 MeV protons. For both proton and electron irradiation, the n+p cells are more radiation resistant at higher fluences than the p+n cells. The first flight module of four InP cells was assembled for the Living Plume Shield III satellite.

  7. Absorption of ac fields in amorphous indium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Ovadyahu, Z.

    2014-08-20

    Absorption data from applied ac fields in Anderson-localized amorphous indium-oxide (In{sub x}O) films are shown to be frequency and disorder dependent. The absorption shows a roll-off at a frequency which is much lower than the electron-electron scattering rate of the material when it is in the diffusive regime. This is interpreted as evidence for discreteness of the energy spectrum of the deeply localized regime. This is consistent with recent many-body localization scenarios. As the metal-insulator transition is approached, the absorption shifts to higher frequencies. Comparing with the previously obtained results on the crystalline version of indium-oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3−x}) implies a considerably higher inelastic electron-phonon scattering rate in the amorphous material. The range over which the absorption versus frequency decreases may indicate that a wide distribution of localization length is a common feature in these systems.

  8. Photoluminescence of monovalent indium centres in phosphate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masai, Hirokazu; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Okumura, Shun; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko; Ina, Toshiaki

    2015-09-01

    Valence control of polyvalent cations is important for functionalization of various kinds of materials. Indium oxides have been used in various applications, such as indium tin oxide in transparent electrical conduction films. However, although metastable In+ (5 s2 configuration) species exhibit photoluminescence (PL), they have attracted little attention. Valence control of In+ cations in these materials will be important for further functionalization. Here, we describe In+ species using PL and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis. Three absorption bands in the UV region are attributed to the In+ centre: two weak forbidden bands (1S0 → 3P1, 1S0 → 3P2) and a strong allowed band (1S0 → 1P1). The strongest PL excitation band cannot be attributed to the conventional allowed transition to the singlet excited state. Emission decay of the order of microseconds suggests that radiative relaxation occurs from the triplet excitation state. The XAFS analysis suggests that these In+ species have shorter In-O distances with lower coordination numbers than in In2O3. These results clearly demonstrate that In+ exists in a metastable amorphous network, which is the origin of the observed luminescent properties.

  9. Solder joint reliability of indium-alloy interconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kozo; Nakanishi, Teru; Karasawa, Kazuaki; Hashimoto, Kaoru; Niwa, Koichi

    1995-01-01

    Recent high-density very large scale integrated (VLSI) interconnections in multichip modules require high-reliability solder interconnection to enable us to achieve small interconnect size andlarge number of input/output terminals, and to minimize soft errors in VLSIs induced by α-particle emission from solder. Lead-free solders such as indium (In)-alloy solders are a possible alternative to conventional lead-tin (Pb-Sn) solders. To realize reliable interconnections using In-alloy solders, fatigue behavior, finite element method (FEM) simulations, and dissolution and reaction between solder and metallization were studied with flip-chip interconnection models. We measured the fatigue life of solder joints and the mechanical properties of solders, and compared the results with a computer simulation based on the FEM. Indium-alloy solders have better mechanical properties for solder joints, and their flip-chip interconnection models showed a longer fatigue life than that of Pb-Sn solder in thermal shock tests between liquid nitrogen and room temperatures. The fatigue characteristics obtained by experiment agree with that given by FEM analysis. Dissolution tests show that Pt film is resistant to dissolution into In solder, indicating that Pt is an adequate barrier layer material for In solder. This test also shows that Au dissolution into the In-Sn solder raises its melting point; however, Ag addition to In-Sn solder prevents melting point rise. Experimental results show that In-alloy solders are suitable for fabricating reliable interconnections.

  10. Anomalous behavior of silver doped indium sulfide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Meril; Jayakrishnan, R.; Ratheesh Kumar, P. M.; Sudha Kartha, C.; Vijayakumar, K. P.; Kashiwaba, Y.; Abe, T.

    2006-08-01

    The effect of doping spray pyrolyzed thin films of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} with silver is discussed. It was observed that silver diffused into In{sub 2}S{sub 3} films in as deposited condition itself. Depth profile using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy clearly showed diffusion of silver into In{sub 2}S{sub 3} layer without any annealing. X-ray analysis revealed significant enhancement in crystallinity and grain size up to an optimum percentage of doping concentration. This optimum value showed dependence on thickness and atomic ratio of indium and sulfur in the film. Band gap decreased up to the optimum value of doping and thereafter it increased. Electrical studies showed a drastic decrease in resistivity from 1.2x10{sup 3} to 0.06 {omega} cm due to doping. A sample having optimum doping was found to be more photosensitive and low resistive when compared with a pristine sample. Improvement in crystallinity, conductivity, and photosensitivity due to doping of spray pyrolyzed In{sub 2}S{sub 3} films with Ag helped to attain efficiency of 9.5% for Ag/In{sub 2}S{sub 3}/CuInS{sub 2}/ITO (indium tin oxide) solar cell.

  11. Stability and crystal chemistry of the ternary borides M2(Ni21-xMx)B6 (M tbnd Ti, Zr, Hf)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artini, C.; Provino, A.; Valenza, F.; Pani, M.; Cacciamani, G.

    2016-01-01

    A crystallochemical study was undertaken to investigate the structural stability and the compositional extent of the ternary borides M2(Ni21-xMx)B6 (M tbnd Ti, Zr, Hf). This phase often occurs during the production of MB2 joints by means of Ni-B brazing alloys. Samples with the nominal compositions M2Ni21B6 and M3Ni20B6 were synthesized by arc melting and characterized by optical and electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Crystal structure refinements were performed by the Rietveld method. The compositional boundaries of the ternary phases were experimentally determined and found strictly related to the M/Ni size ratio. The stability of this structure is mainly determined by the capability of the structure to expand under the effect of the Ni substitution by the M atom. The CALPHAD modeling of the three M-Ni-B ternary systems in the Ni-rich corner of the phase diagram, performed on the basis of the obtained structural data, shows a good agreement with experimental results.

  12. An XPS study of the adherence of refractory carbide, silicide, and boride RF-sputtered wear-resistant coatings. [X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy of steel surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Radio frequency sputtering was used to deposit refractory carbide, silicide, and boride coatings on 440-C steel substrates. Both sputter etched and pre-oxidized substrates were used and the films were deposited with and without a substrate bias. The composition of the coatings was determined as a function of depth by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with argon ion etching. Friction and wear tests were conducted to evaluate coating adherence. In the interfacial region there was evidence that bias may produce a graded interface for some compounds. Biasing, while generally improving bulk film stoichiometry, can adversely affect adherence by removing interfacial oxide layers. Oxides of all film constituents except carbon and iron were present in all cases but the iron oxide coverage was only complete on the preoxidized substrates. The film and iron oxides were mixed in the MoSi2 and Mo2C films but layered in the Mo2B5 films. In the case of mixed oxides, preoxidation enhanced film adherence. In the layered case it did not.

  13. Microstructural Characterization and Wear Behavior of Nano-Boride Dispersed Coating on AISI 304 Stainless Steel by Hybrid High Velocity Oxy-Fuel Spraying Laser Surface Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prashant; Majumdar, Jyotsna Dutta

    2015-07-01

    The current study concerns the detailed microstructural characterization and investigation of wear behavior of nano-boride dispersed coating developed on AISI 304 stainless steel by high velocity oxy-fuel spray deposition of nickel-based alloy and subsequent laser melting. There is a significant refinement and homogenization of microstructure with improvement in microhardness due to laser surface melting (1200 VHN as compared to 945 VHN of as-sprayed and 250 VHN of as-received substrate). The high temperature phase stability of the as-coated and laser melted surface has been studied by differential scanning calorimeter followed by detailed phase analysis at room and elevated temperature. There is a significant improvement in wear resistance of laser melted surface as compared to as-sprayed and the as-received one due to increased hardness and reduced coefficient of friction. The mechanism of wear has been investigated in details. Corrosion resistance of the coating in a 3.56 wt pct NaCl solution is significantly improved (4.43 E-2 mm/year as compared to 5 E-1 mm/year of as-sprayed and 1.66 mm/year of as-received substrate) due to laser surface melting as compared to as-sprayed surface.

  14. Synthesis, crystal structure, and physical properties of a new boride Ga2Ni21B20 with a modified Zn2Ni21B20-type structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Qiang; Gumeniuk, Roman; Schnelle, Walter; Prots, Yurii; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    A ternary boride Ga2Ni21B20, with modified Zn2Ni21B20-type structure (space group I4/mmm, and lattice parameters a = 7.2164(1) Å, c = 14.2715(4) Å), was synthesized from the constituent elements. Single crystal diffraction data reveal Ni at 8f site splitting into 16m position with nearly half occupancy. In this structure, [Ni6B20] cages share ligand boron atoms with [Ga2B4Ni9] hexa-capped square prisms, forming two dimensional layers. Layers are interconnected via Ga-Ni interactions and build up a three-dimensional framework. Quasi-two-dimensional infinite planar nets formed by intercrossed Ni atoms are embedded. Ga2Ni21B20 is a metallic Pauli paramagnet, in agreement with electronic structure calculations, resulting in 8.2 states eV-1 f.u-1 at the Fermi level.

  15. Formation of Flexible and Transparent Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide/Ag/Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Multilayer Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Da-Som; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Yoo, Young-Zo; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Sang-Woo; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the electrical, optical, and bending characteristics of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)/Ag/IGZO (39 nm/19 nm/39 nm) multilayer films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate at room temperature were investigated and compared with those of Sn-doped indium oxide (ITO) (100 nm thick) films. At 500 nm the ITO film transmitted 91.3% and the IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film transmitted 88.8%. The calculated transmittance spectrum of the multilayer film was similar to the experimental result. The ITO film and IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film, respectively, showed carrier concentrations of 1.79 × 1020 and 7.68 × 1021 cm-3 and mobilities of 27.18 cm2/V s and 18.17 cm2/V s. The ITO film had a sheet resistance of 134.9 Ω/sq and the IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film one of 5.09 Ω/sq. Haacke's figure of merit (FOM) was calculated to be 1.94 × 10-3 for the ITO film and 45.02 × 10-3 Ω-1 for the IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film. The resistance change of 100 nm-thick ITO film was unstable even after five cycles, while that of the IGZO/Ag/IGZO film was constant up to 1000 cycles.

  16. Formation of Flexible and Transparent Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide/Ag/Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide Multilayer Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Ho; Kim, Da-Som; Kim, Sun-Kyung; Yoo, Young-Zo; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Sang-Woo; Seong, Tae-Yeon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the electrical, optical, and bending characteristics of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO)/Ag/IGZO (39 nm/19 nm/39 nm) multilayer films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate at room temperature were investigated and compared with those of Sn-doped indium oxide (ITO) (100 nm thick) films. At 500 nm the ITO film transmitted 91.3% and the IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film transmitted 88.8%. The calculated transmittance spectrum of the multilayer film was similar to the experimental result. The ITO film and IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film, respectively, showed carrier concentrations of 1.79 × 1020 and 7.68 × 1021 cm-3 and mobilities of 27.18 cm2/V s and 18.17 cm2/V s. The ITO film had a sheet resistance of 134.9 Ω/sq and the IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film one of 5.09 Ω/sq. Haacke's figure of merit (FOM) was calculated to be 1.94 × 10-3 for the ITO film and 45.02 × 10-3 Ω-1 for the IGZO/Ag/IGZO multilayer film. The resistance change of 100 nm-thick ITO film was unstable even after five cycles, while that of the IGZO/Ag/IGZO film was constant up to 1000 cycles.

  17. Pillar Initiated Growth of High Indium Content Bulk Indium Gallium Nitride to Improve the Material Quality for Photonic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFelea, Heather Dale

    The goal of this research was to reduce dislocations and strain in high indium content bulk InGaN to improve quality for optical devices. In an attempt to achieve this goal, InGaN pillars were grown with compositions that matched the composition of the bulk InGaN grown on top. Pillar height and density were optimized to facilitate coalescence on top of the pillars. It was expected that dislocations within the pillars would bend to side facets, thereby reducing the dislocation density in the bulk overgrowth, however this was not observed. It was also expected that pillars would be completely relaxed at the interface with the substrate. It was shown that pillars are mostly relaxed, but not completely. Mechanisms are proposed to explain why threading dislocations did not bend and how complete relaxation may have been achieved by mechanisms outside of interfacial misfit dislocation formation. Phase separation was not observed by TEM but may be related to the limitations of the sample or measurements. High indium observed at facets and stacking faults could be related to the extra photoluminescence peaks measured. This research focused on the InGaN pillars and first stages of coalescence on top of the pillars, saving bulk growth and device optimization for future research.

  18. Regularly arranged indium islands on glass/molybdenum substrates upon femtosecond laser and physical vapor deposition processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringleb, F.; Eylers, K.; Teubner, Th.; Boeck, T.; Symietz, C.; Bonse, J.; Andree, S.; Krüger, J.; Heidmann, B.; Schmid, M.; Lux-Steiner, M.

    2016-03-01

    A bottom-up approach is presented for the production of arrays of indium islands on a molybdenum layer on glass, which can serve as micro-sized precursors for indium compounds such as copper-indium-gallium-diselenide used in photovoltaics. Femtosecond laser ablation of glass and a subsequent deposition of a molybdenum film or direct laser processing of the molybdenum film both allow the preferential nucleation and growth of indium islands at the predefined locations in a following indium-based physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. A proper choice of laser and deposition parameters ensures the controlled growth of indium islands exclusively at the laser ablated spots. Based on a statistical analysis, these results are compared to the non-structured molybdenum surface, leading to randomly grown indium islands after PVD.

  19. Growth of indium oxide nanowalls on patterned conducting substrates: towards direct fabrication of gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changlong; Wei, Yuling; Sun, Guoxin; Shao, Baiqi

    2012-05-01

    Nanowall materials are ideal two-dimensional structures with high surface-to-volume ratios and open edge geometries. We first report on the growth and characterization of indium oxide nanowalls on transparent and conducting indium tin oxide substrates. The nanosheets that compose the nanowalls are single-crystalline and are approximately 8 nm in thickness. The density and the lateral dimensions of the nanosheets on the substrate can be controlled by the growth time. Adopting a bridgework-like strategy, we directly construct indium oxide nanowall gas sensors on the patterned indium tin oxide substrates. The pattern lines on the substrates are etched using transparent plastic adhesive tape as shadow mask, which is both simple and cheap in comparison with the conventional photolithography technique. The sensors exhibit fast response/recovery behavior and good reproducibility to NO(2) gas under mild testing conditions, such as room temperature, ambient pressure, dry air background, and 1.5 V dc bias, and can achieve a detection limit as low as 50 ppb. We propose an assumption that the gas adsorption is composed of deep adsorption and probe adsorption to explain the interesting gas-sensing behavior of the indium oxide nanowalls. We suggest that the work reported herein, including the facile growth of indium oxide nanowalls, the bridgework-like strategy to directly construct electronic devices, and the high gas-sensing performance of the indium oxide nanowalls sensors, is a significant step towards the real applications of novel semiconductor nanostructures. PMID:22328146

  20. 111Indium labeling of hepatocytes for analysis of short-term biodistribution of transplanted cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Lee, C D; Vemuru, R P; Bhargava, K K

    1994-03-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is useful for ex vivo gene therapy and liver repopulation. Methods for hepatic reconstitution have recently been developed but optimization of hepatocyte transplantation systems is necessary. To develop systems for noninvasive assessment of the biodistribution of transplanted cells, we labeled hepatocytes with 111indium-oxine. Our initial studies showed that hepatocytes incorporated 111indium-oxine with an efficiency of approximately 20%. After labeling, cell viability was unchanged and 111indium was present in hepatocytes after overnight culture, as well as after intrasplenic transplantation. Transplanted cells were successfully localized by means of scintigraphic imaging. The scintigraphic patterns of cell distribution were different when hepatocytes were transplanted by means of either spleen or internal jugular vein, which deposit cells into separate vascular beds. Quantitative analysis of the biodistribution of 111indium-labeled hepatocytes indicated that within 2 hr of intrasplenic transplantation, cells were predominantly localized in liver and spleen, and occasionally in lungs. To determine whether the rate of intrasplenic cell injection influenced translocation of hepatocytes, we transplanted cells in normal rats. Despite intrasplenic cell injection at a variety of rates, organ-specific distribution of 111indium-labeled hepatocytes remained unchanged. Labeling with 111indium did not affect long-term survival of transplanted hepatocytes. These results indicate that 111indium-labeling of hepatocytes should greatly assist noninvasive analysis in the short-term of the biodistribution of transplanted hepatocytes. PMID:8119703

  1. Optimizing galvanic pulse plating parameters to improve indium bump to bump bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Jonathan J.; Rowen, Adam; Mani, Seethambal S.; Yelton, W. Graham; Arrington, Christian; Gillen, Rusty; Hollowell, Andrew E.; Okerlund, Daniel; Ionescu, Adrian

    2010-02-01

    The plating characteristics of a commercially available indium plating solution are examined and optimized to help meet the increasing performance demands of integrated circuits requiring substantial numbers of electrical interconnections over large areas. Current fabrication techniques rely on evaporation of soft metals, such as indium, into lift-off resist profiles. This becomes increasingly difficult to accomplish as pitches decrease and aspect ratios increase. To minimize pixel dimensions and maximize the number of pixels per unit area, lithography and electrochemical deposition (ECD) of indium has been investigated. Pulse ECD offers the capability of improving large area uniformity ideal for large area device hybridization. Electrochemical experimentation into lithographically patterned molds allow for large areas of bumps to be fabricated for low temperature indium to indium bonds. The galvanic pulse profile, in conjunction with the bath configuration, determines the uniformity of the plated array. This pulse is manipulated to produce optimal properties for hybridizing arrays of aligned and bonded indium bumps. The physical properties of the indium bump arrays are examined using a white light interferometer, a SEM and tensile pull testing. This paper provides details from the electroplating processes as well as conclusions leading to optimized plating conditions.

  2. Design rule of indium bump in infrared focal plane array for longer cycling life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Meng, Chao; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Yanqiu; Si, Junjie; Meng, Qingduan

    2016-05-01

    In light of the proposed equivalent method, a three-dimensional structural modeling of InSb infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPAs) is created, and the simulated strain distribution is identical to the deformation distribution on the top surface of InSb IRFPAs. After comparing the deformation features at different regions with the structural characteristics of IRFPAs, we infer that the flatness of InSb IRFPAs will be improved with a thinner indium bump array, and this inference is verified by subsequent simulation results. That is, when the diameter of indium bump is smaller than 20 μm, the simulated Z-components of strain on the whole top surface of InSb IRFPAs is uniform, and the deformation amplitude is small. When the diameter of indium bump is larger than 28 μm, the simulated Z-components of strain increases rapidly with the thicker indium bump, and the flatness of InSb IRFPAs is worsened rapidly. According to the changing trend of deformation amplitude with diameters of indium bump, and employing element pitches normalization method, a design rule of indium bump is proposed. That is, when the diameter of indium bump is shorter than 0.4 times the element pitch, the flatness of InSb IRFPAs is in an acceptable range. This design rule was supported by different IRFPAs with different formats delivered by several main research groups for achieving a longer cycling life.

  3. Amorphous Indium Selenide Thin Films Prepared by RF Sputtering: Thickness-Induced Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Han, Myoung Yoo; Park, Yong Seob; Kim, Nam-Hoon

    2016-05-01

    The influence of indium composition, controlled by changing the film thickness, on the optical and electrical properties of amorphous indium selenide thin films was studied for the application of these materials as Cd-free buffer layers in CI(G)S solar cells. Indium selenide thin films were prepared using RF magnetron sputtering method. The indium composition of the amorphous indium selenide thin films was varied from 94.56 to 49.72 at% by increasing the film thickness from 30 to 70 nm. With a decrease in film thickness, the optical transmittance increased from 87.63% to 96.03% and Eg decreased from 3.048 to 2.875 eV. Carrier concentration and resistivity showed excellent values of ≥1015 cm(-3) and ≤ 10(4) Ω x cm, respectively. The conductivity type of the amorphous indium selenide thin films could be controlled by changing the film-thickness-induced amount of In. These results indicate the possibility of tuning the properties of amorphous indium selenide thin films by changing their composition for use as an alternate buffer layer material in CI(G)S solar cells. PMID:27483886

  4. Indium 111-labeled white blood cell scans after vascular prosthetic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Sedwitz, M.M.; Davies, R.J.; Pretorius, H.T.; Vasquez, T.E.

    1987-11-01

    The clinical value of indium 111-labeled white blood cell (WBC) scanning done after vascular graft procedures was investigated to differentiate noninfectious postoperative inflammation associated with graft incorporation from early prosthetic graft infection. Indium 111-labeled WBC scans were initially obtained in 30 patients before discharge from the hospital and during the subsequent follow-up period (334 days). Fourteen of 30 patients (47%) had normal predischarge scans that included all 10 patients who had grafts confined to the abdomen and 4 of 20 patients (20%) who had grafts arising or terminating at the femoral arteries (p less than 0.05). Sixteen of 30 patients (53%) discharged with abnormal initial indium 111 WBC scans underwent serial scanning until the scan normalized or a graft complication developed. All of the 16 patients had grafts involving the groin region. Abnormal indium 111 uptake in the femoral region continued for a mean 114 days without the development of prosthetic graft infections. The sensitivity of indium 111-labeled WBC scans for detecting wound complications was 100%, whereas the specificity was 50%. Thus, the accuracy of the test was only 53%. We conclude that (1) abnormal indium 111 WBC scans are common after graft operations involving the groin region but are unusual after vascular procedures confined to the abdomen, and (2) in the absence of clinical suspicion, the indium 111-labeled WBC scan does not reliably predict prosthetic graft infection because of the low specificity of the test in the early postoperative period.

  5. Compositional disorder and transport peculiarities in the amorphous indium oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Givan, U.; Ovadyahu, Z.

    2012-10-01

    We present results of the disorder-induced metal-insulator transition (MIT) in three-dimensional amorphous indium-oxide films. The amorphous version studied here differs from the one reported by Shahar and Ovadyahu [Phys. Rev. BPRBMDO1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.46.10917 46, 10917 (1992)] in that it has a much lower carrier concentration. As a measure of the static disorder we use the dimensionless parameter kFℓ. Thermal annealing is employed as the experimental handle to tune the disorder. On the metallic side of the transition, the low temperature transport exhibits weak-localization and electron-electron correlation effects characteristic of disordered electronic systems. These include a fractional power-law conductivity versus temperature behavior anticipated to occur at the critical regime of the transition. The MIT occurs at a kFℓ≈0.3 for both versions of the amorphous material. However, in contrast with the results obtained on the electron-rich version of this system, no sign of superconductivity is seen down to ≈0.3 K even for the most metallic sample used in the current study. This demonstrates that using kFℓ as a disorder parameter for the superconductor-insulator transition (SIT) is an ill defined procedure. A microstructural study of the films, employing high resolution chemical analysis, gives evidence for spatial fluctuations of the stoichiometry. This brings to light that, while the films are amorphous and show excellent uniformity in transport measurements of macroscopic samples, they contain compositional fluctuations that extend over mesoscopic scales. These, in turn, reflect prominent variations of carrier concentrations thus introducing an unusual type of disorder. It is argued that this compositional disorder may be the reason for the apparent violation of the Ioffe-Regel criterion in the two versions of the amorphous indium oxide. However, more dramatic effects due to this disorder are expected when superconductivity sets in, which are

  6. Some studies on successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) grown indium sulphide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Pathan, H.M.; Lokhande, C.D. . E-mail: l_chandrakant@yahoo.com; Kulkarni, S.S.; Amalnerkar, D.P.; Seth, T.; Han, Sung-Hwan . E-mail: shhan@hanyang.ac.kr

    2005-06-15

    Indium sulphide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) thin films were grown on amorphous glass substrate by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. X-ray diffraction, optical absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Rutherford back scattering (RBS) were applied to study the structural, optical, surface morphological and compositional properties of the indium sulphide thin films. Utilization of triethanolamine and hydrazine hydrate complexed indium sulphate and sodium sulphide as precursors resulted in nanocrystalline In{sub 2}S{sub 3} thin film. The optical band gap was found to be 2.7 eV. The film appeared to be smooth and homogeneous from SEM study.

  7. Positron trapping in vacancies in indium doped CdTe crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gély-Sykes, C.; Corbel, C.; Triboulet, R.

    1991-10-01

    In weakly n-type CdTe(In) crystals grown by the travelling heater method, positrons annihilate in vacancy-type defects with a lifetime of 320 ± 4 ps. The concentration of these native defects varies with the concentration of indium and electron in agreement with the model of self-compensation where the indium donors are compensated by indium-vacancy complexes. These defects are assumed to be (V CdIn) - complexes. The positron trapping in these complexes disappears at low temperature. This phenomenon is attributed to competing trapping of positrons by negative ions which are either residual impurities or intrinsic defects.

  8. Local structure of indium oxynitride from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    T-Thienprasert, J.; Onkaw, D.; Rujirawat, S.; Limpijumnong, S.; Nukeaw, J.; Sungthong, A.; Porntheeraphat, S.; Singkarat, S.

    2008-08-04

    Synchrotron x-ray absorption near edge structures (XANES) measurements of In L{sub 3} edge is used in conjunction with first principles calculations to characterize rf magnetron sputtered indium oxynitride at different O contents. Good agreement between the measured and the independently calculated spectra are obtained. Calculations show that the XANES spectra of this alloy are sensitive to the coordination numbers of the In atoms, i.e., fourfold for indium nitride-like structures and sixfold for indium oxide-like structures, but not to the substitution of nearest neighbor N by O or vice versa.

  9. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, Carleton H.; Evans, Jr., Joseph Tate

    1998-01-01

    A method for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100.degree. C. and 300.degree. C. for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer.

  10. Method for restoring the resistance of indium oxide semiconductors after heating while in sealed structures

    DOEpatents

    Seager, C.H.; Evans, J.T. Jr.

    1998-11-24

    A method is described for counteracting increases in resistivity encountered when Indium Oxide resistive layers are subjected to high temperature annealing steps during semiconductor device fabrication. The method utilizes a recovery annealing step which returns the Indium Oxide layer to its original resistivity after a high temperature annealing step has caused the resistivity to increase. The recovery anneal comprises heating the resistive layer to a temperature between 100 C and 300 C for a period of time that depends on the annealing temperature. The recovery is observed even when the Indium Oxide layer is sealed under a dielectric layer. 1 fig.

  11. Highly conductive indium nanowires deposited on silicon by dip-pen nanolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Kozhukhov, Anton; Volodin, Vladimir; Klimenko, Anatoliy; Shcheglov, Dmitriy; Karnaeva, Natalya; Latyshev, Alexander

    2015-04-14

    In this paper, we developed a new dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) method. Using this method, we fabricated conductive nanowires with diameters of 30–50 nm on silicon substrates. To accomplish this, indium was transferred from an atomic force microscopy tip to the surface by applying a potential difference between the tip and substrate. The fabricated indium nanowires were several micrometers in length. Unlike thermal DPN, our DPN method hardly oxidized the indium, producing nanowires with conductivities from 5.7 × 10{sup −3} to 4 × 10{sup −2} Ω cm.

  12. Indium phosphide solar cells - Recent developments and estimated performance in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Irving; Brinker, David J.

    1990-01-01

    The current status of indium phosphide solar cell research is reviewed. In the NASA research program, efficiencies of 18.8 percent were achieved for standard n/p homojunction InP cells while 17 percent was achieved for ITO/InP cells processed by sputtering n-type indium tin oxide onto p-type indium phosphide. The latter represents a cheaper, simpler processing alternative. Computer modeling calculations indicate that efficiencies of over 21 percent are feasible. Relatively large area cells are produced in Japan with a maximum efficiency of 16.6 percent.

  13. Clinical imaging with indium 111 oxine-labeled leukocyte scan: review and case report

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, W.H.; Joseph, W.S.

    1988-04-01

    The clinical use and mechanisms of action of technetium 99m pyrophosphate, gallium 67 citrate, and indium 111 oxine have been presented. The diagnosis of osteomyelitis in the lower extremity can often be made on the basis of clinical, laboratory, and conventional radiographic evaluations. In the case report of diabetic osteolysis, initial evaluations revealed osteomyelitis. The use of scanning involving leukocytes labeled with technetium and indium 111 oxine lessened the possibilities of an osseous infection. Studies show the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of scans using leukocytes labeled with indium 111 oxine to be superior to those of any other form of nucleotide imaging, but further clinical research is needed.20 references.

  14. Low-pressure indium-halide discharges for fluorescent illumination applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Daiyu; Hilbig, Rainer; Körber, Achim; Schwan, Stefan; Scholl, Robert; Boerger, Martin; Huppertz, Maria

    2010-02-01

    Low-pressure gas discharges of molecular radiators were studied for fluorescent lighting applications with a goal of reducing the energy loss due to the large Stokes shift in phosphors of conventional mercury-based fluorescent lamp technology. Indium halides (InCl, InBr, and InI) were chosen as the molecular radiators that generate ultraviolet to blue light emissions. The electrical characteristics and optical emission intensities were measured in discharges containing gaseous indium halides (InCl, InBr, and InI) as molecular radiators. The low-pressure discharges in indium halide vapor showed potential as a highly efficient gas discharge system for fluorescent lighting application.

  15. Indium-111-labeled leukocyte localization in hematomas: a pitfall in abscess detection

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, V.W.; vanSonnenberg, E.; Kipper, S.; Bieberstein, M.P.

    1984-07-01

    Indium-111-labeled white-blood-cell scanning is a useful modality in abscess detection and has replaced gallium scanning in many institutions. Sensitivities of 72% to 90% and specificities of 90% to 100% have been reported. In searching for abscesses seven cases of indium-111-labeled leukocyte uptake were encountered in collections subsequently proved to be noninfected hematomas. Abundant red blood cells with few or no white blood cells, no bacteria, and a benign clinical course identified these noninfected hematomas. Five of the patients were being treated with hemodialysis and three were recent allograft recipients. The results indicate some limitation and nonspecificity in indium-111 scanning, despite its many benefits.

  16. Reversible superconductivity in electrochromic indium-tin oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Ali E.; Xiong, Ka; Cho, Kyeongjae; Salamon, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    Transparent conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films, electrochemically intercalated with sodium or other cations, show tunable superconducting transitions with a maximum Tc at 5 K. The transition temperature and the density of states, D(EF) (extracted from the measured Pauli susceptibility χp) exhibit the same dome shaped behavior as a function of electron density. Optimally intercalated samples have an upper critical field ≈ 4 T and Δ/kBTc ≈ 2.0. Accompanying the development of superconductivity, the films show a reversible electrochromic change from transparent to colored and are partially transparent (orange) at the peak of the superconducting dome. This reversible intercalation of alkali and alkali earth ions into thin ITO films opens diverse opportunities for tunable, optically transparent superconductors.

  17. Synthesis of indium sulphide quantum dots in perfluoronated ionomer membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, R.; Warrier, Anita R.; Vijayan, C.

    2014-01-28

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple and efficient method for synthesis of β-indium sulphide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) nanoparticles embedded in an ionomer matrix (nafion membrane). The influence of reaction temperature on structural, compositional and optical properties of these films were analysed using X-Ray Diffraction, EDAX, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence studies. Average particle diameter was estimated using modified effective mass approximation method. Absorption spectra of In{sub 2}S{sub 3} nanoparticles show blue shift compared to bulk In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, indicating strong quantum size confinement effects. PL emission in the wavelength range 530–600 nm was recorded using a 488 nm line from an Ar{sup +} laser as the excitation source.

  18. Josephson Vortex in Indium Monatomic Superconductor on Silicon Terraces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Takuto; Nagai, Yuki; Yoshizawa, Shunusuke; Kim, Howon; Nakayama, Tomonobu; Hasegawa, Yukio; Uchihashi, Takashi; Hu, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Superconductivity in Indium monatomic layer on a surface of Silicon substrate is intriguing where the terraces and steps exist. Recently, elliptic vortices trapped at steps have been observed by STM/STS measurement under magnetic field. Motivated by this experiment, we clarify the quasiparticle excitation by using Bogoliubov-de Gennes approach. The current distribution and zero energy density of states at vortex core show elliptic shape with longer axis parallel to the step. Moreover, the order parameter is restored at the vortex core. By comparing theoretical results with experiments, we conclude that the recent STS measurement has directly detected Josephson vortex. This work is supported by WPI Initiative on Materials Nanoarchitectonics, MEXT, Japan.

  19. Single-point diamond turning of lead indium phosphate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, S.W.; Cunningham, J.P.; Rajic, S.; Boatner, L.A.; Sales, B.C.

    1996-08-01

    The development of the ability to routinely machine glass materials to optical tolerances is highly desirable and, in particular, could provide new degrees of control over the precise shape of complex and unusual optical surfaces. Of particular interest in this regard is the formation of non-spherical shapes where there is a need to fabricate both inexpensive, low-precision optics as well as specialized high-precision aspheric components. This work describes the initial feasibility tests of the machining of a new type of glass, lead indium phosphate (LIP), a material which transmits from the visible to 2.8 micrometers (for thin samples). Glossy surfaces were produced with a root-mean-square surface roughness of less than 100 nm (with 200 micrometer filter). The results indicate that this approach offers the potential for producing high-quality aspheric optical shapes based on the use of LIP glass.

  20. Unusual insulating phase at low temperature in thin indium films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuma, S.; Kokubo, N.

    1995-06-01

    We have prepared a series of thin indium films whose disorder is systematically introduced, and measured the temperature-dependent and magnetic-field-dependent Hall resistance Rxy as well as the longitudinal resistance Rxx at low temperatures. By increasing the field at fixed disorder, we have found, in addition to a usual critical field BxxC where Rxx(T-->0)-->∞, another critical field BxyC (>~BxxC) where Rxy(T-->0) diverges. With increasing disorder, BxxC decreases faster than BxyC, thus the region BxxC

  1. Tunable morphologies of indium tin oxide nanostructures using nanocellulose templates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aytug, Tolga; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Ozcan, Soydan; Lu, Yuan; Poole, II, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide nanostructures have emerged as an important family of materials for various device applications. The performance is highly dependent on the morphology of the metal oxide nanostructures. Here we report a completely green approach to prepare indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles using only water and cellulose nanofibril (CNF) in addition to the ITO precursor. Surface hydroxyl groups of the CNFs allow for efficient conjugation of ITO precursors (e.g., metal ions) in aqueous solution. The resulting CNF film allows for controllable spatial arrangement of metal oxide precursors, which results in tunable particle morphology (e.g., nanowires, nanospheres, and octahedral nanoparticles). Thesemore » ITO nanoparticles can also form conductive and transparent ITO films. This study opens a new perspective on developing metal oxide nanostructures.« less

  2. Solvent effects on two-line atomic fluorescence of indium.

    PubMed

    Chan, Qing N; Medwell, Paul R; Kalt, Peter A M; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Dally, Bassam B; Nathan, Graham J

    2010-03-10

    We aim to investigate the potential of four different organic solvents, namely, acetone, ethanol, methanol, and isopropanol, and the organic-solvent-water mixtures as a seeding medium for the two-line atomic fluorescence technique. Water is used as the reference case. Indium, which has been previously shown to have suitable spectroscopic attributes, is chosen as the thermometry species in the present study. Acetone and methanol are shown to enhance the fluorescence signal intensity the most (approximately threefold to fivefold at stoichiometric conditions) when used. Acetone and methanol are shown to improve the fluorescence emission over the entire stoichiometric envelope of flame, most significantly in the rich combustion region, as well as a twofold enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:20220881

  3. Tunable morphologies of indium tin oxide nanostructures using nanocellulose templates

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, Tolga; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Ozcan, Soydan; Lu, Yuan; Poole, II, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal oxide nanostructures have emerged as an important family of materials for various device applications. The performance is highly dependent on the morphology of the metal oxide nanostructures. Here we report a completely green approach to prepare indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles using only water and cellulose nanofibril (CNF) in addition to the ITO precursor. Surface hydroxyl groups of the CNFs allow for efficient conjugation of ITO precursors (e.g., metal ions) in aqueous solution. The resulting CNF film allows for controllable spatial arrangement of metal oxide precursors, which results in tunable particle morphology (e.g., nanowires, nanospheres, and octahedral nanoparticles). These ITO nanoparticles can also form conductive and transparent ITO films. This study opens a new perspective on developing metal oxide nanostructures.

  4. Photoconductivity in reactively evaporated copper indium selenide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Urmila, K. S. Asokan, T. Namitha Pradeep, B.; Jacob, Rajani; Philip, Rachel Reena

    2014-01-28

    Copper indium selenide thin films of composition CuInSe{sub 2} with thickness of the order of 130 nm are deposited on glass substrate at a temperature of 423 ±5 K and pressure of 10{sup −5} mbar using reactive evaporation, a variant of Gunther's three temperature method with high purity Copper (99.999%), Indium (99.999%) and Selenium (99.99%) as the elemental starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies shows that the films are polycrystalline in nature having preferred orientation of grains along the (112) plane. The structural type of the film is found to be tetragonal with particle size of the order of 32 nm. The structural parameters such as lattice constant, particle size, dislocation density, number of crystallites per unit area and strain in the film are also evaluated. The surface morphology of CuInSe{sub 2} films are studied using 2D and 3D atomic force microscopy to estimate the grain size and surface roughness respectively. Analysis of the absorption spectrum of the film recorded using UV-Vis-NIR Spectrophotometer in the wavelength range from 2500 nm to cutoff revealed that the film possess a direct allowed transition with a band gap of 1.05 eV and a high value of absorption coefficient (α) of 10{sup 6} cm{sup −1} at 570 nm. Photoconductivity at room temperature is measured after illuminating the film with an FSH lamp (82 V, 300 W). Optical absorption studies in conjunction with the good photoconductivity of the prepared p-type CuInSe{sub 2} thin films indicate its suitability in photovoltaic applications.

  5. Macro- and microscopic properties of strontium doped indium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaenko, Y. M.; Kuzovlev, Y. E.; Medvedev, Y. V.; Mezin, N. I.; Fasel, C.; Gurlo, A.; Schlicker, L.; Bayer, T. J. M.; Genenko, Y. A.

    2014-07-28

    Solid state synthesis and physical mechanisms of electrical conductivity variation in polycrystalline, strontium doped indium oxide In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:(SrO){sub x} were investigated for materials with different doping levels at different temperatures (T = 20–300 °C) and ambient atmosphere content including humidity and low pressure. Gas sensing ability of these compounds as well as the sample resistance appeared to increase by 4 and 8 orders of the magnitude, respectively, with the doping level increase from zero up to x = 10%. The conductance variation due to doping is explained by two mechanisms: acceptor-like electrical activity of Sr as a point defect and appearance of an additional phase of SrIn{sub 2}O{sub 4}. An unusual property of high level (x = 10%) doped samples is a possibility of extraordinarily large and fast oxygen exchange with ambient atmosphere at not very high temperatures (100–200 °C). This peculiarity is explained by friable structure of crystallite surface. Friable structure provides relatively fast transition of samples from high to low resistive state at the expense of high conductance of the near surface layer of the grains. Microscopic study of the electro-diffusion process at the surface of oxygen deficient samples allowed estimation of the diffusion coefficient of oxygen vacancies in the friable surface layer at room temperature as 3 × 10{sup −13} cm{sup 2}/s, which is by one order of the magnitude smaller than that known for amorphous indium oxide films.

  6. Characterization of reliability of printed indium tin oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Jei; Kim, Jong-Woong; Jung, Seung-Boo

    2013-11-01

    Recently, decreasing the amount of indium (In) element in the indium tin oxide (ITO) used for transparent conductive oxide (TCO) thin film has become necessary for cost reduction. One possible approach to this problem is using printed ITO thin film instead of sputtered. Previous studies showed potential for printed ITO thin films as the TCO layer. However, nothing has been reported on the reliability of printed ITO thin films. Therefore, in this study, the reliability of printed ITO thin films was characterized. ITO nanoparticle ink was fabricated and printed onto a glass substrate followed by heating at 400 degrees C. After measurement of the initial values of sheet resistance and optical transmittance of the printed ITO thin films, their reliabilities were characterized with an isothermal-isohumidity test for 500 hours at 85 degrees C and 85% RH, a thermal shock test for 1,000 cycles between 125 degrees C and -40 degrees C, and a high temperature storage test for 500 hours at 125 degrees C. The same properties were investigated after the tests. Printed ITO thin films showed stable properties despite extremely thermal and humid conditions. Sheet resistances of the printed ITO thin films changed slightly from 435 omega/square to 735 omega/square 507 omega/square and 442 omega/square after the tests, respectively. Optical transmittances of the printed ITO thin films were slightly changed from 84.74% to 81.86%, 88.03% and 88.26% after the tests, respectively. These test results suggest the stability of printed ITO thin film despite extreme environments. PMID:24245331

  7. An evaluation of the potential yield of indium recycled from end-of-life LCDs: A case study in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hengguang; Gu, Yifan; Wu, Yufeng; Zhang, Yi-Nan; Wang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    With the advances in electronics and information technology, China has gradually become the largest consumer of household appliances (HAs). Increasingly, end-of-life (EOL) HAs are generated in China. EOL recycling is a promising strategy to reduce dependence on virgin production, and indium is one of the recycled substances. The potential yield of indium recycling has not been systematically evaluated in China thus far. This paper estimates the potential yield of recycled indium from waste liquid crystal displays (LCDs) in China during the period from 2015 to 2030. The quantities of indium that will be used to produce LCDs are also predicted. The estimates focus on the following three key LCD waste sources: LCD TVs, desktop computers and portable computers. The results show that the demand for indium will be increasing in the near future. It is expected that 350 tonnes of indium will be needed to produce LCDs in China in 2035. The indium recycled from EOL LCDs, however, is much less than the demand and only accounts for approximately 48% of the indium demand. The sustainable index of indium is always less than 0.5. Therefore, future indium recycling efforts should focus on the development of recycling technology and the improvement of the relevant policy. PMID:26277718

  8. Hydrometallurgical Recovery of Indium from Flat-Panel Displays of Spent Liquid Crystal Televisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Katsutoshi; Alam, Shafiq

    2015-02-01

    A recovery process for indium from waste liquid crystal display panels was developed on the basis of hydrometallurgical technology. The powdered sample was leached with 3 M HCl to extract its various metal constituents (indium, aluminum, tin, etc.). The mutual separation and subsequent recovery of the dissolved metals was achieved using two column adsorption tests: The first column was packed with a porous resin impregnated with Aliquat 336, a commercially available solvent extraction reagent based on a quaternary ammonium compound, and the resin contained in the second column was impregnated with Cyanex 923, also a commercially available solvent extraction reagent based on trialkylphosphine oxide. In the first column, tin, iron, and zinc were removed from the leach liquor. In the second column, only indium was selectively recovered. The metal ions trapped in these columns were eluted with 0.1 M H2SO4, yielding a solution purified indium solution with a concentration 10 times that of the feed solution.

  9. Indium Oxide-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite for Ethanol Sensing at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Ellis, James E; Green, Uri; Sorescu, Dan C; Zhao, Yong; Star, Alexander

    2015-02-19

    Utilizing a sol-gel synthesis, indium oxide is grown on the surface of oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) to form a hybrid material with high conductivity and sensitivity toward certain organic vapors. The room-temperature sensing of dilute ethanol and acetone vapors on the surface of indium oxide/SWCNT hybrid material is studied using electrical conductance experiments in a nonoxidizing environment. Through testing of variously calcinated materials, it was observed that the degree of annealing greatly affects the material's response to acetone and ethanol, such that the intermediate calcination condition yields the best sensitivity. DFT simulations are used to study the interface between defective SWCNT and indium oxide, as well as the interaction between ethanol and acetone molecules with the indium oxide/SWCNT hybrid material. PMID:26262491

  10. Indium bump array fabrication on small CMOS circuit for flip-chip bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuyang, Huang; Yuxiang, Zhang; Zhizhen, Yin; Guoxin, Cui; C, Liu H.; Lifeng, Bian; Hui, Yang; Yaohui, Zhang

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate a novel method for indium bump fabrication on a small CMOS circuit chip that is to be flip-chip bonded with a GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well spatial light modulator. A chip holder with a via hole is used to coat the photoresist for indium bump lift-off. The 1000 μm-wide photoresist edge bead around the circuit chip can be reduced to less than 500 μm, which ensures the integrity of the indium bump array. 64 × 64 indium arrays with 20 μm-high, 30 μm-diameter bumps are successfully formed on a 5 × 6.5 mm2 CMOS chip.

  11. Optimal design study of high efficiency indium phosphide space solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1990-01-01

    Recently indium phosphide solar cells have achieved beginning of life AMO efficiencies in excess of 19 pct. at 25 C. The high efficiency prospects along with superb radiation tolerance make indium phosphide a leading material for space power requirements. To achieve cost effectiveness, practical cell efficiencies have to be raised to near theoretical limits and thin film indium phosphide cells need to be developed. The optimal design study is described of high efficiency indium phosphide solar cells for space power applications using the PC-1D computer program. It is shown that cells with efficiencies over 22 pct. AMO at 25 C could be fabricated by achieving proper material and process parameters. It is observed that further improvements in cell material and process parameters could lead to experimental cell efficiencies near theoretical limits. The effect of various emitter and base parameters on cell performance was studied.

  12. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  13. Structural and electrical properties of sol-gel spin coated indium doped cadmium oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Rajammal, R.; Savarimuthu, E. Arumugam, S.

    2014-04-24

    The indium doped CdO thin films have been prepared by the sol-gel spin coating technique and the influence of indium doping concentration on the structural and electrical properties of the deposited films has been investigated. The indium doping concentration in the solution has been varied from 0-10 wt% insteps of 2wt%. A indium doping concentration of 6wt% has been found to be optimum for preparing the films and at this stage a minimum resistivity of 5.92×10{sup −4}Ω cm and a maximum carrier concentration of 1.20×10{sup 20}cm{sup −3} have been realized.

  14. Experimental study of the orientation dependence of indium incorporation in GaInN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, Rajaram; Guryanov, Giorgiy M.

    2016-01-01

    Indium incorporation was studied on a wide variety of planes tilted from the c-plane towards either the a-plane or the m-plane, as well as on two additional planes that were tilted with respect to the a- and m-planes but normal to the c-plane. It was found that the indium content and the photoluminescence wavelength variation patterns are similar. The growth rates do not vary significantly with orientation except for (10-13) and (10-1-3). Indium incorporation was found to increase with reactor pressure except for (10-1-2) and (20-2-7). The change in indium incorporation efficiency with growth temperature is found to depend on the orientation.

  15. Detection of a prosthetic aortic valvular abscess with indium-111-labeled leukocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Oates, E.; Sarno, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    An unsuspected annular abscess at the base of a prosthetic aortic valve in a patient with endocarditis was identified by indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy alone. This highly sensitive and specific technique expediently demonstrated the surgically proven inflammatory focus.

  16. Band Offset Characterization of the Atomic Layer Deposited Aluminum Oxide on m-Plane Indium Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Ye; Wallace, Joshua S.; Qin, Yueling; Gardella, Joseph A.; Dabiran, Amir M.; Singisetti, Uttam

    2016-04-01

    In this letter, we report the band offset characterization of the atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide on non-polar m-plane indium nitride grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy by using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The valence band offset between aluminum oxide and m-plane indium nitride was determined to be 2.83 eV. The Fermi level of indium nitride was 0.63 eV above valence band maximum, indicated a reduced band bending in comparison to polar indium nitride. The band gap of aluminum oxide was found to be to 6.7 eV, which gave a conduction band offset of 3.17 eV.

  17. History of ``NANO''-Scale VERY EARLY Solid-State (and Liquid-State) Physics/Chemistry/Metallurgy/ Ceramics; Interstitial-Alloys Carbides/Nitrides/Borides/...Powders and Cermets, Rock Shocks, ...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiden, Colin; Siegel, Edward

    History of ``NANO'': Siegel-Matsubara-Vest-Gregson[Mtls. Sci. and Eng. 8, 6, 323(`71); Physica Status Solidi (a)11,45(`72)] VERY EARLY carbides/nitrides/borides powders/cermets solid-state physics/chemistry/metallurgy/ ceramics FIRST-EVER EXPERIMENTAL NANO-physics/chemistry[1968 ->Physica Status Solidi (a)11,45(`72); and EARLY NANO-``physics''/NANO-``chemistry'' THEORY(after: Kubo(`62)-Matsubara(`60s-`70s)-Fulde (`65) [ref.: Sugano[Microcluster-Physics, Springer('82 `98)

  18. Crystal structures and compressibility of novel iron borides Fe{sub 2}B{sub 7} and Fe{sub x}B{sub 50} synthesized at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bykova, E.; Gou, H.; Bykov, M.; Hanfland, M.; Dubrovinsky, L.; Dubrovinskaia, N.

    2015-10-15

    We present here a detailed description of the crystal structures of novel iron borides, Fe{sub 2}B{sub 7} and Fe{sub x}B{sub 50} with various iron content (x=1.01(1), 1.04(1), 1.32(1)), synthesized at high pressures and high temperatures. As revealed by high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction, the structure of Fe{sub 2}B{sub 7} possesses short incompressible B–B bonds, which make it as stiff as diamond in one crystallographic direction. The volume compressibility of Fe{sub 2}B{sub 7} (the bulk modulus K{sub 0}= 259(1.8) GPa, K{sub 0}′= 4 (fixed)) is even lower than that of FeB{sub 4} and comparable with that of MnB{sub 4}, known for high bulk moduli among 3d metal borides. Fe{sub x}B{sub 50} adopts the structure of the tetragonal δ-B, in which Fe atoms occupy an interstitial position. Fe{sub x}B{sub 50} does not show considerable anisotropy in the elastic behavior. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structures of novel iron borides, Fe{sub 2}B{sub 7} and Fe{sub x}B{sub 50} (x=1.01(1), 1.04(1), 1.32(1)). - Highlights: • Novel iron borides, Fe{sub 2}B{sub 7} and Fe{sub x}B{sub 50}, were synthesized under HPHT conditions. • Fe{sub 2}B{sub 7} has a unique orthorhombic structure (space group Pbam). • Fe{sub 2}B{sub 7} possesses short incompressible B–B bonds that results in high bulk modulus. • Fe{sub x}B{sub 50} adopts the structure of the tetragonal δ-B composed of B{sub 12} icosahedra. • In Fe{sub x}B{sub 50} intraicosahedral bonds are stiffer than intericosahedral ones.

  19. Growth of copper indium sulphide films by thermal evaporation of mixtures of copper sulphide and indium sulphide powders

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Pritty; Kumar, Sanjiv Sahoo, N.K.

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CuInS{sub 2} films are prepared by resistively heating mixtures of CuS and In{sub 2}S{sub 3}. • As deposited films consist of Cu{sub 7}S{sub 4}, InS and In{sub 2}S{sub 3}. • These species react during vacuum annealing to produce CuInS{sub 2} films. • The films bear stoichiometric or Cu-rich composition. • Their electrical and optical features are conducive for photovoltaic applications. - Abstract: The physical evaporation of a 1:1 mixture of copper sulphide (CuS) and indium sulphide (In{sub 2}S{sub 3}) powders by resistive heating followed by the vacuum annealing of the resulting films at 723 K produces copper indium sulphide (CuInS{sub 2}) films with about 95% phase purity. Composed of sub-micron sized grains, the films bear stoichiometric or Cu-rich composition and are endowed with p-type conductivity, a band gap of about 1.5 eV and an absorption coefficient of about 4 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup −1} in visible region. Mechanistically, the formation of CuInS{sub 2} films takes place as a result of solid state reaction among Cu{sub 7}S{sub 4}, InS and In{sub 2}S{sub 3} in the condensed phase. These intermediate species are produced from the decomposition of CuInS{sub 2} formed in the evaporating mixture due to the reaction between CuS and In{sub 2}S{sub 3}, and excess CuS. Process simplicity and the absence of a sulphurisation step make this approach attractive for synthesising CuInS{sub 2} absorber layers for photovoltaic applications.

  20. Investigation of buried homojunctions in p-InP formed during sputter deposition of both indium tin oxide and indium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessert, T. A.; Li, X.; Wanlass, M. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Coutts, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    While dc magnetron sputter deposition of indium tin oxide leads to the formation of a buried homojunction in single crystal p-type InP, the mechanism of type conversion of the InP surface is not apparent. In view of the recent achievement of nearly 17-percent global efficiencies for cells fabricated solely by sputter deposition of In2O3, it is presently surmised that tin may not be an essential element in type conversion. A variety of electrical and optical techniques are presently used to evaluate the changes at both indium tin oxide/InP and indium oxide/InP interfaces. Such mechanisms as the passivation of acceptors by hydrogen, and sputter damage, are found to occur simultaneously.

  1. Ultraflexible polymer solar cells using amorphous zinc-indium-tin oxide transparent electrodes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nanjia; Buchholz, Donald B; Zhu, Guang; Yu, Xinge; Lin, Hui; Facchetti, Antonio; Marks, Tobin J; Chang, Robert P H

    2014-02-01

    Polymer solar cells are fabricated on highly conductive, transparent amorphous zinc indium tin oxide (a-ZITO) electrodes. For two representative active layer donor polymers, P3HT and PTB7, the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) are comparable to reference devices using polycrystalline indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. Benefitting from the amorphous character of a-ZITO, the new devices are highly flexible and can be repeatedly bent to a radius of 5 mm without significant PCE reduction. PMID:24123578

  2. Role of TBATB in nano indium oxide catalyzed C-S bond formation

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Prasanta; Hazarika, Sukanya; Barman, Pranjit

    2015-01-01

    Nano sized indium oxide is found to be an efficient catalyst for the conversion of thiols to sulfides using Na2CO3 as base and TBATB as reagent in DMSO at 110 °C. Here in situ generation of bromo intermediate by TBATB takes place through indium surface. A variety of aryl sulfides can be synthesized in excellent yields from less reactive chlorides, boronic acids and thiols. PMID:26415729

  3. Development of Indium bump bonding for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimonti, G.; Andreazza, A.; Corda, G.; Darbo, G.; Di Gioia, S.; Fiorello, A.; Gariano, G.; Gemme, C.; Meroni, C.; Rovani, A.; Ruscino, E.

    2013-01-01

    About half of the ATLAS pixel modules have been assembled with the Selex indium bump bonding process. The requirements of the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer (IBL) detector ask for larger and thinner chips, two critical parameters for bonding processes. We report on the research and development carried on with Selex to produce modules with 100 μm thick and 18.8 × 20.2 mm2 area read out chips bonded with indium bumps.

  4. Dual-energy subtraction imaging utilizing indium as a contrast agent

    SciTech Connect

    Le Duc, G.; Zhong, Z.; Warkentien, L.; Laster, B.; Thomlinson, W.

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of our current work is to establish the minimum detection, of indium contrast agent using dual-energy subtraction imaging above and below indium K-edge. Experiments were performed on the X12 and X17B2 beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source using the same method but with two different set-ups. Experiments were first carried out on InCl{sub 3} solutions, then on V79 Chinese hamster cells and on BALB/c mice excised tumors, labeled with indium. For each experiment, several layers of Lucite were placed in front of the phantom to ensure a 43 mm thickness, dose to that of a mammography examination. Results were the same on X12 and X17B2. As expected, indium-free materials disappeared on subtracted images (water, steel reference and screw). Indium samples were easily distinguishable for the following concentrations: 10-5-2-1 mg/cm{sup 2}. Smaller concentrations were not clearly distinguishable and we were unable to see cell samples and tumors. To conclude, the lowest concentration we can image is around 1 mg/cm{sup 2}. These results agree with theoretical results. Such results also suggest that indium concentration in both cells and tumors is lower than 0.5 mg/cm{sup 2}. Since the current detection is dose to optimum, we conclude that dual energy subtraction imaging using indium to label tumors cells and tumors is not possible unless the indium uptake is increased by more than an order of magnitude.

  5. Ternary borides Nb7Fe3B8 and Ta7Fe3B8 with Kagome-type iron framework.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qiang; Gumeniuk, Roman; Borrmann, Horst; Schnelle, Walter; Tsirlin, Alexander A; Rosner, Helge; Burkhardt, Ulrich; Reissner, Michael; Grin, Yuri; Leithe-Jasper, Andreas

    2016-06-21

    Two new ternary borides TM7Fe3B8 (TM = Nb, Ta) were synthesized by high-temperature thermal treatment of samples obtained by arc-melting. This new type of structure with space group P6/mmm, comprises TM slabs containing isolated planar hexagonal [B6] rings and iron centered TM columns in a Kagome type of arrangement. Chemical bonding analysis in Nb7Fe3B8 by means of the electron localizability approach reveals two-center interactions forming the Kagome net of Fe and embedded B, while weaker multicenter bonding present between this net and Nb atoms. Magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal antiferromagnetic order below TN = 240 K for Nb7Fe3B8 and TN = 265 K for Ta7Fe3B8. Small remnant magnetization below 0.01μB per f.u. is observed in the antiferromagnetic state. The bulk nature of the magnetic transistions was confirmed by the hyperfine splitting of the Mössbauer spectra, the sizable anomalies in the specific heat capacity, and the kinks in the resistivity curves. The high-field paramagnetic susceptibilities fitted by the Curie-Weiss law show effective paramagnetic moments μeff≈ 3.1μB/Fe in both compounds. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity also reveals metallic character of both compounds. Density functional calculations corroborate the metallic behaviour of both compounds and demonstrate the formation of a sizable local magnetic moment on the Fe-sites. They indicate the presence of both antiferro- and ferrromagnetic interactions. PMID:27216270

  6. Growth and characterization of indium doped silicon single crystals at industrial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haringer, Stephan; Giannattasio, Armando; Alt, Hans Christian; Scala, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    Indium is becoming one of the most important dopant species for silicon crystals used in photovoltaics. In this work we have investigated the behavior of indium in silicon crystals grown by the Czochralski pulling process. The experiments were performed by growing 200 mm crystals, which is a standard diameter for large volume production, thus the data reported here are of technological interest for the large scale production of indium doped p-type silicon. The indium segregation coefficient and the evaporation rate from the silicon melt have been calculated to be 5 × 10-4 ± 3% and 1.6 × 10-4 cm·s-1, respectively. In contrast to previous works the indium was introduced in liquid phase and the efficiency was compared with that deduced by other authors, using different methods. In addition, the percentage of electrically active indium at different dopant concentrations is calculated and compared with the carrier concentration at room temperature, measured by four-point bulk method.

  7. Enhanced optical properties due to indium incorporation in zinc oxide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, S.; Mukherjee, S.; Sarkar, K.; Mazouchi, M.; Stroscio, M. A.; Dutta, M.

    2016-01-01

    Indium-doped zinc oxide nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid technique with 1.6 at. % indium content show intense room temperature photoluminescence (PL) that is red shifted to 20 meV from band edge. We report on a combination of nanowires and nanobelts-like structures with enhanced optical properties after indium doping. The near band edge emission shift gives an estimate for the carrier density as high as 5.5 × 1019 cm-3 for doped nanowires according to Mott's critical density theory. Quenching of the visible green peak is seen for doped nanostructures indicating lesser oxygen vacancies and improved quality. PL and transmission electron microscopy measurements confirm indium doping into the ZnO lattice, whereas temperature dependent PL data give an estimation of the donor and acceptor binding energies that agrees well with indium doped nanowires. This provides a non-destructive technique to estimate doping for 1D structures as compared to the traditional FET approach. Furthermore, these indium doped nanowires can be a potential candidate for transparent conducting oxides applications and spintronic devices with controlled growth mechanism.

  8. Influence of Indium Segregation on InGaN/GaN QD Band Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhill, Christian; Chang, Alexander; Walrath, Jenna; Frost, T.; Bhattacharya, P. K.; Goldman, Rachel

    InGaN/GaN QD systems are promising for optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, light emitters, and lasers due to their high mobility, high absorption coefficient, and direct wide bandgap. However, indium segregation within InGaN quantum structures can lead to inefficiencies in device performance and has not been investigated in InGaN/GaN QD systems. Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we have investigated the influence of indium nanostructure on the band structure of single or multi-layered InGaN/GaN QDs. We observe a mixture of indium mounds and QDs in the single layered InGaN/GaN QD system, where local STS measurements suggest a gradient in indium concentration across the indium mound. Furthermore, STM imaging suggests a higher density of InGaN/GaN QDs for multi-layered InGaN/GaN QDs compared to that of a single layered InGaN/GaN QDs, where STS measurements suggest indium clustering within InGaN QDs. We discuss the comparison of the band structure of InGaN/GaN mounds vs. QD systems.

  9. Apparatus for Precise Indium-Bump Bonding of Microchips

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wild, Larry; Mulder, Jerry; Alvarado, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    An improved apparatus has been designed and built for use in precise positioning and pressing of a microchip onto a substrate (which could, optionally, be another microchip) for the purpose of indium-bump bonding. The apparatus (see figure) includes the following: A stereomicroscope, A stage for precise positioning of the microchip in rotation angle (theta) about the nominally vertical pressing axis and in translation along two nominally horizontal coordinate axes (x and y), and An actuator system that causes a bonding tip to press the microchip against the substrate with a precisely controlled force. In operation, the microscope and the stage are used to position the microchip under the bonding tip and to align the indium bumps on the chip and the substrate, then the actuator system is used to apply a prescribed bonding force for a prescribed time. The improved apparatus supplants a partly similar prior apparatus that operated with less precision and repeatability, producing inconsistent and unreliable bonds. Results of the use of the prior apparatus included broken microchips, uneven bonds, and bonds characterized, variously, by overcompression or undercompression. In that apparatus, the bonding force was generated and controlled by use of a micrometer head positioned over the center of a spring-loaded scale, and the force was applied to the microchip via the scale, which was equipped for digital readout of the force. The inconsistency of results was attributed to the following causes: It was not possible to control the bonding force with sufficient precision or repeatability. Particularly troublesome was the inability to control the force at levels less than the weight of 150 g. Excessive compliance in the spring-loaded scale, combined with deviations from parallelarity of the substrate and bonding-tip surfaces, gave rise to nonuniformity in the pressure applied to the microchip, thereby generating excessive stresses and deformations in the microchip. In the

  10. Low-temperature mechanical dissipation of thermally evaporated indium film for use in interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Peter G.; Martin, Iain W.; Cunningham, Liam; Craig, Kieran; Hammond, Giles D.; Hofmann, Gerd; Hough, James; Nawrodt, Ronny; Reifert, David; Rowan, Sheila

    2015-06-01

    Indium bonding is under consideration for use in the construction of cryogenic mirror suspensions in future gravitational wave detectors. This paper presents measurements of the mechanical loss of a thermally evaporated indium film over a broad range of frequencies and temperatures. It provides an estimate of the resulting thermal noise at 20 K for a typical test mass geometry for a cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector from an indium layer between suspension elements.

  11. Indium: Understanding its Behavior in Magmatic-Hydrothermal Systems Today to Meet Tomorrow's Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, P. M.; Kayser, S.; Candela, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    Indium is integral to modern electronic devices, and is an essential component in indium-tin oxide (ITO), an electrically conductive, and optically transparent material that forms the basis for touch screens and high-end LCDs. World-wide production of indium has increased almost seven-fold from 1990 to 2012. Continued increases in production can be aided by better models for the formation of indium-bearing ores, yet little is known about the behavior of indium in magmatic-hydrothermal systems. As a first step toward solving this problem, we performed experiments to evaluate the partitioning of indium between pyrrhotite (po) and silicate melt (m). Experiments were performed at 800 °C, 100 MPa, and fO2 ≈ NNO in a po-saturated, vapor-brine-rhyolite melt system for durations of 5 to15 days. Three separate series of experiments were conducted in which each series differed by the aqueous solution added. The first series of experiments were prepared with pure water, the second series of experiments with a 1.01 M chloride solution and the third series with a 0.35 M CuCl2-bearing starting aqueous solution. These changes in starting material produced changes in the composition of the run product po and glass. The partition coefficient D(po/m) for the pure-water series experiments is on the order of ≈ 10. The addition of chloride-bearing aqueous solution leads to a decrease in the partition coefficient to ≈ 1.5. The copper-bearing experiments yield a D ≈ 3. The lower values for D in the chloride-bearing experiments may be explained by indium-chloride interactions in the melt phase. Although the D does vary depending upon the composition of the starting aqueous solution, an order of magnitude estimate for D, for general modeling purposes, can be made by assuming a value of 4. By using reasonable estimates of the mass fraction of po that crystallizes in crustal magmatic systems, the proportion of indium sequestered by po, during fractional crystallization, can be

  12. [Health effects of solar cell component material. Toxicity of indium compounds to laboratory animals determined by intratracheal instillations].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiyo; Hirata, Miyuki

    2013-01-01

    Owing to the increasing interest being paid to the issue of the global environment, the production of solar cells has increased rapidly in recent years. Copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is a new efficient thin film used in some types of solar cell. Indium is a constitutive element of CIGS thin-film solar cells. It was thought that indium compounds were not harmful until the beginning of the 1990s because there was little information regarding the adverse health effects on humans or animals arising from exposure to indium compounds. After the mid-1990s, data became available indicating that indium compounds can be toxic to animals. In animal studies, it has been clearly demonstrated that indium compounds cause pulmonary toxicity and that the dissolution of indium compounds in the lungs is considerably slow, as shown by repeated intratracheal instillations in experimental animals. Thus, it is necessary to pay much greater attention to human exposure to indium compounds, and precautions against possible exposure to indium compounds are paramount with regard to health management. PMID:23718969

  13. Investigation of an Electrochemical Method for Separation of Copper, Indium, and Gallium from Pretreated CIGS Solar Cell Waste Materials.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Anna M K; Björefors, Fredrik; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Ekberg, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of the semiconductor material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is important to ensure a future supply of indium and gallium, which are relatively rare and therefore expensive elements. As a continuation of our previous work, where we recycled high purity selenium from CIGS waste materials, we now show that copper and indium can be recycled by electrodeposition from hydrochloric acid solutions of dissolved selenium-depleted material. Suitable potentials for the reduction of copper and indium were determined to be -0.5 V and -0.9 V (versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode), respectively, using cyclic voltammetry. Electrodeposition of first copper and then indium from a solution containing the dissolved residue from the selenium separation and ammonium chloride in 1 M HCl gave a copper yield of 100.1 ± 0.5% and an indium yield of 98.1 ± 2.5%. The separated copper and indium fractions contained no significant contamination of the other elements. Gallium remained in solution together with a small amount of indium after the separation of copper and indium and has to be recovered by an alternative method since electrowinning from the chloride-rich acid solution was not effective. PMID:26347901

  14. Investigation of an Electrochemical Method for Separation of Copper, Indium, and Gallium from Pretreated CIGS Solar Cell Waste Materials

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Anna M. K.; Björefors, Fredrik; Steenari, Britt-Marie; Ekberg, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Recycling of the semiconductor material copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) is important to ensure a future supply of indium and gallium, which are relatively rare and therefore expensive elements. As a continuation of our previous work, where we recycled high purity selenium from CIGS waste materials, we now show that copper and indium can be recycled by electrodeposition from hydrochloric acid solutions of dissolved selenium-depleted material. Suitable potentials for the reduction of copper and indium were determined to be −0.5 V and −0.9 V (versus the Ag/AgCl reference electrode), respectively, using cyclic voltammetry. Electrodeposition of first copper and then indium from a solution containing the dissolved residue from the selenium separation and ammonium chloride in 1 M HCl gave a copper yield of 100.1 ± 0.5% and an indium yield of 98.1 ± 2.5%. The separated copper and indium fractions contained no significant contamination of the other elements. Gallium remained in solution together with a small amount of indium after the separation of copper and indium and has to be recovered by an alternative method since electrowinning from the chloride-rich acid solution was not effective. PMID:26347901

  15. Finite-size effects in amorphous indium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-04-01

    We study the low-temperature magnetotransport properties of several highly disordered amorphous indium oxide (a:InO) samples. Simultaneously fabricated devices comprising a two-dimensional (2D) film and 10 -μ m -long wires of different widths were measured to investigate the effect of size as we approach the 1D limit, which is around 4 times the correlation length, and happens to be around 100 nm for a:InO. The film and the wires showed magnetic field (B )-induced superconductor to insulator transition (SIT). In the superconducting side, the resistance increased with decrease in wire width, whereas an opposite trend is observed in the insulating side. We find that this effect can be explained in light of charge-vortex duality picture of the SIT. Resistance of the 2D film follows an activated behavior over the temperature (T ), whereas, the wires show a crossover from the high-T -activated to a T -independent behavior. At high-temperature regime the wires' resistance follow the film's until they deviate and became independent of T . We find that the temperature at which this deviation occurs evolves with the magnetic field and the width of the wire, which show the effect of finite size on the transport.

  16. Photonic integration in indium-phosphide membranes on silicon (IMOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Tol, Jos; Pello, Josselin; Bhat, Shrivatsa; Jiao, Yuqing; Heiss, Dominik; Roelkens, Gunther; Ambrosius, Huub; Smit, Meint

    2014-03-01

    A new photonic integration technique is presented, based on the use of an indium phosphide membrane on top of a silicon chip. This can provide electronic chips (CMOS) with an added optical layer (IMOS) for resolving the communication bottleneck. A major advantage of InP is the possibility to integrate passive and active components (SOAs, lasers) in a single membrane. In this paper we describe progress achieved in both the passive and active components. For the passive part of the circuit we succeeded to bring the propagation loss of our circuits close to the values obtained with silicon; we achieved propagation loss as low as 3.3 dB/cm through optimization of the lithography and the introduction of C60 (fullerene) in an electro resist. Further we report the smallest polarisation converter reported for membrane waveguides ( <10 μm) with low-loss (< 1 dB from 1520- 1550 nm), > 95% polarisation conversion efficiency over the whole C-band and tolerant fabrication. We also demonstrate an InP-membrane wavelength demultiplexer with a loss of 2.8 dB, a crosstalk level of better than 18 dB and a uniformity over the 8 channels of better than 1.2 dB. For the integration of active components we are testing a twin guide integration scheme. We present our design based on optical and electrical simulations and the fabrication techniques.

  17. Comparative performance of diffused junction indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.; Parat, K. K.

    1987-01-01

    A comparison is made between indium phosphide solar cells whose p-n junctions were processed by open tube capped diffusion, and closed tube uncapped diffusion, of sulfur into Czochralski grown p-type substrates. Air mass zero, total area, efficiencies ranged from 10 to 14.2 percent, the latter value attributed to cells processed by capped diffusion. The radiation resistance of these latter cells was slightly better, under 1 MeV electron irradiation. However, rather than being process dependent, the difference in radiation resistance could be attributed to the effects of increased base dopant concentration. In agreement with previous results, both cells exhibited radiation resistance superior to that of gallium arsenide. The lowest temperature dependency of maximum power was exhibited by the cells prepared by open tube capped diffusion. Contrary to previous results, no correlation was found between open circuit voltage and the temperature dependency of Pmax. It was concluded that additional process optimization was necessary before concluding that one process was better than another.

  18. Indium phosphide nanowires and their applications in optoelectronic devices

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Fateen

    2016-01-01

    Group IIIA phosphide nanocrystalline semiconductors are of great interest among the important inorganic materials because of their large direct band gaps and fundamental physical properties. Their physical properties are exploited for various potential applications in high-speed digital circuits, microwave and optoelectronic devices. Compared to II–VI and I–VII semiconductors, the IIIA phosphides have a high degree of covalent bonding, a less ionic character and larger exciton diameters. In the present review, the work done on synthesis of III–V indium phosphide (InP) nanowires (NWs) using vapour- and solution-phase approaches has been discussed. Doping and core–shell structure formation of InP NWs and their sensitization using higher band gap semiconductor quantum dots is also reported. In the later section of this review, InP NW-polymer hybrid material is highlighted in view of its application as photodiodes. Lastly, a summary and several different perspectives on the use of InP NWs are discussed. PMID:27118920

  19. Structural Properties of Amorphous Indium-Based Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanal, Rabi; Medvedeva, Julia

    2014-03-01

    Amorphous transparent conducting and semiconducting oxides exhibit similar or even superior properties to those observed in their crystalline counterparts. To understand how the structural properties change upon amorphization and how chemical composition affects the local and long-range structure of the amorphous oxides, we employ first-principles molecular dynamics to generate amorphous In-X-O with X =Zn, Ga, Sn, Ge, Y, or Sc, and compare their local structure features to those obtained for amorphous and crystalline indium oxide. The results reveal that the short-range structure of the Metal-O polyhedra is generally preserved in the amorphous oxides; however, different metals (In and X) show quantitatively or qualitatively different behavior. Some of the metals retain their natural distances and/or coordination; while others allow for a highly distorted environment and thus favor ``defect'' formation under variable oxygen conditions. At the same time, we find that the presence of X increases both the average In-O coordination and the number of the 6-coordinated In atoms as compared to those in IO. The improved In coordination may be responsible for the observed reduction in the carrier concentration as the substitution level in In-X-O increases.

  20. Growth and electrical properties of mercury indium telluride single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Linghang Dong Yangchun; Jie Wanqi

    2007-11-06

    A novel photoelectronic single crystal, mercury indium telluride (MIT), has been successfully grown by using vertical Bridgman method (VB). The crystallinity, thermal and electrical properties of the MIT crystal were investigated. The results of X-ray rocking curve show that the as-grown MIT crystal has good crystal quality with the FWHM on (3 1 1) face of about 173 in. DSC measurement reveals that the Hg element is easy to solely evaporate from the compound when the temperature is higher than 387.9 deg. C in the open system. Hall measurements at room temperature show that the resistivity, carrier density and mobility of the MIT crystal were 4.79 x 10{sup 2} {omega} cm, 2.83 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} and 4.60 x 10{sup 2} cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, respectively. The reduction of carrier mobility and the increase of the resistivity are related to the adding of In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} into HgTe, which changes the energy band structure of the crystal.

  1. A conductometric indium oxide semiconducting nanoparticle enzymatic biosensor array.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongjin; Ondrake, Janet; Cui, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    We report a conductometric nanoparticle biosensor array to address the significant variation of electrical property in nanomaterial biosensors due to the random network nature of nanoparticle thin-film. Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles (SNP) are assembled selectively on the multi-site channel area of the resistors using layer-by-layer self-assembly. To demonstrate enzymatic biosensing capability, glucose oxidase is immobilized on the SNP layer for glucose detection. The packaged sensor chip onto a ceramic pin grid array is tested using syringe pump driven feed and multi-channel I-V measurement system. It is successfully demonstrated that glucose is detected in many different sensing sites within a chip, leading to concentration dependent currents. The sensitivity has been found to be dependent on the channel length of the resistor, 4-12 nA/mM for channel lengths of 5-20 μm, while the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is 20 mM. By using sensor array, analytical data could be obtained with a single step of sample solution feeding. This work sheds light on the applicability of the developed nanoparticle microsensor array to multi-analyte sensors, novel bioassay platforms, and sensing components in a lab-on-a-chip. PMID:22163696

  2. Magnetic properties of samples containing small indium particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perenboom, J. A. A. J.; Wyder, P.; Meier, F.

    1981-01-01

    Earlier measurements of the magnetization of small indium particles embedded in paraffin were extended in order to observe the transition from a regime of quantum size effects to a regime with normal bulk behavior. Static-magnetization data have been collected in applied magnetic fields up to 8 T in the temperature range from 3 to 300 K for samples with a mean particle diameter in the range from 2 to 10 nm. The measured temperature dependence at different values of the applied magnetic field reveals a paramagnetic contribution to the magnetization which can be accurately described with the magnetization of a spin triplet level, S=1. The Curie constant is orders of magnitude in excess of one spin per particle and seems to be strongly correlated with the sample handling procedure. In some of our samples we have found also a contribution to the magnetization highly nonlinear with the magnetic field, essentially temperature independent up to room temperature, and saturating at fields around 0.6 T. This contribution resembles strongly the magnetization behavior of ferromagnets. No quantum size effects have been observed in the present data.

  3. Broadband resonances in indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shi-Qiang E-mail: r-chang@northwestern.edu; Sakoda, Kazuaki; Ketterson, John B.; Chang, Robert P. H. E-mail: r-chang@northwestern.edu

    2015-07-20

    There is currently much discussion within the nanophotonics community regarding the origin of wavelength selective absorption/scattering of light by the resonances in nanorod arrays. Here, we report a study of resonances in ordered indium-tin-oxide nanorod arrays resulting from waveguide-like modes. We find that with only a 2.4% geometrical coverage, micron-length nanorod arrays interact strongly with light across a surprisingly wide band from the visible to the mid-infrared, resulting in less than 10% transmission. Simulations show excellent agreement with our experimental observations. The field profile in the vicinity of the rods obtained from simulations shows that the electric field is mainly localized on the surfaces of the nanorods for all resonances. Based on our analysis, the resonances in the visible are different in character from those in the infrared. When light is incident on the array, part of it propagates in the space between the rods and part of it is guided within the rods. The phase difference (interference) at the ends of the rods forms the basis for the resonances in the visible region. The resonances in the infrared are Fabry-Perot-like resonances involving standing surface waves between the opposing ends of the rods. Simple analytical formulae predict the spectral positions of these resonances. It is suggested that these phenomena can be utilized for wavelength-selective photodetectors, modulators, and nanorod-based solar cells.

  4. Experiments with the low melting indium-bismuth alloy system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krepski, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a laboratory experiment designed to create an interest in and to further understanding of materials science. The primary audience for this material is the junior high school or middle school science student having no previous familiarity with the material, other than some knowledge of temperature and the concepts of atoms, elements, compounds, and chemical reactions. The objective of the experiment is to investigate the indium-bismuth alloy system. Near the eutectic composition, the liquidus is well below the boiling point of water, allowing simple, minimal hazard casting experiments. Such phenomena as metal oxidation, formation of intermetallic compound crystals, and an unusual volume increase during solidification could all be directly observed. A key concept for students to absorb is that properties of an alloy (melting point, mechanical behavior) may not correlate with simple interpolation of properties of the pure components. Discussion of other low melting metals and alloys leads to consideration of environmental and toxicity issues, as well as providing some historical context. Wetting behavior can also be explored.

  5. Indium tin oxide for solid-state image sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijtens, Christianus Hermanus L.

    Solid State Image Sensors (SSIS) which convert light into an electrical signal are introduced and transparent conductive materials and their deposition methods are reviewed as a solution to imager problems. The development of basic tools to enable replacement of poly-Si by Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) in SSIS is addressed. The installation and optimization of deposition equipment, the development of deposition and process technology of ITO, and the implementation and application of ITO in an image sensor are studied. Deposition rate and homogeneity and morphology and parameters like gas composition, power, pressure and substrate temperature are considered. Scope is limited to a first generation frame transfer imager with only one ITO layer although some concepts of an all ITO imager are discussed. The sensor used is a redesign of the accordion imager. All requirements imposed on ITO were met and the usefulness of the developed technology was demonstrated by implementing ITO in an imager. The characteristics of a constructed frame-transfer image sensor in which half the gates in the light sensitive part were replaced by ITO gates are discussed.

  6. Physical properties of vapour grown indium monotelluride platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunjomana, A. G.; Chandrasekharan, K. A.; Teena, M.

    2015-02-01

    Indium monotelluride (InTe) crystals were grown from vapour phase under different temperature gradients by employing physical vapour deposition (PVD) method. The morphology of these crystals such as whiskers, needles, platelets etc., strongly depends on the temperature distribution in the horizontal dual zone furnace. InTe platelets were deposited by setting the temperature of the charge (TC) and growth (TS) zones at 1073 K and 773 K (ΔT=300 K), respectively, for different growth periods (24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 96 h). The surface growth features have been analyzed by scanning electron microscopes, which indicate layer growth mechanism for all the crystals. Various crystals grown under ΔT=200 K and 300 K (retaining TS invariant) were examined by X-ray diffraction and elemental analysis. InTe samples exhibited consistent lattice parameters, density and atomic percentage, establishing stoichiometry and chemical homogeneity. The results obtained for Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, power factor, dislocation density and microhardness are found to be reproducible as well. The vapour deposited InTe platelets are mechanically stable and possess high value of TEP, which ensure their practical application in thermoelectric power generation.

  7. Pulsed laser deposition of nanostructured indium-tin-oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Thian Kok; Nee, Chen Hon; Yap, Seong Shan; Siew, Wee Ong; Sáfran, György; Yap, Yoke Kin; Tou, Teck Yong

    2010-08-01

    Effects of O2, N2, Ar and He on the formation of micro- and nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) thin films were investigated in pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition on glass substrate. For O2 and Ar, ITO resistivity of <= 4 × 10-4 Ωcm and optical transmittance of > 90% were obtained with substrate temperature of 250 °C. For N2 and He, low ITO resisitivity could be obtained but with poor optical transmittance. SEM images show nano-structured ITO thin films for all gases, where dense, larger and highly oriented, microcrystalline structures were obtained for deposition in O2 and He, as revealed from the XRD lines. EDX results indicated the inclusion of Ar and N2 at the expense of reduced tin (Sn) content. When the ITO films were applied for fabrication of organic light emitting devices (OLED), only those deposited in Ar and O2 produced comparable performance to single-layer OLED fabricated on the commercial ITO.

  8. Using Indium Tin Oxide To Mitigate Dust on Viewing Ports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    NASA plans to use a number of onboard viewing ports to measure lunar regolith in situ and to monitor robotic and human activities on the lunar or Martian surface. Because of the size and abundance of dust particles on these bodies, the potential for dust to occlude viewing ports and windows is high enough to threaten system lifetime and reliability, especially when activities rely on relaying video to either a habitat module or controllers on Earth. This project uses a technology being developed by KSC's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory to remove dust from windowlike surfaces. The technology applies an alternating electric potential to interlaced electrodes. In this application, we use indium tin oxide (ITO) to create various electrode patterns in order to determine the most reliable pattern for dust removal. This technology has application to systems where optical clarity is important. Specifically, this project considers the in situ resource utilization (ISRU) application of a viewing port for Raman spectroscopy, where the electrode pattern on glass would be coated with a scratch-resistant sapphire film (Al2O3).

  9. Early and delayed indium 111 leukocyte imaging in Crohn's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Navab, F.; Boyd, C.M.; Diner, W.C.; Subramani, R.; Chan, C.

    1987-10-01

    Twenty-seven patients with Crohn's disease were studied for the presence and location of activity by both early (4 h) and delayed (18-24 h) indium 111 leukocyte imaging. The results were compared with other parameters of disease activity including Crohn's disease activity index, barium studies, and endoscopy. There was a correlation between early images and Crohn's disease activity index (r = 0.78) and between delayed images and index (r = 0.82). Based upon the corresponding Crohn's disease activity index, the sensitivity of early and delayed imaging was 81.0% and 95.2%, respectively. Specificity of early and delayed imaging was 75.0% and 87.0%, respectively. Presence of activity on the early and delayed imaging agreed with activity on barium studies and colonoscopy in approximately 80% of cases. Correlation of location of disease by leukocyte imaging and x-ray was observed in 58.9% of early scans and 55.0% of delayed scans. Correlation of the location of disease by imaging and endoscopy was observed in 71.4% of early and 75.0% of delayed studies. Because of the possibility of occurrence of false-negative results in early images, delayed imaging should always be included in evaluation of disease activity in patients with Crohn's disease who are suspected of having mild activity. Delayed imaging is not required if the early imaging study clearly shows activity.

  10. A Conductometric Indium Oxide Semiconducting Nanoparticle Enzymatic Biosensor Array

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongjin; Ondrake, Janet; Cui, Tianhong

    2011-01-01

    We report a conductometric nanoparticle biosensor array to address the significant variation of electrical property in nanomaterial biosensors due to the random network nature of nanoparticle thin-film. Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles (SNP) are assembled selectively on the multi-site channel area of the resistors using layer-by-layer self-assembly. To demonstrate enzymatic biosensing capability, glucose oxidase is immobilized on the SNP layer for glucose detection. The packaged sensor chip onto a ceramic pin grid array is tested using syringe pump driven feed and multi-channel I–V measurement system. It is successfully demonstrated that glucose is detected in many different sensing sites within a chip, leading to concentration dependent currents. The sensitivity has been found to be dependent on the channel length of the resistor, 4–12 nA/mM for channel lengths of 5–20 μm, while the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant is 20 mM. By using sensor array, analytical data could be obtained with a single step of sample solution feeding. This work sheds light on the applicability of the developed nanoparticle microsensor array to multi-analyte sensors, novel bioassay platforms, and sensing components in a lab-on-a-chip. PMID:22163696

  11. Indium-/sup 111/ leukocyte imaging in appendicitis

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, D.A.; Weber, P.M.; Kang, I.Y.; dos Remedios, L.V.; Jasko, I.A.; Sawicki, J.E.

    1987-04-01

    Indium-/sup 111/-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was applied to the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. Thirty-two patients observed in the hospital for possible appendicitis were prospectively studied. Scanning was done 2 hr after radiopharmaceutical injection. Thirteen scans were positive for acute appendicitis, and all but one were confirmed at laparotomy. In addition, two cases of colitis and two cases of peritonitis were detected. Of 15 negative studies, 11 had a benign course. Four patients with negative studies had laparotomy; two were found to have appendicitis and two had a normal appendix. Of 14 proven cases of appendicitis, 12 scans were positive for appendicitis with one false-positive scan, providing a sensitivity of 86%. Specificity was 93%: all negative cases except one had negative scans. Overall accuracy was 91% (29 of 32), comparing favorably with the accepted false-positive laparotomy rate of 25%. Use of In-/sup 111/-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy serves to reduce the false-positive laparotomy rate and to shorten the clinical observation time in patients with acute appendicitis.

  12. Prosthetic graft infection: limitations of indium white blood cell scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, M.C.; Mitchell, R.S.; Baldwin, J.C.; James, D.R.; Olcott C 4; Mehigan, J.T.; McDougall, I.R.; Miller, D.C.

    1986-01-01

    The lack of a rapid, noninvasive, and accurate method to confirm or rule out prosthetic graft infection continues to constitute a compelling and vexing clinical problem. A host of adjunctive diagnostic techniques has been used in the past, but early promising results subsequently have usually not yielded acceptable sensitivity (reflecting false negatives) and specificity (reflecting false positive) data. White blood cell (WBC) indium 111 scanning has recently been added to this list. The utility and accuracy of /sup 111/In WBC scans were assessed by retrospective review of WBC scan results in 70 patients undergoing evaluation for possible prosthetic graft infection over a 7-year period. Operative and autopsy data (mean follow-up, 18 months for survivors with negative scans) were used to confirm the 22 positive, 45 negative, and three equivocal WBC scans. The false positive rate (+/- 70% confidence limits) was 36% +/- 6% (n = 8) among the 22 patients with positive scans (44% +/- 6% (11 of 25) if the three equivocal scans are included as false positive), yielding a specificity of 85% +/- 5% and an overall accuracy rate of 88% +/- 4% (80% +/- 5% and 84% +/- 5%, respectively, if the three equivocal cases are considered as false positive). All three patients with equivocal scans ultimately were judged not to have prosthetic graft infection. As implied by the high accuracy rate, the sensitivity of the test was absolute (100% (14 of 14)); there were no false negative results.

  13. Highly conductive indium zinc oxide prepared by reactive magnetron cosputtering technique using indium and zinc metallic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, T. K.; Chen, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Huang, Y. Y.; Fang, J. S.

    2010-05-15

    Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film is frequently deposited from an oxide target; but the use of metallic target is increasingly expected as preparing the film with comparable properties. This work aimed to prepare a highly conductive and transparent Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film on Corning Eagle{sup 2000} glass substrate by magnetron cosputtering method using indium and zinc targets. Structural characterization was performed using x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The film had an amorphous structure when the film was prepared on an unheated substrate, but had an In{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystalline structure when the film was deposited on 150 and 300 deg. C substrates. The electrical properties of the film were greatly affected by annealing; the Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film had a low resistivity of 6.1x10{sup -4} {Omega} cm and an average transmittance of 81.7% when the film was deposited without substrate heating and followed a 600 deg. C annealing.

  14. Indium-substitution and indium-less case effects on structural and magnetic properties of yttrium-iron garnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazlan, Rodziah; Hashim, Mansor; Ibrahim, Idza Riati; Idris, Fadzidah Mohd; Ismail, Ismayadi; Ab Rahman, Wan Norailiana Wan; Abdullah, Nor Hapishah; Zulkimi, Muhammad Misbah Muhammad; Mustaffa, Muhammad Syazwan

    2015-10-01

    The effect of indium (In) substitution in the dynamics of structure and ferrimagnetism of yttrium iron garnet (YIG) employing sintering temperature as a temporary agent of composition and structural changes was reported in this study. The nanoparticles of YIG powder samples with various In content (x=0.0-0.4) were prepared via the mechanical alloying (MA) technique. A brief, yet revealing characterization of the samples was carried out via transmission electron microscope, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, B-H Hysteresisgraph, and LCR-metre. The X-ray diffraction analysis of the samples prepared via the MA indicates the formation of single phase YIG structure at much lower sintering temperature than that in the conventional ceramic technique. The lattice constant increases as In content increases which obeys Vegard's Law due to the larger In3+ ions replacing the smaller Fe3+ ions. The saturation induction increased reaching about 699.1 G for x=0.3 and decreased with further In substitution. Three stages of ordered magnetism formation were identified which attributed to development of crystallinity and larger grains for magnetic domain accommodation. The Curie temperature shows a decrement in their values with In content due to weakening of superexchange interactions. Raman shifts from 268.1 to 272.2 cm-1 with increasing In content were observed due to stress developed in the YIG crystal structure.

  15. Comparison of indium-111 nonspecific polyclonal IgG with indium-111-leukocytes in a canine osteomyelitis model

    SciTech Connect

    Schauwecker, D.S.; Carlson, K.A.; Miller, G.A.; Kalasinski, L.A.; Katz, B.P. )

    1991-07-01

    Osteomyelitis was surgically produced in the proximal tibia of ten dogs. A sham operation was performed on the other tibia. Early (3 hr) and late (20 hr) imaging was performed 1, 4, 7, 10, and 13 wk later, while the osteomyelitis progressed from acute to chronic. Indium-111-IgG had a significantly greater accumulation at the osteomyelitis site than 111In-leukocytes, both during early (p = 0.001) and late (p = 0.03) imaging, and at each of the weeks studied (p less than 0.001). During early imaging, both agents gave equivalent lesion to background ratios. On the late images, the 111In-leukocytes gave significantly higher lesion-to-background ratios than 111In-IgG (p less than 0.001) and higher ratios than they did during the early images (p less than 0.001). Both agents had greater accumulation in acute osteomyelitis than in chronic osteomyelitis (p less than 0.02). Osteomyelitis in the surgical site can be distinguished from the uptake in the sham surgery site using 111In-leukocytes, but not when using 111In-IgG.

  16. Adsorption of collagen to indium oxide nanoparticles and infrared emissivity study thereon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Yuming Shan Yun; Sun Yanqing; Ju Huangxian

    2008-08-04

    Adsorption of collagen to indium oxide nanoparticles was carried out in water-acetone solution at volumetric ratio of 1:1 with pH value varying from 3.2 to 9.3. As indicated by TGA, maximum collagen adsorption to indium oxide nanoparticles occurred at pH of 3.2. It was proposed that noncovalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, hydrophilic and electrostatic interactions made main contributions to collagen adsorption. The IR emissivity values (8-14 {mu}m) of collagen-adsorbed indium oxide nanoparticles decreased significantly compared to either pure collagen or indium oxide nanoparticles possibly due to the interfacial interactions between collagen and indium oxide nanoparticles. And the lowest infrared emissivity value of 0.587 was obtained at collagen adsorption of 1.94 g/100 g In{sub 2}O{sub 3}. On the chance of improved compatibility with organic adhesives, the chemical activity of adsorbed collagen was further confirmed by grafting copolymerization with methyl methacrylate by formation of polymer shell outside, as evidenced by IR spectrum and transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Effect of impurity on high pressure behavior of nano indium titanate

    SciTech Connect

    Chitnis, Abhishek Garg, Nandini; Mishra, A. K.; Pandey, K. K.; Sharma, Surinder M.; Singhal, Anshu

    2015-06-24

    Angle dispersive x-ray diffraction studies were carried out on a mixture of nano particles of indium titanate, indium oxide, and disordered TiO{sub 2} upto pressures of ∼ 45 GPa. Our studies show that indium titanate undergoes a partial decomposition to its constituent high pressure oxides. However, concomitantly a very small fraction of indium titanate transforms to a denser phase at ∼ 27.5 GPa. This transformation to new phase was found to be irreversible. At this pressure even cubic In{sub 2}O{sub 3} transformed to the In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (II) (iso-structural to Rh{sub 2}O{sub 3} (II)) phase, without any signature of the intermediate corundum phase. The high pressure In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (II) phase transforms to the corundum structure on release of pressure. These studies indicate that the presence of a large fraction of seed impurities could have facilitated the decomposition of indium titanate into its constituent oxides at the cost of its incomplete transformation to the high pressure denser phase.

  18. On the impact of indium distribution on the electronic properties in InGaN nanodisks

    SciTech Connect

    Benaissa, M. E-mail: benaissa@fsr.ac.ma; Sigle, W.; Aken, P. A. van; Ng, T. K.; Ooi, B. S.; El Bouayadi, R.; Jahangir, S.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2015-03-09

    We analyze an epitaxially grown heterostructure composed of InGaN nanodisks inserted in GaN nanowires in order to relate indium concentration to the electronic properties. This study was achieved with spatially resolved low-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy using monochromated electrons to probe optical excitations—plasmons—at nanometer scale. Our findings show that each nanowire has its own indium fluctuation and therefore its own average composition. Due to this indium distribution, a scatter is obtained in plasmon energies, and therefore in the optical dielectric function, of the nanowire ensemble. We suppose that these inhomogeneous electronic properties significantly alter band-to-band transitions and consequently induce emission broadening. In addition, the observation of tailing indium composition into the GaN barrier suggests a graded well-barrier interface leading to further inhomogeneous broadening of the electro-optical properties. An improvement in the indium incorporation during growth is therefore needed to narrow the emission linewidth of the presently studied heterostructures.

  19. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2001-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  20. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2002-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  1. Synthesis and decomposition of a novel carboxylate precursor to indium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Andras, Maria T.; Duraj, Stan A.; Clark, Eric B.; Hehemann, David G.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Fanwick, Phillip E.

    1994-01-01

    Reaction of metallic indium with benzoyl peroxide in 4-1 methylpyridine (4-Mepy) at 25 C produces an eight-coordinate mononuclear indium(III) benzoate, In(eta(sup 2)-O2CC6H5)3(4-Mepy)2 4H2O (I), in yields of up to 60 percent. The indium(III) benzoate was fully characterized by elemental analysis, spectroscopy, and X-ray crystallography; (I) exists in the crystalline state as discrete eight-coordinate molecules; the coordination sphere around the central indium atom is best described as pseudo-square pyramidal. Thermogravimetric analysis of (I) and X-ray diffraction powder studies on the resulting pyrolysate demonstrate that this new benzoate is an inorganic precursor to indium oxide. Decomposition of (I) occurs first by loss of 4-methylpyridine ligands (100 deg-200 deg C), then loss of benzoates with formation of In2O3 at 450 C. We discuss both use of carboxylates as precursors and our approach to their preparation.

  2. Diagnosis of infection by preoperative scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wukich, D.K.; Abreu, S.H.; Callaghan, J.J.; Van Nostrand, D.; Savory, C.G.; Eggli, D.F.; Garcia, J.E.; Berrey, B.H.

    1987-12-01

    Scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells has been reported to be sensitive and specific in the diagnosis of low-grade sepsis of the musculoskeletal system. We reviewed the records of fifty patients who had suspected osteomyelitis or suspected infection about a total joint prosthesis and who underwent scintigraphy with technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate and scintigraphy with indium-111 oxine-labeled white blood cells before an open surgical procedure. Any patient who received preoperative antibiotics was not included in the study. For all of the patients, gram-stain examination of smears, evaluation of a culture of material from the operative site, and histological examination were done. The patients were divided into two groups. Group I was composed of twenty-four patients, each of whom had a prosthesis in place and complained of pain. Group II was composed of twenty-six patients for whom a diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis had to be considered. With the indium scans alone, there was only one false-negative result (in Group II), but there were eighteen false-positive results (eight patients in Group II and ten patients in Group I). Although scintigraphy with indium-labeled white blood cells is quite sensitive, it is not specific in detecting chronic osteomyelitis; a negative scan should be considered highly suggestive that osteomyelitis is not present. Specificity can be increased by interpreting the indium scan in conjunction with the technetium scan.

  3. Bone scan: Indium-WBC correlation in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis of the foot

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, B.; Wrege, S.S.; Altman, M.I.; Moore, J.W. )

    1989-11-01

    A retrospective study was performed of 20 podiatric cases using technetium-99m methylene diphosphonate three-phase bone scans along with indium-111 oxine leukocyte scans, as needed, to determine the presence and extent of osteomyelitis of the foot. Using criteria developed at our institution, the authors attempt to provide a mechanism to make a reliable diagnosis for osteomyelitis that has been supported by surgical/pathologic confirmation of long-term clinical follow-up. The sensitivity, using bone scans alone, was 100%, and specificity was 47%. Correlating bone and indium-111 leukocyte scans yielded a sensitivity of 100% with a specificity raised to 81%. Indium-111 leukocyte scans were used in 40% of cases when a definitive diagnosis for osteomyelitis could not be made on the basis of the three-phase bone scan or clinical presentation alone. Indium-111 leukocyte scans were also helpful in delineating the extent of the disease process. The authors present a standard technique for a 5-hour delayed imaging in the three-phase bone scan, as well as marking the foot in the indium-111 leukocyte scan with three routine views obtained for each imaging procedure, to ensure clinical accuracy.

  4. Imaging of cardiac allograft rejection in dogs using indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin Fab

    SciTech Connect

    Addonizio, L.J.; Michler, R.E.; Marboe, C.; Esser, P.E.; Johnson, L.L.; Seldin, D.W.; Gersony, W.M.; Alderson, P.O.; Rose, E.A.; Cannon, P.J.

    1987-03-01

    The acute rejection of cardiac allografts is currently diagnosed by the presence of myocyte necrosis on endomyocardial biopsy. We evaluated the efficacy of noninvasive scintigraphic imaging with indium-111-labeled anticardiac myosin Fab fragments (indium-111 antimyosin) to detect and quantify cardiac allograft rejection. Six dogs that had intrathoracic heterotopic cardiac allograft transplantation were injected with indium-111 antimyosin and planar and single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) images were obtained in various stages of acute and subacute rejection. Four dogs had an allograft older than 8 months and had been on long-term immunosuppressive therapy; two dogs had an allograft less than 2 weeks old and were not on immunosuppressive therapy. Count ratios comparing heterotopic with native hearts were calculated from both SPECT images and in vitro scans of excised and sectioned hearts and were compared with the degree of rejection scored by an independent histopathologic review. Indium-111 antimyosin uptake was not visible in planar or SPECT images of native hearts. Faint diffuse uptake was apparent in cardiac allografts during long-term immunosuppression and intense radioactivity was present in hearts with electrocardiographic evidence of rejection. The heterotopic to native heart count ratios in SPECT images correlated significantly with the count ratios in the excised hearts (r = 0.93) and with the histopathologic rejection score (r = 0.97). The distribution of indium-111 antimyosin activity in right and left ventricles corresponded to areas of histopathologic abnormalities.

  5. Influences of indium doping and annealing on microstructure and optical properties of cadmium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yuankun; Lei, Pei; Zhu, Jiaqi; Han, Jiecai

    2016-04-01

    The influences of indium doping and subsequent annealing in nitrogen and air atmospheres on the microstructure and optical properties of cadmium oxide films were studied in detail with the aid of various characterizations. X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy analysis shows that indium atom forms chemically oxidized bonds in Cd-O matrix. X-ray diffraction results demonstrate that CdO structure remains FCC structure with indium doping, whereas the preferential orientation transforms from (222) into (200) orientation. Indium doping prevents the large crystalline growth, and this role still works under both nitrogen and air annealing processes. Similarly, CdO films show rough surface under annealing conditions, but the force has been greatly weakened at high doping level. It is clear that refractive index and extinction coefficient are closely correlated with crystalline size for undoped films, whereas it turns to the doping level for doped films, which can be performed by the mechanism of indium atom substitution. This work provides a very useful guild for design and application of optical-electronic devices.

  6. Low-threshold indium gallium nitride quantum dot microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Alexander J.

    Gallium nitride (GaN) microcavities with embedded optical emitters have long been sought after as visible light sources as well as platforms for cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) experiments. Specifically, materials containing indium gallium nitride (InGaN) quantum dots (QDs) offer an outstanding platform to study light matter interactions and realize practical devices, such as on-chip light emitting diodes and nanolasers. Inherent advantages of nitride-based microcavities include low surface recombination velocities, enhanced room-temperature performance (due to their high exciton binding energy, as high as 67 meV for InGaN QDs), and emission wavelengths in the blue region of the visible spectrum. In spite of these advantages, several challenges must be overcome in order to capitalize on the potential of this material system. Such diffculties include the processing of GaN into high-quality devices due to the chemical inertness of the material, low material quality as a result of strain-induced defects, reduced carrier recombination effciencies due to internal fields, and a lack of characterization of the InGaN QDs themselves due to the diffculty of their growth and therefore lack of development relative to other semiconductor QDs. In this thesis we seek to understand and address such issues by investigating the interaction of light coupled to InGaN QDs via a GaN microcavity resonator. Such coupling led us to the demonstration of the first InGaN QD microcavity laser, whose performance offers insights into the properties and current limitations of the nitride materials and their emitters. This work is organized into three main sections. Part I outlines the key advantages and challenges regarding indium gallium nitride (InGaN) emitters embedded within gallium nitride (GaN) optical microcavities. Previous work is also discussed which establishes context for the work presented here. Part II includes the fundamentals related to laser operation, including the

  7. Micropatterning of Proteins and Mammalian Cells on Indium Tin Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sunny S.; Howland, Michael C.; Chen, Li-Jung; Silangcruz, Jaime; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V.; Schweikert, Emile A.; Parikh, Atul N.; Revzin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a novel surface engineering approach that combines oxygen plasma treatment and electrochemical activation to create micropatterned cocultures on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrates. In this approach, photoresist was patterned onto an ITO substrate modified with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) silane. The photoresist served as a stencil during exposure of the surface to oxygen plasma. Upon incubation with collagen (I) solution and removal of the photoresist, the ITO substrate contained collagen regions surrounded by nonfouling PEG silane. Chemical analysis carried out with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) at different stages in micropatterned construction verified removal of PEG-silane during oxygen plasma and presence of collagen and PEG molecules on the same surface. Imaging ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were employed to further investigate micropatterned ITO surfaces. Biological application of this micropatterning strategy was demonstrated through selective attachment of mammalian cells on the ITO substrate. Importantly, after seeding the first cell type, the ITO surfaces could be activated by applying negative voltage (−1.4 V vs Ag/AgCl). This resulted in removal of nonfouling PEG layer and allowed to attach another cell type onto the same surface and to create micropatterned cocultures. Micropatterned cocultures of primary hepatocytes and fibroblasts created by this strategy remained functional after 9 days as verified by analysis of hepatic albumin. The novel surface engineering strategy described here may be used to pattern multiple cell types on an optically transparent and conductive substrate and is envisioned to have applications in tissue engineering and biosensing. PMID:20356132

  8. Lithium indium diselenide: A new scintillator for neutron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukosi, Eric; Herrera, Elan; Hamm, Daniel; Lee, Kyung-Min; Wiggins, Brenden; Trtik, Pavel; Penumadu, Dayakar; Young, Stephen; Santodonato, Louis; Bilheux, Hassina; Burger, Arnold; Matei, Liviu; Stowe, Ashley C.

    2016-09-01

    Lithium indium diselenide, 6LiInSe2 or LISe, is a newly developed neutron detection material that shows both semiconducting and scintillating properties. This paper reports on the performance of scintillating LISe crystals for its potential use as a converter screen for cold neutron imaging. The spatial resolution of LISe, determined using a 10% threshold of the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), was found to not scale linearly with thickness. Crystals having a thickness of 450 μm or larger resulted in an average spatial resolution of 67 μm, and the thinner crystals exhibited an increase in spatial resolution down to the Nyquist frequency of the CCD. The highest measured spatial resolution of 198 μm thick LISe (27 μm) outperforms a commercial 50 μm thick ZnS(Cu):6LiF scintillation screen by more than a factor of three. For the LISe dimensions considered in this study, it was found that the light yield of LISe did not scale with its thickness. However, absorption measurements indicate that the 6Li concentration is uniform and the neutron absorption efficiency of LISe as a function of thickness follows general nuclear theory. This suggests that the differences in apparent brightness observed for the LISe samples investigated may be due to a combination of secondary charged particle escape, scintillation light transport in the bulk and across the LISe-air interface, and variations in the activation of the scintillation mechanism. Finally, it was found that the presence of 115In and its long-lived 116In activation product did not result in ghosting (memory of past neutron exposure), demonstrating potential of LISe for imaging transient systems.

  9. Decay studies of the highly neutron-deficient indium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.

    1982-02-01

    An extension of the experimentally known nuclidic mass surface to nuclei far from the region of beta-stability is of fundamental interest in providing a better determination of the input parameters for the various nuclear mass formulae, allowing a more accurate prediction of the ultimate limits of nuclear stability. In addition, a study of the shape of the mass surface in the vicinity of the doubly-closed nuclide /sup 100/Sn provides initial information on the behavior of the shell closure to be expected when Z = N = 50. Experiments measuring the decay energies of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In by ..beta..-endpoint measurements are described with special attention focused on the development of a plastic scintillator ..beta..-telescope coupled to the on-line mass separator RAMA (Recoil Atom Mass Analyzer). An attempt to measure the ..beta..-endpoint energy of /sup 102/In is also briefly described. The experimentally determined decay energies and derived masses for /sup 103/ /sup 105/In are compared with the predictions of different mass models to identify which models are more successful in this region. Furthermore, the inclusion in these comparisons of the available data on the neutron-rich indium nuclei permits a systematic study of their ground state mass behavior as a function of the neutron number between the shell closures at N = 50 and N = 82. These analyses indicate that the binding energy of /sup 103/In is 1 MeV larger than predicted by the majority of the mass models. An examination of the Q/sub EC/ surface and the single- and two-neutron separation energies in the vicinity of /sup 103/ /sup 105/In is also performed to investigate further the deviation and other possible systematic variations in the mass surface in a model-independent way.

  10. Spectral analysis of the fifth spectrum of indium: In V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swapnil; Tauheed, A.

    2016-01-01

    The fifth spectrum of indium (In V) has been investigated in the grazing and normal incidence wavelength regions. In4+ is a Rh-like ion with the ground configuration 4p64d9 and first excited configurations of the type 4p64d8nℓ (n≥4). The theoretical predications for this ion were made by Cowan's quasi-relativistic Hartree-Fock code with superposition of configurations involving 4p64d8(5p+6p+7p+4f+5f+6f), 4p54d10, 4p64d75s(5p+4f) for the odd parity matrix and 4p64d8 (5s+6s+7s+5d+6d), 4p64d7(5s2+5p2) for the even parity system. The spectra used for this work were recorded on 10.7 m grazing and normal incidence spectrographs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (USA) and also on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph at Antigonish (Canada). The sources used were a sliding spark and a triggered spark respectively. Two hundred and thirty two energy levels based on the identification of 873 spectral lines have been established, forty six being new. Least squares fitted parametric calculations were used to interpret the observed level structure. The energy levels were optimized using a level optimization computer program (LOPT). Our wavelength accuracy for sharp and unblended lines is estimated to be within ±0.005 Å for λ below 400 Å and ±0.006 Å up to 1200 Å.

  11. Vapour growth and characterization of beta indium sesquitelluride crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshmi, P. M.; Kunjomana, A. G.; Chandrasekharan, K. A.; Teena, M.

    2014-05-01

    Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) provides stoichiometric crystals of different morphology, depending upon the materials, geometry of ampoules, temperature profiles, growth parameters and kinetics of crystallization. The crystal forms such as needles, platelets and spherulites of beta indium sesquitelluride (β-In2Te3) were produced by controlling the temperature of source and growth zones. The X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and chemical analysis of the spherulitic crystals confirmed zinc blende structure with beta phase. Their resistivity (135.16 Ω cm) at room temperature (300 K) was determined by van der Pauw method. The temperature dependence of DC conductivity was investigated using the conventional two-probe technique. The variation of dielectric constant (ε1) and dielectric loss (tan δ) with temperature has been studied for different frequencies (1 kHz-1 MHz). The AC conductivity, σac(ω) was found to vary with angular frequency as ωs, where s is the frequency exponent. The values of s lie very close to unity and show a slight decrease with increase in temperature, which indicate a Correlated Barrier Hopping (CBH) between centres forming Intimate Valence Alternation Pairs (IVAP). The activation energy for conduction ranges from 0.187 eV to 0.095 eV. The microhardness of β-In2Te3 spherulites is found to be 353.5 kg/mm2, which is higher than that of other semiconducting chalcogenides. The results thus obtained on crystals grown from vapour phase open up ample possibilities for radiation detector applications.

  12. Indium Tin Oxide Resistor-Based Nitric Oxide Microsensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive resistor-based NO microsensor, with a wide detection range and a low detection limit, has been developed. Semiconductor microfabrication techniques were used to create a sensor that has a simple, robust structure with a sensing area of 1.10 0.99 mm. A Pt interdigitated structure was used for the electrodes to maximize the sensor signal output. N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film was sputter-deposited as a sensing material on the electrode surface, and between the electrode fingers. Alumina substrate (250 m in thickness) was sequentially used for sensor fabrication. The resulting sensor was tested by applying a voltage across the two electrodes and measuring the resulting current. The sensor was tested at different concentrations of NO-containing gas at a range of temperatures. Preliminary results showed that the sensor had a relatively high sensitivity to NO at 450 C and 1 V. NO concentrations from ppm to ppb ranges were detected with the low limit of near 159 ppb. Lower NO concentrations are being tested. Two sensing mechanisms were involved in the NO gas detection at ppm level: adsorption and oxidation reactions, whereas at ppb level of NO, only one sensing mechanism of adsorption was involved. The NO microsensor has the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, simple batch fabrication, high sensor yield, low cost, and low power consumption due to its microsize. The resistor-based thin-film sensor is meant for detection of low concentrations of NO gas, mainly in the ppb or lower range, and is being developed concurrently with other sensor technology for multispecies detection. This development demonstrates that ITO is a sensitive sensing material for NO detection. It also provides crucial information for future selection of nanostructured and nanosized NO sensing materials, which are expected to be more sensitive and to consume less power.

  13. Preparation and properties of electrically conducting ceramics based on indium oxide-rare earth oxides-hafnium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

    1983-09-01

    Electrically conducting refractory oxides based on adding indium oxide to rare earth-stabilized hafnium oxide are being studied for use in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generators, fuel cells, and thermoelectric generators. The use of indium oxide generally increases the electrical conductivity. The results of measurements of the electrical conductivity and data on corrosion resistance in molten salts are presented.

  14. Charge mobility increase in indium-molybdenum oxide thin films by hydrogen doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalán, S.; Álvarez-Fraga, L.; Salas, E.; Ramírez-Jiménez, R.; Rodriguez-Palomo, A.; de Andrés, A.; Prieto, C.

    2016-11-01

    The increase of charge mobility in transparent conductive indium molybdenum oxide (IMO) films is correlated with the presence of hydroxyl groups. The introduction of H2 in the chamber during sputtering deposition compensates the excess charge introduced by cationic Mo doping of indium oxide either by oxygen or hydroxyl interstitials. Films present a linear increase of carrier mobility correlated with H2 content only after vacuum annealing. This behavior is explained because vacuum annealing favors the removal of oxygen interstitials over that of hydroxyl groups. Since hydroxyl groups offer lower effective charge and smaller lattice distortions than those associated with interstitial oxygen, this compensation mechanism offers the conditions for the observed increase in mobility. Additionally, the short-range order around molybdenum is evaluated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, showing that Mo4+ is placed at the In site of the indium oxide.

  15. Effects of indium and tin overlayers on the photoluminescence spectrum of mercuric iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. B.; Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; Ortale, C.; Cheng, A. Y.

    1990-03-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2 ) crystals with semitransparent metal overlayers of indium and tin were characterized using low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The PL spectra were found to differ for points beneath the thin metal overlayers and points that were masked off during each deposition. The photoluminescence data were compared with PL measurements taken on HgI2 photodetectors with indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electrodes. The similarities of the spectra for the HgI2 samples with In, Sn, and ITO conducting overlayers indicate that the regions in the ITO-contacted photodetectors with relatively poor photoresponses are associated with the interaction of indium or tin with the mercuric iodide substrate.

  16. Photoluminescence Spectroscopy Of Thin Indium-Tin-Oxide Contacts On Mercuric Iodide Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Ralph B.; Bao, Xue J.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.; Markakis, Jeff; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, Carol

    1989-05-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) photodetectors with sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electodes were studied using low-temperature photoluminesence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectra obtained on each photodetector was found to differ for points beneath the ITO contact and points adjacent to it, indicating that the contact fabrication process introduces new carrier traps and radiative recombination centers within the ITO-HgI2 interfacial region. In particular, a new broad band was observed in the spectra taken from points beneath the ITO electrode. Photo-current-versus-position measurements showed that the intensity of this broad band was enhanced in regions having relatively poor photoresponse. Specimens of HgI2 with evaporated semi-transparent tin and indium films were also investigated. The spectra obtained from points beneath the Sn and In films suggest that the regions having poor photoresponse in the ITO-contacted photodetector contain either free tin or indium metal.

  17. Evaluation of musculoskeletal sepsis with indium-111 white blood cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ouzounian, T.J.; Thompson, L.; Grogan, T.J.; Webber, M.M.; Amstutz, H.C.

    1987-08-01

    The detection of musculoskeletal sepsis, especially following joint replacement, continues to be a challenging problem. Often, even with invasive diagnostic evaluation, the diagnosis of infection remains uncertain. This is a report on the first 55 Indium-111 white blood cell (WBC) images performed in 39 patients for the evaluation of musculoskeletal sepsis. There were 40 negative and 15 positive Indium-111 WBC images. These were correlated with operative culture and tissue pathology, aspiration culture, and clinical findings. Thirty-eight images were performed for the evaluation of possible total joint sepsis (8 positive and 30 negative images); 17 for the evaluation of nonarthroplasty-related musculoskeletal sepsis (7 positive and 10 negative images). Overall, there were 13 true-positive, 39 true-negative, two false-positive, and one false-negative images. Indium-111 WBC imaging is a sensitive and specific means of evaluating musculoskeletal sepsis, especially following total joint replacement.

  18. Measurement of Activity of Indium in Liquid Bi-In-Sn Alloys by EMF Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. R.; Mohan, S.; Behera, C. K.

    2016-08-01

    The electrochemical technique based on a molten salt electrolyte galvanic cell has been used to measure the activity of indium in liquid Bi-In-Sn alloys in the temperature range of 723 K to 855 K along three ternary sections. The activity of tin in Bi-Sn binary alloys has also been measured by the same technique in the above temperature range. The activity of indium in Bi-In-Sn alloys shows negative deviation from Raoult's law for most of the compositions and slight positive deviations for a few indium-rich compositions. The ternary excess molar free energies have been calculated by Darken's treatment. Isoactivity curves at 813 K in the ternary Bi-In-Sn alloys were derived by combining the activity data of In-Sn and Bi-In alloys. The values of excess molar free energy obtained in this study are compared with those calculated from the Muggianu model at 813 K.

  19. Optical investigations on indium oxide nano-particles prepared through precipitation method

    SciTech Connect

    Seetha, M.; Bharathi, S.; Dhayal Raj, A.; Mangalaraj, D.; Nataraj, D.

    2009-12-15

    Visible light emitting indium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation method. Sodium hydroxide dissolved in ethanol was used as a precipitating agent to obtain indium hydroxide precipitates. Precipitates, thus formed were calcined at 600 deg. C for 1 h to obtain indium oxide nanoparticles. The structure of the particles as determined from the X-Ray diffraction pattern was found to be body centered cubic. The phase transformation of the prepared nanoparticles was analyzed using thermogravimetry. Surface morphology of the prepared nanoparticles was analyzed using high resolution-scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results of the analysis show cube-like aggregates of size around 50 nm. It was found that the nanoparticles have a strong emission at 427 nm and a weak emission at 530 nm. These emissions were due to the presence of singly ionized oxygen vacancies and the nature of the defect was confirmed through Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis.

  20. Sol-gel synthesis of nanostructured indium tin oxide with controlled morphology and porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kőrösi, László; Scarpellini, Alice; Petrik, Péter; Papp, Szilvia; Dékány, Imre

    2014-11-01

    Nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) powders and thin films differing in morphology and porosity were prepared by a sol-gel method. In3+ and Sn4+ were hydrolyzed in aqueous medium through the use of ethanolamine (EA) or sodium acetate (AC). X-ray diffraction measurements demonstrated that both EA and AC furnished indium tin hydroxide, which became nanocrystalline after aging for one day. The indium tin hydroxide samples calcined at 550 °C afforded ITO with a cubic crystal structure, but the morphology differed significantly, depending on the agent used for hydrolysis. Electron microscopy revealed the formation of round monodisperse nanoparticles when AC was used, whereas the application of EA led to rod-like ITO nanoparticles. Both types of nanoparticles were suitable for the preparation of transparent and conductive ITO thin films. The influence of the morphology and porosity on the optical properties is discussed.

  1. Measurement of Activity of Indium in Liquid Bi-In-Sn Alloys by EMF Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M. R.; Mohan, S.; Behera, C. K.

    2016-05-01

    The electrochemical technique based on a molten salt electrolyte galvanic cell has been used to measure the activity of indium in liquid Bi-In-Sn alloys in the temperature range of 723 K to 855 K along three ternary sections. The activity of tin in Bi-Sn binary alloys has also been measured by the same technique in the above temperature range. The activity of indium in Bi-In-Sn alloys shows negative deviation from Raoult's law for most of the compositions and slight positive deviations for a few indium-rich compositions. The ternary excess molar free energies have been calculated by Darken's treatment. Isoactivity curves at 813 K in the ternary Bi-In-Sn alloys were derived by combining the activity data of In-Sn and Bi-In alloys. The values of excess molar free energy obtained in this study are compared with those calculated from the Muggianu model at 813 K.

  2. Detection of musculoskeletal infection with the indium-III leukocyte scan

    SciTech Connect

    Prchal, C.L.; Kahen, H.L.; Blend, M.J.; Barmada, R.

    1987-09-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scans were performed on 39 patients with suspected musculoskeletal infections to assess the usefulness of this study in detecting bone and joint infections. Results of these scans, as well as results of technetium-99m bone scans, were correlated with the patients' final diagnoses. The indium scan had an overall sensitivity of 77%, a specificity of 69%, and an accuracy of 72%. In 10 patients with a duration of symptoms of six weeks or less, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 75%. In 29 patients with symptoms of greater than six weeks, the sensitivity and specificity were lower at 50% and 71% respectively. Technetium-99m bone scans were performed on 23 patients; sensitivity for infection was 100% while specificity was 60%. Our results suggest that the indium-111 leukocyte scan is a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of acute musculoskeletal infections, but may be inconclusive in chronic infections.

  3. Theranostic etoposide phosphate/indium nanoparticles for cancer therapy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Ramishetti; Satterlee, Andrew; Wang, Yuhua; Zhang, Yuan; Wang, Yongjun; Huang, Leaf

    2015-11-01

    Etoposide phosphate (EP), a water-soluble anticancer prodrug, is widely used for treatment of many cancers. After administration it is rapidly converted to etoposide, its parent compound, which exhibits anticancer activity. Difficulty in parenteral administration necessitates the development of a suitable nanoparticle delivery system for EP. Here we have used indium both as a carrier to deliver etoposide phosphate to tumor cells and as a SPECT imaging agent through incorporation of 111In. Etoposide phosphate was successfully encapsulated together with indium in nanoparticles, and exhibited dose dependent cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis in cultured H460 cancer cells via G2/M cell cycle arrest. In a mouse xenograft lung cancer model, etoposide phosphate/indium nanoparticles induce tumor cell apoptosis, leading to significant enhancement of tumor growth inhibition compared to the free drug.

  4. Kinetics of gas-phase reactions relevant to the chemical vapor deposition of indium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, M.D.; McDaniel, A.H.

    1998-03-01

    Compounds containing indium are of interest for electronic and optical applications. These compounds include III-V semiconductors such as InP and InAs used in both electronic devices and solar cells, and indium tin oxide, which can be used for optical memory and antireflection coatings. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques can be used to deposit these materials on a variety of substrates. At the temperatures typically employed (550--900 K), gas-phase chemical reactions involving the indium-containing precursor can occur. The kinetics of trimethylindium pyrolysis are investigated in a flow reactor equipped with a molecular-beam mass-spectrometric sampling system. Data are analyzed using a new computational approach that accounts for heat and mass transport in the reactor. The measured activation energy, 46.2 kcal/mol, is in good agreement with previously reported values.

  5. Compositional analysis of dilute nitride doped indium antimonide bulk crystal by VDS technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Manisha; Maske, Dilip; Choudhari, Rashmi; Arora, Brij Mohan; Gadkari, Dattatray

    2016-05-01

    Dilute nitrides are suitable materials for fabrication of devices in detection of long wavelength infrared region. Dilute nitride doped Indium antimonide bulk crystals were grown using vertical directional solidification technique. The compositional characteristics of the crystals were carried out using EDS. The analysis was simulated and compared with observations using DTSA II software for accuracy. The ingots have uniform composition of Indium and Antimony. The actual nitrogen composition measured using EDS was 0.136% for doped nitrogen composition 0.1% except near conical end where it was 0.1%. The study of bonding between nitrogen, Indium and antimony was carried out using SIMS. The analysis shows strong presence of In-N bonding along with In-Sb bonds which indicates nitrogen has replaced antimony atoms in crystal lattice.

  6. Thermodynamic properties of uranium in liquid gallium, indium and their alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkovich, V. A.; Maltsev, D. S.; Yamshchikov, L. F.; Osipenko, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    Activity, activity coefficients and solubility of uranium was determined in gallium, indium and gallium-indium alloys containing 21.8 (eutectic), 40 and 70 wt.% In. Activity was measured at 573-1073 K employing the electromotive force method, and solubility between room temperature (or the alloy melting point) and 1073 K employing direct physical measurements. Activity coefficients were obtained from the difference of experimentally determined temperature dependencies of uranium activity and solubility. Intermetallic compounds formed in the respective alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction. Partial and excess thermodynamic functions of uranium in the studied alloys were calculated. Liquidus lines in U-Ga and U-In phase diagrams from the side rich in gallium or indium are proposed.

  7. Vapor phase tri-methyl-indium seeding system suitable for high temperature spectroscopy and thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiddon, R.; Zhou, B.; Borggren, J.; Aldén, M.; Li, Z. S.

    2015-09-01

    Tri-methyl-indium (TMI) is used as an indium transport molecule to introduce indium atoms to reactive hot gas flows/combustion environments for spectroscopic diagnostics. A seeding system was constructed to allow the addition of an inert TMI laden carrier gas into an air/fuel mixture burning consequently on a burner. The amount of the seeded TMI in the carrier gas can be readily varied by controlling the vapor pressure through the temperature of the container. The seeding process was calibrated using the fluorescent emission intensity from the indium 62S1/2 → 52P1/2 and 62S1/2 → 52P3/2 transitions as a function of the calculated TMI seeding concentration over a range of 2-45 ppm. The response was found to be linear over the range 3-22.5 ppm; at concentrations above 25 ppm there is a loss of linearity attributable to self-absorption or loss of saturation of TMI vapor pressure in the carrier gas flow. When TMI was introduced into a post-combustion environment via an inert carrier gas, molecular transition from InH and InOH radicals were observed in the flame emission spectrum. Combined laser-induced fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy were applied to detect indium atoms in the TMI seeded flame and the measured atomic indium concentration was found to be at the ppm level. This method of seeding organometallic vapor like TMI to a reactive gas flow demonstrates the feasibility for quantitative spectroscopic investigations that may be applicable in various fields, e.g., chemical vapor deposition applications or temperature measurement in flames with two-line atomic fluorescence.

  8. Vapor phase tri-methyl-indium seeding system suitable for high temperature spectroscopy and thermometry.

    PubMed

    Whiddon, R; Zhou, B; Borggren, J; Aldén, M; Li, Z S

    2015-09-01

    Tri-methyl-indium (TMI) is used as an indium transport molecule to introduce indium atoms to reactive hot gas flows/combustion environments for spectroscopic diagnostics. A seeding system was constructed to allow the addition of an inert TMI laden carrier gas into an air/fuel mixture burning consequently on a burner. The amount of the seeded TMI in the carrier gas can be readily varied by controlling the vapor pressure through the temperature of the container. The seeding process was calibrated using the fluorescent emission intensity from the indium 6(2)S1/2 → 5(2)P1/2 and 6(2)S1/2 → 5(2)P3/2 transitions as a function of the calculated TMI seeding concentration over a range of 2-45 ppm. The response was found to be linear over the range 3-22.5 ppm; at concentrations above 25 ppm there is a loss of linearity attributable to self-absorption or loss of saturation of TMI vapor pressure in the carrier gas flow. When TMI was introduced into a post-combustion environment via an inert carrier gas, molecular transition from InH and InOH radicals were observed in the flame emission spectrum. Combined laser-induced fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy were applied to detect indium atoms in the TMI seeded flame and the measured atomic indium concentration was found to be at the ppm level. This method of seeding organometallic vapor like TMI to a reactive gas flow demonstrates the feasibility for quantitative spectroscopic investigations that may be applicable in various fields, e.g., chemical vapor deposition applications or temperature measurement in flames with two-line atomic fluorescence. PMID:26429429

  9. Vapor phase tri-methyl-indium seeding system suitable for high temperature spectroscopy and thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Whiddon, R.; Zhou, B.; Borggren, J.; Aldén, M.; Li, Z. S.

    2015-09-15

    Tri-methyl-indium (TMI) is used as an indium transport molecule to introduce indium atoms to reactive hot gas flows/combustion environments for spectroscopic diagnostics. A seeding system was constructed to allow the addition of an inert TMI laden carrier gas into an air/fuel mixture burning consequently on a burner. The amount of the seeded TMI in the carrier gas can be readily varied by controlling the vapor pressure through the temperature of the container. The seeding process was calibrated using the fluorescent emission intensity from the indium 6{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} → 5{sup 2}P{sub 1/2} and 6{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} → 5{sup 2}P{sub 3/2} transitions as a function of the calculated TMI seeding concentration over a range of 2–45 ppm. The response was found to be linear over the range 3–22.5 ppm; at concentrations above 25 ppm there is a loss of linearity attributable to self-absorption or loss of saturation of TMI vapor pressure in the carrier gas flow. When TMI was introduced into a post-combustion environment via an inert carrier gas, molecular transition from InH and InOH radicals were observed in the flame emission spectrum. Combined laser-induced fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy were applied to detect indium atoms in the TMI seeded flame and the measured atomic indium concentration was found to be at the ppm level. This method of seeding organometallic vapor like TMI to a reactive gas flow demonstrates the feasibility for quantitative spectroscopic investigations that may be applicable in various fields, e.g., chemical vapor deposition applications or temperature measurement in flames with two-line atomic fluorescence.

  10. Thermal resistance of indium coated sapphire-copper contacts below 0.1 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisel, T.; Bremer, J.; Koettig, T.

    2014-11-01

    High thermal resistances exist at ultra-low temperatures for solid-solid interfaces. This is especially true for pressed metal-sapphire joints, where the heat is transferred by phonons only. For such pressed joints it is difficult to achieve good physical, i.e. thermal contacts due to surface irregularities in the microscopic or larger scale. Applying ductile indium as an intermediate layer reduces the thermal resistance of such contacts. This could be proven by measurements of several researchers. However, the majority of the measurements were performed at temperatures higher than 1 K. Consequently, it is difficult to predict the thermal resistance of pressed metal-sapphire joints at temperatures below 1 K. In this paper the thermal resistances across four different copper-sapphire-copper sandwiches are presented in a temperature range between 30 mK and 100 mK. The investigated sandwiches feature either rough or polished sapphire discs (Ø 20 mm × 1.5 mm) to investigate the phonon scattering at the boundaries. All sandwiches apply indium foils as intermediate layers on both sides of the sapphire. Additionally to the indium foils, thin indium films are vapour deposited onto both sides of one rough and one polished sapphire in order to improve the contact to the sapphire. Significantly different thermal resistances have been found amongst the investigated sandwiches. The lowest total thermal resistivity (roughly 26 cm2 K4/W at 30 mK helium temperature) is achieved across a sandwich consisting of a polished sapphire with indium vapour deposition. The thermal boundary resistance between indium and sapphire is estimated from the total thermal resistivity by assuming the scattering at only one boundary, which is the warm sapphire boundary where phonons impinge, and taking the scattering in the sapphire bulk into account. The so derived thermal boundary resistance agrees at low temperatures very well with the acoustic mismatch theory.

  11. Uptake of indium-111-labeled platelets and indium-111 oxine by murine kidneys after total-body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbe, S.; Taylor, S.; Maurer, H.; Kullgren, B.

    1996-08-01

    Radiation nephropathy is a well-known late manifestation of renal irradiation in human beings and experimental animals. Its pathogenesis is unclear, but vascular injury may play a role. Endothelial cells have been demonstrated to manifest a variety of abnormalities within hours of exposure to radiation. In the present experiments mice were exposed to lethal doses of whole-body radiation, and the distribution of {sup 111}In-labeled platelets was evaluated during the first week after irradiation. The purpose was to determine if early abnormalities of endothelial cells would be manifested by altered sequestration of platelets in kidneys and other organs. It was found that the indium accumulated in the kidneys of irradiated mice to a greater extent than in nonirradiated mice, but the pattern of accumulation differed from that seen after injection of radiolabeled platelets. Renal hyperemia was not demonstrable with {sup 51}Cr-labeled red cells, renal vascular permeability was not detected with {sup 125}I-labeled albumin, and the pattern of renal uptake of plasma proteins labeled albumin, and the pattern of renal uptake of plasma proteins labeled with {sup 59}Fe {sup 111}In did not coincide with that seen from {sup 111}In administered as labeled platelets or oxine. Renal uptake of {sup 111}In-oxine was not associated with alterations in urinary or fecal excretion or an increase in total-body retention of the radioisotope. The findings are consistent with the notion that renal vascular injury at the time of irradiation results in accumulation of platelets or platelet constituents during the first week after total-body irradiation of mice. 29 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. New synthesis routes for indium-doped tin pyrophosphate proton conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, Fernando H; Mukundan, Rangachary; Brosha, Eric L; Einsla, Melinda L

    2008-01-01

    We have synthesized various indium-tin pyrophosphates using the traditional high-temperature method described in the literature as well as a novel solution-precipitation process developed in our laboratory. An ammonium-based precursor was used in an attempt to achieve a lower crystallization temperature. The use of this precursor in the solution-precipitation of indium-tin pyrophosphate gels resulted in precursors that could be crystallized at less than 600 {sup o}C. Inelastic neutron scattering studies indicate the presence of phosphate rich grain boundary phases that may be responsible for the high conductivity of the materials.

  13. Synthesis and thermal characterization of phase-changeable indium/polyalphaolefin nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z. H.; Cao, F. Y.; Yang, B.

    2008-06-01

    Previous research on nanofluids has primarily focused on how to increase thermal conductivity of the fluids. Here, the use of phase change materials as nanoparticles in nanofluids has been proposed to simultaneously enhance the effective thermal conductivity and specific heat of the fluids. As an example, a suspension of indium nanoparticles (melting temperature, 157°C) in polyalphaolefin has been synthesized using a one-step, nanoemulsification method. The fluid's thermophysical properties, i.e., thermal conductivity, viscosity, and specific heat, and their temperature dependence have been investigated experimentally. The observed melting-freezing phase transition of the indium nanoparticles would considerably augment the fluid's effective specific heat.

  14. Atomic layer epitaxy of hematite on indium tin oxide for application in solar energy conversion

    DOEpatents

    Martinson, Alex B.; Riha, Shannon; Guo, Peijun; Emery, Jonathan D.

    2016-07-12

    A method to provide an article of manufacture of iron oxide on indium tin oxide for solar energy conversion. An atomic layer epitaxy method is used to deposit an uncommon bixbytite-phase iron (III) oxide (.beta.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3) which is deposited at low temperatures to provide 99% phase pure .beta.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 thin films on indium tin oxide. Subsequent annealing produces pure .alpha.-Fe.sub.2O.sub.3 with well-defined epitaxy via a topotactic transition. These highly crystalline films in the ultra thin film limit enable high efficiency photoelectrochemical chemical water splitting.

  15. Indium Hybridization of Large Format TES Bolometer Arrays to Readout Multiplexers for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Allen, Christine

    2007-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the Indium hybridization of the large format TES bolometer arrays. We are developing a key technology to enable the next generation of detectors. That is the Hybridization of Large Format Arrays using Indium bonded detector arrays containing 32x40 elements which conforms to the NIST multiplexer readout architecture of 1135 micron pitch. We have fabricated and hybridized mechanical models with the detector chips bonded after being fully back-etched. The mechanical support consists of 30 micron walls between elements Demonstrated electrical continuity for each element. The goal is to hybridize fully functional array of TES detectors to NIST readout.

  16. The study of the structural and morphology features of indium tin oxide (ITO) nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain Sofi, Ashaq; Ashraf Shah, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    Micro sized particles of indium tin oxide (ITO) were reduced to nanosized particles through a simple reaction of indium tin oxide (ITO) and de-ionized water at 210^{\\circ} \\text{C}. The typical average diameters of the as-grown nanoparticles were 80 nm to 110 nm. The phase purity and morphology of the products were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The possible mechanism of formation of ITO nanoparticles is proposed in brief through a mathematical model.

  17. Pulmonary uptake in Indium-111 leukocyte imaging: clinical significance in patients with suspected occult infections

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, P.S.; Datz, F.L.; Disbro, M.A.; Alazraki, N.P.; Taylor, A.T.

    1984-02-01

    A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the frequency and significance of pulmonary activity noted on 306 indium-111 leukocyte studies involving 232 patients with suspected occult infections. Forty-eight studies showed pulmonary activity in one of two patterns of uptake, focal or diffuse. Fourteen of 27 studies (52%) with focal uptake and two of 21 studies (10%) with diffuse uptake were associated with infectious processes. Lung uptake of indium-111-labeled leukocytes was a poor predictor of pulmonary infection in patients studied for occult infection, although the focal pattern was more likely than the diffuse pattern to be associated with infection.

  18. Ternary rare earth metal boride carbides containing two-dimensional boron carbon network: The crystal and electronic structure of R2B4C (R=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr; Zheng, Chong; Mattausch, Hansjürgen; Simon, Arndt

    2007-12-01

    The ternary rare earth boride carbides R2B4C (R=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been synthesized by reacting the elements at temperatures between 1800 and 2000K. The crystal structure of Dy2B4C has been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. It crystallizes in a new structure type in the orthorhombic space group Immm (a=3.2772(6) Å, b=6.567(2) Å, c=7.542(1) Å, Z=2, R1=0.035 (wR2=0.10) for 224 reflections with Io>2σ(Io)). Boron atoms form infinite chains of fused B6 rings in [100] joined with carbon atoms into planar, two-dimensional networks which alternate with planar sheets of rare earth metal atoms. The electronic structure of Dy2B4C was also analyzed using the tight-binding extended Hückel method.

  19. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Graham S.; George, Graham N.; Pushie, M. Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10−7 and 1.1 x 10−6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10−15 and 1.7 x 10−7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10−13 and 1.2 x 10−5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0–3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru—Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26457677

  20. Ternary boride product and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clougherty, Edward V. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A hard, tough, strong ceramic body is formed by hot pressing a mixture of a powdered metal and a powdered metal diboride. The metal employed is zirconium, titanium or hafnium and the diboride is the diboride of a different member of the same group of zirconium, titanium or hafnium to form a ternary composition. During hot pressing at temperatures above about 2,000.degree.F., a substantial proportion of acicular ternary monoboride is formed.

  1. Scaling Mesa Indium Phosphide DHBTs to Record Bandwidths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobisser, Evan

    Indium phosphide heterojunction bipolar transistors are able to achieve higher bandwidths at a given feature size than transistors in the Silicon material system for a given feature size. Indium phosphide bipolar transistors demonstrate higher breakdown voltages at a given bandwidth than both Si bipolars and field effect transistors in the InP material system. The high bandwidth of InP HBTs results from both intrinsic material parameters and bandgap engineering through epitaxial growth. The electron mobility in the InGaAs base and saturation velocity in the InP collector are both approximately three times higher than their counterparts in the SiGe material system. Resistance of the base can be made very low due to the large offset in the valence band between the InP emitter and the InGaAs base, which allows the base to be doped on the order of 1020 cm-3 with negligible reduction in emitter injection efficiency. This thesis deals with type-I, NPN dual-heterojunction bipolar transistors. The emitters are InP, and the base is InGaAs. There is a thin (˜ 10 nm) n-type InGaAs "setback" region, followed by a chirped superlattice InGaAs/InAlAs grade to the InP collector. The setback, grade, and collector are all lightly doped n-type. The emitter and collector are contacted through thin (˜ 5 nm) heavily doped n-type InGaAs layers to reduce contact resistivity. The primary focus of this work is increasing the bandwidth of InP HBTs through the proportional scaling of the device dimensions, both layer thicknesses and junction areas, as well as the reduction of the contact resistivities associated with the transistor. Essentially, all RC time constants and transit times must be reduced by a factor of two to double a transistor's bandwidth. Chapter 2 describes in detail the scaling laws and design principles for high frequency bipolar transistor design. A low-stress, blanket sputter deposited composite emitter metal process was developed. Refractory metal base contacts were

  2. Low-temperature indium-bonded alkali vapor cell for chip-scale atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straessle, R.; Pellaton, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Mileti, G.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2013-02-01

    A low-temperature sealing technique for micro-fabricated alkali vapor cells for chip-scale atomic clock applications is developed and evaluated. A thin-film indium bonding technique was used for sealing the cells at temperatures of ≤140 °C. These sealing temperatures are much lower than those reported for other approaches, and make the technique highly interesting for future micro-fabricated cells, using anti-relaxation wall coatings. Optical and microwave spectroscopy performed on first indium-bonded cells without wall coatings are used to evaluate the cleanliness of the process as well as a potential leak rate of the cells. Both measurements confirm a stable pressure inside the cell and therefore an excellent hermeticity of the indium bonding. The double-resonance measurements performed over several months show an upper limit for the leak rate of 1.5 × 10-13 mbar.l/s. This is in agreement with additional leak-rate measurements using a membrane deflection method on indium-bonded test structures.

  3. Reduction of the Casimir force from indium tin oxide film by UV treatment.

    PubMed

    Chang, C-C; Banishev, A A; Klimchitskaya, G L; Mostepanenko, V M; Mohideen, U

    2011-08-26

    A significant decrease in the magnitude of the Casimir force (from 21% to 35%) was observed after an indium tin oxide sample interacting with an Au sphere was subjected to the UV treatment. Measurements were performed by using an atomic force microscope in high vacuum. The experimental results are compared with theory and a hypothetical explanation for the observed phenomenon is proposed. PMID:21929216

  4. Determination of tellurium in indium antimonide semiconductor material by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shiue, M Y; Sun, Y C; Yang, M H

    2001-08-01

    A method for the determination of the dopant concentration of tellurium in dissolved indium antimonide semiconductor material by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. Efforts were made to investigate the optimal conditions of the furnace heating program and the effect of palladium modifier on the variation of tellurium and the background absorbance. According to the results obtained, the presence of palladium chemical modifier in the analysis of indium antimonide allowed the successful retention of tellurium in the graphite tube, and the optimum mass of palladium modifier was found to be dependent on the sample matrix concentration. The absorbance profile of tellurium and the background level were significantly improved when a pyrolysis temperature of 1100 degrees C and an atomization temperature of 2200 degrees C were employed in the optimized heating program. With the use of this method, a detection limit of 0.8 microg g(-1) tellurium in indium antimonide could be achieved. The applicability of the proposed method was evaluated by comparison with two independent methods, i.e. slurry sampling-ETAAS and ICP-MS. From the good agreement between the results, it was demonstrated that the proposed method is suitable for the determination of typical dopant concentrations of tellurium in indium antimonide. PMID:11534624

  5. Room temperature ferromagnetic ordering in indium substituted nano-nickel-zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Sangeeta; Katyal, S. C.; Gupta, A.; Reddy, V. R.; Singh, M.

    2009-04-01

    Nano-nickel-zinc-indium ferrite (NZIFO)(Ni0.58Zn0.42InxFe2-xO4) with varied quantities of indium (x =0,0.1,0.2) have been synthesized via reverse micelle technique. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy confirmed the size, structure, and morphology of the nanoferrites. The addition of indium in nickel-zinc ferrite (NZFO) has been shown to play a crucial role in enhancing the magnetic properties. Room temperature Mössbauer spectra revealed that the nano-NZFO ferrite exhibit collective magnetic excitations, while indium doped NZFO samples have the ferromagnetic phase. The dependence of Mössbauer parameters, viz. isomer shift, quadrupole splitting, linewidth, and hyperfine magnetic field, on In3+ concentration has been studied. Mössbauer study on these nanosystems shows that the cation distribution not only depends on the particle size but also on the preparation route. Mössbauer results are also supported by magnetization data. Well defined sextets and appearance of hysteresis at room temperature indicate the existence of ferromagnetic couplings which makes nano-NZIFO ferrite suitable for magnetic storage data.

  6. Recovery of indium from etching wastewater using supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui-Ming; Wu, Chia-Chan; Lin, Yun-Hua; Chiang, Chien-Kai

    2009-12-30

    This study presents supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) extraction as an inherently safer and cleaner method for the recovery of indium (In) from the real etching wastewater obtained from indium tin oxide (ITO) etching process. Efficient chelation-supercritical fluids extraction (SFE) from etching wastewater was obtained at 80 degrees C, a pressure of 20.7MPa, and with 15 min static extractions followed by 15 min dynamic extraction. The extractions were performed using unmodified scCO(2) in the presence of the fluorinated beta-diketone chelating agent, 2,2-dimethyl-6,6,7,7,8,8,8-heptafluoro-3,5-octanedione (HFOD). Percentages of indium recovery from etching wastewater were between 90.8% and 100.3% (n=6) with relative standard deviations of <10%. The accuracy of the procedure was confirmed by determining indium levels in a single element standard solution. The developed method was applied to the analysis of real etching wastewater samples as well as to a commercially available ITO etching reagent (ITO-06SD) with satisfactory results. PMID:19699579

  7. Indium Hybridization of Large Format TES Bolometer Arrays to Readout Multiplexers for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Allen, Christine

    2008-04-01

    In our effort to develop large format kilo-pixel arrays of transition edge sensors, we are working toward demonstrating electrical connectivity of a hybridized 32×40 element detector to a NIST multiplexer. The geometry of large-scale arrays that attempt to maintain a high filling factor does not allow for typical fan-out wiring, thus the detector array is hybridized directly to the readout multiplexer. The two parts are bonded together with 10 micron tall indium bumps, which complete the electrical path and also provide mechanical strength. The indium hybridization was developed and performed at the Goddard Space Flight Center and has been shown to withstand tensile loading up to 0.26 gram-force per indium bump. A cavity is deep etched behind each pixel prior to bonding, leaving only 30 micron support walls, which maintains a high filling fraction. Electrical continuity has been shown through the indium path in room temperature measurements. We report on the fabrication process used to hybridize the parts and the subsequent electrical performance.

  8. Atmospheric Deposition of Indium in the Northeastern United States: Flux and Historical Trends.

    PubMed

    White, Sarah Jane O; Keach, Carrie; Hemond, Harold F

    2015-11-01

    The metal indium is an example of an increasingly important material used in electronics and new energy technologies, whose environmental behavior and toxicity are poorly understood despite increasing evidence of detrimental health impacts and human-induced releases to the environment. In the present work, the history of indium deposition from the atmosphere is reconstructed from its depositional record in an ombrotrophic bog in Massachusetts. A novel freeze-coring technique is used to overcome coring difficulties posed by woody roots and peat compressibility, enabling retrieval of relatively undisturbed peat cores dating back more than a century. Results indicate that long-range atmospheric transport is a significant pathway for the transport of indium, with peak concentrations of 69 ppb and peak fluxes of 1.9 ng/cm2/yr. Atmospheric deposition to the bog began increasing in the late 1800s/early 1900s, and peaked in the early 1970s. A comparison of deposition data with industrial production and emissions estimates suggests that both coal combustion and the smelting of lead, zinc, copper, and tin sulfides are sources of indium to the atmosphere in this region. Deposition appears to have decreased considerably since the 1970s, potentially a visible effect of particulate emissions controls instated in North America during that decade. PMID:26426729

  9. INDIUM MEDIATED REACTIONS IN WATER: SYNTHESIS OF BETA-HYDROXYL ESTERS. (R822668)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    A variety of small beta, Greek-hydroxyl esters were synthesized efficiently through indium mediated carbon-carbon bond formation in water followed by ozonolysis.

  10. Use of indium-111-labeled white blood cells in the diagnosis of diabetic foot infections

    SciTech Connect

    Zeiger, L.S.; Fox, I.M.

    1990-01-01

    The diagnosis of bone infection in the patient with nonvirgin bone is a diagnostic dilemma. This is especially true in the diabetic patient with a soft tissue infection and an underlying osteoarthropathy. The authors present a retrospective study using the new scintigraphic technique of indium-111-labeled white blood cells as a method of attempting to solve this diagnostic dilemma.

  11. Liquid precursor for deposition of indium selenide and method of preparing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Ginley, David S.; Hersh, Peter A.; Eldada, Louay; Stanbery, Billy J.

    2015-09-22

    Liquid precursors containing indium and selenium suitable for deposition on a substrate to form thin films suitable for semiconductor applications are disclosed. Methods of preparing such liquid precursors and method of depositing a liquid precursor on a substrate are also disclosed.

  12. High activity of an indium alkoxide complex toward ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters.

    PubMed

    Quan, Stephanie M; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2015-06-14

    An indium complex supported by a ferrocene-derived Schiff base ligand has an unprecedented high activity toward ε-caprolactone, δ-valerolactone, and β-butyrolactone. l-Lactide, d,l-lactide, and trimethylene carbonate polymerizations also showed moderate to high activity. PMID:25973852

  13. Apker Award Talk: Atomic Beam Measurement of the Indium 6p1 / 2 Scalar Polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augenbraun, Benjamin

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first measurement of the scalar polarizability of the indium 6p1 / 2 -excited state using two-step laser spectroscopy in an atomic beam. This is one in a series of precise atomic structure measurements by the Majumder lab at Williams College, which serve as stringent tests of abinitio calculation methods for three-valence-electron systems. We stabilize a laser to the indium 5p1 / 2 --> 6s1 / 2 410 nm transition and scan a second laser across the 6s1 / 2 --> 6p1 / 2 1343 nm transition. The two laser beams are overlapped and interact transversely with a collimated atomic beam of indium. Two-tone FM spectroscopy allows us to observe the small (< 1 part in 103) IR absorption, and characteristic sideband features in the RF-demodulated lineshape provide built-in frequency calibration. Application of DC electric fields up to 20 kV/cm give rise to Stark shifts of order 100 MHz. Because our group has previously measured the difference in polarizabilities within the 410 nm transition, we can determine the 6p1 / 2 polarizability with no loss of precision. Preliminary results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical calculations and can be used to infer accurate values for the indium 6 p - 5 d matrix elements.

  14. INDIUM AND ZINC MEDIATED ONE-ATOM CARBOCYCLE ENLARGEMENT IN WATER. (R822668)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Six-, seven-, eight-membered rings are enlarged by one carbon-atom into seven-, eight- and nine-membered ring derivatives respectively, via indium or zinc mediated reactions in aqueous medium.

  15. Growth of Indium Gallium Nitride Nanorings via Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Zohair

    III-Nitride nanostructures have been an active area of research recently due to their ability to tune their optoelectronic properties. Thus far work has been done on InGaN quantum dots, nanowires, nanopillars, amongst other structures, but this research reports the creation of a new type of InGaN nanostructure, nanorings. Hexagonal InGaN nanorings were formed using Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition through droplet epitaxy. The nanorings were thoroughly analyzed using x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, electron microscopy, electron diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Nanorings with high indium incorporation were achieved with indium content up to 50% that was then controlled using the growth time, temperature, In/Ga ratio and III/N ratio. The analysis showed that the nanoring shape is able to incorporate more indium than other nanostructures, due to the relaxing mechanism involved in the formation of the nanoring. The ideal conditions were determined to be growth of 30 second droplets with a growth time of 1 minute 30 seconds at 770 C to achieve the most well developed rings with the highest indium concentration.

  16. Current and historical record of indium deposition from the atmosphere to an ombrotrophic bog in northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. O.; Keach, C.; Hemond, H.

    2012-12-01

    The industrial production of indium is increasing dramatically due to new uses in the rapidly growing electronics, photovoltaic, and LED industries. Little is known, however, about the natural or industrial cycling of indium or its environmental behavior, despite the fact that industrial emissions to the atmosphere appear to have already exceeded natural emissions. The history of metal deposition from the atmosphere is often reflected in the vertical profiles of the metals in ombrotrophic bogs, which by definition do not receive surface or subsurface runoff. Analysis of a peat core obtained using a novel freeze corer at Thoreau's Bog in Concord, MA shows that the rate of indium deposition to the bog increased beginning in the early 1900s, peaked in the early 1970s, and then decreased dramatically to pre-1900 values by the present time. This profile is counter to the pattern of indium's industrial use, which has increased only in the past 30-40 years. The profile coincides well, however, with the estimated history of particulate emissions from smelting and from coal combustion in North America. Back-trajectory analysis suggests that smelting was the dominant source of atmospheric particles with high indium concentrations deposited to the bog. This study suggests that metal smelting and coal burning are currently indium's primary industrial environmental sources. While releases from the semiconductor and electronics industries are comparatively small at present, this scenario may change with the rapid growth of indium use in these industries.

  17. Defects, strain relaxation, and compositional grading in high indium content InGaN epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazioti, C.; Kehagias, Th.; Pavlidou, E.; Komninou, Ph.; Karakostas, Th.; Dimitrakopulos, G. P.; Papadomanolaki, E.; Iliopoulos, E.; Walther, T.; Smalc-Koziorowska, J.

    2015-10-21

    We investigate the structural properties of a series of high alloy content InGaN epilayers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy, employing the deposition temperature as variable under invariant element fluxes. Using transmission electron microscopy methods, distinct strain relaxation modes were observed, depending on the indium content attained through temperature adjustment. At lower indium contents, strain relaxation by V-pit formation dominated, with concurrent formation of an indium-rich interfacial zone. With increasing indium content, this mechanism was gradually substituted by the introduction of a self-formed strained interfacial InGaN layer of lower indium content, as well as multiple intrinsic basal stacking faults and threading dislocations in the rest of the film. We show that this interfacial layer is not chemically abrupt and that major plastic strain relaxation through defect introduction commences upon reaching a critical indium concentration as a result of compositional pulling. Upon further increase of the indium content, this relaxation mode was again gradually succeeded by the increase in the density of misfit dislocations at the InGaN/GaN interface, leading eventually to the suppression of the strained InGaN layer and basal stacking faults.

  18. Characterization and exposure measurement for indium oxide nanofibers generated as byproducts in the LED manufacturing environment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kwang-Min; An, Hee-Chul

    2016-01-01

    This article aimed to elucidate the physicochemical characteristics and exposure concentration of powder and airborne particles as byproducts generated from indium tin oxide thin film process by an electron beam evaporation method during maintenance in light-emitting diode manufacturing environment. The chemical composition, size, shape, and crystal structure of powder and airborne particles as byproducts were investigated using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive spectrometer, and an X-ray diffractometer. The number and mass concentration measurements of airborne particles were performed by using an optical particle counter of direct-reading aerosol monitor and an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry after sampling, respectively. The airborne particles are composed of oxygen and indium. On the other hand, the powder byproducts consist mostly of oxygen and indium, but tin was found as a minor component. The shapes of the airborne and powder byproducts were fiber type. The length and diameter of fibrous particles were approximately 500-2,000 nm and 30-50 nm, respectively. The powder byproducts indicated indium oxide nanofibers with a rhombohedral structure. On the other hand, the indium oxide used as a source material in the preparation of ITO target showed spherical morphology with a body-centered cubic structure, and it was the same as that of the pure crystalline indium oxide powder. During maintenance, the number concentrations ranged from 350-75,693 particles/ft(3), and arithmetic mean±standard deviation and geometric mean±geometric standard deviation were 11,624±15,547 and 4,846±4.12 particles/ft(3), respectively. Meanwhile, under the same conditions, the airborne mass concentrations of the indium based on respirable particle size (3.5 µm cut-point 50%) were 0.09-0.19 µg/m(3). Physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticle can affect toxicity so the fact that shape and crystal structure have changed is important. Thus

  19. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of indium substituted nanocrystalline Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, Kishor Kr.; Nandi, Mithun; Talukdar, Anup K.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • In situ modification of the MFI zeolite by incorporation of indium. • The samples were characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA, UV–vis (DRS), SAA, EDX and SEM. • The incorporation of indium was confirmed by XRD, FT-IR, UV–vis (DRS), EDX and TGA. • Hydroxylation of phenol reaction was studied on the synthesized catalysts. - Abstract: A series of indium doped Mobil Five (MFI) zeolite were synthesized hydrothermally with silicon to aluminium and indium molar ratio of 100 and with aluminium to indium molar ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1. The MFI zeolite phase was identified by XRD and FT-IR analysis. In XRD analysis the prominent peaks were observed at 2θ values of around 6.5° and 23° with a few additional shoulder peaks in case of all the indium incorporated samples suggesting formation of pure phase of the MFI zeolite. All the samples under the present investigation were found to exhibit high crystallinity (∼92%). The crystallite sizes of the samples were found to vary from about 49 to 55 nm. IR results confirmed the formation of MFI zeolite in all cases showing distinct absorbance bands near 1080, 790, 540, 450 and 990 cm{sup −1}. TG analysis of In-MFI zeolites showed mass losses in three different steps which are attributed to the loss due to adsorbed water molecules and the two types TPA{sup +} cations. Further, the UV–vis (DRS) studies reflected the position of the indium metal in the zeolite framework. Surface area analysis of the synthesized samples was carried out to characterize the synthesized samples The analysis showed that the specific surface area ranged from ∼357 to ∼361 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} and the pore volume of the synthesized samples ranged from 0.177 to 0.182 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. The scanning electron microscopy studies showed the structure of the samples to be rectangular and twinned rectangular shaped. The EDX analysis was carried out for confirmation of Si, Al and In in zeolite frame work. The catalytic activities of

  20. Development of an Indium bump bond process for silicon pixel detectors at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broennimann, Ch.; Glaus, F.; Gobrecht, J.; Heising, S.; Horisberger, M.; Horisberger, R.; Kästli, H. C.; Lehmann, J.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.

    2006-09-01

    The hybrid pixel detectors used in the high-energy physics experiments currently under construction use a vertical connection technique, the so-called bump bonding. As the pitch below 100 μm, required in these applications, cannot be fulfilled with standard industrial processes (e.g. the IBM C4 process), an in-house bump bond process using reflowed indium bumps was developed at PSI as part of the R&D for the CMS-pixel detector. The bump deposition on the sensor is performed in two subsequent lift-off steps. As the first photolithographic step a thin under bump metalization (UBM) is sputtered onto bump pads. It is wettable by indium and defines the diameter of the bump. The indium is evaporated via a second photolithographic step with larger openings and is reflowed afterwards. The height of the balls is defined by the volume of the indium. On the readout chip only one photolithographic step is carried out to deposit the UBM and a thin indium layer for better adhesion. After mating both parts a second reflow is performed for self-alignment and obtaining high mechanical strength. For the placement of the chips a manual and an automatic machine were constructed. The former is very flexible in handling different chip and module geometries but has a limited throughput while the latter features a much higher grade of automatization and is therefore much more suited for producing hundreds of modules with a well-defined geometry. The reliability of this process was proven by the successful construction of the PILATUS detector. The construction of PILATUS 6M (60 modules) and the CMS pixel barrel (roughly 800 modules) has started in early 2006.

  1. Indium telluride nanotubes: Solvothermal synthesis, growth mechanism, and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Liyan; Yan, Shancheng; Lu, Tao; Shi, Yi; Wang, Jianyu; Yang, Fan

    2014-03-15

    hydrogen storage, compared with the nanowires. The nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm, covering the UV–visible–NIR region. This good performance of In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes may enable significant advancements of new photodetection and photosensing applications. Highlights: • The In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm. • The nanotube is 137.85 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, which makes it suitable for gas sensing and hydrogen storage. • A possible growth mechanism of the indium telluride nanotubes was proposed. • In addition, no In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes have been reported until now.

  2. Atomic site preferences and its effect on magnetic structure in the intermetallic borides M{sub 2}Fe(Ru{sub 0.8}T{sub 0.2}){sub 5}B{sub 2} (M=Sc, Ti, Zr; T=Ru, Rh, Ir)

    SciTech Connect

    Brgoch, Jakoah; Mahmoud, Yassir A.; Miller, Gordon J.

    2012-12-15

    The site preference for a class of intermetallic borides following the general formula M{sub 2}Fe(Ru{sub 0.8}T{sub 0.2}){sub 5}B{sub 2} (M=Sc, Ti, Zr; T=Ru, Rh, Ir), has been explored using ab initio and semi-empirical electronic structure calculations. This intermetallic boride series contains two potential sites, the Wyckoff 2c and 8j sites, for Rh or Ir to replace Ru atoms. Since the 8j site is a nearest neighbor to the magnetically active Fe atom, whereas the 2c site is a next nearest neighbor, the substitution pattern should play an important role in the magnetic structure of these compounds. The substitution preference is analyzed based on the site energy and bond energy terms, both of which arise from a tight-binding evaluation of the electronic band energy, and are known to influence the locations of atoms in extended solids. According to these calculations, the valence electron-rich Rh and Ir atoms prefer to occupy the 8j site, a result also corroborated by experimental evidence. Additionally, substitution of Rh or Ir at the 8j site results in a modification of the magnetic structure that ultimately results in larger local magnetic moment on the Fe atoms. - Graphical abstract: The site preference for electron rich atoms to occupy the 8j (gray) site is identified in these intermetallic borides, while the magnetic structure is modified as a function of the substituted atoms band center. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify the energetics dictating the site preference in a series of intermetallic borides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Establish substitution rules for use in future directed synthetic preparations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identified changes in magnetic structure that accompany the site preference.

  3. Synthesis and crystal structures of the new metal-rich ternary borides Ni{sub 12}AlB{sub 8}, Ni{sub 12}GaB{sub 8} and Ni{sub 10.6}Ga{sub 0.4}B{sub 6}-examples for the first B{sub 5} zig-zag chain fragment

    SciTech Connect

    Ade, Martin; Kotzott, Dominik; Hillebrecht, Harald

    2010-08-15

    Single crystals of the new borides Ni{sub 12}AlB{sub 8}, and Ni{sub 10.6}Ga{sub 0.4}B{sub 6} were synthesized from the elements and characterized by XRD and EDXS measurements. The crystal structures were refined on the basis of single crystal data. Ni{sub 12}AlB{sub 8} (oC252, Cmce, a=10.527(2), b=14.527(2), c=14.554(2) A, Z=12, 1350 reflections, 127 parameters, R{sub 1}(F)=0.0284, wR{sub 2}(F{sup 2})=0.0590) represents a new structure type with isolated B atoms and B{sub 5} fragments of a B-B zig-zag chain. Because the pseudotetragonal metric crystals are usually twinned. Ni{sub 10.6}Ga{sub 0.4}B{sub 6} (oP68, Pnma, a=12.305(2), b=2.9488(6), c=16.914(3) A, Z=4, 1386 reflections, 86 parameters, R{sub 1}(F)=0.0394, wR{sub 2}(F{sup 2})=0.104) is closely related to binary Ni borides. The structure contains B-B zig-zag chains and isolated B atoms. Ni{sub 12}GaB{sub 8} is isotypical to the Al-compound (a=10.569(4), b=14.527(4) and c=14.557(5) A). - Graphical abstract: Pentameric B{sub 5}-units are longest fragments of a B-B zig-zag chain ever characterized in a boride. They are found in the structures of Ni{sub 12}AlB{sub 8} and Ni{sub 12}GaB{sub 8}. The compounds are formed on annealing boron-rich {tau}-borides like Ni{sub 20}AlB{sub 14}.

  4. First-principles study of structural stability, elastic and electronic properties of ternary rare earth-transition metal—Borides and carbides (RTxZ, R=Sc, Y, and La, T=Pt and Pd, Z=B and C, and x=2, 3, and 4)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Tiankai; Wang, Yachun; Li, Hui; Lian, Jie; Zhang, Jingwu; Gou, Huiyang

    2013-12-01

    Using first-principles total energy calculations (CASTEP code), the structural stability, elastic, and electronic properties of ternary rare earth-transition metal borides and carbides (RTxZ, R=Sc, Y, and La, T=Pt and Pd, Z=B and C, and x=2, 3, and 4) compounds were studied. Results show that RT3Z compounds with tetragonal P4mm structure are energetically more favorable than usually cubic perovskite-type structure. Furthermore, RT3Z with perovskite structure is found to be mechanically unstable with the negative C44. Formation enthalpy calculations indicate that Pt-based borides are easier to be synthesized compared with Pd-based ones and counterpart carbides, respectively. Elastic constants, bulk moduli, shear moduli, Young's moduli, and Poisson's ratio of studied compounds have been calculated. Also, all the studied compounds show ductile behavior. Moreover, total and partial density of states (DOSs) and bonding charge density were employed to elucidate the bonding features of these compounds. The results reveal that the covalency between Pt-5d and Z-2p as well as T-nd (n=4 for Pd and 5 for Pt) and B-2p states, are the cause of the relatively higher elastic moduli of Pt-based compounds and R-T-borides, respectively.

  5. Determination of indium in geological materials by electrothermal-atomization atomic absorption spectrometry with a tungsten-impregnated graphite furance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, L.; Chao, T.T.; Meier, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The sample is fused with lithium metaborate and the melt is dissolved in 15% (v/v) hydrobromic acid. Iron(III) is reduced with ascorbic acid to avoid its coextraction with indium as the bromide into methyl isobutyl ketone. Impregnation of the graphite furnace with sodium tungstate, and the presence of lithium metaborate and ascorbic acid in the reaction medium improve the sensitivity and precision. The limits of determination are 0.025-16 mg kg-1 indium in the sample. For 22 geological reference samples containing more than 0.1 mg kg-1 indium, relative standard deviations ranged from 3.0 to 8.5% (average 5.7%). Recoveries of indium added to various samples ranged from 96.7 to 105.6% (average 100.2%). ?? 1984.

  6. Indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphic detection of subclinical osteomyelitis complicating delayed and nonunion long bone fractures: a prospective study

    SciTech Connect

    Esterhai, J.L. Jr.; Goll, S.R.; McCarthy, K.E.; Velchik, M.; Alavi, A.; Brighton, C.T.; Heppenstall, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty patients were studied prospectively with indium-labeled leukocyte imaging to evaluate its effectiveness in differentiating noninfected delayed or nonunion from osteomyelitis complicating these entities. All patients underwent an open surgical procedure within 24 h of the scan. Bone specimens from the nonunion site were obtained for microbiological and histological analysis to confirm the presence or absence of osteomyelitis. In these twenty patients, the sensitivity of the indium scintigraphy was 100%, the specificity 100%, and the overall accuracy 100%. Indium-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy is significantly more accurate than /sup 99m/technetium and /sup 67/gallium imaging had been, when studied earlier, in detecting subclinical osteomyelitis complicating nonunion. Indium-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy should supplant sequential technetium and gallium studies in this patient population when the surgeon must determine whether subclinical osteomyelitis is complicating fracture management of delayed and nonunions.

  7. Influence of dislocations on indium diffusion in semi-polar InGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yao; Sun, Huabin; Chen, Peng; Sang, Liwen; Dierre, Benjamin; Sumiya, Masatomo; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Zheng, Youdou; Shi, Yi

    2015-05-15

    The spatial distribution of indium composition in InGaN/GaN heterostructure is a critical topic for modulating the wavelength of light emitting diodes. In this letter, semi-polar InGaN/GaN heterostructure stripes were fabricated on patterned GaN/Sapphire substrates by epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO), and the spatial distribution of indium composition in the InGaN layer was characterized by using cathodoluminescence. It is found that the indium composition is mainly controlled by the diffusion behaviors of metal atoms (In and Ga) on the surface. The diffusivity of metal atoms decreases sharply as migrating to the region with a high density of dislocations and other defects, which influences the distribution of indium composition evidently. Our work is beneficial for the understanding of ELO process and the further development of InGaN/GaN heterostructure based devices.

  8. Indium-Mediated Intramolecular Reaction of N-(2-Iodobenzoyl)azabenzonorbornadienes: A General Access to Dihydrobenzo[c]phenanthridinones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lei, Kang; Liu, Na; Sun, Dong-Wei; Hua, Xue-Wen; Li, Ya-Juan; Xu, Xiao-Hua

    2016-07-01

    An efficient synthesis of dihydrobenzo[c]phenanthridinones was achieved by utilizing an indium(0)-mediated intramolecular cyclization reaction under ligand- and base-free conditions. A variety of functional groups were tolerated in the present protocol. PMID:27243934

  9. GEMAS: Concentrations and origin of indium in agricultural soil of Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladenberger, Anna; Sadeghi, Martiya; Demetriades, Alecos; Reimann, Clemens; Birke, Manfred; Andersson, Madelen; Jonsson, Erik

    2014-05-01

    Indium is classified as a critical metal, urgently needed in the electronics industry, especially for the production of solar panels and LCD screens. It is a volatile chalcophile rare element and its primary sources are different types of sulphide ore deposits. Although sphalerite is the main host mineral for indium, chalcopyrite-rich ores usually contain the highest contents of this element. Apart from common sulphides, higher indium concentrations can occur in cassiterite, wolframite and magnetite, in addition to few known indium minerals such as roquesite. Indium is a very rare element and its determination needs a technique with very low detection limits. Data for In are hardly ever provided in geochemical data sets due to its function as an internal standard when using the ICP-MS for analysis. Within the GEMAS project, over 4000 samples of agricultural (Ap) and grazing land (Gr) soil have been collected, and indium concentrations have been measured by ICP-MS in an aqua regia extraction. The median value of aqua regia extractable In in European soil is 0.0176 mg/kg in the Ap and 0.0177 mg/kg in the Gr samples. The most striking pattern on an In distribution map of Europe in an aqua regia extraction is the large difference between northern (low - median 0.012 mg/kg In in the Ap samples) and southern Europe (high - median 0.021 mg/kg In in the Ap samples). The boundary between predominantly high and low concentrations follows exactly the southernmost limit of the last glaciation. In southern Scandinavia, clay-rich soil is indicated by In anomalies, as is the Oslo Rift and the old silver mine at Kongsberg (Norway). Generally, distinct In anomalies mark many of the famous old mining areas of the continent, typically those featuring relatively young hydrothermal deposits (northern Portugal, Iberian Pyrite Belt, Cornwall in the UK, Harz in Germany and Erzgebirge at the German/Czech border), and granitic intrusions (probably related to associated Sn and skarn

  10. Monovalent indium in a sulfur-rich coordination environment: synthesis, structure and reactivity of tris(2-mercapto-1-tert-butylimidazolyl)hydroborato indium, [TmBut]In.

    PubMed

    Yurkerwich, Kevin; Buccella, Daniela; Melnick, Jonathan G; Parkin, Gerard

    2008-07-28

    [Tm(Bu(t))]In, the first structurally-characterized monovalent indium compound that features a sulfur-rich coordination environment, has been synthesized via treatment of InCl with [Tm(Bu(t))]K; in contrast to the thallium counterpart, the lone pair of [Tm(Bu(t))]In is a site of reactivity, thereby allowing formation of [Tm(Bu(t))]In-->B(C(6)F(5))(3) and [Tm(Bu(t))]In(kappa(2)-S(4)) upon treatment with B(C(6)F(5))(3) and S(8), respectively. PMID:18622452

  11. Recovery of indium from used LCD panel by a time efficient and environmentally sound method assisted HEBM

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Cheol-Hee; Jeong, Mi-Kyung; Fatih Kilicaslan, M.; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Hong, Hyun-Seon; Hong, Soon-Jik

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► In this study, we recovered indium from a waste LCD panel. ► The ITO glass was milled to obtain micron size particles in a HEBM machine. ► Effect of particle size of ITO glass on the amount of dissolved In was investigated. ► In a very short time, a considerable amount of In was recovered. ► Amount of HCl in acid solution was decreased to 40 vol.%. - Abstract: In this study, a method which is environmentally sound, time and energy efficient has been used for recovery of indium from used liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. In this method, indium tin oxide (ITO) glass was crushed to micron size particles in seconds via high energy ball milling (HEBM). The parameters affecting the amount of dissolved indium such as milling time, particle size, effect time of acid solution, amount of HCl in the acid solution were tried to be optimized. The results show that by crushing ITO glass to micron size particles by HEBM, it is possible to extract higher amount of indium at room temperature than that by conventional methods using only conventional shredding machines. In this study, 86% of indium which exists in raw materials was recovered about in a very short time.

  12. Indium droplet formation in InGaN thin films with single and double heterojunctions prepared by MOCVD

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Indium gallium nitride (InGaN) samples with single heterojunction (SH) and double heterojunction (DH) were prepared using metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. SH has a layer of InGaN thin film (thicknesses, 25, 50, 100, and 200 nm) grown on an uGaN film (thickness, 2 μm). The DH samples are distinguished by DH uGaN film (thickness, 120 nm) grown on the InGaN layer. Reciprocal space mapping measurements reveal that the DH samples are fully strained with different thicknesses, whereas the strain in the SH samples are significantly relaxed with the increasing thickness of the InGaN film. Scanning electron microscopy results show that the surface roughness of the sample increases when the sample is relaxed. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of the structure of indium droplets in the DH sample indicate that the thickness of the InGaN layer decreases with the density of indium droplets. The formation of these droplets is attributed to the insufficient kinetic energy of indium atom to react with the elements of group V, resulting to aggregation. The gallium atoms in the GaN thin film will not be uniformly replaced by indium atoms; the InGaN thin film has an uneven distribution of indium atoms and the quality of the epitaxial layer is degraded. PMID:25024692

  13. Recycling of indium from CIGS photovoltaic cells: potential of combining acid-resistant nanofiltration with liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Yannick-Serge; Niewersch, Claudia; Lenz, Markus; Kül, Zöhre Zohra; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Schäffer, Andreas; Wintgens, Thomas

    2014-11-18

    Electronic consumer products such as smartphones, TV, computers, light-emitting diodes, and photovoltaic cells crucially depend on metals and metalloids. So-called "urban mining" considers them as secondary resources since they may contain precious elements at concentrations many times higher than their primary ores. Indium is of foremost interest being widely used, expensive, scarce and prone to supply risk. This study first investigated the capability of different nanofiltration membranes of extracting indium from copper-indium-gallium- selenide photovoltaic cell (CIGS) leachates under low pH conditions and low transmembrane pressure differences (<3 bar). Retentates were then subjected to a further selective liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Even at very acidic pH indium was retained to >98% by nanofiltration, separating it from parts of the Ag, Sb, Se, and Zn present. LLE using di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) extracted 97% of the indium from the retentates, separating it from all other elements except for Mo, Al, and Sn. Overall, 95% (2.4 g m(-2) CIGS) of the indium could be extracted to the D2EHPA phase. Simultaneously, by nanofiltration the consumption of D2EHPA was reduced by >60% due to the metal concentration in the reduced retentate volume. These results show clearly the potential for efficient scarce metal recovery from secondary resources. Furthermore, since nanofiltration was applicable at very low pH (≥ 0.6), it may be applied in hydrometallurgy typically using acidic conditions. PMID:25310266

  14. Temperature sensibility of the birefringence properties in side-hole photonic crystal fiber filled with Indium

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes-Vera, Erick Gómez-Cardona, Nelson D.; Chesini, Giancarlo; Cordeiro, Cristiano M. B.; Torres, Pedro

    2014-11-17

    We report on the temperature sensitivity of the birefringence properties of a special kind of photonic crystal fiber containing two side holes filled with Indium metal. The modulation of the fiber birefringence is accomplished through the stress field induced by the expansion of the metal. Although the fiber was made at low gas pressures during the indium infiltration process, the birefringence showed anomalous property at a relatively low temperature value, which is completely different from those reported in conventional-like fibers with two holes filled with metal. By modeling the anisotropic changes induced by the metal expansion to the refractive index within the fiber, we are able to reproduce the experimental results. Our results have practical relevance for the design of devices based on this technology.

  15. Superconducting thin films of (100) and (111) oriented indium doped topological crystalline insulator SnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Si, W.; Zhang, C.; Wu, L.; Ozaki, T.; Gu, G.; Li, Q.

    2015-09-01

    Recent discovery of the topological crystalline insulator SnTe has triggered a search for topological superconductors, which have potential application to topological quantum computing. The present work reports on the superconducting properties of indium doped SnTe thin films. The (100) and (111) oriented thin films were epitaxially grown by pulsed-laser deposition on (100) and (111) BaF2 crystalline substrates respectively. The onset superconducting transition temperatures are about 3.8 K for (100) and 3.6 K for (111) orientations, slightly lower than that of the bulk. Magneto-resistive measurements indicate that these thin films may have upper critical fields higher than that of the bulk. With large surface-to-bulk ratio, superconducting indium doped SnTe thin films provide a rich platform for the study of topological superconductivity and potential device applications based on topological superconductors.

  16. Synthesis and Raman spectrum of crystalline indium oxide micro-rods with rectangular cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Kavita Mehta, B. R. Singh, J. P.

    2014-04-24

    Indium oxide (IO) micro-rods with rectangular cross section were synthesized without catalyst in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system by carbothermal reduction of indium oxide at 900 °C. The rectangular micro-rods (RMRs) were grown on Si substrate in presence of water vapors and Ar atmosphere. Water was used as oxidizing reagent which controls the In/O stoichiometry in RMRs. The IO RMRs have dimensions of about 20 μm in length and about 1 μm width. The growth process involved in formation of RMRs is vapor-solid (VS) mechanism. Raman analysis was performed to obtain the phonon modes of the RMRs and the peaks of Raman spectrum were indexed to the modes being associated with bcc−In{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  17. Indium-zinc oxide transparent electrode for nitride-based light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, S.; Nakashima, S.; Iwaya, M.; Takeuchi, T.; Kamiyama, S.; Akasaki, I.; Kondo, T.; Teramae, F.; Suzuki, A.; Kitano, T.; Mori, M.; Matsubara, M.

    2013-03-01

    The basic properties of indium-zinc oxide (IZO) were investigated from the view point of the potential of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for nanostructured transparent contact. The resistivity and contact resistance to p-GaN were obtained to be 2.5×10-4 Ωcm and 9.4×10-4 Ωcm2, respectively, which are comparable to those of indium-tin oxide (ITO). The light output of the LED with the moth-eye IZO was 10 % and 40 % higher than that of the LED with the moth-eye ITO and that of the LED without the moth-eye structure, respectively.

  18. Role of indium in highly crystalline ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Anil; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K.

    2013-02-05

    Zinc oxide and indium doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In) transparent conducting thin films were deposited on glass substrates by pulsed DC magnetron sputtering using separate Zn and In targets. The independent control of the In content in ZnO has helped us to explore the role of indium in influencing the oriented (002) growth, crystallinity, conductivity and mobility of the doped films. The lowest resistivity of ZnO:In thin film is 2.73 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} ohm-cm. At the optimal condition of high (002) orientation, ZnO:In films with electrical resistivity of 7.63 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} ohm.cm and mobility of 126.4 cm{sup 2}/V.s are achieved.

  19. Role of indium in highly crystalline ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Anil; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, Dinesh K.

    2013-02-01

    Zinc oxide and indium doped zinc oxide (ZnO:In) transparent conducting thin films were deposited on glass substrates by pulsed DC magnetron sputtering using separate Zn and In targets. The independent control of the In content in ZnO has helped us to explore the role of indium in influencing the oriented (002) growth, crystallinity, conductivity and mobility of the doped films. The lowest resistivity of ZnO:In thin film is 2.73×10-3 ohm-cm. At the optimal condition of high (002) orientation, ZnO:In films with electrical resistivity of 7.63×10-3 ohm.cm and mobility of 126.4 cm2/V.s are achieved.

  20. Indium plasma in single- and two-color mid-infrared fields: Enhancement of tunable harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Wang, Zhe; Lan, Pengfei; Lu, Peixiang; Suzuki, M.; Kuroda, H.

    2016-04-01

    The tuning of odd and even high-order harmonics of ultrashort pulses along the strong resonance of laser-produced indium plasma using an optical parametric amplifier of white-light continuum radiation (1250-1400 nm) allowed observation of different harmonics enhanced in the vicinity of the 4 d105 s21S0→4 d95 s25 p 1P1 transition of In ii ions. We demonstrate various peculiarities and discuss the theoretical model of the phenomenon of tunable harmonics enhancement in the region of 62 nm using indium plasma. With the theoretical analysis we can reproduce the experimental observations and characterize the dynamics of the resonant harmonic emissions.

  1. Transparent conducting indium doped ZnO films by dc reactive S-gun magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Ye, Z Z; Tang, J F

    1989-07-15

    Transparent conducting ZnO films have been prepared by modified S-gun reactive dc magnetron sputtering using an indium doped Zn target. Films with a resistivity of 1.08 x 10(-3) Omega cm and average transmittance of over 80% in the visible region were obtained. The influence of indium content at the surface of Zn target on the resistivity and transmittance of ZnO films was investigated. Optical properties of ZnO films in the 0.2-2.5-microm range were modeled by the Drude theory of free electrons. The reflectance of ZnO films in the 2.5-26.0-microm region was calculated. PMID:20555606

  2. Thermoelectric Properties of Indium-Selenium Nanocomposites Prepared by Mechanical Alloying and Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Ju-Hyuk; Park, Hyung-Ho; Jang, Ho Won; Yoo, Myong-Jae; Paik, Dong-Su; Baek, SeungHyub; Kim, Jin-Sang

    2012-06-01

    Indium-selenium-based compounds have received much attention as thermoelectric materials since a high thermoelectric figure of merit of 1.48 at 705 K was observed in In4Se2.35. In this study, four different compositions of indium-selenium compounds, In2Se3, InSe, In4Se3, and In4Se2.35, were prepared by mechanical alloying followed by spark plasma sintering. Their thermoelectric properties such as electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient, and thermal conductivity were measured in the temperature range of 300 K to 673 K. All the In-Se compounds comprised nanoscaled structures and exhibited n-type conductivity with Seebeck coefficients ranging from -159 μV K-1 to -568 μV K-1 at room temperature.

  3. Superconducting thin films of (100) and (111) oriented indium doped topological crystalline insulator SnTe

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Si, W.; Zhang, C.; Wu, L.; Ozaki, T.; Gu, G.; Li, Q.

    2015-09-01

    Recent discovery of the topological crystalline insulator SnTe has triggered a search for topological superconductors, which have potential application to topological quantum computing. The present work reports on the superconducting properties of indium doped SnTe thin films. The (100) and (111) oriented thin films were epitaxially grown by pulsed-laser deposition on (100) and (111) BaF2 crystalline substrates respectively. The onset superconducting transition temperatures are about 3.8 K for (100) and 3.6 K for (111) orientations, slightly lower than that of the bulk. Magneto-resistive measurements indicate that these thin films may have upper critical fields higher than that of the bulk.more » With large surface-to-bulk ratio, superconducting indium doped SnTe thin films provide a rich platform for the study of topological superconductivity and potential device applications based on topological superconductors.« less

  4. A multi-step solvent-free mechanochemical route to indium(iii) complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingyi; Ganguly, Rakesh; Yongxin, Li; Díaz, Jesus; Soo, Han Sen; García, Felipe

    2016-05-10

    Mechanochemistry is well-established in the solid-phase synthesis of inorganic materials but has rarely been employed for molecular syntheses. In recent years, there has been nascent interest in 'greener' synthetic methods with less solvent, higher yields, and shorter reaction times being especially appealing to the fine chemicals and inorganic catalyst industries. Herein, we demonstrate that main-group indium(iii) complexes featuring bis(imino)acenaphthene (BIAN) ligands are readily accessible through a mechanochemical milling approach. The synthetic methodology reported herein not only bypasses the use of large solvent quantities and transition metal reagents for ligand synthesis, but also reduces reaction times dramatically. These new main-group complexes exhibit the potential to be reduced to indium(i) compounds, which may be employed as photosensitizers in organic catalyses and functional materials. PMID:27112317

  5. Thermoelectric properties of indium doped PbTe{sub 1-y}Se{sub y} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, Ashoka; Mallik, Ramesh Chandra; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2014-07-21

    Lead telluride and its alloys are well known for their thermoelectric applications. Here, a systematic study of PbTe{sub 1-y}Se{sub y} alloys doped with indium has been done. The powder X-Ray diffraction combined with Rietveld analysis confirmed the polycrystalline single phase nature of the samples, while microstructural analysis with scanning electron microscope results showed densification of samples and presence of micrometer sized particles. The temperature dependent transport properties showed that in these alloys, indium neither pinned the Fermi level as it does in PbTe, nor acted as a resonant dopant as in SnTe. At high temperatures, bipolar effect was observed which restricted the zT to 0.66 at 800 K for the sample with 30% Se content.

  6. Effect of spin-orbit interaction on the electronic structure of indium-antimonide d bands

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, V. V. Perevoshchikov, D. A.

    2015-05-15

    The bands and densities of states of d bands in indium antimonide (InSb) are determined taking into account and disregarding the spin-orbit interaction. It is established that taking into account the effect of spin-orbit interaction results also in a substantial change in the dispersion of the obtained bands instead of only in the doublet splitting of the band of core d levels at ∼(0.79–0.86) eV. It is established that it is indium 4d states with e{sub g} and t{sub 2g} symmetry that give the main contribution to the density of states. The calculations are carried out by the LAPW method with the exchange-correlation potential in the generalized gradient approximation (LAPW + GGA)

  7. A study of thermal cycling and radiation effects on indium and solder bump bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Selcuk Cihangir et al.

    2001-09-12

    The BTeV hybrid pixel detector is constructed of readout chips and sensor arrays which are developed separately. The detector is assembled by flip-chip mating of the two parts. This method requires the availability of highly reliable, reasonably low cost fine-pitch flip-chip attachment technology. We have tested the quality of two bump-bonding technologies; indium bumps (by Advanced Interconnect Technology Ltd. (AIT) of Hong Kong) and fluxless solder bumps (by MCNC in North Carolina, USA). The results have been presented elsewhere[1]. In this paper we describe tests we performed to further evaluate these technologies. We subjected 15 indium bump-bonded and 15 fluxless solder bump-bonded dummy detectors through a thermal cycle and then a dose of radiation to observe the effects of cooling, heating and radiation on bump-bonds.

  8. /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scanning in ampicillin-associated right-sided hemorrhagic colitis

    SciTech Connect

    Keshavarzian, A.; Saverymuttu, S.H.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1984-07-01

    Hemorrhagic colitis is a rare but well-recognized complication with ampicillin or penicillin derivative treatment. Early colonoscopy has been advocated in establishing the diagnosis by demonstrating the characteristic pattern of only right-sided involvement and so distinguishing it from other colitides. The authors report a patient who developed colitis after amoxycillin therapy in whom /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan demonstrated right-sided colitis which alerted them to the diagnosis. Discontinuation of the antibiotic resulting in rapid improvement, and return of the /sup 111/Indium leucocyte scan to normal in this patient suggests that ampicillin-associated colitis should not be considered purely as a hemorrhagic disease but may in some cases have an inflammatory component.

  9. Adhesion enhancement of indium tin oxide (ITO) coated quartz optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yihua; Liu, Jing; Wu, Xu; Yang, Bin

    2014-07-01

    Transparent conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) film was prepared on optical fiber through a multi-step sol-gel process. The influence of annealing temperature on the adhesion of ITO coated optical fibers was studied. Different surface treatments were applied to improve the adhesion between ITO film and quartz optical fiber. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), UV-vis spectrophotometer and Avometer were used to characterize the morphology, crystal structure and photo-electric properties. A thermal shock test was used to evaluate the adhesion. The result shows that the adhesion between ITO film and quartz optical fiber can be strongly influenced by the annealing process, and optimal adhesion can be acquired when annealing temperature is 500 °C. Surface treatments of ultrasonic cleaning and the application of surface-active agent have effectively enhanced the adhesion and photo-electric properties of indium tin oxide film coated quartz optical fiber.

  10. Optical frequency standard based upon single laser-cooled indium ion

    SciTech Connect

    Nagourney, Warren; Torgerson, Justin; Dehmelt, Hans

    1999-01-15

    The current state of our single indium ion work will be presented, with emphasis on the construction of a narrow, solid-state source of tunable UV radiation which will serve as a 'clock' laser for the single-ion standard. Indium is shown to be a favorable candidate for a standard with a long term inaccuracy of less than one part in 10{sup 17}. Its advantages are small systematic errors which are well-understood and relatively straightforward generation of the cooling and 'clock' radiation. The stringent requirements on the long term stability of the 'flywheel' clock laser and the difficulty in coherently relating the optical clock laser frequency to a convenient microwave source are problems which should soon be overcome.

  11. Effect of fluorine ions on the growth and properties of anodic oxide layers of indium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, I.N.; Gat'ko, L.E.

    1985-09-01

    The practical use of multielement IR photodetectors and idium arsenide memory elements, developed in recent years, largely determines the possibilities of the technology of deposition of dielectric layers on the surface of a semiconductor. In this paper the authors present the results of a study of the effect of fluorine ions introduced into the electrolyte on the rate of the anodic process and on the electrophysical properties of the AOF/indium arsenide interface. It is concluded that: the introduction of ammonium fluoride into a nonaqueous solution of sulfosalicylic acid increases the electrical conductivity of the electrolyte and the rate of oxidation of the semiconductor, decreases the absolute value of the potential of flat bands and the density of surface states at the oxide/indium-arsenide interface, and has no effect on the stability of the electrophysical parameters of MIS structures.

  12. Superconducting thin films of (100) and (111) oriented indium doped topological crystalline insulator SnTe

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Weidong E-mail: qiangli@bnl.gov; Zhang, Cheng; Wu, Lijun; Ozaki, Toshinori; Gu, Genda; Li, Qiang E-mail: qiangli@bnl.gov

    2015-08-31

    Recent discovery of the topological crystalline insulator SnTe has triggered a search for topological superconductors, which have potential application to topological quantum computing. The present work reports on the superconducting properties of indium doped SnTe thin films. The (100) and (111) oriented thin films were epitaxially grown by pulsed-laser deposition on (100) and (111) BaF{sub 2} crystalline substrates, respectively. The onset superconducting transition temperatures are about 3.8 K for (100) and 3.6 K for (111) orientations, slightly lower than that of the bulk. Magneto-resistive measurements indicate that these thin films may have upper critical fields higher than that of the bulk. With large surface-to-bulk ratio, superconducting indium doped SnTe thin films provide a rich platform for the study of topological superconductivity and potential device applications based on topological superconductors.

  13. Effect of InAlAs window layer on efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cell efficiencies are limited by surface recombination. The effect of a wide bandgap, lattice-matched indium aluminum arsenide (In(0.52)Al(0.48)As) window layer on the performance of InP solar cells was investigated by using the numerical code PC-1D. The p(+)n InP solar cell performance improved significantly with the use of the window layer. No improvement was seen for the n(+)p InP cells. The cell results were explained by the band diagram of the heterostructure and the conduction band energy discontinuity. The calculated current voltage and internal quantum efficiency results clearly demonstrated that In(0.52)Al(0.48)As is a very promising candidate for a window layer material for p(+)n InP solar cells.

  14. Effect of InAlAs window layer on the efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Landis, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cell efficiencies are limited by surface recombination. The effect of a wide-bandgap lattice-matched indium aluminum arsenide (In0.52Al0.48As) window layer on the performance of InP solar cells was investigated using a numerical code PC-1D. The p(+)n InP solar cell performance improves significantly with the use of a window layer. No improvement is seen for n(+)p InP cells. Cell results are explained by the band diagram of the heterostructure and the conduction-band energy discontinuity. The calculated I-V and internal quantum efficiency results clearly demonstrate that In0.52Al0.48As is a promising candidate as a window layer material for p(+)n InP solar cells.

  15. Optical properties of an indium doped CdSe nanocrystal: A density functional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salini, K.; Mathew, Thomas; Mathew, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the electronic and optical properties of a CdSe nanocrystal doped with n-type impurity atom. First principle calculations of the CdSe nanocrystal based on the density functional theory (DFT), as implemented in the Vienna Ab Initio Simulation Package (VASP) was used in the calculations. We have introduced a single Indium impurity atom into CdSe nanocrystal with 1.3 nm diameter. Nanocrystal surface dangling bonds are passivated with hydrogen atom. The band-structure, density of states and absorption spectra of the doped and undopted nanocrystals were discussed. Inclusion of the n-type impurity atom introduces an additional electron in conduction band, and significantly alters the electronic and optical properties of undoped CdSe nanocrystal. Indium doped CdSe nannocrystal have potential applications in optoelectronic devices.

  16. Effects of nitrogen flow rate on the properties of indium oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Cho, Shinho; Kim, Moonhwan

    2013-11-01

    Indium oxide thin films are deposited on glass substrates at nitrogen flow rates of 0-50% by rf reactive magnetron sputtering and are characterized for their structural, morphological, electrical, and optical properties. The experimental results showed that the control of nitrogen flow rate has a significant effect on the properties of the In2O3 thin films. The change in the preferred growth orientation from (222) to (400) planes is observed above a nitrogen flow rate of 10%. The average optical transmittance in the wavelength range of 400-1100 nm is increased from 85.4% at 0% to 86.7% at 50%, where the smallest value of the optical band gap energy is obtained. In addition to the improvement in crystallinity of the films, the nitrogen flow rate plays a crucial role in the fabrication of high-quality indium oxide films and devices. PMID:24245335

  17. Low resistance indium tin oxide contact to n-GaAs nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Chia, A. C. E.; LaPierre, R. R.

    2014-05-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) was deposited by RF sputtering on n-GaAs nanowires grown by the Au-assisted vapor-liquid-solid process in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) system. The ITO formed an Ohmic contact with n-doped (n = 8 × 1018 cm-3) GaAs nanowires with a specific contact resistance of <1.41 Ω cm2. Insertion of a 25 nm thick indium layer between 500 nm thick ITO and the GaAs nanowires resulted in a reduction of specific contact resistance to <0.13 Ω cm2 after annealing at 400 °C for 30 s. The In/ITO film had an average transmittance of 89% from 400 to 900 nm and a sheet resistance of 13 Ω/□, which is well suited for nanowire-based optoelectronic applications.

  18. Characterization of CdZnTe co-doped with indium and lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Yasir; Jie, Wanqi; Wang, Tao; He, Yihui; Xu, Lingyan; Guo, Rongrong; Xu, Yadong; Zha, Gangqiang

    2015-01-01

    Indium and lead co-doped Cd0.9Zn0.1Te (CZT:(In,Pb)) were characterized by using I-V measurement, thermally stimulated current (TSC) spectroscopy and time-of-flight (TOF). The concentration of doping level of In and Pb was 10 ppm and 2 ppm, respectively. I-V curves showed that CZT:(In,Pb) possessed the resistivity as high as 1.8×1010 Ω cm, and the mobility (μ) of about 868 cm2/V s, which is considered acceptable for detector's fabrication. However, the carrier life time (τ) was only 9.44×10-7 s. Therefore, the μτ (mobility life time product) value was low. TSC results showed thirteen different trap levels, which were much more than that in Indium doped CZT crystal. Several special traps associated with lead were found, which might be the reason for the low carrier life time.

  19. Limitations of indium-111 leukocyte scanning in febrile renal transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sebrechts, C.; Biberstein, M.; Klein, J.L.; Witztum, K.F.

    1986-04-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scanning was evaluated as a technique for investigating possible abscess as the cause of fever in 10 renal allograft recipients under therapy for rejection, acute tubular necrosis, or urinary infection. The usefulness of the method in this setting was found to be limited by marked nonspecificity of renal, pulmonary, and other focal leukocyte accumulation. Although wound infections were correctly identified, false-positive scans resulted in multiple nonproductive consultations and radiologic procedures (some invasive) and contributed to the decision to perform one negative exploratory laparotomy. Such generalized nonspecificity in this patient population is in distinct contrast to the experience with this diagnostic test in nontransplant patients, and has not previously been reported. Possible explanations and implications of these findings are discussed. Consequently, great caution is recommended in the use of indium-111 leukocyte scans to diagnose infection in febrile renal transplant patients who present in a similar clinical setting.

  20. Low-temperature thin-film indium bonding for reliable wafer-level hermetic MEMS packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straessle, R.; Pétremand, Y.; Briand, D.; Dadras, M.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper reports on low-temperature and hermetic thin-film indium bonding for wafer-level encapsulation and packaging of delicate and temperature sensitive devices. This indium-bonding technology enables bonding of surface materials commonly used in MEMS technology. The temperature is kept below 140 °C for all process steps and no surface treatment is applied before and during bonding. This bonding technology allows hermetic sealing at 140 °C with a leak rate below 4 × 10-12 mbar l s-1 at room temperature. The tensile strength of the bonds up to 25 MPa goes along with a very high yield.

  1. Diameter distribution of thermally evaporated indium metal islands on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balch, Joleyn; Tsakalakos, Loucas; Huber, William; Grande, James; Knussman, Michael; Cale, Timothy S.

    2007-09-01

    Although many groups have studied the initial growth stages of various metals, including indium, there is little information in literature on diameter distributions of indium in relation to film thickness or annealing conditions. This paper reports island size distributions of thermally evaporated In islands on Si (100) and Si (111) substrates for nominal film thicknesses ranging from 5 to 50 nm. Because indium has a low melting temperature, and therefore a high homologous temperature at room temperature, 3-dimensional islands form during deposition with no subsequent heat treatments needed. Island diameters were calculated using commercial image analysis software in conjunction with SEM images of the samples. It is found that there is a bimodal island diameter distribution for nominal indium thicknesses greater than 5 nm. While the diameters of the larger islands increase exponentially with nominal thickness, those of the smaller islands increase linearly, and therefore more slowly, with nominal thickness. For nominal thickness of 50 nm, the average diameters of the small and large islands differ by almost an order of magnitude. Anneal conditions were studied in an attempt to narrow diameter distributions. Samples of each nominal thickness were annealed at temperatures ranging from 360°C to 550°C and the diameters again measured. The range of island diameters become narrower with 360°C anneal and volume average island diameter increases by ~30-50%. This narrowing of the distribution occurs due to smaller islands being absorbed by the larger in a process akin to Ostwald ripening, which is facilitated by higher surface diffusivities at higher homologous temperatures.

  2. Elastic Constants of Indium Arsenide at Room Temperature by Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arammash, Fouzi; Yin, Ming

    2013-03-01

    The three independent elastic constants, C11, C12, and C44 of indium arsenide (InAs) single crystal were determined at room temperature using resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) technique. We will present and compare our results with those obtained from more conventional measurement techniques. We also compare our results to those of other III-V compound semiconductors such as gallium arsenide (GaAs).

  3. Spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy on indium-catalyzed core-shell germanium nanowires: size effects.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Y; Zardo, I; Cao, L Y; Garma, T; Heiss, M; Morante, J R; Arbiol, J; Brongersma, M L; Fontcuberta I Morral, A

    2010-03-12

    The structure of indium-catalyzed germanium nanowires is investigated by atomic force microscopy, scanning confocal Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The nanowires are formed by a crystalline core and an amorphous shell. We find that the diameter of the crystalline core varies along the nanowire, down to few nanometers. Phonon confinement effects are observed in the regions where the crystalline region is the thinnest. The results are consistent with the thermally insulating behavior of the core-shell nanowires. PMID:20154375

  4. SU-E-I-14: Comparison of Iodine-Labeled and Indium-Labeled Antibody Biodistributions

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, L

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is often assumed that animal biodistributions of novel proteins are not dependent upon the radiolabel used in their determination. In units of percent injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g), organ uptake results (u) may be obtained using either iodine or metal as radioactive labels. Iodination is preferred as it is a one-step process whereas metal labeling requires two chemical procedures and therefore more protein material. It is important to test whether the radioactive tag leads to variation in the uptake value. Methods: Uptakes of 3antibodies to Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) were evaluated in a nude mouse model bearing 150 to 300 mg LS174T human colon cancer xenografts. Antibodies included diabody (56 kDa), minibody (80kDa) and intact M5A (150 kDa) anti-CEA cognates. Both radioiodine and indium-111 labels were used with uptakes evaluated at 7 time(t) points out to 96 h. Ratios (R) of u(iodine-label)/u(indium-label) were determined for liver, spleen, kidneys, lung and tumor. Results: Hepatic loss was rapid for diabody and minibody; by 24 h their R values were only 2%; i.e., uptake of iodine was 2% of that of indium for these 2 antibodies. By contrast, R for the intact cognate was 50% at that time point. Splenic results were similar. Tumor uptake ratios did not depend upon the antibody type and were 50% at 24 h. Conclusions: Relatively rapid loss of iodine relative to indium in liver and spleen was observed in lower mass antibodies. Tumor ratios were larger and independent of antibody type. Aside from tumor, the R ratio of uptakes depended on the antibody type. R values decreased monotonically with time in all tissues and for all cognates. Using this ratio, one can possibly correct iodine-based u (t) results so that they resemble radiometal-derived biodistributions.

  5. Localization of abscess in adult polycystic kidney by indium-111 leukocyte scan

    SciTech Connect

    Bretan, P.N. Jr.; Price, D.C.; McClure, R.D.

    1988-08-01

    In patients with adult polycystic kidney disease (APKD) infected cysts are difficult to localize with current radiographic techniques, especially those dependent on renal function. Indium-111 leukocyte (In-WBC) imaging is both highly sensitive and effective in detecting and localizing abscesses in patients with renal failure. We report on a patient with APKD and sepsis in whom computed tomography, ultrasound, and physical examination failed to locate the renal abscess, which was found by In-WBC scanning.

  6. Surface modifications on InAs decrease indium and arsenic leaching under physiological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewett, Scott A.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2012-11-01

    Devices containing III-V semiconductors such as InAs are increasingly being used in the electronic industry for a variety of optoelectronic applications. Furthermore, the attractive chemical, material, electronic properties make such materials appealing for use in devices designed for biological applications, such as biosensors. However, in biological applications the leaching of toxic materials from these devices could cause harm to cells or tissue. Additionally, after disposal, toxic inorganic materials can leach from devices and buildup in the environment, causing long-term ecological harm. Therefore, the toxicity of these materials along with their stability in physiological conditions are important factors to consider. Surface modifications are one common method of stabilizing semiconductor materials in order to chemically and electronically passivate them. Such surface modifications could also prevent the leaching of toxic materials by preventing the regrowth of the unstable surface oxide layer and by creating an effective barrier between the semiconductor surface and the surrounding environment. In this study, various surface modifications on InAs are developed with the goal of decreasing the leaching of indium and arsenic. The leaching of indium and arsenic from modified substrates was assessed in physiological conditions using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Substrates modified with 11-mercapto-1-undecanol (MU) and graft polymerized with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) were most effective at preventing indium and arsenic leaching. These surfaces were characterized using contact angle analysis, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Substrates modified with collagen and synthetic polyelectrolytes were least effective, due to the destructive nature of acidic environments on InAs. The toxicity of modified and unmodified InAs, along with raw indium, arsenic, and PEG components was assessed

  7. Pulmonary toxicity of indium-tin oxide production facility particles in rats.

    PubMed

    Badding, Melissa A; Fix, Natalie R; Orandle, Marlene S; Barger, Mark W; Dunnick, Katherine M; Cummings, Kristin J; Leonard, Stephen S

    2016-04-01

    Indium-tin oxide (ITO) is used to make transparent conductive coatings for touch-screen and liquid crystal display electronics. Occupational exposures to potentially toxic particles generated during ITO production have increased in recent years as the demand for consumer electronics continues to rise. Previous studies have demonstrated cytotoxicity in vitro and animal models have shown pulmonary inflammation and injury in response to various indium-containing particles. In humans, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) and fibrotic interstitial lung disease have been observed in ITO facility workers. However, which indium materials or specific processes in the workplace may be the most toxic to workers is unknown. Here we examined the pulmonary toxicity of three different particle samples that represent real-life worker exposures, as they were collected at various production stages throughout an ITO facility. Indium oxide (In2O3), sintered ITO (SITO) and ventilation dust (VD) particles each caused pulmonary inflammation and damage in rats over a time course (1, 7 and 90 days post-intratracheal instillation), but SITO and VD appeared to induce greater toxicity in rat lungs than In2O3 at a dose of 1 mg per rat. Downstream pathological changes such as PAP and fibrosis were observed in response to all three particles 90 days after treatment, with a trend towards greatest severity in animals exposed to VD when comparing animals that received the same dose. These findings may inform workplace exposure reduction efforts and provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of an emerging occupational health issue. PMID:26472246

  8. Indium diffusion through high-k dielectrics in high-k/InP stacks

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, H.; Cabrera, W.; Santosh KC,; Brennan, B.; Qin, X.; McDonnell, S.; Hinkle, C. L.; Cho, K.; Chabal, Y. J.; Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D.; Wallace, R. M.

    2013-08-05

    Evidence of indium diffusion through high-k dielectric (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) films grown on InP (100) by atomic layer deposition is observed by angle resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and low energy ion scattering spectroscopy. The analysis establishes that In-out diffusion occurs and results in the formation of a PO{sub x} rich interface.

  9. Humidity-induced room-temperature decomposition of Au contacted indium phosphide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.

    1990-01-01

    It has been found that Au-contacted InP is chemically unstable at room temperature in a humid ambient due to the leaching action of indium nitrate islands that continually remove In from the contact metallization and thus, in effect, from the Inp substrate. While similar appearing islands form on Au-contacted GaAs, that system appears to be stable since leaching of the group III element does not take place.

  10. Indium-111 white blood cell scans: Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and normal patterns of distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Guze, B.H.; Webber, M.M.; Hawkins, R.A.; Sinha, K.

    1990-01-01

    The UCLA Hospital experience with indium-111 labeled white blood cells was reviewed. There were a total of 345 consecutive cases covering a broad range of clinical indications. The overall sensitivity of the method was 79%, specificity was 62%, and accuracy was 73%. The sensitivity for suspected osteomyelitis cases was 84%, with a specificity of 65% and an accuracy of 75%. For other cases sensitivity was 77%, specificity was 60%, and accuracy was 72%. Furthermore, patterns of normal distribution were reviewed.

  11. Novel solar light driven photocatalyst, zinc indium vanadate for photodegradation of aqueous phenol

    SciTech Connect

    Mahapure, Sonali A.; Ambekar, Jalindar D.; Nikam, Latesh K.; Marimuthu, R.; Kulkarni, Milind V.

    2011-05-15

    Graphical abstract: Novel photocatalyst, zinc indium vanadate (ZnIn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 9}) demonstrated and showed an excellent photocatalytic activity for phenol degradation under visible light. Research highlights: {yields} Designing and identification of a photocatalyst having prospective potential application to be used in visible light (400-800 nm). {yields} Successful synthesis of novel ZnIn{sub 2}V{sub 2}O{sub 9} by solid state route. {yields} Confirmation of the designed product using characterization techniques. {yields} Application study comprising photodegradation of aqueous phenol at visible light despite of UV radiations. -- Abstract: In the present investigation, we have demonstrated the synthesis of novel photocatalyst, zinc indium vanadate (ZIV) by solid-solid state route using respective oxides of zinc, indium and vanadium. This novel photocatalyst was characterized using XRD, FESEM, UV-DRS and FTIR in order to investigate its structural, morphological and optical properties. XRD clearly shows the formation of phase pure ZIV of triclinic crystal structure with good crystallinity. FESEM micrographs showed the clustered morphology having particle size between 0.5 and 1 {mu}m. Since, optical study showed the band gap around 2.8 eV, i.e. in visible region, we have performed the photocatalytic activity of phenol degradation under visible light irradiation. The photodecomposition of phenol by ZIV is studied for the first time and an excellent photocatalytic activity was obtained using this novel photocatalyst. Considering the band gap of zinc indium vanadate in visible region, it will also be the potential candidate for water splitting.

  12. Indium 111-labeled leukocyte scanning for detection of prosthetic vascular graft infection

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, P.F.; Dries, D.J.; Alazraki, N.; Albo, D. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Recent animal and human studies have suggested that positive indium 111-labeled leukocyte scans may help establish the diagnosis of vascular graft infection; however, there is little information available about the predictive value of both positive and negative leukocyte scans in larger groups of patients. In this study 31 indium 111 leukocyte scans were performed prior to definitive treatment in 21 patients with suspected vascular graft infections. Patients with more than one leukocyte scan performed had either anatomically distinct sites of infection or rescanning of a potentially infected site after definitive treatment. Scans were performed according to the method of Baker et al., attaching 500 muCi of indium 111 to leukocytes with imaging 24 hours later. All patients with positive scans underwent surgical exploration of the area of leukocyte accumulation, with documentation of purulence and culture of the graft. Patients with negative scans were treated as if scan results were indeterminate and underwent surgical exploration for usual clinical indications; if no exploration was performed, the patient was followed up closely for at least 1 year. Twelve of 12 positive scans showed purulence or culture evidence of infection with three different organisms; in 15 instances of negative scans, two operations were performed with one infection noted, whereas no patient without surgery has had a graft infection at 10 months follow-up. In addition to localizing graft infections, two scans demonstrated a nonvascular site of infection. Positive scans also helped determine the extent of infection along the graft, allowing better planning of the surgical procedure. These results indicate that indium 111-labeled leukocyte scans help document and localize prosthetic vascular graft infections.

  13. Cuboctahedron-based indium-organic frameworks for gas sorption and selective cation exchange.

    PubMed

    Yu, Panpan; Li, Qipeng; Hu, Yue; Liu, Nannan; Zhang, Lijie; Su, Kongzhao; Qian, Jinjie; Huang, Shaoming; Hong, Maochun

    2016-06-28

    [Me2NH2]3[In3(BTB)4]·2DMF·2DMA·28H2O (InOF-9) is an anionic indium-organic framework based on nanosized cuboctahedrons, which is sustained by tetrahedral [In(COO)4] nodes and 3-connected tricarboxylates. Although InOF-9 is structurally unstable when exposed to air, it exhibits excellent gas sorption capacity through a supercritical carbon dioxide activation process and selectively encapsulates guest methylene blue cations. PMID:27254101

  14. Indium 111-granulocyte scanning in the assessment of disease extent and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease. A comparison with colonoscopy, histology, and fecal indium 111-granulocyte excretion

    SciTech Connect

    Saverymuttu, S.H.; Camilleri, M.; Rees, H.; Lavender, J.P.; Hodgson, H.J.; Chadwick, V.S.

    1986-05-01

    Indium 111-leukocyte scanning has recently been introduced as a new method for imaging inflammatory bowel disease. The technique has recently been made more specific for acute inflammation by labeling a pure granulocyte fraction rather than the conventional mixed leukocyte preparation. We now report a prospective study comparing 111In-granulocyte scanning with endoscopy, histology, and fecal 111In-granulocyte excretion for the assessment of disease extent and severity in colonic inflammatory bowel disease. In 52 patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, disease extent and severity were assessed macroscopically, histologically, or by scanning using a numerical grading system. Excellent correlations were found between both endoscopy and histology and 111In scans (r = 0.90 (endoscopy) and r = 0.90 (histology) for extent; r = 0.86 and r = 0.91 for disease activity). Severity graded by scanning also showed a close correlation with fecal 111In-granulocyte excretion (r = 0.90). Indium 111-granulocyte scans are a rapid, accurate, noninvasive means of assessing both disease extent and severity of colonic involvement in inflammatory bowel disease.

  15. Device performances of organic light-emitting diodes with indium tin oxide, gallium zinc oxide, and indium zinc tin oxide anodes deposited at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changhun; Ko, Yoonduk; Kim, Youngsung

    2013-12-01

    Thin films of Indium tin oxide (ITO), Gallium zinc oxide (GZO), and Indium zinc tin oxide (IZTO) were deposited on glass substrates by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The structural, optical, and electrical properties of the films were investigated towards evaluating their applications as flexible anodes. IZTO films exhibited the lowest resistivity (6.3 x 10(-4) Omega cm). Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated using the ITO, GZO, and IZTO films as anode layers. The turn-on voltages at a current density of 4.5 mA/cm2, 5.5 mA/cm2, 6.5 mA/cm2 were 5.5 V, 13.7 V, and 4.7 V for the devices with ITO, GZO, and IZTO anodes, respectively. The best performance was observed with the IZTO film, indicating its suitability as an alternative material for conventional ITO anodes used in OLEDs and flexible displays. PMID:24266182

  16. Work Function Modification of Tungsten-Doped Indium Oxides Deposited by the Co-Sputtering Method.

    PubMed

    Oh, Gyujin; Jeon, Jia; Lee, Kyoung Su; Kim, Eun Kyu

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the work function modification of tungsten-doped indium oxides (IWOs) through the co-sputtering of indium oxide (In2O3) and indium tungsten oxide (In2O3 80 wt% + WO3 20 wt%) via a radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering system. By controlling the elemental deposition of IWOs, the resultant work functions varied from 4.37 eV to 4.1 eV. The IWO thin films showed excellent properties for application as transparent conducting oxide materials in the region of 0 to 2.43 at.% of tungsten versus the total metal content. The carrier concentration of n-type IWO thin films varied from 8.39 x 10(19) cm(-3) to 8.58 x 10(21) cm(-3), while the resistivity varied from 3.15 x 10(-4) Ωcm to 2.26 x 10(-3) Ωcm. The largest measured optical band gap was 3.82 eV determined at 2.43 at.% of tungsten atoms relative to the total amount of metal atoms, while the smallest optical band gap was 3.6 eV at 4.78 at.% of tungsten. IWO films containing more than 2.43 at.% of tungsten atoms relative to the total number of metal atoms revealed an average transmittance of over 80% within the visible light region. PMID:27483882

  17. Contrasting the grain boundary-affected performance of zinc and indium oxide transparent conductors.

    PubMed

    Vai, A T; Rashidi, N; Fang, Y; Kuznetsov, V L; Edwards, P P

    2016-06-01

    Zinc oxide-based transparent conductors have long been advanced for their potential as low-cost, earth-abundant replacements for the indium oxide-based materials that currently dominate in practical applications. However, this potential has yet to be realized because of the difficulties in producing zinc oxide thin films with the necessary high levels of electrical conductivity and environmental stability that are readily achieved using indium oxide. To better understand the fundamental reasons for this, polycrystalline zinc and indium oxide thin films were prepared across a range of deposition temperatures using the technique of spray pyrolysis. Electrical transport measurements of these samples both as a function of temperature and UV irradiation were correlated with film morphology to illustrate that the different grain boundary behaviour of these two materials is one of the key reasons for their divergent performance. This is a critical challenge that must be addressed before any substantial increase in the adoption of ZnO-based transparent conductors can take place. PMID:26952740

  18. Contrasting the grain boundary-affected performance of zinc and indium oxide transparent conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vai, A. T.; Rashidi, N.; Fang, Y.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Edwards, P. P.

    2016-06-01

    Zinc oxide-based transparent conductors have long been advanced for their potential as low-cost, earth-abundant replacements for the indium oxide-based materials that currently dominate in practical applications. However, this potential has yet to be realized because of the difficulties in producing zinc oxide thin films with the necessary high levels of electrical conductivity and environmental stability that are readily achieved using indium oxide. To better understand the fundamental reasons for this, polycrystalline zinc and indium oxide thin films were prepared across a range of deposition temperatures using the technique of spray pyrolysis. Electrical transport measurements of these samples both as a function of temperature and UV irradiation were correlated with film morphology to illustrate that the different grain boundary behaviour of these two materials is one of the key reasons for their divergent performance. This is a critical challenge that must be addressed before any substantial increase in the adoption of ZnO-based transparent conductors can take place.

  19. Diagnostics of surface wave driven low pressure plasmas based on indium monoiodide-argon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ögün, C. M.; Kaiser, C.; Kling, R.; Heering, W.

    2015-06-01

    Indium monoiodide is proposed as a suitable alternative to hazardous mercury, i.e. the emitting component inside the compact fluorescent lamps (CFL), with comparable luminous efficacy. Indium monoiodide-argon low pressure lamps are electrodelessly driven with surface waves, which are launched and coupled into the lamp by the ‘surfatron’, a microwave coupler optimized for an efficient operation at a frequency of 2.45 GHz. A non intrusive diagnostic method based on spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy is employed to characterize the plasma parameters. The line emission coefficients of the plasma are derived by means of Abel’s inversion from the measured spectral radiance data. The characteristic plasma parameters, e.g. electron temperature and density are determined by comparing the experimentally obtained line emission coefficients with simulated ones from a collisional-radiative model. Additionally, a method to determine the absolute plasma efficiency via irradiance measurements without any goniometric setup is presented. In this way, the relationship between the plasma efficiency and the plasma parameters can be investigated systematically for different operating configurations, e.g. electrical input power, buffer gas pressure and cold spot temperature. The performance of indium monoiodide-argon plasma is compared with that of conventional CFLs.

  20. Perturbed angular correlation study of the ion exchange of indium into silicalite zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramallo-López, J. M.; Requejo, F. G.; Rentería, M.; Bibiloni, A. G.; Miró, E. E.

    1999-09-01

    Two indium-containing silicalite zeolites (In/H ZSM5) catalysts prepared by wet impregnation and ionic exchange were characterized by the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) technique using 111In as probe to determine the nature of the indium species. Some of these species take part in the catalytic reaction of the selective reduction (SCR) of NOx with methane. PAC experiments were performed at 500ºC in air before and after reduction reoxidation treatments on the catalysts in order to determine the origin of the different hyperfine interactions and then the degree of ionic exchange. Complementary catalytic activity characterizations were also performed. PAC experiments performed on the catalyst obtained by wet impregnation showed that all In-atoms form In2O3 crystallites while almost 70% of In-atoms form In2O3 in the catalyst obtained by ionic exchange. The PAC experiments of both catalysts performed after the reduction reoxidation treatment revealed the presence of two hyperfine interactions, different from those corresponding to indium in In2O3. These hyperfine interactions should be associated to disperse In species responsible of the catalytic activity located in the ionic exchange-sites of the zeolites.

  1. A novel precursor system and its application to produce tin doped indium oxide.

    PubMed

    Veith, M; Bubel, C; Zimmer, M

    2011-06-14

    A new type of precursor has been developed by molecular design and synthesised to produce tin doped indium oxide (ITO). The precursor consists of a newly developed bimetallic indium tin alkoxide, Me(2)In(O(t)Bu)(3)Sn (Me = CH(3), O(t)Bu = OC(CH(3))(3)), which is in equilibrium with an excess of Me(2)In(O(t)Bu). This quasi single-source precursor is applied in a sol-gel process to produce powders and coatings of ITO using a one-step heat treatment process under an inert atmosphere. The main advantage of this system is the simple heat treatment that leads to the disproportionation of the bivalent Sn(II) precursor into Sn(IV) and metallic tin, resulting in an overall reduced state of the metal in the final tin doped indium oxide (ITO) material, hence avoiding the usually necessary reduction step. Solid state (119)Sn-NMR measurements of powder samples confirm the appearance of Sn(II) in an amorphous gel state and of metallic tin after annealing under nitrogen. The corresponding preparation of ITO coatings by spin coating on glass leads to transparent conductive layers with a high transmittance of visible light and a low electrical resistivity without the necessity of a reduction step. PMID:21541390

  2. High indium non-polar InGaN clusters with infrared sensitivity grown by PAMBE

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Shruti; Mohan, Lokesh; Chandan, Greeshma; Krupanidhi, S. B. Shinde, Satish; Nanda, K. K.; Roul, Basanta; Maiti, R.; Ray, S. K.

    2015-03-15

    Studies on the optical properties of InGaN alloy of relatively higher indium content are of potential interest to understand the effect of indium content on the optical band gap of epitaxial InGaN. We report the growth of self assembled non-polar high indium clusters of In{sub 0.55}Ga{sub 0.45}N over non-polar (11-20) a-plane In{sub 0.17}Ga{sub 0.83}N epilayer grown on a-plane (11-20)GaN/(1-102) r-plane sapphire substrate using plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). Such structures are potential candidates for high brightness LEDs emitting in longer wavelengths. The high resolution X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of two distinct compositions of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N alloys, which were further confirmed by photoluminescence studies. A possible mechanism for the formation of such structure was postulated which was supported with the results obtained by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The structure hence grown when investigated for photo-detecting properties, showed sensitivity to both infrared and ultraviolet radiations due to the different composition of InGaN region.

  3. Resonance-state-induced superconductivity at high Indium contents in In-doped SnTe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Gobson, Quinn; Xie, Weiwei; Nielsen, Morten; Kushwaha, Satya; Cava, Robert; Cava's Group Team

    We report a reinvestigation of superconducting Sn1-xInxTe at both low and high In doping levels. Analysis of the superconductivity reveals a fundamental change as a function of x: the system evolves from a weakly coupled to a strongly coupled superconductor with increasing indium content. Hall Effect measurements further show that the carrier density does not vary linearly with Indium content; indeed at high Indium content, the samples are overall n-type, which is contrary to expectations of the standard picture of In1+ replacing Sn2+ in this material. Density functional theory calculations probing the electronic state of In in SnTe show that it does not act as a trivial hole dopant, but instead forms a distinct, partly flled In 5s - Te 5p hybridized state centered around EF, very different from what is seen for other nominal hole dopants such as Na, Ag, and vacant Sn sites. We conclude that superconducting In-doped SnTe therefore cannot be considered as a simple hole doped semiconductor.

  4. Measurement of the indium segregation in InGaN based LEDs with single atom sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Jinschek, Joerg; Kisielowski, Christian; Van Dyck, Dirk; Geuens, Philippe

    2003-07-30

    In light emitting diodes (LED) consisting of GaN/InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs), the exact indium distribution inside the wells of the active region affects the performance of devices. Indium segregation can take place forming small InGaN clusters of locally varying composition. In the past, we used a local strain analysis from single HRTEM lattice images to determine the In composition inside the InGaN QWs with a resolution of 0.5 nm x 0.3 nm. Truly atomic resolution can be pursued by exploitation of intensity dependencies on the atomic number (Z) of the electron exit-wave (EW). In microscopes with sufficient sensitivity, local variations of amplitude and phase are found to be discrete with sample thickness, which allows for counting the number of atoms in each individual column of {approx}0.08 nm diameter. In QW s of {approx}17 percent of average indium concentration it is possible to discriminate between pure Ga columns and columns containing 1, 2, 3, or more In atoms because phase changes are discrete and element specific. The preparation of samples with atomically flat surfaces is a limiting factor for the application of the procedure.

  5. Nano-porous indium oxide transistor sensor for the detection of ethanol vapours at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seetha, M.; Mangalaraj, D.

    2012-01-01

    Porous indium oxide thin film prepared by the dip coating technique has been used in the construction of a field effect transistor. The coating solution was prepared from indium chloride precursor. The average particle size of the dip coated thin film was found to be 25 nm. Scanning electron microscopic images show the porous nature of the film, and the root mean square roughness of the film calculated using atomic force microscope was 24 nm. A transistor has been constructed by evaporating metal Aluminium as source and drain electrodes on the indium oxide active layer and employing the silicon substrate itself as a gate. The sensor response of the constructed transistor was tested with ethanol, ammonia and acetone vapours. The sensor showed good response to ethanol vapours even at 5-ppm level, and the time for response and recovery of the gas was nearly 1 min. Response to ammonia and acetone was comparatively poor. When the gate voltage was increased from 0 to 300 mV, a considerable increase in the source-drain current was observed. As the temperature of the sensing element increased, response to ethanol vapours also increased. There was nearly a linear variation in the transistor response for 100 ppm of ethanol vapours when the gate voltage was swept from 0 to 300 mV. The sensor response of the transistor increases with the gas concentration. The constructed transistor was found to be selectively sensitive to ethanol; therefore it can be implemented to work as a breath alcohol checker.

  6. Observation of indium segregation effects in structural and optical properties of pseudomorphic HEMT structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Puspashree; Ramesh, V.; Srinivasan, T.; Singh, S. N.; Goyal, Anshu; Sharma, R. K.; Muralidharan, R.

    2006-02-01

    We present a detailed study on the influence of several growth related factors such as indium segregation, spacer layer thickness and Si δ doping on the structural, optical and electrical properties of molecular beam epitaxy grown pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (P-HEMT) structures. Simulation of a high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) rocking curve was performed and compared with the experimental data to determine the quantum well (QW) thickness and composition as well as the indium segregation related changes in the QW composition. It is shown that growth of a thin layer (6 Å) of GaAs on top of the pseudomorphic InGaAs layer followed by 'flash-off' at a higher temperature could minimize the indium segregation related degradation of the hetero interface. Photoluminescence (PL) and surface photo voltage (SPV) peaks corresponding to the sub-band transitions are analysed using a self-consistent solution of Schrödinger and Poisson equations. PL results showed the dependence of the transition energies on the spacer layer thickness and the effectiveness of the carrier transfer into the InGaAs well. SPV spectra showed characteristic peaks from all the layers in the HEMT structures and were correlated with the data obtained from PL and HRXRD.

  7. Influence of different physicochemical conditions on the release of indium oxine from nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Kedzierewicz, F; Thouvenot, P; Monot, I; Hoffman, M; Maincent, P

    1998-03-15

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the influence of factors (pH, enzymes, etc.) chosen partially to mimic in vivo conditions on the release of a model drug, indium oxine, from polyepsiloncaprolactone (PCL) nanocapsules in vitro. A nanocapsule suspension, an emulsion (O/W), and a solution in olive oil were prepared in order to compare the release of a radioactive tracer, indium oxine, as a function of time by an in vitro dialysis method. Nanocapsules were prepared by interfacial deposition of PCL and characterized by particle size distribution (laser light scattering) and determination of the polymer molecular weight by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The results of this study suggest that the partition coefficient between the acceptor medium and the olive oil is the major parameter governing the release of the isotope, at least in the absence of significant enzyme activity. The PCL wall of nanocapsules is a barrier that does not seem to retard the release of indium. The addition of porcine liver esterases accelerated the degradation of PCL. This study confirms that the release of a drug from nanocapsules may be very different depending on the in vivo location, that is, the administration site. PMID:9492220

  8. Characterization of indium oxide for the use as a counter-electrode in an electrochromic device

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, P.C.; Haas, T.E. . Dept. of Chemistry); Goldner, R.B. . Electro-Optics Technology Center); Cogan, S.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Thin films of indium oxide, In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (4000 {Angstrom}), deposited on commercially available In{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Sn (ITO)/glass by rf sputtering, have been examined for potential application as a counter-electrode material in an electrochromic device, based on their chemical, structural, and optical properties. Cyclic voltammetry experiments showed that mobile lithium ions can be inserted (chemical reduction) and removed (chemical oxidation) from the host structure of indium oxide. Coulometric titrations showed that the films exhibited a hysteresis behavior for the injection and removal of lithium ions in Li{sub x}In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x=0-0.23). Structural investigations of the indium oxide films, utilizing electron diffraction techniques, indicated that they were crystalline with a crystallite size of 175 {Angstrom}, in agreement with x-ray diffraction results. Differences in optical transmission between the lithiated and delithiated thin films were no more than 5% in the visible/near-infrared regions of the spectrum. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Intersubband transitions in strained indium gallium arsenide quantum wells for multi-color infrared detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, Clayton Lee

    Intersubband transitions in InxGa1- xAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) were studied. The conduction band offset for this material system is larger than that of the well-known GaAs/AlGaAs system, thus making it possible to design, grow and fabricate quantum well infrared photodetectors operational in the 5--8 mum and 10--14 mum spectral regions with minimal dark current. InxGa 1-xAs/AlGaAs MQWs were grown by MBE with indium compositions ranging from x = 0.10 to 0.15 verified by in situ RHEED oscillations and high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Band-to-band transitions were verified by photoluminescence measurements, and intersubband transitions were measured using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in both the Brewster's angle and waveguide configuration. Due to the high strain and introduction of dislocations associated with the high indium content, wells with indium compositions above ˜12% did not result in intersubband transitions at silicon doping levels of 2 x 10 18 cm-3. New structures were grown, with a thick linear graded InxGa1- xAs buffer below the MQW structures to reduce the strain and resulting dislocations. Intersubband transitions were measured in In xGa1-xAs wells with indium compositions of x = .20 when grown on top of the linear graded buffer (LGB). Three-color device structures consisting of InxGa1-xAs triple-coupled MQWs were grown with and without the LGB. FTIR measurements revealed that without the LGB, intersubband transitions were not present in the three-color structure. However, with the LGB intersubband transitions were measured. Only one intersubband peak was observed in the three-color structures in the Brewster angle configuration---possibly due to nonuniformity in the sample growth. In the waveguide configuration, an additional higher energy peak was observed which other groups have attributed to multiple internal reflections off the many layers in the structure. One three

  10. Preparation and nonlinear optical properties of indium nanocrystals in sodium borosilicate glass by the sol–gel route

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Jiasong; Xiang, Weidong; Zhao, Haijun; Chen, Zhaoping; Liang, Xiaojuan; Zhao, Wenguang; Chen, Guoxin

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: The sodium borosilicate glass doped with indium nanocrystals have been successfully prepared by sol–gel methods. And the indium nanocrystals in tetragonal crystal system have formed uniformly in the glass, and the average diameter of indium nanocrystals is about 30 nm. The third-order optical nonlinear refractive index γ, absorption coefficient β, and susceptibility χ{sup (3)} of the glass are determined to be −4.77 × 10{sup −16} m{sup 2}/W, 2.67 × 10{sup −9} m/W, and 2.81 × 10{sup −10} esu, respectively. Highlights: ► Indium nanocrystals embedded in glass matrix have been prepared by sol–gel route. ► The crystal structure and composition are investigated by XRD and XPS. ► Size and distribution of indium nanocrystals is determined by TEM. ► The third-order optical nonlinearity is investigated by using Z-scan technique. -- Abstract: The sodium borosilicate glass doped with indium nanocrystals have been successfully prepared by sol–gel route. The thermal stability behavior of the stiff gel is investigated by thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermal (DTA) analysis. The crystal structure of the glass is characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Particle composition is determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Size and distribution of the nanocrystals are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Results show that the indium nanocrystals in tetragonal crystal structure have formed in glass, and the average diameter is about 30 nm. Further, the glass is measured by Z-scan technique to investigate the nonlinear optical (NLO) properties. The third-order NLO coefficient χ{sup (3)} of the glass is determined to be 2.81 × 10{sup −10} esu. The glass with large third-order NLO coefficient is promising materials for applications in optical devices.

  11. Electronic structure and bonding of the 3d transition metal borides, MB, M =Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu through all electron ab initio calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeli, Demeter; Mavridis, Aristides

    2008-01-01

    The electronic structure and bonding of the ground and some low-lying states of all first row transition metal borides (MB), ScB, TiB, VB, CrB, MnB, FeB, CoB, NiB, and CuB have been studied by multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) methods employing a correlation consistent basis set of quintuple cardinality (5Z). It should be stressed that for all the above nine molecules, experimental results are essentially absent, whereas with the exception of ScB and CuB the remaining seven species are studied theoretically for the first time. We have constructed full potential energy curves at the MRCI/5Z level for a total of 27 low-lying states, subsequently used to extract binding energies, spectroscopic parameters, and bonding schemes. In addition, some 20 or more states for every MB species have been examined at the MRCI/4Z level of theory. The ground state symmetries and corresponding binding energies (in kcal/mol) are Σ-5(ScB), 76; Δ6(TiB), 65; Σ+7(VB), 55; Σ+6(CrB), 31; Π5(MnB), 20; Σ-4(FeB), 54; Δ3(CoB), 66; Σ+2(NiB), 79; and Σ+1(CuB), 49.

  12. New ternary rare-earth metal boride carbides R{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14} (R=Y, Gd-Lu) containing BC{sub 2} units: Crystal and electronic structures, magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr; Simon, Arndt; Mattausch, Hansjuergen; Hiebl, Kurt; Zheng Chong

    2010-10-15

    The ternary rare-earth boride carbides R{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14} (R=Y, Gd-Lu) were prepared from the elements by arc-melting followed by annealing in silica tubes at 1270 K for 1 month. The crystal structures of Tb{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14} and Er{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14} were determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. They crystallize in a new structure type in space group P4/mnc (Tb{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14}: a=8.1251(5) A, c=15.861(1) A, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.041 (wR{sub 2}=0.088) for 1023 reflections with I{sub o}>2{sigma}(I{sub o}); Er{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14}: a=7.932(1) A, c=15.685(2) A, Z=2, R{sub 1}=0.037 (wR{sub 2}=0.094) for 1022 reflections with I{sub o}>2{sigma}(I{sub o})). The crystal structure contains discrete carbon atoms and bent CBC units in octahedra and distorted bicapped square antiprisms, respectively. In both structures the same type of disorder exists. One R atom position needs to be refined as split atom position with a ratio 9:1 indicative of a 10% substitution of the neighboring C{sup 4-} by C{sub 2}{sup 4-}. The actual composition has then to be described as R{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14.2}. The isoelectronic substitution does not change the electron partition of R{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14} which can be written as (R{sup 3+}){sub 15}(C{sup 4-}){sub 6}(CBC{sup 5-}){sub 4{center_dot}}e{sup -}. The electronic structure was studied with the extended Hueckel method. The investigated compounds Tb{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14}, Dy{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14} and Er{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14} are hard ferromagnets with Curie temperatures T{sub C}=145, 120 and 50 K, respectively. The coercive field B{sub C}=3.15 T for Dy{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14} is quite remarkable. - Graphical abstract: The ternary rare earth boride carbides R{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14} (R=Y, Gd-Lu) were prepared from the elements by arc-melting followed by annealing in silica tubes at 1270 K for 1 month. Tb{sub 15}B{sub 4}C{sub 14} is a new member of the rare-earth metal boride carbide

  13. Ternary rare earth metal boride carbides containing two-dimensional boron-carbon network: The crystal and electronic structure of R{sub 2}B{sub 4}C (R=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er)

    SciTech Connect

    Babizhetskyy, Volodymyr Zheng Chong; Mattausch, Hansjuergen; Simon, Arndt

    2007-12-15

    The ternary rare earth boride carbides R{sub 2}B{sub 4}C (R=Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) have been synthesized by reacting the elements at temperatures between 1800 and 2000K. The crystal structure of Dy{sub 2}B{sub 4}C has been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. It crystallizes in a new structure type in the orthorhombic space group Immm (a=3.2772(6) A, b=6.567(2) A, c=7.542(1) A, Z=2, R1=0.035 (wR{sub 2}=0.10) for 224 reflections with I{sub o}>2{sigma}(I{sub o})). Boron atoms form infinite chains of fused B{sub 6} rings in [100] joined with carbon atoms into planar, two-dimensional networks which alternate with planar sheets of rare earth metal atoms. The electronic structure of Dy{sub 2}B{sub 4}C was also analyzed using the tight-binding extended Hueckel method. - Graphical abstract: Dy{sub 2}B{sub 4}C crystallizes a new structure type where planar 6{sup 3}-Dy metal atom layers alternate with planar non-metal layers consisting of ribbons of fused B{sub 6} hexagons bridged by carbon atoms. Isostructural analogues with Tb, Ho and Er have also been characterized.

  14. Application of Mythen detector: In-situ XRD study on the thermal expansion behavior of metal indium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Rong; Chen, ZhongJun; Cai, Quan; Fu, JianLong; Gong, Yu; Wu, ZhongHua

    2016-07-01

    A Mythen detector has been equipped at the beamline 4B9A of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF), which is expected to enable BSRF to perform time-resolved measurement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) full-profiles. In this paper, the thermal expansion behavior of metal indium has been studied by using the in-situ XRD technique with the Mythen detector. The indium was heated from 303 to 433 K with a heating rate of 2 K/min. The in-situ XRD full-profiles were collected with a rate of one profile per 10 seconds. Rietveld refinement was used to extract the structural parameters. The results demonstrate that these collected quasi-real-time XRD profiles can be well used for structural analysis. The metal indium was found to have a nonlinear thermal expansion behavior from room temperature to the melting point (429.65 K). The a-axis of the tetragonal unit cell expands with a biquadratic dependency on temperature, while the c-axis contracts with a cubic dependency on temperature. By the time-resolved XRD measurements, it was observed that the [200] preferred orientation can maintain to about 403.15 K. While (110) is the last and detectable crystal plane just before melting of the polycrystalline indium foil. This study is not only beneficial to the application of metal indium, but also exhibits the capacity of in-situ time-resolved XRD measurements at the X-ray diffraction station of BSRF.

  15. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Chen, You-Xian

    2001-01-01

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interefere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  16. Growth of CdS thin films on indium coated glass substrates via chemical bath deposition and subsequent air annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Biswajit; Kumar, Kamlesh; Singh, Balwant Kr; Banerjee, Pushan; Das, Subrata

    2014-11-01

    In the present work attempts were made to synthesize indium doped CdS films by fabricating In/CdS bilayers using CBD-CdS on vacuum evaporated In thin films and subsequent air annealing. 135 nm CdS films were grown onto 20 nm and 35 nm indium coated glass substrate employing chemical bath deposition technique. The In/CdS bilayers thus formed were subjected to heat treatment at the temperatures between 200 and 400 °C for 4 min in the muffle furnace to facilitate indium to diffuse into the CdS films. XRD pattern ascertained no noticeable shift in lattice constant implying grain boundary metal segregation, while secondary ion mass spectrometry indicated the diffusion profile of indium into CdS matrices. Mass spectrometry results showed that substantial diffusion of indium had been taken place within CdS at 400 °C. Dark and photocurrent with different illumination time were measured to ascertain the photosensitivity of pure and composite CdS films.

  17. Microstructure-mechanical property relationships for Al-Cu-Li-Zr alloys with minor additions of cadmium, indium or tin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.; Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Minor amounts of cadmium, indium or tin were added to a baseline alloy with the nominal composition of Al-2.4Cu-2.4Li-0.15Zr. These elements were added in an attempt to increase the age-hardening response of the material such that high strengths could be achieved through heat-treatment alone, without the need for intermediate mechanical working. The alloy variant containing indium achieved a higher peak hardness in comparison to the other alloy variations, including the baseline material, when aged at temperatures ranging from 160 C to 190 C. Tensile tests on specimens peak-aged at 160 indicated the yield strength of the indium-bearing alloy increased by approximately 15 percent compared to that of the peak-aged baseline alloy. In addition, the yield strength obtained in the indium-bearing alloy was comparable to that reported for similar baseline material subjected to a 6 percent stretch prior to peak-aging at 190 C. The higher strength levels obtaied for the indium-bearing alloy are attributed to increased number densities and homogeneity of both the T1 and theta-prime phases, as determined by TEM studies.

  18. Synthesis of indium-containing nanoparticles using plasmas in water to study their effects on living body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Takaaki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Seo, Hyunwoong; Itagaki, Naho; Shiratani, Masaharu; Kitazaki, Satoshi; Hirata, Miyuki; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tanaka, Akiyo

    2015-09-01

    Nanoparticles can be employed for biomedical applications such as biomarkers, drug delivery systems, and cancer therapies. They are, however, pointed out their adverse effects on human body. Here, we synthesed indium-containing nanoparticles using discharge plasmas with indium electrodes immersed in DI water and administrated nanoparticles to rats to analyze their kinetics in living body. The discharge power was 5.1 W. The electron density is 5x1017/cm3 deduced from Stark broadening of hydrogen lines. TEM observation shows the mean size of primary nanoparticles is 7 nm. The nanoparticles are indium crystalline and indium hydroxide crystalline. The synthesized nanoparticles and purchased nanoparticles (In2O3, <100nm) were administrated to rats using subcutaneous injection. Indium of 166.7 g/day (synthesized) and of 27.8 g/day (purchased) are detected from the urine at 12 weeks after the administration. Synthesized nanoparticles dispersed in water are useful for analyzing kinetics of nanoparticles in living body. Work partly supported by KAKENHI.

  19. Annealing behavior of the hydrogen-vacancy complex in bulk indium phosphide crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Q.; Wolk, J.A.; Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.; Bliss, D.F.

    1998-12-31

    In order to explain the effects of hydrogen on the electrical properties of bulk indium phosphide crystals, they have performed a series of high temperature annealing studies with both undoped and iron-doped indium phosphide crystals. The samples were annealed at 900 C for 6, 36, and 72 hours, respectively, under a phosphorus overpressure of five atmospheres. Samples were characterized at 10 K by Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy which allowed us to measure the concentrations of both the Fe{sup 2+} and V{sub In}-H{sub 4} defects simultaneously. Undoped samples were further characterized by the Hall effect measurements. The authors find in the iron-doped samples that the [Fe{sup 2+}]/[Fe{sup 3+}] ratio decreases gradually with increasing annealing time, indicating a reduction in the number of donors in the samples. In the undoped samples, annealing leads to a reduction of the free electron concentration accompanied by an increase in the 77 K mobility. The increase of the sample`s mobility eliminates the possibility that the reduction of the free electron concentration is due to an increase in the concentration of the compensating acceptors. The explanation for the observed behavior in all samples is that hydrogen acts as a donor and it diffuses out of the crystal during the annealing process. Based on the experimental data, they propose a calibration equation of [V{sub In}-H{sub 4}] = 4.2 {times} 10{sup 16} cm{sup {minus}1} {times} Absorbance (cm{sup {minus}1}) which is used to correlate the hydrogen-vacancy complex concentrations with the changes of the V{sub In}-H{sub 4} absorption peak in both the iron-doped and the undoped samples. Their results confirm the donor nature of the hydrogen-vacancy complex and provide strong evidence regarding the reduction mechanism of free carrier concentrations in bulk indium phosphide crystals during high temperature annealing under a phosphorus atmosphere.

  20. Self catalytic growth of indium oxide (In2O3) nanowires by resistive thermal evaporation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R Rakesh; Rao, K Narasimha; Rajanna, K; Phani, A R

    2014-07-01

    Self catalytic growth of Indium Oxide (In2O3) nanowires (NWs) have been grown by resistive thermal evaporation of Indium (In) in the presence of oxygen without use of any additional metal catalyst. Nanowires growth took place at low substrate temperature of 370-420 degrees C at an applied current of 180-200 A to the evaporation boat. Morphology, microstructures, and compositional studies of the grown nanowires were performed by employing field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-Ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) respectively. Nanowires were uniformly grown over the entire Si substrate and each of the nanowire is capped with a catalyst particle at their end. X-ray diffraction study reveals the crystalline nature of the grown nanowires. Transmission electron microscopy study on the nanowires further confirmed the single crystalline nature of the nanowires. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis on the nanowires and capped nanoparticle confirmed that Indium act as catalyst for In2O3 nanowires growth. A self catalytic Vapor-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth mechanism was responsible for the growth of In2O3 nanowires. Effect of oxygen partial pressure variation and variation of applied currents to the evaporation boat on the nanowires growth was systematically studied. These studies concluded that at oxygen partial pressure in the range of 4 x 10(-4), 6 x 10(-4) mbar at applied currents to the evaporation boat of 180-200 A were the best conditions for good nanowires growth. Finally, we observed another mode of VLS growth along with the standard VLS growth mode for In2O3 nanowires similar to the growth mechanism reported for GaAs nanowires. PMID:24758054