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1

Sleep/wake behaviours of elite athletes from individual and team sports.  

PubMed

Abstract Sleep is an essential component for athlete recovery due to its physiological and psychological restorative effects, yet few studies have explored the habitual sleep/wake behaviour of elite athletes. The aims of the present study were to investigate the habitual sleep/wake behaviour of elite athletes, and to compare the differences in sleep between athletes from individual and team sports. A total of 124 (104 male, 20 female) elite athletes (mean ± s: age 22.2 ± 3.0 years) from five individual sports and four team sports participated in this study. Participants' sleep/wake behaviour was assessed using self-report sleep diaries and wrist activity monitors for a minimum of seven nights (range 7-28 nights) during a typical training phase. Mixed-effects analyses of variances were conducted to compare the differences in the sleep/wake behaviour of athletes from two sport types (i.e. individual and team). Overall, this sample of athletes went to bed at 22:59 ± 1.3, woke up at 07:15 ± 1.2 and obtained 6.8 ± 1.1 h of sleep per night. Athletes from individual sports went to bed earlier, woke up earlier and obtained less sleep (individual vs team; 6.5 vs 7.0 h) than athletes from team sports. These data indicate that athletes obtain well below the recommended 8 h of sleep per night, with shorter sleep durations existing among athletes from individual sports. PMID:24993935

Lastella, Michele; Roach, Gregory D; Halson, Shona L; Sargent, Charli

2015-03-01

2

Performance Level Affects the Dietary Supplement Intake of Both Individual and Team Sports Athletes  

PubMed Central

Dietary supplement (DS) intake is high in elite level athletes, however few studies have investigated the impact that the performance level of the athletes has on supplementation intake in individual and team sports. The purpose of the study was to determine and compare the DS intake among individual and team sport athletes of various performance levels. A total of 2845 participants (athletes: 2783, controls: 62) between the ages of 11 and 44 years old participated in the study. A 3-page questionnaire was developed to assess the intake of DS. Athletes were categorized based on participation in individual (n = 775) and team sports (n = 2008). To assess the effect of performance level in supplementation intake, athletes were categorized based on training volume, participation in the national team, and winning at least one medal in provincial, national, international or Olympic games. Overall, 37% of all athletes of various performance levels reported taking at least one DS in the last month. A higher prevalence of DS intake was reported in individual (44%) compared to team sport athletes (35%) (p < 0.001). Athletes of high performance level reported greater DS intake compared to lower performance athletes. Males reported a significantly greater prevalence of DS intake compared to females. The most popular supplement reported was amino acid preparation with the main reason of supplementation being endurance improvements. In conclusion, performance level and type of sport appear to impact the DS practices of male and female athletes. These findings should be validated in other populations. Key points 37% of Mediterranean athletes of various sports and levels have reported taking dietary supplements. The performance level of the athletes affects the dietary supplementation intake. Athletes in individual sports appear to have a higher DS intake compared to team sport athletes. Male athletes appear to take more dietary supplements compared to female athletes. PMID:24149744

Giannopoulou, Ifigenia; Noutsos, Kostantinos; Apostolidis, Nikolaos; Bayios, Ioannis; Nassis, George P.

2013-01-01

3

Sex Role Orientations of Male and Female Collegiate Athletes from Selected Individual and Team Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Uses the Bem Sex Role Inventory to compare the sex role orientations of male and female collegiate athletes. Results indicate no significant differences for team sports players, but higher femininity scores for females in individual sports. (FMW)

Wrisberg, Craig A.; And Others

1988-01-01

4

Yin and yang, or peas in a pod? Individual-sport versus team-sport athletes and altitude training.  

PubMed

The question of whether altitude training can enhance subsequent sea-level performance has been well investigated over many decades. However, research on this topic has focused on athletes from individual or endurance sports, with scant number of studies on team-sport athletes. Questions that need to be answered include whether this type of training may enhance team-sport athlete performance, when success in team-sport is often more based on technical and tactical ability rather than physical capacity per se. This review will contrast and compare athletes from two sports representative of endurance (cycling) and team-sports (soccer). Specifically, we draw on the respective competition schedules, physiological capacities, activity profiles and energetics of each sport to compare the similarities between athletes from these sports and discuss the relative merits of altitude training for these athletes. The application of conventional live-high, train-high; live-high, train-low; and intermittent hypoxic training for team-sport athletes in the context of the above will be presented. When the above points are considered, we will conclude that dependent on resources and training objectives, altitude training can be seen as an attractive proposition to enhance the physical performance of team-sport athletes without the need for an obvious increase in training load. PMID:24255910

Aughey, Robert J; Buchheit, Martin; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Bourdon, Pitre C; Gore, Christopher J

2013-12-01

5

Yin and yang, or peas in a pod? Individual-sport versus team-sport athletes and altitude training  

PubMed Central

The question of whether altitude training can enhance subsequent sea-level performance has been well investigated over many decades. However, research on this topic has focused on athletes from individual or endurance sports, with scant number of studies on team-sport athletes. Questions that need to be answered include whether this type of training may enhance team-sport athlete performance, when success in team-sport is often more based on technical and tactical ability rather than physical capacity per se. This review will contrast and compare athletes from two sports representative of endurance (cycling) and team-sports (soccer). Specifically, we draw on the respective competition schedules, physiological capacities, activity profiles and energetics of each sport to compare the similarities between athletes from these sports and discuss the relative merits of altitude training for these athletes. The application of conventional live-high, train-high; live-high, train-low; and intermittent hypoxic training for team-sport athletes in the context of the above will be presented. When the above points are considered, we will conclude that dependent on resources and training objectives, altitude training can be seen as an attractive proposition to enhance the physical performance of team-sport athletes without the need for an obvious increase in training load. PMID:24255910

Aughey, Robert J; Buchheit, Martin; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Roach, Gregory D; Sargent, Charli; Billaut, François; Varley, Matthew C; Bourdon, Pitre C; Gore, Christopher J

2013-01-01

6

Take One for the Team? Influence of Team and Individual Sport Participation on High School Athlete Substance Use Patterns  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The current Web-based survey investigated the association between team or individual sport participation (or both) and self-reported alcohol and tobacco use among high school athletes (N = 1,275) transitioning to college. Peak blood alcohol concentration, weekly drinking, and alcohol-related problems were significantly lower among athletes in…

Kulesza, Magdalena; Grossbard, Joel R.; Kilmer, Jason; Copeland, Amy L.; Larimer, Mary E.

2014-01-01

7

Examining elite parasport athletes with sport involvement and sports equipment.  

PubMed

Elite athletes require the most advanced sports equipment to maintain their competitive edge, but manufacturers cannot always satisfy these athletes' specific equipment needs. Sport involvement can influence sports-equipment selections and is described as the process by which individuals rely on attitudes and belief systems to make sports-related consumption decisions. This study involved semistructured interviews with 5 elite Parasport athletes to identify and analyze the role of sport involvement in their selection of sports equipment. The results revealed that the athletes identified product limitations, created a collaborative environment, and promoted a culture of innovation to develop new sports products and address existing limitations. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. PMID:25544717

Hambrick, Marion E; Hums, Mary A; Bower, Glenna G; Wolff, Eli A

2015-01-01

8

Sports Nutrition for Young Athletes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nutritional needs for peak athletic performance include sufficient calorie intake, adequate hydration, and attention to timing of meals. Student athletes and their advisors often are misinformed or have misconceptions about sports nutrition. This paper identifies nutritional needs of young athletes, reviews common misconceptions, and examines the…

Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E.; McBee, Sheldon

2005-01-01

9

An Analysis of Individual Stretching Programs of Intercollegiate Athletes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To evaluate individual stretching programs of intercollegiate athletes, 238 athletes (164 male, 74 female) in ten sports were surveyed about their stretching practices. Almost all of the athletes stretched, but to varying degrees. Muscle groups stretched by the fewest athletes were the adductors, plantar flexors, hips, and neck. (Author/MT)

Levine, Michael; And Others

1987-01-01

10

Why Young Athletes Sign Up for Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students participate in sports because of several reasons. A coach may effectively guide his team if he knows what motivates each player. In this article, the authors investigate the reasons why athletes sign up for sports. They designed a questionnaire with open-ended and close-ended questions which focuses on how students perceived sports, why…

McGee, Zach; Strasser, Joe; McKenzie, Isaac; Stoll, Sharon

2005-01-01

11

Athletes' Hours Renew Debate over College Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past year, members of Congress have poked around the well-fed belly of intercollegiate athletics, questioning whether college sports deserves its tax-exempt status. Myles Brand, the president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), has led the countercharge against the government, repeatedly defending the educational value…

Wolverton, Brad

2008-01-01

12

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Athlete Pre-Participation Health History, 2012-2013  

E-print Network

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Athlete Pre-Participation Health History at Student Health for your Pre-Participation Physical. Please print this form and fax to General Medicine_________________ Name____________________________________________ Sex_______ Date of Birth______________ Sport(s

Acton, Scott

13

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Student-Athlete Health History 2013-14  

E-print Network

University of Virginia Athletics & Sports Medicine New Student-Athlete Health History 2013____________________________________________ Sex_______ Date of Birth_______________ Sport(s)_________________________ UVA Student ID specified, all questions below refer to your lifetime health history. You must respond to all

Acton, Scott

14

ATHLETICS & RECREATION Mr. Mark Mullin NCAA Division II Athletics program has 15 intercollegiate sports in the Great Lakes Valley  

E-print Network

sports in the Great Lakes Valley Conference. The intramural program supports 19 individual sports with over 6,000 participants and 19 team sports with 400 teams. Our athletic facilities include a state Involvement | Student Success STUDENT RECREATION CENTER HAVENER CENTERSTUDENT HEALTH SERVICES #12;Officeofthe

Missouri-Rolla, University of

15

The Female High School Athlete and Interscholastic Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes the effect on existing athletic programs of the female high school athlete's legally protectable interest in the benefits of an interscholastic sports program where one is provided for the male athletes. (Author)

Fabri, Candace J.; Fox, Elaine S.

1975-01-01

16

The Athlete’s Perception of Coaches’ Behavior Towards Competitors with a Different Sports Level  

PubMed Central

The study was designed to examine how active and former athletes across a different sports level perceived coaching behavior. Eighty competitive athletes (44 males and 36 females; 21.89 ± 1.48 years of age; 8.35 ± 3.65 years of competitive experience) from the University School of Physical Education in Cracow, Poland, participated in the study. They represented both individual (n = 50) and team sports (n = 30). Seventeen participants were internationally renowned and 63 were recognized for competitive excellence at a national level. The participants responded to a demographic survey and the Coaches’ Behaviors Survey. The qualitative analysis procedures were employed to extract themes from open-ended questions. It was confirmed that coaches who perceived their athletes as more skilled, also treated them differently. Female athletes as compared with male athletes, more frequently pointed at the leniency in coach’s behavior towards highly skilled athletes, and perceived it as a factor inhibiting athletic development. Additionally, women often found individualization of the training process as a behavior reinforcing development. Less accomplished athletes more often pointed out to “a post-training session interest in the athlete” as directed only towards more accomplished counterparts; however, they indicated “leniency and favoring” less often than the athletes with international achievements. They also listed “excessive criticism” as a type of behavior hindering development, but they indicated coaches’ “authoritarianism and distance” less frequently than the more accomplished counterparts. The study added data to the discussion of the Pygmalion effect and the phenomenon of the self-fulfilling prophecy both in general (Rosenthal and Jacobson, 1968; Harris and Rosenthal, 1985; Jussim, 1989) and sport psychology (Harris and Rosenthal, 1985; Horn et al., 1998; Solomon and Kosmitzki, 1996; Solomon et al., 1998; Solomon, 2001). PMID:24511359

Siekanska, Ma?gorzata; Blecharz, Jan; Wojtowicz, Agnieszka

2013-01-01

17

[Sports and athletes deserve doping hunting].  

PubMed

This article reviews the evidence-based ergogenic potential adverse effects of the most common products in use by recreational and elite athletes today. This is an aggressively marketed and controversial area of sports medicine wordwide. It is therefore important for the scientific societies, clinicians, dieticians sports federations to be well versed in the more popular supplements and drugs in order to have an important role in information and prevention attitudes that can lead to health risks or addictions! PMID:23971326

Gremion, G; Saugy, M

2013-07-17

18

Perceptions of Sport Retirement by Current Student-Athletes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focused on the problem of college student-athletes retiring from their sports unprepared for life outside of sanctioned athletics. The purpose was to identify if a current student-athlete believes he/she is prepared for a career life after competitive college athletics and who the student-athlete feels should provide guidance into the…

Leffler, Brandy Sue

2012-01-01

19

Why Do Athletes Drink Sports Drinks?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Why does an athlete reach for a sports drink after a tough game or practice? The learning cycle presented in this article helps students answer this question. Learning cycles (Marek 2009) are designed to guide students through direct experiences with a pa

Brook Carlsen

2010-12-01

20

The genetics of sports injuries and athletic performance  

PubMed Central

Summary Purpose: in the last two decades, several evidences have been provided to support the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms and the susceptibility to develop injuries participating in sport and performance related to sports activity. We report up-to-date review of the genetics factors involved in tendon injuries and athletic performance. Methods: we searched PubMed using the terms “sports injuries”, “athletic performance” and “genetics” over the period 1990 to the present day. We also included non-English journals. Results: most of the currently established or putative tendinopathy susceptibility loci have been analyzed by candidate gene studies. The genes currently associated with tendon injuries include gene encoding for collagen, matrix metallopeptidase, tenascin and growth factors. Several genes have been related to the physical performance phenotypes affecting endurance capacity and muscle performance. The most studied include ACE and ACTN3 genes. Conclusions: genetics determines the response of an individual to the surrounding environment. Recently, some of the individual genetic variations contributing to the athletic performance and the onset of musculoskeletal injuries, particularly in tendon and ligament tissues, have been identified. However, the identification of the genetic background related to susceptibility to injuries and physical performance of the athletes is challenging yet and further studies must be performed to establish the specific role of each gene and the potential effect of the interaction of these. PMID:24367777

Maffulli, Nicola; Margiotti, Katia; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Fazio, Vito Michele; Denaro, Vincenzo

2013-01-01

21

COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF ATHLETES WITH SPORT CONCUSSION  

PubMed Central

Currently, the popular approach to post-concussion management of the athlete relies upon the use of a multidisciplinary team of healthcare providers, all typically coordinated by a physician. That core team is often supplemented by nurses, psychotherapists, coaches, teachers, the athletic director, and, of course, family members. However, access to such a model is frequently limited by financial, geographical, and numerous other factors. In the absence of such resources, a thorough clinical evaluation and management by an available, ongoing healthcare provider, quite often the sports physical therapist, becomes necessary. The authors recommend that the professional who coordinates the athlete's post-concussion healthcare should focus efforts upon a comprehensive assessment and tailored treatment plan specific to the athlete's post-concussive symptoms. Assessment of both pre-morbid function and post-injury physical, cognitive, psychosocial, emotional, and behavioral issues, including the patient's support system, can assist the clinician with identifying specific constraints to sport, academic, social, and vocational activity participation. Hence, the assessment provides structure to the athlete's individualized treatment plan. Successful specialized interventions that address the multi-faceted impairments of sport related concussion frequently require knowledge of resources in a variety of other healthcare professions, in order to facilitate appropriate and necessary treatment referrals. Initial assessment should be followed by repeat monitoring throughout treatment, and spanning a variety of environments, in order to ensure the athlete's full recovery prior to return, not only to sport participation, but also to involvement in social, academic, and/or employment related life activities. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:22893863

McQueen-Borden, Emily; Bell, Roberta A.; Barr, Thomas; Juengling, Jenifer

2012-01-01

22

Double play : athletes' use of sport video games to enhance athletic performance  

E-print Network

A design feature of contemporary sport video games allows elite athletes to play as themselves in life-like representations of actual sporting events. The relation between playing sport video games and actual physical ...

Silberman, Lauren (Lauren Beth)

2010-01-01

23

Sport Psychology Service Provision: Preferences for Consultant Characteristics and Mode of Delivery among Elite Malaysian Athletes  

PubMed Central

Factors relevant to the working alliance between athletes and sport psychology consultants were investigated in a sample of elite Malaysian athletes (n = 217). The athletes represented a variety of team and individual sports, and they provided information about the perceived importance of seven consultant characteristics/behaviors as well as seven program delivery options. At a full-sample level, general preferences were expressed for consultants to lead a physically active lifestyle, regularly attend training sessions and competitions, and have prior experience as an athlete or coach. General preferences were also expressed for program content to be determined by the coach or consultant, and for regular, small doses of mental skills training to be delivered in a face-to-face context throughout the year. At a sub-group level, team sport athletes had stronger preferences than individual sport athletes for program delivery on a group/team basis, while individual sport athletes had stronger preferences than team sport athletes for having a role in determining program content. Findings are discussed in relation to dominant value themes within Malaysian society and the reinforcement of these themes within specific sport subcultures. Key points Consultant characteristics and program delivery methods have an impact on the effectiveness of sport psychology services. Preferred consultant characteristics and preferred methods of delivery may be affected by cultural and subcultural values. Elite Malaysian athletes prefer consultants to lead a physically active lifestyle; to regularly attend training/competition; and to have prior experience as an athlete or coach. Elite Malaysian athletes also prefer that the coach or consultant determine program content, and that mental skills training take place in a face-to-face context throughout the year. PMID:25177193

Ponnusamy, Vellapandian; Grove, J. Robert

2014-01-01

24

Supporting the paralympic athlete: focus on wheeled sports.  

PubMed

The complexity of wheelchair sports provides the scientist with a unique challenge. There are two major components that contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance: the athlete and the chair. It is the interaction of these two components that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. This article will describe three discrete case studies on how sport scientists have worked with Great Britain coaches and practitioners to help optimise training leading to a major competition through evidence base practise. A fourth area will describe on-going work designed to address the optimisation of wheelchair configurations for wheelchair court sports. It will focus on four sports: wheelchair racing, wheelchair tennis, wheelchair basketball and wheelchair rugby. The first topic will discuss the concept of pushing economy and mechanical efficiency of wheelchair propulsion. The second topic will show how technology assists the coaching process. The third topic will illustrate the concept of sports classification, and show how training volume 'in terms of basketball shooting' may need to be individually assigned and finally future research within wheelchair team sports and chair configurations will be examined. PMID:20528446

Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria

2010-01-01

25

Development management model of elite athletes in team sports games.  

PubMed

The scientific and expert approach to defining a model of managing the development of top-level athletes in team sports games is oriented toward the challenging values that mark a certain position and role in a team sports game. A hypothetical dynamic model of development management of top-level athletes in team sports games, which explicitly shows the order of procedures in the process of multidimensional development of athletes using the concepts of the dynamic systems theory has been suggested. The hypothetical model of management shows that the athlete's development is primarily under the influence of genetic potential, sports preparation process and the competition format, as well as the management of their lifestyle. In the process, the athlete's development is seen as a dynamic and plastic process under the influence of selective procedures and training programs that enable a continuous change in the level of the athlete's performance and sports preparation process. PMID:19662752

Trnini?, Marko; Trnini?, Slavko; Papi?, Vladan

2009-06-01

26

Reflections on Sport Psychology and the Olympic Athlete.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The eventual role that educational and clinical sport psychologists may play in assisting high-level athletes is discussed. An example of research on Olympic-level rifle and pistol shooters is presented as an example of how sport scientists can be involved in influencing policy for Olympic athletes. Obstacles which prevent the applied potential of…

Landers, Daniel M.

27

What do athletes drink during competitive sporting activities?  

PubMed

Although expert groups have developed guidelines for fluid intake during sports, there is debate about their real-world application. We reviewed the literature on self-selected hydration strategies during sporting competitions to determine what is apparently practical and valued by athletes. We found few studies of drinking practices involving elite or highly competitive athletes, even in popular sports. The available literature revealed wide variability in fluid intake and sweat losses across and within different events with varied strategies to allow fluid intake. Typical drinking practices appear to limit body mass (BM) losses to ~2 % in non-elite competitors. There are events, however, in which mean losses are greater, particularly among elite competitors and in hot weather, and evidence that individual participants fail to meet current guidelines by gaining BM or losing >2 % BM over the competition activity. Substantial (>5 %) BM loss is noted in the few studies of elite competitors in endurance and ultra-endurance events; while this may be consistent with winning outcomes, such observations cannot judge whether performance was optimal for that individual. A complex array of factors influence opportunities to drink during continuous competitive activities, many of which are outside the athlete's control: these include event rules and tactics, regulated availability of fluid, need to maintain optimal technique or speed, and gastrointestinal comfort. Therefore, it is questionable, particularly for top competitors, whether drinking can be truly ad libitum (defined as "whenever and in whatever volumes chosen by the athlete"). While there are variable relationships between fluid intake, fluid balance across races, and finishing times, in many situations it appears that top athletes take calculated risks in emphasizing the costs of drinking against the benefits. However, some non-elite competitors may need to be mindful of the disadvantages of drinking beyond requirements during long events. Across the sparse literature on competition hydration practices in other sports, there are examples of planned and/or ad hoc opportunities to consume fluid, where enhanced access to drinks may allow situations at least close to ad libitum drinking. However, this situation is not universal and, again, the complex array of factors that influence the opportunity to drink during an event is also often beyond the athletes' control. Additionally, some competition formats result in athletes commencing the event with a body fluid deficit because of their failure to rehydrate from a previous bout of training/competition or weight-making strategies. Finally, since fluids consumed during exercise may also be a source of other ingredients (e.g., carbohydrate, electrolytes, or caffeine) or characteristics (e.g., temperature) that can increase palatability or performance, there may be both desirable volumes and patterns of intake that are independent of hydration concerns or thirst, as well as benefits from undertaking a "paced" fluid plan. Further studies of real-life hydration practices in sports including information on motives for drinking or not, along with intervention studies that simulate the actual nature of real-life sport, are needed before conclusions can be made about ideal drinking strategies for sports. Different interpretations may be needed for elite competitors and recreational participants. PMID:23529286

Garth, Alison K; Burke, Louise M

2013-07-01

28

Epidemiology of Concussions Among United States High School Athletes in 20 Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: In the United States (US), an estimated 300,000 sports-related concussions occur annually. Among individuals 15 to 24 years of age, sports are second only to motor vehicle crashes as the leading cause of concussions.Purpose: To investigate the epidemiology of concussions in high school athletes by comparing rates and patterns of concussion among 20 sports.Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study.Methods: Using

Mallika Marar; Natalie M. McIlvain; Sarah K. Fields; R. Dawn Comstock

2012-01-01

29

Sport-specific biomechanics of spinal injuries in the athlete (throwing athletes, rotational sports, and contact-collision sports).  

PubMed

Athletes consistently recruit or transfer high levels of repetitive force through the spine. Proper force transmission from the legs to the hips and pelvis and through the trunk is vital. Hip and pelvis joint restrictions and muscle strength deficits coupled with poor endurance of the trunk muscle will lead to spinal instability, which is habitually described in symptomatic athletes. A rehabilitation program that targets the unstable base first, and then progresses to strengthening of the pelvis and hips and targets control of movement in a sport-specific approach, should result in pain reduction, skill enhancement, and a safe return to play. PMID:22657990

Donatelli, Robert; Dimond, Donn; Holland, Matt

2012-07-01

30

College Sports Inc.: The Athletic Department vs. the University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Big-time intercollegiate athletics has become College Sports Inc., a huge entertainment conglomerate with operating methods and objectives totally separate from, and often opposed to, the educational aims of the schools housing its franchises. This article dispels prevailing myths and seeks a new role definition for intercollegiate athletics

Sperber, Murray

1990-01-01

31

Sports ability after Bankart procedure in professional athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recurrent anterior shoulder instability and the restoration of sports ability after surgery are common problems, especially among professional athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate, level and time of returning to sports activity after Bankart procedure in anterior shoulder instability in high level atheletes. From 1992–1994 61 patients suffering from recurrent anterior shoulder instability were operated

A. Pavlik; D. Csépai; P. Hidas; A. Bánóczy

1996-01-01

32

American Indian Collegiate Athletes: Accessing Education through Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Few activities have the power to bring people together as sports; victory is contagious, defeat unifies, and the concept of a team can create common goals and unbreakable bonds among teammates, communities, and even an entire nation. In a sense, sport has the power to change lives. The lessons that athletics can teach-preparation, competitiveness,…

Ali-Christie, Alisse

2013-01-01

33

How Does Sport Psychology Actually Improve Athletic Performance? A Framework to Facilitate Athletes' and Coaches' Understanding  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The popularity of sport psychology, both as an academic discipline and an applied practice, has grown substantially over the past two decades. Few within the realm of competitive athletics would argue with the importance of being mentally prepared prior to an athletic competition as well as the need to maintain that particular mindset during a…

Gee, Chris J.

2010-01-01

34

Medical sports injuries in the youth athlete: emergency management.  

PubMed

As the number of youth sports participants continues to rise over the past decade, so too have sports related injuries and emergency department visits. With low levels of oversight and regulation observed in youth sports, the responsibility for safety education of coaches, parents, law makers, organizations and institutions falls largely on the sports medicine practitioner. The highly publicized catastrophic events of concussion, sudden cardiac death, and heat related illness have moved these topics to the forefront of sports medicine discussions. Updated guidelines for concussion in youth athletes call for a more conservative approach to management in both the acute and return to sport phases. Athletes younger than eighteen suspected of having a concussion are no longer allowed to return to play on the same day. Reducing the risk of sudden cardiac death in the young athlete is a multi-factorial process encompassing pre-participation screenings, proper use of safety equipment, proper rules and regulations, and immediate access to Automated External Defibrillators (AED) as corner stones. Susceptibility to heat related illness for youth athletes is no longer viewed as rooted in physiologic variations from adults, but instead, as the result of various situations and conditions in which participation takes place. Hydration before, during and after strenuous exercise in a high heat stress environment is of significant importance. Knowledge of identification, management and risk reduction in emergency medical conditions of the young athlete positions the sports physical therapist as an effective provider, advocate and resource for safety in youth sports participation. This manuscript provides the basis for management of 3 major youth emergency sports medicine conditions. PMID:22530197

Merkel, Donna L; Molony, Joseph T

2012-04-01

35

MEDICAL SPORTS INJURIES IN THE YOUTH ATHLETE: EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT  

PubMed Central

As the number of youth sports participants continues to rise over the past decade, so too have sports related injuries and emergency department visits. With low levels of oversight and regulation observed in youth sports, the responsibility for safety education of coaches, parents, law makers, organizations and institutions falls largely on the sports medicine practitioner. The highly publicized catastrophic events of concussion, sudden cardiac death, and heat related illness have moved these topics to the forefront of sports medicine discussions. Updated guidelines for concussion in youth athletes call for a more conservative approach to management in both the acute and return to sport phases. Athletes younger than eighteen suspected of having a concussion are no longer allowed to return to play on the same day. Reducing the risk of sudden cardiac death in the young athlete is a multi?factorial process encompassing pre?participation screenings, proper use of safety equipment, proper rules and regulations, and immediate access to Automated External Defibrillators (AED) as corner stones. Susceptibility to heat related illness for youth athletes is no longer viewed as rooted in physiologic variations from adults, but instead, as the result of various situations and conditions in which participation takes place. Hydration before, during and after strenuous exercise in a high heat stress environment is of significant importance. Knowledge of identification, management and risk reduction in emergency medical conditions of the young athlete positions the sports physical therapist as an effective provider, advocate and resource for safety in youth sports participation. This manuscript provides the basis for management of 3 major youth emergency sports medicine conditions. PMID:22530197

Molony Jr, Joseph T.

2012-01-01

36

National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Safe Weight Loss and Maintenance Practices in Sport and Exercise  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present athletic trainers with recommendations for safe weight loss and weight maintenance practices for athletes and active clients and to provide athletes, clients, coaches, and parents with safe guidelines that will allow athletes and clients to achieve and maintain weight and body composition goals. Background: Unsafe weight management practices can compromise athletic performance and negatively affect health. Athletes and clients often attempt to lose weight by not eating, limiting caloric or specific nutrients from the diet, engaging in pathogenic weight control behaviors, and restricting fluids. These people often respond to pressures of the sport or activity, coaches, peers, or parents by adopting negative body images and unsafe practices to maintain an ideal body composition for the activity. We provide athletic trainers with recommendations for safe weight loss and weight maintenance in sport and exercise. Although safe weight gain is also a concern for athletic trainers and their athletes and clients, that topic is outside the scope of this position statement. Recommendations: Athletic trainers are often the source of nutrition information for athletes and clients; therefore, they must have knowledge of proper nutrition, weight management practices, and methods to change body composition. Body composition assessments should be done in the most scientifically appropriate manner possible. Reasonable and individualized weight and body composition goals should be identified by appropriately trained health care personnel (eg, athletic trainers, registered dietitians, physicians). In keeping with the American Dietetics Association (ADA) preferred nomenclature, this document uses the terms registered dietitian or dietician when referring to a food and nutrition expert who has met the academic and professional requirements specified by the ADA's Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education. In some cases, a registered nutritionist may have equivalent credentials and be the commonly used term. All weight management and exercise protocols used to achieve these goals should be safe and based on the most current evidence. Athletes, clients, parents, and coaches should be educated on how to determine safe weight and body composition so that athletes and clients more safely achieve competitive weights that will meet sport and activity requirements while also allowing them to meet their energy and nutritional needs for optimal health and performance. PMID:21669104

Turocy, Paula Sammarone; DePalma, Bernard F.; Horswill, Craig A.; Laquale, Kathleen M.; Martin, Thomas J.; Perry, Arlette C.; Somova, Marla J.; Utter, Alan C.

2011-01-01

37

Osteoarthritis in Young, Active, and Athletic Individuals  

PubMed Central

Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most devastating chronic conditions that affect people around the world. Although the usual population associated with the condition is the elderly, who are mostly inactive, athletes and younger individuals are also susceptible. Depending on the population, the etiology may differ; injuries, occupational activities, and obesity appear to be the most common causes of OA in young and athletic populations. Diagnosing OA in athletes and young individuals is sometimes challenging because of their increased pain tolerance. However, the treatment of OA in these populations does not differ from its management in the general population. Several considerations need to be taken into account when choosing a treatment modality. The purpose of this review is to address OA in athletes and younger individuals and to discuss its presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24899825

Amoako, Adae O; Pujalte, George Guntur A

2014-01-01

38

Sport Psychology Consulting with Latin American Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this paper was to provide the sport psychology consultant with information about Latin American cultural groups in relation to sport psychology consulting. The paper contains a review of key multicultural terms and concepts, such as worldview and acculturation. This is followed by a brief overview of the various historical influences on Latin American culture. Next, we discussed

Anthony P. Kontos; Erick Arguello

2005-01-01

39

A case of early sports specialization in an adolescent athlete.  

PubMed

Early sport specialization (ESS) refers to intense year round training in a specific sport with the exclusion of other sports at a young age. This approach to training is heavily debated and there are claims both in support and against ESS. ESS is considered to be more common in the modern day youth athlete and could be a source of overuse injuries and burnout. This case describes a 16 year old elite level baseball pitcher who engaged in high volume, intense training at a young age which lead to several significant throwing related injuries. The case highlights the historical context of ESS, the potential risk and benefits as well as the evidence for its effectiveness. It is important for health care professionals to be informed on the topic of ESS in order to educate athletes, parents, coaches and organizations of the potential risks and benefits. PMID:25550662

Ferguson, Brad; Stern, Paula J

2014-12-01

40

A case of early sports specialization in an adolescent athlete  

PubMed Central

Early sport specialization (ESS) refers to intense year round training in a specific sport with the exclusion of other sports at a young age. This approach to training is heavily debated and there are claims both in support and against ESS. ESS is considered to be more common in the modern day youth athlete and could be a source of overuse injuries and burnout. This case describes a 16 year old elite level baseball pitcher who engaged in high volume, intense training at a young age which lead to several significant throwing related injuries. The case highlights the historical context of ESS, the potential risk and benefits as well as the evidence for its effectiveness. It is important for health care professionals to be informed on the topic of ESS in order to educate athletes, parents, coaches and organizations of the potential risks and benefits.

Ferguson, Brad; Stern, Paula J.

2014-01-01

41

Doping in sport: a review of elite athletes' attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge.  

PubMed

Doping in sport is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied mainly from a biomedical point of view, even though psychosocial approaches are also key factors in the fight against doping. This phenomenon has evolved greatly in recent years, and greater understanding of it is essential for developing efficient prevention programmes. In the psychosocial approach, attitudes are considered an index of doping behaviour, relating the use of banned substances to greater leniency towards doping. The aim of this review is to gather and critically analyse the most recent publications describing elite athletes' attitudes, beliefs and knowledge of doping in sport, to better understand the foundations provided by the previous work, and to help develop practical strategies to efficiently combat doping. For this purpose, we performed a literature search using combinations of the terms "doping", "sport", "elite athletes", "attitudes", "beliefs", "knowledge", "drugs", and "performance-enhancing substances" (PES). A total of 33 studies were subjected to comprehensive assessment using articles published between 2000 and 2011. All of the reports focused on elite athletes and described their attitudes, beliefs and knowledge of doping in sport. The initial reasons given for using banned substances included achievement of athletic success by improving performance, financial gain, improving recovery and prevention of nutritional deficiencies, as well as the idea that others use them, or the "false consensus effect". Although most athletes acknowledge that doping is cheating, unhealthy and risky because of sanctions, its effectiveness is also widely recognized. There is a general belief about the inefficacy of anti-doping programmes, and athletes criticise the way tests are carried out. Most athletes consider the severity of punishment is appropriate or not severe enough. There are some differences between sports, as team-based sports and sports requiring motor skills could be less influenced by doping practices than individual self-paced sports. However, anti-doping controls are less exhaustive in team sports. The use of banned substance also differs according to the demand of the specific sport. Coaches appear to be the main influence and source of information for athletes, whereas doctors and other specialists do not seem to act as principal advisors. Athletes are becoming increasingly familiar with anti-doping rules, but there is still a lack of knowledge that should be remedied using appropriate educational programmes. There is also a lack of information on dietary supplements and the side effects of PES. Therefore, information and prevention are necessary, and should cater to the athletes and associated stakeholders. This will allow us to establish and maintain correct attitudes towards doping. Psychosocial programmes must be carefully planned and developed, and should include middle- to long-term objectives (e.g. changing attitudes towards doping and the doping culture). Some institutions have developed or started prevention or educational programmes without the necessary resources, while the majority of the budget is spent on anti-doping testing. Controls are obviously needed, as well as more efficient educational strategies. Therefore, we encourage sporting institutions to invest in educational programmes aimed at discouraging the use of banned substances. Event organizers and sport federations should work together to adapt the rules of each competition to disincentivize dopers. Current research methods are weak, especially questionnaires. A combination of qualitative and quantitative measurements are recommended, using interviews, questionnaires and, ideally, biomedical tests. Studies should also examine possible geographical and cultural differences in attitudes towards doping. PMID:23532595

Morente-Sánchez, Jaime; Zabala, Mikel

2013-06-01

42

Beliefs about the causes of success in sports and susceptibility for doping use in adolescent athletes.  

PubMed

The present study set out to assess the impact of attributional beliefs about success on the susceptibility for doping use in adolescent athletes. The sample consisted of 309 adolescent athletes participating in both team and individual sports. Participants completed a battery of questionnaires including Beliefs about the Causes of Success in Sport Questionnaire (BACSSQ), current and past doping use, and measures of attitudes, norms, situational temptation and social desirability. Variance reduction rate analysis revealed that social desirability did not act as a confounder in the relationship between doping susceptibility and its predictors. With regard to beliefs about the causes of success dimensions, only deception emerged as a significant predictor of doping use susceptibility over and above the effects of well-established social-cognitive predictors of doping intentions and use. These findings imply that beliefs about the causes of success in youth sports may comprise another dimension of risk factors for doping susceptibility and use. PMID:24016156

Barkoukis, Vassilis; Lazuras, Lambros; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos

2014-01-01

43

A personal development model of sport psychology for athletes with disabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Achieving superior sport performance is often the result of well developed psychological skills (Morris & Thomas, 1995). However, little is known about psychological skill development in athletes with disabilities (Hanrahan, 1998). The purpose of the present paper is to help sport psychologists in their work with athletes with physical disabilities. Although there are many similarities among athletes with and without

Jeffrey J. Martin

1999-01-01

44

Supplements of interest for sport-related injury and sources of supplement information among college athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: This study examined incidence of sport-related injury, interest in supplements to treat injury, and sources of supplement information among 145 college athletes (89 males, 56 females). Materials and methods: A survey was used to assess sport- related injuries, interest in three categories of supplements to treat injury, and sources of supplement information among college athletes who used athletic training

Malinauskas BM; Overton RF; Carraway VG; Cash BC

45

Dietary Intakes and Eating Habits of College Athletes: Are Female College Athletes Following the Current Sports Nutrition Standards?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess dietary intakes and eating habits of female college athletes and compared them with the minimum sports nutrition standards. Participants: Data were obtained from 52 female college athletes from a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I university between January 2009 and May…

Shriver, Lenka H.; Betts, Nancy M.; Wollenberg, Gena

2013-01-01

46

1Athletic Training & Sports Health Care | Vol. 5 No. X 2013 Enhancing Ice Hockey Skills Through  

E-print Network

1Athletic Training & Sports Health Care | Vol. 5 No. X 2013 Enhancing Ice Hockey Skills Through- ponent--wearing stroboscopic eyewear--to their normal rou- tines. [Athletic Training & Sports Health Care, MEd, FAAO ABSTRACT Recent research has suggested that a new sport training tool may enhance vision

Mitroff, Stephen

47

Male and Female Athletes' and Nonathletes' Expectations about Sport Psychology Consulting  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore expectations of athletes and nonathletes about sport psychology consulting. Tinsley's (1982) Expectations About Coun-seling-Brief form was revised using sport psychology terms. The revised instrument, Expectations About Sport Psychology Consulting (EASPC) questionnaire, was administered to 111 athletes (64 male and 47 female) and 166 nonathletes (72 male and 94 female) attending an NCAA

Scott B. Martin; Allen Akers; Allen W. Jackson; Craig A. Wrisberg; Lynne Nelson; P. Jason Leslie; Larson Leidig

2001-01-01

48

How Can Sport Biomechanics Contribute to the Advance of World Record and Best Athletic Performance?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Modern history has evidence that sport biomechanics provide valuable contribution in the pursuit of “faster, higher, and stronger.” In this article, the contribution of sport biomechanics to the Olympic Games has been divided into three different categories: improve the physical capacity of the athletes, develop innovative techniques in a given sport, and help athletes interact with the environment more effectively.

Li Li

2012-01-01

49

African American Student Athletes' Perceptions of Career Transition in Sport: A Qualitative and Visual Elicitation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study focuses on 26 African American athletes and explores their perceptions of athletic career transition. Participants consisted of student athletes from a United States National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division IIA institution in the Southeastern region. Participants completed the Life After Sports Scale (LASS), a 58-item…

Harrison, C. Keith; Lawrence, Suzanne Malia

2003-01-01

50

Psychometric properties of the "sport satisfaction instrument (SSI)" in female athletes: predictive model of sport commitment.  

PubMed

The objective of this research was to assess the psychometric properties of the Sport Satisfaction Instrument (SSI) in a Spanish sample of female athletes in team sports federations, to decide whether it constitutes a valid and reliable instrument to be used in the context of female competitive sport in future research. The SSI was administered to a total of 615 athletes from 12 to 38 yr. of age. Confirmatory procedures and psychometric analysis supported the hypothesized theoretical model of two factors (Satisfaction/fun and Boredom). For female athletes, the 7-item model showed better goodness-of-fit indexes upon eliminating Item 2 from the Boredom subscale. Concurrent validity was explored through the correlations with the Perception of Success Questionnaire and Sport Commitment, obtaining positive correlations between Satisfaction/fun and Task Orientation and Sport Commitment, whereas Boredom correlated positively but less closely with Ego Orientation. The importance of Satisfaction/fun in the prediction of Sport Commitment, starting from task orientation, is emphasized. PMID:25153956

Granero-Gallegos, A; Baena-Extremera, A; Gómez-López, M; Abraldes, J A

2014-08-01

51

The sporting body: body image and eating disorder symptomatology among female athletes from leanness focused and nonleanness focused sports.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT Female athletes experience pressure to conform to social and sporting norms concerning body weight. This study compared general and sporting body dissatisfaction and disordered eating symptomatology among 320 elite, recreational, and noncompetitive female athletes aged 17 to 30 years competing in leanness focused sports and nonleanness focused sports. Participants completed an online questionnaire including demographic questions, the Eating Attitudes Test, and the Figure Rating Scale. Athletes from leanness focused sports reported higher levels of body dissatisfaction and greater disordered eating symptomatology regardless of participation level. Elite athletes reported higher levels of body dissatisfaction and greater disordered eating symptomatology regardless of sport type, and differences between recreational and noncompetitive athletes were not found. More than 60% of elite athletes from leanness focused and nonleanness focused sports reported pressure from coaches concerning body shape. The findings have important implications for identifying risk factors for eating disorders among female athletes, where athletes who compete at elite level and those who compete in leanness focused sports at any level may be at higher risk for developing eating disorders. PMID:25511202

Kong, Peiling; Harris, Lynne M

2015-02-17

52

Jersey number detection in sports video for athlete identification  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Athlete identification is important for sport video content analysis since users often care about the video clips with their preferred athletes. In this paper, we propose a method for athlete identification by combing the segmentation, tracking and recognition procedures into a coarse-to-fine scheme for jersey number (digital characters on sport shirt) detection. Firstly, image segmentation is employed to separate the jersey number regions with its background. And size/pipe-like attributes of digital characters are used to filter out candidates. Then, a K-NN (K nearest neighbor) classifier is employed to classify a candidate into a digit in "0-9" or negative. In the recognition procedure, we use the Zernike moment features, which are invariant to rotation and scale for digital shape recognition. Synthetic training samples with different fonts are used to represent the pattern of digital characters with non-rigid deformation. Once a character candidate is detected, a SSD (smallest square distance)-based tracking procedure is started. The recognition procedure is performed every several frames in the tracking process. After tracking tens of frames, the overall recognition results are combined to determine if a candidate is a true jersey number or not by a voting procedure. Experiments on several types of sports video shows encouraging result.

Ye, Qixiang; Huang, Qingming; Jiang, Shuqiang; Liu, Yang; Gao, Wen

2005-07-01

53

Nutritional supplementation habits and perceptions of elite athletes within a state-based sporting institute  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this investigation was to examine the nutritional supplement intake of athletes from a state-based sports institute. Athletes (n=72) from seven sports (kayaking, field hockey, rowing, waterpolo, swimming, athletics and netball) completed a questionnaire detailing their daily usage and rationale therefore. The large majority (63\\/72; 87.5±12.5%) of surveyed athletes reported using nutritional supplements, with no difference between female

B. J. Dascombe; M. Karunaratna; J. Cartoon; B. Fergie; C. Goodman

2010-01-01

54

Determinants of team-sport performance: implications for altitude training by team-sport athletes.  

PubMed

Team sports are increasingly popular, with millions of participants worldwide. Athletes engaged in these sports are required to repeatedly produce skilful actions and maximal or near-maximal efforts (eg, accelerations, changes in pace and direction, sprints, jumps and kicks), interspersed with brief recovery intervals (consisting of rest or low-intensity to moderate-intensity activity), over an extended period of time (1-2 h). While performance in most team sports is dominated by technical and tactical proficiencies, successful team-sport athletes must also have highly-developed, specific, physical capacities. Much effort goes into designing training programmes to improve these physical capacities, with expected benefits for team-sport performance. Recently, some team sports have introduced altitude training in the belief that it can further enhance team-sport physical performance. Until now, however, there is little published evidence showing improved team-sport performance following altitude training, despite the often considerable expense involved. In the absence of such studies, this review will identify important determinants of team-sport physical performance that may be improved by altitude training, with potential benefits for team-sport performance. These determinants can be broadly described as factors that enhance either sprint performance or the ability to recover from maximal or near-maximal efforts. There is some evidence that some of these physical capacities may be enhanced by altitude training, but further research is required to verify that these adaptations occur, that they are greater than what could be achieved by appropriate sea-level training and that they translate to improved team-sport performance. PMID:24282200

Bishop, David J; Girard, Olivier

2013-12-01

55

Sport-related achievement motivation and alcohol outcomes: an athlete-specific risk factor among intercollegiate athletes.  

PubMed

Intercollegiate athletes report greater alcohol consumption and more alcohol-related problems than their non-athlete peers. Although college athletes share many of the same problems faced by non-athletes, there are some consequences that are unique to athletes. Studies have demonstrated that alcohol negatively affects athletic performance including increased dehydration, impeded muscle recovery, and increased risk for injury. Beyond risk factors for alcohol misuse that may affect college students in general, research has begun to examine risk factors that are unique to collegiate athletes. For example, research has found that off-season status, the leadership role, and athlete-specific drinking motives are associated with increased alcohol use. Given these findings, it is possible that other athlete-specific variables influence alcohol misuse. One such variable may be sport achievement orientation. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between sport achievement orientation and alcohol outcomes. Given previous research regarding seasonal status and gender, these variables were examined as moderators. Varsity athletes (n=263) completed the Sport Orientation Questionnaire, which assesses sport-related achievement orientation on three scales (Competitiveness, Win Orientation, and Goal Orientation). In addition, participants completed measures of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Results indicated that Competitiveness, Win Orientation, and Goal Orientation were all significantly associated with alcohol use, but not alcohol-related problems. Moreover, these relationships were moderated by seasonal status and gender. These interactions, clinical implications, and limitations are discussed. PMID:24064192

Weaver, Cameron C; Martens, Matthew P; Cadigan, Jennifer M; Takamatsu, Stephanie K; Treloar, Hayley R; Pedersen, Eric R

2013-12-01

56

What Is All the Hype About Height? A Semiotic Analysis of Sports Media, Smaller Athletes, and Ideology .  

E-print Network

??This study looks at how professional male athletes—particularly undersized athletes—are represented throughout televised sport. Based on the assumption that televised sport is a gendered and… (more)

Cameron, Paul

2012-01-01

57

Consumption of Sport-Related Dietary Supplements among NCAA Division 1 Female Student Athletes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To determine factors that influence sport-related dietary supplement consumption among NCAA Division 1 female student athletes and to estimate the plausibility of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) for predicting the use of sport-related dietary supplements among NCAA Division 1 female student athletes. Method: Self-report data were…

Housman, Jeff; Dorman, Steve; Pruitt, Buzz; Ranjita, Misra; Perko, Michael

2011-01-01

58

Altitude training considerations for the winter sport athlete.  

PubMed

Winter sports events routinely take place at low to moderate altitudes, and nearly all Winter Olympic Games have had at least one venue at an altitude >1000 m. The acute and chronic effects of altitude can have a substantial effect on performance outcomes. Acutely, the decline in oxygen delivery to working muscle decreases maximal oxygen uptake, negatively affecting performance in endurance events, such as cross-country skiing and biathlon. The reduction in air resistance at altitude can dramatically affect sports involving high velocities and technical skill components, such as ski jumping, speed skating, figure skating and ice hockey. Dissociation between velocity and sensations usually associated with work intensity (ventilation, metabolic signals in skeletal muscle and heart rate) may impair pacing strategy and make it difficult to determine optimal race pace. For competitions taking place at altitude, a number of strategies may be useful, depending on the altitude of residence of the athlete and ultimate competition altitude, as follows. First, allow extra time and practice (how much is yet undetermined) for athletes to adjust to the changes in projectile motion; hockey, shooting, figure skating and ski jumping may be particularly affected. These considerations apply equally in the reverse direction; that is, for athletes practising at altitude but competing at sea level. Second, allow time for acclimatization for endurance sports: 3-5 days if possible, especially for low altitude (500-2000 m); 1-2 weeks for moderate altitude (2000-3000 m); and at least 2 weeks if possible for high altitude (>3000 m). Third, increase exercise-recovery ratios as much as possible, with 1:3 ratio probably optimal, and consider more frequent substitutions for sports where this is allowed, such as ice hockey. Fourth, consider the use of supplemental O(2) on the sideline (ice hockey) or in between heats (skating and Alpine skiing) to facilitate recovery. For competitions at sea level, the 'live high-train low' model of altitude training can help athletes in endurance events to maximize performance. PMID:19837773

Chapman, Robert F; Stickford, Jonathon L; Levine, Benjamin D

2010-03-01

59

Diamonds in the Rough: Examining a Case of Successful Black Male Student Athletes in College Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Ailing academic performances of Black male student athletes have been an impetus for a search of recourse by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Amid the volume of these academic underperformances, particularly in revenue-generating sports, there are Black male student athletes who achieve a level of success in the classroom that rivals…

Bimper, Albert Y., Jr.; Harrison, Louis, Jr.; Clark, Langston

2013-01-01

60

Evaluation of the Elite Schools of SportEmpirical Findings from an Individual and Collective Point of View  

Microsoft Academic Search

The German Olympic sport federation considers elite sport schools (ESS) to be beneficial for talented young athletes by offering school education and optimal training conditions, enabling pupils to perform at their best. An evaluation of ESS institutions systematically analyzed empirical data on ascribed and achieved aims with collected individual and collective data using questionnaires. On an individual basis, school performances

Eike Emrich; Michael Fröhlich; Markus Klein; Werner Pitsch

2009-01-01

61

Femoroacetabular impingement in 45 professional athletes: associated pathologies and return to sport following arthroscopic decompression  

PubMed Central

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) occurs when an osseous abnormality of the proximal femur (cam) or acetabulum (pincer) triggers damage to the acetabular labrum and articular cartilage in the hip. Although the precise etiology of FAI is not well understood, both types of FAI are common in athletes presenting with hip pain, loss of range-of-motion, and disability in athletics. An open surgical approach to decompressing FAI has shown good clinical outcomes; however, this highly invasive approach inherently may delay or preclude a high level athlete’s return to play. The purpose of this study was to define associated pathologies and determine if an arthroscopic approach to treating FAI can allow professional athletes to return to high-level sport. Hip arthroscopy for the treatment of FAI allows professional athletes to return to professional sport. Between October 2000 and September 2005, 45 professional athletes underwent hip arthroscopy for the decompression of FAI. Operative and return-to-play data were obtained from patient records. Average time to follow-up was 1.6 years (range: 6 months to 5.5 years). Forty two (93%) athletes returned to professional competition following arthroscopic decompression of FAI. Three athletes did not return to play; however, all had diffuse osteoarthritis at the time of arthroscopy. Thirty-five athletes (78%) remain active in professional sport at an average follow-up of 1.6 years. Arthroscopic treatment of FAI allows professional athletes to return to professional sport. PMID:17479250

Schenker, Mara; Briggs, Karen; Kuppersmith, David

2007-01-01

62

Athletes confessions: The sports biography as an interaction ritual.  

PubMed

Commercialization of emotions is not a new phenomenon but in Denmark there is a new general trend to tell and sell personal stories in the media. Personal deprivation and crises are also major topics in sports media. This paper focuses on sports biographies as a book genre that is reviving in popularity. The paper approaches the topic through the biographies of one Danish athlete: the former professional cyclist, Jesper Skibby, who writes about his doping disclosure and shares his personal dilemmas as a former elite sportsman. The thematic text analysis orientates around social interactions, emotions, and personality constructions. Inspired by microsociology with a Durkheimian flavor of Goffman and Hochschild, themes including "face work," "interaction rituals," and "emotions management" are discussed. The analysis claims that sharing personal information in the media is not only a means of confession and reclaiming status but is also business and management - on an intimate level. Telling the story of the corrosion of a sporting character has become a hot issue, an entertainment, and not least a commercial commitment. PMID:24673745

Thing, L F; Ronglan, L T

2014-03-27

63

Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components among Chinese Professional Athletes of Strength Sports with Different Body Weight Categories  

PubMed Central

Background There is an increasing concern on cardiometabolic health in young professional athletes at heavy-weight class. Objective Our cross-sectional survey aimed to evaluate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and clustering of metabolic risk factors in a population of young and active professional athletes of strength sports in China. Methods From July 2006 to December 2008, a total of 131 male and 130 female athletes of strength sports were enrolled. We used two criteria provided by the Chinese Diabetes Society (2004) and the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (2002) to define the metabolic syndrome and its individual components, respectively. Results Regardless of their similar ages (mean: 21 years) and exercise levels, athletes in the heaviest-weight-class with unlimited maximum body weight (UBW) boundaries (mean weight and BMI: 130 kg and 38 kg/m2 for men, 110 kg and 37 kg/m2 for women) had significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome than did those in all other body-weight-class with limited body weight (LBW) boundaries (mean weight and BMI: 105 kg and 32 kg/m2 for men, 70 kg and 26 kg/m2 for women). Prevalence of metabolic syndrome using CDS criteria (UBW vs. LBW: 89% vs. 18% for men, 47% vs. 0% for women) and its individual components, including central obesity, hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels, and impaired fasting glucose, were all significantly higher in athletes at the heaviest weight group with UBW than all other weight groups with LBW. Conclusions Our study suggests that professional athletes of strength sports at the heaviest-weight-class are at a significant increased risk of cardiometabolic disease compared with those at all other weight categories. The findings support the importance of developing and implementing the strategy of early screening, awareness, and interventions for weight-related health among young athletes. PMID:24255714

Guo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xi; Wang, Ling; Guo, Yan; Xie, Minhao

2013-01-01

64

Use of integrated technology in team sports: a review of opportunities, challenges, and future directions for athletes.  

PubMed

Integrated technology (IT), which includes accelerometers, global positioning systems (GPSs), and heart rate monitors, has been used frequently in public health. More recently, IT data have been used in sports settings to assess training and performance demands. However, the impact of IT in sports settings is yet to be evaluated, particularly in field-based team sports. This narrative-qualitative review provides an overview of the emerging impact of IT in sports settings. Twenty electronic databases (e.g., Medline, SPORTdiscus, and ScienceDirect), print publications (e.g., Signal Processing Magazine and Catapult Innovations news releases), and internet resources were searched using different combinations of keywords as follows: accelerometers, heart rate monitors, GPS, sport training, and field-based sports for relevant articles published from 1990 to the present. A total of 114 publications were identified, and 39 that examined a field-based team sport using a form of IT were analyzed. The articles chosen for analysis examined a field-based team sport using a form of IT. The uses of IT can be divided into 4 categories: (a) quantifying movement patterns (n = 22), (b) assessing the differences between demands of training and competition (n = 12), (c) measuring physiological and metabolic responses (n = 16), and (d) determining a valid definition for velocity and a sprint effort (n = 8). Most studies used elite adult male athletes as participants and analyzed the sports of Australian Rules football, field hockey, cricket, and soccer, with sample sizes between 5 and 20 participants. The limitations of IT in a sports setting include scalability issues, cost, and the inability to receive signals within indoor environments. Integrated technology can contribute to significant improvements in the preparation, training, and recovery aspects of field-based team sports. Future research should focus on using IT with female athlete populations and developing resources to use IT indoors to further enhance individual and team performances. PMID:24263650

Dellaserra, Carla L; Gao, Yong; Ransdell, Lynda

2014-02-01

65

Development of an anaerobic capacity test for field sport athletes.  

PubMed

Maximally accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) has been argued to be currently the best non-invasive method for estimating anaerobic capacity (Medbø et al., 1988, Ramsbottom et al., 1997). An easy to administer field test that could accurately predict MAOD, would be of great use to many field sport athletes and coaches. Fifteen male rugby union players undertook MAOD testing (99.4 +/- 16.9ml x kg(-1)) on a treadmill using a modification of procedure 3 as described by Medbø et al. (1988). All subjects also performed a 300m Shuttle Run Test (66.7 +/- 2.2s), run over a 20m distance. Analysis of the MAOD and 300m Shuttle Run Test time relationship revealed a significant correlation of r = -0.69 [p<0.01). Furthermore, a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that when subjects were split into 'good' and 'poor' groups based on 300m Shuttle Run Test times, the times distinguished between 'good' and 'poor' MAOD values (P<0.05). The findings of the present study support the validity of the 300m Shuttle Run Test as a useful estimate of anaerobic capacity in football athletes. Unexplained variance could be due to speed and agility factors associated with the 300m Shuttle Run Test. Methodological issues pertaining to the accurate assessment of MAOD are also discussed. PMID:14609144

Moore, A; Murphy, A

2003-09-01

66

When the Job's a Game: Athletes, Coaches, Sports Officials, and Related Workers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Looks at the occupations of athletes, coaches and instructors, sports officials, and related workers. Describes the nature of the work, working conditions, employment outlook, earnings, and qualifications and training requirements. Includes sources of additional information. (JOW)

Kasper, Henry

2001-01-01

67

Visual- spatial capacity: gender and sport differences in young volleyball and tennis athletes and non-athletes  

PubMed Central

Background In the general population visual-spatial ability is better in males, due to the influence of biological and socio-cultural factors. We know that sport activity improves motor skills. The aim of this work is to determine if these gender differences exist in young athletes. The orientation test described by Terzi and standardized by Cesaroni, used to measure spatial ability, was carried out on 60 volleyball or 60 tennis athletes as well as on 60 non-sporting subjects. Results The data analysis revealed a worse performance for non-athletes in comparison with athletes in both components of test (p?sport group the males presented better values (p?sports groups there weren’t any gender differences in either part of the test (p?=?0.18; p?=?0.056). Conclusions These results confirm that during athletic preparation in volleyball and tennis the specific training is able to develop spatial ability. Besides, boys and girls have similar performance demands and training experience. It appears that this specific training could be responsible for modifying gender differences in performance of spatial ability during adolescence. PMID:24447526

2014-01-01

68

Lower white blood cell counts in elite athletes training for highly aerobic sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

White cell counts at rest might be lower in athletes participating in selected endurance-type sports. Here, we analysed blood\\u000a tests of elite athletes collected over a 10-year period. Reference ranges were established for 14 female and 14 male sports\\u000a involving 3,679 samples from 937 females and 4,654 samples from 1,310 males. Total white blood cell counts and counts of neutrophils,

P. L. Horn; D. B. Pyne; W. G. Hopkins; C. J. Barnes

2010-01-01

69

Outstanding Women Athletes: Who They Are and How They Influenced Sports in America.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book highlights the stories of 60 of this century's female athletes who pioneered, participated in, or continue to compete in women's sports. Following forewords by Billie Jean King, Anita DeFrantz, and Deborah Slaner Anderson, the volume contains biography, history, an annotated bibliography, and statistics on women athletes from the late…

Woolum, Janet

70

Supplementary effect of carbohydrate-electrolyte drink on sports performance, lactate removal & cardiovascular response of athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background & objectives: Carbohydrate-electrolyte drink has a significant role on energy balance during exercise. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of oral carbohydrate- electrolyte supplementation on sports performance and cardiovascular status of the national level male athletes during exercise and recovery. Methods: A total of 10 male athletes (age range: 20-25 yr) were selected. The experiment was

G. L. Khanna; I. Mann

2005-01-01

71

Sports Specialization is Associated with An Increased Risk of Developing Anterior Knee Pain in Adolescent Female Athletes  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study sought to determine if sport specialization increases the risk of anterior knee pain in adolescent female athletes. Design Retrospective cohort epidemiology study. Methods Female basketball, soccer and volleyball players (N=546) were recruited from a single county public school district in Kentucky consisting of five middle schools and four high schools. A total of 357 multi-sport, and 189 single sport (66 basketball, 57 soccer and 66 volleyball) athlete subjects were included due to their diagnosis of patellofemoral pain on physical exam. Testing consisted of completion of a standardized history and physician-administered physical examination to determine the presence of patellofemoral pain (PFP). This study compared self-reported multi-sport athletes with sport specialized athletes participating in only one sport. The sports participation data was normalized by sport season with each sport accounting for one season of exposure. Incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated and used to determine significant differences between athletes who specialized in sport in early youth and multi-sport athletes. Results Specialization in a single sport increased the relative risk of PFP incidence by 1.5 fold (95% CI 1.0 to 2.2; p=0.038) for cumulative PFP diagnoses. Specific diagnoses such as Sinding Larsen Johansson/patellar tendinopathy (95% CI 1.5 to 10.1; p=0.005) and Osgood Schlatter Disease (95% CI 1.5 to 10.1; p=0.005) demonstrated a four-fold greater relative risk in single sport compared to multiple sport athletes. Other specific PFP diagnoses such as Fat Pad, Plica, Trauma, Pes Anserine Bursitis and IT Band Tendonitis incidence were not different between single sport and multiple sport participants (p>0.05). Conclusion Early sport specialization in female adolescents is associated with increased risk of anterior knee pain disorders including PFP, Osgood Schlatter, Sinding Larsen-Johansson compared to multi-sport athletes. PMID:24622506

Hall, Randon; Foss, Kim Barber; Hewett, Timothy E.; Myer, Gregory D.

2014-01-01

72

National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Preventing Sudden Death in Sports  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention and screening, recognition, and treatment of the most common conditions resulting in sudden death in organized sports. Background: Cardiac conditions, head injuries, neck injuries, exertional heat stroke, exertional sickling, asthma, and other factors (eg, lightning, diabetes) are the most common causes of death in athletes. Recommendations: These guidelines are intended to provide relevant information on preventing sudden death in sports and to give specific recommendations for certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care. PMID:22488236

Casa, Douglas J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.; Anderson, Scott A.; Courson, Ronald W.; Heck, Jonathan F.; Jimenez, Carolyn C.; McDermott, Brendon P.; Miller, Michael G.; Stearns, Rebecca L.; Swartz, Erik E.; Walsh, Katie M.

2012-01-01

73

Organizational Citizenship Behavior in Sport: Relationships with Leadership, Team Cohesion, and Athlete Satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to introduce the construct of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB; Organ, 1988) into the sport psychology literature and examine its utility in sport. Based upon OCB research in the organizational literature, the Multidimensional Model of Leadership (MML; Chelladurai, 1978), the conceptual framework of team cohesion (CFC; Carron & Hausenblas, 1998), and a model of athlete

Mark W. Aoyagi; Richard H. Cox; Richard T. McGuire

2008-01-01

74

Physiological measurements and analyses in motor sports: a preliminary study in racing kart athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aims of this study were to assess methods for performing physiological measurements in motor sports, and to carry out a preliminary study in athletes participating in kart racing. The measurement of physiological variables in motor sports is practically challenging, largely due to the restricted space available for sensors and instrumentation and to movement artefacts from driver's operations and car

Takehiro Yamakoshi; Kenta Matsumura; Yasuhiro Yamakoshi; Hajime Hirose; Peter Rolfe

2010-01-01

75

Special Athletic Opportunities for Individuals with Handicapping Conditions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The report contains 12 author contributed chapters concerned with special athletic opportunities for individuals with handicapping conditions. The monograph begins with a detailed treatment of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 followed by descriptions of athletic programs developed by various groups. Remaining chapters are concerned…

Winnick, Joseph P., Ed.; Short, Francis X., Ed.

76

Implicit beliefs of ability, approach-avoidance goals and cognitive anxiety among team sport athletes.  

PubMed

People's implicit beliefs of ability have been suggested as an antecedent of achievement goal adoption, which has in turn been associated with behavioural, cognitive and affective outcomes. This study examined a conditional process model with team sport athletes' approach-avoidance achievement goals as mediators between their implicit beliefs of sport ability and sport-related cognitive anxiety. We expected gender to moderate the paths from implicit beliefs of ability to approach-avoidance goals and from approach-avoidance goals to cognitive anxiety. Team sport athletes with a mean age of 20 years (163 females and 152 males) responded to questionnaires about their implicit beliefs of sport ability, approach-avoidance goals and sport-related cognitive anxiety. Incremental beliefs, gender and the interaction between them predicted mastery-approach goals. Gender also predicted mastery-avoidance goals, with females reporting higher levels than males. Mastery-avoidance goals, gender and the interaction between them predicted cognitive anxiety, with females reporting higher levels of anxiety than males. Entity beliefs positively predicted performance-avoidance goals and the interaction between performance-approach and gender predicted anxiety. The indirect effects also showed gender differences in relation to performance-approach goals. Taken together, our results suggest that coaches trying to create a facilitating climate for their male and female athletes may be wise to consider their athletes' anxiety and achievement goal patterns as these may affect both the athletes' well-being and performance. PMID:24678759

Stenling, Andreas; Hassmén, Peter; Holmström, Stefan

2014-01-01

77

A Survey of Sports Medicine Physicians Regarding Psychological Issues in Patient-Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To determine the extent to which sports medicine physicians encounter and discuss psychological issues among athletes they treat and to evaluate physicians' perceptions of the availability and efficacy of sport psychologists and other mental health resources.Study Design: Cross-sectional study.Methods: A survey was sent via e-mail to all physician members of 4 prominent sports medicine professional associations: the American Orthopaedic

Barton J. Mann; William A. Grana; Peter A. Indelicato; Daniel F. ONeill; Steven Z. George

2007-01-01

78

No Relative Age Effect in the Birth Dates of Award-Winning Athletes in Male Professional Team Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Athletes born early within an annual youth age-group selection year are probably more likely to be selected for sports teams and talent development programs than those born later in that year. Overrepresentation of these relatively older athletes in youth and adult sport is known as the relative age effect (RAE). RAEs were found in these popular…

Ford, Paul R.; Williams, A. Mark

2011-01-01

79

Sports Medicine and Athletic Training in the 21st Century: Bridging the Gap Between Research and Clinical Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sport and recreational activity is a vital part of today's society, and athletic training researchers are playing an important role in gaining a better understanding of how to promote safe and healthy participation for athletes of all ages. This article aims to illustrate the importance of research to prevent and effectively treat sport and recreational injuries. Increased physical activity among

Kevin M. Guskiewicz

2008-01-01

80

Attitudes and doping: a structural equation analysis of the relationship between athletes' attitudes, sport orientation and doping behaviour  

PubMed Central

Background For effective deterrence methods, individual, systemic and situational factors that make an athlete or athlete group more susceptible to doping than others should be fully investigated. Traditional behavioural models assume that the behaviour in question is the ultimate end. However, growing evidence suggests that in doping situations, the doping behaviour is not the end but a means to an end, which is gaining competitive advantage. Therefore, models of doping should include and anti-doping policies should consider attitudes or orientations toward the specific target end, in addition to the attitude toward the 'tool' itself. Objectives The aim of this study was to empirically test doping related dispositions and attitudes of competitive athletes with the view of informing anti-doping policy developments and deterrence methods. To this end, the paper focused on the individual element of the drug availability – athlete's personality – situation triangle. Methods Data were collected by questionnaires containing a battery of psychological tests among competitive US male college athletes (n = 199). Outcome measures included sport orientation (win and goal orientation and competitiveness), doping attitude, beliefs and self-reported past or current use of doping. A structural equation model was developed based on the strength of relationships between these outcome measures. Results Whilst the doping model showed satisfactory fit, the results suggested that athletes' win and goal orientation and competitiveness do not play a statistically significant role in doping behaviour, but win orientation has an effect on doping attitude. The SEM analysis provided empirical evidence that sport orientation and doping behaviour is not directly related. Conclusion The considerable proportion of doping behaviour unexplained by the model suggests that other factors play an influential role in athletes' decisions regarding prohibited methods. Future research, followed by policy development, should incorporate these factors to capture the complexity of the doping phenomenon and to identify points for effective anti-doping interventions. Sport governing bodies and anti-doping organisations need to recognise that using performance enhancements may be more of a rational, outcome optimizing behaviour than deviance and consider offering acceptable alternative performance-enhancing methods to doping. PMID:17996097

2007-01-01

81

Influence of sports participation on bone health in the young athlete: a review of the literature.  

PubMed

Peak bone mass is attained during the second and third decades of life. Sports participation during the years that peak bone mass is being acquired may lead to adaptive changes that improve bone architecture through increased density and enhanced geometric properties. A review of the literature evaluating sports participation in young athletes, ages 10-30 years, revealed that sports that involve high-impact loading (eg, gymnastics, hurdling, judo, karate, volleyball, and other jumping sports) or odd-impact loading (eg, soccer, basketball, racquet games, step-aerobics, and speed skating) are associated with higher bone mineral composition, bone mineral density (BMD), and enhanced bone geometry in anatomic regions specific to the loading patterns of each sport. Repetitive low-impact sports (such as distance running) are associated with favorable changes in bone geometry. Nonimpact sports such as swimming, water polo, and cycling are not associated with improvements in bone mineral composition or BMD, and swimming may negatively influence hip geometry. Participating in sports during early puberty may enhance bone mass. Continued participation in sports appears to maintain the full benefits of increased peak bone mass, although former athletes who do not maintain participation in sports may retain some benefits of increased BMD. Long-term elite male cycling was reported to negatively influence bone health, and female adolescent distance running was associated with suppressed bone mineral accrual; confounding factors associated with participation in endurance sports may have contributed to those findings. In summary, young men and women who participate in sports that involve high-impact or odd-impact loading exhibit the greatest associated gains in bone health. Participation in nonimpact sports, such as swimming and cycling, is not associated with an improvement in bone health. PMID:21944303

Tenforde, Adam S; Fredericson, Michael

2011-09-01

82

Sports drinks and dental  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To discuss the composition and rationale for the use of sports drinks along with recent studies investigating the relationship between sports drinks and dental erosion. Methods: A review of the literature of sports drinks and dental erosion was done. Results: For most athletes and individuals engaged in physical activity, the use of sports drinks does not provide a benefit

JEFF S. COOMBES

83

Life Development Intervention for Athletes: Life Skills through Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes sport psychology and model for practice consistent with training of counseling psychologists as teachers of life skills. Examines role that sport plays in society and its importance for development of identity and personal competence. Delineates life development intervention (LDI) and psychoeducational model for practice of sport

Danish, Steven J.; And Others

1993-01-01

84

The relation between athletic sports and prevalence of amenorrhea and oligomenorrhea in Iranian female athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In 1992, the concept of female athlete triad was introduced to describe the interrelated problems of amenorrhea, eating disorders and osteoporosis seen in female athletes. To gain a clearer picture of amenorrhea\\/oligomenorrhea in Iran, one of the main components of the female athlete triad, we therefore established this study on the prevalence of amenorrhea\\/oligomenorrhea in elite Iranian female

Haleh Dadgostar; Mohammad Razi; Ashraf Aleyasin; Talia Alenabi; Saeideh Dahaghin

2009-01-01

85

Developing Individual and Team Character in Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The idea that participation in sport builds character is a long-standing one. Advocates of sport participation believe that sport provides an appropriate context for the learning of social skills such as cooperation and the development of prosocial behavior (Weiss, Smith, & Stuntz, 2008). Research in sport regarding character development has…

Gaines, Stacey A.

2012-01-01

86

CAFFEINE USE IN SPORTS: CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE ATHLETE  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ergogenic effects of caffeine on athletic performance have been shown in many studies, and its broad range of metabolic, hormonal, and physiologic effects has been recorded, as this review of the literature shows. However, few caffeine studies have been published to include cognitive and physiologic considerations for the athlete. The following practical recom- mendations consider the global effects of

BULENT SOKMEN; L AWRENCE E. ARMSTRONG; W ILLIAM J. KRAEMER; J. CASA; JOAO C. DIAS; D ANIEL A. JUDELSON; CARL M. MARESH

87

Sports injuries in young athletes: long-term outcome and prevention strategies.  

PubMed

Physical activity plays a significant role in the physical and emotional well-being of a child. In the past 15 to 20 years, there has been a dramatic increase in sports participation at a young age, which has offered numerous health benefits, including self-esteem, confidence, team play, fitness, agility, and strength. Children are playing sports at younger ages. This article assesses the long-term outcome of sports injuries in young athletes, with suggestions on how to prevent such injuries. There are no definitive epidemiological data on withdraw from sports activities due to injury in young athletes. Disturbed physeal growth as a result of injury can result in length discrepancy, angular deformity, or altered joint mechanics, and may cause significant long-term disability. Sequelae of Osgood-Schlatter lesion include painful ossicle in the distal patellar tendon. Fragmentation or separation of the apophysis appears to be the result of adaptive changes to the increased stress that occurs in overuse activities. The presence of these changes undeniably demonstrates an osseous reaction, although they are not disabling. Promotion of a physically active lifestyle is encouraged worldwide, particularly with regard to the many health benefits. Reduction of only a moderate proportion of all sports injuries is of significance for the young athletes' health and could have a long-term economic impact on health care costs. It is therefore important to convince medical doctors, physical therapists, athletic trainers and coaches, as well as athletes of the necessity to implement active prevention measures in their therapy and training programs, thus decreasing the injury and re-injury rate and enhancing athletic performance. PMID:20631461

Maffulli, Nicola; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Spiezia, Filippo; Denaro, Vincenzo

2010-06-01

88

Combat sports practice favors bone mineral density among adolescent male athletes.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to determine the impact of combat sports practice on bone mineral density (BMD) and to analyze the relationship between bone parameters and anthropometric measurements, bone markers, and activity index (AI). In other words, to detect the most important determinant of BMD in the adolescent period among combat sports athletes. Fifty athletes engaged in combat sports, mean age 17.1 ± 0.2 yr, were compared with 30 sedentary subjects who were matched for age, height, and pubertal stage. For all subjects, the whole-body BMD, lumbar spine BMD (L2-L4), and BMD in the pelvis, arms, and legs was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and anthropometric measurements were evaluated. Daily calcium intake, bone resorption, and formation markers were measured. BMD measurements were greater in the combat sports athletes than in the sedentary group (p < 0.01). Weight, body mass index, and lean body mass were significantly correlated with BMD in different sites. Daily calcium consumption lower than daily calcium intake recommended in both athletes and sedentary group. AI was strongly correlated with all BMD measurements particularly with the whole body, legs, and arms. Negative correlations were observed between bone markers and BMD in different sites. The common major predictor of BMD measurements was AI (p < 0.0001). AI associated to lean body mass determined whole-body BMD until 74%. AI explained both BMD in arms and L2-L4 at 25%. AI associated to height can account for 63% of the variance in BMD legs. These observations suggested that the best model predicting BMD in different sites among adolescent combat sports athletes was the AI. Children and adolescents should be encouraged to participate in combat sports to maximize their bone accrual. PMID:24176431

Nasri, Raouf; Hassen Zrour, Saoussen; Rebai, Haithem; Neffeti, Fadoua; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel; Bergaoui, Naceur; Mejdoub, Hafedh; Tabka, Zouhair

2015-01-01

89

Sporting Goods. Part I: Hunting and Fishing Equipment and Part II: Athletic, Marine, and Camping Equipment. A Distributive Education Manual.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

These manuals were prepared to introduce students to the fundamentals of hunting and fishing (Part I) and sports requiring athletic, marine and camping equipment (Part II). The sports salesman is in the position of offering a service to the customer, and he can best do so by understanding the sports and the variety of products which may be sold to…

Day, Bill D., Comp.

90

Sports and Athletics: Issues for Adolescents with Chronic Illnesses and Disabilities. CYDLINE Reviews.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This annotated bibliography focuses on issues in sports and athletics for adolescents and young adults with chronic illnesses and disabilities. The listings are drawn from the National Resource Library of the National Center for Youth with Disabilities, which includes journals, books, and non-published materials. The section on bibliographic…

Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. National Center for Youth with Disabilities.

91

The Parent-Coach/Child-Athlete Relationship in Youth Sport: Cordial, Contentious, or Conundrum?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The roles of coach and parent are often synonymous in youth sport, but little data-based research has been conducted on the parent-coach/child-athlete relationship. Six boys in U-12 competitive soccer were interviewed regarding positive and negative aspects about playing for their father-coach. Similar questions were posed to father-coaches and…

Weiss, Maureen R.; Fretwell, Susan D.

2005-01-01

92

Why Do Athletes Drink Sports Drinks? A Learning Cycle to Explore the Concept of Osmosis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Why does an athlete reach for a sports drink after a tough game or practice? The learning cycle presented in this article helps students answer this question. Learning cycles (Marek 2009) are designed to guide students through direct experiences with a particular concept. In this article, students learn about "osmosis," or the moving of water into…

Carlsen, Brook; Marek, Edmund A.

2010-01-01

93

Sports nuclear medicine. Bone imaging for lower extremity pain in athletes  

SciTech Connect

Increased participation in sports by the general public has led to an increase in sports-induced injuries, including stress fractures, shin splints, arthritis, and a host of musculotendinous maladies. Bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m MDP has been used with increasing frequency in detecting stress fractures, but this study can miss certain important conditions and detect other lesions of lesser clinical significance. This paper demonstrates the spectrum of findings on bone scanning in nonacute sports trauma and offers suggestions for the optimal use of Tc-99m MDP for detecting the causes of lower extremity pain in athletes.

Brill, D.R.

1983-03-01

94

Somatotype analysis of elite boxing athletes compared with nonathletes for sports physiotherapy.  

PubMed

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to show somatotype and physical characteristic differences between elite boxing athletes and non-athletes. [Methods] The somatotypes of 23 elite boxing athletes and 23 nonathletes were measured with the Heath-Carter method. The subjects were divided into four weight divisions as follows: lightweight, light middleweight, middleweight, and heavyweight class. [Results] The endomorphic component values of the boxing athletes were lower than those of the nonathletes. However, the mesomorphic component values of the boxing athletes were higher than those of the nonathletes. There was no significant difference in the ectomorphic component between the two groups. The higher weight divisions tended to have higher values of height, weight, and BMI than the lower weight divisions. The higher weight divisions also tended to have higher values for the endomorphic and mesomorphic components and a lower value for the ectomorphic component than the lower weight divisions. The group of nonathletes consisted of eight endomorphs, four mesomorphs, six ectomorphs, and five central types. Among the boxing athletes, there were 16 mesomorphic, four ectomorphic, and two central types and one endomorphic type. Subdividing the athletes into 13 somatotypes resulted in five balanced mesomorphs, five endomorphic mesomorphs, five mesomorph-ectomorphs, three mesomorph-endomorphs, two mesomorphic ectomorphs, two central types, and one ectomorphic mesomorph type. [Conclusion] The data from this study provides in part physical characteristics of elite boxing athletes that can be used to establish a reference for systemic study of sports physiotherapy. PMID:25202187

Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Park, Byoung-Sun; Yang, Seung-Min; Jeon, Hye-Joo; Lee, Won-Deok; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Jang, Sung-Ho; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Junghwan

2014-08-01

95

FLUID BALANCE DURING TRAINING IN ELITE YOUNG ATHLETES OF DIFFERENT SPORTS.  

PubMed

Although there are many studies demonstrating a high percentage of adult athletes which start exercise in sub-optimal hydration state, limited data concerning hydration levels in athletic youth exists. The purpose of this study was to identify the hydration status of elite young athletes of different sports, during a typical day of training. Fifty-nine young elite men athletes from different sports (basketball, gymnastics, swimming, running, canoeing) participated in the study (age: 15.2±1.3 y, years of training: 7.7±2.0). Hydration status was assessed in the morning, before and immediately after practice. Data collection took place at the same time of the day, with mean environmental temperature and humidity at the time of the measurements at 27.6±0.9 °C and 58±8%, respectively. All athletes trained for approximately 90 min and they were consuming fluids ad libitum throughout their practice. Over 89% of the athletes were hypohydrated (USG?1.020 mg/dl) based on their first morning urine sample. Pre-training urine samples revealed that 76.3% of the athletes were hypohydrated, while a significant high percent remained hypohydrated even after training according to USG values ? 1.020 mg/dl (74.5%) and urine color scale: 5-6 (76.3%). Mean body weight loss during training was -1.1±0.07%. We concluded that the prevalence of hypohydration among elite young athletes is very high, as indicated by the USG and urine color values. The majority of the athletes was hypohydrated throughout the day and dehydrated even more during practice despite fluid availability. PMID:24513625

Arnaoutis, Giannis; Kavouras, Stavros A; Angelopoulou, Athanasia; Skoulariki, Chara; Bismpikou, Stefani; Mourtakos, Stamatis; Sidossis, Labros S

2014-02-10

96

Health in Elite Sports from a Salutogenetic Perspective: Athletes' Sense of Coherence  

PubMed Central

Objective Considering the high number of stressors encountered in the context of elite sports, a high sense of coherence (SOC) is crucial to allow athletes to maintain their health from both short- and long-term perspectives. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate SOC in a population of elite athletes, focusing on identification of subsets of athletes with particularly high and low SOC scores, and any related predictors. The elite athletes' SOC scores were also evaluated for differences with those of the general population of Germany; whether a correlation between SOC and subjective health existed was additionally examined. Method In total, 698 male and female elite athletes, drawn from Germany's highest-level national track and field squads, and first and second division handball teams, completed a survey that included the SOC-L9 Scale and measures of subjective health, sociodemographic information, and the number of injury lay-offs experienced during the athletes' careers to date. Results Classification tree analysis reveals six contrast groups with varying SOC scores. Several interacting factors determine the group to which an athlete belongs. Together with overuse injuries, additional factors are age, gender, and completed/not completed apprenticeship/degree. Female athletes aged between 19 and 25, who had already been subject to lay-offs due to overuse injuries, comprise the group with the lowest SOC scores. Overall, the SOC of elite athletes is slightly lower than in the general population. In accordance with other studies, a stronger SOC is also correlated significantly with better global subjective health. Conclusion The identification of contrast groups with varying SOC scores contributes to the development of more targeted salutogenetic health promotion programs. Such programs would ideally include learning modules pertaining to coping with overuse injuries, as well as social support systems aiming to effectively combine education and elite sport. PMID:25014085

Mayer, Jochen; Thiel, Ansgar

2014-01-01

97

Sports Nutrition and Doping Factors in Synchronized Swimming: Parallel Analysis among Athletes and Coaches  

PubMed Central

Although nutrition and doping are important factors in sports, neither is often investigated in synchronized swimming (Synchro).This study aimed to define and compare Synchro athletes and their coaches on their knowledge of sports nutrition (KSN)and knowledge of doping (KD); and to study factors related to KSN and KD in each of these groups. Additionally, the KSNand KD questionnaires were evaluated for their reliability and validity. Altogether, 82 athletes (17.2 ± 1.92 years of age) and 28 coaches (30.8 ± 5.26 years of age) from Croatia and Serbia were included in the study, with a 99% response rate. The testand retest correlations were 0.94 and 0.90 for the KD and KSN,respectively. Subjects responded equally to 91% queries of the KD and 89% queries of the KSN. Although most of the coache sare highly educated, they declared self-education as the primary source of information about doping and sport-nutrition. Coaches scored higher than their athletes on both questionnaires which defined appropriate discriminative validity of the questionnaires. Variables such as age, sports experience and formal education are positively correlated to KSN and KD scores among athletes. The athletes who scored better on the KD are less prone to doping behavior in the future. These data reinforce the need for systematic educational programs on doping and sports nutrition in synchronized swimming. Special attention should be placed on younger athletes. Key Points Although most of the synchro coaches are highly educated, self-education is declared as the primary source of information about doping and sportnutrition. The knowledge of doping and doping-health hazards are negatively related to potential doping behavior in the future among synchronized swimmers The data reinforce the need for systematic educational programs on doping and sports nutrition in synchronized swimming. We advocate improving the knowledge of sports nutrition among older coaches and the knowledge of doping among younger coaches, while among athletes,younger swimmers should be targeted PMID:24421736

Furjan Mandic, Gordana; Peric, Mia; Krzelj, Lucijana; Stankovic, Sladana; Zenic, Natasa

2013-01-01

98

Sports Nutrition and Doping Factors in Synchronized Swimming: Parallel Analysis among Athletes and Coaches.  

PubMed

Although nutrition and doping are important factors in sports, neither is often investigated in synchronized swimming (Synchro).This study aimed to define and compare Synchro athletes and their coaches on their knowledge of sports nutrition (KSN)and knowledge of doping (KD); and to study factors related to KSN and KD in each of these groups. Additionally, the KSNand KD questionnaires were evaluated for their reliability and validity. Altogether, 82 athletes (17.2 ± 1.92 years of age) and 28 coaches (30.8 ± 5.26 years of age) from Croatia and Serbia were included in the study, with a 99% response rate. The testand retest correlations were 0.94 and 0.90 for the KD and KSN,respectively. Subjects responded equally to 91% queries of the KD and 89% queries of the KSN. Although most of the coache sare highly educated, they declared self-education as the primary source of information about doping and sport-nutrition. Coaches scored higher than their athletes on both questionnaires which defined appropriate discriminative validity of the questionnaires. Variables such as age, sports experience and formal education are positively correlated to KSN and KD scores among athletes. The athletes who scored better on the KD are less prone to doping behavior in the future. These data reinforce the need for systematic educational programs on doping and sports nutrition in synchronized swimming. Special attention should be placed on younger athletes. Key PointsAlthough most of the synchro coaches are highly educated, self-education is declared as the primary source of information about doping and sportnutrition.The knowledge of doping and doping-health hazards are negatively related to potential doping behavior in the future among synchronized swimmersThe data reinforce the need for systematic educational programs on doping and sports nutrition in synchronized swimming.We advocate improving the knowledge of sports nutrition among older coaches and the knowledge of doping among younger coaches, while among athletes,younger swimmers should be targeted. PMID:24421736

Furjan Mandic, Gordana; Peric, Mia; Krzelj, Lucijana; Stankovic, Sladana; Zenic, Natasa

2013-01-01

99

Safety in Individual and Dual Sports. Sports Safety Series. Monograph No. 4.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The prevention of injuries and control of hazards in individual and dual sports is outlined. A separate chapter is devoted to each of twelve sports: archery, bowling, equitation, golf, gymnastics, marksmanship, track and field, weight training and weight lifting, fencing, racquet sports, judo, and wrestling. (MM)

Borozne, Joseph, Ed.; And Others

100

AccesSports: A Model for Adapting Mainstream Sports Activities for Individuals with Visual Impairments.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The AccesSports Model allows professionals with basic knowledge of visual impairments and mainstream sports to analyze any sports activity and design adaptations needed for targets or goals, boundaries, and rules to enable individuals with visual impairments to participate. Suggestions for modifying baseball, table tennis, swim racing, wrestling,…

Ponchilla, Paul E.

1995-01-01

101

Athlete burnout in elite sport: a self-determination perspective.  

PubMed

Using self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985) as the theoretical framework, we examined potential antecedents of athlete burnout in 201 elite Canadian athletes (121 females, 80 males; mean age 22.9 years). Employing a cross-sectional design, our primary aims were to investigate the relationships between behavioural regulations and athlete burnout and to examine whether self-determined motivation mediated relationships between basic needs satisfaction and athlete burnout. Our self-determination theory-derived hypotheses were largely supported. Relationships among athlete burnout and behavioural regulations mostly varied according to their rank on the self-determination continuum, with less self-determined motives showing positive associations and more self-determined motives showing negative correlations with burnout. The basic needs of competence and autonomy, plus self-determined motivation, accounted for significant amounts of variance in athlete burnout symptoms (exhaustion, R(2) = 0.31; devaluation, R(2) = 0.49; reduced accomplishment, R(2) = 0.61; global burnout, R(2) = 0.74). Self-determined motivation fully mediated the relationships that competence and autonomy had with exhaustion. Analyses showed indirect relationships between these two needs and devaluation, through their associations with self-determined motivation. Motivation partially mediated the needs-reduced sense of accomplishment relationships, but the direct effects were more prominent than the indirect effects. PMID:19437185

Lonsdale, Chris; Hodge, Ken; Rose, Elaine

2009-06-01

102

Variations in relative age effects in individual sports: skiing, figure skating and gymnastics.  

PubMed

In many sports, policy-makers and administrators employ annual cohorts to reduce differences between athletes during childhood and youth. Although well-intended, unintended relative age effects (RAEs) usually occur. RAEs refer to the specific selection, participation and attainment disadvantages associated with participants' birthdates relative to an arbitrary 'cutoff' date used to group participants within annual age groups. To date, we have little understanding of RAEs in individual sports. In this article, Study 1 considered the presence of RAEs in 1474 ski jumping, 7501 cross-country skiing, 15,565 alpine skiing, 4179 snowboarders and 713 Nordic combined athletes. Chi-square analyses revealed significant RAEs for most of these contexts across sexes. In Study 2, RAEs in the aesthetic sports of figure skating (n=502) and female gymnastics (n=612) were considered. There was no effect for the figure skaters and an atypical effect for the gymnasts. The significant effects across most ski sports coupled with the null effects in figure skating and atypical effect in gymnastics suggest that sport-specific contextual factors are important elements in understanding the mechanisms of RAEs, although further work is necessary to validate these findings. PMID:24444205

Baker, Joseph; Janning, Christina; Wong, Harmonie; Cobley, Stephen; Schorer, Jörg

2014-01-01

103

Women, Sports, and Science: Do Female Athletes Have an Advantage?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Analyzes data from a longitudinal study of high school youth to suggest that involvement in sports often has a strong and positive association with young womens' success in high school science. Associates participation in cheerleading with negative results. Summarizes both the functionalist and conflict theories regarding the purpose of sports.…

Hanson, Sandra L.; Kraus, Rebecca S.

1998-01-01

104

High School Athletes' Perspectives on Character Development through Sport Participation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Results from empirical research on character development in sport remain mixed concerning the outcomes of sport participation, in part because character is a socially constructed concept that can be interpreted in a wide variety of manners. Furthermore, the majority of research in this field has been conducted employing quantitative…

Camire, Martin; Trudel, Pierre

2010-01-01

105

Social Problems in Athletics; Essays in the Sociology of Sport.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book is an outgrowth of a conference on "Sport and Social Deviance," attended by people interested in the newly emerging interdisciplinary area concerned with the social scientific analysis of sport, play, and games. This anthology, which has contributions from many different authors, is intended to provide social scientists, physical…

Landers, Daniel M., Ed.

106

Human Capital, Sport Performance, and Salary Determination of Professional Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thanks to the high availability of data, professional sport represents a unique laboratory in order to test labour market theories and predictions. In par- ticular, one of the most important propositions concerns the role that hu- man capital plays in shaping the life-cycle earnings patterns of workers. To the extent that sport can be considered as a type of human

Roberto Antonietti

2006-01-01

107

Coaches, Athletes, and Dominance Profiles in Sport: Addressing the Learning Styles of Athletes to Improve Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this article is to examine the background and purpose of using dominance profiles to assist coaches in determining learning preferences for themselves and their athletes. Dominance profiles can provide information that will help coaches understand the differences in how athletes think, act, and learn. Dominance profiles can help…

Stevens, Debbie; Cadorette, Deborah

2012-01-01

108

Sport Nutrition and Doping in Tennis: An Analysis of Athletes’ Attitudes and Knowledge  

PubMed Central

Nutrition and doping issues are rarely studied in the sport of tennis. The aims of this investigation were to determine knowledge on doping (KD) and knowledge on sport nutrition (KSN), and corresponding socio-demographic-, sport-, and sport-nutrition- and doping-factors among an international sample of high-level tennis players of both sexes (43 females; 22 years old on average). In the first phase of the investigation, the KSN and KD questionnaires were studied for their reliability and validity. The consumption of NS is found to be very high, with almost of all the females and 80% of the males using NS at least occasionally. The athletes showed a low tendency regarding future doping usage, although most of them are convinced that doping does exist in tennis. Since athletes declared that their coaches are their main source of information about NS and doping, future studies should investigate what coaches actually know about such problems. KSN has been found to be protective against potential doping behavior in the future. Males are found to be more prone to doping than females. Therefore, in order to prevent doping behavior in tennis we strongly suggest intensive educational programs on sports nutrition and doping-related problems. Key Points The incidence of nutritional supplementation use among the tennis players is found to be very high, especially among the females. Although most of the subjects are of the opinion that the doping behavior is present in tennis circuit, we have found a low tendency regarding future doping usage, and high levels of athletes’ trust in their coaches with regard to nutritional supplementation and doping. There are indices that the knowledge about nutrition is protective factor against potential doping behavior. It clearly reinforces the need to include a wide educational program on sports nutrition in tennis, but also in other sports. PMID:24149808

Kondric, Miran; Sekulic, Damir; Uljevic, Ognjen; Gabrilo, Goran; Zvan, Milan

2013-01-01

109

Youth sport: positive and negative impact on young athletes.  

PubMed

Organized youth sports are highly popular for youth and their families, with approximately 45 million children and adolescent participants in the US. Seventy five percent of American families with school-aged children have at least one child participating in organized sports. On the surface, it appears that US children are healthy and happy as they engage in this traditional pastime, and families report higher levels of satisfaction if their children participate. However, statistics demonstrate a childhood obesity epidemic, with one of three children now being overweight, with an increasingly sedentary lifestyle for most children and teenagers. Increasing sports-related injuries, with 2.6 million emergency room visits a year for those aged 5-24 years, a 70%-80% attrition rate by the time a child is 15 years of age, and programs overemphasizing winning are problems encountered in youth sport. The challenges faced by adults who are involved in youth sports, from parents, to coaches, to sports medicine providers, are multiple, complex, and varied across ethnic cultures, gender, communities, and socioeconomic levels. It appears that an emphasis on fun while establishing a balance between physical fitness, psychologic well-being, and lifelong lessons for a healthy and active lifestyle are paramount for success. PMID:24379720

Merkel, Donna L

2013-01-01

110

Effect of head impacts on diffusivity measures in a cohort of collegiate contact sport athletes  

PubMed Central

Objective: To determine whether exposure to repetitive head impacts over a single season affects white matter diffusion measures in collegiate contact sport athletes. Methods: A prospective cohort study at a Division I NCAA athletic program of 80 nonconcussed varsity football and ice hockey players who wore instrumented helmets that recorded the acceleration-time history of the head following impact, and 79 non–contact sport athletes. Assessment occurred preseason and shortly after the season with diffusion tensor imaging and neurocognitive measures. Results: There was a significant (p = 0.011) athlete-group difference for mean diffusivity (MD) in the corpus callosum. Postseason fractional anisotropy (FA) differed (p = 0.001) in the amygdala (0.238 vs 0.233). Measures of head impact exposure correlated with white matter diffusivity measures in several brain regions, including the corpus callosum, amygdala, cerebellar white matter, hippocampus, and thalamus. The magnitude of change in corpus callosum MD postseason was associated with poorer performance on a measure of verbal learning and memory. Conclusion: This study suggests a relationship between head impact exposure, white matter diffusion measures, and cognition over the course of a single season, even in the absence of diagnosed concussion, in a cohort of college athletes. Further work is needed to assess whether such effects are short term or persistent. PMID:24336143

Ford, James C.; Flashman, Laura A.; Maerlender, Arthur; Greenwald, Richard M.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Bolander, Richard P.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Turco, John H.; Raman, Rema; Jain, Sonia

2014-01-01

111

Effect of intermittent normobaric hypoxic exposure at rest on haematological, physiological, and performance parameters in multi-sport athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine whether 3 weeks of intermittent normobaric hypoxic exposure at rest was able to elicit changes that would benefit multi-sport athletes. Twenty-two multi-sport athletes of mixed ability were exposed to either a normobaric hypoxic gas (intermittent hypoxic training group) or a placebo gas containing normal room air (placebo group). The participants breathed the

Michael John Hamlin; John Hellemans

2007-01-01

112

An Analysis of Goal Achievement Orientation and Sport Morality Levels of Division IA Non-Revenue Collegiate Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intent of this study was to investigate the goal orientations of non-revenue producing team student-athletes and the potential correlation to sport morality levels. Student-athletes (SA’s) (male n=114, female n=118) from a southeastern university, from non-revenue teams, in both semi-contact and non-contact areas, were compared and contrasted by the use of the Task and Ego Orientation Sport Questionaire (TEOSQ) and

John W. Lata

2005-01-01

113

Are sports overemphasized in the socialization process of African American males? A qualitative analysis of former collegiate athletes' perception of sport socialization .  

PubMed

Scholars have noted that an elevated level of sports socialization in the family, neighborhood, and media exists within the African American community, creating an overrepresentation of African American males in certain sports. As a result, African American males may face consequences that are distinctly different from the consequences of those who are not socialized as intensively toward athletics, such as lower levels of academic achievement, higher expectations for professional sports careers as a means to upward mobility, and lower levels of career maturity. This study examines the sport socialization of African American male former collegiate athletes through in-depth ethnographic interviews. The results show that the respondents' perceptions were that their socializing agents and socializing environment emphasized athletics above other roles, other talents, and the development of other skills. PMID:21174872

Beamon, Krystal K

2010-01-01

114

RECOGNITION AND MANAGEMENT OF TRAUMATIC SPORTS INJURIES IN THE SKELETALLY IMMATURE ATHLETE  

PubMed Central

Over the last decade, participation in organized youth sports has risen to include over 35 million contestants.1 The rise in participation has brought about an associated increase in both traumatic and overuse injuries in the youth athlete, which refers to both children and adolescents within a general age range of seven to 17. Exposure rates alone do not account for the increase in injuries. Societal pressures to perform at high levels affect both coaches and athletes and lead to inappropriate levels of training intensity, frequency, and duration. In this environment high physiologic stresses are applied to the immature skeleton of the youth athlete causing injury. Typically, since bone is the weakest link in the incomplete ossified skeleton, the majority of traumatic injuries result in fractures that occur both at mid?shaft and at the growth centers of bone. The following clinical commentary describes the common traumatic sports injuries that occur in youth athletes, as well as those which require rapid identification and care in order to prevent long term sequelae. PMID:23316432

Molony, Joseph T.

2012-01-01

115

Recognition and management of traumatic sports injuries in the skeletally immature athlete.  

PubMed

Over the last decade, participation in organized youth sports has risen to include over 35 million contestants.(1) The rise in participation has brought about an associated increase in both traumatic and overuse injuries in the youth athlete, which refers to both children and adolescents within a general age range of seven to 17. Exposure rates alone do not account for the increase in injuries. Societal pressures to perform at high levels affect both coaches and athletes and lead to inappropriate levels of training intensity, frequency, and duration. In this environment high physiologic stresses are applied to the immature skeleton of the youth athlete causing injury. Typically, since bone is the weakest link in the incomplete ossified skeleton, the majority of traumatic injuries result in fractures that occur both at mid-shaft and at the growth centers of bone. The following clinical commentary describes the common traumatic sports injuries that occur in youth athletes, as well as those which require rapid identification and care in order to prevent long term sequelae. PMID:23316432

Merkel, Donna L; Molony, Joseph T

2012-12-01

116

Doping in sports: Knowledge and attitudes among parents of Austrian junior athletes.  

PubMed

Strategies for doping prevention are based on prior identification of opportunities for intervention. There is no current research focusing on the potential role in doping prevention, which might be played by the parents of junior elite athletes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes toward doping among parents of Austrian junior athletes and to analyze factors potentially influencing these beliefs. In this study, two questionnaires were distributed to 1818 student athletes, each with instructions that these surveys were to be completed by their parents (ntotal ?=?3636). Parents filled in questionnaires at home without observation. Responses from 883 parents were included in this analysis. Compared to female parents, male parents demonstrated significantly better knowledge about doping and its side effects and were more likely to be influenced by their own sporting careers and amounts of sports activities per week. Parental sex did not demonstrate a significant influence on responses reflecting attitudes toward doping. Additional research is needed to compare these results with young athletes' knowledge and attitudes to determine if and to what degree parental attitudes and beliefs influence the behavior and attitudes of their children. PMID:24372621

Blank, C; Leichtfried, V; Schaiter, R; Fürhapter, C; Müller, D; Schobersberger, W

2015-02-01

117

"I Would Just like to Be Known as an Athlete": Managing Hegemony, Femininity, and Heterosexuality in Female Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The community of sport is a powerful site for the construction of masculinity, male identities, and heterosexuality. Consequently, the increased entry of women into the sporting arena has been actively resisted, with women athletes either excluded or framed within traditional, sexualized discourses of femininity and heterosexuality. Yet Title IX…

Mean, Lindsey J.; Kassing, Jeffrey W.

2008-01-01

118

Performance enhancement, elite athletes and anti doping governance: comparing human guinea pigs in pharmaceutical research and professional sports  

PubMed Central

In light of the World Anti Doping Agency’s 2013 Code Revision process, we critically explore the applicability of two of three criteria used to determine whether a method or substance should be considered for their Prohibited List, namely its (potential) performance enhancing effects and its (potential) risk to the health of the athlete. To do so, we compare two communities of human guinea pigs: (i) individuals who make a living out of serial participation in Phase 1 pharmacology trials; and (ii) elite athletes who engage in what is effectively 'unregulated clinical research’ by using untested prohibited or non-prohibited performance enhancing substances and methods, alone or in combination. Our comparison sheds light on norms of research ethics that these practices exacerbate with respect to the concepts of multiplicity, visibility, and consistency. We argue for the need to establish a proper governance framework to increase the accountability of these unregulated research practices in order to protect the human guinea pigs in elite sports contexts, and to establish reasonable grounds for the performance enhancing effects, and the risks to the health of the athlete, of the methods and substances that might justify their inclusion on the Prohibited List. PMID:24499536

2014-01-01

119

Gender, level of participation, and type of sport: differences in achievement goal orientation and attributional style.  

PubMed

Findings regarding gender differences in achievement goal orientations and attributional style have been somewhat inconsistent. One possible explanation for varied findings is that potentially confounding variables such as level of participation and type of sport have not been considered. Athletes (108 males and 164 females) from team and individual sports, competing at recreational and competitive levels, completed the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire, the Sport Attributional Style Scale, and a demographic questionnaire. Athletes competing in individual sports had a higher ego orientation than those from team sports, and females scored higher in task orientation than males. Individual sport athletes made more internal, stable, and global, and less externally controllable attributions for positive events, and more internal attributions for negative events than team sport athletes. Competitive female athletes made less global attributions for positive events than did recreational female athletes. This difference was not observed in male athletes. Competitive individual, but not team, athletes made less global attributions than recreational individual athletes. The significant interactions regarding globality suggest that the tradition in sport psychology attribution research to focus solely on internality, stability, and controllability may be inadequate. From an applied perspective, sport psychologists and coaches may find it beneficial to target individual sport athletes and males for interventions designed to enhance task orientation. Similarly, team sport athletes may be appropriate as a focus for attribution retraining programs. PMID:18356105

Hanrahan, Stephanie J; Cerin, Ester

2009-07-01

120

Reaction time and anticipatory skill of athletes in open and closed skill-dominated sport.  

PubMed

In sports, reaction time and anticipatory skill are critical aspects of perceptual abilities. To date, no study has compared reaction time and anticipatory skill of athletes from open and closed skill-dominated sport. Accordingly, the present study investigated whether a difference exists in sensory-cognitive skills between these two different sport domains. Eleven volleyball players and 11 sprinters participated in this experiment. Reaction time and anticipatory skill of both groups were recorded by a custom-made software called SART (speed anticipation and reaction time test). This software consists of six sensory-cognitive tests that evaluate visual choice reaction time, visual complex choice reaction time, auditory choice reaction time, auditory complex choice reaction time, and anticipatory skill of the high speed and low speed of the ball. For each variable, an independent t-test was performed. Results suggested that sprinters were better in both auditory reaction times (P<0.001 for both tests) and volleyball players were better in both anticipatory skill tests (P = 0.007 and P = 0.04 for anticipatory skill of the high speed and low speed of the ball, respectively). However, no significant differences were found in both visual choice reaction time tests (P > 0.05 for both visual reaction time tests). It is concluded that athletes have greater sensory-cognitive skills related to their specific sport domain either open or closed. PMID:24050458

Nuri, Leila; Shadmehr, Azadeh; Ghotbi, Nastaran; Attarbashi Moghadam, Behrouz

2013-01-01

121

Emergency preparedness in high school-based athletics: a review of the literature and recommendations for sport health professionals.  

PubMed

Approximately 7.6 million high school students in the United States participate in sports. Although most sport-related injuries in adolescents are considered minor emergencies, life-threatening illnesses or injuries may occur, such as sudden cardiac arrest, heat stroke, status asthmaticus and exercise-induced asthma, catastrophic brain injuries, cervical spine injuries, heat- and cold-related illness, blunt chest/abdominal injuries, and extremity fractures resulting in compartment syndrome. Emergency preparedness in athletics involves the identification of and planning for medical services to promote the safety of the athlete, to limit injury, and to provide medical care at the site of practice or competition. Several national organizations have published guidelines for emergency preparedness in school-based athletics. Our article reviews guidelines for emergency preparedness put forth by the Sideline Preparedness collaboration (comprised of 6 major professional associations, including the American Academy of Family Physicians, American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, American College of Sports Medicine, American Medical Society for Sports Medicine, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, and American Osteopathic Academy of Sports Medicine), the National Athletic Trainers' Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics' Committee on School Health, and the American Heart Association. Additionally, we review published data examining compliance of US high schools with these recommendations for emergency preparedness in school-based athletics, determine deficiencies, and provide recommendations for improvement based on these deficiencies. PMID:23703513

Olympia, Robert P; Brady, Jodi

2013-05-01

122

Recurrent shoulder instability among athletes: changes in quality of life, sports activity, and muscle function following open repair  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Recurrent anterior shoulder instability is a disabling condition in young athletes with possibly underestimated\\u000a impact on quality of life and sports activity. Commonly used clinical scoring systems do not reflect the impairment of quality\\u000a of life and sports activity. It was our aim to assess the return to preinjury levels of quality of life and sports activity\\u000a as well

Rupert Meller; Christian Krettek; Thomas Gösling; Knut Wähling; Michael Jagodzinski; Johannes Zeichen

2007-01-01

123

Natural selection for genetic variants in sport: the role of Y chromosome genes in elite female athletes with 46,XY DSD.  

PubMed

At present, it is widely assumed that hyperandrogenism in female athletes confers an unfair competitive advantage. This view is perpetuated in current regulations governing eligibility of female athletes with hyperandrogenism to compete, which identify testosterone levels in the male range as the critical factor. Detailed evidence is presented here for the first time that genes for stature (and possibly other genes) on the Y chromosome are responsible for the increased frequency of 46,XY disorder of sex development (46,XY DSD) among elite female athletes identified by eligibility tests. In many cases, androgens are non-functional or, alternatively, absent and therefore testosterone cannot be responsible for their athletic success. Genetic variation has a major role in the selection of individuals for training and success in competition; however, this variation is not grounds for determining who should compete in athletic events. There is no convincing evidence to support the view that hyperandrogenism is associated with performance advantage in female athletes. Current time-consuming regulations may lead to the unwelcome resurgence of innuendo in the media and coercion of female athletes into accepting gonadectomy and other treatments to which they might otherwise not have been subjected. These regulations should be withdrawn on the grounds that they are not supported scientifically, are discriminatory towards women and place some female athletes at risk of unnecessary and potentially harmful investigations. Improved understanding about genetic factors that lead to selection in sport should offer reassurance that women with hyperandrogenism possess no physical attribute relevant to athletic performance that is neither attainable, nor present in other women. PMID:25160863

Ferguson-Smith, Malcolm A; Bavington, L Dawn

2014-12-01

124

Influence of sprint acceleration stance kinetics on velocity and step kinematics in field sport athletes.  

PubMed

The interaction between step kinematics and stance kinetics determines sprint velocity. However, the influence that stance kinetics has on effective acceleration in field sport athletes requires clarification. About 25 men (age = 22.4 ± 3.2 years; mass = 82.8 ± 7.2 kg; height = 1.81 ± 0.07 m) completed twelve 10-m sprints, 6 sprints each for kinematic and kinetic assessment. Pearson's correlations (p ? 0.05) examined relationships between 0-5, 5-10, and 0-10 m velocity; step kinematics (mean step length [SL], step frequency, contact time [CT], flight time over each interval); and stance kinetics (relative vertical, horizontal, and resultant force and impulse; resultant force angle; ratio of horizontal to resultant force [RatF] for the first, second, and last contacts within the 10-m sprint). Relationships were found between 0-5, 5-10, and 0-10 m SL and 0-5 and 0-10 m velocity (r = 0.397-0.535). CT of 0-5 and 0-10 m correlated with 5-10 m velocity (r = -0.506 and -0.477, respectively). Last contact vertical force correlated with 5-10 m velocity (r = 0.405). Relationships were established between the second and last contact vertical and resultant force and CT over all intervals (r = -0.398 to 0.569). First and second contact vertical impulse correlated with 0-5 m SL (r = 0.434 and 0.442, respectively). Subjects produced resultant force angles and RatF suitable for horizontal force production. Faster acceleration in field sport athletes involved longer steps, with shorter CT. Greater vertical force production was linked with shorter CT, illustrating efficient force production. Greater SLs during acceleration were facilitated by higher vertical impulse and appropriate horizontal force. Speed training for field sport athletes should be tailored to encourage these technique adaptations. PMID:23222091

Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Schultz, Adrian B; Jeffriess, Matthew D; Callaghan, Samuel J

2013-09-01

125

Arrhythmias in athletes: evidence-based strategies and challenges for diagnosis, management, and sports eligibility.  

PubMed

Assessment and management of cardiac rhythm disorders in athletes is particularly challenging. An accurate diagnosis and optimal risk-stratification are often limited because of substantial phenotypic overlap between pathological entities and adaptive cardiovascular responses that normally occur in athletes. An accurate diagnosis, however, is particularly important in this population, as 2 competing risks need to be cautiously balanced: the risk of under-diagnosis of an arrhythmogenic substrate that may trigger life-threatening events versus the risk of over-diagnosis that may result in an athlete's improper disqualification. Accordingly, the management of arrhythmias in athletes may pose therapeutic dilemmas, and often differs substantially compared with the general population. In this review, we present the most frequently observed arrhythmias in athletes and briefly discuss their pathophysiologic substrate. We further propose diagnostic and therapeutic strategies based upon current guidelines, official recommendations, and emerging evidence from relevant clinical investigations. We focus particularly on disparities in current guidelines regarding the management of certain rhythm disorders, as these areas of uncertainty may reflect the challenging nature of these disorders and may indicate the need for individualized approaches in every-day clinical practice. A better understanding of the normal electrophysiological responses to chronic exercise, and of the pathophysiological basis and the true clinical significance of arrhythmias in athletes, may enhance decision-making, and may allow for management strategies which more prudently weigh the risk-to-benefit ratio of each approach. PMID:23422016

Fragakis, Nikolaos; Pagourelias, Efstathios D; Koskinas, Konstantinos C; Vassilikos, Vassilios

2013-01-01

126

The Relationship of Symptoms and Neurocognitive Performance to Perceived Recovery From Sports-Related Concussion Among Adolescent Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sports medicine practitioners often consider athletes’ self-reports of recovery for the management of concussion, and it is not clear which factors (i.e., neurocognitive performance and symptoms) athletes consider when forming perceptions of recovery from concussion. The current study assessed the relationship of perceptions of recovery to neurocognitive performance on the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) battery and to

Natalie K. Sandel; Mark R. Lovell; Nathan E. Kegel; Michael W. Collins; Anthony P. Kontos

2012-01-01

127

Using self-determination theory to explain sport persistence and dropout in adolescent athletes.  

PubMed

Motivational characteristics are influential in shaping adolescents' desire to persist in sport or to discontinue their sport participation. Self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000) was utilized as the theoretical framework for this study. This theory examines whether sustained participatory involvement, defined as continued participation in the sport through the next year, was influenced by individuals' self-determined motivation and by the fulfillment of the three basic psychological needs of autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Four hundred ninety two soccer players between the ages of 13 and 17 years comprised the sample. Results indicated sport dropout was explained by higher levels of amotivation, external regulation, and introjected regulation and by lower satisfaction of relatedness and autonomy needs. The findings of this study contribute to the knowledge base on sport dropout as they supported many of self-determination theory. PMID:20977017

García Calvo, Tomás; Cervelló, Eduardo; Jiménez, Ruth; Iglesias, Damián; Moreno Murcia, Juan Antonio

2010-11-01

128

Organizational and Psychological Consultation in Collegiate Sports Medicine Groups  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complex authority, accountability, and supervisory structures of sports medicine groups in athletic departments can lead to conflicts that affect healthcare delivery for student—athletes. The authors review consultation models that counselors, sport psychologists, and other organizational consultants can use in dealing with these problems in collegiate sports medicine groups and offer examples of improved functioning through systemic, group, and individual

Mark B. Andersen; Britton W. Brewer

1995-01-01

129

Sleep habits in German athletes before important competitions or games.  

PubMed

Sleep is generally regarded as a valuable resource for psychological and physiological well-being. Although the effects of sleep on athletic performance have been acknowledged in sport science, few studies have investigated the prevalence of sleep problems and their effects on elite athletes before a sport event. In this study, 632 German athletes from various sports were asked about their sleep habits during the night(s) before an important competition or game. The findings indicate that 65.8% of the athletes experienced poor sleep in the night(s) before a sports event at least once in their lives and a similarly high percentage (62.3%) had this experience at least once during the previous 12 months. Athletes of individual sports reported more sleep difficulties than athletes of team sports. The main sleep problem was not being able to fall asleep. Internal factors such as nervousness and thoughts about the competition were rated highest for causing sleep problems. Most athletes stated that disturbed sleep had no influence on their athletic performance; however, athletes also reported effects such as a bad mood the following day, increased daytime sleepiness, and worse performance in the competition or game. The differences between individual and team sports indicate that athletes in some sports need more help than those in other sports in managing sleep problems. PMID:21506041

Erlacher, Daniel; Ehrlenspiel, Felix; Adegbesan, Olufemi A; El-Din, Hamdi Galal

2011-05-01

130

New Perspectives In Sports Medicine  

PubMed Central

The current status of sports medicine is reviewed, with its emphasis upon treatment of the individual, particularly the elite athlete. A plea is made for greater interest in sporting activities of the general public, with emphasis upon prevention of disease. Suggestions are advanced for future research, and an appropriate curriculum for the training of the sports physician is proposed. PMID:20469052

Shephard, Roy J.

1974-01-01

131

Injury Representations, Coping, Emotions, and Functional Outcomes in Athletes With Sports-Related Injuries: A Test of Self-Regulation Theory1  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the influence of injury representations on emotions and outcomes of athletes with sports-related musculoskeletal injuries using self-regulation theory. Partici- pants were athletes (N = 220; M age = 23.44 years, SD = 8.42) with a current sports- related musculoskeletal injury. Participants self-reported their cognitive and emotional injury representations, emotions coping procedures, physical and sports functioning, attendance at

Martin S. Hagger; Nikos L. D. Chatzisarantis; Murray Griffin; Joanne Thatcher

2005-01-01

132

Applying self-compassion in sport: an intervention with women athletes.  

PubMed

This study investigated the effects of a self-compassion intervention on negative cognitive states and self-compassion in varsity women athletes. Athletes who self-identified as being self-critical were randomly assigned to a self-compassion intervention (n = 29) or attention control group (n = 22). The self-compassion intervention consisted of a psychoeducation session and writing components completed over a 7-day period. Measures of self-compassion, state self-criticism, state rumination, and concern over mistakes were collected pretreatment, at 1 week posttreatment, and at a 4-week follow-up. A mixed factorial MANOVA with follow-up post hoc tests demonstrated moderate-to-strong effects for the intervention at posttest and follow-up (Wilks's ? = .566, F (8, 42) = 4.03, p < .01, ?2 = .43). The findings demonstrate the effectiveness of the self-compassion intervention in managing self-criticism, rumination, and concern over mistakes. Fostering self-compassionate mind frames is a potential coping resource for women athletes dealing with negative events in sport. PMID:24197719

Mosewich, Amber D; Crocker P, R E; Kowalski, Kent C; Delongis, Anita

2013-10-01

133

Oxidative stress status in elite athletes engaged in different sport disciplines.  

PubMed

Exercise training may increase production of free radicals and reactive oxygen species in different ways. The training type and intensity may influence free radicals production, which leads to differences in oxidative stress status between athletes, but the results of the previous studies are incosistent. The aim of our study was to estimate oxidative stress status in elite athletes engaged in different sport disciplines. The study included 39 male highly skilled professional competitors with international experience (2 Olympic players): 12 wrestlers, 14 soccer players and 13 basketball players in whom we determined the levels of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and malondialdehyde (MDA), as markers of oxidative stress and the total antioxidative capacity (ImAnOX) using commercially available assay kits. The mean AOPP concentration was not significantly different between soccer players, wrestler and basketball players (60.0 ± 23.0 vs. 68.5 ± 30.8 and 80.72 ± 29.1 ?mol/L respectively). Mean ImAnOX concentration was not different between soccer players (344.8 ± 35.6 ?mol/L), wrestlers (342.5 ± 36.2 ?mol/L) and basketball players (347.95 ± 31.3 ?mol/L). Mean MDA concentration was significantly higher in basketball players (1912.1 ± 667.7 ng/mL) compared to soccer players (1060.1 ± 391.0 ng/mL, p=0.003). In spite of this fact, oxidative stress markers levels were increased compared to referral values provided by the manufacturer. Type of sports (soccer, wrestler or basketball) have no impact on the levels of oxidative stress markers. Elite sports engagement is a potent stimulus of oxidative stress that leads to the large recruitment of antioxidative defense. Oxidative stress status monitoring followed by appropriate use of antioxidants is recommended as a part of training regime. PMID:24856375

Hadžovi?-Džuvo, Almira; Valjevac, Amina; Lepara, Orhan; Pjani?, Samra; Hadžimuratovi?, Adnan; Meki?, Amel

2014-05-01

134

Iron status in female athletes participating in team ball-sports.  

PubMed

Iron deficiency anemia is the most prevalent micronutrient deficiency in the world, affecting 20-50% of the world's population. It is estimated that 10 and 20% of male and female athletes are iron deficient, respectively. Iron deficiency has deleterious effects on the physical performance of athletes. It decreases aerobic capacity, increases heart rate and elongates the recovery time after exercise. In this cross-sectional study, 42 semi-professional female athletes who had been playing in basketball, volleyball and handball super league teams served as subjects. Data on socioeconomic and fertility status as well as the type of sport were obtained through a questionnaire. Nutritional data were gathered with a 3 day dietary recall. Total intake of calorie, iron, zinc, folate, vitamin C and B12 were also analyzed. In addition, ferritin and TIBC were measured and a CBC test was done for each subject. The results showed that the mean total calorie intake of women was 2049.79 +/- 735.12 kcal, where their iron intake was 22.33 +/- 9.24 mg day(-1). There was a significant difference between the iron intake of basketball and volleyball players (p = 0.036). Of our subjects, 33.33% had low ferritin levels (< 30 ng mL(-1)) and it was lowest in handball players. Higher than normal ferritin levels were seen in 12.5% of the subjects. We saw a significant difference in ferritin levels of basketball and handball players (p = 0.047). We conclude that the intake of calorie and iron is low in female athletes and therefore, their hematological indices such as ferritin level are below standard values. PMID:20415144

Ahmadi, A; Enayatizadeh, N; Akbarzadeh, M; Asadi, S; Tabatabaee, S H R

2010-01-15

135

Validation of a French Version of the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (ABQ): In Competitive Sport and Physical Education Context  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research develops a psychometrically sound measure of the Athlete Burnout Questionnaire (ABQ; Raedeke & Smith, 2001) in French (Le Questionnaire du Burnout Sportif, QBS). We first developed a preliminary version and then had 895 French adolescents involved in competitive sport or physical education at school complete the survey. The results showed good internal consistency (all Cronbach’s ? values >

Sandrine Isoard-Gautheur; Marie Oger; Emma Guillet; Charles Martin-Krumm

2010-01-01

136

ATHLETES, YOGIS AND INDIVIDUALS WITH SEDENTARY LIFESTYLES; DO THEIR LUNG FUNCTIONS DIFFER ?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Buffalo health study concluded that pulmonary function is a long-term predictor for overall survival rates. It is essential to be involved in physical activity or sports which help in achieving better lung function. Cross sectional observation study was conducted to determine if yoga and athletic activity (running) are associated with better lung functions as compared to subjects with sedentary lifestyles

SHIVESH PRAKASH; SUSHANT MESHRAM; UJJWAL RAMTEKKAR

2007-01-01

137

This is your brain on sports. Measuring concussions in high school athletes in the Twin Cities metropolitan area.  

PubMed

Concussions can have a negative impact on students' ability to perform in the classroom as well as on their health and well-being. Therefore, timely treatment is especially important. To better understand the scope of the problem in Minnesota, the Minnesota Department of Health piloted an online sports-related concussion reporting system in 36 public high schools in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. In the 2013-2014 academic year, 730 concussions were reported to our system from certified athletic trainers working with those schools, with one out of every 100 athletes sustaining concussions. From this, we estimated that 2,974 sports-related concussions occurred among high school athletes statewide. This information is useful for evaluating and guiding prevention efforts and for informing clinicians on how to treat concussions. PMID:25282771

Dugan, Sarah; Seymour, Leslie; Roesler, Jon; Glover, Lori; Kinde, Mark

2014-09-01

138

The relationship of symptoms and neurocognitive performance to perceived recovery from sports-related concussion among adolescent athletes.  

PubMed

Sports medicine practitioners often consider athletes' self-reports of recovery for the management of concussion, and it is not clear which factors (i.e., neurocognitive performance and symptoms) athletes consider when forming perceptions of recovery from concussion. The current study assessed the relationship of perceptions of recovery to neurocognitive performance on the Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) battery and to symptoms using the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale (PCSS). A total of 101 concussed athletes (62 males, 39 females) aged 12 to 18 years old were included in the study (M(age) = 14.75, SD = 1.76). Athletes were asked to rate their "percent back to normal" (i.e., perception of recovery) at the time of evaluation. A multiple regression for neurocognitive performance and symptoms revealed a significant model that accounted for 58% of the variance in perceptions of recovery. Adolescent athletes base their perceptions primarily on somatic symptoms (e.g., headache, nausea, vomiting, etc.), and these perceptions may be incongruent with objective neurocognitive measures. Athletes' tendency to overlook several factors when forming their perceptions of recovery should caution the sports medicine practitioner from relying on self-reported symptoms as their primary criterion for return-to-play decisions. These data further support the need for valid and reliable measures for concussion management. PMID:23427778

Sandel, Natalie K; Lovell, Mark R; Kegel, Nathan E; Collins, Michael W; Kontos, Anthony P

2013-01-01

139

Pattern and management of sports injuries presented by Lagos state athletes at the 16th National Sports Festival (KADA games 2009) in Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background There is a dearth of information on the epidemiology of sports injuries in Nigeria. The study was aimed at documenting sports injuries sustained by Lagos state athletes during the 16th National Sports Festival (KADA Games 2009). It was also aimed at providing information on treatments offered to injured athletes. Methods The study was carried out at Amadu Bello Stadium Complex, sporting arena of the Murtala Square and the team Lagos mini clinic. Participants were accredited Lagos state athletes who at one point in time during the games required treatment from any of the members of the medical team. Demographic data of athletes, type of injuries, body parts injured and treatment modalities used were documented and analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Within the period of the games, a total of 140 sports injuries were documented from 132 athletes with an approximate male to female ratio of 2:1 and age ranging from 15-38 years. Most of the injuries reported by the athletes were "minor" injuries. Muscle strain was the most common type of injury (31.4%) followed by ligament sprains (22.9%). The lower extremities were the most injured body region accounting for 50% of all injuries. Over 60% of injuries presented by the athletes were from basketball, cricket, hockey, rugby and baseball. Cryotherapy was the most frequently used treatment modality, followed by bandaging and massage with anti-inflammatory gels. Conclusion Establishing injury prevention programmes directed at the lower extremities may help reduce the risk of injuries to the lower extremities. Since cryotherapy was the most used treatment modality, it is suggested that it should be made abundantly available to the medical team preferably in forms of portable cold sprays for easy transportation and application during the games. It is also important that physiotherapists form the core of the medical team since they are trained to apply most of these treatment modalities and they also play a major role in establishing injury prevention routines. This data provides information that will be useful to both state and federal medical teams in preparing for future games. PMID:20205785

2010-01-01

140

Acute Effects of Self-Selected Regimen of Rapid Body Mass Loss in Combat Sports Athletes  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the study was to assess the acute effects of the self-selected regimen of rapid body mass loss (RBML) on muscle performance and metabolic response to exercise in combat sports athletes. Seventeen male athletes (20.8 ± 1.0 years; mean ± SD) reduced their body mass by 5.1 ± 1.1% within 3 days. The RBML was achieved by a gradual reduction of energy and fluid intake and mild sauna procedures. A battery of tests was performed before (Test 1) and immediately after (Test 2) RBML. The test battery included the measurement of the peak torque of knee extensors for three different speeds, assessment of total work (Wtot) performed during a 3-min intermittent intensity knee extension exercise and measurements of blood metabolites (ammonia, lactate, glucose and urea). Absolute peak torque was lower in Test 2 compared with Test 1 at angular velocities of 1.57 rad·s-1 (218.6 ± 40.9 vs. 234.4 ± 42.2 N·m; p = 0.013) and 3.14 rad·s-1 (100.3 ± 27.8 vs. 111.7 ± 26.2 N·m; p = 0.008). The peak torque in relation to body mass remained unchanged for any speed. Absolute Wtot was lower in Test 2 compared with Test 1 (6359 ± 2326 vs. 7452 ± 3080 J; p = 0.003) as well as Wtot in relation to body mass (89.1 ± 29.9 vs. 98.6 ± 36.4 J·kg-1; p = 0.034), respectively. As a result of RBML, plasma urea concentration increased from 4.9 to 5.9 mmol·l-1 (p = 0.003). The concentration of ammonia in a post-test sample in Test 2 tended to be higher in comparison with Test 1 (80.9 ± 29.1 vs. 67.6 ± 26.5 mmol·l-1; p = 0.082). The plasma lactate and glucose responses to exercise were similar in Test 1 and Test 2. We conclude that the self-selected regimen of RBML impairs muscle performance in 3-min intermittent intensity exercise and induces an increase in blood urea concentration in experienced male combat sports athletes. Key pointsPrevious studies have revealed a negative effect of rapid body mass loss on performance. However, there are some performance characteristics that may not change or even improve.The methods used for inducing rapid body mass loss have been prescribed by researchers and not chosen by the subjects in many previous studies. The duration of tests, which have revealed a negative impact of rapid body mass loss on performance have also been rather long (5-6 min) in previous studies.We assessed the acute effects of the self-selected regimen of rapid body mass loss on muscle performance and metabolic response to 3-min intermittent intensity exercise in experienced male combat sports athletes.The results suggest that the self-selected regimen of rapid body mass loss impairs muscle performance in 3-min intermittent intensity exercise and induces an increase in blood urea concentration. Hence, the recent changes in the rules of some events (wrestling), including shortening of the duration of a match, have not reduced the likelihood of the occurrence of a negative impact of rapid body mass loss on athletes' performance capacity. PMID:24149451

Timpmann, Saima; Ööpik, Vahur; Pääsuke, Mati; Medijainen, Luule; Ereline, Jaan

2008-01-01

141

The aging spine in sports.  

PubMed

1. Masters athletes may experience low back pain from multiple sources. Masters athletes with discogenic back pain should avoid or modify sports with combined rotational and compressive forces; individuals with facet-mediated pain should avoid or modify sports with excessive extension and rotation. 2. Optimization of flexibility, strength, endurance, and core control is critical. Sports specific training, realistic goal setting, and counseling are of maximal importance. 3. Overall, the health benefits of continued sports and athletic participation outweigh the potential risks of spinal degeneration in middle-aged athletes. There is little correlation between radiographic appearance of the spine and symptoms; therefore, symptoms should serve as the primary guide when determining activity modifications. Overall, masters athletes should be encouraged to remain active and fit to enhance their quality of life and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22657996

Borg-Stein, Joanne; Elson, Lauren; Brand, Erik

2012-07-01

142

Perceived Effects of Emotion Intensity on Athletic Performance: A Contingency-Based Individualized Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study, based on the Individual Zones of Optimal Functioning model, examined the perceived effect of idiosyncratic emotions and bodily symptoms on athletic performance along the entire emotion-intensity range. The participants were 35 elite Italian athletes, 16 women and 19 men, competing in either figure skating or gymnastics. Idiosyncratic…

Robazza, Claudio; Bortoli, Laura; Hanin, Yuri

2006-01-01

143

Identification of the role of the sports pharmacist with a model for the prediction of athletes' actions to cope with sickness.  

PubMed

In 2009, the Japan Anti-Doping Agency (JADA) established Sports Pharmacist-a system for certified pharmacists. There are many over-the-counter drugs that contain prohibited substances in Japan, and they are easily available. In Japan, most doping violations are committed when athletes unintentionally take prohibited substances. Therefore, the Sports Pharmacist has a vital role in promoting the prevention of doping. In the present study, surveys involving a total of 350 athletes, (including 260 representatives of Ehime Prefecture in the National Athletic Meets and 90 college students who participated in the intercollegiate athletics Shikoku area meets), on awareness regarding doping and medical drugs were conducted. Using correspondence and logistic regression analyses, the results were examined to develop a model for the prediction of athletes' actions to cope with sickness based on changes in their awareness of anti-doping, and the relationship between them was also analyzed. The survey results suggested that attitudes towards doping were strongly influenced by gender, rather than the athletic ability and whether or not a doping test is scheduled. Their behavior and criteria for the selection of drugs to address sickness were strongly correlated with awareness of anti-doping. Therefore, athletes with an increased awareness of anti-doping are expected to consult a pharmacist prior to using medicine. The Sports Pharmacist should further promote environmental development, such as activities to improve awareness of doping among young athletes and the establishment of medical drug consultation services for athletes (female athletes in particular). PMID:24189566

Yamaguchi, Takumi; Horio, Ikuo; Aoki, Ryouta; Yamashita, Noboru; Tanaka, Mamoru; Izushi, Fumio; Miyauchi, Yoshirou; Araki, Hiroaki

2013-01-01

144

Diffuse white matter tract abnormalities in clinically normal ageing retired athletes with a history of sports-related concussions.  

PubMed

Sports-related concussions have been shown to lead to persistent subclinical anomalies of the motor and cognitive systems in young asymptomatic athletes. In advancing age, these latent alterations correlate with detectable motor and cognitive function decline. Until now, the interacting effects of concussions and the normal ageing process on white matter tract integrity remain unknown. Here we used a tract-based spatial statistical method to uncover potential white matter tissue damage in 15 retired athletes with a history of concussions, free of comorbid medical conditions. We also investigated potential associations between white matter integrity and declines in cognitive and motor functions. Compared to an age- and education-matched control group of 15 retired athletes without concussions, former athletes with concussions exhibited widespread white matter anomalies along many major association, interhemispheric, and projection tracts. Group contrasts revealed decreases in fractional anisotropy, as well as increases in mean and radial diffusivity measures in the concussed group. These differences were primarily apparent in fronto-parietal networks as well as in the frontal aspect of the corpus callosum. The white matter anomalies uncovered in concussed athletes were significantly associated with a decline in episodic memory and lateral ventricle expansion. Finally, the expected association between frontal white matter integrity and motor learning found in former non-concussed athletes was absent in concussed participants. Together, these results show that advancing age in retired athletes presenting with a history of sports-related concussions is linked to diffuse white matter abnormalities that are consistent with the effects of traumatic axonal injury and exacerbated demyelination. These changes in white matter integrity might explain the cognitive and motor function declines documented in this population. PMID:25186429

Tremblay, Sebastien; Henry, Luke C; Bedetti, Christophe; Larson-Dupuis, Camille; Gagnon, Jean-François; Evans, Alan C; Théoret, Hugo; Lassonde, Maryse; De Beaumont, Louis

2014-11-01

145

Sport for All: A Declaration of Rights of Individuals with Disabilities; Responsibilities of Program Organizers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses why individuals with disabilities participate in sport, introducing the broad array of sport opportunities available to them. A four-level continuum of sport opportunities for individuals with disabilities is described, providing examples of implementation at each level. Questions, challenges, and suggestions for program organizers are…

Stein, Julian U.; Paciorek, Michael J.

1994-01-01

146

Position of Dietitians of Canada, the American Dietetic Association, and the American College of Sports Medicine: Nutrition and Athletic Performance.  

PubMed

It is the position of Dietitians of Canada, the American Dietetic Association, and the American College of Sports Medicine that physical activity, athletic performance, and recovery from exercise are enhanced by optimal nutrition. These organizations recommend appropriate selection of food and fluids, timing of intake, and supplement choices for optimal health and exercise performance. This position paper reviews the current scientific data related to athletes' energy needs, assessment of body composition, strategies for weight change, athletes' nutrient and fluid needs, special nutrient needs during training, the use of supplements and nutritional ergogenic aids, and nutrition recommendations for vegetarian athletes. During times of high physical activity, energy and macronutrient needs - especially carbohydrate and protein intake - must be met in order to maintain body weight, replenish glycogen stores, and provide adequate protein for building and repairing tissue. Fat intake should be adequate to provide essential fatty acids and fat-soluble vitamins, as well as to help provide adequate energy for weight maintenance. Overall, diets should provide moderate amounts of energy from fat (20-25% of energy); there appears to be no health or performance benefit to consuming a diet containing less than 15% of energy from fat. Body weight and composition can affect exercise performance, but should not be used as the sole criterion for sports performance; daily weigh-ins are discouraged. Consuming adequate food and fluid before, during, and after exercise can help maintain blood glucose levels during exercise, maximize exercise performance, and improve recovery time. Athletes should be well hydrated before beginning exercise; they should also drink enough fluid during and after exercise to balance fluid losses. Consumption of sport drinks containing carbohydrates and electrolytes during exercise will provide fuel for the muscles, help maintain blood glucose levels and the thirst mechanism, and decrease the risk of dehydration or hyponatremia. Athletes will not need vitamin-and-mineral supplements if adequate energy to maintain body weight is consumed from a variety of foods. However, supplements may be required by athletes who restrict energy intake, have severe weight-loss practices, eliminate one or more food groups from their diet, or consume high-carbohydrate diets with low micronutrient density. Nutritional ergogenic aids should be used with caution, and only after careful evaluation of the product for safety, for efficacy, for potency, and to determine whether or not it is a banned or illegal substance. Nutrition advice, by a qualified nutrition expert, should be provided only after the athlete's health, diet, supplement and drug use, and energy requirements have been carefully reviewed. PMID:11551367

2000-01-01

147

Achievement Motivation, Coping Processes, and Sports Participation of Athletes with Physical Handicaps: A Student-Initiated Project. Final Report, July 1, 1985 to September 15, 1986.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study examined how the coping behaviors and achievement motivation of 181 athletes (aged 18-66) with cerebral palsy or other physical disabilities influence participation in the normalized activity of competitive sport. The project examined the following cognitive aspects of performance: (1) reasons for becoming involved in sports; (2) how the…

Overton, Sara R.; And Others

148

"Inside the Bubble": A Look at the Experiences of Student-Athletes in Revenue-Producing Sports during College and beyond  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This phenomenological study sought to address the overarching research questions: What are the costs and benefits of participation in Division I college sports? How does participation in Division I college sports prepare student-athletes for life after college? A qualitative methodology was selected to provide richer data than that which could be…

Menke, Donna J.

2010-01-01

149

Stress in College Athletics: Causes, Consequences, Coping.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book addresses the causes and consequences of stress in college sports and offers effective coping mechanisms to help individuals understand and control stressors and emotions in their environment. The chapters are: (1) "Understanding Stress"; (2) "Perceptions of Stress in College Athletics"; (3) "Stress among College Athletes"; (4) "Stress…

Humphrey, James H.; Yow, Deborah A.; Bowden, William W.

150

Local versus global optimal sports techniques in a group of athletes.  

PubMed

Various optimization algorithms have been used to achieve optimal control of sports movements. Nevertheless, no local or global optimization algorithm could be the most effective for solving all optimal control problems. This study aims at comparing local and global optimal solutions in a multistart gradient-based optimization by considering actual repetitive performances of a group of athletes performing a transition move on the uneven bars. Twenty-four trials by eight national-level female gymnasts were recorded using a motion capture system, and then multistart sequential quadratic programming optimizations were performed to obtain global optimal, local optimal and suboptimal solutions. The multistart approach combined with a gradient-based algorithm did not often find the local solution to be the best and proposed several other solutions including global optimal and suboptimal techniques. The qualitative change between actual and optimal techniques provided three directions for training: to increase hip flexion-abduction, to transfer leg and arm angular momentum to the trunk and to straighten hand path to the bar. PMID:24156618

Huchez, Aurore; Haering, Diane; Holvoët, Patrice; Barbier, Franck; Begon, Mickael

2015-06-01

151

INTRAMURALSFall Team Sports* Registration accepted for teams or "free agent" individuals. $25 registration fee required  

E-print Network

INTRAMURALSFall Team Sports* Registration accepted for teams or "free agent" individuals. $25 are forfeited). 3 week season with up to 2 games per week. Sport Registration Dates Season Dates Co-Ed Softball Tournaments* 1 to 4 days of tournament style competition. NO forfeit fee required. Sport Registration Dates

Maxwell, Bruce D.

152

Promoting Athletic Training through a General Education Course in Psychosocial Aspects of Sports Injuries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: A general education course taught by athletic training education faculty has the potential to expose the entire student body to the athletic training profession in a unique way while also meeting requirements of the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education. Objective: To introduce a detailed case study of a general…

Gardiner-Shires, Alison Marie; Heinerichs, Scott

2012-01-01

153

Emotional Intelligence, Body Image and Disordered Eating Attitudes in Combat Sport Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to explore the possible differences in body image, emotional intelligence, anx- iety levels and disordered eating attitudes in a group of Taekwondo (TKD) and Judo athletes and non-athletes. The interrelationships of the above parameters were also examined. A total of 60 subjects were recruited: 20 were national and international TKD and Judo athletes and

Vassiliki Costarelli; Dimitra Stamou

2009-01-01

154

Perspectives on Sport Specialization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For high school athletes, the pressure increases each year to specialize and focus on their best sport, and if they do not, they risk being surpassed by other athletes who have focused on one sport. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of sport specialization and looks at the rising danger of club sports for high school athletes.…

Watts, Jay

2002-01-01

155

Quantification of physiological, movement, and technical outputs during a novel small-sided game in young team sport athletes.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to quantify the physiological responses, time-motion characteristics, and technical executions associated with a novel non-sport-specific small-sided game (SSG) in young team sport players. On 6 separate occasions, 12 young male team sport athletes (mean ± SD: age, 13.0 ± 0.3 years; height, 157.4 ± 4.9 cm; body mass, 47.0 ± 5.0 kg; and V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak, 55.1 ± 4.6 ml·kg·min) completed various "bucketball" SSG formats (i.e., 3 vs. 3, 4 vs. 4, and 6 vs. 6) twice each. Heart rate (HR) was measured during each SSG at 5-second intervals. Time-motion characteristics were measured using global positioning systems. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPEs) were recorded immediately after the SSGs using the Borg scale (RPEs, 6-20). Technical skill executions were measured using a high-speed digital video camera. Analysis revealed a tendency for the 3 vs. 3 games to elicit higher HRs (88.3 ± 4.3) than either 4 vs. 4 (85.9 ± 4.9) or 6 vs. 6 formats (85.9 ± 3.2). Total distance traveled at 13-17.9 km·h was more during 6 vs. 6 than 3 vs. 3 games (very likely substantial true difference, 97%), and total possessions and number of catches, passes, and shots were all higher in 3 vs. 3 compared with 4 vs. 4 and 6 vs. 6 games. There was no difference in RPE between the game formats. The results of this study indicate that 3 vs. 3 non-sport-specific SSGs provide higher stimulus for aerobic fitness adaptation and technical improvement than 4 vs. 4 and 6 vs. 6 formats, and their use for training young team sport athletes is recommended. PMID:23254547

Harrison, Craig B; Gill, Nicholas D; Kinugasa, Taisuke; Kilding, Andrew E

2013-10-01

156

Clinical outcome and return to sport after the surgical treatment of spondylolysis in young athletes.  

PubMed

We studied prospectively 22 young athletes who had undergone surgical treatment for lumbar spondylolysis. There were 15 men and seven women with a mean age of 20.2 years (15 to 34). Of these, 13 were professional footballers, four professional cricketers, three hockey players, one a tennis player and one a golfer. Preoperative assessment included plain radiography, single positron-emission CT, planar bone scanning and reverse-gantry CT. In all patients the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and in 19 the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) scores were determined preoperatively, and both were measured again after two years in all patients. Three patients had a Scott's fusion and 19 a Buck's fusion. The mean duration of back pain before surgery was 9.4 months (6 to 36). The mean size of the defect as determined by CT was 3.5 mm (1 to 8) and the mean preoperative and postoperative ODIs were 39.5 (SD 8.7) and 10.7 (SD 12.9), respectively. The mean scores for the physical component of the SF-36 improved from 27.1 (SD 5.1) to 47.8 (SD 7.7). The mean scores for the mental health component of the SF-36 improved from 39.0 (SD 3.9) to 55.4 (SD 6.3) with p < 0.001. After rehabilitation for a mean of seven months (4 to 10) 18 patients (82%) returned to their previous sporting activity. PMID:12678361

Debnath, U K; Freeman, B J C; Gregory, P; de la Harpe, D; Kerslake, R W; Webb, J K

2003-03-01

157

Understanding how organized youth sport maybe harming individual players within the family unit: a literature review.  

PubMed

Within the United States, close to 45 million youths between the ages of 6 and 18 participate in some form of organized sports. While recent reviews have shown the positive effects of youth sport participation on youth health, there are also several negative factors surrounding the youth sport environment. To date, a comprehensive review of the negative physical and psychological effects of organized sport on youth has not been done and little to date has documented the effect organized sport has on other players within a family, particularly on parents and siblings. Therefore the purpose of this paper is to conduct a review of papers on the negative effects of organized sport on the youth athlete and their parents and siblings. Articles were found by searching multiple databases (Physical Education Index and Sociology, Psychology databases (Proquest), SPORTDiscus and Health, History, Management databases (EBSCOhost), Science, Social Science, Arts and Humanities on Web of Science (ISI), SCOPUS and Scirus (Elsevier). Results show the darker side of organized sport for actors within the family unit. Ideas for future research are drawn and recommendations are made to optimize the youth sport experience and family health. PMID:25275889

Bean, Corliss N; Fortier, Michelle; Post, Courtney; Chima, Karam

2014-01-01

158

The effects of different speed training protocols on sprint acceleration kinematics and muscle strength and power in field sport athletes.  

PubMed

A variety of resistance training interventions are used to improve field sport acceleration (e.g., free sprinting, weights, plyometrics, resisted sprinting). The effects these protocols have on acceleration performance and components of sprint technique have not been clearly defined in the literature. This study assessed 4 common protocols (free sprint training [FST], weight training [WT], plyometric training [PT], and resisted sprint training [RST]) for changes in acceleration kinematics, power, and strength in field sport athletes. Thirty-five men were divided into 4 groups (FST: n = 9; WT: n = 8; PT: n = 9; RST: n = 9) matched for 10-m velocity. Training involved two 60-minute sessions per week for 6 weeks. After the interventions, paired-sample t-tests identified significant (p ? 0.05) within-group changes. All the groups increased the 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m velocity by 9-10%. The WT and PT groups increased the 5- to 10-m velocity by approximately 10%. All the groups increased step length for all distance intervals. The FST group decreased 0- to 5-m flight time and step frequency in all intervals and increased 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m contact time. Power and strength adaptations were protocol specific. The FST group improved horizontal power as measured by a 5-bound test. The FST, PT, and RST groups all improved reactive strength index derived from a 40-cm drop jump, indicating enhanced muscle stretch-shortening capacity during rebound from impacts. The WT group increased absolute and relative strength measured by a 3-repetition maximum squat by approximately 15%. Step length was the major limiting sprint performance factor for the athletes in this study. Correctly administered, each training protocol can be effective in improving acceleration. To increase step length and improve acceleration, field sport athletes should develop specific horizontal and reactive power. PMID:21912294

Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Schultz, Adrian B; Knight, Timothy J; Janse de Jonge, Xanne A K

2012-06-01

159

Selected Cutaneous Disorders in Athletes  

PubMed Central

The author discusses selected cutaneous diseases seen in the athlete. These diseases may be caused by interaction with the elements, the playing surface, other athletes, or the clothing or equipment worn during sport. All of these dermatological conditions are relatively common, but the physically active individual can suffer from these maladies and their complications more often than the inactive person. The emphasis in caring for the participant is on prevention, early recognition and practical aspects of management of cutaneous diseases. PMID:21264034

Walker, James D.

1988-01-01

160

Systematic Review of Clinical Studies Examining Biomarkers of Brain Injury in Athletes Following Sports-Related Concussion.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to systematically review clinical studies examining biofluid biomarkers of brain injury for concussion in athletes. Data Sources included PubMed®, MEDLINE® and the Cochrane Database from 1966 to October 2013. Studies were included if they recruited athletes participating in organized sports who experienced concussion or head injury during a sports-related activity and had brain injury biomarkers measured. Acceptable research designs included experimental, observational, and case control studies. Review articles, opinion papers and editorials were excluded. After title and abstract screening of potential articles, full texts were independently reviewed to identify articles that met inclusion criteria. A composite evidentiary table was then constructed and documented the study title, design, population, methods, sample size, outcome measures, and results. The search identified fifty two publications, of which thirteen were selected and critically reviewed. All of the included studies were prospective and were published either in or after the year 2000. Sports included boxing (6 studies), soccer (5 studies), running/jogging (2 studies), hockey (1 study), basketball (1 study), cycling (1 study), and swimming (1 study). The majority of studies (92%) had fewer than 100 patients. Three studies (23%) evaluated biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), one in both serum and CSF, and 10 (77%) in serum exclusively. There were eleven different biomarkers assessed including S100?, GFAP, NSE, tau, NFL, amyloid beta, BDNF, CK and h-FABP, prolactin, cortisol, and albumin. A handful of biomarkers showed correlation with number of hits to the head (soccer), acceleration/deceleration forces (jumps, collisions, and falls), post-concussive symptoms, trauma to the body versus the head, and dynamics of different sports. Although there are no validated biomarkers for concussion yet, there is potential for biomarkers to provide diagnostic, prognostic, and monitoring information post-injury. They could also be combined with neuroimaging to assess injury evolution and recovery. PMID:25254425

Papa, Linda; Ramia, Michelle M; Edwards, Damyan; Johnson, Brian David; Slobounov, Semyon

2014-09-25

161

Immunoassays for the measurement of IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and -3, and ICTP as indirect biomarkers of recombinant human growth hormone misuse in sport. Values in selected population of athletes.  

PubMed

Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II), insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) -2 and -3 and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) have been proposed, among others, as indirect biomarkers of the recombinant human growth hormone misuse in sport. An extended intra- and inter-laboratory validation of commercially available immunoassays for biomarkers detection was performed. ELISA assays for total IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-3 (IGF-II/ELISA1: DSLabs, IGFBP-2/ELISA2: Biosource, and IGFBP-3/ELISA3: BioSource) and an EIA assay for ICTP (ICTP/EIA: Orion Diagnostica) were evaluated. The inter- and intra-laboratory precision values were acceptable for all evaluated assays (maximum imprecision of 30% and 66% were found only for the lowest quality control samples of IGF-II and IGFBP-3). Correct accuracy was obtained for all inter-laboratory immunoassays and for IGFBP-2 intra-laboratory immunoassay. The range of concentrations found in serum samples under investigation was always covered by the calibration curves of the studied immunoassays. However, 11% and 15% of the samples felt below the estimated LOQ for IGF-II and ICTP, respectively, in the zone where lower precision was obtained. Although the majority of evaluated assays showed an overall reliability not always suitable for antidoping control analysis, relatively high concordances between laboratory results were obtained for all assays. Evaluated immunoassays were used to measure serum concentrations of IGF-II, IGFBP-2 and -3 and ICTP in elite athletes of various sport disciplines at different moments of the training season; in recreational athletes at baseline conditions and finally in sedentary individuals. Serum IGF-II was statistically higher both in recreational and elite athletes compared to sedentary individuals. Elite athletes showed lower IGFBP-2 and higher IGFBP-3 concentration with respect to recreational athletes and sedentary people. Among elite athletes, serum IGFBP-3 (synchronized swimming), and ICTP (rhythmic gymnastics) concentrations were sport-dependent. Over the training season, within athlete variability was observed for IGFBP-2 in case of taekwondo and IGFBP-2 and -3 in case of weightlifting. Variations due to those aspects should be taken in careful consideration in the hypothesis of setting reference concentration ranges for doping detection. PMID:18617352

Abellan, Rosario; Ventura, Rosa; Palmi, Ilaria; di Carlo, Simonetta; Bacosi, Antonella; Bellver, Montse; Olive, Ramon; Pascual, Jose Antonio; Pacifici, Roberta; Segura, Jordi; Zuccaro, Piergiorgio; Pichini, Simona

2008-11-01

162

Shape-based Individual/Group Detection for Sport Videos Categorization  

E-print Network

,, Emmanuel Ramasso b,, Georgios Tziritas a , Mich`ele Rombaut b and Denis Pellerin b aComputer ScienceShape-based Individual/Group Detection for Sport Videos Categorization Costas Panagiotakis a videos in order to classify them to videos of individual and team sports. Moreover, in the case of team

Tziritas, Georgios

163

Academic Engagement among African American Males Who Hold Aspirations for Athletic Careers in Professional Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite the large body of evidence on the benefits of sports, there continues to be growing concern regarding the overemphasis on sports, especially related to the social and educational development of blacks and other minority youth. This article introduces a conceptual framework or typology for analyzing the connection between sports

Dawkins, Marvin P.; Braddock, Jomills Henry, II; Celaya, Adrienne

2008-01-01

164

Sports Bounce GPAs: The Relationship between Athletic Involvement and Academic Performance in High School Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As schools and school districts continue to face budget reductions, school officials must thoroughly evaluate and determine from which programs to decrease funding. Athletic programs are one area that has received much scrutiny for receiving these cuts. If research reveals a significant relationship between athletic involvement and academic…

Filsinger, Lora C.

2012-01-01

165

A rationale for assessing the lower-body power profile in team sport athletes.  

PubMed

Training at the load that maximizes peak mechanical power (Pmax) is considered superior for the development of power. We aimed to identify the Pmax load ('optimal load') in the jump squat and to quantify small, moderate, large, and very large substantial differences in power output across a spectrum of loads to identify loads that are substantially different to the optimal, and lastly, to investigate the nature of power production (load-force-velocity profiles). Professional Australian Rules Football (ARF; n = 16) and highly trained Rugby Union (RU; n = 20) players (subdivided into stronger [SP] vs. weaker [WP] players) performed jump squats across incremental loads (0-60 kg). Substantial differences in peak power (W·kg(-1)) were quantified as 0.2-2.0 of the log transformed between-athlete SD at each load, backtransformed and expressed as a percent with 90% confidence limits (CL). A 0-kg jump squat maximized peak power (ARF: 57.7 ± 10.8 W·kg(-1); RU: 61.4 ± 8.5 W·kg(-1); SP: 64.4 ± 7.5 W·kg(-1); WP: 54.8 ± 9.5 W·kg(-1)). The range for small to very large substantial differences in power output was 4.5-55.9% (CL: ×/÷1.36) and 2.8-32.4% (CL: ×/÷1.31) in ARF and RU players, whereas in SP and WP, it was 3.7-43.1% (CL: ×/÷1.32) and 4.3-51.7% (CL: ×/÷1.36). Power declined per 10-kg increment in load, 14.1% (CL: ±1.6) and 10.5% (CL: ±1.5) in ARF and RU players and 12.8% (CL: ±1.9) and 11.3% (CL: ±1.7) in SP and WP. The use of a 0-kg load is superior for the development of jump squat maximal power, with moderate to very large declines in power output observed at 10- to 60-kg loads. Yet, performance of heavier load jump squats that are substantially different to the optimal load are important in the development of sport-specific force-velocity qualities and should not be excluded. PMID:22505130

Nibali, Maria L; Chapman, Dale W; Robergs, Robert A; Drinkwater, Eric J

2013-02-01

166

Does the polygenic profile determine the potential for becoming a world-class athlete? Insights from the sport of rowing.  

PubMed

We determined whether the polygenic profile computed with seven candidate polymorphisms (i.e., ACE, ACTN3, AMPD1, CKMM, HFE, GDF-8 and PPARGC1A) for endurance performance is different in 39 world-class and 15 national-class Spanish (Caucasian) lightweight rowers. The second purpose was to examine the impact of possessing a "preferable" polygenic profile on the sport success in terms of the number of medals won in World and National Championships. Finally, we also compared the polygenic profile of world- and national-class Spanish rowers with that of the general Spanish population. The polygenic profile did not differ between groups of rowers. We did not observe an association between having a preferable polygenic profile and medals won in World and National Championships. Finally, we observed that rowers tend to have a more "favorable" polygenic profile than the general Spanish population. These findings argue against the idea that genetic endowment differentiates athletic champions from elite, yet less accomplished athletes. In contrast, we cannot discard the fact that, overall, elite athletes are endowed with a more "favorable" polygenic profile than the general population. PMID:19422651

Santiago, C; Ruiz, J R; Muniesa, C A; González-Freire, M; Gómez-Gallego, F; Lucia, A

2010-02-01

167

Illegal performance enhancing drugs and doping in sport: a picture-based brief implicit association test for measuring athletes’ attitudes  

PubMed Central

Background Doping attitude is a key variable in predicting athletes’ intention to use forbidden performance enhancing drugs. Indirect reaction-time based attitude tests, such as the implicit association test, conceal the ultimate goal of measurement from the participant better than questionnaires. Indirect tests are especially useful when socially sensitive constructs such as attitudes towards doping need to be described. The present study serves the development and validation of a novel picture-based brief implicit association test (BIAT) for testing athletes’ attitudes towards doping in sport. It shall provide the basis for a transnationally compatible research instrument able to harmonize anti-doping research efforts. Method Following a known-group differences validation strategy, the doping attitudes of 43 athletes from bodybuilding (representative for a highly doping prone sport) and handball (as a contrast group) were compared using the picture-based doping-BIAT. The Performance Enhancement Attitude Scale (PEAS) was employed as a corresponding direct measure in order to additionally validate the results. Results As expected, in the group of bodybuilders, indirectly measured doping attitudes as tested with the picture-based doping-BIAT were significantly less negative (?2?=?.11). The doping-BIAT and PEAS scores correlated significantly at r?=?.50 for bodybuilders, and not significantly at r?=?.36 for handball players. There was a low error rate (7%) and a satisfactory internal consistency (r tt ?=?.66) for the picture-based doping-BIAT. Conclusions The picture-based doping-BIAT constitutes a psychometrically tested method, ready to be adopted by the international research community. The test can be administered via the internet. All test material is available “open source”. The test might be implemented, for example, as a new effect-measure in the evaluation of prevention programs. PMID:24479865

2014-01-01

168

Project on Elite Athlete Commitment (PEAK): II. A Direct Test and Expansion of the Sport Commitment Model With Elite Amateur Sportsmen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using the voices of the New Zealand All Blacks, a world-class rugby team, the data reported in this article further test and expand the Sport Commitment Model (Model), and examine its external validity, cross-culturally and to elite level athletes, using the Scanlan Collaborative Interview Method (SCIM) (Scanlan, Russell, Wilson, & Scanlan, 2003). At the time of the interviews, the All

Tara K. Scanlan; David G. Russell; Kristin P. Beals; Larry A. Scanlan

169

A Review of Performance-Enhancing Drugs in Professional Sports and Their Spread to Amateur Athletics, Adolescents, and Other At-Risk Populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the past 30 years, we have been involved in the establishment of a number of national and international sports drug testing programs, the review of positive tests, and the medical treatment of substance-abusing athletes. It was expected that with educational programs, testing, and supportive medical treatment this substance-abusing behavior that could lead to deadly addictive disorders would decrease. Unfortunately,

David M. Martin; David A. Baron; Mark S. Gold

2006-01-01

170

A Research on Identifying the Need for Distance Education for National Athletes Who Study in School of Physical Education and Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to identify the problems which national athletes, who study in School of Physical Education and Sport in universities, encounter in formal education and to determine their need for distance learning. Qualitative research, which is one the techniques of researching the method of the study, forms a structured…

Bozkus, Taner

2014-01-01

171

Femoroacetabular impingement in 45 professional athletes: associated pathologies and return to sport following arthroscopic decompression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) occurs when an osseous abnormality of the proximal femur (cam) or acetabulum (pincer) triggers\\u000a damage to the acetabular labrum and articular cartilage in the hip. Although the precise etiology of FAI is not well understood,\\u000a both types of FAI are common in athletes presenting with hip pain, loss of range-of-motion, and disability in athletics. An\\u000a open surgical

Marc Philippon; Mara Schenker; Karen Briggs; David Kuppersmith

2007-01-01

172

[Injuries of the acromioclavicular joint in athletes].  

PubMed

Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation is a common injury to the shoulder girdle, especially in contact and high velocity sports. Besides the severity of the injury, and particularly in competitive and elite athletes and the type of sports, individual career plans and in and out of season injuries have to be taken into account when advising treatment for athletes. Conservative treatment is reserved for low-grade dislocations and in-season athletes. The aim is fast pain relief and a safe return to competitive sport. High-grade ACJ dislocations in athletes should be treated surgically. Arthroscopic and arthroscopically-assisted techniques can offer a lower risk of infection, a higher patient acceptance in terms of cosmetic perspectives and the potential to treat concomitant glenohumeral lesions and may avoid potential disadvantages of open techniques, such as secondary obligatory implant removal and extensive soft tissue preparation with a relevant approach morbidity. PMID:25056562

Kraus, N; Scheibel, M

2014-10-01

173

The Effect of Professional Sports on the Earnings of Individuals: Evidence from Microeconomic Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the impact of professional sports teams and stadiums on the wages of individuals employed in several narrowly defined occupational groups in cities in the United States. The occupational groups examined are among those that proponents of public funding of professional sports claim will benefit economically from these stadiums. Our analysis uses data from the March Supplement to

Dennis Coates; Brad R. Humphreys

2003-01-01

174

The Eect of Professional Sports on the Earnings of Individuals: Evidence from Microeconomic Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper explores the impact of professional sports teams and stadiums on the wages of individuals employed in several narrowly defined occupational groups in cities in the United States. The occupational groups examined are among those that proponents of public funding of professional sports claim will benefit economically from these stadiums. Our analysis uses data from the March Supplement to

Dennis Coates; Brad R. Humphreys

2003-01-01

175

Common Lower Limb Sports-related Overuse Injuries in Young Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Sports injuries in children and adolescent present a unique challenge to the physician. They are often seen for clinical conditions unique to their age group. This paper highlights the epidemiological aspect of sports-related overuse injuries in this age group. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study reviewed all the paediatric patients diagnosed with overuses injuries during a 5 years and

James Hui

2008-01-01

176

Fear of Failure and Student Athletes' Interpersonal Antisocial Behaviour in Education and Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The link between fear of failure and students' antisocial behaviour has received scant research attention despite associations between fear of failure, hostility, and aggression. Also, the effect of sport experience on antisocial behaviour has not been considered outside of the sport context in adult populations. Further, to date, sex…

Sagar, Sam S.; Boardley, Ian D.; Kavussanu, Maria

2011-01-01

177

Individual Moral Philosophies and Ethical Decision Making of Undergraduate Athletic Training Students and Educators  

PubMed Central

Context: Ethics research in athletic training is lacking. Teaching students technical skills is important, but teaching them how to reason and to behave in a manner that befits responsible health care professionals is equally important. Objective: To expand ethics research in athletic training by (1) describing undergraduate athletic training students' and educators' individual moral philosophies and ethical decision-making abilities and (2) investigating the effects of sex and level of education on mean composite individual moral philosophies and ethical decision-making scores. Design: Stratified, multistage, cluster-sample correlational study. Setting: Mailed survey instruments were distributed in classroom settings at 30 institutions having Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP)–accredited athletic training programs. Patients or Other Participants: Undergraduate students and educators (n = 598: 373 women, 225 men; mean age = 23.5 ± 6.3 years) from 25 CAAHEP-accredited athletic training programs. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used the Ethics Position Questionnaire and the Dilemmas in Athletic Training Questionnaire to compute participants' mean composite individual moral philosophies (idealism and relativism) and ethical decision-making scores, respectively. Three separate 2 (sex: male, female) × 3 (education level: underclass, upper class, educator) between-subjects factorial analyses of variance using idealism, relativism, and ethical decision-making scores as dependent measures were performed. Results: Respondents reported higher idealism scores (37.57 ± 4.91) than relativism scores (31.70 ± 4.80) (response rate = 83%). The mean ethical decision-making score for all respondents was 80.76 ± 7.88. No significant interactions were revealed. The main effect for sex illustrated that men reported significantly higher relativism scores ( P = .0014, ? 2 = .015) than did women. The main effect for education level revealed significant differences between students' and educators' idealism ( P = .0190, ? 2 = .013), relativism ( P < .001, ? 2 = .050), and ethical decision-making scores ( P < .001, ? 2 = .027). Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc analysis indicated that educators possessed lower idealism scores (36.90 ± 5.70) and relativism scores (29.92 ± 4.86) and higher ethical decision-making scores (82.98 ± 7.62) than did students. Conclusions: Our findings do not support changes in athletic training ethics education practices to address sex-specific needs. However, when opportunities occur for students to reason using different ethical perspectives, educators should be aware of their students' and their own moral philosophies in order to optimally facilitate professional growth. PMID:18345347

Caswell, Shane V; Gould, Trenton E

2008-01-01

178

A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study on the White Matter Skeleton in Individuals with Sports-Related Concussion  

PubMed Central

Abstract Recognizing and managing the effects of cerebral concussion is very challenging, given the discrete symptomatology. Most individuals with sports-related concussion will not score below 15 on the Glasgow Coma Scale, but will present with rapid onset of short-lived neurological impairment, demonstrating no structural changes on traditional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans. The return-to-play decision is one of the most difficult responsibilities facing the physician, and so far this decision has been primarily based on neurological examination, symptom checklists, and neuropsychological (NP) testing. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may be a more objective tool to assess the severity and recovery of function after concussion. We assessed white matter (WM) fiber tract integrity in varsity level college athletes with sports-related concussion without loss of consciousness, who experienced protracted symptoms for at least 1 month after injury. Evaluation of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) of the WM skeleton using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) revealed a large cluster of significantly increased MD for concussed subjects in several WM fiber tracts in the left hemisphere, including parts of the inferior/superior longitudinal and fronto-occipital fasciculi, the retrolenticular part of the internal capsule, and posterior thalamic and acoustic radiations. Qualitative comparison of average FA and MD suggests that with increasing level of injury severity (ranging from sports-related concussion to severe traumatic brain injury), MD might be more sensitive at detecting mild injury, whereas FA captures more severe injuries. In conclusion, the TBSS analysis used to evaluate diffuse axonal injury of the WM skeleton seems sensitive enough to detect structural changes in sports-related concussion. PMID:21083414

Cubon, Valerie A.; Putukian, Margot; Boyer, Cynthia

2011-01-01

179

Collegiate Athletics Highlights.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Highlights 15 trends/events in black college athletics, including championship coaches, Black Coaches Association, eligibility issues, disclosure of athlete graduation rates, athletics resource allocation, early adoption of professional athlete status, success of the Women's National Basketball Association, lack of black access to certain sports,…

St. John, Eric

1999-01-01

180

Oxidative stress and antioxidant status response of handball athletes: implications for sport training monitoring.  

PubMed

The chronic exposure to regular exercise training seems to improve antioxidant defense systems. However, the intense physical training imposed on elite athletes may lead to overtraining associated with oxidative stress. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of different training loads and competition on oxidative stress, biochemical parameters and antioxidant enzymatic defense in handball athletes during 6-months of monitoring. Ten male elite handball athletes were recruited to the study. Blood samples were collected four times every six weeks throughout the season. During most intense periods of training and competitions there were significant changes in plasma indices of oxidative stress (increased TBARS and decreased thiols). Conversely, chronic adaptations to exercise training demonstrated a significant protective effect against oxidative stress in erythrocyte (decrease in TBARs and carbonyl group levels). Erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly increased, suggesting a training-induced antioxidant adaptation. Biomarkers of skeletal muscle damage were significantly increased during high-intensity training period (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase). No significant changes were observed in plasma IL-6, TNF-? and uric acid, whereas a significant reduction was found in the IL-1? concentration and gamma-glutamyl transferase activity. Oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarkers can change throughout the season in competitive athletes, reflecting the physical stress and muscle damage that occurs as the result of competitive handball training. In addition, these biochemical measurements can be applied in the physiological follow-up of athletes. PMID:23916597

Marin, Douglas Popp; Bolin, Anaysa Paola; Campoio, Thais Regina; Guerra, Beatriz Alves; Otton, Rosemari

2013-10-01

181

Sports Medicine and Ethics  

PubMed Central

Physicians working in the world of competitive sports face unique ethical challenges, many of which center around conflicts of interest. Team-employed physicians have obligations to act in the club’s best interest while caring for the individual athlete. As such, they must balance issues like protecting versus sharing health information, as well as issues regarding autonomous informed consent versus paternalistic decision-making in determining whether an athlete may compete safely. Moreover, the physician has to deal with an athlete’s decisions about performance enhancement and return to play, pursuit of which may not be in the athlete’s long-term best interests but may benefit the athlete and team in the short term. These difficult tasks are complicated by the lack of evidence-based standards in a field influenced by the lure of financial gains for multiple parties involved. In this article, we review ethical issues in sports medicine with specific attention paid to American professional football. PMID:24024796

Testoni, Daniela; Hornik, Christoph P.; Smith, P. Brian; Benjamin, Daniel K.; McKinney, Ross E.

2014-01-01

182

Sudden cardiac death in athletes.  

PubMed

A 'paradox of sport' is that in addition to the undisputed health benefits of physical activity, vigorous exertion may transiently increase the risk of acute cardiac events. In general, the risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD) approximately doubles during physical activity and is 2- to 3-fold higher in athletes compared to nonathletes. The incidence of SCD in young athletes is in fact very low, at around 1-3 per 100,000, but attracts much public attention. Variations in incidence figures may be explained by the methodology used for data collection and more importantly by differences between subpopulations of athletes. The incidence of SCD in older (? 35 years) athletes is higher and may be expected to rise, as more and older individuals take part in organized sports. SCD is often the first clinical manifestation of a potentially fatal underlying cardiovascular disorder and usually occurs in previously asymptomatic athletes. In the young (<35 years), SCD is mainly due to congenital/inherited cardiac abnormalities, whilst coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cause in older athletes. Cardiac screening including family/personal history, physical examination and resting electrocardiogram (ECG) may identify individuals at risk and has the potential to decrease the risk of SCD in young athletes. Screening including the ECG has a high sensitivity for underlying disease in young athletes, but the specificity needs to be improved, whereas the sensitivity of screening without the use of ECG is very low. The screening modality recommended for young athletes is of limited value in older athletes, who should receive individualized screening with cardiac stress testing for patients with high risk of underlying CAD. As cardiovascular screening will never be able to identify all athletes at risk, adequate preparedness is vital in case of a potentially fatal event at the sporting arena/facility. Firstly, we will review the magnitude of the problem of SCD in athletes of different ages, as well as the aetiology. Secondly, we will focus on how to prevent SCD in athletes of all ages, reviewing cardiovascular screening recommendations as well as emergency preparedness and arena safety. PMID:24350833

Schmied, C; Borjesson, M

2014-02-01

183

Sports dentistry  

PubMed Central

Sports dentistry is one of the most recent and upcoming field in dentistry. It mainly includes the prevention and management of athletics-related orofacial injuries and associated oral diseases. The sports or team dentist assists athletes in the prevention, treatment, and diagnosis of oral injuries. The most significant aspect in preventing sports-related orofacial injuries is wearing basic protective devices such as properly-fitting helmets, face masks and/or mouth guards. Dental injuries are the most common type of orofacial injury sustained during participation in sports. Many athletes are not aware of the health implications of a traumatic injury to the mouth or of the potential for incurring severe head and orofacial injuries while playing. The dentist can play an imperative role in informing athletes, coaches and patients about the importance of preventing orofacial injuries in sports. The aim of this paper is to increase professional awareness and interest for orientation toward sports dentistry. PMID:22639498

Saini, Rajiv

2011-01-01

184

Amphetamine margin in sports. [Effects on performance of highly trained athletes  

SciTech Connect

The amphetamines can enhance athletic performance. That much seems clear from the literature, some of which is reviewed here. Increases in endurance have been demonstrated in both man and rat. Smith and Beecher, 20 years ago, showed improvement of running, swimming, and weight throwing in highly trained athletes. Laboratory analogues of such performance have also been used and similar enhancement demonstrated. The amount of change induced by the amphetamines is usually small, of the order of a few percent. Nevertheless, since a fraction of a percent improvement can make the difference between fame and oblivion, the margin conferred by these drugs can be quite important.

Laties, V.G.; Weiss, B.

1980-01-01

185

Where Are the Women in Women's Sports? Predictors of Female Athletes' Interest in a Coaching Career  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, we used social cognitive career theory (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994) to examine the development of female athletes' career interest in coaching and, specifically, the impact of contextual factors (female coaching role models, working hours, and perceived discrimination) on coaching self-efficacy and outcome expectations.…

Moran-Miller, Kelli; Flores, Lisa Y.

2011-01-01

186

Clinical management of immuno-suppression in athletes associated with exercise training: sports medicine considerations.  

PubMed

The Overtraining Syndrome (OTS) is a physically debilitating medical condition that results in athletes being totally compromised in their capacity to perform and compete. Many physiological systems are affected by the process of overtraining and the development of the OTS which results from it; but one system in particular, the immune, is highly susceptible to degradation resulting in a reduction in overall health and physical performance. The aim of this paper is to review; 1) the evidence-based proactive steps and actions to take to greatly reduce the risk of development of an infection or a compromised immune system in athletes; and 2) the course of action for clinicians to take when they are dealing with an athlete displaying overt signs of an infection and, or inflammation. Evidenced reported here within support that it is essential for clinicians to take practical preventative and management steps - actions with athletes (involved in intensive exercise training) in order to help preserve and maintain a healthy and robust immune system if they are going to perform optimally. PMID:24390943

Hackney, Anthony Carl

2013-01-01

187

Prevalence of sudden cardiac death during competitive sports activities in Minnesota High School athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. Reliable prevalence data would be useful in assessing the impact of sudden cardiac death in young competitive athletes on the community and designing effective preparticipation screening strategies.Background. The frequency with which these catastrophes occur is largely unknown.Methods. We utilized a circumstance unique to Minnesota in which the precise number of participants and deaths due to cardiovascular disease could be

Barry J Maron; Thomas E Gohman; Dorothee Aeppli

1998-01-01

188

Sports participation, perceived neighborhood safety, and individual cognitions: how do they interact?  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known about the interaction between individual and environmental determinants of physical activity, although this may be important information for the development of effective interventions. The goal of this paper is to investigate whether perceived neighborhood safety modifies associations between individual cognitions and sports participation. Methods Cross-sectional data were obtained from residents (age 25-75) of 87 neighborhoods in the city of Eindhoven, who participated in the Dutch GLOBE study in 2004 (N = 2474). We used multilevel logistic regression to analyze the interactions between perceived neighborhood safety and individual cognitions (attitude, self-efficacy, social influence, and intention) on sports participation (yes/no). Results In its association with sports participation, perceived neighborhood safety interacted significantly with self-efficacy and attitude (p < 0.05). Among persons who perceived their neighborhood as safe, a positive attitude was strongly associated with sports participation (OR = 2.00, 95%CI = 1.48-2.71). In contrast, attitude was not associated with sports participation in persons who perceived their neighborhood as unsafe (OR = 0.65, 95%CI = 0.34-1.24). Further, self-efficacy was significantly stronger associated with sports participation in persons who perceived their neighborhood as unsafe (OR = 1.85, 95%CI = 1.31-2.60) than in those who perceived their neighborhood as safe (OR = 1.19, 95%CI = 1.05-1.36). Social influence and intention did not interact with perceived neighborhood safety. Conclusions Associations between individual cognitions and sports participation depend on neighborhood circumstances, such as perceived neighborhood safety. Interventions to promote sports participation in adults should take the interaction between environmental and individual characteristics into account. More research is needed to find out the causal pathways in individual-environment interactions. PMID:21777414

2011-01-01

189

Quantifying session ratings of perceived exertion for field-based speed training methods in team sport athletes.  

PubMed

Session ratings of perceived exertion (session RPE) are commonly used to assess global training intensity for team sports. However, there is little research quantifying the intensity of field-based training protocols for speed development. The study's aim was to determine the session RPE of popular training protocols (free sprint [FST], resisted sprint [RST], and plyometrics [PT]) designed to improve sprint acceleration over 10 m in team sport athletes. Twenty-seven men (age = 23.3 ± 4.7 years; mass = 84.5 ± 8.9 kg; height = 1.83 ± 0.07 m) were divided into 3 groups according to 10-m velocity. Training consisted of an incremental program featuring two 1-hour sessions per week for 6 weeks. Subjects recorded session RPE 30 minutes post training using the Borg category-ratio 10 scale. Repeated measures analysis of variance found significant (p < 0.05) changes in sprint velocity and session RPE over 6 weeks. All groups significantly increased 0- to 5-m velocity and 0- to 10-m velocity by 4-7%, with no differences between groups. There were no significant differences in session RPE between the groups, suggesting that protocols were matched for intensity. Session RPE significantly increased over the 6 weeks for all groups, ranging from 3.75 to 5.50. This equated to intensities of somewhat hard to hard. Post hoc testing revealed few significant weekly increases, suggesting that session RPE may not be sensitive to weekly load increases in sprint and plyometric training programs. Another explanation, however, could be that the weekly load increments used were not great enough to increase perceived exertion. Nonetheless, the progressive overload of each program was sufficient to improve 10-m sprint performance. The session RPE values from the present study could be used to assess workload for speed training periodization within a team sports conditioning program. PMID:22130404

Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Scott, Brendan R; Janse de Jonge, Xanne A K

2012-10-01

190

The Quantitative Analysis on the Individual Characteristics of Urban Residents and Their Sport Consumption Motivation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using the questionnaire, mathematical statistics and entropy measurement methods, the quantitative relationship between the individual characteristics urban residents and their sports consumption motivation are studied. The results show that the most main sports consumption motivation of urban residents is fitness motivation and social motivation. Urban residents of different gender, age, education and income levels are different in regulating psychological motivation, rational consumption motivation and seeking common motivation.

Xianliang, Lei; Hongying, Yu

191

Transitioning to an Athletic Subjectivity: First-Semester Experiences at a Corporate (Sporting) University  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores how eight women experience, and are incorporated into, the regulatory regimes and pedagogical practices of a corporate (sporting) university in their first semester of college. Using Foucault's conceptions of power, discipline and subjectivity, we situate women's participation on the soccer team within the context of…

Clift, Bryan C.; Mower, Ronald L.

2013-01-01

192

Sports Safety. Accident Prevention and Injury Control in Physical Education, Athletics, and Recreation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This anthology of articles concerned with injury in sports and safety procedures is divided into three parts. Part One is devoted to general discussions of safety and a guiding philosophy for accident prevention. Part Two develops articles on administration and supervision, including discussions of health examination, legal liability, facilities,…

Yost, Charles Peter, Ed.

193

The Black Athlete in Big-Time Intercollegiate Sports, 1941-1968.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sees the scholarly community's failure to look seriously at the history of Blacks in intercollegiate sports as a missed opportunity to understand an important dimension of Afro-American intellectual history, the nature and development of the modern civil rights struggle, and the Black protest movement. (Author/CMG)

Spivey, Donald

1983-01-01

194

The Effect of Course Length on Individual Medley Swimming Performance in National and International Athletes  

PubMed Central

Effects of course length (25 m versus 50 m) and advances in performance of individual medley swimming were examined for men and women in Swiss national competitions and FINA World Championships during 2000–2011. Linear regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to analyse 200 m and 400 m race results for 26,081 swims on the Swiss high score list and 382 FINA finalists. Swiss and FINA swimmers of both sexes were, on average, 4.3±3.2% faster on short courses for both race distances. Sex-related differences in swim speed were significantly greater for FINA swimmers competing in short-course events than in long-course events (10.3±0.2% versus 9.7±0.3%, p<0.01), but did not differ for Swiss swimmers (p>0.05). Sex-related differences in swimming speed decreased with increasing race distance for both short- and long-course events for Swiss athletes, and for FINA athletes in long-course events. Performance improved significantly (p<0.05) during 2000–2011 for FINA men competing in either course length and FINA females competing in short-course events, but not for Swiss swimmers. Overall, the results showed that men and women individual medley swimmers, competing at both national and international levels, have faster average swimming speeds on short courses than on long courses, for both 200 m and 400 m distances. FINA athletes demonstrate an improving performance in the vast majority of individual medley events, while performance at national level seems to have reached a plateau during 2000–2011. PMID:25414752

Wolfrum, Mathias; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald; Knechtle, Beat

2014-01-01

195

Understanding How Organized Youth Sport May Be Harming Individual Players within the Family Unit: A Literature Review  

PubMed Central

Within the United States, close to 45 million youths between the ages of 6 and 18 participate in some form of organized sports. While recent reviews have shown the positive effects of youth sport participation on youth health, there are also several negative factors surrounding the youth sport environment. To date, a comprehensive review of the negative physical and psychological effects of organized sport on youth has not been done and little thus far has documented the effect organized sport has on other players within a family, particularly on parents and siblings. Therefore the purpose of this paper is to conduct a review of studies on the negative effects of organized sport on the youth athlete and their parents and siblings. Articles were found by searching multiple databases (Physical Education Index and Sociology, Psychology databases (Proquest), SPORTDiscus and Health, History, Management databases (EBSCOhost), Science, Social Science, Arts and Humanities on Web of Science (ISI), SCOPUS and Scirus (Elsevier). Results show the darker side of organized sport for actors within the family unit. A model is proposed to explain under which circumstances sport leads to positive versus negative outcomes, ideas for future research are drawn and recommendations are made to optimize the youth sport experience and family health. PMID:25275889

Bean, Corliss N.; Fortier, Michelle; Post, Courtney; Chima, Karam

2014-01-01

196

Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: prosthetics.  

PubMed

With the technologic advances in medicine and an emphasis on maintaining physical fitness, the population of athletes with impairments is growing. It is incumbent upon health care practitioners to make every effort to inform these individuals of growing and diverse opportunities and to encourage safe exercise and athletic participation through counseling and education. Given the opportunities for participation in sports for persons with a limb deficiency, the demand for new, innovative prosthetic designs is challenging the clinical and technical expertise of the physician and prosthetist. When generating a prosthetic prescription, physicians and prosthetists should consider the needs and preferences of the athlete with limb deficiency, as well as the functional demands of the chosen sporting activity. The intent of this article is to provide information regarding the current advancements in the adaptive sports technology and biomechanics in the field of prosthetics, and to assist clinicians and their patients in facilitating participation in sporting activities. PMID:25134752

De Luigi, Arthur Jason; Cooper, Rory A

2014-08-01

197

Practical issues in nutrition for athletes.  

PubMed

Many athletes do not achieve sound nutritional practices to optimize their sports performance. Factors include poor nutrition knowledge, dietary extremism, poor practical skills in choosing or preparing meals, and reduced access to food due to a busy lifestyle and frequent travel. Education in nutrition for the athlete needs to be practical, so as to address eating strategies and key food and fluid choices that will help to achieve the goals of sound nutrition. Strategies that can achieve a number of nutritional goals simultaneously are most useful, since athletes often find it difficult to integrate separate issues. Athletes with extreme nutrient requirements, or with nutritional problems, should seek individual assessment and counselling from a sports nutrition expert. PMID:8897324

Burke, L

1995-01-01

198

Standards of nutrition for athletes in Germany.  

PubMed

The Deutscher Olympische Sportbund (DOSB) founded recently an advisory board for German elite athlete nutrition, the 'Arbeitsgruppe (AG) Ernahrungsberatung an den Olympiastutzpunkten'. The 'Performance codex and quality criteria for the food supply in facilities of German elite sports' have been established since 1997. The biochemical equivalent (ATP) for the energy demand is calculated using the DLW (Double Labeled Water)-method on the basis of RMR (Resting Metabolic Rate) and BMR (Basic Metabolic Rate) at sport type specific exercises and performances. Certain nutraceutical ingredients for dietary supplements can be recommended. However, quality criteria for nutrition, cooking and food supply are defined on the basis of Health Food and the individual physiological/social-psychological status of the athlete. Especially food supplements and instant food have to be avoided for young athletes. The German advisory board for elite athlete nutrition publishes 'colour lists' for highly recommended (green), acceptable (yellow), and less recommended (red) food stuff. PMID:24741951

Diel, F; Khanferyan, R A

2013-01-01

199

Nutritional Supplements for Endurance Athletes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Athletes engaged in heavy endurance training often seek additional nutritional strategies to help maximize performance. Specific nutritional supplements exist to combat certain factors that limit performance beginning with a sound everyday diet. Research has further demonstrated that safe, effective, legal supplements are in fact available for today's endurance athletes. Several of these supplements are marketed not only to aid performance but also to combat the immunosuppressive effects of intense endurance training. It is imperative for each athlete to research the legality of certain supplements for their specific sport or event. Once the legality has been established, it is often up to each individual athlete to decipher the ethics involved with ingesting nutritional supplements with the sole intent of improving performance.

Rasmussen, Christopher J.

200

Youth sport experiences of individuals with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore youth sport experiences of individuals with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Participants were 6 males (mean age=22.7 yr) with ADHD who had played 3 or more seasons in team sports during adolescence. Following interpretive phenomenological analysis methodology, each participant completed 2 semistructured interviews. Findings showed that symptoms of ADHD hampered participants' experiences and led to negative interpersonal and performance-related consequences. On the other hand, participants reported social and stress/energy-release benefits arising from their experiences in sport. Their experiences were therefore complex, and some findings relating to social interactions appeared contradictory (e.g., negative interpersonal experiences vs. social benefits). Supportive coaches, understanding teammates, and personal coping strategies were key factors that enabled participants to realize benefits and, to some degree, mitigate negative consequences associated with their participation in sport. PMID:25211481

Lee, Homan; Causgrove Dunn, Janice; Holt, Nicholas L

2014-10-01

201

Sport Clubs Post-Travel Report Club: __________________________________ Event: ____________________________ Date(s) of Travel: __________________________  

E-print Network

Sport Clubs Post-Travel Report Club: __________________________________ Event/event:__________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Club or Individual Honors (leading scorers, top finishers, etc · First Aid Responders or Athletic Trainers · Communication between host and KSU club

Khan, Javed I.

202

Detecting Manipulation in Cup and Round Robin Sports Competitions  

E-print Network

Detecting Manipulation in Cup and Round Robin Sports Competitions Tyrel Russell Cheriton School numerous cases where individual athletes and teams have thrown games and colluded to manipulate sports are computationally hard to manipulate and thus possibly resistant to manipulation. In contrast, in this paper we

van Beek, Peter

203

The Effects of Ingestion of Sugarcane Juice and Commercial Sports Drinks on Cycling Performance of Athletes in Comparison to Plain Water  

PubMed Central

Purpose Sugarcane juice (ScJ) is a natural drink popular in most tropical Asian regions. However, research on its effect in enhancing sports performance is limited. The present investigation was to study the effect of sugarcane juice on exercise metabolism and sport performance of athletes in comparison to a commercially available sports drinks. Methods Fifteen male athletes (18-25 yrs) were asked to cycle until volitional exhaustion at 70% VO2 max on three different trials viz. plain water (PW), sports drink (SpD) and ScJ. In each trial 3ml/kg/BW of 6 % of carbohydrate (CHO) fluid was given at every 20 min interval of exercise and a blood sample was taken to measure the hematological parameters. During recovery 200 ml of 9% CHO fluid was given and blood sample was drawn at 5, 10, 15 min of recovery. Results Ingestion of sugarcane juice showed significant increase (P<0.05) in blood glucose levels during and after exercise compared to SpD and PW. However, no significant difference was found between PW, SpD and ScJ for total exercise time, heart rate, blood lactate and plasma volume. Conclusion ScJ may be equally effective as SpD and PW during exercise in a comfortable environment (<30°C) and a more effective rehydration drink than SpD and PW in post exercise as it enhances muscle glycogen resynthesis. PMID:24427476

Kalpana, Kommi; Lal, Priti Rishi; Kusuma, Doddipalli Lakshmi; Khanna, Gulshan Lal

2013-01-01

204

Sport Psychology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sport psychology is defined in terms of human behavior in athletic situations. The psychosocial cross-cultural setting provides a model for studying trait and state psychosocial attributes and suggests issues and concerns for further study. (JMF)

Krotee, March L.

1980-01-01

205

Controversies in College Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The history of intercollegiate athletics is examined. Focus is on four major outside interventions and four major issues: The economics of collegiate sports; unethical practices in recruiting and on-campus treatment of athletes; equal opportunity for women in sports, and the relationship of collegiate sports to higher education. (JMD)

Hanford, George H.

1979-01-01

206

A Life History Analysis of a Male Athlete with an Eating Disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

An exploratory investigation, employing the life history method, was conducted with a male athlete with an eating disorder. The focus of the life history is Mike (pseudonym), an individual with a strong athletic identity, who developed bulimia amidst aspirations to be an elite sports performer. Interviews were structured around the life course, beginning with early childhood memories and ultimately reaching

Anthony Papathomas; David Lavallee

2006-01-01

207

Field-based physiological testing of wheelchair athletes.  

PubMed

The volume of literature on field-based physiological testing of wheelchair sports, such as basketball, rugby and tennis, is considerably smaller when compared with that available for individuals and team athletes in able-bodied (AB) sports. In analogy to the AB literature, it is recognized that performance in wheelchair sports not only relies on fitness, but also sport-specific skills, experience and technical proficiency. However, in contrast to AB sports, two major components contribute towards 'wheeled sports' performance, which are the athlete and the wheelchair. It is the interaction of these two that enable wheelchair propulsion and the sporting movements required within a given sport. Like any other athlete, participants of wheelchair sports are looking for efficient ways to train and/or analyse their technique and fitness to improve their performance. Consequently, laboratory and/or field-based physiological monitoring tools used at regular intervals at key time points throughout the year must be considered to help with training evaluation. The present review examines methods available in the literature to assess wheelchair sports fitness in a field-based environment, with special attention on outcome variables, validity and reliability issues, and non-physiological influences on performance. It also lays out the context of field-based testing by providing details about the Paralympic court sports and the impacts of a disability on sporting performance. Due to the limited availability of specialized equipment for testing wheelchair-dependent participants in the laboratory, the adoption of field-based testing has become the preferred option by team coaches of wheelchair athletes. An obvious advantage of field-based testing is that large groups of athletes can be tested in less time. Furthermore, athletes are tested in their natural environment (using their normal sports wheelchair set-up and floor surface), potentially making the results of such testing more relevant than laboratory testing. However, given that many tests, such as the multistage fitness test and the Yo-Yo intermittent test, have originally been developed for AB games players, the assumption that these can also be used for wheelchair athletes may be erroneous. With the array of AB aerobic and anaerobic field tests available, it is difficult to ascertain which ones may be best suited for wheelchair athletes. Therefore, new, wheelchair sport-specific tests have been proposed and validated. Careful selection of tests to enable coaches to distinguish between disability classifications, wheelchair proficiency and actual performance improvements is paramount as this will not only enhance the value of field-based testing, but also help with the development of meaningful normative data. PMID:23329608

Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Leicht, Christof A

2013-02-01

208

Is an interest in computers or individual/team sports associated with adolescent psychiatric disorders?  

PubMed

The Internet plays a major role in adolescents' free time activities and communication nowadays. The aim here was to investigate the possibility of an association of computers and video games or sports (team, individual) with psychiatric disorders among underage psychiatric inpatients. The series of adolescents (n?=?508) had been diagnosed using semistructured interviews (K-SADS-PL). The results showed that an interest in computers and video games did not increase the risk of any specific psychiatric disorder among these adolescent inpatients, but the likelihood of a substance-related disorder was statistically significantly lower among the boys with computers as a hobby. Team sports were related to increased likelihood of conduct disorder among the boys, whereas the likelihood of an affective disorder was reduced. No such association was found in individual sports or among the girls. We conclude that social contacts and peers play an important role in preventing adolescent depression. PMID:21288072

Harju, Outi; Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Pirkko; Riala, Kaisa

2011-01-01

209

Women in Athletic Leadership  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite significant increased participation opportunities for girls and women in sport following the passage of Title IX, women remain underrepresented in athletic leadership roles. Thirty eight female and 158 male high school athletic directors responded to a 19-item Athletic Director Survey (ADS) designed to elicit information on the following:…

Moore, Sandra L.; Gilmour, Suzanne L.; Kinsella, Mary P.

2005-01-01

210

Catastrophic injuries among young athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

While very rare, catastrophic injuries in youth sports have a major impact on athletes and their families when they do occur. This article reviews and summarises the sparse research on direct catastrophic injuries in youth sports, a direct catastrophic sports injury being defined as a sport injury that resulted from participation in the skills of the sport, and resulted in

E D Zemper

2010-01-01

211

A longitudinal investigation of sports-related risk factors for disordered eating in aesthetic sports.  

PubMed

Previous studies have indicated a higher risk of disordered eating in certain types of elite sports such as aesthetic sports (e.g., rhythmical gymnastics, figure skating). But even though some studies on risk factors for disordered eating in sports exist, most research on this topic is based on cross-sectional data with limitations on causal inferences. We examined sports-related risk factors for disordered eating in a 1-year longitudinal study with two assessment points. The participants were 65 adolescent athletes from aesthetic sports (mean age 14.0? ±.2.2 years) who completed measures of disordered eating, social pressure from the sports environment, sports-related body dissatisfaction, desire to be leaner to improve sports performance, and emotional distress resulting from missed exercise sessions. All variables were relatively stable in the mean. Individual changes in the desire to be leaner to improve sports performance were associated with individual changes in disordered eating. Furthermore, a cross-lagged partial correlation analysis showed that the desire to be leaner to improve sports performance was predictive of disordered eating and not vice versa. The results of our study indicate that athletes are more at risk for disordered eating if they believe it is possible to enhance their sports performance through weight regulation. PMID:22093018

Krentz, E M; Warschburger, P

2013-06-01

212

Reliability and Validity of a 20-s Alternative to the Wingate Anaerobic Test in Team Sport Male Athletes  

PubMed Central

The intent of this study was to evaluate relative and absolute reliability of the 20-s anaerobic test (WAnT20) versus the WAnT30 and to verify how far the various indices of the 30-s Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT30) could be predicted from the WAnT20 data in male athletes. The participants were Exercise Science majors (age: 21.5±1.6 yrs, stature: 0.183±0.08 m, body mass: 81.2±10.9 kg) who participated regularly in team sports. In Phase I, 41 participants performed duplicate WAnT20 and WAnT30 tests to assess reliability. In Phase II, 31 participants performed one trial each of the WAnT20 and WAnT30 to determine the ability of the WAnT20 to predict components of the WAnT30. In Phase III, 31 participants were used to cross-validate the prediction equations developed in Phase II. Respective intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) for peak power output (PPO) (ICC?=?0.98 and 0.95) and mean power output (MPO) (ICC 0.98 and 0.90) did not differ significantly between WAnT20 and WAnT30. ICCs for minimal power output (POmin) and fatigue index (FI) were poor for both tests (range 0.53 to 0.76). Standard errors of the means (SEM) for PPO and MPO were less than their smallest worthwhile changes (SWC) in both tests; however, POmin and FI values were “marginal,” with SEM values greater than their respective SWCs for both tests values. Stepwise regression analysis showed that MPO had the highest coefficient of predictability (R?=?0.97), with POmin and FI considerable lower (R?=?0.71 and 0.41 respectively). Cross-validation showed insignificant bias with limits of agreement of 0.99±1.04, 6.5±92.7 W, and 1.6±9.8% between measured and predicted MPO, POmin, and FI, respectively. WAnT20 offers a reliable and valid test of leg anaerobic power in male athletes and could replace the classic WAnT30. PMID:25474744

Attia, Ahmed; Hachana, Younes; Chaabène, Helmi; Gaddour, Abdelmajid; Neji, Zied; Shephard, Roy J.; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel

2014-01-01

213

Eating Disorders in Adolescent Athletes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research on eating disorders in adolescent athletes, including prevalence, its uncommonness among male athletes, risk factors, medical complications, prevention strategies, and implications for sport and exercise participation, management, and prognosis. (EV)

Patel, Dilip R.; Greydanus, Donald E.; Pratt, Helen D.; Phillips, Elaine L.

2003-01-01

214

Sports Nutrition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide deals with various aspects of sports and nutrition. Twelve chapters are included: (1) "Sports and Nutrition"; (2) "Eat to Compete"; (3) "Fit Folks Need Fit Food"; (4) "The Food Guide Pyramid"; (5) "Fat Finder's Guide"; (6) "Pre- and Post-Event Meals"; (7) "Tips for the Diabetic Athlete"; (8) "Pinning Down Your Optimal Weight"; (9)…

Missouri State Dept. of Health, Jefferson City.

215

The use of energy drinks in sport: perceived ergogenicity and side effects in male and female athletes.  

PubMed

The use of caffeine containing energy drinks has dramatically increased in the last few years, especially in the sport context because of its reported ergogenic effect. The ingestion of low to moderate doses of caffeinated energy drinks has been associated with adverse side effects such as insomnia or increased nervousness. The aim of the present study was to assess psycho-physiological changes and the prevalence of side effects resulting from the ingestion of 3 mg caffeine/kg body mass in the form of an energy drink. In a double-blind and placebo controlled experimental design, ninety experienced and low-caffeine-consuming athletes (fifty-three male and thirty-seven female) in two different sessions were provided with an energy drink that contained 3 mg/kg of caffeine or the same decaffeinated energy drink (placebo; 0 mg/kg). At 60 min after the ingestion of the energy drink, participants completed a training session. The effects of ingestion of these beverages on psycho-physiological variables during exercise and the rate of adverse side effects were measured using questionnaires. The caffeinated energy drink increased self-perceived muscle power during exercise compared with the placebo beverage (6·41 (sd 1·7) v. 5·66 (sd 1·51); P= 0·001). Moreover, the energy drink produced a higher prevalence of side effects such as insomnia (31·2 v. 10·4 %; P< 0·001), nervousness (13·2 v. 0 %; P= 0·002) and activeness (16·9 v. 3·9 %; P= 0·007) than the placebo energy drink. There were no sex differences in the incidence of side effects (P>0·05). The ingestion of an energy drink with 3 mg/kg of caffeine increased the prevalence of side effects. The presence of these side effects was similar between male and female participants. PMID:25212095

Salinero, Juan J; Lara, Beatriz; Abian-Vicen, Javier; Gonzalez-Millán, Cristina; Areces, Francisco; Gallo-Salazar, César; Ruiz-Vicente, Diana; Del Coso, Juan

2014-11-14

216

The effects of kinesiotape on athletic-based performance outcomes in healthy, active individuals: a literature synthesis  

PubMed Central

Context: The effect of the application of kinesiotape to skin overlying musculature on measurable athletic-based performance outcomes in healthy individuals has not been well established. Objective: To systematically search and assess the quality of the literature on the effect of kinesiotape on athletic-based performance outcomes in healthy, active individuals. Methods: An electronic search strategy was conducted in MANTIS, Cochrane Library and EBSCO databases. Retrieved articles that met the eligibility criteria were rated for methodological quality by using an adaption of the critical appraisal criteria in Clinical Epidemiology by Sackett et al. Results: Ten articles met the inclusion criteria. Seven articles had positive results in at least one athletic-based performance measure compared to controls. Conclusion: Evidence is lacking to support the use of kinesiotape as a successful measure for improving athletic-based performance outcomes in healthy individuals. However, there is no evidence to show that kinesiotape has a negative effect on any of the performace measures. PMID:24302784

Drouin, Jillian L.; McAlpine, Caitlin T.; Primak, Kari A.; Kissel, Jaclyn

2013-01-01

217

Extremity trauma: field management of sports injuries.  

PubMed

Traumatic injuries to the extremities are common in athletic competitions. The practitioner providing coverage of sporting events must be prepared to diagnose and provide initial treatment of these injuries. A thorough history and physical examination should result in a provisional diagnosis. Many injuries will require subsequent radiographs or orthopedic consultation. Limb threatening emergencies are rare but must be promptly recognized and referred to a hospital. Early treatment can protect athletes from further injury and may hasten their return to competition. Some athletes with extremity trauma can return to the contest, but this decision must be made on an individual basis. PMID:25283054

Wascher, Daniel C; Bulthuis, Luke

2014-12-01

218

Acute achilles tendon rupture in athletes.  

PubMed

The incidence of AT rupture has increased in recent decades. AT ruptures frequently occur in the third or fourth decade of life in sedentary individuals who play sport occasionally. Ruptures also occur in elite athletes. Clinical examination must be followed by imaging. Conservative management and early mobilization can achieve excellent results, but the rerupture rate is not acceptable for the management of young, active, or athletic individuals. Open surgery is the most common option for AT ruptures, but there are risks of superficial skin breakdown and wound problems. These problems can be prevented with percutaneous repair. PMID:23707180

Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

2013-06-01

219

A PHASED REHABILITATION PROTOCOL FOR ATHLETES WITH LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC HERNIATION  

PubMed Central

Conservative non-surgical management of a herniated lumbar intervertebral disc (HLD) in athletes is a complex task due to the dramatic forces imparted on the spine during sport participation. The demands placed upon the athlete during rehabilitation and return to sport are unique not only from a sport specific perspective, but also regarding return to the sport strength and conditioning programs utilized for sport preparation. Many prescriptions fail to address postural and motor control faults specific to athletic development, which may prevent full return to sport after suffering a HLD or predispose the athlete to future exacerbations of a HLD. Strength exercises involving squatting, deadlifting, and Olympic power lifts are large components of the typical athlete's conditioning program, therefore some progressions are provided to address potential underlying problems in the athlete's technique that may have contributed to their HLD in the first place. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to propose a framework for rehabilitation that is built around the phases of healing of the disc. Phase I: Non-Rotational/Non-Flexion Phase (Acute Inflammatory Phase), Phase II: Counter rotation/Flexion Phase (Repair Phase), Phase III: Rotational Phase/Power development (Remodeling Phase), and Phase IV: Full return to sport. This clinical commentary provides a theoretical basis for these phases based on available literature as well as reviewing many popular current practice trends in the management of an HLD. The authors recognize the limits of any general exercise rehabilitation recommendation with regard to return to sport, as well as any general strength and conditioning program. It is vital that an individual assessment and prescription is made for every athlete which reviews and addresses movement in all planes of motion under all necessary extrinsic and intrinsic demands to that athlete. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24175134

VanGelder, Leonard H.; Vaughn, Daniel W.

2013-01-01

220

Contractual obligations and the sharing of confidential health information in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

As an employee, a sports doctor has obligations to their employer, but also professional and widely accepted obligations of a doctor to the patient (in this case the individual team member). The conflict is evident when sports doctors are asked by an athlete to keep personal health information confidential from the coach and team management, and yet both doctor and

L Anderson

2008-01-01

221

Comparison of eSports and Traditional Sports Consumption Motives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With recognition of the need for studying eSports in this interactive digital communication era, this study explored 14 motivational factors affecting the time spent on eSports gaming. Using a sample of 515 college students and athletic event attendees, we further compared eSports game patterns to their non-eSport or traditional sport involvements…

Lee, Donghun; Schoenstedt, Linda J.

2011-01-01

222

Mental Well-Being and Sport-Related Identities in College Students  

PubMed Central

Past research has linked physical activity and sports participation with improved mental and social well-being, including reduced risk of depression and suicidality. In this study we examined relationships among several dimensions of athletic involvement (team sport participation, individual sport participation, athlete identity, and jock identity), gender, and depression and suicidal behavior in a sample of 791 undergraduate students. Both participation in a team sport and athlete identity were associated with lower depression scores. Athlete identity was also associated with lower odds of a past-year suicide attempt, whereas jock identity was associated with elevated odds of a suicide attempt. The findings are discussed in light of the relationship between mental well-being and a larger constellation of health-risk behaviors linked to a “toxic jock” identity. PMID:20661467

Miller, Kathleen E.; Hoffman, Joseph H.

2010-01-01

223

Sports Nutrition Reference Guide  

E-print Network

H. Sports Nutrition #12;Reference Guide HANDOUT Safe Practices For Athletes What is the best game health and optimal performance. Many athletes attempt to lose weight or body fat with the hope and optimal sports drinks (containing 4-8% carbohydrate and about 100 mg sodium per cup) before, during

224

Sport Heroes in Congress.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reports the findings of a study of the role of sports in the lives of U.S. Congressmen and focuses attention on six gifted athletes for whom sports provided preparation for government service. The word "hero" as used in this paper refers to former members of Congress who were admired for their athletic prowess and for their political…

Corbett, Doris R.

225

The college athlete.  

PubMed

Participation in sports is important to many college students. Student athletes come from different levels of previous sport experience as they enter collegiate athletics. The primary source of student medical care is the campus student health center. The health care providers at student health centers attend to many of the sports-related concerns of student athletes. Preparticipation evaluation provides an opportunity to assess the general health of the student athlete and to identify conditions that might increase the risk of further injury. Sudden cardiac death and sports-associated concussions have generated much interest and are reviewed in this article. Other areas reviewed here include use of drugs and supplements, ankle sprains, acute knee ligament injuries, back pain, and shoulder impingement syndrome. PMID:15748923

Patel, Dilip R; Greydanus, Donald E; Luckstead, Eugene F

2005-02-01

226

Biomechanically Engineered Athletes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The real-world meeting of electronics, computer monitoring, control systems, and mathematics, introduced in the context of sports, is described. Recent advances in the field of biomechanics and its use in improving athletic performance are discussed. (KR)

Perry, Tekla S.

1991-01-01

227

"Emerging" Sports for Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Collegiate Athletic Association has recently introduced nine new sports to intercollegiate athletics: team handball, archery, badminton, bowling, crew, ice hockey, squash, synchronized swimming, and water polo. The initiative is intended to encourage colleges to create more athletic opportunities for women. It sets scholarship limits…

Blum, Debra E.

1994-01-01

228

Drugs in sport.  

PubMed

This paper briefly reviews the misuse of some drugs and medicines by some individuals seeking an advantage in competitive sports. Probably the most abused class of substances is the anabolic androgenic steroids, much employed by competitive athletes and body builders, but also widely used by individuals in gymnasia, where the motivation is essentially to improve perceived body image. The clinician's job may be seen as minimising risk to consumers of such drugs and medicines, but access to users is inevitably incomplete because of the dubious legality of all such misuse. PMID:20533699

Munby, J

2010-05-01

229

Female College Athlete Leadership and Team Effectiveness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This exploratory study contributes to the research on athlete leadership and team effectiveness in college sports. Athletic departments and sports coaches could benefit from a study about athlete leadership and team effectiveness in order to assist their student-leaders with leadership development and explore additional means to help improve team…

Galicinao, Brianne M.

2011-01-01

230

Doing sexuality in sport.  

PubMed

Based on interviews with Norwegian athletes living as lesbians, gays and bisexuals, this article investigates the possible subversive effect of queer visibility in sport. While female athletes living as lesbians sometimes create queer alternative spaces within mainstream sport contexts, male athletes acting openly as homosexuals challenge heteronormative discourses by attempting to disrupt hegemonic beliefs about homosexual behavior. The sexual practices of both groups confirm as well as challenge the laws of heteronormativity. PMID:18771115

Eng, Heidi

2008-01-01

231

Loyalty: Why Is It so Problematic in Athletics?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

What is loyalty and why is it problematic in athletics? The author discusses the ethical lapses that can occur when a powerful social value, "loyalty," trumps individuals' ability to make moral decisions. She argues that education about morality should be a necessary part of sport education and explains how moral education programs can make a…

Stoll, Sharon Kay

2012-01-01

232

The School Psychologist and Sport: A Natural Interface to Promote Optimal Functioning Between, Student-Athlete, Family and School Personnel  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides a background and logical explanation for school psychologists to feel justified in the pursuit of providing sport psychology services. This perspective is useful for the school psychologist or other school administrative personnel who may question or be questioned about the value or need for the provision of sport psychology…

Mintz, Marshall L.

2005-01-01

233

The Female Athlete Triad  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Female Athlete Triad is a syndrome of the interrelated components of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. Sometimes inadvertently, but more often by willful dietary restriction, many female athletes do not ingest sufficient calories to adequately fuel their physical or sport activities, which can disrupt menstrual functioning,…

Sherman, Roberta Trattner; Thompson, Ron A.

2004-01-01

234

A Unique Patient Population? Health-Related Quality of Life in Adolescent Athletes Versus General, Healthy Adolescent Individuals  

PubMed Central

Context: Normative scores for patient-rated outcome (PRO) instruments are important for providing patient-centered, whole-person care and making informed clinical decisions. Although normative values for the Pediatric Quality of Life Generic Core Scale (PedsQL) have been established in the general, healthy adolescent population, whether adolescent athletes demonstrate similar values is unclear. Objective: To compare PedsQL scores between adolescent athletes and general, healthy adolescent individuals. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Secondary schools. Patients or Other Participants: A convenience sample of 2659 interscholastic athletes (males = 2059, females = 600, age = 15.7 ± 1.1 years) represented the athlete group (ATH), and a previously published normative dataset represented the general, healthy adolescent group (GEN). Intervention(s): All participants completed the PedsQL during 1 testing session. Main Outcome Measure(s): The PedsQL consists of 2 summary scores (total, psychosocial) and 4 subscale scores (physical, emotional, social, school), with higher scores indicating better health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Groups were stratified by age (14, 15, or 16 years old). Independent-samples t tests were conducted to compare between-groups and sex differences. Results: The ATH group scored higher than the GEN group across all ages for total and psychosocial summary scores and for emotional and social functioning subscale scores (P ? .005). For physical functioning, scores of the 15-year-old ATH were higher than for their GEN counterparts (P = .001). Both 14- and 15-year-old ATH scored higher than their GEN counterparts for the school functioning subscale (P ? .013), but differences between 16-year olds were not significant (P = .228). Male adolescent athletes reported higher scores than female adolescent athletes across all scores (P ? .001) except for social functioning (P = .229). Conclusions: Adolescent athletes reported better HRQOL than GEN, particularly in emotional functioning. These findings further support the notion that ATH constitutes a unique population that requires its own set of normative values for self-reported, patient-rated outcome instruments. PMID:23672388

Lam, Kenneth C.; Valier, Alison R. Snyder; Bay, R. Curtis; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich

2013-01-01

235

Marijuana as doping in sports.  

PubMed

A high incidence of positive cases for cannabinoids, in analyses for doping control in sports, has been observed since the International Olympic Committee (IOC) included them in the 1989 list of prohibited drugs under the title of classes of prohibited substances in certain circumstances. Where the rules of sports federations so provide, tests are conducted for marijuana, hashish or any other cannabis product exposure by means of urinalysis of 11-nor-delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (carboxy-THC) the main metabolite of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Concentrations >15 ng/mL (cut-off value) in confirmatory analytical procedures are considered doping. Cannabis is an illicit drug in several countries and has received much attention in the media for its potential therapeutic uses and the efforts to legalise its use. Studies have demonstrated that the use of cannabinoids can reduce anxiety, but it does not have ergogenic potential in sports activities. An increase in heart rate and blood pressure, decline of cardiac output and reduced psychomotor activity are some of the pharmacological effects of THC that will determine a decrease in athletic performance. An ergolytic activity of cannabis products has been observed in athletes of several different sport categories. In Brazil, analyses for doping control in sports, performed in our laboratories, have detected positive cases for carboxy-THC in urine samples of soccer, volleyball, cycling and other athletes. It is our intention to discuss in this article some points that may discourage individuals from using cannabis products during sports activities, even in the so-called permitted circumstances defined by the IOC and some sports federations. PMID:12744713

Campos, Daniel R; Yonamine, Mauricio; de Moraes Moreau, Regina L

2003-01-01

236

West Virginia University 1 College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences  

E-print Network

West Virginia University 1 College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences Degree Offered · Bachelor of Science in Physical Education Nature of Program Students in athletic coaching education and Sport Sciences (CPASS) include athletic training, athletic coaching education, physical education

Mohaghegh, Shahab

237

National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Evaluation of Dietary Supplements for Performance Nutrition  

PubMed Central

Objectives To help athletic trainers promote a “food-first” philosophy to support health and performance, understand federal and sport governing body rules and regulations regarding dietary supplements and banned substances, and become familiar with reliable resources for evaluating the safety, purity, and efficacy of dietary supplements. Background The dietary supplement industry is poorly regulated and takes in billions of dollars per year. Uneducated athletes need to gain a better understanding of the safety, eligibility, and efficacy concerns associated with choosing to take dietary supplements. The athletic trainer is a valuable athletic team member who can help in the educational process. In many cases, athletic trainers are asked to help evaluate the legality, safety, and efficacy of dietary supplements. For this position statement, our mission is to provide the athletic trainer with the necessary resources for these tasks. Recommendations Proper nutrition and changes in the athlete's habitual diet should be considered first when improved performance is the goal. Athletes need to understand the level of regulation (or lack thereof) governing the dietary supplement industry at the international, federal, state, and individual sport-participation levels. Athletes should not assume a product is safe simply because it is marketed over the counter. All products athletes are considering using should be evaluated for purity (ie, truth in labeling), safety, and efficacy. PMID:23672334

Buell, Jackie L; Franks, Rob; Ransone, Jack; Powers, Michael E; Laquale, Kathleen M; Carlson-Phillips, Amanda

2013-01-01

238

National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System Commentaries: Introduction and Methods  

PubMed Central

Objective: To describe the history and methods of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System (ISS) as a complement to the sport-specific chapters that follow. Background: The NCAA has maintained the ISS for intercollegiate athletics since 1982. The primary goal of the ISS is to collect injury and exposure data from a representative sample of NCAA institutions in a variety of sports. Relevant data are then shared with the appropriate NCAA sport and policy committees to provide a foundation for evidence-based decision making with regard to health and safety issues. Description: The ISS monitors formal team activities, numbers of participants, and associated time-loss athletic injuries from the first day of formal preseason practice to the final postseason contest for 16 collegiate sports. In this special issue of the Journal of Athletic Training, injury information in 15 collegiate sports from the period covering 1988–1989 to 2003–2004 is evaluated. Conclusions: Athletic trainers and the NCAA have collaborated for 25 years through the NCAA ISS to create the largest ongoing collegiate sports injury database in the world. Data collection through the ISS, followed by annual review via the NCAA sport rules and sports medicine committee structure, is a unique mechanism that has led to significant advances in health and safety policy within and beyond college athletics. The publication of this special issue and the evolution of an expanded Web-based ISS enhance the opportunity to apply the health and safety decision-making process at the level of the individual athletic trainer and institution. PMID:21714302

Dick, Randall; Agel, Julie; Marshall, Stephen W

2007-01-01

239

PresidentPresident''s Task Force on Athletics and Academicss Task Force on Athletics and Academics Enhancing Excellence inEnhancing Excellence in  

E-print Network

intramurals, athletics, and sportsEnhanced intramurals, athletics, and sports will promote:will promote, and sports will promote:will promote: strong links tostrong links to teaching and researchteachingEnhanced intramurals, athletics, and sports will promote:will promote: physical activityphysical activity opportunities

Martin, Jeff

240

Gender typing of sports: an investigation of Metheny's classification.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate if children perceived certain sports to be masculine, feminine, or neutral. Students attending a University Laboratory school (grades K-12) were asked to fill out a survey about sports during a class period, Children in grades K-6 were given a sport (such as baseball) and asked if a boy named David would play it, if a girl named Jane would play it, or if both David and Jane would play the sport. Students in grades 7-12 were asked to name their favorite athlete or team and sport and indicate what sports they felt was best for a girl and a boy. Then they were given a list of sports and asked to indicate, using a 5-point Likert-type scale, whether they believed the sport was masculine, neutral, or feminine. Results from loglinear analyses indicated that students sex-typed certain sports, such as aerobics and football. Additionally, although some responses from students in grades 7-12 indicated that individuals should be able to play any sport they wanted, there were many gendered rsponses in terms of what sport(s) girls and boys should participate in. The results are discussed with reference to Metheny's categories of permissible sports for girls and in the framework of the gender typing of sport. PMID:12848232

Riemer, Brenda A; Visio, Michelle E

2003-06-01

241

Revenue Producing Athletes: An Annotated Bibliography.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An annotated bibliography on revenue producing sports is presented, with attention to: Proposition 48, exploitation of athletes, legal proceedings, research related to athletes and academic performance, psychological characteristics of athletes, and counseling programs for athletes. Introductions to each of the six topics are included. The section…

Ervin, Leroy; And Others

242

Outdoor sports and skin cancer.  

PubMed

Ultraviolet radiation is estimated to be one of the most important risk factors for nonmelanoma and melanoma skin cancers. Athletes practicing outdoor sports receive considerable UV doses because of training and competition schedules with high sun exposure, and in alpine sports, by altitude-related increase of UV radiation and reflection from snow- and ice-covered surfaces. Extreme UV exposure in outdoor sports such as skiing, mountaineering, cycling, or triathlon has been documented in a series of dosimetric studies. Sweating because of physical exercise may contribute to UV-related skin damage as it increases the individual photosensitivity of the skin, facilitating the risk of sunburns. Large epidemiological studies showed that recreational activities such as sun exposure on the beach or during water sports were associated with an increased risk of basal cell carcinoma, whereas skiing has been shown to be at increased risk for squamous cell carcinoma. Risk factors of cutaneous melanoma such as the number of melanocytic nevi and solar lentigines have been found to be more frequent in subjects practicing endurance outdoor sports. An increased risk for cutaneous melanoma may be assumed for these athletes. In addition to the important sun exposure, exercise-induced immunosuppression may increase the risk for nonmelanoma skin cancer and cutaneous melanoma in athletes. Frequently, athletes seem to know little about the risk of sun exposure. Protective means such as avoiding training and competition with considerable sun exposure, choosing adequate clothing, and applying water-resistant sunscreen still need to be propagated in the community of outdoor sportsmen. PMID:18280899

Moehrle, Matthias

2008-01-01

243

Violence in Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Increasing violence in sports is deplored, and a warning is issued on an apparent trend toward antisocial behavior. Contact sports such as hockey and football are cited as typically engendering aggression among athletes, but spectator sports (boxing, car racing, basketball, and baseball) are also singled out as eliciting increasing violence on the…

Cooper, Donald L.

244

Nutrition for winter sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

Winter sports are played in cold conditions on ice or snow and often at moderate to high altitude. The most important nutritional challenges for winter sport athletes exposed to environmental extremes include increased energy expenditure, accelerated muscle and liver glycogen utilization, exacerbated fluid loss, and increased iron turnover. Winter sports, however, vary greatly regarding their nutritional requirements due to variable

Nanna L. Meyer; Melinda M. Manore; Christine Helle

2011-01-01

245

Athletes and Sedentary Individuals: An Intergroup Comparison Utilizing a Pulmonary Function Ratio Obtained During Submaximal Exercise.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A pulmonary function ratio describing oxygen extraction from alveolar ventilation was used for an intergroup comparison between three groups of athletes (rugby, basketball, and football players) and one group of sedentary subjects during steady-state submaximal exercise. The ratio and its component parts are determined from only three gas…

Maud, Peter J.

246

Different metabolic responses during incremental exercise assessed by localized 31P MRS in sprint and endurance athletes and untrained individuals.  

PubMed

Until recently, assessment of muscle metabolism was only possible by invasive sampling. 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS) offers a way to study muscle metabolism non-invasively. The aim of the present study was to use spatially-resolved 31P MRS to assess the metabolism of the quadriceps muscle in sprint-trained, endurance-trained and untrained individuals during exercise and recovery. 5 sprint-trained (STA), 5 endurance-trained (ETA) and 7 untrained individuals (UTI) completed one unlocalized 31P MRS session to measure phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery, and a second session in which spatially-resolved 31P MR spectra were obtained. PCr recovery time constant (?) was significantly longer in STA (50±17 s) and UTI (41±9 s) than in ETA (30±4 s), (P<0.05). PCr changes during exercise differed between the groups, but were uniform across the different components of the quadriceps within each group. pH during recovery was higher for the ETA than for the UTI (P<0.05) and also higher than for the STA (P<0.01). Muscle volume was greater in STA than in UTI (P<0.05) but not different from ETA. Dynamic 31P MRS revealed considerable differences among endurance and sprint athletes and untrained people. This non-invasive method offers a way to quantify differences between individual muscles and muscle components in athletes compared to untrained individuals. PMID:23378173

Pesta, D; Paschke, V; Hoppel, F; Kobel, C; Kremser, C; Esterhammer, R; Burtscher, M; Kemp, G J; Schocke, M

2013-08-01

247

National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Exertional Heat Illnesses  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of exertional heat illnesses and to describe the relevant physiology of thermoregulation. Background: Certified athletic trainers evaluate and treat heat-related injuries during athletic activity in “safe” and high-risk environments. While the recognition of heat illness has improved, the subtle signs and symptoms associated with heat illness are often overlooked, resulting in more serious problems for affected athletes. The recommendations presented here provide athletic trainers and allied health providers with an integrated scientific and practical approach to the prevention, recognition, and treatment of heat illnesses. These recommendations can be modified based on the environmental conditions of the site, the specific sport, and individual considerations to maximize safety and performance. Recommendations: Certified athletic trainers and other allied health providers should use these recommendations to establish on-site emergency plans for their venues and athletes. The primary goal of athlete safety is addressed through the prevention and recognition of heat-related illnesses and a well-developed plan to evaluate and treat affected athletes. Even with a heat-illness prevention plan that includes medical screening, acclimatization, conditioning, environmental monitoring, and suitable practice adjustments, heat illness can and does occur. Athletic trainers and other allied health providers must be prepared to respond in an expedient manner to alleviate symptoms and minimize morbidity and mortality. PMID:12937591

Binkley, Helen M.; Beckett, Joseph; Casa, Douglas J.; Kleiner, Douglas M.; Plummer, Paul E.

2002-01-01

248

Carbohydrate intake considerations for young athletes.  

PubMed

Good nutritional practices are important for exercise performance and health during all ages. Athletes and especially growing children engaged in heavy training have higher energy and nutrient requirements compared to their non-active counterparts. Scientific understanding of sports nutrition for the young athlete is lacking behind the growing number of young athletes engaged in sports. Most of the sports nutrition recommendations given to athletic children and adolescents are based on adult findings due to the deficiency in age specific information in young athletes. Therefore, this review reflects on child specific sports nutrition, particularly on carbohydrate intake and metabolism that distinguishes the child athlete from the adult athlete. Children are characterised to be in an insulin resistance stage during certain periods of maturation, have different glycolytic/metabolic responses during exercise, have a tendency for higher fat oxidation during exercise and show different heat dissipation mechanisms compared to adults. These features point out that young athletes may need different nutritional advice on carbohydrate for exercise to those from adult athletes. Sport drinks for example may need to be adapted to children specific needs. However, more research in this area is warranted to clarify sports nutrition needs of the young athlete to provide better and healthy nutritional guidance to young athletes. Key pointsAthletic girls show lower carbohydrate intakes compared to boys.Substrate oxidation during exercise appears to be maturity related, fat being the preferred fuel for oxidation in younger athletic children.Children appear to have lower endogenous but greater exogenous carbohydrate oxidation rates during exercise.Carbohydrate intake during exercise appears to show no additional performance improvement in young athletes. Perhaps fat intake or a combination of both nutrients may be a better approach for nutrient supplementation during exercise.Gastric emptying physiology of young athletes is not well known. Adult sport drinks showed a tendency to delay gastric emptying in young athletes during exercise at higher intensities.More research is needed in paediatric sports nutrition. PMID:24149421

Montfort-Steiger, Veronica; Williams, Craig A

2007-01-01

249

The role of arthroscopic capsulo-labral repair in unidirectional post-traumatic shoulder instability in adolescent athletes participating in overhead or contact sports  

PubMed Central

Purpose this study was performed to identify the role of arthroscopic capsulo-labral repair (ACR) in unidirectional post-traumatic shoulder instability in adolescent athletes participating in overhead or contact sports. Methods sixty-five adolescent patients (aged 13 to 18 years) with post-traumatic shoulder instability submitted to arthroscopic surgery were selected from our database. The mean follow-up duration was 63 months. Shoulder range of motion and functional outcomes were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively using the Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation (SANE), Rowe, and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. In addition, details in the database on the type of sport practiced, time until surgery, and number of dislocations were analyzed to look for possible correlations with the recurrence rate. Results at the final follow-up, the mean SANE score was 87.23% (range: 30% to 100%) (preoperative mean score: 46.15% [range, 20% to 50%]); the mean Rowe score was 85 (range: 30 to 100) (preoperative mean score: 35.9 [range: 30 to 50]); and the mean ASES score was 84.12 (range: 30 to 100) (preoperative mean score: 36.92 [range: 30 to 48]). Mean forward flexion and external rotation with the arm at 90° abduction did not show changes compared with preoperative values; 81.5% of the patients returned to their pre-injury level of sports activities, and the failure rate was 21.5%. The recurrence rate was not related to the postoperative scores (p = 0.556 for SANE, p = 0.753 for Rowe, and p = 0.478 for ASES), number of preoperative episodes of instability (p = 0.59), or time that elapsed between the first instability episode and the surgery (p = 0.43). A statistically significant association (p = 0.0021) was found between recurrence and the type of sport practiced. Conclusions ACR is a reasonable surgical option in an adolescent population participating in sports. It has a role in restoring shoulder stability with very low morbidity; however, the failure rate is higher than in the adult population and both the young patients and their relatives must be properly informed about the expected outcome of the procedure. Level of Evidence level IV, therapeutic case series.

ROSE, GIACOMO DELLE; BORRONI, MARIO; CASTAGNA, ALESSANDRO

2013-01-01

250

Sports Supplements  

MedlinePLUS

... make you any faster or more skillful. Many factors go into your abilities as an athlete — including your diet, how much sleep you get, genetics and heredity, and your training program. But the fact is that using sports supplements may put you at risk for serious ...

251

Diagnosis and management of sports-related concussion: a 15-year-old athlete with a concussion.  

PubMed

Concussion in youth athletes is a growing problem worldwide. During the past decade, significant progress has been made in standardization of the assessment of young athletes, and a growing appreciation of metabolic vulnerability, activity, and cognitive challenges has led to guidelines and suggestions for rest from the field as well as cognitive rest from school. Outcome data have begun to establish groups linked to symptom class, genetics, and sex who are at risk of worse outcomes from concussions. Decisions regarding return to activity are now based on at-rest symptoms, graded increases in activity, and neuropsychological testing. Using the case of Ms X, a 15-year-old otherwise healthy high school student who fell while skiing, evaluation, prognosis, and management of concussion are discussed. PMID:21632470

Zafonte, Ross

2011-07-01

252

Position of the American Dietetic Association and the Canadian Dietetic Association: nutrition for physical fitness and athletic performance for adults.  

PubMed

The importance of diet and healthful food choices in optimizing health status, fitness levels, and athletic performance has been recognized by both participants and professionals. There continues to be a need for the interpretation of new research findings in this fast-growing discipline and for the dissemination of nutrition information and training techniques for a broad spectrum of individuals involved in various forms of physical activity. The registered dietitian who has specialized in exercise physiology and sports nutrition has the knowledge and counseling skills to act as the provider of this nutrition information. Additional information may be obtained in the Sports Nutrition Manual, 2nd edition, published by The American Dietetic Association and the Sports and Cardiovascular Nutrition dietetic practice group as well as in Sport Nutrition for the Athletes of Canada, published by the Sport Nutrition Advisory Committee of the Sports Medicine and Science Council of Canada. PMID:8509598

1993-06-01

253

Using Role Models to Help Celebrate Paralympic Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A role model is a person or challenge that inspires an individual to go beyond what is expected of him or her and to reach a specific goal. Role models can exemplify motivation, passion, and a genuine love of their life's work. All students need role models, and Paralympic sport athletes can be just that, especially for students with disabilities.…

Mastro, James; Ahrens, Christopher; Statton, Nathan

2012-01-01

254

Sport injuries in adolescents  

PubMed Central

In spite of the wide range of injuries in adolescents during sports activities, there are only a few studies investigating the type and frequency of sport injuries in puberty. However, this information may help to prevent, diagnose and treat sports injuries among teens. 4468 injuries in adolescent patients were treated over a ten year period of time: 66,97% were boys and 32.88% girls. The most frequent sports injuries were football (31.13%) followed by handball (8.89%) and sports during school (8.77%). The lower extremity was involved in 68.71% of the cases. Knee problems were seen in 29.79% of the patients; 2.57% spine and 1.99% head injuries. Injuries consisted primarily of distortions (35.34%) and ligament tears (18.76%); 9,00% of all injuries were fractures. We found more skin wounds (6:1) and fractures (7:2) in male patients compared to females. The risk of ligament tears was highest during skiing. Three of four ski injuries led to knee problems. Spine injuries were observed most often during horse riding (1:6). Head injuries were seen in bicycle accidents (1:3). Head injuries were seen in male patients much more often then in female patients (21:1). Fractures were noted during football (1:9), skiing (1:9), inline (2:3), and during school sports (1:11). Many adolescents participate in various sports. Notwithstanding the methodological problems with epidemiological data, there is no doubt about the large number of athletes sustain musculoskeletal injuries, sometimes serious. In most instances, the accident does not happened during professional sports and training. Therefore, school teachers and low league trainer play an important role preventing further accidence based on knowledge of individual risk patterns of different sports. It is imperative to provide preventive medical check-ups, to monitor the sport-specific needs for each individual sports, to observe the training skills as well as physical fitness needed and to evaluation coaches education. PMID:22355484

Habelt, Susanne; Hasler, Carol Claudius; Steinbrück, Klaus; Majewski, Martin

2011-01-01

255

Scapular Strength in Presence of Scapular Winging and Tipping in Female Athletes Who Participate in Overhead Sports  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study is to determine if scapular stabilizer weakness and instability is a plausible explanation for excessive winging and\\/or tipping of the scapula in females who participate in overhead sports. Instability may be an early sign of weakness that can contribute to shoulder injury. Literature regarding causes of scapular winging and tipping pertaining to weak scapular stabilizer

Rachelle Ewy; Sarah Hudson; Carrie Miller; Andrea Rhoads

256

Ethics in sports medicine.  

PubMed

Physicians have struggled with the medical ramifications of athletic competition since ancient Greece, where rational medicine and organized athletics originated. Historically, the relationship between sport and medicine was adversarial because of conflicts between health and sport. However, modern sports medicine has emerged with the goal of improving performance and preventing injury, and the concept of the "team physician" has become an integral part of athletic culture. With this distinction come unique ethical challenges because the customary ethical norms for most forms of clinical practice, such as confidentiality and patient autonomy, cannot be translated easily into sports medicine. The particular areas of medical ethics that present unique challenges in sports medicine are informed consent, third parties, advertising, confidentiality, drug use, and innovative technology. Unfortunately, there is no widely accepted code of sports medicine ethics that adequately addresses these issues. PMID:17218662

Dunn, Warren R; George, Michael S; Churchill, Larry; Spindler, Kurt P

2007-05-01

257

Vitamin supplementation benefits in master athletes.  

PubMed

Master athletes are more than 35 years of age and continue to train as hard as their young counterparts despite the aging process. All life long, they are capable of accomplishing exceptional sporting performances. For these participants in endurance events, matching energy intake and expenditure is critical to maintain health and performance. The proportions of carbohydrate, fat, and protein must be optimized to provide enough calories to sustain the energy requirements of competition or training, and for recovery. In addition, endurance athletes must include adequate vitamins and minerals in their diets to maintain healthy immune function. Vitamins and minerals may be sufficient in the diets of endurance athletes, who have a high energy intake. This would make it unnecessary to use vitamin and mineral supplements. Furthermore, one major limitation for these athletes is the management of oxidative stress, which, when in excess, can be deleterious for the organism. For individuals exposed to oxidative stress, micronutritional supplementations rich in vitamins and minerals can be also an alternative strategy. Although these supplementations are increasingly used by master athletes, very few data are available on their effects on oxidative stress, muscle recovery, and physical performance. The potential benefits of supplement use in athletes are thus questionable. Some studies indicate no benefits, while others highlight potential negative side effects of vitamin supplementation. Additional studies are warranted in order to design adapted prescriptions in antioxidant vitamins and minerals. PMID:24323888

Brisswalter, Jeanick; Louis, Julien

2014-03-01

258

Doping in sports.  

PubMed

Regardless of one's stance on the topic, drugs are an important issue in sports. Sports pages in newspapers around the globe routinely report on athletes at every level ofcompetition using performance enhancing substances to gain an unfair advantage over their competitors. The level of sophistication in beating drug testing, and developing "next-generation" agents continues to raise. The relative paucity of well designed research has been an additional factor impeding attempts to adequately address the problem. Very limited funds are currently available to conduct the necessary research. Without credible data, athletes are more vulnerable to the claims made by those benefiting from the sales of these compounds. Many younger fans and those dreaming of a similar future admire highly successful professional athletes. A strong, consistent statement admonishing drug use is needed. Actions speak louder than words. Every time a successful athlete is caught using PE drugs, every effort to diminish drug use is negatively impacted. The "win at all cost" and "second place is the first loser" mentality needs to be continually challenged by words and actions in youth sports at every level of competition. Finally, the war on drugs in sports needs to be a coordinated, well organized international undertaking as sports play an important role in virtually every culture. If we are to maintain the integrity of competition and protect the health of the athletes, we must dramatically increase our efforts to eliminate performance enhancing drugs as an acceptable option for any athlete. Sports science professionals and sports psychiatrists need to work with coaches, trainers, athletes, and national governing bodies to educating athletes on the effects of performance enhancing drug use. To achieve this important goal everyone involved in sports needs to be knowledgeable on the negative impact this has on all aspects of organized sports. It is a difficult challenge, but one that must be addressed. PMID:22218235

Baron, D A; Foley, T

2009-10-01

259

Flying sports assistant: external visual imagery representation for sports training  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental imagery is a quasi-perceptual experience emerging from past experiences. In sports psychology, mental imagery is used to improve athletes' cognition and motivation. Eminent athletes often create their mental imagery as if they themselves are the external observers; such ability plays an important role in sport training and performance. Mental image visualization refers to the representation of external vision containing

Keita Higuchi; Tetsuro Shimada; Jun Rekimoto

2011-01-01

260

The German Young Olympic Athletes' Lifestyle and Health Management Study (GOAL Study): design of a mixed-method study  

PubMed Central

Background In order to perform at top levels, elite athletes have to both protect and risk their health at the same time. Adolescent elite athletes have the additional challenge of coping with substantial physical, psychological and social transformations. The contradictory phenomenon of protecting and risking the adolescent athletes' health in sports challenges the development of health promotion and protection strategies. The GOAL Study (German Young Olympic Athletes' Lifestyle and Health Management Study) analyzes the individual and organizational management of health in adolescent elite sports. Methods/design We combine quantitative and qualitative approaches in a mixed-method study. This allows us to gather a broad range of representative information on squad athletes from all Olympic disciplines as well as in-depth information on four selected Olympic disciplines (artistic gymnastics, biathlon, handball and wrestling). Within the quantitative section we attempt to identify the young athletes' health and nutrition behavior, their subjective health state and their lay health representations, health-related social networks, and structures of medical attendance. 1138 national team level athletes born between 1992 and 1995 from 51 Olympic disciplines responded to the questionnaire (response rate: 61,75%). The qualitative section investigates the meaning and relevance of health and nutrition within the athletes' sports specific surroundings, the impact of biographic backgrounds on individual health behavior, and sports specific cultures of health, nutrition and risk. We interviewed 24 athletes and 28 coaching and medical experts, and carried out 14 multi-day participant observations at training sessions and competitions. Conclusions The studies' results will serve as the basis for developing tailored health promotion strategies to be in cooperation with German elite sports associations. PMID:21627777

2011-01-01

261

the Campbell Sports Center join the campbell legacy  

E-print Network

the Campbell Sports Center join the campbell legacy the columbia campaign for athletics: achieving excellence #12;the Campbell Sports Center transforming columbia athletics Through The Columbia Campaign transformation is the construction of The Campbell Sports Center at the Baker Athletics Complex, named in honor

Qian, Ning

262

Intercollegiate Sports: Hearings before the Subcommittee on Commerce, Consumer Protection, and Competitiveness of the Committee on Energy and Commerce. House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session (June 19, 1991--Overview; July 25, 1991--Academics and Athletics; September 12, 1991--Historically Black Colleges and Universities).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Subcommittee on Commerce, Consumer Protection and Competitiveness of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce met on three occasions to hear testimony on intercollegiate sports and in particular on proposed legislation to regulate college sports, to assure due process in investigations of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA),…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Energy and Commerce.

263

The skin in the gym: a comprehensive review of the cutaneous manifestations of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in athletes.  

PubMed

Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CAMRSA) infection is currently a problem of epidemic proportion. Athletes represent a specific group of individuals who are at increased risk to develop CAMRSA skin infections. In this article, the previously published reports of cutaneous CAMRSA infections in athletes are categorized by sport and summarized. General treatment guidelines for the management of cutaneous CAMRSA infection and its associated lesions in athletes are discussed. Also, recommendations for the prevention of CAMRSA skin infection in sports participants are reviewed. PMID:18280900

Cohen, Philip R

2008-01-01

264

Athlete's Foot  

MedlinePLUS

... Ankle Conditions » Athlete's Foot Text Size Print Bookmark Athlete's Foot Athlete's foot is a skin infection caused by fungus. ... the body; on the foot it is called athlete’s foot, or tinea pedis. Fungus commonly attacks the ...

265

Athlete's Foot  

MedlinePLUS

... in a public shower. Why Is It Called Athlete's Foot? Athlete's foot gets its name because athletes ... infections can develop on your feet. Back Continue Athlete's Foot Prevention Many people will develop athlete's foot ...

266

Sports dentistry: A review  

PubMed Central

Dental trauma in sports is the major linking channel between sports and dentistry. Sports dentistry is the prevention of oral/facial athletic injuries and related oral diseases and manifestations. In children, sports activities were found to be responsible for 13% of overall oral trauma. It is emphasized that there is a great need for “Team Dentist” from high schools to professional teams. In this review, we discuss the relationship between sports and dentistry, and the importance of educating parents, teachers, and children in prevention of injuries related to the sports.

Ramagoni, Naveen Kumar; Singamaneni, Vijaya Kumar; Rao, Saketh Rama; Karthikeyan, Jamini

2014-01-01

267

Pressures on Youth in Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The pressures on young athletes today, many of them brought on or exacerbated by parents, drive young athletes to attain perfection and win by any means necessary. For the young athlete, the challenges of learning how to balance schoolwork, social life, family time, and sports, not to mention other interests they might have, are far more intense…

Ungerleider, Steven

2003-01-01

268

Neuroendocrine mechanisms in athletes.  

PubMed

Athletic activity may be associated with alterations in various neuroendocrine axes depending on the state of energy availability. In addition, genetic factors and an underlying predilection for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may predispose some athletes to develop functional hypothalamic amenorrhea earlier than other athletes. In conditions of low energy availability associated with athletic activity, changes that occur in various neuroendocrine axes are primarily adaptive, and aim to either conserve energy for the most essential functions, or allow the body to draw on its reserves to meet energy needs. These hormonal changes, however, then lead to changes in body composition and bone metabolism. Impaired bone accrual in younger athletes and low bone density in older athletes constitutes the major pathologic consequence of neuroendocrine changes associated with low energy availability. The female athlete triad of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone density is prevalent in certain kinds of sports and activities, particularly endurance sports, gymnastics, and ballet. It is essential to screen for this condition in athletes at every preparticipation physical and during office visits, and to put in place an effective treatment team to manage the triad early, in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25248600

Misra, Madhusmita

2014-01-01

269

An investigation into the architecture of the vastus medialis oblique muscle in athletic and sedentary individuals: An in vivo ultrasound study.  

PubMed

There is thought to be a relationship between the vastus medialis oblique muscle (VMO) and patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), a condition that has a high prevalence in young athletic individuals. Following a suggestion that there may be a link between the architecture of the VMO and an individual's activity level, the aim of this study was to determine any differences in two measurable parameters of the VMO between two populations with widely differing activity levels. The parameters measured were VMO fiber angle and insertion ratio, which is the proportion of the medial patellar border with VMO fibers inserting onto it (%). Eighty-two knees from 26 athletic volunteers and 15 sedentary volunteers (aged 20-28 years) were assessed using ultrasound. Activity level was defined using the Tegner scoring system. The mean VMO angle (°) for the athletic group was significantly higher than for the sedentary group at 67.8° and 53.6°, respectively. There was no significant difference in insertion ratio between the athletic group, 43.0%, and the sedentary group, 39.5%. This study found that greater VMO fiber angles were seen in individuals with higher activity levels, exerting a stronger medial stabilizing force on the patella. This has important implications for the treatment of PFPS, particularly in athletic patients, which frequently focus on VMO strengthening exercises. Clin. Anat. 28:262-268, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25244030

Benjafield, A J; Killingback, A; Robertson, C J; Adds, P J

2015-03-01

270

Imaging focal and interstitial fibrosis with cardiovascular magnetic resonance in athletes with left ventricular hypertrophy: implications for sporting participation.  

PubMed

Long-term high-intensity physical activity is associated with morphological changes, termed as the 'athlete's heart'. The differentiation of physiological cardiac adaptive changes in response to high-level exercise from pathological changes consistent with an inherited cardiomyopathy is imperative. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging allows definition of abnormal processes occurring at the tissue level, including, importantly, myocardial fibrosis. It is therefore vital in accurately making this differentiation. In this review, we will review the role of CMR imaging of fibrosis, and detail CMR characterisation of myocardial fibrosis in various cardiomyopathies, and the implications of fibrosis. Additionally, we will outline advances in imaging fibrosis, in particular T1 mapping. Finally we will address the role of CMR in pre-participation screening. PMID:23097483

Waterhouse, Deirdre F; Ismail, Tevfik F; Prasad, Sanjay K; Wilson, Mathew G; O'Hanlon, Rory

2012-11-01

271

Sport Instruction for Individuals with Disabilities. The Best of Practical Pointers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book, written for teachers by teachers, includes articles by 14 contributing authors and is divided into three sections. Section 1 is entitled "Practical Pointers for Team Sports" and contains the following chapters: "Mainstreaming the Physically Handicapped for Team Sports" (S. J. Grosse); "Program Guide to Team Soccer for the Mentally…

American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance, Reston, VA.

272

INTRAMURALSSummer Team Sports* Registration accepted for teams or "free agent" individuals. $25 registration fee required  

E-print Network

are forfeited). Sport Registration Dates Season Dates Flag Football (Men's & Women's & Co-Ed) May 5 - May 17 May - June 20 Softball (Men's & Women's & Co-Ed) June 2 - June 20 June 23 - July 31 Soccer (Men's & Women the team manager via email or text message. Recreational Sports & Fitness 120 Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center

Maxwell, Bruce D.

273

Special Medical Problems of Athletes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article addresses the situations in which athletes with special needs and considerations participate in sports. The health problems discussed are diabetes mellitus, exercise-induced asthma, exercise-induced anaphylaxis, and epilepsy. (MT)

Couch, Joan M.

1987-01-01

274

Sport-Related Concussions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sport-related concussions (SRC) are not limited to specific age ranges, professional athletes, or gender. The primary focus of much of SRC research pertains to the assessment, management, and return to play (RTP) of the concussed athlete. This article highlights some major issues of SRC along with some controversies that presently exist within the…

Brady, Don; Brady, Flo

2011-01-01

275

Nutrition in Children's Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Young athletes need to be aware of the importance of good nutrition to athletic performance. A basic diet plan, worked out with a physician to satisfy energy and weight needs, is essential. The best eating schedule and amount and type of food varies with different sports depending on the intensity and duration of physical activity. Weight control…

Smith, Nathan J.

276

Sports Teams Extend Reach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unlike traditional high school athletic teams, Unified Sports teams are designed to immerse students with intellectual disabilities in a facet of school culture that has largely eluded them. Nationwide, more than 2,000 schools in 42 states have the teams, where the ideal is for about half the athletes on each team to be students with intellectual…

Shah, Nirvi

2012-01-01

277

The Female Athlete Triad: A Statement of the Problem  

Microsoft Academic Search

Almost 3 million high school girls are currently competing in sports, and female participation in collegiate athletics has risen over 137%. Fierce competition in some sports is potentially dangerous for adolescent girls who are especially vulnerable to an obsession with thinness. The Female Athlete Triad (FAT) consists of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. Coaches, athletic trainers and other health professionals

Tara Tietjen-Smith

278

Higher Education Wellness Methods for Institutional Athletics: Research Indicators.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

College and university administrators who must make decisions regarding athletic programs and student services need more information on lifestyle choices and health service needs of athletes in major college sports. This study was conducted to identify lifestyle choices and health service needs of athletes in three major sports at a selected…

Delaney, Gloria; Gunn, Lindsey

279

Development and Initial Psychometric Evaluation of the Sport Interference Checklist  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Sport Interference Checklist (SIC) was developed in 141 athletes to assist in the concurrent assessment of cognitive and behavioral problems experienced by athletes in both training (Problems in Sports Training Scale, PSTS) and competition (Problems in Sports Competition Scale, PSCS). An additional scale (Desire for Sport Psychology Scale,…

Donohue, Brad; Silver, N. Clayton; Dickens, Yani; Covassin, Tracey; Lancer, Kevin

2007-01-01

280

Contact Sport Concussion Incidence  

PubMed Central

Reference/Citation: Koh JO, Cassidy JD, Watkinson EJ. Incidence of concussion in contact sports: a systematic review of the evidence. Brain Inj.20031790191712963556. Clinical Question: What is the incidence of concussion in various contact sports? Data Sources: Studies for the review were found through a MEDLINE search (1985–2000) and by gathering and reviewing older articles referenced in the searched articles. The main terms that were included in the search were brain injuries, brain concussion, and incidence. Text words that were also included were mild traumatic brain injury, concussion, incidence, injury, and head injury, along with the names of 8 contact sports ( American football, boxing, ice hockey, judo, karate, tae kwon do, rugby, and soccer). Study Selection: For this review, concussion was defined as “a mild brain injury resulting from a direct blow to the head resulting in physiological changes in brain function.” Cohort studies with documented incidence of concussion in athletes from 8 identified contact sports were the target of the search. All studies of male and female athletes in any of the 8 contact sports, including practices and games and regardless of level of competition, were included in the study search. Possible articles for review were identified through a 3-step screening process. Article titles were initially screened by one of the authors. If the title seemed to be relevant to the purpose of the review, the abstract of the article was then screened for inclusion/exclusion criteria as the second step. To be included, studies had to relate to the incidence of injury to the head and brain, report results relevant to concussion, involve 1 of the 8 identified contact sports, and be published between 1985 and 2000. All systematic reviews about mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) or concussion were also included. Studies were excluded if they discussed concussion due to whiplash injury or concussion associated with spinal cord injury, facial bone fracture, or soft tissue injuries; if they reported prevalence, rather than incidence, of concussion; if they addressed chronic TBI; if they comprised case reports or letters to the editor; or if they lacked a denominator to determine risk rates. Finally, relevant and unknown articles from the abstract screening were reviewed again for the inclusion and exclusion criteria by an independent, outside party. Data Extraction: A general methodologic criteria design was used to critically appraise all articles that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. This design appraised 11 study design and reporting criteria. In order for an article to be accepted into the systematic review, it had to meet at least the 5 mandatory criteria: description of the source population, appropriate description of inclusion and exclusion criteria, verifiable results from the raw data, differentiation of the incidence of injury between practice and game settings, and adequately measured denominator of population or person-time at risk. For each individual study, the 5 mandatory criteria listed above were rated with regard to whether they were included or addressed in the paper ( yes), were missing from the paper ( no), or were included but not described fully or in a way characterized by sound quality ( substandard). If any of the 5 mandatory criteria were rated no, the article was not evaluated any further. Data taken from these articles included sex, types of sessions in which concussion occurred, and numbers defining incidence of concussion within a contact sport. In some studies, rates were recalculated from the raw data in order to check accuracy, or if they were not presented in the published material, rates were calculated. These rates were recalculated with the denominator presented in the original study, athletes at risk for injury or time at risk for injury. Athlete-exposure was not defined in the review but is commonly used as the denominator in epidemiologic studies and represents one time in which an athlete takes part in a game or practice that expo

Tommasone, Beth A; Valovich McLeod, Tamara C

2006-01-01

281

Sports medicine: a century of progress.  

PubMed

According to the international Olympic Committee, it is the responsibility of the sports medicine profession to care for the health and welfare of Olympic athletes, treat and prevent injuries, conduct medical examinations, evaluate performance capacity, provide nutritional advice, prescribe and supervise training programs, and to monitor substance use. Implicit in these functions is to assist Olympic athletes in achieving the objectives of the Olympic Motto (Citius, Altius, Fortius), which is to become faster, higher, and stronger. During the past Olympiads, athletic performance has increased, as indicated by times for the men's marathon (-28%) or by the distance covered in the women's javelin throw (+80%). However, the fulfillment of these responsibilities was a slow and protracted process, as demonstrated by the facts that medical examinations were not required until 1920, that 28 years elapsed before an official team physician was appointed, and that women had to wait until 1984 before sanction was given to compete in the marathon race. Doping was not defined until 1964, and monitoring of substance abuse did not materialize until after 1972. Although individuals have prepared for athletic competition since the ancient Olympics, the scientific foundations for various training prescriptions were not firmly established until the 1960s and 1970s. It was speculated that performance records will continue to improve in the next century because more scientific sports medicine information would be available and because such information would be better disseminated to athletes. PMID:9164256

Tipton, C M

1997-05-01

282

Eating Disorders in Female College Athletes: Risk Factors, Prevention, and Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Female athletes are at risk for developing eating disorders because of the pressures that are placed on them by society, their peers, their coaches, and the sports culture itself. This paper reviews the literature on the risk factors involved and various methods of prevention and treatment. The authors conclude that individual and group approaches…

Pearson, Frances C.; Rivers, Tara C.

2006-01-01

283

Illicit anabolic steroid use in athletesA case series analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because of recent anabolic steroid abuse scandals at all levels of athletic competition ranging from high school sports to the 1988 Olympics in Seoul, Korea, the investigators closely examined the anabolic steroid use histories of 20 competitive and noncompetitive weight lifters. Steroid efficacy studies only examine the anabolic effects of individual drugs. However, these 20 steroid users consistently practiced polypharmacy.

Paul J. Perry; Kathleen H. Andersen; William R. Yates

1990-01-01

284

Why the Athletic Director Wept  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For days and months, the author had experienced a crisis of faith. Because he had believed sports were beneficial for the university and the young athletes who participated in them, he had willingly invested seventeen years of his professional life in the administration of the athletics program. In 1988, he accepted a position as an an assistant…

Aicinena, Steve

2013-01-01

285

Athletics Reform and Faculty Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since their inception, intercollegiate athletics have engendered controversy and stimulated debate. Supporters assert that "college sports are significant in defining the essence of the American college and university", suggesting that benefits associated with athletics include more increased fundraising, positive public perceptions of graduates,…

Lawrence, Janet; Ott, Molly; Hendricks, Lori

2009-01-01

286

Elite athletes as mothers: Managing multiple identities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mothers’ voices are often silent in the sports literature, especially as elite athletes. This research used a symbolic interactionist approach and semi-structured interviews to explore the experiences of nine elite female athletes in New Zealand who were also mothers at the time of competing. The specific objectives were to explore how motherhood impacted on the identity of elite athletes, how

Farah R. Palmer; Sarah I. Leberman

2009-01-01

287

Creative Management Techniques in Interscholastic Athletics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This text is designed for professional preparation classes in physical education and sports administration and serves as a guide for inservice secondary school athletic directors. Managerial principles are applied to athletic personnel and programs: coaches are depicted as managerial supervisors, the athletic director is middle management, and the…

Fuoss, Donald E.; Troppmann, Robert J.

288

Is there a danger for myopia in anti-doping education? Comparative analysis of substance use and misuse in Olympic racket sports calls for a broader approach  

PubMed Central

Background Racket sports are typically not associated with doping. Despite the common characteristics of being non-contact and mostly individual, racket sports differ in their physiological demands, which might be reflected in substance use and misuse (SUM). The aim of this study was to investigate SUM among Slovenian Olympic racket sport players in the context of educational, sociodemographic and sport-specific factors. Methods Elite athletes (N = 187; mean age = 22 ± 2.3; 64% male) representing one of the three racket sports, table tennis, badminton, and tennis, completed a paper-and-pencil questionnaire on substance use habits. Athletes in this sample had participated in at least one of the two most recent competitions at the highest national level and had no significant difference in competitive achievement or status within their sport. Results A significant proportion of athletes (46% for both sexes) reported using nutritional supplements. Between 10% and 24% of the studied males would use doping if the practice would help them achieve better results in competition and if it had no negative health consequences; a further 5% to 10% indicated potential doping behaviour regardless of potential health hazards. Females were generally less oriented toward SUM than their male counterparts with no significant differences between sports, except for badminton players. Substances that have no direct effect on sport performance (if timed carefully to avoid detrimental effects) are more commonly consumed (20% binge drink at least once a week and 18% report using opioids), whereas athletes avoid substances that can impair and threaten athletic achievement by decreasing physical capacities (e.g. cigarettes), violating anti-doping codes or potentially transgressing substance control laws (e.g. opiates and cannabinoids). Regarding doping issues, athletes' trust in their coaches and physicians is low. Conclusion SUM in sports spreads beyond doping-prone sports and drugs that enhance athletic performance. Current anti-doping education, focusing exclusively on rules and fair play, creates an increasingly widening gap between sports and the athletes' lives outside of sports. To avoid myopia, anti-doping programmes should adopt a holistic approach to prevent substance use in sports for the sake of the athletes' health as much as for the integrity of sports. PMID:21988896

2011-01-01

289

Effects of external loading on power output in a squat jump on a force platform: A comparison between strength and power athletes and sedentary individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to determine the effects of external loading on power output during a squat jump on a force platform in athletes specializing in strength and power events (6 elite weight-lifters and 16 volleyball players) and in 20 sedentary individuals. Instantaneous power was computed from time-force curves during vertical jumps with and without an external load

Tarak Driss; Henry Vandewalle; Jacques Quièvre; Christian Miller; Hugues Monod

2001-01-01

290

The female athlete.  

PubMed

Over the past 30 years, the number of women participating in organized sports has grown dramatically. Several forms of menstrual irregularities have been described in the female athlete: primary and secondary amenorrhoea, oligomenorrhoea, short luteal phases and anovulation. The incidence of menstrual irregularities is much higher in activities where a thin body is required for better performance. The hormonal pattern seen in these athletes is a hypothalamic amenorrhoea profile. There appears to be a decrease in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulses from the hypothalamus, which in turn decreases the pulsatile secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and shuts down stimulation of ovary. Recently, another type of amenorrhoea has been described in swimmers which is characterized by mild hyperandrogenism. Athletes with low weight are at risk of developing the female athletic triad, which includes amenorrhoea, osteoporosis and disordered eating. Athletes with this triad are susceptible to stress fractures. Other issues include the pregnant athlete. Intensive exercise during pregnancy can cause bradycardia. Safe limits of aerobic exercise in pregnancy depend on previous exercise habits. Infertility, which may develop with exercise, is probably reversible with reduction of exercise or weight gain. High impact sports activities may produce urinary incontinence. Oestrogen replacement therapy is often prescribed in amenorrhoeic athletes, but bone loss may not be completely reversible. PMID:10932809

Warren, M P; Shantha, S

2000-03-01

291

Applied Sport Psychology in Professional Sports: The Team Psychologist  

Microsoft Academic Search

Professional sports has become a significant worldwide business in which highly paid athletes are considered substantial assets to be carefully selected, developed, and protected. Psychologists have become increasingly involved with professional sport organizations, providing a wide range of psychological services, such as performance enhancement consultation, clinical or counseling interventions, and psychological testing. As increasing numbers of psychologists enter the sport

Frank L. Gardner

2001-01-01

292

Validity of the Rapid Eating Assessment for Patients for assessing dietary patterns in NCAA athletes  

PubMed Central

Background Athletes may be at risk for developing adverse health outcomes due to poor eating behaviors during college. Due to the complex nature of the diet, it is difficult to include or exclude individual food items and specific food groups from the diet. Eating behaviors may better characterize the complex interactions between individual food items and specific food groups. The purpose was to examine the Rapid Eating Assessment for Patients survey (REAP) as a valid tool for analyzing eating behaviors of NCAA Division-I male and female athletes using pattern identification. Also, to investigate the relationships between derived eating behavior patterns and body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) while stratifying by sex and aesthetic nature of the sport. Methods Two independent samples of male (n = 86; n = 139) and female (n = 64; n = 102) collegiate athletes completed the REAP in June-August 2011 (n = 150) and June-August 2012 (n = 241). Principal component analysis (PCA) determined possible factors using wave-1 athletes. Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) determined factors accounting for error and confirmed model fit in wave-2 athletes. Wave-2 athletes’ BMI and WC were recorded during a physical exam and sport participation determined classification in aesthetic and non-aesthetic sport. Mean differences in eating behavior pattern score were explored. Regression models examined interactions between pattern scores, participation in aesthetic or non-aesthetic sport, and BMI and waist circumference controlling for age and race. Results A 5-factor PCA solution accounting for 60.3% of sample variance determined fourteen questions for EFA and CFA. A confirmed solution revealed patterns of Desserts, Healthy food, Meats, High-fat food, and Dairy. Pattern score (mean ± SE) differences were found, as non-aesthetic sport males had a higher (better) Dessert score than aesthetic sport males (2.16 ± 0.07 vs. 1.93 ± 0.11). Female aesthetic athletes had a higher score compared to non-aesthetic female athletes for the Dessert (2.11 ± 0.11 vs. 1.88 ± 0.08), Meat (1.95 ± 0.10 vs. 1.72 ± 0.07), High-fat food (1.70 ± 0.08 vs. 1.46 ± 0.06), and Dairy (1.70 ± 0.11 vs. 1.43 ± 0.07) patterns. Conclusions REAP is a construct valid tool to assess dietary patterns in college athletes. In light of varying dietary patterns, college athletes should be evaluated for healthful and unhealthful eating behaviors. PMID:25302055

2014-01-01

293

Minorities in Sports. The Effect of Varsity Sports Participation on the Social, Educational, and Career Mobility of Minority Students, with Policy Recommendations from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes a longitudinal study of the role of sports in the lives of minority youth during the 1980s. Data were analyzed from the High School and Beyond study and all findings were proven to be statistically significant after multiple regression analyses. The term "athletes" refers to those individuals who reported participating on…

Sabo, Don

294

Sports and Drug Abuse. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session (September 25, 1984).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This hearing examined the impact of illegal drugs on both professional and amateur sports and the national effort of sports figures to help fight drug abuse. Witnesses included individuals currently involved in programs designed to prevent drug abuse, members of groups formed to rehabilitate drug users, and former professional athletes who…

Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

295

Sports Subsidies Soar. Commentary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Doug Lederman's article, "Sports Subsidies Soar," discusses the issue on institutional subsidies for sports program. His article invites an obvious question: why are so many universities willing to subsidize athletics through either a direct transfer of institutional funds, assessing a dedicated student fee, or a combination of these? This…

Toma, J. Douglas

2010-01-01

296

Legality and legitimacy in sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The tension between legality and legitimacy is the basis of ethics in general, and sport in particular. Sporting reality transcends all social and economic systems. Within sport we can see, following Heraclitus's dictum, that “Confrontation is the seed of everything”. When in a contest between athletes, the antagonism between humans reaches its zenith, the competitors mirror each other. It is

Anna Hogenová

2002-01-01

297

National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Environmental Cold Injuries  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present recommendations for the prevention, recognition, and treatment of environmental cold injuries. Background: Individuals engaged in sport-related or work-related physical activity in cold, wet, or windy conditions are at risk for environmental cold injuries. An understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology, risk management, recognition, and immediate care of environmental cold injuries is an essential skill for certified athletic trainers and other health care providers working with individuals at risk. Recommendations: These recommendations are intended to provide certified athletic trainers and others participating in athletic health care with the specific knowledge and problem-solving skills needed to address environmental cold injuries. Each recommendation has been graded (A, B, or C) according to the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criterion scale. PMID:19030143

Cappaert, Thomas A; Stone, Jennifer A; Castellani, John W; Krause, Bentley Andrew; Smith, Daniel; Stephens, Bradford A

2008-01-01

298

Motivation towards dual career of European student-athletes.  

PubMed

Abstract The present study aimed to investigate motivations for the dual career of European student-athletes living in countries providing different educational services for elite athletes: State-centric regulation-State as sponsor/facilitator (State), National Sporting Federations/Institutes as intermediary (Federation) and Laisser Faire, no formal structures (No Structure). Therefore, the European Student-athletes' Motivation towards Sports and Academics Questionnaire (SAMSAQ-EU) was administered to 524 European student-athletes. Exploratory Factor Analysis, and Confirmatory Factor Analysis were applied to test the factor structure, and the reliability and validity of the SAMSAQ-EU, respectively. A multivariate approach was applied to verify subgroup effects (P ? 0.05) according to gender (i.e., female and male), age (i.e., ?24 years, >24 years), type of sport (i.e., individual sport and team sport) and competition level (i.e., national and international). Insufficient confirmatory indexes were reported for the whole European student-athlete group, whereas distinct three factor models [i.e., Student Athletic Motivation (SAM); Academic Motivation (AM); Career Athletic Motivation (CAM)] emerged, with acceptable reliability estimates, for State (SAM = 0.82; AM = 0.75; and CAM = 0.75), Federation (SAM = 0.82; AM = 0.66; and CAM = 0.87) and No Structure (SAM = 0.78; AM = 0.74; and CAM = 0.79) subgroups. Differences between subgroups were found only for competition level (P < 0.001) in relation to SAM (P = 0.001) and CAM (P < 0.001). For SAM, the highest and lowest values emerged for Federation (national, 5.1 ± 0.5; international, 5.4 ± 0.5) and State (national, 4.5 ± 0.9; international, 4.8 ± 0.7). The opposite picture emerged for CAM (Federation: national, 3.3 ± 0.7; international, 3.5 ± 0.9; State: national, 5.0 ± 0.8; international, 5.0 ± 0.9). Therefore, despite SAMSAQ-EU demonstrated to be a useful tool, results showed that European student-athletes' motivation for dual career has to be specifically investigated according to social contexts. PMID:25145585

Lupo, Corrado; Guidotti, Flavia; Goncalves, Carlos E; Moreira, Liliana; Doupona Topic, Mojca; Bellardini, Helena; Tonkonogi, Michail; Colin, Allen; Capranica, Laura

2015-03-01

299

Injuries to Athletes with Physical Disabilities: Prevention Implications.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While athletes with disabilities may not be injured any more often than other athletes, the types of injuries they sustain are specific to their disabilities and chosen sports. Characteristic injuries are described, and preventive measures are suggested. (Author/MT)

Bloomquist, Lorraine E.

1986-01-01

300

Managing the health of the elite athlete: a new integrated performance health management and coaching model  

PubMed Central

Elite athletes endeavour to train and compete even when ill or injured. Their motivation may be intrinsic or due to coach and team pressures. The sports medicine physician plays an important role to risk-manage the health of the competing athlete in partnership with the coach and other members of the support team. The sports medicine physician needs to strike the right ethical and operational balance between health management and optimising performance. It is necessary to revisit the popular delivery model of sports medicine and science services to elite athletes based on the current reductionist multispecialist system lacking in practice an integrated approach and effective communication. Athlete and coach in isolation or with a member of the multidisciplinary support team, often not qualified or experienced to do so, decide on the utilisation of services and how to apply the recommendations. We propose a new Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model based on the UK Athletics experience in preparation for the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. The Medical and Coaching Teams are managed by qualified and experienced individuals operating in synergy towards a common performance goal, accountable to a Performance Director and ultimately to the Board of Directors. We describe the systems, processes and implementation strategies to assist the athlete, coach and support teams to continuously monitor and manage athlete health and performance. These systems facilitate a balanced approach to training and competing decisions, especially while the athlete is ill or injured. They take into account the best medical advice and athlete preference. This Integrated Performance Health Management and Coaching model underpinned the Track and Field Gold Medal performances at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games. PMID:24620040

Dijkstra, H Paul; Pollock, N; Chakraverty, R; Alonso, J M

2014-01-01

301

Reaffirming the Coach-Athlete Relationship: A Response from Intercollegiate Athletics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reacts to four previous articles on sport psychology and counseling psychology. Welcomes counseling psychology's perspective on the special needs of student-athletes but cautions psychologists that the essence of modern sport is flavored by its economic, competitive, and scientific aspects. Notes need for student-athletes to simplify their lives…

Grant, Christine H. B.; Darley, Charles F.

1993-01-01

302

Feeding Your Child Athlete  

MedlinePLUS

... the right amount and mix of foods to support that higher level of activity, but that mix might not be too different from a normal healthy diet . Eating for sports should be an extension of healthy eating for life. Nutritional Needs of Young Athletes Kids who eat healthy, ...

303

Drug abuse in athletes.  

PubMed

Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with "advances" in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. PMID:25187752

Reardon, Claudia L; Creado, Shane

2014-01-01

304

An Athletic Arms Race  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Myles Brand is a person of unquestioned integrity and high principle. As president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), he has been asked to fend off an unruly mob with a switch. In the present environment for collegiate sports, his chances for success are slight, at best. What Brand and the NCAA face today is a very real "arms…

Budig, Gene A.

2007-01-01

305

Drug abuse in athletes  

PubMed Central

Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with “advances” in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. PMID:25187752

Reardon, Claudia L; Creado, Shane

2014-01-01

306

Nutrition and Athletic Performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is the position of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians of Canada, and the American College of Sports Medicine that physical activity, athletic performance, and recovery from exercise are enhanced by optimal nutrition. These organizations recommend appropriate selection of foods and fluids, timing of intake, and supplement choices for optimal health and exercise performance. This updated position paper couples a

2009-01-01

307

Before the New Season Kicks Off, Get a Game Plan to Cut Sports Injuries.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cites statistics on death and injury from high school sports. Offers advice to coaches and athletic directors about safety consciousness, how to assess sports safety programs, and the advantages of employing certified athletic trainers. (MLF)

Zakariya, Sally Banks

1988-01-01

308

How to minimise the health risks to athletes who compete in weight-sensitive sports review and position statement on behalf of the Ad Hoc Research Working Group on Body Composition, Health and Performance, under the auspices of the IOC Medical Commission.  

PubMed

A focus on low body weight and body fat content, combined with regulations in some weight-sensitive sports, are considered risk factors for extreme dieting, eating disorders (EDs) and related health consequences among athletes. At present there are, from a health perspective, no generally accepted optimum values for body weight or percentage of fat mass in different sports and there is no 'gold standard' method for body composition assessment in athletes. On the basis of health considerations as well as performance, medical support teams should know how to approach elite athletes who seek to achieve an unrealistic body composition and how to prevent restrictive eating practices from developing into an ED. In addition, these teams must know when to raise the alarm and how to advice athletes who are affected by extreme dieting or clinical EDs. However, there is no consensus on when athletes struggling with extreme dieting or EDs should be referred for specialist medical treatment or removed from competition. Based on the present review, we conclude that there is a need for (1) sport-specific and gender-specific preventive programmes, (2) criteria for raising alarm and 'does not start' (DNS) for athletes with EDs and (3) modifications to the regulations in some sports. Further, the key areas for research identified include the development of standard methods for body composition assessment in elite athletes; screening measures for EDs among athletes; development and testing of prevention programmes; investigating the short and long-term effects of extreme dieting; and EDs on health and performance. PMID:24115480

Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn; Meyer, Nanna L; Lohman, Timothy G; Ackland, Timothy R; Maughan, Ronald J; Stewart, Arthur D; Müller, Wolfram

2013-11-01

309

Club Sports in Colleges and Universities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report outlines policies to aid administrators of athletic, physical education, and intramural programs as they seek to provide leadership to the club sports movement on their campuses. The report first discusses the recent emergence and popularity of club sports, and explains some advantages of club sports over varsity sports. The next…

Arnold, Jay; And Others

310

Susceptibility for Depression in Current and Retired Student Athletes  

PubMed Central

Background: Depression, a disabling mental disorder, adversely affects work, sleeping and eating habits, and family. Research does not exist on depression among athletes who have recently graduated from college and retired from their sport after exhausting their collegiate eligibility. Hypothesis: Changes in lifestyle and loss of personal identity, which follow college athletics, would put former college athletes at an increased risk for depression. Methods: A survey was sent to former (n = 163) and current (n = 117) college athletes to correlate depression and retirement from athletics. Results: Depression levels were significantly higher (P = 0.03) in current college athletes (16.77%, n = 27) compared with former, graduated college athletes (8.03%, n = 9). Conclusion: Completion of college sports may not increase levels of depression. There is a need for increased awareness, education, screening, and intervention for depression in college athletes. Clinical Relevance: This study suggests that student athletes’ depression levels should be monitored during their participation in college sports. PMID:24427399

Weigand, Sabrina; Cohen, Jared; Merenstein, Daniel

2013-01-01

311

Could Sport Specialization Influence Fitness and Health of Adults with Mental Retardation?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although several studies showed the positive effects of exercise and physical activity on health and well-being for individuals with ID, there is a lack of information about the influence of sport specialization on fitness and health components. Therefore, the aims of this study were to assess: (a) physical fitness of athletes with intellectual…

Guidetti, Laura; Franciosi, Emanuele; Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Baldari, Carlo

2010-01-01

312

INTRAMURALSSpring Team Sports* Registration accepted for teams or "free agent" individuals. $25 registration fee required  

E-print Network

's & Women's) Jan. 13 - Jan. 26 Jan. 27 - Feb. 20 Co-EdVolleyball Feb. 12 - Feb. 23 Feb. 24 - Mar. 29 Indoor Soccer Feb. 12 - Feb. 23 Feb. 24 - Mar. 29 Softball (Men's & Women's) Mar. 19 - Mar. 30 Mar. 31 - Apr. 24-5500 if you have additional questions. Recreational Sports & Fitness 120 Marga Hosaeus Fitness Center 994

Lawrence, Rick L.

313

Individual and relational risk factors for the development of eating disorders in adolescent aesthetic athletes and general adolescents.  

PubMed

This study compared potential risk and protective factors, levels of disordered eating (DE), and their relationship among young aesthetic athletes (elite and non-elite) and controls (N = 725; 62.5 % females; mean age = 15.3, SD = 2.1). The participants completed self-report measures (McKnight Risk Factor Survey-IV, Contour Drawing Rating Scale and Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire). Female elite athletes showed a greater risk of developing eating disorders than non-elite athletes and controls, with no difference between the three groups of males. Multiple group analyses revealed important differences in DE predictors. Although social pressure is the strongest DE predictor in non-elite athletes and controls, in elite athletes, the strongest DE predictor is body image dissatisfaction. Parental influences, rather than self-esteem, are predictors of DE in elite athletes, unlike the other two groups. These results show that the risk and protective factors involved in the development of DE are not universally valid. The results highlight the importance of studying specific characteristics associated with DE in aesthetic athletes. Some implications for ED risk assessment and prevention are discussed. PMID:23943379

Francisco, Rita; Narciso, Isabel; Alarcão, Madalena

2013-12-01

314

Uncommon sports psychology: Consultation using family therapy theory and techniques  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coaches and athletes utilize sports psychology as a part of training and preparation for competition. A linear, individualistic epistemology is generally subscribed to by sports psychologists. Marriage and family therapists, with their systems epistemology, can apply their training to working with athletic teams. This article revisits an innovative approach to working with athletic teams from a systems perspective. It presents

Toni Schindler Zimmerman; Howard Protinsky

1993-01-01

315

Overview of Youth Sports Programs in the United States.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This overview focuses on two out of the six categories of organized youth sports; namely, agency-sponsored and interscholastic athletics. The discussion of the current status and proposed future direction of organized athletics for youth includes seven components of the problem: the role of youth sports in American culture; the role of athletic

Seefeldt, Vern; And Others

316

Elite volunteer athletes of different sport disciplines may have elevated baseline GH levels divorced from unaltered levels of both IGF-I and GH-dependent bone and collagen markers: a study on-the-field.  

PubMed

Seventy-seven Italian eliteathletes(42 M, 35 F, mean age +/- SE: 24.4-0.7 yr, age range: 17-47 yr) of different sport disciplines (sprinters, triathletes, middle-distance runners, road-walkers, cyclists, rowing athletes, skiers, roller hockey players, swimmers) were sampled on-the-field (before a training session) for the determination of basal GH, IGF-I, C-terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) and amino-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP) levels, two GH-dependent peripheral markers of bone and collagen turnover, respectively. Basal GH concentrations were significantly higher (p<0.001) in female (5.8 +/- 1.0 ng/ml) vs male athletes (1.8 +/- 0.5 ng/ml), with a large spread of values in either gender. Mean GH levels of athletes were significantly higher than those recorded in age-matched sedentary controls (females: 2.5 +/- 0.5 ng/ml, p<0.001; males: 0.5 +/- 0.2 ng/ml, p<0.05). Among female athletes, 7/35 had basal GH values higher than the upper limit of control values (>9.5 ng/ml), while among males 7/42 had values higher than the upper limit of male sedentary controls (>3.6 ng/ml). No significant differences in basal GH concentrations were found between females taking oral contraceptives (OC) and those who did not receive this treatment (5.0 +/- 2.1 vs 6.0 +/- 1.2 ng/ml). IGF-I levels (236.4 +/- 7.8 ng/ml) were in the normal range for age in all athletes (except for 1 athlete with slightly increased levels), no significant correlation being found between GH and IGF-I levels (R2=0.0393). Mean ICTP (4.6 +/- 0.2 ng/ml) and PIIINP (4.4-0.1 ng/ml) concentrations of elite athletes were not significantly different from those recorded in age and matched healthy sedentary subjects; 4 athletes showed increased PIIINP levels and 2 had increased ICTP levels. ICTP and PIIINP levels were positively correlated with chronological age (p<0.001), a positive correlation being also found between the two markers (p<0.001). On the contrary, no significant correlation was found between basal GH/IGF-I levels and ICTP/PIIINP levels. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that: 1) elite athletes (particularly females), which have frequently increased basal GH on-the-field, have actually normal IGF-I levels; 2) ICTP and PIIINP levels of athletes are similar to those recorded in healthy sedentary, being significantly higher in younger subjects of both groups; 3) the presence of increased basal GH levels, being associated with normal IGF-I, ICTP and PIIINP levels, is probably the result of a transient GH peak in this study group. Further additional studies are requested to verify the possible use of these peripheral GH-dependent markers for detecting exogenous chronic administration of recombinant GH in athletes. PMID:15279071

Sartorio, A; Marazzi, N; Agosti, F; Faglia, G; Corradini, C; De Palo, E; Cella, S; Rigamonti, A; Muller, E E

2004-05-01

317

Estimation of return-to-sports-time for athletes with stress fracture – an approach combining risk level of fracture site with severity based on imaging  

PubMed Central

Background The aim was to compare the return-to-sports-time (RTST) following stress fractures on the basis of site and severity of injury. This retrospective study was set up at a single institution. Diagnosis was confirmed by an interdisciplinary adjudication panel and images were rated in a blinded-read setting. Methods 52 athletes (female, n?=?30; male, n?=?22; mean age, 22.8?years) with stress fracture (SFX) who had undergone at least one examination, either MRI or bone scintigraphy, were included. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) and/or bone scintigraphy (BS) of SFX were classified as either low- or high-grade SFX, according to existing grading systems. For MRI, high-grade SFX was defined as visibility of a fracture line or bone marrow edema in T1-, T2-weighted and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences, with low-grade SFX showing no fracture line and bone marrow edema only in STIR and/or T2-weighted sequences. In BS images, a mild and poorly defined focal tracer uptake represented a low-grade lesion, whereas an intense and sharply marginated uptake marked a high-grade SFX. In addition, all injuries were categorized by location as high- or low-risk stress fractures. RTST was obtained from the clinical records. All patients were treated according to a non-weight-bearing treatment plan and comprehensive follow-up data was complete until full recovery. Two-sided Wilcoxon’s rank sum test was used for group comparisons. Results High-risk SFX had a mean RTST of 132?days (d) [IQR 64d – 132d] compared to 119d [IQR 50d – 110d] for low-risk sites (p?=?0.19). RTST was significantly longer (p?=?0.01) in high-grade lesions [mean, 143d; IQR 66d – 134d] than in low-grade [mean, 95d; IQR 42d – 94d]. Analysis of high-risk SFX showed no difference in RTST (p?=?0.45) between high- and low-grade [mean, 131d; IQR 72d – 123d vs. mean, 135d; IQR 63d – 132d]. In contrast, the difference was significant for low-risk SFX (p?=?0.005) [low-grade; mean, 61d; IQR 35d – 78d vs. high-grade; mean, 153d; IQR 64d – 164d]. Conclusion For SFX at low-risk sites, the significant difference in RTST between low- and high-grade lesions allows more accurate estimation of RTST by this approach. Both location of the injury and severity determined by imaging should therefore be considered for prediction of RTST. PMID:22866765

2012-01-01

318

Gender verification in competitive sports.  

PubMed

The possibility that men might masquerade as women and be unfair competitors in women's sports is accepted as outrageous by athletes and the public alike. Since the 1930s, media reports have fuelled claims that individuals who once competed as female athletes subsequently appeared to be men. In most of these cases there was probably ambiguity of the external genitalia, possibly as a result of male pseudohermaphroditism. Nonetheless, beginning at the Rome Olympic Games in 1960, the International Amateur Athletics Federation (IAAF) began establishing rules of eligibility for women athletes. Initially, physical examination was used as a method for gender verification, but this plan was widely resented. Thus, sex chromatin testing (buccal smear) was introduced at the Mexico City Olympic Games in 1968. The principle was that genetic females (46,XX) show a single X-chromatic mass, whereas males (46,XY) do not. Unfortunately, sex chromatin analysis fell out of common diagnostic use by geneticists shortly after the International Olympic Committee (IOC) began its implementation for gender verification. The lack of laboratories routinely performing the test aggravated the problem of errors in interpretation by inexperienced workers, yielding false-positive and false-negative results. However, an even greater problem is that there exist phenotypic females with male sex chromatin patterns (e.g. androgen insensitivity, XY gonadal dysgenesis). These individuals have no athletic advantage as a result of their congenital abnormality and reasonably should not be excluded from competition. That is, only the chromosomal (genetic) sex is analysed by sex chromatin testing, not the anatomical or psychosocial status. For all the above reasons sex chromatin testing unfairly excludes many athletes. Although the IOC offered follow-up physical examinations that could have restored eligibility for those 'failing' sex chromatin tests, most affected athletes seemed to prefer to 'retire'. All these problems remain with the current laboratory based gender verification test, polymerase chain reaction based testing of the SRY gene, the main candidate for male sex determination. Thus, this 'advance' in fact still fails to address the fundamental inequities of laboratory based gender verification tests. The IAAF considered the issue in 1991 and 1992, and concluded that gender verification testing was not needed. This was thought to be especially true because of the current use of urine testing to exclude doping: voiding is observed by an official in order to verify that a sample from a given athlete has actually come from his or her urethra. That males could masquerade as females in these circumstances seems extraordinarily unlikely. Screening for gender is no longer undertaken at IAAF competitions. PMID:8272686

Simpson, J L; Ljungqvist, A; de la Chapelle, A; Ferguson-Smith, M A; Genel, M; Carlson, A S; Ehrhardt, A A; Ferris, E

1993-11-01

319

Nutrition for the pediatric athlete.  

PubMed

A paucity of literature exists with regard to research on nutrition for the pediatric athlete. This lack of research makes the development of specific nutritional recommendations for young athletes problematic. This issue is made difficult by the macro- and micronutrient intake required for growth and development in conjunction with that required for sports. Exogenous carbohydrate drinks could be considered for the young athlete engaged in both endurance exercise and high-intensity exercise. Monitoring of the energy intake during resistance training in the pediatric athlete needs to be considered, as there is evidence to suggest that energy deficits may occur. If decrements in exercise performance are noted, then serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentrations should be monitored, as nonanemic iron deficiency is prevalent in the pediatric athlete. The pediatric athlete exercising in the heat is susceptible to voluntary dehydration and evidence exists to suggest that a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink will abolish this phenomenon. PMID:15231224

Unnithan, Viswanath B; Goulopoulou, Styliani

2004-08-01

320

Ethical Issues in Sports Medicine  

PubMed Central

Ethical issues present a challenge for health care professionals working with athletes of sports teams. Health care professionals—including the team physician, the physical therapist, and the athletic trainer—are faced with the challenge of returning an athlete to competition as quickly as possible but as safely as possible. Conflicts of interest arise due to conflicting obligations of the team physician to the athlete and other members of the sports organization, including coaches and the team owner. The multiple stakeholders involved in sports teams challenge the traditional notion of confidentiality and autonomy. The aims of this article are to explicate the ethics of sports medicine, highlight the ethical issues, and provide some strategies and suggestions for ethical decision making. PMID:24179585

Greenfield, Bruce H.; West, Charles Robert

2012-01-01

321

The Miller Lite Report on Women in Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey distributed to a random sample of 7,000 members of the Women's Sports Foundation uncovered many similarities and differences between athletic women and other Americans interested in sports and fitness. Although the sample of athletic women was atypical of women generally, they resemble other Americans in the sports/fitness activities they…

New World Decisions, Ltd., Iselin, NJ.

322

Orientations de la recherche en médecine du sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

Present and future directions in sports medicine are largely developed in the present edition of “Sciences & Sport”. Our aim is to provide some examples and develop some general concepts. Specificity of the research in sports medicine relates to the fact that highly trained athletes show different physiology and physiological responses as compared to non-athletes. Repeated and intensive training result

J.-L. Saumet

2005-01-01

323

Paralympic sport: an emerging area for research and consultancy in sports biomechanics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Paralympic Games are the pinnacle of sport for many athletes with a disability. The overall purpose of this paper is to highlight the role that the field of sports biomechanics specifically (and sports science in general) may play in improving performance in various summer Paralympic sports through research and consultancy. To achieve this broad aim, this review provides some

Justin W. L. Keogh

2011-01-01

324

Sudden Cardiac Death in Athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sudden cardiac death in athletes, although relatively uncommon, is a well-recognized condition generally associated with some congenital abnormalities. It, however, continues to be of vast interest to the public as athletes are seen as a distinct group of individuals who are especially able to tolerate more intense physical activities than the general population. Obviously, intense activities predispose susceptible athletes to

Peem Lorvidhaya; Shoei K. Stephen Huang

2003-01-01

325

Individual prediction regions for multivariate longitudinal data with small samples  

E-print Network

in medicine/doping control to identify abnormal results in an individual. Currently, follow-ups are mostly-up is systematically done with teenagers using their weight and height to detect the beginning of obesity. In sport, like cycling or athletics, anti-doping control authorities try to generalize the use of a biological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

Rationale and Clinical Techniques for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention Among Female Athletes  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present the rationale and detailed techniques for the application of exercises targeted to prevent anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in high-risk female athletes. Background: Female athletes have a 4- to 6-fold increased risk for ACL injury compared with their male counterparts playing at similar levels in the same sports. The increased ACL injury risk coupled with greater sports participation by young women over the last 30 years (9-fold increase in high school and 5-fold increase in collegiate sports) has generated public awareness and fueled several sex-related mechanistic and interventional investigations. These investigations provide the groundwork for the development of neuromuscular training aimed at targeting identified neuromuscular imbalances to decrease ACL injury risk. Description: After the onset of puberty, female athletes may not have a neuromuscular spurt to match their similar, rapid increase in growth and development. The lack of a natural neuromuscular adaptation may facilitate the development of neuromuscular imbalances that increase the risk for ACL injury. Dynamic neuromuscular analysis training provides the methodologic approach for identifying high-risk individuals and the basis of using interventions targeted to their specific needs. Clinical Advantages: Dynamic neuromuscular training applied to the high-risk population may decrease ACL injury risk and help more female athletes enjoy the benefits of sports participation without the long-term disabilities associated with injury. PMID:15592608

Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Hewett, Timothy E

2004-01-01

327

Wednesday, January 04, 2012 4:00 PM 6:00 PM Recreational Sports Sport Clubs -Men's Soccer South Logan Field  

E-print Network

Wednesday, January 04, 2012 4:00 PM 6:00 PM Recreational Sports Sport Clubs - Men's Soccer South, 2012 3:00 PM 6:00 PM Recreational Sports Sport Clubs - Men's & Women's Rugby South Logan Field 4:30 PM Recreational Sports Sport Clubs - Ultimate South Logan Field 4:30 PM 6:30 PM Athletics SU Softball Practice

Carter, John

328

Medical Malpractice and the Sports Medicine Clinician  

PubMed Central

More individuals are participating in athletics today than ever before. Physicians treating athletes confront unique diagnostic and treatment challenges and an increased risk of legal liability. The key areas regarding liability are preparticipation examinations, determination of eligibility, evaluation of significant on-field injuries, and information disclosure. The issues surrounding preparticipation physicals and determination of eligibility are closely linked. Physicians must be prepared to seek guidance from specialists, particularly when there are cardiac, spinal, or neurologic issues. Appropriate on-field evaluation of potential concussions, spinal injuries, and heat stroke are key areas of concern for the physician. Privacy issues have become more complex in the age of federal regulation. Physicians and all athletic staff should be aware of privacy laws and ensure proper consent documentation is obtained from all athletes or their parents. All athletic programs should develop a plan that details roles and procedures to be followed in a medical emergency. Sports caregivers must take affirmative steps that better protect their patients from harm and physicians from legal liability. PMID:18989733

White, Richard A.

2008-01-01

329

The World of Sports Medicine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Soon, the best athletes in the world will face each other at the Summer Olympics in Beijing. Many of them will sustain injuries, or seek to prevent them, and will be thankful that among their entourages are some of the best sports medicine professionals in the world. When an athlete collapses from fatigue, or something else, there will be a group…

Emeagwali, N. Susan

2008-01-01

330

Sport, how people choose it: A network analysis approach.  

PubMed

Abstract In order to investigate the behaviour of athletes in choosing sports, we analyse data from part of the We-Sport(®) database, a vertical social network that links athletes through sports. In particular, we explore connections between people sharing common sports and the role of age and gender by applying "network science" approaches and methods. The results show a disassortative tendency of athletes in choosing sports, a negative correlation between age and number of chosen sports and a positive correlation between age of connected athletes. Some interesting patterns of connection between age classes are depicted. In addition, we propose a method to classify sports, based on the analyses of the behaviour of people practising them. Thanks to this brand new classifications, we highlight the links of class of sports and their unexpected features. We emphasise some gender dependency affinity in choosing sport classes. PMID:25257354

Ferreri, Luca; Ivaldi, Marco; Daolio, Fabio; Giacobini, Mario; Rainoldi, Alberto; Tomassini, Marco

2014-09-26

331

An Investigation of Scholar-Baller and Non Scholar-Baller Division I Football Student-Athletes' Academic, Athletic, Intrinsic Motivation and Athletic Identity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As less than 3% of student-athletes go on to play sport professionally, it is important that they are prepared for careers outside of athletics (Susanj & Stewart, 2005). Many football student-athletes have low grade point averages and graduation rates. Universities incorporate academic motivational programs to help combat low academic performance.…

Rasmussen, Janet M.

2009-01-01

332

Functional plyometric exercises for the throwing athlete.  

PubMed

In this article we provide athletic health care professionals with a variety of functional strengthening exercises to use in improving the muscular strength of the throwing athlete's shoulder. Upper extremity functional plyometric exercise in sport-specific patterns can be an important component of a throwing athlete's rehabilitation. We discuss several plyometric exercises, using the Inertial Exercise System, the Plyo-ball, and the Theraband. Proper use of these exercises can facilitate a safe and progressive rehabilitation program for the injured, throwing athlete. After the athlete has successfully completed the functional plyometric exercises, a throwing progression can be initiated. PMID:16558304

Pezzullo, D J; Karas, S; Irrgang, J J

1995-03-01

333

Faculty Perceptions of Division I Male Student-Athletes: The Relationship between Student-Athlete Contact, Athletic Department Involvement, and Perceptions of Intercollegiate Athletics  

E-print Network

It has been widely recognized that student-athletes, especially in the sports of men's basketball and football, endure stereotyping (Bowen & Levin, 2003; Simons, Bosworth, Fujita, & Jensen, 2007, Baucom & Lantz, 2001). Although stereotypes about...

Tovar, Elizabeth Anne

2011-12-31

334

Quantifying athlete self-talk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two studies were conducted. The aims of Study 1 were (a) to generate quantitative data on the content of athletes' self-talk and (b) to examine differences in the use of self-talk in general as well as the functions of self-talk in practice and competition settings. Differences in self-talk between the sexes, sport types and skill levels were also assessed. Athletes

James Hardy; Craig R Hall; Lew Hardy

2005-01-01

335

Studies of Television and Youth Sports: Laboratory/Field Research on the Effects of Pro-Social and Anti-Social TV Models on Children/Youth in Sport/Athletics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigates the question of whether or not exposure to televised professional sports affects the social behavior of young people who themselves actively engage in those sports. Lacrosse, hockey, baseball were monitored on television, with students questioned about the impact the behavior of the players (pro-social and anti-social) has…

Moriarty, Dick; And Others

336

Athletics for All: Providing Opportunities for Students of All Abilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The glory days of high school sports are no longer reserved for dream team athletes, as athletic directors are increasingly opening up sports to all students, regardless of ability, and seeing winning results on the field and off. This push is reflected in the most recent National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) survey, which…

Whitmer, Regina

2013-01-01

337

Masters Athletes: An Analysis of Running, Swimming and Cycling Performance by Age and Gender  

Microsoft Academic Search

Given the growth in sport participation by masters athletes, the purposes of this paper are to: (1) describe record-level performances of masters athletes in running, swimming and cycling; (2) delineate the age- and gender-related performance decline that occurs in masters athletes in these sports; (3) explain how physio- logical, sociological and psychological factors affect masters level performance; and (4) provide

Lynda B. Ransdell; Jamie Vener; Jennifer Huberty

2009-01-01

338

Cooling athletes with a spinal cord injury.  

PubMed

Cooling strategies that help prevent a reduction in exercise capacity whilst exercising in the heat have received considerable research interest over the past 3 decades, especially in the lead up to a relatively hot Olympic and Paralympic Games. Progressing into the next Olympic/Paralympic cycle, the host, Rio de Janeiro, could again present an environmental challenge for competing athletes. Despite the interest and vast array of research into cooling strategies for the able-bodied athlete, less is known regarding the application of these cooling strategies in the thermoregulatory impaired spinal cord injured (SCI) athletic population. Individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) have a reduced afferent input to the thermoregulatory centre and a loss of both sweating capacity and vasomotor control below the level of the spinal cord lesion. The magnitude of this thermoregulatory impairment is proportional to the level of the lesion. For instance, individuals with high-level lesions (tetraplegia) are at a greater risk of heat illness than individuals with lower-level lesions (paraplegia) at a given exercise intensity. Therefore, cooling strategies may be highly beneficial in this population group, even in moderate ambient conditions (~21 °C). This review was undertaken to examine the scientific literature that addresses the application of cooling strategies in individuals with an SCI. Each method is discussed in regards to the practical issues associated with the method and the potential underlying mechanism. For instance, site-specific cooling would be more suitable for an athlete with an SCI than whole body water immersion, due to the practical difficulties of administering this method in this population group. From the studies reviewed, wearing an ice vest during intermittent sprint exercise has been shown to decrease thermal strain and improve performance. These garments have also been shown to be effective during exercise in the able-bodied. Drawing on additional findings from the able-bodied literature, the combination of methods used prior to and during exercise and/or during rest periods/half-time may increase the effectiveness of a strategy. However, due to the paucity of research involving athletes with an SCI, it is difficult to establish an optimal cooling strategy. Future studies are needed to ensure that research outcomes can be translated into meaningful performance enhancements by investigating cooling strategies under the constraints of actual competition. Cooling strategies that meet the demands of intermittent wheelchair sports need to be identified, with particular attention to the logistics of the sport. PMID:25119157

Griggs, Katy E; Price, Michael J; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L

2015-01-01

339

Sports Hernia Treatment  

PubMed Central

Background: The minimal repair technique for sports hernias repairs only the weak area of the posterior abdominal wall along with decompressing the genitofemoral nerve. This technique has been shown to return athletes to competition rapidly. This study compares the clinical outcomes of the minimal repair technique with the traditional modified Bassini repair. Hypothesis: Athletes undergoing the minimal repair technique for a sports hernia would return to play more rapidly compared with athletes undergoing the traditional modified Bassini repair. Methods: A retrospective study of 28 patients who underwent sports hernia repair at the authors’ institution was performed. Fourteen patients underwent the modified Bassini repair, and a second group of 14 patients underwent the minimal repair technique. The 2 groups were compared with respect to time to return to sport, return to original level of competition, and clinical outcomes. Results: Patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at a median of 5.6 weeks (range, 4-8 weeks), which was significantly faster compared with the modified Bassini repair group, with a median return of 25.8 weeks (range, 4-112 weeks; P = 0.002). Thirteen of 14 patients in the minimal repair group returned to sports at their previous level, while 9 of 14 patients in the Bassini group were able to return to their previous level of sport (P = 0.01). Two patients in each group had recurrent groin pain. One patient in the minimal repair group underwent revision hernia surgery for recurrent pain, while 1 patient in the Bassini group underwent hip arthroscopy for symptomatic hip pain. Conclusion: The minimal repair technique allows athletes with sports hernias to return to play faster than patients treated with the modified Bassini. PMID:24427419

Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

2013-01-01

340

Readings in Sports Psychology 2.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this collection of papers the psychology of human behavior and performance is examined as it is revealed by the action and interaction of athletes, coaches, and physical education teachers actively engaged in competitive and noncompetitive sports. The following subjects are discussed: (1) competitive sport and personality development; (2)…

Whiting, H. T. A., Ed.

341

Coaches, Athletes and Nutrition: Food for Thought  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Athletes often adjust their dietary routines to enhance sport performance, but problems can arise when athletes turn for guidance to coaches who may not be trained in the field of nutrition, or who, themselves, are poor examples when it comes to healthy eating habits. There are many myths regarding nutrition that are spread throughout the world of…

Docheff, Dennis; Mandali, Swarna; Conn, James

2005-01-01

342

Practical issues in nutrition for athletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many athletes do not achieve sound nutritional practices to optimize their sports performance. Factors include poor nutrition knowledge, dietary extremism, poor practical skills in choosing or preparing meals, and reduced access to food due to a busy lifestyle and frequent travel. Education in nutrition for the athlete needs to be practical, so as to address eating strategies and key food

Louise Burke

1995-01-01

343

Faculty Perceptions of Division I Male Student-Athletes: The Relationship between Student-Athlete Contact, Athletic Department Involvement, and Perceptions of Intercollegiate Athletics  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It has been widely recognized that student-athletes, especially in the sports of men's basketball and football, endure stereotyping (Bowen & Levin, 2003; Simons, Bosworth, Fujita, & Jensen, 2007, Baucom & Lantz, 2001). Although stereotypes about male basketball and football student-athletes academic behaviors are expressed by many sectors of the…

Tovar, Elizabeth A.

2011-01-01

344

Should College Athletes Be Paid to Play?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Is playing big-time college sports an extracurricular activity or a job? Two law professors at Michigan State University, Robert and Amy McCormick, think it is definitely a job for football and basketball players on athletic scholarships at Division I schools. The married couple has added a new dimension to the long debate over paying athletes by…

Cooper, Kenneth J.

2011-01-01

345

Nutritional supplements usage by Portuguese athletes.  

PubMed

In this study, we determined the prevalence of nutritional supplements (NS) usage, the type of supplements used, the reasons for usage, and the source of nutritional advice among Portuguese athletes. Two hundred ninety-two athletes (68 % male, 12 - 37 years old) from 13 national sports federations completed a questionnaire that sought information on socio-demographics, sports data, and NS usage. Most athletes (66 %) consumed NS, with a median consumption of 4 supplements per athlete. The most popular supplements included multivitamins/minerals (67 %), sport drinks (62 %), and magnesium (53 %). Significant differences for the type of NS consumed were found between gender and age groups and the number of weekly training hours. Most athletes used NS to accelerate recovery (63 %), improve sports performance (62 %), and have more energy/reduce fatigue (60 %). Athletes sought advice on supplementation mainly from physicians (56 %) and coaches (46 %). Age and gender were found to influence reasons for use and the source of information. Reasons for NS usage were supported scientifically in some cases (e. g., muscle gain upon protein supplementation), but others did not have a scientific basis (e. g., use of glutamine and magnesium). Given the high percentage of NS users, there is an urgent need to provide athletes with education and access to scientific and unbiased information, so that athletes can make assertive and rational choices about the utilization of these products. PMID:24220164

Sousa, Mónica; Fernandes, Maria João; Moreira, Pedro; Teixeira, Vítor Hugo

2013-01-01

346

Athletics Participation Prevents Many Players from Choosing Majors They Want  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One in five college athletes say their sports participation has prevented them from choosing the major they wanted, according to survey results released at the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA's) 2007 annual convention. The survey also found that time demands on athletes had increased in the past two decades, with many players…

Wolverton, Brad

2007-01-01

347

Role conflict and the female athlete: Preoccupations with little grounding  

Microsoft Academic Search

The potential role conflict which girls and women experience as a result of their athletic participation has been a subject of scholarly inquiry by sport social scientists for some time. Early writers discussed the types of social and psychological pressures exerted on female athletes as societal images, definitions, and expectations of being an athlete collided with those of being a

Maria T. Allison

1991-01-01

348

For College Athletes, Recruiting Is a Fair (but Flawed) Game  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Despite all the alarm that recruiting in college sports has spun out of control, for many athletes the process was neither as intrusive, nor as lavish, as its critics have warned, according to a "Chronicle" survey of hundreds of current Division I athletes. But the accelerated pace of recruiting, and the demands it placed on athletes during their…

Sander, Libby

2008-01-01

349

Interscholastic Sports: A Character-Building Privilege  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While interscholastic sports help young athletes enhance sport skills, physical fitness, self-discipline, sportsmanship, teamwork, time-management skills, self-confidence, and mental toughness, their benefits actually surpass even these. Interscholastic sports also promote life skills and lessons and enhance academic performance. The National…

Lumpkin, Angela; Stokowski, Sarah

2011-01-01

350

Sports and Materials Science Course outline  

E-print Network

Sports and Materials Science CF62 Course outline School of Metallurgy and Materials Success in sport is the result of a winning combination of an athlete at the peak of performance using state-of-the-art sports equipment. Our degree programme combines the study of human performance with materials science

Birmingham, University of

351

Cortical Microstructure and Estimated Bone Strength in Young Amenorrheic Athletes, Eumenorrheic Athletes and Non-Athletes  

PubMed Central

CONTEXT Lower bone density in young amenorrheic athletes (AA) compared to eumenorrheic athletes (EA) and non-athletes may increase fracture risk during a critical time of bone accrual. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a unique tool to estimate bone strength in vivo, and the contribution of cortical microstructure to bone strength in young athletes is not well understood. OBJECTIVE We hypothesized that FEA-estimated stiffness and failure load are impaired in AA at the distal radius and tibia compared to EA and non-athletes despite weight-bearing exercise. DESIGN AND SETTING Cross-sectional study; Clinical Research Center SUBJECTS 34 female endurance athletes involved in weight-bearing sports (17 AA, 17 EA) and 16 non-athletes (14-21y) of comparable age, maturity and BMI OUTCOME MEASURES We used HR-pQCT images to assess cortical microarchitecture and FEA to estimate bone stiffness and failure load. RESULTS Cortical perimeter, porosity and trabecular area at the weight-bearing tibia were greater in both groups of athletes than non-athletes, whereas the ratio (%) of cortical to total area was lowest in AA. Despite greater cortical porosity in EA, estimated tibial stiffness and failure load was higher than in non-athletes. However, this advantage was lost in AA. At the non-weight-bearing radius, failure load and stiffness were lower in AA than non-athletes. After controlling for lean mass and menarchal age, athletic status accounted for 5-9% of the variability in stiffness and failure load, menarchal age for 8-23%, and lean mass for 12-37%. CONCLUSION AA have lower FEA-estimated bone strength at the distal radius than non-athletes, and lose the advantage of weight-bearing exercise seen in EA at the distal tibia. PMID:22878154

Ackerman, Kathryn E.; Putman, Melissa; Guereca, Gabriela; Taylor, Alexander P.; Pierce, Lisa; Herzog, David B.; Klibanski, Anne; Bouxsein, Mary; Misra, Madhusmita

2012-01-01

352

Athletic Overuse Injuries in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 30-month prospective follow-up study of children's overuse injuries at an outpatient sports clinic was carried out to determine the number, profile, and specific features of these injuries compared with those of young adults. During this period 74 athletically active boys (?15 years), 83 girls, 255 men (21-30 years), and 77 women visited the station because of an overuse sports

Pekka Kannus; Seppo Niittymäki; Markku Järvinen

1988-01-01

353

Articular Cartilage Changes in Maturing Athletes  

PubMed Central

Context: Articular cartilage has a unique functional architecture capable of providing a lifetime of pain-free joint motion. This tissue, however, undergoes substantial age-related physiologic, mechanical, biochemical, and functional changes that reduce its ability to overcome the effects of mechanical stress and injury. Many factors affect joint function in the maturing athlete—from chondrocyte survival and metabolism to structural composition and genetic/epigenetic factors governing cartilage and synovium. An evaluation of age-related changes for joint homeostasis and risk for osteoarthritis is important to the development of new strategies to rejuvenate aging joints. Objective: This review summarizes the current literature on the biochemical, cellular, and physiologic changes occurring in aging articular cartilage. Data Sources: PubMed (1969-2013) and published books in sports health, cartilage biology, and aging. Study Selection: Keywords included aging, athlete, articular cartilage, epigenetics, and functional performance with age. Study Design: Systematic review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Data Extraction: To be included, research questions addressed the effect of age-related changes on performance, articular cartilage biology, molecular mechanism, and morphology. Results: The mature athlete faces challenges in maintaining cartilage health and joint function due to age-related changes to articular cartilage biology, morphology, and physiology. These changes include chondrocyte loss and a decline in metabolic response, alterations to matrix and synovial tissue composition, and dysregulation of reparative responses. Conclusion: Although physical decline has been regarded as a normal part of aging, many individuals maintain overall fitness and enjoy targeted improvement to their athletic capacity throughout life. Healthy articular cartilage and joints are needed to maintain athletic performance and general activities. Genetic and potentially reversible epigenetic factors influence cartilage physiology and its response to mechanical and injurious stimuli. Improved understandings of the physical and molecular changes to articular cartilage with aging are important to develop successful strategies for joint rejuvenation. PMID:24427438

Luria, Ayala; Chu, Constance R.

2014-01-01

354

Treatment Options for Patellofemoral Instability in Sports Traumatology  

PubMed Central

Patellofemoral instability not only involves lateral patellar dislocation, patellar mal-tracking or subluxation but can also cause a limiting disability for sports activities. Its underlying causes are known as morphological anomalies of the patellofemoral joint or the mechanical axis, femorotibial malrotation, variants of the knee extensor apparatus, and ligamentous insufficiencies often accompanied by poor proprioception. Athletes with such predisposing factors are either suffering from unspecific anterior knee pain or from slightly traumatic or recurrent lateral patellar dislocation Treatment options of patellar instability are vast, and need to be tailored individually depending on the athlete’s history, age, complaints and physical demands. Different conservative and surgical treatment options are reviewed and discussed, especially limited expectations after surgery. PMID:24191183

M. Tscholl, Philippe; P. Koch, Peter; F. Fucentese, Sandro

2013-01-01

355

Mitochondrial DNA variation is associated with elite athletic status in the Polish population.  

PubMed

There is mounting evidence that genetic factors located in mitochondrial and nuclear genomes influence sport performance. Certain mitochondrial haplogroups and polymorphisms were associated with the status of elite athlete, especially in endurance performance. The aim of our study was to assess whether selected mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA variants are associated with elite athlete performance in a group of 395 elite Polish athletes (213 endurance athletes and 182 power athletes) and 413 sedentary controls. Our major finding was that the mtDNA haplogroup H and HV cluster influence endurance performance at the Olympic/World Class level of performance (P = 0.018 and P = 0.0185, respectively). We showed that two polymorphisms located in the mtDNA control region were associated with achieving the elite performance level either in the total athlete's group as compared with controls (m.16362C, 3.8% vs 9.2%, respectively, P = 0.0025, odds ratio = 0.39, 95% confidence interval: 0.21-0.72), or in the endurance athletes as compared with controls (m.16080G, 2.35% vs 0%, respectively, P = 0.004). Our results indicate that mtDNA variability affects the endurance capacity rather than the power one. We also propose that mtDNA haplogroups and subhaplogroups, as well as individual mtDNA polymorphisms favoring endurance performance, could be population-specific, reflecting complex cross-talk between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. PMID:23163620

Maruszak, A; Adamczyk, J G; Siewierski, M; Soza?ski, H; Gajewski, A; ?ekanowski, C

2014-04-01

356

Injuries and medical issues in synchronized Olympic sports.  

PubMed

Spectators of the Olympic Games can enjoy a wide variety of sports, including strength, team, timed, endurance, and artistic sports. In the Olympic program, there are two synchronized events: synchronized diving and synchronized swimming. The precision of the synchronization of the athlete's movements and skills is an added feature of entertainment. Synchronized athletes have additional training requirements to perfect the synchronization of their skills. The physical demands on the athlete from the repetition of training required for the perfection of synchronization result in injuries unique to these sports. Although both traumatic and overuse injuries occur, overuse injuries are more common. As these disciplines are artistic, judged sports, these athletes also are susceptible to eating disorders and the female athlete triad. This article reviews the training regimen of these athletes and outlines the injuries and health concerns that are common in the synchronized sports. PMID:19741353

Mountjoy, Margo

2009-01-01

357

Coach-Athlete Sexual Relationships: If No Means No Does Yes Mean Yes?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Coach-athlete romantic relationships and consensual sexual relations are commonly accepted among coaches and athletes, although a growing number of sport organisations discourage or prohibit such relationships. In research, coach-athlete sexual relationships are lumped together with sexual abuse, suggested to harm athletes' well-being,…

Johansson, Susanne

2013-01-01

358

Marketing Scholastic Sports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This year, Albuquerque Public Schools plan to generate over $400,000 in cash pledges and exceed $300,000 in in-kind contributions for an ongoing campaign to support its athletic programs. Marketing strategies will involve foundations, scoreboard sponsors, award recognition programs, broadcast rights, special events and promotions, and sports

Montano, Joey

1998-01-01

359

Caffeine and sports performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Athletes are among the groups of people who are interested in the effects of caffeine on endurance and exercise capacity. Although many studies have investigated the effect of caffeine ingestion on exercise, not all are suited to draw conclusions regarding caffeine and sports performance. Characteristics of studies that can better explore the issues of ath- letes include the use of

Louise M. Burke

2008-01-01

360

First Aid for Acute Sports Injuries  

PubMed Central

This article deals with management of acute sports injuries on the field or on the ice and in the dressing room or in the arena's first-aid room. Its most vital message is “Be prepared”. A team approach and suitable ambulance and hospital back-up are mandatory. Individual management of a specific acute injury should be approached with a practice plan. Collars, splints, back board, doctor's bag, ambu bag, suture tray and emergency medications should be at hand. Care must be taken that no long-term harm befalls the player. The attending physician must be knowledgeable about preventive equipment and immediate institution of rehabilitation procedures, and must try to inform the coach or trainer and parent as to when the athlete can safely return to play. It is important that the athlete not return to play until he/she is 100% fit. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21263977

Bull, R.C.

1987-01-01

361

Eating disorders in female athletes: use of screening tools.  

PubMed

Screening female athletes for eating disorders is not performed commonly even though the American College of Sports Medicine, National Athletic Trainer Association, and International Olympic Committee have guidelines recommending screening. Eating disorders are more prevalent in the female athlete population than in the general population and carry short-term and long-term consequences that can affect sport performance. There are several screening tools available that have been studied in the general population and fewer tools that were validated specifically in female athletes. Female athletes with eating disorder pathology often have different factors and environmental pressures contributing to their pathology that can be identified best with an athlete-specific screening tool. We will discuss various screening tools available and the evidence for each one. Screening for eating disorders in all female athletes is an important part of the preparticipation examination and should be done using a tool specifically validated for the female athlete. PMID:25014386

Knapp, Jessica; Aerni, Giselle; Anderson, Jeffrey

2014-01-01

362

Therapeutic drugs. What to avoid with athletes.  

PubMed

Sports medicine is a reflection of the type and quality of medicine practiced in the community in general. In turn, the practice of medicine is a reflection of society, its cultural biases and mores. The use of medication in the treatment of athletes requires special consideration on the part of the physician so that the athlete is not put in a compromising condition or in jeopardy of disqualification. Periodic familiarity with the updated lists of banned substances, knowledge of the requisites of the particular sport, and most importantly, knowledge of the athletes themselves will help minimize medication-related problems. PMID:9580839

Henderson, J M

1998-04-01

363

CDC's Approach to Educating Coaches about Sports-Related Concussion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Sports-related concussions can happen to any athlete in any sport. Each year in the United States, an estimated 1.6-3.8 million sports and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occur, most of which can be classified as concussions. To help coaches prevent, recognize, and better manage sports-related concussions, the Centers for…

Mitchko, Jane; Huitric, Michele; Sarmiento, Kelly; Hayes, Gail; Pruzan, Marcia; Sawyer, Richard

2007-01-01

364

The Council of Europe's Work on Sport in 1994.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains documents from the official work of the Council on Europe and some of its committees on issues in sport, particularly spectator violence at sporting events, drug use among athletes, and sport and education policy. The first main section contains documents on the establishment of sporting event policies. The first of two…

Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France).

365

Sport & Fitness Management: Career Strategies and Professional Content.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of sport management. An introductory chapter gives the definition and direction of sport and fitness management. Part 1 describes sport and fitness management careers. The 12 chapters deal with the professional options: intercollegiate athletics, professional sport, facility…

Parks, Janet B., Ed.; Zanger, Beverly R. K., Ed.

366

Head injuries in sport.  

PubMed Central

Injuries to the head and neck are the most frequent catastrophic sports injury, and head injuries are the most common direct athletic cause of death. Although direct compressive forces may injure the brain, neural tissue is particularly susceptible to injury from shearing stresses, which are most likely to occur when rotational forces are applied to the head. The most common athletic head injury is concussion, which may very widely in severity. Intracranial haemorrhage is the leading cause of head injury death in sports, making rapid initial assessment and appropriate follow up mandatory after a head injury. Diffuse cerebral swelling is another serious condition that may be found in the child or adolescent athlete, and the second impact syndrome is a major concern in adult athletes. Many head injuries in athletes are the result of improper playing techniques and can be reduced by teaching proper skills and enforcing safety promoting rules. Improved conditioning (particularly of the neck), protective headgear, and careful medical supervision of athletes will also minimise this type of injury. PMID:9015588

Cantu, R C

1996-01-01

367

31 CFR 515.567 - Public performances, clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions. 515.567 Section...clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions. (a) Amateur...semi-professional international sports federation competitions . Specific licenses,...

2012-07-01

368

31 CFR 515.567 - Public performances, clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions. 515.567 Section...clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions. (a) Amateur...semi-professional international sports federation competitions . Specific licenses,...

2011-07-01

369

31 CFR 515.567 - Public performances, clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions. 515.567 Section...clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions. (a) Amateur...semi-professional international sports federation competitions. Specific licenses,...

2014-07-01

370

31 CFR 515.567 - Public performances, clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions. 515.567 Section...clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions. (a) Amateur...semi-professional international sports federation competitions . Specific licenses,...

2013-07-01

371

Evaluation of the Relationship between Nutrition Knowledge and Disordered Eating Risk in Female Collegiate Athletes.  

E-print Network

??Involvement in collegiate sports among female athletes is at an all-time high with approximately 198,000 currently participating, (National Collegiate Athletic Association, 2012). With this increase… (more)

Miracle, Amy L.

2013-01-01

372

Psychological considerations for women in sports.  

PubMed

In this article, we have tried to provide a context in which to understand the complexities of the psychological experience of being female and being an athlete. To this end, we have included general information about the socialization process, as well as a more detailed discussion of sports socialization and the impact of external influences (such as the media and role models) on the activities of young women. Information about the psychological characteristics of women athletes was provided as were brief descriptions of a number of issues common to the experience of athletes in general and the female athlete in particular. This is an exciting time for women in sports; laws are changing, opportunities have become available, and women are discovering their athletic potential. The women athlete also has choices that were not available to previous generations. It is a time of discovery as we learn what the female athlete is capable of accomplishing. "We" includes all of us, as coaches, parents, friends, the media, treating professionals, fans, and young athletes themselves. In some ways, what we learn about women athletes will be similar to what is expected in male athletics; however, the female athlete will bring a whole new set of attributes and stylistic differences to sport. It will be important not to limit her with our expectations; rather, we must encourage her to excel to her fullest capabilities. PMID:8013034

Barnett, N P; Wright, P

1994-04-01

373

The Relationship Between Imagery Type and Collective Efficacy in Elite and Non Elite Athletes  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the relationship between imagery function and individual perceptions of collective efficacy as a function of skill level. Elite (n = 70) and non elite (n = 71) athletes from a number of interactive team sports completed the Sport Imagery Questionnaire (SIQ) and the Collective Efficacy Inventory (CEI). Multiple hierarchical regression analysis was then used to examine which SIQ sub-scales predicted individual perceptions of collective efficacy. For the elite sample, Motivational General-Mastery (MG-M) imagery accounted for approximately 17% of the variance in collective efficacy scores. No significant predictions were observed in the non elite sample. The findings suggest MG-M imagery as a potential technique to improve levels of collective efficacy although competitive level may moderate the effectiveness of such interventions. Key pointsAs imagery is an individual intervention, an examination of individual perceptions of collective efficacy was most appropriate.Elite athletes who use more MG-M imagery also have higher individual perceptions of collective efficacy.For non-elite athletes, none of the imagery functions tested predicted individual perceptions of collective efficacy.Performance accomplishments provided by MG-M imagery may increase individual perceptions of collective efficacy.Future research should investigate further the effects of imagery intervention programmes on collective efficacy beliefs. PMID:24149327

Shearer, David A.; Thomson, Rob; Mellalieu, Stephen D.; Shearer, Catherine R

2007-01-01

374

Jet Lag in Athletes  

PubMed Central

Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

2012-01-01

375

Mortality and longevity of elite athletes.  

PubMed

The health benefits of leisure-time physical activity are well known, however the effects of engaging in competitive sports on health are uncertain. This literature review examines mortality and longevity of elite athletes and attempts to understand the association between long-term vigorous exercise training and survival rates. Fourteen articles of epidemiological studies were identified and classified by type of sport. Life expectancy, standardised mortality ratio, standardised proportionate mortality ratio, mortality rate, and mortality odds ratio for all causes of death were used to analyse mortality and longevity of elite athletes. It appears that elite endurance (aerobic) athletes and mixed-sports (aerobic and anaerobic) athletes survive longer than the general population, as indicated by lower mortality and higher longevity. Lower cardiovascular disease mortality is likely the primary reason for their better survival rates. On the other hand, there are inconsistent results among studies of power (anaerobic) athletes. When elite athletes engaging in various sports are analysed together, their mortality is lower than that of the general population. In conclusion, long-term vigorous exercise training is associated with increased survival rates of specific groups of athletes. PMID:19574095

Teramoto, Masaru; Bungum, Timothy J

2010-07-01

376

THROWING INJURIES IN THE ADOLESCENT ATHLETE  

PubMed Central

Introduction: Adolescents ranging in age from 11–15 (early?mid adolescence) comprise the largest percentage of baseball and softball athletes in the United States. Shoulder and elbow injuries are commonly experienced by these athletes with baseball pitchers and softball position players most likely to be injured. Common Injuries: Physeal injury often termed “Little League” shoulder or elbow is common and should be differentiated from soft tissue injuries such as biceps, rotator cuff, or UCL injuries. Regardless of diagnosis, rehabilitation of these athletes’ shoulder and elbow injuries provide a unique challenge given their rapidly changing physical status. Treatment: Common impairments include alterations in shoulder range of motion, decreased muscle performance, and poor neuromuscular control of the scapula, core, and lower extremity. A criterion based, progressive rehabilitation program is presented. Discharge from formal rehabilitation should occur only when the athlete has demonstrated a resolution of symptoms, acceptable ROM, muscle performance, and neuromuscular control while progressing through a symptom free return to sport. Prevention of Reinjury: Reintegration into the desired level of sport participation should be guided by the sports medicine professional with a focus on long?term durability in sport performance as well as injury prevention. A prevention program which includes parent, coach, and athlete education, regular screening to identify those athletes at the highest risk, and monitoring athletes for the development of risk factors or warning signs of injury over the course of participation is indicated. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24175142

Thigpen, Chuck

2013-01-01

377

Athlete's Foot  

MedlinePLUS

Athlete's foot is a common infection caused by a fungus. It most often affects the space between ... scaly skin between your toes. You can get athlete's foot from damp surfaces, such as showers, swimming ...

378

Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and…

Fitzgerald, Hayley

2012-01-01

379

Self Hypnosis for Elite Athletes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A summary of the use of hypnosis in sport (Morgan 1980) has suggested that the evidence in this area is equivocal, particularly in strength, endurance, and psychomotor tasks. However, some experiments have demonstrated the potential use of hypnosis. This paper presents examples of two elite Australian athletes who achieve success using hypnosis or…

Davey, Colin P.

380

Overview of sports vision  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sports vision encompasses the visual assessment and provision of sports-specific visual performance enhancement and ocular protection for athletes of all ages, genders and levels of participation. In recent years, sports vision has been identified as one of the key performance indicators in sport. It is built on four main cornerstones: corrective eyewear, protective eyewear, visual skills enhancement and performance enhancement. Although clinically well established in the US, it is still a relatively new area of optometric specialisation elsewhere in the world and is gaining increasing popularity with eyecare practitioners and researchers. This research is often multi-disciplinary and involves input from a variety of subject disciplines, mainly those of optometry, medicine, physiology, psychology, physics, chemistry, computer science and engineering. Collaborative research projects are currently underway between staff of the Schools of Physics and Computing (DIT) and the Academy of Sports Vision (RAU).

Moore, Linda A.; Ferreira, Jannie T.

2003-03-01

381

[Arrhythmia and sport].  

PubMed

Sports arrhythmia has gained wide attention with the mediatization of the death of famous sports stars. Sport strongly modifies the structure of the heart with the development of left ventricular hypertrophy which may be difficult to differentiate from that due to doping. Intense training modifies also the resting electrocardiogram with appearance of signs of left ventricular hypertrophy whereas resting sinus bradycardia and atrioventricular conduction disturbances usually reverts upon exertion. Accordingly, arrhythmia may develop ranging from extrasystoles to atrial fibrillation and even sudden death. Recent data suggest that if benign arrhythmia may be the result of the sole intense training and are reversible, malignant ventricular arrhythmia and sudden death mostly occur in unknown structural heart disease. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is amongst the most frequent post mortem diagnosis in this situation. Doping is now present in many sports and further threatens the athlete in the safe practice of sport. PMID:16433243

Saoudi, N; Yaici, K; Zarkane, N; Darmon, J P; Rinaldi, J P; Brunner, P; Ricard, P; Mourou, M Y

2005-12-01

382

Incidence and Risk Factors for Concussion in High School Athletes, North Carolina, 1996-1999  

Microsoft Academic Search

A prospective cohort study was used to quantify risk factors for sports concussions. Analysis was based on a stratified cluster sample of North Carolina high school athletes followed during 1996-1999. Clustering was by school and sport, and the sample included 15,802 athletes with 1-8 seasons of follow-up per athlete. Concussion rates were estimated for 12 sports, and risk factors were

Mark R. Schulz; Stephen W. Marshall; Frederick O. Mueller; Jingzhen Yang; Nancy L. Weaver; William D. Kalsbeek; J. Michael Bowling

383

The clinical utility of screening of biochemical parameters in elite athletes: analysis of 100 cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective:To determine the clinical utility of screening for biochemical parameters in elite athletes.Design:A prospective sequential case series.Setting:The Department of Sports Medicine at the Australian Institute of Sport.Participants:100 elite athletes from 11 sports (56 male and 44 female athletes, mean age 19 years, range 16–27), undergoing routine medical screening.Intervention:Initial and follow-up assessment of the following biochemical parameters in association with clinical

K E Fallon

2008-01-01

384

Psychosocial Influences on College Adjustment in Division I Student-Athletes: The Role of Athletic Identity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Traditionally, graduation rates have been employed as a primary measure of college success for student-athletes. However, other sport related factors influencing college success and adjustment have yet to be adequately researched in the literature. The purpose of this study was to examine more closely the impact of race, gender, and athletic

Melendez, Mickey C.

2010-01-01

385

Demographic Profile and Athletic Identity of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injured Wheelchair Basketball Athletes in Greece  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An epidemiological study conducted across the country of Greece was conducted in order to determine the profile and the athletic identity of spinal cord injured (SCI) wheelchair basketball athletes who participated to the 13th Greek Wheelchair Basketball Championship and Cup. The Disability Sport Participation questionnaire was used for data…

Vasiliadis, Angelo; Evaggelinou, Christina; Avourdiadou, Sevastia; Grekinis, Petros

2010-01-01

386

Current Issues in the Identification, Assessment, and Management of Concussions in Sports-Related Injuries  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent literature has focused on the need for appropriate identification, assessment, and management of sports-related concussion. This article addresses current issues in the preva- lence and assessment of sports-related concussion. Despite a paucity of research on female athletes and youth athletes, there is evidence that female athletes are at higher risk for injury than males and that concussions may

Catherine McKeever; Philip Schatz

2003-01-01

387

Training the prepubertal and pubertal athlete.  

PubMed

Participation of prepubertal and pubertal children in sports has increased significantly over the past decade. There is a continuing concern for their emotional and physical well-being. This review discusses concerns that coaches, trainers, parents, and athletes must confront. Young athletes are limited in their ability to perform on the playing field by both their physical and emotional maturity. Competitive sports in this age group can lead to injury and disability. Both strength training and aerobic training can have benefits for this age group but must be performed in a cautious and creative fashion. Child athletes have increased nutritional demands that require special attention. The use of performance-enhancing drugs is of special concern in this age group. Training the child athlete should be performed with the utmost concern for the athlete's safety and well-being. PMID:19202665

Logsdon, Valerie K

2007-06-01

388

Supplements and sports.  

PubMed

Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from professional athletes to junior high school students. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have serious adverse effects. Anabolic steroids and ephedrine have life-threatening adverse effects and are prohibited by the International Olympic Committee and the National Collegiate Athletic Association for use in competition. Blood transfusions, androstenedione, and dehydroepiandrosterone are also prohibited in competition. Caffeine, creatine, and sodium bicarbonate have been shown to enhance performance in certain contexts and have few adverse effects. No performance benefit has been shown with amino acids, beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate, chromium, human growth hormone, and iron. Carbohydrate-electrolyte beverages have no serious adverse effects and can aid performance when used for fluid replacement. Given the widespread use of performance-enhancing supplements, physicians should be prepared to counsel athletes of all ages about their effectiveness, safety, and legality. PMID:19007050

Jenkinson, David M; Harbert, Allison J

2008-11-01

389

Bone health in endurance athletes: runners, cyclists, and swimmers.  

PubMed

Weight-bearing exercise has been recognized widely to be beneficial for long-term bone health. However inherent differences in bone-loading characteristics and energy expenditure during participation in endurance sports place many endurance athletes at a relative disadvantage with regard to bone health compared with other athletes. Adolescents and adults who participate in endurance sports, such as running, and non-weight-bearing sports, such as biking and swimming, often have lower bone mineral density (BMD) than athletes participating in ball and power sports, and sometimes their BMD is lower than their inactive peers. Low BMD increases the risk of stress and fragility fractures, both while an athlete is actively competing and later in life. This article reviews the variable effects of distance running, cycling, swimming, and triathlons on bone health; the evaluation of stress and fragility fractures; and the diagnosis, management, and prevention of low BMD in endurance athletes. PMID:23147022

Scofield, Kirk L; Hecht, Suzanne

2012-01-01

390

Sport, Exercise & Health Strategy  

E-print Network

Sport, Exercise & Health Strategy The University's Vision is of an inclusive and collaborative advice and support to students. Sport, Exercise & Health Strategy 2010 ­ 2016 We aspire to provide standards, respect for the individual and a strong sense of collegiality. #12;Sport, Exercise & Health

Bristol, University of

391

A Comparison of the Foot and Ankle Condition between Elite Athletes and Non-athletes  

PubMed Central

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the foot and ankle condition between elite athletes and non-athletes. [Subjects] The elite athletes group included 85 subjects (28 males and 57 females) and the non-athletes group included 85 subjects (38 males and 47 females). [Methods] All subjects were evaluated for pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) and foot and ankle condition (The Foot and Ankle Disability Index, FADI, and The Foot and Ankle Outcome Score, FAOS). [Results] The elite athlete group showed significant differences from the non-athletes group in VAS, FADI (FADI, FADI-Sports), and FAOS (FAOS-symptoms, FAOS-pain, FAOS-ADL, FAOS-sports, FAOS-QoL). In addition, a meaningful difference in VAS, FADI-Sports, and FAOS-symptoms was observed between gymnasts and wrestlers. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest the necessity prevention of injury to the foot and ankle of elite athletes, and for the development of exercise for the rehabilitation of foot and ankle injuries, because there is a difference in foot and ankle condition between elite athletes and non-athletes. PMID:24259773

Kim, Hyeyoung; Chung, EunJung; Lee, Byoung-Hee

2013-01-01

392

Etiology and pathophysiology of tendon ruptures in sports.  

PubMed

Of all spontaneous tendon ruptures, complete Achilles tendon tears are most closely associated with sports activities (1-3). Schönbauer (3) reported that 75% of all ruptures of the Achilles tendon are related to sports. In Plecko & Passl (2) the number was 60%. In our material of 430 cases, the number of sports-related Achilles ruptures was very similar (62%), while only 2% of ruptures of other tendons were sports-related (P < 0.001) (1). Also, the majority of Achilles reruptures occurred in sports. The ruptures occurred most often in soccer (34%), track and field (16%) and basketball (14%). The distribution of Achilles ruptures according to different sports varies considerably from country to country, according to the national sport traditions. For example, in northern and middle Europe, soccer, tennis, track and field, indoor ball games, downhill skiing, and gymnastics are the most common; and in North America, football, basketball, baseball, tennis and downhill skiing dominate the statistics (1, 2, 4). In sports, some Achilles ruptures are not spontaneous or degeneration-induced but may occur as a consequence of the remarkably high forces that are involved in the performance (2). Ruptures in the high jump or triple jump are good examples. In such cases, failure in the neuromuscular protective mechanisms due to fatigue or disturbed co-ordination can frequently be found. The spontaneous complete rupture of the supraspinatus tendon of the rotator cuff does not occur very frequently in sports. Those sports that include high-energy throwing movements, such as American and Finnish baseball, American football, rugby and discuss and javelin throwing, may, however, produce this injury. Partial tears and inflammations of the rotator cuff complex are much more frequent in throwing sports. The complete rupture of the proximal long head of the biceps brachii tendon is rare among competitive and recreational athletes. In our material, under 2% of these ruptures were associated with sports activities (5). The rupture (avulsion) of the distal tendon of the biceps muscle is rare. In sports, gymnastics, body building and weight lifting have been said to be able to produce this injury (6). In general, complete ruptures of the quadriceps tendon and the patellar tendon occur most often in older individuals. In our study, the mean age of these patients was 65 years (5). However, these injuries do also occur in younger age groups, especially in athletes. In athletes, the rupture most frequently occurs in high-power sports events, such as high jump, basketball and weight lifting, at the age of 15-30 years. A chronic-patellar apicitis (jumper's knee) may predispose rupture of the tendon (7). As is the case with the rotator cuff complex, overuse inflammation and partial tears of the quadriceps and patellar tendons are one of the most characteristic athletic injuries. Complete spontaneous ruptures of other tendons in sports are rare, although the literature does provide case studies from almost every tendon the human body possesses (8-18). PMID:9211611

Kannus, P; Natri, A

1997-04-01

393

Systems Engineering 490/495 -Spring 2013 Sports Analytics\\  

E-print Network

Systems Engineering 490/495 - Spring 2013 Sports Analytics\\ DESIGNING A GAME ANALYSIS DECISION Overview Collegiate Athletics · Largest national non-profit collegiate sports organization U.S. (NCAA) Mission promote student athlete development alongside higher education · 1,000 colleges are affiliated

394

The Functions and Methods of Mental Training on Competitive Sports  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mental training is the major training method of the competitive sports and the main factor of athletes skill and tactics level.By combining the psychological factor with the current competitive sports characteristics, this paper presents the function of mental training forward athletes, and how to improve the comprehensive psychological quality by using mental training.

Xiong, Jianshe

395

The Psychological UNIFORM: Using Mental Skills in Youth Sport  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most athletes can benefit from practicing and using mental skills within a sport context, but budgets do not always allow the hiring of a Sport Psychologists to implement a mental skills training program. With guidance, however, dedicated coaches can help athletes develop the mental side of their game by providing basic psychological skills. A…

Johnson, Crystal A.; Gilbert, Jenelle N.

2004-01-01

396

Online training in sports concussion for youth sports coaches  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to evaluate ACTive: Athletic Concussion Training using Interactive Video Education, an interactive e-learning program designed to train community coaches of youth ages 10–18 in effective sports concussion prevention and management practices. Seventy-five youth sports coaches from across the country completed the study over the Internet. Results of a randomized control trial demonstrated significant differences between treatment and control participants on measures of (a) knowledge about sports concussion, management, and prevention; (b) attitudes about the importance of preventing sports concussion; and (c) intention and self-efficacy in sports concussion management and prevention. The results suggest that ACTive is an effective method of training youth sports coaches who are in an important position to reduce risks associated with sports concussion. PMID:20640175

Glang, Ann; Koester, Michael C.; Beaver, Sherry Vondy; Clay, Janet E.; McLaughlin, Karen A.

2010-01-01

397

Challenges and Countermeasures for Thermal Environment and Indoor Air Quality in Sports Buildings  

Microsoft Academic Search

the sports building is often crowded with many sports practitioners, so the thermal environment and indoor air quality in the sports buildings are very important to the athletes and other sports practitioners. Many problems such as different demands between auditorium and playing area, air conditioning system design and air conditioning operation exist in sports buildings in order to improve the

Li Xianting; Ma Yong; Shao Xiaoliang; Ma Xiaojun

2011-01-01

398

Dietary habits of athletes in Bahrain.  

PubMed

This study describes the dietary habits of athletes involved in four common sports in Bahrain (football, handball, volleyball and basketball). A sample of 304 athletes was obtained from 14 first class clubs. It was found that 28% of athletes skipped breakfast, and only 39% consumed breakfast daily. Foods eaten before competition were similar to those consumed by other family members, indicating that athletes did not eat any specific diet before events. There were some differences in meal patterns among athletes of various sports. In general, athletes allowed enough time between a meal and competition (2.8-3.1 hours). About half of them consumed water only at restbreak, while the rest consumed fruit drinks, tea and oranges in addition to water. Some (3%) did not consume any fluid. A small proportion of the athletes (4%) used vitamins and protein supplements. Mass media (53.6%) and coaches (20.1%) were the primary sources of nutrition information for athletes. It is suggested that information on nutrition and physical performance should be introduced in all educational programmes for both athletes and coaches. PMID:7761044

Musaiger, A O; Ragheb, M A

1994-01-01

399

Exertion injuries in female athletes.  

PubMed Central

Because sports injuries in men form most of the available statistics, the reportage of injuries in female athletes is sparse. We describe exertion injuries and disorders in 281 women athletes, all of which hampered athletic training or performances. Sixty per cent of the injuries occurred to girls ages between 12-19 years, and about forty-eight per cent were track and field athletes. The most common sites of injury were the ankle, foot, heel and leg. Osteochondritic disorders were the most typical injuries in the series, and the chronic medical tibial syndrome was the injury that needed surgical treatment most frequently. Overuse injuries seem to differ very little from each other in the events included in this survey. Images p229-a p229-b p229-c PMID:6797496

Orava, S.; Hulkko, A.; Jormakka, E.

1981-01-01

400

Predictability of physiological testing and the role of maturation in talent identification for adolescent team sports.  

PubMed

Entrepreneurial marketing of sport increases demands on sport development officers to identify talented individuals for specialist development at the youngest possible age. Talent identification results in the streamlining of resources to produce optimal returns from a sports investment. However, the process of talent identification for team sports is complex and success prediction is imperfect. The aim of this review is to describe existing practices in physiological tests used for talent identification in team sports and discuss the impact of maturity-related differences on the long term outcomes particularly for male participants. Maturation is a major confounding variable in talent identification during adolescence. A myriad of hormonal changes during puberty results in physical and physiological characteristics important for sporting performance. Significant changes during puberty make the prediction of adult performance difficult from adolescent data. Furthermore, for talent identification programs to succeed, valid and reliable testing procedures must be accepted and implemented in a range of performance-related categories. Limited success in scientifically based talent identification is evident in a range of team sports. Genetic advances challenge the ethics of talent identification in adolescent sport. However, the environment remains a significant component of success prediction in sport. Considerations for supporting talented young male athletes are discussed. PMID:16844415

Pearson, D T; Naughton, G A; Torode, M

2006-08-01

401

Cardioleader use in acyclic types of sports  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of the cardioleader method in regulating training loads and tests for athletes in acyclic sports was investigated. It was found that the use of this method increases the effectiveness of the training process.

Bondin, V. I.

1980-01-01

402

American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine  

MedlinePLUS

... to help athletes prevent and manage injury. In short, sports medicine is more than our members’ job - it is their passion. ... Boost Your Practice with Social Media How can Twitter be valuable for a ...

403

Facility Focus: Sports and Recreation Facilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines projects that demonstrate three different commitments administrators make to their athletic facilities: convenience; excellence; and comfort. Projects discussed involve a fitness center, a football stadium, and a multi-sport indoor practice facility. (GR)

College Planning & Management, 2000

2000-01-01

404

Interscholastic Sports: A Character-Building Privilege  

E-print Network

High school coaches should teach, model, and reinforce to their athletes that participation in interscholastic sports is a character-building privilege earned by showing respect, playing fair, and striving to win while ...

Lumpkin, Angela; Stokowski, Sarah

2011-01-01

405

Exploring Common Ground: Comparing the Imagery of Dancers and Aesthetic Sport Performers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The imagery of aesthetic sport athletes and dancers was compared, and the relationship between imagery and self-confidence was explored. Materials included the Sport Imagery Questionnaire (SIQ; Hall, Mack, Paivio, & Hausenblas, 1998), the Dance Imagery Questionnaire (DIQ; Nordin & Cumming, 2006), the Trait Sport Confidence Inventory (TSCI; Vealey, 1986), and open-ended questions. Participants were 144 dancers and 124 aesthetic athletes,

Sanna M. Nordin; Jennifer Cumming

2008-01-01

406

Use of prescription drugs in athletes.  

PubMed

Although athletes are young and generally healthy, they use a variety of non-doping classified medicines to treat injuries, cure illnesses and obtain a competitive edge. Athletes and sports medicine physicians try to optimize the treatment of symptoms related to extreme training during an elite athlete's active career. According to several studies, the use of antiasthmatic medication is more frequent among elite athletes than in the general population. The type of training and the kind of sport influence the prevalence of asthma. Asthma is most common among those competing in endurance events, such as cycling, swimming, cross-country skiing and long-distance running. Recent studies show that athletes use also NSAIDs and oral antibacterials more commonly than age-matched controls, especially athletes competing in speed and power sports. Inappropriately high doses and concomitant use of several different NSAIDs has been observed. All medicines have adverse effects that may have deleterious effects on elite athletes' performance. Thus, any unnecessary medication use should be minimized in elite athletes. Inhaled beta(2)-agonists may cause tachycardia and muscle tremor, which are especially harmful in events requiring accuracy and a steady hand. In experimental animal models of acute injury, especially selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors have been shown to be detrimental to tissue-level repair. They have been shown to impair mechanical strength return following acute injury to bone, ligament and tendon. This may have clinical implications for future injury susceptibility. However, it should be noted that the current animal studies have limited translation to the clinical setting. Adverse effects related to the CNS and gastrointestinal adverse reactions are commonly reported in connection with NSAID use also in elite athletes. In addition to the potential for adverse effects, recent studies have shown that NSAID use may negatively regulate muscle growth by inhibiting protein synthesis. Physicians and pharmacists taking care of athletes' medication need to be aware of the medicines that an athlete is taking and how those medicines interact with performance, exercise, environment and other medicines. Sport associations should repeatedly monitor not only the use of banned substances, but also the trends of use of legal medicines in athletes. Not only physicians and pharmacists, but also athletes and coaches should be better educated with respect to potential benefits and risks, and how each agent may affect an athlete's performance. The attitudes and beliefs leading to ample use of legal medicines in athletes is an interesting area of future research. PMID:18489193

Alaranta, Antti; Alaranta, Hannu; Helenius, Ilkka

2008-01-01

407

Knee complaints seen in general practice: active sport participants versus non-sport participants  

PubMed Central

Background Since knee complaints are common among athletes and are frequently presented in general practice, it is of interest to investigate the type of knee complaints represented in general practice of athletes in comparison with those of non-athletes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the differences in type of knee complaints between sport participants, in this study defined as athletes, and non-sport participants, defined as non-athletes, presenting in general practice. Further, differences in the initial policy of the GP, medical consumption, and outcome at one-year follow-up were also investigated. Methods Patients consulting their GP for a new episode of knee complaints were invited to participate in this prospective cohort study. From the total HONEUR knee cohort population (n = 1068) we extracted patients who were athletes (n = 421) or non-athletes (n = 388). Results The results showed that acute distortions of the knee were significantly more diagnosed in athletes than in non-athletes (p = 0.04). Further, more athletes were advised by their GP to 'go easy on the knee' than the non-athletes (p < 0.01), but no differences were found in number of referrals and medication prescribed by the GP. The medical consumption was significantly higher among athletes; however, no significant differences were found between the two groups for recovery at one-year follow-up. Conclusion There are no major differences in the diagnosis and prognosis of knee complaints between athletes and non-athletes presented to the GP. This implies that there are no indications for different treatment strategies applied in both groups. However, athletes are more often advised to 'go easy on the knee' and to rest than non-athletes. Further, there is a trend towards increased medical consumption among athletes while functional disability and pain are lower than among the non-athletes. PMID:18366679

van Middelkoop, Marienke; van Linschoten, Robbart; Berger, Marjolein Y; Koes, Bart W; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita MA

2008-01-01

408

Prophylactic use of NSAIDs by athletes: a risk/benefit assessment.  

PubMed

Athletes often seek artificial means to gain advantage and prolong participation when competing. This often involves taking naturally occurring or chemically synthesized compounds. The World Anti-Doping Agency does not prohibit the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) because these agents are not performance enhancing, and their analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects are at best performance enabling. Consequently, athletes have relatively unrestricted access to NSAIDs, which are readily available as over-the-counter drugs. However, concern has been raised on athletes' prophylactic use of these agents. Data from many sporting fields have consistently demonstrated that many individuals self-administer NSAIDs prior to athletic participation to prevent pain and inflammation before it occurs. However, scientific evidence for this approach is currently lacking, and athletes should be aware of the potential risks in using NSAIDs as a prophylactic agent. These agents are not benign, and can produce significant side effects, including gastrointestinal and cardiovascular conditions, as well as musculoskeletal and renal side effects. The latter side effects appear paradoxical to the rationale for prophylactic use of NSAIDs. This article discusses current observations regarding athlete use of NSAIDs, and the possible benefits and potential risks of their use. PMID:20424410

Warden, Stuart J

2010-04-01

409

Women in Division I Sports Programs: "The Glass Is Half Empty and Half Full."  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty-five years after passage of Title IX, federal legislation barring sex discrimination in athletics in federally-funded schools, females make up 37% of college athletes and receive 38% of athletic scholarships at National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I schools. Women's participation in college sports has increased four-fold.…

Naughton, Jim

1997-01-01

410

Celiac Disease in an Elite Female Collegiate Volleyball Athlete: A Case Report  

PubMed Central

Objective: To present the case of an elite female volleyball player who complained of diarrhea and fatigue after preseason training. Background: The athlete lost 8.1 kg during the first 20 days of training, and we initially suspected an eating disorder. The sports medicine team interviewed the athlete and found she did not have psychological symptoms indicative of an eating disorder. The results of routine blood tests revealed critically high platelet counts; in conjunction with the physical findings, the athlete was referred to a gastroenterologist. Differential Diagnosis: Our initial suggestion was an eating disorder. Therefore, the differential diagnosis included anorexia athletica, anorexia nervosa, and bulimia nervosa. On referral, the differential diagnosis was anemia, gastrointestinal dysfunction, lymphoma, or bowel adenocarcinoma. Diarrhea, weight loss, and blood test results were suggestive of active celiac disease, and a duodenal biopsy specimen confirmed this diagnosis. Treatment: The athlete was treated with a gluten-free diet, which excludes wheat, barley, and rye. Dietary substitutions were incorporated to maintain adequate caloric intake. Uniqueness: The presence of active celiac disease may not be uncommon. However, elite athletes who face celiac disease present a new challenge for the athletic trainer. The athletic trainer can help guide the athlete in coping with the lifestyle changes associated with a gluten-free diet. Conclusions: One in every 200 to 400 individuals has celiac disease; many of these individuals are asymptomatic and, therefore, their conditions are undiagnosed. Undiagnosed, untreated celiac disease and patients who fail to follow the gluten-free diet increase the risk of further problems. PMID:16404459

Eberman, Lindsey E; Cleary, Michelle A

2005-01-01

411

Energy Expenditure and Habitual Physical Activities in Adolescent Sprint Athletes  

PubMed Central

This study aimed to assess total energy expenditure (TEE) and specific habitual physical activities in adolescent sprint athletes. Two methods used to estimate TEE, an activity diary (AD) and SenseWear armband (SWA), were compared. Sixteen athletes (6 girls, 10 boys, mean age 16.5 ± 1.6 yr) simultaneously wore a SWA and completed an AD and food diary during one week. Basal energy expenditure as given by the SWA when taken off was corrected for the appropriate MET value using the AD. TEE as estimated by the AD and SWA was comparable (3196 ± 590 kcal and 3012 ± 518 kcal, p = 0.113) without day-to-day variations in TEE and energy expended in activities of high intensity. Daily energy intake (2569 ± 508 kcal) did not match TEE according to both the AD and SWA (respectively p < 0.001 and p = 0.007). Athletes were in a supine position for a longer time on weekend days than on week days and slept longer on Sundays. Athletes reported a longer time of high-intensive physical activities in the AD than registered by the SWA on 4 out of 7 days. In addition to specific sprint activities on 3 to 7 days per week, 11 out of 16 athletes actively commuted to school where they participated in sports once or twice per week. The AD and the SWA are comparable in the estimation of TEE, which appears realistic and sustainable. The SWA offers an appropriate and objective method in the assessment of TEE, sleeping and resting in adolescent athletes on the condition that detailed information is given for the times the armband is not worn. The AD offers activity specific information but relies on the motivation, compliance and subjectivity of the individual, especially considering high-intensive intermittent training. Key points The activity diary and Sensewear armband provide comparable estimates of TEE in adolescent sprint athletes. A high inter-individual variation was observed in time spent in high-intensity physical activities, advocating an individual based assessment when coaching athletes. The activity diary is useful when detailed information on specific physical activities is desired. The Sensewear armband offers objective information on sleeping, resting, and physical activity duration. Wearing the Sensewear combined with reporting on activities when the Sensewear is not worn and when doing specific activities of interest results in more complete information. PMID:24149884

Aerenhouts, Dirk; Zinzen, Evert; Clarys, Peter

2011-01-01

412

Physics of Sports: Resonances  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When force is applied by an athlete to sports equipment resonances can occur. Just a few examples are: the ringing of a spiked volleyball, the strumming of a golf club shaft during a swing, and multiple modes induced in an aluminum baseball bat when striking a ball. Resonances produce acoustic waves which, if conditions are favorable, can be detected off the playing field. This can provide a means to evaluate athletic performance during game conditions. Results are given from the use of a simple hand-held acoustic detector - by a spectator sitting in the stands - to determine how hard volleyballs were spiked during college and high school games.

Browning, David

2000-04-01

413

Athletic Trainers' Attitudes Toward Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual National Collegiate Athletic Association Student-Athletes  

PubMed Central

Abstract Context: Researchers have investigated heterosexuals' attitudes toward homosexuals, focusing on factors such as sex, race, religion, education, and contact experiences. However, in the context of sport, this research is deficient. We found no published literature investigating athletic trainers (ATs') attitudes toward lesbian, gay, and bisexual student-athletes (LGB). Objective: To determine heterosexual ATs' attitudes toward LGB student-athletes in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. Design: Cross-sectional study Setting: E-mailed survey. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 964 ATs employed at member institutions. Main Outcome Measure(s): We measured attitudes using the Attitudes Toward Lesbian, Gay Men, and Bisexuals (ATLGB) Scale. To determine the extent to which sex, religion, and whether having an LGB friend or family member had an effect on ATs' attitudes, we performed analysis of variance. To establish the effect of age on ATs' attitudes, we calculated a Pearson correlation. We used an independent t test to identify differences between ATs who reported working with LGB student-athletes and ATs who did not. Results: With ATLGB score as the dependent factor, a main effect was noted for sex, religion, and having an LGB friend or family member (P < .01 for all comparisons). Age and total score were related (P < .01). A difference was seen in the ATLGB scores between ATs who were aware of LGB student-athletes on their teams and ATs who were not (P < .001). Conclusions: Many ATs hold positive attitudes toward LGB student-athletes, especially females, those who have an LGB friend or family member, and those who are aware of LGB student-athletes. Still, it is important to provide an open environment in the athletic training room for all student-athletes. PMID:21214353

Ensign, Kristine A.; Yiamouyiannis, Athena; White, Kristi M.; Ridpath, B. David

2011-01-01

414

The Future of Division I College Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When structured and operated as an integral part of the college or university, intercollegiate athletics can enhance the educational development of students and student-athletes and act as a window into the academy itself. And yet, there is an uneasy sense among chancellors and presidents that not all is right with college sports. There is rising…

Likins, Peter

2005-01-01

415

An Interprofessional Learning Experience in Sports Dentistry.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A survey of dental schools elicited information about course offerings in sports dentistry, opinions about offering such a course, dental school construction of mouthguards for campus or outside athletes, and provision of treatment for athlete dental trauma. A University of Illinois course is described and student reactions are discussed. (MSE)

Kumamoto, David P.; DiOrio, Louis P.

1989-01-01

416

Small Colleges Sweat over Sports Facilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Welcome to the Centennial Conference: 11 small, private liberal-arts colleges in the mid-Atlantic region that belong to the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division III, where there are no sports scholarships to lure top-notch players. Instead, the contest to recruit the best athletes--a high-stakes game that has long defined only the…

Kelderman, Eric

2008-01-01

417

Cerebral Concussion: Causes, Effects, and Risks in Sports.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE: To characterize the causes, effects, and risks associated with concussion in sports. BACKGROUND: Concussion is an injury associated with sports and is most often identified with boxing, football, ice hockey, and the martial arts. In addition, recent research has shown that concussion occurs in many different sports. In the decade of the 1990s, concussion became a primary issue for discussion among the media, sports sponsors, sports medicine professionals, and athletes. DESCRIPTION: Concussion is an injury that results from a wide variety of mechanisms and has numerous signs and symptoms that are common to different types of injury. Continued improvement in prevention and management strategies for concussion requires a strong body of research from a variety of different disciplines. It is essential that research efforts focus on both prevention and management and that researchers and clinicians work closely toward their common goals. CONCLUSIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS: Until the research community is able to provide sound recommendations for the prevention and management of the concussion, the care of the injured player falls squarely on the clinician. It is important for sports medicine professionals to continue to stay up to date on the advances in understanding concussions and how to care individually for each player who sustains a concussion. PMID:12937501

Powell, John W.

2001-09-01

418

Concussions Among United States High School and Collegiate Athletes  

PubMed Central

Context: An estimated 300?000 sport-related traumatic brain injuries, predominantly concussions, occur annually in the United States. Sports are second only to motor vehicle crashes as the leading cause of traumatic brain injury among people aged 15 to 24 years. Objective: To investigate the epidemiology of concussions in a nationally representative sample of high school athletes and to compare rates of concussion among high school and collegiate athletes. Design: Descriptive epidemiologic study Setting: 100 United States high schools and 180 US colleges. Patients or Other Participants: United States high school and collegiate athletes. Main Outcome Measure(s): Data from 2 injury surveillance systems, High School Reporting Information Online (RIO) and the National Collegiate Athletic Association Injury Surveillance System, were analyzed to calculate rates, describe patterns, and evaluate potential risk factors for sport-related concussion. Results: Concussions represented 8.9% (n = 396) of all high school athletic injuries and 5.8% (n = 482) of all collegiate athletic injuries. Among both groups, rates of concussions were highest in the sports of football and soccer. In high school sports played by both sexes, girls sustained a higher rate of concussions, and concussions represented a greater proportion of total injuries than in boys. In all sports, collegiate athletes had higher rates of concussion than high school athletes, but concussions represented a greater proportion of all injuries among high school athletes. Conclusions: Sport-related injury surveillance systems can provide scientific data to drive targeted injury-prevention projects. Developing effective sport-related concussion preventive measures depends upon increasing our knowledge of concussion rates, patterns, and risk factors. PMID:18174937

Gessel, Luke M; Fields, Sarah K; Collins, Christy L; Dick, Randall W; Comstock, R. Dawn

2007-01-01

419

Sports medicine and the law.  

PubMed

Legal problems occur in sports medicine as well as in other fields. To whom do sports doctors owe their duty - to the club, to the team or to its members? Doping has become a part of competitive sport. What is the doctor's responsibility in relation to this? Medical "treatments" given sometimes on demand, in order to enable athletes to continue the game or competition despite the high risk of future severe irreparable damage, may constitute gross negligence. Consent given by athletes in such circumstances may be considered invalid. The club is obliged to insure its members against personal injuries. However, insurance companies may refuse to cover cases where a priori negligent medical treatment was demanded, or will sue the doctor for reimbursement. Medical confidentiality should be kept even regarding athletes, and disclosing any information is unlawful without the athletes' consent. Doctors' professional duty to the athletes should override any duty to the club that hired them, and professional medical opinion should override any caprice of the athlete. PMID:12017443

Frenkel, David A

2002-01-01

420

Sport specificity of mental disorders: the issue of sport psychiatry.  

PubMed

The prevalence of psychiatric conditions among elite athletes is still under debate. More and more evidence has accumulated that high-performance athletes are not protected from mental disorders as previously thought. The authors discuss the issue of the sport specificity of selected mental diseases in elite athletes. Specific aspects of eating disorders, exercise addiction, chronic traumatic encephalopathy and mood disorders in the context of overtraining syndrome are examined. In particular, the interrelationship between life and work characteristics unique to elite athletes and the development of mental disorders are reviewed. Differences of clinical presentation and some therapeutic consequences are discussed. The authors suggest that the physical and mental strains endured by elite athletes might influence the onset and severity of their psychiatric disorder. Beside the existing research strategies dealing with the amount of exercise, its intensity and lack of recreation experienced by athletes, further research on psycho-social factors is needed to better understand the sport-specific aetiology of mental disorders in high-performance athletes. PMID:24091603

Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Markser, Valentin Z

2013-11-01

421

Explanatory Style and Athletic Performance  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created by David Howell of the University of Vermont, this website is self described as: "This document was prepared as an illustration of the use of both t tests and correlation/regression analysis in drawing conclusions from data in an actual study." The study compares athletic performance of swimmers that are optimists versus pessimists. Howell provides: an introduction, a section on explanatory style, a section on athletic performance, methods and results. This is a great look at how statistics can be applied to many different disciplines, in this case sports, and provide wonderful insight into different aspects of the field.

Howell, David

2009-03-02

422

Disordered eating and eating disorders in aquatic sports.  

PubMed

Disordered eating behavior (DE) and eating disorders (EDs) are of great concern because of their associations with physical and mental health risks and, in the case of athletes, impaired performance. The syndrome originally known as the Female Athlete Triad, which focused on the interaction of energy availability, reproductive function, and bone health in female athletes, has recently been expanded to recognize that Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (RED-S) has a broader range of negative effects on body systems with functional impairments in both male and female athletes. Athletes in leanness-demanding sports have an increased risk for RED-S and for developing EDs/DE. Special risk factors in aquatic sports related to weight and body composition management include the wearing of skimpy and tight-fitting bathing suits, and in the case of diving and synchronized swimming, the involvement of subjective judgments of performance. The reported prevalence of DE and EDs in athletic populations, including athletes from aquatic sports, ranges from 18 to 45% in female athletes and from 0 to 28% in male athletes. To prevent EDs, aquatic athletes should practice healthy eating behavior at all periods of development pathway, and coaches and members of the athletes' health care team should be able to recognize early symptoms indicating risk for energy deficiency, DE, and EDs. Coaches and leaders must accept that DE/EDs can be a problem in aquatic disciplines and that openness regarding this challenge is important. PMID:24667155

Melin, Anna; Torstveit, Monica Klungland; Burke, Louise; Marks, Saul; Sundgot-Borgen, Jorunn

2014-08-01

423

Cannabis in Sport  

PubMed Central

Since 2004, when the World Anti-Doping Agency assumed the responsi-bility for establishing and maintaining the list of prohibited substances and methods in sport (i.e. the Prohibited List), cannabinoids have been prohibited in all sports during competition. The basis for this prohibition can be found in the World Anti-Doping Code, which defines the three criteria used to consider banning a substance. In this context, we discuss the potential of can-nabis to enhance sports performance, the risk it poses to the athlete’s health and its violation of the spirit of sport. Although these compounds are prohibited in-competition only, we explain why the pharmacokinetics of their main psychoactive compound, ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol, may complicate the results management of adverse analytical findings. Passive inhalation does not appear to be a plausible explanation for a positive test. Although the prohibition of cannabinoids in sports is one of the most controversial issues in anti-doping, in this review we stress the reasons behind this prohibition, with strong emphasis on the evolving knowledge of cannabinoid pharmacology. PMID:21985215

Huestis, Marilyn A.; Mazzoni, Irene; Rabin, Olivier

2013-01-01

424

Fluid needs for training and competition in athletics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diverse nature of the athletic events, together with the varied training programmes and individuality of athletes taking part, inevitably means that fluid needs are highly variable – between athletes, perhaps between training and competition, and with differing environmental conditions and degree of training and heat acclimatization. There are limited data from athletics on all aspects of fluid balance, but wherever possible

Susan M. Shirreffs; Douglas J. Casa; Robert Carter III

2007-01-01

425

Sports and Technology. Resources in Technology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Technology is making a significant impact in all areas of sports and recreation. New equipment and computer training methods in spectator sports have had a major social and economic impact, and individual sports have reaped the benefits of technology. (JOW)

Hadley, Fred W.

1993-01-01

426

Vaccination in elite athletes.  

PubMed

Public health vaccination guidelines cannot be easily transferred to elite athletes. An enhanced benefit from preventing even mild diseases is obvious but stronger interference from otherwise minor side effects has to be considered as well. Thus, special vaccination guidelines for adult elite athletes are required. In most of them, protection should be strived for against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, influenza, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, measles, mumps and varicella. When living or traveling to endemic areas, the athletes should be immune against tick-borne encephalitis, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, poliomyelitis, typhoid fever, and meningococcal disease. Vaccination against pneumococci and Haemophilus influenzae type b is only relevant in athletes with certain underlying disorders. Rubella and papillomavirus vaccination might be considered after an individual risk-benefit analysis. Other vaccinations such as cholera, rabies, herpes zoster, and Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) cannot be universally recommended for athletes at present. Only for a very few diseases, a determination of antibody titers is reasonable to avoid unnecessary vaccinations or to control efficacy of an individual's vaccination (especially for measles, mumps, rubella, varicella, hepatitis B and, partly, hepatitis A). Vaccinations should be scheduled in a way that possible side effects are least likely to occur in periods of competition. Typically, vaccinations are well tolerated by elite athletes, and resulting antibody titers are not different from the general population. Side effects might be reduced by an optimal selection of vaccines and an appropriate technique of administration. Very few discipline-specific considerations apply to an athlete's vaccination schedule mainly from the competition and training pattern as well as from the typical geographical distribution of competitive sites. PMID:24986118

Gärtner, Barbara C; Meyer, Tim

2014-10-01

427

Journal of Issues in Collegiate Athletics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Created as an initiative by the College Sport Research Institute (CSRI) the Journal of Issues in Collegiate Athletics is "intended to foster an atmosphere that encourages personal and intellectual growth for faculty and students, demands excellence and professional integrity from faculty and student affiliates, supports independent critical college-sport research, and advocates for college athletes' rights and education." Visitors to the site can look over information about their editorial board and staff, their complete mission statement, and then make their way to the actual journal. The publication was started in 2008, and visitors can view articles such as "Collegiate Sport Chaplaincy: Problems and Promise" and "Can the Faculty Reform Intercollegiate Athletics? A Past, Present, and Future Perspective". The site is rounded out by a listing of links to related organizations, conferences, and online resources.

428

Perfectionistic profiles among elite athletes and differences in their motivational orientations.  

PubMed

Although there is an emerging body of research that has examined perfectionistic clusters in the general population, few studies have explored such profiles in athlete samples. The purposes of this research were to explore perfectionistic profiles within a sample of elite athletes and the differences between them on key motivational variables. A sample of 423 elite athletes (179 males, 244 females) aged between 14 and 66 years (M = 25.64; SD = 8.57) from a variety of team (e.g., rowing, hockey, baseball, rugby) and individual sports (e.g., cycling, athletics, triathlon, gymnastics) completed a multisection questionnaire including measures of sport perfectionism, motivation regulation, achievement goals, and fear of failure. Cluster analyses revealed the existence of three perfectionism profiles, namely, nonperfectionists, maladaptive perfectionists, and adaptive perfectionists. Subsequent analyses generally supported the robustness of these perfectionism profiles in terms of differential motivational orientations (achievement goals, fear of failure, and motivation regulation) in hypothesized directions. Overall, the differences in motivational orientations between the three clusters supported a categorical conceptualization of perfectionism. PMID:22605360

Gucciardi, Daniel F; Mahoney, John; Jalleh, Geoffrey; Donovan, Robert J; Parkes, Jarred

2012-04-01

429

Local Positioning Systems in (Game) Sports  

PubMed Central

Position data of players and athletes are widely used in sports performance analysis for measuring the amounts of physical activities as well as for tactical assessments in game sports. However, positioning sensing systems are applied in sports as tools to gain objective information of sports behavior rather than as components of intelligent spaces (IS). The paper outlines the idea of IS for the sports context with special focus to game sports and how intelligent sports feedback systems can benefit from IS. Henceforth, the most common location sensing techniques used in sports and their practical application are reviewed, as location is among the most important enabling techniques for IS. Furthermore, the article exemplifies the idea of IS in sports on two applications. PMID:22163725

Leser, Roland; Baca, Arnold; Ogris, Georg

2011-01-01

430

Doping in Sport and Competition Design  

Microsoft Academic Search

We develop a game-theoretic model of doping which focuses on the economic aspects of competitive sports. According to the model, incentives for athletes to use doping increase when (i) the efficiency of the drug test system is low, (ii) the number of competitions during one season is high, (iii) the spread of prizes from sports events is large, (iv) the

Nicolas EBER; Jacques THÉPOT

1999-01-01

431

Interscholastic Sports: A Character-Building Privilege  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

While interscholastic sports help young athletes enhance sport skills, physical fitness, self-discipline, sportsmanship, teamwork, time-management skills, self-confidence, and mental toughness, they also promote life skills and lessons and enhance academic performance as well. Coaches have a tremendous opportunity--and responsibility--to instill…

Lumpkin, Angela; Stokowski, Sarah

2011-01-01

432

The New Face of College Sports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For decades, college coaches in many sports have been recruiting internationally to stock their teams with the best players they can find. American universities in the NCAA's Division I gain competitive advantages with gifted young athletes from overseas, and the proportion of foreign players in many Division I sports has doubled since the…

Wilson, Robin; Wolverton, Brad

2008-01-01

433

Osgood-Schlatter's disease in adolescent athletesRetrospective study of incidence and duration  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the period of 1976 to 1981, a total of 412 young athletes contacted the Turku Sports Medical Research Unit's (TSMRU) Outpatient Sports Clinic with 586 com plaints. These records included 68 athletes with Os good-Schlatter's disease (OSD), who were initially pre scribed an average of 2 months' rest from any physical activity causing pain. Symptoms of tibial tuberosity pain

Urho M. Kujala; Martti Kvist; Olli Heinonen

1985-01-01

434

Female Collegiate Athletes: Prevalence of Eating Disorders and Disordered Eating Behaviors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: The authors assessed the prevalence of pathogenic eating and weight-control behaviors among female college athletes, using a psychometrically valid measure. Participants: Participants were 204 college athletes (M age = 20.16 years, SD = 1.31 years) from 17 sports at 3 universities. On average, they participated in their sport for 10.88…

Greenleaf, Christy; Petrie, Trent A.; Carter, Jennifer; Reel, Justine J.

2009-01-01

435

A comparison of sensation seeking among different groups of athletes and nonathletes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The major purpose of this study was to compare the sensation seeking needs of different groups of athletes and nonathletes of both sexes. Athletes from four male sport teams (lacrosse, rugby, crew and soccer) and five female sport teams (soccer, Volleyball, softball, tennis and golf) from a local university participated in the study. Male and female nonathletes also served as

Marvin L. Schroth

1995-01-01

436

The Athletae Dei: Missing the Meaning of Sport.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By making virtue of ascesis or self-discipline in their sport, the athlete evangelists (the "athletae-Dei"), unwittingly rob sport of its fundamental theological significance. These proponents of an evangelical brand of protestant theology have shifted drastically from an anti-sport stance of a century ago to a position that not only embraces…

Hoffman, Shirl J.

437

Peanuts & Crackerjacks: Economics of Pro Team Sports. Teacher's Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This teacher's guide presents instructional materials which examine issues in professional sports for students in high school economics and social studies classes. The issues include how the pro sports market evolved; how leagues gained market power; why athletes earn as much as they do; what are the sources of pro sports revenues; why tickets…

Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, MA.

438

High School and College Sports in the United States.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three major trends in the development of high school sports are identified: high school sports as entertainment, feeder system for colleges, and the movement toward specialization. The purpose and role of intercollegiate athletics, scandals and reform in big-time college sports, participation trends, and college coaches are also discussed. (IAH)

Sage, George H.

1990-01-01

439

Self-Presentation and Health-Damaging Behavior in Sport  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between self-presentational concerns and health-damaging behaviors in sport competition as related to the sport ethic outlined by Hughes and Coakley (1991). Male (n = 358) and female (n = 781) NCAA Division I collegiate athletes from multiple sports completed a series of online surveys which tested self-presentational concerns (SPSQ)

Amber Nicole Miller

2008-01-01

440

A PILOT STUDY OF CORE STABILITY AND ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE: IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP?  

PubMed Central

Study Design: Correlation study Objectives: To objectively evaluate the relationship between core stability and athletic performance measures in male and female collegiate athletes. Background: The relationship between core stability and athletic performance has yet to be quantified in the available literature. The current literature does not demonstrate whether or not core strength relates to functional performance. Questions remain regarding the most important components of core stability, the role of sport specificity, and the measurement of core stability in relation to athletic performance. Methods: A sample of 35 volunteer student athletes from Asbury College (NAIA Division II) provided informed consent. Participants performed a series of five tests: double leg lowering (core stability test), the forty yard dash, the T-test, vertical jump, and a medicine ball throw. Participants performed three trials of each test in a randomized order. Results: Correlations between the core stability test and each of the other four performance tests were determined using a General Linear Model. Medicine ball throw negatively correlated to the core stability test (r –0.389, p=0.023). Participants that performed better on the core stability test had a stronger negative correlation to the medicine ball throw (r =–0.527). Gender was the most strongly correlated variable to core strength, males with a mean measurement of double leg lowering of 47.43 degrees compared to females having a mean of 54.75 degrees. Conclusions: There appears to be a link between a core stability test and athletic performance tests; however, more research is needed to provide a definitive answer on the nature of this relationship. Ideally, specific performance tests will be able to better define and to examine relationships to core stability. Future studies should also seek to determine if there are specific sub-categories of core stability which are most important to allow for optimal training and performance for individual sports. PMID:21713228

Sharrock, Chris; Cropper, Jarrod; Mostad, Joel; Johnson, Matt

2011-01-01

441

Physical and physiological profiles of taekwondo athletes.  

PubMed

Taekwondo has evolved into a modern-day Olympic combat sport. The physical and physiological demands of modern-day taekwondo competition require athletes to be competent in several aspects of fitness. This review critically explores the physical and physiological characteristics of taekwondo athletes and presents implications for training and research. International taekwondo athletes possess low levels of body fat and a somatotype that characterises a blend of moderate musculoskeletal tissue and relative body linearity. While there is some variation in the maximum oxygen uptake of taekwondo athletes, moderate to high levels of cardio-respiratory fitness are necessary to support the metabolic demands of fighting and to facilitate recovery between consecutive matches. Taekwondo athletes demonstrate high peak anaerobic power characteristics of the lower limbs and this attribute appears to be conducive to achieving success in international competition. The ability to generate and sustain power output using both concentric and 'stretch-shortening cycle' muscle actions of the lower limbs may be important to support the technical and tactical actions in combat. Taekwondo competitors also display moderate to high maximum dynamic strength characteristics of the lower and upper extremities, and moderate endurance properties of the trunk and hip flexor musculature. The dynamic nature of the technical and tactical actions in the sport demand high flexibility of the lower limbs. More extensive research is required into the physical and physiological characteristics of taekwondo athletes to extend existing knowledge and to permit specialised conditioning for different populations within t