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Sample records for indole protects rodent

  1. Indole-3-carbinol protects against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity: role of calcitonin gene-related peptide and insulin-like growth factor-1.

    PubMed

    El-Naga, Reem N; Mahran, Yasmen F

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity associated with the clinical use of the anticancer drug cisplatin is a limiting problem. Thus, searching for new protective measures is required. Indole-3-carbinol is a powerful anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. The present study aimed to investigate the potential protective effect of indole-3-carbinol against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity in rats. Rats were pre-treated with 20 mg/kg indole-3-carbinol orally before giving cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity was demonstrated where relative kidney weight, BUN and serum creatinine were significantly increased. Increased oxidative stress was evident in cisplatin group where GSH and SOD tissue levels were significantly depleted. Also, lipid peroxidation and NOX-1 were increased as compared to the control. Additionally, renal expression of pro-inflammatory mediators was induced by cisplatin. Cisplatin-induced cell death was shown by increased caspase-3 and decreased expression of EGF, IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor. Nephrotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic effects induced by cisplatin were significantly ameliorated by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment. Besides, the role of CGRP in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was explored. Furthermore, cisplatin cytotoxic activity was significantly enhanced by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment in vitro. In conclusion, indole-3-carbinol provides protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Also, reduced expression of CGRP may play a role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:27417335

  2. Indole-3-carbinol protects against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity: role of calcitonin gene-related peptide and insulin-like growth factor-1

    PubMed Central

    El-Naga, Reem N.; Mahran, Yasmen F.

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity associated with the clinical use of the anticancer drug cisplatin is a limiting problem. Thus, searching for new protective measures is required. Indole-3-carbinol is a powerful anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. The present study aimed to investigate the potential protective effect of indole-3-carbinol against cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity in rats. Rats were pre-treated with 20 mg/kg indole-3-carbinol orally before giving cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity was demonstrated where relative kidney weight, BUN and serum creatinine were significantly increased. Increased oxidative stress was evident in cisplatin group where GSH and SOD tissue levels were significantly depleted. Also, lipid peroxidation and NOX-1 were increased as compared to the control. Additionally, renal expression of pro-inflammatory mediators was induced by cisplatin. Cisplatin-induced cell death was shown by increased caspase-3 and decreased expression of EGF, IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptor. Nephrotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptotic effects induced by cisplatin were significantly ameliorated by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment. Besides, the role of CGRP in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was explored. Furthermore, cisplatin cytotoxic activity was significantly enhanced by indole-3-carbinol pre-treatment in vitro. In conclusion, indole-3-carbinol provides protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Also, reduced expression of CGRP may play a role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced renal injury. PMID:27417335

  3. Palladium-catalyzed direct desulfitative C2 arylations of 3-halo-N-protected indoles using (hetero)arenesulfonyl chlorides.

    PubMed

    Hfaiedh, Anoir; Ben Ammar, Hamed; Soulé, Jean-François; Doucet, Henri

    2016-06-01

    The direct arylation of N-protected 3-haloindole derivatives with benzenesulfonyl chlorides as coupling partners using 5 mol% of bis(acetonitrile)dichloropalladium(ii) catalyst and lithium carbonate as a base in 1,4-dioxane was investigated. We demonstrated that both iodo and chloro substituents at the indolyl C3 position act as temporary blocking groups allowing the formation of 2-arylindoles through a direct desulfitative arylation, followed by in situ dehalogenation. While, from 3-bromoindole derivatives, 2-aryl-3-bromoindoles were obtained without debromination, and could be converted into 2,3-diarylindoles through a second palladium coupling. This method allows one to prepare in a few steps a very wide variety of indole derivatives, which are of interest in the synthesis of bioactive molecules. PMID:27171489

  4. Protective effects of melatonin and indole-3-propionic acid against lipid peroxidation, caused by potassium bromate in the rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Karbownik, Małgorzata; Stasiak, Magdalena; Zygmunt, Arkadiusz; Zasada, Krzysztof; Lewiński, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Potassium bromate (KBrO(3)) is classified as a carcinogenic agent. KBrO(3) induces tumors and pro-oxidative effects in kidneys. Melatonin is a well known antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Indole-3-propionic acid (IPA), an indole substance, also reveals antioxidative properties. Recently, some antioxidative effects of propylthiouracil (PTU)-an antithyroid drug-have been found. The aim of the study was to compare protective effects of melatonin, IPA, and PTU against lipid peroxidation in the kidneys and blood serum and, additionally, in the livers and the lungs, collected from rats, pretreated with KBrO(3). Male Wistar rats were administered KBrO(3) (110 mg/kg b.w., i.p., on the 10th day of the experiment) and/or melatonin, or IPA (0.0645 mmol/kg b.w., i.p., twice daily, for 10 days), or PTU (0.025% solution in drinking water, for 10 days). The level of lipid peroxidation products-malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxyalkenals (MDA + 4-HDA)-was measured spectrophotometrically in thyroid homogenates. KBrO(3), when injected to rats, significantly increased lipid peroxidation in the kidney homogenates and blood serum, but not in the liver and the lung homogenates. Co-treatment with either melatonin or with IPA, but not with PTU, decreased KBrO(3)-induced oxidative damage to lipids in the rat kidneys and serum. In conclusion, melatonin and IPA, which prevent KBrO(3)-induced lipid peroxidation in rat kidneys, may be of great value as protective agents under conditions of exposure to KBrO(3). PMID:16397908

  5. Protective effect of androgens against inflammation induced cartilage degradation in male rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, J A; Larbre, J P; Spector, T D; Perry, L A; Scott, D L; Willoughby, D A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease which predominantly affects women. Interestingly, low serum androgen levels and clinical improvement with androgen replacement have been reported in male patients. The aetiopathogenic role of sex hormones in arthritis and their potential long term effects on joint destruction and disability remains unclear, however. This study was designed to investigate the potential influence of sex hormones on inflammation induced cartilage degradation in male rodents. METHODS--An in vivo model of cotton wrapped cartilage implants was used to assess the effects of androgen, oestradiol, and progesterone on inflammation induced cartilage degradation, and in vitro techniques were used to investigate the direct actions on cartilage metabolism and cytokine production in male animals. RESULTS--Orchidectomy resulted in accelerated cartilage damage which was reversed by replacement of physiological levels of androgens. Granulomatous tissue from castrated male rodents produced higher amounts of interleukin 1. Sex hormones reduced spontaneous proteoglycan loss in vitro but did not interfere with the effects of interleukin 1 on cultured cartilage. CONCLUSIONS--Androgens appear to protect cartilage from inflammation induced breakdown in male animals. These results support a pathogenic role for hypoandrogenism in rheumatoid arthritis and suggest that long term androgen replacement may help prevent joint damage and disability. PMID:8484695

  6. Cerium oxide nanoparticles protect rodent lungs from hypobaric hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Aditya; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Singh, Sushil Kumar; Das, Mainak; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2013-01-01

    Background Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are effective at quenching reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell culture and animal models. Although nanoceria reportedly deposit in lungs, their efficacy in conferring lung protection during oxidative stress remains unexplored. Thus, the study evaluated the protective efficacy of nanoceria in rat lung tissue during hypobaric hypoxia. Methods A total of 48 animals were randomly divided into four equal groups (control [C], nanoceria treated [T], hypoxia [H], and nanoceria treated plus hypoxia [T+H]). Animals were injected intraperitoneally with either a dose of 0.5 μg/kg body weight/week of nanoceria (T and T+H groups) or vehicle (C and H groups) for 5 weeks. After the final dose, H and T+H animals were challenged with hypobaric hypoxia, while C and T animals were maintained at normoxia. Lungs were isolated and homogenate was obtained for analysis of ROS, lipid peroxidation, glutathione, protein carbonylation, and 4-hydroxynonenal-adduct formation. Plasma was used for estimating major inflammatory cytokines using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Intact lung tissues were fixed and both transmission electron microscopy and histopathological examinations were carried out separately for detecting internalization of nanoparticles as well as altered lung morphology. Results Spherical nanoceria of 7–10 nm diameter were synthesized using a microemulsion method, and the lung protective efficacy of the nanoceria evaluated during hypobaric hypoxia. With repeated intraperitoneal injections of low micromole concentration, we successfully localized the nanoceria in rodent lung without any inflammatory response. The lung-deposited nanoceria limited ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione oxidation, and prevented oxidative protein modifications like nitration and carbonyl formation during hypobaric hypoxia. We also observed reduced lung inflammation in the nanoceria-injected lungs, supporting the anti

  7. Palivizumab epitope-displaying virus-like particles protect rodents from RSV challenge.

    PubMed

    Schickli, Jeanne H; Whitacre, David C; Tang, Roderick S; Kaur, Jasmine; Lawlor, Heather; Peters, Cory J; Jones, Joyce E; Peterson, Darrell L; McCarthy, Michael P; Van Nest, Gary; Milich, David R

    2015-04-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common cause of serious viral bronchiolitis in infants, young children, and the elderly. Currently, there is not an FDA-approved vaccine available for RSV, though the mAb palivizumab is licensed to reduce the incidence of RSV disease in premature or at-risk infants. The palivizumab epitope is a well-characterized, approximately 24-aa helix-loop-helix structure on the RSV fusion (F) protein (F254-277). Here, we genetically inserted this epitope and multiple site variants of this epitope within a versatile woodchuck hepadnavirus core-based virus-like particle (WHcAg-VLP) to generate hybrid VLPs that each bears 240 copies of the RSV epitope in a highly immunogenic arrayed format. A challenge of such an epitope-focused approach is that to be effective, the conformational F254-277 epitope must elicit antibodies that recognize the intact virus. A number of hybrid VLPs containing RSV F254-277 were recognized by palivizumab in vitro and elicited high-titer and protective neutralizing antibody in rodents. Together, the results from this proof-of-principle study suggest that the WHcAg-VLP technology may be an applicable approach to eliciting a response to other structural epitopes. PMID:25751145

  8. Rupatadine protects against pulmonary fibrosis by attenuating PAF-mediated senescence in rodents.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiao-xi; Wang, Xiao-xing; Li, Ke; Wang, Zi-yan; Li, Zhe; Lv, Qi; Fu, Xiao-ming; Hu, Zhuo-wei

    2013-01-01

    A similar immune response is implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and allergic disorders. We investigated the potential therapeutic efficacy and mechanism of rupatadine, a dual antagonist of histamine and platelet-activation factor (PAF), in bleomycin- (BLM-) and silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The indicated dosages of rupatadine were administered in rodents with bleomycin or silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The tissue injury, fibrosis, inflammatory cells and cytokines, and lung function were examined to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of rupatadine. The anti-fibrosis effect of rupatadine was compared with an H1 or PAF receptor antagonist, and efforts were made to reveal rupatadine's anti-fibrotic mechanism. Rupatadine promoted the resolution of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in a dose-dependent manner, as indicated by the reductions in inflammation score, collagen deposition and epithelial-mesenchymal transformation, and infiltration or expression of inflammatory cells or cytokines in the fibrotic lung tissue. Thus, rupatadine treatment improved the declined lung function and significantly decreased animal death. Moreover, rupatadine was able not only to attenuate silica-induced silicosis but also to produce a superior therapeutic efficacy compared to pirfenidone, histamine H1 antagonist loratadine, or PAF antagonist CV-3988. The anti-fibrotic action of rupatadine might relate to its attenuation of BLM- or PAF-induced premature senescence because rupatadine treatment protected against the in vivo and in vitro activation of the p53/p21-dependent senescence pathway. Our studies indicate that rupatadine promotes the resolution of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis by attenuating the PAF-mediated senescence response. Rupatadine holds promise as a novel drug to treat the devastating disease of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23869224

  9. Fine Pathogen Discrimination within the APL1 Gene Family Protects Anopheles gambiae against Human and Rodent Malaria Species

    PubMed Central

    Mitri, Christian; Jacques, Jean-Claude; Thiery, Isabelle; Riehle, Michelle M.; Xu, Jiannong; Bischoff, Emmanuel; Morlais, Isabelle; Nsango, Sandrine E.; Vernick, Kenneth D.; Bourgouin, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Genetically controlled resistance of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium falciparum is a common trait in the natural population, and a cluster of natural resistance loci were mapped to the Plasmodium-Resistance Island (PRI) of the A. gambiae genome. The APL1 family of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) proteins was highlighted by candidate gene studies in the PRI, and is comprised of paralogs APL1A, APL1B and APL1C that share ≥50% amino acid identity. Here, we present a functional analysis of the joint response of APL1 family members during mosquito infection with human and rodent Plasmodium species. Only paralog APL1A protected A. gambiae against infection with the human malaria parasite P. falciparum from both the field population and in vitro culture. In contrast, only paralog APL1C protected against the rodent malaria parasites P. berghei and P. yoelii. We show that anti-P. falciparum protection is mediated by the Imd/Rel2 pathway, while protection against P. berghei infection was shown to require Toll/Rel1 signaling. Further, only the short Rel2-S isoform and not the long Rel2-F isoform of Rel2 confers protection against P. falciparum. Protection correlates with the transcriptional regulation of APL1A by Rel2-S but not Rel2-F, suggesting that the Rel2-S anti-parasite phenotype results at least in part from its transcriptional control over APL1A. These results indicate that distinct members of the APL1 gene family display a mutually exclusive protective effect against different classes of Plasmodium parasites. It appears that a gene-for-pathogen-class system orients the appropriate host defenses against distinct categories of similar pathogens. It is known that insect innate immune pathways can distinguish between grossly different microbes such as Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, or fungi, but the function of the APL1 paralogs reveals that mosquito innate immunity possesses a more fine-grained capacity to distinguish between classes of closely

  10. Rodent repellency

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, J.B.; Welch, J.F.; Bellack, E.

    1950-01-01

    In the course of studies involving more than 2,500 chemical repellents, it has been found that certain groups of- compounds containing nitrogen or sulfur are repellent to rats under the , test conditions and it appears probable that some of these compounds might be used for the protection of packaged goods against rodent attacks. Additional tests to determine optimum methods of application will be necessary before final evaluation of these compounds will be possible and extensive field trials will be required to establish the degree of protection which may be afforded by the use of these materials. Pending such final evaluation, it may be assumed that the results,to date offer a means of selecting the most promising types of'materials for further trial....On the basis of the test data, it appears that some amine derivative, such as a salt of some organic, acid, or a complex with trinitrobenzene or with a metallic salt of a dialkyl dithiocarbamic acid might offer promise of protection of packaging materials against rodent attacks....Protection might be obtained through the use of certain 'physical deterrents' such as plastics, waxes or drying oils.

  11. Fenamate NSAIDs inhibit the NLRP3 inflammasome and protect against Alzheimer's disease in rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Michael J. D.; Rivers-Auty, Jack; Schilling, Tom; Spencer, Nicholas G.; Watremez, William; Fasolino, Victoria; Booth, Sophie J.; White, Claire S.; Baldwin, Alex G.; Freeman, Sally; Wong, Raymond; Latta, Clare; Yu, Shi; Jackson, Joshua; Fischer, Nicolas; Koziel, Violette; Pillot, Thierry; Bagnall, James; Allan, Stuart M.; Paszek, Pawel; Galea, James; Harte, Michael K.; Eder, Claudia; Lawrence, Catherine B.; Brough, David

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 enzymes. The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multi-protein complex responsible for the processing of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β and is implicated in many inflammatory diseases. Here we show that several clinically approved and widely used NSAIDs of the fenamate class are effective and selective inhibitors of the NLRP3 inflammasome via inhibition of the volume-regulated anion channel in macrophages, independently of COX enzymes. Flufenamic acid and mefenamic acid are efficacious in NLRP3-dependent rodent models of inflammation in air pouch and peritoneum. We also show therapeutic effects of fenamates using a model of amyloid beta induced memory loss and a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. These data suggest that fenamate NSAIDs could be repurposed as NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors and Alzheimer's disease therapeutics. PMID:27509875

  12. Protective Effects of Indole-3-Carbinol-Loaded Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Nanoparticles Against Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Heun; Kim, Jwa-Jin; Bak, Dong Ho; Yu, Kwang Sik; Lee, Je Hun; Lee, Nam Seob; Jeong, Young Gil; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Dong-Kwan; Han, Seung-Yun

    2015-10-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Nonetheless, the potential of I3C to treat neurodegenerative diseases remains unclear because of its poor ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Because polymer-based drug delivery systems stabilized by surfactants have been intensively utilized as a strategy to cross the blood-brain barrier, we prepared I3C-loaded poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) that were stabilized by Tween 80 (T80) (I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs) and examined their neuroprotective potential in vitro. We prepared I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs with an oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation technique and confirmed their successful synthesis with both transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy. I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs were then used to treat PC12 neuronal cells injured by glutamate excitotoxicity (GE) and examined the resulting survival rates compared with PC12 cells treated with I3C only. The 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay revealed higher survival rates in I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs-treated cells after GE injury compared with those treated with I3C only. Furthermore, I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs decreased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis-related enzymes (Caspase-3 and -8) in GE-damaged neuronal cells. Taken together, I3C-PLGA-T80-NPs might possess neuroprotective effects against GE through ROS scavenging and subsequent apoptosis blockage. PMID:26726441

  13. Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota protects against nonalcoholic steatohepatitis development in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Hirofumi; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Fujishiro, Midori; Nakatsu, Yusuke; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Matsunaga, Yasuka; Kamata, Hideaki; Asahara, Takashi; Yoshida, Yasuto; Chonan, Osamu; Iwashita, Misaki; Nishimura, Fusanori; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2013-12-01

    Gut microbiota alterations are associated with various disorders. In this study, gut microbiota changes were investigated in a methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) rodent model, and the effects of administering Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) on the development of NASH were also investigated. Mice were divided into three groups, given the normal chow diet (NCD), MCD diet, or the MCD diet plus daily oral administration of LcS for 6 wk. Gut microbiota analyses for the three groups revealed that lactic acid bacteria such as Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus in feces were markedly reduced by the MCD diet. Interestingly, oral administration of LcS to MCD diet-fed mice increased not only the L. casei subgroup but also other lactic acid bacteria. Subsequently, NASH development was evaluated based on hepatic histochemical findings, serum parameters, and various mRNA and/or protein expression levels. LcS intervention markedly suppressed MCD-diet-induced NASH development, with reduced serum lipopolysaccharide concentrations, suppression of inflammation and fibrosis in the liver, and reduced colon inflammation. Therefore, reduced populations of lactic acid bacteria in the colon may be involved in the pathogenesis of MCD diet-induced NASH, suggesting normalization of gut microbiota to be effective for treating NASH. PMID:24113768

  14. Mild Sensory Stimulation Completely Protects the Adult Rodent Cortex from Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chen-Bee, Cynthia H.; Frostig, Ron D.

    2010-01-01

    Despite progress in reducing ischemic stroke damage, complete protection remains elusive. Here we demonstrate that, after permanent occlusion of a major cortical artery (middle cerebral artery; MCA), single whisker stimulation can induce complete protection of the adult rat cortex, but only if administered within a critical time window. Animals that receive early treatment are histologically and behaviorally equivalent to healthy controls and have normal neuronal function. Protection of the cortex clearly requires reperfusion to the ischemic area despite permanent occlusion. Using blood flow imaging and other techniques we found evidence of reversed blood flow into MCA branches from an alternate arterial source via collateral vessels (inter-arterial connections), a potential mechanism for reperfusion. These findings suggest that the cortex is capable of extensive blood flow reorganization and more importantly that mild sensory stimulation can provide complete protection from impending stroke given early intervention. Such non-invasive, non-pharmacological intervention has clear translational potential. PMID:20585659

  15. Discovery of novel non-steroidal reverse indole mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Anthony K; Bunte, Ellen Vande; Mal, Rudrajit; Lan, Ping; Sun, Zhongxiang; Crespo, Alejandro; Wiltsie, Judyann; Clemas, Joseph; Gibson, Jack; Contino, Lisa; Lisnock, JeanMarie; Zhou, Gaochao; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Jochnowitz, Nina; Ma, Xiuying; Pan, Yi; Brown, Patricia; Zamlynny, Beata; Bateman, Thomas; Leung, Dennis; Xu, Ling; Tong, Xinchun; Liu, Kun; Crook, Martin; Sinclair, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Reported herein are a series of reverse indoles that represent novel non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists. The key structure-activity relationships (SAR) are presented below. This reverse indole series is exemplified by a compound that demonstrated efficacy in an acute natriuresis rodent model comparable to marketed MR antagonists, spironolactone and eplerenone. PMID:27161805

  16. Treatment with hyperimmune equine immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin fragments completely protects rodents from Ebola virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xuexing; Wong, Gary; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; He, Shihua; Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Weijin; Jin, Hongli; Gai, Weiwei; Chu, Di; Cao, Zengguo; Wang, Chong; Fan, Quanshui; Chi, Hang; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Yan, Feihu; Huang, Geng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Nan; Li, Yuetao; Qian, Jun; Zou, Yong; Kobinger, Gary; Gao, George Fu; Qiu, Xiangguo; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Recent successes with monoclonal antibody cocktails ZMappTM and MIL77 against Ebola virus (EBOV) infections have reignited interest in antibody-based therapeutics. Since the production process for monoclonal antibodies can be prolonged and costly, alternative treatments should be investigated. We produced purified equine antisera from horses hyperimmunized with EBOV virus-like particles, and tested the post-exposure efficacy of the antisera in a mouse model of infection. BALB/c mice were given up to 2 mg of purified equine antisera per animal, at 30 minutes, 1 or 2 days post-infection (dpi), in which all animals survived. To decrease the possibility of serum sickness, the equine antisera was digested with pepsin to generate F(ab′)2 fragments, with in vitro neutralizing activity comparable to whole immunoglobulin. Full protection was achieved with when treatment was initiated at 1 dpi, but the suboptimal protection observed with the 30 minute and 2 dpi groups demonstrate that in addition to virus neutralization, other Fc-dependent antibody mechanisms may also contribute to survival. Guinea pigs given 20 mg of antisera or F(ab′)2 at or starting at 1 or 2 dpi were also fully protected from EBOV infection. These results justify future efficacy studies for purified equine products in NHPs. PMID:27067649

  17. Treatment with hyperimmune equine immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin fragments completely protects rodents from Ebola virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xuexing; Wong, Gary; Zhao, Yongkun; Wang, Hualei; He, Shihua; Bi, Yuhai; Chen, Weijin; Jin, Hongli; Gai, Weiwei; Chu, Di; Cao, Zengguo; Wang, Chong; Fan, Quanshui; Chi, Hang; Gao, Yuwei; Wang, Tiecheng; Feng, Na; Yan, Feihu; Huang, Geng; Zheng, Ying; Li, Nan; Li, Yuetao; Qian, Jun; Zou, Yong; Kobinger, Gary; Gao, George Fu; Qiu, Xiangguo; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    Recent successes with monoclonal antibody cocktails ZMapp(TM) and MIL77 against Ebola virus (EBOV) infections have reignited interest in antibody-based therapeutics. Since the production process for monoclonal antibodies can be prolonged and costly, alternative treatments should be investigated. We produced purified equine antisera from horses hyperimmunized with EBOV virus-like particles, and tested the post-exposure efficacy of the antisera in a mouse model of infection. BALB/c mice were given up to 2 mg of purified equine antisera per animal, at 30 minutes, 1 or 2 days post-infection (dpi), in which all animals survived. To decrease the possibility of serum sickness, the equine antisera was digested with pepsin to generate F(ab')2 fragments, with in vitro neutralizing activity comparable to whole immunoglobulin. Full protection was achieved with when treatment was initiated at 1 dpi, but the suboptimal protection observed with the 30 minute and 2 dpi groups demonstrate that in addition to virus neutralization, other Fc-dependent antibody mechanisms may also contribute to survival. Guinea pigs given 20 mg of antisera or F(ab')2 at or starting at 1 or 2 dpi were also fully protected from EBOV infection. These results justify future efficacy studies for purified equine products in NHPs. PMID:27067649

  18. Marine Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Netz, Natalie; Opatz, Till

    2015-01-01

    Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed. PMID:26287214

  19. Marine Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Netz, Natalie; Opatz, Till

    2015-08-01

    Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed. PMID:26287214

  20. Benefits of protective fencing to plant and rodent communities of the western Mojave Desert, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Matthew L.

    1995-01-01

    Human disturbance in the western Mojave Desert takes many forms. The most pervasive are livestock grazing and off-highway vehicle use. Over the past few decades several areas within this region have been fenced to preclude human disturbance. These areas provide opportunities to study the impact of human activities in a desert ecosystem. This paper documents the response of plant and small mammal populations to fencing constructed between 1978 and 1979 at the Desert Tortoise Research Natural Area, Kern County, California. Aboveground live annual plant biomass was generally greater inside than outside the fenced plots during April 1990, 1991, and 1992. The alien grass Schismus barbatus was a notable exception, producing more biomass in the unprotected area. Forb biomass was greater than that of alien annual grasses inside the fence during all three years of the study. Outside the fence, forb biomass was significantly higher than that of alien grasses only during spring 1992. Percent cover of perennial shrubs was higher inside the fence than outside, while no significant trend was detected in density. There was als more seed biomass inside the fence; this may have contributed to the greater diversity and density of Merriam's kangaroo rats ( Dipodomys merriami), long-tailed pocket mice ( Chaetodipus formosus), and southern grasshopper mice ( Onychomys torridus) in the protected area. These results show that protection from human disturbance has many benefits, including greater overall community biomass and diversity. The significance and generality of these results can be further tested by studying other exclosures of varying age and configurations in different desert regions of the southwestern United States.

  1. Rodent Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for rodent control in crop fields, threshing yards, and rural residential areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for rodent control at the national level. Training personnel in rodent control procedures and procedures for educating the public in the necessity for control are covered. (EC)

  2. Nucleophilic index value: implication in the protection by indole-3-carbinol from N-nitrosodimethylamine cyto and genotoxicity in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Shertzer, H G; Tabor, M W

    1988-04-01

    A novel assay system was developed in order to quantitate the nucleophilicity of pure chemicals or tissue extracts. This Nucleophilic Index Value (NIV) assay was based on the ability of putative nucleophiles to inhibit the methylation of cysteine by limiting concentrations of the electrophilic source, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU). Efficacy of model and cellular nucleophiles was quantitated as nmol cysteine protected by the nucleophile from methylation by MNU/h/mM compound. The NIVs of the pure compounds ascorbate, glutathione, 4-(4-nitrobenzyl)-pyridine (NBP) and indole-3-carbinol (I-3-C) were 2400, 1600, 3 and 0, respectively. When mice were treated with I-3-C by gavage at dosages of 0, 25, 50, 75 or 100 mg/kg body wt, the NIV for ethyl acetate extracts of the livers 1 h after treatment were 0, 33, 47, 52 and 92 nmol cysteine preserved/h/g tissue, respectively. The I-3-C enhancement of NIV was not attributable to ascorbate or glutathione, neither of which were present in the ethyl extracts of liver. When mice were treated with 10 mg N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA)/kg body wt 1 h after the varying dosages of I-3-C, the 24 h post-NDMA plasma alanine transaminase (ALT) values were decreased by I-3-C pretreatment in a dose-dependent fashion. Plasma ALT values were used in this study as an indicator of hepatotoxicity. The coefficient of determination, r2, computed from the linear least squares correlation coefficient between NIV and ALT values, was 0.80 (0-100 mg I-3-C/kg) and 0.97 (0-75 mg/kg).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3379233

  3. Protective Effect of SAHA against LPS-induced Liver Damage in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yili; Zhou, Peter; Liu, Baoling; Bambakidis, Ted; Mazitschek, Ralph; Alam, Hasan B.; Li, Yongqing

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has a deleterious effect on several organs including the liver and eventually leads to endotoxic shock and death. LPS-induced hepatotoxicity is characterized by disturbed intracellular redox balance and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, leading to liver injury. We have shown that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI), improves survival in a murine model of LPS-induced shock, but the protective effect of SAHA against liver damage remains unknown. The goal of this study was to investigate the mechanism underlying SAHA action in murine livers. METHOD Male C57BL/6J mice (6-8 weeks) weighing 20-25 g were randomly divided into three groups: (A) a sham group was given isotonic sodium chloride solution (10 μL/g body weight, intraperitoneal, i.p.) with DMSO (1 μl/g body weight, i.p.); (B) a LPS group was challenged with LPS (20 mg/kg, i.p.) dissolved in isotonic sodium chloride solution with DMSO; (C) a LPS plus SAHA group was treated with SAHA (50 mg/kg, i.p.) dissolved in DMSO immediately after injection of LPS (20 mg/kg, i.p.). Mice were anesthetized, and their livers were harvested 6 or 24 hours after injection to analyze whether SAHA affected production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of apoptotic proteins in the liver cells of challenged mice. RESULTS SAHA counteracted LPS-induced production of ROS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and nitrite) and reversed an LPS-induced decrease in antioxidant enzyme, glutathione (GSH). SAHA also attenuated LPS-induced hepatic apoptosis. Moreover, SAHA inhibited activation of the redox-sensitive kinase, apoptosis signal-regulating kinase-1 (ASK1), and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). CONCLUSION Our data indicates, for the first time, that SAHA is capable of alleviating LPS-induced hepatotoxicity and suggests that a blockade of the upstream

  4. Comparison of potential protective effects of melatonin, indole-3-propionic acid, and propylthiouracil against lipid peroxidation caused by potassium bromate in the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Karbownik, Malgorzata; Stasiak, Magdalena; Zasada, Krzysztof; Zygmunt, Arkadiusz; Lewinski, Andrzej

    2005-05-01

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) is a prooxidant and carcinogen, inducing thyroid tumors. Melatonin and indole-3-propionic acid (IPA) are effective antioxidants. Some antioxidative effects of propylthiouracil (PTU)--a thyrostatic drug--have been found. The aim of the study was to compare protective effects of melatonin, IPA, and PTU against lipid peroxidation in the thyroids, collected from rats treated with KBrO3, and in homogenates of porcine thyroids, incubated in the presence of KBrO3. Wistar rats were administered KBrO3 (110 mg/kg b.w., i.p., on the 10th day of the experiment) and/or melatonin, or IPA (0.0645 mmol/kg b.w., i.p., twice daily, for 10 days), or PTU (0.025% solution in drinking water, for 10 days). Homogenates of porcine thyroids were incubated for 30 min in the presence of KBrO3 (5 mM) plus one of the antioxidants: melatonin (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, 7.5 mM), or IPA (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 mM), or PTU (0.01, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0 mM). The level of lipid peroxidation products (MDA + 4-HDA) was measured spectrophotometrically in thyroid homogenates. In vivo pretreatment with either melatonin or with IPA or with PTU decreased lipid peroxidation caused by KBrO3--injections in rat thyroid gland. Under in vitro conditions, PTU (5.0, 7.5, and 10.0 mM), but neither melatonin nor IPA, reduced KBrO3-related lipid peroxidation in the homogenates of porcine thyroids. In conclusion, melatonin and IPA may be of great value as protective agents under conditions of exposure to KBrO3. PMID:15723291

  5. Biosynthesis of Fungal Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Gavia, Diego J.; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This review provides a summary of recent research advances in elucidating the biosynthesis of fungal indole alkaloids. Different strategies used to incorporate and derivatize the indole/indoline moieties in various families of fungal indole alkaloids will be discussed, including tryptophan-containing nonribosomal peptides and polyketide-nonribosomal peptide hybrids; and alkaloids derived from other indole building blocks. This review also includes discussion regarding the downstream modifications that generate chemical and structural diversity among indole alkaloids. PMID:25180619

  6. Repetitive live sporozoites inoculation under arteether chemoprophylaxis confers protection against subsequent sporozoite challenge in rodent malaria model.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Siddiqui, Arif Jamal; Goyal, Manish; Prakash, Kirtika; Soni, Awakash; Puri, Sunil K

    2016-06-01

    Inoculation with live sporozoites under prophylactic antimalarial cover (CPS-immunization) represents an alternate approach to develop sterile, reproducible, and long-term protection against malaria. Here, we have employed arteether (ART), a semi synthetic derivative of artemisinin to explore its potential as a chemoprophylaxis candidate in CPS approach and systematically compared the protective potential of arteether with mefloquine, azithromycin and primaquine. Blood stage patency and quantitative RT-PCR of liver stage parasite load were monitored as primary key end-points for protection against malaria challenge infection. For this purpose, sequential exposures of Plasmodium yoelii sporozoites under prophylactic treatment with arteether (ART), mefloquine (MFQ), azithromycin (AZ) or primaquine (PQ) was conducted in experimental Swiss mice. Our results show that during the first three sequential exposures (1st, 2nd and 3rd challenge) no marked difference in the blood stage patency was observed between control and CPS-ART group. However, delayed patency was recorded following 4th sporozoite challenge and mice enjoyed sterile protection after 5th sporozoite challenge. A similar response was observed in CPS-MFQ group, whereas earlier protection was recorded in CPS-AZ group i.e., after 4th sprozoite challenge. However, mice under PQ cover did not show any protection/delay in patency even after five sequential sporozoite inoculations, possibly due to inhibition of liver stage development. Furthermore, protection acquired by CPS-immunization is stage-specific as the protected mice remained susceptible to challenge with blood stage parasites. In short, the present study demonstrates that sporozoite administration under ART, MFQ or AZ treatment confers strong protection against subsequent sporozoite infection and the acquired response is dependent on the presence of liver stage parasites. PMID:26925772

  7. Aqueous stem bark extract of Stereospermum kunthianum (Cham, Sandrine Petit) protects against generalized seizures in pentylenetetrazole and electro-convulsive models in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ching, F P; Omogbai, E K I; Otokiti, I O

    2009-01-01

    Stereospermum kunthianum, Cham Sandrine Petit (Bignoniaceae) known in English as pink jacaranda is used in traditional medicine to treat an array of ailments including febrile convulsions in infants and young children by the rural dwellers in Nigeria. This study examined the anticonvulsant activity of its aqueous stem bark extract (100 - 400mg/kg) against maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rodents. Phenobarbitone and ethosuximide were used as reference anticonvulsant drugs for comparison. Stereospermum kunthianum extract (200 - 400mg/kg, i.p.) remarkably protected (76.9% and 84.6 % respectively) the rats against electroshock-induced seizures. However, the extract (200- 400mg/kg) when administered orally showed a comparatively less effect (33.3% and 55.6% respectively) to the intraperitoneally administered extract in the maximal electroshock test. The extract (100-400mg/kg, i.p.) significantly delayed (p<0.05) the onset of pentylenetetrazole-induced clonic seizures but only slightly prolonged the time of death of the mice. Although the findings in the present study do not provide conclusive evidence, it appears that the aqueous stem bark extract of Stereospermum kunthianum produces its antiseizure effect by enhancing GABAergic neurotransmission and/or action in the brain. The results indicate that the aqueous extract possesses anticonvulsant activity in rodents and therefore tend to suggest that the shrub may be used as a natural supplementary remedy in the management, control and/or treatment of childhood convulsions. It can be concluded that the aqueous stem bark extract possesses anticonvulsant activity and therefore lend pharmacological credence to the traditionally claimed use in the treatment of childhood convulsions. PMID:20606775

  8. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporin A and tacrolimus protect against podocyte injury induced by puromycin aminonucleoside in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiujin; Jiang, Hong; Ying, Meike; Xie, Zhoutao; Li, Xiayu; Wang, Haibing; Zhao, Jie; Lin, Chuan; Wang, Yucheng; Feng, Shi; Shen, Jia; Weng, Chunhua; Lin, Weiqiang; Wang, Huiping; Zhou, Qin; Bi, Yan; Li, Meng; Wang, Lingyan; Zhu, Tongyu; Huang, Xiaoru; Lan, Hui-Yao; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Podocyte injury and the appearance of proteinuria are features of minimal-change disease (MCD). Cyclosporin A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506) has been reported to reduce proteinuria in patients with nephrotic syndrome, but mechanisms remain unknown. We, therefore, investigated the protective mechanisms of CsA and FK506 on proteinuria in a rat model of MCD induced by puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and in vitro cultured mouse podocytes. Our results showed that CsA and FK506 treatment decreased proteinuria via a mechanism associated to a reduction in the foot-process fusion and desmin, and a recovery of synaptopodin and podocin. In PAN-treated mouse podocytes, pre-incubation with CsA and FK506 restored the distribution of the actin cytoskeleton, increased the expression of synaptopodin and podocin, improved podocyte viability, and reduced the migrating activities of podocytes. Treatment with CsA and FK506 also inhibited PAN-induced podocytes apoptosis, which was associated with the induction of Bcl-xL and inhibition of Bax, cleaved caspase 3, and cleaved PARP expression. Further studies revealed that CsA and FK506 inhibited PAN-induced p38 and JNK signaling, thereby protecting podocytes from PAN-induced injury. In conclusion, CsA and FK506 inhibit proteinuria by protecting against PAN-induced podocyte injury, which may be associated with inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27580845

  9. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporin A and tacrolimus protect against podocyte injury induced by puromycin aminonucleoside in rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiujin; Jiang, Hong; Ying, Meike; Xie, Zhoutao; Li, Xiayu; Wang, Haibing; Zhao, Jie; Lin, Chuan; Wang, Yucheng; Feng, Shi; Shen, Jia; Weng, Chunhua; Lin, Weiqiang; Wang, Huiping; Zhou, Qin; Bi, Yan; Li, Meng; Wang, Lingyan; Zhu, Tongyu; Huang, Xiaoru; Lan, Hui-Yao; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Podocyte injury and the appearance of proteinuria are features of minimal-change disease (MCD). Cyclosporin A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506) has been reported to reduce proteinuria in patients with nephrotic syndrome, but mechanisms remain unknown. We, therefore, investigated the protective mechanisms of CsA and FK506 on proteinuria in a rat model of MCD induced by puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and in vitro cultured mouse podocytes. Our results showed that CsA and FK506 treatment decreased proteinuria via a mechanism associated to a reduction in the foot-process fusion and desmin, and a recovery of synaptopodin and podocin. In PAN-treated mouse podocytes, pre-incubation with CsA and FK506 restored the distribution of the actin cytoskeleton, increased the expression of synaptopodin and podocin, improved podocyte viability, and reduced the migrating activities of podocytes. Treatment with CsA and FK506 also inhibited PAN-induced podocytes apoptosis, which was associated with the induction of Bcl-xL and inhibition of Bax, cleaved caspase 3, and cleaved PARP expression. Further studies revealed that CsA and FK506 inhibited PAN-induced p38 and JNK signaling, thereby protecting podocytes from PAN-induced injury. In conclusion, CsA and FK506 inhibit proteinuria by protecting against PAN-induced podocyte injury, which may be associated with inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27580845

  10. Sulforaphane Protects Rodent Retinas against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury through the Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruixing; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Yu, Albert Cheung Hoi; Pu, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    Retinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury induces oxidative stress, leukocyte infiltration, and neuronal cell death. Sulforaphane (SF), which can be obtained in cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, exerts protective effects in response to oxidative stress in various tissues. These effects can be initiated through nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-mediated induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). This investigation was designed to elucidate the neural protective mechanisms of SF in the retinal I/R rat model. Animals were intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected with SF (12.5 mg/kg) or vehicle (corn oil) once a day for 7 consecutive days. Then, retinal I/R was made by elevating the intraocular pressure (IOP) to 130 mmHg for 1 h. To determine if HO-1 was involved in the Nrf2 antioxidant pathway, rats were subjected to protoporphyrin IX zinc (II) (ZnPP, 30 mg/kg, i.p.) treatments at 24 h before retinal ischemia. The neuroprotective effects of SF were assessed by determining the morphology of the retina, counting the infiltrating inflammatory cells and the surviving retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and amacrine cells, and measuring apoptosis in the retinal layers. The expression of Nrf2 and HO-1 was studied by immunofluorescence analysis and western blotting. I/R induced a marked increase of ROS generation, caused pronounced inflammation, increased the apoptosis of RGCs and amacrine cells and caused the thinning of the inner retinal layer (IRL), and these effects were diminished or abolished by SF pretreatment. Meanwhile, SF pretreatment significantly elevated the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the level of HO-1 expression in the I/R retinas; however, ZnPP reversed the protective effects of SF on I/R retinas. Together, we offer direct evidence that SF had protective effects on I/R retinas, which could be attributed, at least in part, to the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 antioxidant pathway. PMID:25470382

  11. Baculovirus-Vectored Multistage Plasmodium vivax Vaccine Induces Both Protective and Transmission-Blocking Immunities against Transgenic Rodent Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Masanori; Iyori, Mitsuhiro; Blagborough, Andrew M.; Fukumoto, Shinya; Funatsu, Tomohiro; Sinden, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    A multistage malaria vaccine targeting the pre-erythrocytic and sexual stages of Plasmodium could effectively protect individuals against infection from mosquito bites and provide transmission-blocking (TB) activity against the sexual stages of the parasite, respectively. This strategy could help prevent malaria infections in individuals and, on a larger scale, prevent malaria transmission in communities of endemicity. Here, we describe the development of a multistage Plasmodium vivax vaccine which simultaneously expresses P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (PvCSP) and P25 (Pvs25) protein of this species as a fusion protein, thereby acting as a pre-erythrocytic vaccine and a TB vaccine, respectively. A new-concept vaccine platform based on the baculovirus dual-expression system (BDES) was evaluated. The BDES-Pvs25-PvCSP vaccine displayed correct folding of the Pvs25-PvCSP fusion protein on the viral envelope and was highly expressed upon transduction of mammalian cells in vitro. This vaccine induced high levels of antibodies to Pvs25 and PvCSP and elicited protective (43%) and TB (82%) efficacies against transgenic P. berghei parasites expressing the corresponding P. vivax antigens in mice. Our data indicate that our BDES, which functions as both a subunit and DNA vaccine, can offer a promising multistage vaccine capable of delivering a potent antimalarial pre-erythrocytic and TB response via a single immunization regimen. PMID:25092912

  12. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Regulates TRPC3/6 Channels and Protects Against Myocardial Infarction in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Pengzhou; Zhao, Jing; Cai, Benzhi; Tian, Shanshan; Huang, Wei; Guo, Jing; Sun, Chuan; Li, Yue; Du, Zhimin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with coronary artery diseases. However, its role and mechanism in myocardial infarction (MI) is not fully understood. Methods: Wistar rat and Kunming mouse model of MI were induced by the ligation of left coronary artery. Blood samples were collected from MI rats and patients. Plasma BDNF level, protein expression of BDNF, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and its downstream transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC)3/6 channels were examined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blot. Infarct size, cardiac function and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were measured after intra-myocardium injection with recombinant human BDNF. Protective role of BDNF against cardiomyocyte apoptosis was confirmed by BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc. The regulation of TRPC3/6 channels by BDNF was validated by pretreating with TRPC blocker (2-Aminoethyl diphenylborinate, 2-APB) and TRPC3/6 siRNAs. Results: Circulating BDNF was significantly enhanced in MI rats and patients. Protein expression of BDNF, TrkB and TRPC3/6 channels were upregulated in MI. 3 days post-MI, BDNF treatment markedly reduced the infarct size and serum lactate dehydrogenase activity. Meanwhile, echocardiography indicated that BDNF significantly improved cardiac function of MI mice. Furthermore, BDNF markedly inhibited cardiomyocyte apoptosis by upregulating Bcl-2 expression and downregulating caspase-3 expression and activity in ischemic myocardium. In neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, cell viability was dramatically increased by BDNF in hypoxia, which was restored by TrkB-Fc. Furthermore, protective role of BDNF against hypoxia-induced apoptosis was reversed by 2-APB and TRPC3/6 siRNAs. Conclusion: BDNF/TrkB alleviated cardiac ischemic injury and inhibited cardiomyocytes apoptosis by regulating TRPC3/6 channels, which provides a novel potential therapeutic candidate for MI. PMID:25892961

  13. Enhanced protection against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury with combined melatonin and exendin-4 in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yi-Chih; Hsu, Shu-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Chao; Sung, Pei-Hsun; Chen, Yi-Ling; Huang, Tien-Hung; Kao, Gour-Shenq; Chen, Sheng-Yi; Chen, Kuan-Hung; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Yip, Hon-Kan; Lee, Fan-Yen

    2016-08-01

    We tested the hypothesis that combined treatment with melatonin, an anti-oxidant, and exendin-4, an anti-inflammatory agent, was superior to either alone for protecting the kidney from ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Male adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n=40) were equally divided into group 1 (sham-operated control), group 2 (IR only, IR=1h/72h), group 3 (IR-exendin-4, 10 µg/kg at 30 min, 24 h, 48 h after IR procedure), group 4 (IR-melatonin, i.p. 50 mg at 30 min, then 20 mg at 6 and 18 h after IR procedure), and group 5 (combined IR-exendin-4-melatonin). All animals were sacrificed by 72 h after IR/sham procedure. The results showed that the kidney injury score, plasma creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were highest in group 2 and lowest in group 1, significantly higher in groups 3 and 4 than those in group 5 and significantly higher in group 3 than those in group 4 (all p < 0.001). The protein expressions of inflammatory (toll-like receptor 4, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin-1β), apoptotic (mitochondrial Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, p53), podocyte integrity (E-cadherin, P-cadherin), and cell survival (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin) biomarkers, as well the podocyte dysfunction biomarkers (Wnt1/Wnt4/β-catenin) displayed a pattern identical to that of creatinine level among the five groups (all p < 0.001). Microscopic findings demonstrated that podocyte dysfunction (Wnt1/Wnt4/β-catenin expression) and inflammatory (CD14 and F4/80-positively stained cells) biomarkers exhibited an identical pattern, whereas that of antioxidant (HO-1(+), NQO-1(+) cells) biomarkers showed an opposite pattern compared to that of creatinine level among the five groups (all p < 0.001). Combined melatonin-exendin-4 therapy offered an additional benefit in protecting the kidney from acute IR injury. PMID:27037275

  14. Toxicological evaluation of Terminalia paniculata bark extract and its protective effect against CCl4-induced liver injury in rodents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Based on the reported antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of Terminalia paniculata, the bark aqueous extract (TPW) was investigated against liver damage. Methods Intrinsic cytotoxicity was tested on normal human liver (Chang) cell lines, followed by acute and sub-chronic toxicity studies in mice. TPW was then evaluated against CCl4-induced liver toxicity in rats. Liver enzymes (AST, ALT, and ALP) and antioxidant markers were assessed. The effect of TPW on isolated hepatic cells, post-CCl4 administration, was assessed by isolated mitochondrial membrane staining. The actions of TPW on apoptotic pathway in CCl4-treated Chang cells were also elucidated. Results TPW was found to be safe at all doses tested in both in vitro and in vivo toxicity studies. TPW (400 mg/kg, p.o.) significantly (*p <0.05) improved liver enzyme activity as compared to CCl4. Also, it improved antioxidant status (GSH, GST, MDA and total thiol) and preserved hepatic cell architecture. TPW pre-treatment significantly attenuated the levels of phospho-p53, p53, cleaved caspase-3, phospho-Bad, Bad and cleaved PARP in CCl4-treated Chang cells, improving the viability considerably. Conclusion The findings support a protective role for Terminalia paniculata in pathologies involving oxidative stress. PMID:23742226

  15. Protective effects of systemic treatment with methylprednisolone in a rodent model of non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION).

    PubMed

    Huang, Tzu-Lun; Huang, Shun-Ping; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Lin, Kung-Hung; Chang, Shu-Wen; Tsai, Rong-Kung

    2015-02-01

    This study investigated the protective effects of the administration of steroids on optic nerves (ON) and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rodent model of non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (rAION). We induced rAION using rose bengal and argon laser irradiation in a photodynamic procedure on the optic discs of rats. The treated groups received methylprednisolone (MP) via peritoneal injection for 2 weeks. The control group received intraperitoneal injections of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) post-rAION. At the 4th week post-infarct, MP treatments significantly rescued the RGCs (mm(2)) in the central retinas (1920 ± 210, p < 0.001) and mid-peripheral retinas (950 ± 240, respectively, p = 0.018) compared with those of the PBS-treated rats (central: 900 ± 210 and mid-peripheral: 440 ± 180). Functional assessment with flash visual-evoked potentials demonstrated that P1 latency (ms) was shortened in the MP group compared to the PBS group (108 ± 14 and 147 ± 9, respectively, p < 0.001). In addition, the P1 amplitude (uV) was enhanced in the MP group compared to the PBS group (55 ± 12 and 41 ± 13, respectively, p < 0.05). TUNEL assays showed a decrease in the number of apoptotic cells in the RGC layers of MP-treated retinas compared to the PBS-treated group (p < 0.05). ED1 positive cells (/HPF) were significantly decreased in the ONs of the MP group compared to the PBS group (p < 0.001). In conclusion, systemic administration of MP had neuroprotective effects on RGC survival and ON function in the rAION animal model. PMID:25543054

  16. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  17. Immunogenicity and Protective Efficacy of Brugia malayi Heavy Chain Myosin as Homologous DNA, Protein and Heterologous DNA/Protein Prime Boost Vaccine in Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Jyoti; Pathak, Manisha; Misra, Sweta; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2015-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated the immunoprophylactic efficacy of recombinant heavy chain myosin (Bm-Myo) of Brugia malayi (B. malayi) in rodent models. In the current study, further attempts have been made to improve this efficacy by employing alternate approaches such as homologous DNA (pcD-Myo) and heterologous DNA/protein prime boost (pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo) in BALB/c mouse model. The gene bm-myo was cloned in a mammalian expression vector pcDNA 3.1(+) and protein expression was confirmed in mammalian Vero cell line. A significant degree of protection (79.2%±2.32) against L3 challenge in pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunized group was observed which was much higher than that exerted by Bm-Myo (66.6%±2.23) and pcD-Myo (41.6%±2.45). In the heterologous immunized group, the percentage of peritoneal leukocytes such as macrophages, neutrophils, B cells and T cells marginally increased and their population augmented further significantly following L3 challenge. pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo immunization elicited robust cellular and humoral immune responses as compared to pcD-Myo and Bm-Myo groups as evidenced by an increased accumulation of CD4+, CD8+ T cells and CD19+ B cells in the mouse spleen and activation of peritoneal macrophages. Though immunized animals produced antigen-specific IgG antibodies and isotypes, sera of mice receiving pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo or Bm-Myo developed much higher antibody levels than other groups and there was profound antibody-dependent cellular adhesion and cytotoxicity (ADCC) to B. malayi infective larvae (L3). pcD-Myo+Bm-Myo as well as Bm-Myo mice generated a mixed T helper cell phenotype as evidenced by the production of both pro-inflammatory (IL-2, IFN-γ) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) cytokines. Mice receiving pcD-Myo on contrary displayed a polarized pro-inflammatory immune response. The findings suggest that the priming of animals with DNA followed by protein booster generates heightened and mixed pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses that are capable of providing

  18. Rodents And Other Gnawers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information about rodents and lagomorphs, including definitions and the characteristics of these animals. Contains teaching activities such as "Habitats for Hoppers,""Cartoon Gnawers," and "The Great Rodent Expedition." Reproducible handouts for two of the activities are provided. (TW)

  19. Biochemical Characterization of Indole Prenyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xia; Liu, Yan; Xie, Xiulan; Zheng, Xiao-Dong; Li, Shu-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The putative prenyltransferase gene ACLA_031240 belonging to the dimethylallyltryptophan synthase superfamily was identified in the genome sequence of Aspergillus clavatus and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The soluble His-tagged protein EAW08391 was purified to near homogeneity and used for biochemical investigation with diverse aromatic substrates in the presence of different prenyl diphosphates. It has shown that in the presence of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), the recombinant enzyme accepted very well simple indole derivatives with l-tryptophan as the best substrate. Product formation was also observed for tryptophan-containing cyclic dipeptides but with much lower conversion yields. In contrast, no product formation was detected in the reaction mixtures of l-tryptophan with geranyl or farnesyl diphosphate. Structure elucidation of the enzyme products by NMR and MS analyses proved unequivocally the highly regiospecific regular prenylation at C-5 of the indole nucleus of the simple indole derivatives. EAW08391 was therefore termed 5-dimethylallyltryptophan synthase, and it filled the last gap in the toolbox of indole prenyltransferases regarding their prenylation positions. Km values of 5-dimethylallyltryptophan synthase were determined for l-tryptophan and DMAPP at 34 and 76 μm, respectively. Average turnover number (kcat) at 1.1 s−1 was calculated from kinetic data of l-tryptophan and DMAPP. Catalytic efficiencies of 5-dimethylallyltryptophan synthase for l-tryptophan at 25,588 s−1·m−1 and for other 11 simple indole derivatives up to 1538 s−1·m−1 provided evidence for its potential usage as a catalyst for chemoenzymatic synthesis. PMID:22123822

  20. Rodent Research-1 Validation of Rodent Hardware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Ruth; Beegle, Janet

    2013-01-01

    To achieve novel science objectives, validation of a rodent habitat on ISS will enable - In-flight analyses during long duration spaceflight- Use of genetically altered animals- Application of modern analytical techniques (e.g. genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics)

  1. The glucosinolate breakdown product indole-3-carbinol acts as an auxin antagonist in roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ella; Nisani, Sophia; Yadav, Brijesh S; Woldemariam, Melkamu G; Shai, Ben; Obolski, Uri; Ehrlich, Marcelo; Shani, Eilon; Jander, Georg; Chamovitz, Daniel A

    2015-05-01

    The glucosinolate breakdown product indole-3-carbinol functions in cruciferous vegetables as a protective agent against foraging insects. While the toxic and deterrent effects of glucosinolate breakdown on herbivores and pathogens have been studied extensively, the secondary responses that are induced in the plant by indole-3-carbinol remain relatively uninvestigated. Here we examined the hypothesis that indole-3-carbinol plays a role in influencing plant growth and development by manipulating auxin signaling. We show that indole-3-carbinol rapidly and reversibly inhibits root elongation in a dose-dependent manner, and that this inhibition is accompanied by a loss of auxin activity in the root meristem. A direct interaction between indole-3-carbinol and the auxin perception machinery was suggested, as application of indole-3-carbinol rescues auxin-induced root phenotypes. In vitro and yeast-based protein interaction studies showed that indole-3-carbinol perturbs the auxin-dependent interaction of Transport Inhibitor Response (TIR1) with auxin/3-indoleacetic acid (Aux/IAAs) proteins, further supporting the possibility that indole-3-carbinol acts as an auxin antagonist. The results indicate that chemicals whose production is induced by herbivory, such as indole-3-carbinol, function not only to repel herbivores, but also as signaling molecules that directly compete with auxin to fine tune plant growth and development. PMID:25758811

  2. Gait Analysis Methods for Rodent Models of Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Brittany Y.; Kloefkorn, Heidi E.; Allen, Kyle D.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with osteoarthritis (OA) primarily seek treatment due to pain and disability, yet the primary endpoints for rodent OA models tend to be histological measures of joint destruction. The discrepancy between clinical and preclinical evaluations is problematic, given that radiographic evidence of OA in humans does not always correlate to the severity of patient-reported symptoms. Recent advances in behavioral analyses have provided new methods to evaluate disease sequelae in rodents. Of particular relevance to rodent OA models are methods to assess rodent gait. While obvious differences exist between quadrupedal and bipedal gait sequences, the gait abnormalities seen in humans and in rodent OA models reflect similar compensatory behaviors that protect an injured limb from loading. The purpose of this review is to describe these compensations and current methods used to assess rodent gait characteristics, while detailing important considerations for the selection of gait analysis methods in rodent OA models. PMID:25160712

  3. Study on the synthesis of the cyclopenta[f]indole core of raputindole A.

    PubMed

    Marsch, Nils; Kock, Mario; Lindel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The raputindoles from the rutaceous tree Raputia simulans share a cyclopenta[f]indole partial structure the synthesis of which is subject of this investigation. An efficient route to a series of 1,5-di(indol-6-yl)pentenones was developed via Mo/Au-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangement of tertiary propargylic alcohol precursors. However, none of the enones underwent the desired Nazarov cyclization to a cyclopenta[f]indole. More suitable were 6-hydroxyallylated indolines which gave good yields of cyclopenta[f]indolines after treatment with SnCl4, as soon as sterically demanding β-cyclocitral adducts were reacted. Most successful were Pt(II) and Au(I)-catalyzed cyclizations of N-TIPS-protected indolin-6-yl-substituted propargylacetates which provided the hydrogenated tricyclic cyclopenta[f]indole core system in high yield. PMID:26977193

  4. Study on the synthesis of the cyclopenta[f]indole core of raputindole A

    PubMed Central

    Marsch, Nils; Kock, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Summary The raputindoles from the rutaceous tree Raputia simulans share a cyclopenta[f]indole partial structure the synthesis of which is subject of this investigation. An efficient route to a series of 1,5-di(indol-6-yl)pentenones was developed via Mo/Au-catalyzed Meyer–Schuster rearrangement of tertiary propargylic alcohol precursors. However, none of the enones underwent the desired Nazarov cyclization to a cyclopenta[f]indole. More suitable were 6-hydroxyallylated indolines which gave good yields of cyclopenta[f]indolines after treatment with SnCl4, as soon as sterically demanding β-cyclocitral adducts were reacted. Most successful were Pt(II) and Au(I)-catalyzed cyclizations of N-TIPS-protected indolin-6-yl-substituted propargylacetates which provided the hydrogenated tricyclic cyclopenta[f]indole core system in high yield. PMID:26977193

  5. Daily Movements and Microhabitat Selection of Hantavirus Reservoirs and Other Sigmodontinae Rodent Species that Inhabit a Protected Natural Area of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Maroli, Malena; Vadell, María Victoria; Iglesias, Ayelén; Padula, Paula Julieta; Gómez Villafañe, Isabel Elisa

    2015-09-01

    Abundance, distribution, movement patterns, and habitat selection of a reservoir species influence the dispersal of zoonotic pathogens, and hence, the risk for humans. Movements and microhabitat use of rodent species, and their potential role in the transmission of hantavirus were studied in Otamendi Natural Reserve, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Movement estimators and qualitative characteristics of rodent paths were determined by means of a spool and line device method. Sampling was conducted during November and December 2011, and March, April, June, October, and December 2012. Forty-six Oxymycterus rufus, 41 Akodon azarae, 10 Scapteromys aquaticus and 5 Oligoryzomys flavescens were captured. Movement patterns and distances varied according to sex, habitat type, reproductive season, and body size among species. O. flavescens, reservoir of the etiologic agent of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the region, moved short distances, had the most linear paths and did not share paths with other species. A. azarae had an intermediate linearity index, its movements were longer in the highland grassland than in the lowland marsh and the salty grassland, and larger individuals traveled longer distances. O. rufus had the most tortuous paths and the males moved more during the non-breeding season. S. aquaticus movements were associated with habitat type with longer distances traveled in the lowland marsh than in the salty grassland. Hantavirus antibodies were detected in 20% of A. azarae and were not detected in any other species. Seropositive individuals were captured during the breeding season and 85% of them were males. A. azarae moved randomly and shared paths with all the other species, which could promote hantavirus spillover events. PMID:26063039

  6. Auditing laboratory rodent biosecurity programs.

    PubMed

    Porter, William P; Horn, Mandy J; Cooper, Dale M; Klein, Hilton J

    2013-10-22

    A rodent biosecurity program that includes periodic evaluation of procedures used in an institution's vivarium can be used to ensure that best practices are in place to prevent a microbial pathogen outbreak. As a result of an ongoing comprehensive biosecurity review within their North American and European production facilities, the authors developed a novel biosecurity auditing process and worksheet that could be useful in other animal care and use operations. The authors encourage other institutions to consider initiating similar audits of their biosecurity programs to protect the health of their laboratory animals. PMID:24150170

  7. Responses of Pisum sativum L. to exogenous indole acetic acid application under manganese toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Savita; Singh, Vijay Pratap; Maurya, Jagat Narayan

    2011-06-01

    Responses of pea (Pisum sativum L.) seedlings to manganese (50, 100 and 250 μM) and indole acetic acid (10 and 100 μM) treatments were investigated. Single and combined exposure of pea to manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot fresh mass, chlorophyll, carotenoids, protein and nitrogen while ammonium content increased compared to the control. Combined treatment of pea with 250 μM manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot fresh mass by 54% and 51%, chlorophyll and carotenoids by 31% and 26%, root and shoot protein by 47% and 44%, and root and shoot nitrogen by 44% and 40%, respectively. Activities of glutamine synthetase and glutamate synthase were decreased by the exposure of manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid while glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased. Combined application of 250 μM manganese and 100 μM indole acetic acid decreased root and shoot glutamine synthetase activity by 44% and 39%, and glutamate synthase activity by 39% and 37% while root and shoot glutamate dehydrogenase activity increased by 47% and 42%, respectively compared to the control. In contrast, application of 10 μM indole acetic acid together with manganese decreased the negative impacts of manganese, and promoted seedling growth compared to the manganese treatments alone. This study has shown that 10 μM indole acetic acid protected pea seedlings appreciably from manganese toxicity by regulating ammonium content and the activities of enzymes of ammonium assimilation, while 100 μM of indole acetic acid exhibited opposite response under manganese toxicity. PMID:21516457

  8. Detoxification of Indole by an Indole-Induced Flavoprotein Oxygenase from Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guang-Huey; Chen, Hao-Ping; Shu, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Indole, a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan, is a toxic signaling molecule, which can inhibit bacterial growth. To overcome indole-induced toxicity, many bacteria have developed enzymatic defense systems to convert indole to non-toxic, water-insoluble indigo. We previously demonstrated that, like other aromatic compound-degrading bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii can also convert indole to indigo. However, no work has been published investigating this mechanism. Here, we have shown that the growth of wild-type A. baumannii is severely inhibited in the presence of 3.5 mM indole. However, at lower concentrations, growth is stable, implying that the bacteria may be utilizing a survival mechanism to oxidize indole. To this end, we have identified a flavoprotein oxygenase encoded by the iifC gene of A. baumannii. Further, our results suggest that expressing this recombinant oxygenase protein in Escherichia coli can drive indole oxidation to indigo in vitro. Genome analysis shows that the iif operon is exclusively present in the genomes of A. baumannii and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also indicate that the iif operon is activated by indole through the AraC-like transcriptional regulator IifR. Taken together, these data suggest that this species of bacteria utilizes a novel indole-detoxification mechanism that is modulated by IifC, a protein that appears to be, at least to some extent, regulated by IifR. PMID:26390211

  9. Detoxification of Indole by an Indole-Induced Flavoprotein Oxygenase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    PubMed

    Lin, Guang-Huey; Chen, Hao-Ping; Shu, Hung-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Indole, a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan, is a toxic signaling molecule, which can inhibit bacterial growth. To overcome indole-induced toxicity, many bacteria have developed enzymatic defense systems to convert indole to non-toxic, water-insoluble indigo. We previously demonstrated that, like other aromatic compound-degrading bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii can also convert indole to indigo. However, no work has been published investigating this mechanism. Here, we have shown that the growth of wild-type A. baumannii is severely inhibited in the presence of 3.5 mM indole. However, at lower concentrations, growth is stable, implying that the bacteria may be utilizing a survival mechanism to oxidize indole. To this end, we have identified a flavoprotein oxygenase encoded by the iifC gene of A. baumannii. Further, our results suggest that expressing this recombinant oxygenase protein in Escherichia coli can drive indole oxidation to indigo in vitro. Genome analysis shows that the iif operon is exclusively present in the genomes of A. baumannii and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also indicate that the iif operon is activated by indole through the AraC-like transcriptional regulator IifR. Taken together, these data suggest that this species of bacteria utilizes a novel indole-detoxification mechanism that is modulated by IifC, a protein that appears to be, at least to some extent, regulated by IifR. PMID:26390211

  10. Degradation of indole by Alcaligenes spec.

    PubMed

    Claus, G; Kutzner, H J

    1983-01-01

    Alcaligenes spec. strain In 3 was isolated from an enrichment culture with indole inoculated with activated sludge. The organism was able to grow with indole as sole source of carbon and nitrogen. During growth with this substrate indigo and anthranilate accumulated in the culture broth. By measurement of the oxidation of intermediates (O(2)-uptake) and determination of the activity of enzymes responsible for ring cleavage the following pathway for indole degradation could be established: indole → indoxyl → isatin → anthranilate → gentisate → maleyl pyruvate → fumaryl pyruvate → fumarate + pyruvate. - Alcaligenes spec. strain In 3 was also able to grow with various aromatic compounds; these were degraded by ortho- or meta-cleavage or via the gentisinic acid pathway. PMID:23194589

  11. Activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 Antioxidant Pathway Contributes to the Protective Effects of Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides in the Rodent Retina after Ischemia-Reperfusion-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung; So, Kwok-Fai; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Pu, Mingliang

    2014-01-01

    Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP), extracts from the wolfberries, are protective to retina after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). The antioxidant response element (ARE)–mediated antioxidant pathway plays an important role in maintaining the redox status of the retina. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), combined with potent AREs in its promoter, is a highly effective therapeutic target for the protection against neurodegenerative diseases, including I/R-induced retinal damage. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether the protective effect of LBP after I/R damage was mediated via activation of the Nrf2/HO-1-antioxidant pathway in the retina. Retinal I/R was induced by an increase in intraocular pressure to 130 mm Hg for 60 minutes. Prior to the induction of ischemia, rats were orally treated with either vehicle (PBS) or LBP (1 mg/kg) once a day for 1 week. For specific experiments, zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP, 20 mg/kg), an HO-1 inhibitor, was intraperitoneally administered at 24 h prior to ischemia. The protective effects of LBP were evaluated by quantifying ganglion cell and amacrine cell survival, and by measuring cell apoptosis in the retinal layers. In addition, HO-1 expression was examined using Western blotting and immunofluorescence analyses. Cytosolic and nuclear Nrf2 was measured using immunofluorescent staining. LBP treatment significantly increased Nrf2 nuclear accumulation and HO-1 expression in the retina after I/R injury. Increased apoptosis and a decrease in the number of viable cells were observed in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) and inner nuclear layer (INL) in the I/R retina, which were reversed by LBP treatment. The HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP, diminished the LBP treatment-induced protective effects in the retina after I/R. Taken together, these results suggested that LBP partially exerted its beneficial neuroprotective effects via the activation of Nrf2 and an increase in HO-1 protein expression. PMID:24400114

  12. Hexarelin Protects Rodent Pancreatic Β-Cells Function from Cytotoxic Effects of Streptozotocin Involving Mitochondrial Signalling Pathways In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiezhong; Lin, Chao; Shao, Renfu; Yan, Chunxia; Chen, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions are crucial for pancreatic β-cell survival and glucose-induced insulin secretion. Hexarelin (Hex) is a synthetic small peptide ghrelin analogue, which has been shown to protect cardiomyocytes from the ischemia-reperfusion process. In this study, we used in vitro and in vivo models of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced β-cell damage to study the protective effect of Hex and the associated mechanisms. We found that STZ produced a cytotoxic effect in a dose- and time-dependent manner in MIN6 cells (a mouse β-cell line). Hex (1.0 μM) decreased the STZ-induced damage in β-cells. Rhodamine 123 assay and superoxide DHE production assay revealed that Hex ameliorated STZ-induced mitochondrial damage and excessive superoxide activity in β-cells. In addition, Hex significantly reduced STZ-induced expression of cleaved Caspases-3, Caspases-9 and the ratio of pro-apoptotic protein Bax to anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in MIN6 cells. We further examined the in vivo effect of Hex in a rat model of type 1 diabetes induced by STZ injection. Hex ameliorated STZ-induced decrease in plasma insulin and protected the structure of islets from STZ-induced disruption. Hex also ameliorated STZ-induced expression of cleaved Caspase-9 and the Bax in β-cells. In conclusion, our data indicate that Hex is able to protects β-cell mass from STZ-caused cytotoxic effects involving mitochondrial pathways in vitro and in vivo. Hex may serve as a potential protective agent for the management of diabetes. PMID:26918825

  13. Rhodium-catalyzed pyridannulation of indoles with diazoenals: a direct approach to pyrido[1,2-a]indoles.

    PubMed

    Dawande, Sudam Ganpat; Lad, Bapurao Sudam; Prajapati, Sunitkumar; Katukojvala, Sreenivas

    2016-06-28

    A novel rhodium catalyzed pyridannulation of 3-substituted indoles with diazoenals furnished privileged pyrido[1,2-a]indoles. The reaction is proposed to involve a [4 + 2]-annulation of the diacceptor rhodium enalcarbenoid via C-2 functionalization of the indole. The utility of the methodology was demonstrated with a short synthesis of the tetrahydropyrido[1,2-a]indole core, present in a large number of biologically important polycyclic indole alkaloids. PMID:26964882

  14. Indoles in edible members of the Cruciferae.

    PubMed

    Wall, M E; Taylor, H; Perera, P; Wani, M C

    1988-01-01

    Antimutagenic fractions from collards yielded indole-3-carboxaldehyde [4] and traces of indole-3-acetonitrile [2]. The compounds had no antimutagenic activity. An analytical procedure for various indoles in plants was developed based on reversed-phase hplc. The indoles studied included the 3-carbinol 1, the acetonitrile 2, the carboxaldehyde 4, the 3-carboxylic acid 5, and the 3-acetic acid 6. Many Cruciferae and non-Cruciferae were analyzed. The latter did not contain measurable quantities of these compounds. In the case of the Cruciferae--with the exception of collards, which consistently indicated the presence of the aldehyde 4--major indole found was the nitrile 2. Although a particularly careful search for the carbinol 1 was conducted, only trace levels were noted. A review of the literature indicates that the content and occurrence of this indole in plants have been heavily overestimated. Because of the low levels found in the Cruciferae, our studies indicate that the role of the compound as a dietary factor may be questionable. PMID:3373222

  15. Degradation of substituted indoles by an indole-degrading methanogenic consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Jidong Gu; Berry, D.F. )

    1991-09-01

    Degradation of indole-degrading methanogenic consortium enriched from sewage sludge proceeded through a two-step hydroxylation pathway yielding oxindole and isatin. The ability of this consortium to hydroxylate and subsequently degrade-substituted indoles was investigated. Of the substituted indoles tested, the consortium was able to transform or degrade 3-methylindole, and 3-indolyl acetate. Oxindole, 3-methyloxindole, and indoxyl were identified as metabolites of indole, 3-methylindole, and 3-indolyl acetate degradation, respectively. Isatin (indole-2, 3-dione) was produced as an intermediate when the acetate degradation, respectively, Isatin (indole-2,3-dione) was produced as an intermediate when the consortium was amended with oxindole, providing evidence that degradation of indole proceeded through successive hydroxylation of the 2- and 3-positions prior to ring cleavage between the C-2 and C-3 atoms on the pyrrole ring of indole. The presence of a methyl group ({emdash}CH{sub 3}) at either the 1- or 2-position of indole inhibited the initial hydroxylation reaction. The substituted indole, 3-methylindole, was hydroxylated in the 2-position but not in the 3 position and could not be further metabolized through the oxindole-isatin pathway. Indoxyl (indole-3-one), the deacetylated product of 3-indolyl acetate, was not hydroxylated in the 2-position and thus was not further metabolized by the consortium. When an H atom or electron-donating group (i.e., {emdash}CH{sub 3}) was present at the 3-position, hydroxylation proceeded at the 2-position, but the presence of electron-withdrawing substituent groups (i.e., {emdash}OH or {emdash}COOH) at the 3-position inhibited hydroxylation.

  16. Synthesis of pharmacologically active indoles.

    PubMed

    Hishmat, O H; Ebeid, M Y; Nakkady, S S; Fathy, M M; Mahmoud, S S

    1999-06-01

    Formylation of 6-methoxy-1-methyl and 5-methyl,2,3-diphenyl-1H-indole (Ib and IX) gave the 5- and 6- carboxaldehyde derivatives (II and X) respectively, which were treated with ethyl cyanoacetate to form the corresponding 2-cyano-3-substituted acrylic acid ethyl ester (III and XI). The latter compounds reacted with hydrazine hydrate, urea and thiourea to form the corresponding 5-amino-4-substituted 2,4,dihydropyrazol-3- one (IV), 6-indolyl-2,4-dioxo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-carbonitrile s (V and XII) and 6-indolyl-4-oxo-2-thixo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydropyrimidine-5-ca rbonitriles (VI and XIII). Reaction of the 5- and 6-carboxaldehyde derivatives with malononitrile afforded the 2-substituted malononitrile derivatives (VII and XIV). VII and XIV reacted readilly with aromatic ketones to give the 2-amino4,6-disubstituted nicotinonitriles (VIII a,b and XVa,b). The biological activity of compounds Ia, Ib, II, III, IX and X was tested for antiinflammatory, ulcerogenic and antispasmodic activities. PMID:10464975

  17. Indole Alkaloids from Marine Sources as Potential Leads against Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    França, Paulo H. B.; Barbosa, Daniel P.; da Silva, Daniel L.; Ribeiro, Êurica A. N.; Santana, Antônio E. G.; Santos, Bárbara V. O.; Barbosa-Filho, José M.; Quintans, Jullyana S. S.; Barreto, Rosana S. S.; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J.; de Araújo-Júnior, João X.

    2014-01-01

    Indole alkaloids comprise a large and complex class of natural products found in a variety of marine sources. Infectious diseases remain a major threat to public health, and in the absence of long-term protective vaccines, the control of these infectious diseases is based on a small number of chemotherapeutic agents. Furthermore, the emerging resistance against these drugs makes it urgently necessary to discover and develop new, safe and, effective anti-infective agents. In this regard, the aim of this review is to highlight indole alkaloids from marine sources which have been shown to demonstrate activity against infectious diseases. PMID:24995289

  18. Valproic Acid Treatment Inhibits Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Accumulation and Protects against Burn-Induced Gut Barrier Dysfunction in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong-Min; Du, Ming-Hua; Lin, Zhi-Long; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Li; Wang, Huan; Yu, Wen; Lv, Yi; Lu, Jiang-Yang; Pi, Yu-Li; Hu, Sen; Sheng, Zhi-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Objective Burn-induced gut dysfunction plays an important role in the development of sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction. Emerging evidence suggests that hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is critical in paracelluar barrier functions via regulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) expression. Previous studies have also demonstrated that histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) can repress HIF-1α. This study aims to examine whether valproic acid (VPA), a HDACI, protects against burn-induced gut barrier dysfunction via repressing HIF-1α-dependent upregulation of VEGF and MLCK expression. Methods Rats were subjected to third degree 55% TBSA burns and treated with/ without VPA (300mg/kg). Intestinal barrier dysfunction was evaluated by permeability of intestinal mucosa to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran and histologic evaluation. Histone acetylation, tight junction protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), VEGF, MLCK and HIF-1α were measured. In addition, CaCO2 cells were transfected with siRNA directed against HIF-1α and were stimulated with CoCl2 (1mM) for 24 hours with/without VPA (2mM) followed by analysis of HIF-1α, MLCK, VEGF and ZO-1. Results Burn insults resulted in a significant increase in intestinal permeability and mucosal damage, accompanied by a significant reduction in histone acetylation, ZO-1, upregulation of VEGF, MLCK expression, and an increase in HIF-1α accumulation. VPA significantly attenuated the increase in intestinal permeability, mucosa damage, histone deacetylation and changes in ZO-1 expression. VPA also attenuated the increased VEGF, MLCK and HIF-1α protein levels. VPA reduced HIF-1α, MLCK and VEGF production and prevented ZO-1 loss in CoCl2-stimulated Caco-2 cells. Moreover, transfection of siRNA directed against HIF-1α led to inhibition of MLCK and VEGF production, accompanied by upregulation of ZO-1. Conclusions These results indicate that VPA can protect against burn

  19. Catalytic functionalization of indoles in a new dimension.

    PubMed

    Bandini, Marco; Eichholzer, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    140 years ago Adolf von Baeyer proposed the structure of a heteroaromatic compound which revolutionized organic and medical chemistry: indole. After more than a century, indole itself and the complexity of naturally occurring indole derivatives continue to inspire and influence developments in synthetic chemistry. In particular, the ubiquitous presence of indole rings in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and functional materials are testament to the ever increasing interest in the design of mild and efficient synthetic routes to functionalized indole derivatives. This Review emphasizes the achievements in the selective catalytic functionalization of indoles (C-C bond-forming processes) over the last four years. PMID:19946913

  20. Rodent models of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sophocleous, Antonia; Idris, Aymen I

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this protocol is to provide a detailed description of male and female rodent models of osteoporosis. In addition to indications on the methods of performing the surgical procedures, the choice of reliable and safe anaesthetics is also described. Post-operative care, including analgesia administration for pain management, is also discussed. Ovariectomy in rodents is a procedure where ovaries are surgically excised. Hormonal changes resulting from ovary removal lead to an oestrogen-deprived state, which enhances bone remodelling, causes bone loss and increases bone fracture risk. Therefore, ovariectomy has been considered as the most common preclinical model for understanding the pathophysiology of menopause-associated events and for developing new treatment strategies for tackling post-menopausal osteoporosis. This protocol also provides a detailed description of orchidectomy, a model for androgen-deficient osteoporosis in rodents. Endocrine changes following testes removal lead to hypogonadism, which results in accelerated bone loss, increasing osteoporosis risk. Orchidectomised rodent models have been proposed to mimic male osteoporosis and therefore remain a valuable tool for understanding androgen deficiency in aged men. Although it would have been particularly difficult to assemble an internationally acceptable description of surgical procedures, here we have attempted to provide a comprehensive guide for best practice in performing ovariectomy and orchidectomy in laboratory rodents. Research scientists are reminded that they should follow their own institution's interpretation of such guidelines. Ultimately, however, all animal procedures must be overseen by the local Animal Welfare and Ethical Review Body and conducted under licences approved by a regulatory ethics committee. PMID:25852854

  1. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone protects 6-OHDA and MPTP induced dopaminergic neurons degeneration through activation of TrkB in rodents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dandan; Shi, Ying; Wang, Jun; Lin, Qing; Sun, Yi; Ye, Keqiang; Yan, Qiao; Zhang, Hai

    2016-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a notably important neurotrophin which regulates neuronal survival and differentiation in the nervous system. However, its clinical usage is particularly limited. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), which acts as a selective agonist of BDNF receptor TrkB, is reported to possess neuroprotective effects both in vitro and in vivo. Here we explored the potent neuroprotective effects of 7,8-DHF in 6-OHDA induced rat and MPTP induced mouse model of Parkinsonism. The results demonstrated that treatment with 7,8-DHF in drinking water for four weeks (two weeks before 6-OHDA+two weeks after 6-OHDA lesion) significantly improved dopamine-mediated behaviors in 6-OHDA rat model, and prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Phospho-Y816-TrkB immunostaining showed that TrkB phosphorylation was significantly elevated in the SN in 7,8-DHF pretreated group, indicating 7,8-DHF activated TrkB and likely contributed to its neuroprotective effects. 7,8-DHF also protected acute MPTP neurotoxicity in mice but did not affect the climbing behavior in pole test. Thus our study indicates the neuroprotective properties of 7,8-DHF through the activation of TrkB, which provides a novel therapeutic treatment for Parkinson's disease. PMID:27019033

  2. Antigenic and sequence diversity at the C-terminus of the merozoite surface protein-1 from rodent malaria isolates, and the binding of protective monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, P A; Ling, I T; Clottey, G; Valero, L M; Ogun, S A; Fleck, S L; Walliker, D; Morgan, W D; Birdsall, B; Feeney, J; Holder, A A

    1999-11-30

    Merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1) is a major candidate in the development of a vaccine against malaria. Immunisation with a recombinant fusion protein containing the two Plasmodium yoelii MSP-1 C-terminal epidermal growth factor-like domains (MSP-1(19)) can protect mice against homologous but not heterologous challenge, and therefore, antigenic differences resulting from sequence diversity in MSP-1(19) may be crucial in determining the potential of this protein as a vaccine. Representative sequence variants from a number of distinct P. yoelii isolates were expressed in Escherichia coli and the resulting recombinant proteins were screened for binding to a panel of monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) capable of suppressing a P. yoelii YM challenge infection in passive immunisation experiments. The sequence polymorphisms affected the binding of the antibodies to the recombinant proteins. None of the Mabs recognised MSP-1(19) of P. yoelii yoelii 2CL or 33X or P. yoelii nigeriensis N67. The epitopes recognised by the Mabs were further distinguished by their reactivity with the other fusion proteins. The extent of sequence variation in MSP-1(19) among the isolates was extensive, with differences detected at 35 out of the 96 positions compared. Using the 3-dimensional structure of the Plasmodium falciparum MSP-1(19) as a model, the locations of the amino acid substitutions that may affect Mab binding were identified. The DNA sequence of MSP-1(19) from two Plasmodium vinckei isolates was also cloned and the deduced amino acid sequence compared with that in other species. PMID:10593171

  3. Glucocorticoid protects rodent hearts from ischemia/reperfusion injury by activating lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase–derived PGD2 biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Tokudome, Satori; Sano, Motoaki; Shinmura, Ken; Matsuhashi, Tomohiro; Morizane, Shintaro; Moriyama, Hidenori; Tamaki, Kayoko; Hayashida, Kentaro; Nakanishi, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Noritada; Shimizu, Noriaki; Endo, Jin; Katayama, Takaharu; Murata, Mitsushige; Yuasa, Shinsuke; Kaneda, Ruri; Tomita, Kengo; Eguchi, Naomi; Urade, Yoshihiro; Asano, Koichiro; Utsunomiya, Yasunori; Suzuki, Takeshi; Taguchi, Ryo; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2009-01-01

    Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS), which was originally identified as an enzyme responsible for PGD2 biosynthesis in the brain, is highly expressed in the myocardium, including in cardiomyocytes. However, the factors that control expression of the gene encoding L-PGDS and the pathophysiologic role of L-PGDS in cardiomyocytes are poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that glucocorticoids, which act as repressors of prostaglandin biosynthesis in most cell types, upregulated the expression of L-PGDS together with cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A2 and COX2 via the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in rat cardiomyocytes. Accordingly, PGD2 was the most prominently induced prostaglandin in vivo in mouse hearts and in vitro in cultured rat cardiomyocytes after exposure to GR-selective agonists. In isolated Langendorff-perfused mouse hearts, dexamethasone alleviated ischemia/reperfusion injury. This cardioprotective effect was completely abrogated by either pharmacologic inhibition of COX2 or disruption of the gene encoding L-PGDS. In in vivo ischemia/reperfusion experiments, dexamethasone reduced infarct size in wild-type mice. This cardioprotective effect of dexamethasone was markedly reduced in L-PGDS–deficient mice. In cultured rat cardiomyocytes, PGD2 protected against cell death induced by anoxia/reoxygenation via the D-type prostanoid receptor and the ERK1/2-mediated pathway. Taken together, these results suggest what we believe to be a novel interaction between glucocorticoid-GR signaling and the cardiomyocyte survival pathway mediated by the arachidonic acid cascade. PMID:19451694

  4. Fear Extinction in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun-hui; Knapska, Ewelina; Orsini, Caitlin A.; Rabinak, Christine A.; Zimmerman, Joshua M.; Maren, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Pavlovian conditioning paradigms have become important model systems for understanding the neuroscience of behavior. In particular, studies of the extinction of Pavlovian fear responses are yielding important information about the neural substrates of anxiety disorders in humans. These studies are germane to understanding the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral interventions that suppress fear, including exposure therapy. This chapter described detailed behavioral protocols for examining the nature and properties of fear extinction in laboratory rodents. PMID:19340814

  5. Microdialysis in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Agustin; Chefer, Vladimir I.; Shippenberg, Toni S.

    2010-01-01

    Microdialysis is an in vivo sampling technique that permits the quantification of various substances (e.g., neurotransmitters, peptides, electrolytes) in blood and tissue. It is also used to infuse substances into the brain and spinal cord. This unit describes methods for the construction and stereotaxic implantation of microdialysis probes into discrete brain regions of the rat and mouse. Procedures for the conduct of conventional and quantitative microdialysis experiments in the awake and anesthetized rodent are also provided. PMID:19340813

  6. Induced production of 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate by jasmonic acid and methyl jasmonate in sprouts and leaves of pak choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis).

    PubMed

    Wiesner, Melanie; Hanschen, Franziska S; Schreiner, Monika; Glatt, Hansruedi; Zrenner, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Pak choi plants (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) were treated with different signaling molecules methyl jasmonate, jasmonic acid, linolenic acid, and methyl salicylate and were analyzed for specific changes in their glucosinolate profile. Glucosinolate levels were quantified using HPLC-DAD-UV, with focus on induction of indole glucosinolates and special emphasis on 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate. Furthermore, the effects of the different signaling molecules on indole glucosinolate accumulation were analyzed on the level of gene expression using semi-quantitative realtime RT-PCR of selected genes. The treatments with signaling molecules were performed on sprouts and mature leaves to determine ontogenetic differences in glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression. The highest increase of indole glucosinolate levels, with considerable enhancement of the 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate content, was achieved with treatments of sprouts and mature leaves with methyl jasmonate and jasmonic acid. This increase was accompanied by increased expression of genes putatively involved in the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway. The high levels of indole glucosinolates enabled the plant to preferentially produce the respective breakdown products after tissue damage. Thus, pak choi plants treated with methyl jasmonate or jasmonic acid, are a valuable tool to analyze the specific protection functions of 1-methoxy-indole-3-carbinole in the plants defense strategy in the future. PMID:23873294

  7. Induced Production of 1-Methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl Glucosinolate by Jasmonic Acid and Methyl Jasmonate in Sprouts and Leaves of Pak Choi (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Melanie; Hanschen, Franziska S.; Schreiner, Monika; Glatt, Hansruedi; Zrenner, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Pak choi plants (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis) were treated with different signaling molecules methyl jasmonate, jasmonic acid, linolenic acid, and methyl salicylate and were analyzed for specific changes in their glucosinolate profile. Glucosinolate levels were quantified using HPLC-DAD-UV, with focus on induction of indole glucosinolates and special emphasis on 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate. Furthermore, the effects of the different signaling molecules on indole glucosinolate accumulation were analyzed on the level of gene expression using semi-quantitative realtime RT-PCR of selected genes. The treatments with signaling molecules were performed on sprouts and mature leaves to determine ontogenetic differences in glucosinolate accumulation and related gene expression. The highest increase of indole glucosinolate levels, with considerable enhancement of the 1-methoxy-indol-3-ylmethyl glucosinolate content, was achieved with treatments of sprouts and mature leaves with methyl jasmonate and jasmonic acid. This increase was accompanied by increased expression of genes putatively involved in the indole glucosinolate biosynthetic pathway. The high levels of indole glucosinolates enabled the plant to preferentially produce the respective breakdown products after tissue damage. Thus, pak choi plants treated with methyl jasmonate or jasmonic acid, are a valuable tool to analyze the specific protection functions of 1-methoxy-indole-3-carbinole in the plants defense strategy in the future. PMID:23873294

  8. Indoles: Industrial, Agricultural and Over-the-Counter Uses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Timothy C.

    Indole-containing compounds are best known for their medicinal properties in the pharmaceutical industry. Although to a lesser degree, the indole motif none-the-less appears in many significant products across the entire chemical industry. This chapter describes the role that indole plays in a more commodity setting and provides examples illustrating these uses.

  9. Searching for indole derivatives as potential mushroom tyrosinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Stefania; Certo, Giovanna; De Luca, Laura; Germanò, Maria Paola; Rapisarda, Antonio; Gitto, Rosaria

    2016-06-01

    Tyrosinase is a copper-containing enzyme widely distributed in nature, involved in the biosynthesis of melanin whose role is to protect the skin from ultraviolet damage. A great interest has been shown on the melanin involvement in malignant melanoma and other carcinogenetic processes. These phenomena have encouraged the research of tyrosinase inhibitors useful in therapeutic field as well as in foods and cosmetics to prevent browning. The idea was to screen our "in house" database to select suitable lead compounds for the discovery of potential drug-inhibiting enzyme. The obtained biological results demonstrated that compounds containing 4-fluorobenzyl moiety at N - 1 position of indole system showed the best activity. In addition, the role of the portion linked to the carbonyl group at C - 3 was discussed. A Lineweaver-Burk kinetic analysis of the most active indoles, CHI 1043 and derivative 4, showed a mixed-type inhibition in the presence of l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) as substrate. PMID:25826148

  10. Chemistry and biology of new marine alkaloids from the indole and annelated indole series.

    PubMed

    Aygün, Alparslan; Pindur, Ulf

    2003-07-01

    Chemistry and biology of marine natural products from the indole and annelated indole series have become an attractive research field for development of new pharmacological lead substances. In the past years some of the isolated natural organic compounds were synthesized by chemists and evaluated with great enthusiasm to find new lead natural compounds against different diseases. In this review the latest results for new compounds including isolation, biological evaluation, synthetic pathways and some retrosynthetic analyses are summarized. PMID:12678805

  11. A new indole alkaloid from Ervatamia yunnanensis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yong-Sheng; Du, Jing-Ling; Chen, Hai-Sheng; Jin, Li; Liang, Shuang

    2010-01-01

    The stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis have afforded a new indole alkaloid, ervataine (1), whose structure was determined by spectroscopic analysis. Five known compounds, ibogaine (2) coronaridine (3), heyneanine (4), voacangine hydroxyindolenine (5) and coronaridine hydroxyindolenine (6), were also isolated. PMID:19647051

  12. Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Unprotected Indoles Catalyzed by η(6)-Arene/N-Me-sulfonyldiamine-Ru(II) Complexes.

    PubMed

    Touge, Taichiro; Arai, Takayoshi

    2016-09-01

    Protecting-group-free transformation is a challenging and important issue in atom-economical organic synthesis. The η(6)-arene/N-Me-sulfonyldiamine-Ru(II)-BF4 complex-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of 2-substituted unprotected indoles in weakly acidic hexafluoroisopropanol gives optically active indoline compounds with up to >99% ee. Under mild reaction media, halogen atoms and synthetically important protecting groups (e.g., silyl ether, acetal, benzyl ether, and ester) on indoles are maintained, which is advantageous for the synthesis of further complex indoline molecules. PMID:27509089

  13. Reflections on Rodent Implantation.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jeeyeon M; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2015-01-01

    Embryo implantation is a complex process involving endocrine, paracrine, autocrine, and juxtacrine modulators that span cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. The quality of implantation is predictive for pregnancy success. Earlier observational studies formed the basis for genetic and molecular approaches that ensued with emerging technological advances. However, the precise sequence and details of the molecular interactions involved have yet to be defined. This review reflects briefly on aspects of our current understanding of rodent implantation as a tribute to Roger Short's lifelong contributions to the field of reproductive physiology. PMID:26450495

  14. Indoles - A promising scaffold for drug development.

    PubMed

    Sravanthi, T V; Manju, S L

    2016-08-25

    Generally, heterocycles occupy a prominent place in chemistry due to their wide range of applications in the fields of drug design, photochemistry, agrochemicals, dyes and so on. Among them, indole scaffolds have been found in most of the important synthetic drug molecules and paved a faithful way to develop effective targets. Privileged structures bind to multiple receptors with high affinity, thus aiding the development of novel biologically active compounds. Among the indole class of compounds, 2-arylindoles appear to be a most promising lead for drug development. The derivatives of 2-arylindoles exhibits antibacterial, anticancer, anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antiviral, antiproliferative, antituberculosis activity, etc. This article would provide a clear knowledge on the wide-ranging biological activities of 2-arylindoles over the past two decades, which would be beneficial for the designing of more potent drug targets in order to compete with the existing drugs. PMID:27237590

  15. Obinutuzumab for the treatment of indolent lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Jennifer; Gribben, John G

    2016-08-01

    Obinutuzumab is a humanized, type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody designed for strong induction of direct cell death and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The Phase III GADOLIN trial tested the clinical efficacy of obinutuzumab plus bendamustine followed by obinutuzumab monotherapy in rituximab-refractory indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma versus treatment with bendamustine alone. It demonstrated significantly longer progression-free survival for the obinutuzumab-containing regimen in this difficult to treat patient group. Based on the results of this trial, US FDA approval was most recently granted for obinutuzumab in the treatment of follicular lymphoma that has relapsed after or was refractory to a rituximab-containing regimen. This article summarizes the available data on chemistry, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety of obinutuzumab in the treatment of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27117452

  16. Indole-like Trk receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tammiku-Taul, Jaana; Park, Rahel; Jaanson, Kaur; Luberg, Kristi; Dobchev, Dimitar A; Kananovich, Dzmitry; Noole, Artur; Mandel, Merle; Kaasik, Allen; Lopp, Margus; Timmusk, Tõnis; Karelson, Mati

    2016-10-01

    The virtual screening for new scaffolds for TrkA receptor antagonists resulted in potential low molecular weight drug candidates for the treatment of neuropathic pain and cancer. In particular, the compound (Z)-3-((5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-2-oxindole and its derivatives were assessed for their inhibitory activity against Trk receptors. The IC50 values were computationally predicted in combination of molecular and fragment-based QSAR. Thereafter, based on the structure-activity relationships (SAR), a series of new compounds were designed and synthesized. Among the final selection of 13 compounds, (Z)-3-((5-methoxy-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-N-methyl-2-oxindole-5-sulfonamide showed the best TrkA inhibitory activity using both biochemical and cellular assays and (Z)-3-((5-methoxy-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-2-oxindole-5-sulfonamide was the most potent inhibitor of TrkB and TrkC. PMID:27318978

  17. Synthesis of New Functionalized Indoles Based on Ethyl Indol-2-carboxylate.

    PubMed

    Boraei, Ahmed T A; El Ashry, El Sayed H; Barakat, Assem; Ghabbour, Hazem A

    2016-01-01

    Successful alkylations of the nitrogen of ethyl indol-2-carboxylate were carried out using aq. KOH in acetone. The respective N-alkylated acids could be obtained without separating the N-alkylated esters by increasing the amount of KOH and water. The use of NaOMe in methanol led to transesterification instead of the alkylation, while the use of NaOEt led to low yields of the N-alkylated acids. Hydrazinolysis of the ester gave indol-2-carbohydrazide which then was allowed to react with different aromatic aldehydes and ketones in ethanol catalyzed by acetic acid. Indol-2-thiosemicarbazide was used in a heterocyclization reaction to form thiazoles. The new structures were confirmed using NMR, mass spectrometry and X-ray single crystal analysis. PMID:26978331

  18. Unprecedented Utilization of Pelargonidin and Indole for the Biosynthesis of Plant Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Anne-Christin; Tatsis, Evangelos C; Dudek, Bettina; Kai, Marco; Lorenz, Sybille; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-02-15

    Nudicaulins are a group of indole alkaloid glycosides responsible for the color of yellow petals of Papaver nudicaule (Iceland poppy). The unique aglycone scaffold of these alkaloids attracted our interest as one of the most unusual flavonoid-indole hybrid structures that occur in nature. Stable isotope labeling experiments with sliced petals identified free indole, but not tryptamine or l-tryptophan, as one of the two key biosynthetic precursors of the nudicaulin aglycone. Pelargonidin was identified as the second key precursor, contributing the polyphenolic unit to the nudicaulin molecule. This finding was inferred from the temporary accumulation of pelargonidin glycosides in the petals during flower bud development and a drop at the point in time when nudicaulin levels start to increase. The precursor-directed incorporation of cyanidin into a new 3'-hydroxynudicaulin strongly supports the hypothesis that anthocyanins are involved in the biosynthesis of nudicaulins. PMID:26670055

  19. Unprecedented Utilization of Pelargonidin and Indole for the Biosynthesis of Plant Indole Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Warskulat, Anne‐Christin; Tatsis, Evangelos C.; Dudek, Bettina; Kai, Marco; Lorenz, Sybille

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nudicaulins are a group of indole alkaloid glycosides responsible for the color of yellow petals of Papaver nudicaule (Iceland poppy). The unique aglycone scaffold of these alkaloids attracted our interest as one of the most unusual flavonoid‐indole hybrid structures that occur in nature. Stable isotope labeling experiments with sliced petals identified free indole, but not tryptamine or l‐tryptophan, as one of the two key biosynthetic precursors of the nudicaulin aglycone. Pelargonidin was identified as the second key precursor, contributing the polyphenolic unit to the nudicaulin molecule. This finding was inferred from the temporary accumulation of pelargonidin glycosides in the petals during flower bud development and a drop at the point in time when nudicaulin levels start to increase. The precursor‐directed incorporation of cyanidin into a new 3′‐hydroxynudicaulin strongly supports the hypothesis that anthocyanins are involved in the biosynthesis of nudicaulins. PMID:26670055

  20. Towards a facile and convenient synthesis of highly functionalized indole derivatives based on Multi-Component Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Neochoritis, Constantinos G.; Dömling, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A library of potentially bioactive compounds through the novel 1H-indole-methyl-isocyanide and MCRs has been described. A flexible and efficient synthesis affording great complexity and diversity is achieved, with moderate to good yields with no need for protection and deprotection steps. PMID:24477767

  1. Emended descriptions of indole negative and indole positive isolates of Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Fellström, C; Karlsson, M; Pettersson, B; Zimmerman, U; Gunnarsson, A; Aspan, A

    1999-12-01

    Two type/reference strains of Brachyspira (B.) hyodysenteriae, 14 Belgian and German indole negative, and 14 Belgian, German and Swedish indole positive field isolates of strongly beta-haemolytic intestinal spirochaetes were compared by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, biochemical reaction patterns, 16S rDNA sequences and MIC determinations of six antibacterial substances. Three tests for indole production, including a spot indole test, were compared with congruent results. All field isolates were classified as B. hyodysenteriae due to a high genetic and phenotypic similarity with the type strains. The Belgian and German indole negative isolates had identical and unique PFGE patterns for the tested restriction enzymes MluI and SalI, as well as identical 16S rDNA sequences, and they could not be differentiated by any of the methods used. Seven unique PFGE patterns were achieved from the 14 indole positive field isolates. The patterns were identical and unique for epidemiologically related isolates. Type/reference strains and isolates without known relation to other tested isolates showed unique banding patterns. The MICs of tylosin, tiamulin, erythromycin, clindamycin, carbadox and virginiamycin were determined in broth for all isolates. In contrast to Belgian and German isolates, the majority of the Swedish field isolates were susceptible to tylosin, erythromycin and clindamycin. Probable pathways of infection for some of the Swedish isolates were determined. The PFGE patterns of epidemic clones of B. hyodysenteriae remained stable for a period of up to 8 years. In vivo development of resistance to macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics due to use of tylosin was clearly indicated for two epidemic clones. PMID:10596806

  2. Analysis of several iridoid and indole precursors of terpenoid indole alkaloids with a single HPLC run.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, D; Schripsema, J; Verpoorte, R

    1996-06-01

    An isocratic HPLC system is described which allows the separation of the iridoid and indole precursors of terpenoid indole alkaloids, which are present in a single crude extract. The system consists of a column of LiChrospher 60 RP select B 5 microm, 250 x 4 mm (Merck) with an eluent of 1% formic acid-acetonitrile-trichloroacetic acid (100:10:0.25, v:v:w) at a flow of 1.2 ml/min. In the suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus secologanin and tryptophan were detected. in the cultures of Tabernaemontana divaricata loganin, tryptophan, and tryptamine accumulated. PMID:17252445

  3. Palladium-Catalyzed Oxidative Sulfenylation of Indoles and Related Electron-Rich Heteroarenes with Aryl Boronic Acids and Elemental Sulfur.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianxiao; Li, Chunsheng; Yang, Shaorong; An, Yanni; Wu, Wanqing; Jiang, Huanfeng

    2016-09-01

    An efficient and convenient palladium-catalyzed C-H bond oxidative sulfenylation of indoles and related electron-rich heteroarenes with aryl boronic acids and elemental sulfur has been described. This procedure provides a useful and direct approach for the assembly of a wide range of structurally diverse 3-sulfenylheteroarenes with moderate to excellent yields from simple and readily available starting materials. Moreover, this synthetic protocol is suitable for N-protected and unprotected indoles. Notably, the construction of two C-S bonds in one step was also achieved in this transformation. PMID:27500941

  4. Aerobic palladium(II)-catalyzed dehydrogenation of cyclohexene-1-carbonyl indole amides: an indole-directed aromatization.

    PubMed

    Kandukuri, Sandeep R; Oestreich, Martin

    2012-10-01

    A palladium(II)-catalyzed oxidative dehydrogenation of cyclohexene-1-carbonyl indole amides yielding the corresponding benzoylindoles is reported. The new aromatization is also applied to functionalized indoles such as tryptamine and tryptophan. The tethered indole is likely acting as a directing group for allylic C-H bond activation, and there is evidence for a mechanism proceeding through 1,3-diene formation followed by aromatization. PMID:22950832

  5. Astronaut Norman Thagard changes tray in RAHF for rodents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Astronaut Norman Thagard changes a tray in the research animal holding facility (RAHF) for rodents at the Ames double rack facility aboard the Spacelab 3 science module in the cargo bay of the shuttle Challenger. Lending a hand is payload specialist Lodewijk van den Berg. Both men are wearing protective clothing and surgical masks for this procedure.

  6. Invasive rodent eradication on islands.

    PubMed

    Howald, Gregg; Donlan, C Josh; Galván, Juan Pablo; Russell, James C; Parkes, John; Samaniego, Araceli; Wang, Yiwei; Veitch, Dick; Genovesi, Piero; Pascal, Michel; Saunders, Alan; Tershy, Bernie

    2007-10-01

    Invasive mammals are the greatest threat to island biodiversity and invasive rodents are likely responsible for the greatest number of extinctions and ecosystem changes. Techniques for eradicating rodents from islands were developed over 2 decades ago. Since that time there has been a significant development and application of this conservation tool. We reviewed the literature on invasive rodent eradications to assess its current state and identify actions to make it more effective. Worldwide, 332 successful rodent eradications have been undertaken; we identified 35 failed eradications and 20 campaigns of unknown result. Invasive rodents have been eradicated from 284 islands (47,628 ha). With the exception of two small islands, rodenticides were used in all eradication campaigns. Brodifacoum was used in 71% of campaigns and 91% of the total area treated. The most frequent rodenticide distribution methods (from most to least) are bait stations, hand broadcasting, and aerial broadcasting. Nevertheless, campaigns using aerial broadcast made up 76% of the total area treated. Mortality of native vertebrates due to nontarget poisoning has been documented, but affected species quickly recover to pre-eradication population levels or higher. A variety of methods have been developed to mitigate nontarget impacts, and applied research can further aid in minimizing impacts. Land managers should routinely remove invasive rodents from islands <100 ha that lack vertebrates susceptible to nontarget poisoning. For larger islands and those that require nontarget mitigation, expert consultation and greater planning effort are needed. With the exception of house mice (Mus musculus), island size may no longer be the limiting factor for rodent eradications; rather, social acceptance and funding may be the main challenges. To be successful, large-scale rodent campaigns should be integrated with programs to improve the livelihoods of residents, island biosecurity, and reinvasion response

  7. Identification of New Metabolites of Bacterial Transformation of Indole by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Arthrobacter sp. SPG transformed indole completely in the presence of an additional carbon source. High performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detected indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-glyoxylic acid, and indole-3-aldehyde as biotransformation products. This is the first report of the formation of indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-glyoxylic acid, and indole-3-aldehyde from indole by any bacterium. PMID:25548566

  8. Palladium-catalysed direct C-2 methylation of indoles.

    PubMed

    Tu, Daoquan; Cheng, Xiuzhi; Gao, Yadong; Yang, Panpan; Ding, Yousong; Jiang, Chao

    2016-08-21

    A direct C-2 methylation reaction of indoles bearing a readily removable N-2-pyrimidyl moiety as a site-specific directing group has been developed with a palladium catalyst. This reaction relied on the use of KF to promote efficient methylation. A moderate to good yield was achieved in a range of indole substrates. PMID:27424955

  9. Gold(I)-Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Allenes with Indoles

    PubMed Central

    Toups, Kristina L.; Liu, Gordon T.; Widenhoefer, Ross A.

    2010-01-01

    Reaction of a monosubstituted, 1,3-disubstituted, or tetrasubstituted allene with various indoles catalyzed by a 1:1 mixture of a gold(I) N-heterocyclic carbene complex and AgOTf at room temperature leads to hydroarylation with formation of 3-allyl-indoles in modest to good yield. PMID:20305794

  10. Gold(I)-Catalyzed Hydroarylation of Allenes with Indoles

    PubMed Central

    Toups, Kristina L.; Liu, Gordon T.; Widenhoefer, Ross A.

    2009-01-01

    Reaction of a monosubstituted, 1,3-disubstituted, or tetrasubstituted allene with various indoles catalyzed by a 1:1 mixture of a gold(I) N-heterocyclic carbene complex and AgOTf at room temperature leads to hydroarylation with formation of 3-allyl-indoles in modest to good yield. PMID:17428061

  11. Indole compounds may be promising medicines for ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Naganuma, Makoto; Kanai, Takanori

    2016-09-01

    Indole compounds are extracted from indigo plants and have been used as blue or purple dyes for hundreds of years. In traditional Chinese medicine, herbal agents in combination with Qing-Dai (also known as indigo naturalis) have been used to treat patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and to remedy inflammatory conditions. Recent studies have noted that indole compounds can be biosynthesized from tryptophan metabolites produced by various enzymes derived from intestinal microbiota. In addition to their action on indole compounds, the intestinal microbiota produce various tryptophan metabolites that mediate critical functions through distinct pathways and enzymes. Furthermore, some indole compounds, such as indigo and indirubin, act as ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. This signaling pathway stimulates mucosal type 3 innate lymphoid cells to produce interleukin-22, which induces antimicrobial peptide and tight junction molecule production, suggesting a role for indole compounds during the mucosal healing process. Thus, indole compounds may represent a novel treatment strategy for UC patients. In this review, we describe the origin and function of this indole compound-containing Chinese herb, as well as the drug development of indole compounds. PMID:27160749

  12. New pathway for the biodegradation of indole in Aspergillus niger

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, A.; Vaidyanathan, C.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Indole and its derivatives form a class of toxic recalcitrant environmental pollutants. The growth of Aspergillus niger was inhibited by very low concentrations (0.005 to 0.02%) of indole, even when 125- to 500-fold excess glucose was present in the medium. When 0.02% indole was added, the fungus showed a lag phase for about 30 h and the uptake of glucose was inhibited. Indole was metabolized by a new pathway via indoxyl (3-hydroxyindole), N-formylanthranilic acid, anthranilic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and catechol, which was further degraded by an ortho cleavage. The enzymes N-formylanthranilate deformylase, anthranilate hydroxylase, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate decarboxylase, and catechol dioxygenase were induced by indole as early as after 5 h of growth, and their activities were demonstrated in a cell-free system.

  13. Antifungal Indole Alkaloids from Winchia calophylla.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei-Li; Chen, Jia; Sun, Meng; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Gao, Kun

    2016-05-01

    Ten indole alkaloids (1-10) were obtained from an antifungal extract of Winchia calophylla, of which two (2 and 4) were new. N(4)-Methyl-10-hydroxyl-desacetylakuammilin (2) was an akuammiline-type indole alkaloid. N(1)-Methyl-echitaminic acid (4) was an unusual zwitterion with a basic vincorine-type skeleton. This is the first report of 10 in W. calophylla. The structures of all of the compounds were determined based on spectroscopic data, and their bioactivities were assessed. Compound 1 showed potent activity against the plant pathogenic fungi of Penicillium italicum and Fusarium oxysporum f.sp cubens with IC50 s of 10.4 and 11.5 µM, respectively, and 3 inhibited Rhizoctonia solani with an IC50 of 11.7 µM. Compounds 2 and 4 showed weak cytotoxicity against the human leukemic cell line HL-60 in vitro with IC50 s of 51.4 and 75.3 µM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 displayed weak activity against acetylcholinesterase with IC50 s around 61.3 and 52.6 µM, respectively. PMID:27002397

  14. Site-Specific Labeling of Protein Lysine Residues and N-Terminal Amino Groups with Indoles and Indole-Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Larda, Sacha Thierry; Pichugin, Dmitry; Prosser, Robert Scott

    2015-12-16

    Indoles and indole-derivatives can be used to site-specifically label proteins on lysine and N-terminal amino groups under mild, nondenaturing reaction conditions. Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and α-lactalbumin were labeled with indole, fluoroindole, or fluoroindole-2-carboxylate via electrophilic aromatic substitutions to lysine side chain Nε- and N-terminal amino imines, formed in situ in the presence of formaldehyde. The reaction is highly site-selective, easily controlled by temperature, and does not eliminate the native charge of the protein, unlike many other common lysine-specific labeling strategies. (19)F NMR was used to monitor reaction progression, and in the case of HEWL, unique resonances for each labeled side chain could be resolved. We demonstrate that the indole tags are highly selective for primary amino groups. (19)F NMR demonstrates that each lysine exhibits a different rate of conjugation to indoles making it possible to employ these tags as a means of probing surface topology by NMR or mass spectrometry. Given the site-specificity of this tagging method, the mildness of the reaction conditions (aqueous, buffered, or unbuffered) and the low stoichiometry required for the reaction, indole-derivatives should serve as a valuable addition to the bioconjugation toolkit. We propose that labeling lysine side chains and N-terminal amino groups with indoles is a versatile and general strategy for bioconjugations with substituted indoles having broad implications for protein functionalization. PMID:26587689

  15. Synthesis and characterization of novel indole derivatives reveal improved therapeutic agents for treatment of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wei; Bi, Yue; Xue, Ping; Zhang, Yanrong; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Zhibo; Li, Meng; Baudy-Floc'h, Michèle; Ngerebara, Nathaniel; Gibson, K Michael; Bi, Lanrong

    2010-09-23

    To develop more potent therapeutic agents with therapeutic efficacy for ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, we linked an antiinflammatory moiety (1,3-dioxane derivative) to the key pharmacophoric moiety of melatonin. We hypothesized that the resulting new indole derivatives might induce a synergistic protection against oxidative damage associated with I/R injury. Our results indicate that one of these indole derivatives (7) manifests potent antiinflammatory antioxidant effects and exerts a protective effect against skeletal muscle injury and associated lung injury following limb I/R in rats. PMID:20731361

  16. Glucose enhances indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis without reducing primary sulfur assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Wei, Jia; Huang, Jirong; Chang, Jiaqi; Qian, Hongmei; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yanting; Sun, Bo; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glucose as a signaling molecule on induction of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis was reported in our former study. Here, we further investigated the regulatory mechanism of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis by glucose in Arabidopsis. Glucose exerted a positive influence on indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis, which was demonstrated by induced accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and enhanced expression of related genes upon glucose treatment. Genetic analysis revealed that MYB34 and MYB51 were crucial in maintaining the basal indolic glucosinolate accumulation, with MYB34 being pivotal in response to glucose signaling. The increased accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and mRNA levels of MYB34, MYB51, and MYB122 caused by glucose were inhibited in the gin2-1 mutant, suggesting an important role of HXK1 in glucose-mediated induction of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis. In contrast to what was known on the function of ABI5 in glucose-mediated aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, ABI5 was not required for glucose-induced indolic glucosinolate accumulation. In addition, our results also indicated that glucose-induced glucosinolate accumulation was due to enhanced sulfur assimilation instead of directed sulfur partitioning into glucosinolate biosynthesis. Thus, our data provide new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying glucose-regulated glucosinolate biosynthesis. PMID:27549907

  17. Indole and 7-hydroxyindole diminish Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jintae; Attila, Can; Cirillo, Suat L G; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Wood, Thomas K

    2009-01-01

    Indole is an extracellular biofilm signal for Escherichia coli, and many bacterial oxygenases readily convert indole to various oxidized compounds including 7-hydroxyindole (7HI). Here we investigate the impact of indole and 7HI on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 virulence and quorum sensing (QS)-regulated phenotypes; this strain does not synthesize these compounds but degrades them rapidly. Indole and 7HI both altered extensively gene expression in a manner opposite that of acylhomoserine lactones; the most repressed genes encode the mexGHI-opmD multidrug efflux pump and genes involved in the synthesis of QS-regulated virulence factors including pyocyanin (phz operon), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS) signal (pqs operon), pyochelin (pch operon) and pyoverdine (pvd operon). Corroborating these microarray results, indole and 7HI decreased production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, PQS and pyoverdine and enhanced antibiotic resistance. In addition, indole affected the utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, and 7HI abolished swarming motility. Furthermore, 7HI reduced pulmonary colonization of P. aeruginosa in guinea pigs and increased clearance in lungs. Hence, indole-related compounds have potential as a novel antivirulence approach for the recalcitrant pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:21261883

  18. Glucose enhances indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis without reducing primary sulfur assimilation.

    PubMed

    Miao, Huiying; Cai, Congxi; Wei, Jia; Huang, Jirong; Chang, Jiaqi; Qian, Hongmei; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yanting; Sun, Bo; Wang, Bingliang; Wang, Qiaomei

    2016-01-01

    The effect of glucose as a signaling molecule on induction of aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis was reported in our former study. Here, we further investigated the regulatory mechanism of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis by glucose in Arabidopsis. Glucose exerted a positive influence on indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis, which was demonstrated by induced accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and enhanced expression of related genes upon glucose treatment. Genetic analysis revealed that MYB34 and MYB51 were crucial in maintaining the basal indolic glucosinolate accumulation, with MYB34 being pivotal in response to glucose signaling. The increased accumulation of indolic glucosinolates and mRNA levels of MYB34, MYB51, and MYB122 caused by glucose were inhibited in the gin2-1 mutant, suggesting an important role of HXK1 in glucose-mediated induction of indolic glucosinolate biosynthesis. In contrast to what was known on the function of ABI5 in glucose-mediated aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, ABI5 was not required for glucose-induced indolic glucosinolate accumulation. In addition, our results also indicated that glucose-induced glucosinolate accumulation was due to enhanced sulfur assimilation instead of directed sulfur partitioning into glucosinolate biosynthesis. Thus, our data provide new insights into molecular mechanisms underlying glucose-regulated glucosinolate biosynthesis. PMID:27549907

  19. Synthesis of indoles from pyridinium salts

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, S.P.; Bkhaumik, M.M.; Bundel', Yu.G.

    1987-10-01

    The detailed analysis of the products of the interaction of nitropyridinium salts with ketones and alkylamines resulted in new data testifying in favor of the previously proposed scheme for the formation of indoles from pyridinium salts. The PMR spectra were taken on a Bruker WM-500 spectrometer for the compounds (IXa,b) in CDCl/sub 3/, and (IVg, i-Z) in acetone-D/sub 6/, and a Varian T-60 spectrometer for the alkylindoles (IVa,c,h) in CDCl/sub 3/, with reference to HMDS. The /sup 13/C NMR spectra were taken on a Bruker WM-250 spectrometer in CDCl/sub 3/. The mass spectra were taken on a Finnigan-4021 instrument.

  20. Cytotoxic indole alkaloids from Tabernaemontana divaricata.

    PubMed

    Bao, Mei-Fen; Yan, Ju-Ming; Cheng, Gui-Guang; Li, Xing-Yao; Liu, Ya-Ping; Li, Yan; Cai, Xiang-Hai; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2013-08-23

    Five new vobasinyl-ibogan-type bisindole alkaloids, tabernaricatines A-E (1-5), two new monomers, tabernaricatines F and G (6 and 7), and 24 known indole alkaloids were isolated from the aerial parts of Tabernaemontana divaricata. Alkaloids 1 and 2 are the first vobasinyl-ibogan-type alkaloids possessing a six-membered ring via an ether linkage between C-17 and C-21. All compounds except for 3 were evaluated for their cytotoxicity against five human cancer cell lines; conophylline showed significant bioactivity against HL-60, SMMC-7721, A-549, MCF-7, and SW480 cells with IC₅₀ values of 0.17, 0.35, 0.21, 1.02, and 1.49 μM, respectively. PMID:23944995

  1. Strongly Acidic Auxin Indole-3-Methanesulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jerry D.; Baldi, Bruce G.; Bialek, Krystyna

    1985-01-01

    A radiochemical synthesis is described for [14C]indole-3-methanesulfonic acid (IMS), a strongly acidic auxin analog. Techniques were developed for fractionation and purification of IMS using normal and reverse phase chromatography. In addition, the utility of both Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry for analysis of IMS has been demonstrated. IMS was shown to be an active auxin, stimulating soybean hypocotyl elongation, bean first internode curvature, and ethylene production. IMS uptake by thin sections of soybean hypocotyl was essentially independent of solution pH and, when applied at a 100 micromolar concentration, IMS exhibited a basipetal polarity in its transport in both corn coleoptile and soybean hypocotyl sections. [14C]IMS should, therefore, be a useful compound to study fundamental processes related to the movement of auxins in plant tissues and organelles. PMID:16664007

  2. Lewis Acid and Fluoroalcohol Mediated Nucleophilic Addition to the C2 Position of Indoles.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoki; Morioku, Kumika; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Takeuchi, Yasuo; Nishina, Yuta

    2016-05-01

    Indole readily undergoes nucleophilic substitution at the C3 site, and many indole derivatives have been functionalized using this property. Indole also forms indolium, which allows electrophilic addition in acidic conditions, but current examples have been limited to intramolecular reactions. C2 site-selective nucleophilic addition to indole derivatives using fluoroalcohol and a Lewis acid was developed. PMID:27119318

  3. 40 CFR 799.9305 - TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false TSCA Repeated dose 28-day oral toxicity study in rodents. 799.9305 Section 799.9305 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING REQUIREMENTS Health...

  4. Iridium(iii)-catalyzed regioselective C7-sulfonamidation of indoles.

    PubMed

    Song, Zengqiang; Antonchick, Andrey P

    2016-06-01

    Iridium(iii)-catalyzed direct C7-sulfonamidation of indoles with sulfonyl azides is described. The developed method has good compatibility with diverse functional groups, providing various 7-amino-substituted indoles with good to excellent yields in a short time under mild reaction conditions. The key feature of the developed method is the regioselective functionalization at the C7-position of 2,3-unsubstituted indoles. Biologically active compounds can be obtained using this protocol. The application of the iridium(iii) catalyst and directing group plays a crucial role in the regioselectivity of the developed reaction. PMID:27173668

  5. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of indole glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quan V; Trenerry, Craige; Rochfort, Simone; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina; Hughes, Andrew B

    2014-01-15

    The nitronate and nitrovinyl methods to synthesize indole glucosinolates (GLs) have been investigated. The results were applied to generally the most prevalent natural indole glucosinolates to synthesize 4-methoxyglucobrassicin (MGB) and neo-glucobrassicin (NGB) in moderate overall yield for the first time. The anti-inflammatory activity of the synthetic indole GLs was determined by inhibition of TNF-α secretion in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. The data showed that glucobrassicin (GB) exhibited higher activity than other synthetic indolyl GLs. PMID:24360830

  6. Indole Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Limits Phenylpropanoid Accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce an array of metabolites (including lignin monomers and soluble UV-protective metabolites) from phenylalanine through the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway. A subset of plants, including many related to Arabidopsis thaliana, synthesizes glucosinolates, nitrogen- and sulfur-containing secondary metabolites that serve as components of a plant defense system that deters herbivores and pathogens. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis thaliana reduced epidermal fluorescence5 (ref5-1) mutant, identified in a screen for plants with defects in soluble phenylpropanoid accumulation, has a missense mutation in CYP83B1 and displays defects in glucosinolate biosynthesis and in phenylpropanoid accumulation. CYP79B2 and CYP79B3 are responsible for the production of the CYP83B1 substrate indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx), and we found that the phenylpropanoid content of cyp79b2 cyp79b3 and ref5-1 cyp79b2 cyp79b3 plants is increased compared with the wild type. These data suggest that levels of IAOx or a subsequent metabolite negatively influence phenylpropanoid accumulation in ref5 and more importantly that this crosstalk is relevant in the wild type. Additional biochemical and genetic evidence indicates that this inhibition impacts the early steps of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway and restoration of phenylpropanoid accumulation in a ref5-1 med5a/b triple mutant suggests that the function of the Mediator complex is required for the crosstalk. PMID:25944103

  7. Translocation of radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol from kernel to shoot of Zea mays L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chisnell, J. R.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Either 5-[3H]indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or 5-[3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was applied to the endosperm of kernels of dark-grown Zea mays seedlings. The distribution of total radioactivity, radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid, and radiolabeled ester conjugated indole-3-acetic acid, in the shoots was then determined. Differences were found in the distribution and chemical form of the radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid in the shoot depending upon whether 5-[3H]indole-3-acetic acid or 5-[3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was applied to the endosperm. We demonstrated that indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol applied to the endosperm provides both free and ester conjugated indole-3-acetic acid to the mesocotyl and coleoptile. Free indole-3-acetic acid applied to the endosperm supplies some of the indole-3-acetic acid in the mesocotyl but essentially no indole-3-acetic acid to the coleoptile or primary leaves. It is concluded that free IAA from the endosperm is not a source of IAA for the coleoptile. Neither radioactive indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol nor IAA accumulates in the tip of the coleoptile or the mesocotyl node and thus these studies do not explain how the coleoptile tip controls the amount of IAA in the shoot.

  8. Indole-3-Acetic Acid Biosynthesis in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, M.; Riov, J.; Sharon, A.

    1998-01-01

    We characterized the biosynthesis of indole-3-acetic acid by the mycoherbicide Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene. Auxin production was tryptophan dependent. Compounds from the indole-3-acetamide and indole-3-pyruvic acid pathways were detected in culture filtrates. Feeding experiments and in vitro assay confirmed the presence of both pathways. Indole-3-acetamide was the major pathway utilized by the fungus to produce indole-3-acetic acid in culture. PMID:9835603

  9. Oxidative Furan-to-Indole Rearrangement. Synthesis of 2-(2-Acylvinyl)indoles and Flinderole C Analogues.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Anton S; Merkushev, Anton A; Uchuskin, Maxim G; Trushkov, Igor V

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative rearrangement of 2-(2-aminobenzyl)furans affording 2-(2-acylvinyl)indoles in a stereocontrolled manner in good-to-excellent yields has been developed. Thus, (2-aminobenzyl)furans with electron-releasing alkoxy substituents in the phenyl group form only E-isomers of 2-(2-acylvinyl)indoles. Conversely, substrates without such substituents produce target products as Z-isomers exclusively. A short diastereoselective method for the transformation of the obtained 2-(2-acylvinyl)indoles into antimalarial bisindole alkaloid flinderole A-C analogues has been developed. PMID:27074535

  10. Dearomative [2 + 2] Cycloaddition and Formal C-H Insertion Reaction of o-Carboryne with Indoles: Synthesis of Carborane-Functionalized Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Da; Zhang, Jiji; Xie, Zuowei

    2015-07-29

    o-Carboryne (1,2-dehydro-o-carborane) is a very useful synthon for the synthesis of a variety of carborane-functionalized heterocycles. Reaction of o-carboryne with N-protected indoles gave carborane-fused indolines if the protecting group was TMS via dearomative [2 + 2] cycloaddition or carboranyl indoles for N-alkyl ones through formal C-H insertion reaction. For N-aryl indoles, both reactions were observed, giving two products, in which the product ratio was dependent upon the nature of the substituents on the aryl rings. In general, electron-withdrawing substituents favor [2 + 2] cycloaddition, whereas electron-donating substituents promote a formal C-H insertion pathway. This reaction is also compatible with other heteroaromatics. Thus, a stepwise reaction mechanism was proposed to account for the experimental observations. These protocols offer general and efficient methods for the preparation of carborane-functionalized indoles and indolines as well as other heterocycles. The observed dearomative [2 + 2] cycloaddition represents the first example of indoles to undergo such reaction in the absence of transition metals or without UV irradiation. All new compounds were fully characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (11)B NMR spectroscopy as well as HRMS spectrometry. Some were further confirmed by single-crystal X-ray analyses. PMID:26160111

  11. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps, poisons, and other generally accepted...

  12. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps, poisons, and other generally accepted...

  13. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be maintained free of rodent infestation through the use of traps, poisons, and other generally accepted...

  14. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  15. 21 CFR 1250.96 - Rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rodent control. 1250.96 Section 1250.96 Food and... SANITATION Sanitation Facilities and Conditions on Vessels § 1250.96 Rodent control. Vessels shall be... of rodent control....

  16. Access to Indole Derivatives from Diaryliodonium Salts and 2-Alkynylanilines.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengfei; Weng, Yunxiang; Xu, Xianxiang; Cui, Xiuling

    2016-05-20

    An efficient, environmentally friendly, and operationally simple procedure to 1,2-disubstituted indoles from 2-alkynylanilines and diaryliodonium salts has been developed. This reaction proceeds smoothly under metal-free conditions. The products obtained could be transferred into 3,3'-diindolylmethane with DMSO catalyzed by palladium. The isotopic label experiments indicated that the methylene group in 3,3'-diindolylmethane is derived from DMSO. The diverse indoles were obtained in up to 90% yield for 28 examples. PMID:27156581

  17. Friedel-Crafts Fluoroacetylation of Indoles with Fluorinated Acetic Acids for the Synthesis of Fluoromethyl Indol-3-yl Ketones under Catalyst- and Additive-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shun-Jiang; Ren, Zhi-Hui; Wang, Yao-Yu; Guan, Zheng-Hui

    2016-05-20

    A simple and efficient protocol for the fluoroacetylation of indoles is reported. The reaction uses fluorinated acetic acids as the fluoroacetylation reagents to synthesize diverse fluoromethyl indol-3-yl ketones in good yields under catalyst- and additive-free conditions. In addition, the only byproduct is water in this transformation. The synthetic utility of this reaction was also demonstrated by the concise synthesis of α-(trifluoromethyl)(indol-3-yl)methanol and indole-3-carboxylic acid. PMID:27101475

  18. Indole and 7-benzyloxyindole attenuate the virulence of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Cho, Hyun Seob; Kim, Younghoon; Kim, Jung-Ae; Banskota, Suhrid; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2013-05-01

    Human pathogens can readily develop drug resistance due to the long-term use of antibiotics that mostly inhibit bacterial growth. Unlike antibiotics, antivirulence compounds diminish bacterial virulence without affecting cell viability and thus, may not lead to drug resistance. Staphylococcus aureus is a major agent of nosocomial infections and produces diverse virulence factors, such as the yellow carotenoid staphyloxanthin, which promotes resistance to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the host immune system. To identify novel antivirulence compounds, bacterial signal indole present in animal gut and diverse indole derivatives were investigated with respect to reducing staphyloxanthin production and the hemolytic activity of S. aureus. Treatment with indole or its derivative 7-benzyloxyindole (7BOI) caused S. aureus to become colorless and inhibited its hemolytic ability without affecting bacterial growth. As a result, S. aureus was more easily killed by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and by human whole blood in the presence of indole or 7BOI. In addition, 7BOI attenuated S. aureus virulence in an in vivo model of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, which is readily infected and killed by S. aureus. Transcriptional analyses showed that both indole and 7BOI repressed the expressions of several virulence genes such as α-hemolysin gene hla, enterotoxin seb, and the protease genes splA and sspA and modulated the expressions of the important regulatory genes agrA and sarA. These findings show that indole derivatives are potential candidates for use in antivirulence strategies against persistent S. aureus infection. PMID:23318836

  19. N-alkenyl indoles as useful intermediates for alkaloid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Boonnak, Nawong; Padwa, Albert

    2011-11-18

    A mild cross-coupling reaction to access several N-alkenyl-substituted indoles has been developed. The coupling procedure involves treating a NH-indole with various alkenyl bromides using a combination of 10 mol % of copper(I) iodide and 20 mol % of ethylenediamine as the catalyst in dioxane at 110 °C in the presence of K(3)PO(4) as the base. When treated with acid, these unique enamines produce a dimeric product derived from a preferred protonation reaction at the enamine π-bond. A cationic cyclization reaction of the readily available 2-(2-(1H-indol-1-yl)allyl)cyclopentanol was utilized to construct tetracyclic indole derivatives with a quaternary stereocenter attached to the C(2)-position of the indole ring. An alternative strategy for selective functionalization at the C(2)-position of a N-alkenyl-substituted indole derivative that was also studied involves a radical cyclization of a xanthate derivative. The work described provides an attractive route to the tetracyclic core of some vinca alkaloids, including the tetrahydroisoquinocarbazole RS-2135. PMID:22007631

  20. Photoreaction of indole-containing mycotoxins to fluorescent products.

    PubMed

    Maragos, C M

    2009-06-01

    Photochemical reaction of the non-fluorescent mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) to fluorescent products was recently reported. Because CPA contains an indole moiety, believed to contribute to the fluorescence, it was of interest to determine whether the effect might be more generally applicable to indole-containing mycotoxins. Three indole-containing tremorgens (penitrem A, paxilline, verruculogen) that have not previously been reported to be fluorescent were rendered fluorescent by exposure to ultraviolet light in a photoreactor. Naturally fluorescent ergot alkaloids, which also contain an indole-moiety, exhibited a diminished response after exposure. This suggests that the phenomenon may be most useful for detection of indole-containing tremorgens that are non-fluorescent, rather than for the enhancement of materials that are already fluorescent, such as the ergot alkaloids. The extent to which fluorescence enhancement was seen was strongly influenced by the reaction environment, in particular the solvent used and whether cyclodextrins were present. In an HPLC format, placement of the photoreactor post-column allowed for the fluorescence detection of penitrem A, paxilline, and verruculogen. The ability to photoreact indole-containing tremorgens and detect them by fluorescence may open up new avenues for detection of these mycotoxins alone or in combination. PMID:23604981

  1. UV-Photoelectron Spectroscopy of BN Indoles: Experimental and Computational Electronic Structure Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive electronic structure analysis of two BN isosteres of indole using a combined UV-photoelectron spectroscopy (UV-PES)/computational chemistry approach. Gas-phase He I photoelectron spectra of external BN indole I and fused BN indole II have been recorded, assessed by density functional theory calculations, and compared with natural indole. The first ionization energies of these indoles are natural indole (7.9 eV), external BN indole I (7.9 eV), and fused BN indole II (8.05 eV). The computationally determined molecular dipole moments are in the order: natural indole (2.177 D) > fused BN indole II (1.512 D) > external BN indole I (0.543 D). The λmax in the UV–vis absorption spectra are in the order: fused BN indole II (292 nm) > external BN indole I (282 nm) > natural indole (270 nm). The observed relative electrophilic aromatic substitution reactivity of the investigated indoles with dimethyliminium chloride as the electrophile is as follows: fused BN indole II > natural indole > external BN indole I, and this trend correlates with the π-orbital coefficient at the 3-position. Nucleus-independent chemical shifts calculations show that the introduction of boron into an aromatic 6π-electron system leads to a reduction in aromaticity, presumably due to a stronger bond localization. Trends and conclusions from BN isosteres of simple monocyclic aromatic systems such as benzene and toluene are not necessarily translated to the bicyclic indole core. Thus, electronic structure consequences resulting from BN/CC isosterism will need to be evaluated individually from system to system. PMID:25089659

  2. Bioactive indole alkaloids isolated from Alstonia angustifolia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Terrazas, César; Muñoz Acuña, Ulyana; Ninh, Tran Ngoc; Chai, Heebyung; Carcache de Blanco, Esperanza J.; Soejarto, Djaja D.; Satoskar, Abhay R.

    2014-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation was conducted on a CHCl3-soluble extract of the stem bark of Alstonia angustifolia (Apocynaceae) collected in Vietnam using the HT-29 human colon cancer cell line, and led to the isolation of a new sarpagine-type indole alkaloid (1), together with nine known alkaloids, including four macroline-derived alkaloids (2–5), a sarpagine-type alkaloid (6), and four macroline-pleiocarpamine bisindole alkaloids (7–10). The structure of the new compound (1) was determined on the basis of spectroscopic data interpretation. Compounds 1–10 were evaluated in vitro for their NF-κB (p65) inhibitory activity against the Hela cells in an ELISA assay. The new sarpagine alkaloid, N(4)-methyltalpinine (1), was found to show significant NF-κB inhibitory activity (ED50 = 1.2 µM). Furthermore, all the isolates (1–10) were evaluated in vitro for their antileishmanial activity, and compounds (1–4, 6 and 8–10) exhibited leishmaniacidal activity against promastigotes of Leishmania mexicana. PMID:25584095

  3. Partial purification and characterization of indol-3-ylacetylglucose:myo-inositol indol-3-ylacetyltransferase (indoleacetic acid-inositol synthase)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kesy, J. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is described for the purification of the enzyme indol-3-ylacetylglucose:myo-inositol indol-3-ylacetyltransferase (IAA-myo-inositol synthase). This enzyme catalyzes the transfer of indol-3-ylacetate from 1-0-indol-3-ylacetyl-beta-d-glucose to myo-inositol to form indol-3-ylacetyl-myo-inositol and glucose. A hexokinase or glucose oxidase based assay system is described. The enzyme has been purified approximately 16,000-fold, has an isoelectric point of pH 6.1 and yields three catalytically inactive bands upon acrylamide gel electrophoresis of the native protein. The enzyme shows maximum transferase activity with myo-inositol but shows some transferase activity with scyllo-inositol and myo-inosose-2. No transfer of IAA occurs with myo-inositol-d-galactopyranose, cyclohexanol, mannitol, or glycerol as acyl acceptor. The affinity of the enzyme for 1-0-indol-3-ylacetyl-beta-d-glucose is, Km = 30 micromolar, and for myo-inositol is, Km = 4 millimolar. The enzyme does not catalyze the exchange incorporation of glucose into IAA-glucose indicating the reaction mechanism involves binding of IAA glucose to the enzyme with subsequent hydrolytic cleavage of the acyl moiety by the hydroxyl of myo-inositol to form IAA myo-inositol ester.

  4. Antitumor efficacy testing in rodents.

    PubMed

    Hollingshead, Melinda G

    2008-11-01

    The preclinical research and human clinical trials necessary for developing anticancer therapeutics are costly. One contributor to these costs is preclinical rodent efficacy studies, which, in addition to the costs associated with conducting them, often guide the selection of agents for clinical development. If inappropriate or inaccurate recommendations are made on the basis of these preclinical studies, then additional costs are incurred. In this commentary, I discuss the issues associated with preclinical rodent efficacy studies. These include the identification of proper preclinical efficacy models, the selection of appropriate experimental endpoints, and the correct statistical evaluation of the resulting data. I also describe important experimental design considerations, such as selecting the drug vehicle, optimizing the therapeutic treatment plan, properly powering the experiment by defining appropriate numbers of replicates in each treatment arm, and proper randomization. Improved preclinical selection criteria can aid in reducing unnecessary human studies, thus reducing the overall costs of anticancer drug development. PMID:18957675

  5. Rodent models of cerebral ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.D.; Busto, R. )

    1989-12-01

    The use of physiologically regulated, reproducible animal models is crucial to the study of ischemic brain injury--both the mechanisms governing its occurrence and potential therapeutic strategies. Several laboratory rodent species (notably rats and gerbils), which are readily available at relatively low cost, are highly suitable for the investigation of cerebral ischemia and have been widely employed for this purpose. We critically examine and summarize several rodent models of transient global ischemia, resulting in selective neuronal injury within vulnerable brain regions, and focal ischemia, typically giving rise to localized brain infarction. We explore the utility of individual models and emphasize the necessity for meticulous experimental control of those variables that modulate the severity of ischemic brain injury.169 references.

  6. Influence of the tryptophan-indole-IFNγ axis on human genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection: role of vaginal co-infections

    PubMed Central

    Aiyar, Ashok; Quayle, Alison J.; Buckner, Lyndsey R.; Sherchand, Shardulendra P.; Chang, Theresa L.; Zea, Arnold H.; Martin, David H.; Belland, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The natural history of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infections can vary widely; infections can spontaneously resolve but can also last from months to years, potentially progressing to cause significant pathology. The host and bacterial factors underlying this wide variation are not completely understood, but emphasize the bacterium's capacity to evade/adapt to the genital immune response, and/or exploit local environmental conditions to survive this immune response. IFNγ is considered to be a primary host protective cytokine against endocervical C. trachomatis infections. IFNγ acts by inducing the host enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxgenase, which catabolizes tryptophan, thereby depriving the bacterium of this essential amino acid. In vitro studies have revealed that tryptophan deprivation causes Chlamydia to enter a viable but non-infectious growth pattern that is termed a persistent growth form, characterized by a unique morphology and gene expression pattern. Provision of tryptophan can reactivate the bacterium to the normal developmental cycle. There is a significant difference in the capacity of ocular and genital C. trachomatis serovars to counter tryptophan deprivation. The latter uniquely encode a functional tryptophan synthase to synthesize tryptophan via indole salvage, should indole be available in the infection microenvironment. In vitro studies have confirmed the capacity of indole to mitigate the effects of IFNγ; it has been suggested that a perturbed vaginal microbiome may provide a source of indole in vivo. Consistent with this hypothesis, the microbiome associated with bacterial vaginosis includes species that encode a tryptophanase to produce indole. In this review, we discuss the natural history of genital chlamydial infections, morphological and molecular changes imposed by IFNγ on Chlamydia, and finally, the microenvironmental conditions associated with vaginal co-infections that can ameliorate the effects of IFNγ on C. trachomatis. PMID

  7. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of novel chiral oxazino-indoles as potential and selective neuroprotective agents against Aβ25-35-induced neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Tao, Ling-Xue; Xiao, Wei; Ji, Sha-Sha; Wang, Jian-Rong; Li, Xu-Wen; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Guo, Yue-Wei

    2016-08-01

    A series of chiral oxazino-indoles have been synthesized via a key intermolecular oxa-Pictet-Spengler reaction. These compounds exhibited significant and selective neuroprotective effects against Aβ25-35-induced neuronal damage. This is the first report of evaluating the influence of chiral diversity of oxazino-indoles on their neuroprotective activities, with the structure-activity relationship been analyzed. The highly active compounds 3f, 3g, 4g, 4h, and 6b all performed over 90% cell protection, providing a new direction for the development of neuroprotective agents against Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27301369

  8. Ag(I)-Catalyzed Indolization/C3-Functionalization Cascade of 2-Ethynylanilines via Ring Opening of Donor-Acceptor Cyclopropanes.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Raju; Suneja, Arun; Singh, Vinod K

    2016-06-01

    A AgSbF6-catalyzed cascade involving the ring opening of donor-acceptor cyclopropanes (DACs) preceded by the cyclization of N-protected 2-ethynylaniline is described. The method discloses a step-economy route to 2,3-disubstituted indole, where a Ag catalyst is found to trigger the cascade by activating both alkyne and DACs. Various functionalities at different ends of both substrates offer rapid access to 2,3-disubstituted indole derivatives in one pot in good to excellent yields. Elaboration of the cascade product to useful intermediates is also depicted. PMID:27186903

  9. Low-Dose Radiotherapy in Indolent Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Rossier, Christine; Schick, Ulrike; Miralbell, Raymond; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Weber, Damien C.; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the response rate, duration of response, and overall survival after low-dose involved-field radiotherapy in patients with recurrent low-grade lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Methods and Materials: Forty-three (24 women, 19 men) consecutive patients with indolent lymphoma or CLL were treated with a total dose of 4 Gy (2 x 2 Gy) using 6- 18-MV photons. The median age was 73 years (range, 39-88). Radiotherapy was given either after (n = 32; 75%) or before (n = 11; 25%) chemotherapy. The median time from diagnosis was 48 months (range, 1-249). The median follow-up period was 20 months (range, 1-56). Results: The overall response rate was 90%. Twelve patients (28%) had a complete response, 15 (35%) had a partial response, 11 (26%) had stable disease, and 5 (11%) had progressive disease. The median overall survival for patients with a positive response (complete response/partial response/stable disease) was 41 months; for patients with progressive disease it was 6 months (p = 0.001). The median time to in-field progression was 21 months (range, 0-24), and the median time to out-field progression was 8 months (range, 0-40). The 3-year in-field control was 92% in patients with complete response (median was not reached). The median time to in-field progression was 9 months (range, 0.5-24) in patients with partial response and 6 months (range, 0.6-6) in those with stable disease (p < 0.05). Younger age, positive response to radiotherapy, and no previous chemotherapy were the best factors influencing the outcome. Conclusions: Low-dose involved-field radiotherapy is an effective treatment in the management of patients with recurrent low-grade lymphoma or CLL.

  10. Environmental factors affecting indole metabolism under anaerobic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, E.L.; Francis, A.J.; Bollag, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of physiological and environmental factors on the accumulation of oxindole during anaerobic indole metabolism was investigated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Under methanogenic conditions, indole was temporarily converted to oxindole in stoichiometric amounts in media inoculated with three freshwater sediments and an organic soil. In media inoculated with methanogenic sewage sludge, the modest amounts of oxindole detected at 35/sup 0/C reached higher concentrations and persisted longer when the incubation temperature was decreased from 35 to 15/sup 0/C. Also, decreasing the concentration of sewage sludge used as an inoculum from 50 to 1% caused an increase in the accumulation of oxindole from 10 to 75% of the indole added. Under denitrifying conditions, regardless of the concentration or source of the inoculum, oxindole appeared in trace amounts but did not accumulate during indole metabolism. In addition, denitrifying consortia which previously metabolized indole degraded oxindole with no lag period. Our data suggest that oxindole accumulation under methanogenic, but not under denitrifying conditions is caused by differences between relative rates of oxindole production and destruction.

  11. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for 3-(1-naphthoyl) Indole Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjyou, Noriko; Ito, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    3-(1-naphthoyl) indole is one of the raw materials that synthesizes a synthetic cannabinoid such as 1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole (JWH-018) and 1-butyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole (JWH-073). It is important to detect the 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole derivatives rapidly, sensitively, and comprehensively. We developed two monoclonal antibodies (MAb) against 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole derivatives, named NT1 (IgG1) and NT2 (IgG1), which were possibly effective for detecting 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole derivatives. The cross-reactive ability of these MAbs was evaluated using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the results, we found both of these antibodies recognize 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole and its derivatives. However neither of these antibodies recognize naphtoic acid, 4-methyl-naphtoic acid, and indole. Sixty to 100 nanomole per liter of 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole derivatives, such as 1-methyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole, 1-ethyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole, and 1-octyl-3-(1-naphthoyl) indole, can be detected using both of the obtained MAbs. Thus, the MAbs produced in this study could be a useful tool for the detection of 3-(1-naphthoyl) indole derivatives. PMID:26871514

  12. Assessment of different formulations of oral Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine in rodent models for immunogenicity and protection against aerosol challenge with M. bovis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Simon; Cross, Martin L; Smith, Alan; Court, Pinar; Vipond, Julia; Nadian, Allan; Hewinson, R Glyn; Batchelor, Hannah K; Perrie, Yvonne; Williams, Ann; Aldwell, Frank E; Chambers, Mark A

    2008-10-29

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) caused by infection with Mycobacterium bovis is causing considerable economic loss to farmers and Government in the United Kingdom as its incidence is increasing. Efforts to control bTB in the UK are hampered by the infection in Eurasian badgers (Meles meles) that represent a wildlife reservoir and source of recurrent M. bovis exposure to cattle. Vaccination of badgers with the human TB vaccine, M. bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG), in oral bait represents a possible disease control tool and holds the best prospect for reaching badger populations over a wide geographical area. Using mouse and guinea pig models, we evaluated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy, respectively, of candidate badger oral vaccines based on formulation of BCG in lipid matrix, alginate beads, or a novel microcapsular hybrid of both lipid and alginate. Two different oral doses of BCG were evaluated in each formulation for their protective efficacy in guinea pigs, while a single dose was evaluated in mice. In mice, significant immune responses (based on lymphocyte proliferation and expression of IFN-gamma) were only seen with the lipid matrix and the lipid in alginate microcapsular formulation, corresponding to the isolation of viable BCG from alimentary tract lymph nodes. In guinea pigs, only BCG formulated in lipid matrix conferred protection to the spleen and lungs following aerosol route challenge with M. bovis. Protection was seen with delivery doses in the range 10(6)-10(7) CFU, although this was more consistent in the spleen at the higher dose. No protection in terms of organ CFU was seen with BCG administered in alginate beads or in lipid in alginate microcapsules, although 10(7) in the latter formulation conferred protection in terms of increasing body weight after challenge and a smaller lung to body weight ratio at necropsy. These results highlight the potential for lipid, rather than alginate, -based vaccine formulations as suitable delivery

  13. Prediction of rodent carcinogenicity for 30 chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Ashby, J.

    1996-10-01

    Predictions of carcinogenic activity are made for 30 chemicals currently being assessed for rodent carcinogenicity by the U.S. National Toxicology Program. The predictions are based upon the chemical structure, the anticipated or reported mutagenicity, and the reported sub-chronic toxicity of each chemical. It is predicted that 13 chemicals will be noncarcinogenic to rodents, that 7 will be genotoxic carcinogens, and that 10 may show some evidence of presumed nongenotoxic rodent carcinogenesis. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Clinical hematology of rodent species.

    PubMed

    Pilny, Anthony A

    2008-09-01

    Pet rodents, such as rats, guinea pigs, and chinchillas, differ from more traditional companion animal species in many aspects of their hematologic parameters. Animals within this order have much diversity in size, anatomy, methods of restraint, and blood collection technique. Appropriate sample collection is often the most challenging aspect of the diagnostic protocol, and inappropriate restraint may cause a stress response that interferes with blood test results. For many of these patients, sedation is required and can also affect results as well. In most cases, however, obtaining a standard database is necessary and very possible when providing medical care for this popular group of pets. PMID:18675732

  15. Sniffing and whisking in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Deschênes, Martin; Moore, Jeffrey; Kleinfeld, David

    2016-01-01

    Summary Sniffing and whisking are two rhythmic orofacial motor activities that enable rodents to localize and track objects in their environment. They have related temporal dynamics, possibly as a result of both shared musculature and shared sensory tasks. Sniffing and whisking also constitute the overt expression of an animal's anticipation of a reward. Yet, the neuronal mechanisms that underlie the control of these behaviors have not been established. Here, we review the similarities between sniffing and whisking and suggest that such similarities indicate a mechanistic link between these two rhythmic exploratory behaviors. PMID:22177596

  16. Toxic effects of brominated indoles and phenols on zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Kammann, U; Vobach, M; Wosniok, W

    2006-07-01

    Organobromine compounds in the marine environment have been the focus of growing attention in past years. In contrast to anthropogenic brominated flame retardants, other brominated compounds are produced naturally, e.g., by common polychaete worms and algae. Brominated phenols and indoles assumed to be of biogenic origin have been detected in water and sediment extracts from the German Bight. These substances as well as some of their isomers have been tested with the zebrafish embryo test and were found to cause lethal as well as nonlethal malformations. The zebrafish test was able to detect a log K(OW)-related toxicity for bromophenols, suggesting nonpolar narcosis as a major mode of action. Different effect patterns could be observed for brominated indoles and bromophenols. The comparison of effective concentrations in the zebrafish embryo test with the concentrations determined in water samples suggests the possibility that brominated indoles may affect early life stages of marine fish species in the North Sea. PMID:16418895

  17. [Occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary metabolites of soil Aspergillus].

    PubMed

    Vinokurova, N G; Khmel'nitskaia, I I; Baskunov, B P; Arinbasarov, M U

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of indole alkaloids among secondary fungal metabolites was studied in species of the genus Aspergillus, isolated from soils that were sampled in various regions of Russia (a total of 102 isolates of the species A. niger, A. phoenicis, A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. ustus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus). Clavine alkaloids were represented by fumigaclavine, which was formed by A. fumigatus. alpha-Cyclopiazonic acid was formed by isolates of A. fumigatus, A. flavus, A. versicolor, A. phoenicis, and A. clavatus. The occurrence of indole-containing diketopiperazine alkaloids was documented for isolates of A. flavus, A. fumigatus, A. clavatus, and A. ochraceus. No indole-containing metabolites were found among the metabolites of A. ustus or A. niger. PMID:12722658

  18. Conversion of indole to oxindole under methanogenic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.F.; Madsen, E.L.; Bollag, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Aromatic N-heterocyclic compounds are often present in aqueous effluents associated with coal mining and processing operations. The environmental fate of these chemicals is of great concern because they are toxic and may contaminate both surface water and groundwater. Previous investigations of microbial metabolism of aromatic chemicals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions suggest that microorganisms may play a key role in determining the fate of this class of compounds. When indole was incubated under methanogenic conditions with an inoculum of sewage sludge, the chemical was metabolized within 10 days and temporary formation of an intermediate was observed. The metabolite was isolated by thin-layer chromatography and determined to be 1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one (oxindole) by UV spectroscopy (lambda/sub max/, 247 nm) and mass spectrometry (m/z, 133). The methane produced (net amount) indicated nearly complete mineralization of indole.

  19. Structure of the indole-benzene dimer revisited.

    PubMed

    Biswal, Himansu S; Gloaguen, Eric; Mons, Michel; Bhattacharyya, Surjendu; Shirhatti, Pranav R; Wategaonkar, Sanjay

    2011-09-01

    The structure of the indole-benzene dimer has been investigated using experimental techniques, namely, UV spectroscopy and infrared-ultraviolet (IR/UV) double resonance spectroscopy, combined with quantum chemical calculations such as MP2 and dispersion corrected DFT methods. The red shift of the indole N-H stretch frequency in the dimer provides direct evidence that the experimentally observed indole-benzene dimer is an N-H···π bound hydrogen bonded complex. Theoretical investigations suggest that the potential energy surface (PES) of the complex is rather flat along the coordinate describing the tilt angle between the molecular planes of indole and benzene, with several minima of similar energies, namely, parallel displaced (PD), right-angle T-shaped (T), and other intermediate structures which can be categorized as tilted T-shaped (T') and tilted parallel displaced (PD') structures. Three different computational methods, namely, RI-MP2, RI-B97-D, and PBE1-DCP, are used to arrive at a new structural assignment after assessing their performance in predicting the structure of the pyrrole dimer, for which accurate experimental data are available. By comparing the computed IR spectra of PD, T, and T'/PD' structures with the experimental IR spectrum, the tilted T-shaped (T') structure was assigned to the indole-benzene dimer. The empirically dispersion-corrected functionals (RI-B97-D and PBE1-DCP) correctly reproduce the experimental IR spectrum whereas the popular post-Hartree-Fock, MP2 method gives disappointing results. These results are also in agreement with the experimental dissociation energy (D(0)) reported in the literature. The N-H stretch frequency of the indole-benzene dimer has been found to be a more pertinent parameter for the structural assignment than the dissociation energy (D(0)). PMID:21413767

  20. Urban resident attitudes toward rodents, rodent control products, and environmental effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent control in urban areas can result in the inadvertent mortality of non-target species (e.g., bobcats). However, there is little detailed information about rodent control practices of urban residents. Our objective was to evaluate urban rodent control behaviors in two area...

  1. Indole Alkaloids from the Leaves of Nauclea officinalis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Long; Liao, Cheng-Hui; Kang, Qiang-Rong; Zheng, Kai; Jiang, Ying-Chun; He, Zhen-Dan

    2016-01-01

    Three new indole alkaloids, named naucleamide G (1), and nauclealomide B and C (5 and 6), were isolated from the n-BuOH-soluble fraction of an EtOH extract of the leaves of Nauclea officinalis, together with three known alkaloids, paratunamide C (2), paratunamide D (3) and paratunamide A (4). The structures with absolute configurations of the new compounds were identified on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR, HRESIMS, acid hydrolysis and quantum chemical circular dichroism (CD) calculation. According to the structures of isolated indole alkaloids, their plausible biosynthetic pathway was deduced. PMID:27455233

  2. The Miocene rodents of Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Z.

    2009-04-01

    During the Miocene period a group of shallow lakes was created in depressions at the territory of present-day Serbia. This caused the present wide distribution of lacustrine sediments, which occasionally alternate with the alluvial and marsh sediments. The remains of large mammals are relatively common, while the remains of small mammals used to be known only from two localities - Mala Miliva and Sibnica. The method of sediment sieving, used during the last decade, led to discovery of 6 new localities with remains of fossil vertebrates - Sibnica 1, Vračevići, village Lazarevac, Bele Vode, Brajkovac and Tavnik. Most of the fossil material is represented by osteological and odontological remains of small mammals. The best represented group of small mammals at each of the localities was the rodents. According to the odontological material presence was proven for 35 rodent species from 6 families. MN zonation was determined according to structure of associations. The geological age of fossil-bearing sediments was determined by using the method of correlation with the sites in Europe and Turkey.

  3. Rodent sociality and parasite diversity.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Frédéric; Blumstein, Daniel T; Morand, Serge

    2007-12-22

    The risk of parasitism is considered to be a general cost of sociality and individuals living in larger groups are typically considered to be more likely to be infected with parasites. However, contradictory results have been reported for the relationship between group size and infection by directly transmitted parasites. We used independent contrasts to examine the relationship between an index of sociality in rodents and the diversity of their macroparasites (helminths and arthropods such as fleas, ticks, suckling lice and mesostigmatid mites). We found that the species richness of directly transmitted ectoparasites, but not endoparasites, decreased significantly with the level of rodent sociality. A greater homogeneity in the biotic environment (i.e. a reduced number of cohabiting host species) of the more social species may have reduced ectoparasites' diversity by impairing ectoparasites transmission and exchange. Our finding may also result from beneficial outcomes of social living that include behavioural defences, like allogrooming, and the increased avoidance of parasites through dilution effects. PMID:17925270

  4. Inhibition of the MAP3 kinase Tpl2 protects rodent and human β-cells from apoptosis and dysfunction induced by cytokines and enhances anti-inflammatory actions of exendin-4

    PubMed Central

    Varin, E M; Wojtusciszyn, A; Broca, C; Muller, D; Ravier, M A; Ceppo, F; Renard, E; Tanti, J-F; Dalle, S

    2016-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines exert cytotoxic effects on β-cells, and are involved in the pathogenesis of type I and type II diabetes and in the drastic loss of β-cells following islet transplantation. Cytokines induce apoptosis and alter the function of differentiated β-cells. Although the MAP3 kinase tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2) is known to integrate signals from inflammatory stimuli in macrophages, fibroblasts and adipocytes, its role in β-cells is unknown. We demonstrate that Tpl2 is expressed in INS-1E β-cells, mouse and human islets, is activated and upregulated by cytokines and mediates ERK1/2, JNK and p38 activation. Tpl2 inhibition protects β-cells, mouse and human islets from cytokine-induced apoptosis and preserves glucose-induced insulin secretion in mouse and human islets exposed to cytokines. Moreover, Tpl2 inhibition does not affect survival or positive effects of glucose (i.e., ERK1/2 phosphorylation and basal insulin secretion). The protection against cytokine-induced β-cell apoptosis is strengthened when Tpl2 inhibition is combined with the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog exendin-4 in INS-1E cells. Furthermore, when combined with exendin-4, Tpl2 inhibition prevents cytokine-induced death and dysfunction of human islets. This study proposes that Tpl2 inhibitors, used either alone or combined with a GLP-1 analog, represent potential novel and effective therapeutic strategies to protect diabetic β-cells. PMID:26794660

  5. Indole-3-acetic acid biosynthetic pathways in the basidiomycetous yeast Rhodosporidium paludigenum.

    PubMed

    Nutaratat, Pumin; Srisuk, Nantana; Arunrattiyakorn, Panarat; Limtong, Savitree

    2016-07-01

    Microorganisms produce plant growth regulators, such as auxins, cytokinins and gibberellins, to promote plant growth. Auxins are a group of compounds with an indole ring that have a positive effect on plant growth. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is a plant growth hormone classified as an indole derivative of the auxin family. IAA biosynthesis pathways have been reported and widely studied in several groups of bacteria. Only a few studies on IAA biosynthesis pathways have been conducted in yeast. This study aimed to investigate IAA biosynthesis pathways in a basidiomycetous yeast (Rhodosporidium paludigenum DMKU-RP301). Investigations were performed both with and without a tryptophan supplement. Indole compound intermediates were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Indole-3-lactic acid and indole-3-ethanol were found as a result of the enzymatic reduction of indole-3-pyruvic acid and indole-3-acetaldehyde, in IAA biosynthesis via an indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. In addition, we also found indole-3-pyruvic acid in culture supernatants determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Identification of tryptophan aminotransferase activity supports indole-3-pyruvic acid-routed IAA biosynthesis in R. paludigenum DMKU-RP301. We hence concluded that R. paludigenum DMKU-RP301 produces IAA through an indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. PMID:26899734

  6. Role of Indole Production on Virulence of Vibrio cholerae Using Galleria mellonella Larvae Model.

    PubMed

    Nuidate, Taiyeebah; Tansila, Natta; Saengkerdsub, Suwat; Kongreung, Jetnaphang; Bakkiyaraj, Dhamodharan; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2016-09-01

    Cell to cell communication facilitated by chemical signals plays crucial roles in regulating various cellular functions in bacteria. Indole, one such signaling molecule has been demonstrated to control various bacterial phenotypes such as biofilm formation and virulence in diverse bacteria including Vibrio cholerae. The present study explores some key factors involved in indole production and the subsequent pathogenesis of V. cholerae. Indole production was higher at 37 °C than at 30 °C, although the growth at 37 °C was slightly higher. A positive correlation was observed between indole production and biofilm formation in V. cholerae. Maximum indole production was detected at pH 7. There was no significant difference in indole production between clinical and environmental V. cholerae isolates, although indole production in one environmental isolate was significantly different. Both growth and indole production showed relevant changes with differences in salinity. An indole negative mutant strain was constructed using transposon mutagenesis and the direct effect of indole on the virulence of V. cholerae was evaluated using Galleria mellonella larvae model. Comparison to the wild type strain, the mutant significantly reduced the mortality of G. mellonella larvae which regained its virulence after complementation with exogenous indole. A gene involved in indole production and the virulence of V. cholerae was identified. PMID:27407302

  7. Rodents as agents of ecological change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rodents have the potential to exert a wide array of ecological pressures in any given ecosystem. The negative impacts to plant communities in general, especially cultivated crops, are typically cited as examples of rodent grazing pressure. Considerable research has been conducted on the negative imp...

  8. Rodent Control: Seal Up! Trap Up! Clean Up!

    MedlinePlus

    ... successfully trapping rodents in and around the home. Seal Up! Seal up holes inside and outside the home to ... infested areas. Before cleaning, trap the rodents and seal up any entryways to ensure that no rodents ...

  9. A simple method for simultaneous RP-HPLC determination of indolic compounds related to bacterial biosynthesis of indole-3-acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Szkop, Michał; Bielawski, Wiesław

    2013-03-01

    In this short technical report, we present a fast and simple procedure for sample preparation and a single-run Reversed Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) determination of seven indoles (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-acetonitrile, indole-3-ethanol, indole-3-lactic acid, tryptamine and tryptophan) in bacterial culture supernatants. The separation of the analytes, after a single centrifugal filtration clean-up step, was performed using a gradient elution on a symmetry C8 column followed by fluorimetric detection (λ(ex) = 280/λ(em) = 350 nm). The calibration curves were linear for all of the studied compounds over the concentration range of 0.0625-125 μg mL(-1) (r ( 2 ) ≥ 0.998) and the limits of detection were below 0.015 μg mL(-1). The applicability of the method was confirmed by analysis of Pseudomonas putida culture supernatants. PMID:23111785

  10. Diastereoselective Synthesis of Biologically Active Cyclopenta[b]indoles.

    PubMed

    Santos, Marilia S; Fernandes, Daniara C; Rodrigues, Manoel T; Regiani, Thais; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia T G; Vendramini-Costa, Débora B; de Carvalho, João E; Eberlin, Marcos N; Coelho, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    The cyclopenta[b]indole motif is present in several natural and synthetic biologically active compounds, being directly responsible for the biological effects some of them present. We described herein a three step sequence for the synthesis of cyclopenta[b]indoles with a great structural diversity. The method is based on an oxidative Michael addition of suitable indoles on the double bond of Morita-Baylis-Hillman adducts mediated by a hypervalent iodine reagent (IBX) to form β-ketoesters, which were chemoselectively reduced with NaBH4 in THF to give the corresponding β-hydroxy-esters. The diastereoisomeric mixture was then treated with a catalytic amount of triflic acid (20 mol %) to give cyclopenta[b]indoles with overall yields ranging from 8 to 73% (for 2 steps). The acid-catalyzed cyclization step gave the required heterocycles, via an intramolecular Friedel-Crafts reaction, with high diastereoselectivity, where only the trans product was observed. A mechanistic study monitored by ESI-(+)-MS was also conducted to collect evidence about the mechanism of this reaction. The new molecules herein synthesized were also evaluated against a panel of human cancer cells demonstrating a promising antitumoral profile. PMID:27403650

  11. Gas-phase electronic spectrum of the indole radical cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalyavi, N.; Catani, K. J.; Sanelli, J. A.; Dryza, V.; Bieske, E. J.

    2015-08-01

    The visible and near-UV electronic spectrum of the indole radical cation is measured in the gas phase by photodissociation of indole+-Ar and indole+-He complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. A series of resolved vibronic transitions extending from 610 to 460 nm are assigned to the D2 ← D0 band system, while weak transitions between 390 and 360 nm are assigned to the D3 ← D0 system, and a stronger, broad, unresolved absorption between 350 and 300 nm is attributed to the D4 ← D0 system. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations are used to assign vibronic structure of the D2 ← D0 band system, and show that the main active vibrational modes correspond to in-plane ring deformations. The strongest D2 ← D0 vibronic transitions of indole+-He do not correspond with any catalogued diffuse interstellar bands, even considering band displacements of up to 50 cm-1possibly caused by the attached He atom.

  12. Copper-catalyzed intermolecular asymmetric propargylic dearomatization of indoles.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wen; Li, He; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Chen-Jiang; You, Shu-Li

    2015-06-22

    The first copper-catalyzed intermolecular dearomatization of indoles by an asymmetric propargylic substitution reaction was developed. This method provides a highly efficient synthesis of versatile furoindoline and pyrroloindoline derivatives containing a quaternary carbon stereogenic center and a terminal alkyne moiety with up to 86 % yield and 98 % ee. PMID:25968474

  13. Differential effects of indole and aliphatic glucosinolates on lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Müller, René; de Vos, Martin; Sun, Joel Y; Sønderby, Ida E; Halkier, Barbara A; Wittstock, Ute; Jander, Georg

    2010-08-01

    Glucosinolates are a diverse group of defensive secondary metabolites that is characteristic of the Brassicales. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. (Brassicaceae) lines with mutations that greatly reduce abundance of indole glucosinolates (cyp79B2 cyp79B3), aliphatic glucosinolates (myb28 myb29), or both (cyp79B2 cyp79B3 myb28 myb29) make it possible to test the in vivo defensive function of these two major glucosinolate classes. In experiments with Lepidoptera that are not crucifer-feeding specialists, aliphatic and indole glucosinolates had an additive effect on Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) larval growth, whereas Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and Manduca sexta (L.) (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) were affected only by the absence of aliphatic glucosinolates. In the case of two crucifer-feeding specialists, Pieris rapae (L.) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) and Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), there were no major changes in larval performance due to decreased aliphatic and/or indole glucosinolate content. Nevertheless, choice tests show that aliphatic and indole glucosinolates act in an additive manner to promote larval feeding of both species and P. rapae oviposition. Together, these results support the hypothesis that a diversity of glucosinolates is required to limit the growth of multiple insect herbivores. PMID:20617455

  14. Photolysis of Indole-Containing Mycotoxins to Fluorescent Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Photochemical reaction of the non-fluorescent mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) to fluorescent products was recently reported. Because CPA contains an indole moiety, believed to contribute to the fluorescence, it was of interest to determine whether the effect might be more generally applicable to ...

  15. Pediatric Rodent Models of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Semple, Bridgette D; Carlson, Jaclyn; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    Due to a high incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and adolescents, age-specific studies are necessary to fully understand the long-term consequences of injuries to the immature brain. Preclinical and translational research can help elucidate the vulnerabilities of the developing brain to insult, and provide model systems to formulate and evaluate potential treatments aimed at minimizing the adverse effects of TBI. Several experimental TBI models have therefore been scaled down from adult rodents for use in juvenile animals. The following chapter discusses these adapted models for pediatric TBI, and the importance of age equivalence across species during model development and interpretation. Many neurodevelopmental processes are ongoing throughout childhood and adolescence, such that neuropathological mechanisms secondary to a brain insult, including oxidative stress, metabolic dysfunction and inflammation, may be influenced by the age at the time of insult. The long-term evaluation of clinically relevant functional outcomes is imperative to better understand the persistence and evolution of behavioral deficits over time after injury to the developing brain. Strategies to modify or protect against the chronic consequences of pediatric TBI, by supporting the trajectory of normal brain development, have the potential to improve quality of life for brain-injured children. PMID:27604726

  16. Indole molecules as inhibitors of tubulin polymerization: potential new anticancer agents, an update (2013-2015).

    PubMed

    Patil, Renukadevi; Patil, Siddappa A; Beaman, Kenneth D; Patil, Shivaputra A

    2016-07-01

    Discovery of new indole-based tubulin polymerization inhibitors will continue to dominate the synthetic efforts of many medicinal chemists working in the field. The indole ring system is an essential part of several tubulin inhibitors identified in the recent years. The present review article will update the synthesis, anticancer and tubulin inhibition activities of several important new indole classes such as 2-phenylindoles (28, 29 & 30), oxindoles (35 & 38), indole-3-acrylamides (44), indolines (46), aroylindoles (49), carbozoles (75, 76 & 82), azacarbolines (87) and annulated indoles (100-105). PMID:27476704

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel indole-2-one and 7-aza-2-oxindole derivatives as anti-inflammatory agents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gaozhi; Jiang, Lili; Dong, Lili; Wang, Zhe; Xu, Fengli; Ding, Ting; Fu, Lili; Fang, Qilu; Liu, Zhiguo; Shan, Xiaoou; Liang, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis, a typically acute inflammatory disease, is the biggest cause of death in ICU (intensive care unit). Novel anti-inflammatory alternatives are still in urgent need. In this study, we designed and synthesized 30 indole-2-one and 7-aza-2-oxindole derivatives based on the skeleton of tenidap, and their anti-inflammatory activity was determined by evaluating the inhibitory potency against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 release in RAW264.7 macrophages. Quantitative SAR (structure–activity relationship) analysis revealed that a high molecular polarizability and low lipid/water partition coefficient (ALogP) in indole-2-one are beneficial for anti-inflammatory activity. Moreover, compounds 7i and 8e inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, COX-2, PGES, and iNOS in LPS-stimulated macrophages, and 7i exhibited a significant protection from LPS-induced septic death in mouse models. These data present a series of new indole-2-one compounds with potential therapeutic effects in acute inflammatory diseases. PMID:25378906

  18. Fecal Indole as a Biomarker of Susceptibility to Cryptosporidium Infection.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Cynthia L; Darkoh, Charles; Shimmin, Lawrence; Farhana, Naveed; Kim, Do-Kyun; Okhuysen, Pablo C; Hixson, James

    2016-08-01

    Cryptosporidium causes significant diarrhea worldwide, especially among children and immunocompromised individuals, and no effective drug treatment is currently available for those who need it most. In this report, previous volunteer infectivity studies have been extended to examine the association between fecal indole and indole-producing (IP) gut microbiota on the outcome of a Cryptosporidium infection. Fecal indole concentrations (FICs) of 50 subjects and 19 taxa of common gut microbiota, including six IP taxa (11 subjects) were determined in stool samples collected before and after a challenge with Cryptosporidium oocysts. At the baseline, the mean FIC (± the standard deviation) was 1.66 ± 0.80 mM in those who became infected after a challenge versus 3.20 ± 1.23 mM in those who remained uninfected (P = 0.0001). Only 11.1% of the subjects with a FIC of >2.5 mM became infected after a challenge versus 65.2% of the subjects with a FIC of <2.5 mM. In contrast, the FICs of infected subjects at the baseline or during diarrhea were not correlated with infection intensity or disease severity. The relative abundances (percent) of Escherichia coli, Bacillus spp., and Clostridium spp. were greater ≥2.5-fold in volunteers with a baseline FIC of >2.5 mM, while those of Bacteroides pyogenes, B. fragilis, and Akkermansia muciniphila were greater in those with a baseline FIC of <2.5 mM. These data indicate that some IP bacteria, or perhaps indole alone, can influence the ability of Cryptosporidium to establish an infection. Thus, preexisting indole levels in the gut join the oocyst dose and immune status as important factors that determine the outcome of Cryptosporidium exposure. PMID:27245413

  19. Simultaneous detection and quantification of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) produced by rhizobacteria from l-tryptophan (Trp) using HPTLC.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Dweipayan; Thakker, Janki N; Dhandhukia, Pinakin C

    2015-03-01

    A simple, quick and reliable method is proposed for the detection and quantitation of indole-3-acetate (IAA) and indole-3-butyrate (IBA), an auxin phytohormone produced by rhizobacteria from l-tryptophan (Trp) metabolism using high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). Microbial auxin biosynthesis routes involve Trp as a precursor where other than IAA and IBA, products such as indole-3-pyruvate (IPA), indole-3-acetamide (IAM), tryptamine, indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN), indole-3-lactic acid (ILA) and indole-3-acetaldehyde (IAAld) are also produced. In traditional spectrophotometric method, Salkowski reagent develops color by reacting with indolic compounds. The color development is non-specific contributed by several Trp derivatives produced by rhizobacteria rather than IAA only. To overcome this limitation, HPTLC based protocol is developed to precisely detect and quantify IAA and IBA in the range of 100 to 1000ng per spot. This protocol is applicable to detect and quantify IAA and IBA from microbial samples ignoring other Trp derivatives. For microbial samples, the spectrophotometric method gives larger values as compared to HPTLC derived values which may be attributed by total indolic compounds reacting with Salkowski reagent rather than only IAA and/or IBA. PMID:25573587

  20. Systematic investigation and microbial community profile of indole degradation processes in two aerobic activated sludge systems

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiao; Qu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xuwang; Liu, Ziyan; Li, Huijie; Zhang, Zhaojing; Wang, Jingwei; Shen, Wenli; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-01-01

    Indole is widely spread in various environmental matrices. Indole degradation by bacteria has been reported previously, whereas its degradation processes driven by aerobic microbial community were as-yet unexplored. Herein, eight sequencing batch bioreactors fed with municipal and coking activated sludges were constructed for aerobic treatment of indole. The whole operation processes contained three stages, i.e. stage I, glucose and indole as carbon sources; stage II, indole as carbon source; and stage III, indole as carbon and nitrogen source. Indole could be completely removed in both systems. Illumina sequencing revealed that alpha diversity was reduced after indole treatment and microbial communities were significantly distinct among the three stages. At genus level, Azorcus and Thauera were dominant species in stage I in both systems, while Alcaligenes, Comamonas and Pseudomonas were the core genera in stage II and III in municipal sludge system, Alcaligenes and Burkholderia in coking sludge system. In addition, four strains belonged to genera Comamonas, Burkholderia and Xenophilus were isolated using indole as sole carbon source. Burkholderia sp. IDO3 could remove 100 mg/L indole completely within 14 h, the highest degradation rate to date. These findings provide novel information and enrich our understanding of indole aerobic degradation processes. PMID:26657581

  1. Isolation of Indole Utilizing Bacteria Arthrobacter sp. and Alcaligenes sp. From Livestock Waste.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsu; Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Eonmi; Choi, Hyukjae; Kim, Younghoon; Lee, Jintae

    2016-06-01

    Indole is an interspecies and interkingdom signaling molecule widespread in different environmental compartment. Although multifaceted roles of indole in different biological systems have been established, little information is available on the microbial utilization of indole in the context of combating odor emissions from different types of waste. The present study was aimed at identifying novel bacteria capable of utilizing indole as the sole carbon and energy source. From the selective enrichment of swine waste and cattle feces, we identified Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria belonging to the genera Arthrobacter and Alcaligenes. Bacteria belonging to the genus Alcaligenes showed higher rates of indole utilization than Arthrobacter. Indole at 1.0 mM for growth was completely utilized by Alcaligenes sp. in 16 h. Both strains produced two intermediates, anthranilic acid and isatin, during aerobic indole metabolism. These isolates were also able to grow on several indole derivatives. Interestingly, an adaptive response in terms of a decrease in cell size was observed in both strains in the presence of indole. The present study will help to explain the degradation of indole by different bacteria and also the pathways through which it is catabolized. Furthermore, these novel bacterial isolates could be potentially useful for the in situ attenuation of odorant indole and its derivatives emitted from different types of livestock waste. PMID:27570307

  2. Formation of Volatile Tea Constituent Indole During the Oolong Tea Manufacturing Process.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Lanting; Zhou, Ying; Gui, Jiadong; Fu, Xiumin; Mei, Xin; Zhen, Yunpeng; Ye, Tingxiang; Du, Bing; Dong, Fang; Watanabe, Naoharu; Yang, Ziyin

    2016-06-22

    Indole is a characteristic volatile constituent in oolong tea. Our previous study indicated that indole was mostly accumulated at the turn over stage of oolong tea manufacturing process. However, formation of indole in tea leaves remains unknown. In this study, one tryptophan synthase α-subunit (TSA) and three tryptophan synthase β-subunits (TSBs) from tea leaves were isolated, cloned, sequenced, and functionally characterized. Combination of CsTSA and CsTSB2 recombinant protein produced in Escherichia coli exhibited the ability of transformation from indole-3-glycerol phosphate to indole. CsTSB2 was highly expressed during the turn over process of oolong tea. Continuous mechanical damage, simulating the turn over process, significantly enhanced the expression level of CsTSB2 and amount of indole. These suggested that accumulation of indole in oolong tea was due to the activation of CsTSB2 by continuous wounding stress from the turn over process. Black teas contain much less indole, although wounding stress is also involved in the manufacturing process. Stable isotope labeling indicated that tea leaf cell disruption from the rolling process of black tea did not lead to the conversion of indole, but terminated the synthesis of indole. Our study provided evidence concerning formation of indole in tea leaves for the first time. PMID:27263428

  3. Indole alkaloids of Rauwolfia reflexa. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance structural analysis of the bis(indole) alkaloid flexicorine

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Ghosh, A.K.; Hagaman, E.W.

    1982-01-01

    The /sup 13/C NMR spectra analysis of the new bis(indole) alkaloid flexicorine and of its chemically modified derivatives were used to determine the structure of the natural base. Flexicorine is, apparently, the first 10'-hydroxy N'-unsubstituted indoline which preferentially exists in the original iminoquinone form. 2 tables.

  4. 3-Methylindole (skatole) and indole production by mixed populations of pig fecal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, M T; Cox, R P; Jensen, B B

    1995-01-01

    Pig fecal slurries converted added L-tryptophan either to indole without detectable intermediates or to 3-methylindole (skatole) via indole-3-acetate. The initial rate of production of 3-methylindole was greatest at pH 6.5 and less at pH 5.0 and 8.0; the initial rates of indole production were similar at pH 6.5 and 8.0. More than 80% of the tryptophan added was converted to 3-methylindole at pH 5.0; at pH 8.0 85% was converted to indole. Both pathways had similar Km values for tryptophan and similar maximum rates. Indole-3-carbinol and indole-3-acetonitrile completely inhibited the production of 3-methylindole from indole-3-acetate but had no effect on the reactions involving L-tryptophan. PMID:7487051

  5. A Rapid and Specific Method for the Detection of Indole in Complex Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, Cynthia; Gonzales, Christopher; Okhuysen, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Indole, a bacterial product of tryptophan degradation, has a variety of important applications in the pharmaceutical industry and is a biomarker in biological and clinical specimens. Yet, specific assays to quantitate indole are complex and require expensive equipment and a high level of training. Thus, indole in biological samples is often estimated using the simple and rapid Kovács assay, which nonspecifically detects a variety of commonly occurring indole analogs. We demonstrate here a sensitive, specific, and rapid method for measuring indole in complex biological samples using a specific reaction between unsubstituted indole and hydroxylamine. We compared the hydroxylamine-based indole assay (HIA) to the Kovács assay and confirmed that the two assays are capable of detecting microgram amounts of indole. However, the HIA is specific to indole and does not detect other naturally occurring indole analogs. We further demonstrated the utility of the HIA in measuring indole levels in clinically relevant biological materials, such as fecal samples and bacterial cultures. Mean and median fecal indole concentrations from 53 healthy adults were 2.59 mM and 2.73 mM, respectively, but varied widely (0.30 mM to 6.64 mM) among individuals. We also determined that enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strain H10407 produces 3.3 ± 0.22 mM indole during a 24-h period in the presence of 5 mM tryptophan. The sensitive and specific HIA should be of value in a variety of settings, such as the evaluation of various clinical samples and the study of indole-producing bacterial species in the gut microbiota. PMID:26386049

  6. The role of mitoxantrone in the treatment of indolent lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Hagemeister, Fredrick; Cabanillas, Fernando; Coleman, Morton; Gregory, Stephanie A; Zinzani, Pier Luigi

    2005-02-01

    With the introduction of newer therapeutic approaches, survival in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) appears to be improving. Mitoxantrone (Novantrone; Serono, Inc.; Rockland, MA, http://www.seronousa.com), an anthracenedione with low cardiotoxic potential, has demonstrated activity in indolent NHL in combination with fludarabine (Fludara; Berlex Laboratories; Wayne, NJ, http://www.berlex.com) and other agents. In a Southwest Oncology Group trial (SWOG 9501), treatment with fludarabine and mitoxantrone (FM) induced a complete remission (CR) rate of 44% and a partial remission (PR) rate of 50% in untreated patients. The estimated 4-year progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 38%. In a multicenter Italian trial comparing the efficacy of FM with that of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (Adriamycin; Bedford Laboratories; Bedford, OH, http://www.bedfordlabs.com), vincristine (Oncovin; Eli Lilly and Company; Indianapolis, IN, http://www.lilly.com), and prednisone (Deltasone; Pfizer Pharmaceuticals; New York, NY, http://www.pfizer.com), CHOP, followed by rituximab (Rituxan; Genentech, Inc.; South San Francisco, CA, http://www.gene.com) for patients with incomplete clinical or molecular responses, the CR and molecular response rates were significantly higher in the FM arm, but the PFS and overall survival (OS) rates did not differ between the two arms. However, FM was also significantly less toxic than CHOP. The administration of rituximab following chemotherapy resulted in higher clinical and molecular response rates in both arms. In a separate trial, FM plus dexamethasone (Decadron; Merck and Co., Inc.; Whitehouse Station, NJ, http://www.merck.com), FND, plus concurrent rituximab produced a CR rate of 92%. In a randomized German study, patients with indolent lymphomas received FM plus cyclophosphamide (FCM) or FCM with rituximab. PFS and OS times were significantly better for patients who received combined chemoimmunotherapy. Mitoxantrone-based regimens are highly

  7. Indole-3-acetic acid: A widespread physiological code in interactions of fungi with other organisms

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Shih-Feng; Wei, Jyuan-Yu; Chen, Hung-Wei; Liu, Yen-Yu; Lu, Hsueh-Yu; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Plants as well as microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi, produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). IAA is the most common plant hormone of the auxin class and it regulates various aspects of plant growth and development. Thus, research is underway globally to exploit the potential for developing IAA-producing fungi for promoting plant growth and protection for sustainable agriculture. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that IAA biosynthesis evolved independently in bacteria, microalgae, fungi, and plants. Present studies show that IAA regulates the physiological response and gene expression in these microorganisms. The convergent evolution of IAA production leads to the hypothesis that natural selection might have favored IAA as a widespread physiological code in these microorganisms and their interactions. We summarize recent studies of IAA biosynthetic pathways and discuss the role of IAA in fungal ecology. PMID:26179718

  8. Can rodents conceive hyperbolic spaces?

    PubMed Central

    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Troiani, Francesca; Stella, Federico; Treves, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The grid cells discovered in the rodent medial entorhinal cortex have been proposed to provide a metric for Euclidean space, possibly even hardwired in the embryo. Yet, one class of models describing the formation of grid unit selectivity is entirely based on developmental self-organization, and as such it predicts that the metric it expresses should reflect the environment to which the animal has adapted. We show that, according to self-organizing models, if raised in a non-Euclidean hyperbolic cage rats should be able to form hyperbolic grids. For a given range of grid spacing relative to the radius of negative curvature of the hyperbolic surface, such grids are predicted to appear as multi-peaked firing maps, in which each peak has seven neighbours instead of the Euclidean six, a prediction that can be tested in experiments. We thus demonstrate that a useful universal neuronal metric, in the sense of a multi-scale ruler and compass that remain unaltered when changing environments, can be extended to other than the standard Euclidean plane. PMID:25948611

  9. The multifaceted roles of the interspecies signalling molecule indole in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Hyung; Kim, Yong-Guy; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Jintae

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria utilize signal molecules to ensure their survival in environmental niches, and indole is an interspecies and interkingdom signalling molecule, which is widespread in the natural environment. In this study, we sought to identify novel roles of indole in soil-borne bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium tumefaciens was found not to synthesize indole and to degrade it rapidly. The addition of exogenous indole dose-dependently inhibited A. tumefaciens growth and decreased its motility. Surprisingly, indole markedly increased A. tumefaciens biofilm formation on polystyrene, glass and nylon membrane surfaces and enhanced its antibiotic tolerance. Transcriptional analysis showed that indole markedly up-regulated several biofilm-related (celA, cheA, exoR, phoB, flgE, fliR and motA), stress-related genes (clpB, dnaK, gsp, gyrB, marR and soxR) and efflux genes (emrA, norM, and Atu2551) in A. tumefaciens, which partially explained the increased biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. In contrast, the plant auxin indole-3-acetic acid did not affect biofilm formation, antibiotic tolerance or gene expression. Interestingly, indole was found to exhibit several similarities with antibiotics, as it inhibited the growth of non-indole-producing bacteria, whereas these bacteria countered its effects by rapidly degrading indole, and by enhancing biofilm formation and antibiotic tolerance. PMID:25040348

  10. Transport and metabolism of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-galactoside in seedlings of Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komoszynski, M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1986-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol galactoside labeled with 3H in the indole and 14C in the galactose moieties was applied to kernels of 5 day old germinating seedlings of Zea mays. Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol galactoside was not transported into either the shoot or root tissue as the intact molecule but was instead hydrolyzed to yield [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and [3H]indole-3-acetic acid which were then transported to the shoot with little radioactivity going to the root. With certain assumption concerning the equilibration of applied [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-[U-14C]galactose with the endogenous pool, it may be concluded that indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol galactoside in the endosperm supplies about 2 picomoles per plant per hour of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and 1 picomole per plant per hour of indole-3-acetic acid to the shoot and thus is comparable to indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol as a source of indole-acetic acid for the shoot. Quantitative estimates of the amount of galactose in the kernels suggest that [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-[14C]galactose is hydrolyzed after the compound leaves the endosperm but before it reaches the shoot. In addition, [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol-[14C]galactose supplies appreciable amounts of 14C to the shoot and both 14C and 3H to an uncharacterized insoluble fraction of the endosperm.

  11. Regulatory and Functional Aspects of Indolic Metabolism in Plant Systemic Acquired Resistance.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Elia; Bellwon, Patricia; Huber, Stefan; Schlaeppi, Klaus; Bernsdorff, Friederike; Vallat-Michel, Armelle; Mauch, Felix; Zeier, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Tryptophan-derived, indolic metabolites possess diverse functions in Arabidopsis innate immunity to microbial pathogen infection. Here, we investigate the functional role and regulatory characteristics of indolic metabolism in Arabidopsis systemic acquired resistance (SAR) triggered by the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. Indolic metabolism is broadly activated in both P. syringae-inoculated and distant, non-inoculated leaves. At inoculation sites, camalexin, indol-3-ylmethylamine (I3A), and indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA) are the major accumulating compounds. Camalexin accumulation is positively affected by MYB122, and the cytochrome P450 genes CYP81F1 and CYP81F2. Local I3A production, by contrast, occurs via indole glucosinolate breakdown by PEN2- dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, exogenous application of the defense hormone salicylic acid stimulates I3A generation at the expense of its precursor indol-3-ylmethylglucosinolate (I3M), and the SAR regulator pipecolic acid primes plants for enhanced P. syringae-induced activation of distinct branches of indolic metabolism. In uninfected systemic tissue, the metabolic response is more specific and associated with enhanced levels of the indolics I3A, ICA, and indole-3-carbaldehyde (ICC). Systemic indole accumulation fully depends on functional CYP79B2/3, PEN2, and MYB34/51/122, and requires functional SAR signaling. Genetic analyses suggest that systemically elevated indoles are dispensable for SAR and associated systemic increases of salicylic acid. However, soil-grown but not hydroponically -cultivated cyp79b2/3 and pen2 plants, both defective in indolic secondary metabolism, exhibit pre-induced immunity, which abrogates their intrinsic ability to induce SAR. PMID:26802249

  12. Taichunamides: Prenylated Indole Alkaloids from Aspergillus taichungensis (IBT 19404).

    PubMed

    Kagiyama, Ippei; Kato, Hikaru; Nehira, Tatsuo; Frisvad, Jens C; Sherman, David H; Williams, Robert M; Tsukamoto, Sachiko

    2016-01-18

    Seven new prenylated indole alkaloids, taichunamides A-G, were isolated from the fungus Aspergillus taichungensis (IBT 19404). Taichunamides A and B contained an azetidine and 4-pyridone units, respectively, and are likely biosynthesized from notoamide S via (+)-6-epi-stephacidin A. Taichunamides C and D contain endoperoxide and methylsulfonyl units, respectively. This fungus produced indole alkaloids containing an anti-bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane core, whereas A. protuberus and A. amoenus produced congeners with a syn-bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane core. Plausible biosynthetic pathways to access these cores within the three species likely arise from an intramolecular hetero Diels-Alder reaction. PMID:26644336

  13. Unintentional wildlife poisoning and proposals for sustainable management of rodents.

    PubMed

    Coeurdassier, Michael; Riols, Romain; Decors, Anouk; Mionnet, Aymeric; David, Fabienne; Quintaine, Thomas; Truchetet, Denis; Scheifler, Renaud; Giraudoux, Patrick

    2014-04-01

    In Europe, bromadiolone, an anticoagulant rodenticide authorized for plant protection, may be applied intensively in fields to control rodents. The high level of poisoning of wildlife that follows such treatments over large areas has been frequently reported. In France, bromadiolone has been used to control water voles (Arvicola terrestris) since the 1980s. Both regulation and practices of rodent control have evolved during the last 15 years to restrict the quantity of poisoned bait used by farmers. This has led to a drastic reduction of the number of cases of poisoned wildlife reported by the French surveillance network SAGIR. During the autumn and winter 2011, favorable weather conditions and high vole densities led to the staging of several hundreds of Red Kites (Milvus milvus) in the Puy-de-Dôme department (central France). At the same time, intensive treatments with bromadiolone were performed in this area. Although no misuse has been mentioned by the authorities following controls, 28 Red Kites and 16 Common Buzzards (Buteo buteo) were found dead during surveys in November and December 2011. For all these birds, poisoning by bromadiolone as the main cause of death was either confirmed or highly suspected. Other observations suggest a possible impact of bromadiolone on the breeding population of Red Kites in this area during the spring 2011. French regulation of vole control for plant protection is currently under revision, and we believe this event calls for more sustainable management of rodent outbreaks. Based on large-scale experiments undertaken in eastern France, we propose that direct control of voles at low density (with trapping or limited chemical treatments) and mechanical destruction of vole tunnels, mole control, landscape management, and predator fostering be included in future regulation because such practices could help resolve conservation and agricultural issues. PMID:24405288

  14. Rodents as potential couriers for bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Lõhmus, Mare; Janse, Ingmar; van de Goot, Frank; van Rotterdam, Bart J

    2013-09-01

    Many pathogens that can cause major public health, economic, and social damage are relatively easily accessible and could be used as biological weapons. Wildlife is a natural reservoir for many potential bioterrorism agents, and, as history has shown, eliminating a pathogen that has dispersed among wild fauna can be extremely challenging. Since a number of wild rodent species live close to humans, rodents constitute a vector for pathogens to circulate among wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. This article reviews the possible consequences of a deliberate spread of rodentborne pathogens. It is relatively easy to infect wild rodents with certain pathogens or to release infected rodents, and the action would be difficult to trace. Rodents can also function as reservoirs for diseases that have been spread during a bioterrorism attack and cause recurring disease outbreaks. As rats and mice are common in both urban and rural settlements, deliberately released rodentborne infections have the capacity to spread very rapidly. The majority of pathogens that are listed as potential agents of bioterrorism by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases exploit rodents as vectors or reservoirs. In addition to zoonotic diseases, deliberately released rodentborne epizootics can have serious economic consequences for society, for example, in the area of international trade restrictions. The ability to rapidly detect introduced diseases and effectively communicate with the public in crisis situations enables a quick response and is essential for successful and cost-effective disease control. PMID:23971813

  15. Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus Cultivated in Yunnan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bei; Liu, Lu; Chen, Ying-ying; Li, Qiong; Li, Dan; Liu, Va-ping; Luo, Xiao-dong

    2015-12-01

    A new monoterpenoid indole alkaloid, 15,20-dehydro-3α-(2-oxopropyl) coronaridine (1), along with sixteen analogues (2-17) were isolated from the leaves of Catharanthus roseus cultivated in Yunnan. The new alkaloid was elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, and the known alkaloids were identified by comparison with the reported spectroscopic data. Among them, alkaloid 16 was isolated from Catharanthus for the first time. PMID:26882670

  16. Enantioselective Synthesis of Indole-Annulated Medium-Sized Rings.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lin; Dai, Li-Xin; You, Shu-Li

    2016-05-11

    Asymmetric synthesis of indole-annulated medium-sized-ring compounds is developed through an iridium-catalyzed allylic dearomatization/retro-Mannich/hydrolysis cascade reaction. The reaction features mild conditions and a broad substrate scope. Under the optimal conditions, various seven-, eight-, or nine-membered-ring compounds can be afforded in good to excellent yields and excellent enantioselectivity. The proposed mechanism is supported by capturing the dearomatized intermediate through in situ reduction. PMID:27093370

  17. Bioinspired Collective Syntheses of Iboga-Type Indole Alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gaoyuan; Xie, Xingang; Sun, Haiyu; Yuan, Ziyun; Zhong, Zhuliang; Tang, Shouchu; She, Xuegong

    2016-05-20

    We present the application of a bioinspired collective synthesis strategy in the total syntheses of seven iboga-type indole alkaloids: (±)-tabertinggine, (±)-ibogamine, (±)-ibogaine, (±)-ibogaine hydroxyindolenine, (±)-3-oxoibogaine hydroxyindolenine, (±)-iboluteine, and (±)-ervaoffines D. In particular, tabertinggine and its congeners serve as iboga precursors for the subsequent biomimetic transformations into other iboga-type alkaloids. PMID:27160167

  18. Cytotoxic indole alkaloids from the fruits of Melodinus cochinchinensis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Shun; Zhang, Hao; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Hai-Yuan; Feng, Yan; Ding, Xiao; Zhou, Qiang; Zhao, Qing; He, Hong-Ping; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-08-01

    Eight indole alkaloids, melosines A-H, together with 13 known alkaloids, were isolated from the fruits of Melodinus cochinchinensis. The structure elucidation of isolated secondary metabolites was based on comprehensive spectroscopic data analysis. Melosine B showed moderate cytotoxic activity against five human cancer cell lines, HL-60, SMMC-7721, A-549, MCF-7, and SW480 with IC50 values ranging from 1.6 to 8.1μM. PMID:25817833

  19. Relationship between indole production and differentiation of Klebsiella species: indole-positive and -negative isolates of Klebsiella determined to be clonal.

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, J N; Brecher, S M; Adams, K S; Durbin, A; Loring, S; Arbeit, R D

    1993-01-01

    Klebsiellae are an important cause of nosocomial infections. The two clinically relevant species, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca, are differentiated by the ability to produce indole from tryptophan, K. oxytoca being indole positive. We report here the detailed biochemical and molecular analysis of two isolates of Klebsiella, cultured from the same urine specimen, that differed only in their ability to produce indole. The two isolates were identical as determined by ribotyping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and they differed from 10 epidemiologically unrelated strains. Probing with the Escherichia coli tryptophanase operon, tna, revealed seven restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) among the 12 strains. The two index strains had identical RFLP; no single RFLP could account for all of the indole-positive or -negative strains. Thus, the identification of epidemiologically related strains of Klebsiella differing only in indole production may warrant further examination to determine whether the strains are clonal. Images PMID:8370726

  20. Biosynthesis of ambiguine indole alkaloids in cyanobacterium Fischerella ambigua.

    PubMed

    Hillwig, Matthew L; Zhu, Qin; Liu, Xinyu

    2014-02-21

    Ambiguines belong to a family of hapalindole-type indole alkaloid natural products, with many of the members possessing up to eight consecutive carbon stereocenters in a fused pentacyclic 6-6-6-5-7 ring scaffold. Here, we report the identification of a 42 kbp ambiguine (amb) biosynthetic gene cluster that harbors 32 protein-coding genes in its native producer Fischerella ambigua UTEX1903. Association of the amb cluster with ambiguine biosynthesis was confirmed by both bioinformatic analysis and in vitro characterizations of enzymes responsible for 3-((Z)-2'-isocyanoethenyl) indole and geranyl pyrophosphate biosynthesis and a C-2 indole dimethylallyltransferase that regiospecifically tailors hapalindole G to ambiguine A. The presence of five nonheme iron-dependent oxygenase coding genes (including four Rieske-type oxygenases) within the amb cluster suggests late-stage C-H activations are likely responsible for the structural diversities of ambiguines by regio- and stereospecific chlorination, hydroxylation, epoxidation, and sp(2)-sp(3) C-C bond formation. PMID:24180436

  1. A Molecular Signature Predictive of Indolent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Irshad, Shazia; Bansal, Mukesh; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Zheng, Tian; Aytes, Alvaro; Wenske, Sven; Le Magnen, Clémentine; Guarnieri, Paolo; Sumazin, Pavel; Benson, Mitchell C.; Shen, Michael M.; Califano, Andrea; Abate-Shen, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Many newly diagnosed prostate cancers present as low Gleason score tumors that require no treatment intervention. Distinguishing the many indolent tumors from the minority of lethal ones remains a major clinical challenge. We now show that low Gleason score prostate tumors can be distinguished as indolent and aggressive subgroups on the basis of their expression of genes associated with aging and senescence. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we identified a 19-gene signature enriched in indolent prostate tumors. We then further classified this signature with a decision tree learning model to identify three genes—FGFR1, PMP22, and CDKN1A—that together accurately predicted outcome of low Gleason score tumors. Validation of this three-gene panel on independent cohorts confirmed its independent prognostic value as well as its ability to improve prognosis with currently used clinical nomograms. Furthermore, protein expression of this three-gene panel in biopsy samples distinguished Gleason 6 patients who failed surveillance over a 10-year period. We propose that this signature may be incorporated into prognostic assays for monitoring patients on active surveillance to facilitate appropriate courses of treatment. PMID:24027026

  2. Controlling bacterial behavior with indole-containing natural products and derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Melander, Roberta J.; Minvielle, Marine J.; Melander, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Indole has recently been implicated as an important small molecule signal utilized by many bacteria to coordinate various forms of behavior. Indole plays a role in numerous bacterial processes, including: biofilm formation and maintenance, virulence factor production, antibiotic resistance and persister cell formation. Intercepting indole-signaling pathways with appropriately designed small molecules provides a n opportunity to control unwanted bacterial behaviors, and is an attractive anti-virulence therapeutic strategy. In this review, we give an overview of the process controlled by indole signaling, and summarize current efforts to design indole-containing small molecules to intercept these pathways, and detail the synthetic efforts towards accessing indole derived bioactive small molecules. PMID:25267859

  3. Differential susceptibility of indole-positive and -negative strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae to cefazolin, choramphenicol and tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Nishida, M; Asano, H; Kamimura, T; Yokota, Y

    1978-01-01

    Biochemical properties and antibiotic susceptibilities of 168 clinical isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae were tested. On the basis of the indole reaction, 30 isolates (18%) were indole-positive and 138 isolates (82%) were indole-negative. A significant difference in antibiotic susceptibility was found in each of the two groups of isolates. Of the indole-negative isolates, 82.6% were susceptible to cefazolin at 6.25 microgram/ml or lower, while the indole-positive isolates varied in susceptibility to cefazolin. All of the indole-positive isolates were susceptible to chloramphenicol and tetracycline, but the indole-negative isolates varied in their susceptibility to these antibiotics. Whereas there was no relationship between indole production and susceptibility to cephalothin among the K. pneumoniae isolates studied, it appeared that there was a correlation between the indole reaction and susceptibility to cefazolin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline. PMID:350514

  4. Copper-mediated direct C2-cyanation of indoles using acetonitrile as the cyanide source.

    PubMed

    Pan, Changduo; Jin, Hongming; Xu, Pan; Liu, Xu; Cheng, Yixiang; Zhu, Chengjian

    2013-09-20

    A copper-mediated C2-cyanation of indoles using cheap and commercially available acetonitrile as the "nonmetallic" cyanide source was achieved through sequential C-C and C-H bond cleavages. The installation of a removable pyrimidyl group on the indole nitrogen atom is the key for this C2 selectivity. This approach provides a novel and alternative route leading to indole-2-carbonitrile. PMID:23957858

  5. The effect of indole-3-carbinol on PIN1 and PIN2 in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ella; Nisani, Sophia; Sela, Mor; Behar, Hila; Chamovitz, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The phytochemical indole-3-carbinol is produced in Cruciferous plants upon tissue rapture and deters herbivores. We recently showed that indole-3-carbinol modulates auxin signaling in root tips. Here we present transcript profiling experiments which further reveal the influence of indole-3-carbinol on auxin signaling in root tips, and also show that I3C affects auxin transporters. Brief treatment with indole-3-carbinol led to a reduction in the amount of PIN1 and to mislocalization of PIN2. PMID:26252364

  6. The effect of indole-3-carbinol on PIN1 and PIN2 in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ella; Nisani, Sophia; Sela, Mor; Behar, Hila; Chamovitz, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    The phytochemical indole-3-carbinol is produced in Cruciferous plants upon tissue rapture and deters herbivores. We recently showed that indole-3-carbinol modulates auxin signaling in root tips. Here we present transcript profiling experiments which further reveal the influence of indole-3-carbinol on auxin signaling in root tips, and also show that I3C affects auxin transporters. Brief treatment with indole-3-carbinol led to a reduction in the amount of PIN1 and to mislocalization of PIN2. PMID:26252364

  7. Indole Alkaloids from the Sea Anemone Heteractis aurora and Homarine from Octopus cyanea.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Kamel H; Göhl, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Seifert, Karlheinz

    2015-11-01

    The two new indole alkaloids 2-amino-1,5-dihydro-5-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-4H-imidazol-4-one (1), 2-amino-5-[(6-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl]-3,5-dihydro-3-methyl-4H-imidazol-4-one (2), and auramine (3) have been isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis aurora. Both indole alkaloids were synthesized for the confirmation of the structures. Homarine (4), along with uracil (5), hypoxanthine (6), and inosine (7) have been obtained from Octopus cyanea. PMID:26567952

  8. Indole is an essential herbivore-induced volatile priming signal in maize

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Matthias; Veyrat, Nathalie; Robert, Christelle A. M.; Xu, Hao; Frey, Monika; Ton, Jurriaan; Turlings, Ted C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Herbivore-induced volatile organic compounds prime non-attacked plant tissues to respond more strongly to subsequent attacks. However, the key volatiles that trigger this primed state remain largely unidentified. In maize, the release of the aromatic compound indole is herbivore-specific and occurs earlier than other induced responses. We therefore hypothesized that indole may be involved in airborne priming. Using indole-deficient mutants and synthetic indole dispensers, we show that herbivore-induced indole enhances the induction of defensive volatiles in neighbouring maize plants in a species-specific manner. Furthermore, the release of indole is essential for priming of mono- and homoterpenes in systemic leaves of attacked plants. Indole exposure markedly increases the herbivore-induced production of the stress hormones jasmonate-isoleucine conjugate and abscisic acid, which represents a likely mechanism for indole-dependent priming. These results demonstrate that indole functions as a rapid and potent aerial priming agent that prepares systemic tissues and neighbouring plants for incoming attacks. PMID:25683900

  9. Discovery of isoquinolinone indole acetic acids as antagonists of chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells (CRTH2) for the treatment of allergic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Kaila, Neelu; Follows, Bruce; Leung, Louis; Thomason, Jennifer; Huang, Adrian; Moretto, Alessandro; Janz, Kristin; Lowe, Michael; Mansour, Tarek S; Hubeau, Cedric; Page, Karen; Morgan, Paul; Fish, Susan; Xu, Xin; Williams, Cara; Saiah, Eddine

    2014-02-27

    Previously we reported the discovery of CRA-898 (1), a diazine indole acetic acid containing CRTH2 antagonist. This compound had good in vitro and in vivo potency, low rates of metabolism, moderate permeability, and good oral bioavailability in rodents. However, it showed low oral exposure in nonrodent safety species (dogs and monkeys). In the current paper, we wish to report our efforts to understand and improve the poor PK in nonrodents and development of a new isoquinolinone subseries that led to identification of a new development candidate, CRA-680 (44). This compound was efficacious in both a house dust mouse model of allergic lung inflammation (40 mg/kg qd) as well as a guinea pig allergen challenge model of lung inflammation (20 mg/kg bid). PMID:24512187

  10. Enucleation for Treating Rodent Ocular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wilding, Laura A; Uchihashi, Mayu; Bergin, Ingrid L; Nowland, Megan H

    2015-01-01

    Our standard of care for rodent corneal lesions previously included treatment of the primary lesion, application of topical NSAIDs, and systemic NSAIDs in severe cases. When intensive medical management was unsuccessful, animals were euthanized, leading to premature loss of valuable genetically modified animals and those on long-term studies. We investigated enucleation surgery as a treatment for 15 cases of rodent corneal disease that did not respond to medical management. Enucleation was performed under isoflurane anesthesia and involved removal of the globe, extensive hemostasis, and packing the orbital space with absorbable gelatin sponge. The lid margins were closed by tarsorrhaphy and tissue glue. Analgesia was provided by using buprenorphine preoperatively and carprofen chew tabs postoperatively. To date, we have a 100% success rate with this procedure (n = 20; 15 clinically affected rodents [2 rats, 13 mice], 5 healthy controls), which included a 60-d follow-up period. The single complication involved dehiscence of the tarsorrhaphy site and was repaired by trimming the lid margins to provide fresh tissue for closure. Histologic examination at both 1 and 3 mo after surgery revealed no evidence of infection of the enucleation site. Enucleation in rodents is a straightforward procedure that represents a refinement to our current standard of care for rodents, does not cause significant inflammation of remaining periocular structures, and has reduced the number of animals euthanized prior to study endpoint because of severe ocular lesions. PMID:26045460

  11. Photophysics of indole-2-carboxylic acid (I2C) and indole-5-carboxylic acid (I5C): heavy atom effect.

    PubMed

    Kowalska-Baron, Agnieszka; Gałęcki, Krystian; Wysocki, Stanisław

    2013-12-01

    In this study the effect of carboxylic group substitution in the 2 and 5 position of indole ring on the photophysics of the parent indole chromophore has been studied. The photophysical parameters crucial in triplet state decay mechanism of aqueous indole-2-carboxylic acid (I2C) and indole-5-carboxylic acid (I5C) have been determined applying our previously proposed methodology based on the heavy atom effect and fluorescence and phosphorescence decay kinetics [Kowalska-Baron et al., 2012]. The determined time-resolved phosphorescence spectra of I2C and I5C are red-shifted as compared to that of the parent indole. This red-shift was especially evident in the case of I2C and may indicate the possibility of hydrogen bonded complex formation incorporating carbonyl CO, the NH group of I2C and, possibly, surrounding water molecules. The possibility of the excited state charge transfer process and the subsequent electronic charge redistribution in such a hydrogen bonded complex may also be postulated. The resulting stabilization of the I2C triplet state is manifested by its relatively long phosphorescence lifetime in aqueous solution (912 μs). The relatively short phosphorescence lifetime of I5C (56 μs) may be the consequence of more effective ground-state quenching of I5 C triplet state. This hypothesis may be strengthened by the significantly larger value of the determined rate constant of I5C triplet state quenching by its ground-state (4.4 × 10(8)M(-1)s(-1)) as compared to that for indole (6.8 × 10(7)M(-1)s(-1)) and I2C (2.3 × 10(7)M(-1)s(-1)). The determined bimolecular rate constant for triplet state quenching by iodide [Formula: see text] is equal to 1 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1); 6 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1) and 2.7 × 10(4)M(-1)s(-1) for indole, I2 C and I5 C, respectively. In order to obtain a better insight into iodide quenching of I2C and I5C triplet states in aqueous solution, the temperature dependence of the bimolecular rate constants for iodide quenching of the

  12. Biosynthesis and regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jianhua; Wang, Mingxuan; Wen, Wei; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces a wide range of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA). Many of them, such as vinblastine and vincristine, have significant bioactivity. They are valuable chemotherapy drugs used in combination with other drugs to treat lymphoma and leukemia. The TIA biosynthetic pathway has been investigated for many years, for scientific interest and for their potential in manufacturing applications, to fulfill the market demand. In this review, the progress and perspective of C. roseus TIA biosynthesis and its regulating enzymes are described. In addition, the culture condition, hormones, signaling molecules, precursor feeding on the accumulation of TIA, and gene expression are also evaluated and discussed. PMID:26009689

  13. Biosynthesis and regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jianhua; Wang, Mingxuan; Wen, Wei; Yu, Rongmin

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces a wide range of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA). Many of them, such as vinblastine and vincristine, have significant bioactivity. They are valuable chemotherapy drugs used in combination with other drugs to treat lymphoma and leukemia. The TIA biosynthetic pathway has been investigated for many years, for scientific interest and for their potential in manufacturing applications, to fulfill the market demand. In this review, the progress and perspective of C. roseus TIA biosynthesis and its regulating enzymes are described. In addition, the culture condition, hormones, signaling molecules, precursor feeding on the accumulation of TIA, and gene expression are also evaluated and discussed. PMID:26009689

  14. Three new monoterpenoid indole alkaloids from Vinca major.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Jun; Du, Ru-Nan; He, Juan; Wu, Xing-De; Li, Yan; Li, Rong-Tao; Zhao, Qin-Shi

    2016-04-01

    Three new monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, 19-hydroxyl-10-methoxy-19, 20-dihydrovinorine (1), 19-O-acetyl-10-methoxy-19, 20-dihydrovinorine (2), and 19, 21α-dihydroxyl-10-methoxy-19, 20-dihydrovinorine (3), along with five known analogues (4-8), were isolated from the whole plants of Vinca major. The new structures were elucidated by extensive NMR and MS analysis and comparison with known compounds. In addition, compounds 1-3 were evaluated for their cytotoxicities against five human cancer cell lines. PMID:26700398

  15. New cytotoxic indolic metabolites from a marine Streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Sánchez López, José M; Martínez Insua, Marta; Pérez Baz, Julia; Fernández Puentes, José L; Cañedo Hernández, Librada M

    2003-06-01

    Three new cytotoxic 3,6-disubstituted indoles (1-3) were isolated from the mycelium of a strain identified as Streptomyces sp. (BL-49-58-005), which was separated from a Mexican marine invertebrate, and their structures established by analysis of NMR and mass spectral data. GI(50) values for 1 and 2 in cytotoxic bioassays against a panel of 14 different tumor cell lines were estimated at micromolar range, while compound 3 showed no activity in the same assays. PMID:12828477

  16. Attenuation of Carcinogenesis and the Mechanism Underlying by the Influence of Indole-3-carbinol and Its Metabolite 3,3′-Diindolylmethane: A Therapeutic Marvel

    PubMed Central

    Maruthanila, V. L.; Poornima, J.; Mirunalini, S.

    2014-01-01

    Rising evidence provides credible support towards the potential role of bioactive products derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage, brussels sprouts, turnips, kohlrabi, bok choy, and radishes. Many epidemiological studies point out that Brassica vegetable protects humans against cancer since they are rich sources of glucosinolates in addition to possessing a high content of flavonoids, vitamins, and mineral nutrients. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) belongs to the class of compounds called indole glucosinolate, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, and is well-known for tits anticancer properties. In particular, I3C and its dimeric product, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), have been generally investigated for their value against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. This paper reviews an in-depth study of the anticancer activity and the miscellaneous mechanisms underlying the anticarcinogenicity thereby broadening its therapeutic marvel. PMID:24982671

  17. Attenuation of Carcinogenesis and the Mechanism Underlying by the Influence of Indole-3-carbinol and Its Metabolite 3,3'-Diindolylmethane: A Therapeutic Marvel.

    PubMed

    Maruthanila, V L; Poornima, J; Mirunalini, S

    2014-01-01

    Rising evidence provides credible support towards the potential role of bioactive products derived from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage, brussels sprouts, turnips, kohlrabi, bok choy, and radishes. Many epidemiological studies point out that Brassica vegetable protects humans against cancer since they are rich sources of glucosinolates in addition to possessing a high content of flavonoids, vitamins, and mineral nutrients. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) belongs to the class of compounds called indole glucosinolate, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, and is well-known for tits anticancer properties. In particular, I3C and its dimeric product, 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), have been generally investigated for their value against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. This paper reviews an in-depth study of the anticancer activity and the miscellaneous mechanisms underlying the anticarcinogenicity thereby broadening its therapeutic marvel. PMID:24982671

  18. Plasmodium liver load following parenteral sporozoite administration in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ploemen, Ivo H; Chakravarty, Sumana; van Gemert, Geert-Jan J; Annoura, Takeshi; Khan, Shahid M; Janse, Chris J; Hermsen, Cornelus C; Hoffman, Stephen L; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2013-07-25

    One of the bottlenecks in the development of a whole sporozoite malaria vaccine is the route and method of sporozoite administration. Immunization and challenge of human volunteers by mosquito bites is effective, but cannot be used as a vaccine. Intravenous immunization with sporozoites is effective in rodents and non-human primates, and being studied in humans, but is not yet used for licensed vaccines for infectious diseases. Intradermal and subcutaneous immunization regimens show a strong decrease in protective efficacy, which in rodents, is associated with a decreased degree of parasite liver infection during immunization. The objective of this study was to explore alternative routes of sporozoite administration to increase efficiency of liver infection. Using in vivo imaging, we found that IM injection of sporozoites resulted in a greater parasite liver load compared to ID and SC injection. The use of small inoculation volumes and multiple injections further increased the subsequent liver load. These observations were corroborated in a Plasmodium yoelii model using cryopreserved sporozoites administered ID. Our findings provide a rationale for the design of clinical trials to optimize needle and syringe administration of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites. PMID:23063834

  19. Palladium(0)-Catalyzed Intermolecular Allylic Dearomatization of Indoles by a Formal [4+2] Cycloaddition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Run-Duo; Xu, Qing-Long; Zhang, Bo; Gu, Yiting; Dai, Li-Xin; You, Shu-Li

    2016-08-01

    Bridged indoline derivatives were synthesized by an intermolecular Pd-catalyzed allylic dearomatization reaction of substituted indoles. The reaction between indoles and allyl carbonates bearing a nucleophilic alcohol side-chain proceeds in a cascade fashion, providing bridged indolines in excellent enantioselectivity. PMID:27321285

  20. Metal free sulfenylation and bis-sulfenylation of indoles: persulfate mediated synthesis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Ch Durga; Kumar, Shailesh; Sattar, Moh; Adhikary, Amit; Kumar, Sangit

    2013-12-14

    A method which avoids metal and halogen for the synthesis of 3-arylthioindoles from indoles and diaryl disulfides using ammonium persulfate in methanol has been presented. Moreover, double C-H sulfenylation of indoles at 2 and 3-positions has also been achieved using iodine and ammonium persulfate. PMID:24166084

  1. A review on recent developments of indole-containing antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Chen, Qiong; Yang, Guang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Indole represents one of the most important privileged scaffolds in drug discovery. Indole derivatives have the unique property of mimicking the structure of peptides and to bind reversibly to enzymes, which provide tremendous opportunities to discover novel drugs with different modes of action. There are seven indole-containing commercial drugs in the Top-200 Best Selling Drugs by US Retail Sales in 2012. There are also an amazing number of approved indole-containing drugs in the market as well as compounds currently going through different clinical phases or registration statuses. This review focused on the recent development of indole derivatives as antiviral agents with the following objectives: 1) To present one of the most comprehensive listings of indole antiviral agents, drugs on market or compounds in clinical trials; 2) To focus on recent developments of indole compounds (including natural products) and their antiviral activities, summarize the structure property, hoping to inspire new and even more creative approaches; 3) To offer perspectives on how indole scaffolds as a privileged structure might be exploited in the future. PMID:25462257

  2. Intermolecular decarboxylative direct C-3 arylation of indoles with benzoic acids.

    PubMed

    Cornella, Josep; Lu, Pengfei; Larrosa, Igor

    2009-12-01

    A palladium catalyzed C-H activation of indoles and a silver catalyzed decarboxylative C-C activation of ortho substituted benzoic acids are synergistically combined to synthesize indoles arylated exclusively in the C-3 position. This novel decarboxylative C-H arylation methodology is compatible with electron-donating and -withdrawing substituents in both coupling partners. PMID:19877661

  3. Electrochemical C-H/N-H Functionalization for the Synthesis of Highly Functionalized (Aza)indoles.

    PubMed

    Hou, Zhong-Wei; Mao, Zhong-Yi; Zhao, Huai-Bo; Melcamu, Yared Yohannes; Lu, Xin; Song, Jinshuai; Xu, Hai-Chao

    2016-08-01

    Indoles and azaindoles are among the most important heterocycles because of their prevalence in nature and their broad utility in pharmaceutical industry. Reported herein is an unprecedented noble-metal- and oxidant-free electrochemical method for the coupling of (hetero)arylamines with tethered alkynes to synthesize highly functionalized indoles, as well as the more challenging azaindoles. PMID:27240116

  4. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of 3-thiocyanato-1H-indoles as potential anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Margiani P; da Silva, Paulo B N; da Silva, Teresinha G; Kaufman, Teodoro S; Militão, Gardenia C G; Silveira, Claudio C

    2016-08-01

    A novel series of twenty 3-thiocyanato-1H-indoles, carrying diversification at positions N-1, C-2 and C-5 of the heterocyclic core, were synthesized; their antiproliferative activity against four human cancer cell lines (HL60, HEP-2, NCI-H292 and MCF-7) was evaluated, employing doxorubicin as positive control. Indole, N-methylindole and 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-N-methylindole demonstrated to be essentially inactive, whereas several of their congener 3-thiocyanato-1H-indoles displayed good to excellent levels of potency (IC50 ≤ 6 μM), while being non-hemolytic. N-Phenyl-3-thiocyanato-1H-indole and 1-methyl-2-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-thiocyanato-1H-indole showed good to high potency against all the cell lines. On the other side, the N-(4-chlorophenyl)-, 2-(4-chlorophenyl)- and 2-phenyl- 3-thiocyanato-1H-indole derivatives were slightly less active against the test cell lines. Overall, these results suggest that the indole-3-thiocyanate motif can be suitably decorated to afford highly cytotoxic compounds and that the substituted indole can be employed as a useful scaffold toward more potent compounds. PMID:27116711

  5. Indole prenyltransferases from fungi: a new enzyme group with high potential for the production of prenylated indole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Steffan, N; Grundmann, A; Yin, W-B; Kremer, A; Li, S-M

    2009-01-01

    Prenylated indole derivatives are hybrid natural products containing both aromatic and isoprenoid moieties and are widely spread in plants, fungi and bacteria. Some of these complex natural products, e.g. the ergot alkaloids ergotamine and fumigaclavine C as well as the diketopiperazine derivative fumitremorgin C and its biosynthetic precursors tryprostatin A and B, show a wide range of biological and pharmacological activities. Prenyl transfer reactions catalysed by prenyltransferases represent key steps in the biosynthesis of these compounds and often result in formation of products which possess biological activities distinct from their non-prenylated precursors. Recently, a series of putative indole prenyltransferase genes could be identified in the genome sequences of different fungal strains including Aspergillus fumigatus. The gene products show significant sequence similarities to dimethylallyltryptophan synthases from fungi. We have cloned and overexpressed six of these genes, fgaPT1, fgaPT2, ftmPT1, ftmPT2, 7-dmats and cdpNPT from A. fumigatus in E. coli and S. cerevisiae. The overproduced enzymes were characterised biochemically. Three additional prenyltransferases, DmaW-Cs, TdiB and MaPT were identified and characterised in a Clavicipitalean fungus, Aspergillus nidulans and Malbranchea aurantiaca, respectively. Sequence analysis and alignments with known aromatic prenyltransferases as well as phylogenetic analysis revealed that these enzymes belong to a new group of "aromatic prenyltransferases". They differ clearly from membrane-bound aromatic prenyltransferases from different sources and soluble prenyltransferases from bacteria. The characterised enzymes are soluble proteins, catalyse different prenyl transfer reactions on indole moieties of various substrates and do not require divalent metal ions for their enzymatic reactions. All of the enzymes accepted only dimethylallyl diphosphate as prenyl donor. On the other hand, they showed broad substrate

  6. A multi-component domino reaction for the direct access to polyfunctionalized indoles via intermolecular allylic esterification and indolation†

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Bo; Yi, Mian-Shuai; Shi, Feng; Pindi, Suresh; McDowell, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A novel multi-component reaction for the synthesis of polyfunctionalized indoles and bis-indoles has been established. The reaction pathways were controlled by varying enamines with different substitution patterns to give polyfunctionalized indoles and bis-indoles selectively. The reaction proceeds at a fast speed within 15–30 min with water as the major byproduct, which makes work-up convenient. PMID:22038299

  7. 5-Meth­oxy-1-[(5-meth­oxy-1H-indol-2-yl)meth­yl]-1H-indole

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Mohamed I.; El-Brollosy, Nasser R.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Arshad, Suhana; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2012-01-01

    In the title compound, C19H18N2O2, the two indole ring systems are essentially planar [maximum deviation = 0.015 (2) Å in both indole ring systems] and make a dihedral angle of 72.17 (7)° with each other. In the crystal, the mol­ecules are linked into a zigzag chain along the a axis via N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds. PMID:22590027

  8. Synthesis of 8-phenyl-10H-pyrido(1,2-. cap alpha. )indole salts from 2,3,3-trimethyl-3H-indole chlorides with cinnamaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Shachkus, A.A.; Degutis, Yu.A.

    1987-10-01

    Reaction of 2,3,3-trimethyl-3H-indole chloride with cinnamic and 4-dimethylaminocinnamic aldehydes led to salts of 8-phenyl and 8-(4-dimethylaminophenyl)-10,10-dimethyl-10H-pyrido(1,2-..cap alpha..)indole. PMR spectra were recorded on a Tesla BS-487C (80 MHz) instrument (internal standard HMDS) and IR spectra on a UR-20 spectrometer (KBr pellets).

  9. The pyruvate kinase of Stigmatella aurantiaca is an indole binding protein and essential for development.

    PubMed

    Stamm, Irmela; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Plaga, Wulf

    2005-06-01

    Myxospore formation of the myxobacterium Stigmatella aurantiaca can be uncoupled from the cooperative development i.e. fruiting body formation, by low concentrations of indole. Two putative indole receptor proteins were isolated by their capacity to bind indole and identified as pyruvate kinase (PK) and aldehyde dehydrogenase. The PK activity of Stigmatella crude extracts was stimulated by indole. Cloning of the PK gene (pykA) and the construction of a pykA disruption mutant strikingly revealed that PK is essential for multicellular development: Fruiting body formation was abolished in the mutant strain and indole-induced spore formation was delayed. The developmental defects could be complemented by insertion of the pykA gene at the mtaB locus of the Stigmatella genome excluding any polar effects of the pykA disruption. PMID:15882428

  10. Asymmetric synthesis of N-allylic indoles via regio- and enantioselective allylation of aryl hydrazines

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kun; Gilles, Thomas; Breit, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric synthesis of N-allylic indoles is important for natural product synthesis and pharmaceutical research. The regio- and enantioselective N-allylation of indoles is a true challenge due to the favourable C3-allylation. We develop here a new strategy to the asymmetric synthesis of N-allylic indoles via rhodium-catalysed N-selective coupling of aryl hydrazines with allenes followed by Fischer indolization. The exclusive N-selectivities and good to excellent enantioselectivities are achieved applying a rhodium(I)/DTBM-Segphos or rhodium(I)/DTBM-Binap catalyst. This method permits the practical synthesis of valuable chiral N-allylated indoles, and avoids the N- or C-selectivity issue. PMID:26137886

  11. Four new minor brominated indole related alkaloids with antibacterial activities from Laurencia similis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Chen; Sun, Wen-Shuang; Cheng, Wei; Liu, Dong; Liang, Hong; Zhang, Qing-Ying; Lin, Wen-Han

    2016-08-01

    Four new minor brominated indole related alkaloids (one indoles, 1, one 1,3-dihydro-indole-2-one, 2, one carbazole, 3, and one 2-carbonylamino-benzoate, 4) were isolated and identified from Laurencia similis by extensive chromatographic and spectrometric methods. Among them, 1 and 2 were the first example of naturally occurring indole with 3-benzyl group and 1,3-dihydro-indole-2-one with 2-isopropylidene group, respectively, whereas 3 and 4 were the first carbazole alkaloids and 2-carbonylamino-benzoate, respectively, isolated from the genus Laurencia. Moreover, 1 showed the most potent antibacterial activity against seven bacterial strains with MIC values ranging from 2 to 8μg/mL. PMID:27318539

  12. Asymmetric synthesis of N-allylic indoles via regio- and enantioselective allylation of aryl hydrazines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Gilles, Thomas; Breit, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    The asymmetric synthesis of N-allylic indoles is important for natural product synthesis and pharmaceutical research. The regio- and enantioselective N-allylation of indoles is a true challenge due to the favourable C3-allylation. We develop here a new strategy to the asymmetric synthesis of N-allylic indoles via rhodium-catalysed N-selective coupling of aryl hydrazines with allenes followed by Fischer indolization. The exclusive N-selectivities and good to excellent enantioselectivities are achieved applying a rhodium(I)/DTBM-Segphos or rhodium(I)/DTBM-Binap catalyst. This method permits the practical synthesis of valuable chiral N-allylated indoles, and avoids the N- or C-selectivity issue. PMID:26137886

  13. Hobartine: a tetracyclic indole alkaloid extracted from Aristotelia chilensis (maqui).

    PubMed

    Paz Robles, Cristian; Badilla Vidal, Natalia; Suarez, Sebastián; Baggio, Ricardo

    2014-11-01

    The natural compound hobartine {systematic name: (1R)-3-[(1S,5S)-(4,4,8-trimethylbicyclo[3.3.1]non-7-en-2-yl)methyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H-indole}, C20H26N2, (I), is an indole alkaloid isolated from Aristotelia chilensis as part of a study of secondary metabolites from Chilean flora. The colourless compound has a tetracyclic structure closely related to the strongly coloured polymorphic structures discussed in Paz et al. [Acta Cryst. (2013), C69, 1509-1512] and Watson et al. [Acta Cryst. (1989), C45, 1322-1324]. The main differences reside in the absence of a keto group in (I) compared with the previous structures, as well as an endo double bond in (I) contrasting with the exo double bond found in the previous structures. The supramolecular structure of (I) in strongly related to the twofold screw axis, around which isolated chains build up, internally linked by an N-H···N hydrogen bond which is the only significant intermolecular interaction present in the structure. PMID:25370110

  14. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Aminonaphthols Incorporated Indole Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Anand Raghunath, Saundane; Nandibeoor Mathada, Kirankumar

    2014-01-01

    An efficient one pot condensation of naphthols (1), 2,5-disubstituted indole-3-carboxaldehydes (2), and secondary amines (3) has been achieved using dichloromethane as a solvent, stirring at room temperature. Some of the new [(disubstituted amino)(5-substituted 2-phenyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl]naphthalene-ols (4) derivatives were prepared in good yields. The significant features of this method are simple work-up procedure, inexpensive nontoxic solvent, shorter reaction times, and excellent product yields. The structures of newly synthesized compounds (4a–r) are confirmed by their elemental analysis, FTIR, 1H and 13C NMR, and mass spectral data. These compounds were screened for their in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial, antitubercular, and anticancer activities. Among the synthesized compounds (4a–r), the compound 4e exhibited highest activity for radical scavenging and ferric ions reducing antioxidant power activities; compounds 4b, 4h, and 4k showed good metal chelating activity. Compounds 4n and 4q showed excellent antimicrobial activities with MIC value 08 µg/mL against tested strains. Compounds 4h, 4k, 4n, and 4q exhibited promising antitubercular activity with MIC value 12.5 µg/mL. Compounds 4k and 4q exhibited 100% cell lysis at concentration 10 µg/mL against MDA-MB-231 (human adenocarcinoma mammary gland) cell lines. PMID:25383220

  15. Indole generates quiescent and metabolically active Escherichia coli cultures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Chin; Walia, Rupali; Mukherjee, Krishna J; Mahalik, Subhashree; Summers, David K

    2015-04-01

    An inherent problem with bacterial cell factories used to produce recombinant proteins or metabolites is that resources are channeled into unwanted biomass as well as product. Over several years, attempts have been made to increase efficiency by unlinking biomass and product generation. One example was the quiescent cell (Q-Cell) expression system that generated non-growing but metabolically active Escherichia coli by over-expressing a regulatory RNA (Rcd) in a defined genetic background. Although effective at increasing the efficiency with which resources are converted to product, the technical complexity of the Rcd-based Q-Cell system limited its use. We describe here an alternative method for generating Q-Cells by the direct addition of indole, or related indole derivatives, to the culture medium of an E. coli strain carrying defined mutations in the hns gene. This simple and effective approach is shown to be functional in both shake-flask and fermenter culture. The cells remain metabolically active and analysis of their performance in the fermenter suggests that they may be particularly suitable for the production of cellular metabolites. PMID:25594833

  16. Biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoxuan; Zeng, Xinyi; Sun, Chao; Chen, Shilin

    2014-09-01

    Catharanthus roseus is one of the most extensively investigated medicinal plants, which can produce more than 130 alkaloids, including the powerful antitumor drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Here we review the recent advances in the biosynthetic pathway of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) in C. roseus, and the identification and characterization of the corresponding enzymes involved in this pathway. Strictosidine is the central intermediate in the biosynthesis of different TIAs, which is formed by the condensation of secologanin and tryptamine. Secologanin is derived from terpenoid (isoprenoid) biosynthetic pathway, while tryptamine is derived from indole biosynthetic pathway. Then various specific end products are produced by different routes during downstream process. Although many genes and corresponding enzymes have been characterized in this pathway, our knowledge on the whole TIA biosynthetic pathway still remains largely unknown up to date. Full elucidation of TIA biosynthetic pathway is an important prerequisite to understand the regulation of the TIA biosynthesis in the medicinal plant and to produce valuable TIAs by synthetic biological technology. PMID:25159992

  17. Stem cell transplantation for indolent lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gribben, John G; Hosing, Chitra; Maloney, David G.

    2012-01-01

    The indolent lymphomas, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL) remain incurable with standard therapy. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT[JHA1]) is feasible and has low treatment related mortality in follicular lymphoma, but there are questions relating to optimal timing of the procedure, conditioning regimen and late effects. Myeloablative allogeneic HSCT is associated with high treatment related morbidity and mortality, few late relapses, but is applicable to only a small number of patients. The major focus of HSCT in these lymphomas has been with reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) allogeneic HSCT, which is applicable to the age distribution of these diseases and which exploit the graft versus lymphoma effect in these diseases. Steps to further decrease the morbidity and mortality of the RIC HSCT and in particular to reduce the incidence of chronic extensive graft versus host disease while maintaining tumor control remain the major focus. Many potential treatments are available for indolent lymphomas and CLL, and appropriate patient selection and the timing of HSCT remain controversial. The use of HSCT must always be weighed against the risk of the underlying disease, particularly in a setting where improvements in treatment are leading to improved outcome. PMID:21195313

  18. A new indole glycoside from the seeds of Raphanus sativus.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hong-Guang; Ko, Hae Ju; Chowdhury, Md Anisuzzaman; Lee, Dong-Sung; Woo, Eun-Rhan

    2016-06-01

    A new indole glycoside, β-D-glucopyranosyl 2-(methylthio)-1H-indole-3-carboxylate, named raphanuside A (1), as well as eight known compounds, β-D-fructofuranosyl-(2 → 1)-(6-O-sinapoyl)-α-D-glucopyranoside (2), (3-O-sinapoyl)-β-D-fructofuranosyl-(2 → 1)-α-D-glucopyranoside (3), (3-O-sinapoyl)-β-D-fructofuranosyl-(2 → 1)-(6-O-sinapoyl)-α-D-glucopyranoside (4), (3,4-O-disinapoyl)-β-D-fructofuranosyl-(2 → 1)-(6-O-sinapoyl)-α-D-glucopyranoside (5), isorhamnetin 3,4'-di-O-β-D-glucoside (6), isorhamnetin 3-O-β-D-glucoside-7-O-α-L-rhamnoside (7), isorhamnetin 3-O-β-D-glucoside (8) and 3'-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin 7-O-β-D-glucoside (9) were isolated from the seeds of Raphanus sativus. Furthermore, compounds 1-3 and 6-9, were isolated from this plant for the first time. The structures of compounds 1-9 were identified using 1D and 2D NMR, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectroscopic analyses. The inhibitory activity of these isolated compounds against interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in TNF-α stimulated MG-63 cells was also examined. PMID:27193305

  19. Object Recognition Memory and the Rodent Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR…

  20. Hemagglutination by Pasteurellaceae isolated from rodents.

    PubMed

    Boot, R; Thuis, H; Teppema, J S

    1993-06-01

    Pasteurellaceae notably P. pneumotropica, have been associated with severe outbreaks of respiratory disease in several species of rodents. Host-specific parasitism of Pasteurellaceae in rodents has hardly been studied. Since host tropism in many bacteria involves adhesive mechanisms, we examined the hemagglutinating (HA) properties of 44 isolates from different rodent species (mouse (15) rat (8), hamster (9), gerbil (10) and Mastomys (2)). Only 13 mouse isolates and the 2 Mastomys isolates hemagglutinated human (type O Rh+) and canine red blood cells (RBCs). No HA was found using RBCs from 10 other animal species. HA was not inhibited by simple sugars and glycoconjugates, but was completely inhibited by heating of bacterial cells for 10 min at 80 or 100 degrees C, partially inhibited by glutaraldehyde and inhibited in a dose-dependent mode by NaIO4, suggesting the involvement of bacterial polysaccharide structures in the HA process. Enrichment procedures did not reveal the presence of HA- subpopulations in HA+ isolates or the presence of HA+ subpopulations in HA- isolates. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of fimbriae both in HA+ and HA- isolates. A regularly structured (RS) layer was detected on cells of part of the HA+ isolates only. Our results suggest that Pasteurellaceae of mice and Mastomys may be related and differ from isolates isolated from other rodent species. PMID:8219497

  1. Simultaneous extraction and HPLC determination of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid in pea plant by using ionic liquid-modified silica as sorbent.

    PubMed

    Sheikhian, Leila; Bina, Sedigheh

    2016-01-15

    In this study, ionic liquid-modified silica was used as sorbent for simultaneous extraction and preconcentration of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid in pea plants. The effect of some parameters such as pH and ionic strength of sample solution, amount of sorbent, flow rate of aqueous sample solution and eluent solution, concentration of eluent solution, and temperature were studied for each hormone solution. Percent extraction of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid was strongly affected by pH of aqueous sample solution. Ionic strength of aqueous phase and temperature showed no serious effects on extraction efficiency of studied plant hormones. Obtained breakthrough volume was 200mL for each of studied hormones. Preconcentration factor for spectroscopic and chromatographic determination of studied hormones was 100 and 4.0×10(3) respectively. Each solid sorbent phase was reusable for almost 10 times of extraction/stripping procedure. Relative standard deviations of extraction/stripping processes of 3-indole butyric acid and 3-indole acetic acid were 2.79% and 3.66% respectively. The calculated limit of detections for IBA and IAA were 9.1×10(-2)mgL(-1) and 1.6×10(-1)mgL(-1) respectively. PMID:26701202

  2. Meal-feeding rodents and toxicology research.

    PubMed

    Carey, Gale B; Merrill, Lisa C

    2012-08-20

    Most laboratory rodents used for toxicology studies are fed ad libitum, with unlimited access to food. As a result, ad libitum-fed rodents tend to overeat. Research demonstrates that ad libitum-fed rodents are physiologically and metabolically different from rodents fed controlled amounts of food at scheduled times (meal-fed). Ad libitum-fed rodents can develop hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, diet-induced obesity, nephropathy, cardiomyopathy, and pituitary, pancreatic, adrenal, and thyroid tumors, conditions likely to affect the results of toxicology research studies. In contrast, meal-feeding synchronizes biological rhythms and leads to a longer life span, lower body weight, lower body temperature, hypertrophy of the small intestine, and synchronization of hepatic and digestive enzymes. The circadian rhythms present in nearly all living organisms are entrained by light intensity and food intake, and peripheral clocks in all organs of the body, especially the GI tract and liver, are particularly sensitive to food intake. Feeding schedule has been demonstrated to alter the toxicity and metabolism of drugs including sodium valproate, chloral hydrate, acetaminophen, gentamicin, and methotrexate. Feeding schedule alters the expression of genes that code for Phase I, II, and III proteins, thereby altering the rate and amplitude of drug disposition. Rhythms of plasma insulin and glucagon that fluctuate with food ingestion are also altered by feeding schedule; ad libitum feeding promotes hyperinsulinemia which is a precursor for developing diabetes. The emerging field of chronopharmacology, the interaction of biological rhythms and drugs, will lead to optimizing the design and delivery of drugs in a manner that matches biological rhythms, but it is wise for toxicology researchers to consider feeding schedule when designing these experiments. It has been 10 years since the Society for Toxicologic Pathology voiced its position that feeding schedule is an

  3. Arenavirus Diversity and Phylogeography of Mastomys natalensis Rodents, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Obadare, Adeoba; Oyeyiola, Akinlabi; Igbokwe, Joseph; Fasogbon, Ayobami; Igbahenah, Felix; Ortsega, Daniel; Asogun, Danny; Umeh, Prince; Vakkai, Innocent; Abejegah, Chukwuyem; Pahlman, Meike; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Mastomys natalensis rodents are natural hosts for Lassa virus (LASV). Detection of LASV in 2 mitochondrial phylogroups of the rodent near the Niger and Benue Rivers in Nigeria underlines the potential for LASV emergence in fresh phylogroups of this rodent. A Mobala-like sequence was also detected in eastern Nigeria. PMID:26982388

  4. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  5. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  6. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  7. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  8. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  9. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  10. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  11. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  12. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  13. 20 CFR 654.415 - Insect and rodent control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Insect and rodent control. 654.415 Section 654.415 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR SPECIAL... Insect and rodent control. Housing and facilities shall be free of insects, rodents, and other vermin....

  14. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  15. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  16. 7 CFR 58.247 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.247 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.247 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control program...

  17. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  18. 7 CFR 58.147 - Insect and rodent control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Insect and rodent control program. 58.147 Section 58... Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.147 Insect and rodent control program. In addition to... made responsible for the performance of a regularly scheduled insect and rodent control...

  19. Transport of the two natural auxins, indole-3-butyric acid and indole-3-acetic acid, in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashotte, Aaron M.; Poupart, Julie; Waddell, Candace S.; Muday, Gloria K.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Polar transport of the natural auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is important in a number of plant developmental processes. However, few studies have investigated the polar transport of other endogenous auxins, such as indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), in Arabidopsis. This study details the similarities and differences between IBA and IAA transport in several tissues of Arabidopsis. In the inflorescence axis, no significant IBA movement was detected, whereas IAA is transported in a basipetal direction from the meristem tip. In young seedlings, both IBA and IAA were transported only in a basipetal direction in the hypocotyl. In roots, both auxins moved in two distinct polarities and in specific tissues. The kinetics of IBA and IAA transport appear similar, with transport rates of 8 to 10 mm per hour. In addition, IBA transport, like IAA transport, is saturable at high concentrations of auxin, suggesting that IBA transport is protein mediated. Interestingly, IAA efflux inhibitors and mutations in genes encoding putative IAA transport proteins reduce IAA transport but do not alter IBA movement, suggesting that different auxin transport protein complexes are likely to mediate IBA and IAA transport. Finally, the physiological effects of IBA and IAA on hypocotyl elongation under several light conditions were examined and analyzed in the context of the differences in IBA and IAA transport. Together, these results present a detailed picture of IBA transport and provide the basis for a better understanding of the transport of these two endogenous auxins.

  20. [Aerosol deposition in nasal passages of burrowing and ground rodents when breathing dust-laden air].

    PubMed

    Moshkin, M P; Petrovskiĭ, D V; Akulov, A E; Romashchenko, A V; Gerlinskaia, L A; Muchnaia, M I; Ganimedov, V L; Sadovskiĭ, A S; Savelov, A A; Koptiug, I V; Troitskiĭ, S Iu; Bukhtiiarov, V I; Kolchanov, N A; Sagdeev, R Z; Fomin, V M

    2014-01-01

    In subterranean rodents, which dig down the passages with frontal teeth, adaptation to the underground mode of life presumes forming of mechanisms that provide protection against inhaling dust particles of different size when digging. One of such mechanisms can be specific pattern of air flow organization in the nasal cavity. To test this assumption, comparative study of geometry and aerodynamics of nasal passages has been conducted with regard to typical representative of subterranean rodents, the mole vole, and a representative of ground rodents, the house mouse. Numerical modeling of air flows and deposition of micro- and nanoparticle aerosols indicates that sedimentation of model particles over the whole surface of nasal cavity is higher in mole vole than in house mouse. On the contrary, particles deposition on the surface of olfactory epithelium turns out to be substantially less in the burrowing rodent as compared to the ground one. Adaptive significance of the latter observation has been substantiated by experimental study on the uptake ofnanoparticles of hydrated manganese oxide MnO x (H2O)x and Mn ions from nasal cavity into brain. It has been shown with use of magnetic resonance tomography method that there is no difference between studied species with respect to intake of particles or ions by olfactory bulb when they are introduced intranasally. Meanwhile, when inhaling nanoparticle aerosol of MnCl2, deposition of Mn in mouse's olfactory bulbs surpasses markedly that in vole's bulbs. Thereby, the morphology of nasal passages as a factor determining the aerodynamics of upper respiratory tract ensures for burrowing rodents more efficient protection of both lungs and brain against inhaled aerosols than for ground ones. PMID:25771679

  1. Brönsted Acid-Catalyzed One-Pot Synthesis of Indoles from o-Aminobenzyl Alcohols and Furans

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Alexey; Makarov, Anton; Rubtsov, Alexandr E.; Butin, Alexander V.; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Brönsted acid-catalyzed one-pot synthesis of indoles from o-aminobenzyl alcohols and furans has been developed. This method operates via the in situ formation of aminobenzylfuran, followed by its recyclization into the indole core. The method proved to be efficient for substrates possessing different functional groups, including -OMe, -CO2Cy, and -Br. The resulting indoles can easily be transformed into diverse scaffolds, including 2,3- and 1,2-fused indoles, and indole possessing an α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety at the C-2 position. PMID:24255969

  2. General Approach to the Total Synthesis of 9-Methoxy Substituted Indole Alkaloids: Synthesis of Mitragynine, as well as 9-Methoxygeissoschizol and 9-Methoxy-Nb-methylgeissoschizol

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Yin, Wenyuan; Zhou, Hao; Liao, Xuebin; Cook, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Herein the full details of the synthesis of the 9-methoxy-substituted Corynanthe indole alkaloids mitragynine (1), 9-methoxygeissoschizol (3) and 9-methoxy-Nb-methylgeissoschizol (4) are described. Initially an efficient synthetic route to the optically active 4-methoxytryptophan ethyl ester 20 on a multigram scale was developed via a Mori-Ban-Hegedus indole synthesis. The ethyl ester of (D)-4-methoxytryptophan 20 was obtained with a radical-mediated regioselective bromination of indoline 12 serving as a key step. Alternatively, the key 4-methoxytryptophan intermediate 22 could be synthesized by the Larock heteroannulation of aryl iodide 10b with the internal alkyne 21a. The use of the Boc protected aniline 10b was crucial to the success of this heteroannulation. The α,β-unsaturated ester 6 was synthesized via the Pictet-Spengler reaction as the pivotal step. This was followed by a Ni(COD)2 mediated cyclization to set up the stereocenter at C-15. The benzyloxy group in 31 was removed to provide the intermediate ester 5. This chiral tetracyclic ester 5 was employed to accomplish the first total synthesis of 9-methoxygeissoschizol (3) and 9-methoxy-Nb-methylgeisso-schizol (4) as well as the opioid agonistic indole alkaloid mitragynine (1). PMID:19046119

  3. Indole synthesis by conjugate addition of anilines to activated acetylenes and an unusual ligand-free copper(II)-mediated intramolecular cross-coupling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Detian; Back, Thomas G

    2012-11-12

    A versatile new synthesis of indoles was achieved by the conjugate addition of N-formyl-2-haloanilines to acetylenic sulfones, ketones, and esters followed by a copper-catalyzed intramolecular C-arylation. The conjugate addition step was conducted under exceptionally mild conditions at room temperature in basic, aqueous DMF. Surprisingly, the C-arylation was performed most effectively by employing copper(II) acetate as the catalyst in the absence of external ligands, without the need for protection from air or water. An unusual feature of this process, for the case of acetylenic ketones, is the ability of the initial conjugate-addition product to serve as a ligand for the catalyst, which enables it to participate in the catalysis of its further transformation to the final indole product. Mechanistic studies, including EPR experiments, indicated that copper(II) is reduced to the active copper(I) species by the formate ion that is produced by the base-catalyzed hydrolysis of DMF. This process also served to recycle any copper(II) that was produced by the adventitious oxidation of copper(I), thereby preventing deactivation of the catalyst. Several examples of reactions involving acetylenic sulfones attached to a modified Merrifield resin demonstrated the feasibility of solid-phase synthesis of indoles by using this protocol, and tricyclic products were obtained in one pot by employing acetylenic sulfones that contain chloroalkyl substituents. PMID:23019064

  4. Asymmetric distribution of glucose and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol in geostimulated Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momonoki, Y. S.; Bandurski, R. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol occurs in both the kernel and vegetative shoot of germinating Zea mays seedlings. The effect of a gravitational stimulus on the transport of [3H]-5-indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and [U-14C]-D-glucose from the kernel to the seedling shoot was studied. Both labeled glucose and labeled indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol become asymmetrically distributed in the mesocotyl cortex of the shoot with more radioactivity occurring in the bottom half of a horizontally placed seedling. Asymmetric distribution of [3H]indole-3-acetic acid, derived from the applied [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol, occurred more rapidly than distribution of total 3H-radioactivity. These findings demonstrate that the gravitational stimulus can induce an asymmetric distribution of substances being transported from kernel to shoot. They also indicate that, in addition to the transport asymmetry, gravity affects the steady state amount of indole-3-acetic acid derived from indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol.

  5. An evaluation of synthetic indole derivatives as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Chirkova, Zhanna V; Kabanova, Mariya V; Filimonov, Sergey I; Abramov, Igor G; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P; Suponitsky, Kyrill Yu

    2016-05-01

    In a recent study we have shown that several indole-5,6-dicarbonitrile derivatives are potent inhibitors of human monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B. To expand on these results and to further determine structure-activity relationships (SARs) for MAO inhibition by this chemical class, the present study investigates the MAO inhibition properties of additional indole-5,6-dicarbonitriles and related indole-5,6-dicarboxylic acid and pyrrolo[3,4-f]indole-5,7-dione derivatives. Among the active compounds two pyrrolo[3,4-f]indole-5,7-dione derivatives inhibited MAO-A (4g) and MAO-B (4d) with IC50 values of 0.250 and 0.581μM, respectively. In general indole-5,6-dicarbonitriles, however, exhibit higher MAO inhibition potencies while indole-5,6-dicarboxylic acids are weak MAO inhibitors. Active MAO inhibitors such as 4g and 4d may be used as leads for the development of drugs for the treatment of disease states such as Parkinson's disease and depression. MAO inhibitors are also under investigation as potential agents for the treatment of prostate cancer, certain types of cardiomyopathies and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27020523

  6. Asymmetric distribution of glucose and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol in geostimulated Zea mays seedlings.

    PubMed

    Momonoki, Y S

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol occurs in both the kernel and vegetative shoot of germinating Zea mays seedlings. The effect of a gravitational stimulus on the transport of [3H]-5-indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and [U-14C]-D-glucose from the kernel to the seedling shoot was studied. Both labeled glucose and labeled indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol become asymmetrically distributed in the mesocotyl cortex of the shoot with more radioactivity occurring in the bottom half of a horizontally placed seedling. Asymmetric distribution of [3H]indole-3-acetic acid, derived from the applied [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol, occurred more rapidly than distribution of total 3H-radioactivity. These findings demonstrate that the gravitational stimulus can induce an asymmetric distribution of substances being transported from kernel to shoot. They also indicate that, in addition to the transport asymmetry, gravity affects the steady state amount of indole-3-acetic acid derived from indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol. PMID:11537873

  7. Transformation of indole by methanogenic and sulfate-reducing microorganisms isolated from digested sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Shanker, R.; Bollag, J.M. )

    1990-01-01

    In the present study, mineralization of an aromatic N-heterocyclic molecule, indole, by microorganisms present in anaerobically digested sewage sludge was examined. The first step in indole mineralization was the formation of a hydroxylated intermediate, oxindole. The rate of transformation of indole to oxindole and its subsequent disappearance was dependent on the concentration of inoculum and indole and the incubation temperature. Methanogenesis appeared to be the dominant process in the mineralization of indole in 10% digested sludge even in the presence of high concentrations of sulfate. Enrichment of the digested sludge with sulfate as an electron acceptor allowed the isolation of a metabolically stable mixed culture of anaerobic bacteria which transformed indole to oxindole and acetate, and ultimately to methane and carbon dioxide. This mixed culture exhibited a predominance of sulfate-reducers over methanogens with more than 75% of the substrate mineralized to carbon dioxide. The investigation demonstrates that indole can be transformed by both methanogenic and sulfate-reducing microbial populations.

  8. Characterization of a Novel Phenol Hydroxylase in Indoles Biotranformation from a Strain Arthrobacter sp. W1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinliang; Zhang, Xuwang; Zhou, Jiti

    2012-01-01

    Background Indigoids, as popular dyes, can be produced by microbial strains or enzymes catalysis. However, the new valuable products with their transformation mechanisms, especially inter-conversion among the intermediates and products have not been clearly identified yet. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate novel microbial catalytic processes for indigoids production systematically. Findings A phenol hydroxylase gene cluster (4,606 bp) from Arthrobacter sp. W1 (PHw1) was obtained. This cluster contains six components in the order of KLMNOP, which exhibit relatively low sequence identities (37–72%) with known genes. It was suggested that indole and all the tested indole derivatives except for 3-methylindole were transformed to various substituted indigoid pigments, and the predominant color products derived from indoles were identified by spectrum analysis. One new purple product from indole, 2-(7-oxo-1H-indol-6(7H)-ylidene) indolin-3-one, should be proposed as the dimerization of isatin and 7-hydroxylindole at the C-2 and C-6 positions. Tunnel entrance and docking studies were used to predict the important amino acids for indoles biotransformation, which were further proved by site-directed mutagenesis. Conclusions/Significance We showed that the phenol hydroxylase from genus Arthrobacter could transform indoles to indigoids with new chemical compounds being produced. Our work should show high insights into understanding the mechanism of indigoids bio-production. PMID:23028517

  9. Studies on organic indole-3-aldehyde single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haja Hameed, A. S.; Ravi, G.; Dhanasekaran, R.; Ramasamy, P.

    Indole-3-aldehyde (IA) is a new organic nonlinear material for which its solubility in methanol and acetone was found out using the apparatus fabricated by the authors. In order to get the good-quality crystals, methods of evaporation of solvent at room temperature and slow cooling of saturated solution at boiling temperature were adopted. Simulated lattice parameter values were found out using experimentally known " d" values. The etching and mechanical strength studies on different planes of the crystal were carried out. Decomposition temperature, weight loss and different functional bond frequencies associated with the crystal were also found out from differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis, respectively.

  10. Biogenetically inspired synthesis and skeletal diversification of indole alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Haruki; Oikawa, Hideaki; Oguri, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    To access architecturally complex natural products, chemists usually devise a customized synthetic strategy for constructing a single target skeleton. In contrast, biosynthetic assembly lines often employ divergent intramolecular cyclizations of a polyunsaturated common intermediate to produce diverse arrays of scaffolds. With the aim of integrating such biogenetic strategies, we show the development of an artificial divergent assembly line generating unprecedented numbers of scaffold variations of terpenoid indole alkaloids. This approach not only allows practical access to multipotent intermediates, but also enables systematic diversification of skeletal, stereochemical and functional group properties without structural simplification of naturally occurring alkaloids. Three distinct modes of [4+2] cyclizations and two types of redox-mediated annulations provided divergent access to five skeletally distinct scaffolds involving iboga-, aspidosperma-, andranginine- and ngouniensine-type skeletons and a non-natural variant within six to nine steps from tryptamine. The efficiency of our approach was demonstrated by successful total syntheses of (±)-vincadifformine, (±)-andranginine and (-)-catharanthine.

  11. Saddle-Shaped Cyclic Indole Tetramers: 3D Electroactive Molecules.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Constanza; Monge, Ángeles; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Navarrete, Juan T López; Ruiz Delgado, M Carmen; Gómez-Lor, Berta

    2016-07-18

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental study of a series of cyclic indole tetramers aimed at understanding the fundamental electronic properties of this 3D platform and evaluating its potential in the construction of new semiconductors. To this end, we combined absorption and Raman spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and spectroelectrochemistry with DFT calculations. Our results suggest that this platform can be easily and reversibly oxidized. Additionally, it has a HOMO that matches very well with the workfunction of gold, therefore charge injection from a gold electrode is expected to occur without significant barriers. Interestingly, the cyclic tetraindoles allow for good electron delocalization in spite of their saddle-shaped structures. The steric constraints introduced by N-substitution significantly inhibits ring inversion of the central cyclooctatetraene unit, whereas it only barely affects the optical and electrochemical properties (a slightly higher oxidation potential and a blueshifted absorption upon alkylation are observed). PMID:27320301

  12. Development of indole sulfonamides as cannabinoid receptor negative allosteric modulators.

    PubMed

    Greig, Iain R; Baillie, Gemma L; Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Trembleau, Laurent; Ross, Ruth A

    2016-09-15

    Existing CB1 negative allosteric modulators (NAMs) fall into a limited range of structural classes. In spite of the theoretical potential of CB1 NAMs, published in vivo studies have generally not been able to demonstrate the expected therapeutically-relevant CB1-mediated effects. Thus, a greater range of molecular tools are required to allow definitive elucidation of the effects of CB1 allosteric modulation. In this study, we show a novel series of indole sulfonamides. Compounds 5e and 6c (ABD1075) had potencies of 4 and 3nM respectively, and showed good oral exposure and CNS penetration, making them highly versatile tools for investigating the therapeutic potential of allosteric modulation of the cannabinoid system. PMID:27542310

  13. Indole alkaloid glucosides from the roots of Isatis indigotica.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Feng; Chen, Ming-Hua; Lin, Sheng; Li, Yu-Huan; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Shi, Jian-Gong

    2016-01-01

    Five new indole alkaloid glucosides named isatindigotindolosides A-E (1-5), along with three known analogs (6-8), were isolated from an aqueous extract of the Isatis indigotica roots. Their structures including the absolute configurations were determined based on comprehensive spectroscopic data analysis, combined with chemical methods and electronic circular dichroism spectra calculations. In the preliminary assays, compounds 1, 6 and 7 showed antiviral activity against influenza virus A/Hanfang/359/95 (H3N2) with IC50 values of 14.6-33.3 μM. Compound 1 also exhibited inhibitory effect against nitric oxide (NO) production in microglial cell BV2 with an inhibition ratio of 93.0% at 10 μM. PMID:26651370

  14. Response of patients with indolent systemic mastocytosis to tamoxifen citrate.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Joseph H; Chen, Dong

    2016-01-01

    We examined whether tamoxifen citrate at 20mg/day for 1 year had a beneficial effect on laboratory findings, bone marrow mastocytosis, common clinical symptoms, or quality-of-life assessment for 5 women and 2 men with indolent systemic mastocytosis. Tamoxifen was well tolerated. We found significant reductions in the platelet count, serum alkaline phosphatase, and 24-h urinary excretion of N-methylhistamine and significant increases in serum lactate dehydrogenase and (excluding 2 patients taking aspirin) in 24-h urinary excretion of 11β-prostaglandin F2α. Overall, no change occurred in percent involvement of bone marrow by mastocytosis. Symptom scores were mild and did not change during the treatment. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey scores for quality of life physical and mental components showed no marked changes. Tamoxifen, an older, nonhematotoxic medication, has limited activity in systemic mastocytosis at the dosage used in this study. PMID:26612479

  15. Effects of indole on drug resistance and virulence of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium revealed by genome-wide analyses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria produce large quantities of indole as an intercellular signal in microbial communities. Indole demonstrated to affect gene expression in Escherichia coli as an intra-species signaling molecule. In contrast to E. coli, Salmonella does not produce indole because it does not harbor tnaA, which encodes the enzyme responsible for tryptophan metabolism. Our previous study demonstrated that E. coli-conditioned medium and indole induce expression of the AcrAB multidrug efflux pump in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium for inter-species communication; however, the global effect of indole on genes in Salmonella remains unknown. Results To understand the complete picture of genes regulated by indole, we performed DNA microarray analysis of genes in the S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain ATCC 14028s affected by indole. Predicted Salmonella phenotypes affected by indole based on the microarray data were also examined in this study. Indole induced expression of genes related to efflux-mediated multidrug resistance, including ramA and acrAB, and repressed those related to host cell invasion encoded in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1, and flagella production. Reduction of invasive activity and motility of Salmonella by indole was also observed phenotypically. Conclusion Our results suggest that indole is an important signaling molecule for inter-species communication to control drug resistance and virulence of S. enterica. PMID:22632036

  16. Rodent reservoirs of future zoonotic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Han, Barbara A.; Schmidt, John Paul; Bowden, Sarah E.; Drake, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing frequency of zoonotic disease events underscores a need to develop forecasting tools toward a more preemptive approach to outbreak investigation. We apply machine learning to data describing the traits and zoonotic pathogen diversity of the most speciose group of mammals, the rodents, which also comprise a disproportionate number of zoonotic disease reservoirs. Our models predict reservoir status in this group with over 90% accuracy, identifying species with high probabilities of harboring undiscovered zoonotic pathogens based on trait profiles that may serve as rules of thumb to distinguish reservoirs from nonreservoir species. Key predictors of zoonotic reservoirs include biogeographical properties, such as range size, as well as intrinsic host traits associated with lifetime reproductive output. Predicted hotspots of novel rodent reservoir diversity occur in the Middle East and Central Asia and the Midwestern United States. PMID:26038558

  17. Genetic detection of hantaviruses in rodents, Albania.

    PubMed

    Papa, Anna; Rogozi, Elton; Velo, Enkelejda; Papadimitriou, Evangelia; Bino, Silvia

    2016-08-01

    In order to have a first insight into the epidemiology of hantaviruses in Albania, 263 small mammals (248 rodents, 15 insectivores) were captured in 352 locations in 29 districts and tested for hantavirus infection. Dobrava-Belgrade virus (DOBV) was detected in 10 of 148 (6.7%) Apodemus flavicollis rodents. DOBV-positive A. flavicollis were detected in six districts (Diber, Korce, Kolonje, Librazhd, Pogradec, and Vlore). The obtained nucleotide sequences were highly similar to each other and to DOBV sequences from northwestern Greece. Understanding the epidemiology of hantaviruses and identifying the endemic foci enables the public health strategies to minimize the risk of human infection. J. Med. Virol. 88:1309-1313, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27249068

  18. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  19. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general. PMID:26548564

  20. Indolent infection in nonunion of the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Wan; Byun, Seong-Eun; Oh, Hyoung Keun; Kim, Jung Jae

    2015-04-01

    In the treatment of nonunions of the distal femur, infection should be excluded. However, it is difficult to determine whether the nonunion is infected or not with negative history and signs of infection. The purpose of this study was to investigate indolent infection as a cause of presumptive aseptic distal femur nonunion. All presumptive aseptic distal femur nonunions treated from 1998 to 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Any patient with suspected of having an infection clinically was excluded. Multiple tissue cultures were performed at the nonunion site. The main outcomes were to analyze the rate of positive cultures in presumptive aseptic distal femur nonunion and to compare the rate of secondary surgery in positive and negative culture groups. Of the 22 patients, 3 (13.6%) had positive culture results. The organisms cultured were Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Enterobacter cloacae. The overall rate of infection was 9.1% (2/22), and one patient underwent a secondary procedure. In the open fracture group, 2 of 10 patients (20%) had positive cultures; all developed infection. In the closed fracture group, 1 of 12 patients (8.3%) had positive culture results, but Infection did not occur in the patient with a 3-week intravenous antibiotic treatment. The postoperative infection rate was 67% (2/3) in patients with positive intraoperative cultures, while 0% (0/18) in the group with negative intraoperative cultures (p<0.001). The presence of indolent infection can be verified in patients with presumptive aseptic nonunion of distal femoral fractures by obtaining intraoperative biopsy tissue cultures. Positive intraoperative culture results were related with postoperative infection. PMID:25189289

  1. Volumes of cochlear nucleus regions in rodents.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, Donald A; Lee, Augustine C; Hamilton, Walter D; Benjamin, Louis C; Vishwanath, Shilpa; Simo, Hermann; Godfrey, Lynn M; Mustapha, Abdurrahman I A A; Heffner, Rickye S

    2016-09-01

    The cochlear nucleus receives all the coded information about sound from the cochlea and is the source of auditory information for the rest of the central auditory system. As such, it is a critical auditory nucleus. The sizes of the cochlear nucleus as a whole and its three major subdivisions - anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN), posteroventral cochlear nucleus (PVCN), and dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) - have been measured in a large number of mammals, but measurements of its subregions at a more detailed level for a variety of species have not previously been made. Size measurements are reported here for the summed granular regions, DCN layers, AVCN, PVCN, and interstitial nucleus in 15 different rodent species, as well as a lagomorph, carnivore, and small primate. This further refinement of measurements is important because the granular regions and superficial layers of the DCN appear to have some different functions than the other cochlear nucleus regions. Except for DCN layers in the mountain beaver, all regions were clearly identifiable in all the animals studied. Relative regional size differences among most of the rodents, and even the 3 non-rodents, were not large and did not show a consistent relation to their wide range of lifestyles and hearing parameters. However, the mountain beaver, and to a lesser extent the pocket gopher, two rodents that live in tunnel systems, had relative sizes of summed granular regions and DCN molecular layer distinctly larger than those of the other mammals. Among all the mammals studied, there was a high correlation between the size per body weight of summed granular regions and that of the DCN molecular layer, consistent with other evidence for a close relationship between granule cells and superficial DCN neurons. PMID:27435005

  2. Evidence for Novel Hepaciviruses in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Jan Felix; Corman, Victor Max; Müller, Marcel Alexander; Lukashev, Alexander N.; Gmyl, Anatoly; Coutard, Bruno; Adam, Alexander; Ritz, Daniel; Leijten, Lonneke M.; van Riel, Debby; Kallies, Rene; Klose, Stefan M.; Gloza-Rausch, Florian; Binger, Tabea; Annan, Augustina; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Oppong, Samuel; Bourgarel, Mathieu; Rupp, Daniel; Hoffmann, Bernd; Schlegel, Mathias; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Krüger, Detlev H.; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Setién, Alvaro Aguilar; Cottontail, Veronika M.; Hemachudha, Thiravat; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Osterrieder, Klaus; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Matthee, Sonja; Beer, Martin; Kuiken, Thijs; Reusken, Chantal; Leroy, Eric M.; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Drosten, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is among the most relevant causes of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Research is complicated by a lack of accessible small animal models. The systematic investigation of viruses of small mammals could guide efforts to establish such models, while providing insight into viral evolutionary biology. We have assembled the so-far largest collection of small-mammal samples from around the world, qualified to be screened for bloodborne viruses, including sera and organs from 4,770 rodents (41 species); and sera from 2,939 bats (51 species). Three highly divergent rodent hepacivirus clades were detected in 27 (1.8%) of 1,465 European bank voles (Myodes glareolus) and 10 (1.9%) of 518 South African four-striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio). Bats showed anti-HCV immunoblot reactivities but no virus detection, although the genetic relatedness suggested by the serologic results should have enabled RNA detection using the broadly reactive PCR assays developed for this study. 210 horses and 858 cats and dogs were tested, yielding further horse-associated hepaciviruses but none in dogs or cats. The rodent viruses were equidistant to HCV, exceeding by far the diversity of HCV and the canine/equine hepaciviruses taken together. Five full genomes were sequenced, representing all viral lineages. Salient genome features and distance criteria supported classification of all viruses as hepaciviruses. Quantitative RT-PCR, RNA in-situ hybridisation, and histopathology suggested hepatic tropism with liver inflammation resembling hepatitis C. Recombinant serology for two distinct hepacivirus lineages in 97 bank voles identified seroprevalence rates of 8.3 and 12.4%, respectively. Antibodies in bank vole sera neither cross-reacted with HCV, nor the heterologous bank vole hepacivirus. Co-occurrence of RNA and antibodies was found in 3 of 57 PCR-positive bank vole sera (5.3%). Our data enable new hypotheses regarding HCV evolution and encourage efforts to

  3. Amphipathic solvation of indole: implications for the role of tryptophan in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew J; Zhang, Yapei Rosie; Busch, Sebastian; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Imberti, Silvia; McLain, Sylvia E

    2015-05-14

    The microscopic structure of the tryptophan side chain, indole, in an amphiphilic environment has been investigated using a combination of neutron diffraction measurements and simulations in solution. The results show that indole is preferentially solvated by hydrogen bonding interactions between water and alcohol -OH groups rather than the interaction being dominated by indole-methyl interactions. This has implications for understanding how tryptophan interacts with the amphipathic membrane environment to anchor proteins into membranes, where the results here suggest that the benzene ring of tryptophan interacts directly with the interfacial water at the membrane surface rather than being buried into the hydrophobic regions of the membrane bilayer. PMID:25893741

  4. Mechanistic Considerations in the Synthesis of 2-Aryl-Indole Analogues under Bischler-Mohlau Conditions

    PubMed Central

    MacDonough, Matthew T.; Shi, Zhe; Pinney, Kevin G.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic insight into the pathway of the Bischler-Mohlau indole formation reaction is provided by isotopic labeling utilizing judicious incorporation of a 13C atom within the α-bromoacetophenone analogue reactant. The resulting rearranged 2-aryl indole, isolated as the major product, located the 13C isotope label at the methine carbon of the fused five-membered heterocyclic ring, which suggested that the mechanistic pathway of cyclization, in this specific example, required two equivalents of the aniline analogue reactant partner and proceeded through an imine intermediate rather than by direct formation of the corresponding 3-aryl indole accompanied by a concomitant 1,2-aryl shift rearrangement. PMID:26973358

  5. Enantioselective cyclopropanation of indoles: construction of all-carbon quaternary stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Özüduru, Gülsüm; Schubach, Thea; Boysen, Mike M K

    2012-10-01

    The first enantioselective copper-catalyzed cyclopropanation of N-acyl indoles is described. Using carbohydrate-based bis(oxazoline) ligands (glucoBox), the products were obtained in up to 72% ee. Cyclopropanation of N-Boc 3-methyl indole yielded a product with an all-carbon quaternary stereocenter, which is a valuable building block for the synthesis of indole alkaloids: Deprotection and rearrangement gave a tricyclic hemiaminal ester in 96% ee, which was subsequently employed as a key intermediate for the synthesis of (-)-desoxyeseroline. PMID:23009104

  6. Rodent models for compulsive alcohol intake

    PubMed Central

    Hopf, F. Woodward; Lesscher, Heidi M.B.

    2014-01-01

    Continued seeking and drinking of alcohol despite adverse legal, health, economic, and societal consequences is a central hallmark of human alcohol use disorders. This compulsive drive for alcohol, defined by resistance to adverse and deleterious consequences, represents a major challenge when attempting to treat alcoholism clinically. Thus, there has long been interest in developing pre-clinical rodent models for the compulsive drug use that characterizes drug addiction. Here, we review recent studies that have attempted to model compulsive aspects of alcohol and cocaine intake in rodents, and consider technical and conceptual issues that need to be addressed when trying to recapitulate compulsive aspects of human addiction. Aversion-resistant alcohol intake has been examined by pairing intake or seeking with the bitter tastant quinine or with footshock, and exciting recent work has used these models to identify neuroadaptations in the amygdala, cortex, and striatal regions that promote compulsive intake. Thus, rodent models do seem to reflect important aspects of compulsive drives that sustain human addiction, and will likely provide critical insights into the molecular and circuit underpinnings of aversion-resistant intake as well as novel therapeutic interventions for compulsive aspects of addiction. PMID:24731992

  7. Rodent models for compulsive alcohol intake.

    PubMed

    Hopf, F Woodward; Lesscher, Heidi M B

    2014-05-01

    Continued seeking and drinking of alcohol despite adverse legal, health, economic, and societal consequences is a central hallmark of human alcohol use disorders. This compulsive drive for alcohol, defined by resistance to adverse and deleterious consequences, represents a major challenge when attempting to treat alcoholism clinically. Thus, there has long been interest in developing pre-clinical rodent models for the compulsive drug use that characterizes drug addiction. Here, we review recent studies that have attempted to model compulsive aspects of alcohol and cocaine intake in rodents, and consider technical and conceptual issues that need to be addressed when trying to recapitulate compulsive aspects of human addiction. Aversion-resistant alcohol intake has been examined by pairing intake or seeking with the bitter tastant quinine or with footshock, and exciting recent work has used these models to identify neuroadaptations in the amygdala, cortex, and striatal regions that promote compulsive intake. Thus, rodent models do seem to reflect important aspects of compulsive drives that sustain human addiction, and will likely provide critical insights into the molecular and circuit underpinnings of aversion-resistant intake as well as novel therapeutic interventions for compulsive aspects of addiction. PMID:24731992

  8. Geometric Morphometrics of Rodent Sperm Head Shape

    PubMed Central

    Varea Sánchez, María; Bastir, Markus; Roldan, Eduardo R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa, particularly those of rodent species, are extremely complex cells and differ greatly in form and dimensions. Thus, characterization of sperm size and, particularly, sperm shape represents a major challenge. No consensus exists on a method to objectively assess size and shape of spermatozoa. In this study we apply the principles of geometric morphometrics to analyze rodent sperm head morphology and compare them with two traditional morphometry methods, that is, measurements of linear dimensions and dimensions-derived parameters calculated using formulae employed in sperm morphometry assessments. Our results show that geometric morphometrics clearly identifies shape differences among rodent spermatozoa. It is also capable of discriminating between size and shape and to analyze these two variables separately. Thus, it provides an accurate method to assess sperm head shape. Furthermore, it can identify which sperm morphology traits differ between species, such as the protrusion or retraction of the base of the head, the orientation and relative position of the site of flagellum insertion, the degree of curvature of the hook, and other distinct anatomical features and appendices. We envisage that the use of geometric morphometrics may have a major impact on future studies focused on the characterization of sperm head formation, diversity of sperm head shape among species (and underlying evolutionary forces), the effects of reprotoxicants on changes in cell shape, and phenotyping of genetically-modified individuals. PMID:24312234

  9. Biological activity of a small molecule indole analog, 1-[(1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]-2-phenylhydrazine (HMPH), in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Misra, Chandra Sekhar; Gejjalagere Honnappa, Chethan; Jitta, Srinivas Reddy; Gourishetti, Karthik; Daram, Prasanthi; Singh, Mahendra Pal; Hosur Shrungeswara, Akhila; Nayak, Yogendra; Unnikrishnan, Mazhuvancherry Kesavan

    2016-01-25

    A synthetic small molecule, 1-[(1H-indol-3-yl)methylene]-2-phenylhydrazine (HMPH) was conveniently synthesised by a one-step reaction, purified and characterised by chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. HMPH scavenged free radicals and inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ROS generation and NO release in RAW-264.7 cells without signs of any detectable cytotoxicity. HMPH inhibited lipid peroxidation (LPO) with IC50 of 135 ± 9 as against 58 ± 8 μM for α-tocopherol. Further, HMPH (>50 μM) significantly reduced the LPS-induced TNF-α release in mouse peritoneal macrophages and in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). HMPH did not show any visible signs of toxicity in rats up to 400 mg/kg/intraperitoneal and 2000 mg/kg/oral. HMPH at 25 and 50 mg/kg attenuated neutrophil infiltration in air-pouch lavage and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in rat models. HMPH also reduced myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitrite and TNF-α in air-pouch lavage in addition to MPO in plasma. HMPH reduced acute paw-inflammation in carrageenan-induced paw-edema. HMPH consistently decreased both ipsilateral and contralateral paw inflammation, minimised the clinical scores of arthritis, prevented body weight (B.wt.) loss, attenuated serum C-reactive protein (C-RP) and rheumatoid factors (RF) in rat model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. Histopathology and radio-graphical reports show that HMPH reduced bone erosion in both ipsilateral and contralateral paw joints. Failure to inhibit COX suggests that effectiveness of HMPH in both acute and chronic inflammation is mediated by a multimodal mechanism involving modulation of immunity, attenuating TNF-α, protecting bone attrition and reducing oxidative stress. PMID:26549477

  10. The discovery of indole derivatives as novel hepatitis C virus inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhiqiang; Liang, Xiao; Wang, Yaxin; Qing, Jie; Cao, Lin; Shang, Luqing; Yin, Zheng

    2016-06-30

    In this study, a library of in-house small molecule was screened using a HCV cell-based assay and a compound (1) containing an N-protected indole scaffold (NINS) was identified as a novel anti-HCV inhibitor. Through structure activity relationship (SAR) study, it was observed that the racemic inhibitor (10m) displayed good anti-HCV activity (EC50 = 1.02 ± 0.10 μM) with the excellent selectivity index (SI = 45.56). Interestingly, R-enantiomer ((R)-10m) showed better anti-HCV activity and lower cytotoxicity than S-enantiomer ((S)-10m). (R)-10m gave the best anti-HCV potency (EC50 = 0.72 ± 0.09 μM) with the highest selectivity index (SI > 69.44). In addition, the mechanism of action study of NINS derivatives demonstrated that NINS derivatives interfere with the early step (viral entry) of the HCV life cycle. PMID:27061978

  11. Novel indole-3-sulfonamides as potent HIV non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Zhijian; Wolkenberg, Scott E.; Lu, Meiqing; Munshi, Vandna; Moyer, Gregory; Feng, Meizhen; Carella, Anthony V.; Ecto, Linda T.; Gabryelski, Lori J.; Lai, Ming-Tain; Prasad, Sridar G.; Yan, Youwei; McGaughey, Georgia B.; Miller, Michael D.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Hartman, George D.; Vacca, Joseph P.; Williams, Theresa M.

    2008-09-29

    This Letter describes the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of novel 3-indole sulfonamides as potent non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with balanced profiles against common HIV RT mutants K103N and Y181C.

  12. Pd-Catalyzed C-H Bond Functionalization on the Indole and Pyrrole Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Elizabeth M.; Gaunt, Matthew J.

    This review details recent developments in the Pd-catalyzed C-H bond arylation and alkenylation of indoles and pyrroles, aromatic heterocycles that are frequently displayed in natural products and medicinal agents.

  13. The laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectra of some indole derivatives and alkaloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kevin; Milnes, John; Gormally, John

    1992-06-01

    The laser desorption and laser ionization mass spectra of some indole derivatives and alkaloids are described with particular reference to their modes of fragmentation. Mass spectra of yohimbine, reserpine, quinine and quinidine are presented. Full experimental details are given.

  14. Synthesis of indoles and tryptophan derivatives via photoinduced nitrene C-H insertion.

    PubMed

    Junk, Lukas; Kazmaier, Uli

    2016-03-14

    Functionalized indoles and tryptophans can be obtained from stannylated alkenes and o-iodoanilines via Stille coupling. Subsequent azidation and photochemical nitrene generation results in the formation of the heterocyclic ring systems via C-H insertion. PMID:26869211

  15. Matched and mixed cap derivatives in the tetracyclic indole class of HCV NS5A inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Michael P; Keertikar, Kerry M; Chen, Lei; Tong, Ling; Selyutin, Oleg; Nair, Anilkumar G; Yu, Wensheng; Zhou, Guowei; Lavey, Brian J; Yang, De-Yi; Wong, Michael; Kim, Seong Heon; Coburn, Craig A; Rosenblum, Stuart B; Zeng, Qingbei; Jiang, Yueheng; Shankar, Bandarpalle B; Rizvi, Razia; Nomeir, Amin A; Liu, Rong; Agrawal, Sony; Xia, Ellen; Kong, Rong; Zhai, Ying; Ingravallo, Paul; Asante-Appiah, Ernest; Kozlowski, Joseph A

    2016-08-15

    A matched and mixed capping SAR study was conducted on the tetracyclic indole class of HCV NS5A inhibitors to examine the influence of modifications of this region on the overall HCV virologic resistance profiles. PMID:27423481

  16. An in vitro system from maize seedlings for tryptophan-independent indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Oestin, A.; Ilic, N.; Cohen, J.D.

    1999-01-01

    The enzymatic synthesis of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) from indole by an in vitro preparation from maize (Zea mays L.) that does not use tryptophan (Trp) as an intermediate is described. Light-grown seedlings of normal maize and the maize mutant orange pericarp were shown to contain the necessary enzymes to convert [{sup 14}C]indole to IAA. The reaction was not inhibited by unlabeled Trp and neither [{sup 14}C]Trp nor [{sup 14}C]serine substituted for [{sup 14}C]indole in this in vitro system. The reaction had a pH optimum greater than 8.0, required a reducing environment, and had an oxidation potential near that of ascorbate. The results obtained with this in vitro enzyme preparation provide strong, additional evidence for the presence of a Trp-independent IAA biosynthesis pathway in plants.

  17. Purification and Characterization of a New Indole Oxygenase from the Leaves of Tecoma stans L

    PubMed Central

    Kunapuli, Satya P.; Vaidyanathan, Chelarkara S.

    1983-01-01

    A new indole oxygenase from the leaves of Tecoma stans was isolated and purified to homogenity. The purified enzyme system catalyzes the conversion of indole to anthranilic acid. It is optimally active at pH 5.2 and 30°C. Two moles of oxygen are consumed and one mole of anthranilic acid is formed for every mole of indole oxidized. Dialysis resulted in complete loss of the activity. The inactive enzyme could be reactivated by the addition of concentrated dialysate. The enzyme is not inhibited by copper-specific chelators, non-heme iron chelators or atebrin. It is not a cuproflavoprotein, unlike the other indole oxygenases and oxidases. PMID:16662784

  18. Ethylene-enhanced catabolism of ( sup 14 C)indole-3-acetic acid to indole-3-carboxylic acid in citrus leaf tissues. [Citrus sinensis

    SciTech Connect

    Sagee, O.; Riov, J.; Goren, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Exogenous ({sup 14}C)indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is conjugated in citrus (Citrus sinensis) leaf tissues to one major substance which has been identified as indole-3-acetylaspartic acid (IAAsp). Ethylene pretreatment enhanced the catabolism of ({sup 14}C)IAA to indole-3-carboxylic acid (ICA), which accumulated as glucose esters (ICGlu). Increased formation of ICGlu by ethylene was accompanied by a concomitant decrease in IAAsp formation. IAAsp and ICGlu were identified by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Formation of ICGlu was dependent on the concentration of ethylene and the duration of the ethylene pretreatment. It is suggested that the catabolism of IAA to ICA may be one of the mechanisms by which ethylene endogenous IAA levels.

  19. Objective cerebrospinal fluid response to intraventricular rituximab in indolent CNS lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Strowd, Roy E; Abuali, Inas A; Grossman, Stuart A

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Indolent CNS lymphomas (CNSLs) are rare and no guidelines exist for management. Recent literature highlights the potential for safe and tolerable intrathecal (IT) delivery of rituximab, a large anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, for aggressive CNSL. We report a patient with relapsed indolent CNSL who failed systemic rituximab and could not tolerate IT chemotherapies, but had an objective response of 6 months duration to IT rituximab. PMID:25905905

  20. Biomimetic Synthesis of Moschamine-Related Indole Alkaloids via Iron-Catalyzed Selectively Oxidative Radical Coupling.

    PubMed

    Liang, Kangjiang; Yang, Jing; Tong, Xiaogang; Shang, Wenbin; Pan, Zhiqiang; Xia, Chengfeng

    2016-03-18

    An iron-catalyzed oxidative radical coupling reaction was developed to selectively construct indolofuran or bisphenolic indole cores, which exist in two types of moschamine-related indole alkaloids. Both (+)-decursivine and 4,4″-bis(N-feruloyl)serotonin were biomimetically synthesized by using coupling reactions. The proposed reassignment of the structure of montamine as 4,4″-bis(N-feruloyl)serotonin was excluded. PMID:26949004

  1. Copper-Catalyzed Oxidative C-H Amination of Tetrahydrofuran with Indole/Carbazole Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingjing; Choy, Pui Ying; Fu, Wai Chung; Fan, Baomin; Kwong, Fuk Yee

    2015-11-01

    A simple α-C-H amination of cyclic ether with indole/carbazole derivatives has been accomplished by employing copper(II) chloride/bipy as the catalyst system. In the presence of the di-tert-butyl peroxide oxidant, cyclic ethers such as tetrahydrofuran, 1,4-dioxane, and tetrahydropyran successfully undergo C-H/N-H cross dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) with various carbazole or indole derivatives in good-to-excellent yields. PMID:26485515

  2. Asymmetric synthesis of cyclic indole aminals via 1,3-stereoinduction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei; Chen, Cheng-yi; Nguyen, Hoa; Cohen, Ryan; Maligres, Peter E; Yasuda, Nobuyoshi; Mangion, Ian; Zavialov, Ilia; Reibarkh, Mikhail; Chung, John Y L

    2014-09-19

    A general and efficient asymmetric synthesis of cyclic indoline aminals was developed with a high level of 1,3-stereoinduction through a dynamic crystallization-driven condensation. Dehydrogenation of the indoline aminals with potassium permanganate produced the corresponding cyclic indole aminals in high yields and excellent enantioselectivities. This general methodology was successfully applied to the synthesis of a wide variety of chiral cyclic indoline aminals and indole aminals with aromatic and aliphatic functional groups. PMID:25162915

  3. Electric Dipole Transition Moments and Solvent-Dependent Interactions of Fluorescent Boron-Nitrogen Substituted Indole Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Saif, Mari; Widom, Julia R; Xu, Senmiao; Abbey, Eric R; Liu, Shih-Yuan; Marcus, Andrew H

    2015-06-25

    Fluorescent analogues of the indole side chain of tryptophan can be useful spectroscopic probes of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Here we present linear dichroism and solvent-dependent spectroscopic studies of two fluorescent analogues of indole, in which the organic C═C unit is substituted with the isosteric inorganic B-N unit. We studied the so-called "external" BN indole, which has C2v symmetry, and the "fused" BN indole with Cs symmetry. We performed a combination of absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet linear dichroism (UV-LD) in stretched poly(ethylene) (PE) films, and quantum chemical calculations on both BN indole compounds. Our measurements allowed us to characterize the degree of alignment for both molecules in stretched PE films. We thus determined the orientations and magnitudes of the two lowest energy electric dipole transition moments (EDTMs) for external BN indole, and the two lowest energy EDTMs for fused BN indole within the 30 000-45 000 cm(-1) spectral range. We compared our experimental results to those of quantum chemical calculations using standard density functional theory (DFT). Our theoretical predictions for the low-energy EDTMs are in good agreement with our experimental data. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of the external and the fused BN indoles are sensitive to solvent polarity. Our results indicate that the fused BN indole experiences much greater solvation interactions with polar solvents than does the external BN indole. PMID:26000556

  4. Rodents and Risk in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam: Seroprevalence of Selected Zoonotic Viruses in Rodents and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Van Cuong, Nguyen; Carrique-Mas, Juan; Vo Be, Hien; An, Nguyen Ngoc; Tue, Ngo Tri; Anh, Nguyet Lam; Anh, Pham Hong; Phuc, Nguyen The; Baker, Stephen; Voutilainen, Liina; Jääskeläinen, Anne; Huhtamo, Eili; Utriainen, Mira; Sironen, Tarja; Vaheri, Antti; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Chaval, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In the Mekong Delta in southern Vietnam, rats are commonly traded in wet markets and sold live for food consumption. We investigated seroprevalence to selected groups of rodent-borne viruses among human populations with high levels of animal exposure and among co-located rodent populations. The indirect fluorescence antibody test (IFAT) was used to determine seropositivity to representative reference strains of hantaviruses (Dobrava virus [DOBV], Seoul virus [SEOV]), cowpox virus, arenaviruses (lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV]), flaviviruses (tick-borne encephalitis virus [TBEV]), and rodent parechoviruses (Ljungan virus), using sera from 245 humans living in Dong Thap Province and 275 rodents representing the five common rodent species sold in wet markets and present in peridomestic and farm settings. Combined seropositivity to DOBV and SEOV among the rodents and humans was 6.9% (19/275) and 3.7% (9/245), respectively; 1.1% (3/275) and 4.5% (11/245) to cowpox virus; 5.4% (15/275) and 47.3% (116/245) for TBEV; and exposure to Ljungan virus was 18.8% (46/245) in humans, but 0% in rodents. Very little seroreactivity was observed to LCMV in either rodents (1/275, 0.4%) or humans (2/245, 0.8%). Molecular screening of rodent liver tissues using consensus primers for flaviviruses did not yield any amplicons, whereas molecular screening of rodent lung tissues for hantavirus yielded one hantavirus sequence (SEOV). In summary, these results indicate low to moderate levels of endemic hantavirus circulation, possible circulation of a flavivirus in rodent reservoirs, and the first available data on human exposures to parechoviruses in Vietnam. Although the current evidence suggests only limited exposure of humans to known rodent-borne diseases, further research is warranted to assess public health implications of the rodent trade. PMID:25629782

  5. Comparative dosimetry for children and rodents exposed to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yijian; Capstick, Myles; Dasenbrock, Clemens; Fedrowitz, Maren; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sánchez-García, Isidro; Kuster, Niels

    2016-07-01

    We describe a method to correlate E-fields induced by exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields in laboratory mice and rats during in vivo experiments to those induced in children. Four different approaches of mapping relative dose rates between humans and rodents are herein proposed and analyzed. Based on these mapping methods and volume averaging guidelines published by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNRP) in 2010, maximum and median induced field values for whole body and for tissues of children and rodents were evaluated and compared. Median induced electric fields in children younger than 10 years old are in the range 5.9-8.5 V/m per T (±0.4 dB). Maximum induced electric fields, generally in the skin, are between 48 V/m and 228 V/m per T (±4 dB). To achieve induced electric fields of comparable magnitude in rodents, external magnetic field must be increased by a factor of 4.0 (±2.6 dB) for rats and 7.4 (±1.8 dB) for mice. Meanwhile, to achieve comparable magnetic field dose in rodents, ratio is close to one. These induced field dose rates for children and rodents can be used to quantifiably compare experimental data from in vivo studies with data on exposure of children from epidemiological studies, such as for leukemia. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:310-322, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27176719

  6. Detection of Lyme Disease and Q Fever Agents in Wild Rodents in Central Italy

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Marco; Dall'Acqua, Francesca; Sozio, Giulia; Cammà, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The maintenance of tick-borne disease agents in the environment strictly depends on the relationship between tick vectors and their hosts, which act as reservoirs for these pathogens. A pilot study aimed to investigate wild rodents as reservoirs for zoonotic tick-borne pathogens (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum) was carried out in an area of Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga National Park (Abruzzi Region, central Italy), a wide protected area where, despite sporadic reports of infection in humans and animals, eco-epidemiological data on these diseases are still not available. Rodents were trapped and released at the capture site after the collection of feeding ticks and blood samples. In all, 172 ticks were collected; the most frequent species was Ixodes acuminatus (53%). Out of 88 tick pools, 11 resulted positive for C. burnetii and 13 for B. burgdorferi s.l.; the Borrelia afzelii genospecies was identified in one Ixodes ricinus tick collected from one Apodemus sp. rodent. Out of 143 blood samples, seven Apodemus spp. and five Myodes glareolus were positive for B. burgdorferi s.l. and two Apodemus spp. were positive for C. burnetii. All samples (ticks and blood) were negative for F. tularensis and A. phagocytophilum. This is the first report of B. burgdorferi s.l. in the environment for Abruzzi Region. Data on the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. are similar to that observed in other Mediterranean countries. The present work is also the first report of C. burnetii in wild rodents in Italy. C. burnetii infection has been largely investigated in Italy in ruminant farms by serology and molecular methods, but information on ecology and on the wild cycle are still lacking. Further studies including genotyping should be performed and species-specific differences between wild rodent reservoirs of Q fever and Lyme disease agents should be investigated. PMID:26134933

  7. Detection of Lyme Disease and Q Fever Agents in Wild Rodents in Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Pascucci, Ilaria; Di Domenico, Marco; Dall'Acqua, Francesca; Sozio, Giulia; Cammà, Cesare

    2015-07-01

    The maintenance of tick-borne disease agents in the environment strictly depends on the relationship between tick vectors and their hosts, which act as reservoirs for these pathogens. A pilot study aimed to investigate wild rodents as reservoirs for zoonotic tick-borne pathogens (Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.), Coxiella burnetii, Francisella tularensis, and Anaplasma phagocytophilum) was carried out in an area of Gran Sasso e Monti della Laga National Park (Abruzzi Region, central Italy), a wide protected area where, despite sporadic reports of infection in humans and animals, eco-epidemiological data on these diseases are still not available. Rodents were trapped and released at the capture site after the collection of feeding ticks and blood samples. In all, 172 ticks were collected; the most frequent species was Ixodes acuminatus (53%). Out of 88 tick pools, 11 resulted positive for C. burnetii and 13 for B. burgdorferi s.l.; the Borrelia afzelii genospecies was identified in one Ixodes ricinus tick collected from one Apodemus sp. rodent. Out of 143 blood samples, seven Apodemus spp. and five Myodes glareolus were positive for B. burgdorferi s.l. and two Apodemus spp. were positive for C. burnetii. All samples (ticks and blood) were negative for F. tularensis and A. phagocytophilum. This is the first report of B. burgdorferi s.l. in the environment for Abruzzi Region. Data on the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. are similar to that observed in other Mediterranean countries. The present work is also the first report of C. burnetii in wild rodents in Italy. C. burnetii infection has been largely investigated in Italy in ruminant farms by serology and molecular methods, but information on ecology and on the wild cycle are still lacking. Further studies including genotyping should be performed and species-specific differences between wild rodent reservoirs of Q fever and Lyme disease agents should be investigated. PMID:26134933

  8. Leptospira and Rodents in Cambodia: Environmental Determinants of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Svilena; Herbreteau, Vincent; Blasdell, Kim; Chaval, Yannick; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; Morand, Serge

    2012-01-01

    We investigated infection of rodents and shrews by Leptospira spp. in two localities of Cambodia (Veal Renh, Kaev Seima) and in four types of habitat (forests, non-flooded lands, lowland rain-fed paddy fields, houses) during the wet and the dry seasons. Habitat preference was common, and rodent and shrew species were found only in houses or in rain-fed paddy fields or in forests. Among 649 small mammals trapped belonging to 12 rodent species and 1 shrew species, 71 of 642 animals tested were carriers of Leptospira according to the 16S ribosomal RNA marker used. Rodent infection was higher in low-slope locations, corresponding to rain-fed paddy fields, especially in the rainy season and in Kaev Seima. Rodents (Rattus exulans) and shrews (Suncus murinus) inhabiting households showed significantly low levels of infections, whereas rodents living in and near to forests (shrubby wasteland, orchards) showed high levels of infection. PMID:22665613

  9. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Achiral Indole-Substituted Titanocene Dichloride Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Deally, Anthony; Hackenberg, Frauke; Lally, Grainne; Tacke, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Six new titanocene compounds have been isolated and characterised. These compounds were synthesised from their fulvene precursors using Super Hydride (LiBEt3H) followed by transmetallation with titanium tetrachloride to yield the corresponding titanocene dichloride derivatives. These complexes are bis-[((1-methyl-3-diethylaminomethyl)indol-2-yl)methylcyclopentadienyl] titanium (IV) dichloride (5a), bis-[((5-methoxy-1-methyl,3-diethylaminomethyl)indol-2-yl)methylcyclopentadienyl] titanium (IV) dichloride (5b), bis-[((1-methyl,3-diethylaminomethyl)indol-4-yl)methylcyclopentadienyl] titanium (IV) dichloride (5c), bis-[((5-bromo-1-methyl)indol-3-yl)methylcyclopentadienyl] titanium (IV) dichloride (5d), bis-[((5-chloro-1-methyl)indol-3-yl)methylcyclopentadienyl] titanium (IV) dichloride (5e), and bis-[((5-fluoro-1-methyl)indol-3-yl)methylcyclopentadienyl] titanium (IV) dichloride (5f). All six titanocenes 5a–5f were tested for their cytotoxicity through MTT-based in vitro tests on CAKI-1 cell lines using DMSO and Soluphor P as solubilising agents in order to determine their IC50 values. Titanocenes 5a–5f were found to have IC50 values of 10 (±2), 21 (±3), 29 (±4), 140 (±6), and 450 (±10) μM when tested using DMSO. PMID:25954531

  10. Bacterial Metabolite Indole Modulates Incretin Secretion from Intestinal Enteroendocrine L Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chimerel, Catalin; Emery, Edward; Summers, David K.; Keyser, Ulrich; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Summary It has long been speculated that metabolites, produced by gut microbiota, influence host metabolism in health and diseases. Here, we reveal that indole, a metabolite produced from the dissimilation of tryptophan, is able to modulate the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from immortalized and primary mouse colonic L cells. Indole increased GLP-1 release during short exposures, but it reduced secretion over longer periods. These effects were attributed to the ability of indole to affect two key molecular mechanisms in L cells. On the one hand, indole inhibited voltage-gated K+ channels, increased the temporal width of action potentials fired by L cells, and led to enhanced Ca2+ entry, thereby acutely stimulating GLP-1 secretion. On the other hand, indole slowed ATP production by blocking NADH dehydrogenase, thus leading to a prolonged reduction of GLP-1 secretion. Our results identify indole as a signaling molecule by which gut microbiota communicate with L cells and influence host metabolism. PMID:25456122

  11. Interactions of Indole Derivatives with β-Cyclodextrin: A Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship Study

    PubMed Central

    Šoškić, Milan; Porobić, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Retention factors for 31 indole derivatives, most of them with auxin activity, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, using bonded β-cyclodextrin as a stationary phase. A three-parameter QSPR (quantitative structure-property relationship) model, based on physico-chemical and structural descriptors was derived, which accounted for about 98% variations in the retention factors. The model suggests that the indole nucleus occupies the relatively apolar cavity of β-cyclodextrin while the carboxyl group of the indole -3-carboxylic acids makes hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl groups of β-cyclodextrin. The length and flexibility of the side chain containing carboxyl group strongly affect the binding of these compounds to β-cyclodextrin. Non-acidic derivatives, unlike the indole-3-carboxylic acids, are poorly retained on the column. A reasonably well correlation was found between the retention factors of the indole-3-acetic acids and their relative binding affinities for human serum albumin, a carrier protein in the blood plasma. A less satisfactory correlation was obtained when the retention factors of the indole derivatives were compared with their affinities for auxin-binding protein 1, a plant auxin receptor. PMID:27124734

  12. Interactions of Indole Derivatives with β-Cyclodextrin: A Quantitative Structure-Property Relationship Study.

    PubMed

    Šoškić, Milan; Porobić, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Retention factors for 31 indole derivatives, most of them with auxin activity, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography, using bonded β-cyclodextrin as a stationary phase. A three-parameter QSPR (quantitative structure-property relationship) model, based on physico-chemical and structural descriptors was derived, which accounted for about 98% variations in the retention factors. The model suggests that the indole nucleus occupies the relatively apolar cavity of β-cyclodextrin while the carboxyl group of the indole -3-carboxylic acids makes hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl groups of β-cyclodextrin. The length and flexibility of the side chain containing carboxyl group strongly affect the binding of these compounds to β-cyclodextrin. Non-acidic derivatives, unlike the indole-3-carboxylic acids, are poorly retained on the column. A reasonably well correlation was found between the retention factors of the indole-3-acetic acids and their relative binding affinities for human serum albumin, a carrier protein in the blood plasma. A less satisfactory correlation was obtained when the retention factors of the indole derivatives were compared with their affinities for auxin-binding protein 1, a plant auxin receptor. PMID:27124734

  13. Differences between Human and Rodent Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Michael J.; Longacre, Melissa J.; Stoker, Scott W.; Kendrick, Mindy; Thonpho, Ansaya; Brown, Laura J.; Hasan, Noaman M.; Jitrapakdee, Sarawut; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Hanson, Matthew S.; Fernandez, Luis A.; Odorico, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Anaplerosis, the net synthesis in mitochondria of citric acid cycle intermediates, and cataplerosis, their export to the cytosol, have been shown to be important for insulin secretion in rodent beta cells. However, human islets may be different. We observed that the enzyme activity, protein level, and relative mRNA level of the key anaplerotic enzyme pyruvate carboxylase (PC) were 80–90% lower in human pancreatic islets compared with islets of rats and mice and the rat insulinoma cell line INS-1 832/13. Activity and protein of ATP citrate lyase, which uses anaplerotic products in the cytosol, were 60–75% lower in human islets than in rodent islets or the cell line. In line with the lower PC, the percentage of glucose-derived pyruvate that entered mitochondrial metabolism via carboxylation in human islets was only 20–30% that in rat islets. This suggests human islets depend less on pyruvate carboxylation than rodent models that were used to establish the role of PC in insulin secretion. Human islets possessed high levels of succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid-CoA transferase, an enzyme that forms acetoacetate in the mitochondria, and acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase, which uses acetoacetate to form acyl-CoAs in the cytosol. Glucose-stimulated human islets released insulin similarly to rat islets but formed much more acetoacetate. β-Hydroxybutyrate augmented insulin secretion in human islets. This information supports previous data that indicate beta cells can use a pathway involving succinyl-CoA:3-ketoacid-CoA transferase and acetoacetyl-CoA synthetase to synthesize and use acetoacetate and suggests human islets may use this pathway more than PC and citrate to form cytosolic acyl-CoAs. PMID:21454710

  14. Euthanasia using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Valentim, A M; Guedes, S R; Pereira, A M; Antunes, L M

    2016-08-01

    Several questions have been raised in recent years about the euthanasia of laboratory rodents. Euthanasia using inhaled agents is considered to be a suitable aesthetic method for use with a large number of animals simultaneously. Nevertheless, its aversive potential has been criticized in terms of animal welfare. The data available regarding the use of carbon dioxide (CO2), inhaled anaesthetics (such as isoflurane, sevoflurane, halothane and enflurane), as well as carbon monoxide and inert gases are discussed throughout this review. Euthanasia of fetuses and neonates is also addressed. A table listing currently available information to ease access to data regarding euthanasia techniques using gaseous agents in laboratory rodents was compiled. Regarding better animal welfare, there is currently insufficient evidence to advocate banning or replacing CO2 in the euthanasia of rodents; however, there are hints that alternative gases are more humane. The exposure to a volatile anaesthetic gas before loss of consciousness has been proposed by some scientific studies to minimize distress; however, the impact of such a measure is not clear. Areas of inconsistency within the euthanasia literature have been highlighted recently and stem from insufficient knowledge, especially regarding the advantages of the administration of isoflurane or sevoflurane over CO2, or other methods, before loss of consciousness. Alternative methods to minimize distress may include the development of techniques aimed at inducing death in the home cage of animals. Scientific outcomes have to be considered before choosing the most suitable euthanasia method to obtain the best results and accomplish the 3Rs (replacement, reduction and refinement). PMID:26609130

  15. Retinal image quality in the rodent eye.

    PubMed

    Artal, P; Herreros de Tejada, P; Muñoz Tedó, C; Green, D G

    1998-01-01

    Many rodents do not see well. For a target to be resolved by a rat or a mouse, it must subtend a visual angle of a degree or more. It is commonly assumed that this poor spatial resolving capacity is due to neural rather than optical limitations, but the quality of the retinal image has not been well characterized in these animals. We have modified a double-pass apparatus, initially designed for the human eye, so it could be used with rodents to measure the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the eye's optics. That is, the double-pass retinal image of a monochromatic (lambda = 632.8 nm) point source was digitized with a CCD camera. From these double-pass measurements, the single-pass MTF was computed under a variety of conditions of focus and with different pupil sizes. Even with the eye in best focus, the image quality in both rats and mice is exceedingly poor. With a 1-mm pupil, for example, the MTF in the rat had an upper limit of about 2.5 cycles/deg, rather than the 28 cycles/deg one would obtain if the eye were a diffraction-limited system. These images are about 10 times worse than the comparable retinal images in the human eye. Using our measurements of the optics and the published behavioral and electrophysiological contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) of rats, we have calculated the CSF that the rat would have if it had perfect rather than poor optics. We find, interestingly, that diffraction-limited optics would produce only slight improvement overall. That is, in spite of retinal images which are of very low quality, the upper limit of visual resolution in rodents is neurally determined. Rats and mice seem to have eyes in which the optics and retina/brain are well matched. PMID:9682864

  16. Susceptibility of Laboratory Rodents to Trichinella papuae

    PubMed Central

    Sadaow, Lakkhana; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Boonmars, Thidarut; Morakote, Nimit

    2013-01-01

    Members of the genus Trichinella are small nematodes that can infect a wide range of animal hosts. However, their infectivity varies depending on the parasite and host species combination. In this study, we examined the susceptibility of 4 species of laboratory rodents, i.e., mice, rats, hamsters, and gerbils to Trichinella papuae, an emerging non-encapsulated Trichinella species. Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella pseudospiralis were also included in this study for comparison. Fifteen animals of each rodent species were infected orally with 100 muscle larvae of each Trichinella species. Intestinal worm burden was determined at day 6 and 10 post-inoculation (PI). The numbers of muscle larvae were examined at day 45 PI. The reproductive capacity index (RCI) of the 3 Trichinella species in different rodent hosts was determined. By day 6 PI, 33.2-69.6% of the inoculated larvae of the 3 Trichinella species became adult worms in the small intestines of the host animals. However, in rats, more than 96% of adult worms of all 3 Trichinella species were expelled from the gut by day 10 PI. In gerbils, only 4.8-18.1% of adult worms were expelled by day 10 PI. In accordance with the intestinal worm burden and the persistence of adults, the RCI was the highest in gerbils with values of 241.5±41.0 for T. papuae, 432.6±48 for T. pseudospiralis, and 528.6±20.6 for T. spiralis. Hamsters ranked second and mice ranked third in susceptibility in terms of the RCI, Rats yielded the lowest parasite RCI for all 3 Trichinella species. Gerbils may be an alternative laboratory animal for isolation and maintenance of Trichinella spp. PMID:24516265

  17. Susceptibility of laboratory rodents to Trichinella papuae.

    PubMed

    Sadaow, Lakkhana; Intapan, Pewpan M; Boonmars, Thidarut; Morakote, Nimit; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-12-01

    Members of the genus Trichinella are small nematodes that can infect a wide range of animal hosts. However, their infectivity varies depending on the parasite and host species combination. In this study, we examined the susceptibility of 4 species of laboratory rodents, i.e., mice, rats, hamsters, and gerbils to Trichinella papuae, an emerging non-encapsulated Trichinella species. Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella pseudospiralis were also included in this study for comparison. Fifteen animals of each rodent species were infected orally with 100 muscle larvae of each Trichinella species. Intestinal worm burden was determined at day 6 and 10 post-inoculation (PI). The numbers of muscle larvae were examined at day 45 PI. The reproductive capacity index (RCI) of the 3 Trichinella species in different rodent hosts was determined. By day 6 PI, 33.2-69.6% of the inoculated larvae of the 3 Trichinella species became adult worms in the small intestines of the host animals. However, in rats, more than 96% of adult worms of all 3 Trichinella species were expelled from the gut by day 10 PI. In gerbils, only 4.8-18.1% of adult worms were expelled by day 10 PI. In accordance with the intestinal worm burden and the persistence of adults, the RCI was the highest in gerbils with values of 241.5±41.0 for T. papuae, 432.6±48 for T. pseudospiralis, and 528.6±20.6 for T. spiralis. Hamsters ranked second and mice ranked third in susceptibility in terms of the RCI, Rats yielded the lowest parasite RCI for all 3 Trichinella species. Gerbils may be an alternative laboratory animal for isolation and maintenance of Trichinella spp. PMID:24516265

  18. Transformation of 1-O-(indole-3-acetyl)-beta-D-glucose into di-O-(indole-3-acetyl)-D-glucose catalysed by enzyme preparations from corn seedlings.

    PubMed

    Szmidt-Jaworska, A; Kesy, J; Kopcewicz, J

    1997-01-01

    A new enzymatic activity, which catalyses formation in vitro of di-O-(indole-3-acetyl)-D-glucose from 1-O-(indole-3-acetyl)-beta-D-glucose has been found in extracts of Zea mays seedlings. The structure of di-O-(indole-3-acetyl)-D-glucose, not as yet described, has been assigned by GC-MS, 1H NMR and ammonolysis. PMID:9360710

  19. Control of Domestic Rats & Mice, Training Guide--Rodent Control Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjornson, Bayard F.; And Others

    As one booklet in a series on rodent control, this training guide has been developed to assist administrators, rodent-control operators, and others responsible for rodent-control operations in the training of employees in this field. Topics covered include rodents and human welfare, description and habits of domestic rats and mice, rodent-borne…

  20. Stem Cell Transplantation for Indolent Lymphoma. A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    van Besien, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic transplantation is established as a curative treatment for follicular lymphoma, but with considerable short and long-term morbidity and mortality. Data and controversies regarding conditioning regimen, donor source, GVHD prophylaxis, post transplant interventions and approaches to predict and reduce morbidity and mortality are reviewed. Total body irradiation is very effective but toxic and reduced intensity conditioning is often preferred though associated with somewhat higher rates of recurrence. The risk of chronic GVHD and its late sequelae can be markedly reduced by in-vivo T-cell depletion using alemtuzumab but also leads to somewhat higher incidence of disease recurrence. When using such treatment strategies, one can consider prophylactic or preemptive donor lymphocyte infusions or low toxicity medical treatment such as rituximab. Overall the long term outcomes, particularly survival and current progression free survival of patients undergoing allogeneic transplantation for indolent lymphoma have steadily improved and transplant can now often safely be considered up to the sixth decade of life. Outcomes of unrelated donor transplantation approach those of HLA-identical sibling transplant and even mismatched umbilical cord transplant can be considered in selected patients. The assessment of risks and benefits is aided by the use of various novel tools. PMID:21641099

  1. [Investigation of vasoactive agents with indole skeletons at Richter Ltd].

    PubMed

    Kárpáti, Egon; Bíró, Katalin; Kukorelli, Tibor

    2002-01-01

    Investigation of agents with indol skeleton was started in Richter Ltd. 50 years ago. This paper presents the results obtained by Richter's scientists. At first, a vasoactive alcaloid, vincamine was extracted from the leaves of Vinca minor in industrial quantity in 1955. This agent selectively improves the cerebral blood supply. Vincamine (Devincan) is used for the treatment of cerebrovascular disorders from 1959. Vinpocetine (Cavinton), the most powerful vasoactive compound was produced by transforming the chemical structure of vincamine. Cavinton is a cis(3S,16S)-derivate of vincamine having antianoxic, antiischaemic and neuroprotective properties. Therefore, it is frequently used in the therapy of cerebral disorders of vascular origin. Cavinton was introduced into clinical practice in 1978. At present, Cavinton tablets are approved in 47 countries. The third compound, vintoperol is a trans(3S,16R)-derivate of vincamine. Vintoperol proved to be a powerful enhancer of blood flow in the lower extremities. Because of its toxic side effects the agent is not used in clinical practice. PMID:12426785

  2. Metabolic regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry D. Cohen

    2009-11-01

    The phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) is important for many aspects of plant growth, development and responses to the environment yet the routes to is biosynthesis and mechanisms for regulation of IAA levels remain important research questions. A critical issue concerning the biosynthesis if IAA in plants is that redundant pathways for IAA biosynthesis exist in plants. We showed that these redundant pathways and their relative contribution to net IAA production are under both developmental and environmental control. We worked on three fundamental problems related to how plants get their IAA: 1) An in vitro biochemical approach was used to define the tryptophan dependent pathway to IAA using maize endosperm, where relatively large amounts of IAA are produced over a short developmental period. Both a stable isotope dilution and a protein MS approach were used to identify intermediates and enzymes in the reactions. 2) We developed an in vitro system for analysis of tryptophan-independent IAA biosynthesis in maize seedlings and we used a metabolite profiling approach to isolate intermediates in this reaction. 3) Arabidopsis contains a small family of genes that encode potential indolepyruvate decarboxylase enzymes. We cloned these genes and studied plants that are mutant in these genes and that over-express each member in the family in terms of the level and route of IAA biosynthesis. Together, these allowed further development of a comprehensive picture of the pathways and regulatory components that are involved in IAA homeostasis in higher plants.

  3. Anticonvulsant and Neurotoxicity of Some Novel 1-([1,3,4]thiadiazino[6,5- b]indol-3-yl Semicarbazides.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Ravitas; Thakur, Alok S; Jha, Arvind K; Kumar, Sudhir P

    2015-01-01

    In the present study a series of new N(4)-(4-substituted benzylidene)-N(1)-([1,3,4]thiadiazino [6,5-b]indol-3-yl)semicarbazide (1-6), N(4)-([1,3,4]thiadiazino[6,5-b]indol-3-yl)-N(1)-(1-(4-substituted phenyl)ethylidene)semicarbazide (7-10), N(4)-([1,3,4]thiadiazino[6,5-b]indol-3-yl)-N(1)-((4-substituted phenyl)(phenyl)methylene) semicarbazide. (11-14) have been synthesized from isatin and thiosemicarbazide through multiple steps to meet structural necessities for the anticonvulsant activity. All the newly prepared compounds were characterized by spectral techniques like FT-IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR, EI-MS and elemental analysis. All the newly synthesized compounds were investigated for the anticonvulsant activity against maximal electroshock induced seizures (MES) and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazole (scPTZ) models and their neurotoxicity were also evaluated by rotarod test. The results obtained showed that 64% of the compounds showed protection in the MES test and 36% of the compounds showed protection in ScPTZ test. Some of the compounds also showed good activity after oral administration. Among the synthesized compounds, compound 14 was shown to be the most active compound showing activity at 100 and 300 mg/kg in MES and ScPTZ test with prolonged duration of action. In the present study, semicarbazones of hydroxy containing carbonyl compounds were depicted to be the potent molecule with low neurotoxicity and prolong duration of action on oral administration. The result of the present study may be used for the future development of novel anticonvulsants with broad spectrum of anticonvulsant activity. PMID:26100150

  4. Rodent models of treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Caldarone, Barbara J.; Zachariou, Venetia; King, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Major depression is a prevalent and debilitating disorder and a substantial proportion of patients fail to reach remission following standard antidepressant pharmacological treatment. Limited efficacy with currently available antidepressant drugs highlights the need to develop more effective medications for treatment resistant patients and emphasizes the importance of developing better preclinical models that focus on treatment resistant populations. This review discusses methods to adapt and refine rodent behavioral models that are predictive of antidepressant efficacy to identify populations that show reduced responsiveness or are resistant to traditional antidepressants. Methods include separating antidepressant responders from non-responders, administering treatments that render animals resistant to traditional pharmacological treatments, and identifying genetic models that show antidepressant resistance. This review also examines pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments regimes that have been effective in refractory patients and how some of these approaches have been used to validate animal models of treatment-resistant depression. The goals in developing rodent models of treatment-resistant depression are to understand the neurobiological mechanisms involved in antidepressant resistance and to develop valid models to test novel therapies that would be effective in patients that do not respond to traditional monoaminergic antidepressants. PMID:25460020

  5. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR

    PubMed Central

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S.; Lantican, Cecile; Michaelides, Tula; Zimicki, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584) males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50%) while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26%) or other ethnic groups (140, 24%). Most of the respondents (79.5%) had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease) than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption) and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts. PMID:26196134

  6. Hunting, Food Preparation, and Consumption of Rodents in Lao PDR.

    PubMed

    Suwannarong, Kanokwan; Chapman, Robert S; Lantican, Cecile; Michaelides, Tula; Zimicki, Susan

    2015-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted in 29 villages of Khamkeuth District in Bolikhamxay Province in the Lao PDR during March to May 2013. The study aimed to determine the characteristics associated with rodent consumption and related behaviors among different ethnic groups, ages, and genders. Five-hundred-eighty-four (584) males and females from 18-50 years of age participated in this study. Half of them were Hmong (292, 50%) while 152 respondents were Lao-Tai (26%) or other ethnic groups (140, 24%). Most of the respondents (79.5%) had farming as their main occupation. Prevalences of the studied outcomes were high: 39.9 for hunting or capturing rodents in the previous year, 77.7% for preparing rodents as food, and 86.3% for rodent consumption. Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that likelihood of these types of rodent contact was more consistently associated with behavioral factors (gathering things from the forest and elsewhere, cultivation-related activities, and taking measures to prevent rodent-borne disease) than with socio-demographic, environmental, or cultural factors. The strongest associations were observed for gathering things; these associations were consistently positive and statistically significant. Although this study did not directly assess rodent-borne zoonosis risk, we believe that study findings raise concern that such risk may be substantial in the study area and other similar areas. Further epidemiological studies on the association between rodent-borne disease infection and rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption are recommended. Moreover, further studies are needed on the association between these potential exposure factors (i.e., rodent hunting, preparation for food, and consumption) and rodent-borne infections, especially among ethnic groups like the Hmong in Lao PDR and those in neighboring countries with similar socio-demographic, environmental, behavioral and cultural contexts. PMID:26196134

  7. Preparation of 2,3-Disubstituted Indoles by Sequential Larock Heteroannulation and Silicon-Based Cross-Coupling Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Baird, John D.

    2009-01-01

    A simple and convergent synthesis of 2,3-disubstituted indoles has been developed using a sequential Larock indole synthesis and silicon-based, cross-coupling reaction. Substituted 2-iodoanilines reacted with an alkynyldimethylsilyl tert-butyl ether to afford indole-2-silanols under the Larock heteroannulation conditions after hydrolysis. The corresponding sodium 2-indolylsilanolate salts successfully engaged in cross-coupling with aryl bromides and chlorides to afford multi-substituted indoles. The development of an alkynyldimethylsilyl tert-butyl ether as a masked silanol equivalent enabled a smooth heteroannulation process and the identification of a suitable catalyst/ligand combination provided for a facile cross-coupling reaction. PMID:19784400

  8. Isolation and characterization of esters of indole-3-acetic acid from the liquid endosperm of the horse chestnut (Aesculus species)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domagalski, W.; Schulze, A.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    Esters of indole-3-acetic acid were extracted and purified from the liquid endosperm of immature fruits of various species of the horse chestnut (Aesculus parviflora, A. baumanni, A. pavia rubra, and A. pavia humulis). The liquid endosperm contained, at least 12 chromatographically distinct esters. One of these compounds was purified and characterized as an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and myo-inositol. A second compound was found to be an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and the disaccharide rutinose (glucosyl-rhamnose). A third compound was partially characterized as an ester of indole-3-acetic acid and a desoxyaminohexose.

  9. Visual Landmarks Facilitate Rodent Spatial Navigation in Virtual Reality Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Youngstrom, Isaac A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2012-01-01

    Because many different sensory modalities contribute to spatial learning in rodents, it has been difficult to determine whether spatial navigation can be guided solely by visual cues. Rodents moving within physical environments with visual cues engage a variety of nonvisual sensory systems that cannot be easily inhibited without lesioning brain…

  10. Recent isolations of Lassa virus from Nigerian rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Herta; Fabiyi, A.; Monath, T. P.

    1975-01-01

    Rodents were trapped in the Benue-Plateau and North-Eastern States of Nigeria where Lassa fever had been reported in previous years. Eight Lassa virus strains were isolated from tissues and blood of rodents identified in the field as being of 3 different species: Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus, and Mus minutoides. All the infected rodents were collected in village habitats. These isolations indicate the presence of Lassa virus in wild rodents in Nigeria during periods when no human infections were evident. Prior studies in Sierra Leone have indicated that a single rodent species, M. natalensis, may be the important reservoir host of Lassa virus. Since the present study indicates that other rodent species may be involved as well, the ecology of Lassa virus may be more complicated than was heretofore supposed. In view of the importance of determining the geographic and species range of rodent hosts of Lassa virus, and because of the problems inherent in rodent identification under austere field conditions, it is urgent that further studies be conducted in the same areas of Nigeria to confirm these findings. PMID:1085216

  11. Vitamin K Contents of Rodent Diets: A Review

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate nutrient intake is critical in the maintenance of normal physiological activity of rodents in biomedical studies. Vitamin K is an essential nutrient in rodent diets and functions as a cofactor for the y-carboxylation of certain proteins involved in blood coagulation and bone metabolism. Dif...

  12. PREDICTIVE SIMULATION MODELING FOR ANTIANDROGEN IMPACTS ON RODENT PROSTATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Predictive simulation modeling for antiandrogen impacts on rodent prostate
    HA Barton1, RW Setzer1, LK Potter1,2
    1US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, ETD, PKB, Research Triangle Park, NC and 2Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC

    Changes in rodent prostate weight and functi...

  13. Bartonella Infection in Rodents and Their Flea Ectoparasites: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Krasnov, Boris; Morick, Danny; Gottlieb, Yuval; Khokhlova, Irina S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Epidemiological studies worldwide have reported a high prevalence and a great diversity of Bartonella species, both in rodents and their flea parasites. The interaction among Bartonella, wild rodents, and fleas reflects a high degree of adaptation among these organisms. Vertical and horizontal efficient Bartonella transmission pathways within flea communities and from fleas to rodents have been documented in competence studies, suggesting that fleas are key players in the transmission of Bartonella to rodents. Exploration of the ecological traits of rodents and their fleas may shed light on the mechanisms used by bartonellae to become established in these organisms. The present review explores the interrelations within the Bartonella–rodent–flea system. The role of the latter two components is emphasized. PMID:25629778

  14. Prospects of chemosterilant and genetic control of rodents

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Rex E.; Howard, Walter E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper discusses some requirements of an ideal rodent chemosterilant, analyses the advantages of chemosterilants over other control methods, and compares the potential values of chemosterilants that affect females, males, and both sexes. Examples are given of specific situations where chemosterilants will be valuable in rodent control, together with suggested methods of applying them. The theory and practicability of using genetics in rodent control are also discussed. Neither the chemosterilant nor the genetic method is expected to become a panacea, but their eventual application will be a significant advance in rodent-control technology. Since both approaches are based on sound biological principles and are relatively safe, they should be helpful in regulating rodent populations in the future. PMID:4583051

  15. Problems associated with the control of rodents in tropical Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, N. G.; Arata, A. A.

    1975-01-01

    As elsewhere in the world, rodents are responsible for very considerable economic losses in tropical Africa because of their depredations on both growing crops and stored food products. Unfortunately, few accurate data are available on the extent of these losses but there is evidence that they are considerable. The public health importance of rodents, both as reservoirs and vectors of disease in tropical Africa, is also great; plague, leptospirosis, murine typhus, and Lassa fever are among the diseases associated with rodent hosts. Scientifically based rodent control programmes have been carried out in very few areas of Africa and there is urgent need for studies and demonstrations on rodent control in both urban and rural areas. The problems likely to be encountered are reviewed and methods of control proposed. PMID:1085224

  16. Management of Indolent Lymphoma: Where Are We Now and Where Are We Going

    PubMed Central

    Lunning, Matthew; Vose, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Indolent lymphoma comprises a unique and challenging subset of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). While definitions of indolence will vary, the most common indolent NHL subtypes include follicular lymphoma, marginal zone lymphoma, and small lymphocytic lymphoma. Patients with indolent NHL (iNHL) excluding those with rare localized presentations are often met with an incurable but highly treatable NHL. In the rituximab era, response rates are approaching 90% with rituximab plus chemotherapy and time to next treatment are beginning to be measured in years. As a result of a prolonged natural history, we are encountering a gridlock of novel regimens and agents that appropriately fill peer-reviewed journals. In this review, we tackle a spectrum of topics in the management of indolent lymphoma including the initial approach to the newly diagnosed patient, approaches to first cytotoxic chemotherapy, maintenance and consolidation techniques, as well as highlight promising treatments on the horizon in iNHL. Clinicians continue to face tough choices in the management of iNHL. Through well-thought out clinical trials and peer-reviewed vetting of data we will continue to determine how to best manage the clinical continuum that is iNHL. PMID:23063143

  17. Indole affects the formation of multicellular aggregate structures in Pantoea agglomerans YS19.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xuemei; Jiang, Jing; Liang, Chen; Zhang, Xiao; Wang, Jieru; Shen, Delong; Feng, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Pantoea agglomerans YS19 is an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium isolated from rice. As well as having the ability to form a biofilm, as do most bacteria, it is characterized by the formation of a unique multicellular aggregate structure called symplasmata. Indole is traditionally known as a metabolite of the amino acid tryptophan, which, however, has recently been shown to participate in various regulations of bacterial physiological processes, including stress resistance, quorum sensing and biofilm formation. Here, an indole signal was found to promote symplasmata formation, yet inhibit biofilm formation, indicating different regulatory pathways of indole in the construction of the two structures. However, symplasmata showed almost an equivalent stress-resistant capability, as compared with biofilms, for YS19 to confront acids, heavy metals (Cu(2+)), and UV treatments. Moreover, indole was tested to show a promoting effect on exopolysaccharides (EPS) production and an inhibition effect on the expression of an outer membrane protein OmpW. These results provide evidence for understanding the regulatory mechanisms of indole on such multicellular aggregates. PMID:26923129

  18. Crystal structures of four indole derivatives as possible cannabinoid allosteric antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jamie R.; Trembleau, Laurent; Storey, John M. D.; Wardell, James L.; Harrison, William T. A.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of four indole derivatives with various substituents at the 2-, 3- and 5-positions of the ring system are described, namely, ethyl 3-(5-chloro-2-phenyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-3-phenyl­propano­ate, C25H22ClNO2, (I), 2-bromo-3-(2-nitro-1-phenyl­eth­yl)-1H-indole, C16H13BrN2O2, (II), 5-meth­oxy-3-(2-nitro-1-phenyl­eth­yl)-2-phenyl-1H-indole, C23H20N2O3, (III), and 5-chloro-3-(2-nitro-1-phenyl­eth­yl)-2-phenyl-1H-indole, C22H17ClN2O2, (IV). The dominant inter­molecular inter­action in each case is an N—H⋯O hydrogen bond, which generates either chains or inversion dimers. Weak C—H⋯O, C—H⋯π and π–π inter­actions occur in these structures but there is no consistent pattern amongst them. Two of these compounds act as modest enhancers of CB1 cannabanoid signalling and two are inactive. PMID:26090143

  19. Indole as an olfactory synergist for volatile kairomones for diabroticite beetles.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, R L; Lampman, R L; Deem-Dickson, L

    1995-08-01

    Olfactory synergism, where combinations of plant volatile kairomones are quantitatively more attractive to insects than the sum of attraction of the individual components, is an important but little-studied phenomenon in host plant selection and feeding and in pollination ecology. Diabroticite beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are strongly attracted toCucurbita blossoms, and 2- to 3-fold olfactory synergism has been demonstrated in four species by combinations of the key blossom volatiles, 1,2,4-trimethoxybenzene, indole, and (E)-cinnamaldehyde. This TIC mixture represents an optimizedCurcurbita blossom volatile kairomone mixture useful in monitoring Diabroticite populations and in studying their behavior and ecology. Indole, which exhibits a spectrum of attraction to these beetles ranging from moderate forDiabrotica virgifera virgifera andAcalymma vittatum to very weak forD. barberi, is the primary synergistic component. Indole combined with 4-methoxycinnamaldehyde was significantly synergistic toD. v. virgifera at a ratio of 1:300 and produced 4-fold synergism at a ratio of 1:1. Indole combined with 4-methoxyphenethanol was less synergistic toD. barberi with 1.5- to 2-fold synergism at a 1:1 ratio. These consistent variations in diabroticite beetle olfactory responses presumably indicate evolutionary divergences in the numbers of relict indole antennal receptors. PMID:24234523

  20. Mechanisms and Therapeutic Implications of Cell Death Induction by Indole Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Aamir; Sakr, Wael A.; Rahman, KM Wahidur

    2011-01-01

    Indole compounds, obtained from cruciferous vegetables, are well-known for their anti-cancer properties. In particular, indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its dimeric product, 3,3′-diindolylmethane (DIM), have been widely investigated for their effectiveness against a number of human cancers in vitro as well as in vivo. These compounds are effective inducers of apoptosis and the accumulating evidence documenting their ability to modulate multiple cellular signaling pathways is a testimony to their pleiotropic behavior. Here we attempt to update current understanding on the various mechanisms that are responsible for the apoptosis-inducing effects by these compounds. The significance of apoptosis-induction as a desirable attribute of anti-cancer agents such as indole compounds cannot be overstated. However, an equally intriguing property of these compounds is their ability to sensitize cancer cells to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Such chemosensitizing effects of indole compounds can potentially have major clinical implications because these non-toxic compounds can reduce the toxicity and drug-resistance associated with available chemotherapies. Combinational therapy is increasingly being realized to be better than single agent therapy and, through this review article, we aim to provide a rationale behind combination of natural compounds such as indoles with conventional therapeutics. PMID:24212940

  1. Enhanced Photoreduction of Nitro-aromatic Compounds by Hydrated Electrons Derived from Indole on Natural Montmorillonite.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haoting; Guo, Yong; Pan, Bo; Gu, Cheng; Li, Hui; Boyd, Stephen A

    2015-07-01

    A new photoreduction pathway for nitro-aromatic compounds (NACs) and the underlying degradation mechanism are described. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene was reduced to 3-nitroaniline by the widely distributed aromatic molecule indole; the reaction is facilitated by montmorillonite clay mineral under both simulated and natural sunlight irradiation. The novel chemical reaction is strongly affected by the type of exchangeable cation present on montmorillonite. The photoreduction reaction is initiated by the adsorption of 1,3-dinitrobenzene and indole in clay interlayers. Under light irradiation, the excited indole molecule generates a hydrated electron and the indole radical cation. The structural negative charge of montmorillonite plausibly stabilizes the radical cation hence preventing charge recombination. This promotes the release of reactive hydrated electrons for further reductive reactions. Similar results were observed for the photoreduction of nitrobenzene. In situ irradiation time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies provided direct evidence for the generation of hydrated electrons and the indole radical cations, which supported the proposed degradation mechanism. In the photoreduction process, the role of clay mineral is to both enhance the generation of hydrated electrons and to provide a constrained reaction environment in the galley regions, which increases the probability of contact between NACs and hydrated electrons. PMID:26029791

  2. Epidemiology of Leptospira Transmitted by Rodents in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Mathilde; Tatard, Caroline; Chaval, Yannick; Suputtamongkol, Yupin; Buchy, Philippe; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Herbreteau, Vincent; Morand, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Background Leptospirosis is the most common bacterial zoonoses and has been identified as an important emerging global public health problem in Southeast Asia. Rodents are important reservoirs for human leptospirosis, but epidemiological data is lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings We sampled rodents living in different habitats from seven localities distributed across Southeast Asia (Thailand, Lao PDR and Cambodia), between 2009 to 2010. Human isolates were also obtained from localities close to where rodents were sampled. The prevalence of Leptospira infection was assessed by real-time PCR using DNA extracted from rodent kidneys, targeting the lipL32 gene. Sequencing rrs and secY genes, and Multi Locus Variable-number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) analyses were performed on DNA extracted from rat kidneys for Leptospira isolates molecular typing. Four species were detected in rodents, L. borgpetersenii (56% of positive samples), L. interrogans (36%), L. kirschneri (3%) and L. weilli (2%), which were identical to human isolates. Mean prevalence in rodents was approximately 7%, and largely varied across localities and habitats, but not between rodent species. The two most abundant Leptospira species displayed different habitat requirements: L. interrogans was linked to humid habitats (rice fields and forests) while L. borgpetersenii was abundant in both humid and dry habitats (non-floodable lands). Conclusion/Significance L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii species are widely distributed amongst rodent populations, and strain typing confirmed rodents as reservoirs for human leptospirosis. Differences in habitat requirements for L. interrogans and L. borgpetersenii supported differential transmission modes. In Southeast Asia, human infection risk is not only restricted to activities taking place in wetlands and rice fields as is commonly accepted, but should also include tasks such as forestry work, as well as the hunting and preparation of rodents for consumption, which

  3. Scatter-hoarding rodents prefer slightly astringent food.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Jin

    2011-01-01

    The mutualistic interaction between scatter-hoarding rodents and their seed plants is highly complex yet poorly understood. Plants may benefit from the seed dispersal behavior of rodents, as long as seed consumption is minimized. In parallel, rodents may maximize foraging efficiency and cache high-quality resources for future consumption. Defensive compounds, such as tannins, are thought to be a major mechanism for plant control over rodent behavior. However, previous studies, using naturally occurring seeds, have not provided conclusive evidence supporting this hypothesis. Here, we test the importance of tannin concentrations on the scatter-hoarding behavior of rodents by using an artificial seed system. We combined feeding trials and field observations to examine the overall impact of seed tannin concentrations on rodent behavior and health. We found that rodents favored seeds with an intermediate amount of tannin (~5%) in the field. Meanwhile, in rodents that were fed a diet with different tannin content, only diets with high tannin content (25%, 15%, and 10%) caused a significant negative influence on rodent survival and health. Significant differences were not found among treatments with tannin levels of 0-5%. In contrast to many existing studies, our results clearly demonstrate that scatter-hoarding rodents prefer slightly 'astringent' food. In the co-evolutionary arms race between plants and animals, our results suggest that while tannins may play a significant role in reducing general predation levels by the faunal community, they have no precise control over the behavior of their mutualistic partner. Instead, the two partners appear to have reached an evolutionary point where both parties receive adequate benefits, with the year-to-year outcome being dependent on a wide range of factors beyond the control of either partner. PMID:22046284

  4. Intraoperative cerebral blood flow imaging of rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hangdao; Li, Yao; Yuan, Lu; Wu, Caihong; Lu, Hongyang; Tong, Shanbao

    2014-09-01

    Intraoperative monitoring of cerebral blood flow (CBF) is of interest to neuroscience researchers, which offers the assessment of hemodynamic responses throughout the process of neurosurgery and provides an early biomarker for surgical guidance. However, intraoperative CBF imaging has been challenging due to animal's motion and position change during the surgery. In this paper, we presented a design of an operation bench integrated with laser speckle contrast imager which enables monitoring of the CBF intraoperatively. With a specially designed stereotaxic frame and imager, we were able to monitor the CBF changes in both hemispheres during the rodent surgery. The rotatable design of the operation plate and implementation of online image registration allow the technician to move the animal without disturbing the CBF imaging during surgery. The performance of the system was tested by middle cerebral artery occlusion model of rats.

  5. Oxytocin-dependent consolation behavior in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Burkett, J. P.; Andari, E.; Johnson, Z. V.; Curry, D. C.; de Waal, F. B. M.; Young, L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Consolation behavior toward distressed others is common in humans and great apes, yet our ability to explore the biological mechanisms underlying this behavior is limited by its apparent absence in laboratory animals. Here, we provide empirical evidence that a rodent species, the highly social and monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), greatly increases partner-directed grooming toward familiar conspecifics (but not strangers) that have experienced an unobserved stressor, providing social buffering. Prairie voles also match the fear response, anxiety-related behaviors, and corticosterone increase of the stressed cagemate, suggesting an empathy mechanism. Exposure to the stressed cagemate increases activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, and oxytocin receptor antagonist infused into this region abolishes the partner-directed response, showing conserved neural mechanisms between prairie vole and human. PMID:26798013

  6. Generation of rodent and human osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Sarah E B; Shah, Mittal; Orriss, Isabel R

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation, culture and staining of primary osteoblasts from neonatal rodents and human samples. The calvaria and long-bone assays allow direct measurement of bone matrix deposition and mineralisation, as well as producing osteoblasts at defined stages of differentiation for molecular and histological analysis. Culture of human osteoblasts enables cell function to be investigated in targeted patient groups. The described methods will provide a step-by-step guide of what to expect at each stage of the culture and highlight the varied tissue culture conditions required to successfully grow osteoblasts from different sources. A special focus of this paper is the methods used for analysis of bone mineralisation and how to ensure that nonspecific mineral deposition or staining is not quantified. PMID:25396049

  7. Hindlimb unloading: rodent analog for microgravity.

    PubMed

    Globus, Ruth K; Morey-Holton, Emily

    2016-05-15

    The rodent hindlimb unloading (HU) model was developed in the 1980s to make it possible to study mechanisms, responses, and treatments for the adverse consequences of spaceflight. Decades before development of the HU model, weightlessness was predicted to yield deficits in the principal tissues responsible for structure and movement on Earth, primarily muscle and bone. Indeed, results from early spaceflight and HU experiments confirmed the expected sensitivity of the musculoskeletal system to gravity loading. Results from human and animal spaceflight and HU experiments show that nearly all organ systems and tissues studied display some measurable changes, albeit sometimes minor and of uncertain relevance to astronaut health. The focus of this review is to examine key HU results for various organ systems including those related to stress; the immune, cardiovascular, and nervous systems; vision changes; and wound healing. Analysis of the validity of the HU model is important given its potential value for both hypothesis testing and countermeasure development. PMID:26869711

  8. Defective enamel ultrastructure in diabetic rodents.

    PubMed

    Atar, M; Atar-Zwillenberg, D R; Verry, P; Spornitz, U M

    2004-07-01

    We investigated six different types of diabetic rodents. Four expressed a genetic obesity resulting in diabetes. One developed diabetes induced by a diet-dependent obesity, and one with genetic diabetes received anti-diabetic medication. The tooth samples were examined under a scanning electron microscope and with an energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). The electron micrographs showed severe, varying degrees of damage within the six different diabetic animal types, such as irregular crystallite deposition and prism perforations in genetically obese animals compared to less-disordered prism structures in diet-dependent obesity. Anti-diabetic medication resulted in normal enamel ultrastructure. The EDX analysis revealed a reduction in the amount of calcium and phosphorus in all regions affected by diabetes. Based on these animal studies, we suggest that both juvenile diabetes type I (in infants) and adult diabetes type II (in pregnant mothers, affecting the developing foetus) may affect the normal development of teeth in humans. PMID:15242388

  9. Oxytocin-dependent consolation behavior in rodents.

    PubMed

    Burkett, J P; Andari, E; Johnson, Z V; Curry, D C; de Waal, F B M; Young, L J

    2016-01-22

    Consolation behavior toward distressed others is common in humans and great apes, yet our ability to explore the biological mechanisms underlying this behavior is limited by its apparent absence in laboratory animals. Here, we provide empirical evidence that a rodent species, the highly social and monogamous prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster), greatly increases partner-directed grooming toward familiar conspecifics (but not strangers) that have experienced an unobserved stressor, providing social buffering. Prairie voles also match the fear response, anxiety-related behaviors, and corticosterone increase of the stressed cagemate, suggesting an empathy mechanism. Exposure to the stressed cagemate increases activity in the anterior cingulate cortex, and oxytocin receptor antagonist infused into this region abolishes the partner-directed response, showing conserved neural mechanisms between prairie vole and human. PMID:26798013

  10. Domestic Rodent Control Training Manual: A Training Aid for the Rodent Control Category for Certification of Pesticide Applicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, William R., Jr.; And Others

    This training manual, designed for training applicants who wish to obtain certification in pesticide application relative to rodent control, covers the following topics: economic factors, public health factors, biological characteristics of domestic rodents, rat and mouse signs, trapping, repellents, poisons, baits, poisoned water, dumps, sewers,…

  11. Brain acetylcholinesterase activity recovery following acute methyl parathion intoxication in two feral rodent species: comparison to laboratory rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.K.; Silvey, N.J.; Bailey, E.M. Jr.

    1988-07-01

    Widespread use of organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) has produced both acute and chronic intoxication among nontarget organisms. Most such studies have included fish and birds as opposed to mammals. However, numerous OP toxicity studies have been conducted on laboratory rodents creating a temptation to apply this data to feral rodents. Chronic OP exposure has been reported to produce cholinergic adaptation which in turn lowers mortality rates following a subsequent acute anticholinesterase exposure. The relevance that these laboratory rodent studies have on feral rodents is subject to debate. Field studies involving OP exposure among nontarget feral mammals have produced contradictory results. Increased mortality as a result of repeated OP application has been reported. This observation may be of considerable importance to nontarget feral rodent populations due to the repetitive nature of OP application protocols. The ability of feral rodents to recover brain AChE activity (BAA) between OP application intervals undoubtedly promotes their survival. This study investigated and compared BAA recovery following acute oral methyl parathion intoxication among 2 feral rodent species and among 2 common laboratory rodent species.

  12. A Curated Database of Rodent Uterotrophic Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Kleinstreuer, Nicole C.; Ceger, Patricia C.; Allen, David G.; Strickland, Judy; Chang, Xiaoqing; Hamm, Jonathan T.; Casey, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Novel in vitro methods are being developed to identify chemicals that may interfere with estrogen receptor (ER) signaling, but the results are difficult to put into biological context because of reliance on reference chemicals established using results from other in vitro assays and because of the lack of high-quality in vivo reference data. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)-validated rodent uterotrophic bioassay is considered the “gold standard” for identifying potential ER agonists. Objectives: We performed a comprehensive literature review to identify and evaluate data from uterotrophic studies and to analyze study variability. Methods: We reviewed 670 articles with results from 2,615 uterotrophic bioassays using 235 unique chemicals. Study descriptors, such as species/strain, route of administration, dosing regimen, lowest effect level, and test outcome, were captured in a database of uterotrophic results. Studies were assessed for adherence to six criteria that were based on uterotrophic regulatory test guidelines. Studies meeting all six criteria (458 bioassays on 118 unique chemicals) were considered guideline-like (GL) and were subsequently analyzed. Results: The immature rat model was used for 76% of the GL studies. Active outcomes were more prevalent across rat models (74% active) than across mouse models (36% active). Of the 70 chemicals with at least two GL studies, 18 (26%) had discordant outcomes and were classified as both active and inactive. Many discordant results were attributable to differences in study design (e.g., injection vs. oral dosing). Conclusions: This uterotrophic database provides a valuable resource for understanding in vivo outcome variability and for evaluating the performance of in vitro assays that measure estrogenic activity. Citation: Kleinstreuer NC, Ceger PC, Allen DG, Strickland J, Chang X, Hamm JT, Casey WM. 2016. A curated database of rodent uterotrophic bioactivity. Environ

  13. Rodent Models of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Thomas; Rothstein, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a motor neuron disease affecting upper and lower motor neurons in the CNS. Patients with ALS develop extensive muscle wasting and atrophy leading to paralysis and death 3-5 years after disease onset. ALS may be familial (fALS 10%) or sporadic ALS (sALS, 90%). The large majority of fALS) cases are due to genetic mutations in the Superoxide dismutase 1 gene (SOD1, 15% of fALS) and repeat nucleotide expansions in the gene encoding C9ORF72 (around 40-50% of fALS and ~10% of sALS). From a wide range of pathological studies the general conclusion is that ALS disease is mediated through aberrant protein homeostasis (ie ER stress and autophagy) and/or changes in RNA processing (as seen in all non-SOD1-mediated ALS). In all of these cases, animal models suggest that the disease is mediated non-cell-autonomously, i.e. not only motor neurons are involved, but glial cells including microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and other neuronal subpopulations are also implicated in disease pathogenesis. This overview will give a chronological overview of a wide range of different ALS rodent models generated so far with a thorough description of their intrinsic advantages and disadvantages. We will focus on their respective correlation with disease as seen in humans and their potential for understanding basic disease biology. As RNA processing has more recently come to the foreground of ALS research, we will mainly focus on a thorough description of the most recently generated ALS rodent models. PMID:26344214

  14. Automatic cortical thickness analysis on rodent brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ehlers, Cindy; Crews, Fulton; Niethammer, Marc; Budin, Francois; Paniagua, Beatriz; Sulik, Kathy; Johns, Josephine; Styner, Martin; Oguz, Ipek

    2011-03-01

    Localized difference in the cortex is one of the most useful morphometric traits in human and animal brain studies. There are many tools and methods already developed to automatically measure and analyze cortical thickness for the human brain. However, these tools cannot be directly applied to rodent brains due to the different scales; even adult rodent brains are 50 to 100 times smaller than humans. This paper describes an algorithm for automatically measuring the cortical thickness of mouse and rat brains. The algorithm consists of three steps: segmentation, thickness measurement, and statistical analysis among experimental groups. The segmentation step provides the neocortex separation from other brain structures and thus is a preprocessing step for the thickness measurement. In the thickness measurement step, the thickness is computed by solving a Laplacian PDE and a transport equation. The Laplacian PDE first creates streamlines as an analogy of cortical columns; the transport equation computes the length of the streamlines. The result is stored as a thickness map over the neocortex surface. For the statistical analysis, it is important to sample thickness at corresponding points. This is achieved by the particle correspondence algorithm which minimizes entropy between dynamically moving sample points called particles. Since the computational cost of the correspondence algorithm may limit the number of corresponding points, we use thin-plate spline based interpolation to increase the number of corresponding sample points. As a driving application, we measured the thickness difference to assess the effects of adolescent intermittent ethanol exposure that persist into adulthood and performed t-test between the control and exposed rat groups. We found significantly differing regions in both hemispheres.

  15. Testing the limits of Rodent Sperm Analysis: azoospermia in an otherwise healthy wild rodent population.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, Lawrence V; Thran, Brandolyn H; Willams, Keith J

    2009-01-01

    By comparing the sperm parameters of small rodents trapped at contaminated terrestrial sites and nearby habitat-matched noncontaminated locations, the patent-pending Rodent Sperm Analysis (RSA) method provides a direct health status appraisal for the maximally chemical-exposed mammalian ecological receptor in the wild. RSA outcomes have consistently allowed for as definitive determinations of receptor health as are possible at the present time, thereby streamlining the ecological risk assessment (ERA) process. Here, we describe the unanticipated discovery, at a contaminated US EPA Superfund National Priorities List site, of a population of Hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), with a high percentage of adult males lacking sperm entirely (azoospermia). In light of the RSA method's role in streamlining ERAs and in bringing contaminated Superfund-type site investigations to closure, we consider the consequences of the discovery. The two matters specifically discussed are (1) the computation of a population's average sperm count where azoospermia is present and (2) the merits of the RSA method and its sperm parameter thresholds-for-effect when azoospermia is masked in an otherwise apparently healthy rodent population. PMID:18437443

  16. Endocarp thickness affects seed removal speed by small rodents in a warm-temperate broad-leafed deciduous forest, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongmao; Zhang, Zhibin

    2008-11-01

    Seed traits are important factors affecting seed predation by rodents and thereby the success of recruitment. Seeds of many tree species have hard hulls. These are thought to confer mechanical protection, but the effect of endocarp thickness on seed predation by rodents has not been well investigated. Wild apricot ( Prunus armeniaca), wild peach ( Amygdalus davidiana), cultivated walnut ( Juglans regia), wild walnut ( Juglans mandshurica Maxim) and Liaodong oak ( Quercus liaotungensis) are very common tree species in northwestern Beijing city, China. Their seeds vary greatly in size, endocarp thickness, caloric value and tannin content. This paper aims to study the effects of seed traits on seed removal speed of these five tree species by small rodents in a temperate deciduous forest, with emphasis on the effect of endocarp thickness. The results indicated that speed of removal of seeds released at stations in the field decreased significantly with increasing endocarp thickness. We found no significant correlations between seed removal speed and other seed traits such as seed size, caloric value and tannin content. In seed selection experiments in small cages, Père David's rock squirrel ( Sciurotamias davidianus), a large-bodied, strong-jawed rodent, selected all of the five seed species, and the selection order among the five seed species was determined by endocarp thickness and the ratio of endocarp mass/seed mass. In contrast, the Korean field mouse ( Apodemus peninsulae) and Chinese white-bellied rat ( Niviventer confucianus), with relatively small bodies and weak jaws, preferred to select small seeds like acorns of Q. liaotungensis and seeds of P. armeniaca, indicating that rodent body size is also an important factor affecting food selection based on seed size. These results suggest endocarp thickness significantly reduces seed removal speed by rodents and then negatively affects dispersal fitness of seeds before seed removal of tree species in the study

  17. Weak inter­actions in the crystal structures of two indole derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jamie R.; Trembleau, Laurent; Storey, John M. D.; Wardell, James L.; Harrison, William T. A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the syntheses and crystal structures of two indole derivatives, namely a second monoclinic polymorph of ethyl 5-chloro-1H-indole-2-carboxyl­ate C11H10ClNO2, (I), and ethyl 5-chloro-3-iodo-1H-indole-2-carboxyl­ate, C11H9ClINO2, (II). In their crystal structures, both compounds form inversion dimers linked by pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds, which generate R 2 2(10) loops. The dimers are linked into double chains in (I) and sheets in (II) by a variety of weak inter­actions, including π–π stacking, C—I⋯π, C—Cl—π inter­actions and I⋯Cl halogen bonds. PMID:27555941

  18. Identification and biochemical characterization of an Arabidopsis indole-3-acetic acid glucosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R G; Lim, E K; Li, Y; Kowalczyk, M; Sandberg, G; Hoggett, J; Ashford, D A; Bowles, D J

    2001-02-01

    Biochemical characterization of recombinant gene products following a phylogenetic analysis of the UDP-glucosyltransferase (UGT) multigene family of Arabidopsis has identified one enzyme (UGT84B1) with high activity toward the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and three related enzymes (UGT84B2, UGT75B1, and UGT75B2) with trace activities. The identity of the IAA conjugate has been confirmed to be 1-O-indole acetyl glucose ester. A sequence annotated as a UDP-glucose:IAA glucosyltransferase (IAA-UGT) in the Arabidopsis genome and expressed sequence tag data bases given its similarity to the maize iaglu gene sequence showed no activity toward IAA. This study describes the first biochemical analysis of a recombinant IAA-UGT and provides the foundation for future genetic approaches to understand the role of 1-O-indole acetyl glucose ester in Arabidopsis. PMID:11042207

  19. Synthesis, structural investigations, and anti-cancer activity of new methyl indole-3-carboxylate derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemyjska, Maria; Maciejewska, Dorota; Wolska, Irena; Truszkowski, Paweł

    2012-10-01

    Two new methyl indole-3-carboxylate derivatives: methyl 1-(3'-indolylmethane)-indole-3-carboxylate (1), and methyl 1-(1'-benzenosulfonyl-3'-indolylmethane)-indole-3-carboxylate (2) were synthesized. They are interesting as the analogs of 3,3'-diindolylmethane, which is intensively tested as a potent antitumor agent. Their solid-state structure was characterized using 13C CP/MAS NMR or X-ray diffraction measurements. Molecular modeling was used as a help in the structure elucidation. The solid-state NMR spectroscopy showed only one stable conformer of 1, but the X-ray diffraction results indicate that compound 2 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1 with two molecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit. Both compounds inhibited the growth of melanoma, renal and breast cancers cell lines.

  20. Recent development of new substituted indole and azaindole derivatives as anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Ölgen, Süreyya

    2013-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infections cause global health problems. Indole derivatives have been considered as one of the promising HIV inhibitors. Recent inventions have focused on substituted indole and azaindole derivatives that possess unique antiviral activities against HIV-1. In this review, the evaluation of recent advances in substituted indole and azaindole derivatives for the treatment or prevention of HIV-1 and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) has been focused. In this respect, compounds having drug and bio-active properties, including their synthesis and pharmacologic properties have been reported. In addition, anti-HIV properties of compounds, the structural features of inhibitors, the current progress in terms of therapeutic interventions and the leading groups in the field are discussed. Moreover, clinical and ADME (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Elimination) properties of some clinically important compounds such as BMS-378806, L-737126 and IDX899 are reported. PMID:23895189

  1. Adaptation of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor to sense microbiota-derived indoles

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Troy D.; Murray, Iain A.; Bisson, William H.; Lahoti, Tejas S.; Gowda, Krishne; Amin, Shantu G.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Perdew, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Ligand activation of the aryl hydrocarbon (AHR) has profound effects upon the immunological status of the gastrointestinal tract, establishing and maintaining signaling networks, which facilitate host-microbe homeostasis at the mucosal interface. However, the identity of the ligand(s) responsible for such AHR-mediated activation within the gut remains to be firmly established. Here, we combine in vitro ligand binding, quantitative gene expression, protein-DNA interaction and ligand structure activity analyses together with in silico modeling of the AHR ligand binding domain to identify indole, a microbial tryptophan metabolite, as a human-AHR selective agonist. Human AHR, acting as a host indole receptor may exhibit a unique bimolecular (2:1) binding stoichiometry not observed with typical AHR ligands. Such bimolecular indole-mediated activation of the human AHR within the gastrointestinal tract may provide a foundation for inter-kingdom signaling between the enteric microflora and the immune system to promote commensalism within the gut. PMID:26235394

  2. Subcellular Localization of Enzymes Involved in Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus1

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Vincenzo; Cutler, Adrian J.

    1987-01-01

    The subcellular localization of enzymes involved in indole alkaloid biosynthesis in leaves of Catharanthus roseus has been investigated. Tryptophan decarboxylase and strictosidine synthase which together produce strictosidine, the first indole alkaloid of this pathway, are both cytoplasmic enzymes. S-Adenosyl-l-methionine: 16-methoxy-2,3-dihydro-3-hydroxytabersonine-N-methyltransferase which catalyses the third to last step in vindoline biosynthesis could be localized in the chloroplasts of Catharanthus leaves and is specifically associated with thylakoids. Acetyl-coenzyme-A-deacetylvindoline-O-acetyltransferase which catalyses the last step in vindoline biosynthesis could also be localized in the cytoplasm. The participation of the chloroplast in this pathway suggests that indole alkaloid intermediates enter and exit this compartment during the biosynthesis of vindoline. PMID:16665811

  3. Experimental and computational study on the molecular energetics of indoline and indole.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Manuel A V Ribeiro; Cabral, Joana I T A; Gomes, José R B

    2008-11-27

    Static bomb calorimetry, Calvet microcalorimetry and the Knudsen effusion technique were used to determine the standard molar enthalpy of formation in the gas phase, at T = 298.15 K, of the indole and indoline heterocyclic compounds. The values obtained were 164.3 +/- 1.3 kJ x mol(-1) and 120.0 +/- 2.9 kJ x mol(-1), respectively. Several different computational approaches and different working reactions were used to estimate the gas-phase enthalpies of formation for indole and indoline. The computational approaches support the experimental results reported. The calculations were further extended to the determination of other properties such as bond dissociation enthalpies, gas-phase acidities, proton and electron affinities and ionization energies. The agreement between theoretical and experimental data for indole is very good supporting the data calculated for indoline. PMID:18980369

  4. Properties of the indole ring in metal complexes. A comparison with the phenol ring.

    PubMed

    Shimazaki, Yuichi; Yajima, Tatsuo; Yamauchi, Osamu

    2015-07-01

    Tryptophan (Trp), an essential amino acid, has an indole ring with a high electron density and is frequently seen at the proximal position of the metal site in metalloproteins. For example, the indole ring of Trp has been reported to interact weakly with Cu(I) in a Cu chaperone CusF. Another aromatic amino acid, tyrosine (Tyr), has a phenol ring, which is an important metal binding site in various metalloproteins. Although the structures of the aromatic rings are different, they both have a weakly acidic moiety and perform some similar roles in biological systems, such as radical formation and electron transfer. In this review, we focus on these and other properties of the indole and phenol rings in metal-containing systems. PMID:25817198

  5. Catalytic Asymmetric Reactions of 4-Substituted Indoles with Nitroethene: A Direct Entry to Ergot Alkaloid Structures.

    PubMed

    Romanini, Simone; Galletti, Emilio; Caruana, Lorenzo; Mazzanti, Andrea; Himo, Fahmi; Santoro, Stefano; Fochi, Mariafrancesca; Bernardi, Luca

    2015-12-01

    A domino Friedel-Crafts/nitro-Michael reaction between 4-substituted indoles and nitroethene is presented. The reaction is catalyzed by BINOL-derived phosphoric acid catalysts, and delivers the corresponding 3,4-ring-fused indoles with very good results in terms of yields and diastereo- and enantioselectivities. The tricyclic benzo[cd]indole products bear a nitro group at the right position to serve as precursors of ergot alkaloids, as demonstrated by the formal synthesis of 6,7-secoagroclavine from one of the adducts. DFT calculations suggest that the outcome of the reaction stems from the preferential evolution of a key nitronic acid intermediate through a nucleophilic addition pathway, rather than to the expected "quenching" through protonation. PMID:26486074

  6. Palladium-catalyzed reactions in the synthesis of 3- and 4-substituted indoles. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, L.S.; Sestrick, M.R.; Michaelson, E.T.; Harrington, P.J. )

    1989-08-18

    4-Bromo-1-tosylindole (1) was converted to tricyclic indole enone 11, a potential intermediate in the synthesis of tetracyclic ergot alkaloids, by a series of palladium-catalyzed processes. Attempts to construct the ergot D ring by the hetero-Diels-Alder reaction of enone 11 and 1-azabutadiene 12 produced not the expected (4 + 2) adduct 13 but the benz(cd)indoline derivative 14 resulting from attack of the aza diene at the indole 2-position. The thermodynamic stability of the naphthol nucleus makes enone 11 generally susceptible to attack at the indole 2-position, as evidenced by the attack of hydride and methyl cuprate nucleophiles at this portion forming indolines 16 and 17, respectively.

  7. An herbivore elicitor activates the gene for indole emission in maize

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Monika; Stettner, Cornelia; Paré, Paul W.; Schmelz, Eric A.; Tumlinson, James H.; Gierl, Alfons

    2000-01-01

    Maize and a variety of other plant species release volatile compounds in response to herbivore attack that serve as chemical cues to signal natural enemies of the feeding herbivore. N-(17-hydroxylinolenoyl)-l-glutamine is an elicitor component that has been isolated and chemically characterized from the regurgitant of the herbivore-pest beet armyworm. This fatty acid derivative, referred to as volicitin, triggers the synthesis and release of volatile components, including terpenoids and indole in maize. Here we report on a previously unidentified enzyme, indole-3-glycerol phosphate lyase (IGL), that catalyzes the formation of free indole and is selectively activated by volicitin. IGL's enzymatic properties are similar to BX1, a maize enzyme that serves as the entry point to the secondary defense metabolites DIBOA and DIMBOA. Gene-sequence analysis indicates that Igl and Bx1 are evolutionarily related to the tryptophan synthase alpha subunit. PMID:11106389

  8. The inter-kingdom volatile signal indole promotes root development by interfering with auxin signalling.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Aurélien; Groenhagen, Ulrike; Schulz, Stefan; Geisler, Markus; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2014-12-01

    Recently, emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has emerged as a mode of communication between bacteria and plants. Although some bacterial VOCs that promote plant growth have been identified, their underlying mechanism of action is unknown. Here we demonstrate that indole, which was identified using a screen for Arabidopsis growth promotion by VOCs from soil-borne bacteria, is a potent plant-growth modulator. Its prominent role in increasing the plant secondary root network is mediated by interfering with the auxin-signalling machinery. Using auxin reporter lines and classic auxin physiological and transport assays we show that the indole signal invades the plant body, reaches zones of auxin activity and acts in a polar auxin transport-dependent bimodal mechanism to trigger differential cellular auxin responses. Our results suggest that indole, beyond its importance as a bacterial signal molecule, can serve as a remote messenger to manipulate plant growth and development. PMID:25227998

  9. Naturally-Occurring Marine Brominated Indoles are Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligands/Agonists

    PubMed Central

    DeGroot, Danica E.; Franks, Diana G.; Higa, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Junichi; Hahn, Mark E.; Denison, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that mediates the toxic and biological effects of structurally diverse chemicals, including the environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). As part of a larger effort to identify the full spectrum of chemicals that can bind to and activate the AhR, we have examined the ability of several naturally-occurring marine-derived brominated indoles and brominated (methylthio)indoles (collectively referred to as “brominated indoles”) to bind to the AhR and stimulate AhR-dependent gene expression. Incubation of mouse, rat and guinea pig recombinant cell lines containing a stably transfected AhR-responsive luciferase reporter gene with eight brominated indoles revealed that all compounds stimulated luciferase reporter gene activity, although some species-specific differences were observed. All compounds induced significantly more luciferase activity when incubated with cells for 4 h as compared to 24 h, demonstrating that these compounds are transient activators of the AhR signaling pathway. Three of the brominated indoles induced CYP1A1 mRNA in human HepG2 cells in vitro and Cyp1a mRNA in zebrafish embryos in vivo. The identification of the brominated indoles as direct ligands and activators/agonists of the AhR was confirmed by their ability to compete with [3H]TCDD for binding to the AhR and to stimulate AhR transformation and DNA binding in vitro. Taken together, these marine-derived brominated indoles are members of a new class of naturally-occurring AhR agonists. PMID:26001051

  10. Potassium iodide catalyzed simultaneous C3-formylation and N-aminomethylation of indoles with 4-substituted-N,N-dimethylanilines.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan-Tao; Li, Hong-Ying; Xing, Li-Juan; Wen, Li-Juan; Wang, Peng; Wang, Bin

    2012-12-28

    A one-pot dual functionalization of indoles has been developed. The simultaneous C3-formylation and N-aminomethylation of indoles can be achieved using readily available potassium iodide as a catalyst and tert-butyl peroxybenzoate as a co-oxidant. PMID:23143045

  11. Synthesis of quinoline-3-carboxylates by a Rh(II)-catalyzed cyclopropanation-ring expansion reaction of indoles with halodiazoacetates

    PubMed Central

    Mortén, Magnus; Hennum, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Summary In this letter, we report a novel synthesis of ethyl quinoline-3-carboxylates from reactions between a series of indoles and halodiazoacetates. The formation of the quinoline structure is probably the result of a cyclopropanation at the 2- and 3-positions of the indole followed by ring-opening of the cyclopropane and elimination of H–X. PMID:26664614

  12. Genome Sequence of an Efficient Indole-Degrading Bacterium, Cupriavidus sp. Strain IDO, with Potential Polyhydroxyalkanoate Production Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiao; Zhang, Zhaojing; Li, Pengpeng

    2015-01-01

    Cupriavidus sp. strain IDO has been shown to efficiently transform indole, and the genus of Cupriavidus has been described as a promising cell factory for polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis from low-cost wastes. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of strain IDO, which may provide useful genetic information on indole metabolism and polyhydroxyalkanoate production. PMID:25767238

  13. Asymmetric Synthesis of CF3- and Indole-Containing Thiochromanes via a Squaramide-Catalyzed Michael-Aldol Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanyuan; Dong, Zhenghao; Cheng, Xin; Zhong, Xiaoling; Liu, Xiaolin; Lin, Li; Shen, Zhiqiang; Yang, Peiju; Li, Yuan; Wang, Hailin; Yan, Wenjin; Wang, Kairong; Wang, Rui

    2016-08-01

    A Michael-aldol reaction of 2-mercaptobenzaldehyde with β-indole-β-CF3 enones catalyzed by a squaramide has been realized. The method affords a series of 2-CF3-2-indole-substituted thiochromanes featuring a CF3-containing quaternary stereocenter in excellent yields, diastereoselectivities, and enantioselectivities. PMID:27390924

  14. Heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of unprotected indoles in water: A green solution to a long-standing challenge

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Aditya; Zhou, Weihong; Török, Béla

    2011-01-01

    An environmentally benign procedure for the hydrogenation of unprotected indoles is described. The hydrogenation reaction is catalyzed by Pt/C and activated by p-toluenesulfonic acid in water as a solvent. The efficacy of the method is illustrated by the hydrogenation of a variety of substituted indoles to their corresponding indolines which were obtained in excellent yields. PMID:21902212

  15. Benzannulation via the Reaction of Ynamides and Vinylketenes. Application to the Synthesis of Highly Substituted Indoles

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Tin Yiu; Wang, Yu-Pu

    2013-01-01

    A two-stage “tandem strategy” for the synthesis of indoles with a high level of substitution on the six-membered ring is described. Benzannulation based on the reaction of cyclobutenones with ynamides proceeds via a cascade of four pericyclic reactions to produce multiply substituted aniline derivatives in which the position ortho to the nitrogen can bear a wide range of functionalized substituents. In the second stage of the tandem strategy, highly substituted indoles are generated via acid-, base-, and palladium-catalyzed cyclization and annulation processes. PMID:23952525

  16. [A new indole derivative from endophyte Myrothecium roridum IFB-E091 in Artemisia annua].

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Li, Ling-yu; Zhang, Xiao-jun; Li, Ming; Song, Yong-chun

    2015-10-01

    Three compounds were isolated from solid culture of endophyte Myrothecium roridum IFB-E091 in Artemisia annua. Their structures were determined as (S)-(-)-N-[2-(3-hydroxy-2-oxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-indol-3-yl)-ethyl]-acetamide (1), N-(4-hydroxyphenethyl)acetamide (2) and asperfumoid (3), in which compound 1 was a new indole derivative. In cytotoxicity assay, the compound 1 had no obvious inhibition activity in human hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721 and human cervical carcinoma cell line HeLa. PMID:26837178

  17. Structural Diversity and Biological Activities of Indole Diketopiperazine Alkaloids from Fungi.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yang-Min; Liang, Xi-Ai; Kong, Yang; Jia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    Indole diketopiperazine alkaloids are secondary metabolites of microorganisms that are widely distributed in filamentous fungi, especially in the genera Aspergillus and Penicillium of the phylum Ascomycota or sac fungi. These alkaloids represent a group of natural products characterized by diversity in both chemical structures and biological activities. This review aims to summarize 166 indole diketopiperazine alkaloids from fungi published from 1944 to mid-2015. The emphasis is on diverse chemical structures within these alkaloids and their relevant biological activities. The aim is to assess which of these compounds merit further study for purposes of drug development. PMID:27538469

  18. Co(III)-Catalyzed, Internal and Terminal Alkyne-Compatible Synthesis of Indoles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuguang; Wang, Jinhu; Wang, Lili; Chen, Kehao; Song, Chao; Zhu, Jin

    2016-08-01

    A Co(III)-catalyzed, internal and terminal alkyne-compatible indole synthesis protocol is reported herein. The N-amino (hydrazine) group imparts distinct, diverse reactivity patterns for directed C-H functionalization/cyclization reactions. Notable synthetic features include regioselectivity for a meta-substituted arylhydrazine, regioselectivity for a chain-branched terminal alkyne, formal incorporation of an acetylenic unit through C2-desilylation on a C2-silylated indole derivative, formal inversion of regioselectivity through consecutive C3-derivatization and C2-desilylation processes, and formal bond migration for a linear-chain terminal alkyne. PMID:27434348

  19. Design, synthesis, and biological activity of oxime ether strobilurin derivatives containing indole moiety as novel fungicide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ya-Qiang; Huang, Zi-Long; Yan, Hui-Dong; Li, Jun; Ye, Li-Yi; Che, Li-Ming; Tu, Song

    2015-06-01

    Twenty-one novel oxime ether strobilurins containing indole moiety, which employed an indole group to stabilize the E-styryl group in Enoxastrobin, were designed and synthesized. The biological assay indicated that most compounds exhibited potent fungicidal activities. The structure-activity relationship study demonstrated that the synthesized methyl 3-methoxypropenoate oxime ethers 7b-e exhibited remarkably high activities among all the synthesized oxime ether compounds 7. Moreover, the fungicidal activities of methyl α-(methoxyimino)benzeneacetate oxime ethers compounds 7f-i and N-methoxy-carbamic acid methyl esters compounds 7j-m showed significant differences compared to the corresponding products of ammonolysis. PMID:25346294

  20. Active site diversification of P450cam with indole generates catalysts for benzylic oxidation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Herter, Susanne; Kranz, David C; Turner, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are useful biocatalysts for C–H activation, and there is a need to expand the range of these enzymes beyond what is naturally available. A panel of 93 variants of active self-sufficient P450cam[Tyr96Phe]-RhFRed fusion enzymes with a broad diversity in active site amino acids was developed by screening a large mutant library of 16,500 clones using a simple, highly sensitive colony-based colorimetric screen against indole. These mutants showed distinct fingerprints of activity not only when screened in oxidations of substituted indoles but also for unrelated oxidations such as benzylic hydroxylations. PMID:26664590

  1. Substituted indoles as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a patent evaluation (WO2015044928).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Gao, Ping; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-05-01

    The invention described in this patent (WO2015044928) is related to compounds based on the substituted indole scaffold, their synthetic process and application to inhibit HIV-1 replication as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Some of the newly claimed compounds presented improved potency against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 strain in comparison to previously disclosed indole-based NNRTIs and were also shown to be effective against common resistant HIV-1 strains. In light of their novel structural characteristics, simple synthetic route and improved anti-HIV activity, these compounds deserve further study as promising NNRTIs. PMID:26742549

  2. Indole alkaloids from Vinca major and V. minor growing in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bahadori, Fatemeh; Topçu, Gülaçti; Boğa, Mehmet; Türkekul, Ayla; Kolak, Ufuk; Kartal, Murat

    2012-06-01

    A new indole alkaloid, 11-hydroxypolyneuridine, was isolated from Vinca major subsp. major L. and the known indole alkaloids vallesiachotamine and isovallesiachotamine from Vinca minor L. This is the first report on the alkaloids of both Vinca species growing in Turkey; vallesiachotamine and isovallesiachotamine were isolated from a Vinca species for the first time. V. minor may be considered as a new source for these two alkaloids due to their occurrence in high amount in the aerial parts of the plant. The alkaloid extracts of the two Vinca species were found to have high lipid peroxidation inhibitory and DPPH radical scavenging activities. Anticholinesterase activity of the extracts was also very strong. PMID:22816294

  3. Gold-Catalyzed Intramolecular Tandem Cyclization of Indole-Ynamides: Diastereoselective Synthesis of Spirocyclic Pyrrolidinoindolines.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nan; Chang, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Li-Jie; Gong, Jian-Xian; Yang, Zhen

    2016-02-01

    A gold-catalyzed intramolecular tandem cyclization of indole-ynamide affords tetracyclic spirocyclic pyrrolidinoindoline bearing an all-carbon quaternary stereocentre in a single step; however, when the reaction was carried out in the presence of BF3 ⋅Et2 O, the corresponding tricyclic spirocyclic pyrrolidinoindoline-based enones are produced through a key 1,5-hydride shift. The developed chemistry provides a diastereoselective and straightforward entry to structurally diverse polycylic pyrrolidinoindolines from indole-ynamides in one-pot reactions under mild conditions. PMID:26374716

  4. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of Dihydropyrido[1,2-a]indoles from Nitrones and Allenoates.

    PubMed

    Pace, Wiktoria H; Mo, Dong-Liang; Reidl, Tyler W; Wink, Donald J; Anderson, Laura L

    2016-08-01

    An asymmetric method for the synthesis of dihydropyrido[1,2-a]indoles from mixtures of nitrones and allenoates has been developed. This transformation showcases the use of squaramide catalysis in a complicated cascade system that has been shown to be highly sensitive to reaction conditions and substituent effects. The new method provides access to enantiomerically enriched dihydropyridoindoles from modular, non-indole reagents. The optimization and scope of the new transformation is discussed in addition to initial mechanistic experiments that indicate the role of the catalyst. PMID:27346675

  5. 2-Methyl-1-phenyl­sulfonyl-1H-indole-3-carbaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Ramathilagam, C.; Saravanan, V.; Mohanakrishnan, A. K.; Umarani, P. R.; Manivannan, V.

    2011-01-01

    In the title compound, C16H13NO3S, the sulfonyl-bound phenyl ring forms a dihedral angle of 84.17 (6)° with the indole ring system. An intra­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bond generates an S(6) ring motif. The crystal structure exhibits weak inter­molecular C—H⋯O hydrogen bonds and π–π inter­actions between the five- and six-membered rings of the indole group [centroid–centroid distance = 3.6871 (9) Å]. PMID:22058759

  6. A new indole alkaloidal glucoside from the aerial parts of Clematis terniflora DC.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Ting; Yang, Bing-Xian; Zhu, Wei; Gong, Ming-Hua; Xu, Xiang-Dong; Lu, Xiang-Hong; Sun, Lian-Li; Tian, Jing-Kui; Zhang, Lin

    2013-01-01

    A new indole alkaloidal glucoside together with three known compounds aurantiamide acetate (2), eleutheroside E (3) and 1-O-caffeoyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (4) has been isolated from ethanol extract of the aerial parts of Clematis terniflora DC. On the basis of their spectroscopic and chemical evidence, the new compound was elucidated as (6-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-1H-indol-3-yl) carboxylic acid methyl ester (1). Compounds 1 and 3 showed significant cytotoxicity against human ECA-109. PMID:24050211

  7. Tetracyclic indole inhibitors of hepatitis C virus NS5B-polymerase.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Ian; Ercolani, Caterina; Mackay, Angela; Conte, Immacolata; Pompei, Marco; Koch, Uwe; Gennari, Nadia; Giuliano, Claudio; Rowley, Michael; Narjes, Frank

    2009-02-01

    We report the evolutionary path from an open-chain series to conformationally constrained tetracyclic indole inhibitors of HCV NS5B-polymerase, where the C2 aromatic is tethered to the indole nitrogen. SAR studies led to the discovery of zwitterionic compounds endowed with good intrinsic enzyme affinity and cell-based potency, as well as superior DMPK profiles to their acyclic counterparts, and ultimately to the identification of a pre-clinical candidate with an excellent predicted human pharmacokinetic profile. PMID:19131244

  8. The "Gatekeeper" Residue Influences the Mode of Binding of Acetyl Indoles to Bromodomains.

    PubMed

    Unzue, Andrea; Zhao, Hongtao; Lolli, Graziano; Dong, Jing; Zhu, Jian; Zechner, Melanie; Dolbois, Aymeric; Caflisch, Amedeo; Nevado, Cristina

    2016-04-14

    Small-molecule hits for the bromodomains of CREBBP and BAZ2B have been identified by scaffold hopping followed by docking of a set of ∼200 compounds containing the acetyl indole scaffold. Chemical synthesis of nearly 30 derivatives has resulted in ligands of representatives of three subfamilies of human bromodomains with favorable ligand efficiency. The X-ray crystal structures of three different bromodomains (CREBBP, BAZ2B, and BRPF1b) in complex with acetyl indole derivatives reveal the influence of the gatekeeper residue on the orientation of small-molecule ligands in the acetyl lysine binding site. PMID:26982797

  9. Indole – the scent of a healthy ‘inner soil’

    PubMed Central

    Berstad, Arnold; Raa, Jan; Valeur, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid with an indole nucleus. Humans cannot produce this amino acid themselves, but must obtain it through their diet. Much attention is currently paid to the wide physiological and clinical implications of the tryptophan-derived substances, serotonin and kynurenines, generated by human enzymes following the intestinal absorption of tryptophan. However, even before being absorbed, several microbial metabolites of tryptophan are formed, mainly from ‘malabsorbed’ (incompletely digested) proteins within the colon. The normal smell of human faeces is largely due to indole, one of the major metabolites. Recent studies indicate that this foul-smelling substance is also of utmost importance for our health. PMID:26282698

  10. The effects of UV-B stress on the production of terpenoid indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Binder, Bernard Y K; Peebles, Christie A M; Shanks, Jacqueline V; San, Ka-Yiu

    2009-01-01

    In nature, plants generate protective secondary metabolites in response to environmental stresses. Such metabolites include terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), which absorb UV-B light and serve putatively to protect the plant from harmful radiation. Catharanthus roseus plants, multiple shoot cultures, and cell suspension cultures exposed to UV-B light show significant increases in the production of TIAs, including precursors to vinblastine and vincristine, which have proven effective in the treatment of leukemia and lymphoma. Here, the effect of UV-B light on C. roseus hairy roots was examined. Analysis of alkaloid concentrations up to 168 h after UV-B exposure shows significant increases in the concentrations of lochnericine and significant decreases in the concentration of hörhammericine over time (ANOVA, P < 0.05). Our results also indicate that increasing UV-B exposure time up to 20 min caused significant increases in lochnericine, serpentine, and ajmalicine and a decrease in hörhammericine (t-test, p < 0.05). PMID:19479674

  11. Data quality in predictive toxicology: reproducibility of rodent carcinogenicity experiments.

    PubMed Central

    Gottmann, E; Kramer, S; Pfahringer, B; Helma, C

    2001-01-01

    We compared 121 replicate rodent carcinogenicity assays from the two parts (National Cancer Institute/National Toxicology Program and literature) of the Carcinogenic Potency Database (CPDB) to estimate the reliability of these experiments. We estimated a concordance of 57% between the overall rodent carcinogenicity classifications from both sources. This value did not improve substantially when additional biologic information (species, sex, strain, target organs) was considered. These results indicate that rodent carcinogenicity assays are much less reproducible than previously expected, an effect that should be considered in the development of structure-activity relationship models and the risk assessment process. PMID:11401763

  12. Myo-inositol esters of indole-3-acetic acid are endogenous components of Zea mays L. shoot tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chisnell, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol esters have been demonstrated to be endogenous components of etiolated Zea mays shoots tissue. This was accomplished by comparison of the putative compounds with authentic, synthetic esters. The properties compared were liquid and gas-liquid chromatographic retention times and the 70-ev mass spectral fragmentation pattern of the pentaacetyl derivative. The amount of indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol esters in the shoots was determined to be 74 nanomoles per kilogram fresh weight as measured by isotope dilution, accounting for 19% of the ester indole-3-acetic acid of the shoot. This work is the first characterization of an ester conjugate of indole-3-acetate acid from vegetative shoot tissue using multiple chromatographic properties and mass spectral identification. The kernel and the seedling shoot both contain indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol esters, and these esters comprise approximately the same percentage of the total ester content of the kernel and of the shoot.

  13. Characterization of a Nitrilase and a Nitrile Hydratase from Pseudomonas sp. Strain UW4 That Converts Indole-3-Acetonitrile to Indole-3-Acetic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is a fundamental phytohormone with the ability to control many aspects of plant growth and development. Pseudomonas sp. strain UW4 is a rhizospheric plant growth-promoting bacterium that produces and secretes IAA. While several putative IAA biosynthetic genes have been reported in this bacterium, the pathways leading to the production of IAA in strain UW4 are unclear. Here, the presence of the indole-3-acetamide (IAM) and indole-3-acetaldoxime/indole-3-acetonitrile (IAOx/IAN) pathways of IAA biosynthesis is described, and the specific role of two of the enzymes (nitrilase and nitrile hydratase) that mediate these pathways is assessed. The genes encoding these two enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the enzymes were isolated and characterized. Substrate-feeding assays indicate that the nitrilase produces both IAM and IAA from the IAN substrate, while the nitrile hydratase only produces IAM. The two nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes have very different temperature and pH optimums. Nitrilase prefers a temperature of 50°C and a pH of 6, while nitrile hydratase prefers 4°C and a pH of 7.5. Based on multiple sequence alignments and motif analyses, physicochemical properties and enzyme assays, it is concluded that the UW4 nitrilase has an aromatic substrate specificity. The nitrile hydratase is identified as an iron-type metalloenzyme that does not require the help of a P47K activator protein to be active. These data are interpreted in terms of a preliminary model for the biosynthesis of IAA in this bacterium. PMID:24837382

  14. Hindlimb unloading rodent model: technical aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center in the mid-1970s, many laboratories around the world have used the rat hindlimb unloading model to simulate weightlessness and to study various aspects of musculoskeletal loading. In this model, the hindlimbs of rodents are elevated to produce a 30 degrees head-down tilt, which results in a cephalad fluid shift and avoids weightbearing by the hindquarters. Although several reviews have described scientific results obtained with this model, this is the first review to focus on the technical aspects of hindlimb unloading. This review includes a history of the technique, a brief comparison with spaceflight data, technical details, extension of the model to mice, and other important technical considerations (e.g., housing, room temperature, unloading angle, the potential need for multiple control groups, age, body weight, the use of the forelimb tissues as internal controls, and when to remove animals from experiments). This paper is intended as a reference for researchers, reviewers of manuscripts, and institutional animal care and use committees. Over 800 references, related to the hindlimb unloading model, can be accessed via the electronic version of this article.

  15. Assessing Spatial Learning and Memory in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Vorhees, Charles V.; Williams, Michael T.

    2014-01-01

    Maneuvering safely through the environment is central to survival of almost all species. The ability to do this depends on learning and remembering locations. This capacity is encoded in the brain by two systems: one using cues outside the organism (distal cues), allocentric navigation, and one using self-movement, internal cues and nearby proximal cues, egocentric navigation. Allocentric navigation involves the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex, and surrounding structures; in humans this system encodes allocentric, semantic, and episodic memory. This form of memory is assessed in laboratory animals in many ways, but the dominant form of assessment is the Morris water maze (MWM). Egocentric navigation involves the dorsal striatum and connected structures; in humans this system encodes routes and integrated paths and, when overlearned, becomes procedural memory. In this article, several allocentric assessment methods for rodents are reviewed and compared with the MWM. MWM advantages (little training required, no food deprivation, ease of testing, rapid and reliable learning, insensitivity to differences in body weight and appetite, absence of nonperformers, control methods for proximal cue learning, and performance effects) and disadvantages (concern about stress, perhaps not as sensitive for working memory) are discussed. Evidence-based design improvements and testing methods are reviewed for both rats and mice. Experimental factors that apply generally to spatial navigation and to MWM specifically are considered. It is concluded that, on balance, the MWM has more advantages than disadvantages and compares favorably with other allocentric navigation tasks. PMID:25225309

  16. Rodent models of aging bone: an update.

    PubMed

    Syed, Farhan A; Melim, Terry

    2011-12-01

    With an increase in the average life span especially in the Western hemisphere, there is renewed interest in treating maladies of old age including osteoporosis. Age-related bone loss and resultant osteoporosis substantially increase risk of fractures and morbidity in the geriatric population leading to both a decline in the quality of life for the elderly as well as a substantial burden on the health care system. Herein, we review recent research in murine and rodent models looking at how both extrinsic and intrinsic factors such as hormones, biochemicals, neuromodulators, inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, nutrition, and exercise influence the skeleton with age. Recent studies on the relationship between bone and fat in the marrow, and the fate of the marrow mesenchymal stromal cell population, which can give rise to either bone-forming osteoblasts or fat-forming adipocytic cells as a function of age, have also been highlighted. An appreciable range of studies using aging murine as well as cellular models are discussed, as these studies have broadened our understanding of the pathways and players in the aging bone. Impactful information regarding aging and the bone may then allow the application of better pharmacologic as well as nonpharmacologic regimens to alleviate bone loss due to aging. PMID:21918858

  17. Active vibrissal sensing in rodents and marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Mitchinson, Ben; Grant, Robyn A.; Arkley, Kendra; Rankov, Vladan; Perkon, Igor; Prescott, Tony J.

    2011-01-01

    In rats, the long facial whiskers (mystacial macrovibrissae) are repetitively and rapidly swept back and forth during exploration in a behaviour known as ‘whisking’. In this paper, we summarize previous evidence from rats, and present new data for rat, mouse and the marsupial grey short-tailed opossum (Monodelphis domestica) showing that whisking in all three species is actively controlled both with respect to movement of the animal's body and relative to environmental structure. Using automatic whisker tracking, and Fourier analysis, we first show that the whisking motion of the mystacial vibrissae, in the horizontal plane, can be approximated as a blend of two sinusoids at the fundamental frequency (mean 8.5, 11.3 and 7.3 Hz in rat, mouse and opossum, respectively) and its second harmonic. The oscillation at the second harmonic is particularly strong in mouse (around 22 Hz) consistent with previous reports of fast whisking in that species. In all three species, we found evidence of asymmetric whisking during head turning and following unilateral object contacts consistent with active control of whisker movement. We propose that the presence of active vibrissal touch in both rodents and marsupials suggests that this behavioural capacity emerged at an early stage in the evolution of therian mammals. PMID:21969685

  18. Widespread vestibular activation of the rodent cortex.

    PubMed

    Rancz, Ede A; Moya, Javier; Drawitsch, Florian; Brichta, Alan M; Canals, Santiago; Margrie, Troy W

    2015-04-15

    Much of our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms of spatial navigation is derived from chronic recordings in rodents in which head-direction, place, and grid cells have all been described. However, despite the proposed importance of self-reference information to these internal representations of space, their congruence with vestibular signaling remains unclear. Here we have undertaken brain-wide functional mapping using both fMRI and electrophysiological methods to directly determine the spatial extent, strength, and time course of vestibular signaling across the rat forebrain. We find distributed activity throughout thalamic, limbic, and particularly primary sensory cortical areas in addition to known head-direction pathways. We also observe activation of frontal regions, including infralimbic and cingulate cortices, indicating integration of vestibular information throughout functionally diverse cortical regions. These whole-brain activity maps therefore suggest a widespread contribution of vestibular signaling to a self-centered framework for multimodal sensorimotor integration in support of movement planning, execution, spatial navigation, and autonomic responses to gravito-inertial changes. PMID:25878265

  19. Utility of Recycled Bedding for Laboratory Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Toru; Li, Zhixia; Kibushi, Tomomi; Okano, Shinya; Yamasaki, Nakamichi; Kasai, Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    Animal facilities generate a large amount of used bedding containing excrement as medical waste. We developed a recycling system for used bedding that involves soft hydrothermal processing. In this study, we examined the effects of bedding type on growth, hematologic and serum biochemical values, and organ weights of female and male mice reared on either recycled or fresh bedding from 3 to 33 wk of age. Neither growth nor physiology differed between mice housed on recycled bedding compared with fresh bedding. When 14-wk-old mice were bred, litter size and total number of weaned pups showed no significant differences between animals raised on recycled or fresh bedding. Because bedding type influences the environment within cages and animal rooms, we evaluated particulate and ammonia data from cages and animal rooms. Values were significantly lower from cages and rooms that used recycled bedding than from those using fresh bedding, thus indicating that recycled bedding has the potential to improve the environment within both cages and animal rooms. Overall, this study revealed that recycled bedding is an excellent material for use in housing laboratory rodents. Specifically, recycled bedding may reduce medical waste and maintain healthy environments within cages and animal rooms. PMID:19653951

  20. Mother–Pup Interactions: Rodents and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lucion, Aldo B.; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2014-01-01

    In order to survive after birth, mammalian infants need a caretaker, usually the mother. Several behavioral strategies have evolved to guarantee the transition from a period of intense caregiving to offspring independence. Here, we examine a selection of literature on the genetic, epigenetic, physiological, and behavioral factors relating to development and mother–infant interactions. We intend to show the utility of comparisons between rodent and human models for deepening knowledge regarding this key relationship. Particular attention is paid to the following factors: the distinct developmental stages of the mother–pup relationship as relating to behavior; examples of key genetic components of mammalian mother–infant interactions, specifically those coding for the hormones oxytocin and vasopressin; and the possible functions of gene imprinting in mediating interactions between genetics and environment in the mother–infant relationship. As early mother–infant attachment seems to establish the basic parameters for later social interactions, ongoing investigations in this area are essential. We propose the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in order to better understand the network of genes, gene regulation, neuropeptide action, physiological processes, and feedback loops essential to understand the complex behaviors of mother–infant interaction. PMID:24616713

  1. Mother-pup interactions: rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Lucion, Aldo B; Bortolini, Maria Cátira

    2014-01-01

    In order to survive after birth, mammalian infants need a caretaker, usually the mother. Several behavioral strategies have evolved to guarantee the transition from a period of intense caregiving to offspring independence. Here, we examine a selection of literature on the genetic, epigenetic, physiological, and behavioral factors relating to development and mother-infant interactions. We intend to show the utility of comparisons between rodent and human models for deepening knowledge regarding this key relationship. Particular attention is paid to the following factors: the distinct developmental stages of the mother-pup relationship as relating to behavior; examples of key genetic components of mammalian mother-infant interactions, specifically those coding for the hormones oxytocin and vasopressin; and the possible functions of gene imprinting in mediating interactions between genetics and environment in the mother-infant relationship. As early mother-infant attachment seems to establish the basic parameters for later social interactions, ongoing investigations in this area are essential. We propose the importance of interdisciplinary collaboration in order to better understand the network of genes, gene regulation, neuropeptide action, physiological processes, and feedback loops essential to understand the complex behaviors of mother-infant interaction. PMID:24616713

  2. ASSESSMENT OF HOST RESISTANCE TO INFECTION WITH RODENT MALARIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resistance to malaria infection is known to require an intact immune system. his chapter presents an overview of rodent malaria, the host response to infection and methods for assessing infection in rats and mice.

  3. A NEW METHOD TO QUANTIFY CORE TEMPERATURE INSTABILITY IN RODENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods to quantify instability of autonomic systems such as temperature regulation should be important in toxicant and drug safety studies. Stability of core temperature (Tc) in laboratory rodents is susceptible to a variety of stimuli. Calculating the temperature differential o...

  4. Rodent-associated Bartonella Febrile Illness, Southwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Iralu, Jonathan; Bai, Ying; Crook, Larry; Tempest, Bruce; Simpson, Gary; McKenzie, Taylor

    2006-01-01

    Serum specimens from 114 patients hospitalized with a febrile illness were tested with an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) using Bartonella antigens prepared from 6 species of sigmodontine rodents and 3 known human Bartonella pathogens: B. henselae, B. quintana, and B. elizabethae. Acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples from 5 of these patients showed seroconversion with an IFA titer >512 to rodent-associated Bartonella antigens. The highest titer was against antigen derived from the white-throated woodrat (Neotoma albigula), although this rodent is not necessarily implicated as the source of infection. Three of the 5 who seroconverted showed no cross-reaction to the 3 Bartonella human pathogens. Common clinical characteristics were fever, chills, myalgias, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and transaminasemia. Although antibodies to Bartonella are cross-reactive, high-titer seroconversions to rodent-associated Bartonella antigens in adults with common clinical characteristics should stimulate the search for additional Bartonella human pathogens. PMID:16836824

  5. Can Rodent Longevity Studies be Both Short and Powerful?

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Henry T.; Smith, Daniel L.; Pajewski, Nicholas M.; Weindruch, Richard H.; Garland, Theodore; Argyropoulos, George; Bokov, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Many rodent experiments have assessed effects of diets, drugs, genes, and other factors on life span. A challenge with such experiments is their long duration, typically over 3.5 years given rodent life spans, thus requiring significant time costs until answers are obtained. We collected longevity data from 15 rodent studies and artificially truncated them at 2 years to assess the extent to which one will obtain the same answer regarding mortality effects. When truncated, the point estimates were not significantly different in any study, implying that in most cases, truncated studies yield similar estimates. The median ratio of variances of coefficients for truncated to full-length studies was 3.4, implying that truncated studies with roughly 3.4 times as many rodents will often have equivalent or greater power. Cost calculations suggest that shorter studies will be more expensive but perhaps not so much to not be worth the reduced time. PMID:21051569

  6. First Isolates of Leptospira spp., from Rodents Captured in Angola.

    PubMed

    Fortes-Gabriel, Elsa; Carreira, Teresa; Vieira, Maria Luísa

    2016-05-01

    Rodents play an important role in the transmission of pathogenic Leptospira spp. However, in Angola, neither the natural reservoirs of these spirochetes nor leptospirosis diagnosis has been considered. Regarding this gap, we captured rodents in Luanda and Huambo provinces to identify circulating Leptospira spp. Rodent kidney tissue was cultured and DNA amplified and sequenced. Culture isolates were evaluated for pathogenic status and typing with rabbit antisera; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing were also performed. A total of 37 rodents were captured: Rattus rattus (15, 40.5%), Rattus norvegicus (9, 24.3%), and Mus musculus (13, 35.2%). Leptospiral DNA was amplified in eight (21.6%) kidney samples. From the cultures, we obtained four (10.8%) Leptospira isolates belonging to the Icterohaemorrhagiae and Ballum serogroups of Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira borgpetersenii genospecies, respectively. This study provides information about circulating leptospires spread by rats and mice in Angola. PMID:26928840

  7. First Isolates of Leptospira spp., from Rodents Captured in Angola

    PubMed Central

    Fortes-Gabriel, Elsa; Carreira, Teresa; Vieira, Maria Luísa

    2016-01-01

    Rodents play an important role in the transmission of pathogenic Leptospira spp. However, in Angola, neither the natural reservoirs of these spirochetes nor leptospirosis diagnosis has been considered. Regarding this gap, we captured rodents in Luanda and Huambo provinces to identify circulating Leptospira spp. Rodent kidney tissue was cultured and DNA amplified and sequenced. Culture isolates were evaluated for pathogenic status and typing with rabbit antisera; polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing were also performed. A total of 37 rodents were captured: Rattus rattus (15, 40.5%), Rattus norvegicus (9, 24.3%), and Mus musculus (13, 35.2%). Leptospiral DNA was amplified in eight (21.6%) kidney samples. From the cultures, we obtained four (10.8%) Leptospira isolates belonging to the Icterohaemorrhagiae and Ballum serogroups of Leptospira interrogans and Leptospira borgpetersenii genospecies, respectively. This study provides information about circulating leptospires spread by rats and mice in Angola. PMID:26928840

  8. MEASUREMENT OF VENTILATORY FREQUENCY IN UNRESTRAINED RODENTS USING MICROWAVE RADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A novel technique for remote determination of breathing frequency in unrestrained rodents using microwave radiation is described. Single mice were placed inside a rectangular waveguide operating at 2450 MHz. Because mice efficiently absorb radio frequency energy at 2450 MHz, any ...

  9. Frequent disruption of the RB pathway in indolent follicular lymphoma suggests a new combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Oricchio, Elisa; Ciriello, Giovanni; Jiang, Man; Boice, Michael H; Schatz, Jonathan H; Heguy, Adriana; Viale, Agnes; de Stanchina, Elisa; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Bouska, Alyssa; McKeithan, Tim; Sander, Chris; Tam, Wayne; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Chan, Wing-Chung; Chaganti, R S K; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2014-06-30

    Loss of cell cycle controls is a hallmark of cancer and has a well-established role in aggressive B cell malignancies. However, the role of such lesions in indolent follicular lymphoma (FL) is unclear and individual lesions have been observed with low frequency. By analyzing genomic data from two large cohorts of indolent FLs, we identify a pattern of mutually exclusive (P = 0.003) genomic lesions that impair the retinoblastoma (RB) pathway in nearly 50% of FLs. These alterations include homozygous and heterozygous deletions of the p16/CDKN2a/b (7%) and RB1 (12%) loci, and more frequent gains of chromosome 12 that include CDK4 (29%). These aberrations are associated with high-risk disease by the FL prognostic index (FLIPI), and studies in a murine FL model confirm their pathogenic role in indolent FL. Increased CDK4 kinase activity toward RB1 is readily measured in tumor samples and indicates an opportunity for CDK4 inhibition. We find that dual CDK4 and BCL2 inhibitor treatment is safe and effective against available models of FL. In summary, frequent RB pathway lesions in indolent, high-risk FLs indicate an untapped therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24913233

  10. Spiro Fused Diterpene-Indole Alkaloids from a Creek-Bottom-Derived Aspergillus terreus

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shengxin; Du, Lin; Gerea, Alexandra L.; King, Jarrod B.; You, Jianlan

    2013-01-01

    Four metabolites, teraspiridoles A–D (2–5), formed from the merger of diterpene and modified indole scaffold were obtained from an Aspergillus terreus isolate. The structures and absolute configurations of these natural products were established using NMR, mass spectrometry, Marfey’s method, VCD, and ECD data. Teraspiridole B (3) exhibited weak inhibition of planaria regeneration/survival. PMID:23924243

  11. Asymmetric Total Synthesis of Kopsiyunnanine K, a Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloid with a Rearranged Skeleton.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Ryoko; Okamoto, Yoshiki; Koyama, Tetsuya; Kogure, Noriyuki; Kitajima, Mariko; Takayama, Hiromitsu

    2016-07-15

    A new monoterpenoid indole alkaloid, kopsiyunnanine K, was isolated from Kopsia arborea. Its intriguing rearranged structure and absolute configuration, which were inferred from spectral data and a possible biosynthetic pathway, were determined on the basis of a 13-step asymmetric total synthesis. PMID:27355591

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis Strain IITR89, an Indole-Oxidizing Bacterium.

    PubMed

    Regar, Raj Kumar; Gaur, Vivek Kumar; Mishra, Gayatri; Jadhao, Sudhir; Kamthan, Mohan; Manickam, Natesan

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis strain IITR89, a bacterium able to form indigo by utilizing indole as the sole carbon source. The Alcaligenes species is increasingly reported for biodegradation of diverse toxicants and thus complete sequencing may provide insight into biodegradation capabilities and other phenotypes. PMID:26941148

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis Strain IITR89, an Indole-Oxidizing Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Regar, Raj Kumar; Gaur, Vivek Kumar; Mishra, Gayatri; Jadhao, Sudhir; Kamthan, Mohan

    2016-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Alcaligenes faecalis strain IITR89, a bacterium able to form indigo by utilizing indole as the sole carbon source. The Alcaligenes species is increasingly reported for biodegradation of diverse toxicants and thus complete sequencing may provide insight into biodegradation capabilities and other phenotypes. PMID:26941148

  14. Direct C-H alkylation and indole formation of anilines with diazo compounds under rhodium catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Neeraj Kumar; Choi, Miji; Jo, Hyeim; Oh, Yongguk; Sharma, Satyasheel; Han, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Taejoo; Han, Sangil; Lee, Seok-Yong; Kim, In Su

    2015-12-18

    The rhodium(III)-catalyzed direct functionalization of aniline C-H bonds with α-diazo compounds is described. These transformations provide a facile construction of ortho-alkylated anilines with diazo malonates or highly substituted indoles with diazo acetoacetates. PMID:26458276

  15. Bendamustine: Safety and Efficacy in the Management of Indolent Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tageja, Nishant

    2011-01-01

    Bendamustine (Treanda, Ribomustin) was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of patients with rituximab refractory indolent lymphoma and is expected to turn into a frontline therapy option for indolent lymphoma. This compound with amphoteric properties was designed in the former Germany Democratic Republic in 1960s and re-discovered in 1990s with multiple successive well-designed studies. Bendamustine possesses a unique mechanism of action with potential antimetabolite properties, and only partial cross-resistance with other alkylators. Used in combination with rituximab in vitro, bendamustine shows synergistic effects against various leukemia and lymphoma cell lines. In clinical studies, bendamustine plus rituximab is highly effective in patients with relapsed-refractory indolent lymphoma, inducing remissions in 90% or more and a median progression-free survival of 23–24 months. The optimal dosing and schedule of bendamustine administration is largely undecided and varies among studies. Results of ongoing trials and dose-finding studies will help to further help ascertain the optimal place of bendamustine in the management of indolent NHL. PMID:21695099

  16. Comparative Indole-3-Acetic Acid Levels in the Slender Pea and Other Pea Phenotypes 1

    PubMed Central

    Law, David M.; Davies, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Free indole-3-acetic acid levels were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in three ultra-tall `slender' Pisum sativum L. lines differing in gibberellin content. Measurements were made for apices and stem elongation zones of light-grown plants and values were compared with wild-type, dwarf, and nana phenotypes in which internode length is genetically regulated, purportedly via the gibberellin level. Indole-3-acetic acid levels of growing stems paralleled growth rates in all lines, and were high in all three slender genotypes. Growth was inhibited by p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid, demonstrating the requirement of auxin activity for stem elongation, and also by the ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. It is concluded that the slender phenotype may arise from constant activation of a gibberellin receptor or transduction chain event leading directly or indirectly to elevated levels of indole-3-acetic acid, and that increased indole-3-acetic acid levels are a significant factor in the promotion of stem elongation. PMID:16667653

  17. [Fast analysis of indole alkaloids from Evodiae fructus by supercritical fluid chromatography].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; Fu, Qing; Li, Kuiyong; Liang, Tu; Jin, Yu

    2014-05-01

    A fast chromatographic separation of indole alkaloids from Evodiae fructus was developed by supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The initial screening of four stationary phases was investigated with a standard mixture of evodiamine and rutaecarpine, and a complex sample of indole alkaloids prepared from Evodiae fructus as probes. Later, the effects of chromatographic parameters on separation were studied including injection volume, organic modifier, additive, temperature and back pressure. The injection volume had significant impact on the peak shape. With the additives in the mobile phase, slight changes in peak shape and retention time were observed in separation. Variation in organic modifier led to dramatic change in chromatographic behavior. Both decreased temperature and increased back pressure shortened the retention time. Finally, a fast analytical method using SFC, on a Waters ACQUITY UPC2 BEH column, methanol as modifier, under 35 degrees C and 2.07 x 10(7) Pa, was developed to separate a complex sample of indole alkaloids in less than 15 min. Another rapid approach for the separation of a complex sample of indole alkaloids was developed by using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC). As a result, SFC can be used in the separation of natural products, giving high performance, good resolution and fast analysis speed. The difference in selectivity with UHPLC can be used to the development of natural product separation. PMID:25185311

  18. 3-(2-Methyl-2-nitro­prop­yl)-1H-indole

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zheng; Zhang, Feng; Zou, Bao-hua; Guo, Kai

    2012-01-01

    In the title compound, C12H14N2O2, the indole ring is essentially planar, with an r.m.s. deviation of 0.0136 Å. In the crystal, pairs of N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds link the mol­ecules into inversion dimers.. PMID:22719541

  19. Binary stress induces an increase in indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Yang, Bingxian; Komatsu, Setsuko; Lu, Xiaoping; Li, Ximin; Tian, Jingkui

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle and cell wall was largely increased; while, that of proteins related to tetrapyrrole synthesis and photosynthesis was decreased. Of note, 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloid was two-fold more abundant in treated group compared to the control. In addition, mRNA expression levels of genes involved in the indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway indicated an up-regulation in their transcription in C. roseus under UV-B irradiation. These results suggest that binary stress might negatively affect the process of photosynthesis in C. roseus. In addition, the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis appears to be responsive to binary stress. PMID:26284098

  20. Efficient direct 2,2,2-trifluoroethylation of indoles via C-H functionalization.

    PubMed

    Tolnai, Gergely L; Székely, Anna; Makó, Zita; Gáti, Tamás; Daru, János; Bihari, Tamás; Stirling, András; Novák, Zoltán

    2015-03-14

    A novel highly C3 selective metal free trifluoroethylation of indoles using 2,2,2-trifuoroethyl(mesityl)-iodonium triflate was developed. The methodology enables the introduction of a trifluoroethyl group in a fast and efficient reaction under mild conditions with high functional group tolerance. Beyond the synthetic developments, quantum chemical calculations provide a deeper understanding of the transformation. PMID:25682991

  1. Binary stress induces an increase in indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Yang, Bingxian; Komatsu, Setsuko; Lu, Xiaoping; Li, Ximin; Tian, Jingkui

    2015-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle and cell wall was largely increased; while, that of proteins related to tetrapyrrole synthesis and photosynthesis was decreased. Of note, 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloid was two-fold more abundant in treated group compared to the control. In addition, mRNA expression levels of genes involved in the indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway indicated an up-regulation in their transcription in C. roseus under UV-B irradiation. These results suggest that binary stress might negatively affect the process of photosynthesis in C. roseus. In addition, the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis appears to be responsive to binary stress. PMID:26284098

  2. Synthesis and SAR of potent LXR agonists containing an indole pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Washburn, David G.; Hoang, Tram H.; Campobasso, Nino; Smallwood, Angela; Parks, Derek J.; Webb, Christine L.; Frank, Kelly A.; Nord, Melanie; Duraiswami, Chaya; Evans, Christopher; Jaye, Michael; Thompson, Scott K.

    2009-03-27

    A novel series of 1H-indol-1-yl tertiary amine LXR agonists has been designed. Compounds from this series were potent agonists with good rat pharmacokinetic parameters. In addition, the crystal structure of an LXR agonist bound to LXR{alpha} will be disclosed.

  3. Copper-catalyzed enantioselective C-H functionalization of indoles with an axially chiral bipyridine ligand.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiang; Wu, Bo; Yan, Zhong; Zhou, Yong-Gui

    2016-09-21

    Using copper complexes with an axially chiral bipyridine ligand C4-ACBP as the catalyst, an enantioselective functionalization of indoles with diazo compounds was developed with up to 95% ee. This protocol paves the way for further applications of these ligands. PMID:27529404

  4. Chemical oxidation of a malodorous compound, indole, using iron entrapped in calcium alginate beads.

    PubMed

    Ben Hammouda, Samia; Adhoum, Nafaâ; Monser, Lotfi

    2016-01-15

    Iron-alginate beads (Fe-ABs) were successfully prepared by the ion-gelation method, and applied as heterogeneous Fenton catalysts for the removal of a malodorous compound 'indole'. Similarly, copper-enriched alginate beads (Cu-ABs) were synthesized and tested as like-Fenton catalyst, however, their application proved not to be effective for this purpose. Fe-ABs catalysts were characterized by FTIR, SEM, EDS and AAS spectroscopy. Results pointed out that the parameters affecting Fenton catalysis must be carefully chosen to avoid excessive iron release. Under optimal conditions, complete indole removal and considerably high reduction of TOC, without significant leaching was achieved. Indole decay followed a pseudo-first-order kinetics. The absolute rate constant for indole hydroxylation was 3.59×10(9) M(-1) s(-1), as determined by the competition kinetics method. Four reaction intermediates (Isatin, Dioxindole, Oxindole and Anthralinic acid) were identified by ULC/MS/MS analysis. Short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids like formic, acetic, oxalic, maleic, oxamic and pyruvic acids were identified by ion exclusion chromatography and as end-products. Based on the identified by-products, a plausible mineralization pathway was proposed. Moreover, the catalyst was recovered quantitatively by simple filtration and reused for several times without significant loss of activity. PMID:26384996

  5. Indole-3-acetic acid in Fusarium graminearum: Identification of biosynthetic pathways and characterization of physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Luo, Kun; Rocheleau, Hélène; Qi, Peng-Fei; Zheng, You-Liang; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Ouellet, Thérèse

    2016-09-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a devastating pathogenic fungus causing fusarium head blight (FHB) of wheat. This fungus can produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and a very large amount of IAA accumulates in wheat head tissues during the first few days of infection by F. graminearum. Using liquid culture conditions, we have determined that F. graminearum can use tryptamine (TAM) and indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN) as biosynthetic intermediates to produce IAA. It is the first time that F. graminearum is shown to use the l-tryptophan-dependent TAM and IAN pathways rather than the indole-3-acetamide or indole-3-pyruvic acid pathways to produce IAA. Our experiments also showed that exogenous IAA was metabolized by F. graminearum. Exogenous IAA, TAM, and IAN inhibited mycelial growth; IAA and IAN also affected the hyphae branching pattern and delayed macroconidium germination. IAA and TAM had a small positive effect on the production of the mycotoxin 15-ADON while IAN inhibited its production. Our results showed that IAA and biosynthetic intermediates had a significant effect on F. graminearum physiology and suggested a new area of exploration for fungicidal compounds. PMID:27567719

  6. Strawberry Fruit Protein With a Novel Post-Translational Indole-acyl Modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fruit of the diploid strawberry, Fragaria vesca, L. ‘Yellow Wonder’ contain indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) covalently attached to specific strawberry proteins. Protein-conjugated IAA accounts for between 0.4 and 4 ng of IAA per gram fresh weight of tissue in achenes, and in receptacle tissue. Immunob...

  7. Alpneumines A-H, new anti-melanogenic indole alkaloids from Alstonia pneumatophora.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Koichiro; Hirasawa, Yusuke; Hosoya, Takahiro; Hoe, Teh Chin; Chan, Kit-Lam; Morita, Hiroshi

    2010-06-15

    Eight new indole alkaloids, alpneumines A-H (1-8) were isolated from the Malaysian Alstonia pneumatophora (Apocynaceae) and their structures were determined by MS and 2D NMR spectroscopic methods. Alpneumines E and G (5 and 7), vincamine, and apovincamine showed anti-melanogenesis in B16 mouse melanoma cells. PMID:20576577

  8. Synthesis of pyrroloindolines and furoindolines via cascade dearomatization of indole derivatives with carbenium ion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan; Yin, Qin; Dai, Li-Xin; You, Shu-Li

    2015-04-01

    A highly efficient intermolecular cascade dearomatization of substituted indoles with benzodithiolylium tetrafluoroborate has been developed. This reaction provides a novel strategy to synthesise C3 methyl-substituted pyrroloindolines and furoindolines under mild reaction conditions, the utility of which has been demonstrated by the synthesis of esermethol and physovenine in a highly concise manner. PMID:25735950

  9. New monoclonal antibodies specific for 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(2-iodobenzoyl)indole.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kenjyou, Noriko

    2015-02-01

    1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(2-iodobenzoyl)indole (AM694) is one of the synthetic cannabinoids and an illegal drug in Japan. It is important to generate a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against AM694 for use in the rapid and sensitive detection of the drug. Two monoclonal antibodies, named HN0124 (IgG1) and NK0504 (IgG1), were obtained, which were possibly effective for detecting AM694 and its derivatives. The cross-reactive ability of these MAbs was evaluated using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the results, both of these antibodies recognize 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(2-iodobenzoyl)indole, 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(3-iodobenzoyl)indole, 1-(5-fluoropentyl)-3-(4-iodobenzoyl)indole. Forty nmol/L AM694 can be detected using HN0124 MAb. Thus, MAbs produced in this study could be considered a useful tool for the detection of AM694. PMID:25723285

  10. Clinical study of anesthetization by dezocine combined with propofol for indolent colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bin-Bin; Zhao, Xiao-Liang; Xu, Gui-Ping

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the use of dezocine combined with propofol for the anesthetization of patients undergoing indolent colonoscopy. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of patients undergoing indolent colonoscopy in the Xinjiang People’s Hospital was conducted from April 1 to April 30, 2015. The survey collected patient general information and anesthesia data, including overall medical experience and pain management. Thirty minutes after colonoscopy surgery, samples of venous blood were collected and the biochemical indicators of gastrointestinal function were analyzed. RESULTS: There were 98 female and 62 male respondents. Indolent colonoscopy was found to be more suitable for mid to older-aged patients. The necessary conditions for the diagnosis of digestive diseases were required in 65 of the 73 inpatients. Adverse reactions to the intraoperative process included two cases of body movement and two cases of respiratory depression. Gastrin and vasoactive intestinal peptide levels were slightly increased. However, somatostatin and endothelin levels were slightly decreased. CONCLUSION: This study revealed that dezocine combined with propofol can be successfully used for the anesthetization of indolent colonoscopy patients without pain and should be widely used. PMID:27350739

  11. Synthesis and evaluation of new indole-based chalcones as potential antiinflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Ahmet; Altintop, Mehlika Dilek; Turan-Zitouni, Gülhan; Çiftçi, Gülşen Akalın; Ertorun, İpek; Alataş, Özkan; Kaplancikli, Zafer Asim

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, new indole-based chalcone derivatives were obtained via the reaction of 5-substituted-1H-indole-3-carboxaldehydes/1-methylindole-3-carboxaldehyde with appropriate acetophenones. The synthesized compounds were investigated for their in vitro COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. The most effective COX inhibitors were also evaluated for their in vivo antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities in LPS induced sepsis model. Furthermore, the CCK-8 assay was carried out to determine cytotoxic effects of all compounds against NIH/3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. 3-(5-Bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-(4-cyanophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (6) can be considered as a non-selective COX inhibitor (COX-1 IC50 = 8.1 ± 0.2 μg/mL, COX-2 IC50 = 9.5 ± 0.8 μg/mL), whereas 3-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)-1-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (1) inhibited only COX-1 (IC50 = 8.6 ± 0.1 μg/mL). According to in vivo studies, these compounds also displayed antiinflammatory and antioxidant activities. PMID:25462246

  12. Synthesis of 1,2-Disubstituted Indoles from α-Aminonitriles and 2-Halobenzyl Halides.

    PubMed

    Bachon, Anne-Katrin; Opatz, Till

    2016-03-01

    The α-alkylation of deprotonated Strecker products derived from primary amines and aromatic aldehydes with 2-halobenzyl halides furnishes intermediates that can be cyclized to 1,2-disubstituted indoles in moderate to high yields (up to 94% over two steps) by microwave-assisted copper- or palladium-catalyzed intramolecular cross-coupling. PMID:26836119

  13. Anti-Toxoplasma Activity of 2-(Naphthalene-2-γlthiol)-1H Indole

    PubMed Central

    ASGARI, Qasem; KESHAVARZ, Hossein; REZAEIAN, Mostafa; SADEGHPOUR, Hossein; MIRI, Ramin; MOTAZEDIAN, Mohammad Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to evaluate the viability, infectivity and immunity of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites exposed to 2-(naphthalene-2-ylthio)-1H-indole. Methods: Tachyzoites of RH strain were incubated in various concentrations of 2-(naphthalene-2-ylthio)-1H-indole (25–800 μM) for 1.5 hours. Then, they were stained by PI and analyzed by Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). To evaluate the infectivity, the tachyzoites exposed to the different concentrations of the compound were inoculated to 10 BALB/c mice groups. For Control, parasites exposed to DMSO (0.2% v/v) were also intraperitoneally inoculated into two groups of mice. The immunity of the exposed tachyzoites was evaluated by inoculation of the naïve parasite to the survived mice. Results: The LD50 of 2-(naphthalene-2-ylthio)-1H-indole was 57 μmol. The longevity of mice was dose dependent. Five mice out of group 400μmol and 3 out of group 800μmol showed immunization to the parasite. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated the toxoplasmocidal activity of the compound. The presence of a well-organized transporter mechanism for indole compounds within the parasite in conjunction with several effective mechanisms of these compounds on Toxoplasma viability would open a window for production of new drugs and vaccines. PMID:26246814

  14. Molecular Cloning and Biochemical Characterization of Indole-3-acetic Acid Methyltransferase from Poplar (Populus trichocarpa)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the most active endogenous auxin involved in various physiological processes in higher plants. Concentrations of IAA in plant tissues are regulated at multiple levels including de novo biosynthesis, degradation, and conjugation/deconjugation. In this paper, we report id...

  15. Transmission ecology of rodent-borne diseases: New frontiers.

    PubMed

    Bordes, Frédéric; Blasdell, Kim; Morand, Serge

    2015-09-01

    Rodents are recognized reservoir hosts for many human zoonotic pathogens. The current trends resulting from anthropocene defaunation suggest that in the future they, along with other small mammals, are likely to become the dominant mammals in almost all human-modified environments. Recent intricate studies on bat-borne emerging diseases have highlighted that many gaps exist in our understanding of the zoonotic transmission of rodent-borne pathogens. This has emphasized the need for scientists interested in rodent-borne diseases to integrate rodent ecology into their analysis of rodent-borne pathogen transmission in order to identify in more detail the mechanisms of spillover and chains of transmission. Further studies are required to better understand the true impact of rodent abundance and the importance of pathogen sharing and circulation in multi-host- multi-pathogen communities. We also need to explore in more depth the roles of generalist and abundant species as the potential links between pathogen-sharing, co-infections and disease transmission. PMID:26176684

  16. Serologic Survey of Orthopoxvirus Infection Among Rodents in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Oldal, Miklós; Sironen, Tarja; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Madai, Mónika; Horváth, Győző; Dallos, Bianka; Kutas, Anna; Földes, Fanni; Kemenesi, Gábor; Németh, Viktória; Bányai, Krisztián

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As a result of discontinuing vaccination against smallpox after the late 1970s, different orthopoxviruses (OPVs), such as cowpox virus (CPXV), have become a re-emerging healthcare threat among zoonotic pathogens. In Hungary, data on OPV prevalence among its rodent host species have been absent. Here, rodents belonging to four species, i.e., striped field mouse (Apodemus agrarius), yellow-necked mouse (A. flavicollis), wood mouse (A. sylvaticus) and bank vole (Myodes glareolus), were live trapped at 13 sampling plots on a 149-ha area in the Mecsek Mountains, Hungary, from March to September in 2011 and 2012. Rodent sera were collected and screened for OPV-reactive antibodies with an immunfluorescence assay (IFA). Among the 1587 tested rodents, 286 (18.0%) harbored OPV-specific antibodies. Seroprevalence was the highest for the bank vole (71.4%) and the striped field mouse (66.7%). Due to a masting event in the autumn of 2011 across Central Europe, the abundance of bank voles increased drastically in the 2012 season, raising the overall OPV seroprevalence. We provide the first data on OPV occurrence and seroprevalence in rodents in Hungary. The circulation of OPV in rodents in densely populated areas warrants further studies to elucidate the zoonotic potential of OPV in humans. PMID:25988441

  17. Biochemical analyses of indole-3-acetaldoxime-dependent auxin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Satoko; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Hanada, Atsushi; Nishimura, Takeshi; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Zhao, Yunde; Kamiya, Yuji; Kasahara, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Auxins are hormones that regulate many aspects of plant growth and development. The main plant auxin is indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), whose biosynthetic pathway is not fully understood. Indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx) has been proposed to be a key intermediate in the synthesis of IAA and several other indolic compounds. Genetic studies of IAA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis have suggested that 2 distinct pathways involving the CYP79B or YUCCA (YUC) genes may contribute to IAOx synthesis and that several pathways are also involved in the conversion of IAOx to IAA. Here we report the biochemical dissection of IAOx biosynthesis and metabolism in plants by analyzing IAA biosynthesis intermediates. We demonstrated that the majority of IAOx is produced by CYP79B genes in Arabidopsis because IAOx production was abolished in CYP79B-deficient mutants. IAOx was not detected from rice, maize, and tobacco, which do not have apparent CYP79B orthologues. IAOx levels were not significantly altered in the yuc1 yuc2 yuc4 yuc6 quadruple mutants, suggesting that the YUC gene family probably does not contribute to IAOx synthesis. We determined the pathway for conversion of IAOx to IAA by identifying 2 likely intermediates, indole-3-acetamide (IAM) and indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN), in Arabidopsis. When 13C6-labeled IAOx was fed to CYP79B-deficient mutants, 13C6 atoms were efficiently incorporated to IAM, IAN, and IAA. This biochemical evidence indicates that IAOx-dependent IAA biosynthesis, which involves IAM and IAN as intermediates, is not a common but a species-specific pathway in plants; thus IAA biosynthesis may differ among plant species. PMID:19279202

  18. Cannabinoids in Disguise: Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-Like Effects of Tetramethylcyclopropyl Ketone Indoles

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, Jenny L.; Marusich, Julie A.; Lefever, Timothy W.; Grabenauer, Megan; Moore, Katherine N.; Thomas, Brian F.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic indole-derived cannabinoids have become commonly used recreational drugs and continue to be abused despite their adverse consequences. As compounds that were identified early in the epidemic (e.g., naphthoylindoles) have become legally banned, new compounds have appeared on the drug market. Two tetramethylcyclopropyl ketone indoles, UR-144 [(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone] and XLR-11 [(1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)-(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone], recently have been identified in confiscated products. These compounds are structurally related to a series of CB2-selective compounds explored by Abbott Labs. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which UR-144 and XLR-11 shared cannabinoid effects with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). Indices of in vitro and in vivo activity at cannabinoid receptors were assessed. Similar to other psychoactive cannabinoid agonists, XLR-11 and UR-144 showed low nanomolar (< 30) affinity for CB1 and CB2 receptors, activated these receptors as full agonists, and produced dose-dependent effects that were blocked by rimonabant in mice, including antinociception, hypothermia, catalepsy and suppression of locomotor activity. The potency of both compounds was several-fold greater than Δ9-THC. XLR-11 and UR-144 also substituted for Δ9-THC in a Δ9-THC discrimination procedure in mice, effects that were attenuated by rimonabant. Analysis of urine from mice treated with the compounds revealed that both were extensively metabolized, with predominant urinary excretion as glucuronide conjugates. Together, these results demonstrate that UR-144 and XLR-11 share a pharmacological profile of in vitro and in vivo effects with Δ9-THC and other abused indole-derived cannabinoids and would be predicted to produce Δ9-THC-like subjective effects in humans. PMID:23916483

  19. Asymmetric Distribution of Glucose and Indole-3-Acetyl-myo-Inositol in Geostimulated Zea mays Seedlings 1

    PubMed Central

    Momonoki, Yoshie S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol occurs in both the kernel and vegetative shoot of germinating Zea mays seedlings. The effect of a gravitational stimulus on the transport of [3H]-5-indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol and [U-14C]-d-glucose from the kernel to the seedling shoot was studied. Both labeled glucose and labeled indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol become asymmetrically distributed in the mesocotyl cortex of the shoot with more radioactivity occurring in the bottom half of a horizontally placed seedling. Asymmetric distribution of [3H]indole-3-acetic acid, derived from the applied [3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol, occurred more rapidly than distribution of total 3H-radioactivity. These findings demonstrate that the gravitational stimulus can induce an asymmetric distribution of substances being transported from kernel to shoot. They also indicate that, in addition to the transport asymmetry, gravity affects the steady state amount of indole-3-acetic acid derived from indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol. PMID:11537873

  20. Rodent model of direct cranial blast injury.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Reed; Simard, Philippe F; Driscoll, Ian; Keledjian, Kaspar; Ivanova, Svetlana; Tosun, Cigdem; Williams, Alicia; Bochicchio, Grant; Gerzanich, Volodymyr; Simard, J Marc

    2011-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury resulting from an explosive blast is one of the most serious wounds suffered by warfighters, yet the effects of explosive blast overpressure directly impacting the head are poorly understood. We developed a rodent model of direct cranial blast injury (dcBI), in which a blast overpressure could be delivered exclusively to the head, precluding indirect brain injury via thoracic transmission of the blast wave. We constructed and validated a Cranium Only Blast Injury Apparatus (COBIA) to deliver blast overpressures generated by detonating .22 caliber cartridges of smokeless powder. Blast waveforms generated by COBIA replicated those recorded within armored vehicles penetrated by munitions. Lethal dcBI (LD(50) ∼ 515 kPa) was associated with: (1) apparent brainstem failure, characterized by immediate opisthotonus and apnea leading to cardiac arrest that could not be overcome by cardiopulmonary resuscitation; (2) widespread subarachnoid hemorrhages without cortical contusions or intracerebral or intraventricular hemorrhages; and (3) no pulmonary abnormalities. Sub-lethal dcBI was associated with: (1) apnea lasting up to 15 sec, with transient abnormalities in oxygen saturation; (2) very few delayed deaths; (3) subarachnoid hemorrhages, especially in the path of the blast wave; (4) abnormal immunolabeling for IgG, cleaved caspase-3, and β-amyloid precursor protein (β-APP), and staining for Fluoro-Jade C, all in deep brain regions away from the subarachnoid hemorrhages, but in the path of the blast wave; and (5) abnormalities on the accelerating Rotarod that persisted for the 1 week period of observation. We conclude that exposure of the head alone to severe explosive blast predisposes to significant neurological dysfunction. PMID:21639724

  1. Developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials in rodents.

    PubMed

    Ema, Makoto; Gamo, Masashi; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-05-15

    We summarized significant effects reported in the literature on the developmental toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in rodents. The developmental toxicity of ENMs included not only structural abnormalities, but also death, growth retardation, and behavioral and functional abnormalities. Most studies were performed on mice using an injection route of exposure. Teratogenic effects were indicated when multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and TiO2-nanoparticles were administered to mice during early gestation. Reactive oxygen species levels were increased in placentas and malformed fetuses and their placentas after prenatal exposure to MWCNTs and SWCNTs, respectively. The pre- and postnatal mortalities and growth retardation in offspring increased after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Histopathological and functional abnormalities were also induced in placentas after prenatal exposure to ENMs. Maternal exposure to ENMs induced behavioral alterations, histopathological and biochemical changes in the central nervous system, increased susceptibility to allergy, transplacental genotoxicity, and vascular, immunological, and reproductive effects in offspring. The size- and developmental stage-dependent placental transfer of ENMs was noted after maternal exposure. Silver accumulated in the visceral yolk sac after being injected with Ag-NPs during early gestation. Although currently available data has provided initial information on the potential developmental toxicity of ENMs, that on the developmental toxicity of ENMs is still very limited. Further studies using well-characterized ENMs, state-of the-art study protocols, and appropriate routes of exposure are required in order to clarify these developmental effects and provide information suitable for risk assessments of ENMs. PMID:26721308

  2. Indole inhibition of N-acylated homoserine lactone-mediated quorum signalling is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo-Romano, Benjamin; Gollihar, Jimmy; Brown, Stacie A; Whiteley, Marvin; Valenzuela, Ernesto; Kaplan, Heidi B; Wood, Thomas K; McLean, Robert J C

    2014-11-01

    The LuxI/R quorum-sensing system and its associated N-acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) signal is widespread among Gram-negative bacteria. Although inhibition by indole of AHL quorum signalling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter oleivorans has been reported previously, it has not been documented among other species. Here, we show that co-culture with wild-type Escherichia coli, but not with E. coli tnaA mutants that lack tryptophanase and as a result do not produce indole, inhibits AHL-regulated pigmentation in Chromobacterium violaceum (violacein), Pseudomonas chlororaphis (phenazine) and Serratia marcescens (prodigiosin). Loss of pigmentation also occurred during pure culture growth of Chro. violaceum, P. chlororaphis and S. marcescens in the presence of physiologically relevant indole concentrations (0.5-1.0 mM). Inhibition of violacein production by indole was counteracted by the addition of the Chro. violaceum cognate autoinducer, N-decanoyl homoserine lactone (C10-HSL), in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of exogenous indole or co-culture with E. coli also affected Chro. violaceum transcription of vioA (violacein pigment production) and chiA (chitinase production), but had no effect on pykF (pyruvate kinase), which is not quorum regulated. Chro. violaceum AHL-regulated elastase and chitinase activity were inhibited by indole, as was motility. Growth of Chro. violaceum was not affected by indole or C10-HSL supplementation. Using a nematode-feeding virulence assay, we observed that survival of Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to Chro. violaceum, P. chlororaphis and S. marcescens was enhanced during indole supplementation. Overall, these studies suggest that indole represents a general inhibitor of AHL-based quorum signalling in Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25165125

  3. Quality of Life is Similar between Long-term Survivors of Indolent and Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Beaven, Anne W; Samsa, Greg; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Smith, Sophia K

    2016-07-01

    Differences in quality of life (QOL) of long-term survivors of aggressive or indolent subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have not been frequently evaluated. We assessed these differences by analyzing results of a large QOL survey of long-term NHL survivors. We hypothesized that the incurable nature of indolent NHL would relate to worse QOL in long-term survivors while the potentially cured long-term survivors of aggressive lymphoma would have better QOL. We found that QOL was similar between the two groups. Results suggest that patients with indolent NHL are coping well with their disease, yet experience some overall feelings of life threat. PMID:27379565

  4. Photophysical and photocatalytic properties of histidine-stabilized CdS quantum dots in the presence of indole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanu, T. Inakhunbi; Negi, Devendra P. S.

    2012-01-01

    The fluorescence band of the histidine-stabilized CdS quantum dots was found to be blue-shifted as well as enhanced in intensity in the presence of indole. Irradiation of the reaction mixture containing CdS and indole using visible light resulted in the formation of indigo and isatin as the products of the photocatalytic reaction. The presence of adenine was found to enhance the photocatalytic activity of the CdS quantum dots. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements indicated that adenine enhanced the lifetime of the photogenerated electron-hole pair thereby allowing more indole molecules to undergo reaction with the hole.

  5. Rhodium-Catalyzed Cyclization of 2-Ethynylanilines in the Presence of Isocyanates: Approach toward Indole-3-carboxamides.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Akiho; Ise, Yumi; Kimachi, Tetsutaro; Inamoto, Kiyofumi

    2016-02-19

    Catalytic synthesis of indole-3-carboxamides from 2-ethynylanilines and isocyanates was achieved in the presence of a rhodium catalyst through a tandem-type, cyclization-addition sequence. This tandem-type process can be performed under mild reaction conditions, affording 2,3-disubstituted indoles in a one-pot manner generally in good to excellent yields. The broad substrate scope and good functional group compatibility make the method highly efficient and widely applicable, providing a facile and entirely novel route toward variously substituted indole-3-carboxamides. PMID:26840978

  6. Problems in the study of rodent aggression.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Robert J; Wall, Philip M; Blanchard, D Caroline

    2003-09-01

    Laboratory research has produced detailed descriptions of aggression and defense patterns in the rat, mouse, and hamster, showing strong similarities, but also some differences, across these species. Research on target sites for attack, in conjunction with analyses of the situational antecedents of attack behaviors and of responsivity of these to conditions that elicit fear, has also provided a strong basis for analysis of offensive and defensive aggression strategies and for identification of combinations of these modalities such as may occur in maternal aggression. These patterns have been empirically differentiated from phenomena such as play fighting or predation and compared for laboratory rodents and their wild ancestors. An array of tasks, suitable for use with pharmacological and experimental manipulations, is available for analysis of both aggression and defense. These developments should produce a firm basis for research using animal models to analyze a broad array of aggression-related phenomena, including systematic approaches to understanding the normal antecedents and consequences of each of several differentiable types of aggressive behavior. Despite this strong empirical and analytic background, laboratory animal aggression research has been in a period of decline, spanning several decades, relative to comparable research focusing on areas such as sexual behavior or stress. Problems that may have contributed to the relative neglect of aggression research include confusion about the interpretation of different tasks for eliciting aggression; difficulties and labor intensiveness of observational measures needed for an adequate differentiation of offensive and defensive behaviors; analytic difficulties stemming from the sensitivity of offensive aggression to the inhibitory effects of fear or defensiveness; lack of a clear relationship between categories of aggressive behavior as defined in animal studies and those used in human aggression research; and

  7. Hypergravity Effects on Rodent Pregnancy and Parturition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Baer, L. A.; Mills, N. A.; Wade, C. E.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    No mammal has yet undergone birth, or parturition, in the microgravity of space. Previous studies (Ronco & Alberts, 2000) have shown that mid-pregnant rat dams exposed to spaceflight (0-g) and landed 48-72 hrs before term successfully delivered robust, healthy offspring Microgravity-exposed dams exhibited twice the expected numbers of labor contractions whereas length of pregnancy, duration of labor, fetal wastage, number of neonates born and litter gender ratios were identical to controls. In the present study, we report the results of rodent pregnancy and parturition at the opposite end of the gravity spectrum, in hypergravity. Dams exposed to either: 1.0-g, 1.5-g, 1.75-g or 2.0-g from Gestational day (G) 11 and throughout the births of their litters had comparable pregnancy and labor durations, fetal wastage, numbers of neonates born and litter Tender ratios. During parturition, hypergravity-exposed dams exhibited significantly fewer labor contractions as compared to 1.0-g controls. Dams that underwent birth in hypergravity had significantly fewer offspring surviving the immediate postpartum period (P1: 1.0-g, 11.92 +/- 2.84; 1.5-g, 10.88 +/- 2.17; 1.75-g, 9.22 +/-1.99; 2.0-g, 8.83 +/- 3.31). Within 24 hrs postpartum, neonatal survival was further diminished in hypergravity [P2: 100% (1.0-g); 96% (1.5-g); 96% (1.75-g); 73% (2.0-g)] and continued to decline (P10: 100%(1.0-g.); 90%(1.5-g); 87%(1.75-g), 40%(2.0-g)]. Neonatal losses stabilized by P5 for the 1.5-g andl.75-g conditions but continued until P9 for the 2.0-g condition. Together, these findings show that postnatal, but not prenatal, survival is compromised following birth in hypergravity, Maternal and neonatal factors that contribute to peri-parturitional vulnerability to altered gravity environments will be discussed.

  8. Lassa fever or lassa hemorrhagic fever risk to humans from rodent-borne zoonoses.

    PubMed

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Abdalla Saleh, Hala Ahmed; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound hemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. Lassa fever, an acute hemorrhagic fever characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and chest and abdominal pain. Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne zoonosis worldwide. Transmission rodents to humans occur by aerosol spread, either from the genus Mastomys rodents' excreta (multimammate rat) or through the close contact with infected patients (nosocomial infection). Other rodents of the genera Rattus, Mus, Lemniscomys, and Praomys are incriminated rodents hosts. Now one may ask do the rodents' ectoparasites play a role in Lassa virus zoonotic transmission. This paper summarized the update knowledge on LHV; hopping it might be useful to the clinicians, nursing staff, laboratories' personals as well as those concerned zoonoses from rodents and rodent control. PMID:26012219

  9. Fibroblasts From Long-Lived Rodent Species Exclude Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Dostál, Lubomír; Kohler, William M.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Miller, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to the lethal effects of cellular stressors, including the toxic heavy metal cadmium (Cd), is characteristic of fibroblast cell lines derived from long-lived bird and rodent species, as well as cell lines from several varieties of long-lived mutant mice. To explore the mechanism of resistance to Cd, we used inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy to measure the rate of Cd uptake into primary fibroblasts of 15 rodent species. These data indicate that fibroblasts from long-lived rodent species have slower rates of Cd uptake from the extracellular medium than those from short-lived species. In addition, fibroblasts from short-lived species export more zinc after exposure to extracellular Cd than cells from long-lived species. Lastly, fibroblasts from long-lived rodent species have lower baseline concentrations of two redox-active metals, iron and copper. Our results suggest that evolution of longevity among rodents required adjustment of cellular properties to alter metal homeostasis and to reduce the toxic effects of heavy metals that accumulate over the course of a longer life span. PMID:24522391

  10. Old World Hantaviruses in Rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Robert W.; Waffa, Bradley; Freeman, Ashley; Riegel, Claudia; Moses, Lina M.; Bennett, Andrew; Safronetz, David; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Feldmann, Heinz; Voss, Thomas G.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Seoul virus, an Old World hantavirus, is maintained in brown rats and causes a mild form of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in humans. We captured rodents in New Orleans, Louisiana and tested them for the presence of Old World hantaviruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with sequencing, cell culture, and electron microscopy; 6 (3.4%) of 178 rodents captured—all brown rats—were positive for a Seoul virus variant previously coined Tchoupitoulas virus, which was noted in rodents in New Orleans in the 1980s. The finding of Tchoupitoulas virus in New Orleans over 25 years since its first discovery suggests stable endemicity in the city. Although the degree to which this virus causes human infection and disease remains unknown, repeated demonstration of Seoul virus in rodent populations, recent cases of laboratory-confirmed HFRS in some US cities, and a possible link with hypertensive renal disease warrant additional investigation in both rodents and humans. PMID:24639295

  11. Observations on the food habits of some African rodents.

    PubMed

    Iwuala, M O; Braide, E I; Maduka, N

    1980-12-01

    Food habits of four common species of African rodents: the giant rat (Cricetomys gambianus), the black house rat (Rattus rattus), the multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) and the pygmy mouse (Mus minutoides) were studied on the basis of stomach content analysis, habitat sampling and experimental trials with caged animals. Vegetable items (especially grass, grains and tubers) formed the bulk of the food of all the species. Oil-palm nuts and kernels were also common in the guts of C. gambianus and M. natalensis. Animal food components of all the rodent species comprised mainly insects (especially ants, crickets etc.). Vertebrate flesh and scales were also well represented in the guts of C. gambianus. Domestic and miscellaneous food items were recorded from R. rattus, most of which were trapped in human and animal shelters. Inorganic gut contents, primarily sand grains, were found in sizeable quantities in more than 70% of the rodents examined. Results of experimental feeding trials with caged rodents showed close correlation with those recorded from field samples, especially in terms of food choices and the relative quantities consumed. The ecological and practical implications of these observations are discussed in the light of the importance of the rodents as agricultural and domestic pests. PMID:7323341

  12. Toxoplasmosis in rodents: ecological survey and first evidences in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Sarataphan, Nachai; Maruyama, Soichi; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Morand, Serge; Herbreteau, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    Domestic and wild rodents known as the most abundant and diversified order of mammals have a key role in the ecological food chain and also in the transmission of parasites and pathogens to other animals. While foraging on the ground, they can get infected by Toxoplasma gondii, a protozoan parasite, which is the causative agent of toxoplasmosis. Therefore, they serve as intermediate hosts of T. gondii and can transmit it to their predators. To assess their role in the maintenance of T. gondii lifecycle in Thailand, we sampled rodents in a range of biotopes representative of the high biodiversity and conducted a serological survey with latex agglutination test to detect anti-T. gondii antibodies. Overall, 21 of 461 (4.6%) rodents had diagnostically significant antibody titers (cutoff, 1:64). Every species with at least 37 individuals captured tested positive, confirming the wide range of potential mammalian hosts of toxoplasmosis. None of the ecological traits (sex, maturity, morphology, season, or habitat) was found significant to predict the susceptibility to T. gondii both univariately and in a multivariate analysis. However, high prevalences were reported in either forested or anthropized areas. This survey constitutes the first confirmed serological investigation of T. gondii in rodents in Thailand. The rarity of both domestic and wild felids in Thailand emphasizes the importance of rodents in maintaining T. gondii, and questions the involvement of other carnivores in the life cycle. PMID:20645868

  13. Toxoplasmosis seroprevalence in urban rodents: a survey in Niamey, Niger

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Aurélien; Garba, Madougou; Bonnabau, Henri; Kane, Mamadou; Rossi, Jean-Pierre; Dardé, Marie-Laure; Dobigny, Gauthier

    2013-01-01

    A serological survey of Toxoplasma gondii was conducted on 766 domestic and peridomestic rodents from 46 trapping sites throughout the city of Niamey, Niger. A low seroprevalence was found over the whole town with only 1.96% of the rodents found seropositive. However, differences between species were important, ranging from less than 2% in truly commensal Mastomys natalensis, Rattus rattus and Mus musculus, while garden-associated Arvicanthis niloticus displayed 9.1% of seropositive individuals. This is in line with previous studies on tropical rodents - that we reviewed here - which altogether show that Toxoplasma seroprevalence in rodent is highly variable, depending on many factors such as locality and/or species. Moreover, although we were not able to decipher statistically between habitat or species effect, such a contrast between Nile grass rats and the other rodent species points towards a potentially important role of environmental toxoplasmic infection. This would deserve to be further scrutinised since intra-city irrigated cultures are extending in Niamey, thus potentially increasing Toxoplasma circulation in this yet semi-arid region. As far as we are aware of, our study is one of the rare surveys of its kind performed in Sub-Saharan Africa and the first one ever conducted in the Sahel. PMID:23828008

  14. Thieving rodents as substitute dispersers of megafaunal seeds

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Patrick A.; Hirsch, Ben T.; Emsens, Willem-Jan; Zamora-Gutierrez, Veronica; Wikelski, Martin; Kays, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The Neotropics have many plant species that seem to be adapted for seed dispersal by megafauna that went extinct in the late Pleistocene. Given the crucial importance of seed dispersal for plant persistence, it remains a mystery how these plants have survived more than 10,000 y without their mutualist dispersers. Here we present support for the hypothesis that secondary seed dispersal by scatter-hoarding rodents has facilitated the persistence of these large-seeded species. We used miniature radio transmitters to track the dispersal of reputedly megafaunal seeds by Central American agoutis, which scatter-hoard seeds in shallow caches in the soil throughout the forest. We found that seeds were initially cached at mostly short distances and then quickly dug up again. However, rather than eating the recovered seeds, agoutis continued to move and recache the seeds, up to 36 times. Agoutis dispersed an estimated 35% of seeds for >100 m. An estimated 14% of the cached seeds survived to the next year, when a new fruit crop became available to the rodents. Serial video-monitoring of cached seeds revealed that the stepwise dispersal was caused by agoutis repeatedly stealing and recaching each other’s buried seeds. Although previous studies suggest that rodents are poor dispersers, we demonstrate that communities of rodents can in fact provide highly effective long-distance seed dispersal. Our findings suggest that thieving scatter-hoarding rodents could substitute for extinct megafaunal seed dispersers of tropical large-seeded trees. PMID:22802644

  15. Methodological considerations for measuring spontaneous physical activity in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Leighton, Claudio E.; Billington, Charles J.; Kotz, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    When exploring biological determinants of spontaneous physical activity (SPA), it is critical to consider whether methodological factors differentially affect rodents and the measured SPA. We determined whether acclimation time, sensory stimulation, vendor, or chamber size affected measures in rodents with varying propensity for SPA. We used principal component analysis to determine which SPA components (ambulatory and vertical counts, time in SPA, and distance traveled) best described the variability in SPA measurements. We compared radiotelemetry and infrared photobeams used to measure SPA and exploratory activity. Acclimation time, sensory stimulation, vendor, and chamber size independently influenced SPA, and the effect was moderated by the propensity for SPA. A 24-h acclimation period prior to SPA measurement was sufficient for habituation. Principal component analysis showed that ambulatory and vertical measurements of SPA describe different dimensions of the rodent's SPA behavior. Smaller testing chambers and a sensory attenuation cubicle around the chamber reduced SPA. SPA varies between rodents purchased from different vendors. Radiotelemetry and infrared photobeams differ in their sensitivity to detect phenotypic differences in SPA and exploratory activity. These data highlight methodological considerations in rodent SPA measurement and a need to standardize SPA methodology. PMID:24598463

  16. On the positional and orientational order of water and methanol around indole: a study on the microscopic origin of solubility.

    PubMed

    Henao, Andres; Johnston, Andrew J; Guàrdia, Elvira; McLain, Sylvia E; Pardo, Luis Carlos

    2016-08-17

    Although they are both highly polar liquids, there are a number of compounds, such as many pharmaceuticals, which show vastly different solubilities in methanol compared with water. From theories of the hydrophobic effect, it might be predicted that this enhanced solubility is due to association between drugs and the less polar -CH3 groups on methanol. In this work, detailed analysis on the atomic structural interactions between water, methanol and the small molecule indole - which is a precursor to many drugs and is sparingly soluble in water yet highly soluble in methanol - reveal that indole preferentially interacts with both water and methanol via electrostatic interactions rather than with direction interactions to the -CH3 groups. The presence of methanol hydrogen bonds with π electrons of the benzene ring of indole can explain the increase in solubility of indole in methanol relative to water. In addition, the excess entropy calculations performed here suggest that this solvation is enthalpically rather than entropically driven. PMID:27489172

  17. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid and oxindole-3-acetic acid to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside in Zea mays seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nonhebel, H. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabeled oxindole-3-acetic acid was metabolized by roots, shoots, and caryopses of dark grown Zea mays seedlings to 2,3-dihydro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-1H indole-3-acetic acid-7'-O-beta-D-glycopyranoside with the simpler name of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside. This compound was also formed from labeled indole-3-acetic acid supplied to intact seedlings and root segments. The glucoside of 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid was also isolated as an endogenous compound in the caryopses and shoots of 4-day-old seedlings. It accumulates to a level of 4.8 nanomoles per plant in the kernel, more than 10 times the amount of oxindole-3-acetic acid. In the shoot it is present at levels comparable to that of oxindole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetic acid (62 picomoles per shoot). We conclude that 7-hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside is a natural metabolite of indole-3-acetic acid in Z. mays seedlings. From the data presented in this paper and in previous work, we propose the following route as the principal catabolic pathway for indole-3-acetic acid in Zea seedlings: Indole-3-acetic acid --> Oxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid --> 7-Hydroxyoxindole-3-acetic acid-glucoside.

  18. Effect of indole-3-carbinol on ethanol-induced liver injury and acetaldehyde-stimulated hepatic stellate cells activation using precision-cut rat liver slices.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Wu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Chun; Liao, Zhang-Xiu; Wu, Yong; Xia, Zheng-Yuan; Wang, Hui

    2010-12-01

    1. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a major indole compound found in high levels in cruciferous vegetables, shows a broad spectrum of biological activities. However, few studies have reported the effect of I3C on alcoholic liver injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of I3C on acute ethanol-induced hepatotoxicity and acetaldehyde-stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSC) activation using precision-cut liver slices (PCLS). 2. Rat PCLS were incubated with 50 mmol/L ethanol or 350 μmol/L acetaldehyde, and different concentrations (100-400 μmol/L) of I3C were added into the culture system of these two liver injury models, respectively. Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring enzyme leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in tissue. Activities of alcoholic enzymes were also determined. α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor (TGF-β(1) ) and hydroxyproline (HYP) were used as indices to evaluate the activation of HSC. In addition, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) were observed to estimate collagen degradation. 3. I3C significantly reduced the enzyme leakage in ethanol-treated slices. In I3C groups, cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 activities were inhibited by 40.9-51.8%, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity was enhanced 1.6-fold compared with the ethanol-treated group. I3C also showed an inhibitory effect against HSC activation and collagen production stimulated by acetaldehyde. After being incubated with I3C (400 μmol/L), the expression of MMP-1 was markedly enhanced, whereas TIMP-1 was decreased. 4. These results showed that I3C protected PCLS against alcoholic liver injury, which might be associated with the regulation of ethanol metabolic enzymes, attenuation of oxidative injury and acceleration of collagen degradation. PMID:20880187

  19. Synthesis of fully protected, reverse N-prenylated (2S,3R)-3-hydroxytryptophan, a unique building block of the cyclomarins.

    PubMed

    Barbie, Philipp; Kazmaier, Uli

    2015-09-21

    Reverse N-prenylated 3-hydroxytryptophan, the rather exotic amino acid of the cyclomarins, is obtained in enantio- and diastereomerically pure and fully protected form by a combination of a highly stereoselective addition of a zincated indole toward protected serinal and subsequent palladium-catalyzed N-prenylation. PMID:26229033

  20. Can shrub cover increase predation risk for a desert rodent?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schooley, R.L.; Sharpe, Peter B.

    1996-01-01

    Previous research indicates that predation risk may influence activity patterns, habitat partitioning, and community structure of nocturnal desert rodents. Shrub microhabitat is typically considered safer than open microhabitat for these small mammals. We investigated predation risk for Townsend's ground squirrels (Spermophilus townsendii), which are diurnal desert rodents that detect predators visually and use burrows for refuge. Our results suggested that shrub cover may increase risk for these squirrels by decreasing their ability to escape from predators. Our field experiment indicated that running speeds of juvenile squirrels were lower in shrub (Ceratoides lanata) habitat than in open areas. Shrub cover was also associated with shorter predator-detection distances (mammalian and avian) and fewer refuges (burrow entrances per hectare) than in open areas in one year but not in another. Our study demonstrated that the visual and locomotive obstruction of vegetative cover may increase predation risk for diurnal desert rodents and that elements of habitat-dependent risk may be temporally dynamic.

  1. Rodents for comparative aging studies: from mice to beavers.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Vera; Bozzella, Michael J; Seluanov, Andrei

    2008-09-01

    After humans, mice are the best-studied mammalian species in terms of their biology and genetics. Gerontological research has used mice and rats extensively to generate short- and long-lived mutants, study caloric restriction and more. Mice and rats are valuable model organisms thanks to their small size, short lifespans and fast reproduction. However, when the goal is to further extend the already long human lifespan, studying fast aging species may not provide all the answers. Remarkably, in addition to the fast-aging species, the order Rodentia contains multiple long-lived species with lifespans exceeding 20 years (naked mole-rat, beavers, porcupines, and some squirrels). This diversity opens great opportunities for comparative aging studies. Here we discuss the evolution of lifespan in rodents, review the biology of slow-aging rodents, and show an example of how the use of a comparative approach revealed that telomerase activity coevolved with body mass in rodents. PMID:19424861

  2. A Standardized Technique for Performing Thrombelastography in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wohlauer, Max V.; Moore, Ernest E.; Harr, Jeffrey; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Fragoso, Miguel; Silliman, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Thrombelastography (TEG), employed in liver transplant and cardiac surgery for nearly 50 years, has recently been applied to the trauma setting. Rodents are employed widely for shock research, but are known to have differences in their coagulation system compared to humans. Consequently, the appropriate technique for performing TEG requires modification of the standard clinical protocol. Materials and Methods Thrombelastography (TEG) was performed with blood collected from the femoral artery of rodents, and technical modifications were tested to optimize results. Results Analysis of citrated whole blood using TEG revealed a more rapid onset of coagulation in rats compared to humans. The reference ranges of TEG parameters for Sprague-Dawley rats are detailed. Discussion Citrated native whole blood is the optimal TEG method in the assessment of coagulation in rodents. Investigators using TEG for research purposes should establish their own reference ranges in order to determine normal values for their target population. PMID:22005752

  3. Colonisation and shedding of Lawsonia intracellularis in experimentally inoculated rodents and in wild rodents on pig farms.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Fell, S; Pearson, H; Toribio, J-A

    2011-06-01

    Lawsonia intracellularis is an intracellular bacterium causing proliferative enteropathy in various animal species, and is considered an economically important pathogen of pigs. Rats and mice have been implicated as external vectors for a wide range of pig pathogens, including L. intracellularis. Previous studies have demonstrated L. intracellularis infection and proliferative enteropathy in rodents, but did not show the duration of shedding or the number of L. intracellularis shed by infected rodents, and therefore the infection risk that rodents pose to pigs. In this study, the number of L. intracellularis shed in the faeces and intestinal mucosa of wild rats trapped on pig farms was determined by a quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assay. The prevalence of L. intracellularis in wild rats trapped on pig farms with endemic proliferative enteropathy (PE) was very high (≥ 70.6%), and large numbers of L. intracellularis were shed (10(10)/g of faeces) in a small proportion of wild rats. The duration of colonisation in laboratory rats and mice challenged with porcine isolates of L. intracellularis was also shown. Faecal shedding of L. intracellularis persisted for 14-21 days in rats and mice that were mildly affected with histological lesions of PE. The humoral immune response to L. intracellularis persisted for 40 days in both species. This study demonstrates that rodents may be an important reservoir of L. intracellularis on piggeries, and hence rodent control is important in disease eradication programs on pig farms. PMID:21349664

  4. Formal Total Synthesis of Diazonamide A by Indole Oxidative Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    David, Nadège; Pasceri, Raffaele; Kitson, Russell R A; Pradal, Alexandre; Moody, Christopher J

    2016-07-25

    A short formal total synthesis of the marine natural product diazonamide A is described. The route is based on indole oxidative rearrangement, and a number of options were investigated involving migration of tyrosine or oxazole fragments upon oxidation of open chain or macrocyclic precursors. The final route proceeds from 7-bromoindole by sequential palladium-catalysed couplings of an oxazole fragment at C-2, followed by a tyrosine fragment at C-3. With the key 2,3-disubstituted indole readily in hand, formation of a macrocyclic lactam set the stage for the crucial oxidative rearrangement to a 3,3-disubstituted oxindole. Notwithstanding the concomitant formation of the unwanted indoxyl isomer, the synthesis successfully delivered, after deprotection, the key oxindole intermediate, thereby completing a formal total synthesis of diazonamide A. PMID:27346186

  5. Exploring the 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole scaffold as a novel antimalarial chemotype.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sofia A; Lukens, Amanda K; Coelho, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; Wirth, Dyann F; Mazitschek, Ralph; Moreira, Rui; Paulo, Alexandra

    2015-09-18

    A series of 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indoles with building block diversity was synthesized based on a hit derived from an HTS whole-cell screen against Plasmodium falciparum. Thirty-eight compounds were obtained following a three-step synthetic approach and evaluated for anti-parasitic activity. The SAR shows that 3-piperidin-4-yl-1H-indole is intolerant to most N-piperidinyl modifications. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a new compound (10d) with lead-like properties (MW = 305; cLogP = 2.42), showing antimalarial activity against drug-resistant and sensitive strains (EC50 values ∼ 3 μM), selectivity for malaria parasite and no cross-resistance with chloroquine, thus representing a potential new chemotype for further optimization towards novel and affordable antimalarial drugs. PMID:26295174

  6. Novel indole based dual responsive "turn-on" chemosensor for fluoride ion detection.

    PubMed

    Jeyanthi, Dharmaraj; Iniya, Murugan; Krishnaveni, Karuppiah; Chellappa, Duraisamy

    2015-02-01

    An efficient new dual channel chemosensor 2,3-bis((E)-(1H-indole-3-yl)methyleneamino)maleonitrile (DN) which exhibits selective sensing of F(-) ions in DMSO, was synthesized by a facile one step condensation reaction of indole-3-carboxaldehyde with diaminomaleonitrile. The probe DN was characterized by elemental analysis, (1)H, (13)C-NMR, ESI-MS and IR spectral techniques. Upon addition of F(-), DN induces remarkable changes in both absorption and fluorescence spectra on the basis of charge transfer mechanism. The receptor DN serves for highly selective, sensitive detection of F(-) without the interference of other relevant anions. The Job's plot analysis indicates the binding stoichiometry to be 1:1 (host/guest). PMID:25456669

  7. Uptake and metabolism of indole compounds by the goldfish pineal organ

    SciTech Connect

    McNulty, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    Indole metabolism was studied in the pineal organ of the goldfish by radioautography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The rate of uptake of tritiated serotonin was rapid in vitro with dense labeling over the photoreceptor cells. Tritiated tryptophan was taken up at a slower rate and the label was distributed evenly over the epithelium. Continual light caused a reduction in the concentration of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) compared to groups exposed to constant darkness both in vivo and in explants, suggesting that these effects are not derived from photoreceptors outside the pineal organ. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that indole metabolism is functionally linked to phototransduction events in the pineal organ of lower vertebrates.

  8. An extremely indolent T-cell leukemia: an 18-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Adediran, Samuel; Cornfield, Dennis; Bagg, Adam; Agostino, Nicole

    2016-02-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare malignancy that comprises about 2% of all mature lymphoid neoplasms. Patients usually present with prominent peripheral blood lymphocytosis, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, lymphadenopathy, B symptoms, and occasionally with skin lesions.¹ The disease follows an aggressive clinical course with rapid progression and typically has a median survival of less than 1 year. In some cases, the disease is indolent for a period of time before becoming aggressive.² In 2002, 7 years after initial diagnosis in 1995, the case discussed herein was reported as a rare, indolent form of T-PLL.³ We now present 11 additional years of follow-up of this case, during which time the patient remained asymptomatic with respect to his lymphoid neoplasm. PMID:26955661

  9. Auxin Biosynthesis: Are the Indole-3-Acetic Acid and Phenylacetic Acid Biosynthesis Pathways Mirror Images?

    PubMed

    Cook, Sam D; Nichols, David S; Smith, Jason; Chourey, Prem S; McAdam, Erin L; Quittenden, Laura; Ross, John J

    2016-06-01

    The biosynthesis of the main auxin in plants (indole-3-acetic acid [IAA]) has been elucidated recently and is thought to involve the sequential conversion of Trp to indole-3-pyruvic acid to IAA However, the pathway leading to a less well studied auxin, phenylacetic acid (PAA), remains unclear. Here, we present evidence from metabolism experiments that PAA is synthesized from the amino acid Phe, via phenylpyruvate. In pea (Pisum sativum), the reverse reaction, phenylpyruvate to Phe, is also demonstrated. However, despite similarities between the pathways leading to IAA and PAA, evidence from mutants in pea and maize (Zea mays) indicate that IAA biosynthetic enzymes are not the main enzymes for PAA biosynthesis. Instead, we identified a putative aromatic aminotransferase (PsArAT) from pea that may function in the PAA synthesis pathway. PMID:27208245

  10. Cytotoxic monoterpenoid indole alkaloids isolated from the barks of Voacanga africana Staph.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Mei; Yang, Yu-Ting; Li, Hong-Xiang; Cao, Zhi-Xing; Dan, Xiao-Mei; Mei, Ling; Guo, Da-Le; Song, Chuan-Xia; Dai, Yu; Hu, Jia; Deng, Yun

    2016-05-01

    A new monoterpenoid indole alkaloid compound (1) and six known monoterpenoid indole alkaloids compounds (2-7) were isolated from the barks of Voacanga africana Staph. The structures were established by spectral analysis as ibogamine-16-carboxylic acid,17,20-didehydro-5,6-dioxo-10-methoxy-methyl ester (1), voacamine (2), vobasine (3), voacangine (4), voacristine (5), 19-epi-voacristine (6) and 19-epi-heyneanine (7). Compound 1 was confirmed by X-ray crystallographic analysis. All of the isolated compounds were evaluated for cytotoxicity against five cell lines (HEPG-2, A375, MDA-MB-231, SH-SY5Y, CT26). Among them, compounds 2 and 6 displayed significant inhibitory activities, compounds 3, 4 and 5 showed moderate inhibitory activities, while compounds 1 and 7 showed no inhibitory activities against the five cell lines. PMID:26140390

  11. One-Pot Aminoethylation of Indoles/Pyrroles with Alkynes and Sulfonyl Azides.

    PubMed

    Rajasekar, Shanmugam; Yadagiri, Dongari; Anbarasan, Pazhamalai

    2015-11-16

    A general and efficient one-pot aminoethylation of substituted indoles/pyrroles was accomplished for the synthesis of various tryptamine derivatives employing a combination of alkynes and sulfonyl azides as readily accessible aminoethylating agents. The reaction features a successful integration of copper-catalyzed alkyne and azide cycloaddition to N-sulfonyl-1,2,3-triazole, rhodium-catalyzed selective insertion of α-iminocarbenes onto the C3-H bond of indoles, and reduction of the resultant enamides to tryptamine derivatives employing either NaCNBH3 or palladium catalyst, in one-pot. The reaction also showed excellent functional-group tolerance and allowed the synthesis of various substituted tryptamines in good to excellent yield. This transformation constitutes a one-pot formal regioselective functionalization of terminal alkynes. Utility of the synthesized tryptamine was further demonstrated in the synthesis of dihydro-β-carboline and tryptoline. PMID:26443500

  12. Antibacterial monoterpenoid indole alkaloids from Alstonia scholaris cultivated in temperate zone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Chen, Ying-Ying; Qin, Xu-Jie; Wang, Bei; Jin, Qiong; Liu, Ya-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Three new monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, named normavacurine-21-one (1), 5-hydroxy-19, 20-E-alschomine (2), and 5-hydroxy-19, 20-Z-alschomine (3), together with thirteen known indole alkaloids (4-16) were isolated from the leaves of Alstonia scholaris cultivated in Kunming. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis, as well as by comparison with the reported spectroscopic data. The leaves of A. scholaris cultivated in Kunming, contained picrinine-type alkaloids, scholaricin-type alkaloids and nareline as major alkaloids. New compounds 1-3 might be derived from a common biogenetic precursor (5). Compounds 1, 5 and 10 exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Enterococcus faecalis, and 3, 9 and 14 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an MIC value of 0.781 μg/mL, while 14 showed moderate activity against Klepsiella pneumonia with an MIC value of 1.56 μg/mL. PMID:26136061

  13. Cytotoxic Indole Alkaloids against Human Leukemia Cell Lines from the Toxic Plant Peganum harmala

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunhua; Zhang, Zhenxue; Wang, Yihai; He, Xiangjiu

    2015-01-01

    Bioactivity-guided fractionation was used to determine the cytotoxic alkaloids from the toxic plant Peganum harmala. Two novel indole alkaloids, together with ten known ones, were isolated and identified. The novel alkaloids were elucidated to be 2-(indol-3-yl)ethyl-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1 → 6)-β-d-glucopyranoside (2) and 3-hydroxy-3-(N-acetyl-2-aminoethyl)-6-methoxyindol-2-one (3). The cytotoxicity against human leukemia cells was assayed for the alkaloids and some of them showed potent activity. Harmalacidine (compound 8, HMC) exhibited the highest cytotoxicity against U-937 cells with IC50 value of 3.1 ± 0.2 μmol/L. The cytotoxic mechanism of HMC was targeting the mitochondrial and protein tyrosine kinase signaling pathways (PTKs-Ras/Raf/ERK). The results strongly demonstrated that the alkaloids from Peganum harmala could be a promising candidate for the therapy of leukemia. PMID:26540074

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy study of indolic molecules adsorbed on gold colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Qiang; Eisen, Jonathan; Chang, Chang

    2010-03-01

    Serotonin is both a ubiquitous neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and an important immunomodulator involved in various immune responses. The ability to unambiguously detect serotonin is therefore imperative in biomedical research. However, detection of serotonin and related indoles using immunohistochemistry has been largely limited by their small molecular size and the resultant uncertainty in antibody specificity. Here we show that surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) can be used to detect and distinguish serotonin from its various closely related precursors and metabolites. Compared with traditional antibody-based methods, SERS is highly specific and capable of real-time detection. We also quantify the relative concentration of serotonin against a background of other indoles using SERS. We expect this optical detection method to directly benefit a variety of immune and nervous systems studies involving serotonin.

  15. Synthesis and antimycobacterial activity of novel thiadiazolylhydrazones of 1-substituted indole-3-carboxaldehydes.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Kamaleddin Haj Mohammad Ebrahim; Mashayekhi, Vida; Azerang, Parisa; Sardari, Soroush; Kobarfard, Farzad; Rostamizadeh, Kobra

    2014-02-01

    A series of novel thiocarbohydrazones of substituted indoles and their corresponding thiadiazole derivatives were prepared, and their structures were confirmed by different analytical and spectroscopic methods. The derivatives were prepared by a sequential synthetic strategy including substitution at N-1 position of indole ring by various aliphatic and benzylic substituents, followed by condensation with thiocarbohydrazide, and finally cyclization by triethyl orthoformate. The derivatives were tested for their antimycobacterial activity against Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and the results revealed that among the synthesized compounds, thiadiazole derivatives 4e, 4f, 4n, 4p, 4q, and 4t exhibited the highest activity with IC₅₀ value of 3.91 μg/mL. The results indicate that the thiadiazole moiety plays a vital role in exerting antimycobacterial activity. PMID:24103309

  16. Synthesis and antituberculosis activity of indole-pyridine derived hydrazides, hydrazide-hydrazones, and thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Velezheva, Valeriya; Brennan, Patrick; Ivanov, Pavel; Kornienko, Albert; Lyubimov, Sergey; Kazarian, Konstantin; Nikonenko, Boris; Majorov, Konstantin; Apt, Alexander

    2016-02-01

    We describe the design, synthesis, and in vitro antimycobacterial activity of a series of novel simple hybrid hydrazides and hydrazide-hydrazones combining indole and pyridine nuclei. The compounds are derivatives of 1-acetylindoxyl or substituted indole-3-carboxaldehydes tethered via a hydrazine group by simple C-N or double C=N bonds with 3- and 4-pyridines, 1-oxide 3- and 4-pyridine carbohydrazides. The most active of 15 compounds showed MICs values against an INH-sensitive strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv equal to that of INH (0.05-2 μg/mL). Five compounds demonstrated appreciable activity against the INH-resistant M. tuberculosis CN-40 clinical isolate (MICs: 2-5 μg/mL), providing justification for further in vivo studies. PMID:26725953

  17. A new and convenient synthetic way to 2-substituted thieno[2,3-b]indoles

    PubMed Central

    Karmatsky, Arseny A; Rusinov, Gennady L; Charushin, Valery N

    2015-01-01

    Summary A short and robust approach for the synthesis of 2-(hetero)aryl substituted thieno[2,3-b]indoles from easily available 1-alkylisatins and acetylated (hetero)arenes has been advanced. The two-step procedure includes the “aldol-crotonic” type of condensation of the starting materials, followed by treatment of the intermediate 3-(2-oxo-2-(hetero)arylethylidene)indolin-2-ones with Lawesson’s reagent. The latter process involves two sequential reactions, namely reduction of the C=C ethylidene double bond of the intermediate indolin-2-ones followed by the Paal–Knorr cyclization, thus affording tricyclic thieno[2,3-b]indoles. PMID:26199654

  18. Australian helminths in Australian rodents: an issue of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Warner, L R

    1998-06-01

    The Australian public as well as Australian funding bodies are generally unsympathetic to native murids, rats and mice, in spite of the fact that 36% have either become extinct or critically endangered since European settlement. The endemic Australian parasites of these rats and mice have been even less sympathetically regarded. Prior to 1958 very little work was carried out on the helminths of Australian rodents and little more is known today. Records are known from only 28% of the extant host species, comprising some 109 species of helminth identified at least to generic level. The rodents invaded Australia from the north, perhaps through New Guinea in at least two separate waves, 5-8 then about 1 million years ago. The parasites they brought with them have adapted and speciated and there has been some host switching between rodent groups and between rodents and the Australian marsupials. This is illustrated particularly in the Trichostrongyloidea. The origins of the rodents from Southeast Asia down the Indonesian island chain are reflected in the presence of the nematode genus Tikusnema in both Australia and Indonesia, and Cyclodontostomum purvisi across Southeast Asia and into New Guinea. Hydromys chrysogaster, the Australian water-rat, illustrates how the biogeographical influences of the host's distribution and lifestyle can affect its parasite fauna. Most of the research to date is merely indicative of where more data are needed. The links between Australian and New Guinean helminth fauna, as well as the links between rodent and marsupial hosts and their fauna, cannot be determined without further research. PMID:9673864

  19. Multiple Infections of Rodents with Zoonotic Pathogens in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Sabrina; Essbauer, Sandra S.; Mayer-Scholl, Anne; Poppert, Sven; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Klempa, Boris; Henning, Klaus; Schares, Gereon; Groschup, Martin H.; Spitzenberger, Friederike; Richter, Dania; Heckel, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rodents are important reservoirs for a large number of zoonotic pathogens. We examined the occurrence of 11 viral, bacterial, and parasitic agents in rodent populations in Austria, including three different hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox virus, Leptospira spp., Borrelia spp., Rickettsia spp., Bartonella spp., Coxiella burnetii, and Toxoplasma gondii. In 2008, 110 rodents of four species (40 Clethrionomys glareolus, 29 Apodemus flavicollis, 26 Apodemus sylvaticus, and 15 Microtus arvalis) were trapped at two rural sites in Lower Austria. Chest cavity fluid and samples of lung, spleen, kidney, liver, brain, and ear pinna skin were collected. We screened selected tissue samples for hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox viruses, Leptospira, Borrelia, Rickettsia, Bartonella spp., C. burnetii, and T. gondii by RT-PCR/PCR and detected nucleic acids of Tula hantavirus, Leptospira spp., Borrelia afzelii, Rickettsia spp., and different Bartonella species. Serological investigations were performed for hantaviruses, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, orthopox viruses, and Rickettsia spp. Here, Dobrava-Belgrade hantavirus-, Tula hantavirus-, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-, orthopox virus-, and rickettsia-specific antibodies were demonstrated. Puumala hantavirus, C. burnetii, and T. gondii were neither detected by RT-PCR/PCR nor by serological methods. In addition, multiple infections with up to three pathogens were shown in nine animals of three rodent species from different trapping sites. In conclusion, these results show that rodents in Austria may host multiple zoonotic pathogens. Our observation raises important questions regarding the interactions of different pathogens in the host, the countermeasures of the host's immune system, the impact of the host–pathogen interaction on the fitness of the host, and the spread of infectious agents among wild rodents and from those to other animals or humans. PMID

  20. Social and cultural dimensions of rodent pest management.

    PubMed

    Palis, Florencia G; Singleton, Grant; Sumalde, Zenaida; Hossain, Mahabub

    2007-09-01

    Rice production in Vietnam is threatened by rodent pests, with a significant increase in impact reported from 1990 through to the early 21st century. Pre-harvest rice losses are typically 5-10%, with losses of >20% occurring in some years in some regions. Farmers' rodent control practices are generally reactive and rely essentially on chemical and physical methods. Ecologically-based rodent pest management (EBRM) was developed in the late 1990s to manage rodents in rice-based farming systems in Vietnam and other parts of South-East Asia. EBRM combines both cultural and physical rodent management practices such as synchrony of cropping, short 2-week rat campaigns at key periods in key habitats, increasing general hygiene around villages, and use of a community trap-barrier system. Although EBRM has been reported to be economically profitable, the successful adoption of this set of technologies requires community participation. In this paper we address issues relating to the adoption and sustainability of EBRM in lowland irrigated rice fields in the Mekong Delta in Vietnam. We particularly explore the social and cultural mechanisms involved in maintaining community participation to further understand the conditions under which EBRM works and does not work. Positive indications of sustained use of community-based EBRM include: a policy pronouncement from the prime minister directing the use of integrated rodent management; the use of existing cooperatives for developing community actions; budgetary allocation from provincial and local governments; diffusion of EBRM to provinces in the south and north that are not involved in farmer participatory field trials; and the adoption of EBRM by a non-governmental organization, World Vision Vietnam, in their area-development programs. PMID:21396033

  1. Structural Complexity, Differential Response to Infection, and Tissue Specificity of Indolic and Phenylpropanoid Secondary Metabolism in Arabidopsis Roots1[w

    PubMed Central

    Bednarek, Paweł; Schneider, Bernd; Svatoš, Aleš; Oldham, Neil J.; Hahlbrock, Klaus

    2005-01-01

    Levels of indolic and phenylpropanoid secondary metabolites in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves undergo rapid and drastic changes during pathogen defense, yet little is known about this process in roots. Using Arabidopsis wild-type and mutant root cultures as an experimental system, and the root-pathogenic oomycete, Pythium sylvaticum, for infections, we analyzed the aromatic metabolite profiles in soluble extracts from uninfected and infected roots, as well as from the surrounding medium. A total of 16 indolic, one heterocyclic, and three phenylpropanoid compounds were structurally identified by mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. Most of the indolics increased strongly upon infection, whereas the three phenylpropanoids decreased. Concomitant increases in both indolic and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic mRNAs suggested that phenylpropanoids other than those examined here in “soluble extracts” were coinduced with the indolics. These and previous results indicate that roots differ greatly from leaves with regard to the nature and relative abundance of all major soluble phenylpropanoid constituents. For indolics, by contrast, our data reveal far-reaching similarities between roots and leaves and, beyond this comparative aspect, provide an insight into this highly diversified yet under-explored metabolic realm. The data point to metabolic interconnections among the compounds identified and suggest a partial revision of the previously proposed camalexin pathway. PMID:15923335

  2. Selective MS screening reveals a sex pheromone in Caenorhabditis briggsae and species-specificity in indole ascaroside signalling.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chuanfu; Dolke, Franziska; von Reuss, Stephan H

    2016-08-14

    The indole ascarosides (icas) represent a highly potent class of nematode-derived modular signalling components that integrate structural inputs from amino acid, carbohydrate, and fatty acid metabolism. Comparative analysis of the crude exo-metabolome of hermaphroditic Caenorhabditis briggsae using a highly sensitive mass spectrometric screen reveals an indole ascaroside blend dominated by two new components. The structures of isolated icas#2 and icas#6.2 were determined by NMR spectroscopy and confirmed by total synthesis and chemical correlation. Low atto- to femtomolar amounts of icas#2 and icas#6.2 act in synergism to attract males indicating a function as sex pheromone. Comparative analysis of 14 Caenorhabditis species further demonstrates that species-specific indole ascaroside biosynthesis is highly conserved in the Elegans group. Functional characterization of the dominating indole ascarosides icas#2, icas#3, and icas#9 reveals a high degree of species-specificity and considerable variability with respect to gender-specificity, thus, confirming that indole ascarosides modulate different biological functions within the Elegans group. Although the nematode response was usually most pronounced towards conspecific signals, Caenorhabditis brenneri, the only species of the Elegans group that does not produce any indole ascarosides, exhibits a robust response to icas#2 suggesting the potential for interspecies interactions. PMID:27381649

  3. Cloning and characterization of a locus encoding an indolepyruvate decarboxylase involved in indole-3-acetic acid synthesis in Erwinia herbicola.

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, M T; Lindow, S E

    1996-01-01

    Erwinia herbicola 299R synthesizes indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) primarily by the indole-3-pyruvic acid pathway. A gene involved in the biosynthesis of IAA was cloned from strain 299R. This gene (ipdC) conferred the synthesis of indole-3-acetaldehyde and tryptophol upon Escherichia coli DH5 alpha in cultures supplemented with L-tryptophan. The deduced amino acid sequence of the gene product has high similarity to that of the indolepyruvate decarboxylase of Enterobacter cloacae. Regions within pyruvate decarboxylases of various fungal and plant species also exhibited considerable homology to portions of this gene. This gene therefore presumably encodes an indolepyruvate decarboxylase (IpdC) which catalyzes the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid to indole-3-acetaldehyde. Insertions of Tn3-spice within ipdC abolished the ability of strain 299R to synthesize indole-3-acetaldehyde and tryptophol and reduced its IAA production in tryptophan-supplemented minimal medium by approximately 10-fold, thus providing genetic evidence for the role of the indolepyruvate pathway in IAA synthesis in this strain. An ipdC probe hybridized strongly with the genomic DNA of all E. herbicola strains tested in Southern hybridization studies, suggesting that the indolepyruvate pathway is common in this species. Maximum parsimony analysis revealed that the ipdC gene is highly conserved within this group and that strains of diverse geographic origin were very similar with respect to ipdC. PMID:8900003

  4. Discovery of Novel Alphacoronaviruses in European Rodents and Shrews

    PubMed Central

    Tsoleridis, Theocharis; Onianwa, Okechukwu; Horncastle, Emma; Dayman, Emma; Zhu, Miaoran; Danjittrong, Taechasit; Wachtl, Marta; Behnke, Jerzy M.; Chapman, Sarah; Strong, Victoria; Dobbs, Phillipa; Ball, Jonathan K.; Tarlinton, Rachael E.; McClure, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Eight hundred and thirteen European rodents and shrews encompassing seven different species were screened for alphacoronaviruses using PCR detection. Novel alphacoronaviruses were detected in the species Rattus norvegicus, Microtus agrestis, Sorex araneus and Myodes glareolus. These, together with the recently described Lucheng virus found in China, form a distinct rodent/shrew-specific clade within the coronavirus phylogeny. Across a highly conserved region of the viral polymerase gene, the new members of this clade were up to 22% dissimilar at the nucleotide level to the previously described Lucheng virus. As such they might represent distinct species of alphacoronaviruses. These data greatly extend our knowledge of wildlife reservoirs of alphacoronaviruses. PMID:27102167

  5. Stress, social behavior, and resilience: Insights from rodents

    PubMed Central

    Beery, Annaliese K.; Kaufer, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The neurobiology of stress and the neurobiology of social behavior are deeply intertwined. The social environment interacts with stress on almost every front: social interactions can be potent stressors; they can buffer the response to an external stressor; and social behavior often changes in response to stressful life experience. This review explores mechanistic and behavioral links between stress, anxiety, resilience, and social behavior in rodents, with particular attention to different social contexts. We consider variation between several different rodent species and make connections to research on humans and non-human primates. PMID:25562050

  6. Experimental infection of Rio Mamore hantavirus in Sigmodontinae rodents.

    PubMed

    Souza, William Marciel de; Machado, Alex Martins; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-05-24

    This study shows an experimental spillover infection of Sigmodontinae rodents with Rio Mamore hantavirus (RIOMV). Necromys lasiurus and Akodon sp were infected with 103 RNA copies of RIOMV by intraperitoneal administration. The viral genome was detected in heart, lung, and kidney tissues 18 days after infection (ai), and viral excretion in urine and faeces began at four and six ai, respectively. These results reveal that urine and faeces of infected rodents contain the virus for at least 18 days. It is possible that inhaled aerosols of these excreta could transmit hantavirus to humans and other animals. PMID:27223653

  7. Experimental infection of Rio Mamore hantavirus in Sigmodontinae rodents

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, William Marciel; Machado, Alex Martins; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    2016-01-01

    This study shows an experimental spillover infection ofSigmodontinae rodents with Rio Mamore hantavirus (RIOMV).Necromys lasiurus and Akodon sp were infected with 103 RNA copies of RIOMV by intraperitoneal administration. The viral genome was detected in heart, lung, and kidney tissues 18 days after infection (ai), and viral excretion in urine and faeces began at four and six ai, respectively. These results reveal that urine and faeces of infected rodents contain the virus for at least 18 days. It is possible that inhaled aerosols of these excreta could transmit hantavirus to humans and other animals. PMID:27223653

  8. Discovery of Novel Alphacoronaviruses in European Rodents and Shrews.

    PubMed

    Tsoleridis, Theocharis; Onianwa, Okechukwu; Horncastle, Emma; Dayman, Emma; Zhu, Miaoran; Danjittrong, Taechasit; Wachtl, Marta; Behnke, Jerzy M; Chapman, Sarah; Strong, Victoria; Dobbs, Phillipa; Ball, Jonathan K; Tarlinton, Rachael E; McClure, C Patrick

    2016-03-01

    Eight hundred and thirteen European rodents and shrews encompassing seven different species were screened for alphacoronaviruses using PCR detection. Novel alphacoronaviruses were detected in the species Rattus norvegicus, Microtus agrestis, Sorex araneus and Myodes glareolus. These, together with the recently described Lucheng virus found in China, form a distinct rodent/shrew-specific clade within the coronavirus phylogeny. Across a highly conserved region of the viral polymerase gene, the new members of this clade were up to 22% dissimilar at the nucleotide level to the previously described Lucheng virus. As such they might represent distinct species of alphacoronaviruses. These data greatly extend our knowledge of wildlife reservoirs of alphacoronaviruses. PMID:27102167

  9. Determination of Endogenous Indole-3-Acetic Acid in Plagiochila arctica (Hepaticae) 1

    PubMed Central

    Law, David M.; Basile, Dominick V.; Basile, Margaret R.

    1985-01-01

    Endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was found in axenically cultured gametophytes of the leafy liverwort, Plagiochila arctica Bryhn and Kaal., by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Identification of the methylated auxin was confirmed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Addition of 57 micromolar IAA to cultures increased relative production of ethylene. This is the first definitive (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) demonstration of the natural occurrence of IAA in a bryophyte. PMID:16664164

  10. Synthesis and bioactivity of secondary metabolites from marine sponges containing dibrominated indolic systems.

    PubMed

    Mollica, Adriano; Locatelli, Marcello; Stefanucci, Azzurra; Pinnen, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Marine sponges. (e.g., Hyrtios sp., Dragmacidin sp., Aglophenia pleuma, Aplidium cyaneum, Aplidium meridianum.) produce bioactive secondary metabolites involved in their defence mechanisms. Recently it was demonstrated that several of those compounds show a large variety of biological activities against different human diseases with possible applications in medicinal chemistry and in pharmaceutical fields, especially related to the new drug development process. Researchers have focused their attention principally on secondary metabolites with anti-cancer and cytotoxic activities. A common target for these molecules is the cytoskeleton, which has a central role in cellular proliferation, motility, and profusion involved in the metastatic process associate with tumors. In particular, many substances containing brominated indolic rings such as 5,6-dibromotryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptophan (dibromoabrine), 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5,6-dibromo-L-hypaphorine isolated from different marine sources, have shown anti-cancer activity, as well as antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Considering the structural correlation between endogenous monoamine serotonin with marine indolic alkaloids 5,6-dibromoabrine and 5,6-dibromotryptamine, a potential use of some dibrominated indolic metabolites in the treatment of depression-related pathologies has also been hypothesized. Due to the potential applications in the treatment of various diseases and the increasing demand of these compounds for biological assays and the difficult of their isolation from marine sources, we report in this review a series of recent syntheses of marine dibrominated indole-containing products. PMID:22614862

  11. Identification of Indole-3-Acetic Acid in the Basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune 1

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Ephraim; Miles, Philip G.

    1967-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was detected in the ether extracts of culture filtrates of indigotin-producing strains of the basidiomycete Schizophyllum commune. Several solvents, known to give distinctly different RF values for IAA, and 3 location reagents gave identical results with synthetic IAA and IAA found in the extract. Confirmation was obtained by the Avena straight growth test, split pea test, and ultraviolet absorption spectrum. PMID:16656596

  12. Trypanosoma cruzi: Antiproliferative effect of indole phytoalexins on intracellular amastigotes in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Mezencev, Roman; Galizzi, Melina; Kutschy, Peter; Docampo, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    American trypanosomiasis (Chagas disease) continues to be a significant public health problem, and the therapeutic potential of current antichagasic agents (nifurtimox and benznidazole) is rather limited. Here we report on the antitrypanosomal effect of 1-methoxyspirobrassinol and other indole phytoalexins - secondary metabolites produced by Cruciferous plants. These compounds, that previously demonstrated antimicrobial and anticancer properties, displayed significant antiproliferative effects on intracellular amastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi and may be prospective candidates for antichagasic drug design and development. PMID:19545522

  13. Monoterpene indole alkaloids from the stem bark of Mitragyna diversifolia and their acetylcholine esterase inhibitory effects.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xing-Fen; Wang, Jun-Song; Wang, Xiao-Bing; Luo, Jun; Wang, Hong-Ying; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2013-12-01

    Five monoterpene indole alkaloids, mitradiversifoline, with a unique rearranged skeleton, specionoxeine-N(4)-oxide, 7-hydroxyisopaynantheine, 3-dehydropaynantheine, and 3-isopaynantheine-N(4)-oxide, and 10 known ones, were isolated from Mitragyna diversifolia. All the isolates were evaluated for their inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activities, and four showed moderate activities, with IC50 values of 4.1, 5.2, 10.2, and 10.3 μM, respectively. PMID:24169379

  14. The Synthesis and Pharmacological Evaluation of Adamantane-Derived Indoles: Cannabimimetic Drugs of Abuse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Two novel adamantane derivatives, adamantan-1-yl(1-pentyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methanone (AB-001) and N-(adamtan-1-yl)-1-pentyl-1H-indole-3-carboxamide (SDB-001), were recently identified as cannabimimetic indoles of abuse. Conflicting anecdotal reports of the psychoactivity of AB-001 in humans, and a complete dearth of information about the bioactivity of SDB-001, prompted the preparation of AB-001, SDB-001, and several analogues intended to explore preliminary structure–activity relationships within this class. This study sought to elucidate which structural features of AB-001, SDB-001, and their analogues govern the cannabimimetic potency of these chemotypes in vitro and in vivo. All compounds showed similar full agonist profiles at CB1 (EC50 = 16–43 nM) and CB2 (EC50 = 29–216 nM) receptors in vitro using a FLIPR membrane potential assay, with the exception of SDB-002, which demonstrated partial agonist activity at CB2 receptors. The activity of AB-001, AB-002, and SDB-001 in rats was compared to that of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and cannabimimetic indole JWH-018 using biotelemetry. SDB-001 dose-dependently induced hypothermia and reduced heart rate (maximal dose 10 mg/kg) with potency comparable to that of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC, maximal dose 10 mg/kg), and lower than that of JWH-018 (maximal dose 3 mg/kg). Additionally, the changes in body temperature and heart rate affected by SDB-001 are of longer duration than those of Δ9-THC or JWH-018, suggesting a different pharmacokinetic profile. In contrast, AB-001, and its homologue, AB-002, did not produce significant hypothermic and bradycardic effects, even at relatively higher doses (up to 30 mg/kg), indicating greatly reduced potency compared to Δ9-THC, JWH-018, and SDB-001. PMID:23551277

  15. One-pot gold-catalyzed synthesis of 3-silylethynyl indoles from unprotected o-alkynylanilines

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Jonathan P; Chevalley, Clara

    2011-01-01

    Summary The Au(III)-catalyzed cyclization of 2-alkynylanilines was combined in a one-pot procedure with the Au(I)-catalyzed C3-selective direct alkynylation of indoles using the benziodoxolone reagent TIPS-EBX to give a mild, easy and straightforward entry to 2-substituted-3-alkynylindoles. The reaction can be applied to unprotected anilines, was tolerant to functional groups and easy to carry out (RT, and requires neither an inert atmosphere nor special solvents). PMID:21647264

  16. Indole alkaloids from cell suspension cultures of Tabernaemontana divaricata and Tabernanthe iboga.

    PubMed

    Pawelka, K H; Stöckigt, J

    1983-04-01

    From cell suspension cultures of Tabernaemontana divaricata and Tabernanthe iboga grown under standard conditions, six monoterpenoid indole alkaloids have been isolated and identified. T. divaricata synthesized apparicine, catharanthine, coronaridine, conoflorine, tubotaiwine and vinervine, whereas T. iboga produced tubotaiwine and conoflorine. Both cultures are a reasonable source for conoflorine, which is expected to be a good candidate for studying the mechanism of Aspidosperma type alkaloid formation at the cell-free level. PMID:24257961

  17. Antiproliferative Activity of 2,3-Disubstituted Indoles Toward Apoptosis-Resistant Cancers Cells

    PubMed Central

    Magedov, Igor V.; Lefranc, Florence; Frolova, Liliya V.; Banuls, Laetitia Moreno Y; Peretti, Amanda S.; Rogelj, Snezna; Mathieu, Véronique; Kiss, Robert; Kornienko, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Many types of cancer, including glioma, melanoma, NSCLC, among others, are resistant to apoptosis induction and poorly responsive to current therapies with propaptotic agents. We describe a series of 2,3-disubstituted indoles, which display cytostatic rather than cytotoxic effects in cancer cells, and serve as a new chemical scaffold to develop anticancer agents capable of combating apoptosis-resistant cancers associated with dismal prognoses. PMID:23622980

  18. Discovery of Tertiary Amine and Indole Derivatives as Potent RORγt Inverse Agonists.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ting; Liu, Qian; Cheng, Yaobang; Cai, Wei; Ma, Yingli; Yang, Liuqing; Wu, Qianqian; Orband-Miller, Lisa A; Zhou, Ling; Xiang, Zhijun; Huxdorf, Melanie; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jing; Xiang, Jia-Ning; Leung, Stewart; Qiu, Yang; Zhong, Zhong; Elliott, John D; Lin, Xichen; Wang, Yonghui

    2014-01-01

    A novel series of tertiary amines as retinoid-related orphan receptor gamma-t (RORγt) inverse agonists was discovered through agonist/inverse agonist conversion. The level of RORγt inhibition can be enhanced by modulating the conformational disruption of H12 in RORγt LBD. Linker exploration and rational design led to the discovery of more potent indole-based RORγt inverse agonists. PMID:24900774

  19. Design and synthesis of novel indole-chalcone fibrates as lipid lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Sashidhara, Koneni V; Dodda, Ranga Prasad; Sonkar, Ravi; Palnati, Gopala Reddy; Bhatia, Gitika

    2014-06-23

    A series of novel indole-chalcone fibrates were synthesized and their hypolipidemic activity was evaluated in triton WR-1339 induced hyperlipidemic rat model. Preliminary studies indicated that the hybrids 19, 24 and 29 exhibited potent in vitro antioxidant and significant in vivo antidyslipidemic effects. Our results suggest that these new hybrid architectures may serve as promising leads for the development of next generation lipid lowering agents. PMID:24871900

  20. Radioprotective Effects of Amifostine on Acute and Chronic Esophageal Injury in Rodents

    SciTech Connect

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Thrasher, Bradley A.; Jackson, Isabel L.; Brizel, Marla B.; Brizel, David M.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: This study was performed to evaluate the protective benefit of amifostine against esophageal injury from fractionated radiation in a rodent model. Methods: Fractionated or sham esophageal irradiation was administered to Fisher-344 rats for 5 consecutive daily fractions of 9 Gy using 150 kV X-rays. Animals received an intraperitoneal injection of amifostine or placebo 30 min before each fraction. Histopathologic analyses for mucosal thickness, submucosal collagen deposition, activation of macrophages, oxidative stress and expression/activation of integrin{alpha}v{beta}6 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-{beta} were performed 5 days and 10 weeks after irradiation. Results: Pre-RT mean mucosal thickness was 35 {mu}m in both the placebo and the amifostine groups. Five days post-RT, mean mucosal thicknesses were 30 {mu}m in the placebo group versus 37 {mu}m in the amifostine group (p = 0.024). At 10 weeks post-RT, the group receiving amifostine experienced a significant decrease in tunica muscularis damage (p = 0.002), submucosal collagen deposition (p = 0.027), and macrophage accumulation (p = 0.026) when compared with the placebo group. The levels of immunoreactivity for oxidative stress, TGF-{beta}, and integrin{alpha}v{beta}6 were significantly decreased 10 weeks post-RT in the group receiving amifostine treatment compared with placebo group. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that amifostine given before each radiation fraction protects against acute and chronic esophageal injury in a rodent model. Protection of the mucosal epithelium integrity by amifostine prevents integrin{alpha}v{beta}6 expression which reduces TGF-{beta} activation and subsequent development of chronic esophageal injury in this model. Further investigation is necessary to determine the clinical relevance of these findings.

  1. Different N-H⋯π inter-actions in two indole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Jamie R; Trembleau, Laurent; Storey, John M D; Wardell, James L; Harrison, William T A

    2016-05-01

    We describe the syntheses and crystal structures of two indole derivatives, namely 6-isopropyl-3-(2-nitro-1-phenyl-eth-yl)-1H-indole, C19H20N2O2, (I), and 2-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)-3-(2-nitro-1-phenyl-eth-yl)-1H-indole, C23H20N2O3, (II); the latter crystallizes with two mol-ecules (A and B) with similar conformations (r.m.s. overlay fit = 0.139 Å) in the asymmetric unit. Despite the presence of O atoms as potential acceptors for classical hydrogen bonds, the dominant inter-molecular inter-action in each crystal is an N-H⋯π bond, which generates chains in (I) and A+A and B+B inversion dimers in (II). A different aromatic ring acts as the acceptor in each case. The packing is consolidated by C-H⋯π inter-actions in each case but aromatic π-π stacking inter-actions are absent. PMID:27308022

  2. Gene-to-metabolite networks for terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus cells

    PubMed Central

    Rischer, Heiko; Orešič, Matej; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Katajamaa, Mikko; Lammertyn, Freya; Ardiles-Diaz, Wilson; Van Montagu, Marc C. E.; Inzé, Dirk; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Goossens, Alain

    2006-01-01

    Rational engineering of complicated metabolic networks involved in the production of biologically active plant compounds has been greatly impeded by our poor understanding of the regulatory and metabolic pathways underlying the biosynthesis of these compounds. Whereas comprehensive genome-wide functional genomics approaches can be successfully applied to analyze a select number of model plants, these holistic approaches are not yet available for the study of nonmodel plants that include most, if not all, medicinal plants. We report here a comprehensive profiling analysis of the Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus), a source of the anticancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. Genome-wide transcript profiling by cDNA-amplified fragment-length polymorphism combined with metabolic profiling of elicited C. roseus cell cultures yielded a collection of known and previously undescribed transcript tags and metabolites associated with terpenoid indole alkaloids. Previously undescribed gene-to-gene and gene-to-metabolite networks were drawn up by searching for correlations between the expression profiles of 417 gene tags and the accumulation profiles of 178 metabolite peaks. These networks revealed that the different branches of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis and various other metabolic pathways are subject to differing hormonal regulation. These networks also served to identify a select number of genes and metabolites likely to be involved in the biosynthesis of terpenoid indole alkaloids. This study provides the basis for a better understanding of periwinkle secondary metabolism and increases the practical potential of metabolic engineering of this important medicinal plant. PMID:16565214

  3. Indolic Uremic Solutes Enhance Procoagulant Activity of Red Blood Cells through Phosphatidylserine Exposure and Microparticle Release

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-01-01

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca2+]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process. PMID:26516916

  4. The protein encoded by the rolB plant oncogene hydrolyses indole glucosides.

    PubMed Central

    Estruch, J J; Schell, J; Spena, A

    1991-01-01

    The rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes, whose expression stimulates the formation of roots by transformed plant tissues and other growth alterations in transgenic plants, codes for a beta-glucosidase able to hydrolyse indole-beta-glucosides. Indeed, we show that extracts of bacteria and/or plant tissue expressing the rolB protein hydrolyse indoxyl-beta-glucoside (plant indican). Because of the structural similarity between indoxyl-beta-glucoside and indole-3-acetyl-beta-glucoside (IAA-beta-glucoside), we propose that the physiological and developmental alterations in transgenic plants expressing the rolB gene could be the result of an increased intracellular auxin activity caused by the release of active auxins from inactive beta-glucosides. Thus two of the oncogenes carried by the T-DNA of the plant pathogen Agrobacterium rhizogenes (rolB and rolC) perturb plant growth and development by coding for beta-glucosidases with distinct specificities. Whereas the rolC beta-glucosidase releases cytokinins from their glucoside conjugates, the rolB encoded protein hydrolyses indole-beta-glucosides. The combined action of these two genes therefore is expected to modulate the intracellular concentration of two of the main growth factors active in plants. Images PMID:1915286

  5. Indolic uremic solutes enhance procoagulant activity of red blood cells through phosphatidylserine exposure and microparticle release.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chunyan; Ji, Shuting; Dong, Weijun; Qi, Yushan; Song, Wen; Cui, Debin; Shi, Jialan

    2015-11-01

    Increased accumulation of indolic uremic solutes in the blood of uremic patients contributes to the risk of thrombotic events. Red blood cells (RBCs), the most abundant blood cells in circulation, may be a privileged target of these solutes. However, the effect of uremic solutes indoxyl sulfate (IS) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) on procoagulant activity (PCA) of erythrocyte is unclear. Here, RBCs from healthy adults were treated with IS and IAA (mean and maximal concentrations reported in uremic patients). Phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure of RBCs and their microparticles (MPs) release were labeled with Alexa Fluor 488-lactadherin and detected by flow cytometer. Cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]) with Fluo 3/AM was analyzed by flow cytometer. PCA was assessed by clotting time and purified coagulation complex assays. We found that PS exposure, MPs generation, and consequent PCA of RBCs at mean concentrations of IS and IAA enhanced and peaked in maximal uremic concentrations. Moreover, 128 nM lactadherin, a PS inhibitor, inhibited over 90% PCA of RBCs and RMPs. Eryptosis or damage, by indolic uremic solutes was due to, at least partially, the increase of cytosolic [Ca(2+)]. Our results suggest that RBC eryptosis in uremic solutes IS and IAA plays an important role in thrombus formation through releasing RMPs and exposing PS. Lactadherin acts as an efficient anticoagulant in this process. PMID:26516916

  6. Indole-3-ethylsulfamoylphenylacrylamides with Potent Anti-proliferative and Anti-angiogenic Activities.

    PubMed

    Mehndiratta, Samir; Pan, Shiow-Lin; Kumar, Sunil; Liou, Jing-Ping

    2016-01-01

    HDAC inhibition is emerging as a new strategy for cancer therapy. We previously reported that Nhydroxy- 3-{4-[2-(2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-ethylsulfamoyl]-phenyl}-acrylamide (9) demonstrated potent histone deacetylases (HDAC) inhibition and anti-inflammatory effects. This continuous study provides detailed structureactivity relationship (SAR) of novel indol-3-ethylsulfamoylphenylacrylamides as anti-cancer agents. These compounds are endowed with potent HDAC inhibitory activity, almost 2.5 folds to 42 folds better than suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA). Compounds 8, 10, 11 and 17 exhibited significant inhibitory effects on various cancer cell lines with GI50 values in the range of 0.02 to 0.35 μM which are 10-50 folds better than SAHA. In-vivo nude mice model indicated the anti-angiogenic potential of these acrylamides. This study has indicated the potential of 3-{4-[2-(1-Ethyl-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-ethyl-N-tert-butoxycarbonylsulfamoyl]-phenyl}-N-hydroxy-acrylamide (11, mean GI50 = 0.04 μM) as a lead molecule for further development as anti-cancer agent. PMID:26459769

  7. Synthesis and biological evaluation of indole-chalcone derivatives as β-amyloid imaging probe.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mengchao; Ono, Masahiro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Liu, Bo Li; Saji, Hideo

    2011-02-01

    A series of chaclone derivatives containing an indole moiety were evaluated in competitive binding assays with Aβ(1-42) aggregates versus [(125)I]IMPY. The affinity of these compounds ranged from 4.46 to >1008 nM, depending on the substitution on the phenyl ring. Fluorescent staining in vitro showed that one compound with a N,N-dimethylamino group intensely stained Aβ plaques within brain sections of AD transgenic mice. The radioiodinated probe [(125)I]-(E)-3-(1H-indol-5-yl)-1-(4-iodophenyl)prop-2-en-1-one, [(125)I]4, was prepared and autoradiography in sections of brain tissue from an animal model of AD showed that it labeled Aβ plaques specifically. However, experiments with normal mice indicated that [(125)I]4 exhibited a low uptake into the brain in vivo (0.41% ID/g at 2 min). Additional chemical modifications of this indole-chalcone structure may lead to more useful imaging agents for detecting β-amyloid plaques in the brains of AD patients. PMID:21216142

  8. Different N—H⋯π inter­actions in two indole derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Jamie R.; Trembleau, Laurent; Storey, John M. D.; Wardell, James L.; Harrison, William T. A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the syntheses and crystal structures of two indole derivatives, namely 6-isopropyl-3-(2-nitro-1-phenyl­eth­yl)-1H-indole, C19H20N2O2, (I), and 2-(4-meth­oxy­phen­yl)-3-(2-nitro-1-phenyl­eth­yl)-1H-indole, C23H20N2O3, (II); the latter crystallizes with two mol­ecules (A and B) with similar conformations (r.m.s. overlay fit = 0.139 Å) in the asymmetric unit. Despite the presence of O atoms as potential acceptors for classical hydrogen bonds, the dominant inter­molecular inter­action in each crystal is an N—H⋯π bond, which generates chains in (I) and A+A and B+B inversion dimers in (II). A different aromatic ring acts as the acceptor in each case. The packing is consolidated by C—H⋯π inter­actions in each case but aromatic π–π stacking inter­actions are absent. PMID:27308022

  9. Design, synthesis and antiproliferative activity of a novel class of indole-2-carboxylate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xing-yue; Xue, Si-tu; Zhan, Yue-chen; Shen, Jia-jia; Wu, Lin-tao; Jin, Jie; Wang, Zhen; Li, Zhuo-rong

    2014-08-18

    Based on the chemical structure of Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a novel class of indole-2-carboxylate derivatives was designed, synthesized and assayed for antiproliferative activity in cancer cells in vitro. The biological results showed that some derivatives exhibited significant antiproliferative activity against HepG2, A549 and MCF7 cells. Notably, the novel compounds, methyl 6-amino-4-cyclohexylmethoxy-1H-indole-2-carboxylate (6e) and methyl 4-isopropoxy-6-methoxy-1H-indole-2-carboxylate (9l) exhibited more potent antiproliferative activity than the reference drugs PQQ and etoposide in vitro, with IC50 values ranging from 3.78 ± 0.58 to 24.08 ± 1.76 μM. Further biological assay showed that both compounds 6e and 9l increased ROS generation dose-dependently, and induced PARP cleavage in A549 cells. Consequently, 6e and 9l appeared as promising anticancer lead compounds for further optimization. PMID:24996136

  10. Ervatamines A-I, Anti-inflammatory Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids with Diverse Skeletons from Ervatamia hainanensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Bo; Yu, Dao-Geng; Sun, Meng; Zhu, Xu-Xin; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Zhou, Shuang-Yan; Chen, Jian-Jun; Gao, Kun

    2015-06-26

    Nine new monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, ervatamines A-I (1-9), and five known ones (10-14), were isolated from Ervatamia hainanensis. The new structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis and comparison to known compounds. Their absolute configurations were determined by various methods including computational methods, X-ray diffraction analysis, and electronic circular dichroism spectroscopy, as well as chemical transformations. Ervatamine A (1) is a ring-C-contracted ibogan-type monoterpenoid indole alkaloid with an unusual 6/5/6/6/6 pentacyclic rearranged ring system. Ervatamines B-E (2-5) display a nitrogen-containing 9/6 ring system, which is rarely observed in nature. The epimeric ervatamines B (2) and C (3) possess a 22-nor-monoterpenoid indole alkaloid carbon skeleton, which was only found in deformylstemmadenine. Compounds 10 and 14 exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activities, with IC50 values of 25.5 and 41.5 μM, respectively, while the IC50 value of indomethacin as a positive control was found to be 42.6 μM. Additionally, compound 9 showed mild activity against 786-O and HL-60 cell lines. PMID:26024020

  11. Prevalence and diversity of Bartonella in rodents of northern Thailand: a comparison with Bartonella in rodents from southern China.

    PubMed

    Castle, Kevin T; Kosoy, Michael; Lerdthusnee, Kriangkrai; Phelan, Lori; Bai, Ying; Gage, Kenneth L; Leepitakrat, Warisa; Monkanna, Taweesak; Khlaimanee, Nittaya; Chandranoi, Kirkvich; Jones, James W; Coleman, Russell E

    2004-04-01

    We report results of the first study to investigate the distribution and diversity of Bartonella in rodents from Thailand. Whole blood from 195 rodents, representing six species, was tested for the presence of Bartonella species using standard culture techniques. Isolates were obtained from 17 (8.7%) of the samples, and 14 of those isolates represented distinct strains, based upon partial sequencing of the citrate synthase (gltA) gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the isolates and other Bartonella species indicated that five unique isolates from Bandicota indica form a cluster that may represent a new Bartonella species. Two additional isolates from B. indica clustered together, and were nearly identical to an isolate from Apodemus draco collected in southern China. Importantly, a number of the isolates from Thailand rodents are closely related to B. grahamii and B. elizabethae, species which have been associated with human illness. PMID:15100459

  12. Wild-rodent-flea control in rural areas of an enzootic plague region in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Kartman, Leo; Lonergan, Richard P.

    1955-01-01

    Preliminary field tests were carried out to develop methods for controlling fleas on wild rodents in the enzootic plague region of the Island of Hawaii. Among several designs, a metal hood-type DDT bait-box was developed which was simple in design, low in cost, easy to transport to and maintain in the field, protected the insecticide from the elements, and attracted all species of field rats inhabiting a gulch in the Hamakua District. These rats—Rattus rattus (and its subspecies), R. norvegicus, and R. hawaiiensis—readily fed in the DDT bait-boxes and were dusted with 10% DDT powder (in pyrophyllite) on contacting hanging cloth sacks, containing the insecticide, when entering and leaving the bait-boxes. The results indicate that a reduction of the plague-vector fleas, Xenopsylla cheopis and X. vexabilis hawaiiensis, may be obtained both on rats and within their burrows and nests, by the use of DDT bait-boxes. It is suggested that the use of such bait-boxes for wild-rodent-flea control may constitute a valuable method in the prevention of epizootics of plague in the Hamakua District, Hawaii. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 4FIG. 4(Contd.) PMID:13260882

  13. Nephrilin peptide modulates a neuroimmune stress response in rodent models of burn trauma and sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Desmond D; ElAyadi, Amina; Singh, Baljit K; Prasai, Anesh; Hegde, Sachin D; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis occurs three times more often in burns than in other types of trauma, suggesting an overlap or synergy between underlying immune mechanisms in burn trauma and sepsis. Nephrilin peptide, a designed inhibitor of mTORC2, has previously been shown to modulate a neuroimmune stress response in rodent models of xenobiotic and metabolic stress. Here we investigate the effect of nephrilin peptide administration in different rodent models of burn trauma and sepsis. In a rat scald burn model, daily subcutaneous bolus injection of 4 mg/kg nephrilin significantly reduced the elevation of kidney tissue substance P, S100A9 gene expression, PMN infiltration and plasma inflammatory markers in the acute phase, while suppressing plasma CCL2 and insulin C-peptide, kidney p66shc-S36 phosphorylation and PKC-beta and CGRP in dorsal root ganglia at 14 days (chronic phase). In the mouse cecal ligation and puncture model of sepsis, nephrilin fully protected mice from mortality between surgery and day 7, compared to 67% mortality in saline-treated animals, while significantly reducing elevated CCL2 in plasma. mTORC2 may modulate important neuroimmune responses in both burn trauma and sepsis. PMID:24273694

  14. Examining lethality risk for rodent studies of primary blast lung injury.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, William Brad; Hall, Christina; Siva Sai Suijith Sajja, Venkata; Lavik, Erink; VandeVord, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    While protective measures have been taken to mitigate injury to the thorax during a blast exposure, primary blast lung injury (PBLI) is still evident in mounted/in vehicle cases during military conflicts. Moreover, civilians, who are unprotected from blast exposure, can be severely harmed by terrorist attacks that use improvised explosive devices (IEDs). Since the lungs are the most susceptible organ due to their air-filled nature, PBLI is one of the most serious injuries seen in civilian blast cases. Determining lethality threshold for rodent studies is crucial to guide experimental designs centered on therapies for survival after PBLI or mechanistic understanding of the injury itself. Using an Advanced Blast Simulator, unprotected rats were exposed to a whole body blast to induce PBLI. The one-hour survival rate was assessed to determine operating conditions for a 50% lethality rate. Macroscopic and histological analysis of lung was conducted using hematoxylin and eosin staining. Results demonstrated lethality risk trends based on static blast overpressure (BOP) for rodent models, which may help standardized animal studies and contribute to scaling to the human level. The need for a standardized method of producing PBLI is pressing and establishing standard curves, such as a lethality risk curve for lung blasts, is crucial for this condensing of BOP methods. PMID:25405409

  15. IDENTIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DEVELOPMENT OF TOXICANT ASSOCIATED FATTY LIVER DISEASE IN RODENTS

    PubMed Central

    Al-Eryani, Laila; Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K.C.; Guardiola, J. J.; Clair, H.B.; Prough, R.A.; Cave, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Toxicant associated fatty liver disease (TAFLD) is a recently identified form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) associated with exposure to industrial chemicals and environmental pollutants. Numerous studies have been conducted to test the association between industrial chemicals/ environmental pollutants and fatty liver disease both in vivo and in vitro. Objectives The objective of the paper is to report a list of chemicals associated with TAFLD. Methods Two federal databases of rodent toxicology studies– ToxRefDB (Environmental Protection Agency) and Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS, National Toxicology Program) were searched for liver endpoints. Combined, these two databases archive nearly 2000 rodent studies. TASH descriptors including fatty change, fatty necrosis, Oil red O positive staining, steatosis and lipid deposition were queried. Results Using these search terms, 123 chemicals associated with fatty liver were identified. Pesticides and solvents were the most frequently identified chemicals, while PCBs/dioxins were the most potent. About 44% of identified compounds were pesticides or their intermediates, and nearly 10% of pesticide registration studies in ToxRefDB were associated with fatty liver. Fungicides and herbicides were more frequently associated with fatty liver than insecticides. Conclusions More research on pesticides, solvents, metals and PCBs/dioxins in NAFLD/TAFLD is warranted due to their association with liver damage. PMID:25326588

  16. Aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness-receptor agonists generated from indole-3-carbinol in vitro and in vivo: Comparisons with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect

    Bjeldanes, L.F.; Jinyoung Kim; Grose, K.R.; Bartholomew, J.C. ); Bradfield, C.A. )

    1991-11-01

    Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is a secondary plant metabolite produced in vegetables of the Brassica genus, including cabbage, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts. I3C is both an anti-initiator and a promoter of carcinogenesis. Consumption of I3C by humans and rodents can lead to marked increases in activities of cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases and in a variety of phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The authors have reported previously that the enzyme-inducing activity of I3C is mediated through a mechanism requiring exposure of the compound to the low-pH environment of the stomach. They report here the aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness-receptor K{sub d} values (22 nM-90 nM), determined with C57BL/6J mouse liver cytosol and the in vitro- and in vivo-molar yields of the major acid condensation products of I3C. They also show that indolo (3,2-b)carbazole (ICZ) is produced form I3C in yields on the order of 0.01% in vitro and, after oral intubation, in vivo. ICZ has a K{sub d} of 190 pM for aromatic hydrocarbon responsiveness-receptor binding and an EC{sub 50} of 269 nM for induction of cytochrome P4501A1, as measured by ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells. The binding affinity of ICZ is only a factor of 3.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} lower than that of the highly toxic environmental contaminant and cancer promoter 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. ICZ and related condensation products appear responsible for the enzyme-inducing effects of dietary I3C.

  17. Rodent community landscape ecology in grassland-shrubland ecotones and gradients in the Chihuahuan Desert

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is believed that the abundance and diversity of Chihuahuan Desert rodents increases with shrub encroachment accompanying desertification although grassland specialist species decline with loss of perennial grasses. It has been reported, however, that rodent population responses to spatial variati...

  18. PI3Kδ Inhibition by Idelalisib in Patients with Relapsed Indolent Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajay K.; Kahl, Brad S.; de Vos, Sven; Wagner-Johnston, Nina D.; Schuster, Stephen J.; Jurczak, Wojciech J.; Flinn, Ian W.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Martin, Peter; Viardot, Andreas; Blum, Kristie A.; Goy, Andre H.; Davies, Andrew J.; Zinzani, Pier Luigi; Dreyling, Martin; Johnson, Dave; Miller, Langdon L.; Holes, Leanne; Li, Daniel; Dansey, Roger D.; Godfrey, Wayne R.; Salles, Gilles A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) mediates B-cell receptor signaling and microenvironmental support signals that promote the growth and survival of malignant B lymphocytes. In a phase 1 study, idelalisib, an orally active selective PI3Kδ inhibitor, showed antitumor activity in patients with previously treated indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Methods In this single-group, open-label, phase 2 study, 125 patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas who had not had a response to rituximab and an alkylating agent or had had a relapse within 6 months after receipt of those therapies were administered idelalisib, 150 mg twice daily, until the disease progressed or the patient withdrew from the study. The primary end point was the overall rate of response; secondary end points included the duration of response, progression-free survival, and safety. Results The median age of the patients was 64 years (range, 33 to 87); patients had received a median of four prior therapies (range, 2 to 12). Subtypes of indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma included follicular lymphoma (72 patients), small lymphocytic lymphoma (28), marginal-zone lymphoma (15), and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma with or without Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (10). The response rate was 57% (71 of 125 patients), with 6% meeting the criteria for a complete response. The median time to a response was 1.9 months, the median duration of response was 12.5 months, and the median progression-free survival was 11 months. Similar response rates were observed across all subtypes of indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, though the numbers were small for some categories. The most common adverse events of grade 3 or higher were neutropenia (in 27% of the patients), elevations in aminotransferase levels (in 13%), diarrhea (in 13%), and pneumonia (in 7%). Conclusions In this single-group study, idelalisib showed antitumor activity with an acceptable safety profile in patients with indolent non

  19. Response of brown treesnakes to reduction of their rodent prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gragg, J.E.; Rodda, G.H.; Savidge, J.A.; White, Gary C.; Dean-Bradley, K.; Ellingson, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Trapping brown treesnakes (Boiga irregularis; BTS) with live-mouse (Mus domesticus) lures is the principal control technique for this invasive species on Guam. Lure-based trapping is also used on other islands as a precaution against undetected arrivals and in response to verified BTS sightings. However, the effectiveness of lure-based trapping on other islands is questionable, as it has yielded no BTS despite other evidence of their presence. Some evidence suggests that high rodent numbers may interfere with BTS control. To test the relationship between rodent abundance and snake trappability, we conducted a controlled, replicated field experiment incorporating a rodenticide treatment during a BTS mark-recapture study. Using open population modeling in Program MARK, we estimated BTS apparent survival and recapture probabilities. Rodent reduction increased BTS recapture probabilities by 52-65% in 2002 and 22-36% in 2003, and it decreased apparent survival by <1% both years. This appears to be the first published instance of manipulating wild prey to influence snake behavior. Rodent reduction may enhance detection and control of BTS with traps on Guam and other islands. It may also amplify the effectiveness of oral toxicants against BTS.

  20. Comparative Metabolism of Furan in Rodent and Human Cryopreserved Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Leah A.; Phillips, Martin B.; Matter, Brock A.

    2014-01-01

    Furan is a liver toxicant and carcinogen in rodents. Although humans are most likely exposed to furan through a variety of sources, the effect of furan exposure on human health is still unknown. In rodents, furan requires metabolism to exert its toxic effects. The initial product of the cytochrome P450 2E1-catalyzed oxidation is a reactive α,β-unsaturated dialdehyde, cis-2-butene-1,4-dial (BDA). BDA is toxic and mutagenic and consequently is considered responsible for the toxic effects of furan. The urinary metabolites of furan in rats are derived from the reaction of BDA with cellular nucleophiles, and precursors to these metabolites are detected in furan-exposed hepatocytes. Many of these precursors are 2-(S-glutathionyl)butanedial-amine cross-links in which the amines are amino acids and polyamines. Because these metabolites are derived from the reaction of BDA with cellular nucleophiles, their levels are a measure of the internal dose of this reactive metabolite. To compare the ability of human hepatocytes to convert furan to the same metabolites as rodent hepatocytes, furan was incubated with cryopreserved human and rodent hepatocytes. A semiquantitative liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry assay was developed for a number of the previously characterized furan metabolites. Qualitative and semiquantitative analysis of the metabolites demonstrated that furan is metabolized in a similar manner in all three species. These results indicate that humans may be susceptible to the toxic effects of furan. PMID:24751574