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Sample records for individual cloned mouse

  1. [The identification of mouse cloned SFA DNA].

    PubMed

    Yi, Ning; Wu, Weng Qing; Ni, Zu Mei; Shi, Lu Ji

    2002-12-01

    For some basic investigation and the construction of artificial chromosomes, cloned centromeric DNAs identified on a firm ground are required. Thus, in the present work a preliminary screened clone of 13.5 kb DNA, 6# clone, form a mouse centromeric library contructed previously in our library was futher investigated by FISH and PCR. It was found that mouse 6# cloned SFA DNA, as shown by FISH is a fragment of mouse centromeric DNA. Evidence was also observed that 6# cloned SFA DNA consists of mouse minor satellite DNA and other DNA sequences. PMID:15346991

  2. Dielectrophoretic separation of mouse melanoma clones

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncu, Ahmet C.; Liu, Jie A.; Beebe, Stephen J.; Beskok, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is employed to differentiate clones of mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. Five clones were tested on microelectrodes. At a specific excitation frequency, clone 1 showed a different DEP response than the other four. Growth rate, melanin content, recovery from cryopreservation, and in vitro invasive studies were performed. Clone 1 is shown to have significantly different melanin content and recovery rate from cryopreservation. This paper reports the ability of DEP to differentiate between two malignant cells of the same origin. Different DEP responses of the two clones could be linked to their melanin content. PMID:20697600

  3. Mouse gastric mucin: cloning and chromosomal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Shekels, L L; Lyftogt, C; Kieliszewski, M; Filie, J D; Kozak, C A; Ho, S B

    1995-01-01

    Mucins protect gastric epithelium by maintaining a favourable pH gradient and preventing autodigestion. The purpose of this study was to clone a mouse gastric mucin which would provide a foundation for analysis of mucin gene regulation. Mucin was purified from the glandular portion of gastric specimens and deglycosylated by HF solvolysis. Antibodies against native and deglycosylated mouse gastric mucin (MGM) were raised in chickens. Screening of a mouse stomach cDNA library with the anti-(deglycosylated MGM) antibody yielded partial clones containing a 48 bp tandem repeat and 768 bp of non-repetitive sequence. The 16-amino-acid tandem repeat has a consensus sequence of QTSSPNTGKTSTISTT with 25% serine and 38% threonine. The MGM tandem repeat sequence bears no similarity to previously identified mucins. The MGM non-repetitive region shares sequence similarity with human MUC5AC and, to a lesser extent, human MUC2 and rat intestinal mucin. Northern blot analysis reveals a polydisperse message beginning at 13.5 kb in mouse stomach with no expression in oesophagus, trachea, small intestine, large intestine, caecum, lung or kidney. Immunoreactivity of antibodies against deglycosylated MGM and against a synthetic MGM tandem repeat peptide was restricted to superficial mucous cells, antral glands and Brunner's glands in the pyloric-duodenal region. DNA analysis shows that MGM recognizes mouse and rat DNA but not hamster, rabbit or human DNA. The MGM gene maps to a site on mouse chromosome 7 homologous to the location of a human secretory mucin gene cluster on human chromosome 11p15. Due to sequence similarity and predominant expression in the stomach, the MGM gene may be considered a MUC5AC homologue and named Muc5ac. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:7487932

  4. Cloning, characterization and targeting of the mouse HEXA gene

    SciTech Connect

    Wakamatsu, N.; Trasler, J.M.; Gravel, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The HEXA gene, encoding the {alpha} subunit of {beta}-hexosaminidase A, is essential for the metabolism of ganglioside G{sub M2}, and defects in this gene cause Tay-Sachs disease in humans. To elucidate the role of the gene in the nervous system of the mouse and to establish a mouse model of Tay-Sachs disease, we have cloned and characterized the HEXA gene and targeted a disruption of the gene in mouse ES cells. The mouse HEXA gene spans {approximately}26 kb and consists of 14 exons, similar to the human gene. A heterogeneous transcription initiation site was identified 21-42 bp 5{prime} of the initiator ATG, with two of the sites fitting the consensus CTCA (A = start) as seen for some weak initiator systems. Promoter analysis showed that the first 150 bp 5{prime} of the ATG contained 85% of promoter activity observed in constructs containing up to 1050 bp of 5{prime} sequence. The active region contained a sequence matching that of the adenovirus major late promoter upstream element factor. A survey of mouse tissues showed that the highest mRNA levels were in (max to min): testis (5.5 x brain cortex), adrenal, epididymis, heart, brain, lung, kidney, and liver (0.3 x brain cortex). A 12 kb BstI/SalI fragment containing nine exons was disrupted with the insertion of the bacterial neo{sup r} gene in exon 11 and was targeted into 129/Sv ES cells by homologous recombination. Nine of 153 G418 resistant clones were correctly targeted as confirmed by Southern blotting. The heterozygous ES cells were microinjected into mouse blastocysts and implanted into pseudo-pregnant mice. Nine male chimeric mice, showing that 40-95% chimerism for the 129/Sv agouti coat color marker, are being bred in an effort to generate germline transmission of the disrupted HEXA gene.

  5. Genetic Heterogeneity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Results from 24 Clones Derived from a Single C57BL/6 Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng; Klco, Jeffery M.; Helton, Nichole M.; George, Daniel R.; Mudd, Jacqueline L.; Miller, Christopher A.; Lu, Charles; Fulton, Robert; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina; Wilson, Richard K.; Ley, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have tremendous potential as a tool for disease modeling, drug testing, and other applications. Since the generation of iPSCs “captures” the genetic history of the individual cell that was reprogrammed, iPSC clones (even those derived from the same individual) would be expected to demonstrate genetic heterogeneity. To assess the degree of genetic heterogeneity, and to determine whether some cells are more genetically “fit” for reprogramming, we performed exome sequencing on 24 mouse iPSC clones derived from skin fibroblasts obtained from two different sites of the same 8-week-old C57BL/6J male mouse. While no differences in the coding regions were detected in the two parental fibroblast pools, each clone had a unique genetic signature with a wide range of heterogeneity observed among the individual clones: a total of 383 iPSC variants were validated for the 24 clones (mean 16.0/clone, range 0–45). Since these variants were all present in the vast majority of the cells in each clone (variant allele frequencies of 40–60% for heterozygous variants), they most likely preexisted in the individual cells that were reprogrammed, rather than being acquired during reprogramming or cell passaging. We then tested whether this genetic heterogeneity had functional consequences for hematopoietic development by generating hematopoietic progenitors in vitro and enumerating colony forming units (CFUs). While there was a range of hematopoietic potentials among the 24 clones, only one clone failed to differentiate into hematopoietic cells; however, it was able to form a teratoma, proving its pluripotent nature. Further, no specific association was found between the mutational spectrum and the hematopoietic potential of each iPSC clone. These data clearly highlight the genetic heterogeneity present within individual fibroblasts that is captured by iPSC generation, and suggest that most of the changes are random, and functionally benign

  6. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  7. Rapid cloning of any rearranged mouse immunoglobulin variable genes

    SciTech Connect

    Dattamajumdar, A.K.; Jacobson, D.P.; Hood, L.E.; Osman, G.E.

    1996-12-31

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) have been the focus of extensive study for several decades and have become an important research area for immunologists and molecular biologists. The use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology has accelerated the cloning, sequencing, and characterization of genes of the immune system. However, cloning and sequencing the Ig variable (V) genes using the PCR technology has been a challenging task, primarily due to the very diverse nature of Ig V region genes. We have developed a simple, rapid, and reproducible PCR-based technique to clone any rearranged mouse Ig heavy or light chain genes. A close examination of all Ig heavy and light chain V gene families has resulted in the design of 5{prime} and 3{prime} universal primers from regions that are highly conserved across all heavy or light chain V gene families, and the joining or constant regions, respectively. We present our strategy for designing universal primers for Ig V gene families. These primers were able to rapidly amplify the rearranged Ig V genes, belonging to diverse Ig V gene families from very different cell lines, i.e., J558, MOPC-21, 36-60, and a chicken ovalbumin specific B-cell hybridoma. In addition, the present study provides the complete alignment of nucleotide sequences of all heavy and light chain variable gene families. This powerful method of cloning Ig V genes, therefore, allows rapid and precise analysis of B-cell hybridomas, B-cell repertoire, and B-cell ontogeny. 55 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Measurement of background translocation frequencies in individuals with clones

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, M.J.

    1996-08-01

    In the leukemia case the unseparated B and T lymphocytes had a high translocation frequency even after 0.0014, respectively. After purging all clones from the data, the translocation frequencies for Bio 8 and Bio 23 were 0.00750.0014 and 0.0073 metaphases were scored for chromosomal aberrations,, specifically reciprocal translocations, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Metaphase spreads were used from two healthy, unexposed individuals (not exposed to radiation, chemotherapy or radiotherapy) and one early B- precursor acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patient (metaphase spreads from both separated T lymphocytes and unseparated B and T lymphocytes were scored). All three individuals had an abnormally high translocation frequency. The high translocation frequencies resulted from clonal expansion of specific translocated chromosomes. I show in this thesis that by purging (discounting or removing) clones from the data of unexposed individuals, one can obtain true background translocation frequencies. In two cases, Bio 8 and Bio 23, the measured translocation frequency for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 was 0.0124 purging all of the clones from the data. This high translocation frequency may be due to a low frequency of some clones and may not be recognized. The separated T lymphocytes had a higher translocation frequency than expected.

  9. "Mouse Clone Model" for evaluating the immunogenicity and tumorigenicity of pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the immune-rejection and tumor-formation potentials of induced pluripotent stem cells and other stem cells, we devised a model-designated the "Mouse Clone Model"-which combined the theory of somatic animal cloning, tetraploid complementation, and induced pluripotent stem cells to demonstrate the applicability of stem cells for transplantation therapy. PMID:26687081

  10. Cloning the mouse homologue of the human lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, J.H.; Yang, B.Z.; Liu, H.M.

    1994-09-01

    Pompe disease (GSD II) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of lysosomal acid {alpha}-glucosidase (GAA). In an attempt to create a mouse model for Pompe disease, we isolated and characterized the gene encoding the mouse homologue of the human GAA. Twenty clones that extend from exon 2 to the poly(A) tail were isolated from a mouse liver cDNA library, but the remainder of the mRNA proved difficult to obtain by conventional cDNA library screening. Sequences spanning exons 1-2 were cloned by RACE from mouse liver RNA. The full-length liver GAA cDNA contains 3365 nucleotides with a coding region of 2859 nucleotides and a 394 base pair 3{prime}-nontranslated region. The deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse GAA shows 84% identity to the human GAA. Southern blot analysis demonstrated that the mouse GAA was encoded by a single copy gene. Then six bacteriophages containing DNA from the GAA gene were isolated by screening 10{sup 6} phage plaques of a mouse 129 genomic library using a mouse GAA cDNA as a probe. From one of these bacteriophages, an 11-kilobase EcoRI fragment containing exons 3 to 15 was subcloned and sequenced. Work is in progress using this genomic clone to disrupt the GAA gene in murine embryonic stem cells in order to create GSD II mice.

  11. Significant improvement of mouse cloning technique by treatment with trichostatin A after somatic nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishigami, Satoshi . E-mail: kishigami@cdb.riken.jp; Mizutani, Eiji; Ohta, Hiroshi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Thuan, Nguyen Van; Wakayama, Sayaka; Bui, Hong-Thuy; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2006-02-03

    The low success rate of animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is believed to be associated with epigenetic errors including abnormal DNA hypermethylation. Recently, we elucidated by using round spermatids that, after nuclear transfer, treatment of zygotes with trichostatin A (TSA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylase, can remarkably reduce abnormal DNA hypermethylation depending on the origins of transferred nuclei and their genomic regions [S. Kishigami, N. Van Thuan, T. Hikichi, H. Ohta, S. Wakayama. E. Mizutani, T. Wakayama, Epigenetic abnormalities of the mouse paternal zygotic genome associated with microinsemination of round spermatids, Dev. Biol. (2005) in press]. Here, we found that 5-50 nM TSA-treatment for 10 h following oocyte activation resulted in more efficient in vitro development of somatic cloned embryos to the blastocyst stage from 2- to 5-fold depending on the donor cells including tail tip cells, spleen cells, neural stem cells, and cumulus cells. This TSA-treatment also led to more than 5-fold increase in success rate of mouse cloning from cumulus cells without obvious abnormality but failed to improve ES cloning success. Further, we succeeded in establishment of nuclear transfer-embryonic stem (NT-ES) cells from TSA-treated cloned blastocyst at a rate three times higher than those from untreated cloned blastocysts. Thus, our data indicate that TSA-treatment after SCNT in mice can dramatically improve the practical application of current cloning techniques.

  12. Individual clones of hemopoietic cells in murine long-term bone marrow culture

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, J.L.; Deryugina, E.I.; Drize, N.J.; Udalov, G.A.

    1987-06-01

    Forty-seven individual hemopoietic cell clones bearing unique radiation markers were studied in long-term bone marrow cultures. Throughout cultivation clones appeared at different times, from 1 to 12 weeks after explantation, survived during 1-10 more weeks, and were characterized by marked variability in size. Usually, the number of metaphases peculiar to an individual clone rapidly increased, achieved maximum, and then underwent a decline. Cells of reliably disappearing clones were never seen again. The experimental results provide further evidence for the model of hemopoiesis by clonal succession.

  13. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    Cloning describes the processes used to create an exact genetic replica of another cell, tissue or organism. ... named Dolly. There are three different types of cloning: Gene cloning, which creates copies of genes or ...

  14. Positional cloning of the mouse saccharin preference (Sac) locus

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Li, Xia; Reed, Danielle R.; Ohmen, Jeffery D.; Li, Shanru; Chen, Zhenyu; Tordoff, Michael G.; de Jong, Pieter J.; Wu, Chenyan; West, David B.; Chatterjee, Alu; Ross, David A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2013-01-01

    Differences in sweetener intake among inbred strains of mice are partially determined by allelic variation of the saccharin preference (Sac) locus. Genetic and physical mapping limited a critical genomic interval containing Sac to a 194-kb DNA fragment. Sequencing and annotation of this region identified a gene (Tas1r3) encoding the third member of the T1R family of putative taste receptors, T1R3. Introgression by serial backcrossing of the 194-kb chromosomal fragment containing the Tas1r3 allele from the high-sweetener preferring C57BL/6ByJ strain onto the genetic background of the low-sweetener preferring 129P3/J strain rescued its low sweetener preference phenotype. Polymorphisms of Tas1r3 that are likely to have functional significance were identified using analysis of genomic sequences and sweetener preference phenotypes of genealogically distant mouse strains. Tas1r3 has two common haplotypes, consisting of six single nucleotide polymorphisms: one haplotype was found in mouse strains with elevated sweetener preference and the other in strains relatively indifferent to sweeteners. This study provides compelling evidence that Tas1r3 is equivalent to the Sac locus and that the T1R3 receptor responds to sweeteners. PMID:11555487

  15. Cloning, characterization, and tissue expression pattern of mouse Nma/BAMBI during odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Knight, C; Simmons, D; Gu, T T; Gluhak-Heinrich, J; Pavlin, D; Zeichner-David, M; MacDougall, M

    2001-10-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotides to consensus serine kinase functional domains previously identified a novel, partial rabbit tooth cDNA (Zeichner-David et al., 1992) that was used in this study to identify a full-length mouse clone. A 1390-base-pair cDNA clone was isolated encoding a putative 260-amino-acid open reading frame containing a hydrophobic 25-amino-acid potential transmembrane domain. This clone shares some homology with the TGF-beta type I receptor family, but lacks the intracellular kinase domain. DNA database analysis revealed that this clone has 86% identity to a newly isolated human gene termed non-metastatic gene A and 80% identity to a Xenopus cDNA clone termed BMP and activin membrane bound inhibitor. Here we report the mouse Nma/BAMBI cDNA sequence, the tissue expression pattern, and confirmed expression in dental cell lines. This study demonstrates that Nma/BAMBI is a highly conserved protein across species and is expressed at high levels during odontogenesis. PMID:11706948

  16. Cloning and developmental expression of mouse pygopus 2, a putative Wnt signaling component☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Baoan; Mackay, Douglas R.; Ma, Ji; Dai, Xing

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies in Drosophila identified pygopus, which encodes a PHD finger protein, as an additional nuclear component of the canonical Wingless(Wg)/Wnt signaling pathway. In this study, we describe the molecular cloning and expression analysis of a mouse pygopus gene, mpygo2. mpygo2 transcripts were detected in almost all adult mouse tissues examined, whereas transcripts of another mouse pygopus gene, mpygo1, were detected only in heart tissue. Abundant mpygo2 transcripts were observed during embryogenesis in multiple developmental sites. Consistent with the demonstrated role of the Wnt-β-catenin–LEF/TCF signaling pathway in mammalian skin development, mpygo2 expression was detected in the developing epidermis and hair follicles, which suggests that mpygo2 might mediate the effect of this signaling pathway in mouse skin. PMID:15234002

  17. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit gene: Cloning, mapping, structure, and targeting in mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1994-09-01

    The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor {alpha}7 subunit is a member of a family of ligand-gated ion channels, and is the only subunit know to bind {alpha}-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. {alpha}-Bungarotoxin binding sites are known to be more abundant in the hippocampus of mouse strains that are particularly sensitive to nicotine-induced seizures. The {alpha}7 receptor is highly permeable to calcium, which could suggest a role in synaptic plasticity in the nervous system. Auditory gating deficiency, an abnormal response to a second auditory stimulus, is characteristic of schizophrenia. Mouse strains that exhibit a similar gating deficit have reduced hippocampal expression of the {alpha}7 subunit. We have cloned and sequenced the full length cDNA for the mouse {alpha}7 gene (Acra-7) and characterized its gene structure. The murine {alpha}7 shares amino acid identity of 99% and 93% with the rat and human {alpha}7 subunits, respectively. Using an interspecies backcross panel, the murine gene was mapped to chromosome 7 near the p locus, a region syntenic with human chromosome 15; the human gene (CHRNA7) was confirmed to map to 15q13-q14 by FISH. To generate a mouse {alpha}7 mutant by homologous recombination, we have constructed a replacement vector which will delete transmembrane domains II-IV and the cytoplasmic domain from the gene product. Recombinant embryonic stem (ES) cell clones were selected and used to develop mouse chimeras that are currently being bred to obtain germline transmission.

  18. Gating mechanism of the cloned inward rectifier potassium channel from mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Hiraoka, M

    1994-10-01

    The complementary DNA encoding the inward rectifier potassium channel was cloned from the adult mouse heart by using the polymerase chain reaction. The clone had the nucleotide sequence identical to that of the IRK1 gene cloned from a mouse macrophage cell line. Northern blot analysis revealed that the transcript of this gene was mainly expressed in the ventricle, where the inward rectifier K+ channel plays a predominant role in maintaining the high negative value of the resting membrane potential. The current expressed by injection of the complementary RNA of the cloned gene into Xenopus oocytes showed a marked inward rectification that depends on the driving force of K+. A region of negative slope conductance was observed in the current-voltage relationship at potentials positive to the reversal potential. When the extracellular K+ concentration was raised, the increase in outward current amplitude resulted in the "crossover" of outward current-voltage relations. The fast time-dependent increase in current amplitude was recorded upon membrane repolarization from a potential positive to the reversal potential. The kinetics of the time-dependent current was very similar to that of the intrinsic gating mechanism of the native cardiac inward rectifier K+ channel. Our results suggest the existence of the intrinsic gating mechanism, accounting for the extent of rectification in the current-voltage relationship in the expressed channel. PMID:7707353

  19. Aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of imprinted microRNA-127 and Rtl1 in cloned mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Xiangshun; Zhang Dingxiao; Ko, Yoeung-Gyu; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2009-02-06

    The microRNA (miRNA) genes mir-127 and mir-136 are located near two CpG islands in the imprinted mouse retrotransposon-like gene Rtl1, a key gene involved in placenta formation. These miRNAs appear to be involved in regulating the imprinting of Rtl1. To obtain insights into the epigenetic reprogramming of cloned embryos, we compared the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in fertilized mouse embryos, parthenotes, androgenotes and cloned embryos developing in vitro. We also examined the DNA methylation status of the promoter regions of Rtl1 and mir-127 in these embryos. Our data showed that mir-127 and mir-136 were highly expressed in parthenotes, but rarely expressed in androgenotes. Interestingly, the expression levels of mir-127 and mir-136 in parthenotes were almost twice that seen in the fertilized embryos, but were much lower in the cloned embryos. The Rtl1 promoter region was hyper-methylated in blastocyst stage parthenotes (75.0%), moderately methylated (32.4%) in the fertilized embryos and methylated to a much lower extent ({approx}10%) in the cloned embryos. Conversely, the promoter region of mir-127 was hypo-methylated in parthenogenetically activated embryos (0.4%), moderately methylated (30.0%) in fertilized embryos and heavily methylated in cloned blastocysts (63-70%). These data support a role for mir-127 and mir-136 in the epigenetic reprogramming of the Rtl1 imprinting process. Analysis of the aberrant epigenetic reprogramming of mir-127 and Rtl1 in cloned embryos may help to explain the nuclear reprogramming procedures that occur in donor cells following somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT)

  20. Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... DNA Reproductive cloning, which creates copies of whole animals Therapeutic cloning, which creates embryonic stem cells. Researchers hope to use these cells to grow healthy tissue to replace injured or diseased tissues in the human body. NIH: National Human Genome Research Institute

  1. Molecular cloning of the mouse CCK gene: expression in different brain regions and during cortical development.

    PubMed Central

    Vitale, M; Vashishtha, A; Linzer, E; Powell, D J; Friedman, J M

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we describe experiments that address specific issues concerning the regulation of the mouse cholecystokinin gene in brain and intestine. The mouse cholecystokinin gene was cloned and sequenced. Extensive homology among the mouse, man and rat genes was noted particularly in the three exons and the regions upstream of the RNA start site. RNAse protection assays for each of the three exons were used to demonstrate that CCK is expressed in only a subset of tissues and that the same cap site and splice choices are used in brain, intestine as well as in cerebellum, cortex, midbrain, hypothalamus and hippocampus. CCK RNA was also noted to be detectable in kidney. Thus the same gene using the same promoter is expressed in subsets of cells that differ in their biochemical, morphologic and functional characteristics. The level of expression of CCK was also monitored during mouse cortical development and the appearance of CCK RNA was compared to glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), enkephalin and somatostatin. It was noted that each of these cortical markers was first expressed at different times during cortical development. The appearance of CCK RNA during intestinal development was also measured and found to precede appearance in cortex by several days. Images PMID:2011497

  2. Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of cloned human and mouse preprocathepsin B cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, S J; San Segundo, B; McCormick, M B; Steiner, D F

    1986-01-01

    Cathepsin B is a lysosomal thiol proteinase that may have additional extralysosomal functions. To further our investigations on the structure, mode of biosynthesis, and intracellular sorting of this enzyme, we have determined the complete coding sequences for human and mouse preprocathepsin B by using cDNA clones isolated from human hepatoma and kidney phage libraries. The nucleotide sequences predict that the primary structure of preprocathepsin B contains 339 amino acids organized as follows: a 17-residue NH2-terminal prepeptide sequence followed by a 62-residue propeptide region, 254 residues in mature (single chain) cathepsin B, and a 6-residue extension at the COOH terminus. A comparison of procathepsin B sequences from three species (human, mouse, and rat) reveals that the homology between the propeptides is relatively conserved with a minimum of 68% sequence identity. In particular, two conserved sequences in the propeptide that may be functionally significant include a potential glycosylation site and the presence of a single cysteine at position 59. Comparative analysis of the three sequences also suggests that processing of procathepsin B is a multistep process, during which enzymatically active intermediate forms may be generated. The availability of the cDNA clones will facilitate the identification of possible active or inactive intermediate processive forms as well as studies on the transcriptional regulation of the cathepsin B gene. PMID:3463996

  3. DNA Methylation Errors in Cloned Mouse Sperm by Germ Line Barrier Evasion.

    PubMed

    Koike, Tasuku; Wakai, Takuya; Jincho, Yuko; Sakashita, Akihiko; Kobayashi, Hisato; Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Sayaka; Miura, Fumihito; Ito, Takashi; Kono, Tomohiro

    2016-06-01

    The germ line reprogramming barrier resets parental epigenetic modifications according to sex, conferring totipotency to mammalian embryos upon fertilization. However, it is not known whether epigenetic errors are committed during germ line reprogramming that are then transmitted to germ cells, and consequently to offspring. We addressed this question in the present study by performing a genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using a target postbisulfite sequencing method in order to identify DNA methylation errors in cloned mouse sperm. The sperm genomes of two somatic cell-cloned mice (CL1 and CL7) contained significantly higher numbers of differentially methylated CpG sites (P = 0.0045 and P = 0.0116). As a result, they had higher numbers of differentially methylated CpG islands. However, there was no evidence that these sites were transmitted to the sperm genome of offspring. These results suggest that DNA methylation errors resulting from embryo cloning are transmitted to the sperm genome by evading the germ line reprogramming barrier. PMID:27103445

  4. Cloning and mapping of the mouse {alpha}7-neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr-Urtreger, A.; Baldini, A.; Beaudet, A.L.

    1995-03-20

    We report the isolation of cDNA clones for the mouse {alpha}7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit (gene symbol Acra7), the only nicotinic receptor subunit known to bind a-bungarotoxin in mammalian brain. This gene may have relevance to nicotine sensitivity and to some electrophysiologic findings in schizophrenia. The mouse {alpha}7 subunit gene encodes a protein of 502 amino acids with substantial identity to the rat (99.6%), human (92.8%), and chicken (87.5%) amino acid sequences. The {alpha}7 gene was mapped to mouse chromosome 7 near the p locus with the following gene order from proximal to distal: Myod1-3.5 {+-}1.7 cM-Gas2-0.9 cM {+-} 0.9 cM-D7Mit70-1.8 {+-} 1.2 cM- Acra7-4.4 {+-}1.0 cM-Hras1-ps11/Igf1r/Snrp2a. The human gene was confirmed to map to the homologous region of human chromosome 15q13-q14. 26 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Cloning and optimal Gaussian individual attacks for a continuous-variable quantum key distribution using coherent states and reverse reconciliation

    SciTech Connect

    Namiki, Ryo; Koashi, Masato; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2006-03-15

    We investigate the security of continuous-variable quantum key distribution using coherent states and reverse reconciliation against Gaussian individual attacks based on an optimal Gaussian 1{yields}2 cloning machine. We provide an implementation of the optimal Gaussian individual attack. We also find a Bell-measurement attack which works without delayed choice of measurements and has better performance than the cloning attack.

  6. Cloning and Characterization of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase from Mouse Macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qiao-Wen; Cho, Hearn J.; Calaycay, Jimmy; Mumford, Richard A.; Swiderek, Kristine M.; Lee, Terry D.; Ding, Aihao; Troso, Tiffany; Nathan, Carl

    1992-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) conveys a variety of messages between cells, including signals for vasorelaxation, neurotransmission, and cytotoxicity. In some endothelial cells and neurons, a constitutive NO synthase is activated transiently by agonists that elevate intracellular calcium concentrations and promote the binding of calmodulin. In contrast, in macrophages, NO synthase activity appears slowly after exposure of the cells to cytokines and bacterial products, is sustained, and functions independently of calcium and calmodulin. A monospecific antibody was used to clone complementary DNA that encoded two isoforms of NO synthase from immunologically activated mouse macrophages. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to confirm most of the amino acid sequence. Macrophage NO synthase differs extensively from cerebellar NO synthase. The macrophage enzyme is immunologically induced at the transcriptional level and closely resembles the enzyme in cytokine-treated tumor cells and inflammatory neutrophils.

  7. Cloning of three mouse Unc5 genes and their expression patterns at mid-gestation.

    PubMed

    Engelkamp, Dieter

    2002-10-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans gene unc-5 and it's vertebrate homologues are Netrin receptors. In this study, I report the cloning of three mouse Unc5 family members, namely, Unc5h1, Unc5h2 and Unc5h4. Furthermore, a comparative expression analysis is presented with Unc5h3, deleted in colorectal cancer and Netrin-1. Transcript distribution is studied during early eye development, mammary bud formation, vascularisation, and limb development. The most widely expressed Unc5 family member is Unc5h2 and it's mRNA is observed during early blood vessel formation, in the semicircular canal and in a dorsal to ventral gradient in the retina. Unc5h1 expression is restricted to the central nervous system, whereas, sites of Unc5h4 expression are in the developing limb and mammary gland. PMID:12351186

  8. Cloning, characterization, and mapping of human homolog of mouse T-cell death-associated gene.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, H; Zeng, Z; Su, K; Fan, P; Shell, B K; Carter, K C; Li, Y

    1998-06-01

    To establish immunologic autotolerance, self-reactive immature thymocytes are eliminated by negative selection during T-cell development in the thymus. Self-reactive clones undergo apoptosis after stimulation via the T-cell receptor (TCR). The process of cell selection is determined by the dedication of the TCR for tolerogenic antigen/major histocompatibility complex. We have cloned a novel human gene that is highly homologous in the transmembrane and G protein-coupling domains to mouse T-cell death-associated gene 8 (TDAG8). The gene, human TDAG8 (hTDAG8), which belongs to the G protein-couple receptor superfamily, encodes a protein of 337 amino acids. An expressed sequence tag (EST) corresponding to hTDAG8 was identified from a human thyroid cDNA library and subsequently used to isolate a full-length genomic clone. Northern blot analysis revealed that the hTDAG8 gene is expressed predominantly in lymphoid tissues, including peripheral blood leukocytes, spleen, lymph nodes, and thymus. Stably transfected mammalian CHO cells were generated, and heterologous expression of hTDAG8 was confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) revealed that hTDAG8 maps to human chromosome 14q31-32.1, a region in which abnormalities associated with human T-cell lymphoma or leukemia are found. Taken together, these data implicate the hTDAG8 gene in T-cell-associated diseases in humans, but its actual physiological and pathological role in the human immune system needs further investigation. PMID:9655242

  9. Cloning and partial characterization of the mouse glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT) gene promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Sayeski, P P; Wang, D; Su, K; Han, I O; Kudlow, J E

    1997-01-01

    Glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT) is the enzyme that is rate limiting in the synthesis of glucosamine and hexosamines. Glucosamine has been proposed to contribute to the glucotoxicity of diabetes. Evidence that the gene encoding GFAT is transcriptionally regulated prompted us to clone and characterize its promoter. The position of the mouse GFAT promoter relative to the translational start site was located by primer extension and found to be 149 bp upstream of the translational start site. A 1.9 kb SacI fragment of the GFAT gene was found to contain the promoter and 88 bp of sequence downstream of the transcriptional start site. This promoter segment could drive expression of a luciferase reporter gene, could confer correct transcriptional initiation to the reporter and could confer the EGF-responsiveness previously observed in the native gene. The mouse GFAT promoter lacks a canonical TATA box and has several GC boxes within a highly GC-rich region. Deletional analysis of the promoter indicated that a proximal element extending to -120 relative to the transcriptional start site could confer reporter expression at a level of 57% of the 1.9 kb construct. Detailed analysis of this proximal region by DNase I footprinting, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and site-directed mutagenesis indicated that Sp1 binds to three elements in this proximal promoter segment and plays a vital role in regulation of transcription from this gene. PMID:9060444

  10. Molecular characterization of a mouse prostaglandin D receptor and functional expression of the cloned gene.

    PubMed

    Hirata, M; Kakizuka, A; Aizawa, M; Ushikubi, F; Narumiya, S

    1994-11-01

    Prostanoid receptors belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors with seven transmembrane domains. By taking advantage of nucleotide sequence homology among the prostanoid receptors, we have isolated and identified a cDNA fragment and its gene encoding a mouse prostaglandin (PG) D receptor by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and gene cloning. This gene codes for a polypeptide of 357 amino acids, with a calculated molecular weight of 40,012. The deduced amino acid sequence has a high degree of similarity with the mouse PGI receptor and the EP2 subtype of the PGE receptor, which together form a subgroup of the prostanoid receptors. Chinese hamster ovary cells stably expressing the gene showed a single class of binding sites for [#H]PGD2 with a Kd of 40 nM. This binding was displaced by unlabeled ligands in the following order: PGD2 > BW 245C (a PGD agonist) > BW A868C (a PGD antagonist) > STA2 (a thromboxane A2 agonist). PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and iloprost showed little displacement activity at concentrations up to 10 microM. PGD2 and BW 245C also increased cAMP levels in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the receptor, in a concentration-dependent manner. BW A868C showed a partial agonist activity in the cAMP assay. Northern blotting analysis with mouse poly(A)+ RNA identified a major mRNA species of 3.5 kb that was most abundantly expressed in the ileum, followed by lung, stomach, and uterus. PMID:7972033

  11. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, K.; Satokata, I.; Ogita, Z.; Uchida, T.; Okada, Y.

    1989-07-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene.

  12. Molecular cloning of a mouse DNA repair gene that complements the defect of group-A xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, K; Satokata, I; Ogita, Z; Uchida, T; Okada, Y

    1989-01-01

    For isolation of the gene responsible for xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation group A, plasmid pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from a mouse embryo were cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells, a group-A XP cell line. Two primary UV-resistant XP transfectants were isolated from about 1.6 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. pSV2gpt and genomic DNA from the primary transfectants were again cotransfected into XP2OSSV cells and a secondary UV-resistant XP transfectant was obtained by screening about 4.8 X 10(5) pSV2gpt-transformed XP colonies. The secondary transfectant retained fewer mouse repetitive sequences. A mouse gene that complements the defect of XP2OSSV cells was cloned into an EMBL3 vector from the genome of a secondary transfectant. Transfections of the cloned DNA also conferred UV resistance on another group-A XP cell line but not on XP cell lines of group C, D, F, or G. Northern blot analysis of poly(A)+ RNA with a subfragment of cloned mouse DNA repair gene as the probe revealed that an approximately 1.0 kilobase mRNA was transcribed in the donor mouse embryo and secondary transfectant, and approximately 1.0- and approximately 1.3-kilobase mRNAs were transcribed in normal human cells, but none of these mRNAs was detected in three strains of group-A XP cells. These results suggest that the cloned DNA repair gene is specific for group-A XP and may be the mouse homologue of the group-A XP human gene. Images PMID:2748601

  13. CLoNe is a new method to target single progenitors and study their progeny in mouse and chick

    PubMed Central

    García-Moreno, Fernando; Vasistha, Navneet A.; Begbie, Jo; Molnár, Zoltán

    2014-01-01

    Cell lineage analysis enables us to address pivotal questions relating to: the embryonic origin of cells and sibling cell relationships in the adult body; the contribution of progenitors activated after trauma or disease; and the comparison across species in evolutionary biology. To address such fundamental questions, several techniques for clonal labelling have been developed, each with its shortcomings. Here, we report a novel method, CLoNe that is designed to work in all vertebrate species and tissues. CLoNe uses a cocktail of labelling, targeting and transposition vectors that enables targeting of specific subpopulations of progenitor types with a combination of fluorophores resulting in multifluorescence that describes multiple clones per specimen. Furthermore, transposition into the genome ensures the longevity of cell labelling. We demonstrate the robustness of this technique in mouse and chick forebrain development, and show evidence that CLoNe will be broadly applicable to study clonal relationships in different tissues and species. PMID:24644261

  14. CLoNe is a new method to target single progenitors and study their progeny in mouse and chick.

    PubMed

    García-Moreno, Fernando; Vasistha, Navneet A; Begbie, Jo; Molnár, Zoltán

    2014-04-01

    Cell lineage analysis enables us to address pivotal questions relating to: the embryonic origin of cells and sibling cell relationships in the adult body; the contribution of progenitors activated after trauma or disease; and the comparison across species in evolutionary biology. To address such fundamental questions, several techniques for clonal labelling have been developed, each with its shortcomings. Here, we report a novel method, CLoNe that is designed to work in all vertebrate species and tissues. CLoNe uses a cocktail of labelling, targeting and transposition vectors that enables targeting of specific subpopulations of progenitor types with a combination of fluorophores resulting in multifluorescence that describes multiple clones per specimen. Furthermore, transposition into the genome ensures the longevity of cell labelling. We demonstrate the robustness of this technique in mouse and chick forebrain development, and show evidence that CLoNe will be broadly applicable to study clonal relationships in different tissues and species. PMID:24644261

  15. Toxoplasma gondii sexual cross in a single naturally infected feline host: Generation of highly mouse-virulent and avirulent clones, genotypically different from clonal types I, II and III

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tachyzoite clones obtained from a single Toxoplasma gondii oocyst field sample were genotyped and characterized regarding mouse virulence. PCR-RFLP genotyping of tachyzoites initially isolated from interferon-γ-knockout (GKO) mice, BALB/c mice and VERO cell culture using the nine independent, unlinked genetic markers nSAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico revealed mixed T. gondii infections showing combinations of type II and type III alleles at different loci. Forty-five individual clones were obtained from all mixed T. gondii tachyzoite cell cultures by limiting dilution. Sixteen T. gondii clones showed type III alleles at all loci and 29 clones displayed a combination of type II and type III alleles at different loci. Five clone groups were identified in total, four of which include T. gondii clones that showed a non-canonical allele pattern and have never been described in natural infections before. All tested clones, except two, were highly virulent in BALB/c mice. The isolation of different non-canonical T. gondii clones originating from an oocyst sample of a single naturally infected cat demonstrate that sexual recombination as well as re-assortment of chromosomes via a sexual cross of T. gondii occur under natural conditions and result in the emergence of clones with increased virulence in mice. PMID:22546040

  16. A simple and rapid strategy for the molecular cloning and monitoring of mouse HtrA2 serine protease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Goo-Young; Nam, Min-Kyung; Kim, Sang-Soo; Kim, Ho-Young; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Rhim, Hyangshuk

    2008-03-01

    A simple and rapid strategy for molecular cloning using a gel-free and antibiotic selection method is described which allows for the complete elimination of DNA extraction by gel electrophoresis, and thus has several advantages over gel-based cloning methods, including: (i) a cloning efficiency that is approximately 10-times higher due to the prevention of ethidium bromide ultraviolet-induced DNA damage and contamination with ligase inhibitors; (ii) the amount of plasmid DNA required is approximately five times less; and (iii) the cloning time is several hours less. Once the target gene, such as mouse HtrA2 serine protease, was cloned into the pEGFP-N3 plasmid, the integrity of the kanamycin-resistant molecular clone encoding the GFP fusion protein was verified by immunoblot and immunofluorescence assays. In addition, the integrity of the ampicillin-resistant molecular clone was directly evaluated by analyzing the expression and affinity purification of the GST fusion protein and by measuring its enzymatic activity. Therefore, this method is suitable for the routine construction of a plasmid expressing the gene of interest, and the usefulness of this strategy can be demonstrated by monitoring the expression of the target gene in E. coli and mammalian cells. PMID:17939055

  17. Functional properties of a cloned 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptor subunit: comparison with native mouse receptors.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N; Lukas, W; Jones, K A

    1994-12-01

    1. A comparative study of the whole-cell and single-channel properties of cloned and native mouse 5-hydroxytryptamine ionotropic receptors (5-HT3) was undertaken using mammalian cell lines expressing the cloned 5-HT3 receptor subunit A (5-HT3R-A), superior cervical ganglia (SCG) neurones and N1E-115 cells. 2. No pharmacological difference was found in the sensitivity to the agonists 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT, or to the antagonists d-tubocurare and 3-tropanyl-3,5-dichlorobenzoate (MDL-72222). 3. Current-voltage (I-V) relationships of whole-cell currents showed inward rectification in the three preparations. Rectification was stronger both in cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit and in N1E-115 cells when compared with SCG neurones. 4. No clear openings could be resolved in 5-HT-activated currents in patches excised from cells expressing the 5-HT3R-A subunit or N1E-115 cells. Current fluctuation analysis of whole-cell and excised-patch records revealed a slope conductance of 0.4-0.6 pS in both preparations. Current-voltage relationships of these channels showed strong rectification that fully accounted for the whole-cell voltage dependence. 5. In contrast, single channels of about 10 pS were activated by 5-HT in patches excised from SCG neurones. The weak voltage dependence of their conductance did not account completely for the rectification of whole-cell currents. A lower unitary conductance (3.4 pS) was inferred from whole-cell noise analysis. 6. We conclude that the receptor expressed from the cloned cDNA is indistinguishable from the 5-HT3 receptor of N1E-115 cells, suggesting an identical structure for these two receptors. The higher conductance and different voltage dependence of the 5-HT3 receptor in SCG neurones might indicate the participation of an additional subunit in the structure of native ganglionic 5-HT3 receptors. Homo-oligomeric 5-HT3R-A channels may also be present as suggested by the lower conductance estimated by whole-cell noise analysis. PMID

  18. Predominance of the metastatic phenotype in hybrids formed by fusion of mouse and human melanoma clones.

    PubMed

    van Golen, K L; Risin, S; Staroselsky, A; Berger, D; Tainsky, M A; Pathak, S; Price, J E

    1996-03-01

    The fusion of mouse and human melanoma cells that were tumorigenic but had different metastatic capabilities resulted in hybrids that were metastatic when injected intravenously or subcutaneously into nude mice, regardless of whether it was the mouse or the human melanoma clone that was metastatic. The H7 hybrid line, formed by fusing murine nonmetastatic K1735 C19 cells with human metastatic A375 C15 cells retained high metastatic potential over more than 50 sub-culture passages, suggesting that the dominant metastatic phenotype in these hybrid cells was stable. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), human chromosome 17 was consistently identified as the predominant human chromosome in the majority of H7 cells tested between passages 20 and 60. Western blot analysis showed that the hybrid cells expressed human nm23 protein, indicating that at least one gene on the human chromosome 17 was functional. Immunocytochemistry and immunoprecipitation showed that the metastatic A375 C15 and H7 cells expressed p53 protein, but that the nonmetastatic K1735 C19 melanoma cells did not. Sequencing the human p53 gene in A375 C15N and H7 showed mutations in exon 7. Using a bioassay technique, we showed that K1735 C19 cells can spread from subcutaneous tumors to the lungs of nude mice yet fail to form metastases. With the addition of human chromosome 17 from A375 C15 cells, which carries a mutant p53 gene, the cells readily formed lung metastases. In this melanoma hybrid, a mutant p53 gene appears to confer a survival advantage on cells arrested in the lungs of nude mice and thus contributes to the growth of metastatic cells. PMID:8605733

  19. Identification, cloning and expression of the mouse N-acetylglutamate synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Yu, Xiaolin; Thompson, Mark; Shi, Dashuang; Gallegos, Rene; Allewell, Norma M; Malamy, Michael H; Tuchman, Mendel

    2002-06-15

    In ureotelic animals, N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI), the first enzyme in the urea cycle. NAG synthase (NAGS; EC 2.3.1.1) catalyses the formation of NAG from glutamate and acetyl-CoA in liver and intestinal mitochondria. This enzyme is supposed to regulate ureagenesis by producing variable amounts of NAG, thus modulating CPSI activity. Moreover, inherited deficiencies in NAGS have been associated with hyperammonaemia, probably due to the loss of CPSI activity. Although the existence of the NAGS protein in mammals has been known for decades, the gene has remained elusive. We identified the mouse (Mus musculus) and human NAGS genes using their similarity to the respective Neurospora crassa gene. NAGS was cloned from a mouse liver cDNA library and was found to encode a 2.3 kb message, highly expressed in liver and small intestine with lower expression levels in kidney, spleen and testis. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative mitochondrial targeting signal at the N-terminus. The cDNA sequence complements an argA (NAGS)-deficient Escherichia coli strain, reversing its arginine auxotrophy. His-tagged versions of the pre-protein and two putative mature proteins were each overexpressed in E. coli, and purified to apparent homogeneity by using a nickel-affinity column. The pre-protein and the two putative mature proteins catalysed the NAGS reaction but one of the putative mature enzymes had significantly higher activity than the pre-protein. The addition of l-arginine increased the catalytic activity of the purified recombinant NAGS enzymes by approx. 2-6-fold. PMID:12049647

  20. Identification, cloning and expression of the mouse N-acetylglutamate synthase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Caldovic, Ljubica; Morizono, Hiroki; Yu, Xiaolin; Thompson, Mark; Shi, Dashuang; Gallegos, Rene; Allewell, Norma M; Malamy, Michael H; Tuchman, Mendel

    2002-01-01

    In ureotelic animals, N-acetylglutamate (NAG) is an essential allosteric activator of carbamylphosphate synthetase I (CPSI), the first enzyme in the urea cycle. NAG synthase (NAGS; EC 2.3.1.1) catalyses the formation of NAG from glutamate and acetyl-CoA in liver and intestinal mitochondria. This enzyme is supposed to regulate ureagenesis by producing variable amounts of NAG, thus modulating CPSI activity. Moreover, inherited deficiencies in NAGS have been associated with hyperammonaemia, probably due to the loss of CPSI activity. Although the existence of the NAGS protein in mammals has been known for decades, the gene has remained elusive. We identified the mouse (Mus musculus) and human NAGS genes using their similarity to the respective Neurospora crassa gene. NAGS was cloned from a mouse liver cDNA library and was found to encode a 2.3 kb message, highly expressed in liver and small intestine with lower expression levels in kidney, spleen and testis. The deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative mitochondrial targeting signal at the N-terminus. The cDNA sequence complements an argA (NAGS)-deficient Escherichia coli strain, reversing its arginine auxotrophy. His-tagged versions of the pre-protein and two putative mature proteins were each overexpressed in E. coli, and purified to apparent homogeneity by using a nickel-affinity column. The pre-protein and the two putative mature proteins catalysed the NAGS reaction but one of the putative mature enzymes had significantly higher activity than the pre-protein. The addition of l-arginine increased the catalytic activity of the purified recombinant NAGS enzymes by approx. 2-6-fold. PMID:12049647

  1. Cloning, expression, purification and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of mouse protein arginine methyltransferase 7.

    PubMed

    Cura, Vincent; Troffer-Charlier, Nathalie; Lambert, Marie-Annick; Bonnefond, Luc; Cavarelli, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Protein arginine methyltransferase 7 (PRMT7) is a unique but less characterized member of the family of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) that plays a role in male germline gene imprinting. PRMT7 is the only known PRMT member that catalyzes the monomethylation but not the dimethylation of the target arginine residues and harbours two catalytic domains in tandem. PRMT7 genes from five different species were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli and Sf21 insect cells. Four gave soluble proteins from Sf21 cells, of which two were homogeneous and one gave crystals. The mouse PRMT7 structure was solved by the single anomalous dispersion method using a crystal soaked with thimerosal that diffracted to beyond 2.1 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P4(3)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 97.4, c = 168.1 Å and one PRMT7 monomer in the asymmetric unit. The structure of another crystal form belonging to space group I222 was solved by molecular replacement. PMID:24419624

  2. Abnormal dynamic changes in β-tubulin in somatic nuclear transfer cloned mouse embryos.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jingling; Wang, Zhendong; Shen, Xinghui; Zheng, Zhong; Zhang, Qinghua; Feng, Xiuqing; Hu, Lili; Lei, Lei

    2015-02-01

    The efficiency of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning remains low, thus limiting the applications of this technique. In this study, we used immunochemistry and confocal microscopy to detect the microtubule component, β-tubulin, in SCNT, parthenogenetic (PA), and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) embryos before the first mitotic division. β-Tubulin is the component subunit of microtubule, which plays critical roles in regulating localization of cellular organelles, and the growth, maturation and fertilization of oocytes. Our results demonstrated similar changes of spindle patterns in PA and ICSI embryos. The second meiotic division resumed 1 h post-treatment, and the cytoplasmic asters (CAs) disappeared. After about 4-6 h of treatment, pronuclei formed with the midbodies connecting each other. Meanwhile, the CAs reappeared and a microtubule network developed in the cytoplasm. However, SCNT embryos showed abnormal multipolar spindles, and the pseudopronuclei that contained many nucleoli existed after 6 h of SrCl2 activation. Enucleated oocytes alone did not form spindle-like structures when they were artificially activated for 6 h, indicating that somatic cell chromosomes might be necessary for spindle formation in SCNT embryos. These results demonstrated abnormal changes of β-tubulin in mouse SCNT embryos, compared with PA and ICSI embryos. PMID:24345634

  3. Complementary DNA cloning, messenger RNA expression, and induction of alpha-class glutathione S-transferases in mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Buetler, T M; Eaton, D L

    1992-01-15

    Glutathione S-transferases (EC 2.5.1.18) are a multigene family of related proteins divided into four classes. Each class has multiple isoforms that exhibit tissue-specific expression, which may be an important determinant of susceptibility of that tissue to toxic injury or cancer. Recent studies have suggested that alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isoforms may play an important role in the development of cancers. Several alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isozymes have been characterized, purified, and cloned from a number of species, including rats, mice, and humans. Here we report on the cloning, sequencing, and mRNA expression of two alpha-class glutathione S-transferases from mouse liver, termed mYa and mYc. While mYa was shown to be identical to the known alpha-class glutathione S-transferase complementary DNA clone pGT41 (W. R. Pearson et al., J. Biol. Chem., 263: 13324-13332, 1988), the other clone, mYc, was demonstrated to be a novel complementary DNA clone encoding a glutathione S-transferase homologous to rat Yc (subunit 2). The mRNA for this novel complementary DNA is expressed constitutively in mouse liver. It also is the major alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isoform expressed in lung. The levels of expression of the butylated hydroxyanisole-inducible form (mYa) are highest in kidney and intestine. Treatment of mice with butylated hydroxyanisole had little effect on the expression levels of mYc but strongly induced mYa expression in liver. Butylated hydroxyanisole treatment increased expression levels for both mYa and mYc to varying degrees in kidney, lung, and intestine. The importance of the novel mouse liver alpha-class glutathione S-transferase isoform (mYc) in the metabolism of aflatoxin B1 and other carcinogens is discussed. PMID:1728405

  4. Cloning and characterization of the mouse glucokinase gene locus and identification of distal liver-specific DNase I hypersensitive sites

    SciTech Connect

    Postic, C.; Niswender, K.D.; Shelton, K.D.; Pettepher, C.C.; Granner, D.K.; Magnuson, M.A.

    1995-10-10

    We cloned and characterized an 83-kb fragment of mouse genomic DNA containing the entire glucokinase (GK) gene. The 11 exons of the gene span a total distance of 49 kb, with exons 1{beta} and 1L being separated by 35 kb. A total of 25,266 bp of DNA sequence information was determined: from {approximately}-9.2 to {approximately}+15 kb (24,195 bp), relative to the hepatocyte transcription start site, and from -335 to -736 bp (1071 bp), relative to the transcription start site in {beta} cells. These sequences revealed that mouse GK is >94% identical to rat and human GK. Mouse hepatic GK mRNA is regulated by fasting and refeeding, as also occurs in the rat. Alignment of the upstream and downstream promoter regions of the mouse, rat, and human genes revealed several evolutionarily conserved regions that may contribute to transcriptional regulation. However, fusion gene studies in transgenic mice indicate that the conserved regions near the transcription start site in hepatocytes are themselves not sufficient for position-independent expression in liver. Analysis of the chromatin structure of a 48-kb region of the mouse gene using DNase I revealed eight liver-specific hypersensitive sites whose locations ranged from 0.1 to 36 kb upstream of the liver transcription start site. The availability of a single, contiguous DNA fragment containing the entire mouse GK gene should allow further studies of cell-specific expression of GK to be performed. 46 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Comparison between two clones of Daphnia magna: effects of multigenerational cadmium exposure on toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics.

    PubMed

    Guan, Rui; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2006-03-10

    We investigated the effects of genotype (two different clones) and multigenerational Cd-exposure history on Cd toxicity, individual fitness, and biokinetics in populations of a freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna. The adults of the tolerant (T) clone had longer mean-survival-time than the sensitive (S) clone in both control groups (without Cd-exposure) and continuous Cd-exposure groups, but the two clones showed comparable resistances to acute Cd stress in the recovery groups. The body concentration of metallothionein (MT) played a critical role in handling Cd stress, which mainly accounted for the significant difference between the two clones in terms of survival distribution. High comparability of these two clones in individual fitness parameters and biokinetics suggested that these parameters are unlikely driven by genetic variation. For each specific clone, continuous Cd-exposure inhibited the animal growth, elevated the MT induction, and increased the Cd uptake rate (ingestion rate, assimilation efficiency from dietary phase, and uptake rate from dissolved phase), all of which enhanced the weight-specific Cd accumulation in daphnids' bodies. The strong dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors (e.g., food concentrations, pH, dissolved or dietary metal concentration, and metal exposure histories) rather than on genotypes implied the great potential of using biokinetics in inter-lab comparisons and environmental risk assessments. PMID:16289344

  6. In vitro Expression in Eukaryotic Cells of a Prion Protein Gene Cloned from Scrapie-Infected Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughey, Byron; Race, Richard E.; Vogel, Mari; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Chesebro, Bruce

    1988-07-01

    It has been proposed that the causative agent of scrapie represents a class of infectious particle that is devoid of nucleic acid and that an altered form of the endogenous prion protein (PrP) is the agent. However, it has been difficult to exclude the possibility that PrP purified from scrapie tissues might be contaminated with a more conventional viral agent. To obtain PrP uncontaminated by scrapie-infected tissues, PrP cDNA cloned from a scrapie-infected mouse brain was expressed in mouse C127 cells in vitro. mRNA and protein encoded by the cloned PrP gene were identified. The expressed PrP polypeptides appeared to be glycosylated and were released from the cell surface into the medium. Homogenates of the cells expressing the cloned PrP gene were inoculated into susceptible mice but failed to induce clinical signs of scrapie. Thus, either PrP is not the transmissible agent of scrapie or the expressed PrP requires additional modification to be infectious.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of human WINS1 and mouse Wins2, homologous to Drosophila segment polarity gene Lines (Lin).

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2002-08-01

    WNT signaling molecules play key roles in carcinogenesis and embryogenesis. Drosophila segment polarity gene Lines (Lin) is essential for Wnt/Wingless-dependent patterning in dorsal epidermis and also for hindgut development. With Wnt signaling, Lin accumulates in the nucleus to modulate transcription of Wnt target genes through association with beta-catenin/Armadillo and TCF/Pangolin. Here, human WINS1 and mouse Wins2, encoding proteins with Drosophila Lin homologous domain, were isolated using bioinformatics and cDNA-PCR. Human WINS1 encoded 757-amino-acid protein, and mouse Wins2 encoded 498-amino-acid protein. Human WINS1 and mouse Wins2 showed 60.0% total-amino-acid identity. Lin homologous domain of WINS1 and Wins2 showed 29.4% and 27.2% amino-acid identity with that of Drosphila Lin, respectively. In the human chromosome 15q26 region, WINS1 gene was clustered with ASB7 gene encoding ankyrin repeat and SOCS box-containing protein 7. Human WINS1 mRNA of 2.8-kb in size was expressed in adult testis, prostate, spleen, thymus, skeletal muscle, fetal kidney and brain. This is the first report on molecular cloning and initial characterization of human WINS1 and mouse Wins2 PMID:12119551

  8. One Mouse per Child: Interpersonal Computer for Individual Arithmetic Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcoholado, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Tagle, A.; Gomez, F.; Denardin, F.; Susaeta, H.; Villalta, M.; Toyama, K.

    2012-01-01

    Single Display Groupware (SDG) allows multiple people in the same physical space to interact simultaneously over a single communal display through individual input devices that work on the same machine. The aim of this paper is to show how SDG can be used to improve the way resources are used in schools, allowing students to work simultaneously on…

  9. A spare or an individual? Cloning and the implications of monozygotic twinning.

    PubMed

    Bryan, E M

    1998-01-01

    The creation of Dolly, the cloned sheep, raises the scenario of cloning in humans. Neither the case for, nor against, the ethics of cloning in humans is discussed in this paper. Instead, it considers the neglected issue of the likely happiness or otherwise of the resulting children if they are born as monozygotic twins or triplets. The advantages and disadvantages of twinship are discussed in detail, and it is concluded that recognized medical risks, and incompletely understood psychological effects, should be given serious consideration. PMID:10098472

  10. Molecular Cloning and Analysis of a DNA Repetitive Element from the Mouse Genome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geisinger, Adriana; Cossio, Gabriela; Wettstein, Rodolfo

    2006-01-01

    We report the development of a 3-week laboratory activity for an undergraduate molecular biology course. This activity introduces students to the practice of basic molecular techniques such as restriction enzyme digestion, agarose gel electrophoresis, cloning, plasmid DNA purification, Southern blotting, and sequencing. Students learn how to carry…

  11. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of the mouse cyclin-dependent kinase 5 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, Toshio; Nagle, J.W.; Brady, R.O.; Kozak, C.A.

    1995-08-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is predominantly expressed in neurons. In vitro, Cdk5 purified from the nervous tissue phosphorylates both high-molecular-weight neurofilament and microtubule-associated tau. The mouse gene encoding Cdk5 (Cdk5) was found to be 5 kb in length and divided into 12 exons. All of the exon-intron junctions matched the expected consensus sequence with the exception of the splice junction for intron 9, which has AT and AC dinucleotides instead of the usual GT and AG bordering sequence. In the 5{prime}-flanking region of mouse Cdk5, several putative promoter elements were present, including AP1, Sp1, PuF, and TATA motifs. A metal regulatory element was also identified at position -207 to -201. Nucleotide sequence analysis of mouse Cdk5 showed high identity to the homologues of other vertebrate species, indicating that this kinase is highly conserved during evolution. Mouse Cdk5 was mapped to the centromeric region of mouse chromosome 5. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Cloning, comparative mapping, and RNA expression of the mouse homologues of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nucleotide excision repair gene RAD23.

    PubMed

    van der Spek, P J; Visser, C E; Hanaoka, F; Smit, B; Hagemeijer, A; Bootsma, D; Hoeijmakers, J H

    1996-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD23 gene is involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). Two human homologs of RAD23, HHR23A and HHR23B (HGMW-approved symbols RAD23A and RAD23B), were previously isolated. The HHR23B protein is complexed with the protein defective in the cancer-prone repair syndrome xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group C, and is specifically involved in the global genome NER subpathway. The cloning of both mouse homologs (designated MHR23A and MHR23B) and detailed sequence comparison permitted the deduction of the following overall structure for all RAD23 homologs: an ubiquitin-like N-terminus followed by a strongly conserved 50-amino-acid domain that is repeated at the C-terminus. We also found this domain as a specific C-terminal extension of one of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, providing a second link with the ubiquitin pathway. By means of in situ hybridization, MHR23A was assigned to mouse chromosome 8C3 and MHR23B to 4B3. Because of the close chromosomal proximity of human XPC and HHR23B, the mouse XPC chromosomal location was determined (6D). Physical disconnection of the genes in mouse argues against a functional significance of the colocalization of these genes in human. Northern blot analysis revealed constitutive expression of both MHR23 genes in all tissues examined. Elevated RNA expression of both MHR23 genes was observed in testis. Although the RAD23 equivalents are well conserved during evolution, the mammalian genes did not express the UV-inducible phenotype of their yeast counterpart. This may point to a fundamental difference between the UV responses of yeast and human. No stage-specific mRNA expression during the cell cycle was observed for the mammalian RAD23 homologs. PMID:8808275

  13. Isolation and characterization of a cDNA clone for the complete protein coding region of the delta subunit of the mouse acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    LaPolla, R J; Mayne, K M; Davidson, N

    1984-01-01

    A mouse cDNA clone has been isolated that contains the complete coding region of a protein highly homologous to the delta subunit of the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor (AcChoR). The cDNA library was constructed in the vector lambda 10 from membrane-associated poly(A)+ RNA from BC3H-1 mouse cells. Surprisingly, the delta clone was selected by hybridization with cDNA encoding the gamma subunit of the Torpedo AcChoR. The nucleotide sequence of the mouse cDNA clone contains an open reading frame of 520 amino acids. This amino acid sequence exhibits 59% and 50% sequence homology to the Torpedo AcChoR delta and gamma subunits, respectively. However, the mouse nucleotide sequence has several stretches of high homology with the Torpedo gamma subunit cDNA, but not with delta. The mouse protein has the same general structural features as do the Torpedo subunits. It is encoded by a 3.3-kilobase mRNA. There is probably only one, but at most two, chromosomal genes coding for this or closely related sequences. Images PMID:6096870

  14. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of the FSH receptor gene promoter from the volcano mouse (Neotomodon alstoni alstoni).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Solis, Marco Allán; Macías, Héctor; Acosta-MontesdeOca, Adriana; Pasapera, Ana María; Fierro, Reyna; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Gutiérrez-Sagal, Rubén

    2010-02-01

    To gain further insights on the genetic divergence and the species-specific characteristics of the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR), we cloned 946 bp of the 5'-flanking region of the FSHR gene from the volcano mouse (Neotomodon alstoni alstoni), and compared its features with those from other mammalian species. The sequence of neotomodon FSHR (nFSHR) gene from the translation initiation site to -946 is 74, 71, 64, and 59% homologous to rat, mouse (129/J), human, and sheep, respectively. The nFSHR 5'-flanking region exhibits new interesting putative cis-regulatory elements including those for the SRY transcription factor, which had not been previously related to the FSHR gene. The transcriptional regulation properties of nFSHR gene were studied in mouse Sertoli (MSC-1) and non-Sertoli (H441) cell lines, and compared with those obtained with similar 129/J constructs. All constructs tested were more active in H441 than in MSC-1 cells. The low transcription levels detected in MSC-1 cells probably reflect the recruitment of Sertoli cells-specific nuclear factors that repress transcription of the FSHR gene. In H441 cells, 129/J constructs were more active than their neotomodon counterparts, indicating important species-specific differences in their transcription pattern. Functional analysis of a series of progressive 5'-deletion mutants identified regions involved in positive and negative transcriptional regulation as well as the strongest minimal promoter spanning 260 bp upstream the translation initiation site. The identification of inhibitory nuclear transcription factors, which are apparently expressed in MSC-1 cells, may contribute to a better understanding of the transcriptional regulation of the FSHR gene. PMID:19862645

  15. [Cloning of gene fragment of estrogen receptor-beta and its expression in mouse embryo].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Feng; Fan, Shao-Hua; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin; Li, Fei; Zheng, Yuan-Lin

    2008-03-01

    In order to study the expression and regulation effects of estrogen receptor-beta (ERbeta) in the development of mouse embryo, the primer of ERbeta was designed, the ERbeta fragment was first obtained by RT-PCR and subcloned into plasmids pGEM- 3Z, then the recombinant plasmids were linearized with the restriction enzymes of EcoRand Hind. Using Sp6 and T7 RNA polymerase, the digoxigenin(dig) labeled sense and anti-sense probes were transcriped in vitro, respectively. Then the expression of ERbeta in mouse embryo was examined with the probes by whole-mount in situ hybridization. The results indicated that ERbeta is expressed in the brain, spinal neural tube, genital ridge, pericardium, limb bud and mandibular arch of 10.5 dpc embryo, and is also expressed in the telencephalon, mesencephalon, medulla oblongata, spinal cord and limb bud of 13.5 dpc embryo. These results suggest that ERbeta maybe play a role of regulation in sexual differentiation, primal differentiation of neural tube, further differentiation of three primary cerebral vesicles and spinal cord, generation and differentiation of bone and cartilage of limb bud, development of pericardium and configuration differentiation of mandibular in mouse embryo. PMID:18332005

  16. Characterizations of individual mouse red blood cells parasitized by Babesia microti using 3-D holographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Park, HyunJoo; Hong, Sung-Hee; Kim, Kyoohyun; Cho, Shin-Hyeong; Lee, Won-Ja; Kim, Youngchan; Lee, Sang-Eun; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Babesia microti causes “emergency” human babesiosis. However, little is known about the alterations in B. microti invaded red blood cells (Bm-RBCs) at the individual cell level. Through quantitative phase imaging techniques based on laser interferometry, we present the simultaneous measurements of structural, chemical, and mechanical modifications in individual mouse Bm-RBCs. 3-D refractive index maps of individual RBCs and in situ parasite vacuoles are imaged, from which total contents and concentration of dry mass are also precisely quantified. In addition, we examine the dynamic membrane fluctuation of Bm-RBCs, which provide information on cell membrane deformability. PMID:26039793

  17. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of a mouse gene upregulated by lipopolysaccharide treatment reveals alternative splicing

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Kejun; Chen, Yaoming; Dai, Zongming; Bi, Yuan; Cai, Tongjian; Hou, Lichao; Chai, Yubo; Song, Qinghe; Chen, Sumin; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of mouse cells with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) potently initiates an inflammatory response, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We therefore sought to characterize cDNA sequences of a new mouse LPS-responsive gene, and to evaluate the effects of MLrg. Full-length cDNAs were obtained from LPS-treated NIH3T3 cells. We report that the MLrg gene produces two alternative splice products (GenBank Accession Nos. (DQ316984) and (DQ320011)), respectively, encoding MLrgW and MLrgS polypeptides. Both proteins contain zinc finger and leucine zipper domains and are thus potential regulators of transcription. Expression of MLrgW and MLrgS were robustly upregulated following LPS treatment, and the proteins were localized predominantly in the nuclear membrane and cytoplasm. In stable transfectants over-expressing MLrgW the proportion of cells in G1 phase was significantly reduced, while in cells over-expressing MLrgS the proportion of cells in G2 was significantly increased; both proteins are thus potential regulators of cell cycle progression. Upregulation of MLrgW and MLrgS may be an important component of the LPS inflammatory pathway and of the host response to infection with GNB.

  18. Do individually ventilated cage systems generate a problem for genetic mouse model research?

    PubMed

    Logge, W; Kingham, J; Karl, T

    2014-09-01

    Technological developments over recent decades have produced a novel housing system for laboratory mice, so-called 'individually ventilated cage' (IVC) systems. IVCs present a cage environment which is different to conventional filter-top cages (FILTER). Nothing is known about the consequences of IVC housing on genetic mouse models, despite studies reporting IVC-mediated changes to the phenotypes of inbred mouse strains. Thus, in this study, we systematically compared the established behavioural phenotype of a validated mouse model for the schizophrenia risk gene neuregulin 1 (TM Nrg1 HET) kept in FILTER housing with Nrg1 mutant mice raised in IVC systems. We found that particular schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes of TM Nrg1 HETs which had been established and widely published using FILTER housing were altered when mice were raised in IVC housing. IVCs diminished the schizophrenia-relevant prepulse inhibition deficit of Nrg1 mutant males. Furthermore, IVC housing had a sex-dependent moderate effect on the locomotive phenotype of Nrg1 mice across test paradigms. Behavioural effects of IVC housing were less prominent in female mice. Thus, transferring the breeding colony of mouse mutants from FILTER to IVC systems can shift disease-relevant behaviours and therefore challenge the face validity of these mice. Researchers facing an upgrade of their mouse breeding or holding facilities to IVC systems must be aware of the potential impact this upgrade might have on their genetic mouse models. Future publications should provide more details on the cage system used to allow appropriate data comparison across research sites. PMID:24920375

  19. Molecular cloning of the b subunit of mouse coagulation factor XIII and assignment of the gene to chromosome 1: Close evolutionary relationship to complement factor H

    SciTech Connect

    Nonaka, Mayumi; Nonaka, Masaru; Natsuume-Sakai, Shunnosuke ); Matsuda, Yoichi ); Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Moriwaki, Kazuo )

    1993-03-01

    The b subunit of human coagulation factor XIII (FXIII-b) is composed of 10 short consensus repeats (SCRs) characteristic of the regulatory proteins of complement activation system. A full-length cDNA clone of mouse FXIII-b was isolated and the entire sequence was determined. The predicted amino acid sequence showed 77.5% homology with human FXIII-b, although mouse FXIII-b contained seven extra amino acid residues at the carboxyl terminal. The strong reactivity of the translation product of this clone with rabbit anti-human FXIII-b antiserum confirmed that it encodes a mouse counterpart of the human FXIII-b. By in situ hybridization and mapping studies using 66 interspecific backcross mice, the mouse FXIII-b gene (designated F13b) was shown to be located on distal chromosome 1 closely linked to Cfh, extending a conserved linkage group between human and mouse chromosome 1. In addition, a significant structural similarity between FXIII-b and complement factor H is described. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The human and mouse homologs of the yeat RAD52 gene: cDNA cloning, sequence analysis, assignment to human chromosome 12p12.2-p13, and mRNA expression in mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.; Chen, D.J.; Denison, K.

    1995-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD52 gene is involved in DNA double-strand break repair and mitotic/meiotic recombination. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of yeast S. cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and Kluyveromyces lactis and chicken is highly conserved. Using the technology of mixed oligonucleotide primed amplification of cDNA (MOPAC), two mouse RAD52 homologous cDNA fragments were amplified and sequenced. Subsequently, we have cloned the cDNA of the human and mouse homologs of yeast RAD52 gene by screening cDNA libraries using the identified mouse cDNA fragments. Sequence analysis of cDNA derived amino acid revealed a highly conserved N-terminus among human, mouse, chicken, and yeast RAD52 genes. The human RAD52 gene was assigned to chromosome 12p12.2-p13 by fluorescence in situ hybridization, R-banding, and DNA analysis of somatic cell hybrids. Unlike chicken RAD52 and mouse RAD51, no significant difference in mouse RAD52 mRNA level was found among mouse heart, brain, spleen, lung, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney, and testis. In addition to an {approximately}1.9-kb RAD52 mRNA band that is present in all of the tested tissues, an extra mRNA species of {approximately}0.85 kb was detectable in mouse testis. 40 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Morphokinetics of cloned mouse embryos treated with epigenetic drugs and blastocyst prediction.

    PubMed

    Mallol, Anna; Piqué, Laia; Santaló, Josep; Ibáñez, Elena

    2016-03-01

    Time-lapse monitoring of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos may help to predict developmental success and increase birth and embryonic stem cells (ESC) derivation rates. Here, the development of ICSI fertilized embryos and of SCNT embryos, non-treated or treated with either psammaplin A (PsA) or vitamin C (VitC), was monitored, and the ESC derivation rates from the resulting blastocysts were determined. Blastocyst rates were similar among PsA-treated and VitC-treated SCNT embryos and ICSI embryos, but lower for non-treated SCNT embryos. ESC derivation rates were higher in treated SCNT embryos than in non-treated or ICSI embryos. Time-lapse microscopy analysis showed that non-treated SCNT embryos had a delayed development from the second division until compaction, lower number of blastomeres at compaction and longer compaction and cavitation durations compared with ICSI ones. Treatment of SCNT embryos with PsA further increased this delay whereas treatment with VitC slightly reduced it, suggesting that both treatments act through different mechanisms, not necessarily related to their epigenetic effects. Despite these differences, the time of completion of the third division, alone or combined with the duration of compaction and/or the presence of fragmentation, had a strong predictive value for blastocyst formation in all groups. In contrast, we failed to predict ESC derivation success from embryo morphokinetics. Time-lapse technology allows the selection of SCNT embryos with higher developmental potential and could help to increase cloning outcomes. Nonetheless, further studies are needed to find reliable markers for full-term development and ESC derivation success. PMID:26621919

  2. Characterisation of a genomic clone covering the structural mouse MyoD1 gene and its promoter region.

    PubMed Central

    Zingg, J M; Alva, G P; Jost, J P

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated the mouse MyoD1 gene flanked by its promoter region by screening a genomic library with synthetic oligonucleotides. The structural gene is interrupted by two G + C rich introns. Transfection of the cloned gene inserted into an expression vector converts fibroblasts to myoblasts. Sequence analysis of about 650 bp of the 5' upstream region revealed the presence of several potential regulatory elements such as a TATA-box, an AP2-box, two SP1-boxes and a CAAT-box. In addition, there are three half palindromic estrogen response elements, a potential cAMP response element and various muscle specific elements such as a muscle-specific CAAT-box (MCAT) and four potential binding sites for MyoD1. Using S1 protection analysis the major start site of transcription in muscle and myoblast cells was mapped 3 bp upstream of the published cDNA 5' end. Promoter activity of the 650 bp upstream fragment was tested by in vitro transcription and by transfection analysis of myoblasts and fibroblasts. In all promoter test systems used, MyoD1 promoter activity was detected in myoblasts as well as in fibroblasts. Furthermore, DNA methylation was found to turn off MyoD1 promoter activity both in myoblasts and in fibroblasts. Images PMID:1754380

  3. A novel, rapid and efficient method of cloning functional antigen-specific T-cell receptors from single human and mouse T-cells.

    PubMed

    Hamana, Hiroshi; Shitaoka, Kiyomi; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2016-06-10

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. However, the paired cloning and functional assays of antigen-specific TCRα and TCRβ is time-consuming and laborious. In this study, we developed a novel, rapid and efficient antigen-specific TCR-cloning system by combining three technologies: multiplex one-step RT-PCR, transcriptionally active PCR (TAP) and luciferase reporter assays. Multiplex one-step RT-PCR with leader primers designed from leader peptide sequences of TCRs enabled us to amplify cDNAs of TCRα and β pairs from single T-cells with remarkably high efficiency. The combination of TAP fragments and HEK293T-based NFAT-luciferase reporter cells allowed for a rapid functional assay without the need to construct expression vectors. Using this system, we cloned human TCRs specific for Epstein-Barr virus BRLF-1-derived peptide as well as mouse TCRs specific for melanoma-associated antigen tyrosinase-related protein 2 (TRP-2) within four days. These results suggest that our system provides rapid and efficient cloning of functional antigen-specific human and mouse TCRs and contributes to TCR-based immunotherapy for cancers and infectious diseases. PMID:27155153

  4. Molecular cloning of the mouse gene coding for {alpha}{sub 2}-macroglobulin and targeting of the gene in embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Umans, L.; Serneels, L.; Hilliker, C.

    1994-08-01

    The authors have cloned the mouse gene coding for {alpha}{sub 2}-macroglobulin in overlapping {lambda} clones and have analyzed its structure. The gene contains 36 exons, coding for the 4.8-kb cDNA that we cloned previously. Including putative control elements in the 5{prime} flanking region, the gene covers about 45 kb. A region of 3.8 kb, stretching from 835 bases upstream of the cDNA start site to exon 4, including all intervening sequences, was sequenced completely. The analysis demonstrated that the putative promoter region of the mouse A2M gene differed considerably from the known promoter sequences of the human A2M gene and of the rat acute-phas A2M gene. Comparison of the exon-intron structure of all known genes of the A2M family confirmed that the rat acute phase A2M gene is more closely related to the human gene than to the mouse A2M gene. To generate mice with the A2M gene inactivated, an insertion type of construct containing 7.5 kb of genomic DNA of the mouse strain 129/J, encompassing exons 16 to 19, was synthesized. A hygromycin marker gene was embedded in intron 17. After electroporation, 198 hygromycin-resistant ES cell lines were isolated and analyzed by Southern blotting. Five ES cell lines were obtained with one allele of the mouse A2M gene targeted by this insertion construct, demonstrating that the position and the characteristics of the vector served the intended goal.

  5. Cloning and characterization of HARP/SMARCAL1: a prokaryotic HepA-related SNF2 helicase protein from human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M A; Eisen, J A; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2000-05-01

    The SNF2 gene family consists of a large group of proteins involved in transcriptional regulation, maintenance of chromosome integrity, and various aspects of DNA repair. We cloned a novel SNF2 family human cDNA, with sequence identity to the Escherichia coli RNA polymerase-binding protein HepA and named the human hepA-related protein (HHARP/SMARCAL1). In addition, the mouse ortholog (Mharp/Smarcal1) was cloned, and the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog (CEHARP) was identified in the GenBank database. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the HARP proteins share a high level of sequence similarity to the seven motif helicase core region (SNF2 domain) with identifiable orthologs in other eukaryotic species, except for yeast. Purified His-tagged HARP/SMARCAL1 protein exhibits single-stranded DNA-dependent ATPase activity, consistent with it being a member of the SNF2 family of proteins. Both the human and the mouse genes consist of 17 exons and 16 introns. The human gene maps to chromosome 2q34-q36, and the mouse gene is localized to the syntenic region of chromosome 1 (between markers Gls and Acrg). HARP/SMARCAL1 transcripts are ubiquitously expressed in human and mouse tissues, with testis presenting the highest levels of mRNA expression in humans. PMID:10857751

  6. cDNA cloning and chromosomal mapping of the mouse type VII collagen gene (Col7a1): Evidence for rapid evolutionary divergence of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Kehua; Christiano, A.M.; Chu, Mon Li; Uitto, J. Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J. )

    1993-06-01

    Type VII collagen is the major component of anchoring fibrils, critical attachment structures at the dermal-epidermal basement membrane zone. Genetic linkage analyses with recently cloned human type VII collagen cDNAs have indicated that the corresponding gene, COL7A1, is the candidate gene in the dystrophic forms of epidermolysis bullosa. To gain insight into the evolutionary conservation of COL7A1, in this study the authors have isolated mouse type VII collagen cDNAs by screening a mouse epidermal keratinocyte cDNA library with a human COL7A1 cDNA. Two overlapping mouse cDNAs were isolated, and Northern hybridization of mouse epidermal keratinocyte RNA with one of them revealed the presence of a mRNA transcript of [approximately]9.5 kb, the approximate size of the human COL7A1 mRNA. Nucleotide sequencing of the mouse cDNAs revealed a 2760-bp open reading frame that encodes the 5[prime] half of the collagenous domain and a segment of the NC-1, the noncollagenous amino-terminal domain of type VII collagen. Comparison of the mouse amino acid sequences with the corresponding human sequences deduced from cDNAs revealed 82.5% identity. The evolutionary divergence of the gene was relatively rapid in comparison to other collagen genes. Despite the high degree of sequence variation, several sequences, including the size and the position of noncollagenous imperfections and interruptions within the Gly-X-Y repeat sequence, were precisely conserved. Finally, the mouse Col7a1 gene was located by interspecific backcross mapping to mouse Chromosome 9, a region that corresponds to human chromosome 3p21, the position of human COL7Al. This assignment confirms and extends the relationship between the mouse and the human chromosomes in this region of the genome. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. 3D modeling, ligand binding and activation studies of the cloned mouse delta, mu; and kappa opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Filizola, M; Laakkonen, L; Loew, G H

    1999-11-01

    Refined 3D models of the transmembrane domains of the cloned delta, mu and kappa opioid receptors belonging to the superfamily of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) were constructed from a multiple sequence alignment using the alpha carbon template of rhodopsin recently reported. Other key steps in the procedure were relaxation of the 3D helix bundle by unconstrained energy optimization and assessment of the stability of the structure by performing unconstrained molecular dynamics simulations of the energy optimized structure. The results were stable ligand-free models of the TM domains of the three opioid receptors. The ligand-free delta receptor was then used to develop a systematic and reliable procedure to identify and assess putative binding sites that would be suitable for similar investigation of the other two receptors and GPCRs in general. To this end, a non-selective, 'universal' antagonist, naltrexone, and agonist, etorphine, were used as probes. These ligands were first docked in all sites of the model delta opioid receptor which were sterically accessible and to which the protonated amine of the ligands could be anchored to a complementary proton-accepting residue. Using these criteria, nine ligand-receptor complexes with different binding pockets were identified and refined by energy minimization. The properties of all these possible ligand-substrate complexes were then examined for consistency with known experimental results of mutations in both opioid and other GPCRs. Using this procedure, the lowest energy agonist-receptor and antagonist-receptor complexes consistent with these experimental results were identified. These complexes were then used to probe the mechanism of receptor activation by identifying differences in receptor conformation between the agonist and the antagonist complex during unconstrained dynamics simulation. The results lent support to a possible activation mechanism of the mouse delta opioid receptor similar to that recently

  8. Cloning, analysis, and chromosomal localization of myoxin (MYH12), the human homologue to the mouse dilute gene

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, L.J.; Kennett, R.H. )

    1994-02-01

    The mouse dilute gene encodes a novel type of non-muscle myosin that structurally combines elements from both nonmuscle myosin type I and nonmuscle myosin type II. Phenotypically, mutations in the mouse dilute gene result not only in the lightening of coat color, but also in the onset of severe neurological defects shortly after birth. This may indicate that the mouse dilute gene is important in maintaining the normal neuronal function in the mouse. The authors report the isolation and sequencing of [open quotes]myoxin[close quotes] (MYH12), the human homologue of the mouse dilute gene, and its assignment to human chromosome 15. 35 refs., 6 figs.

  9. Individual strains of Lactobacillus paracasei differentially inhibit human basophil and mouse mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Lalanne, Ana Inés; Garault, Peggy; Cotillard, Aurélie; Chervaux, Christian; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The microbiota controls a variety of biological functions, including immunity, and alterations of the microbiota in early life are associated with a higher risk of developing allergies later in life. Several probiotic bacteria, and particularly lactic acid bacteria, were described to reduce both the induction of allergic responses and allergic manifestations. Although specific probiotic strains were used in these studies, their protective effects on allergic responses also might be common for all lactobacilli. Methods To determine whether allergic effector cells inhibition is a common feature of lactobacilli or whether it varies among lactobacilli strains, we compared the ability of 40 strains of the same Lactobacillus paracasei species to inhibit IgE‐dependent mouse mast cell and human basophil activation. Results We uncovered a marked heterogeneity in the inhibitory properties of the 40 Lactobacillus strains tested. These segregated into three to four clusters depending on the intensity of inhibition. Some strains inhibited both mouse mast cell and human basophil activation, others strains inhibited only one cell type and another group induced no inhibition of activation for either cell type. Conclusions Individual Lactobacillus strains of the same species differentially inhibit IgE‐dependent activation of mouse mast cells and human basophils, two cell types that are critical in the onset of allergic manifestations. Although we failed to identify specific bacterial genes associated with inhibition by gene‐trait matching analysis, our findings demonstrate the complexity of the interactions between the microbiota and the host. These results suggest that some L. paracasei strains might be more beneficial in allergies than others strains and provide the bases for a rational screening of lactic acid bacteria strains as next‐generation probiotics in the field of allergy. PMID:27621812

  10. Single body parts are processed by individual neurons in the mouse dorsolateral striatum.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Kevin R; Nader, Miles; West, Mark O

    2016-04-01

    Interest in the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) has generated numerous scientific studies of its neuropathologies, as well as its roles in normal sensorimotor integration and learning. Studies are informed by knowledge of DLS functional organization, the guiding principle being its somatotopic afferent projections from primary somatosensory (S1) and motor (M1) cortices. The potential to connect behaviorally relevant function to detailed structure is elevated by mouse models, which have access to extensive genetic neuroscience tool kits. Remaining to be demonstrated, however, is whether the correspondence between S1/M1 corticostriatal terminal distributions and the physiological properties of DLS neurons demonstrated in rats and non-human primates exists in mice. Given that the terminal distribution of S1/M1 projections to the DLS in mice is similar to that in rats, we studied whether firing rates (FRs) of DLS neurons in awake, behaving mice are related to activity of individual body parts. MSNs exhibited robust, selective increases in FR during movement or somatosensory stimulation of single body parts. Properties of MSNs, including baseline FRs, locations, responsiveness to stimulation, and proportions of responsive neurons were similar to properties observed in rats. Future studies can be informed by the present demonstration that the mouse lateral striatum functions as a somatic sensorimotor sector of the striatum and appears to be a homolog of the primate putamen, as demonstrated in rats (Carelli and West, 1991). PMID:26827625

  11. 3T3 fibroblasts induce cloned interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to resemble connective tissue mast cells in granular constituency

    SciTech Connect

    Dayton, E.T.; Pharr, P.; Ogawa, M.; Serafin, W.E.; Austen, K.F.; Levi-Schaffer, F.; Stevens, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    As assessed by ultrastructure, histochemical staining, and T-cell dependency, in vitro-differentiated interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells are comparable to the mast cells that reside in the gastrointestinal mucosa but not in the skin or the serosal cavity of the mouse. The authors now demonstrate that when cloned interleukin 3-dependent mast cells are cocultured with mouse skin-derived 3T3 fibroblasts in the presence of WEHI-3 conditioned medium for 28 days, the mast cells acquire the ability to stain with safranin, increase their histamine content approx. 50-fold and their carboxypeptidase. A content approx. 100-fold, and augment approx. their biosynthesis of proteoglycans bearing /sup 35/S-labeled haparin relative to /sup 35/S-labeled chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans. Thus, fibroblasts induce interleukin 3-dependent mouse mast cells to change phenotype from mucosal-like to connective tissue-like, indicating that the biochemical and functional characteristics of this mast cell type are strongly influenced by the connective tissue microenvironment.

  12. [Cloning and characterization of a novel mouse short-chain dehydrogenase/reductases cDNA mHsdl2#, encoding a protein with a SDR domaid and a SCP2 domain].

    PubMed

    Dai, J; Li, P; Ji, Ch; Feng, C; Gui, M; Sun, Y; Zhang, J; Zhu, J; Dou, Ch; Gu, Sh

    2005-01-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) play important roles in body's metabolism. We cloned a novel mouse SDR cDNA which encodes a deduced HSD-like protein with a conserved SDR domain and a SCP2 domain. The 1.8 kb cDNA consists of 11 exons and is mapped to mouse chromosome 4B3. The corresponding gene is widely expressed in normal mouse tissues and its expression level in liver increases after inducement with cholesterol food. The predicted mouse HSDL2 protein, which has a peroxisomal target signal, is localized in the cytoplasm of NIH 3T3 cells. PMID:16240713

  13. A novel mouse running wheel that senses individual limb forces: biomechanical validation and in vivo testing

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Grahm C.; Edke, Mangesh

    2012-01-01

    Biomechanical data provide fundamental information about changes in musculoskeletal function during development, adaptation, and disease. To facilitate the study of mouse locomotor biomechanics, we modified a standard mouse running wheel to include a force-sensitive rung capable of measuring the normal and tangential forces applied by individual paws. Force data were collected throughout the night using an automated threshold trigger algorithm that synchronized force data with wheel-angle data and a high-speed infrared video file. During the first night of wheel running, mice reached consistent running speeds within the first 40 force events, indicating a rapid habituation to wheel running, given that mice generated >2,000 force-event files/night. Average running speeds and peak normal and tangential forces were consistent throughout the first four nights of running, indicating that one night of running is sufficient to characterize the locomotor biomechanics of healthy mice. Twelve weeks of wheel running significantly increased spontaneous wheel-running speeds (16 vs. 37 m/min), lowered duty factors (ratio of foot-ground contact time to stride time; 0.71 vs. 0.58), and raised hindlimb peak normal forces (93 vs. 115% body wt) compared with inexperienced mice. Peak normal hindlimb-force magnitudes were the primary force component, which were nearly tenfold greater than peak tangential forces. Peak normal hindlimb forces exceed the vertical forces generated during overground running (50-60% body wt), suggesting that wheel running shifts weight support toward the hindlimbs. This force-instrumented running-wheel system provides a comprehensive, noninvasive screening method for monitoring gait biomechanics in mice during spontaneous locomotion. PMID:22723628

  14. Molecular cloning of five individual stage- and tissue-specific mRNA sequences from sea urchin pluteus embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Fregien, N; Dolecki, G J; Mandel, M; Humphreys, T

    1983-01-01

    Five developmentally regulated sea urchin mRNA sequences which increase in abundance between the blastula and pluteus stages of development were isolated by molecular cloning of cDNA. The regulated sequences all appeared in moderately abundant mRNA molecules of pluteus cells and represented 4% of the clones tested. There were no regulated sequences detected in the 40% of the clones which hybridized to the most abundant mRNA, and the screening procedures were inadequate to detect possible regulation in the 20 to 30% of the clones presumably derived from rare-class mRNA. The reaction of 32P[cDNA] from blastula and pluteus mRNA to dots of the cloned DNAs on nitrocellulose filters indicated that the mRNAs complementary to the different cloned pluteus-specific sequences were between 3- and 47-fold more prevalent at the pluteus stage than at the blastula stage. Polyadenylated RNA from different developmental stages was transferred from electrophoretic gels to nitrocellulose filters and reacted to the different cloned sequences. The regulated mRNAs were undetectable in the RNA of 3-h embryos, became evident at the hatching blastula stage, and reached a maximum in abundance by the gastrula or pluteus stage. Certain of the clones reacted to two sizes of mRNA which did not vary coordinately with development. Transfers of RNA isolated from each of the three cell layers of pluteus embryos that were reacted to the cloned sequences revealed that two of the sequences were found in the mRNA of all three layers, two were ectoderm specific, and one was endoderm specific. Four of the regulated sequences were complementary to one or two major bands and one to at least 50 bands on Southern transfers of restriction endonuclease-digested total sea urchin DNA. Images PMID:6688291

  15. Differences in susceptibility among mouse strains to infection with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA clone) sporozoites and its relationship to protection by gamma-irradiated sporozoites

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.I.; Lowell, G.H.; Gordon, D.M. )

    1990-04-01

    Three inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6 (H-2b), A/J (H-2a), and BALB/c (H-2d), and 1 outbred strain, CD-1, demonstrated differences in susceptibility to iv challenge with the ANKA clone of Plasmodium berghei. Mice were challenged with 100, 1,000, or 10,000 sporozoites, then evaluated daily beginning on day 4 for patency. CD-1 mice were further evaluated at challenge doses of 12,500, 25,000, and 50,000 sporozoites. C57BL/6 mice were the easiest to infect, with 90% becoming infected with 100 sporozoites. The outbred strain CD-1 was the most difficult to infect, requiring a challenge dose of 25,000 sporozoites/mouse in order to achieve a 100% infection rate. Mouse strains also demonstrated differences in their ability to be protected by intravenous immunization with gamma-irradiated sporozoites. A/J mice needed a minimum of 3 doses of irradiated sporozoites for protection against a challenge with 10,000 sporozoites. In contrast, BALB/c mice immunized with a single dose of 1,000 irradiated sporozoites are protected against a 10,000 sporozoite challenge. These data suggest that both infectivity and protection are genetically restricted and that susceptibility to infection may be inversely related to protection.

  16. Differences in susceptibility among mouse strains to infection with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA clone) sporozoites and its relationship to protection by gamma-irradiated sporozoites

    SciTech Connect

    Jaffe, R.I.; Lowell, G.H.; Gordon, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    Three inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6 (H-2/b/), A/J (H-2/a/), and BALB/C (H-2/d/), and one outbred strain, CD-1, demonstrated differences in susceptibility to challenge intravenously with the ANKA clone of Plasmodium berghei. Mice were challenged with 100, 1000, or 10000 sporozoites, then evaluated daily beginning on day 4 for patency. CD-1 mice were further evaluated at challenge doses of 125000, 25000, and 50000 sporozoites. C57BL/6 mice were the easiest to infect with 90% becoming infected with 100 sporozoites. The outbred strain CD-1 was the most difficult to infect requiring a challenge dose of 25000 sporozoites per mouse in order to achieve a 100% infection rate. Mouse strains also demonstrated differences in their ability to be protected by intravenous immunization with gamma-irradiated sporozoites. A/J mice needed a minimum of 3 doses of irradiated sporozoites for protection against a challenge with 1000 sporozoites. In contrast BALB/C mice, immunized with a single dose of 1000 irradiated sporozoites, are protected against a 10000 sporozoite challenge. These data suggest that both infectivity and protection are genetically restricted and that susceptibility to infection may be inversely related to protection.

  17. The toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) of Vibrio cholerae: molecular cloning of genes involved in pilus biosynthesis and evaluation of TCP as a protective antigen in the infant mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sharma, D P; Stroeher, U H; Thomas, C J; Manning, P A; Attridge, S R

    1989-12-01

    A serum containing antibodies to non-lipopolysaccharide (non-LPS) protective antigens of Vibrio cholerae has been used, after extensive absorption, to facilitate the cloning of genes involved in the synthesis of toxin-coregulated pili (TCP). A gene bank was constructed from V. cholerae Z17561 DNA using a mobilizable cosmid vector in Escherichia coli, and subsequently transferred by conjugation into V. cholerae O17. This strain does not produce TCP in vitro and lacks non-LPS protective antigens. Eight positive clones were isolated, and of these, four produced TCP as determined by electron microscopic and immunoblotting analyses. TCP-positive O17 clones were 70-fold more virulent than TCP-negative clones or O17 in the infant mouse cholera model. Only the former could remove protective antibodies from the clone-probing serum by absorption. As a corollary, serum containing antibodies to TCP protected mice from challenge with TCP-positive clones, but not with TCP-negative clones or O17. Our data indicate that TCP can function as both a virulence determinant and a protective antigen in the infant mouse model. PMID:2576091

  18. Induction of human beta-interferon synthesis with poly(rI . rC) in mouse cells transfected with cloned cDNA plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Pitha, P M; Ciufo, D M; Kellum, M; Raj, N B; Reyes, G R; Hayward, G S

    1982-01-01

    Human genomic DNA and plasmids carrying portions of the cDNA gene for human beta-interferon have been introduced into mouse Ltk- cells by cotransfection with a herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) gene. One plasmid contains 840 base pairs of human DNA complementary to pre-beta-interferon mRNA inserted into pBR322, whereas the other plasmids have hybrid genes containing only the 560-base pair coding region inserted under the transcriptional control of the TK promoter. Constitutive interferon production could not be detected in any of the mouse TK+ cell lines tested. Nevertheless, synthesis of interferon could be induced by poly(rI . rC) treatment in at least 16 of these cell lines, including clones transfected with genomic DNA, the beta-interferon cDNA, and the TK-beta-interferon cDNA hybrid gene. The interferon produced was specific for human cells and could be neutralized by antiserum against human beta-interferon. In contrast to human fibroblast cells, in which the synthesis of induced beta-interferon is transient, the poly(rI . rC)-induced TK+ lines continued to produce beta-interferon for prolonged periods of time and did not respond to superinduction conditions. Therefore, in transfected mouse cells, the coding DNA sequence from the human beta-interferon gene, without any of the adjacent 3' or 5' flanking human DNA sequences, was sufficient both to direct synthesis of biologically active product and to respond to the specific induction system that operates in human cells. However, the mechanism that switches off the synthesis of induced interferon in human cells appears not to operate in mouse cells transfected with beta-interferon cDNA. PMID:6956863

  19. Molecular cloning of a highly conserved mouse and human integral membrane protein (Itm1) and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Guizhu; Tylzanowski, P.; Deleersnijder, W.

    1996-02-01

    We have isolated and characterized a novel cDNA coding for a highly hydrophobic protein (B5) from a fetal mouse mandibular condyle cDNA library. The full-length mouse B5 cDNA is 3095 nucleotides long and contains a potential open reading frame coding for a protein of 705 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 80.5 kDa. The B5 mRNA is differentially polyadenylated, with the most abundant transcript having a length of 2.7 kb. The human homolog of B5 was isolated from a cDNA testis library. The predicted amino acid sequence of the human B5 is 98.5% identical to that of mouse. The most striking feature of the B5 protein is the presence of numerous (10-14) potential transmembrane domains, characteristic of an integral membrane protein. Similarity searches in public databanks reveal that B5 is 58% similar to the T12A2.2 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans and 60% similar to the STT3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Futhermore, the report of an EST sequence (Accession No. Z13858) related to the human B5, but identical to the STT3 gene, indicates that B5 belongs to a larger gene family coding for novel putative transmembrane proteins. This family exhibits a remarkable degree of conservation in different species. The gene for B5, designated Itm1 (Integral membrane protein 1), is located on mouse chromosome 9. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Molecular cloning and expression of Pgp-1. The mouse homolog of the human H-CAM (Hermes) lymphocyte homing receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhou, D F; Ding, J F; Picker, L J; Bargatze, R F; Butcher, E C; Goeddel, D V

    1989-11-15

    Mouse phagocytic glycoprotein-1 (Pgp-1; Ly-24) is a 95-kDa glycoprotein of unknown function that has served as an important T cell/leukocyte differentiation marker. Recent work has suggested that it may be related to a human 85- to 95-kDa glycoprotein (termed variously the Hermes Ag/lymphocyte homing receptor, ECMRIII, P80, and CD44) that is involved in lymphocyte binding to high endothelial venules in the process of lymphocyte homing, and has been implicated in other cell adhesion events. The widespread expression of this molecular class in diverse organ systems suggests a broad role in cellular adhesion, and has led to the unifying designation homing-cellular adhesion molecule (H-CAM). By using human H-CAM cDNA probes, we have isolated a full-length cDNA for the mouse homolog. Comparison of the human and mouse sequences reveals that an N-terminal domain homologous to cartilage proteoglycan core and link proteins, as well as the C-terminal transmembrane and cytoplasmic sequences, are highly conserved (89% and 86% identity, respectively). In contrast, a proximal extracellular domain thought to serve as a target for O-glycosylation and chondroitin sulfate attachment has undergone substantial divergence (only 42% identity). Transient expression of the cDNA in CHO cells followed by immunologic staining confirms that this mouse H-CAM cDNA encodes Pgp-1.1, one of two known Pgp-1 alloantigens. PMID:2681416

  1. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Relationship between individual neuron and network spontaneous activity in developing mouse cortex

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Heather M.; Gjorgjieva, Julijana; Weir, Keiko; Comfort, Cara; Fairhall, Adrienne L.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous synchronous activity (SSA) that propagates as electrical waves is found in numerous central nervous system structures and is critical for normal development, but the mechanisms of generation of such activity are not clear. In previous work, we showed that the ventrolateral piriform cortex is uniquely able to initiate SSA in contrast to the dorsal neocortex, which participates in, but does not initiate, SSA (Lischalk JW, Easton CR, Moody WJ. Dev Neurobiol 69: 407–414, 2009). In this study, we used Ca2+ imaging of cultured embryonic day 18 to postnatal day 2 coronal slices (embryonic day 17 + 1–4 days in culture) of the mouse cortex to investigate the different activity patterns of individual neurons in these regions. In the piriform cortex where SSA is initiated, a higher proportion of neurons was active asynchronously between waves, and a larger number of groups of coactive cells was present compared with the dorsal cortex. When we applied GABA and glutamate synaptic antagonists, asynchronous activity and cellular clusters remained, while synchronous activity was eliminated, indicating that asynchronous activity is a result of cell-intrinsic properties that differ between these regions. To test the hypothesis that higher levels of cell-autonomous activity in the piriform cortex underlie its ability to initiate waves, we constructed a conductance-based network model in which three layers differed only in the proportion of neurons able to intrinsically generate bursting behavior. Simulations using this model demonstrated that a gradient of intrinsic excitability was sufficient to produce directionally propagating waves that replicated key experimental features, indicating that the higher level of cell-intrinsic activity in the piriform cortex may provide a substrate for SSA generation. PMID:25185811

  3. Generation of Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies Specific to Chikungunya Virus Using ClonaCell-HY Hybridoma Cloning Kit.

    PubMed

    Yew, Chow Wenn; Tan, Yee Joo

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies offer high specificity and this makes it an important tool for molecular biology, biochemistry and medicine. Typically, monoclonal antibodies are generated by fusing mouse spleen cells that have been immunized with the desired antigen with myeloma cells to create immortalized hybridomas. Here, we describe the generation of monoclonal antibodies that are specific to Chikungunya virus using ClonaCell-HY system. PMID:27233275

  4. Molecular cloning of mouse amino acid transport system B0, a neutral amino acid transporter related to Hartnup disorder.

    PubMed

    Bröer, Angelika; Klingel, Karin; Kowalczuk, Sonja; Rasko, John E J; Cavanaugh, Juleen; Bröer, Stefan

    2004-06-01

    Resorption of amino acids in kidney and intestine is mediated by transporters, which prefer groups of amino acids with similar physico-chemical properties. It is generally assumed that most neutral amino acids are transported across the apical membrane of epithelial cells by system B(0). Here we have characterized a novel member of the Na(+)-dependent neurotransmitter transporter family (B(0)AT1) isolated from mouse kidney, which shows all properties of system B(0). Flux experiments showed that the transporter is Na(+)-dependent, electrogenic, and actively transports most neutral amino acids but not anionic or cationic amino acids. Superfusion of mB(0)AT1-expressing oocytes with neutral amino acids generated inward currents, which were proportional to the fluxes observed with labeled amino acids. In situ hybridization showed strong expression in intestinal microvilli and in the proximal tubule of the kidney. Expression of mouse B(0)AT1 was restricted to kidney, intestine, and skin. It is generally assumed that mutations of the system B(0) transporter underlie autosomal recessive Hartnup disorder. In support of this notion mB(0)AT1 is located on mouse chromosome 13 in a region syntenic to human chromosome 5p15, the locus of Hartnup disorder. Thus, the human homologue of this transporter is an excellent functional and positional candidate for Hartnup disorder. PMID:15044460

  5. Cloning of the VASP (Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein) genes in human and mouse: Structure, sequence, and chromosomal localization

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmer, M.; Fischer, L.; Hauser, W.

    1996-09-01

    The genes encoding the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) in human and mouse were isolated, and major parts were sequenced. In both species the gene is composed of 13 exons with conserved exon-intron positions. The mouse VASP cDNA sequence was deduced from the genomic sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence is 89% identical to the human protein. The high nucleotide sequence homology extends not only over the coding regions but also into the 3{prime}-UTRs, indicating a possible function in mRNA targeting or regulation of translation. Prominent 5{prime} CpG islands including multiple SP1 sites indicate a housekeeping function of VASP. Using cosmid DNA as a probe for fluorescence in situ hybridization, the human VASP gene was assigned to chromosome 19q13.2-q13.3, an extended region with homology to mouse chromosome 7. A sequence overlap of the VASP 5{prime}-region with the telomeric end of a cosmid contig physically links the VASP gene with ERCC1. VASP is located about 92 kb distal to ERCC1 and about 300 kb proximal to the myotonic dystrophy protein kinase gene. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of the mouse carboxyl ester lipase gene and evidence for expression in the lactating mammary gland

    SciTech Connect

    Lidmer, A.S.; Lundberg, L.; Kannius, M.; Bjursell, G.

    1995-09-01

    DNA hybridization was used to isolate a 2.04-kb cDNA encoding carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) from a mouse lactating mammary gland, {lambda}gt10 cDNA library. The cDNA sequence translated into a protein of 599 amino acids, including 20 amino acids of a putative signal peptide. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse CEL with CEL from five other species revealed that there is a high degree of a homology between the different species. The mouse CEL gene was also isolated and found to span approximately 7.2 kb and to include 11 exons. This organization is similar to those of the recently reported human and rat CEL genes. We have also analyzed expression of the CEL gene in the mammary glands from other species by performing a Northern blot analysis with RNA from goat and cow. The results show that the gene is expressed in both species. 36 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Characterization of a cDNA clone encoding the calmodulin-binding domain of mouse brain calcineurin.

    PubMed Central

    Kincaid, R L; Nightingale, M S; Martin, B M

    1988-01-01

    A cDNA clone corresponding to a portion of the catalytic subunit of calmodulin (CaM)-dependent phosphoprotein phosphatase (calcineurin) was isolated from a murine brain library by expression vector immunoscreening. A beta-galactosidase fusion protein that reacted on Western blots with anti-calcineurin antibodies and biotinylated CaM was purified in preparative amounts using CaM-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Partial digestion of the hybrid protein with Staphylococcus aureus V-8 protease produced several immunoreactive peptides that appeared identical to fragments generated from authentic brain calcineurin. The 1111-base-pair (bp) EcoRI insert contained an open reading frame encoding a protein of 35 kDa followed by a 190-bp 3' noncoding region; seven peptides obtained by partial amino acid sequencing of the bovine brain enzyme were found in the deduced sequence. A domain approximately 12 kDa from the carboxyl terminus was deduced to be the CaM-binding site based on consensus structural features and a sequence of seven amino acids highly related to smooth muscle myosin light-chain kinase. Two regions with identity to protein phosphatases 1 and 2A were found in the amino half of the cloned sequence; however, the intervening sequence contained apparent insertions, suggesting splicing of subdomains. Thus, the structure of calcineurin is chimeric, consisting of conserved catalytic elements and a regulatory CaM-binding domain. Images PMID:2848250

  8. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL): Mouse and human HL gene (HMGCL) cloning and detection of large gene deletions in two unrelated HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.P.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1996-04-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL, EC 4.1.3.4) catalyzes the cleavage of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA to acetoacetic acid and acetyl CoA, the final reaction of both ketogenesis and leucine catabolism. Autosomal-recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma. Using a mouse HL cDNA as a probe, we isolated a clone containing the full-length mouse HL gene that spans about 15 kb of mouse chromosome 4 and contains nine exons. The promoter region of the mouse HL gene contains elements characteristic of a housekeeping gene: a CpG island containing multiple Sp1 binding sites surrounds exon 1, and neither a TATA nor a CAAT box are present. We identified multiple transcription start sites in the mouse HL gene, 35 to 9 bases upstream of the translation start codon. We also isolated two human HL genomic clones that include HL exons 2 to 9 within 18 kb. The mouse and human HL genes (HGMW-approved symbol HMGCL) are highly homologous, with identical locations of intron-exon junctions. By genomic Southern blot analysis and exonic PCR, was found 2 of 33 HL-deficient probands to be homozygous for large deletions in the HL gene. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Molecular cloning of the cDNA coding for mouse aldehyde oxidase: tissue distribution and regulation in vivo by testosterone.

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaki, M; Demontis, S; Barzago, M M; Garattini, E; Terao, M

    1999-01-01

    The cDNA coding for mouse aldehyde oxidase (AO), a molybdoflavoprotein, has been isolated and characterized. The cDNA is 4347 nt long and consists of an open reading frame predicting a polypeptide of 1333 amino acid residues, with 5' and 3' untranslated regions of 13 and 335 nt respectively. The apparent molecular mass of the translation product in vitro derived from the corresponding cRNA is consistent with that of the monomeric subunit of the AO holoenzyme. The cDNA codes for a catalytically active form of AO, as demonstrated by transient transfection experiments conducted in the HC11 mouse mammary epithelial cell line. The deduced primary structure of the AO protein contains consensus sequences for two distinct 2Fe-2S redox centres and a molybdopterin-binding site. The amino acid sequence of the mouse AO has a high degree of similarity with the human and bovine counterparts, and a significant degree of relatedness to AO proteins of plant origin. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analyses demonstrate that hepatocytes, cardiocytes, lung endothelial or epithelial cells and oesophagus epithelial cells express high levels of AO mRNA. In the various tissues and organs considered, the level of AO mRNA expression is not strictly correlated with the amount of the corresponding protein, suggesting that the synthesis of the AO enzyme is under translational or post-translational control. In addition, we observed sex-related regulation of AO protein synthesis. In the liver of male animals, despite similar amounts of AO mRNA, the levels of the AO enzyme and corresponding polypeptide are significantly higher than those in female animals. Treatment of female mice with testosterone increases the amounts of AO mRNA and of the relative translation product to levels similar to those in male animals. PMID:10377246

  10. Memory B Cell Antibodies to HIV-1 gp140 Cloned from Individuals Infected with Clade A and B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Mouquet, Hugo; Klein, Florian; Scheid, Johannes F.; Warncke, Malte; Pietzsch, John; Oliveira, Thiago Y. K.; Velinzon, Klara; Seaman, Michael S.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the antibody response to HIV-1 in humans that show broad neutralizing serologic activity is a crucial step in trying to reproduce such responses by vaccination. Investigating antibodies with cross clade reactivity is particularly important as these antibodies may target conserved epitopes on the HIV envelope gp160 protein. To this end we have used a clade B YU-2 gp140 trimeric antigen and single-cell antibody cloning methods to obtain 189 new anti-gp140 antibodies representing 51 independent B cell clones from the IgG memory B cells of 3 patients infected with HIV-1 clade A or B viruses and exhibiting broad neutralizing serologic activity. Our results support previous findings showing a diverse antibody response to HIV gp140 envelope protein, characterized by differentially expanded B-cell clones producing highly hypermutated antibodies with heterogenous gp140-specificity and neutralizing activity. In addition to their high-affinity binding to the HIV spike, the vast majority of the new anti-gp140 antibodies are also polyreactive. Although none of the new antibodies are as broad or potent as VRC01 or PG9, two clonally-related antibodies isolated from a clade A HIV-1 infected donor, directed against the gp120 variable loop 3, rank in the top 5% of the neutralizers identified in our large collection of 185 unique gp140-specific antibodies in terms of breadth and potency. PMID:21931643

  11. Stable yeast transformants that secrete functional. cap alpha. -amylase encoded by cloned mouse pancreatic cDNA

    SciTech Connect

    Filho, S.A.; Galembeck, E.V.; Faria, J.B.; Frascino, A.C.S.

    1986-04-01

    Mouse pancreatic ..cap alpha..-amylase complementary DNA was inserted into a yeast shuttle vector after the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MF..cap alpha..1 promoter and secretion signals coding sequences. When transformed with the recombinant plasmid, S. cerevisiae cells were able to synthesize and secrete functional ..cap alpha..-amylase, efficiently hydrolyzing starch present in the culture medium. Stable amylolytic cells were obtained from different yeast strains. This work represents a significant step towards producing yeast that can convert starchy materials directly to ethanol.

  12. Analysis of the Airway Microbiota of Healthy Individuals and Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease by T-RFLP and Clone Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zakharkina, Tetyana; Heinzel, Elke; Koczulla, Rembert A.; Greulich, Timm; Rentz, Katharina; Pauling, Josch K.; Baumbach, Jan; Herrmann, Mathias; Grünewald, Christiane; Dienemann, Hendrik; von Müller, Lutz; Bals, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive, inflammatory lung disease that affects a large number of patients and has significant impact. One hallmark of the disease is the presence of bacteria in the lower airways. Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the detailed structure of microbial communities found in the lungs of healthy individuals and patients with COPD. Nine COPD patients as compared and 9 healthy individuals underwent flexible bronchoscopy and BAL was performed. Bacterial nucleic acids were subjected to terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length polymorphism and clone library analysis. Overall, we identified 326 T-RFLP band, 159 in patients and 167 in healthy controls. The results of the TRF analysis correlated partly with the data obtained from clone sequencing. Although the results of the sequencing showed high diversity, the genera Prevotella, Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Fusobacterium, Megasphaera, Veillonella, Staphylococcus, and Streptococcus constituted the major part of the core microbiome found in both groups. A TRF band possibly representing Pseudomonas sp. monoinfection was associated with a reduction of the microbial diversity. Non-cultural methods reveal the complexity of the pulmonary microbiome in healthy individuals and in patients with COPD. Alterations of the microbiome in pulmonary diseases are correlated with disease. PMID:23874580

  13. Isolation and characterization of expressible cDNA clones encoding the M1 and M2 subunits of mouse ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Thelander, L; Berg, P

    1986-01-01

    Mammalian ribonucleotide reductase consists of two nonidentical subunits, proteins M1 and M2, which are differentially regulated during the cell cycle. We have isolated expressible cDNA clones of both subunits from an Okayama-Berg cDNA library made with mRNA from hydroxyurea-resistant, M2 protein-overproducing mouse TA3 cells. Expression of M2 protein could be demonstrated by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy after transfection of COS-7 monkey cells with the plasmid. Electrophoresis and blot analyses of the parent and hydroxyurea-resistant TA3 mRNA revealed two M2 transcripts, a major one of 2.1 kilobases and a minor one of about 1.6 kilobases. Restriction endonuclease mapping of the corresponding cDNAs indicated that the two mRNAs differed only in the length of the 3' untranslated ends. By contrast, there was only one mRNA corresponding to the M1 protein, and its mobility corresponded to about 3.1 kilobases. The hydroxyurea-resistant TA3 cells contained a 50- to 100-fold excess of the M2 mRNAs over that of the parent cells and a 10-fold excess of the M1 mRNA. However, a Southern blot analysis of the corresponding genomic DNA sequences showed that the M2 gene was amplified fivefold but the M1 gene was still single copy. The complete nucleotide sequence of the 2,111-base-pair-long M2 cDNA revealed an open reading frame coding for 390 amino acids, which corresponds to a molecular weight of 45,100. The mouse M2 protein sequence was quite homologous to the equivalent protein in the clam Spisula solidissima, while the homology to the smaller subunits of Epstein-Barr virus, herpes simplex virus type 2, and Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductases were less pronounced. Images PMID:3025593

  14. The Voice of Bats: How Greater Mouse-eared Bats Recognize Individuals Based on Their Echolocation Calls

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Matthias O.; Denzinger, Annette; Schnitzler, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Echolocating bats use the echoes from their echolocation calls to perceive their surroundings. The ability to use these continuously emitted calls, whose main function is not communication, for recognition of individual conspecifics might facilitate many of the social behaviours observed in bats. Several studies of individual-specific information in echolocation calls found some evidence for its existence but did not quantify or explain it. We used a direct paradigm to show that greater mouse-eared bats (Myotis myotis) can easily discriminate between individuals based on their echolocation calls and that they can generalize their knowledge to discriminate new individuals that they were not trained to recognize. We conclude that, despite their high variability, broadband bat-echolocation calls contain individual-specific information that is sufficient for recognition. An analysis of the call spectra showed that formant-related features are suitable cues for individual recognition. As a model for the bat's decision strategy, we trained nonlinear statistical classifiers to reproduce the behaviour of the bats, namely to repeat correct and incorrect decisions of the bats. The comparison of the bats with the model strongly implies that the bats are using a prototype classification approach: they learn the average call characteristics of individuals and use them as a reference for classification. PMID:19503606

  15. Variation in Taxonomic Composition of the Fecal Microbiota in an Inbred Mouse Strain across Individuals and Time

    PubMed Central

    Hoy, Yana Emmy; Bik, Elisabeth M.; Lawley, Trevor D.; Holmes, Susan P.; Monack, Denise M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetics, diet, and other environmental exposures are thought to be major factors in the development and composition of the intestinal microbiota of animals. However, the relative contributions of these factors in adult animals, as well as variation with time in a variety of important settings, are still not fully understood. We studied a population of inbred, female mice fed the same diet and housed under the same conditions. We collected fecal samples from 46 individual mice over two weeks, sampling four of these mice for periods as long as 236 days for a total of 190 samples, and determined the phylogenetic composition of their microbial communities after analyzing 1,849,990 high-quality pyrosequencing reads of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region. Even under these controlled conditions, we found significant inter-individual variation in community composition, as well as variation within an individual over time, including increases in alpha diversity during the first 2 months of co-habitation. Some variation was explained by mouse membership in different cage and vendor shipment groups. The differences among individual mice from the same shipment group and cage were still significant. Overall, we found that 23% of the variation in intestinal microbiota composition was explained by changes within the fecal microbiota of a mouse over time, 12% was explained by persistent differences among individual mice, 14% by cage, and 18% by shipment group. Our findings suggest that the microbiota of controlled populations of inbred laboratory animals may not be as uniform as previously thought, that animal rearing and handling may account for some variation, and that as yet unidentified factors may explain additional components of variation in the composition of the microbiota within populations and individuals over time. These findings have implications for the design and interpretation of experiments involving laboratory animals. PMID:26565698

  16. Molecular cloning of Elk-3, a new member of the Ets family expressed during mouse embryogenesis and analysis of its transcriptional repression activity.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, M; Onishi, Y; Kanno, N; Ono, Y; Fujimura, Y

    1996-10-01

    We isolated a cDNA clone, Elk-3, that encodes a novel Ets transcription factor from 16-day mouse embryos. The deduced amino acid sequence of the protein was homologous to human ELK-1 and SAP-1. This protein, ELK-1, and SAP-1 shared some unique structural properties such as an Ets DNA-binding site in the amino-terminal region, a serum response factor interacting domain and phosphorylation sites of serine or threonine residues in the carboxy-terminal region. Northern blotting weakly revealed that two transcripts of 4 and 2.1 kb are expressed in the adult ovary and lung and a 2.1-kb transcript predominated in 8- to 14-day embryos. We assayed the transcriptional activities of Elk-3 protein on the cytokeratin EndoA enhancer containing Ets binding sites in endodermal cells. Elk-3 protein strongly repressed enhancer activity but did not affect the activity of the basal promoter in the absence of the enhancer. Furthermore, Elk-3 can suppress the activity of Ets-2 as the transcriptional activator on the EndoA enhancer. These data suggested that the Elk-3 gene product plays a role in transcriptional regulation during embryogenesis. PMID:8892757

  17. Preparation of Proper Immunogen by Cloning and Stable Expression of cDNA coding for Human Hematopoietic Stem Cell Marker CD34 in NIH-3T3 Mouse Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Abbasi-Kenarsari, Hajar; Majidi, Jafar; Movassaghpour, Ali Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Kazemi, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Transmembrane CD34 glycoprotein is the most important marker for identification, isolation and enumeration of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). We aimed in this study to clone the cDNA coding for human CD34 from KG1a cell line and stably express in mouse fibroblast cell line NIH-3T3. Such artificial cell line could be useful as proper immunogen for production of mouse monoclonal antibodies. Methods: CD34 cDNA was cloned from KG1a cell line after total RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis. Pfu DNA polymerase-amplified specific band was ligated to pGEMT-easy TA-cloning vector and sub-cloned in pCMV6-Neo expression vector. After transfection of NIH-3T3 cells using 3 μg of recombinant construct and 6 μl of JetPEI transfection reagent, stable expression was obtained by selection of cells by G418 antibiotic and confirmed by surface flow cytometry. Results: 1158 bp specific band was aligned completely to reference sequence in NCBI database corresponding to long isoform of human CD34. Transient and stable expression of human CD34 on transfected NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was achieved (25% and 95%, respectively) as shown by flow cytometry. Conclusion: Cloning and stable expression of human CD34 cDNA was successfully performed and validated by standard flow cytometric analysis. Due to murine origin of NIH-3T3 cell line, CD34-expressing NIH-3T3 cells could be useful as immunogen in production of diagnostic monoclonal antibodies against human CD34. This approach could bypass the need for purification of recombinant proteins produced in eukaryotic expression systems. PMID:25789221

  18. HTLV-1 positive and negative T cells cloned from infected individuals display telomerase and telomere genes deregulation that predominate in activated but untransformed CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Zane, Linda; Sibon, David; Capraro, Valérie; Galia, Perrine; Karam, Maroun; Delfau-Larue, Marie-Hélène; Gilson, Eric; Gessain, Antoine; Gout, Olivier; Hermine, Olivier; Mortreux, Franck; Wattel, Eric

    2012-08-15

    Untransformed HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) cells from infected individuals are selected for expressing tax and displaying morphological features consistent with telomere dysfunctions. We show that in resting HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) cells cloned from patients, hTERT expression parallels tax expression and cell cycling. Upon activation, these cells dramatically augment tax expression, whereas their increase in telomerase activity is about 20 times lower than that of their uninfected counterpart. Activated HTLV-1 positive CD4(+) but not uninfected CD4(+) or CD8(+) clones also repress the transcription of TRF1, TPP1, TANK1, POT1, DNA-PKc and Ku80. Both infected and uninfected lymphocytes from infected individuals shared common telomere gene deregulations toward a pattern consistent with premature senescence. ATLL cells displayed the highest telomerase activity (TA) whereas recovered a telomere gene transcriptome close to that of normal CD4(+) cells. In conclusion HTLV-1-dependent telomere modulations seem involved in clonal expansion, immunosuppression, tumor initiation and progression. PMID:21717459

  19. Gastrointestinal microbiota of wild and inbred individuals of two house mouse subspecies assessed using high-throughput parallel pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Kreisinger, Jakub; Cížková, Dagmar; Vohánka, Jaroslav; Piálek, Jaroslav

    2014-10-01

    The effects of gastrointestinal tract microbiota (GTM) on host physiology and health have been the subject of considerable interest in recent years. While a variety of captive bred species have been used in experiments, the extent to which GTM of captive and/or inbred individuals resembles natural composition and variation in wild populations is poorly understood. Using 454 pyrosequencing, we performed 16S rDNA GTM barcoding for 30 wild house mice (Mus musculus) and wild-derived inbred strain mice belonging to two subspecies (M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus). Sequenced individuals were selected according to a 2 × 2 experimental design: wild (14) vs. inbred origin (16) and M. m. musculus (15) vs. M. m. domesticus (15). We compared alpha diversity (i.e. number of operational taxonomic units - OTUs), beta diversity (i.e. interindividual variability) and microbiota composition across the four groups. We found no difference between M. m. musculus and M. m. domesticus subspecies, suggesting low effect of genetic differentiation between these two subspecies on GTM structure. Both inbred and wild populations showed the same level of microbial alpha and beta diversity; however, we found strong differentiation in microbiota composition between wild and inbred populations. Relative abundance of ~ 16% of OTUs differed significantly between wild and inbred individuals. As laboratory mice represent the most abundant model for studying the effects of gut microbiota on host metabolism, immunity and neurology, we suggest that the distinctness of laboratory-kept mouse microbiota, which differs from wild mouse microbiota, needs to be considered in future biomedical research. PMID:25204516

  20. Pharmacology of a cloned potassium channel from mouse brain (MK-1) expressed in CHO cells: effects of blockers and an 'inactivation peptide'.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B.; Owen, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    1. Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO), maintained in cell culture, were stably transfected with DNA for the MK-1 voltage-activated potassium channel, previously cloned from a mouse brain library. 2. Voltage-activated currents were recorded by the whole cell patch clamp method. In CHO cells transfected with the vector only, there were no significant outward voltage activated currents. However, large outward voltage-activated potassium currents were always observed in those cells which had been transfected with the vector containing the DNA encoding for MK-1. 3. These potassium currents activated from -40 mV, and reversed at the potassium equilibrium potential. The half-maximal conductance of MK-1 was at -10 mV and had a slope factor of 11 mV when fitted with a Boltzmann function. There was only very slight (< 10%) inactivation of MK-1 even at very large positive voltages. 4. MK-1 was reversibly blocked by: 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 0.1-4 mM), Toxin I 10-100 nM), mast cell degranulating peptide (1 microM), tetraethylammonium (TEA, 4-10 mM), tedisamil (100 microM), quinine (100 microM) and ciclazindol (100 microM); all applied to the outside of the cell from a 'U tube' rapid perfusion system. 4-AP may block closed as well as open MK-1 potassium channels. 5. A synthetic 20 amino acid peptide derived from the N-terminus sequence of the Shaker B potassium channel (the 'inactivation peptide') produced dramatic inactivation of MK-1 when applied to the inside, but not the outside of the cell. Reducing peptide concentration or 'degrading' the peptide produced less inactivation. 6. The block of MK-1 by the synthetic inactivation peptide was quite different in time dependence from block by internal TEA (0.4-4 mM), which probably blocks much more quickly but less potently than the peptide. PMID:8358568

  1. Molecular cloning and identification of mouse epididymis-specific gene mHong1, the homologue of rat HongrES1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuang-Gang; Du, Han; Yao, Guang-Xin; Zhang, Yong-Lian

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that rat epididymis-specific gene HongrES1 plays important roles in sperm capacitation and fertility. In this study, we cloned the mouse homologue gene by sequence alignment and RT-PCR methods and designated it as mHong1. The mHong1 gene is located on chromosome 12p14, spanning five exons. The cDNA sequence consists of 1257 nucleotides and encodes a 419 amino-acid protein with a predicted N-terminal signal peptide of 20 amino acids. The mHong1 mRNA shows similarity with HongrES1 in the expression patterns: (i) specific expression in epididymal tissue, especially in the cauda region; and (ii) androgen-dependence but testicular fluid factor independence. Its protein product shows 71% similarity with HongrES1 and contains a classical serpin domain as does HongrES1. A polyclonal antibody against mHong1 with high specificity and sensitivity was raised. Like HongrES1, the mHong1 protein shows a checker-board expression pattern in the epididymal epithelium and is secreted into the epididymal lumen. The mHong1 protein shows higher glycosylation than HongrES1. Although both of them are deposited onto the sperm head surface, mHong1 is localized to the equatorial segment, which is different from that of HongrES1. The mHong1 protein can be removed from the sperm membrane by high ionic strength and therefore can be classed as an extrinsic membrane protein. Collectively, we conclude that mHong1 is the homologue of HongrES1 and the present work paves the way for establishing animal models to elucidate the precise functions of HongrES1 and mHong1. PMID:22426594

  2. Ammonia Levels and Urine-Spot Characteristics as Cage-Change Indicators for High-Density Individually Ventilated Mouse Cages.

    PubMed

    Washington, Ida M; Payton, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Mouse cage and bedding changes are potentially stressful to mice and are also labor- and resource-intensive. These changes are often performed on a calendar-based schedule to maintain a clean microenvironment and limit the concentrations of ammonia to which mice and workers are exposed. The current study sought to establish a performance-based approach to mouse cage-changing that uses urine spot characteristics as visual indicators of intracage ammonia levels. Colorimetric ammonia indicators were used to measure ammonia levels in individually-ventilated cages (IVC) housing male or female mice (n =5 per cage) of various strains at 1 to 16 d after cage change. Urine spot characteristics were correlated with ammonia levels to create a visual indicator of the cage-change criterion of 25 ppm ammonia. Results demonstrated a consistent increase in ammonia levels with days since cage change, with cages reaching the cage-change criterion at approximately 10 d for IVC containing male mice and 16 d for those with female mice. Ammonia levels were higher for male than female mice but were not correlated with mouse age. However, urine spot diameter, color, and edge characteristics were strongly correlated with ammonia levels. Husbandry practices based on using urine spot characteristics as indicators of ammonia levels led to fewer weekly cage changes and concomitant savings in labor and resources. Therefore, urine spot characteristics can be used as visual indicators of intracage ammonia levels for use of a performance (urine spot)-based approach to cage-changing frequency that maintains animal health and wellbeing. PMID:27177558

  3. HMG-CoA lyase (HL) gene: Cloning and characterization of the 5{prime} end of the mouse gene, gene targeting in ES cells, and demonstration of large deletions in three HL-deficient patients

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA lyase (HL) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme which catalyzes the last step of leucine catabolism and of ketogenesis. Autosomal recessive HL deficiency in humans results in episodes of hypoglycemia and coma. We are interested in the pathophysiology of HL deficiency as a model for both amino acid and fatty acid inborn errors. We have cloned the human and mouse HL genes. In order to analyze the 5{prime} nontranslated region of mouse HL gene, we cloned and sequenced a 1.8 kb fragment containing the 5{prime} extremity including exon 1 and about 1.6 kb of 5{prime} nontranslated sequence. The region surrounding exon 1 is CpG-rich (66.4%). Using the criteria of West, the Observed/Expected ratio for CpG dinucleotides is 0.7 ({ge}0.6 is consistent with a CpG island). We are carrying out primer extension and RNase protection experiments to determine the transcription initiation site. We constructed a gene targeting vector by introducing the neomycin resistance gene into exon 2 of a 7.5 kb genomic subclone of the mouse HL gene. Targeting was performed by electroporating 10 mg linearized vector into 10{sup 7} ES cells and selecting for 12 days with G418. 5/228 colonies (2.2%) had homologous recombination as shown by PCR screening and Southern analysis. We are microinjecting the 5 targeted clones into blastocysts to create an HL-deficient mouse. To date we have obtained two chimeras with contributions of 95% and 55% from 129, by coat color estimates. Three of 27 (11%) of the HL-deficient patients studied were suggested by genomic Southern analysis to be homozygous for large intragenic deletions. We confirmed this and defined the boundaries using exonic PCR.

  4. In vitro clonal analysis of mouse neural crest development.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Morita, T; Sieber-Blum, M

    1993-06-01

    Analysis of lineage segregation during mammalian neural crest development has not been sufficiently performed due to technical difficulties. In the present study, therefore, we established a clonal culture system of mouse neural crest cells in order to analyze developmental potentials of individual neural crest cells and their patterns of lineage segregation. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and cholera toxin (CT) were applied to culture medium to trigger melanogenic differentiation of mouse neural crest cells. Three morphologically distinct types of clones were observed. (1) "Pigmented clones" consisted of melanocytes only, suggesting that the clone-forming cells were committed to the melanogenic lineage. These clones were observed only in the presence of TPA and CT. The proportion of this type of clone (8%) was much lower than that of the equivalent type of clone in quail trunk neural crest (40-60%; Sieber-Blum and Cohen, 1980, Dev. Biol. 80, 96-106). It therefore appears that the segregation pattern to the melanogenic lineage during mouse neural crest development in vitro differs quantitatively from that in the quail. (2) "Mixed clones" consisted of pigmented and unpigmented cells. Like pigmented clones, they were observed only in the presence of TPA and CT. The clones contained up to four types of cells: melanocytes, S100-positive cells (Schwann cells or melanogenic precursor cells), serotonin (5-HT)-positive autonomic neuron-like cells, and substance P (SP)-immunoreactive sensory neuron-like cells. Thus, at least some mixed clone-forming cells are pluripotent. (3) Two classes of "unpigmented clones" were observed that consisted of unpigmented cells only. These clones developed in the presence and absence of TPA and CT. Unpigmented clones in one class contained up to three types of cells as well as other, as yet unidentified cells: S100-, 5-HT-, and SP-positive cells. This observation suggests that at least some of these clones originate from cells

  5. Visualizing the Distribution of Synapses from Individual Neurons in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Tasic, Bosiljka; Micheva, Kristina D.; Ivanov, Vsevolod M.; Spletter, Maria L.; Smith, Stephen J.; Luo, Liqun

    2010-01-01

    Background Proper function of the mammalian brain relies on the establishment of highly specific synaptic connections among billions of neurons. To understand how complex neural circuits function, it is crucial to precisely describe neuronal connectivity and the distributions of synapses to and from individual neurons. Methods and Findings In this study, we present a new genetic synaptic labeling method that relies on expression of a presynaptic marker, synaptophysin-GFP (Syp-GFP) in individual neurons in vivo. We assess the reliability of this method and use it to analyze the spatial patterning of synapses in developing and mature cerebellar granule cells (GCs). In immature GCs, Syp-GFP is distributed in both axonal and dendritic regions. Upon maturation, it becomes strongly enriched in axons. In mature GCs, we analyzed synapses along their ascending segments and parallel fibers. We observe no differences in presynaptic distribution between GCs born at different developmental time points and thus having varied depths of projections in the molecular layer. We found that the mean densities of synapses along the parallel fiber and the ascending segment above the Purkinje cell (PC) layer are statistically indistinguishable, and higher than previous estimates. Interestingly, presynaptic terminals were also found in the ascending segments of GCs below and within the PC layer, with the mean densities two-fold lower than that above the PC layer. The difference in the density of synapses in these parts of the ascending segment likely reflects the regional differences in postsynaptic target cells of GCs. Conclusions The ability to visualize synapses of single neurons in vivo is valuable for studying synaptogenesis and synaptic plasticity within individual neurons as well as information flow in neural circuits. PMID:20634890

  6. Molecular cloning of the mouse grb2 gene: differential interaction of the Grb2 adaptor protein with epidermal growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Suen, K L; Bustelo, X R; Pawson, T; Barbacid, M

    1993-01-01

    We report the isolation and molecular characterization of the mouse grb2 gene. The product of this gene, the Grb2 protein, is highly related to the Caenorhabditis elegans sem-5 gene product and the human GRB2 protein and displays the same SH3-SH2-SH3 structural motifs. In situ hybridization studies revealed that the mouse grb2 gene is widely expressed throughout embryonic development (E9.5 to P0). However, grb2 transcripts are not uniformly distributed, and in certain tissues (e.g., thymus) they appear to be regulated during development. Recent genetic and biochemical evidence has implicated the Grb2 protein in the signaling pathways that link cell surface tyrosine kinase receptors with Ras. We have investigated the association of the Grb2 protein with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. EGF treatment of PC12 cells results in the rapid association of Grb2 with the activated EGF receptors, an interaction mediated by the Grb2 SH2 domain. However, Grb2 does not bind to NGF-activated Trk receptors. Mitogenic signaling of NGF in NIH 3T3 cells ectopically expressing Trk receptors also takes place without detectable association between Grb2 and Trk. These results suggest that whereas EGF and NGF can activate the Ras signaling pathway in PC12 cells, only the EGF receptor is likely to do so through a direct interaction with Grb2. Finally, binding studies with glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins indicate that Grb2 binds two distinct subsets of proteins which are individually recognized by its SH2 and SH3 domains. These observations add further support to the concept that Grb2 is a modular adaptor protein. Images PMID:7689150

  7. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of inhibitor-sensitive (mENT1) and inhibitor-resistant (mENT2) equilibrative nucleoside transporters from mouse brain.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, A; Farah, K; Kim, J; Garriock, R J; Drysdale, T A; Hammond, J R

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian cells express at least two subtypes of equilibrative nucleoside transporters, i.e. ENT1 and ENT2, which can be distinguished functionally by their sensitivity and resistance respectively to inhibition by nitrobenzylthioinosine. The ENT1 transporters exhibit distinctive species differences in their sensitivities to inhibition by dipyridamole, dilazep and draflazine (human>mouse>rat). A comparison of the ENT1 structures in the three species would facilitate the identification of the regions involved in the actions of these cardioprotective agents. We now report the molecular cloning and functional expression of the murine (m)ENT1 and mENT2 transporters. mENT1 and mENT2 encode proteins containing 458 and 456 residues respectively, with a predicted 11-transmembrane-domain topology. mENT1 has 88% and 78% amino acid identity with rat ENT1 and human ENT1 respectively; mENT2 is more highly conserved, with 94% and 88% identity with rat ENT2 and human ENT2 respectively. We have also isolated two additional distinct cDNAs that encode proteins similar to mENT1; these probably represent distinct mENT1 isoforms or alternative splicing products. One cDNA encodes a protein with two additional amino acids (designated mENT1b) that adds a potential protein kinase CK2 phosphorylation site in the central intracellular loop of the transporter, and is similar, in this regard, to the human and rat ENT1 orthologues. The other cDNA has a 5'-untranslated region sequence that is distinct from that of full-length mENT1. Microinjection of mENT1, mENT1b or mENT2 cRNA into Xenopus oocytes resulted in enhanced uptake of [(3)H]uridine by the oocytes relative to that seen in water-injected controls. mENT1-mediated, but not mENT2-mediated, [(3)H]uridine uptake was inhibited by nitrobenzylthioinosine and dilazep. Dipyridamole inhibited both mENT1 and mENT2, but was significantly more effective against mENT1. Adenosine inhibited both systems with a similar potency, as did a range of other

  8. Molecular cloning and heterologous expression of a cDNA encoding a mouse glutathione S-transferase Yc subunit possessing high catalytic activity for aflatoxin B1-8,9-epoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, J D; Judah, D J; Neal, G E; Nguyen, T

    1992-01-01

    Resistance to the carcinogenic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in the mouse is due to the constitutive expression of an Alpha-class glutathione S-transferase (GST), YcYc, with high detoxification activity towards AFB1-8,9-epoxide. A cDNA clone (pmusGST Yc) for a murine GST Yc polypeptide has been isolated. Sequencing has shown the cDNA insert of pmusGST Yc to be 922 bp in length, with an open reading frame of 663 bp that encodes a polypeptide of M(r) 25358. The primary structure of the murine GST Yc subunit predicted by pmusGST Yc is in complete agreement with the partial amino acid sequence of the aflatoxin-metabolizing mouse liver GST described previously [McLellan, Kerr, Cronshaw & Hayes (1991) Biochem. J. 276, 461-469]. A plasmid, termed pKK-musGST Yc, which permits the expression of the murine Yc subunit in Escherichia coli, has been constructed. The murine GST expressed in E. coli was purified and found to be catalytically active towards several GST substrates, including AFB1-8,9-epoxide. This enzyme was also found to possess electrophoretic and immunochemical properties closely similar to those of the GST Yc subunit from mouse liver. However, the GST synthesized in E. coli and the constitutive mouse liver Alpha-class GST exhibited small differences in their chromatographic behaviour during reverse-phase h.p.l.c. Automated Edman degradation revealed alanine to be the N-terminal amino acid in the GST Yc subunit expressed in E. coli, whereas the enzyme in mouse liver possesses a blocked N-terminus. Although sequencing showed that the purified Yc subunit from E. coli lacked the initiator methionine, the amino acid sequence obtained over the first eleven N-terminal residues agreed with that predicted from the cDNA clone, pmusGST Yc. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the mouse Yc polypeptide with the primary structures of the rat Alpha-class GST enzymes revealed that it is more closely related to the ethoxyquin-induced rat liver Yc2 subunit than to

  9. Why Clone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How might cloning be used in medicine? Cloning animal models of disease Much of what researchers learn about human disease comes from studying animal models such as mice. Often, animal models are ...

  10. Ethical issues in livestock cloning.

    PubMed

    Thompson, P B

    1999-01-01

    Although cloning may eventually become an important technology for livestock production, four ethical issues must be addressed before the practice becomes widespread. First, researchers must establish that the procedure is not detrimental to the health or well-being of affected animals. Second, animal research institutions should evaluate the net social benefits to livestock producers by weighing the benefits to producers against the opportunity cost of research capacity lost to biomedical projects. Third, scientists should consider the indirect effects of cloning research on the larger ethical issues surrounding human cloning. Finally, the market structure for products of cloned animals should protect individual choice, and should recognize that many individuals find the prospect of cloning (or consuming cloned animals) repugnant. Analysis of these four issues is complicated by spurious arguments alleging that cloning will have a negative impact on environment and genetic diversity. PMID:15719505

  11. Cloning of a parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) cDNA from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell line: Chromosomal assignment of the gene in the human, mouse, and rat genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pausova, Z.; Bourdon, J.; Clayton, D.; Janicic, N.; Goltzman, D.; Hendy, G.N. ); Mattei, M.G. ); Seldin, M.F. ); Riviere, M.; Szpirer, J. )

    1994-03-01

    Complementary DNAs spanning the entire coding region of the rat parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone-related peptide receptor (PTHR) were isolated from a rat osteosarcoma (UMR 106) cell-line cDNA library. The longest of these clones (rPTHrec4) was used to chromosomally assign the PTHR gene in the human, rat, and mouse genomes. By somatic cell hybrid analysis, the gene was localized to human chromosome 3 and rat chromosome 8; by in situ hybridization, the gene was mapped to human chromosome 3p21.1-p22 and to mouse chromosome 9 band F; and by interspecific backcross analysis, the Pthr gene segregated with the transferrin (Trf) gene in chromosome 9 band F. Mouse chromosome 9 and rat chromosome 8 are known to be highly homologous and to also show synteny conservation with human chromosome 3. These three chromosomes share the transferrin gene (TF), the myosin light polypeptide 3 gene (MYL3), and the acelpeptide hydrolase gene (APEH). These results add a fourth gene, the PTHR gene, to the synteny group conserved in these chromosomes. 34 refs., 7 figs. 1 tab.

  12. Academic Cloning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally negative practice.…

  13. Imperfect Cloning Operations in Algebraic Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitajima, Yuichiro

    2015-01-01

    No-cloning theorem says that there is no unitary operation that makes perfect clones of non-orthogonal quantum states. The objective of the present paper is to examine whether an imperfect cloning operation exists or not in a C*-algebraic framework. We define a universal -imperfect cloning operation which tolerates a finite loss of fidelity in the cloned state, and show that an individual system's algebra of observables is abelian if and only if there is a universal -imperfect cloning operation in the case where the loss of fidelity is less than . Therefore in this case no universal -imperfect cloning operation is possible in algebraic quantum theory.

  14. Isolation and sequence of a cDNA clone for human tyrosinase that maps at the mouse c-albino locus

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, B.S.; Haq, A.K.; Pomerantz, S.H.; Halaban, R.

    1987-11-01

    Screening of a lambdagt11 human melanocyte cDNA library with antibodies against hamster tyrosinase resulted in the isolation of 16 clones. The cDNA inserts from 13 of the 16 clones cross-hybridized with each other, indicating that they were form related mRNA species. One of the cDNA clones, Pmel34, detected one mRNA species with an approximate length of 2.4 kilobases that was expressed preferentially in normal and malignant melanocytes but not in other cell types. The amino acid sequence deduced from the nucleotide sequence showed that the putative human tyrosinase is composed of 548 amino acids with a molecular weight of 62,610. The deduced protein contains glycosylation sites and histidine-rich sites that could be used for copper binding. Southern blot analysis of DNA derived from newborn mice carrying lethal albino deletion mutations revealed that Pmel34 maps near or at the c-albino locus, the position of the structural gene for tyrosinase.

  15. Comparative mapping on the mouse and human X chromosomes of a human cDNA clone encoding the vasopressin renal-type receptor (AVP2R)

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, C.J.; Gonzales, J.C.; Seibold, A.; Birnbaumer, M.; Herman, G.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Mutation in the gene for the human renal-type vasopressin receptor (V2R) have recently been identified in patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Both V2R and NDI have been independently mapped to Xq28. Using a combination of genetic and physical mapping, we have localized the murine V2r locus to within 100 kb of L1Cam on the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with human Xq28. Based on conserved gene order of mouse and human loci in this region, physical mapping using DNA derived form human lymphoblasts has established that the corresponding human loci V2R and L1CAM are linked within 210 kb. The efficiency and precision of genetic mapping of V2r and other loci in the mouse suggest that it might be easier to map additional human genes in the mouse first and infer the corresponding human location. More precise physical mapping in man could then be performed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and/or yeast artificial chromosomes. 16 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  16. Cloning and characterization of E-dlg, a novel splice variant of mouse homologue of the Drosophila discs large tumor suppressor binds preferentially to SAP102

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Peizhong; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Fukaya, Masahiro; Tao, Feng; Li, Dechun; Watanabe, Masahiko; Johns, Roger A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) act as scaffolds to coordinate signaling events through their multiple domains at the plasma membrane. The MAGUK SH3 domain is noncanonical and its function remains unclear. To identify potential binding partners of MAGUK SH3, the synapse-associated protein 102 (SAP102) SH3 domain was used as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a mouse embryonic cDNA library. A mouse homologue of the Drosophila discs large tumor suppressor (Dlg, also known as SAP97) bound preferentially to SAP102 SH3. The 4347bp cDNA sequence encoded an 893 amino acid protein with 94% identity to mouse SAP97. A deleted region (33-aa) strongly suggests this is a novel splice variant, which we call Embryonic-dlg/SAP97 (E-dlg). The interaction of SAP102 and E-dlg was confirmed in mammalian cells. E-dlg can also bind to potassium channel Kv1.4 in a pull-down assay. E-dlg was highly expressed in embryonic and some adult mouse tissues, such as brain, kidney and ovary. Furthermore, in situ hybridization showed that E-dlg was mostly expressed in olfactory bulb and cerebellum. PMID:18618587

  17. Cloning-free CRISPR

    PubMed Central

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels; Sherwood, Richard I.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each target locus. We introduce a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid and a short double-stranded DNA sequence encoding the desired locus-specific sgRNA into target cells, allowing them to produce a locus-specific sgRNA plasmid through homologous recombination. scCRISPR enables efficient generation of gene knockouts (∼88% mutation rate) at approximately one-sixth the cost of plasmid-based sgRNA construction with only 2 hr of preparation for each targeted site. Additionally, we demonstrate efficient site-specific knockin of GFP transgenes without any plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (2%–4% knockin rate) through PCR-based addition of short homology arms. scCRISPR substantially lowers the bar on mouse and human transgenesis. PMID:26527385

  18. Mitochondrial HMG to CoA synthase (mHS): cDNA cloning in human, mouse and C. elegans, mapping to human chromosome 1p12-13 and partial human genomic cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Boukaftane, Y.; Robert, M.F.; Mitchell, G.A. |

    1994-09-01

    mHS catalyzes the rate-limiting first step of ketogenesis in the liver. A cytoplasmic HS isozyme, encoded by another gene, catalyzes an early step in cholesterol synthesis. Starting from a rat mHS cDNA obtained by RT-PCR from the published rat cDNA sequence, we obtained and sequenced human and mouse cDNAs spanning the entire coding sequence of natural human and mouse mHS, as well as sequencing C. elegans HS-like cDNA. Consensus sequences for 3 mitochondrial and 4 cytoplasmic HSs were created and compared to invertebrate HS sequences. We found high conversation in the active site and at other regions presumably important for HS function. We mapped the mHS locus, HMGCS2 by in situ hybridization to chromosome 1P12-13, in contrast to the human cHS locus (HMGCS1) known to be on chromosome 5p13. Comparative mapping results suggest that these two chromosomal regions may be contiguous in other species, constant with a recent gene duplication event. Furthermore, we have characterized a human genomic mHS subclone containing 4 mHS exons, and found the position of all splice junctions to be identical to that of the hamster cHS gene except for one site in the 3{prime} nontranslated region. We calculate that the mHS and cHS genes were derived from a common ancestor 400-700 Myrs ago, implying that ketogenesis from fat may have become possible around the time of emergence of vertebrates ({approximately}500 Myr ago). Ketogenesis has evolved into an important pathway of energy metabolism, and we predict the mHS deficiency may prove to be responsible for some as yet explained cases of Reye-like syndromes in humans. This hypothesis can now be tested at the molecular level without the necessity of obtaining hepatic tissue.

  19. Molecular cloning of the mouse proteasome subunits MC14 and MECL-1: reciprocally regulated tissue expression of interferon-gamma-modulated proteasome subunits.

    PubMed

    Stohwasser, R; Standera, S; Peters, I; Kloetzel, P M; Groettrup, M

    1997-05-01

    The primary structures of the interferon-gamma-inducible mouse 20S proteasome subunit MECL-1 and its alternate homolog MC14 were determined. Northern analysis of mouse tissues revealed that MECL-1 mRNA predominantly occurred in thymus, lymph nodes, and spleen, whereas small amounts were detected in non-lymphoid tissues such as kidney, muscle, and testis. Unexpectedly, probing RNA blots with MC14 showed that tissues with high MECL-1 expression contained little MC14 and vice versa. A very similar reciprocal tissue expression was subsequently found for the homologous subunit pairs LMP2 and delta as well as LMP7 and MB1. The subunit protein composition of 20S proteasomes purified from liver, thymus, and lung reflected RNA expression. The impact of a regulated reciprocal tissue expression is discussed with respect to thymic selection and the induction of tolerance in potentially autoreactive T cells. PMID:9174609

  20. Cloning of cDNAs that encode human mast cell carboxypeptidase A, and comparison of the protein with mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A and rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, D.S.; Gurley, D.S.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.; Serafin, W.E. Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA ); Sugarbaker, D.J. )

    1989-12-01

    Human skin and lung mast cells and rodent peritoneal cells contain a carboxypeptidase in their secretory granules. The authors have screened human lung cDNA libraries with a mouse mast cell carboxypeptidase A (MC-CPA) cDNA probe to isolate a near-full-length cDNA that encodes human MC-CPA. The 5{prime} end of the human MC-CPA transcript was defined by direct mRNA sequencing and by isolation and partial sequencing of the human MC-CPA gene. Human MC-CPA is predicted to be translated as a 417 amino acid preproenzyme which includes a 15 amino acid signal peptide and a 94-amino acid activation peptide. The mature human MC-CPA enzyme has a predicted size of 36.1 kDa, a net positive charge of 16 at neutral pH, and 86% amino acid sequence identity with mouse MC-CPA. DNA blot analyses showed that human MC-CPA mRNA is transcribed from a single locus in the human genome. Comparison of the human MC-CPA with mouse MC-CPA and with three rat pancreatic carboxypeptidases shows that these enzymes are encoded by distinct but homologous genes.

  1. Cloning of mouse telomerase reverse transcriptase gene promoter and identification of proximal core promoter sequences essential for the expression of transgenes in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Si, Shao-Yan; Song, Shu-Jun; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Liu, Jun-Li; Liang, Shuang; Feng, Kai; Zhao, Gang; Tan, Xiao-Qing

    2011-08-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex, whose function is to add motif-specific nucleotides to the end of chromosomes. Telomerase consists of three major subunits, the telomerase RNA template (hTR), the telomerase-associated protein (TEP1) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). TERT is the most important component responsible for the catalytic activity of telomerase and a rate-limiting determinant of the activity. Telomerase activities were at high levels in approximately 90% of mouse cancers or tumor-derived cell lines through TERT transcriptional up-regulation. Unlike human telomerase, telomerase activity exists in colon, liver, ovary and testis but not in brain, heart, stomach and muscle in normal mouse tissues. In this study, we prepared 5' truncations of 1086 bp fragments upstream of the initiating ATG codon of the mTERT gene to construct luciferase reporter gene plasmids, and transfected these plasmids into a normal mouse cell line and several cancer lines to identify the core promoter region essential for transcriptional activation in cancer cells by a luciferase assay. We constructed a eukaryotic expression vector of membrane-expressing staphylococcal endotoxin A (SEA) gene driven by the core promoter region of the mTERT gene and observed if the core promoter region could express the SEA gene in these cancer cells, but not in normal cells following transfection with the construct. The results showed that the transcriptional activities of each fragment of the mTERT gene promoter in the cancer cell lines Hepa1-6, B16 and CT26 were higher than those in NIH3T3 cells, and the proximal 333-bp fragment was the core promoter of the mTERT gene in the cancer cells. The proximal 333-bp fragment was able to make the SEA express on the surface of the cancer cells, but not in NIH3T3 cells. It provides a foundation for cancer targeting gene therapy by using the mTERT gene promoter. PMID:21567104

  2. Cloning and partial nucleotide sequence of human immunoglobulin mu chain cDNA from B cells and mouse-human hybridomas.

    PubMed Central

    Dolby, T W; Devuono, J; Croce, C M

    1980-01-01

    Purified mRNAs coding for mu and kappa human immunoglobulin polypeptides were translated in vitro and their products were characterized. The mu-specific mRNAs, derived from both human lymphoblastoid cells (GM607) and from a mouse-human somatic cell hybrid secreting human mu chains (alpha D5-H11-BC11), were copied into cDNAs and inserted into the plasmid pBR322. Several recombinant cDNAs that were obtained were identified by a combination of colony hybridization with labeled probes, in vitro translation of plasmid-selected mu mRNAs, and DNA nucleotide sequence determination. One recombinant DNA, for which the sequence has been partially determined, contains the codons for part of the C3 constant region domain through the carboxy-terminal piece (155 amino acids total) as well as the entire 3' noncoding sequence up to the poly(A) site of the human mu mRNA. The sequence A-A-U-A-A occurs 12 nucleotides prior to the poly(A) addition site in the human mu mRNA. Considerable sequence homology is observed in the mouse and human mu mRNA 3' coding and noncoding sequences. Images PMID:6777778

  3. Molecular cloning of mouse glycolate oxidase. High evolutionary conservation and presence of an iron-responsive element-like sequence in the mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kohler, S A; Menotti, E; Kühn, L C

    1999-01-22

    Iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) control the synthesis of several proteins in iron metabolism by binding to iron-responsive elements (IREs), a hairpin structure in the untranslated region (UTR) of corresponding mRNAs. Binding of IRPs to IREs in the 5' UTR inhibits translation of ferritin heavy and light chain, erythroid aminolevulinic acid synthase, mitochondrial aconitase, and Drosophila succinate dehydrogenase b, whereas IRP binding to IREs in the 3' UTR of transferrin receptor mRNA prolongs mRNA half-life. To identify new targets of IRPs, we devised a method to enrich IRE-containing mRNAs by using recombinant IRP-1 as an affinity matrix. A cDNA library established from enriched mRNA was screened by an RNA-protein band shift assay. This revealed a novel IRE-like sequence in the 3' UTR of a liver-specific mouse mRNA. The newly identified cDNA codes for a protein with high homology to plant glycolate oxidase (GOX). Recombinant protein expressed in bacteria displayed enzymatic GOX activity. Therefore, this cDNA represents the first vertebrate GOX homologue. The IRE-like sequence in mouse GOX exhibited strong binding to IRPs at room temperature. However, it differs from functional IREs by a mismatch in the middle of its upper stem and did not confer iron-dependent regulation in cells. PMID:9891009

  4. Chorioallantoic placenta defects in cloned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wakisaka-Saito, Noriko; Kohda, Takashi . E-mail: tkhoda.epgn@tmd.ac.jp; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogonuki, Narumi; Miki, Hiromi; Hikichi, Takafusa; Mizutani, Eiji; Wakayama, Teruhiko; Kaneko-Ishino, Tomoko; Ogura, Atsuo; Ishino, Fumitoshi

    2006-10-13

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer technology has been applied to produce live clones successfully in several mammalian species, but the success rates are very low. In mice, about half of the nuclear transfer embryos undergo implantation, but very few survive to term. We undertook detailed histological analyses of placentas from cloned mouse embryos generated from cumulus cells at 10.5 dpc of pregnancy, by which stage most clones have terminated their development. At 10.5 dpc, the extraembryonic tissues displayed several defined histological patterns, each reflecting their stage of developmental arrest. The most notable abnormality was the poor development of the spongiotrophoblast layer of diploid cells. This is in contrast to the placental hyperplasia frequently observed in somatic clones at 12.5 dpc or later stages. A variety of structural abnormalities were also observed in the embryos. Both placental and embryonic defects likely contribute to the low success rate of the mouse clones.

  5. Undetectable levels of N6-methyl adenine in mouse DNA: Cloning and analysis of PRED28, a gene coding for a putative mammalian DNA adenine methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Charles, Marie-Pierre; Platet, Nadine; Breuillaud, Lionel; Lunardi, Joël; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2006-05-29

    Three methylated bases, 5-methylcytosine, N4-methylcytosine and N6-methyladenine (m6A), can be found in DNA. However, to date, only 5-methylcytosine has been detected in mammalian genomes. To reinvestigate the presence of m6A in mammalian DNA, we used a highly sensitive method capable of detecting one N6-methyldeoxyadenosine per million nucleosides. Our results suggest that the total mouse genome contains, if any, less than 10(3) m6A. Experiments were next performed on PRED28, a putative mammalian N6-DNA methyltransferase. The murine PRED28 encodes two alternatively spliced RNA. However, although recombinant PRED28 proteins are found in the nucleus, no evidence for an adenine-methyltransferase activity was detected. PMID:16684535

  6. Cloning and characterization of the 5'-upstream sequence governing the cell cycle-dependent transcription of mouse DNA polymerase alpha 68 kDa subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, N S; Izumi, M; Uchida, H; Yokoi, M; Miyazawa, H; Hanaoka, F

    2000-04-01

    We have isolated the genomic DNA fragment spanning the 5-end and the first four exons encoding the 68 kDa subunit (p68) of the mouse DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex [corrected]. The p68 promoter region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains a GC-rich sequence, two palindrome sequences and two putative E2F-binding sites [corrected]. A series of transient expression assays using a luciferase reporter gene indicated that a region from nucleotide position -89 to -30 (-89/-30) with respect to the transcription initiation site is crucial for basal transcription of the p68 gene in proliferating NIH 3T3 cells. In particular, part of the GC-rich sequence (-57/-46) and the palindrome (-81/-62) elements were necessary for promoter activity, both of which share homology with the E-box sequence. Gel mobility shift assays using NIH 3T3 nuclear extracts revealed that the upstream stimulatory factor, known as an E-box-binding protein, binds to these sites. Moreover, we observed binding of E2F to two sites near the transcription initiation site (-11/-3 and +9/+16). A transient luciferase expression assay using synchronized NIH 3T3 cells in G(0)phase revealed that these E2F sites are essential for transcription induction of the p68 gene after serum stimulation, but are dispensable for basal transcription. These results indicate that growth-dependent regulation of transcription of the mouse p68 and p180 genes is mediated by a common factor, E2F; however, basal transcription of the genes, interestingly, is regulated by different transcription factors. PMID:10710418

  7. Definition of the tumor protein D52 (TPD52) gene family through cloning of D52 homologues in human (hD53) and mouse (mD52)

    SciTech Connect

    Byrne, J.A.; Basset, P.; Mattei, M.G.

    1996-08-01

    Cloning is reported of a cDNA homologue to the breast carcinoma-associated D52 cDNA, termed D53, and of a mouse D52 cDNA (HGMW-approved symbols TPD52L1 and TPD52). Human D53 and mouse D52 proteins are predicted to be 52 and 86% identical to human D52, respectively. Analysis of the three protein sequences identified a coiled-coil domain and N- and C-terminally located PEST domains in each. The conservation of homology between the D52 and the D53 sequences, combined with a lack of homology between these and known proteins, defines a new mammalian gene/protein family, the D52 family. The human D52 locus has been previously mapped to chromosome 8q21, and using in situ mapping in the present study, a human D53 locus was mapped to chromosome 6q22-q23. We observed coexpression of the human D52 and D53 genes in some breast tumors and derivative cell lines and found that maintenance of D52 and D53 transcript levels in estrogen receptor-positive MCF7 breast carcinoma cells depends upon estradiol. However, D52 and D53 genes were specifically expressed in HL-60 and K-562 leukemia cells, respectively, with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatment decreasing D52 and D53 transcript levels in these cell lines. The presence of a coiled-coil domain, combined with observed codependent or independent expression of the D52 and D53 genes, suggests that D52 and D53 proteins may be capable of hetero- and/or homodimer formation. 41 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Nuclear factor XIIIa staining (clone AC-1A1 mouse monoclonal) is a sensitive and specific marker to discriminate sebaceous proliferations from other cutaneous clear cell neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Uhlenhake, Elizabeth E; Clark, Lindsey N; Smoller, Bruce R; Shalin, Sara C; Gardner, Jerad M

    2016-08-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma is a rare but serious malignancy that may be difficult to diagnose when poorly differentiated. Other epithelial tumors with clear cell change may mimic sebaceous carcinoma. Few useful or specific immunohistochemical markers for sebaceous differentiation are available. Nuclear staining with factor XIIIa (clone AC-1A1) was recently found to be a highly sensitive marker of sebaceous differentiation. We evaluated nuclear factor XIIIa (AC-1A1) staining in sebaceous neoplasms vs. other cutaneous clear cell tumors. We stained 27 sebaceous proliferations: sebaceous hyperplasia (7), sebaceous adenoma (8), sebaceoma (5), sebaceous carcinoma (7). We also stained 67 tumors with clear cell change: basal cell carcinoma (8), squamous cell carcinoma (8), hidradenoma (7), desmoplastic trichilemmoma (2), trichilemmoma (10), trichilemmal carcinoma (3), clear cell acanthoma (9), atypical fibroxanthoma (1), syringoma (8), trichoepithelioma (1), metastatic renal cell carcinoma (2), and nevi with balloon cell change (8). Nuclear factor XIIIa (AC-1A1) staining was present in 100% of sebaceous proliferations; 96% displayed strong staining. Non-sebaceous clear cell tumors were negative or only weakly positive with factor XIIIa (AC-1A1) in 95.5%; only 4.5% showed strong staining. This suggests that strong nuclear factor XIIIa (AC-1A1) staining is a sensitive and specific marker of sebaceous neoplasms vs. other clear cell tumors. PMID:27153339

  9. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  10. MicroRNA-Attenuated Clone of Virulent Semliki Forest Virus Overcomes Antiviral Type I Interferon in Resistant Mouse CT-2A Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Martikainen, Miika; Niittykoski, Minna; von und zu Fraunberg, Mikael; Immonen, Arto; Koponen, Susanna; van Geenen, Maartje; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Ylösmäki, Erkko; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Saksela, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma is a terminal disease with no effective treatment currently available. Among the new therapy candidates are oncolytic viruses capable of selectively replicating in cancer cells, causing tumor lysis and inducing adaptive immune responses against the tumor. However, tumor antiviral responses, primarily mediated by type I interferon (IFN-I), remain a key problem that severely restricts viral replication and oncolysis. We show here that the Semliki Forest virus (SFV) strain SFV4, which causes lethal encephalitis in mice, is able to infect and replicate independent of the IFN-I defense in mouse glioblastoma cells and cell lines originating from primary human glioblastoma patient samples. The ability to tolerate IFN-I was retained in SFV4-miRT124 cells, a derivative cell line of strain SFV4 with a restricted capacity to replicate in neurons due to insertion of target sites for neuronal microRNA 124. The IFN-I tolerance was associated with the viral nsp3-nsp4 gene region and distinct from the genetic loci responsible for SFV neurovirulence. In contrast to the naturally attenuated strain SFV A7(74) and its derivatives, SFV4-miRT124 displayed increased oncolytic potency in CT-2A murine astrocytoma cells and in the human glioblastoma cell lines pretreated with IFN-I. Following a single intraperitoneal injection of SFV4-miRT124 into C57BL/6 mice bearing CT-2A orthotopic gliomas, the virus homed to the brain and was amplified in the tumor, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and improved survival. IMPORTANCE Although progress has been made in development of replicative oncolytic viruses, information regarding their overall therapeutic potency in a clinical setting is still lacking. This could be at least partially dependent on the IFN-I sensitivity of the viruses used. Here, we show that the conditionally replicating SFV4-miRT124 virus shares the IFN-I tolerance of the pathogenic wild-type SFV, thereby allowing efficient targeting of a glioma

  11. Development of dry skin in the NOA mouse under individual housing conditions: a potentially useful animal model for evaluating moisturizing effects.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Taizo; Ohno, Hitoshi; Kondo, Toshio; Shiomoto, Yasuhisa; Momii, Akira

    2005-10-01

    In a previous study, we reported the development of grossly observable dry skin in all of the Naruto Research Institute Otsuka Atrichia (NOA) mice that were housed individually. In the present study, dermal physiological function tests were conducted and the usefulness of this dry skin model for evaluating the efficacy of topical moisturizers was assessed. As a result, we have confirmed a marked reduction in the water content of the stratum corneum in these animals. Therefore, the development of dry skin in the NOA mouse strain under individual housing conditions may be expected to serve as a useful animal model for evaluating topical moisturizers. Specifically, the water content of the stratum corneum was restored in proportion to the oil content of the ointment base used to treat the animals, and the moisturizing effects of urea were confirmed in animals treated with urea-containing ointment. In addition, when the animals that had been housed individually were returned to group housing conditions, the water content of the stratum corneum was restored, with a corresponding improvement in dry skin. This finding suggests that socio-psychological factors are involved in the etiology of dry skin in individually housed NOA mice. PMID:16365520

  12. A Japanese Encephalitis Virus Genotype 5 Molecular Clone Is Highly Neuropathogenic in a Mouse Model: Impact of the Structural Protein Region on Virulence

    PubMed Central

    de Wispelaere, Mélissanne; Frenkiel, Marie-Pascale

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) strains can be separated into 5 genotypes (g1 to g5) based on sequence similarity. JEV g5 strains have been rarely isolated and are poorly characterized. We report here the full characterization of a g5 virus generated using a cDNA-based technology and its comparison with a widely studied g3 strain. We did not observe any major differences between those viruses when their infectious cycles were studied in various cell lines in vitro. Interestingly, the JEV g5 strain was highly pathogenic when inoculated to BALB/c mice, which are known to be largely resistant to JEV g3 infection. The study of chimeric viruses between JEV g3 and g5 showed that there was a poor viral clearance of viruses that express JEV g5 structural proteins in BALB/c mice blood, which correlated with viral invasion of the central nervous system and encephalitis. In addition, using an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, we were able to show that JEV g5 does not have an enhanced capacity for entering the central nervous system, compared to JEV g3. Overall, in addition to providing a first characterization of the understudied JEV g5, our work highlights the importance of sustaining an early viremia in the development of JEV encephalitis. IMPORTANCE Genotype 5 viruses are genetically and serologically distinct from other JEV genotypes and can been associated with human encephalitis, which warrants the need for their characterization. In this study, we characterized the in vitro and in vivo properties of a JEV g5 strain and showed that it was more neuropathogenic in a mouse model than a well-characterized JEV g3 strain. The enhanced virulence of JEV g5 was associated with poor viral clearance but not with enhanced crossing of the blood-brain barrier, thus providing new insights into JEV pathogenesis. PMID:25787283

  13. Artificial cloning of domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Keefer, Carol L

    2015-07-21

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research. PMID:26195770

  14. Artificial cloning of domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    Keefer, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research. PMID:26195770

  15. Cloning, expression patterns, and chromosome localization of three human and two mouse homologues of GABA(A) receptor-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Xin, Y; Yu, L; Chen, Z; Zheng, L; Fu, Q; Jiang, J; Zhang, P; Gong, R; Zhao, S

    2001-06-15

    Type A receptors of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter, contain alpha, beta, delta, gamma, and rho subunits. The gamma subunit has four subtypes: gamma1, gamma2, gamma3, andgamma4. GABA(A) receptor-associated protein (GABARAP) was previously demonstrated to act as a linker protein between microtubules and the gamma2 subunit of GABA(A) receptors. However, no other linker proteins have been identified as mediating the linkage of microtubules and the remaining subunits of GABA(A) receptors. In this study we identified three human paralogues (GABARAPL1, GABARAPL2, and GABARAPL3) and two mouse orthologues (Gabarapl1 and Gabarapl2) of human GABARAP, all of which encoded 117 amino acids, as does Gabarapl. The expression patterns of GABARAPL1, GABARAPL2, and GABARAP in 16 adult tissues showed that they were expressed ubiquitously. The expression levels of GABARAPL1 as a 2.3-kb transcript were very high in brain, heart, peripheral blood leukocytes, liver, kidney, placenta, and skeletal muscle, very low in thymus and small intestine, and moderate in other tissues tested. The unique 1.35-kb transcript of GABARAPL2 was expressed at high levels in heart, brain, testis, prostate, ovary, spleen, and skeletal muscle, at very low levels in lung, thymus, and small intestine, and moderately in other tissues tested. For GABARAP, a 1.3-kb transcript was abundantly expressed in all tested tissues with small variation. The expression patterns of Gabarapl1 and Gabarapl2 were similar to those of their counterparts in human. In addition, GABARAPL1 was localized to human chromosome 12p12.3 and GABARAPL2 to 16q22.3-q24.1 by RH mapping, while GABARAP and GABARAPL3 were found to be localized at chromosomes 17p13.2 and 15q25.1, respectively, by searching the related databases. Sequence comparison of the cDNAs and their corresponding genomic sequences shows that GABARAP, GABARAPL1, and GABARAPL2 are composed of four exons each, while GABARAPL3 is distributed only at

  16. Analysis of Individual Mouse Activity in Group Housed Animals of Different Inbred Strains using a Novel Automated Home Cage Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Rasneer S.; Cater, Heather L.; Sillito, Rowland R.; Chartsias, Agisilaos; Sneddon, Duncan; Concas, Danilo; Keskivali-Bond, Piia; Lukins, Timothy C.; Wells, Sara; Acevedo Arozena, Abraham; Nolan, Patrick M.; Armstrong, J. Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system disorders such as autism as well as the range of neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington's disease are commonly investigated using genetically altered mouse models. The current system for characterizing these mice usually involves removing the animals from their home-cage environment and placing them into novel environments where they undergo a battery of tests measuring a range of behavioral and physical phenotypes. These tests are often only conducted for short periods of times in social isolation. However, human manifestations of such disorders are often characterized by multiple phenotypes, presented over long periods of time and leading to significant social impacts. Here, we have developed a system which will allow the automated monitoring of individual mice housed socially in the cage they are reared and housed in, within established social groups and over long periods of time. We demonstrate that the system accurately reports individual locomotor behavior within the group and that the measurements taken can provide unique insights into the effects of genetic background on individual and group behavior not previously recognized. PMID:27375446

  17. Dry deposition of pollutant and marker particles onto live mouse airway surfaces enhances monitoring of individual particle mucociliary transit behaviour.

    PubMed

    Donnelley, Martin; Morgan, Kaye S; Siu, Karen K W; Parsons, David W

    2012-07-01

    Particles suspended in the air are inhaled during normal respiration and unless cleared by airway defences, such as the mucociliary transit (MCT) system, they can remain and affect lung and airway health. Synchrotron phase-contrast X-ray imaging (PCXI) methods have been developed to non-invasively monitor the behaviour of individual particles in live mouse airways and in previous studies the MCT behaviour of particles and fibres in the airways of live mice after deposition in a saline carrier fluid have been examined. In this study a range of common respirable pollutant particles (lead dust, quarry dust and fibreglass fibres) as well as marker particles (hollow glass micro-spheres) were delivered into the trachea of live mice using a dry powder insufflator to more accurately mimic normal environmental particulate exposure and deposition via inhalation. The behaviour of the particles once delivered onto the airway surface was tracked over a five minute period via PCXI. All particles were visible after deposition. Fibreglass fibres remained stationary throughout while all other particle types transited the tracheal surface throughout the imaging period. In all cases the majority of the particle deposition and any airway surface activity was located close to the dorsal tracheal wall. Both the individual and bulk motions of the glass bead marker particles were visible and their behaviour enabled otherwise hidden MCT patterns to be revealed. This study verified the value of PCXI for examining the post-deposition particulate MCT behaviour in the mouse trachea and highlighted that MCT is not a uniform process as suggested by radiolabel studies. It also directly revealed the advantages of dry particle delivery for establishing adequate particulate presence for visualizing MCT behaviour. The MCT behaviour and rate seen after dry particle delivery was different from that in previous carrier-fluid studies. It is proposed that dry particle delivery is essential for producing

  18. Cloning of human transketolase cDNAs and comparison of the nucleotide sequence of the coding region in Wernicke-Korsakoff and non-Wernicke-Korsakoff individuals.

    PubMed

    McCool, B A; Plonk, S G; Martin, P R; Singleton, C K

    1993-01-15

    Variants of the enzyme transketolase which possess reduced affinity for its cofactor thiamine pyrophosphate (high apparent Km) have been described in chronic alcoholic patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Since the syndrome has been shown to be directly related to thiamine deficiency, it has been hypothesized that such transketolase variants may represent a genetic predisposition to the development of this syndrome. To test this hypothesis, human transketolase cDNA clones were isolated, and their nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence were determined. Transketolase was found to be a single copy gene which produces a single mRNA of approximately 2100 nucleotides. Additionally, the nucleotide sequence of the transketolase coding region in fibroblasts derived from two Wernicke-Korsakoff (WK) patients was compared to that of two nonalcoholic controls. Although nucleotide and predicted amino acid differences were detected between fibroblast cultures and the original cDNAs and among the cultures themselves, no specific nucleotide variations, which would encode a variant amino acid sequence, were associated exclusively with the coding region from WK patients. Thus, allelic variants of the transketolase gene cannot account for the biochemically distinct forms of the enzyme found in these patients nor be considered as a mechanism for genetic predisposition to the development of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. Instead, the underlying mechanism must be extragenic and may be a result of differences in post-translational processing/modification of the transketolase polypeptide. PMID:8419340

  19. Cloning of two individual cDNAS encoding 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase from Gentiana lutea, their tissue-specific expression and physiological effect in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changfu; Kauder, Friedrich; Römer, Susanne; Sandmann, Gerhard

    2007-02-01

    Two 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) cDNAs have been cloned from a petal library of Gentiana lutea. Both cDNAs carry a putative transit sequence for chloroplast import and differ mainly in their length and the 5'-flanking regions. GlNCED1 was evolutionary closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana NCED6 whereas GlNCED2 showed highest homology to tomato NCED1 and A. thaliana NCED3. The amounts of GlNCED2 transcript were below Northern detection in G. lutea. In contrast, GlNCED1 was specifically expressed at higher levels in developing flowers when petals start appearing. By genetic engineering of tobacco with coding regions of either gene under a constitutive promoter, their function was further analyzed. Although mRNA of both genes was detectable in the corresponding transgenic plants, a physiological effect was only found for GlNCED1 but not for GlNCED2. In germination experiments of GlNCED1 transgenic lines, delayed radicle formation and cotyledon appearance were observed. However, the transformants exhibited no improved tolerance against desiccation stress. In contrast to other plants with over-expressed NCEDs, prolonged delay of seed germination is the only abscisic-acid-related phenotypic effect in the GlNCED1 transgenic lines. PMID:16618520

  20. Group and individual regulation of physiology and behavior: a behavioral, thermographic, and acoustic study of mouse development.

    PubMed

    Harshaw, Christopher; Alberts, Jeffrey R

    2012-07-16

    The traditional approach to the study of thermoregulation in young animals focuses on the regulatory capacities of individuals, which, for multiparous species, risks ignoring critical aspects of the early developmental niche. Here, we examined the ontogeny of regulatory behavior in C57BL/6 mice, employing simultaneous behavioral, thermographic, and acoustic measures of groups and individual pups. Litters of mice were placed in a chamber on Postnatal Day (PND) 2, 4, or 8, in which the ambient temperature (T(a)) gradually cycled (over 50 min) from warm (36.5°C) to cool (20°C) and back (to 36.5°C). Litters of all three ages displayed "group regulatory behavior," whereby group size varied with changes in T(a). This coupling, moreover, improved with age. Infrared thermography was used to monitor skin temperature of pups' interscapular (T(IS)) and rump (T(rump)) areas, and to estimate brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis (T(IS)-T(rump)) in PND4 and PND8 individuals and huddles. Huddling was found to significantly reduce heat loss in pups subject to thermal challenge as groups, compared to pups challenged as individuals. Additionally, females were found to display significantly warmer T(IS) and T(rump) values than male huddlemates. Huddling did not have a consistent effect on emissions of ultrasonic vocalizations, which were generally correlated with ambient temperature and BAT activation. Our results indicate that simultaneous measures of behavioral and physiological response to cooling may prove useful for a variety of applications, including the phenotyping of social dysfunction. PMID:22580514

  1. Gene expression analysis of the CD4+ T-cell clones derived from gingival tissues of periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, H; Honda, T; Domon, H; Oda, T; Okui, T; Amanuma, R; Nakajima, T; Yamazaki, K

    2005-12-01

    The function of T cells infiltrating periodontitis lesions is complex and has not been fully elucidated. Here, we established T-cell clones from the gingival tissues of periodontitis patients and examined their gene expression. A total of 57 and 101 T-cell clones were established by means of immobilized anti-CD3 antibody and IL-2 from gingival tissues and peripheral blood, respectively. The gingival T-cell clones were derived from three patients, and the peripheral blood T-cell clones from two of these patients and a further patient whose gingival T-cell clones were not established. Gingival tissues were also obtained from a further 19 periodontitis patients. The expression of cytokines and molecules related to both regulatory function and tissue destruction were examined by means of reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. All the gingival T-cell clones expressed mRNA for TGF-beta1, CTLA-4, and CD25, and all the T-cell clones from peripheral blood expressed IFN-gamma and TGF-beta1 mRNAs. Most but not all the T-cell clones from gingival tissues and peripheral blood expressed mRNA for IFN-gamma and, CD25 and CTLA-4, respectively. The frequency of T-cell clones and gingival tissues expressing FOXP3, a possible master gene for mouse CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, was very high (97%, 93%, and 100% for gingival T-cell clones, peripheral blood T-cell clones, and gingival tissues, respectively). Whereas the frequency of IL-4-expressing T-cell clones was lower for gingival T-cell clones (70% vs. 87%), the frequency of the gingival T-cell clones expressing IL-10 and IL-17 was higher than peripheral blood T-cell clones (75% vs. 62% for IL-10, 51% vs. 11% for IL-17). A similar expression profile was observed for gingival T-cell clones compared with gingival tissue samples with the exception of IL-4 expression, where the frequency of positive samples was lower in the gingival tissues (70% vs. 11%). These results suggest that the individual T cells infiltrating

  2. Transcriptome analysis of individual stromal cell populations identifies stroma-tumor crosstalk in mouse lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyejin; Sheng, Jianting; Gao, Dingcheng; Li, Fuhai; Durrans, Anna; Ryu, Seongho; Lee, Sharrell B; Narula, Navneet; Rafii, Shahin; Elemento, Olivier; Altorki, Nasser K; Wong, Stephen T C; Mittal, Vivek

    2015-02-24

    Emerging studies have begun to demonstrate that reprogrammed stromal cells play pivotal roles in tumor growth, metastasis, and resistance to therapy. However, the contribution of stromal cells to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has remained underexplored. We used an orthotopic model of Kras-driven NSCLC to systematically dissect the contribution of specific hematopoietic stromal cells in lung cancer. RNA deep-sequencing analysis of individually sorted myeloid lineage and tumor epithelial cells revealed cell-type-specific differentially regulated genes, indicative of activated stroma. We developed a computational model for crosstalk signaling discovery based on ligand-receptor interactions and downstream signaling networks and identified known and novel tumor-stroma paracrine and tumor autocrine crosstalk-signaling pathways in NSCLC. We provide cellular and molecular insights into components of the lung cancer microenvironment that contribute to carcinogenesis. This study has the potential for development of therapeutic strategies that target tumor-stroma interactions and may complement conventional anti-cancer treatments. PMID:25704820

  3. A common structure for concepts of individuals, stuffs, and real kinds: more Mama, more milk, and more mouse.

    PubMed

    Millikan, R G

    1998-02-01

    Concepts are highly theoretical entities. One cannot study them empirically without committing oneself to substantial preliminary assumptions. Among the competing theories of concepts and categorization developed by psychologists in the last thirty years, the implicit theoretical assumption that what falls under a concept is determined by description ("descriptionism") has never been seriously challenged. I present a nondescriptionist theory of our most basic concepts, "substances," which include (1) stuffs (gold, milk), (2) real kinds (cat, chair), and (3) individuals (Mama, Bill Clinton, the Empire State Building). On the basis of something important that all three have in common, our earliest and most basic concepts of substances are identical in structure. The membership of the category "cat," like that of "Mama," is a natural unit in nature, to which the concept "cat" does something like pointing, and continues to point despite large changes in the properties the thinker represents the unit as having. For example, large changes can occur in the way a child identifies cats and the things it is willing to call "cat" without affecting the extension of its word "cat." The difficulty is to cash in the metaphor of "pointing" in this context. Having substance concepts need not depend on knowing words, but language interacts with substance concepts, completely transforming the conceptual repertoire. I will discuss how public language plays a crucial role in both the acquisition of substance concepts and their completed structure. PMID:10097011

  4. Self-Cloning CRISPR.

    PubMed

    Arbab, Mandana; Sherwood, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-gene editing has emerged as a revolutionary technology to easily modify specific genomic loci by designing complementary sgRNA sequences and introducing these into cells along with Cas9. Self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR) uses a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid (sgPal) that recombines with short PCR-amplified site-specific sgRNA sequences within the target cell by homologous recombination to circumvent the process of sgRNA plasmid construction. Through this mechanism, scCRISPR enables gene editing within 2 hr once sgRNA oligos are available, with high efficiency equivalent to conventional sgRNA targeting: >90% gene knockout in both mouse and human embryonic stem cells and cancer cell lines. Furthermore, using PCR-based addition of short homology arms, we achieve efficient site-specific knock-in of transgenes such as GFP without traditional plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette (2% to 4% knock-in rate). The methods in this paper describe the most rapid and efficient means of CRISPR gene editing. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27532819

  5. Hybrid Sequencing Approach Applied to Human Fecal Metagenomic Clone Libraries Revealed Clones with Potential Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Džunková, Mária; D’Auria, Giuseppe; Pérez-Villarroya, David; Moya, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Natural environments represent an incredible source of microbial genetic diversity. Discovery of novel biomolecules involves biotechnological methods that often require the design and implementation of biochemical assays to screen clone libraries. However, when an assay is applied to thousands of clones, one may eventually end up with very few positive clones which, in most of the cases, have to be “domesticated” for downstream characterization and application, and this makes screening both laborious and expensive. The negative clones, which are not considered by the selected assay, may also have biotechnological potential; however, unfortunately they would remain unexplored. Knowledge of the clone sequences provides important clues about potential biotechnological application of the clones in the library; however, the sequencing of clones one-by-one would be very time-consuming and expensive. In this study, we characterized the first metagenomic clone library from the feces of a healthy human volunteer, using a method based on 454 pyrosequencing coupled with a clone-by-clone Sanger end-sequencing. Instead of whole individual clone sequencing, we sequenced 358 clones in a pool. The medium-large insert (7–15 kb) cloning strategy allowed us to assemble these clones correctly, and to assign the clone ends to maintain the link between the position of a living clone in the library and the annotated contig from the 454 assembly. Finally, we found several open reading frames (ORFs) with previously described potential medical application. The proposed approach allows planning ad-hoc biochemical assays for the clones of interest, and the appropriate sub-cloning strategy for gene expression in suitable vectors/hosts. PMID:23082187

  6. Tissue-specific methylation of individual CpG dinucleotides in the 5{prime} upstream region of the mouse catalase gene (Cas-1)

    SciTech Connect

    Pillay, I.L.; Singh, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The intracellular antioxidant enzyme, catalase, is encoded by a gene whose level of expression in different organisms, including humans, varies with tissue-type. The {open_quotes}TATA-less{close_quotes} 5{prime} upstream region of the catalase gene, in mice and humans, contains a CpG island. Such CG-rich regions are target sites for cytosine methylation and have been implicated in tissue-specific gene expression. However, the methylation status of individual CpG dinucleotides and their significance in gene expression has not been established. A 275 bp fragment within the 5{prime} region of Cas-1 was evaluated for CpG methylation. HpaII digestion of genomic DNA, followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification (HpaII-PCR), suggests that at least one of three CCGG is not methylated in nine different somatic tissues that express this enzyme at various levels. In contrast, all three CCGG sites are methylated in DNA from sperm and spleen. Further examination of the methylation specificity of individual CCGG sites was conducted using sodium bisulfite modification of genomic DNA followed by HPaII-PCR. Sodium bisulfite modifies non-methylated cytosines to uracils, changing a CG to a TG dinucleotide. This nucleotide substitution eliminates HpaII sites and allows the methylation status of each of the CCGG sites to be assessed. The ability to discern the number and combination of methylated sites within the 5{prime} region of a gene permits the determination of a possible correlation between differential methylation patterns and temporal/spatial gene regulation. Analysis of differential methylation, using the mouse catalase gene as a model, provides further insight into CpG methylation as one mechanism of mammalian gene regulation.

  7. The Clone Factory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoddard, Beryl

    2005-01-01

    Have humans been cloned? Is it possible? Immediate interest is sparked when students are asked these questions. In response to their curiosity, the clone factory activity was developed to help them understand the process of cloning. In this activity, students reenact the cloning process, in a very simplified simulation. After completing the…

  8. Microdissection and visualization of individual hair follicles for lineage tracing studies.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Inês; Legué, Emilie; Capgras, Suzanne; Nicolas, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    In vivo lineage tracing is a valuable technique to study cellular behavior. Our lab developed a lineage tracing method, based on the Cre/lox system, to genetically induce clonal labelling of cells and follow their progeny. Here we describe a protocol for temporally controlled clonal labelling and for microdissection of individual mouse hair follicles. We further present staining and visualization techniques used in our lab to analyze clones issued from genetically induced labelling. PMID:24281870

  9. [Cloning and law in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Julesz, Máté

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive human cloning is prohibited in Hungary, as in many other countries. Therapeutic human cloning is not prohibited, just like in many other countries. Stem cell therapy is also allowed. Article III, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian basic law (constitution) strictly forbids total human cloning. Article 1 of the Additional Protocol to the Oviedo Convention, on the Prohibition of Cloning Human Beings (1998) stipulates that any intervention seeking to create a human being genetically identical to another human being, whether living or dead, is prohibited. In Hungary, according to Article 174 of the Criminal Code, total human cloning constitutes a crime. Article 180, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian Act on Health declares that embryos shall not be brought about for research purposes; research shall be conducted only on embryos brought about for reproductive purposes when this is authorized by the persons entitled to decide upon its disposal, or when the embryo is damaged. Article 180, paragraph (5) of the Hungarian Act on Health stipulates that multiple individuals who genetically conform to one another shall not be brought about. According to Article 181, paragraph (1) of the Hungarian Act on Health, an embryo used for research shall be kept alive for not longer than 14 days, not counting the time it was frozen for storage and the time period of research. PMID:25749537

  10. Analysis of neural crest–derived clones reveals novel aspects of facial development

    PubMed Central

    Kaucka, Marketa; Ivashkin, Evgeny; Gyllborg, Daniel; Zikmund, Tomas; Tesarova, Marketa; Kaiser, Jozef; Xie, Meng; Petersen, Julian; Pachnis, Vassilis; Nicolis, Silvia K.; Yu, Tian; Sharpe, Paul; Arenas, Ernest; Brismar, Hjalmar; Blom, Hans; Clevers, Hans; Suter, Ueli; Chagin, Andrei S.; Fried, Kaj; Hellander, Andreas; Adameyko, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Cranial neural crest cells populate the future facial region and produce ectomesenchyme-derived tissues, such as cartilage, bone, dermis, smooth muscle, adipocytes, and many others. However, the contribution of individual neural crest cells to certain facial locations and the general spatial clonal organization of the ectomesenchyme have not been determined. We investigated how neural crest cells give rise to clonally organized ectomesenchyme and how this early ectomesenchyme behaves during the developmental processes that shape the face. Using a combination of mouse and zebrafish models, we analyzed individual migration, cell crowd movement, oriented cell division, clonal spatial overlapping, and multilineage differentiation. The early face appears to be built from multiple spatially defined overlapping ectomesenchymal clones. During early face development, these clones remain oligopotent and generate various tissues in a given location. By combining clonal analysis, computer simulations, mouse mutants, and live imaging, we show that facial shaping results from an array of local cellular activities in the ectomesenchyme. These activities mostly involve oriented divisions and crowd movements of cells during morphogenetic events. Cellular behavior that can be recognized as individual cell migration is very limited and short-ranged and likely results from cellular mixing due to the proliferation activity of the tissue. These cellular mechanisms resemble the strategy behind limb bud morphogenesis, suggesting the possibility of common principles and deep homology between facial and limb outgrowth. PMID:27493992

  11. Analysis of neural crest-derived clones reveals novel aspects of facial development.

    PubMed

    Kaucka, Marketa; Ivashkin, Evgeny; Gyllborg, Daniel; Zikmund, Tomas; Tesarova, Marketa; Kaiser, Jozef; Xie, Meng; Petersen, Julian; Pachnis, Vassilis; Nicolis, Silvia K; Yu, Tian; Sharpe, Paul; Arenas, Ernest; Brismar, Hjalmar; Blom, Hans; Clevers, Hans; Suter, Ueli; Chagin, Andrei S; Fried, Kaj; Hellander, Andreas; Adameyko, Igor

    2016-08-01

    Cranial neural crest cells populate the future facial region and produce ectomesenchyme-derived tissues, such as cartilage, bone, dermis, smooth muscle, adipocytes, and many others. However, the contribution of individual neural crest cells to certain facial locations and the general spatial clonal organization of the ectomesenchyme have not been determined. We investigated how neural crest cells give rise to clonally organized ectomesenchyme and how this early ectomesenchyme behaves during the developmental processes that shape the face. Using a combination of mouse and zebrafish models, we analyzed individual migration, cell crowd movement, oriented cell division, clonal spatial overlapping, and multilineage differentiation. The early face appears to be built from multiple spatially defined overlapping ectomesenchymal clones. During early face development, these clones remain oligopotent and generate various tissues in a given location. By combining clonal analysis, computer simulations, mouse mutants, and live imaging, we show that facial shaping results from an array of local cellular activities in the ectomesenchyme. These activities mostly involve oriented divisions and crowd movements of cells during morphogenetic events. Cellular behavior that can be recognized as individual cell migration is very limited and short-ranged and likely results from cellular mixing due to the proliferation activity of the tissue. These cellular mechanisms resemble the strategy behind limb bud morphogenesis, suggesting the possibility of common principles and deep homology between facial and limb outgrowth. PMID:27493992

  12. Transfer of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis with T cell clones

    SciTech Connect

    Romball, C.G.; Weigle, W.O.

    1987-02-15

    We have investigated three T lymphocyte clones isolated from CBA/CaJ mice primed with mouse thyroid extract (MTE) in adjuvant. All three clones are L3T4+, Ig-, and Lyt2- and proliferate to MTE, mouse thyroglobulin (MTG) and rat thyroid extract. Clones A7 and B7 transfer thyroiditis to irradiated (475 rad) syngeneic mice, but not to normal recipients. The thyroid lesion induced by the B7 clone is characterized by the infiltration of both mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cells. The thyroiditis is transient in that lesions are apparent 7 and 14 days after transfer, but thyroids return to normal by day 21. Clone B7 showed helper activity for trinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin-primed B cells in vitro when stimulated with trinitrophenyl-MTG and also stimulated the production of anti-MTG antibody in recipient mice. Clone A7 induced thyroid lesions characterized by infiltration of the thyroid with mononuclear cells, with virtually no polymorphonuclear cell infiltration. This clone has shown no helper activity following stimulation with trinitrophenyl-MTG. The third clone (D2) proliferates to and shows helper activity to MTG, but fails to transfer thyroiditis to syngeneic, irradiated mice. On continuous culture, clone B7 lost its surface Thy. The loss of Thy appears unrelated to the ability to transfer thyroiditis since subclones of B7 with markedly different percentages of Thy+ cells transferred disease equally well.

  13. Maneb-induced dopaminergic neuronal death is not affected by loss of mitochondrial complex I activity: Results from primary mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons cultured from individual Ndufs4+/+ and Ndufs4-/- mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Xia, Zhengui

    2014-01-01

    Primary cultures from embryonic mouse ventral mesencephalon are widely used for investigating the mechanisms of dopaminergic neuronal death in Parkinson's disease models. Specifically, single mouse or embryo cultures from littermates can be very useful for comparative studies involving transgenic mice when the neuron cultures are to be prepared before genotyping. However, preparing single mouse embryo culture is technically challenging because of the small number of cells present in the mesencephalon of each embryo (150,000-300,000), of which only 0.5-5% are tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) -positive, dopaminergic neurons. In this study, we optimized the procedure for preparing primary mesencephalic neuron cultures from individual mouse embryos. Mesencephalic neurons that are dissociated delicately, plated on Aclar film coverslips, and incubated in DMEM supplemented with FBS for 5 days and then N2 supplement for 1 day resulted in the best survival of dopaminergic neurons from each embryo. Using this optimized method, we prepared mesencephalic neuron cultures from single Ndufs4+/+ or Ndufs4-/- embryos, and investigated the role of mitochondrial complex I in maneb-induced dopamine neuron death. Our results suggest that maneb toxicity to dopamine neurons is not affected by loss of mitochondrial complex I activity in Ndufs4-/- cultures. PMID:25275677

  14. Multipartite asymmetric quantum cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Iblisdir, S.; Gisin, N.; Acin, A.; Cerf, N.J.; Filip, R.; Fiurasek, J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the optimal distribution of quantum information over multipartite systems in asymmetric settings. We introduce cloning transformations that take N identical replicas of a pure state in any dimension as input and yield a collection of clones with nonidentical fidelities. As an example, if the clones are partitioned into a set of M{sub A} clones with fidelity F{sup A} and another set of M{sub B} clones with fidelity F{sup B}, the trade-off between these fidelities is analyzed, and particular cases of optimal N{yields}M{sub A}+M{sub B} cloning machines are exhibited. We also present an optimal 1{yields}1+1+1 cloning machine, which is an example of a tripartite fully asymmetric cloner. Finally, it is shown how these cloning machines can be optically realized.

  15. Aristotle and headless clones.

    PubMed

    Mosteller, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Cloned organisms can be genetically altered so that they do not exhibit higher brain functioning. This form of therapeutic cloning allows for genetically identical organs and tissues to be harvested from the clone for the use of the organism that is cloned. "Spare parts" cloning promises many opportunities for future medical advances. What is the ontological and ethical status of spare parts, headless clones? This paper attempts to answer this question from the perspective of Aristotle's view of the soul. Aristotle's metaphysics as applied to his view of biological essences generates an ethic that can contribute to moral reasoning regarding the use of headless spare parts clones. The task of this paper is to show the implications that Aristotle's view of the soul, if it is true, would have on the ethics of headless, spare parts cloning. PMID:16180113

  16. Emergence and spread of O16-ST131 and O25b-ST131 clones among faecal CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli in healthy individuals in Hunan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yi-Ming; Liu, Wen-En; Liang, Xiang-Hui; Li, Yan-Ming; Jian, Zi-Juan; Hawkey, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli ST131 strain prevalence in stool specimens from healthy subjects in central China and to molecularly characterize clonal groups. Methods From November 2013 to January 2014, stool specimens from healthy individuals in Hunan Province were screened for ESBL-producing E. coli using chromogenic medium and CTX-M genotypes and phylogenetic groups were determined. ST131 clonal groups were detected by PCR and characterized for antibiotic resistance, fimH, gyrA and parC alleles, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants, virulence genotypes and PFGE patterns. Results Among 563 subjects, 287 (51.0%) exhibited the presence of faecal ESBL-producing E. coli, all of which produced CTX-M enzymes. The most common CTX-M genotypes were CTX-M-14 (48.4%), CTX-M-15 (27.5%) and CTX-M-27 (15.0%). Of the 287 CTX-M-producing isolates, 32 (11.1%) belonged to the ST131 clone. O16-ST131 isolates were dominant (75%) and contained the fimH41 allele. The remaining eight (25%) ST131 isolates were of the O25b subgroup and contained fimH30 or fimH41. Ciprofloxacin resistance was found in 100% of the O25b-ST131 isolates, whereas only 8% of the O16-ST131 isolates were resistant. All of the O25b-ST131 isolates except one showed gyrA1AB and parC1aAB mutations; most of the O16-ST131 isolates had gyrA1A and parC1b mutations. The virulence genotypes of O16-ST131 resembled those of the O25b-ST131 isolates. The 32 ST131 isolates formed one large group at the 64% similarity level. They comprised 15 PFGE groups (defined at ≥85% similarity). Conclusions O16-ST131 isolates have emerged as the predominant type of ST131 isolate in faecal CTX-M-producing E. coli in healthy individuals in China. PMID:25957581

  17. Unstable resistance of G mouse fibroblasts to ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikura, H; Naito, Y; Moriwaki, K

    1979-01-01

    G mouse cells were resistant to N- and NB-tropic Friend leukemia viruses and to B-tropic WN 1802B. Though the cells were resistant to focus formation by the Moloney isolate of murine sarcoma virus, they were relatively sensitive to helper component murine leukemia virus. To amphotropic murine leukemia virus and to focus formation by amphotropic murine sarcoma virus, G mouse cells were fully permissive. When the cell lines were established starting from the individual embryos, most cell lines were not resistant to the murine leukemia viruses. Only one resistant line was established. Cloning of this cell line indicated that the resistant cells constantly segregated sensitive cells during the culture; i.e., the G mouse cell cultures were probably always mixtures of sensitive and resistant cells. Among the sensitive cell clones, some were devoid of Fv-1 restriction. Such dually permissive cells, and also feral mouse-derived SC-1 cells, retained glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-1 and apparently normal number 4 chromosomes. The loss of Fv-1 restriction in these mouse cells was not brought about by any gross structural changes in the vicinity of Fv-1 on number 4 chromosomes. Images PMID:221667

  18. Comparing quantum cloning: A Fisher-information perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongting; Luo, Shunlong; Li, Nan; Chang, Lina

    2013-10-01

    Perfect cloning of an unknown quantum state is impossible. Approximate cloning, which is optimal in various senses, has been found in many cases. Paradigmatic examples are Wootters-Zurek cloning and universal cloning. These cloning machines aim at optimal cloning of the full quantum states. However, in practice, what is important and relevant may only involve partial information in quantum states, rather than quantum states themselves. For example, signals are often encoded as parameters in quantum states, whose information content is well synthesized by quantum Fisher information. This raises the basic issue of evaluating the information transferring capability (e.g., distributing quantum Fisher information) of quantum cloning. We assess and compare Wootters-Zurek cloning and universal cloning from this perspective and show that, on average, Wootters-Zurek cloning performs better than universal cloning for the phase (as well as amplitude) parameter, although they are incomparable individually, and universal cloning has many advantages over Wootters-Zurek cloning in other contexts. Physical insights and related issues are further discussed.

  19. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  20. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since "Dolly," the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories. PMID:19085136

  1. Changes in the gut microbiota of cloned and non-cloned control pigs during development of obesity: gut microbiota during development of obesity in cloned pigs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity induced by a high-caloric diet has previously been associated with changes in the gut microbiota in mice and in humans. In this study, pigs were cloned to minimize genetic and biological variation among the animals with the aim of developing a controlled metabolomic model suitable for a diet-intervention study. Cloning of pigs may be an attractive way to reduce genetic influences when investigating the effect of diet and obesity on different physiological sites. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the changes in the composition of the gut microbiota of cloned vs. non-cloned pigs during development of obesity by a high-fat/high-caloric diet. Furthermore, we investigated the association between diet-induced obesity and the relative abundance of the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes in the fecal-microbiota. The fecal microbiota from obese cloned (n = 5) and non-cloned control pigs (n= 6) was investigated biweekly over a period of 136 days, by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and quantitative real time PCR (qPCR). Results A positive correlation was observed between body-weight at endpoint and percent body-fat in cloned (r=0.9, P<0.0001) and in non-cloned control pigs (r=0.9, P<0.0001). Shannon Weaver and principal component analysis (PCA) of the terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs) revealed no differences in the bacterial composition or variability of the fecal microbiota between the cloned pigs or between cloned and non-cloned control pigs. Body-weight correlated positively with the relative abundance of Firmicutes in both cloned (r=0.37; P<0.02) and non cloned-control pigs (r=0.45; P<0.006), and negatively with the abundance of Bacteroidetes in cloned pigs (r=−0.33, P<0.04), but not in the non-cloned control pigs. Conclusion The cloned pigs did not have reduced inter-individual variation as compared to non-cloned pigs in regard to their gut microbiota in neither the obese nor the lean state. Diet

  2. Cloning, killing, and identity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, J

    1999-01-01

    One potentially valuable use of cloning is to provide a source of tissues or organs for transplantation. The most important objection to this use of cloning is that a human clone would be the sort of entity that it would be seriously wrong to kill. I argue that entities of the sort that you and I essentially are do not begin to exist until around the seventh month of fetal gestation. Therefore to kill a clone prior to that would not be to kill someone like you or me but would be only to prevent one of us from existing. And even after one of us begins to exist, the objections to killing it remain comparatively weak until its psychological capacities reach a certain level of maturation. These claims support the permissibility of killing a clone during the early stages of its development in order to use its organs for transplantation. PMID:10226909

  3. When larger brains do not have more neurons: increased numbers of cells are compensated by decreased average cell size across mouse individuals

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Messeder, Débora J.; Fonseca-Azevedo, Karina; Pantoja, Nilma A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong trend toward increased brain size in mammalian evolution, with larger brains composed of more and larger neurons than smaller brains across species within each mammalian order. Does the evolution of increased numbers of brain neurons, and thus larger brain size, occur simply through the selection of individuals with more and larger neurons, and thus larger brains, within a population? That is, do individuals with larger brains also have more, and larger, neurons than individuals with smaller brains, such that allometric relationships across species are simply an extension of intraspecific scaling? Here we show that this is not the case across adult male mice of a similar age. Rather, increased numbers of neurons across individuals are accompanied by increased numbers of other cells and smaller average cell size of both types, in a trade-off that explains how increased brain mass does not necessarily ensue. Fundamental regulatory mechanisms thus must exist that tie numbers of neurons to numbers of other cells and to average cell size within individual brains. Finally, our results indicate that changes in brain size in evolution are not an extension of individual variation in numbers of neurons, but rather occur through step changes that must simultaneously increase numbers of neurons and cause cell size to increase, rather than decrease. PMID:26082686

  4. Genome Clone Libraries and Data from the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression (I.M.A.G.E.) Consortium

    DOE Data Explorer

    The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium was initiated in 1993 by four academic groups on a collaborative basis after informal discussions led to a common vision of how to achieve an important goal in the study of the human genome: the Integrated Molecular Analysis of Genomes and their Expression Consortium's primary goal is to create arrayed cDNA libraries and associated bioinformatics tools, and make them publicly available to the research community. The primary organisms of interest include intensively studied mammalian species, including human, mouse, rat and non-human primate species. The Consortium has also focused on several commonly studied model organisms; as part of this effort it has arrayed cDNAs from zebrafish, and Fugu (pufferfish) as well as Xenopus laevis and X. tropicalis (frog). Utilizing high speed robotics, over nine million individual cDNA clones have been arrayed into 384-well microtiter plates, and sufficient replicas have been created to distribute copies both to sequencing centers and to a network of five distributors located worldwide. The I.M.A.G.E. Consortium represents the world's largest public cDNA collection, and works closely with the National Institutes of Health's Mammalian Gene Collection(MGC) to help it achieve its goal of creating a full-length cDNA clone for every human and mouse gene. I.M.A.G.E. is also a member of the ORFeome Collaboration, working to generate a complete set of expression-ready open reading frame clones representing each human gene. Custom informatics tools have been developed in support of these projects to better allow the research community to select clones of interest and track and collect all data deposited into public databases about those clones and their related sequences. I.M.A.G.E. clones are publicly available, free of any royalties, and may be used by anyone agreeing with the Consortium's guidelines.

  5. Partial structure of the mouse glucokinase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimura-Oka, Kazumi; Chu, Mei-Jin; Sullivan, M.; Oka, Kazuhiro

    1995-10-10

    A complementary DNA for glucokinase (GK) was cloned from mouse liver total RNA by a combination of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and mouse liver cDNA library screening. Liver- and {beta}-cell-specific exons 1 were isolated by PCR using mouse and rat genomic DNAs. These clones were then used to screen a mouse genomic library; three genomic clones were isolated and characterized. The mouse GK gene spans over 20 kb, containing 11 exons including a liver- or {beta}-cell-specific exon 1, which encodes a tissue-specific 15-aa peptide at the N-terminus of the protein. Both types of GK contain 465 amino acid residues. The predicted amino acid sequence of mouse {beta}-cell-specific GK showed 98 and 96% identity to the rat and human enzymes, respectively; the corresponding values are 98 and 95% respectively, for the liver-specific GK. Several transcription factor-binding consensus sequences are identified in the 5{prime} flanking region of the mouse GK gene. 21 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Characterization of antigen-expressing Plasmodium falciparum cDNA clones that are reactive with parasite inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Horii, T; Bzik, D J; Inselburg, J

    1988-07-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum (FCR3 strain) lambda gt11 cDNA expression library was constructed from trophozoite and schizont poly(A) RNA and was screened immunologically with a pooled human immune serum from Nigeria to form a gene bank of 288 positive clones. The gene bank was subsequently screened with parasite inhibitory mouse monoclonal antibodies (mMAb) and with individual human Liberian sera. Two mMAb, 43E5 and 5H10, strongly reacted with 8 and 3 cDNA clones, respectively. Several of those clones also weakly cross-reacted with the other mMAb. Two of those weakly cross-reactive clones, cDNA#366 and cDNA#22, were shown to be located in different chromosomal regions of the parasite by Southern hybridization and so appeared to represent two different parasite genes. The genomic organization of both cDNA#366 and cDNA#22 sequences were identical in the FCR3 and the Honduras-1 strain. The nucleotide sequence of cDNA#366 and the amino acid sequence it coded for were homologous to a partial DNA and amino acid sequence previously reported for a P. falciparum (Camp strain) exoantigen designated p126. The mRNA for cDNA#366 appeared to represent an abundant message in blood stage trophozoites and schizonts. PMID:2456465

  7. The mouse genome informatics and the mouse genome database

    SciTech Connect

    Maltais, L.J.; Blackburn, R.E.; Bradt, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD) is a centralized, comprehensive database of the mouse genome that includes genetic mapping data, comparative mapping data, gene descriptions, mutant phenotype descriptions, strains and allelic polymorphism data, inbred strain characteristics, physical mapping data, and molecular probes and clones data. Data in MGD are obtained from the published literature and by electronic transfer from laboratories working on large backcross panels of mice. MGD provides tools that enable the user to search the database, retrieve data, generate reports, analyze data, annotate records, and build genetic maps. The Encyclopedia of the Mouse Genome provides a graphic user interface to mouse genome data. It consists of software tools including: LinkMap, a graphic display of genetic linkage maps with the ability to magnify regions of high locus density: CytoMap, a graphic display of cytogenetic maps showing banded chromosomes with cytogenetic locations of genes and chromosomal aberrations; CATS, a catalog searching tool for text retrieval of mouse locus descriptions. These software tools provide access to the following data sets: Chromosome Committee Reports, MIT Genome Center data, GBASE reports, Mouse Locus Catalog (MLC), and Mouse Cytogenetic Mapping Data. The MGD is available to the scientific community through the World Wide Web (WWW) and Gopher. In addition GBASE can be accessed via the Internet.

  8. Do Managers Clone Themselves?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Alma S.

    1981-01-01

    A recent questionnaire survey provides statistics on male managers' views of female managers. The author recommends that male managers break out of their cloning behavior and that the goal ought to be a plurality in management. (Author/WD)

  9. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Print Email Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  10. Efficacy of PARP inhibition in Pde6a mutant mouse models for retinitis pigmentosa depends on the quality and composition of individual human mutations

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, K; Sahaboglu, A; Zrenner, E; Ueffing, M; Ekström, P A R; Paquet-Durand, F

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited blinding disease, is caused by a variety of different mutations that affect retinal photoreceptor function and survival. So far there is neither effective treatment nor cure. We have previously shown that poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) acts as a common and critical denominator of cell death in photoreceptors, qualifying it as a potential target for future therapeutic intervention. A significant fraction of RP-causing mutations affect the genes for the rod photoreceptor phosphodiesterase 6A (PDE6A) subunit, but it is not known whether they all engage the same death pathway. Analysing three homozygous point mutations (Pde6a R562W, D670G, and V685M) and one compound heterozygous Pde6aV685M/R562W mutation in mouse models that match human RP patients, we demonstrate excessive activation of PARP, which correlated in time with the progression of photoreceptor degeneration. The causal involvement of PARP activity in the neurodegenerative process was confirmed in organotypic retinal explant cultures treated with the PARP-selective inhibitor PJ34, using different treatment time-points and durations. Remarkably, the neuroprotective efficacy of PARP inhibition correlated inversely with the strength of the genetically induced insult, with the D670G mutant showing the best treatment effects. Our results highlight PARP as a target for neuroprotective interventions in RP caused by PDE6A mutations and are a first attempt towards personalized, genotype-matched therapy development for RP. In addition, for each of the different mutant situations, our work identifies windows of opportunity for an optimal treatment regimen for further in vivo experimentation and possibly clinical studies. PMID:27551530

  11. Vitamin D for combination photodynamic therapy of skin cancer in individuals with vitamin D deficiency: Insights from a preclinical study in a mouse model of squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Sanjay; Thomas, Erik; Hasan, Tayyaba; Maytin, Edward V.

    2016-03-01

    Combination photodynamic therapy (cPDT) in which vitamin D (VD) is given prior to aminolevulinate, a precursor (pro-drug) for protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), is an approach developed in our laboratory. We previously showed that 1α,25- dihydroxyvitamin D3 (calcitriol), given prior to PDT, enhances accumulation of PpIX and improves cell death post-PDT in a mouse skin cancer model. However, since calcitriol poses a risk for hypercalcemia, we replaced systemic calcitriol with oral cholecalciferol (D3), administered as a high (tenfold, "10K") diet over a ten-day period. Here, we ask whether VD deficiency might alter the response to cPDT. Nude mice were fed a VD-deficient diet for at least 4 weeks ("deficient"); controls were fed a normal 1,000 IU/kg diet ("1K"). Human A431 cells were implanted subcutaneously and mice were switched to the 10K diet or continued on their baseline diets (controls). In other experiments, mice received a human equivalent dose of 50,000 IU D3 by oral gavage, to simulate administration of a single, high-dose VD pill. At various times, tumors were harvested and serum was collected to measure levels of VD metabolic intermediates. A significant increase in PpIX levels and in the expression of differentiation and proliferation markers in tumor tissue was observed after VD supplementation of both the deficient and 1K mice. Further results describing mechanistic details of PpIX enhancement through alteration of heme- and VD-metabolic enzyme levels will be presented. Based on these results, a clinical study using oral vitamin D prior to PDT for human skin cancer should be performed.

  12. Development of an in vitro cloning method for Cowdria ruminantium.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, J M; Martinez, D; Debus, A; Sheikboudou, C; Bensaid, A

    1997-01-01

    Cowdria ruminantium is a tick-borne rickettsia which causes severe disease in ruminants. All studies with C. ruminantium reported so far were carried out with stocks consisting of infective blood collected from reacting animals or from the same stocks propagated in vitro. Cloned isolates are needed to conduct studies on immune response of the host, on genetic diversity of the parasite, and on mechanisms of attenuation and the development of vaccines. A method of cloning based on the particular chlamydia life cycle of Cowdria was developed. Instead of cloning extracellular elementary bodies, it appeared more convenient to clone endothelial cells infected by one morula resulting from the infection of the cell by one elementary body of Cowdria. Two hundred and sixteen clones were obtained by limiting dilution of infected cells. The method was experimentally validated by comparing randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints from individual clones obtained from endothelial cell cultures coinfected with two different stocks of C. ruminantium. PMID:9302217

  13. Networks of protein kinases and phosphatases in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Mucic, Goran; Sase, Sunetra; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2015-03-01

    Although protein kinases and phosphatases have been reported to be involved in fear memory, information about these signalling molecules in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning (cFC) is limited. C57BL/6J mice were tested in cFC, sacrificed and hippocampi were used for screening of approximately 800 protein kinases and phosphatases by protein microarrays with subsequent Western blot confirmation of threefold higher or lower hippocampal levels as compared to foot shock controls. Immunoblotting of the protein kinases and phosphatases screened out was carried out by Western blotting. A network of protein kinases and phosphatases was generated (STRING 9.1). Animals learned the task in the paradigm and protein kinase and phosphatase levels were determined in the individual phases acquisition, consolidation and retrieval and compared to foot shock controls. Protein kinases discoidin containing receptor 2 (DDR2), mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase 7 (TAK1), protein phosphatases dual specificity protein phosphatase (PTEN) and protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A) were modulated in the individual phases of cFC. Phosphatidyl-inositol-3,4,5-triphosphate 3-phosphatase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) that is interacting with PTEN were modulated as well. Freezing time was correlating with PP2A levels in the retrieval phase of cFC. The abovementioned protein kinases, phosphatases and inositol-signalling enzymes were not reported so far in cFC and the results are relevant for interpretation of previous and design of future studies in cFC or fear memory. Protein phosphatase PP2A was, however, the only signalling compound tested that was directly linked to retrieval in the cFC. PMID:25461266

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveals protein kinases and phosphatases in the individual phases of contextual fear conditioning in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Šmidák, Roman; Mayer, Rupert Laurenz; Bileck, Andrea; Gerner, Christopher; Mechtcheriakova, Diana; Stork, Oliver; Lubec, Gert; Li, Lin

    2016-04-15

    A series of protein kinases and phosphatases (PKPs) have been linked to contextual fear conditioning (cFC) but information is mainly derived from immunochemical studies. It was therefore decided to use an explorative label-free quantitative proteomics approach to concomitantly determine PKPs in hippocampi of mice in the individual phases of cFC. C57BL/6J mice were divided into four groups: three training groups representing the acquisition, consolidation and retrieval phases of cFC and a foot shock control group. Using this approach we identified 32 protein kinases or phosphatases/phosphatase subunits with significantly changed protein levels in one or more training groups as compared to foot shock control. These include members of PKP signalling modules of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP3K10, RAF1, KSR2), Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKIIα, DAPK1), protein kinase C (PRKCD) and protein phosphatases 1, 2A, 2B(3) previously implicated in various learning paradigms. In addition, our analysis showed protein kinases WNK1, LYN, VRK1, ABL1, CDK4, CDKL3, SgK223 and ADCK1, and protein phosphatases PTPRF, ACP1, DNAJC6, SSH2 and UBASH3B that have not been directly linked to fear memory processes so far. Determination of PKPs in the individual cFC phases represents a valuable resource for interpretation of previous and design of future studies on PKPs in memory mechanisms. PMID:26748257

  15. cDNA cloning of a mouse mammary epithelial cell surface protein reveals the existence of epidermal growth factor-like domains linked to factor VIII-like sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, J.D.; Bui, A. San Francisco State Univ., CA ); Lekutis, C.; Singer, K.L.; Srinivasan, U.; Parry, G. ); Yuzuki, D. )

    1990-11-01

    A 2.1-kilobase cDNA coding for a surface protein of mammary epithelial cells has been isolated from a mouse mammary gland {lambda}gt11 cDNA library. Sequence analysis of this cDNA reveals an open reading frame of 1,389 base pairs that defines a protein with a molecular mass of 51.5 dKa. Structural analysis of the predicted sequence identifies two putative functional domains of the protein: (i) an N-terminal cysteine-rich region that is similar to epidermal growth factor-like domains of Drosophila Notch-1 protein and (ii) a large segment of the sequence that exhibited 54.5% identify with C-terminal domains of human coagulation factors VIII and V. These similarities in structure are used to predict the possible functions of the protein and its means of interaction with the cell surface. mRNA expression was detectable in mammary tissue from nonpregnant animals but was maximal in the lactating gland. In cultured cells, mRNA levels also correlated with the degree of cellular differentiation.

  16. [Advances in Molecular Cloning].

    PubMed

    Ashwini, M; Murugan, S B; Balamurugan, S; Sathishkumar, R

    2016-01-01

    "Molecular cloning" meaning creation of recombinant DNA molecules has impelled advancement throughout life sciences. DNA manipulation has become easy due to powerful tools showing exponential growth in applications and sophistication of recombinant DNA technology. Cloning genes has become simple what led to an explosion in the understanding of gene function by seamlessly stitching together multiple DNA fragments or by the use of swappable gene cassettes, maximizing swiftness and litheness. A novel archetype might materialize in the near future with synthetic biology techniques that will facilitate quicker assembly and iteration of DNA clones, accelerating the progress of gene therapy vectors, recombinant protein production processes and new vaccines by in vitro chemical synthesis of any in silico-specified DNA construct. The advent of innovative cloning techniques has opened the door to more refined applications such as identification and mapping of epigenetic modifications and high-throughput assembly of combinatorial libraries. In this review, we will examine the major breakthroughs in cloning techniques and their applications in various areas of biological research that have evolved mainly due to easy construction of novel expression systems. PMID:27028806

  17. MOUSE UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The original MOUSE (Modular Oriented Uncertainty System) system was designed to deal with the problem of uncertainties in Environmental engineering calculations, such as a set of engineering cost or risk analysis equations. t was especially intended for use by individuals with li...

  18. Use of BAC clones as standardized reagents for Marek’s disease virus research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cloning of the Marek’s disease virus (MDV) genome as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone have led to major advances through our ability to study individual gene function by making precise insertions and deletions in the viral genome. We believe that MDV BAC clones will repl...

  19. Extremal quantum cloning machines

    SciTech Connect

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.; Cerf, N.J.

    2005-10-15

    We investigate the problem of cloning a set of states that is invariant under the action of an irreducible group representation. We then characterize the cloners that are extremal in the convex set of group covariant cloning machines, among which one can restrict the search for optimal cloners. For a set of states that is invariant under the discrete Weyl-Heisenberg group, we show that all extremal cloners can be unitarily realized using the so-called double-Bell states, whence providing a general proof of the popular ansatz used in the literature for finding optimal cloners in a variety of settings. Our result can also be generalized to continuous-variable optimal cloning in infinite dimensions, where the covariance group is the customary Weyl-Heisenberg group of displacement000.

  20. Virulence Potential and Genome-Wide Characterization of Drug Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Clones Selected In Vivo by the 7-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Frazão, Nelson; Hiller, N. Luisa; Powell, Evan; Earl, Josh; Ahmed, Azad; Sá-Leão, Raquel; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Ehrlich, Garth D.; Tomasz, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    We used mouse models of pneumococcal colonization and disease combined with full genome sequencing to characterize three major drug resistant clones of S. pneumoniae that were recovered from the nasopharynx of PCV7-immunized children in Portugal. The three clones – serotype 6A (ST2191), serotype 15A (ST63) and serotype 19A (ST276) carried some of the same drug resistance determinants already identified in nasopharyngeal isolates from the pre-PCV7 era. The three clones were able to colonize efficiently the mouse nasopharyngeal mucosa where populations of these pneumococci were retained for as long as 21 days. During this period, the three clones were able to asymptomatically invade the olfactory bulbs, brain, lungs and the middle ear mucosa and established populations in these tissues. The virulence potential of the three clones was poor even at high inoculum (105 CFU per mouse) concentrations in the mouse septicemia model and was undetectable in the pneumonia model. Capsular type 3 transformants of clones 6A and 19A prepared in the laboratory produced lethal infection at low cell concentration (103 CFU per mouse) but the same transformants became impaired in their potential to colonize, indicating the importance of the capsular polysaccharide in both disease and colonization. The three clones were compared to the genomes of 56 S. pneumoniae strains for which sequence information was available in the public databank. Clone 15A (ST63) only differed from the serotype 19F clone G54 in a very few genes including serotype so that this clone may be considered the product of a capsular switch. While no strain with comparable degree of similarity to clone 19A (ST276) was found among the sequenced isolates, by MLST this clone is a single locust variant (SLV) of Denmark14-ST230 international clone. Clone 6A (ST2191) was most similar to the penicillin resistant Hungarian serotype 19A clone. PMID:24069360

  1. MXS-Chaining: A Highly Efficient Cloning Platform for Imaging and Flow Cytometry Approaches in Mammalian Systems.

    PubMed

    Sladitschek, Hanna L; Neveu, Pierre A

    2015-01-01

    The continuous improvement of imaging technologies has driven the development of sophisticated reporters to monitor biological processes. Such constructs should ideally be assembled in a flexible enough way to allow for their optimization. Here we describe a highly reliable cloning method to efficiently assemble constructs for imaging or flow cytometry applications in mammalian cell culture systems. We bioinformatically identified a list of restriction enzymes whose sites are rarely found in human and mouse cDNA libraries. From the best candidates, we chose an enzyme combination (MluI, XhoI and SalI: MXS) that enables iterative chaining of individual building blocks. The ligation scar resulting from the compatible XhoI- and SalI-sticky ends can be translated and hence enables easy in-frame cloning of coding sequences. The robustness of the MXS-chaining approach was validated by assembling constructs up to 20 kb long and comprising up to 34 individual building blocks. By assessing the success rate of 400 ligation reactions, we determined cloning efficiency to be 90% on average. Large polycistronic constructs for single-cell imaging or flow cytometry applications were generated to demonstrate the versatility of the MXS-chaining approach. We devised several constructs that fluorescently label subcellular structures, an adapted version of FUCCI (fluorescent, ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator) optimized to visualize cell cycle progression in mouse embryonic stem cells and an array of artificial promoters enabling dosage of doxycyline-inducible transgene expression. We made publicly available through the Addgene repository a comprehensive set of MXS-building blocks comprising custom vectors, a set of fluorescent proteins, constitutive promoters, polyadenylation signals, selection cassettes and tools for inducible gene expression. Finally, detailed guidelines describe how to chain together prebuilt MXS-building blocks and how to generate new customized MXS

  2. Discovery of four natural clones in a crayfish species Procambarus clarkii

    PubMed Central

    Yue, G. H.; Wang, G. L.; Zhu, B. Q.; Wang, C. M.; Zhu, Z .Y.; Lo, L. C.

    2008-01-01

    Self-cloning is quite rare in shrimp, lobsters, crayfish and crabs. Here we report the discovery of four natural clones of red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii), each containing 2-6 genetically identical individuals, during the genotyping of 120 individuals with five microsatellites. The four clones were heterozygote at most of the five microsatellite loci. Phylogenetic analysis using microsatellite genotypes suggests recent origin of the four clones. Sequencing a part of the mitochondrial gene Cox I confirmed that the four clones were from the species Procambarus clarkii. PMID:18781225

  3. Secure the Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Thomas; Kirchner, Florent; Pichardie, David

    Exchanging mutable data objects with untrusted code is a delicate matter because of the risk of creating a data space that is accessible by an attacker. Consequently, secure programming guidelines for Java stress the importance of using defensive copying before accepting or handing out references to an internal mutable object. However, implementation of a copy method (like clone()) is entirely left to the programmer. It may not provide a sufficiently deep copy of an object and is subject to overriding by a malicious sub-class. Currently no language-based mechanism supports secure object cloning. This paper proposes a type-based annotation system for defining modular copy policies for class-based object-oriented programs. A copy policy specifies the maximally allowed sharing between an object and its clone. We present a static enforcement mechanism that will guarantee that all classes fulfill their copy policy, even in the presence of overriding of copy methods, and establish the semantic correctness of the overall approach in Coq. The mechanism has been implemented and experimentally evaluated on clone methods from several Java libraries.

  4. Applications of quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarico, E.; Sanguinetti, B.; Sekatski, P.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum Cloning Machines (QCMs) allow for the copying of information, within the limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These devices are particularly interesting in the high-gain regime, i.e., when one input qubit generates a state of many output qubits. In this regime, they allow for the study of certain aspects of the quantum to classical transition. The understanding of these aspects is the root of the two recent applications that we will review in this paper: the first one is the Quantum Cloning Radiometer, a device which is able to produce an absolute measure of spectral radiance. This device exploits the fact that in the quantum regime information can be copied with only finite fidelity, whereas when a state becomes macroscopic, this fidelity gradually increases to 1. Measuring the fidelity of the cloning operation then allows to precisely determine the absolute spectral radiance of the input optical source. We will then discuss whether a Quantum Cloning Machine could be used to produce a state visible by the naked human eye, and the possibility of a Bell Experiment with humans playing the role of detectors.

  5. The Cloning of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  6. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Lacks, S.A.

    1991-12-31

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA and chromosomal DNA cloned by this method are disclosed. The method includes the selection of a target organism having a segment of chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned. A first DNA segment, having a first restriction enzyme site on either side. homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  7. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  8. Probabilistic Cloning and Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ting; Yan, Feng-Li; Wang, Zhi-Xi

    2004-06-01

    We discuss the usefulness of quantum cloning and present examples of quantum computation tasks for which the cloning offers an advantage which cannot be matched by any approach that does not resort to quantum cloning. In these quantum computations, we need to distribute quantum information contained in the states about which we have some partial information. To perform quantum computations, we use a state-dependent probabilistic quantum cloning procedure to distribute quantum information in the middle of a quantum computation.

  9. Recombinational Cloning Using Gateway and In-Fusion Cloning Schemes

    PubMed Central

    Throop, Andrea L.; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive study of protein structure and function, or proteomics, depends on the obtainability of full-length cDNAs in species-specific expression vectors and subsequent functional analysis of the expressed protein. Recombinational cloning is a universal cloning technique based on site-specific recombination that is independent of the insert DNA sequence of interest, which differentiates this method from the classical restriction enzyme-based cloning methods. Recombinational cloning enables rapid and efficient parallel transfer of DNA inserts into multiple expression systems. This unit summarizes strategies for generating expression-ready clones using the most popular recombinational cloning technologies, including the commercially available Gateway® (Life Technologies) and In-Fusion® (Clontech) cloning technologies. PMID:25827088

  10. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  11. Cloning of murine ferrochelatase.

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, D A; Frasier, F

    1991-01-01

    Ferrochelatase (protoheme ferro-lyase, EC 4.99.1.1) catalyzes the last step in the heme biosynthetic pathway, the chelation of ferrous iron and protoporphyrin to form heme. The activity of ferrochelatase is deficient in the inherited disease protoporphyria. In this study, murine ferrochelatase cDNAs were obtained by screening cDNA libraries with an oligonucleotide probe. The derived amino acid sequence of murine ferrochelatase has 47% identity with the recently cloned Saccharomyces cerevisiae ferrochelatase, but it is not significantly similar to other published sequences. Results of Southern blotting are consistent with a single murine ferrochelatase gene, while Northern blotting demonstrates two ferrochelatase transcripts in all tissues examined. The ferrochelatase protein and mRNAs have different relative concentrations in different tissues. The cloning of murine ferrochelatase cDNAs provides the basis for future studies on ferrochelatase gene expression and on the identification of the molecular defect in protoporphyria. Images PMID:1704134

  12. Keith's MAGIC: Cloning and the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Wells, D N

    2013-10-01

    Abstract Professor Keith Campbell's critical contribution to the discovery that a somatic cell from an adult animal can be fully reprogrammed by oocyte factors to form a cloned individual following nuclear transfer (NT)(Wilmut et al., 1997 ) overturned a dogma concerning the reversibility of cell fate that many scientists had considered to be biologically impossible. This seminal experiment proved the totipotency of adult somatic nuclei and finally confirmed that adult cells could differentiate without irreversible changes to the genetic material. PMID:24020700

  13. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, Sanford A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism's chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes.

  14. Sequential cloning of chromosomes

    DOEpatents

    Lacks, S.A.

    1995-07-18

    A method for sequential cloning of chromosomal DNA of a target organism is disclosed. A first DNA segment homologous to the chromosomal DNA to be sequentially cloned is isolated. The first segment has a first restriction enzyme site on either side. A first vector product is formed by ligating the homologous segment into a suitably designed vector. The first vector product is circularly integrated into the target organism`s chromosomal DNA. The resulting integrated chromosomal DNA segment includes the homologous DNA segment at either end of the integrated vector segment. The integrated chromosomal DNA is cleaved with a second restriction enzyme and ligated to form a vector-containing plasmid, which is replicated in a host organism. The replicated plasmid is then cleaved with the first restriction enzyme. Next, a DNA segment containing the vector and a segment of DNA homologous to a distal portion of the previously isolated DNA segment is isolated. This segment is then ligated to form a plasmid which is replicated within a suitable host. This plasmid is then circularly integrated into the target chromosomal DNA. The chromosomal DNA containing the circularly integrated vector is treated with a third, retrorestriction (class IIS) enzyme. The cleaved DNA is ligated to give a plasmid that is used to transform a host permissive for replication of its vector. The sequential cloning process continues by repeated cycles of circular integration and excision. The excision is carried out alternately with the second and third enzymes. 9 figs.

  15. Probabilistic cloning of equidistant states

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, O.; Roa, Luis; Delgado, A.

    2010-08-15

    We study the probabilistic cloning of equidistant states. These states are such that the inner product between them is a complex constant or its conjugate. Thereby, it is possible to study their cloning in a simple way. In particular, we are interested in the behavior of the cloning probability as a function of the phase of the overlap among the involved states. We show that for certain families of equidistant states Duan and Guo's cloning machine leads to cloning probabilities lower than the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability of equidistant states. We propose an alternative cloning machine whose cloning probability is higher than or equal to the optimal unambiguous discrimination probability for any family of equidistant states. Both machines achieve the same probability for equidistant states whose inner product is a positive real number.

  16. Efficient high-resolution genetic mapping of mouse interspersed repetitive sequence PCR products, toward integrated genetic and physical mapping of the mouse genome.

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, L; Hunter, K; Schalkwyk, L; Riba, L; Anson, S; Mott, R; Newell, W; Bruley, C; Bar, I; Ramu, E

    1995-01-01

    The ability to carry out high-resolution genetic mapping at high throughput in the mouse is a critical rate-limiting step in the generation of genetically anchored contigs in physical mapping projects and the mapping of genetic loci for complex traits. To address this need, we have developed an efficient, high-resolution, large-scale genome mapping system. This system is based on the identification of polymorphic DNA sites between mouse strains by using interspersed repetitive sequence (IRS) PCR. Individual cloned IRS PCR products are hybridized to a DNA array of IRS PCR products derived from the DNA of individual mice segregating DNA sequences from the two parent strains. Since gel electrophoresis is not required, large numbers of samples can be genotyped in parallel. By using this approach, we have mapped > 450 polymorphic probes with filters containing the DNA of up to 517 backcross mice, potentially allowing resolution of 0.14 centimorgan. This approach also carries the potential for a high degree of efficiency in the integration of physical and genetic maps, since pooled DNAs representing libraries of yeast artificial chromosomes or other physical representations of the mouse genome can be addressed by hybridization of filter representations of the IRS PCR products of such libraries. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7777502

  17. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock Lizard Darevskia dahli [corrected].

    PubMed

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa. PMID:24896777

  18. Clonal diversity and clone formation in the parthenogenetic Caucasian rock lizard Darevskia dahlia.

    PubMed

    Vergun, Andrey A; Martirosyan, Irena A; Semyenova, Seraphima K; Omelchenko, Andrey V; Petrosyan, Varos G; Lazebny, Oleg E; Tokarskaya, Olga N; Korchagin, Vitaly I; Ryskov, Alexey P

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa. PMID:24618670

  19. Clonal Diversity and Clone Formation in the Parthenogenetic Caucasian Rock Lizard Darevskia dahli

    PubMed Central

    Vergun, Andrey A.; Martirosyan, Irena A.; Semyenova, Seraphima K.; Omelchenko, Andrey V.; Petrosyan, Varos G.; Lazebny, Oleg E.; Tokarskaya, Olga N.; Korchagin, Vitaly I.; Ryskov, Alexey P.

    2014-01-01

    The all-female Caucasian rock lizard species Darevskia dahli and other parthenogenetic species of this genus reproduce normally via true parthenogenesis. Previously, the genetic diversity of this species was analyzed using allozymes, mitochondrial DNA, and DNA fingerprint markers. In the present study, variation at three microsatellite loci was studied in 111 specimens of D. dahli from five populations from Armenia, and new information regarding clonal diversity and clone formation in D. dahli was obtained that suggests a multiple hybridization origin. All individuals but one were heterozygous at the loci studied. Based on specific allele combinations, 11 genotypes were identified among the individuals studied. Individuals with the same genotypes formed distinct clonal lineages: one major clone was represented by 72 individuals, an intermediate clone was represented by 21 individuals, and nine other clones were rare and represented by one or several individuals. A new approach based on the detection and comparison of genotype-specific markers formed by combinations of parental-specific markers was developed and used to identify at least three hybridization founder events that resulted in the initial formation of one major and two rare clones. All other clones, including the intermediate and seven rare clones, probably arose through postformation microsatellite mutations of the major clone. This approach can be used to identify hybridization founder events and to study clone formation in other unisexual taxa. PMID:24618670

  20. Latrunculin A Treatment Prevents Abnormal Chromosome Segregation for Successful Development of Cloned Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Terashita, Yukari; Yamagata, Kazuo; Tokoro, Mikiko; Itoi, Fumiaki; Wakayama, Sayaka; Li, Chong; Sato, Eimei; Tanemura, Kentaro; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer to an enucleated oocyte is used for reprogramming somatic cells with the aim of achieving totipotency, but most cloned embryos die in the uterus after transfer. While modifying epigenetic states of cloned embryos can improve their development, the production rate of cloned embryos can also be enhanced by changing other factors. It has already been shown that abnormal chromosome segregation (ACS) is a major cause of the developmental failure of cloned embryos and that Latrunculin A (LatA), an actin polymerization inhibitor, improves F-actin formation and birth rate of cloned embryos. Since F-actin is important for chromosome congression in embryos, here we examined the relation between ACS and F-actin in cloned embryos. Using LatA treatment, the occurrence of ACS decreased significantly whereas cloned embryo-specific epigenetic abnormalities such as dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me2) could not be corrected. In contrast, when H3K9me2 was normalized using the G9a histone methyltransferase inhibitor BIX-01294, the Magea2 gene—essential for normal development but never before expressed in cloned embryos—was expressed. However, this did not increase the cloning success rate. Thus, non-epigenetic factors also play an important role in determining the efficiency of mouse cloning. PMID:24205216

  1. Platelet-mediated transformation of mtDNA-less human cells: Analysis of phenotypic variability among clones from normal individuals-and complementation behavior of the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation causing myoclonic epilepsy and ragged red fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Chomyn, A.; Lai, S.T.; Shakeley, R.; Attardi, G. ); Bresolin, N.; Scarlato, G. )

    1994-06-01

    In the present work, the authors demonstrate the possibility of using human blood platelets as mitochondrial donors for the repopulation of mtDNA-less ([rho][sup o]) cells. The noninvasive nature of platelet isolation, combined with the prolonged viability of platelet mitochondria and the simplicity and efficiency of the mitochondria-transfer procedure, has substantially increased the applicability of the [rho][sup o] cell transformation approach for mitochondrial genetic analysis and for the study of mtDNA-linked diseases. This approach has been applied to platelets from several normal human individuals and one individual affected by the myoclonic-epilepsy-and-ragged-red-fibers (MERRF) encephalomyopathy. A certain variability in respiratory capacity was observed among the platelet-derived [rho][sup o] cell transformants from a given normal subject, and it was shown to be unrelated to their mtDNA content. The results of sequential transfer of mitochondria from selected transformants into a [rho][sup o] cell line different from the first [rho][sup o] acceptor strongly suggest that this variability reflected, at least in part, differences in nuclear gene content and/or activity among the original recipient cells. A much greater variability in respiratory capacity was observed among the transformants derived from the MERRF patient and was found to be related to the presence and amount of the mitochondrial tRNA[sup Lys] mutation associated with the MERRF syndrome. An analysis of the relationship between proportion of mtDNA carrying the MERRF mutation and degree of respiratory activity in various transformations derived from the MERRF patient revealed an unusual complementation behavior of the tRNA[sup Lys] mutation, possibly reflecting the distribution of mutant mtDNA among the platelet mitochondria. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. To clone or not to clone--a Jewish perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Lipschutz, J H

    1999-01-01

    Many new reproductive methods such as artificial insemination, in vitro fertilisation, freezing of human embryos, and surrogate motherhood were at first widely condemned but are now seen in Western society as not just ethically and morally acceptable, but beneficial in that they allow otherwise infertile couples to have children. The idea of human cloning was also quickly condemned but debate is now emerging. This article examines cloning from a Jewish perspective and finds evidence to support the view that there is nothing inherently wrong with the idea of human cloning. A hypothesis is also advanced suggesting that even if a body was cloned, the brain, which is the essence of humanity, would remain unique. This author suggests that the debate should be changed from "Is cloning wrong?" to "When is cloning wrong?". PMID:10226913

  3. The effect of high-fat diet on the composition of the gut microbiota in cloned and non-cloned pigs of lean and obese phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Rebecca; Andersen, Anders Daniel; Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise; Stagsted, Jan; Boye, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-far-high-energy diet on cloned and non-cloned domestic pigs of both lean and obese phenotype and to evaluate if the lean cloned pigs had a lower inter-individual variation as compared with non-cloned pigs. The microbiota of colon and terminal ileum was investigated in cloned and non-cloned pigs that received a high-far-high-energy diet with either restricted or ad libitum access to feed, resulting in lean and obese phenotypes, respectively. The fecal microbiota of lean pigs was investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The intestinal microbiota of lean and obese cloned and non-cloned pigs was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR and a novel high-throughput qPCR platform (Fluidigm). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the T-RFLP profiles revealed that lean cloned and non-cloned pigs had a different overall composition of their gut microbiota. The colon of lean cloned pigs contained relatively more bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes and less from the phylum Bacteroidetes than obese cloned pigs as estimated by qPCR. Fluidigm qPCR results revealed differences in specific bacterial groups in the gut microbiota of both lean and obese pigs. Our results suggest that high-far-high-energy diet is associated with changes in the gut microbiota even in the absence of obesity. Overall, the cloned pigs had a different gut microbiota from that of non-cloned pigs. To our knowledge this is the first study to investigate the gut microbiota of cloned domestic pigs of lean and obese phenotype. PMID:23974297

  4. What is Cloning?

    MedlinePlus

    ... two. Twinning happens in the first days after egg and sperm join, while the embryo is made ... individuals. Since they developed from the same fertilized egg, the resulting individuals are genetically identical. Artificial embryo ...

  5. Therapeutic cloning and reproductive liberty.

    PubMed

    Sparrow, Robert

    2009-04-01

    Concern for "reproductive liberty" suggests that decisions about embryos should normally be made by the persons who would be the genetic parents of the child that would be brought into existence if the embryo were brought to term. Therapeutic cloning would involve creating and destroying an embryo, which, if brought to term, would be the offspring of the genetic parents of the person undergoing therapy. I argue that central arguments in debates about parenthood and genetics therefore suggest that therapeutic cloning would be prima facie unethical unless it occurred with the consent of the parents of the person being cloned. Alternatively, if therapeutic cloning is thought to be legitimate, this undermines the case for some uses of reproductive cloning by implying that the genetic relation it establishes between clones and DNA donors does not carry the same moral weight as it does in cases of normal reproduction. PMID:19240247

  6. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Francisco J.

    2015-01-01

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits. PMID:26195738

  7. Cloning humans? Biological, ethical, and social considerations.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Francisco J

    2015-07-21

    There are, in mankind, two kinds of heredity: biological and cultural. Cultural inheritance makes possible for humans what no other organism can accomplish: the cumulative transmission of experience from generation to generation. In turn, cultural inheritance leads to cultural evolution, the prevailing mode of human adaptation. For the last few millennia, humans have been adapting the environments to their genes more often than their genes to the environments. Nevertheless, natural selection persists in modern humans, both as differential mortality and as differential fertility, although its intensity may decrease in the future. More than 2,000 human diseases and abnormalities have a genetic causation. Health care and the increasing feasibility of genetic therapy will, although slowly, augment the future incidence of hereditary ailments. Germ-line gene therapy could halt this increase, but at present, it is not technically feasible. The proposal to enhance the human genetic endowment by genetic cloning of eminent individuals is not warranted. Genomes can be cloned; individuals cannot. In the future, therapeutic cloning will bring enhanced possibilities for organ transplantation, nerve cells and tissue healing, and other health benefits. PMID:26195738

  8. Molecular cloning and characterization of canine ICOS.

    PubMed

    Lee, Je-Hwan; Joo, Young-Don; Yim, Daesong; Lee, Richard; Ostrander, Elaine A; Loretz, Carol; Little, Marie-Térèse; Storb, Rainer; Kuhr, Christian S

    2004-10-01

    Inducible costimulatory receptor (ICOS) is one recently identified member of the CD28 family of costimulatory molecules. Evidence suggests ICOS functions as a critical immune regulator and, to evaluate these effects, we employed the canine model system that has been used to develop strategies currently in clinical use for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To investigate the effects of blocking the ICOS pathway in the canine hematopoietic cell transplantation model, we tested existing murine and human reagents and cloned the full length of the open reading frame of canine ICOS cDNA to allow the development of reagents specific for the canine ICOS. Canine ICOS contains a major open reading frame of 624 nucleotides, encoding a protein of 208 amino acids, and localizes to chromosome 37. Canine ICOS shares 79% sequence identity with human ICOS, 70% with mouse, and 69% with rat. Canine ICOS expression is limited to stimulated PBMC. PMID:15475250

  9. Evaluation of a pooled strategy for high-throughput sequencing of cosmid clones from metagenomic libraries.

    PubMed

    Lam, Kathy N; Hall, Michael W; Engel, Katja; Vey, Gregory; Cheng, Jiujun; Neufeld, Josh D; Charles, Trevor C

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing methods have been instrumental in the growing field of metagenomics, with technological improvements enabling greater throughput at decreased costs. Nonetheless, the economy of high-throughput sequencing cannot be fully leveraged in the subdiscipline of functional metagenomics. In this area of research, environmental DNA is typically cloned to generate large-insert libraries from which individual clones are isolated, based on specific activities of interest. Sequence data are required for complete characterization of such clones, but the sequencing of a large set of clones requires individual barcode-based sample preparation; this can become costly, as the cost of clone barcoding scales linearly with the number of clones processed, and thus sequencing a large number of metagenomic clones often remains cost-prohibitive. We investigated a hybrid Sanger/Illumina pooled sequencing strategy that omits barcoding altogether, and we evaluated this strategy by comparing the pooled sequencing results to reference sequence data obtained from traditional barcode-based sequencing of the same set of clones. Using identity and coverage metrics in our evaluation, we show that pooled sequencing can generate high-quality sequence data, without producing problematic chimeras. Though caveats of a pooled strategy exist and further optimization of the method is required to improve recovery of complete clone sequences and to avoid circumstances that generate unrecoverable clone sequences, our results demonstrate that pooled sequencing represents an effective and low-cost alternative for sequencing large sets of metagenomic clones. PMID:24911009

  10. Evaluation of a Pooled Strategy for High-Throughput Sequencing of Cosmid Clones from Metagenomic Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Kathy N.; Hall, Michael W.; Engel, Katja; Vey, Gregory; Cheng, Jiujun; Neufeld, Josh D.; Charles, Trevor C.

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing methods have been instrumental in the growing field of metagenomics, with technological improvements enabling greater throughput at decreased costs. Nonetheless, the economy of high-throughput sequencing cannot be fully leveraged in the subdiscipline of functional metagenomics. In this area of research, environmental DNA is typically cloned to generate large-insert libraries from which individual clones are isolated, based on specific activities of interest. Sequence data are required for complete characterization of such clones, but the sequencing of a large set of clones requires individual barcode-based sample preparation; this can become costly, as the cost of clone barcoding scales linearly with the number of clones processed, and thus sequencing a large number of metagenomic clones often remains cost-prohibitive. We investigated a hybrid Sanger/Illumina pooled sequencing strategy that omits barcoding altogether, and we evaluated this strategy by comparing the pooled sequencing results to reference sequence data obtained from traditional barcode-based sequencing of the same set of clones. Using identity and coverage metrics in our evaluation, we show that pooled sequencing can generate high-quality sequence data, without producing problematic chimeras. Though caveats of a pooled strategy exist and further optimization of the method is required to improve recovery of complete clone sequences and to avoid circumstances that generate unrecoverable clone sequences, our results demonstrate that pooled sequencing represents an effective and low-cost alternative for sequencing large sets of metagenomic clones. PMID:24911009

  11. Induction of autophagy improves embryo viability in cloned mouse embryos

    PubMed Central

    Shen, XingHui; Zhang, Na; Wang, ZhenDong; Bai, GuangYu; Zheng, Zhong; Gu, YanLi; Wu, YanShuang; Liu, Hui; Zhou, DongJie; Lei, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an essential cellular mechanism that degrades cytoplasmic proteins and organelles to recycle their components. Moreover, autophagy is essential for preimplantation development in mammals. Here we show that autophagy is also important for reprogramming in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Our data indicate that unlike fertilized oocytes, autophagy is not triggered in SCNT embryos during 6 hours of activation. Mechanistically, the inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation is due to the cytochalasin B (CB) caused depolymerization of actin filaments. In this study, we induced autophagy during SCNT activation by rapamycin and pp242, which could restore the expected level of autophagy and significantly enhance the development of SCNT embryos to the blastocyst stage when compared with the control (68.5% and 68.7% vs. 41.5%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the treatment of rapamycin and pp242 accelerates active DNA demethylation indicated by the conversion of 5 mC to 5 hmC, and treatment of rapamycin improves degradation of maternal mRNA as well. Thus, our findings reveal that autophagy is important for development of SCNT embryos and inhibited autophagic induction during SCNT activation might be one of the serious causes of low efficiency of SCNT. PMID:26643778

  12. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Peter A. . E-mail: p.whittaker@lancaster.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated.

  13. Human cloning and child welfare.

    PubMed Central

    Burley, J; Harris, J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an objection to human cloning which appeals to the welfare of the child. This objection varies according to the sort of harm it is expected the clone will suffer. The three formulations of it that we will consider are: 1. Clones will be harmed by the fearful or prejudicial attitudes people may have about or towards them (H1); 2. Clones will be harmed by the demands and expectations of parents or genotype donors (H2); 3. Clones will be harmed by their own awareness of their origins, for example the knowledge that the genetic donor is a stranger (H3). We will show why these three versions of the child welfare objection do not necessarily supply compelling reasons to ban human reproductive cloning. The claim that we will develop and defend in the course of our discussion is that even if it is the case that a cloned child will suffer harms of the type H1-H3, it is none the less permissible to conceive by cloning so long as these cloning-induced welfare deficits are not such as to blight the existence of the resultant child, whoever this may be. PMID:10226914

  14. Cloning of multiple copies of immunoglobulin variable kappa genes in cosmid vectors.

    PubMed Central

    Cattaneo, R; Gorski, J; Mach, B

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of cloning large segments of DNA in cosmid vectors offers distinct advantages, in particular for the study of multigene families. Large size fragments of mouse embryo DNA were successfully cloned in the cosmid pHC 79. Twelve recombinants hybridizing specifically to an immunoglobulin kappa chain variable region probe were identified. In 9 of these recombinants, the size of the insert ranges from 30 to 43 kilobases. Factors affecting the cloning efficiency of a complex mammalian genome in cosmids were studied. The stability of these recombinant cosmids and the preparation of recombinant cosmid DNA are also discussed. Images PMID:6269060

  15. Clone history shapes Populus drought responses.

    PubMed

    Raj, Sherosha; Bräutigam, Katharina; Hamanishi, Erin T; Wilkins, Olivia; Thomas, Barb R; Schroeder, William; Mansfield, Shawn D; Plant, Aine L; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2011-07-26

    Just as animal monozygotic twins can experience different environmental conditions by being reared apart, individual genetically identical trees of the genus Populus can also be exposed to contrasting environmental conditions by being grown in different locations. As such, clonally propagated Populus trees provide an opportunity to interrogate the impact of individual environmental history on current response to environmental stimuli. To test the hypothesis that current responses to an environmental stimulus, drought, are contingent on environmental history, the transcriptome- level drought responses of three economically important hybrid genotypes-DN34 (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra), Walker [P. deltoides var. occidentalis × (Populus laurifolia × P. nigra)], and Okanese [Walker × (P. laurifolia × P. nigra)]-derived from two different locations were compared. Strikingly, differences in transcript abundance patterns in response to drought were based on differences in geographic origin of clones for two of the three genotypes. This observation was most pronounced for the genotypes with the longest time since establishment and last common propagation. Differences in genome-wide DNA methylation paralleled the transcriptome level trends, whereby the clones with the most divergent transcriptomes and clone history had the most marked differences in the extent of total DNA methylation, suggesting an epigenomic basis for the clone history-dependent transcriptome divergence. The data provide insights into the interplay between genotype and environment in the ecologically and economically important Populus genus, with implications for the industrial application of Populus trees and the evolution and persistence of these important tree species and their associated hybrids. PMID:21746919

  16. Frequent occurrence of highly expanded but unrelated B-cell clones in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah N; Debes Marun, Carina S; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Gibson, Spencer B; Venner, Christopher P; Johnston, James B; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2013-01-01

    Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM) includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16%) being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%), suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in MM and the

  17. Frequent Occurrence of Highly Expanded but Unrelated B-Cell Clones in Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah N.; Debes Marun, Carina S.; Lafarge, Sandrine T.; Gibson, Spencer B.; Venner, Christopher P.; Johnston, James B.; Belch, Andrew R.; Pilarski, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    Clonal diversity in multiple myeloma (MM) includes both MM-related and MM-unrelated clonal expansions which are subject to dominance exerted by the MM clone. Here we show evidence for the existence of minor but highly expanded unrelated B-cell clones in patients with MM defined by their complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) peak. We further characterize these clones over the disease and subsequent treatment. Second clones were identified by their specific IgH-VDJ sequences that are distinct from those of dominant MM clones. Clonal frequencies were determined through semi-quantitative PCR, quantitative PCR and single-cell polymerase chain reaction of the clone-specific sequence. In 13/74 MM patients, more than one dominant CDR3 peak was identified with 12 patients (16%) being truly biclonal. Second clones had different frequencies, were found in different locations and were found in different cell types from the dominant MM clone. Where analysis was possible, they were shown to have chromosomal characteristic distinct from those of the MM clone. The frequency of the second clone also changed over the course of the disease and often persisted despite treatment. Molecularly-defined second clones are infrequent in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 1/43 individuals or 2%), suggesting that they may arise at relatively late stages of myelomagenesis. In further support of our findings, biclonal gammopathy and concomitant MM and CLL (chronic lymphocytic leukemia) were confirmed to originate from two unrelated clones. Our data supports the idea that the clone giving rise to symptomatic myeloma exerts clonal dominance to prevent expansion of other clones. MM and second clones may arise from an underlying niche permissive of clonal expansion. The clinical significance of these highly expanded but unrelated clones remains to be confirmed. Overall, our findings add new dimensions to evaluating related and unrelated clonal expansions in MM and the

  18. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    PubMed

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it. PMID:19860340

  19. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... from clones and their offspring out of the food chain until CVM could further evaluate the issue. back to top FDA Studies Cloning For more than five years, CVM ... evaluate the safety of food from these animals. The resulting report, called a ...

  20. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  1. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Henstock, Peter V.; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  2. Therapeutic cloning: promises and issues

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Advances in biotechnology necessitate both an understanding of scientific principles and ethical implications to be clinically applicable in medicine. In this regard, therapeutic cloning offers significant potential in regenerative medicine by circumventing immunorejection, and in the cure of genetic disorders when used in conjunction with gene therapy. Therapeutic cloning in the context of cell replacement therapy holds a huge potential for de novo organogenesis and the permanent treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and diabetes mellitus as shown by in vivo studies. Scientific roadblocks impeding advancement in therapeutic cloning are tumorigenicity, epigenetic reprogramming, mitochondrial heteroplasmy, interspecies pathogen transfer, low oocyte availability. Therapeutic cloning is also often tied to ethical considerations concerning the source, destruction and moral status of IVF embryos based on the argument of potential. Legislative and funding issues are also addressed. Future considerations would include a distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning in legislative formulations. PMID:18523539

  3. End Sequencing and Finger Printing of Human & Mouse BAC Libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, C

    2005-09-27

    This project provided for continued end sequencing of existing and new BAC libraries constructed to support human sequencing as well as to initiate BAC end sequencing from the mouse BAC libraries constructed to support mouse sequencing. The clones, the sequences, and the fingerprints are now an available resource for the community at large. Research and development of new metaodologies for BAC end sequencing have reduced costs and increase throughput.

  4. PyClone: Statistical inference of clonal population structure in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Andrew; Khattra, Jaswinder; Yap, Damian; Wan, Adrian; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Ha, Gavin; Aparicio, Samuel; Bouchard-Côté, Alexandre; Shah, Sohrab P.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel statistical method, PyClone, for inference of clonal population structures in cancers. PyClone is a Bayesian clustering method for grouping sets of deeply sequenced somatic mutations into putative clonal clusters while estimating their cellular prevalences and accounting for allelic imbalances introduced by segmental copy number changes and normal cell contamination. Single cell sequencing validation demonstrates that PyClone infers accurate clustering of mutations that co-occur in individual cells. PMID:24633410

  5. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    PubMed

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe? PMID:14634633

  6. A novel nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid clone formed via androgenesis in polyploid gibel carp

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Unisexual vertebrates have been demonstrated to reproduce by gynogenesis, hybridogenesis, parthenogenesis, or kleptogenesis, however, it is uncertain how the reproduction mode contributes to the clonal diversity. Recently, polyploid gibel carp has been revealed to possess coexisting dual modes of unisexual gynogenesis and sexual reproduction and to have numerous various clones. Using sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male and subsequent 7 generation multiplying of unisexual gynogenesis, we have created a novel clone strain with more than several hundred millions of individuals. Here, we attempt to identify genetic background of the novel clone and to explore the significant implication for clonal diversity contribution. Methods Several nuclear genome markers and one cytoplasmic marker, the mitochondrial genome sequence, were used to identify the genetic organization of the randomly sampled individuals from different generations of the novel clone. Results Chromosome number, Cot-1 repetitive DNA banded karyotype, microsatellite patterns, AFLP profiles and transferrin alleles uniformly indicated that nuclear genome of the novel clone is identical to that of clone A, and significantly different from that of clone D. However, the cytoplasmic marker, its complete mtDNA genome sequence, is same to that of clone D, and different from that of clone A. Conclusions The present data indicate that the novel clone is a nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid between the known clones A and D, because it originates from the offspring of gonochoristic sexual reproduction mating between clone D female and clone A male, and contains an entire nuclear genome from the paternal clone A and a mtDNA genome (cytoplasm) from the maternal clone D. It is suggested to arise via androgenesis by a mechanism of ploidy doubling of clone A sperm in clone D ooplasm through inhibiting the first mitotic division. Significantly, the selected nucleo-cytoplasmic hybrid female

  7. Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract (SLiCE) cloning method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongwei; Werling, Uwe; Edelmann, Winfried

    2014-01-01

    SLiCE (Seamless Ligation Cloning Extract) is a novel cloning method that utilizes easy to generate bacterial cell extracts to assemble multiple DNA fragments into recombinant DNA molecules in a single in vitro recombination reaction. SLiCE overcomes the sequence limitations of traditional cloning methods, facilitates seamless cloning by recombining short end homologies (15-52 bp) with or without flanking heterologous sequences and provides an effective strategy for directional subcloning of DNA fragments from bacterial artificial chromosomes or other sources. SLiCE is highly cost-effective and demonstrates the versatility as a number of standard laboratory bacterial strains can serve as sources for SLiCE extract. We established a DH10B-derived E. coli strain expressing an optimized λ prophage Red recombination system, termed PPY, which facilitates SLiCE with very high efficiencies. PMID:24395368

  8. Current Protocols in Mouse Biology Tissue-specific regulation of oncogene expression using Cre-inducible ROSA26 knock-in transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Carofino, Brandi L.; Justice, Monica J.

    2015-01-01

    Cre-inducible mouse models are often utilized for the spatial and temporal expression of oncogenes. With the wide number of Cre recombinase lines available, inducible transgenesis represents a tractable approach to achieve discrete oncogene expression. Here, we describe a protocol for targeting Cre-inducible genes using a loxP-STOP-loxP approach to the ubiquitously expressed ROSA26 locus. Gene targeting provides several advantages over standard transgenic techniques, including a known site of integration and previously characterized pattern of expression. Historically, an inherent instability of ROSA26 targeting vectors has hampered the efficiency of developing ROSA26 knock-in lines. In this protocol, we provide individual steps for utilizing Gateway recombination for cloning, and detailed instructions for screening targeted ES cell clones. By following this protocol, one can achieve germline transmission of a ROSA26 knock-in line within several months. PMID:26069083

  9. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, Richard S.; Allen, Larry N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host and in a C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing host to the C.sub.1 -utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C.sub.1 -utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C.sub.1 -utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C.sub.1 -utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C.sub.1 -utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C.sub.1 -utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C.sub.1 gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields.

  10. Cloning and pharmacological characterization of a rat kappa opioid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Meng, F; Xie, G X; Thompson, R C; Mansour, A; Goldstein, A; Watson, S J; Akil, H

    1993-01-01

    A full-length cDNA was isolated from a rat striatal library by using low-stringency screening with two PCR fragments, one spanning transmembrane domains 3-6 of the mouse delta opioid receptor and the other unidentified but homologous to the mouse delta receptor from rat brain. The novel cDNA had a long open reading frame encoding a protein of 380 residues with 59% identity to the mouse delta receptor and topography consistent with a seven-helix guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptor. COS-1 cells transfected with the coding region of this clone showed high-affinity binding to kappa opioid receptor-selective ligands such as dynorphin A and U-50,488 and also nonselective opioid ligands such as bremazocine, ethylketocyclazocine, and naloxone. Not bound at all (or bound with low affinity) were dynorphin A-(2-13), enantiomers of naloxone and levophanol [i.e., (+)-naloxone and dextrorphan], and selective mu and delta opioid receptor ligands. Activation of the expressed receptor by kappa receptor agonists led to inhibition of cAMP. Finally, in situ hybridization revealed a mRNA distribution in rat brain that corresponded well to the distribution of binding sites labeled with kappa-selective ligands. These observations indicate that we have cloned a cDNA encoding a rat kappa receptor of the kappa 1 subtype. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8234341

  11. Ultraviolet survival and sensitizing effect of caffeine in mouse hybrid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zampetti-Bosseler, F.; Delhaise, P.; Limbosch, S.

    1980-10-01

    In a previous paper it was reported that three hybrid cell lines between mouse lymphoma cells (L5178YS) and mouse fibroblasts (A9) were more resistant to x rays than either of the parental cells. In this work, these hybrids displayed a degree of resistance to uv light either higher than (hybrid clone 3) or similar to (hybrid clones 1 and 2) that of the more resistant parent (A9). The enhanced resistance of hybrid clone 3 to uv was related neither to changes in cell shape, ploidy, and growth rate nor to an increase in a caffeine-sensitive recovery process after uv irradiation.

  12. Genotoxic effects of 1 GeV/amu Fe ions in mouse kidney epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, A.; Gauny, S. S.; Connolly, L.; Turker, M.

    Human exploration of space places individuals in environments where they are exposed to charged particle radiation. The goal of our studies is to assess the genotoxic and mutagenic effects of high energy Fe ions (1 GeV/amu) in kidney epithelial cells of the mouse irradiated either in vitro or in vivo. The initial study focused on establishing the toxicity of these heavy ions (LET=159 keV/micron) in two Aprt heterozygous kidney epithelial cell lines: K06 cells derived from a C57BL6/129Sv animal, and clone 4a cells derived from a C57BL6/DBA2 animal. Cells were exposed in vitro to graded doses of Fe ions (0-300 cGy) and the toxicity of the treatment was established using colony forming assays. Experiments were performed in triplicate at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The results indicate that Fe ions are toxic to mouse kidney epithelial cells and that no shoulder is observed on the survival curve for cells from either genetic background. The clone 4a cells were more sensitive to Fe ion exposures than the K06 cells. The D(37) for clone 4a cells was 92 cGy and the D(10) was 212 cGy. The more resistant K06 cells had a D(37) of 192 cGy and an estimated D(10) of 388 cGy. Parallel experiments are underway to establish the RBE's for cell killing for these two cell lines. Supported by NASA grant T-403X to A. Kronenberg

  13. Intra-strain polymorphisms are detected but no genomic alteration is found in cloned mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Koshichi . E-mail: koshichi@kazusa.or.jp; Inoue, Kimiko; Ogura, Atsuo; Oishi, Michio

    2006-09-15

    In-gel competitive reassociation (IGCR) is a method for differential subtraction of polymorphic (RFLP) DNA fragments between two DNA samples of interest without probes or specific sequence information. Here, we applied the IGCR procedure to two cloned mice derived from an F1 hybrid of the C57BL/6Cr and DBA/2 strains, in order to investigate the possibility of genomic alteration in the cloned mouse genomes. Each of the five of the genomic alterations we detected between the two cloned mice corresponded to the 'intra-strain' polymorphisms in the C57BL/6Cr and DBA/2 mouse strains. Our result suggests that no severe aberration of genome sequences occurs due to somatic cell nuclear transfer.

  14. ISOLATION OF MOUSE NEUTROPHILS

    PubMed Central

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E.; Lionakis, Michail S.

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT 19.6. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:26237011

  15. DNA cloning: A personal view after 40 years

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Stanley N.

    2013-01-01

    In November 1973, my colleagues A. C. Y. Chang, H. W. Boyer, R. B. Helling, and I reported in PNAS that individual genes can be cloned and isolated by enzymatically cleaving DNA molecules into fragments, linking the fragments to an autonomously replicating plasmid, and introducing the resulting recombinant DNA molecules into bacteria. A few months later, Chang and I reported that genes from unrelated bacterial species can be combined and propagated using the same approach and that interspecies recombinant DNA molecules can produce a biologically functional protein in a foreign host. Soon afterward, Boyer’s laboratory and mine published our collaborative discovery that even genes from animal cells can be cloned in bacteria. These three PNAS papers quickly led to the use of DNA cloning methods in multiple areas of the biological and chemical sciences. They also resulted in a highly public controversy about the potential hazards of laboratory manipulation of genetic material, a decision by Stanford University and the University of California to seek patents on the technology that Boyer and I had invented, and the application of DNA cloning methods for commercial purposes. In the 40 years that have passed since publication of our findings, use of DNA cloning has produced insights about the workings of genes and cells in health and disease and has altered the nature of the biotechnology and biopharmaceutical industries. Here, I provide a personal perspective of the events that led to, and followed, our report of DNA cloning. PMID:24043817

  16. Coordinate secretion of mouse alphafetoprotein, mouse albumin and rat albumin by mouse hepatoma-rat hepatoma hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Cassio, D; Hassoux, R; Dupiers, M; Uriel, J; Weiss, M C

    1980-09-01

    Mouse heptoma cells that secrete large amounts of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and albumin have been crossed with rat hepatoma cells that secret only albumin, and in relatively small amounts, to investigate the influence of each parental genome upon the expression of serum proteins. All of the ten independent hybrid clones examined produce mouse AFP and both mouse and rat albumin; none produces rat AFP. The absence of production of rat AFP by the hybrids suggests that different mechanisms are involved in the initiation and in the maintenance of expression of this function. The secretion of the three proteins by the hybrid cells is coordinate: Whatever the growth phase (exponential or stationary) and irrespective of the amounts produced over a wide range, the ratio secreted of mouse AFP to mouse albumin is near to one, and that of mouse albumin to rat albumin is near to five. In addition, even though the pattern of protein secretion during the growth cycle of hybrid cells is different from those of both parents, the products of both parental genomes conform to the new hybrid pattern. Finally, some hybrids secrete less of the proteins with increasing numbers of cell generations, yet all three continue to be secreted in coordinate fashion. Since the rates of secretion of serum proteins probably reflect their rates of synthesis, we conclude that coordinate secretion indicates coordinate synthesis, and may reflect coordinate transcription of the relevant genes. PMID:6158520

  17. Cloning of a quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Sedlak, Michal

    2011-10-15

    We analyze quantum algorithms for cloning of a quantum measurement. Our aim is to mimic two uses of a device performing an unknown von Neumann measurement with a single use of the device. When the unknown device has to be used before the bipartite state to be measured is available we talk about 1{yields}2 learning of the measurement, otherwise the task is called 1{yields}2 cloning of a measurement. We perform the optimization for both learning and cloning for arbitrary dimension d of the Hilbert space. For 1{yields}2 cloning we also propose a simple quantum network that achieves the optimal fidelity. The optimal fidelity for 1{yields}2 learning just slightly outperforms the estimate and prepare strategy in which one first estimates the unknown measurement and depending on the result suitably prepares the duplicate.

  18. A Clone of Your Own.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilodeau, Kirsten

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity used at the Washington Park Arboretum that helps students understand cloning through plant propagation. Students also learn how to make a pot from recycled newspapers and how to make soil that is appropriate for the plants. (DDR)

  19. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  20. Isolation of the mouse homologue of BRCA1 and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, L.M.; Haugen-Strano, A.; Cochran, C.

    1995-10-10

    The BRCA1 gene is in large part responsible for hereditary human breast and ovarian cancer. Here we report the isolation of the murine Brca1 homologue cDNA clones. In addition, we identified genomic P1 clones that contain most, if not all, of the mouse Brca1 locus. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the mouse and human coding regions are 75% identical at the nucleotide level while the predicted amino acid identity is only 58%. A DNA sequence variant in the Brcal locus was identified and used to map this gene on a (Mus m. musculus Czech II x C57BL/KsJ)F1 x C57BL/KsJ intersubspecific backcross to distal mouse chromosome 11. The mapping of this gene to a region highly syntenic with human chromosome 17, coupled with Southern and Northern analyses, confirms that we isolated the murine Brcal homologue rather than a related RING finger gene. The isolation of the mouse Brca1 homologue will facilitate the creation of mouse models for germline BRCA1 defects. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  2. Methylotroph cloning vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, R.S.; Allen, L.N.

    1989-04-25

    A cloning vehicle comprising: a replication determinant effective for replicating the vehicle in a non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host and in a C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA effective to allow the vehicle to be mobilized from the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing host to the C[sub 1]-utilizing host; DNA providing resistance to two antibiotics to which the wild-type C[sub 1]-utilizing host is susceptible, each of the antibiotic resistance markers having a recognition site for a restriction endonuclease; a cos site; and a means for preventing replication in the C[sub 1]-utilizing host. The vehicle is used for complementation mapping as follows. DNA comprising a gene from the C[sub 1]-utilizing organism is inserted at the restriction nuclease recognition site, inactivating the antibiotic resistance marker at that site. The vehicle can then be used to form a cosmid structure to infect the non-C[sub 1]-utilizing (e.g., E. coli) host, and then conjugated with a selected C[sub 1]-utilizing mutant. Resistance to the other antibiotic by the mutant is a marker of the conjugation. Other phenotypical changes in the mutant, e.g., loss of an auxotrophic trait, is attributed to the C[sub 1] gene. The vector is also used to inactivate genes whose protein products catalyze side reactions that divert compounds from a biosynthetic pathway to a desired product, thereby producing an organism that makes the desired product in higher yields. 3 figs.

  3. Local cloning of entangled qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Sujit K.; Kunkri, Samir; Rahaman, Ramij; Roy, Anirban

    2007-11-15

    We discuss the exact cloning of orthogonal but entangled qubits under local operations and classical communication. The amount of entanglement necessary in a blank copy is obtained for various cases. Surprisingly, this amount is more than 1 ebit for certain sets of two nonmaximal but equally entangled states of two qubits. To clone any three Bell states, at least log{sub 2} 3 ebit is necessary.

  4. Islamic perspectives on human cloning.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    The present paper seeks to assess various views from Islamic jurists relating to human cloning, which is one of the controversial topics in the recent past. Taking Islamic jurisprudence principles, such as the rule of necessity for self preservation and respect for human beings, the rule of la darar wa la dirar ('the necessity to refrain from causing harm to oneself and others') and the rule of usr wa haraj, one may indicate that if human cloning could not be prohibited, as such, it could still be opposed because it gives way to various harmful consequences, which include family disorder, chaos in the clone's family relationships, physical and mental diseases for clones and suffering of egg donors and surrogate mothers. However with due attention to the fact that the reasons behind the prohibition of abortion only restrict the destruction of human embryos in their post-implantation stages, human cloning for biomedical research and exploitation of stem cells from cloned embryos at the blastocyst stage for therapeutic purposes would be acceptable. PMID:17966502

  5. Cloning goes to the movies.

    PubMed

    Cormick, Craig

    2006-10-01

    Public attitude research conducted by Biotechnology Australia shows that one of the major sources of information on human reproductive cloning is movies. Traditionally, understanding of new and emerging technologies has come through the mass media but human cloning, being so widely addressed through the popular culture of movies, is more effectively defined by Hollywood than the news media or science media. But how well are the science and social issues of cloning portrayed in box office hits such as The Island, Multiplicity, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Jurassic Park? These movies have enormous reach and undoubted influence, and are therefore worth analyzing in some detail. This study looks at 33 movies made between 1971 and 2005 that address human reproductive cloning, and it categorizes the films based on their genre and potential influence. Yet rather than simply rating the quality of the science portrayed, the study compares the key messages in these movies with public attitudes towards cloning, to examine the correlations. PMID:17214211

  6. Structure and evolution of the mouse pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (Psg) gene locus

    PubMed Central

    McLellan, Andrew S; Fischer, Beate; Dveksler, Gabriela; Hori, Tomomi; Wynne, Freda; Ball, Melanie; Okumura, Katsuzumi; Moore, Tom; Zimmermann, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Background The pregnancy-specific glycoprotein (Psg) genes encode proteins of unknown function, and are members of the carcinoembryonic antigen (Cea) gene family, which is a member of the immunoglobulin gene (Ig) superfamily. In rodents and primates, but not in artiodactyls (even-toed ungulates / hoofed mammals), there have been independent expansions of the Psg gene family, with all members expressed exclusively in placental trophoblast cells. For the mouse Psg genes, we sought to determine the genomic organisation of the locus, the expression profiles of the various family members, and the evolution of exon structure, to attempt to reconstruct the evolutionary history of this locus, and to determine whether expansion of the gene family has been driven by selection for increased gene dosage, or diversification of function. Results We collated the mouse Psg gene sequences currently in the public genome and expressed-sequence tag (EST) databases and used systematic BLAST searches to generate complete sequences for all known mouse Psg genes. We identified a novel family member, Psg31, which is similar to Psg30 but, uniquely amongst mouse Psg genes, has a duplicated N1 domain. We also identified a novel splice variant of Psg16 (bCEA). We show that Psg24 and Psg30 / Psg31 have independently undergone expansion of N-domain number. By mapping BAC, YAC and cosmid clones we described two clusters of Psg genes, which we linked and oriented using fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH). Comparison of our Psg locus map with the public mouse genome database indicates good agreement in overall structure and further elucidates gene order. Expression levels of Psg genes in placentas of different developmental stages revealed dramatic differences in the developmental expression profile of individual family members. Conclusion We have combined existing information, and provide new information concerning the evolution of mouse Psg exon organization, the mouse Psg genomic locus

  7. Cloning of the human DNA methyltransferase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ramchanani, S.K.; Rouleau, J.; Szyf, M.

    1994-09-01

    During the process of carcinogenesis it has been observed that DNA methylation is deregulated. At least two levels of regulation of the mouse DNA MeTase have been shown: at the transcriptional level, via its promoter, and at the post transcriptional level in a cell cycle dependent fashion. The sequence of the complete DNA MeTase gene and identification of the promoter has not yet been reported. Using a probe generated by PCR of the human DNA MeTase cDNA, a human genomic library was screened and a clone of approximately 22 kilobases (kb) was isolated. It was found that this clone contains the complete coding sequence of the DNA MeTase enzyme. Sequence analysis along with restriction enzyme digests have allowed us to construct a partial map of the physical structure of the human DNA MeTase gene. This partial structure has already revealed some interesting aspects related to the genetic evolution of the human DNA MeTase. First, the proposed catalytic domain of the human DNA MeTase is extremely homologous to all other cytosine DNA MeTases, even to those that are found in bacteria, and this catalytic domain is conserved within one complete exon in the human gene. This is very different from the structure of the 5{prime} region of the gene, which is fragmented into numerous little introns and exons. Within one of the small introns that have been identified, a trinucleotide repeat of ATG occurs (9 times in a row), and this repeat is upstream of the proposed start site of translation. Trinucleotide repeat expansion has been shown to be a genetic hot spot for mutation, but even more interesting is the nature of the repeat, ATG, which is the translation start codon; this repeat appears to be in frame with the {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} coding sequence, the implications being that possible alternative methyltransferases may be translated under certain conditions such as cancer.

  8. The rise and fall of horror autotoxicus and forbidden clones.

    PubMed

    Jennette, J Charles; Falk, Ronald J

    2010-09-01

    Cui and associates show that healthy individuals have natural autoantibodies (NAAs) specific for myeloperoxidase, proteinase 3, and glomerular basement membrane (GBM) with the same specificity as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and anti-GBM antibodies that are pathogenic. Although Ehrlich proposed horror autotoxicus and Burnet envisioned elimination of forbidden clones, NAAs are present in all healthy individuals and play beneficial homeostatic roles. Pathogenic autoimmunity is dysregulation of natural homeostatic autoimmunity rather than onset of a previously absent self-recognition. PMID:20805814

  9. Local cloning of entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Gheorghiu, Vlad; Yu Li; Cohen, Scott M.

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the conditions under which a set S of pure bipartite quantum states on a DxD system can be locally cloned deterministically by separable operations, when at least one of the states is full Schmidt rank. We allow for the possibility of cloning using a resource state that is less than maximally entangled. Our results include that: (i) all states in S must be full Schmidt rank and equally entangled under the G-concurrence measure, and (ii) the set S can be extended to a larger clonable set generated by a finite group G of order |G|=N, the number of states in the larger set. It is then shown that any local cloning apparatus is capable of cloning a number of states that divides D exactly. We provide a complete solution for two central problems in local cloning, giving necessary and sufficient conditions for (i) when a set of maximally entangled states can be locally cloned, valid for all D; and (ii) local cloning of entangled qubit states with nonvanishing entanglement. In both of these cases, we show that a maximally entangled resource is necessary and sufficient, and the states must be related to each other by local unitary 'shift' operations. These shifts are determined by the group structure, so need not be simple cyclic permutations. Assuming this shifted form and partially entangled states, then in D=3 we show that a maximally entangled resource is again necessary and sufficient, while for higher-dimensional systems, we find that the resource state must be strictly more entangled than the states in S. All of our necessary conditions for separable operations are also necessary conditions for local operations and classical communication (LOCC), since the latter is a proper subset of the former. In fact, all our results hold for LOCC, as our sufficient conditions are demonstrated for LOCC, directly.

  10. Local cloning of two product states

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhengfeng; Feng Yuan; Ying Mingsheng

    2005-09-15

    Local quantum operations and classical communication (LOCC) put considerable constraints on many quantum information processing tasks such as cloning and discrimination. Surprisingly, however, discrimination of any two pure states survives such constraints in some sense. We show that cloning is not that lucky; namely, probabilistic LOCC cloning of two product states is strictly less efficient than global cloning. We prove our result by giving explicitly the efficiency formula of local cloning of any two product states.