Science.gov

Sample records for indonesian governmental hospital

  1. HOSPITAL VENTILATION STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A REVIEW OF GOVERNMENTAL AND PRIVATE AGENCY ENERGY CONSERVATION INITIATIVES

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, Robert S.; Rainer, David

    1980-03-01

    This report presents the results of a recent research project originally concerned with review of governmental initiatives for changes to hospital design and operation standards at both the federal and state levels. However. it quickly became apparent that concern with energy conservation was not impacting hospital environmental standards, especially at the state level, irrespective of the energy implications. Consequently, the study was redirected to consider all energy conservation initiatives directed toward design and operating practices unique to the hospital environment. The scope was limited to agency programs (i.e., not undertaken at the initiative of individual hospitals), applicable to non-federal public and private hospitals.

  2. Governmental designation of spine specialty hospitals, their characteristics, performance and designation effects: a longitudinal study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Sang Gyu; Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Kyu-Tae; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study compares the characteristics and performance of spine specialty hospitals versus other types of hospitals for inpatients with spinal diseases in South Korea. We also assessed the effect of the government's specialty hospital designation on hospital operating efficiency. Setting We used data of 823 hospitals including 17 spine specialty hospitals in Korea. Participants All spine disease-related inpatient claims nationwide (N=645 449) during 2010–2012. Interventions No interventions were made. Outcome measures Using a multilevel generalised estimating equation and multilevel modelling, this study compared inpatient charges, length of stay (LOS), readmission within 30 days of discharge and in-hospital death within 30 days of admission in spine specialty versus other types of hospitals. Results Spine specialty hospitals had higher inpatient charges per day (27.4%) and a shorter LOS (23.5%), but per case charges were similar after adjusting for patient-level and hospital-level confounders. After government designation, spine specialty hospitals had 8.8% lower per case charges, which was derived by reduced per day charge (7.6%) and shorter LOS (1.0%). Rates of readmission also were lower in spine specialty hospitals (OR=0.796). Patient-level and hospital-level factors both played important roles in determining outcome measures. Conclusions Spine specialty hospitals had higher per day inpatient charges but a much shorter LOS than other types of hospitals due to their specialty volume and experience. In addition, their readmission rate was lower. Spine specialty hospitals also endeavoured to be more efficient after governmental ‘specialty’ designation. PMID:25394819

  3. Adoption and Barriers to Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Nurses in Three Governmental Hospitals in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    El Mahalli, Azza

    2015-01-01

    Although electronic health records (EHRs) have been implemented in many hospitals and healthcare providers benefit from their effective and efficient data processing, their evaluation from nurses has received little attention. This project aimed to assess the adoption and barriers to the use of an EHR system by nurses at three governmental hospitals implementing the same EHR software and functionalities in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. The study was a cross-sectional, paper-based questionnaire study. SPSS version 20 was used for data entry and analysis, and descriptive statistics were calculated. The study found underutilization of almost all functionalities among all hospitals and no utilization of any communication tools with patients. In addition, there were no instances of "allowing patients to use the Internet to access parts of their health records." The most frequently cited barrier among all hospitals was "loss of access to medical records transiently if computer crashes or power fails" (88.6 percent). This was followed by "lack of continuous training/ support from information technology staff in hospital" (85.9 percent), "additional time required for data entry" (84.9 percent), and "system hanging up problem" (83.8 percent). Complexity of technology (81.6 percent) and lack of system customizability (81.1 percent) were also frequently reported problems. The formation of an EHR committee to discuss problems with the system in Saudi hospitals is recommended. PMID:26604875

  4. Adoption and Barriers to Adoption of Electronic Health Records by Nurses in Three Governmental Hospitals in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Mahalli, Azza El.

    2015-01-01

    Although electronic health records (EHRs) have been implemented in many hospitals and healthcare providers benefit from their effective and efficient data processing, their evaluation from nurses has received little attention. This project aimed to assess the adoption and barriers to the use of an EHR system by nurses at three governmental hospitals implementing the same EHR software and functionalities in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. The study was a cross-sectional, paper-based questionnaire study. SPSS version 20 was used for data entry and analysis, and descriptive statistics were calculated. The study found underutilization of almost all functionalities among all hospitals and no utilization of any communication tools with patients. In addition, there were no instances of “allowing patients to use the Internet to access parts of their health records.” The most frequently cited barrier among all hospitals was “loss of access to medical records transiently if computer crashes or power fails” (88.6 percent). This was followed by “lack of continuous training/ support from information technology staff in hospital” (85.9 percent), “additional time required for data entry” (84.9 percent), and “system hanging up problem” (83.8 percent). Complexity of technology (81.6 percent) and lack of system customizability (81.1 percent) were also frequently reported problems. The formation of an EHR committee to discuss problems with the system in Saudi hospitals is recommended. PMID:26604875

  5. Allocation of Health Resources According To the Type and Size of Iranian Governmental Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hassani, SA; Abolhallaje, M; Inanlo, S; Hosseini, H; Pourmohammadi, K; Bastani, P; Ramezanian, M; Marnani, A Barati

    2013-01-01

    Background: Due to consuming about 50%–80% of health resources, hospitals are the greatest and costly operational units in Iranian Health system. so allocation of resources specially human and space resources as the most expensive ones is really important for further controlling of costs, analysis of costs and making suitable policies for increasing the profitability and allocation of resources and improvement of quality. Method: This paper intends to describe and analyze any allocation of resources in 530 university hospitals in Iran. The final goal of this research is to provide a data bank according which there is a basis for more scientific budget allocation of state’s hospitals from the size and type of application points of view. Results: The relevant index of person to bed was 2.04 for human resources. All hospitals more than 300 beds are located in benefiting areas from which 17 cases are educational and 2 cases are therapeutic. This is necessary to mention that the rate of management group forces to total personnel at deprived areas is about 2.5% more than benefiting areas. Conclusion: Because 60–80% of hospital costs are applied for human forces, all managers of hospitals are obliged to revise their policies in attraction and employment of human force in order to benefit from such a valuable resource and prevent from expensive costs. So any employment of personnel should be based upon real needs of hospital. PMID:23865036

  6. Indonesian: Sounds of Indonesian Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    The sounds of Standard Indonesian, or Bahasa Indonesian, used in official government and private communication, are presented here. The place and manner of articulation and the distinctive features of consonants, vowels, diphthongs, and vocalic combinations are thoroughly explained through text, illustrations, and charts. Variants of…

  7. Indonesian coal mining

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-15

    The article examines the opportunities and challenges facing the Indonesian coal mining industry and how the coal producers, government and wider Indonesian society are working to overcome them. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  8. [Indonesian transmigration discredited].

    PubMed

    Lagerberg, C S

    1987-12-01

    The Indonesian program of transmigration is described and evaluated. "The article goes into the aspect of national integrity or security, especially with regard to Irian Yaya, and the negative consequences of wild migration and the actions of the military forces for the original population of this region." (SUMMARY IN ENG) PMID:12281555

  9. "Sekolah Pembangunan": an Indonesian Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohler, Gerda

    1973-01-01

    As an introduction to the problems of the Indonesian education system this study first examines the present system, then considers the Sekolah Pembangunan' reform, and finally reviews the new model in relation to a possibly necessary conversion of the whole Indonesian education system. (Author/RK)

  10. Indonesian Basic Course: Abbreviations and Acronyms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    In this unit of the Basic Course in Indonesian for the official use of faculty, staff, and students of the Defense Language Institute, a glossary of Indonesian abbreviations and acronyms, taken from Indonesian newspapers and magazines, is presented. An adequate command of these terms is necessary to comprehend written works in Indonesian. No…

  11. Health services for seafarers employed by the Indonesian State Oil Company "Pertamina".

    PubMed

    Margono, P

    1999-01-01

    In this article, the system of health services for seafarers employed by the lndonesian State Oil Company "Pertamina" is presented. The health services for Indonesian seafarers are provided by the port health authorities of the government in 22 large ports of the country, by the Indonesian Directorate of Sea Transportation, by the national shipowner company PELNI, and by the Indonesian Navy for their personnel, through their hospitals and clinics (reference to the article by T.H. Pangemanan and P. Margono, in the same issue of the International Maritime Health). PMID:10970275

  12. Global Governmental Investment in Nanotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnologies seem to have huge potential to bring benefits in areas as diverse as drug development, water decontamination, information and communication infrastructures, and the production of stronger, lighter and perfect nanomaterials. This potential attracts global investment from governments and private sectors in nanotechnologies with the hopes that R&D and commercial applications of nanomaterials, nanodevices, nanoparticles and nanodrugs will provide new impetus, after the ebb-tides of biotechnology and dotcom, to turn faltering economies around. The global governmental funding has been actively promoting industrial and academic cooperation to realize big prosperity from the nanotechnologies. This article summarizes historic trends and status of global governmental supports for nanotechnologies. PMID:19865495

  13. Governmental Policies Affecting Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Arthur M.

    This document traces the influence of governmental policies on American community colleges, focusing on how different levels of government have affected the colleges at various stages of their development with respect to college organization and governance, finance, enrollment, and curriculum. The community college's main contribution has been to…

  14. Getting to Know Governmental GAAP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissell, George E.

    1987-01-01

    Presents the history and an overview of how generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) are established and by what process the standards are created. School business officials are invited to participate in the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB), established as the standard setting body for state and local governments. (MLF)

  15. Major Changes in Governmental GAAP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Craig L.

    1988-01-01

    The Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) is the standard-setting body for establishing generally accepted accounting principles for school systems and all state and local governments. A brief summary of a statement prepared by GASB's staff outlines the proposed changes in school accounting and financial reporting. (MLF)

  16. Child abuse and neglect in Turkey: professional, governmental and non-governmental achievements in improving the national child protection system.

    PubMed

    Akco, Seda; Dagli, Tolga; Inanici, Mehmet Akif; Kaynak, Hatice; Oral, Resmiye; Sahin, Figen; Sofuoglu, Zeynep; Ulukol, Betul

    2013-11-01

    Since ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1995, significant efforts were made in Turkey to improve protection of children from abuse and neglect. The government took steps to amend relevant laws. Several state departments recognized the need for professional in-service training of relevant governmental agency staff. University hospitals established numerous hospital-based multidisciplinary child protection centres. The government established an Interministerial Higher Council, which has been overseeing the foundation of 13 child advocacy centres for a multidisciplinary and interagency response to child sexual abuse. In addition to undertaking research, non-governmental organizations contributed to this process by instituting professional and public education. These ground-breaking developments in the last decade give promise of even further improvement in the national child protection system from investigative, child protective and rehabilitative perspectives. PMID:24070409

  17. Ambivalences: Voices of Indonesian Academic Discourse Gatekeepers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basthomi, Yazid

    2012-01-01

    This article presents voices of academic discourse gatekeepers in the Indonesian context. It reports on results of an attempt to re-read (re-analyze and re-interpret) the transcripts of interviews with Indonesian journal editors/reviewers in the area of English Language Teaching (ELT). The interviews were made with five editors/reviewers of two…

  18. Engaging Education Policies through Governmentality Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brass, Jory

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a brief introduction to governmentality studies and the conceptual tools that it provides to help English educators recognise the ideas and practices that education policies mobilise to steer our professions towards particular values, norms and outcomes. After a short overview of governmentality, it offers a short discussion of…

  19. Governmental Surveillance of Three Progressive Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Murry R.; Singleton, H. Wells

    Governmental interference with academic freedom is illustrated by F.B.I. surveillance of and unauthorized distribution of information about progressive educators John Dewey, George Counts, and Harold Rugg. These three educators attracted the attention of governmental agencies and special interest groups during the 1930s and 1940s because they…

  20. 37 CFR 3.58 - Governmental registers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Government. Governmental interests recorded on the Departmental Register will be available for public inspection as provided in § 1.12. (b) The Office will maintain a Secret Register to record governmental... this Secret Register at the request of the department or agency submitting the same. No...

  1. 37 CFR 3.58 - Governmental registers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Government. Governmental interests recorded on the Departmental Register will be available for public inspection as provided in § 1.12. (b) The Office will maintain a Secret Register to record governmental... this Secret Register at the request of the department or agency submitting the same. No...

  2. Managed competition, governmentality and institutional response in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Light, D W

    2001-04-01

    This article traces the use of managed competition policy to transform the NHS from an administered public service to a set of interlocking markets and contracts. It reviews the overlooked origins of managed competition in the new managerialism and explains the relationship between managed competition and the cost crisis of the NHS by extending Foucault's concept of governmentality to revise the concept of the state. The paper then describes how the government structured health care markets, using managed competition as an instrument of governmentality. It summarises institutional responses by health authorities, hospital trusts, and GP fundholders. The terms "master institution", "dictated competition" and "coercive partnering" are introduced as new concepts for economic sociology and as strategies of governmentality. Implementation, however, led to resistance, opposition and eventual abandonment of managed competition as too disruptive and costly. Yet, this analysis contends, managed competition has left an enduring legacy of accountability to purchasers in economic terms such as efficiency, transaction costs, and cost effectiveness. The policies of the new government are based on coercive partnering and doctor-based "commissioning". This and the Internet imply revolutionary changes for the health professions and the delivery of health care services through networks of moebius-strip organisations interacting in flexible sequences and subject to communitarian pressures. PMID:11281401

  3. Lactose intolerance in Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Hegar, Badriul; Widodo, Ariani

    2015-01-01

    "Lactose intolerance (LI)" is considered a common problem in Asians, and in many parts of the world. Its prevalence and age of manifestation varies between by Asian country, for possible genetic or cultural reasons. Studies in Indonesian children 3-15 years old (y) are available within the past two decades, using a pure lactose tolerance test. The prevalences of lactose malabsorption (LM) in pre-elementary (3-5 y), elementary (6-11 y), and junior high (12-14 y) school-children were 21.3%, 57.8%, and 73%, respectively. An increasing trend for LM prevalence was seen within the pre-elementary group, from 9.1% at 3 y to 28.6% at 5 y. The most frequent symptoms of LI in junior high school (JHS) group were abdominal pain (64.1%), abdominal distention (22.6%), nausea (15.1%), flatulence (5.7%), and diarrhea (1.9%), mostly within one hour of lactose ingestion. In children with regular and irregular milk drinking, LM occurred in 81.2% and 69.6%; LI was found in 56.2% and 52.1%, respectively. Most JHS children with dairy-associated recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) symptoms proved to be malabsorbers. Dairy products most related to RAP were milk and yogurt. LI was found in 81% of RAP children with abdominal pain most frequently, followed by nausea, bloating, diarrhea, borborygmi, and flatulence. Symp-tom onset occurred 30 minutes after lactose ingestion, especially nausea, bloating, and abdominal pain. In RAP children LI symptoms mostly found in breath hydrogen concentration>20 ppm. More LI symptoms were found in lactose malabsorbers, but symptoms were mild and generally disappeared in 7 hours, and in most by 15 hours. PMID:26715082

  4. A Genre-Based Analysis of Indonesian Research Articles in the Social Sciences and Humanities Written by Indonesian Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arsyad, Safnil

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the discursive structures and linguistic features of research articles (RAs) written in Indonesian by Indonesian writers with the aim of exploring how Indonesian writers rhetorically describe their research methods in their RAs. The corpus for this study consists of 51 selected RAs published mainly in university-based social…

  5. Governmentality of Youth: Managing Risky Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Besley, Tina A. C.

    2010-01-01

    This article poses the question: How do understandings of governmentality play out in discourses of youth? In the twenty-first-century neoliberal contexts of consumer capitalist societies, discourses of youth need now to move beyond the valuable earlier understandings based on psychological and cultural/subcultural studies to harness Foucault's…

  6. Aerospace management techniques: Commercial and governmental applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milliken, J. G.; Morrison, E. J.

    1971-01-01

    A guidebook for managers and administrators is presented as a source of useful information on new management methods in business, industry, and government. The major topics discussed include: actual and potential applications of aerospace management techniques to commercial and governmental organizations; aerospace management techniques and their use within the aerospace sector; and the aerospace sector's application of innovative management techniques.

  7. English Code Switching in Indonesian Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setiawan, Dedy

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing phenomenon, worldwide, of inserting English words, phrases or expressions, into the local language: this is part of the acceptance of English as current world language. Indonesia is experiencing the use of this mixture of language when using either their own Indonesian or local language; English words, phrases and expressions…

  8. Indonesian Youth Looking towards the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nilan, Pam; Parker, Lynette; Bennett, Linda; Robinson, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    Selected survey data on future aspirations and expectations from 3565 young Indonesians are presented in this study. Muslim-majority Indonesia is an Asian economic success story. The economy has seen solid growth, leading to an expansion of the private sector. The upward credentialling of the labour market and the rapid growth of the middle class…

  9. A Discussion on Governmental Research Grants.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Governmental research grants are financially supported by taxpayers to meet financial requirements of research, particularly research that is unlikely to be supported by private funds. Researchers reward donors by producing knowledge. Publishing research results in an academic journal reflects achievement by researchers; however, receiving a grant award does not. The latter only provides the researcher with the capacity to perform his/her research. Applicants may receive more financial support than they actually need because there is no strict audit on the amount of money requested by each research proposal. There are fewer opportunities to apply for a governmental grant than there are for publishing an academic article, and the application process for governmental grants is not flexible. Some potentially innovative research may be impeded by the intense competition among scientific researchers applying for financial support. Researchers face stiffer competition at this stage than at the stage of publishing results. This paper suggests that scientific foundations can improve their efficiency by giving funding preference to economic proposals. Methods for estimating the efficiency of grants are proposed. The practice followed by the Small Grants for Exploratory Research programme of the National Science Foundation validates my analysis and recommendations. PMID:25143309

  10. Guidelines for the Analysis of Responsibility in Governmental Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouran, Dennis S.

    This paper discusses specific issues involving governmental conduct in communication with the public, outlines a set of conditions that frequently stimulate social interest in governmental responsibility, and develops a corresponding set of guidelines for use in the evaluation of instances of questionable governmental conduct in communication.…

  11. Indonesian immigrant settlements in peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Azizah Kassim

    2000-04-01

    For over 2 decades, until the economic crisis in mid-1997, Malaysia's rapid economic growth attracted an influx of foreign labor, mostly from Indonesia, Bangladesh, and the Philippines. In 1997 the number of registered workers was estimated at 1.2 million and undocumented ones at approximately 800,000. The influx created various problems, of which housing is one of the most serious, especially in the Kelang Valley. This paper examines the ways and means by which Indonesian workers, the largest group among foreigners, overcame their accommodation problem. Two types of settlements are identified, that is, illegal ones in the squatter areas and legal ones, which are largely in Malay Reservation Areas. The settlements, which signify Indonesians' success in finding a foothold in Malaysia, today have become a base for more in-migration. PMID:12349650

  12. Reaching the people--the Indonesian experience.

    PubMed

    1989-10-01

    This 1st section of INTEGRATION is a 27-page special report entitled REACHING THE PEOPLE - THE INDONESIAN EXPERIENCE. The section includes 6 articles: 1) NGOs (Nongovernmental organizations) Promote Human Resource Development-Oriented Project, 2) Front Line of Integral Health: First Step is Parasite Control, 3) Mothers Should be Informed of Health Advantages: A Perception of Marriage, Family Planning, and Children by an Indonesian Woman of the New Generation, 4) BKKBN Chairman Haryona Suyono: Building a Self-Reliant Family Planning Program, 5) Developing a Fee-Charging Contraceptive Distribution System in Indonesia: The Experience of Kusuma Buana Foundation, and 6) President Soeharto's Speech at UN Award Rites: Transforming Population into an Asset for Development. PMID:12315967

  13. Introduction in Indonesian Social Sciences and Humanities Research Articles: How Indonesian Writers Justify Their Research Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arsyad, Safnil; Wardhana, Dian Eka Chandra

    2014-01-01

    The introductory part of a research article (RA) is very important because in this section writers must argue about the importance of their research topic and project so that they can attract their readers' attention to read the whole article. This study analyzes RA introductions written by Indonesian writers in social sciences and humanities…

  14. Teachers' Perceptions of Educational Technology Integration in an Indonesian Polytechnic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marwan, Ardi; Sweeney, Trudy

    2010-01-01

    Educational technology is becoming more pervasive in Indonesian vocational higher institutions, yet there is limited research available about Indonesian teachers' perceptions of this innovation. This paper sets out to contribute to this gap in the research literature and reports on a study that investigated the factors which supported and…

  15. Beginning Indonesian: Part II, Lessons 19-30.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, John U.

    This volume is the second of two volumes of a basic elementary course in Indonesian (Malay). The aim of the materials is to prepare the student to communicate and read in Indonesian as a native speaker does. The books are designed to be used with the help of a native-speaking informant who furnishes the model of speech for students to imitate. The…

  16. The Way Deans Run Their Faculties in Indonesian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngo, Jenny; de Boer, Harry; Enders, Jurgen

    2014-01-01

    Using the theory of reasoned action in combination with the Competing Values Framework of organizational leadership, our study examines how deans at Indonesian universities lead and manage their faculties. Based on a large-scale survey with responses from more than 200 Indonesian deans, the study empirically identifies a number of deanship styles:…

  17. Dietary practices and xerophthalmia among Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Tarwotjo, I; Sommer, A; Soegiharto, T; Susanto, D; Muhilal

    1982-03-01

    The stated frequency with which 30 Indonesian children with corneal xerophthalmia and age/sex/neighborhood matched controls ordinarily consumed vitamin- and provitamin A-rich foods was compared. Controls were more frequent consumers of eggs (p less than 0.05), fish (p less than 0.05), dark green leafy vegetables (p less than 0.05), carrots (p less than 0.01), and carotene-containing fruits (p less than 0.1). Similar data were collected on 358 children with Bitot's spots and on normal preschool age children in a countrywide survey. Breast-feeding was more common among normals than among cases (p less than 0.001). Normals were also more frequent consumers of mango and papaya during the 2nd and 3rd yr of life (p less than 0.05); and of dark green leafy vegetables and eggs during the 3rd through 6th yr of life (p less than 0.01). In two separate studies, differences in carotene consumption by normals and abnormals were confirmed by differences in their serum carotene levels. Approximately 80% of Indonesian families, with an without xerophthalmic children, consumed dark-green leafy vegetables at least once a day, and 99% at least once a week. Diet therefore appears to be an important factor in the genesis of xerophthalmia in Indonesia despite the availability of suitable provitamin A-rich foods. PMID:7064908

  18. 7 CFR 1250.351 - Influencing governmental action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Influencing governmental action. 1250.351 Section... RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Egg Research and Promotion Order Expenses and Assessments § 1250.351 Influencing governmental action. No funds collected by the Board under this subpart shall in any manner be used for...

  19. 7 CFR 1205.337 - Influencing governmental action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Influencing governmental action. 1205.337 Section... RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Expenses and Assessments § 1205.337 Influencing governmental action. No funds collected by the Board under this subpart shall in any manner be used for...

  20. 7 CFR 1215.53 - Influencing governmental action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Influencing governmental action. 1215.53 Section 1215... PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Expenses and Assessments § 1215.53 Influencing governmental action. No funds received by the Board...

  1. 7 CFR 1207.360 - Influencing governmental action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Influencing governmental action. 1207.360 Section... RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1207.360 Influencing governmental action. No funds collected by the Board under this plan shall in any matter be used for...

  2. 47 CFR 76.1505 - Public, educational and governmental access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1505 Public, educational and governmental access. (a) An open video system operator shall be subject to public, educational and governmental access requirements for every cable franchise area with which its system overlaps. (b) An...

  3. Indonesian migrants in Johor: an itinerant labour force.

    PubMed

    Guinness, P

    1990-04-01

    "The links between Indonesia and Johor, Malaysia, across the narrow straits have been strong for centuries. Many Johoreans trace their origins to various islands in the Indonesian archipelago. In recent years the presence of large numbers of Indonesian migrant workers in Malaysia has become the focus of media and political debate; it is seen not only as undermining working conditions but as aggravating fragile ethnic relations within Malaysia. The aim of this article is to examine the presence and employment of Indonesians in the southern area of Johor, and the responses of government and the public to this phenomenon." PMID:12282972

  4. Indonesian Christian Teachers' Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Professional Development Programs Offered by ACSI-I and Indonesian National Department of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwani, Amy

    2014-01-01

    This is a study to examine Indonesian Christian Teachers' Perceptions of the effectiveness of professional development programs offered by the Association of Christian Schools International Indonesia (ACSI-I) and by the Indonesian National Department of Education. The study was focused on how Indonesian Christian teachers perceived the…

  5. Destruction of public and governmental experiments of GMO in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Marcel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to compile the destruction of GMO trials from academic or governmental research institutes in Europe, in a factual manner and to highlight their main characteristics. About 80 acts of vandalism against academic or governmental research on GMOs are identified, mainly in 4 countries; namely France, Germany, the United Kingdom and Switzerland. Examples are also provided for Italy and Belgium. The general conclusions that can be drawn from these acts are also discussed. PMID:22825391

  6. Adherence to informed consent standards in Shiraz hospitals: matrons’ perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mohsenian Sisakht, Alireza; Karamzade Ziarati, Najme; Kouchak, Farideh; Askarian, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Informed consent is an important part of the patients’ rights and hospitals are assigned to obtain informed consent before any diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Obtaining an informed consent enables patients to accept or reject their care or treatments and prevent future contentions among patients and medical staff. Methods: This survey was carried out during 2011-2. We assessed adherence of 33 Shiraz hospitals (governmental and non-governmental) to informed consent standards defined by Joint Commission International (JCI) Accreditation, USA. The questionnaire was designed using the Delphi method and then filled out by hospital matrons. We calculated valid percent frequency for each part of the questionnaire and compared these frequencies in governmental and non-governmental hospitals using analytical statistics. Results: Considering 63% of the hospitals that filled out the questionnaire, no statistically significant difference was observed between the governmental and non-governmental hospitals in adherence to informed consent standards. Conclusion: This study shows a relatively acceptable adherence to standards about informed consent in Shiraz hospitals but the implementation seems not to be as satisfactory. PMID:25584348

  7. Indonesian survey looks at adolescent reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Achmad, S I; Westley, S B

    1999-10-01

    The Baseline Survey of Young Adult Reproductive Welfare in Indonesia, conducted from September to December 1998, provides information about young Indonesians on topics concerning work, education, marriage, family life, sexuality, fertility, and HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. The survey interviewed 4106 men and 3978 women aged 15-24 years in three provinces of Java. Survey findings showed that 42% of the women and 8% of the men are currently or have been married. There was a strong inverse relationship between marriage and schooling, which suggests that greater educational attainment and a higher average age at marriage are likely to go together. Although most young couples prefer to delay and space births, only half of currently married young women are using any type of contraception. These results indicate that there is a need for better reproductive health care as well as improved reproductive health education. Moreover, the current economic crisis has lead to a decline in the use of the private sector for health care. Instead, young people are using the less-expensive government services, and young women are turning to pharmacies and midwives rather than to private doctors to obtain contraceptives. These findings have several policy implications including the need for reproductive health programs that provide services needed by young people. PMID:12295693

  8. Interannual variability of the Indonesian Throughflow: The salinity effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shijian; Sprintall, Janet

    2016-04-01

    The Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) region possesses strong mixing and experiences significant freshwater input, but the role of salinity variability in the Indonesian Seas remains unclear. The goal of this study is to understand how salinity variability influences the ITF transport on interannual time scales. The ITF transport is calculated using observations and assimilation data sets and verified using direct ITF transport estimates. We find that the halosteric component of the ITF transport contributes (36 ± 7)% of the total ITF variability, in contrast to (63 ± 6)% by the thermosteric component. Thus, while not dominant, this result nonetheless implies that the salinity variability in the Indonesian Seas is of remarkable importance in determining the interannual variability of ITF transport. Correlation analysis indicates that the interannual variability of the total ITF transport is mainly influenced by the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) rather than the Indian Ocean Dipole. Under the ENSO cycle, the Walker Circulation shifts longitudinally resulting in fluctuations in precipitation over the Indonesian Seas that modulates salinity and subsequently influences the interannual variability of ITF transport. This result signals the importance of precipitation and the subsequent salinity effect in determining the interannual variability of the ITF transport. The role of wind forcing and oceanic planetary waves is also revisited using this newly calculated ITF transport series. ENSO-related wind forcing is found to modulate the ITF transport via Rossby waves through the wave guide in the Indonesian Seas, which is in agreement with previous studies.

  9. Family responses to a child with schizophrenia: An Indonesian experience.

    PubMed

    Wiguna, Tjhin; Ismail, Raden Irawati; Noorhana, Setyawati R; Kaligis, Fransiska; Aji, Arundhati Nugrahaning; Belfer, Myron L

    2015-12-01

    Indonesian culture puts a high value on family bonding. Therefore, support and encouragement for each family member is high that any problems are the responsibility of the whole family. This paper explores the implications of the phenomena whether is a schizophrenic child in the family affected the parental relationship in Indonesian family and trying to find out the implication of parental relationship on medication adherence. This was a cross-sectional study which involved 180 parents of children with schizophrenia and parents with aged matched non-schizophrenic children as a control group; consisting of 45 parents of children with schizophrenia and 135 parents of non-schizophrenic children. The parental relationship was examined by using the Indonesian version of Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scale IV (Indonesian version of FACES IV). Our study revealed that 75.6% parents of children with schizophrenia experienced a healthy parental relationship compared to 94.80% in the parents of non-schizophrenic children group. The most prevalent of unhealthy relationship among parents of children with schizophrenia was chaotic disengagement. Parental adherence to give medication for their child with schizophrenia was better if they had a healthy parental relationship. In conclusion, a small number of Indonesian parents with schizophrenic children experienced an unhealthy parental relationship. Therefore, psycho-education and supportive psychotherapy still needed to facilitate those families to express their emotion adapt and cope. PMID:26481170

  10. Participation in the 1996 Arlindo Cruise to the Indonesian Seas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marra, John

    1997-01-01

    The objective of Arlindo-Productivity is to understand the factors responsible for regional differences in the response of phytoplankton and zooplankton to the SE and NW Monsoons in Indonesia. The hypothesis is that an interplay between circulation and shoaling of the nutricline, as a response to the monsoons, regulates productivity in the Indonesian Seas. My o@jective for the cruise in 1996 was to continue our collaboration with Indonesian scientists by conducting a set of hydrographic, primary production and spectral irradiance observations in the Indonesian Seas. This grant paid for shipping, travel and incidental costs associated with participation in the cruise in December, 1996. Ship costs were borne by the Indonesian Institute of Sciences as part of the collaborative effort. A plan for Arlindo in 1996 was agreed upon in March, 1996, by Indonesian scientists together with Arnold Gordon. The plan called for a 20-day physical oceanography and mooring cruise in November, 1996, followed by a 5-day bio-optical cruise. The bio-optical cruise departed from, and returned to, Ambon, and sampled in the Banda Sea. We completed a series of chlorophyll analyses, both a sampling of surface variability and depth profiles in the Banda Sea. We also completed three MER profiles for depth profiles of spectral irradiance. These data have a useful by-product in that they can be used for vicarious calibration of the OCTS sensor aboard the ADEOS satellite. As such, the data has been transmitted to NASDA in Japan for their use.

  11. Indonesian Basic Course: Volume XVII. Readings in Social and Political Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This 7-unit reader written in Bahasa Indonesian deals with national issues in Indonesia and is used by official United States military personnel after 40 weeks of instruction in Bahasa Indonesian. The topics discussed are: (1) Nationalism in Indonesia, (2) The Chinese Minority, (3) The Military and Politics in Indonesia, (4) The Indonesian Farmer,…

  12. Factors associated with obesity in Indonesian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Collins, Allison E; Pakiz, Bilge; Rock, Cheryl L

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate adolescent eating, activity, and behavioral patterns, and attitudes and their associations with obesity in selected communities in Indonesia. DESIGN. A cross-sectional questionnaire and physical measurement-based study in three communities of varying modernization levels in Indonesia (Yogyakarta, Kuta, and Jakarta). Subjects. 1758 middle school students (aged 12-15 years) recruited at six different schools: one public and one private school in each of the three target communities. MEASUREMENTS. The questionnaire collected data on demographic characteristics (age, gender, ethnicity, estimated household income); fast food eating habits (frequency, types of food/restaurant, general beliefs about fast foods); television, computer, and Play Station usage; physical activity (hrs/wk of participation in physical activity, transportation means for attending school); and eating habits (frequency of consuming selected foods and beverages). Student's height and weights were obtained, body mass index (BMI: weight [kg]/height [m(2)]) was calculated, and obesity was defined as ≥95%, using the BMI-for-age cut-offs from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) charts. RESULTS. Chi-square analysis revealed associations between obesity and community setting, family income, use of a computer or Play Station, type of transportation to school, and beliefs about fast foods (P<0.01). According to the logistic regression analysis, adolescents from families with incomes over Rp 2 mil were three times as likely to be obese (95% CI 1.9, 4.9) and boys were 2.6 times more likely to be obese (95% CI 1.5, 4.5). CONCLUSION. Greater likelihood of obesity among Indonesian adolescents who spend greater amounts of time using a computer or Play Station suggests that such sedentary activities may be replacing physical activity, promoting an energy imbalance, and subsequently, an increased risk for obesity. PMID:17852550

  13. Modernization of Indonesian Islamic Schools' Curricula, 1945-2003

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuhdi, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    As the most populous Muslim country in the world, Indonesia has a unique experience in dealing with Islamic education, a system that was established years before the country's independence. This paper summarizes the development of Indonesian Islamic schools with special reference to their changing curricula. Using the social constructionist…

  14. Lesson Study as Practice: An Indonesian Elementary School Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suratno, Tatang

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the "practice architectures"; and "ecologies of practice" of LS (lesson study) in an Indonesian private elementary school. It aims at drawing on LS as a form of professional learning from the perspective of contemporary practice theory (Kemmis, Wilkinson, Hardy, & Edwards-Groves, 2009; Kemmis, 2009a, 2009b). This case study…

  15. Indonesian Basic Course: Volume XIV. Outline of History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This 10-unit volume dealing with historical events in Indonesia is used in the advanced phase of the Indonesian Basic Course for United States military personnel. The objectives of the course are: (1) to relate the significant history of the area, (2) to expand the student's vocabulary, and (3) to develop the student's linguistic skills. The ten…

  16. Patterns and Variation of Address Terms in Colloquial Indonesian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djenar, Dwi Noverini

    2006-01-01

    Colloquial Indonesian has two pronouns for addressing friends of a similar age or younger persons, namely "kamu" and "elu" (or its variants, "lu," "elo," and "lo"). This article examines variation in the use of these terms by two pairs of teenagers involved in romantic relationships. Based on data from contemporary fictional narratives, it…

  17. Reading for Meaning: Problematizing Inclusion in Indonesian Civic Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fearnley-Sander, Mary; Moss, Julianne; Harbon, Lesley

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on the use of the "Index for Inclusion" in five socioeconomically different primary school contexts in Indonesia. The research was designed and developed through Australian and Indonesian teachers and teacher educators collaborative efforts over a year. The work took place during the post-Suharto reform period and focuses on the…

  18. Indonesian Basic Course: Volume II, Lessons 9-16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This is a field-test edition of the revised "Indonesian Basic Course," prepared by the Defense Language Institute. Lessons are structured around language pattern recognition exercises, dialogue mastery and translation, and a review of grammar. Cultural notes and vocabulary lists are included. Lessons concern: (1) occupations, (2) color, (3) points…

  19. Performance Indicators in Indonesian Universities: The Perception of Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaus, Nurdiana; Hall, David

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the perceptions of Indonesian academics towards the implementation of Performance Indicators (PIs) on teaching and research. The study was a case study using semi-structured interviews, conducted with 30 academics in three state universities in Indonesia. The results of the study revealed academics believed that outcome…

  20. Islamic and Indonesianic Characters Perspective of Higher Education of Muhammadiyah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobroni; Purwojuwono, Ribut

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to describe the educational model of Islamic and Indonesianic character in Muhammadiyah, perspective of phenomenological studies at School of Higher Education Teaching (STKIP) of Muhammadiyah Sorong of Papua Province Indonesia. The study is done by using qualitative approach with phenomenological paradigm. The main data was obtained…

  1. Crafting a New Democracy: Civic Education in Indonesian Islamic Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Indonesia's post-1998 transition to democracy has presented Muslim educators with the opportunity to take part in shaping the future of Indonesian democracy in ways that are consistent with Muslim social, political, and educational aspirations. One of the key vehicles for doing so is civic education. For Muslim educators in the Islamic higher…

  2. Evaluation of Achievement in the Indonesian Education System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moegiadi; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Multiple regression analysis of 11 home factors and 13 school factors indicated that home accounted for 8.8 percent of the total variance in achievement of sixth grade Indonesian pupils, while school accounted for 6.2 percent. Classroom climate, interpreted as an unmeasured effect of good teaching, accounted for 46 percent of the variance. (CP)

  3. The Pedagogic Beliefs of Indonesian Teachers in Inclusive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehy, Kieron; Budiyanto

    2015-01-01

    This research explores, for the first time, the pedagogical orientations of Indonesian teachers in the context of inclusive education. A mixed-method approach was used for an analysis of questionnaire data from 140 teachers and qualitative interviews from 20 teachers in four inclusive schools. The findings suggest that, in general, the implicit…

  4. Cyberbully, Cybervictim, and Forgiveness among Indonesian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safaria, Triantoro; Tentama, Fatwa; Suyono, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Cyberbullying has been commonplace practice among Indonesian teenagers engaging in on-line space. However, this phenomenon has not been extensively researched in the context of Indonesia. This present study aims to examine the extent to which level of forgiveness contribute to varying degrees of cyberbullying. It is a quantitative in which the…

  5. Cultural Studies of Education: Filming Fluid Subjectivities in Indonesian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logli, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on the Indonesian film "Cin(T)a," which features the interfaith and multiethnic love between two college students. I apply intergroup contact theory, critical pedagogy and grounded cosmopolitanism to the reading of the movie in order to demonstrate two key points. First, higher education is a contact zone, where…

  6. Hedging and Boosting in English and Indonesian Research Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanjaya, I Nyoman Suka

    2013-01-01

    The present cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary study was aimed at exploring the similarities and differences between English and Indonesian research articles from the disciplines of applied linguistics and chemistry in terms of frequency of usage of hedges (e.g. "perhaps," "may") and boosters (e.g. "clearly,"…

  7. Indonesian Basic Course: Volume III, Lessons 17-24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This field-test edition of the revised "Indonesian Basic Course" was prepared by the Defense Language Institute. Lessons include materials on: (1) location, question words, and classifiers; (2) negative requests and time words; (3) duration; (4) nouns; (5) relative pronouns and adjectives; (6) disbelief or amazement; and (7) reduplication of…

  8. Indonesian Basic Course: Volume 1, Lessons 1-8

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This field test edition of the revised "Indonesian Basic Course" (volume 1, lessons 1 to 8) was prepared by the Defense Language Institute. Lessons include materials on: (1) greetings, (2) possessives, (3) asking names, (4) location and direction, (5) action in progress, (6) numbers and telling time, (7) negation and request sentences, and (8)…

  9. Making Citizens Governable? The Crick Report as Governmental Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pykett, Jessica

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the recent introduction of Citizenship Education in England from a governmental perspective, drawing on the later work of Foucault to offer a detailed account of the political rationalities, technologies and subjectivities implicated in contemporary education policy in the formation and governance of citizen-subjects. This is…

  10. 7 CFR 1150.154 - Influencing governmental action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Influencing governmental action. 1150.154 Section 1150.154 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM...

  11. 7 CFR 1150.154 - Influencing governmental action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Influencing governmental action. 1150.154 Section 1150.154 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM...

  12. 76 FR 76633 - Indian Tribal Governmental Plans; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... Register on Tuesday, November 8, 2011 (76 FR 69188). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Concerning the ANPRM... subject of FR Doc. 2011- 28858, is corrected as follows: ] 1. On page 69192, column 1, footnote 10, the... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BI19 Indian Tribal Governmental Plans; Correction...

  13. 77 FR 5442 - Determination of Governmental Plan Status

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... of public hearing published in the Federal Register on Monday, January 23, 2012 (77 FR 3202) that..., November 8, 2011 (76 FR 69172). The rules of 26 CFR 601.601(a)(3) apply to the hearing. A period of 10... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG43 Determination of Governmental Plan Status...

  14. 77 FR 13996 - Determination of Governmental Plan Status; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... in the Federal Register on Thursday, March 1, 2012 (77 FR 12514) relating to the determination of... advance proposed rulemaking (REG-157714-06) which was the subject of FR. Doc. 2012-4905, is corrected as... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BG43 Determination of Governmental Plan Status;...

  15. 77 FR 12514 - Determination of Governmental Plan Status; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... 3, 2012 (77 FR 5442) relating to the determination of governmental plans. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...) which was the subject of FR. Doc. 2012-2499, is corrected as follows: 0 1. On page 5442, column 2, in... ADDRESSES:, second paragraph, first line, the language ``Mail outlines to CC:PA:LPD:PR (REG-'' is...

  16. Regional Meeting of Pacific Islands Women's Non-Governmental Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Pacific Commission, Noumea (New Caledonia).

    Papers presented at a 1985 regional conference of the Pacific Islands Women's Non-Governmental Organizations are provided in this document. Each paper reports on a different country and discusses developmental issues relating to women's role, such as medical programs, health, social status and welfare, education, employment, and other subjects.…

  17. Developing Governmentality: Conduct [to the third power] and Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This article examines education policy and the policy process in the light of two key concepts. The first is the concept of "governmentality" from the work of Michel Foucault (1991). The second is the concept of "political spectacle" from the work of Murray Edelman (1985, 1988). Taking note, further, of recent work by Fairclough (2000) on…

  18. 76 FR 69172 - Determination of Governmental Plan Status

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... benefit plans that are determined to be governmental plans. DATES: Written or electronic comments must be... the exclusive benefit of the employer's employees or their beneficiaries; Provide definitely... from Other Employee Benefit Rules Relating to Retirement Plans.'' Over the past several years, the...

  19. Governmental Policy and Languages for Specific Purposes in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mery-Gorrie, Rose

    A review of Canada's policy for languages for special purposes looks at (1) federal language policy as reflected in the Official Languages Act and the watchdog office of the Commissioner of Official Languages; (2) the policies of the provinces of New Brunswick, Quebec, and Ontario; and (3) the impact of governmental policy, and presents three case…

  20. Learning as Investment: Notes on Governmentality and Biopolitics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Maarten

    2006-01-01

    The "European Space of Higher Education" could be mapped as an infrastructure for entrepreneurship and a place where the distinction between the social and the economic becomes obsolete. Using Foucault's understanding of biopolitics and discussing the analyses of Agamben and Negri/Hardt it is argued that the actual governmental configuration, i.e.…

  1. Higher Education and the Unholy Crusade Against Governmental Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.

    Issues pertaining to increasing government regulation of higher education, monetary and nonmonetary costs of such regulation, and court cases and legislation that illustrate the academic autonomy versus governmental interference conflict are considered in this book by a circuit judge. It is suggested that although colleges and universities have…

  2. Schoolchildren, Governmentality and National E-Safety Policy Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of widespread school Internet access in industrialised countries has been accompanied by the materialisation of what can be labelled as a national school e-safety agenda. Drawing upon Foucault's notions of discourse and governmentality, this paper explores how e-safety policy documents serve to constrain the conceptual…

  3. Governmental Immunity: Legal Basis and Implications for Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Eugene T.

    The concept of sovereign immunity in English law originated in both early canon law and the feudal system, became formalized in case law under King Henry II, and as the royal prerogative, became established into statutory law under King Henry VIII. This concept of governmental immunity was adopted by the states when the union was founded. The case…

  4. 47 CFR 76.1505 - Public, educational and governmental access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1505 Public, educational and governmental access. (a) An open video system operator shall be subject to public, educational and... video system operator must ensure that all subscribers receive any public, educational and...

  5. 47 CFR 76.1505 - Public, educational and governmental access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1505 Public, educational and governmental access. (a) An open video system operator shall be subject to public, educational and... video system operator must ensure that all subscribers receive any public, educational and...

  6. 47 CFR 76.1505 - Public, educational and governmental access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Open Video Systems § 76.1505 Public, educational and governmental access. (a) An open video system operator shall be subject to public, educational and... video system operator must ensure that all subscribers receive any public, educational and...

  7. An Introduction to Some Historical Governmental Weather Records of China.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pao K.; Zhang, De'er

    1988-07-01

    Some historical weather records of China in the governmental archives are discussed. The records in the pre-Qing period (before 1636) am briefly summarized and their use for the reconstruction of past climate is assessed. The more-elaborate weather records of the Qing dynasty, the Clear and Rain Records and the Inches of Rain and Snow, are examined in more detail.

  8. Governmental Immunity for Public Education: A Shield of Legal Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitken, Joan E.

    The American tradition of sovereign immunity and the Eleventh Amendment of the United States Constitution have provided certain legal protection to government personnel, including leaders of public elementary, secondary, and post-secondary institutions, but the concept of governmental immunity may be difficult to understand as it applies to…

  9. Global governmentality: Biosecurity in the era of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Jappah, Jlateh Vincent; Smith, Danielle Taana

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses Foucault's concept of governmentality to examine relationships between globalisation, the threat of infectious diseases and biosecurity. It draws attention to forms of calculated practices which Foucault notes as technologies of power that aim to foster positive demographic and economic trends in societies through the apparatus of security. These practices are employed at the global level with similar ambitions; hence, we adopt the term global governmentality. We discuss the applications of global governmentality by actors in the global core through the apparatus of security and (neo)liberal economic practices. We then provide examples of resistance/contestation from actors mainly in the global periphery through discussions of viral sovereignty; access to essential medicines, including HIV drugs; and health for all as a human right. We conclude that despite the core-periphery power asymmetry and competing paradigms, these developments tend to complement and/or regulate the phenomenon termed global governmentality, which is made evident by the tremendous successes in global health. PMID:25981616

  10. The Neoliberal Racial Project: The Tiger Mother and Governmentality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhee, Jeong-eun

    2013-01-01

    Combining the conceptual approach of racial formation and racial projects with the Foucauldian concept of governmentality, Jeong-eun Rhee theorizes the "neoliberal racial project" (NRP) and examines contemporary meanings and operations of race and racism in relation to neoliberalism. She analyzes Amy Chua's popular parenting memoir,…

  11. State, Governmentality and Education--the Nordic Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivinen, Osmo; Rinne, Risto

    1998-01-01

    Interrogates the prevailing concept of the state as a regulative idea. Introduces Michel Foucault's notion of "governmentality" and investigates how it has historically been linked to education and to the Scandinavian "Caring State." Explores changing tasks of education and the nature of social contracts that could correspond to the new social…

  12. Governmentality as a Genealogical Toolbox in Historical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, Janicke

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to show how governmentality may be used to analyze historical events and discourses, and how this historical analysis can be used as a perspective to problematize contemporary discourses. The example used in this article is from my research on life-extension handbooks published in Sweden 1700-1930, and by this I stress…

  13. The development of indonesian online game addiction questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Jap, Tjibeng; Tiatri, Sri; Jaya, Edo Sebastian; Suteja, Mekar Sari

    2013-01-01

    Online game is an increasingly popular source of entertainment for all ages, with relatively prevalent negative consequences. Addiction is a problem that has received much attention. This research aims to develop a measure of online game addiction for Indonesian children and adolescents. The Indonesian Online Game Addiction Questionnaire draws from earlier theories and research on the internet and game addiction. Its construction is further enriched by including findings from qualitative interviews and field observation to ensure appropriate expression of the items. The measure consists of 7 items with a 5-point Likert Scale. It is validated by testing 1,477 Indonesian junior and senior high school students from several schools in Manado, Medan, Pontianak, and Yogyakarta. The validation evidence is shown by item-total correlation and criterion validity. The Indonesian Online Game Addiction Questionnaire has good item-total correlation (ranging from 0.29 to 0.55) and acceptable reliability (α = 0.73). It is also moderately correlated with the participant's longest time record to play online games (r = 0.39; p<0.01), average days per week in playing online games (ρ = 0.43; p<0.01), average hours per days in playing online games (ρ = 0.41; p<0.01), and monthly expenditure for online games (ρ = 0.30; p<0.01). Furthermore, we created a clinical cut-off estimate by combining criteria and population norm. The clinical cut-off estimate showed that the score of 14 to 21 may indicate mild online game addiction, and the score of 22 and above may indicate online game addiction. Overall, the result shows that Indonesian Online Game Addiction Questionnaire has sufficient psychometric property for research use, as well as limited clinical application. PMID:23560113

  14. The Development of Indonesian Online Game Addiction Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Jap, Tjibeng; Tiatri, Sri; Jaya, Edo Sebastian; Suteja, Mekar Sari

    2013-01-01

    Online game is an increasingly popular source of entertainment for all ages, with relatively prevalent negative consequences. Addiction is a problem that has received much attention. This research aims to develop a measure of online game addiction for Indonesian children and adolescents. The Indonesian Online Game Addiction Questionnaire draws from earlier theories and research on the internet and game addiction. Its construction is further enriched by including findings from qualitative interviews and field observation to ensure appropriate expression of the items. The measure consists of 7 items with a 5-point Likert Scale. It is validated by testing 1,477 Indonesian junior and senior high school students from several schools in Manado, Medan, Pontianak, and Yogyakarta. The validation evidence is shown by item-total correlation and criterion validity. The Indonesian Online Game Addiction Questionnaire has good item-total correlation (ranging from 0.29 to 0.55) and acceptable reliability (α = 0.73). It is also moderately correlated with the participant's longest time record to play online games (r = 0.39; p<0.01), average days per week in playing online games (ρ = 0.43; p<0.01), average hours per days in playing online games (ρ = 0.41; p<0.01), and monthly expenditure for online games (ρ = 0.30; p<0.01). Furthermore, we created a clinical cut-off estimate by combining criteria and population norm. The clinical cut-off estimate showed that the score of 14 to 21 may indicate mild online game addiction, and the score of 22 and above may indicate online game addiction. Overall, the result shows that Indonesian Online Game Addiction Questionnaire has sufficient psychometric property for research use, as well as limited clinical application. PMID:23560113

  15. Plutonium distribution: Summary of public and governmental support issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pasternak, A.

    1995-03-31

    Obtaining strong public and governmental support for the plutonium disposition program and for the projects comprising the selected disposition options will be essential to the success of the program in meeting non-proliferation goals established as national policy. This paper summarizes issues related to public and governmental support for plutonium disposition. Recommendations are offered which rest on two fundamental assumptions: (1) public and political support derive from public trust and confidence, and (2) despite widespread support for U.S. non-proliferation goals, establishing and operating facilities to carry out the program will entail controversy. Documentation for the Administration`s policy on non-proliferation as it relates to plutonium disposition is cited and summarized as background for ongoing planning efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE). Consensus is a reasonable goal for efforts to secure public and governmental support for the plutonium disposition program and its elements; unanimity is very unlikely. The program will be aided by the popular recognition of the importance of the nation`s non-proliferation goals, the potential for an energy dividend if an energy production option is selected ({open_quotes}Swords to Plowshares{close_quotes} metaphor), the possibility of influencing disposition decisions in other countries, and the clear need to do something with the excess material ({open_quotes}the no action alternative{close_quotes} will not suffice).

  16. The ranks of Indonesian and Japanese industrial sectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the ranks of Indonesian and Japanese industrial sectors from the economic point of view. The analysis period of this study is 2005. This study employs one of the well-known analysis tools in the economic topic, the Input-Output (IO) analysis. More specifically, this study uses the analysis methods in the IO analysis, backward and forward linkages, in order to achieve the purpose. The results of calculations show that the orders of the ranks depend on the method used. Nevertheless, from the results, one can say that the manufacturing industry was a leading sector in the Indonesian economy on the analysis period. On the other hand, for the Japanese case, the sector which had the beneficial effects in the Japanese economy on the analysis period was the transport.

  17. Antibacterial and antifungal activity of Indonesian ethnomedical plants.

    PubMed

    Goun, E; Cunningham, G; Chu, D; Nguyen, C; Miles, D

    2003-09-01

    Methylene chloride and methanol extracts of 20 Indonesian plants with ethnomedical uses have been assessed for in vitro antibacterial and antifungal properties by disk diffusion method. Extracts of the six plants: Terminalia catappa, Swietenia mahagoni Jacq., Phyllanthus acuminatus, Ipomoea spp., Tylophora asthmatica and Hyptis brevipes demonstrated high activity in this bioassay system. These findings should stimulate the search for novel, natural product such as new antibacterial and antifungal agents. PMID:12946723

  18. The unwelcome guests: Indonesian immigrants and Malaysian public responses.

    PubMed

    Kassim, A

    1987-09-01

    The author examines attitudes among different sections of the Malaysian population toward the presence of immigrants from Indonesia, many of whom are illegal migrants. Data are from a review of Malaysian newspaper articles and from a survey conducted in 1985 in two squatter settlements in Kuala Lumpur. The author concludes that in recent years, the mood of the general public has turned against Indonesian migrants. PMID:12157842

  19. Non-Governmental Religious Schools in Germany--Increasing Demand by Decreasing Religiosity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheunpflug, Annette

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the situation of non-governmental religious schools in Germany. The available empirical data demonstrate an increasing demand for these schools in recent decades. In this paper, possible causes of this development are discussed. First, the given constitutional framework for religion in governmental and non-governmental schools…

  20. Coral radiocarbon constraints on the source of the Indonesian throughflow

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.D.; Schrag, D.P.; Kashgarian, M.

    1997-06-01

    Radiocarbon variability in {ital Porites} spp. corals from Guam and the Makassar Strait (Indonesian Seaway) was used to identify the source waters contributing to the Indonesian throughflow. Time series with bimonthly resolution were constructed using accelerator mass spectrometry. The seasonal variability ranges from 15 to 60{per_thousand}, with large interannual variability. {Delta}{sup 14}C values from Indonesia and Guam have a nearly identical range. Annual mean {Delta}{sup 14}C values from Indonesia are 50 to 60{per_thousand} higher than in corals from Canton in the South Equatorial Current [{ital Druffel}, 1987]. These observations support a year-round North Pacific source for the Indonesian throughflow and imply negligible contribution by South Equatorial Current water. The large seasonality in {Delta}{sup 14}C values from both sites emphasizes the dynamic behavior of radiocarbon in the surface ocean and suggests that {Delta}{sup 14}C time series of similar resolution can help constrain seasonal and interannual changes in ocean circulation in the Pacific over the last several decades.{copyright} 1997 American Geophysical Union

  1. Overview of Recent and Future Indonesian Throughflow Tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprintall, J.

    2014-12-01

    The tropical Indonesian seas play a central role in the climate system. They lie at the climatological center of the atmospheric deep convection associated with the ascending branch of the Walker Circulation. They also provide an oceanic pathway for the Pacific and Indian inter-ocean exchange, known as the Indonesian throughflow (ITF). The ITF is the only tropical pathway in the global thermohaline circulation. As such, the volume of heat and fresh water carried by the ITF is known to impact the state of the Pacific and Indian oceans as well as air-sea exchange, which modulates the climate system on a variety of timescales. Still, many fundamental questions about the structure and variability of the ITF on climate time scales remain unanswered. Longer time series are needed to understand the links of the vertical ITF transport profile to the IOD and ENSO phenomena and decadal variability, and their implications for climate variations, such as known impacts on precipitation in the Australasian region. This talk will highlight some recent scientific studies of the maritime Indonesian continent, and also discuss a co-ordinated international observational and modeling effort targeted towards identifying the urgent gaps that would lead to an improved understanding of the ITF variability. The ultimate goal of this ITF-Task Team is to provide a scientific basis for developing and evaluating a cost-effective strategy for sustained monitoring of the ITF heat and mass transport over the long term for use in climate models and future predictions.

  2. On Estimation of GPS-based Indonesian Strain Rate Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilo, Susilo; Abidin, Hasanuddin Z.; Meilano, Irwan; Sapiie, Benyamin; Wijanarto, Antonius B.

    2016-04-01

    Using the GPS-derived rates at survey mode (sGPS) stations and continuous GPS stations across Indonesian region, covering the 22 years period from 1993 to 2014, the linear deformation velocities with an accuracy of about 2 to 3 mm/year level are derived. These velocities are corrected to the coseismic and postseismic deformation caused by significant earthquakes in that period. In this study, we use this GPS velocities field to construct a crustal strain rate map without including the physical model yet. An interpolation method was used to compute the velocity model. By differentiation of the continuous velocity model, we derive the strain rate map of Indonesia. At present, our result is only the magnitude of the strain rate. The Indonesian strain rate map is very important for studying the deformation characteristics in the region and to establish a deformation (velocity) model for supporting the implementation of the Indonesian Geospatial Reference System 2013 (IGRS 2013). This is a new semi-dynamic geocentric datum of Indonesia, which uses the global ITRF2008 reference frame, with a reference epoch of 1 January 2012. A deformation (velocity) model is required to transform coordinates from an observation epoch to or from this reference epoch.

  3. Genomic Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae IIEMP-3, a Vitamin B12-Producing Strain from Indonesian Tempeh.

    PubMed

    Yulandi, Adi; Sugiokto, Febri Gunawan; Febrilina; Suwanto, Antonius

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae strain IIEMP-3, isolated from Indonesian tempeh, is a vitamin B12-producing strain that exhibited a different genetic profile from pathogenic isolates. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain IIEMP-3, which may provide insights on the nature of fermentation, nutrition, and immunological function of Indonesian tempeh. PMID:26950331

  4. A Phenomenological Study of an Indonesian Cohort Group's Transformative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budiraharjo, Markus

    2013-01-01

    This study was set to investigate how a cohort of ten Indonesian teachers experienced transformations in their teaching professionalism upon receiving an assignment of instructional leadership training to other school leaders. These ten teachers, who came from three different Indonesian Jesuit high schools and one archdiocese-based educational…

  5. Developing Metacognitive and Discursive Activities in the Indonesian Mathematics Education. Results of a Feasibility Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaune, Christa; Cohors-Fresenborg, Elmar; Nowinska, Edyta; Marpaung, Yansen; Handayani, Novi

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a German-Indonesian feasibility study, which has been conducted to examine whether a more extensive pilot study could be successful. The objective of the pilot study is to enhance the mathematical skills of Indonesian students in the 7th class by increasing the number of students who can really understand…

  6. Application of security concepts to the personnel database for the Indonesian Navy. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wibisono, M.

    1983-09-01

    This thesis is a continuation of the study work done by Moedjiono (M.S. thesis, Naval Postgraduate School, 1982) concerning personnel database in the Indonesian Navy. It discusses the current database security and the concept of Multics (Multiplexed Information and Computing System) to propose a personnel database security model in the Indonesian Navy.

  7. Nah, Baca! Authentic Indonesian Readings. Volume 2: Teachers' Edition [and] Student Workbook [and] Reading Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafferty, Ellen; Collins, James T.; Barnard, Erlin Susanti; Hiple, David

    The selection of reading texts for second language learners of Indonesian for this volume were based on the desire to provide level-appropriate material, to reflect the diversity of contemporary Indonesian society, and to pique the interest of university students. Included materials are from government publications, Jakarta newspapers, provincial…

  8. Social Support of Indonesian and U.S. Children and Adolescents by Family Members and Friends.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Doran C.; Rianasari, Meta; Pidada, Sri; Nelwan, Peter; Buhrmester, Duane

    2001-01-01

    Assessed multiple features of social support provided by mothers, fathers, siblings, and friends to Indonesian and U.S. elementary and junior high school students. Found that Indonesian youth ranked family members higher and friends lower on companionship and satisfaction than did U.S. youth. Friends were seen as the primary sources of intimacy in…

  9. Phonological Awareness, Letter Knowledge, and Literacy Development in Indonesian Beginner Readers and Spellers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winskel, Heather; Widjaja, Vivilia

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the grain size predominantly used by children learning to read and spell in Indonesian. Indonesian is an orthographically transparent language, and the syllable is a salient unit. Tasks assessing various levels of phonological awareness as well as letter knowledge, reading familiar words and…

  10. Consonantal and Syllabic Repairs of Arabic and Dutch Loanwords in Indonesian: A Phonological Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batais, Saleh Saeed

    2013-01-01

    The dissertation study aims to contribute mainly to the field of loanword phonology in general and particularly to Indonesian and its phonology that are rarely studied to date. The study investigates what consonantal and syllabic repair strategies are employed by Indonesian in adapting Arabic and Dutch loanwords, whether these adaptation…

  11. Indonesian Primary Teachers' Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching Geometry: Implications for Educational Policy and Teacher Preparation Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Dicky

    2011-01-01

    This study examines Indonesian primary teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching geometry and what factors contribute to this knowledge. A translated and adapted version of the Learning Mathematics for Teaching measures and the Indonesian Educational Survey were used to gather information on teachers' knowledge for teaching geometry and their…

  12. Governmental oversight of discharges from concentrated animal feeding operations.

    PubMed

    Centner, Terence J

    2006-06-01

    As point sources of pollution in the United States, concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are subject to the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permitting system requirements. Changes to federal regulations in 2003 and a 2005 court decision have increased the governmental oversight of CAFOs. Manure application to fields from "large CAFOs" that results in unpermitted discharges can be regulated under the Clean Water Act. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's interpretation of agricultural stormwater discharges was approved so that unpermitted discharges may arise if an owner or operator of a CAFO fails to apply manure correctly. Owners and operators do not, however, have a duty to secure governmental permits in the absence of a discharge. Turning to the federal provisions regarding nutrient management plans, a court found that they were deficient. Moreover, the federal government needs to reconsider requirements that would reduce pathogens from entering surface waters. Although these developments should assist in reducing the impairment of U.S. waters, concern still exists. Greater oversight of nutrient management plans and enhanced enforcement efforts offer opportunities to provide greater assurance that CAFO owners and operators will not allow a discharge of pollutants to enter surface waters. PMID:16456627

  13. Selected Organizational Factors Affecting Performance of Professional Nurses in North West Bank Governmental Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thulth, Ahida Saleem; Sayej, Sumaya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organizational factors are considered to be the cornerstone in achieving psychological and professional security at work, which in turn are positively reflected in job performance both quantitatively and qualitatively. Aim of the Study: The study aimed to assess of selected organizational factors (workload, available recourses and…

  14. Healthcare Personnel's Use of E-Information Sources in Riyadh Governmental Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khudair, Ahmad A.; Cooke, Louise

    2008-01-01

    ICT has enabled a wide dissemination of information and a sharp increase in the magnitude of electronic information sources. The use of e-information sources by healthcare personnel within Saudi Arabia has received little research attention. This paper discusses the use of e-information sources by healthcare personnel in the kingdom. A…

  15. Defending the next round of non-profit hospital class action lawsuits.

    PubMed

    Olson, Mark D

    2005-01-01

    Recent controversies surrounding how not-for-profit hospitals price to and collect from the uninsured have resulted in class action lawsuits, investigations by state attorneys general, and other governmental investigations. The author argues that oversight at the hospital governing board level has been lax and sets forth a series of specific steps that hospital boards should take to deal with these controversies whether or not their specific hospital or hospital system has been investigated or sued. PMID:18973003

  16. Novel Adociaquinone Derivatives from the Indonesian Sponge Xestospongia sp.

    PubMed Central

    He, Fei; Mai, Linh H.; Longeon, Arlette; Copp, Brent R.; Loaëc, Nadège; Bescond, Amandine; Meijer, Laurent; Bourguet-Kondracki, Marie-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Seven new adociaquinone derivatives, xestoadociaquinones A (1a), B (1b), 14-carboxy-xestoquinol sulfate (2) and xestoadociaminals A–D (3a, 3c, 4a, 4c), together with seven known compounds (5–11) were isolated from an Indonesian marine sponge Xestospongia sp. Their structures were elucidated by extensive 1D and 2D NMR and mass spectrometric data. All the compounds were evaluated for their potential inhibitory activity against eight different protein kinases involved in cell proliferation, cancer, diabetes and neurodegenerative disorders as well as for their antioxidant and antibacterial activities. PMID:25927661

  17. Sustainable Energy in Remote Indonesian Grids. Accelerating Project Development

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Brian; Burman, Kari; Davidson, Carolyn; Elchinger, Michael; Hardison, R.; Karsiwulan, D.; Castermans, B.

    2015-06-30

    Sustainable Energy for Remote Indonesian Grids (SERIG) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded initiative to support Indonesia’s efforts to develop clean energy and increase access to electricity in remote locations throughout the country. With DOE support, the SERIG implementation team consists of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Winrock International’s Jakarta, Indonesia office. Through technical assistance that includes techno-economic feasibility evaluation for selected projects, government-to-government coordination, infrastructure assessment, stakeholder outreach, and policy analysis, SERIG seeks to provide opportunities for individual project development and a collective framework for national replication office.

  18. Indonesian Throughflow variability over the last glacial cycle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbourn, A. E.; Kuhnt, W.; Regenberg, M.; Xu, J.; Hendrizan, M.; Schröder, J.

    2013-12-01

    The transfer of surface and intermediate waters from the Pacific Ocean to the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian archipelago (Indonesian Throughflow: ITF) strongly influences the heat and freshwater budgets of tropical water masses, in turn affecting global climate. Key areas for monitoring past ITF variations through this critical gateway are the narrow passages through the Makassar Strait and Flores Sea and the main outflow area within the Timor Sea. Here, we integrate high-resolution sea surface temperature and salinity reconstructions (based on paired planktic foraminiferal Mg/Ca and δ18O) with X-ray fluorescence runoff data and benthic isotopes from marine sediment cores retrieved in these regions during several cruises with RV'Sonne' and RV'Marion Dufresne'. Our results show that high latitude climate variability strongly influenced ITF intensity on millennial to centennial timescales as well as on longer glacial-interglacial timescales. Marked declines in ITF strength occurred during Heinrich events and the Younger Dryas, most likely related to slowdown of the global thermohaline circulation during colder northern hemisphere climate spells, when deep water production decreased and the deep ocean became more stratified. Additionally, the surface component of the ITF strongly reflects regional windstress and rainfall patterns, and thus the spatial extent and intensity of the tropical convection over the Indonesian archipelago. Our runoff and salinity estimates reveal that the development of the tropical convection was intricately linked to the latitudinal migration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). In particular, our data show that the Australian monsoon intensified during the major deglacial atmospheric CO2 rise through the Younger Dryas and earliest Holocene (12.9-10 ka). This massive intensification of the Australian monsoon coincided with a southward shift of the ITCZ, linked to southern hemisphere warming and enhanced greenhouse forcing

  19. [Etiology of hypersensitivity reactions following Chinese or Indonesian meals].

    PubMed

    de Maat-Bleeker, F

    1992-02-01

    Various authors have criticised or confirmed the relation between adverse reactions to Chinese food ('The Chinese Restaurant Syndrome') and the use of monosodium glutamate (Vetsin). In our experience the occurrence of urticaria, angioedema or anaphylaxis after meals in Chinese or Indonesian restaurants is more often due to IgE-mediated Type I food allergy, caused by consumption of shrimp, peanut or spices, in particular those of the parsley family (e.g. coriander). A detailed description of four such cases is presented. PMID:1571051

  20. Two new stingrays (Chondrichthyes: Dasyatidae) from the eastern Indonesian Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Last, Peter R; White, William T

    2013-01-01

    Two new stingrays, Dasyatis longicauda sp. nov. and Himanturajavaensis sp. nov., are described from material collected in the eastern Indonesian Archipelago. These species, which are both relatively small stingrays (both probably smaller than 40 cm DW), have been confused with closest relatives in the region. Dasyatis longicauda sp. nov., known from West Papua, differs from its congener, the Australian endemic D. fluviorum, in having a slightly lower vertebral count, lower pectoral-radial count, a longer tail, larger and less numerous thorns along the mid-disc and tail, as well as a different CO1 Barcode. Himantura javaensis sp. nov., known only from southern Java (near Cilacap), belongs to a complex of small whiprays which also includes another Indonesian species, H. walga. Apart from major differences in squamation and a different CO1 Barcode, Himantura javaensis is more brownish in coloration, has more vertebrae, a longer tail, smaller eye and orbit, more posteriorly positioned sting, shorter adult claspers, shorter pelvic fin, and differs in various measurements around the head. PMID:26171511

  1. The Indonesian family planning program: its strategy for the future.

    PubMed

    Suyono, H; Parsons, J S; Teachman, J D

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the strategy of the Indonesian national family planning program for the coming 5-10 years, in which communities will be given greater responsibility for their own fertility limitation programs and a stronger alliance with other government programs will be sought in order to assure the long-term success of both family planning and development activities. The article explains why more vigorous fertility limitation efforts will be required in the future despite encouraging results so far, and describes the structure of the Indonesian national family planning program. The rationale behind the move away from clinics as depensers of family planning services is examined, and the community family planning approach in Bali is described and compared to that in Java. The differing approach to service delivery in the Outer Islands is then discussed. The relationship between development and the small family norm is discussed, and efforts underway to maximize cooperation between the family planning and development sector projects are described. PMID:12309781

  2. Pacific-to-Indian Ocean connectivity: Tasman leakage, Indonesian Throughflow, and the role of ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebille, Erik; Sprintall, Janet; Schwarzkopf, Franziska U.; Sen Gupta, Alex; Santoso, Agus; England, Matthew H.; Biastoch, Arne; Böning, Claus W.

    2014-02-01

    The upper ocean circulation of the Pacific and Indian Oceans is connected through both the Indonesian Throughflow north of Australia and the Tasman leakage around its south. The relative importance of these two pathways is examined using virtual Lagrangian particles in a high-resolution nested ocean model. The unprecedented combination of a long integration time within an eddy-permitting ocean model simulation allows the first assessment of the interannual variability of these pathways in a realistic setting. The mean Indonesian Throughflow, as diagnosed by the particles, is 14.3 Sv, considerably higher than the diagnosed average Tasman leakage of 4.2 Sv. The time series of Indonesian Throughflow agrees well with the Eulerian transport through the major Indonesian Passages, validating the Lagrangian approach using transport-tagged particles. While the Indonesian Throughflow is mainly associated with upper ocean pathways, the Tasman leakage is concentrated in the 400-900 m depth range at subtropical latitudes. Over the effective period considered (1968-1994), no apparent relationship is found between the Tasman leakage and Indonesian Throughflow. However, the Indonesian Throughflow transport correlates with ENSO. During strong La Niñas, more water of Southern Hemisphere origin flows through Makassar, Moluccas, Ombai, and Timor Straits, but less through Moluccas Strait. In general, each strait responds differently to ENSO, highlighting the complex nature of the ENSO-ITF interaction.

  3. Mother milk and the Indonesian economy: a major national resource.

    PubMed

    Rohde, J E

    1981-01-01

    Lactating Indonesian mothers contribute a value of US $520 million annually to the economy. Rather than protect and increase the production of this valuable resource, diverse influences are acting to undermine and reduce maternal maternal lactation threatening great social and economic losses to the country. Strong affirmative action on the part of the government is needed to avoid further loss of the great natural resource of mother's milk. A lactating mother produces 180 liters of milk for her baby in the 1st year and 110 liters in the 2nd year. Numerous studies of milk protein, fat, and carbohydrates show that Indonesian mothers produce milk of the highest nutritional value and that this high quality is preserved even in mothers who are undernourished. Total milk production in Indonesia calculated from average daily milk volume and duration of lactation, if all Indonesian mothers followed the rural feeding pattern, is 1315 million liters. If all mothers "modernized" to the urban pattern, production would drop to 582 million liters, or less than half. The net value of mother's milk calculated as its retail value less production costs is roughly $400 million. The true value of mother's milk far exceeds its commercial value. It contains a myriad of immunologically active factors protecting the infant from infections, allergies, asthma, and even death. The relative risk of diarrhea among bottle feeders is about 5-8 times those infants who are breastfed. A reduction in number of mothers breastfeeding by only 25% could lead to a doubling of the total cases of diarrhea. About 5% of women will conceive before resuming menstruation, but 90% remain infertile until return of menses. In general a women is protected for roughly 75% as long as she lactates, particularly if lactation is frequent and bottle substitutes are not used. The current breastfeeding pattern accounts for roughly 4.5 million couple years of contraception annually. The World Health Organization and the

  4. [Prevention of cervical and breast cancer in health services and non-governmental organizations in the city of Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Ponce, Marisa

    2013-08-01

    The article analyzes actions for the prevention of cervical and breast cancer in public, private, and employment-based health services and in non-governmental organizations in the city of Buenos Aires. The article seeks to reflect on the reach and limitations of the approaches implemented in the three subsectors of the health care system and the community to prevent women from suffering or eventually dying as a consequence of these diseases, in the fragmented context of a health system with great heterogeneity in access and deep social inequalities in the use of preventive actions. The study utilizes a broad definition of prevention which integrates education, awareness-building and early detection of pre-carcinogenic and carcinogenic lesions, among other medical and non-medical components. The results were obtained using semi-structured interviews with subjects from public hospitals, employment-based health care services, private medical companies and non-governmental organizations with work in cancer prevention. These results show that contrary to a comprehensive approach, each institution limits its actions to only one aspect of prevention, implementing predominately isolated or disconnected actions inadequate to generate an autonomous and well-informed demand for treatment and health care among women. PMID:23989627

  5. The emergence of non-governmental support groups in migration.

    PubMed

    Liem, N H

    1989-01-01

    The Philippine labor export policy, though always stated as a temporary policy, has been implemented for over a decade. From the beginning it has had 2 main features: 1) a strong presence of the government in the process of sending overseas contract workers, especially through the Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA), and 2) the increasing involvement of the private sector, notably the recruitment industry, in the implementation and, to a certain extent, in the policy formulation of labor export policy. Another feature is the change in the structure of overseas contract workers over the years from a male-dominated to an increasingly female-characterized temporary migration. During the past few years, increasing attention has been focused on the actual and potential role in the process of development of non-governmental support groups, commonly known as Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs). This paper focuses on the NGOs which have a direct link, and to a limited extent those with an indirect link, with the issue of migrant workers. The paper attempts to 1) come up with a typology of these NGOs based on certain classification criteria, 2) elaborate on their main patterns of support services, 3) pinpoint some of their weaknesses as an organization and in delivering services, and 4) draw a picture of future prospects. NGOs came about mainly because of the social aspect of migration. Most of the NGOs were formally organized in the early 1980s, except those serving the sea-based workers and the Philippine Nurses Association. A limited number of NGOs in migration are exclusively servicing migrant workers; the others have broader target groups, such as women's groups and trade unions. Services provided to the migrant workers include, especially in the early stages of the organization, mainly advocacy and non-economic activities related to the pre-departure of the migrant workers. Many activities are related to the pre-departure stage. Few NGOs are

  6. South China Sea throughflow impact on the Indonesian throughflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Arnold L.; Huber, Bruce A.; Metzger, E. Joseph; Susanto, R. Dwi; Hurlburt, Harley E.; Adi, T. Rameyo

    2012-06-01

    In 2008-2009 the Makassar throughflow profile changed dramatically: the characteristic thermocline velocity maximum increased from 0.7 to 0.9 m/sec and shifted from 140 m to 70 m, amounting to a 47% increase in the transport of warmer water between 50 and 150 m during the boreal summer. HYCOM output indicates that ENSO induced change of the South China Sea (SCS) throughflow into the Indonesian seas is the likely cause. Increased SCS throughflow during El Niño with a commensurate increase in the southward flow of buoyant surface water through the Sulu Sea into the northern Makassar Strait, inhibits tropical Pacific surface water injection into Makassar Strait; during La Niña SCS throughflow is near zero allowing tropical Pacific inflow. The resulting warmer ITF reaches into the Indian Ocean, potentially affecting regional sea surface temperature and climate.

  7. Organophosphate pesticide concentrations in coral tissues of Indonesian coastal waters.

    PubMed

    Sabdono, Agus; Kang, Suil; Hur, Hor-Gil; Grossart, Hans-Peter; Simon, Meinhard; Radjasa, Ocky Kama

    2007-06-01

    In this study we evaluated the persistence of diazinon, chlorpyrifos, profenofos, parathion, malathion and ethion in dead coral tissues of Indonesian coastal waters (Java, Bali, Sulawesi and Komodo). Comparison of the residue levels in coral tissues showed that the highest presence of organophosphate concentrations was detected in a coral sample collected from Java coastal waters. While medium amounts of a contaminant diazinon can still lead to detectable in Bali and Sulawesi coastal waters. Prominent contamination of organophosphate was not found in a sample collected from Komodo. Neither parathion nor malathion were detected in any of the samples. This result implies that the geographical variations of organophosphate compounds are determined by the possible usage of these chemicals around coastal waters at the present or in the past. There is need for further work to identify sources and fate of pesticide contaminants, as well as to improve monitoring of pesticide use. PMID:19086563

  8. [Wound management with coconut oil in Indonesian folk medicine].

    PubMed

    Sachs, M; von Eichel, J; Asskali, F

    2002-04-01

    The medical plants which are used to treat wounds and injuries by the ethnic group of Ngada on Flores, an Eastern Indonesian island, will be presented. Additionally, the coconut oil used to treat wounds and to conserve medicinal plants will be analysed biochemically. The people of Ngada use the following plants for wound treatment: seeds of the betel nut (Areca catechu L.), fruits of papaya (Carica papaya L.), leaves of the Indian Hydrocotyle (Centelle asiatica L.), the rhizome of turmeric (Curcuma domestica Val. and Curcumara xanthorrhiza Roxb.), leaves of betel (Piper betel L.). Coconut oil is particularly useful because of its biochemical structure: unlike olive oil and animal fatty tissue, it consists of short-chained and saturated fatty acids. These qualities in coconut oil prevent it from becoming oxidized and rancid, thus making it suitable for the preservation of medicinal plants and for wound treatment. PMID:12063927

  9. Satellite communication subsystem design for the Indonesian Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, R. A.; Neuman, M. E.; Asturi, H.

    To meet the requirements of the Indonesian Archipelago, an advanced communication subsystem was designed which incorporated many key system advances. Orthogonally polarized grid reflectors, offset feed with displaced foci, provide shaped beam coverage of orthogonal polarizations with maximum reflector area for each. The 24 channels of 36 MHz each are implemented by functionally separate horizontal and vertical repeaters. High efficiency traveling wave tubes with triply depressed collectors provide downlink power amplification, while a 5 for 4 redundancy implementation insures reliability. Channel selectivity is established by elliptic function input and output multiplexers utilizing circulator dropping techniques on the input and common manifold combining on the output. As a result of this system implementation, it has been possible to achieve 34 dBW downlink EIRP and -5 dB K uplink G/T with a much smaller spacecraft than previously achieved.

  10. Seasonal variability of mixed layer depth in Indonesian Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radjawane, Ivonne M.; Nurdjaman, Susanna; Apriansyah

    2015-09-01

    This research is conducted to analyzed seasonal variation of mixed layer depth (MLD) in Indonesian Seas using monthly temperature average data from World Ocean Atlas (WOA) 2009 with the 0.25 degree grid resolution and wind data from NCEP. The results of this study indicate that seasonal variation of MLD are closely related to seasonal monsoonal wind pattern prevail in Indonesia region especially at south of west Java, central of Banda Sea and Sulawesi Sea. The MLD is deeper during Southeast (SE) Monsoon. The stronger wind blowing over ocean surface caused stronger ocean dynamics and stronger mixing process that effect deeper mixing region. In contrary, during SE Monsoon, the location of strong upwelling such as in the coastal area of east Java and from eastern Banda Sea till Arafura Sea showed the MLD is shallower compare during the Northwest (NW) Monsoon.

  11. The Indonesian Drug Advisory Committee and the drug approval process.

    PubMed

    Darmansjah, I; Wardhini, S

    1991-01-01

    The Indonesian Food and Drug Agency began to evaluate drug applications in the early 1970s through an Advisory Committee. This was in response to the perestroika-like policy applied to our drug industry; nowadays there are more than 300 drug companies formulating some 13,5600 drug products. During 1977-1988, 603 drugs were evaluated by the Advisory Committee; 66% were single drugs and 34% were fixed dose combinations. Nine-hundred and twenty-five sessions were needed to arrive at decisions. Most of the applications (88.5%) were reviewed in one or two sessions but 8 drugs took 6-12 sessions. The time needed for assessment may vary from 1 to 3 months (61%), but some have needed almost a year and a half. There were 60% acceptances for single drugs and 35% for fixed combinations. PMID:2045840

  12. Stress factors in modern urban lifestyles: an Indonesian perspective.

    PubMed

    Soewondo, S

    1996-09-01

    An Indonesian perspective of lifestyle in an urban environment is likely to be sharper because of how recent and substantial urbanisation has been. Contrasts between rural and new urban ways of life make the stressors more obvious than they may be to those in societies where the industrial revolution occurred much earlier. Additionally, the post-industrial society is grafted onto a recent industrial society in cities like Jakarta. The impact on nutritional flows through work patterns, eating styles and family life requires attention. There are medical-physiological and psychological approaches to the understanding of stress. In this way, an appreciation of factors other than the food supply itself on nutritional status can be gained. These include fashion, peer pressure, relationships, physical activity patterns and food patterns. Management of these stressors provides additional opportunities for preventive health. PMID:24394567

  13. 36 CFR 1275.50 - Restriction of materials related to abuses of governmental power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... related to abuses of governmental power. 1275.50 Section 1275.50 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... § 1275.50 Restriction of materials related to abuses of governmental power. (a) The Archivist will... power, as defined in § 1275.16(c), when: (1) The Archivist, in accordance with § 1275.44, is in...

  14. Silencing the Subaltern: Nation-State/Colonial Governmentality and Bilingual Education in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of "nation-state/colonial governmentality" as a framework for analyzing the ways current language ideologies marginalize the language practices of subaltern populations. Specifically, the article focuses on the innate limitations of re-appropriating nation-state/colonial governmentality in an attempt…

  15. 22 CFR 140.9 - Other non-governmental entities and individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Section 140.9 applies to private voluntary agencies, educational institutions, for-profit firms, other non-governmental entities and private individuals. A non-governmental entity that is not organized under the laws...) as part of the agency's approval process. (2) A $100,000 grant to a covered foreign private...

  16. 22 CFR 140.9 - Other non-governmental entities and individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... Section 140.9 applies to private voluntary agencies, educational institutions, for-profit firms, other non-governmental entities and private individuals. A non-governmental entity that is not organized under the laws...) as part of the agency's approval process. (2) A $100,000 grant to a covered foreign private...

  17. 39 CFR 3002.15 - Office of Public Affairs and Governmental Relations. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Office of Public Affairs and Governmental Relations. 3002.15 Section 3002.15 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL ORGANIZATION §§ 3002.15 Office of Public Affairs and Governmental Relations....

  18. 36 CFR 1275.50 - Restriction of materials related to abuses of governmental power.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... related to abuses of governmental power. 1275.50 Section 1275.50 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... § 1275.50 Restriction of materials related to abuses of governmental power. (a) The Archivist will restrict access to materials determined during the processing period to relate to abuses of...

  19. 39 CFR 3002.15 - Office of Public Affairs and Governmental Relations. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Office of Public Affairs and Governmental Relations. 3002.15 Section 3002.15 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL ORGANIZATION §§ 3002.15 Office of Public Affairs and Governmental Relations....

  20. 39 CFR 3002.15 - Office of Public Affairs and Governmental Relations. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Office of Public Affairs and Governmental Relations. 3002.15 Section 3002.15 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL ORGANIZATION § 3002.15 Office of Public Affairs and Governmental Relations....

  1. Genealogies of Governmentality: Producing and Managing Young Children and Their Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ailwood, Jo

    2004-01-01

    Genealogies, or histories of the present, create critical spaces to remind us of the non-necessity of that which we consider necessary to our lives (Burchell 1993). Further, genealogies of governmentality attempt to create this space with a focus on how conduct is conducted. In this paper I suggest that genealogies of governmentality are one way…

  2. "Languaging the Worker: Globalized Governmentalities in/of Language in Peripheral Spaces"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dlaske, Kati; Barakos, Elisabeth; Motobayashi, Kyoko; McLaughlin, Mireille

    2016-01-01

    In the introduction to the special issue "Languaging the worker: globalized governmentalities in/of language in peripheral spaces", we take up the notion of governmentality as a means to interrogate the complex relationship between language, labor, power, and subjectivity in peripheral multilingual spaces. Our aim here is to argue for…

  3. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  4. Salinification and warming of the South Atlantic due to the Indonesian Throughflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bars, D.; Dijkstra, H. A.; de Ruijter, W. P. M.

    2012-04-01

    Experiments on the influence of the Indonesian Throughflow on the structure and water properties of the Southern Hemisphere supergyre is presented. In a strongly eddying global ocean model, we compare an upper ocean flow for a closed Indonesian Seaway experiment with that of a control simulation. Most of the volume transport from the Indonesian Throughflow flows through the Mozambique Channel into the Agulhas Current. Import of warm and fresh water from the Pacific leads to increasing temperature of the upper Indian Ocean and decreasing salinity of the Agulhas Current. Agulhas Leakage is strengthened and, even though its salinity decreases, brings extra salt and heat from the Indian into the Atlantic Ocean. This causes a warming and salinification of the South Atlantic. The dynamical relation between Indonesian Throughflow transport and Agulhas leakage is analyzed using a regional idealized model at high resolution. This allows us to derive a non-linear relation between these two quantities and to identify the important physical mechanisms involved.

  5. The use of language to express thermal sensation suggests heat acclimatization by Indonesian people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tochihara, Yutaka; Lee, Joo-Young; Wakabayashi, Hitoshi; Wijayanto, Titis; Bakri, Ilham; Parsons, Ken

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether there is evidence of heat acclimatization in the words used to express thermal sensation. A total of 458 urban Japanese and 601 Indonesians participated in a questionnaire. In addition, in a preliminary survey, 39 native English speakers in the UK participated. Our results showed that (1) for Indonesians, the closest thermal descriptor of a feeling of thermal comfort was `cool' (75%) followed by `slightly cool' (7%), `slightly cold' (5%) and `cold' (5%), while Japanese responses were distributed uniformly among descriptors `cool', `slightly cool', `neither', `slightly warm', and `warm'; (2) the closest thermal descriptors of a feeling of discomfort for Indonesians were less affected by individual thermal susceptibility (vulnerability) than those for Japanese; (3) in the cases where `cool' and `slightly cold' were imagined in the mind, the descriptors were cognized as a thermal comfortable feeling by 97% and 57% of Indonesians, respectively; (4) the most frequently voted choice endorsing hot weather was `higher than 32°C' for Indonesians and `higher than 29°C' for Japanese respondents; for cold weather, `lower than 15°C' for Japanese and `lower than 20°C' for Indonesians. In summary, the descriptor `cool' in Indonesians connotes a thermally comfortable feeling, but the inter-zone between hot and cold weather that was judged in the mind showed a upward shift when compared to that of Japanese. It is suggested that linguistic heat acclimatization exists on a cognitive level for Indonesians and is preserved in the words of thermal descriptors.

  6. Governmental policies drive the LUCC trajectories in the Jianghan Plain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Shao, Qihui; Li, Rendong; Song, Mingjie; Zhou, Yong

    2013-12-01

    The prosperity of farmers is closely tied to governmental policies. The Jianghan Plain is an important region for commodity grains, cotton and edible oil for China. The trajectories of land use and land cover change (LUCC) of the study area from 1995 to 2010 were studied based on the LUCC database of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The LUCC was characterised by a continuous decrease of arable land and continuous increase of waters and construction land. The LUCC was obviously concurrent with the implementation of related national policies. The transition to construction land was ever well controlled by 'Notice regarding the further strengthening of land management and arable land protection' promulgated in 1997. However, it flourished again with the 'Rise of Central China Strategy' taking effect since 2006. The transition of construction land to others reflects an uncommon trend, which must be strengthened with the strict implementation of the overall plan, which imposes a limited acreage quota of construction land to each district. The policies were quite contradictory to the transition of waters. LUCC related to waters is most active, which was driven by both natural forces and national policies. Just after the devastating flood of 1998, the state council of China put forward the Green Policy to govern the major rivers. As to the study area, it is mainly to 'push over dykes to let flood through and return farmland to lakes'. In 2004, the Grain Direct Subsidy Policy was implemented, which, along with the surge in the price of rice, resulted in a strengthening trend of conversion of ponds to paddy fields. PMID:23884914

  7. Risk Factors of Typhoid Infection in the Indonesian Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    Alba, Sandra; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Hatta, Mochammad; Scheelbeek, Pauline F. D.; Dwiyanti, Ressy; Usman, Romi; Sultan, Andi R.; Sabir, Muhammad; Tandirogang, Nataniel; Amir, Masyhudi; Yasir, Yadi; Pastoor, Rob; van Beers, Stella; Smits, Henk L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge of risk factors and their relative importance in different settings is essential to develop effective health education material for the prevention of typhoid. In this study, we examine the effect of household level and individual behavioural risk factors on the risk of typhoid in three Indonesian islands (Sulawesi, Kalimantan and Papua) in the Eastern Indonesian archipelago encompassing rural, peri-urban and urban areas. Methods We enrolled 933 patients above 10 years of age in a health facility-based case-control study between June 2010 and June 2011. Individuals suspected of typhoid were tested using the typhoid IgM lateral flow assay for the serodiagnosis of typhoid fever followed by blood culture testing. Cases and controls were defined post-recruitment: cases were individuals with a culture or serology positive result (n = 449); controls were individuals negative to both serology and culture, with or without a diagnosis other than typhoid (n = 484). Logistic regression was used to examine the effect of household level and individual level behavioural risk factors and we calculated the population attributable fraction (PAF) of removing each risk significant independent behavioural risk factor. Results Washing hands at critical moments of the day and washing hands with soap were strong independent protective factors for typhoid (OR = 0.38 95% CI 0.25 to 0.58 for each unit increase in hand washing frequency score with values between 0 = Never and 3 = Always; OR = 3.16 95% CI = 2.09 to 4.79 comparing washing hands with soap sometimes/never vs. often). These effects were independent of levels of access to water and sanitation. Up to two thirds of cases could be prevented by compliance to these practices (hand washing PAF = 66.8 95% CI 61.4 to 71.5; use of soap PAF = 61.9 95%CI 56.7 to 66.5). Eating food out in food stalls or restaurant was an important risk factor (OR = 6.9 95%CI 4.41 to 10.8 for every unit increase in frequency score

  8. Pacar and Tamu: Indonesian women sex workers' relationships with men.

    PubMed

    Wolffers, I; Triyoga, R S; Basuki, E; Yudhi, D; Deville, W; Hargono, R

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on research on the multiple identities and behavior of female prostitutes in Indonesia as they relate to different players in their lives. It is introduced with a review of the literature, which reveals an underlying research bias that prostitutes are a hazard to society and a lack of attention to how they negotiate various aspects of their daily lives. The next sections review the various degrees to which Indonesian women engage in sex work and the concept of multiple identities. The prostitutes support their moves from one identity to another (mother, lover, daughter, sister, sex worker) with various rituals and codes that govern degrees of emotional involvement. The description of the study methodology notes that sex workers from Jakarta (486), Bandung (342), and Surabaya (658) were studied using a variety of means and that this report draws mainly on qualitative findings. The report then discusses why the women begin sex work, the problems that arise when the women attempt to keep their disparate roles discreet, relationships with casual clients and rituals performed with casual clients to enhance cleanliness and prevent disease, relationships with regular clients, relationships with boyfriends, and relationships of older women with men who consider them their "secret wives." The study concludes that the different roles and expected behaviors of these women must be understood to expose their sexual identities. Furthermore, programs to prevent disease must recognize that women who sell sex have complex identities and various types of relationships with men. PMID:12295114

  9. Allele frequency of CODIS 13 in Indonesian population.

    PubMed

    Untoro, Evi; Atmadja, Djaja Surya; Pu, Chang-En; Wu, Fang-Chi

    2009-04-01

    Since the first application of DNA technology in 1985 in forensic cases, and the acceptance of this technology in 1988 at court, the DNA typing is widely used in personal identification, parentage cases and tracing the source of biological samples found in the crime scene. The FBI on 1990 had recommended the forensic labs to used 13 loci of Short Tandem Repeats (STR), known as CODIS 13, as the loci of choice for forensic use. The research on the population DNA database on these loci is extremely important for calculating the Paternity Index as well as Matching Probability for forensic application of DNA technology. As many as 402 unrelated persons, consisted of 322 from western part of Indonesia and 80 from eastern part of Indonesia, were chosen as the respondents of this research, after signing the informed consent. The peripheral blood sample was taken using sterile lancets and dropped onto FTA classic cards. The DNA was extracted by FTA purification solution (3x) and TE(-1) (2x), and amplified by PCR mix, either Cofiler or Profiler Plus (Perkin Elmers), followed by sequencing using ABI Prism type 3100 Avant Genetic Analyzer. The analysis showed that the alleles frequencies of Indonesian is specific, different with the other Asian populations with some specific alleles and microvariant were found. PMID:19261522

  10. Reconstructed Indonesian Warm Pool SSTs from Tree Rings and Corals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arrigo, R.; Wilson, R.

    2006-12-01

    The West Pacific warm pool is the heat engine for the globe's climate system. Its vast moisture and heat exchange profoundly impact conditions in the tropics and higher latitudes. Here, September-November SST variability is reconstructed for the warm pool region (15^{circ}S-5^{circ}N, 110-160^{circ}E) surrounding Indonesia using annually-resolved teak-ring-width and coral 18O records. The reconstruction dates from AD 1782-1992 and accounts for 52 percent of the SST variance over the most replicated period. Significant correlations are found with ENSO and monsoon indices at interannual to decadal frequency bands. Negative reconstructed SST anomalies coincide with major volcanic eruptions, while other noteworthy extremes are at times synchronous with Indian and Indonesian monsoon drought, particularly during major warm ENSO episodes. While the reconstruction adds to the sparse network of proxy reconstructions available for the tropical Indo-Pacific, additional proxies are needed to clarify how warm pool dynamics have interacted with global climate in past centuries to millennia.

  11. AIDS: a nightmare ingredient in the Indonesian development broth.

    PubMed

    Green, C

    2000-06-01

    In Indonesia, evidence indicates that HIV infections have decreased during the 1990s. Estimates by the WHO put sexually transmitted HIV infections at 25,000 among the more than 200 million population of the country. However, reports from other countries suggest that injecting drug users (IDUs) are potentially becoming a threat to the success of AIDS-preventive programs. This is because of the huge explosion of drug use among young people, which in turn has resulted in a rise in HIV infections with communal needle use in recent years. Available data suggest that Indonesia could experience an overall 50% prevalence of HIV among the over 1 million IDUs within 1 or 2 years. Although it is the responsibility of the Indonesian government to respond to this health crisis, in its bankrupt state it can only be hoped that it will be able to put into place a framework that will allow the community, nongovernmental organizations, and donors to work together with minimum restrictions. PMID:12179452

  12. Modeling Regional Air Quality Impacts from Indonesian Biomass Burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumbam, L.; Raffuse, S. M.; Wiedinmyer, C.; Larkin, N.

    2012-12-01

    Smoke from thousands of forest-clearing burns in Indonesia cause widespread air quality impacts in cities across southeastern Asia. These fires, which can produce significant smoke due to peat burning, are readily detected by polar orbiting satellites. Widespread smoke can be seen in satellite imagery, and high concentrations of particulate matter are detected by ground based sensors. Here we present results of a pilot modeling study focusing on the September 2011 Indonesian smoke episode. In the study, fire location information was collected from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The BlueSky modeling framework, which links information about fire locations with smoke emissions and meteorological models, was used to pass the fire location information from MODIS through the Fire INventories from NCAR (FINN) methodology to estimate emissions of aerosol and gaseous pollutants from the fires. These emissions were further directed by BlueSky through the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, which predicted the dispersion and transport of PM2.5 from the fires. The resulting regional PM2.5 concentration maps from BlueSky were compared with satellite imagery and urban ground stations, where available. This work demonstrates the extension of a system developed for producing daily smoke predictions in the United States outside of North America for the first time. We discuss the implications of regional smoke impacts and possibilities for predictive smoke modeling to protect public health in southeastern Asia.

  13. Contribution of peat fires to the 2015 Indonesian fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Johannes W.; Heil, Angelika; Wooster, Martin J.; van der Werf, Guido R.

    2016-04-01

    Indonesia experienced widespread fires and severe air quality degradation due to smoke during September and October 2015. The fires are thought to have originated from the combination of El-Niño-induced drought and human activities. Fires ignited for land clearing escaped into drained peatlands and burned until the onset of the monsoonal rain. In addition to the health impact, these fires are thought to have emitted large amounts of greenhouse gases, e.g. more than Japan over the entire year. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) has detected and quantified the fires with the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) and the smoke dispersion with the Chemistry-Integrated Forecasting System (C-IFS) in near real time. GFAS and C-IFS are constrained by satellite-based observations of fire and smoke constituents, respectively. The distinction between peat and above-ground fires is a crucial and difficult step in fire emission estimation as it introduces errors of up to one order of magnitude. Here, we quantify the contribution of peat fires to the total emission flux of the 2015 Indonesian fires by (1) using an improved peat map in GFAS and (2) analysing the observed diurnal cycle of the fire activity as represented in a new development for GFAS. Furthermore, we link the fires occurrence to economic activity by analysing the coincidence with concessions for palm oil plantations and other industrial forest uses.

  14. The Indonesian Throughflow response to Indo-Pacific climate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprintall, Janet; Révelard, Adèle

    2014-02-01

    The Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) is the only open pathway for interocean exchange between the Pacific and Indian Ocean basins at tropical latitudes. A proxy time series of ITF transport variability is developed using remotely sensed altimeter data. The focus is on the three outflow passages of Lombok, Ombai, and Timor that collectively transport the entire ITF into the Indian Ocean, and where direct velocity measurements are available to help ground-truth the transport algorithm. The resulting 18 year proxy time series shows strong interannual ITF variability. Significant trends of increased transport are found in the upper layer of Lombok Strait, and over the full depth in Timor Passage that are likely related to enhanced Pacific trade winds since the early 1990s. The partitioning of the total ITF transport through each of the major outflow passage varies according to the phase of the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) or El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In general, Pacific ENSO variability is strongest in Timor Passage, most likely through the influence of planetary waves transmitted from the Pacific along the Northwest Australian shelf pathway. Somewhat surprisingly, concurrent El Niño and positive IOD episodes consistently show contradictory results from those composites constructed for purely El Niño episodes. This is particularly evident in Lombok and Ombai Straits, but also at depth in Timor Passage. This suggests that Indian Ocean dynamics likely win out over Pacific Ocean dynamics in gating the transport through the outflow passages during concurrent ENSO and IOD events.

  15. 40 CFR 35.917-6 - Acceptance by implementing governmental units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-6 Acceptance by implementing governmental units. A facilities plan submitted...

  16. 40 CFR 35.917-6 - Acceptance by implementing governmental units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-6 Acceptance by implementing governmental units. A facilities plan submitted...

  17. 40 CFR 35.917-6 - Acceptance by implementing governmental units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-6 Acceptance by implementing governmental units. A facilities plan submitted...

  18. 40 CFR 35.917-6 - Acceptance by implementing governmental units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-6 Acceptance by implementing governmental units. A facilities plan submitted...

  19. Governmental policies of the County of Lassen toward the utilization of geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect

    Totten, M.A.

    1981-05-01

    The interim geothermal policy adopted is presented. The environmental impacts of the Honey Lake hybrid geothermal power plant are discussed. A partial listing of the governmental organizations which must have input into geothermal decisions is given.

  20. Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Indonesian Subjects with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Who Were Not Receiving Lipid-Lowering Agents.

    PubMed

    Kaligis, Rinambaan W M; Adiarto, Suko; Nugroho, Johanes; Pradnyana, Bagus Ari; Lefi, Achmad; Rifqi, Sodiqur

    2016-09-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) is frequently utilized for detection of subclinical atherosclerosis. This study aims to investigate the association between the CIMT values and demographic characteristics, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, lipid biochemistry profiles, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels among the Indonesian population. Subjects who had two or more CVD risk factors but were not receiving lipid-lowering therapy were recruited from six hospitals of Indonesia. Measurements of CIMT are obtained by ultrasonography of 12 sites within the common carotid artery. CVD risk factors, lipid and glucose profiles, and hs-CRP values were analyzed with respect to distribution of CIMT. The mean-max CIMT was 0.805 ± 0.190 mm (minimum, 0.268 mm; maximum, 1.652 mm) and the mean-mean CIMT was 0.614 ± 0.190 mm (minimum, 0.127 mm; maximum, 1.388 mm). Multivariate analyses confirmed an independent association between increasing CIMT and increasing age (regression coefficient = 0.004; p = 0.004). Our data show normative mean-mean CIMT data for Indonesian subjects with two or more CVD risk factors who are not receiving lipid-lowering therapy, which may guide CVD risk stratification of asymptomatic individuals in Indonesia. PMID:27574385

  1. Potential Problematic Rhetorical Style Transfer from First Language to Foreign Language: A Case of Indonesian Authors Writing Research Article Introductions in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arsyad, Safnil; Arono

    2016-01-01

    Rhetorical style transfer from first language to a foreign language can be serious problems in academic writing, such as Research Articles (RAs). This study is aimed at analyzing the rhetorical style of Indonesian RA introductions in multiple disciplines written by Indonesian authors and published in Indonesian research journals especially on the…

  2. The Implementation of Contextual Approach in Solving Problems Understanding Syntax: "Sentence" Indonesian at Universities in Surakarta, Indonesia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahyuni, Tutik; Suwandi, Sarwiji; Slamet, St. Y.; Andayani

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to: (1) assess the charge textbooks Syntax: "Sentence" bahasa Indonesia is based on a needs analysis; (2) analyzing the breakdown of understanding Syntax: "Sentence" Indonesian with contextual approach; (3) test the effectiveness of understanding Syntax: "Sentence" Indonesian with kontekstua approach.…

  3. Beyond the Classroom: Religious Stressors and Adjustment among Indonesian Muslim Graduate Students in an American Graduate School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukminin, Amirul; Yanto, Fridi; Yanto, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    This paper was to report some of findings from a larger phenomenological study on the lived experience of Indonesian graduate students in a US higher education. Particularly, this paper was to discuss the Indonesian Muslim graduate students' religious life experiences attending an American graduate school. The primary data sources were a…

  4. An Analysis of Indonesian and Japanese Students' Understandings of Macroscopic and Submicroscopic Levels of Representing Matter and Its Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahayu, Sri; Kita, Masakazu

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated Indonesian and Japanese students' understandings of macroscopic and submicroscopic levels of representing matter and its changes and the difficulties they have with these concepts. A multiple-choice questionnaire was constructed and delivered to 447 Indonesian and 446 Japanese public senior high school students. The data…

  5. Radiocesium monitoring in Indonesian waters of the Indian Ocean after the Fukushima nuclear accident.

    PubMed

    Suseno, Heny; Wahono, Ikhsan Budi; Muslim

    2015-08-15

    As data on anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations (i.e., (134)Cs and (137)Cs) in Indonesian marine environments including the Indian Ocean are scarce, offshore monitoring has been performed in the West Sumatra and South Java Seas. The activity concentration of (137)Cs ranges from below minimum detectable activity (MDA) to 0.13Bqm(-3) in the surface seawater of the South Java Sea and from lower than MDA to 0.28Bqm(-3) in the surface seawater of the West Sumatra Sea. The concentrations of (137)Cs in the surface seawater of the West Sumatra and South Java Seas are lower than the estimation of (137)Cs concentration in the subsurface waters owing to the input of the North Pacific Ocean via the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF). The concentrations of (134)Cs in the sampling locations were lower than MDA. These results have indicated that these Indonesian marine waters have not yet been influenced by the Fukushima radioactive release. PMID:26095987

  6. Variability of Indonesian throughflow within Makassar Strait, 2004-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, R. Dwi; Ffield, Amy; Gordon, Arnold L.; Adi, T. Rameyo

    2012-09-01

    In contrast to earlier measurements, January 2004 through May 2009 Makassar Strait velocities within the main Pacific inflow pathway of the Indonesian throughflow (ITF) are larger with a clear signal of the Asian-Australian monsoon overriding the relatively weak 2006/2007 El Niño and 2007/2008 La Niña. The Makassar flow is thermocline intensified with maximum along-channel velocity of -0.8 m/s near 120 m during the southeast monsoon, July to September, decreasing to -0.6 m/s from October to December, during the transition to the northwest monsoon. The temperature variability is highly correlated to ENSO, and the salinity variability reveals low-salinity surface water inputs to the ITF, possibly from the Java and Sulu seas. Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) analysis of the velocity profile reveals that the first mode (45%) is dominated by the intrusions of Kelvin waves from the south, the second mode (30%) reflects ENSO modulation, and the third mode (17%) is associated with regional monsoon winds. The strength of the northward intrusions of Kelvin waves plays an important role in the total transport. The 2004-2009 average seasonal transport varied from -15.5 Sv (Sv = 106 m3/s) during the northwest monsoon (January to March) to -9.6 Sv during the monsoon transition (October to December). The annual mean transport is southward at 13.3 ± 3.6 Sv, with small year-to-year range from 12.5 to 14.0 Sv, substantially higher than measurements from 1997 when El Niño suppressed the transport (9.2 Sv).

  7. Chromosome abnormalities in Indonesian patients with short stature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Short stature is associated with several disorders including wide variations of chromosomal disorders and single gene disorders. The objective of this report is to present the cytogenetic findings in Indonesian patients with short stature. Methods G-banding and interphase/metaphase FISH were performed on short stature patients with and without other clinical features who were referred by clinicians all over Indonesia to our laboratory during the year 2003–2009. Results The results of chromosomal analysis of ninety seven patients (mean age: 10.7 years old) were collected. The group of patients with other clinical features showed sex chromosome abnormalities in 45% (18/40) and autosomal abnormalities in 10% (4/40), whereas those with short stature only, 42.1% (24/57) had sex chromosome abnormalities and 1.75% (1/57) had autosomal abnormalities. The autosomal chromosomal abnormalities involved mostly subtelomeric regions. Results discrepancies between karyotype and FISH were found in 10 patients, including detection of low-level monosomy X mosaicism in 6 patients with normal karyotype, and detection of mosaic aneuploidy chromosome 18 in 1 patient with 45,XX,rob(13;14)(q10;q10). Statistical analysis showed no significant association between the groups and the type of chromosomal abnormalities. Conclusion Chromosome abnormalities account for about 50% of the short stature patients. Wide variations of both sex and autosomal chromosomes abnormalities were detected in the study. Since three out of five patients had autosomal structural abnormalities involving the subtelomeric regions, thus in the future, subtelomeric FISH or even a more sensitive method such as genomic/SNP microarray is needed to confirm deletions of subtelomeric regions of chromosome 9, 11 and 18. Low-level mosaicism in normal karyotype patients indicates interphase FISH need to be routinely carried out in short stature patients as an adjunct to karyotyping. PMID:22863325

  8. Indonesian throughflow proxy from satellite altimeters and gravimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, R. Dwi; Song, Y. Tony

    2015-04-01

    The Indonesian throughflow (ITF) from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean plays an important role in global ocean circulation and climate. Yet, continuous ITF measurement is difficult and expensive. The longest time series of in situ measurements of the ITF to date were taken in the Makassar Strait, the main pathway of the ITF. Here we have demonstrated a plausible approach to derive the ITF transport proxy using satellite altimetry sea surface height (SSH), gravimetry ocean bottom pressure (OBP) data, in situ measurements from the Makassar Strait from 1996 to 1998 and 2004 to 2011, and a theoretical formulation. We first identified the optimal locations of the correlation between the observed ITF transport through the Makassar Strait and the pressure gradients, represented by the SSH and OBP differences between the Pacific and Indian Oceans at a 1° × 1° horizontal resolution. The optimal locations were found centered at 162°E and 11°N in the Pacific Ocean and 80°E and 0° in the Indian Ocean, then were used in the theoretical formulation to estimate the throughflow. The proxy time series follow the observation time series quite well, with the 1993-2011 mean proxy transport of 11.6 ± 3.2 Sv southward, varying from 5.6 Sv during the strong 1997 El Niño to 16.9 Sv during the 2007 La Nina period, which are consistent with previous estimates. The observed Makassar mean transport is 13.0 ± 3.8 Sv southward over 2004-2011, while the SSH proxy (for the same period) gives an ITF mean transport of 13.9 ± 4.1 Sv and the SSH + OBP proxy (for 2004-2010) is 15.8 ± 3.2 Sv.

  9. The Indonesian Family Planning Programme: a success story for women?

    PubMed

    Smyth, I

    1992-01-01

    Many family planning specialists worldwide are praising the success of the family program of Indonesia because fertility rates have fallen considerably in many parts of the country. Yet, others question the reliability of the data collected and distributed by the National Family Co-ordinating Board (BKKBN), whether the publicized fertility rates are real, and whether the program or socioeconomic changes are responsible for the decline. Further, no one has assessed whether the program is sensitive to women's needs and desires. Overall, the program does not meet women's needs or consider women's health. Specifically, it deems population control more important than family planning, uses provider-dependent, long-acting hormonal contraceptives, and delivers poor quality service. The BKKBN is a prestigious group and accountable to Indonesia's president because its primary objective is to reduce population growth so socioeconomic development can occur. Even though the program originally stressed maternal and child health as a means for women to accept family planning methods, it no longer promotes maternal and child health as evidenced by the continuously high maternal mortality rates (lowest rate, 450/100,000 lives births). In fact, the maternal mortality rate for 15-19 year old women (1100) is so very high that it is second only to Ethiopia. The Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association agrees that the family planning program of Indonesia does not provide means for women to autonomously control their fertility and has taken as assembly line approach. Moreover, the administrative officials coerce subordinates to meet the ambitious targets who then coerce eligible couples and individuals to accept contraceptives. This violates their basic rights. The program has realized the significant role women play in demographic dynamics, but not as leader of socioeconomic development but as tools to rapidly and effectively implement population policies. PMID:12285429

  10. Multi-scale interactions during the Indonesian monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moron, Vincent; Robertson, Andrew W.; Qian, Jian-Hua

    2010-05-01

    The multi-scale interactions between El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indonesian monsoonal rainfall are analyzed using various datasets including daily rain gauges, high resolution satellites estimates of rainfall, atmospheric data taken from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/NCAR reanalysis and regional climate model version 3 (RegCM3) simulations with an horizontal resolution of 25 km from 1979 to 2006. We analyze interactions between large-scale ENSO-induced seasonal anomalies, synoptic scale of weather regimes defined through a k-means clustering of daily 850 hPa NCEP/NCAR winds and local scale and diurnal cycle of rainfall. The impact of ENSO is found to be largely spatially-uniform across the most of Indonesia during the spring-to-summer transition when the monsoon advances southeastward with a large delay (small advance) observed during warm (cold) ENSO events. The ENSO signal becomes more fragmented during the rainy season, from December. In particular, the large-scale seasonal easterly anomaly observed in low tropospheric levels (i.e. weakening of the austral summer monsoon) across Indonesia during warm ENSO events is found to be related to an increased frequency of a weather regime characterized by "quiescent" winds. RegCM3 outputs suggest that these weak winds tend to enhance the diurnal cycle and this leads to locally increased rainfall over mountains and the southern/western faces of the islands, such as Java. The ENSO signal is thus temporally and spatially coherent over the seas (i.e. anomalously dry during warm ENSO events), but more complex over the islands, with the spatially-uniform signal across Indonesia restricted to onset phase of the monsoon.

  11. Satellite Altimeters and Gravimeters as Proxy of the Indonesian Throughflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susanto, R. D.; Song, Y. T.

    2014-12-01

    The Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), the only pathway for interocean exchange between the Pacific to the Indian Ocean, plays an important role in global ocean circulation and climate. Yet, continuous ITF measurement is difficult and expensive. We demonstrate a plausible approach to derive the ITF transport proxy using satellite altimetry sea surface height (SSH), gravimetry ocean bottom pressure (OBP) data, in situ measurements from the Makassar Strait from 1996-1998 and 2004-2009, and a theoretical formulation. We first identified the optimal locations in the Pacific and Indian Ocean based on the optimal correlation between the ITF transport through the Makassar Strait and the pressure gradients, represented by the SSH and OBP differences between the Pacific and Indian Oceans at a 1° x 1° horizontal resolution. These geographical locations (centred at off-equatorial in the western Pacific Ocean and centred at along the equator in the eastern Indian Ocean) that control the strength and variability of the ITF transport in the Makassar Strait differ from early studies. The proxy time series follow the observation time series quite well, resolving the intraseasonal, monsoonal, and interannual signals with the 1993-2011 annual mean proxy transport of 11.6 ± 3.2 Sv. Our formulation provides a continuous approach to derive the ITF proxy as long as the satellite data are available. Such a continuous record would be difficult to achieve by in situ measurements alone due to logistical and financial challenges. Ideally, the proxy can be used to complement or fill in the gaps of the observations for a continuous ITF proxy for better understanding the ocean climate and validating ocean circulation models.

  12. Polymorphism of HF (beta 1H-globulin) in three Asian populations (Bangladeshis, Tibetans and Indonesians).

    PubMed

    Kido, Akira; Susukida, Rie; Oya, Masakazu; Fujitani, Noboru; Kimura, Hiroshi; Hara, Masaaki

    2003-03-01

    The polymorphism of HF (beta 1H-globulin) was investigated in three Asian populations (Bangladeshis, Tibetans and Indonesians) by means of isoelectric focusing and immunoblotting. Phenotypes associated with three common alleles (HF*A, HF*B and HF*Q0) and a rare allele HF*A1 were identified. The observed numbers of phenotypes were in accordance with the numbers expected under the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. HF*A1 seems to be a unique allele of the East-Asian Mongoloids including Tibetans and Indonesians. PMID:12712773

  13. Deployment of Indonesian migrants in the Middle East: present situation and prospects.

    PubMed

    Cremer, G

    1988-12-01

    "This paper examines the Indonesian overseas employment program. It is limited to overseas deployment through the official channels, i.e. organised by licensed labour suppliers and approved by government authorities. The main destination of this official labour migration is the Middle East. Indonesian officials have indicated that the government aims to increase overseas employment and to shift deployment from houseworkers to better skilled workers. It is argued in the paper that, in view of a shrinking labour market for migrants, even limited realisation of these hopes would depend upon some distinct changes in the overseas employment program." PMID:12281679

  14. Governmental studies on medical malpractice: the implications of rising premiums for healthcare and the allocation of health resources.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, A C

    2005-06-01

    The United States may or may not be facing a "malpractice crisis" which can result in a loss of quality of medical care in certain specialties by virtue of non-performance or the exiting of certain physicians from certain high-risk specialties due to increases in premiums. Various studies have been performed by various governmental agencies on a federal level in the United States. The Department of Legal Medicine, part of the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, began collecting veteran's affairs medical malpractice claims data and extracting information from the analysis from medical records and associated documents. During the 1993 fiscal year, 801 medical malpractice claims were filed against the Department of Veteran's Affairs. The Department of Veteran's Affairs had approximately 125,000 hospital discharges and 26 million outpatient visits during the same time period. The rate of claims per hospital discharge was less than 1/ 1000 hospital patient discharges (.864/1000). Subsequent to that report, several other reports have been issued including a report on medical malpractice insurance generated by the General Accounting Office in 2003, some ten years later. More recently, a report of medical malpractice having implications on rising premiums on and access to health care generated by the General Accounting Office was released in August of 2003. This paper will demonstrate areas of concern with regard to the area of medical malpractice as well as incidence of medical malpractice and claims upon the insurance industry, medical specialties and the impact upon the community generally in the United States. PMID:16082866

  15. Proxy Records of the Indonesian Low and the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) from Stable Isotope Measurements of Indonesian Reef Corals

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Earth`s largest atmospheric convective center is the Indonesian Low. It generates the Australasian monsoon, drives the zonal tropospheric Walker Circulation, and is implicated in the genesis of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The long-term variability of the Indonesian Low is poorly characterized, yet such information is crucial for evaluating whether changes in the strength and frequency of ENSO events are a possible manifestation of global warming. Stable oxygen isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 18}O) in shallow-water reef coral skeletons track topical convective activity over hundreds of years because the input of isotopically-depleted rainwater dilutes seawater {delta}{sup 18}O. Corals also impose a temperature-dependent fractionation on {delta}{sup 18}O, but where annual rainfall is high and sea surface temperature (SST) variability is low the freshwater flux effect dominates.

  16. PREVALENCE OF METHICILLIN RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS FROM NOSE AND THROAT OF PATIENTS ON ADMISSION TO MEDICAL WARDS OF DR SOETOMO HOSPITAL, SURABAYA, INDONESIA.

    PubMed

    Kuntaman, K; Hadi, Usman; Setiawan, Firman; Koendori, Eko Budi; Rusli, Musofa; Santosaningsih, Dewi; Severin, Juliette; Verbrugh, Henri A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in Indonesian hospitals are still scarce. These data are required for health management of infectious diseases in order to control hospital MRSA. The carriage rate of MRSA in nose and throat of patients on admission to Dr Soetomo Hospital Surabaya, Indonesia was 8.1% of 643 patients, 5.4% from throat, 3.9% from nose and 1.2% from both sites. Prevalence of MRSA among patients admitted to surgical and non-surgical ward was not different (8.2% and 8.0%, respectively). Although MRSA prevalence in Indonesian hospitals is low compared to many other countries worldwide, appropriate health strategies will be needed to be implemented if this infection is to be controlled. PMID:27086426

  17. Communicating new ideas to traditional villagers (an Indonesian case).

    PubMed

    Muis, A

    1984-01-01

    Recent cases derived from a series of communication research projects conducted in remote villages on the island of Sulawesi, Indonesia, are presented. These cases, which indicate the tremendously complex problem of communicating new ideas to traditional villages, also reflect the equally complex problem of social marketing. Indonesian, villagers remain very traditional, but their communication environment has been undergoing marked changes over the past decade or so. Overwhelming media exposure has pushed these people towards a modern environment filled with new knowledge and experiences. In view of the importance of changing attitudes and behavior of traditional villagers -- to realize modernization for the rural society -- the government of Indonesia has been using a host of communication means and channels. These include all the viable traditional or indigenous communication systems, but mainly face-to-face communication. Traditional dances, story-telling, and music are no longer interesting to the rural people themselves, and, apparently, no real developmental message can be transmitted by traditional "mass media." Among the 50 respondents randomly selected from the isolated village of Gelang (Case I), only 17% claimed to have listened to news in addition to music and songs. 67% of the respondents explained that information carrying novel ideas or methods usually attract them, but they are always reluctant to accept the new ideas for real application. Case II is about the effect of movie exposure on traditional villagers. As many as 73% of 50 respondents explained that the knowledge of the peasant-fisherman has increased considerably with regard to the urban way of life, as a result of movie attendance. The informants indicated that many villagers were disgusted by feature films or theatrical ones and that 62% of the villagers had yet to go to a movie. Case III involved the communication of new methods of medication to rural societies, including traditional

  18. Indonesian Adolescents' Spiritual and Religious Experiences and Their Longitudinal Relations with Socioemotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallquist, Julie; Eisenberg, Nancy; French, Doran C.; Purwono, Urip; Suryanti, Telie A.

    2010-01-01

    The spirituality and religiosity of Indonesian Muslim adolescents were examined longitudinally as were the relations of spirituality and religiosity with (mal)adjustment. At Time 1 (T1), 959 seventh-grade Muslim adolescents were screened for selection of a sample; at Time 2 (T2), 183 eighth-grade adolescents participated; and at Time 3 (T3), 300…

  19. Argument-Counterargument Structure in Indonesian EFL Learners' English Argumentative Essays: A Dialogic Concept of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusfandi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the potential use of the argument-counterargument structure in English L2 essays written by Indonesian EFL learners. It examines whether L2 proficiency affects the use of opposing views in their essays, and measures whether there is a correlation between the use of the rhetorical structure and the participants' overall…

  20. Instructional Leadership in Indonesian School Reform: Overcoming the Problems to Move Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sofo, Francesco; Fitzgerald, Robert; Jawas, Umiati

    2012-01-01

    The paper reviews the research on instructional leadership and, through identifying problems emerging in Indonesian school reform, suggests some sustainable solutions. There are some discrepancies in the processes of Indonesia's school reform, and the objectives of the national education reform do not seem to have been reflected in the actual…

  1. Political Education through the Mass Media? A Survey Of Indonesian University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamad, Ibnu; Ichtiat, Helmi Qodrat; Zulham

    2001-01-01

    Surveys Indonesian university students to determine how effective the mass media was as an agent of political education in influencing the students' political activities. Notes that the relationship between media consumption and political participation was low. Suggests that several decades of government suppression of so-called "practical…

  2. Indonesian EFL Teachers' Familiarity with and Opinion on the Internet-Based Teaching of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahyono, Bambang Yudi; Mutiaraningrum, Ira

    2016-01-01

    The use of the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) especially the Internet has been a common practice in education. However, research studies show that the Internet has not been frequently used in the teaching of English as a foreign language (EFL) writing, especially in the Indonesian context. This study aimed to find out whether or…

  3. Emergent Modelling: From Traditional Indonesian Games to a Standard Unit of Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wijaya, Ariyadi; Doorman, L. Michiel; Keijze, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the way in which traditional Indonesian games can support the learning of linear measurement. Previous research has revealed that young children tend to perform measurement as an instrumental procedure. This tendency may be due to the way in which linear measurement has been taught as an isolated concept, which is…

  4. Loneliness of Indonesian and Chinese Adolescents as Predicted by Relationships with Friends and Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Junsheng; Li, Dan; Purwono, Urip; Chen, Xinyin; French, Doran C.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the extent to which loneliness of Indonesian and Chinese adolescents was predicted by their intimacy and conflict with friends and parents. The total sample included 1,833 thirteen- and fifteen-year-old adolescents recruited from urban schools. Boys reported more loneliness than girls, and Chinese boys reported more loneliness…

  5. The Indonesian Digital Library Network Is Born To Struggle with the Digital Divide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahmi, Ismail

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Indonesian Digital Library Network that is designed to develop Indonesia as a knowledge-based society. Highlights include the digital divide; problems in a developing country, including Internet accessibility, bandwidth capacity, and network delays; gathering information about national assets; information infrastructure; data…

  6. A Genre-Based Analysis on the Introductions of Research Articles Written by Indonesian Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arsyad, Safnil

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to search for the occurrence of communicative and subcommunicative units and to identify the linguistic features commonly used by the authors to realize the communicative and subcommunicative units. Three groups of English RAs by Indonesian speakers were chosen for this study: 10 RAs from engineering science, ten…

  7. Assessing the Number Knowledge of Children in the First and Second Grade of an Indonesian School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumiati, Rumi; Wright, Robert

    2010-01-01

    An assessment approach from Mathematics Recovery was used to document the number knowledge of 20 first-graders and 20 second-graders in an Indonesian school. Sixteen first-graders were at the advanced-counting-by-ones stage and fourteen second-graders were facile. As well, fifteen first-graders and eleven second-graders were at the level of an…

  8. Purposes of Transnational Higher Education Programs: Lessons from Two Indonesian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutrisno, Agustian; Pillay, Hitendra

    2013-01-01

    While intended to facilitate knowledge transfer from international universities and develop Indonesian universities' capacity, transnational higher education programs (TEPs) in Indonesia have been criticised for operating merely as an international trade in education -- implying discrepancy between the rhetoric and reality surrounding the key…

  9. Characterization of mangrove forest types based on ALOS-PALSAR in overall Indonesian archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmawan, S.; Takeuchi, W.; Vetrita, Y.; Winarso, G.; Wikantika, K.; Sari, D. K.

    2014-06-01

    Indonesia has largest mangrove forest in the world, total area around 3.5 million ha or 17% - 23% from mangrove forest in the world. Mangrove forest provides products and services, such as carbon balance of the coastal zone. Mapping and monitoring biomass of mangrove is very important but field survey of mangrove biomass and productivity in overall Indonesia is very difficult. Global-scale mosaics with HH and HV backscatter of Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) which is 50-m spatial resolution has been generated. This image available for identification and monitoring mangrove forest. The Objective of this research to investigate characterization of mangrove forest types based on ALOS-PALSAR in overall Indonesian archipelago. Methodology consists of collecting ALOS-PALSAR image for overall Indonesian archipelago, preprocessing and mosaicking, collecting region of interest of mangrove forest, plotting, ground survey, characterization and classification. The result of this research has showed characterization of mangrove forest types based on ALOS-PALSAR. Indonesian mangrove forest types has HH value around -10 dB until -7 dB and HV value around -17 dB until -13 dB. Higher of HH and HV backscatters value indicated higher of level biomass. Based on scatter plot of HH and HV, Indonesian mangrove forest can be classified in three level biomass. Generally level biomass of mangrove forest in Indonesia archipelago is moderate.

  10. Language as "Soft Power" in Bilateral Relations: The Case of Indonesian Language in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Since Joseph Nye introduced the concept of "Soft power" in his 1991 book, "Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power", analysts have discussed states' efforts to exercise their influence by attracting and co-opting rather than coercing or using force. This paper will examine enrolments trends in Indonesian language…

  11. Professional Identity, Curriculum and Teaching "Intercultural Communication": An Indonesian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gandana, Isti; Parr, Graham

    2013-01-01

    Influenced by contemporary research into the interconnectedness of language and culture, many Indonesian teacher education courses have introduced "new" subjects such as "Intercultural Communication" and "Cross-Cultural Understanding", hoping to unsettle their students' traditional assumptions that language is…

  12. Individual Variation in L2 Study-Abroad Outcomes: A Case Study from Indonesian Pragmatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hassall, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    This is a study of two Australian learners of Indonesian during a short stay abroad. It examines their contrasting success in acquiring L2 address terms, in tandem with their contrasting experiences of the L2 culture setting. It thereby helps explain the persistent finding of great individual variation in L2 gains--and in particular pragmatic…

  13. FXIIIA subtypes in Indonesians, Bangladeshis, Tibetans, South African blacks and South African whites.

    PubMed

    Kido, A; Susukida, R; Oya, M; Fujitani, N; Kimura, H; Hara, M

    2001-03-01

    The polymorphism of FXIIIA was investigated in 105 Indonesians, 141 Bangladeshis, 186 Tibetans, 101 South African Blacks and 100 South African Whites using isoelectric focusing followed by immunoblotting. These population data conformed to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. A circum-pan-Pacific cline in the FXIII*1A (or FXIII*1B) allele frequency appeared to exist among the Mongoloids. PMID:11360808

  14. Classroom Assessment Preference of Indonesian Junior High School Teachers in English as Foreign Language Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saefurrohman

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted using a mix method design with 24 Indonesian junior high school English teachers as respondents who completed the questionnaire on classroom assessment practices. Six respondents participated in an interview and observation to further clarify their practices on classroom assessment. The study found that an Indonesian…

  15. Bali: So Many Faces--Short Stories and Other Literary Excerpts in Indonesian.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cork, Vern, Comp.

    This collection of 25 short stories (in Indonesian) by Balinese writers aims to give Bali's writers a wider public. Some of the stories in the collection are distinctly and uniquely Balinese, while others are more universal in their approach and are self-contained. But according to the collection's foreword, in all of the stories, experiences of…

  16. Effects of Prereading Strategies on EFL Reading by Indonesian College Students Having Different Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diptoadi, Veronica L.

    An Indonesian study on prereading strategies for reading in English as a Foreign Language (EFL) is reported. Three areas were examined: (1) differences in the reading achievement of groups receiving AO ("advance organizer" or meaningful verbal learning, based on the learning theory of David Ausubel) techniques or "Daftar Kata-Kata Pokok" (DKP, or…

  17. Knowledge Transfer through a Transnational Program Partnership between Indonesian and Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutrisno, Agustian; Pillay, Hitendra

    2015-01-01

    As transnational programs are often advocated as a knowledge transfer opportunity between the partner universities, this case study investigated the knowledge transfer (KT) processes between Indonesian and Australian universities through an undergraduate transnational program partnership (TPP). An inter-organisational KT theoretical framework from…

  18. Helping Students Identify Base Words in Indonesian--Linking Learning Objects in an ICLL Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colman, Ingrid; Davison, Janine

    2008-01-01

    For students of Indonesian, learning to identify base words is very important, but can often be quite tricky. This article describes how one of the authors used interactive digital content from The Le@rning Federation (TLF) together with an extensive range of offline activities within an intercultural language learning (ICLL) framework. It helps…

  19. Indonesian Students' Perceptions of Choice Criteria in the Selection of a Tertiary Institution: Strategic Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Mathew; Joseph, Beatriz

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the criteria that Indonesian students consider when choosing a college or university. The most important factors identified were "course and career information" and "physical aspects and facilities." Other important factors were cost of education, degree (content and structure), and value of education. Results are applied to…

  20. The Indonesian's Road Transportations as the Contexts to Support Primary School Students Learning Number Operation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kairuddin; Darmawijoyo

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights the Indonesian's road transportation contexts, namely, angkot, that used in learning and teaching of addition and subtraction in first grade and second grade MIN-2 Palembang. PMRI approach that adopt from RME [Realistic Mathematics Education] was used in this design research. From teaching experiment was founded that the…

  1. Physical processes contributing to the water mass transformation of the Indonesian Throughflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch-Larrouy, Ariane; Madec, Gurvan; Iudicone, Daniele; Atmadipoera, Agus; Molcard, Robert

    2008-11-01

    The properties of the waters that move from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean via passages in the Indonesian archipelago are observed to vary with along-flow-path distance. We study an ocean model of the Indonesian Seas with reference to the observed water property distributions and diagnose the mechanisms and magnitude of the water mass transformations using a thermodynamical methodology. This model includes a key parameterization of mixing due to baroclinic tidal dissipation and simulates realistic water property distributions in all of the seas within the archipelago. A combination of air-sea forcing and mixing is found to significantly change the character of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF). Around 6 Sv (approximately 1/3 the model net ITF transport) of the flow leaves the Indonesian Seas with reduced density. Mixing transforms both the intermediate depth waters (transforming 4.3 Sv to lighter density) and the surface waters (made denser despite the buoyancy input by air-sea exchange, net transformation = 2 Sv). The intermediate transformation to lighter waters suggests that the Indonesian transformation contributes significantly to the upwelling of cold water in the global conveyor belt. The mixing induced by the wind is not driving the transformation. In contrast, the baroclinic tides have a major role in this transformation. In particular, they are the only source of energy acting on the thermocline and are responsible for creating the homostad thermocline water, a characteristic of the Indonesian outflow water. Furthermore, they cool the sea surface temperature by between 0.6 and 1.5°C, and thus allow the ocean to absorb more heat from the atmosphere. The additional heat imprints its characteristics into the thermocline. The Indonesian Seas cannot only be seen as a region of water mass transformation (in the sense of only transforming water masses in its interior) but also as a region of water mass formation (as it modifies the heat flux and induced more

  2. Consideration of environmental noise effects in transportation planning by governmental entities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    Environmental concerns are reviewed with respect to major transportation systems: the interstate highway system and commercial air transportation. The type of planning that was done for interstate highway systems is described, and the shift in social value emphasis that has become apparent since the interstate system was authorized is considered. Other topics discussed include the constitutional framework for the allocation of governmental power with respect to transportation systems planning, governmental assessment of the aircraft noise problem, and evaluating the social benefit of noise abatement.

  3. Multimorbidity prevalence and pattern in Indonesian adults: an exploratory study using national survey data

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Mohammad Akhtar; Huxley, Rachel R; Al Mamun, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the prevalence and pattern of multimorbidity in the Indonesian adult population. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Community-based survey. The sampling frame was based on households in 13 of the 27 Indonesian provinces, representing about 83% of the Indonesian population. Participants 9438 Indonesian adults aged 40 years and above. Main outcome measures Prevalence and pattern of multimorbidity by age, gender and socioeconomic status. Results The mean number of morbidities in the sample was 1.27 (SE±0.01). The overall age and sex standardised prevalence of multimorbidity was 35.7% (34.8% to 36.7%), with women having significantly higher prevalence of multimorbidity than men (41.5% vs 29.5%; p<0.001). Of those with multimorbidity, 64.6% (62.8% to 66.3%) were aged less than 60 years. Prevalence of multimorbidity was positively associated with age (p for trend <0.001) and affluence (p for trend <0.001) and significantly greater in women at all ages compared with men. For each 5-year increment in age there was an approximate 20% greater risk of multimorbidity in both sexes (18% in women 95% CI 1.14 to 1.22 and 22% in men 95% CI 1.18 to 1.26). Increasing age, female gender, non-Javanese ethnicity, and high per-capital expenditure were all significantly associated with higher odds of multimorbidity. The combination of hypertension with cardiac diseases, hypercholesterolemia, arthritis, and uric acid/gout were the most commonly occurring disease pairs in both sexes. Conclusions More than one-third of the Indonesian adult population are living with multimorbidity with women and the more wealthy being particularly affected. Of especial concern was the high prevalence of multimorbidity among younger individuals. Hypertension was the most frequently occurring condition common to most individuals with multimorbidity. PMID:26656028

  4. Tidal currents in the Indonesian Seas and their effect on transport and mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatayama, Takaki; Awaji, Toshiyuki; Akitomo, Kazunori

    1996-05-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of tides and tidal currents in the Indonesian Seas, with particular emphasis on the predominant constituents, the barotropic M2 and K1 components. The calculated harmonic constants of the M2 and K1 tides agree well with those obtained from extensive tide gauge observations: the mean root-mean-square errors between models and observations for M2 and K1 over the entire Indonesian Seas are 11.2 and 8.65 cm, respectively, smaller than previous studies. The features of the tidal current field are qualitatively similar to those reported by Wyrtki [1961]. Relatively strong tidal currents are found in the Java Sea and in the vicinities of the narrow straits, such as the Lombok and Malacca Straits. Tracking of numerous labeled particles in the calculated velocity field clearly shows that the tidal currents play essential roles in the transport and mixing processes in the Indonesian Seas. For example, in the eastern Indonesian Seas a significant clockwise residual circulation appears around Buru Island, due primarily to the tidal rectification over variable bottom topography, with a minor impact from the nonlinear effects around narrow straits. The tide-induced residual transport from the Seram Sea to the eastern Banda Sea attains about 3.8 Sv (1 Sv = 106 m3 s-1), comparable to that of the Indo-Pacific throughflow along the eastern route. In the western Indonesian Seas (the Java Sea and the Makassar Strait) the residual transport is much smaller than the throughflow transport along the western route. Our result suggests, however, that the properties of water flowing through this route could be modified by strong tidal mixing around the shelf of the southern Makassar Strait and the Lombok Strait.

  5. Development of taste sensor system for differentiation of Indonesian herbal medicines

    SciTech Connect

    Kaltsum, U.; Triyana, K. Siswanta, D.

    2014-09-25

    In Indonesia, herbal medicines are usually produced by small and medium enterprises which are relatively low in quality control. The purpose of this paper is to report that we have developed a taste sensor system with global selectivity, i.e., electronic tongue (e-tongue) for differentiation of Indonesian herbal medicines. The e-tongue was composed of five kinds of ion selective electrodes as working electrodes, data acquisition system, and pattern recognition system. Each ion selective electrode (ISE) was built by attaching lipid/polymer membrane. For this purpose, the five kinds of membranes were built by mixing lipid, plasticizer (nitrophenyl octyl ether/NPOE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and tetrahydrofuran (THF). In this study, we employed five kinds of lipid, namely oleic acid (OA), dioctyl phosphate (DOP), decyl alcohol (DA), dodecylamine (DDC), and trioctyl methyl ammonium chloride (TOMA). In this case, the membranes transform information of taste substances into electric signal. The five kinds of Indonesian herbal medicine were purchased from local supermarket in Yogyakarta, i.e., kunyit asam (made from turmeric and tamarind), beras kencur (made from rice and kencur), jahe wangi (made from ginger and fragrance), sirih wangi (made from betel leaf), and temulawak (made from Javanese ginger). Prior to detecting the taste from the Indonesian herbal medicine samples, each ion selective electrode was tested with five basic taste samples, i.e., for saltiness, sweetness, umami, bitterness, and sourness. All ISEs showed global selectivity to all samples. Furthermore, the array of ISEs showed specific response pattern to each Indonesian herbal medicine. For pattern recognition system, we employed principle component analysis (PCA). As a result, the e-tongue was able to differentiate five kinds of Indonesian herbal medicines, proven by the total variance of first and second principle components is about 93%. For the future, the e-tongue may be developed for quality

  6. Development of taste sensor system for differentiation of Indonesian herbal medicines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltsum, U.; Triyana, K.; Siswanta, D.

    2014-09-01

    In Indonesia, herbal medicines are usually produced by small and medium enterprises which are relatively low in quality control. The purpose of this paper is to report that we have developed a taste sensor system with global selectivity, i.e., electronic tongue (e-tongue) for differentiation of Indonesian herbal medicines. The e-tongue was composed of five kinds of ion selective electrodes as working electrodes, data acquisition system, and pattern recognition system. Each ion selective electrode (ISE) was built by attaching lipid/polymer membrane. For this purpose, the five kinds of membranes were built by mixing lipid, plasticizer (nitrophenyl octyl ether/NPOE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and tetrahydrofuran (THF). In this study, we employed five kinds of lipid, namely oleic acid (OA), dioctyl phosphate (DOP), decyl alcohol (DA), dodecylamine (DDC), and trioctyl methyl ammonium chloride (TOMA). In this case, the membranes transform information of taste substances into electric signal. The five kinds of Indonesian herbal medicine were purchased from local supermarket in Yogyakarta, i.e., kunyit asam (made from turmeric and tamarind), beras kencur (made from rice and kencur), jahe wangi (made from ginger and fragrance), sirih wangi (made from betel leaf), and temulawak (made from Javanese ginger). Prior to detecting the taste from the Indonesian herbal medicine samples, each ion selective electrode was tested with five basic taste samples, i.e., for saltiness, sweetness, umami, bitterness, and sourness. All ISEs showed global selectivity to all samples. Furthermore, the array of ISEs showed specific response pattern to each Indonesian herbal medicine. For pattern recognition system, we employed principle component analysis (PCA). As a result, the e-tongue was able to differentiate five kinds of Indonesian herbal medicines, proven by the total variance of first and second principle components is about 93%. For the future, the e-tongue may be developed for quality

  7. Research program on Indonesian active faults to support the national earthquake hazard assesments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natawidjaja, D. H.

    2012-12-01

    In mid 2010 an Indonesian team of earthquake scientists published the new Indonesian probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) map. The new PSHA map replaced the previous version that is published in 2002. One of the major challenges in developing the new map is that data for many active fault zones in Indonesia is sparse and mapped only at regional scale, thus the input fault parameters for the PSHA introduce unavoidably large uncertainties. Despite the fact that most Indonesian islands are torn by active faults, only Sumatra has been mapped and studied in sufficient details. In other areas, such as Java and Bali, the most populated regions as well as in the east Indonesian region, where tectonic plate configurations are far more complex and relative plate motions are generally higher, many major active faults and plate boundaries are not well mapped and studied. In early 2011, we have initiated a research program to study major active faults in Indonesia together with starting a new graduate study program, GREAT (Graduate Research for Earthquake and Active Tectonics), hosted by ITB (Institute of Technology bandung) and LIPI (Indonesian Institute of Sciences) in partnership with the Australia-Indonesia Facility for Disaster Reduction (AIFDR). The program include acquisition of high-resolution topography and images required for detailed fault mapping, measuring geological slip rates and locating good sites for paleoseismological studies. It is also coupled by seismological study and GPS surveys to measure geodetic slip rates. To study submarine active faults, we collect and incorporate bathymetry and marine geophysical data. The research will be carried out, in part, through masters and Ph.D student theses. in the first four year of program we select several sites for active fault studies, particulary the ones that pose greater risks to society.

  8. Assessment of Safety Culture in Isfahan Hospitals (2010)

    PubMed Central

    Raeisi, Ahmed Reza; Nazari, Maryam; Bahmanziari, Najme

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Many internal and external risk factors in health care organizations make safety important and it has caused the management to consider safety in their mission statement. One of the most important tools is to establish the appropriate organizational structure and safety culture. The goal: The goal of this research is to inform managers and staff about current safety culture status in hospitals in order to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of health services. Methods: This is a descriptive-survey research. The research population was selected hospitals of Isfahan, Iran. Research tool was a questionnaire (Cronbach alpha 0.75). The questionnaire including 93 questions (Likert scale) classified in 12 categories: Demographic questions, Individual attitude, management attitude, Safety Training, Induced stress, pressure and emotional conditions during work, Consultation and participation, Communications, Monitoring and control, work environment, Reporting, safety Rules, procedures and work instructions that distributed among 45 technicians, 208 Nurses and 62 Physicians. All data collected from the serve was analysis with statistical package of social science (SPSS). In this survey Friedman test, Spearman correlation, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and factor analysis have been used for data analyzing. Results: The score of safety culture dimensions was 2.90 for Individual attitude, 3.12 for management attitude, 3.32 for Safety Training, 3.14 for Induced stress, pressure and emotional conditions during work, 3.31 for Consultation and participation, 2.93 for Communications, 3.28 for Monitoring and control, 3.19 for work environment, 3.36 for Reporting, 3.59 safety Rules, procedures and work instructions that Communication and individual attitude were in bad condition. Safety culture among different hospitals: governmental and educational, governmental and non-educational and non-governmental and different functional groups (physicians, nurses, diagnostic

  9. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  10. Hospital Hints

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... have to spend the night in the hospital. Learning more about what to expect and about people ...

  11. Understanding HIV-related stigma among Indonesian nurses.

    PubMed

    Waluyo, Agung; Culbert, Gabriel J; Levy, Judith; Norr, Kathleen F

    2015-01-01

    Evidence indicates widespread stigmatization of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in Indonesia. Such attitudes among health care workers could impede the country's policies for effective diagnosis and medical treatment of PLWH. Nonetheless, research to guide interventions to reduce stigma in health care settings is lacking. Also, the contributions of workplace, religion, and HIV knowledge to nurses' HIV-related stigma are poorly understood. Our cross-sectional study aimed to describe factors associated with nurses' stigmatizing attitudes toward PLWH. Four hundred nurses recruited from four hospitals in Jakarta, Indonesia, were surveyed using the Nurse AIDS Attitude Scale to measure stigma. Stigmatizing attitudes were significantly predicted by education, HIV training, perceived workplace stigma, religiosity, Islamic religious identification, and affiliation with the Islamic hospital. HIV knowledge was not a significant predictor of stigmatizing attitudes. Organization changes fostering workplace diversity are likely to substantially reduce stigmatizing attitudes in nurses. PMID:24759060

  12. Understanding HIV-related stigma among Indonesian nurses

    PubMed Central

    Waluyo, Agung; Culbert, Gabriel J.; Levy, Judith; Norr, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Evidence indicates widespread stigmatization of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in Indonesia. Such attitudes among health care workers could impede the country’s policies for effective diagnosis and medical treatment of PLWH. Nonetheless, research to guide interventions to reduce stigma in health care settings is lacking. Also, the contributions of workplace, religion, and HIV knowledge to nurses’ HIV-related stigma are poorly understood. Our cross-sectional study aimed to describe factors associated with nurses’ stigmatizing attitudes toward PLWH. Four hundred nurses recruited from 4 hospitals in Jakarta, Indonesia, were surveyed using the Nurse AIDS Attitude Scale (NAAS) to measure stigma. Stigmatizing attitudes were significantly predicted by education, HIV training, perceived workplace stigma, religiosity, Islamic religious identification, and affiliation with the Islamic hospital. HIV knowledge was not a significant predictor of stigmatizing attitudes. Organization changes fostering workplace diversity are likely to substantially reduce stigmatizing attitudes in nurses. PMID:24759060

  13. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  14. Neo-Liberal "Governmentality" in the English and Japanese Higher Education Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yokoyama, Keiko

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify common patterns in central authorities' steering of universities and the institutional power in neo-liberal higher education regimes. The paper examines the regulatory mechanisms of England and Japan through Foucault's idea of "governmentality" and utilises the concept of autonomy to identify the…

  15. Governmentality in Environmental Education Policy Discourses: A Qualitative Study of Teachers in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketlhoilwe, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    International environmental education policy discourses have influenced policy construction in Botswana and how teachers conduct themselves and teaching in environmental learning. The researcher uses Foucault's notion of governmentality to understand the effects of power/knowledge relations in policy. The analysis is taken further through a…

  16. Governmental Professionalism: Re-Professionalising or De-Professionalising Teachers in England?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper draws on recent work by John Clarke and Janet Newman and their colleagues to analyse a relatively coherent governmental project, spanning the decades of Conservative and New Labour government in England since 1979, that has sought to render teachers increasingly subservient to the state and agencies of the state. Under New Labour this…

  17. 27 CFR 479.104 - Registration of firearms by certain governmental entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Registration of firearms by certain governmental entities. 479.104 Section 479.104 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE...

  18. 27 CFR 479.104 - Registration of firearms by certain governmental entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Registration of firearms by certain governmental entities. 479.104 Section 479.104 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE...

  19. 27 CFR 479.104 - Registration of firearms by certain governmental entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Registration of firearms by certain governmental entities. 479.104 Section 479.104 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND...

  20. 27 CFR 479.104 - Registration of firearms by certain governmental entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Registration of firearms by certain governmental entities. 479.104 Section 479.104 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND...

  1. 27 CFR 479.104 - Registration of firearms by certain governmental entities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Registration of firearms by certain governmental entities. 479.104 Section 479.104 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND...

  2. Is There Scientific Consensus on Acid Rain? -- Excerpts from Six Governmental Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Education Report and Newsletter, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Compiles a series of direct quotations from six governmental reports that reflect a scientific consensus on major aspects of acid deposition. Presents the statements in a question and answer format. Also reviews the sources, extent, and effects of acid rain. (ML)

  3. In the Name of Liberation: Notes on Governmentality, Entrepreneurial Education, and Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstedt, Magnus; Hertzberg, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this article is the growing importance of entrepreneurship in the context of Swedish education policy. Departing from Foucault's concept of governmentality, this article analyzes some of the main ideas in the discourse on entrepreneurship education in Sweden and points out its specifics, as an instance of the broader educational…

  4. Non-Governmental Organizations in Africa: The Leonenet Street Children Project in Sierra Leone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide snapshots of observations, interventions, and processes in the day to day working of a child charity in Sierra Leone. There were 114 local and 49 overseas funded Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in Sierra Leone in 2002. The Leonenet Street Children Project was founded in 1996 by the membership of the…

  5. Governmentality in Higher Education: A Critical Analysis of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Bonnie B.

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) serves as a nodal point through which to examine the power relations shaping the direction and practices of higher education in the twenty-first century. Theoretically, my analysis is informed by Foucault's concept of governmentality, briefly defined as a technology of…

  6. Managerial Perception of Education in the Educational Non-Governmental Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslan, Mehmet Metin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the educational NGO managers' perceptions of education in the city of Kirikkale. The sample of this qualitative research, which has been conducted on a case pattern basis, comprises managers from 13 educational non-governmental organizations in the province of Kirikkale. Data were collected by the…

  7. Weighing in on NBC's "The Biggest Loser": Governmentality and Self-Concept on the Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Readdy, Tucker; Ebbeck, Vicki

    2012-01-01

    Previous analyses (i.e., Bernstein & St. John, 2006; Sender & Sullivan, 2008) of the television show "The Biggest Loser" have detailed its negative presentation of the obese body, potential consequences for viewers, and its role as a technology of governmentality. However, there has been little exploration of how audience members conceptualize and…

  8. The Governmentality of Childhood Obesity: Coca-Cola, Public Health and Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Darren; Gard, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the emergence of what might seem an unexpected policy outcome--a large multinational corporation, frequently blamed for exacerbating childhood obesity, operating as an officially sanctioned driver of anti-obesity initiatives in primary schools across the globe. We draw on Foucault's notion of governmentality to examine…

  9. 40 CFR 35.917-6 - Acceptance by implementing governmental units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acceptance by implementing governmental units. 35.917-6 Section 35.917-6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.917-6 Acceptance...

  10. Role of Non-Governmental Organizations for the Development of Basic Education in Punjab, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iqbal, Javed

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the general working structure of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and to examine the services and facilities provided by NGOs for basic education in Punjab, Pakistan. The population comprised 112 NGOs working for the promotion of basic education in Punjab, 3980 teachers working in basic education…

  11. The Intractability of Information: Non-Governmental Development Organizations and the Uses of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiter, Jordan

    2006-01-01

    The globalization of information has led to increased optimism about the increasing role of global civil society. However, the underdeveloped have been left out of this information explosion. Through development, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) seek to empower the poor so that they have the resources and abilities to join the rest of the…

  12. Quality Management in Hungarian Higher Education: Organisational Responses to Governmental Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csizmadia, Tibor; Enders, Jurgen; Westerheijden, Don F.

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on responses of higher education institutions to governmental policy. We investigate the influence of organisational characteristics on the implementation of quality management in Hungarian higher education institutions. Our theoretical framework is based on organisational theories (resource dependency and…

  13. 77 FR 7609 - Policy Letter 11-01, Performance of Inherently Governmental and Critical Functions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... ``Performance of Inherently Governmental and Critical Functions'' (76 FR 56227-56242, September 12, 2011) to... from the published Final Policy remains unchanged. The full text of the original notice is available at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-09-12/pdf/2011-23165.pdf . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  14. The Governmentality of Reconciliation: Adult Education as a Community Relations Technique in Northern Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smala, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Despite a successfully negotiated peace agreement in Belfast in 1998, tensions between different community groups continue to exist in Northern Ireland. This situation creates a governmental need to find solutions to problems such as segregation, inter- and intra-group violence and other forms of sectarian antagonisms. On the one hand, this is…

  15. Schooling Entrepreneurs: Entrepreneurship, Governmentality and Education Policy in Sweden at the Turn of the Millennium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dahlstedt, Magnus; Hertzberg, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Departing from Michel Foucault's concept of governmentality, the focus of this article is the introduction of entrepreneurial education in Swedish education policy at the turn of the millennium. We analyze the various meanings attached to the concepts of "entrepreneur" and "entrepreneurship" in education policy documents,…

  16. Governmentality and "Fearless Speech": Framing the Education of Asylum Seeker and Refugee Children in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Pam; Sidhu, Ravinder

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers the educational provision for, and general treatment of, refugee and asylum seeker children in Australia, using a framework of governmentality. The paper describes the regimes of practices which govern refugees and asylum seekers in Australia, including mandatory detention and a complex set of visa categorisations, and…

  17. 20 CFR 410.470 - Determination by nongovernmental organization or other governmental agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Disability or Death Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.470 Determination by nongovernmental organization or other... not an individual is totally disabled due to pneumoconiosis, or was totally disabled due to pneumoconiosis. As used in this section, the term other governmental agency includes the Administration...

  18. The Role of Governmental Policies in Promoting Residential Segregation in the St. Louis Metropolitan Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Dennis R.

    1997-01-01

    Explains how local, state, and federal governments have exacerbated or failed to take steps to reduce residential segregation in the St. Louis (Missouri) metropolitan area since the 1981 Liddell v. Board of Education decision that decided that school board and governmental housing policies had contributed to segregation in the city's schools. (SLD)

  19. 45 CFR 146.180 - Treatment of non-Federal governmental plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Treatment of non-Federal governmental plans. 146.180 Section 146.180 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GROUP HEALTH INSURANCE MARKET Exclusion of Plans and Enforcement § 146.180 Treatment of...

  20. My Brother as "Problem": Neoliberal Governmentality and Interventions for Black Young Men and Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author argues that the Obama Administration's My Brother's Keeper (MBK) initiative serves as an exemplar of neoliberal governmentality, in which Black young men and boys are constructed as essentially damaged, as problems in need of a technocratic public--private solution. More than simply an ideological imposition from above…

  1. Working with or against the Stores?: A Non-Governmental Organization Working with Alcohol Purchase Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geidne, Susanna; Eriksson, Charli

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyse the implementation by a non-governmental organization (NGO) of an intervention with two different strategies--one employing confrontational approaches, the other cooperative ones--aiming to reduce the rate of successful purchase attempts (PAs) of medium-strength beer in Sweden.…

  2. 29 CFR 510.24 - Governmental entities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Governmental entities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. (a) The Commonwealth government of Puerto Rico has been determined...

  3. 29 CFR 510.24 - Governmental entities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Governmental entities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. (a) The Commonwealth government of Puerto Rico has been determined...

  4. 29 CFR 510.24 - Governmental entities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Governmental entities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. (a) The Commonwealth government of Puerto Rico has been determined...

  5. 29 CFR 510.24 - Governmental entities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Governmental entities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. (a) The Commonwealth government of Puerto Rico has been determined...

  6. 29 CFR 510.24 - Governmental entities eligible for minimum wage phase-in.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Governmental entities eligible for minimum wage phase-in..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MINIMUM WAGE PROVISIONS OF THE 1989 AMENDMENTS TO THE... eligible for minimum wage phase-in. (a) The Commonwealth government of Puerto Rico has been determined...

  7. From Governing through Data to Governmentality through Data: Artefacts, Strategies and the Digital Turn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souto-Otero, Manuel; Beneito-Montagut, Roser

    2016-01-01

    The article argues that current discussions about governance through data in education can be fruitfully extended through: (1) the establishment of connections with wider debates about the role of commensuration processes and governmentality in the recreation of education systems; (2) greater emphasis on the "artefacts" through which…

  8. Governmental Reform and Education for the Gifted in Japan: A Current Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugaj, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Though targeted for governmental reform since 2002, services envisioned for gifted and talented students have not materialized in Japan. From the perspective of his personal experience as a Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund participant in 2005 and an extensive review of available literature and contacts with the Japanese Ministry of Education,…

  9. The Structures of Centralized Governmental Privacy Protection: Approaches, Models, and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Paul T.; McClure, Charles R.; Fraser, Bruce T.

    2002-01-01

    Asserts that the federal government should adopt a centralized governmental structure for the privacy protection of personal information and data. Discusses the roles of federal law, federal agencies, and the judiciary; the concept of information privacy; the impact of current technologies; and models of centralized government structures for…

  10. Neoliberal Governmentality, Schooling and the City: Conceptual and Empirical Notes on and from the Global South

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulson, Kalervo N.; Fataar, Aslam

    2011-01-01

    This paper applies ideas that emanate from the Global North, concerning neoliberalism and neoliberal governmentality, to the case of marketisation in South Africa. It also attends to the limits of Northern ideas that are both intellectual undertakings and policy manifestations. In the first part of the paper, we identify how rationales for school…

  11. Women's Socio-Economic Development in India: The Role of Non-Governmental Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razvi, Meena; Roth, Gene L.

    2004-01-01

    Jacobs (2000) and McLean (2000) affirm the need to expand boundaries of HRD to include multiple topics in a variety of contexts. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) provide possibilities and limitations for the socio-economic development of women in India. The roles of NGOs in serving the socio-economic needs of women provide a broader,…

  12. 45 CFR 146.180 - Treatment of non-Federal governmental plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... governmental employer and reports to work on August 6. The individual has diabetes. Under the terms of the plan... diabetes. He submits the required form, which reflects that condition. The plan also receives information... diabetes. CMS resolves the complaint in favor of the plan on the basis that the plan permissibly...

  13. 45 CFR 146.180 - Treatment of non-Federal governmental plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....180 Section 146.180 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO... § 146.180 Treatment of non-Federal governmental plans. (a) Opt-out election for self-funded non-Federal... plan cannot elect to exempt its plan from requirements under section 2705(a)(6) and 2705(c) through...

  14. Why nonprofits? Hospitals and the future of American health care.

    PubMed

    Gray, B H

    1992-01-01

    The future of the nonprofit hospital depends on its relationship to the for-profit and governmental sectors of our economy. A decade ago, the primary challenge came from the growing investor-owned hospital companies. Nonprofit hospitals' responses--both competitive and imitative--led to new challenges from government regarding tax-exempt status. The reasons underlying this challenge include the growing commercialism of health care, the nation's failure to deal directly with the problem of the uninsured, and the lack of a coherent theory of tax exemption. Although hospitals are likely to retain exemptions from federal taxation, challenges to local tax exemptions are likely to continue. Strategies that hospitals pursue for competitive purposes may undercut their legitimacy as tax-exempt institutions, but several groups are working to address the issue. PMID:10118566

  15. 34 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Appendix I, Standards for Audit of Governmental Organizations, Programs, Activities, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Appendix I, Standards for Audit of Governmental Organizations, Programs, Activities, and Functions (GAO) B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 668 Education... Governmental Organizations, Programs, Activities, and Functions (GAO) Qualifications of Independent...

  16. 34 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Appendix I, Standards for Audit of Governmental Organizations, Programs, Activities, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Appendix I, Standards for Audit of Governmental Organizations, Programs, Activities, and Functions (GAO) B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 668 Education... Governmental Organizations, Programs, Activities, and Functions (GAO) Qualifications of Independent...

  17. 77 FR 27055 - National and Governmental Advisory Committees to the U.S. Representative to the Commission for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ...Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, EPA gives notice of a meeting of the National Advisory Committee (NAC) and Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) to the U.S. Representative to the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC). The National and Governmental Advisory Committees advise the EPA Administrator in her capacity as the U.S. Representative to......

  18. 77 FR 18807 - National and Governmental Advisory Committees to the U.S. Representative to the Commission for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ...Under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, Public Law 92-463, EPA gives notice of a meeting of the National Advisory Committee (NAC) and Governmental Advisory Committee (GAC) to the U.S. Representative to the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC). The National and Governmental Advisory Committees advise the EPA Administrator in her capacity as the U.S. Representative to......

  19. A Legal Analysis of Litigation against Oklahoma Educators and School Districts under the Oklahoma Governmental Tort Claims Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacefield, Kevin Lee

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation analyzed public court decisions in cases against Oklahoma school districts and their employees involving sovereign immunity claims filed under Oklahoma's Governmental Tort Claims Act. The questions addressed were: (1) How have the Oklahoma courts interpreted the Governmental Tort Claims Act, (Okla. Stat. tit. 51 Section 151 et…

  20. Filling the Gaps: The Role and Impact of International Non-Governmental Organisations in "Education for All"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tota, Pasqua Marina

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the involvement of international non-governmental organisations (INGOs) in transnational education policy-making, with particular reference to the global initiative Education for All (EFA). EFA is a policy process carried out by international governmental organisations (IGOs) with the main aim to achieve basic education for…

  1. 43 CFR 19.4 - Liaison with other governmental agencies and submission of views by interested persons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liaison with other governmental agencies and submission of views by interested persons. 19.4 Section 19.4 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior WILDERNESS PRESERVATION National Wilderness Preservation System § 19.4 Liaison with other governmental agencies...

  2. Impact of Night Shift and Training Development Factors on Performance of Professional Nurses in North West Bank Governmental Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayed, Ahmad; Thulth, Ahida Saleem; Sayej, Sumaya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Organizational factors are considered to be the cornerstone in achieving psychological and professional security at work, which in turn are positively reflected in job performance both quantitatively and qualitatively. Aim of the Study: The study aimed to assess night shift and education/training developmental factors on performance of…

  3. [Laennec Hospital].

    PubMed

    Dauphin, A; Mazin-Deslandes, C

    2000-01-01

    When the Laennec Hospital of Paris closed, after 366 years of activities for the patients, the articles about the circumstances of the foundation and the main stapes of the institution which became an very famous university hospital it present the available information of the history of the apothecaries, of the "gagnants-maitrise", pharmacists and the pharmacy's interns who succeeded themselves to create and dispense the medicaments necessary to the patients hospitalized or welcomed in ambulatory. It describes the evolution of the places, of the material, of forms, of the organization, of the medicaments and of the missions of what became the Pharmacy department after the recent individualization of the biological analysis in the biochemistry. PMID:11625687

  4. Regulation of sexuality in Indonesian discourse: normative gender, criminal law and shifting strategies of control.

    PubMed

    Blackwood, Evelyn

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines changes in the regulation of sexuality in Indonesia in the period since 1980 as seen through state, religious and lesbian and gay activist discourses on sexuality. Three different eras during that period of Indonesian history are compared. Under the New Order regime of Suharto, the Indonesian state sought to control sexuality through a deployment of gender. During the 1990s, state Islamic discourses of sexuality shifted in response to international pressures to support same-sex marriage and sexual rights. During the third period following the end of the Suharto regime in 1998, a conservative Islamic minority pushed for more restrictive laws in the State Penal Code, initiating intense public debate on the role of the state in questions of sexuality and morality. Over this time period, the dominant discourse on sexuality moved from strategically linking normative gender with heterosexuality and marriage to direct attempts to legislate heterosexual marriage by criminalizing a wide range of sexual practices. PMID:17457732

  5. The origin of Indonesian cattle and conservation genetics of the Bali cattle breed.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, K; Olsson, M; Andersson, G; Purwantara, B; van Tol, H T A; Rodriguez-Martinez, H; Colenbrander, B; Lenstra, J A

    2012-01-01

    Both Bos indicus (zebu) and Bos javanicus (banteng) contribute to the Indonesian indigenous livestock, which is supposedly of a mixed species origin, not by direct breeding but by secondary cross-breeding. Here, the analysis of mitochondrial, Y-chromosomal and microsatellite DNA showed banteng introgression of 10-16% in Indonesian zebu breeds with East-Javanese Madura and Galekan cattle having higher levels of autosomal banteng introgression (20-30%) and combine a zebu paternal lineage with a predominant (Madura) or even complete (Galekan) maternal banteng origin. Two Madura bulls carried taurine Y-chromosomal haplotypes, presumably of French Limousin origin. There was no evidence for zebu introgression in five populations of the Bali cattle, a domestic form of the banteng. PMID:22212207

  6. Indonesian throughflow nutrient fluxes and their potential impact on Indian Ocean productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayers, Jennifer M.; Strutton, Peter G.; Coles, Victoria J.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Matear, Richard J.

    2014-07-01

    The Indonesian throughflow (ITF) is a chokepoint in the upper ocean thermohaline circulation, carrying Pacific waters through the strongly mixed Indonesian Seas and into the Indian Ocean. Yet the influence of the ITF on biogeochemical fluxes into the Indian Ocean is largely unknown. This study determines the first depth- and time-resolved nitrate, phosphate, and silicate fluxes at the three main exit passages of the ITF: Lombok Strait, Ombai Strait, and Timor Passage. Nutrient flux as well as its variability with depth and time differs greatly between the passages. We estimate the effective flux of nutrients into the Indian Ocean by accounting for existing nutrients in the basin and find it largest in the upper 300-400 m. This suggests that the majority of ITF nutrient supply to the Indian Ocean is to thermocline waters, where it is likely to support new production and significantly impact Indian Ocean biogeochemical cycling.

  7. Assessment of the GNSS-derived Path Delay (GPD) wet tropospheric correction in the Indonesian Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuli Handoko, Eko; Joana Fernandes, Maria; Lázaro, Clara

    2015-04-01

    Due to its high temporal and spatial variability, the wet tropospheric correction is one of the major error sources in coastal altimetry. GNSS-derived path delay (GPD) is an algorithm to estimate the wet tropospheric correction which combines zenith wet delays (ZWD) derived from GNSS, valid microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements and atmospheric models (Fernandes, et al., 2010). Global GPD solutions have been derived by University of Porto for the main altimetry missions (ERS-1, ERS-2, Envisat, TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, Jason-2, CryoSat-2 and SARAL/AltiKa) using more than 400 GNSS stations in coastal and island regions. In particular, a local network of near 30 GNSS stations, located mostly along of the Sumatera Island, has been used to improve the GNSS coverage in the Indonesian region. A set of GNSS stations not used in the GPD computations has been reserved for validation purposes. The focus of this study is the assessment of the GPD wet tropospheric corrections in the Indonesian region by comparing GNSS-derived wet path delays at the Indonesian stations not used in the GPD computations with the various available wet tropospheric corrections: GPD, microwave radiometer (MWR) and atmospheric model (ERA Interim). In addition to the direct comparison of the wet path delays, sea level anomaly (SLA) variance analysis using the various wet tropospheric corrections has also been performed. The results show the significant impact of the GPD corrections on the improvement of sea level estimation in the Indonesian region, particularly noticeable for the missions possessing a two-band radiometer: all ESA missions and SARAL/AltiKa.

  8. The impact of Indonesian peatland degradation on downstream marine ecosystems and the global carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Jesse F; Hohn, Sönke; Rixen, Tim; Baum, Antje; Merico, Agostino

    2016-01-01

    Tropical peatlands are among the most space-efficient stores of carbon on Earth containing approximately 89 Gt C. Of this, 57 Gt (65%) are stored in Indonesian peatlands. Large-scale exploitation of land, including deforestation and drainage for the establishment of oil palm plantations, is changing the carbon balance of Indonesian peatlands, turning them from a natural sink to a source via outgassing of CO2 to the atmosphere and leakage of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) into the coastal ocean. The impacts of this perturbation to the coastal environment and at the global scale are largely unknown. Here, we evaluate the downstream effects of released Indonesian peat carbon on coastal ecosystems and on the global carbon cycle. We use a biogeochemical box model in combination with novel and literature observations to investigate the impact of different carbon emission scenarios on the combined ocean-atmosphere system. The release of all carbon stored in the Indonesian peat pool, considered as a worst-case scenario, will increase atmospheric pCO2 by 8 ppm to 15 ppm within the next 200 years. The expected impact on the Java Sea ecosystems is most significant on the short term (over a few hundred years) and is characterized by an increase of 3.3% in phytoplankton, 32% in seagrass biomass, and 5% decrease in coral biomass. On the long term, however, the coastal ecosystems will recover to reach near pre-excursion conditions. Our results suggest that the ultimate fate of the peat carbon is in the deep ocean with 69% of it landing in the deep DIC pool after 1000 years, but the effects on the global ocean carbonate chemistry will be marginal. PMID:26416553

  9. Termite-Susceptible Species of Wood for Inclusion as a Reference in Indonesian Standardized Laboratory Testing

    PubMed Central

    Arinana; Tsunoda, Kunio; Herliyana, Elis N.; Hadi, Yusuf S.

    2012-01-01

    Standardized laboratory testing of wood and wood-based products against subterranean termites in Indonesia (SNI 01.7207-2006) (SNI) has no requirement for the inclusion of a comparative reference species of wood (reference control). This is considered a weakness of the Indonesian standard. Consequently, a study was undertaken to identify a suitable Indonesian species of community wood that could be used as a reference control. Four candidate species of community woods: Acacia mangium, Hevea brasiliensis, Paraserianthes falcataria and Pinus merkusii were selected for testing their susceptibility to feeding by Coptotermes formosanus. Two testing methods (SNI and the Japanese standard method JIS K 1571-2004) were used to compare the susceptibility of each species of wood. Included in the study was Cryptomeria japonica, the reference control specified in the Japanese standard. The results of the study indicated that P. merkusii is a suitable reference species of wood for inclusion in laboratory tests against subterranean termites, conducted in accordance with the Indonesian standard (SNI 01.7207-2006). PMID:26466532

  10. "Wait a while, my love" -- an Indonesian popular song with a family planning message.

    PubMed

    Pekerti, R; Musa, R

    1989-10-01

    "Wait a While, My Love," recorded by pop singer Irianti Emingpraja, was the first Indonesian rock sock to contain a family planning message. The album including the song has sold over 100,000 copies. The song has also been packaged as a 60-second video that can be used as an opening theme for radio and television programs. The song, aimed at encouraging Indonesian youth to postpone marriage, has the following lyrics: "Flying free like a seagull/I'll cover many places 'round the world/Give me time for study and reflection, to grow as a mature wise woman/Oh, wait a while, my love/Don't buy me a ring, reflection of your inner love/I'll climb my way up to the top of the world/And reaching our rainbow of hope." The song was produced with support from the United Nations Fund for Population Activities and the Indonesian National Family Planning Coordinating Board. Key factors to be examined in producing a popular song with a family planning message include the specific message desired, the target audience, type of music, the singer, the producer, marketing, a multimedia campaign strategy, and distribution outlets. PMID:12315970

  11. The Influence of Medication Attitudes on Utilization of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Indonesian Prisons.

    PubMed

    Culbert, Gabriel J; Bazazi, Alexander R; Waluyo, Agung; Murni, Astia; Muchransyah, Azalia P; Iriyanti, Mariska; Finnahari; Polonsky, Maxim; Levy, Judith; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-05-01

    Negative attitudes toward HIV medications may restrict utilization of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Indonesian prisons where many people living with HIV (PLH) are diagnosed and first offered ART. This mixed-method study examines the influence of medication attitudes on ART utilization among HIV-infected Indonesian prisoners. Randomly-selected HIV-infected male prisoners (n = 102) completed face-to-face in-depth interviews and structured surveys assessing ART attitudes. Results show that although half of participants utilized ART, a quarter of those meeting ART eligibility guidelines did not. Participants not utilizing ART endorsed greater concerns about ART efficacy, safety, and adverse effects, and more certainty that ART should be deferred in PLH who feel healthy. In multivariate analyses, ART utilization was independently associated with more positive ART attitudes (AOR = 1.09, 95 % CI 1.03-1.16, p = 0.002) and higher internalized HIV stigma (AOR = 1.03, 95 % CI 1.00-1.07, p = 0.016). Social marketing of ART is needed to counteract negative ART attitudes that limit ART utilization among Indonesian prisoners. PMID:26400080

  12. Adaptation to Pronunciation Variations in Indonesian Spoken Query-Based Information Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Dessi Puji; Furui, Sadaoki

    Recognition errors of proper nouns and foreign words significantly decrease the performance of ASR-based speech applications such as voice dialing systems, speech summarization, spoken document retrieval, and spoken query-based information retrieval (IR). The reason is that proper nouns and words that come from other languages are usually the most important key words. The loss of such words due to misrecognition in turn leads to a loss of significant information from the speech source. This paper focuses on how to improve the performance of Indonesian ASR by alleviating the problem of pronunciation variation of proper nouns and foreign words (English words in particular). To improve the proper noun recognition accuracy, proper-noun specific acoustic models are created by supervised adaptation using maximum likelihood linear regression (MLLR). To improve English word recognition, the pronunciation of English words contained in the lexicon is fixed by using rule-based English-to-Indonesian phoneme mapping. The effectiveness of the proposed method was confirmed through spoken query based Indonesian IR. We used Inference Network-based (IN-based) IR and compared its results with those of the classical Vector Space Model (VSM) IR, both using a tf-idf weighting schema. Experimental results show that IN-based IR outperforms VSM IR.

  13. Climate change influenced female population sizes through time across the Indonesian archipelago.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Elsa G; Tumonggor, Meryanne K; Lansing, J Stephen; Sudoyo, Herawati; Cox, Murray P

    2013-01-01

    Lying at the crossroads of Asia and the Pacific world, the Indonesian archipelago hosts one of the world's richest accumulations of cultural, linguistic, and genetic variation. While the role of human migration into and around the archipelago is now known in some detail, other aspects of Indonesia's complex history are less understood. Here, we focus on population size changes from the first settlement of Indonesia nearly 50 kya up to the historic era. We reconstructed the past effective population sizes of Indonesian women using mitochondrial DNA sequences from 2,104 individuals in 55 village communities on four islands spanning the Indonesian archipelago (Bali, Flores, Sumba, and Timor). We found little evidence for large fluctuations in effective population size. Most communities grew slowly during the late Pleistocene, peaked 15-20 kya, and subsequently declined slowly into the Holocene. This unexpected pattern may reflect population declines caused by the flooding of lowland hunter/gatherer habitat during sea-level rises following the last glacial maximum. PMID:24297223

  14. Termite-Susceptible Species of Wood for Inclusion as a Reference in Indonesian Standardized Laboratory Testing.

    PubMed

    Arinana; Tsunoda, Kunio; Herliyana, Elis N; Hadi, Yusuf S

    2012-01-01

    Standardized laboratory testing of wood and wood-based products against subterranean termites in Indonesia (SNI 01.7207-2006) (SNI) has no requirement for the inclusion of a comparative reference species of wood (reference control). This is considered a weakness of the Indonesian standard. Consequently, a study was undertaken to identify a suitable Indonesian species of community wood that could be used as a reference control. Four candidate species of community woods: Acacia mangium, Hevea brasiliensis, Paraserianthes falcataria and Pinus merkusii were selected for testing their susceptibility to feeding by Coptotermes formosanus. Two testing methods (SNI and the Japanese standard method JIS K 1571-2004) were used to compare the susceptibility of each species of wood. Included in the study was Cryptomeria japonica, the reference control specified in the Japanese standard. The results of the study indicated that P. merkusii is a suitable reference species of wood for inclusion in laboratory tests against subterranean termites, conducted in accordance with the Indonesian standard (SNI 01.7207-2006). PMID:26466532

  15. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  16. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  17. Navigating the profits and pitfalls of governmental partnerships: the ICRC and intergovernmental relief, 1918-23.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Kimberly A

    2015-10-01

    The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) is today a staunch proponent of the need for humanitarian organisations to remain independent of state interests, yet it deliberately solicited intergovernmental intervention in international relief after the First World War of 1914-18. This paper examines why an organisation committed to upholding the independence and impartiality of humanitarian action might still choose to partner with governmental bodies. It also highlights the historical beginnings of a linkage between international aid and geopolitics. To secure governmental funding for refugee relief during the 1920s, the ICRC argued that the humanitarian crises of the post-war years were a threat to the political and social stability of Europe. While this has become axiomatic, the interwar history of the ICRC demonstrates that the perceived connection between relief and geopolitical stability is historically constructed, and that it must continue to be asserted persuasively to be effective. PMID:26395109

  18. Weighing in on NBC's The Biggest Loser: governmentality and self-concept on the scale.

    PubMed

    Readdy, Tucker; Ebbeck, Vicki

    2012-12-01

    Previous analyses (i.e., Bernstein & St. John, 2006; Sender & Sullivan, 2008) of the television show The Biggest Loser have detailed its negative presentation of the obese body, potential consequences for viewers, and its role as a technology of governmentality. However there has been little exploration of how audience members conceptualize and enact the messages communicated in the show within these intricate frameworks. The current research used information from semistructured interviews with 40 dedicated viewers to capture the salient meanings they ascribed to The Biggest Loser within the themes of governmentality and self-concept. Overall, the group experienced the program as a transformative, entertaining, and inspirational event that produced little change in their exercise behavior. Thus, the role of reality television in creating healthy behavior change is potentially limited. PMID:23367821

  19. Governmental Control of the Internet in addressing Law Enforcement and National Security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watney, Murdoch

    Some people contended that governmental regulation of the Internet would not be possible due to its inherent characteristics. This paper relates how governments, in addressing law enforcement and national security, have taken control of the Internet by means of legislation. Consideration is given to the influence and impact of powerful governments on the legal regulation of the Internet. It is pointed out that when addressing law enforcement and national security the borderless nature of the Internet is in reality bordered. It is concluded that in striving towards law enforcement and national security, enforcement of governmental control of the Internet is not easily achieved without the assistance of the Internet Service Provider (ISP) as well as international assistance and co-operation.

  20. A comprehensive survey of the relationship between self-efficacy and performance for the governmental auditors.

    PubMed

    Su, Jau-Ming; Lee, Shue-Ching; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Lu, Tzu-Li

    2016-01-01

    As governmental auditing is involved in evaluating the legitimacy, economy, efficiency, and effectiveness of how the various administrative branches use their allocated resources to optimize the government's functions, it is expected that the performance of the auditors in charge are strongly influenced by their respective qualities such as self-efficacy and experience, etc. To further understand the factors that may enhance their performance and to ultimately provide practical recommendations for the audit authorities, we have surveyed about 50 % of all the governmental auditors in Taiwan. The result showed that any auditing experience and professionalization do positively influence the professional awareness, and acquired knowledge and skillset of an auditor can effectively improve his or her professional judgment. We also found that perceived ability, problem-solving skills, and resource sharing may significantly impact any performance involved. Our study provides a workable management guidelines for strengthening the self-efficacy of audit authorities in Taiwan. PMID:27186472

  1. Achieving quality in a government hospital: departmental responsibility.

    PubMed

    Haron, Yafa; Segal, Zvi; Barhoum, Masad

    2009-01-01

    Quality improvement in health care organizations requires structural reorganization and system reform and the development of an appropriate organizational "culture." In 2007, the Division of Quality and Excellence in Civil Service in Israel developed a concept to improve quality management in governmental institutions throughout the country. To put this strategy into practice, Western Galilee Hospital, a governmental hospital, in northern Israel, developed a plan to advance the quality management system where each department and unit is autonomously responsible for its own quality and excellence. Since the hospital has been certificated by ISO 9001 for more than 10 years (the only hospital in Israel to have this certificate), the main challenge now is to improve the quality and excellence system in every department. The aim of this article is to describe the implementation of a comprehensive program designed to raise the ability of managers and workers in Western Galilee Hospital in addressing all of the government's requirements for quality and excellence in service in Israel. PMID:19369858

  2. The role of purchasing in hospital performance.

    PubMed

    Preker, Alexander S; Langenbrunner, John C

    2005-01-01

    In this article the authors review the core messages on getting value for public money spent on healthcare presented in a recent World Bank publication, Spending Wisely: Buying Health Services for the Poor, edited by the same authors. The authors discuss how interest of the poor would often be better served through a fundamental shift in the way public money is spent on the health services--notably by moving away from passive budgeting within the public sector towards strategic purchasing or contracting of services from non-governmental providers. The shift from hiring staff in the public sector and producing services "in house" to strategic purchasing of non governmental providers--outsourcing--has been at the centre of a lively debate on collective financing of healthcare during recent years. Its underlying premise is that it is necessary to separate the functions of financing from the production services to improve performance and accountability. Promoting good health and confronting disease challenges of course requires action across a broad range of activities in the health system. This includes improvements in the policymaking and stewardship role of governments, better access to human resources, drugs, medical equipment and consumables, and a greater engagement of both public and private providers of services. Managing scarce resources and healthcare effectively and efficiently in the hospital sector through more strategic purchasing is an important part of this story. This is the second in series of articles on the economics of hospital care. In the first article on the "Economics of organizational reform" the authors, Alexander S. Preker and April Harding, examined the role of economic incentives to good governance and performance in the hospital sector. A more detailed discussion on this topic can be found in the World Bank publication Innovations in Health Care: The Corporatization of Public Hospitals, 2003, edited by the same authors. PMID:16512059

  3. The influence of governmental mitigation measures on contamination characteristics of PM(2.5) in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Schleicher, Nina; Chen, Yizhen; Chai, Fahe; Norra, Stefan

    2014-08-15

    Beijing, the capital of China, has become one of the most air-polluted cities due to its rapid economic growth. Weekly PM2.5 samples-collected continuously from 2007 to 2010-were used to study the contamination characteristics of atmospheric particles and effects of governmental mitigation measures especially since the 2008 Summer Olympic Games. PM2.5 mass concentrations during the sampling period were reduced compared to the previous studies before 2005, although they were still too high in comparison with environmental standards of China and many other countries as well as WHO standards. Results of principle component analysis show that elements of primary anthropogenic origin had an obvious decline while elements mainly from the natural environment kept a relatively stable course. The governmental macro-control measures influenced both anthropogenic and geogenic sources, but they also led to some pollution peaks prior to implementation of the respective measures. Some element concentrations correlated to the restrictiveness of relative measures, especially during different traffic restrictions. The comparison with other countries and international standards shows that there is a long way to go in order to improve air quality in Beijing, and that governmental mitigation measures need to be continued and reinforced. PMID:24887192

  4. The double helix of cultural assimilationism and neo-liberalism: citizenship in contemporary governmentality.

    PubMed

    Schinkel, Willem; Van Houdt, Friso

    2010-12-01

    In this article the recent transformations of citizenship in the Netherlands are analysed in relation to a developing form of governmentality. We regard citizenship as a state regulated technique of in- and exclusion and a crucial instrument in the management of populations. Taking the Dutch contexts of immigration and integration as our case, we argue that cultural assimilationism and neo-liberalism appear in a double helix: they combine to form a new governmental strategy we call neo-liberal communitarianism. Neo-liberal communitarianism is the underlying rationale of a population management that operates both in an individualizing (citizenship as individual participation and responsibility) and a de-individualizing way ('community' at various aggregate and localized levels as frame of 'integration'). It thus combines a communitarian care of a Dutch culturally grounded national community - conceived as traditionally'enlightened' and 'liberal'- with a neo-liberal emphasis on the individual's responsibility to achieve membership of that community. 'Community' is thereby selectively seen as mobilized and present (when immigrant integration is concerned) or as latently present and still in need of mobilization (when indigenous Dutch are concerned). Concomitantly, a repressive responsibilization and a facilitative responsibilization are aimed at these two governmentally differentiated populations. PMID:21138428

  5. The German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) - Past, Present and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudloff, A.; Lauterjung, J.; Gitews Project Team (Awi, Bgr, Dlr, Gfz, Gkss, Gtz, Ifm-Geomar, Kdm, Unu-Ehs)

    2010-12-01

    The German initiative to design and construct a Tsunami Early Warning System for the Indian Ocean got underway immediately after the 26 December 2004 tsunami in the region. First seismic instruments as well as ocean monitoring sensors were already deployed a few months later between spring and autumn 2005. A significant success and important mile stone for the whole system, which incorporates seismological and GPS sensors, tide gauges, ocean surface and bottom monitoring tools, as well as a tsunami simulation system and a decision support system, was its relevance during the 12 September 2007 Bengkulu earthquake sequence off coast Southern Sumatra. On this occasion, for the first time ever, BMKG - the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climate and Geophysics launched its own tsunami alarm after 4:40 minutes. During the complete phase of installation, joint German-Indonesian academic and training workshops were held, in addition to training courses for maintenance proficiency. Moreover, capacity building and capacity development measures were carried out at different stages, starting with a PhD programme in Germany, institutional consulting at national, regional and local levels and intensive discussion and knowledge exchange with local communities and administrations in the three pilot regions, Padang (Sumatra), Cilacap (Java) and Kuta (Bali). More than five years after commencement of this pioneering initiative which included a number of official acts, meeting presentations and peer-reviewed publications, a number of measures still remain to be taken. One important step integrates the handing over of the technical system to the Indonesian government. This phase will be accompanied by a subsidiary Indonesian-German company, established through the Indonesian and German partner institutions, which will be responsible for sustainable maintenance and support during the process,. In March 2011, when the German project funding will reach an end, the actual natural

  6. Genetic diversity of Japanese encephalitis virus isolates obtained from the Indonesian archipelago between 1974 and 1987.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Amy J; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B; Barrett, Alan D T

    2013-07-01

    Five genotypes (GI-V) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) have been identified, all of which have distinct geographical distributions and epidemiologies. It is thought that JEV originated in the Indonesia-Malaysia region from an ancestral virus. From that ancestral virus GV diverged, followed by GIV, GIII, GII, and GI. Genotype IV appears to be confined to the Indonesia-Malaysia region, as GIV has been isolated in Indonesia from mosquitoes only, while GV has been isolated on three occasions only from a human in Malaysia and mosquitoes in China and South Korea. In contrast, GI-III viruses have been isolated throughout Asia and Australasia from a variety of hosts. Prior to this study only 13 JEV isolates collected from the Indonesian archipelago had been studied genetically. Therefore the sequences of the envelope (E) gene of 24 additional Indonesian JEV isolates, collected throughout the archipelago between 1974 and 1987, were determined and a series of molecular adaptation analyses were performed. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that over a 14-year time span three genotypes of JEV circulated throughout Indonesia, and a statistically significant association between the year of virus collection and genotype was revealed: isolates collected between 1974 and 1980 belonged to GII, isolates collected between 1980 and 1981 belonged to GIV, and isolates collected in 1987 belonged to GIII. Interestingly, three of the GII Indonesian isolates grouped with an isolate that was collected during the JE outbreak that occurred in Australia in 1995, two of the GIII Indonesian isolates were closely related to a Japanese isolate collected 40 years previously, and two Javanese GIV isolates possessed six amino acid substitutions within the E protein when compared to a previously sequenced GIV isolate collected in Flores. Several amino acids within the E protein of the Indonesian isolates were found to be under directional evolution and/or co-evolution. Conceivably, the tropical climate

  7. Impact of the Indonesian Throughflow on the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bars, Dewi; Dijkstra, Henk

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the strength and variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is one of the main topics of climate science and in particular physical oceanography. Current simple representations of the global ocean overturning separates the surface return flow to the Atlantic basin into a cold water path through the Drake Passage and a warm water path through the Indonesian Throughflow and Agulhas leakage. The relative importance of these two paths has been investigated in non-eddying ocean models. In these models the Agulhas retroflection cannot be modelled properly, which leads to an important overestimation of the Agulhas leakage. Furthermore, it seems that the in these models the relation between the meridional density gradient and the overturning strength is greatly simplified and changes significantly when eddies are resolved (Den Toom et al. 2013). As a result, the impact of the Pacific-Indian Oceans exchange through the Indonesian Throughflow on the AMOC is still unknown. To investigate this question we run a state-of-the-art ocean model, the Parallel Ocean Program (POP), globally, at eddy resolving resolution (0.1º). Using climatological forcing from the CORE dataset we perform two simulations of 110 years, a control experiment with realistic coastlines and one in which the Indonesian Passages are closed. Results show that, for a closed Indonesian Throughflow, the Indian Ocean cools down but its salinity increases. The Agulhas leakage reduces also by 3Sv (Le Bars et al. 2013) and the net effect on the south Atlantic is a cooling down and decrease salinity. The anomalies propagate slowly northward and a significant decrease of the AMOC is found at 26ºN after 50 years. This decrease AMOC also leads to reduced northward heat flux in the Atlantic. These processes are investigated with a detailed analysis of the heat and freshwater balances in the Atlantic-Arctic region and in the region south of 34ºS where

  8. Genetic Diversity of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Isolates Obtained from the Indonesian Archipelago Between 1974 and 1987

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Amy J.; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Five genotypes (GI–V) of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) have been identified, all of which have distinct geographical distributions and epidemiologies. It is thought that JEV originated in the Indonesia-Malaysia region from an ancestral virus. From that ancestral virus GV diverged, followed by GIV, GIII, GII, and GI. Genotype IV appears to be confined to the Indonesia-Malaysia region, as GIV has been isolated in Indonesia from mosquitoes only, while GV has been isolated on three occasions only from a human in Malaysia and mosquitoes in China and South Korea. In contrast, GI–III viruses have been isolated throughout Asia and Australasia from a variety of hosts. Prior to this study only 13 JEV isolates collected from the Indonesian archipelago had been studied genetically. Therefore the sequences of the envelope (E) gene of 24 additional Indonesian JEV isolates, collected throughout the archipelago between 1974 and 1987, were determined and a series of molecular adaptation analyses were performed. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that over a 14-year time span three genotypes of JEV circulated throughout Indonesia, and a statistically significant association between the year of virus collection and genotype was revealed: isolates collected between 1974 and 1980 belonged to GII, isolates collected between 1980 and 1981 belonged to GIV, and isolates collected in 1987 belonged to GIII. Interestingly, three of the GII Indonesian isolates grouped with an isolate that was collected during the JE outbreak that occurred in Australia in 1995, two of the GIII Indonesian isolates were closely related to a Japanese isolate collected 40 years previously, and two Javanese GIV isolates possessed six amino acid substitutions within the E protein when compared to a previously sequenced GIV isolate collected in Flores. Several amino acids within the E protein of the Indonesian isolates were found to be under directional evolution and/or co-evolution. Conceivably, the

  9. Results of a hospital waste survey in private hospitals in Fars province, Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Askarian, Mehrdad; Vakili, Mahmood; Kabir, Gholamhosein

    2004-07-01

    Hospital waste is considered dangerous because it may possess pathogenic agents and can cause undesirable effects on human health and the environment. In Iran, neither rules have been compiled nor does exact information exist regarding hospital waste management. The survey presented in this article was carried out in all 15 private hospitals of Fars province (Iran) from the total numbers of 50 governmental and private hospitals located in this province, in order to determine the amount of different kinds of waste produced and the present situation of waste management. The results indicated that the waste generation rate is 4.45 kg/bed/day, which includes 1830 kg (71.44%) of domestic waste, 712 kg (27.8%) of infectious waste, and 19.6 kg (0.76%) of sharps. Segregation of the different types of waste is not carried out perfectly. Two (13.3%) of the hospitals use containers without lids for on-site transport of wastes. Nine (60%) of the hospitals are equipped with an incinerator and six of them (40%) have operational problems with the incinerators. In all hospitals municipal workers transport waste outside the hospital premises daily or at the most on alternative days. In the hospitals under study, there aren't any training courses about hospital waste management and the hazards associated with them. The training courses that are provided are either ineffective or unsuitable. Performing extensive studies all over the country, compiling and enacting rules, establishing standards and providing effective personnel training are the main challenges for the concerned authorities and specialists in this field.

  10. Results of a hospital waste survey in private hospitals in Fars province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Askarian, Mehrdad; Vakili, Mahmood; Kabir, Gholamhosein

    2004-01-01

    Hospital waste is considered dangerous because it may possess pathogenic agents and can cause undesirable effects on human health and the environment. In Iran, neither rules have been compiled nor does exact information exist regarding hospital waste management. The survey presented in this article was carried out in all 15 private hospitals of Fars province (Iran) from the total numbers of 50 governmental and private hospitals located in this province, in order to determine the amount of different kinds of waste produced and the present situation of waste management. The results indicated that the waste generation rate is 4.45 kg/bed/day, which includes 1830 kg (71.44%) of domestic waste, 712 kg (27.8%) of infectious waste, and 19.6 kg (0.76%) of sharps. Segregation of the different types of waste is not carried out perfectly. Two (13.3%) of the hospitals use containers without lids for on-site transport of wastes. Nine (60%) of the hospitals are equipped with an incinerator and six of them (40%) have operational problems with the incinerators. In all hospitals municipal workers transport waste outside the hospital premises daily or at the most on alternative days. In the hospitals under study, there aren't any training courses about hospital waste management and the hazards associated with them. The training courses that are provided are either ineffective or unsuitable. Performing extensive studies all over the country, compiling and enacting rules, establishing standards and providing effective personnel training are the main challenges for the concerned authorities and specialists in this field. PMID:15081061

  11. Responding to the rape of Indonesian Chinese women and girls.

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    In May 1998, 168 women and girls were gang-raped during the Jakarta riots. In response, the Humanity Volunteer Team, a nongovernmental organization, set up a Violence Against Women Division. This group is composed of 400 people from diverse backgrounds and ethnic groups who undergo training and then volunteer their services to provide psychological and physical support to the affected victims and their families and to investigate the crimes. The volunteers have adopted a holistic approach and work with the cooperation of private hospitals. They accomplish their work in a climate of fear because it is considered subversive simply to bring this issue to light. Rape survivors and their families, as well as medical staff and volunteers, have been intimidated to the point that many rape survivors have traveled abroad to seek treatment. Long-term prevention strategies should include 1) a state apology to rape survivors and their communities, 2) an independent investigation to expose the perpetrators, and 3) the protection of the civil rights of the minority Chinese in Indonesia. PMID:12294313

  12. 76 FR 15308 - National and Governmental Advisory Committees to the U.S. Representative to the Commission for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-21

    ... Environmental Cooperation AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY... the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC). The National and Governmental... Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC), North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act, Public Law...

  13. 75 FR 63470 - National and Governmental Advisory Committees to the U.S. Representative to the Commission for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Environmental Cooperation AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY... the North American Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC). The National and Governmental... Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC), North American Free Trade Agreement Implementation Act, Public Law...

  14. Developing an Instrument for Measuring Teachers' Mathematics Content Knowledge on Ratio and Proportion: A Case of Indonesian Primary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekawati, Rooselyna; Lin, Fou-Lai; Yang, Kai-Lin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we developed an instrument for assessing teachers' mathematics content knowledge (MCK) on ratio and proportion and examined the profile of Indonesian primary teacher's MCK on this topic. The MCK items were administered to 271 Indonesian in-service primary teachers with a variety of educational backgrounds and teaching…

  15. From East to West: A Phenomenological Study of Indonesian Graduate Students' Experiences on the Acculturation Process at an American Public Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukminin, Amirul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this inquiry was to describe and understand the lived experiences of the acculturative process of the Indonesian graduate students at an American public university. The primary focus here was on better understanding how some events or changes become sources of difficulties, problems, or culture shock in Indonesian graduate…

  16. The role of non-governmental organizations in the social and the health system.

    PubMed

    Piotrowicz, Maria; Cianciara, Dorota

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the definitions, objectives, fields and tasks of non-governmental organizations in social life, health system and health policy. In addition, the article addresses the issue of effectiveness and quality of NGOs' activity. The term "NGOs" (Non-governmental Organizations) includes different categories of entities that operate not to obtain financial gain, and also do not belong to the government sector. Non-governmental Organizations' fields of activity were described in the International Classification of Non-Profit Organizations (ICNPO). NGOs are an integral part of a democratic society. Sociological sciences emphasize their importance in enhancing social integration, implementation of the principle of subsidiarity, building civil society, social dialogue and participatory democracy. The main tasks of NGOs in the health system are providing services and health advocacy. Provision of services includes medical, social and psychological services as well as, integration activities, care and nursing, material and financial support, educational and information services and training. Health advocacy is a combination of individual and social actions designed to gain political commitment, policy support, social acceptance and systems support for a particular health goal or program. An important task carried out by NGOs is participation in the formation of health policy. The increasing role of NGOs in providing social services and the participation in political processes, result in the need to confirm the validity and credibility of their operation. One of the ways could be to introduce the mechanisms to assess quality and efficiency, such as registration as a part of a legal system, self-regulatory activities (card rules, codes of ethics), certification, participation in networks, monitoring and audit. PMID:23745379

  17. Indonesian experts' perspectives on a curriculum for psychologists working in primary health care in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Setiyawati, Diana; Blashki, Grant; Wraith, Ruth; Colucci, Erminia; Minas, Harry

    2014-01-01

    Mental health is a critical issue in Indonesia, since its population ranks among the top five in the world and the prevalence of common mental disorders is 11.6% of the adult population. However, the need to build an effective mental health-care system that is accessible to the whole population has only been recently addressed. The Aceh tsunami in 2004 brought to the forefront an unexpected window of opportunity to build a mental health-care system. Integration of mental health care into primary health care is a key strategy to close the treatment gap for people with mental disorders. Existing integration of psychologists into primary health care is a big step to meet the shortage of mental health-care specialists. As primary mental health care is an emerging field, the perspectives of Indonesian experts on Indonesian mental health care are needed to develop a curriculum for training psychologists to work in primary health care. In this study, data have been collected through semi-structured interviews with 24 Indonesian mental health experts, and three focus group discussions with 26 psychologists. Overall, experts agreed that to be able to work in primary health-care psychologists should have roles and training ranging from clinical to advocacy skills. Participants also agreed that psychologists should work in the community and contribute to primary health care as service providers and that strong collaborations between psychologists and other primary health-care providers are the key; these can be developed partly through referral and by respecting each other's unique strengths. PMID:25750806

  18. Gaps in the family networks of older people in three Indonesian communities.

    PubMed

    Kreager, Philip; Schröder-Butterfill, Elisabeth

    2007-03-01

    Family networks are widely assumed to be a key source of support for older people in Indonesia and Southeast Asia more generally, although empirical study of their composition and functioning is in its infancy. This paper draws on ethnographic and survey data collected in longitudinal research of ageing in three rural Indonesian communities, in order to identify demographic and social factors limiting the size of elders' networks. Gaps in networks commonly emerge as a result of childlessness, migration and alienation, but their implications for older people's vulnerability are shaped by socio-economic status, reputation and cultural norms. PMID:17072765

  19. Gaps in the Family Networks of Older People in Three Indonesian Communities

    PubMed Central

    Schröder-Butterfill, E.

    2007-01-01

    Family networks are widely assumed to be a key source of support for older people in Indonesia and Southeast Asia more generally, although empirical study of their composition and functioning is in its infancy. This paper draws on ethnographic and survey data collected in longitudinal research of ageing in three rural Indonesian communities, in order to identify demographic and social factors limiting the size of elders’ networks. Gaps in networks commonly emerge as a result of childlessness, migration and alienation, but their implications for older people’s vulnerability are shaped by socio-economic status, reputation and cultural norms. PMID:17072765

  20. Tidal Mixing in the Indonesian Archipelago and Its Impact on Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch-Larrouy, A.; Atmadipoera, A.; Madec, G.; Lengaigne, M.; Terray, P.; Izumo, T.; van Beek, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Indonesian archipelago produces large internal tides dissipation in the thermocline. The recent Indonesian Mixing program (INDOMIX) has been designed to quantify this mixing using direct and indirect measure of the mixing.A wide range of values is obtained for dissipation within [10-8, 10-4] W/kg with spots of higher dissipation in the ocean interior correlated with a strong internal tide signal. Deduced Kz values are found between 510-4 to 5 10-1 m2/s, much more higher than open ocean values. Surface mixing, below the base of the mixed layer is found to be very strong above all straits, with values within [10-4, 10-3 m2/s]. Introduced in a model using an adapted parameterisation to the Indonesian archipelago, models show good agreement with the observations, where strong water mass transformation has been previously diagnosed. This additional mixing produce a ~0.5°C surface cooling and reduces by 20% the overlying deep convection. This improves both the amount and structure of the rainfall and weakens the wind convergence relaxes the equatorial Pacific trade winds and strengthens the winds along Java coast. These wind changes causes the thermocline to be deeper in the eastern equatorial Pacific and shallower in the eastern Indian Ocean. The El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) amplitude is therefore slightly reduced while the Indian Ocean Dipole/Zonal Mode (IODZM) variability increases. IODZM precursors, related to ENSO events the preceding winter in this model, are also shown to be more efficient in promoting an IODZM thanks to an enhanced wind/thermocline coupling. The MJO is also improved in the model.Changes in the coupled system in response tidal mixing are as large as those found when closing the Indonesian Throughflow, emphasizing the key role of IA on the Indo-Pacific climate. This suggests that climate models need to take into account this intensified mixing to properly represent the mean state of the atmosphere and its climate variability.

  1. In-Situ Estimates of tidal mixing in the Indonesian archipelago from multidisciplinary data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch-Larrouy, Ariane; Atmadipoera, Agus; van Beek, Pieter; Madec, Gurvan; Aucan, Jerome; Lyard, Florent; Grelet, Jacques; Souhaut, Marc

    2015-04-01

    The Indonesian Mixing program (INDOMIX) was designed to quantify the very strong mixing that transforms Pacific waters into homohaline Indonesian Waters in the Indonesian archipelago. The turbulent dissipation rates and associated mixing were estimated and analyzed using a multidisciplinary approach that combines physical and geochemical observations: 1) direct measurements of the dissipation using a microstructure profiler, 2) use of density-based fine-scale methods, and 3) study of the vertical distribution of natural radionuclides (radium isotopes and actinium-227). Data were collected at five contrasting stations within the Indonesian archipelago. Strong instabilities, inversions of the density profiles and a very strong water mass transformation were observed. A wide range of values is obtained for dissipation within [10-10, 10-4] W.kg-1 with spots of higher dissipation in the ocean interior correlated with a strong internal tide signal. Both Fine-scale and micro-scale methods allow us to identify very strong dissipation energy levels above the straits, ranging within [10-7, 10-4] W.kg-1, in contrast to lower values at stations far from generation sites. However, the dissipation in the interior water column for the station located in the center of Halmahera [10-9, 10-8] W.kg-1 is stronger than for the Banda station [10-11, 10-10] W.kg-1, which is further away from generation sites. The three approaches agree relatively well and provide Kz values ranging between 5 10-4 and 5 10-1 m2.s-1, except in the Banda Sea where values are similar to the ones found in the open ocean (10-6 m2.s-1). Kz values mainly increase toward the bottom, where stratification decreases. Surface mixing, at the base of the mixed layer is found to be still very strong with values within [10-4, 10-3 m2.s-1]. These results confirm the results of modelling studies, in which hypothesis of intensified subsurface mixing were made, a mixing that strongly modifies the whole tropical mean state and

  2. Analysis of governmental Web sites on food safety issues: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Namkung, Young; Almanza, Barbara A

    2006-10-01

    Despite a growing concern over food safety issues, as well as a growing dependence on the Internet as a source of information, little research has been done to examine the presence and relevance of food safety-related information on Web sites. The study reported here conducted Web site analysis in order to examine the current operational status of governmental Web sites on food safety issues. The study also evaluated Web site usability, especially information dimensionalities such as utility, currency, and relevance of content, from the perspective of the English-speaking consumer. Results showed that out of 192 World Health Organization members, 111 countries operated governmental Web sites that provide information about food safety issues. Among 171 searchable Web sites from the 111 countries, 123 Web sites (71.9 percent) were accessible, and 81 of those 123 (65.9 percent) were available in English. The majority of Web sites offered search engine tools and related links for more information, but their availability and utility was limited. In terms of content, 69.9 percent of Web sites offered information on foodborne-disease outbreaks, compared with 31.5 percent that had travel- and health-related information. PMID:17066944

  3. Governmentality, the iconography of sexual disease and 'duties' of the STI clinic.

    PubMed

    Pryce, A

    2001-09-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) have come to occupy a different social space over the last hundred years, where the iconography of disease has moved from purity to consumption of desire, and where the regulation of disease has moved from moral proscription to governmentality. These processes are represented through health promotion campaigns where the medico-moral discourses appropriated both the iconography of pathology and the construction of the family as the site of moral surveillance and governmentality. This paper will consider how the 'duties' of STD clinics have been defined and mark a paradigmatic statement of the panoptic role of medicine in the mapping of the social and psychological spaces between individuals. Sexual health medicine, together with health promotion ideologies, has claimed privileged status through the deployment of expert, clinical knowledge and rationalities, to penetrate the sexual praxis of populations. In so doing, it also underscored the individual's roles and responsibilities in the ideological work of the changing constructions of sexual citizenship, from moral purity to ars erotica, as well as the increasing intervention of the state in reproduction and control of sexualities. PMID:11882214

  4. Hospitals for sale.

    PubMed

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve. PMID:21864058

  5. Dengue virus infection-enhancing antibody activities against Indonesian strains in inhabitants of central Thailand.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Oddgun, Duangjai; Chantawat, Nantarat; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Churrotin, Siti; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Kameoka, Masanori; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Konishi, Eiji

    2016-04-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection-enhancing antibodies are a hypothetic factor to increase the dengue disease severity. In this study, we investigated the enhancing antibodies against Indonesian strains of DENV-1-4 in 50 healthy inhabitants of central Thailand (Bangkok and Uthai Thani). Indonesia and Thailand have seen the highest dengue incidence in Southeast Asia. The infection history of each subject was estimated by comparing his/her neutralizing antibody titers against prototype DENV-1-4 strains. To resolve the difficulty in obtaining foreign live viruses for use as assay antigens, we used a recombinant system to prepare single-round infectious dengue viral particles based on viral sequence information. Irrespective of the previously infecting serotype(s), most serum samples showed significantly higher enhancement titers against Indonesian DENV-2 strains than against Thai DENV-2 strains, whereas the opposite effect was observed for the DENV-3 strains. Equivalent enhancing activities were observed against both DENV-1 and DENV-4. These results suggest that the genotype has an impact on enhancing antibody activities against DENV-2 and DENV-3, because the predominant circulating genotypes of each serotype differ between Indonesia and Thailand. PMID:26645957

  6. Allele frequency data for 15 autosomal STR loci in eight Indonesian subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Venables, Samantha J; Daniel, Runa; Sarre, Stephen D; Soedarsono, Nurtami; Sudoyo, Herawati; Suryadi, Helena; van Oorschot, Roland A H; Walsh, Simon J; Widodo, Putut T; McNevin, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    Evolutionary and cultural history can affect the genetic characteristics of a population and influences the frequency of different variants at a particular genetic marker (allele frequency). These characteristics directly influence the strength of forensic DNA evidence and make the availability of suitable allele frequency information for every discrete country or jurisdiction highly relevant. Population sub-structure within Indonesia has not been well characterised but should be expected given the complex geographical, linguistic and cultural architecture of the Indonesian population. Here we use forensic short tandem repeat (STR) markers to identify a number of distinct genetic subpopulations within Indonesia and calculate appropriate population sub-structure correction factors. This data represents the most comprehensive investigation of population sub-structure within Indonesia to date using these markers. The results demonstrate that significant sub-structure is present within the Indonesian population and must be accounted for using island specific allele frequencies and corresponding sub-structure correction factors in the calculation of forensic DNA match statistics. PMID:26517173

  7. Tectonic development of the Indonesian archipelago and its bearing on the occurrence of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Simanjuntak, T.O. )

    1994-07-01

    The present geological and tectonic configuration of the Indonesian archipelago may represent a typical triple junction plate convergence, which has developed since Neogene times due to the northward-moving Indo-Australian plate, the westward-moving Pacific plate, and the south-southeastward-moving Eurasian Craton. The occurrence of a number of microcontinents in eastern Indonesia makes the geology and tectonics of the region more complex. The archipelago is one of the most complicated regions from the plate tectonics point of view. The geological evolution of the Indonesian archipelago is recorded by the occurrence of both tectonic convergence and tectonic divergence. Various types of plate convergences include a Cordilleran type subduction, which has been reoccurring since Paleozoic until present times in western Indonesia; a Neogene Tethyan type collision in the Banda region; and a double-arc collision in northern Maluku, central Indonesia. Tectonic divergence, which was preceded by rifting due to thermal doming and magma rise in the northern margins of the Australian Craton and followed by the detachment and west-northwestward displacement of continental fragments in Mesozoic, gave rise to the development of the microcontinents in eastern Indonesia.

  8. Assay of Antioxidant Potential of Two Filamentous Fungi Isolated from the Indonesian Fermented Dried Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Yudiarti, Turrini; Isroli, Isroli

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant capacity and antioxidant constituents of two filamentous fungi (Acremonium charticola and Rhizopus oryzae) isolated from the Indonesian fermented dried cassava (gathot) were evaluated in the present study. The antioxidant capacity of the fungal crude extracts was assessed based on the 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzthiazolin-6-sulfonicacid) (ABTS) method. Total phenolics were determined based on the Folin-Ciocalteu method, while the flavonoids content in the fungal extracts was determined by the spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride. Total tannins were estimated by the Folin-Denis method. The ABTS+ radical scavenging activity was higher (p < 0.01) in A. charticola compared to that in R. oryzae and ascorbic acid (as a control). A higher (p < 0.01) content of total phenolics was detected in A. charticola than that in R. oryzae. Total flavonoids were higher (p < 0.01) in R. oryzae as compared with that in A. charticola. The fungus A. charticola had a higher (p < 0.01) level of total tannins than R. oryzae. In conclusion, both filamentous fungi isolated from the Indonesian fermented dried cassava exhibited antioxidant potentials as indicated by their capabilities to scavenge ABTS+. A. charticola had a higher antioxidant capacity than R. oryzae. The antioxidant capacity of A. charticola was attributed mainly to its phenolics and tannins contents. PMID:26848695

  9. Improving Indonesian peatland C stock estimates using ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, N.; Comas, X.; Slater, L. D.; Warren, M.; Kolka, R. K.; Kristijono, A.; Sudiana, N.; Nurjaman, D.; Darusman, T.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical peatlands sequester an estimated 15% of the carbon pool from peatlands worldwide. Indonesian peatlands account for approximately 65% of all tropical peat, and are believed to be the largest global source of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere from degrading peat. However, there is great uncertainty in these estimates due to insufficient data regarding the thickness of organic peat soils and their carbon content. Meanwhile, Indonesian peatlands are threatened by heightening pressure to drain and develop. Indirect geophysical methods have garnered interest for their potential to non-invasively estimate peat depth and gas content in boreal peatlands. Drawing from these techniques, we employed ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) in tandem with direct methods (core sampling) to evaluate the potential of these methods for tropical peatland mapping at 2 distinct study sites on West Kalimantan (Indonesia). We find that: [1] West Kalimantan peatland thicknesses estimated from GPR and ERI in intermediate/shallow peat can vary substantially over short distances (for example, > 2% over less than 0.02° surface topography gradient), [2] despite having less vertical resolution, ERI is able to better resolve peatland thickness in deep peat, and [3] GPR provides useful data regarding peat matrix attributes (such as the presence of wood layers). These results indicate GPR and ERI could help reduce uncertainty in carbon stocks and aid in responsible land management decisions in Indonesia.

  10. Assay of Antioxidant Potential of Two Filamentous Fungi Isolated from the Indonesian Fermented Dried Cassava.

    PubMed

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Yudiarti, Turrini; Isroli, Isroli

    2016-01-01

    The antioxidant capacity and antioxidant constituents of two filamentous fungi (Acremonium charticola and Rhizopus oryzae) isolated from the Indonesian fermented dried cassava (gathot) were evaluated in the present study. The antioxidant capacity of the fungal crude extracts was assessed based on the 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethyl-benzthiazolin-6-sulfonicacid) (ABTS) method. Total phenolics were determined based on the Folin-Ciocalteu method, while the flavonoids content in the fungal extracts was determined by the spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride. Total tannins were estimated by the Folin-Denis method. The ABTS⁺ radical scavenging activity was higher (p < 0.01) in A. charticola compared to that in R. oryzae and ascorbic acid (as a control). A higher (p < 0.01) content of total phenolics was detected in A. charticola than that in R. oryzae. Total flavonoids were higher (p < 0.01) in R. oryzae as compared with that in A. charticola. The fungus A. charticola had a higher (p < 0.01) level of total tannins than R. oryzae. In conclusion, both filamentous fungi isolated from the Indonesian fermented dried cassava exhibited antioxidant potentials as indicated by their capabilities to scavenge ABTS⁺. A. charticola had a higher antioxidant capacity than R. oryzae. The antioxidant capacity of A. charticola was attributed mainly to its phenolics and tannins contents. PMID:26848695

  11. Freshening anomalies in the Indonesian throughflow and impacts on the Leeuwin Current during 2010-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ming; Benthuysen, Jessica; Zhang, Ningning; Slawinski, Dirk

    2015-10-01

    During the 2010-2011 La Niña and Ningaloo Niño, excessive precipitations in the Maritime Continent and Indonesian-Australian Basin caused surface waters to freshen by 0.3 practical salinity unit in the southeast Indian Ocean. The low-salinity anomalies are observed to be carried westward by the Indonesian throughflow and the South Equatorial Current and transmitted into the poleward flowing eastern boundary current, the Leeuwin Current, along the Western Australian coast. Low-salinity anomalies contribute to about 30% of the anomalous increase of the southward Leeuwin Current transport during the evolution of the 2010-2011 Ningaloo Niño, resulting in unprecedented warming off the coast of Western Australia. Episodical freshening of the Leeuwin Current has been observed at the Rottnest coastal reference station of Western Australia during extended La Niña conditions over the past several decades; low-salinity anomalies at the station during the 2010-2011 Ningaloo Niño are comparable with strong historical events.

  12. The South Indian Ocean Countercurrent: a return pathway of the Indonesian Throughflow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Erwin; leBars, Dewi; de Ruijter, Will

    2014-05-01

    The South Indian Ocean Counter Current (SICC) is associated with a thermal front embedded in a broad eastward flow across the subtropical Indian Ocean and feeds into the poleward Leeuwin Current (LC). Previous studies have shown that the LC and SICC are sensitive to variations of the inflow of Pacific water through the Indonesian Passages (ITF). These subtropical countercurrents, of which the SICC is an example, are characterized by high eddy activity and theoretical work has shown the non-linear nature of their dynamics. That has motivated us to investigate the inertial response to the ITF of the IO circulaion. Analysis of two global eddy resolving model runs with the Indonesian Passages open and closed showed that the full 15 Sv of the ITF flows through the Mozambique Channel but only 10 Sv ends up in the Agulhas Current. This suggests that the SICC-LC system forms part of the return pathway of the ITF to the Pacific. Using the Hallberg Isopycnal Model we have investigated the combined effect of ITF, wind- and buoyancy forcing on the Indian Ocean circulation in the inertial boundary layer regime.

  13. Cool Indonesian throughflow as a consequence of restricted surface layer flow.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Arnold L; Susanto, R Dwi; Vranes, Kevin

    2003-10-23

    Approximately 10 million m3 x s(-1) of water flow from the Pacific Ocean into the Indian Ocean through the Indonesian seas. Within the Makassar Strait, the primary pathway of the flow, the Indonesian throughflow is far cooler than estimated earlier, as pointed out recently on the basis of ocean current and temperature measurements. Here we analyse ocean current and stratification data along with satellite-derived wind measurements, and find that during the boreal winter monsoon, the wind drives buoyant, low-salinity Java Sea surface water into the southern Makassar Strait, creating a northward pressure gradient in the surface layer of the strait. This surface layer 'freshwater plug' inhibits the warm surface water from the Pacific Ocean from flowing southward into the Indian Ocean, leading to a cooler Indian Ocean sea surface, which in turn may weaken the Asian monsoon. The summer wind reversal eliminates the obstructing pressure gradient, by transferring more-saline Banda Sea surface water into the southern Makassar Strait. The coupling of the southeast Asian freshwater budget to the Pacific and Indian Ocean surface temperatures by the proposed mechanism may represent an important negative feedback within the climate system. PMID:14574409

  14. Evaluation of earthquake parameters used in the Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madlazim; Prastowo, Tjipto

    2016-02-01

    Twenty-two of a total of 30 earthquake events reported by the Indonesian Agency for Geophysics, Climatology and Meteorology during the time period 2007-2010 were falsely issued as tsunamigenic by the Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (Ina-TEWS). These 30 earthquakes were of different magnitudes and occurred in different locations. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the Ina-TEWS using common earthquake parameters, including the earthquake magnitude, origin time, depth, and epicenter. In total, 298 datasets assessed by the Ina-TEWS and the global centroid moment tensor (CMT) method were assessed. The global CMT method is considered by almost all seismologists to be a reference for the determination of these parameters as they have been proved to be accurate. It was found that the earthquake magnitude, origin time, and depth provided by the Ina-TEWS were significantly different from those given in the global CMT catalog, whereas the latitude and longitude positions of the events provided by both tsunami assessment systems were coincident. The performance of the Ina-TEWS, particularly in terms of accuracy, remains questionable and needs to be improved.

  15. Numerical simulations examining the possible role of anthropogenic and volcanic emissions during the 1997 Indonesian fires.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Melissa Anne; Langmann, Bärbel; Heil, Angelika; Graf, Hans-F

    2012-09-01

    The regional atmospheric chemistry and climate model REMOTE has been used to conduct numerical simulations of the atmosphere during the catastrophic Indonesian fires of 1997. These simulations represent one possible scenario of the event, utilizing the RETRO wildland fire emission database. Emissions from the fires dominate the atmospheric concentrations of O(3), CO, NO(2), and SO(2) creating many possible exceedances of the Indonesian air quality standards. The scenario described here suggests that urban anthropogenic emissions contributed to the poor air quality due primarily to the fires. The urban air pollution may have increased the total number of people exposed to exceedances of the O(3) 1-h standard by 17%. Secondary O(3) from anthropogenic emissions enhanced the conversion of SO(2) released by the fires to [Formula: see text], demonstrating that the urban pollution actively altered the atmospheric behavior and lifetime of the fire emissions. Under the conditions present during the fires, volcanic SO(2) emissions had a negligible influence on surface pollution. PMID:22942920

  16. The potential of Indonesian mangrove forests for global climate change mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdiyarso, Daniel; Purbopuspito, Joko; Kauffman, J. Boone; Warren, Matthew W.; Sasmito, Sigit D.; Donato, Daniel C.; Manuri, Solichin; Krisnawati, Haruni; Taberima, Sartji; Kurnianto, Sofyan

    2015-12-01

    Mangroves provide a wide range of ecosystem services, including nutrient cycling, soil formation, wood production, fish spawning grounds, ecotourism and carbon (C) storage. High rates of tree and plant growth, coupled with anaerobic, water-logged soils that slow decomposition, result in large long-term C storage. Given their global significance as large sinks of C, preventing mangrove loss would be an effective climate change adaptation and mitigation strategy. It has been reported that C stocks in the Indo-Pacific region contain on average 1,023 MgC ha-1 (ref. ). Here, we estimate that Indonesian mangrove C stocks are 1,083 +/- 378 MgC ha-1. Scaled up to the country-level mangrove extent of 2.9 Mha (ref. ), Indonesia’s mangroves contained on average 3.14 PgC. In three decades Indonesia has lost 40% of its mangroves, mainly as a result of aquaculture development. This has resulted in annual emissions of 0.07-0.21 Pg CO2e. Annual mangrove deforestation in Indonesia is only 6% of its total forest loss; however, if this were halted, total emissions would be reduced by an amount equal to 10-31% of estimated annual emissions from land-use sectors at present. Conservation of carbon-rich mangroves in the Indonesian archipelago should be a high-priority component of strategies to mitigate climate change.

  17. Teleseismic Double-Difference Earthquake Hypocenter Relocation in the Indonesian Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, A. D.; Shiddiqi, H. A.; Widiyantoro, S.; Ramdhan, M.; Wandono, W.; Sutiyono, S.; Handayani, T.

    2014-12-01

    Accuracy of hypocenter location is a crucial obstacle for seismicity study. Therefore, it is important to obtain accurate earthquake location using an adequate relocation method. We have relocated nearly 30,000 earthquakes (with magnitude greater than 2.0) compiled by BMKG from April 2009 to June 2014 around the Indonesian region using teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm. We used arrival time data from local, regional and teleseismic stations. For the inversion procedure, we have applied 1-D and 3-D seismic velocity models to determine earthquake hypocenter location. Our relocation results show that the travel-time RMS errors were greatly reduced. The hypocenter locations distribution shows significantly improved locations after the relocation. The relocated hypocenters also exhibit improvement in hypocenter depths particularly for shallow earthquakes. Overall, our relocation results were well correlated with tectonic features in this region, e.g. major subduction zones beneath Sumatra, Java, Bali, Banda, Sulawesi and Molluca and inland fault zones such as the Sumatra faut zone. These results will provide better information for updating seismic hazard maps and further advanced studies in the Indonesian region.

  18. Source Spectra and Site Response for Two Indonesian Earthquakes: the Tasikmalaya and Kerinci Events of 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawan, I.; Cummins, P. R.; Ghasemi, H.; Suhardjono, S.

    2012-12-01

    Indonesia is very prone to natural disasters, especially earthquakes, due to its location in a tectonically active region. In September-October 2009 alone, intraslab and crustal earthquakes caused the deaths of thousands of people, severe infrastructure destruction and considerable economic loss. Thus, both intraslab and crustal earthquakes are important sources of earthquake hazard in Indonesia. Analysis of response spectra for these intraslab and crustal earthquakes are needed to yield more detail about earthquake properties. For both types of earthquakes, we have analysed available Indonesian seismic waveform data to constrain source and path parameters - i.e., low frequency spectral level, Q, and corner frequency - at reference stations that appear to be little influenced by site response.. We have considered these analyses for the main shocks as well as several aftershocks. We obtain corner frequencies that are reasonably consistent with the constant stress drop hypothesis. Using these results, we consider using them to extract information about site response form other stations form the Indonesian strong motion network that appear to be strongly affected by site response. Such site response data, as well as earthquake source parameters, are important for assessing earthquake hazard in Indonesia.

  19. Hospitals face loss of federal tax-exempt status.

    PubMed

    Nauert, R C; Sanborn, A B; MacKelvie, C F; Harvitt, J L

    1988-09-01

    Because of governmental challenges, not-for-profit hospitals can no longer take for granted their right to be tax exempt. The Internal Revenue Service is auditing nearly 1,500 tax-exempt healthcare organizations to determine how accurately they are reporting unrelated business income. At greatest risk are those hospital systems that have become overly acquisitive or have strayed from the charitable mission that originally entitled them to tax exemption. To protect their tax-exempt status, currently exempt healthcare institutions must be careful that any activities, such as joint ventures and affiliate corporations, conform to their charitable mission. In the face of tougher legislation and Federal scrutiny, hospitals must make sure they are devoted to and performing a charitable purpose if they want to keep their tax-exempt status. PMID:10288886

  20. International Graduate Students' Cross-Cultural Academic Engagement: Stories of Indonesian Doctoral Students on an American Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mukminin, Amirul; McMahon, Brenda J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of academic engagement of twelve Indonesian doctoral students attending an American graduate school during their first term and over time through demographic background surveys and semi-structured in-depth interviews. The research design was qualitative in the phenomenological approach…

  1. The Impact of "Jalan Sesama" on the Educational and Healthy Development of Indonesian Preschool Children: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borzekowski, Dina L. G.; Henry, Holly K.

    2011-01-01

    "Jalan Sesama" was developed to address the developmental needs of Indonesian children ages 3 to 6 years. Using a randomized experimental research study design, this study examined the effect of a 14-week intervention on 160 children in the Pandeglang District in Indonesia's Banten Province. Results offer solid evidence that early cognitive…

  2. An Ideal Indonesian in an Increasingly Competitive World: Personal Character and Values Required to Realise a Projected 2045 "Golden Indonesia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malihah, Elly

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine the way character education and multicultural values' education can contribute to a perfect and transformed Indonesia by 2045. At this time (i.e. 2045), the Republic of Indonesia will be 100 years old. The presence of an ideal Indonesian will contribute to high national growth and development. This will…

  3. Indonesian Muslim Adolescents' Use of Tobacco and Alcohol: Associations with Use by Friends and Network Affiliates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Doran C.; Purwono, Urip; Rodkin, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this longitudinal study were to predict the tobacco and alcohol use of Indonesian Muslim adolescents from their religiosity and the substance use of friends and network affiliates. At Year 1, there were 996 participants from eighth grade (n = 507, age = 13.4 years) and 10th grade (n = 489, age = 15.4); 875 were followed into the…

  4. The Indonesian School Principal: Broadening Responsibility. Educational Policy and Planning Project. A Government of Indonesia-USAID Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, William K.; And Others

    The Indonesian school principal is a highly respected individual who serves as the critical link between the school and the community as well as local and national authorities. While most principals are well educated and capable, their positions are too limited. Most principals simply implement educational policy whereas they could and should be…

  5. Warm Feelings, Chill Thoughts: Negotiating the Implementation of an ODA ELT Project with the Indonesian Civil Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belben, Gillian; Gaylord, Wendy

    Lessons learned in the development and implementation of an English language training (ELT) project for Indonesian Civil Service workers are discussed. The project, designed to focus on development of English communication skills, was undertaken in cooperation with the state administration agency. Issues and difficulties discussed include:…

  6. Visual effects of the first ladies’ Kebaya clothing on the image of Indonesian women’s appearances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suciati

    2016-04-01

    The image of Indonesian women on international level is partly influenced by the appearance of the First Lady. The role and position of the First Lady is the representation of Indonesian women, because basically the First Lady, as the wife who accompanies the President (head of state), has a strong background of cultural grip, high intellectuality and good personality in her daily lifestyle, including in wearing clothes, and as an ambassador of culture and design. Fashion style of the First Lady always draws praise and criticism from the public. The purpose of this study is to reveal the visualization effects of Indonesian First Ladies’ kebaya clothing style in various state occasions on the image of Indonesian women’s appearances. This study is a qualitative research of visual data that emphasizes the discussion of Kebaya Clothing using semiological study (connotation and denotation meaning) that bring out self-image. The results showed that the style the First Ladies’ Kebaya clothing in every presidency period of their husbands had characteristics both in the style of clothing or hairstyle, indicating self-image. The conclusion of this study reveals that the First Ladies’ Kebaya Clothing (National Clothing) is interpreted as having implied messages because clothing can be observed visually. Implication was done on the construction of learning patterns of clothing, national fashion design and Nusantara ethnic clothing design.

  7. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples. PMID:25711185

  8. An application of multiplier analysis in analyzing the role of information and communication technology sectors on Indonesian national economy: 1990-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuhdi, Ubaidillah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to continue the previous studies which focused on Indonesian Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sectors. More specifically, this study aims to analyze the role of ICT sectors on Indonesian national economy using simple household income multiplier, one of the analysis tools in Input-Output (IO) analysis. The analysis period of this study is from 1990-2005. The results show that the sectors did not have an important role on the national economy of Indonesia on the period. Besides, the results also show that, from the point of view of the multiplier, Indonesian national economy tended to stable during the period.

  9. A Study of an Emerging Hospital Service

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Gitta; Eliot, Johan W.; Hoffman, Sybil

    1967-01-01

    This report presents the methodologic problems of a 1964 study of family planning assistance given in one midwestern metropolitan area in 20 hospitals that had obstetrics residencies; assesses the ability of administrators, obstetrics chiefs, and other staff members to estimate numbers and characteristics of patients served, in the absence of systematic records of family planning services; and discusses the nature, origin, and operation of policies on family planning assistance. The widespread lack of specific policies, other than negative policies in Catholic hospitals, resulted in great variety and unevenness in amount and type of, and indications for, family planning service. Staff members themselves suggested many needed improvements with respect to indications for family planning assistance and extent and type of service provided. Numerous correctable deficiencies remain. However, since 1964, some obstetrics departments have been able to implement some of these suggestions, and major new family planning programs, publicly and governmentally supported, are estimated to have doubled the number of women in low-income groups given family planning services in these hospitals. PMID:6081243

  10. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  11. Non-governmental organizations in international health: past successes, future challenges.

    PubMed

    Gellert, G A

    1996-01-01

    Non-governmental organizations, or NGOs, are increasingly instrumental to the implementation of international health programs. Following an overview of current conditions in global health and the problems that could be targeted by NGOs, this article describes the activities and philosophies of several representative approaches in this sector. The attributes of NGOs that increase their potential effectiveness are discussed, including ability to reach areas of severe need, promotion of local involvement, low cost of operations, adaptiveness and innovation, independence, and sustainability. A summary is provided of major future challenges in international health that may be addressed by NGOs, with particular emphasis on tobacco-related disease, communicable diseases and the AIDS epidemic, maternal mortality and women's health, injury prevention and control, and the need to secure durable financial support. PMID:10157062

  12. The potential of health sector non-governmental organizations: policy options.

    PubMed

    Gilson, L; Sen, P D; Mohammed, S; Mujinja, P

    1994-03-01

    Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have increasingly been promoted as alternative health care providers to the state, furthering the same goals but less hampered by government inefficiencies and resource constraints. However, the reality of NGO health care provision is more complex. Not only is the distinction between government and NGO providers sometimes difficult to determine because of their operational integration, but NGOs may also suffer from resource constraionts and management inefficiencies similar to those of government providers. Some registered NGOs operate as for-profit providers in practice. Policy development must reflect the strengths and weaknesses of NGOs in particular settings and should be built on NGO advantages over government in terms of resource mobilization, efficiency and/or quality. Policy development will always require a strong government presence in co-ordinating and regulating health care provision, and an NGO sector responsive to the policy goals of government. PMID:10133097

  13. Role of non-governmental organizations in mental health in India

    PubMed Central

    Thara, R.; Patel, Vikram

    2010-01-01

    The paucity of treatment facilities and psychiatrists in the Government sector has widened the treatment gap in mental health. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have played a significant role in the last few decades in not only helping bridge this gap, but also by creating low cost replicable models of care. NGOs are active in a wide array of areas such as child mental health, schizophrenia and psychotic conditions, drug and alcohol abuse, dementia etc. Their activities have included treatment, rehabilitation, community care, research, training and capacity building, awareness and lobbying. This chapter outlines the activities of NGOs in India. This is a revised version of the chapter in the book on mental health to be brought out by Government of India. PMID:21836712

  14. Non-fatal Occupational Injuries among Non-governmental Employees in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    ABAS, ADINEGARA BIN LUTFI; SAID, ABDUL RAZZAK BIN MOHD; MOHAMMED, MOHAMMED AZMAN BIN AZIZ; SATHIAKUMAR, NALINI

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed data on non-fatal occupational injuries reported to Malaysia’s social security organization from 2002 to 2006. There was a decrease in both the absolute number and the incidence rates of these injuries over time. About 40% of cases occurred in the manufacturing sector followed by the service (17%) and trading (17%) sectors. The agriculture sector reported the highest incidence rate (24.1/1,000), followed by the manufacturing sector subcategories of wood-product manufacturing (22.1/1,000) and non-metallic industries (20.8/1,000). Men age 40 to 59 and persons of Indian ethnicity had a greater tendency to sustain injuries. Government and non-governmental organizations should strive to develop strategies to reduce the occupational injuries targeting vulnerable groups. Enforcement of safety measures will further play an important role to ensure that both employees and employers take special precautions to address workplace hazards. PMID:21344818

  15. Effect of a parenting education program on girls’ life satisfaction in governmental guidance schools of Shiraz

    PubMed Central

    KAVEH, MOHAMMAD HOSSIEN; MORADI, LEILA; GHAHREMANI, LEILA; TABATABAEE, HAMID REZA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: One of the main determinants of adolescents’ life satisfaction is parenting skills. Due to the lack of educational trials in this field, this research was done to evaluate the effect of a parenting education program on girls’ life satisfaction in governmental guidance schools of Shiraz.  Methods: This study is an educational randomized controlled trial. At first, 152 female students in 2nd grade of governmental guidance schools and 304 parents (152 mother and 152 father) were selected by multistage random cluster sampling method. Then, they were categorized into experimental and control groups. Before and after the intervention, data were collected from two groups using multidimensional students’ life satisfaction scale with stability (Cronbach's alpha=0.89), test–retest and correlation coefficient (r=0.70). Educational intervention for parents was performed in the experimental group through presentations with question and answer, discussion in small groups and distribution of educational booklets in 5 volumes. Finally, the data were analyzed using SPSS 14 and through Mann-Whitney test, Chi-square test, Fisher’s Exact test, Wilcoxon test. Results: Before the intervention, the experimental and control groups did not show a statistically significant difference based on the demographic variables. Thetotal of life satisfaction scores and also its subscales in the experimental and controlgroup, before and six weeks afterthe educational interventiondid showstatisticallysignificant difference (p<0.001). The scores of differences (pre-test/post-test) in total life satisfaction between the experimental and control groups were statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Conclusion: According to low scores of the students in the pre-test, especially in the control group which didn’t undergo any educational program, holding scheduled educational intervention is necessary. This study not only supports the effectiveness of educational intervention

  16. Reconstructing Holocene Climate Variability and the Indonesian Throughflow in the Western Equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, Y.; Oppo, D. W.; Linsley, B.; Djajadihardja, Y. S.; Ridlo, A.; Syamsudin, F.

    2005-12-01

    The Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) is an important component of modern tropical climate and yet we have very limited understanding of its long term variability. Instrumental data indicate that the ITF modifies the heat and freshwater budgets and the air-sea heat fluxes of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and may exercise a role in the ENSO and Asian monsoon. The ITF has also been noted as an important current for transferring climate signals and their anomalies around the world's oceans in part because it transports warm water from about ~5°N in the WPWP through the Indonesian Seas, into the Indian Ocean at ~12°S. Although we now have a more complete understanding of interannual variations in the ITF over the last several ENSO cycles, nothing is known about longer term, lower frequency ITF variations. Our method for reconstructing the Holocene history of the ITF is based on the strong correlation between thermocline temperatures, ITF transport through the Makassar Strait and the state of ENSO/ WPWP observed in the modern ocean ( Ffield et al., 2000). We are studying gravity and multi cores spanning the depth range of the main ITF (300-700m) from key locations within the Indonesian Seaway. Our goal is to use paired planktic and benthic δ18O and Mg/Ca analyses along depth transects to reconstruct changes in the hydrographic structure of the upper ocean in this region. So far we have generated two low-resolution (every 8cm) records of both planktonic ( Globigerinoides rubber) and benthic ( Cibicidoides sp.) δ18O and Mg/Ca from thermocline depth cores on opposite sides of the Makassar Strait. The paired δ18O and Mg/Ca records show the utility of this method to provide new and potentially exciting insights on the behavior of the thermocline in the Makassar Strait during the deglaciation and the Holocene, and by inference also on long-term ENSO dynamics. The preliminary results suggest that comparable amplitude millennial-scale changes in Makassar Strait thermocline

  17. Preliminary results of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes around Indonesian archipelago region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nugraha, Andri Dian; Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash; Widiyantoro, Sri; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono, Sutiyono, Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-01

    Indonesian archipelago region is located in active tectonic setting and high seismicity zone. During the last decade, Indonesian was experienced with destructive major earthquakes causing damage and victims. The information of precise earthquake location parameters are very important in partular for earthquake early warning to the society and for advance seismic studies. In this study, we attempted to improve hypocenter location compiled by BMKG for time periods of April, 2009 up to June, 2014 for about 22,000 earthquake events around Indonesian region. For the firts time, we applied teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD) to improve hypocenter region in Indonesia region combining regional and teleseismic stations. Hypocenter relocation was performed utilizing local, regional, and teleseismic P-wave arrival time data. Our relocation result show that travel-time RMS errors were greatly reduced compared to the BMKG catalog. Seismicity at shallower depth (less than 50 km) shows significantly improvement especially in depth, and refined shallow geological structures, e.g. trench and major strike slip faults. Clustered seismicity is also detected beneath volcanic region, and probably related volcano activities and also major faults nearby. In the Sunda arc region, seismicity at shallower depth centered at two major distributions parallel to the trench strike direction, i.e. around fore-arc and in mainland that related to major fault, e.g. the Sumatran fault, and volcanic fronts. Below Central Java region, relocated hypocenter result showed double seismic zone pattern. A seismic gap is detected around the Sunda-Banda transition zone where transition between oceanic subduction to continental crust collision of Australian plate occurs. In Eastern Indonesia region, shallow earthquakes are observed related to major strike slip faults, e.g. Sorong and Palu-Koro fault, volcanism, and shallow part of subduction and collision zones. We also compare our

  18. Persistently strong Indonesian Throughflow during marine isotope stage 3: evidence from radiogenic isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Roland; Kraft, Steffanie; Frank, Martin; Haley, Brian; Holbourn, Ann; Kuhnt, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    The Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) connects the western Pacific Ocean with the eastern Indian Ocean, thus forming one of the major near surface current systems of the global thermohaline circulation. The intensity of the ITF has been found to be sensitive to changes in global ocean circulation, fluctuations in sea level, as well as to the prevailing monsoonal conditions of the Indonesian Archipelago and NW Australia. This study presents the first reconstruction of ITF dynamics combining radiogenic isotope compositions of neodymium (Nd), strontium (Sr), and lead (Pb) of the clay-size detrital fraction to investigate changes in sediment provenance, and paleo seawater Nd signatures extracted from the planktonic foraminifera and authigenic Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide coatings of the marine sediments focussing on marine isotope stage 3 (MIS3). Sediment core MD01-2378 was recovered within the framework of the International Marine Global Change Study (IMAGES) and is located in the area of the ITF outflow in the western Timor Sea (Scott Plateau, 13° 04.95‧ S and 121° 47.27‧ E, 1783 m water depth). In order to produce reliable seawater signatures, several extraction methods were tested against each other. The results of the study show that at this core location the extraction of surface water Nd isotope compositions from planktonic foraminifera is complicated by incomplete removal of contributions from Fe-Mn oxyhydroxides carrying ambient bottom water signatures. The bottom water Nd isotope signatures reliably obtained from the sediment coatings (average ɛNd = -5.0) document an essentially invariable water mass composition similar to today throughout the entire MIS3. The radiogenic Nd, Sr, and Pb isotope records of the clay-sized detrital fraction suggest that the Indonesian Archipelago rather than NW Australia was the main particle source at the location of core MD01-2378, and thus indicating a persistently strong ITF during MIS3. Furthermore, the variations of the detrital

  19. Preliminary results of teleseismic double-difference relocation of earthquakes around Indonesian archipelago region

    SciTech Connect

    Nugraha, Andri Dian Widiyantoro, Sri; Shiddiqi, Hasbi Ash; Ramdhan, Mohamad; Wandono,; Sutiyono,; Handayani, Titi; Nugroho, Hendro

    2015-04-24

    Indonesian archipelago region is located in active tectonic setting and high seismicity zone. During the last decade, Indonesian was experienced with destructive major earthquakes causing damage and victims. The information of precise earthquake location parameters are very important in partular for earthquake early warning to the society and for advance seismic studies. In this study, we attempted to improve hypocenter location compiled by BMKG for time periods of April, 2009 up to June, 2014 for about 22,000 earthquake events around Indonesian region. For the firts time, we applied teleseismic double-difference relocation algorithm (teletomoDD) to improve hypocenter region in Indonesia region combining regional and teleseismic stations. Hypocenter relocation was performed utilizing local, regional, and teleseismic P-wave arrival time data. Our relocation result show that travel-time RMS errors were greatly reduced compared to the BMKG catalog. Seismicity at shallower depth (less than 50 km) shows significantly improvement especially in depth, and refined shallow geological structures, e.g. trench and major strike slip faults. Clustered seismicity is also detected beneath volcanic region, and probably related volcano activities and also major faults nearby. In the Sunda arc region, seismicity at shallower depth centered at two major distributions parallel to the trench strike direction, i.e. around fore-arc and in mainland that related to major fault, e.g. the Sumatran fault, and volcanic fronts. Below Central Java region, relocated hypocenter result showed double seismic zone pattern. A seismic gap is detected around the Sunda-Banda transition zone where transition between oceanic subduction to continental crust collision of Australian plate occurs. In Eastern Indonesia region, shallow earthquakes are observed related to major strike slip faults, e.g. Sorong and Palu-Koro fault, volcanism, and shallow part of subduction and collision zones. We also compare our

  20. Indonesia against the trend? Ageing and inter-generational wealth flows in two Indonesian communities.

    PubMed

    Kreager, Philip; Schröder-Butterfill, Elisabeth

    2008-10-01

    Indonesian family systems do not conform to the prevailing image of Asian families, the predominant arrangements being nuclear and bilateral, with an important matrilineal minority. This paper considers the strength of family ties in two communities, focussing particularly on inter-generational flows of support to and from older members. Data are drawn from a longitudinal anthropological demography that combines ethnographic and panel survey methods. Several sources of variation in family ties are detailed, particularly the heterogeneity of support flows - balanced, upward, and downward - that co-exist in both communities. Different norms in each locale give sharply contrasting valuations of these flows. The ability of families to observe norms is influenced by the effectiveness of networks and by socio-economic status. PMID:23750113

  1. Indonesia against the trend? Ageing and inter-generational wealth flows in two Indonesian communities

    PubMed Central

    Kreager, Philip; Schröder-Butterfill, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Indonesian family systems do not conform to the prevailing image of Asian families, the predominant arrangements being nuclear and bilateral, with an important matrilineal minority. This paper considers the strength of family ties in two communities, focussing particularly on inter-generational flows of support to and from older members. Data are drawn from a longitudinal anthropological demography that combines ethnographic and panel survey methods. Several sources of variation in family ties are detailed, particularly the heterogeneity of support flows – balanced, upward, and downward – that co-exist in both communities. Different norms in each locale give sharply contrasting valuations of these flows. The ability of families to observe norms is influenced by the effectiveness of networks and by socio-economic status. PMID:23750113

  2. Virtual Screening of Indonesian Herbal Database as HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yanuar, Arry; Suhartanto, Heru; Mun׳im, Abdul; Anugraha, Bram Hik; Syahdi, Rezi Riadhi

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 (Human immunodeficiency virus type 1)׳s infection is considered as one of most harmful disease known by human, the survivability rate of the host reduced significantly when it developed into AIDS. HIV drug resistance is one of the main problems of its treatment and several drug designs have been done to find new leads compound as the cure. In this study, in silico virtual screening approach was used to find lead molecules from the library or database of natural compounds as HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Virtual screening against Indonesian Herbal Database with AutoDock was performed on HIV-1 protease. From the virtual screening, top ten compounds obtained were 8-Hydroxyapigenin 8-(2",4"-disulfatoglucuronide), Isoscutellarein 4'-methyl ether, Amaranthin, Torvanol A, Ursonic acid, 5-Carboxypyranocyanidin 3-O-(6"-O-malonyl-beta-glucopyranoside), Oleoside, Jacoumaric acid, Platanic acid and 5-Carboxypyranocyanidin 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside. PMID:24616554

  3. The Longitudinal Relations of Regulation and Emotionality to Quality of Indonesian Children’s Socioemotional Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Liew, Jeffrey; Pidada, Sri Untari

    2005-01-01

    Data regarding individual differences in children’s regulation, emotionality, quality of socioemotional functioning, and shyness were obtained from teachers and peers for 112 Indonesian 6th graders. Similar data (plus parents’ reports) also were collected when these children were in 3rd grade. For boys, regulation and low negative emotionality generally predicted positive socioemotional functioning (e.g., social skills, adjustment, prosocial tendencies and peer liking, sympathy) within and across time and across reporters, even at the follow-up when initial levels of regulation or negative emotionality were controlled. For girls, relations were obtained primarily for concurrent teacher reports, probably because girls tended to be fairly well regulated and socially competent and variability in their scores was relatively low. Shyness for both sexes tended to be associated with concurrent measures of low regulation, high negative emotionality, and low quality of social competence. PMID:15355166

  4. Climatology and variability of the Indonesian Throughflow in an eddy-permitting oceanic GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Xuehong

    2005-07-01

    A quasi-global eddy permitting oceanic GCM, LICOM1.0, is run with the forcing of ERA40 daily wind stress from 1958 to 2001. The modelled Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) is reasonable in the aspects of both its water source and major pathways. Compared with the observation, the simulated annual mean and seasonal cycle of the ITF transport are fairly realistic. The interannual variation of the tropical Pacific Ocean plays a more important role in the interannual variability of the ITF transport. The relationship between the ITF and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) also reflects the influence of ENSO. However, the relationship between the ITF transport and the interannual anomalies in the Pacific and Indian Oceans vary with time. During some years, (e.g., 1994), the effect of a strong IOD on the ITF transport is more than that from ENSO.

  5. Virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of influenza a subtype H5N1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parikesit, A. A.; Ardiansah, B.; Handayani, D. M.; Tambunan, U. S. F.; Kerami, D.

    2016-02-01

    Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) H5N1 poses a significant threat to animal and human health worldwide. The number of H5N1 infection in Indonesia is the highest during 2005-2013, with a mortality rate up to 83%. A mutation that occurred in H5N1 strain made it resistant to commercial antiviral agents such as oseltamivir and zanamivir, so the more potent antiviral agent is needed. In this study, virtual screening of Indonesian flavonoid as neuraminidase inhibitor of H5N1 was conducted. Total 491 flavonoid compound obtained from HerbalDB were screened. Molecular docking was performed using MOE 2008.10. This research resulted in Guajavin B as the best ligand.

  6. Virtual screening of Indonesian herbal database as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Syahdi, Rezi Riadhi; Mun'im, Abdul; Suhartanto, Heru; Yanuar, Arry

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 (Human immunodeficiency virus type 1) is a member of retrovirus family that could infect human and causing AIDS disease. AIDS epidemic is one of most destructive diseases in modern era. There were more than 33 million people infected by HIV until 2010. Various studies have been widely employed to design drugs that target the essential enzymes of HIV-1 that is, reverse transcriptase, protease and integrase. In this study, in silico virtual screening approach is used to find lead molecules from the library or database of natural compounds as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor. Virtual screening against Indonesian Herbal Database using AutoDock4 performed on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. From the virtual screening, top ten compounds were mulberrin, plucheoside A, vitexilactone, brucine N-oxide, cyanidin 3-arabinoside, alpha-mangostin, guaijaverin, erycristagallin, morusin and sanggenol N. PMID:23275721

  7. A complex empirical orthogonal function for combining two different variables over Indonesian maritime continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuryanto, Danang Eko

    2016-02-01

    The spatiotemporal patterns of Indonesian Maritime Continent (IMC) convective activity was documented by using two different variables i.e. cloud and wind datasets. In this study, a Complex Empirical Orthogonal Function (CEOF) was used to combining that variables. This method was applied to representing the land-sea-atmosphere interaction of diurnal convective activity in IMC. This study used pseudo-vector to define complex signals from convective index (cloud) as complex part and convergence (wind) as real part. The results showed that the phase patterns of CEOF were more consistent than those of pseudo-vector. Both CEOF1 and CEOF2 have shown semi-annual and annual cycles, respectively. Spatially, CEOF1 represents common patterns, whereas CEOF2 was more toward local patterns and tends to be in random.

  8. How economic development and family planning programs combined to reduce Indonesian fertility.

    PubMed

    Gertler, P J; Molyneaux, J W

    1994-02-01

    This paper examines the contributions of family planning programs, economic development, and women's status to Indonesian fertility decline from 1982 to 1987. Methodologically we unify seemingly conflicting demographic and economic frameworks into a single "structural" proximate-cause model as well as controlling statistically for the targeted (nonrandom) placement of family planning program inputs. The results are consistent with both frameworks: 75% of the fertility decline resulted from increased contraceptive use, but was induced primarily through economic development and improved education and economic opportunities for females. Even so, the dramatic impact of the changes in demand-side factors (education and economic development) on contraceptive use was possible only because there already existed a highly responsive contraceptive supply delivery system. PMID:8005342

  9. Estimates of tidal mixing in the Indonesian archipelago from multidisciplinary INDOMIX in-situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch-Larrouy, Ariane; Atmadipoera, Agus; van Beek, Pieter; Madec, Gurvan; Aucan, Jérôme; Lyard, Florent; Grelet, Jacques; Souhaut, Marc

    2015-12-01

    The Indonesian Mixing program (INDOMIX) was designed to quantify the very strong mixing that transforms Pacific waters into isohaline Indonesian Waters in the Indonesian archipelago. The turbulent dissipation rates and associated mixing were estimated and analyzed using a multidisciplinary approach that combines physical and geochemical in-situ observations: (1) direct measurements of the dissipation using a microstructure profiler, (2) use of density-based fine-scale methods applied to CTD and XCTD data, and (3) study of the vertical distribution of natural radionuclides (radium isotopes and actinium-227). Data were collected at five contrasting stations within the Indonesian archipelago, found above energetic straits or in relatively quiescent large basins. Strong instabilities, inversions of the density profiles and a very strong water mass transformation were observed. A wide range of dissipation values were obtained (between [10-10, 10-4] W kg-1) with spots of higher dissipation in the ocean interior correlated with a strong internal tide signal. Both the fine-scale and micro-scale methods allow us to identify very strong energy dissipation levels above the straits, ranging between [10-7, 10-4] W kg-1, in contrast to lower values at stations further away from the generation sites. The dissipation for the station located in the center of the Halmahera Sea ([10-9, 10-8] W kg-1) is stronger than for the Banda station ([10-11, 10-10] W kg-1), which is even further away from the generation sites. The three approaches agree relatively well and provide vertical eddy diffusivities values ranging between 5×10-4 and 5×10-1 m2 s-1, except in the Banda Sea where values are similar to the ones found in the open ocean (10-6 m2 s-1). CTD and XCTD profilers (deployed between stations) give estimates of dissipation all along the transit. It is found that enhanced mixing occurs preferentially above rough topography, such as in the Ombai Strait, the Halmahera Sea's northern

  10. Two New Tryptamine Derivatives, Leptoclinidamide and (-)-Leptoclinidamine B, from an Indonesian Ascidian Leptoclinides dubius

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Wewengkang, Defny S.; Nishikawa, Teruaki; Rotinsulu, Henki; Mangindaan, Remy E. P.; Namikoshi, Michio

    2012-01-01

    Two new tryptamine-derived alkaloids, named as leptoclinidamide (1) and (-)-leptoclinidamine B (2), were isolated from an Indonesian ascidian Leptoclinides dubius together with C2-α-D-mannosylpyranosyl-L-tryptophan (3). The structure of 1 was assigned on the basis of spectroscopic data for 1 and its N-acetyl derivative (4). Compound 1 was an amide of tryptamine with two β-alanine units. Although the planar structure of 2 is identical to that of the known compound (+)-leptoclinidamine B (5), compound 2 was determined to be the enantiomer of 5 based on amino acid analysis using HPLC methods. Compounds 1 to 4 were evaluated for cytotoxicity against two human cancer cell lines, HCT-15 (colon) and Jurkat (T-cell lymphoma) cells, but none of the compounds showed activity. PMID:22412806

  11. Aspects of late quaternary palynology of Eastern Indonesian deep-sea cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kaars, W. A.

    Samples from ten eastern Indonesian piston cores have been analysed for palynomorphs. We report on the provisional pollen-diagrams of three cores, one from the Seram Trench (core 56), one from the Weber Deep (core 107) and one from the Timor Trench (core 149). Three distinct periods in the vegetational history of northern Australia and New Guinea, including the emerged parts of the Sahul Shelf, can be recognized. A eucalypt open forest vegetation is replaced by grasslands, indicating low rainfall with strong seasonality. The subsequent drowning of the shelf and the probable establishment of extensive mangrove forests on southern New Guinea and the reduction in grassland area in the region, is closely followed by a possible expansion of the gymnosperm mountain forests. This indicates the completion of the last deglaciation, higheer temperature and increased precipitation.

  12. Comparison of Indonesian Throughflow transport observations, Makassar Strait to eastern Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranes, Kevin; Gordon, Arnold L.

    2005-05-01

    The Pacific to Indian Ocean transport within the passageways of the Indonesian seas (ITF) varies on interannual and longer time scales associated with ENSO, the Asian monsoons and interannual climate variability of the Indian Ocean. Although direct current measurements of the ITF are of limited duration, none long enough to properly describe greater than annual variability of the ITF, observations indicate that the bulk of the ITF passes through Makassar Strait. The repeat expendable bathythermograph (XBT) IX1 section begun in 1983 provides the longest time series of the full ITF introduced into the Indian Ocean between northwest Australia and Java. We find that the surface to 600 dbar Makassar Strait transport, as measured by current meter moorings from December 1996 to July 1998, correlates at r = 0.77 +/- 0.14 with the geostrophic transport constructed from IX1 XBT data for that time interval, with a 98 day lag.

  13. Annual variations of carbonaceous PM2.5 in Malaysia: influence by Indonesian peatland fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Y.; Tohno, S.; Amil, N.; Latif, M. T.; Oda, M.; Matsumoto, J.; Mizohata, A.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we quantified carbonaceous PM2.5 in Malaysia through annual observations of PM2.5, focusing on organic compounds derived from biomass burning. We determined organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon and concentrations of solvent-extractable organic compounds (biomarkers derived from biomass burning sources and n-alkanes). We observed seasonal variations in the concentrations of pyrolyzed OC (OP), levoglucosan (LG), mannosan (MN), galactosan, syringaldehyde, vanillic acid (VA) and cholesterol. The average concentrations of OP, LG, MN, galactosan, VA and cholesterol were higher during the southwestern monsoon season (June-September) than during the northeastern monsoon season (December-March), and these differences were statistically significant. Conversely, the syringaldehyde concentration during the southwestern monsoon season was lower. The PM2.5 OP / OC4 mass ratio allowed distinguishing the seven samples, which have been affected by the Indonesian peatland fires (IPFs). In addition, we observed significant differences in the concentrations between the Indonesian peatland fire (IPF) and other samples of many chemical species. Thus, the chemical characteristics of PM2.5 in Malaysia appeared to be significantly influenced by IPFs during the southwestern monsoon season. Furthermore, we evaluated two indicators, the vanillic acid / syringic acid (VA / SA) and LG / MN mass ratios, which have been suggested as indicators of IPFs. The LG / MN mass ratio ranged from 14 to 22 in the IPF samples and from 11 to 31 in the other samples. Thus, the respective variation ranges partially overlapped. Consequently, this ratio did not satisfactorily reflect the effects of IPFs in Malaysia. In contrast, the VA / SA mass ratio may serve as a good indicator, since it significantly differed between the IPF and other samples. However, the OP / OC4 mass ratio provided more remarkable differences than the VA / SA mass ratio, offering an even better indicator. Finally, we

  14. Comprehensive laboratory measurements of biomass-burning emissions: 1. Emissions from Indonesian, African, and other fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, T. J.; Kleiss, B.; Yokelson, R. J.; Holzinger, R.; Crutzen, P. J.; Hao, W. M.; Saharjo, B. H.; Ward, D. E.

    2003-12-01

    Trace gas and particle emissions were measured from 47 laboratory fires burning 16 regionally to globally significant fuel types. Instrumentation included the following: open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy; proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry; filter sampling with subsequent analysis of particles with diameter <2.5 μm for organic and elemental carbon and other elements; and canister sampling with subsequent analysis by gas chromatography (GC)/flame ionization detector, GC/electron capture detector, and GC/mass spectrometry. The emissions of 26 compounds are reported by fuel type. The results include the first detailed measurements of the emissions from Indonesian fuels. Carbon dioxide, CO, CH4, NH3, HCN, methanol, and acetic acid were the seven most abundant emissions (in order) from burning Indonesian peat. Acetol (hydroxyacetone) was a major, previously unobserved emission from burning rice straw (21-34 g/kg). The emission factors for our simulated African fires are consistent with field data for African fires for compounds measured in both the laboratory and the field. However, the higher concentrations and more extensive instrumentation in this work allowed quantification of at least 10 species not previously quantified for African field fires (in order of abundance): acetaldehyde, phenol, acetol, glycolaldehyde, methylvinylether, furan, acetone, acetonitrile, propenenitrile, and propanenitrile. Most of these new compounds are oxygenated organic compounds, which further reinforces the importance of these reactive compounds as initial emissions from global biomass burning. A few high-combustion-efficiency fires emitted very high levels of elemental (black) carbon, suggesting that biomass burning may produce more elemental carbon than previously estimated.

  15. Maternal agency influences the prevalence of diarrhea and acute respiratory tract infections among young Indonesian children.

    PubMed

    Agustina, Rina; Shankar, Anita V; Ayuningtyas, Azalea; Achadi, Endang L; Shankar, Anuraj H

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between measures of mother's caretaking, practice and individual agency on acute diarrhea and respiratory tract infections (ARTIs) of Indonesian children. Using population-based household data from the Indonesian Demographic Health Surveys for 2002-2003 (n = 9,151 children) and 2007 (n = 9,714 children), we selected 28 indicators related to mother' caretaking, and applied principal component analysis to derive indices for access to care, practice and experience, and agency. The association between index quartiles (level 1-4) and the prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in the youngest child <5 years of age was assessed with multivariate logistic regression adjusting for socioeconomic status, residence type, mother's age and education, family size, child's age and sex, immunization status and received vitamin A supplementation. Moderate levels (level 3) of practice and experience were associated with decreased diarrheal risk (adjusted OR 0.86, 95 % CI 0.75-0.98), but not for ARTIs. Children of mothers with higher levels (level 4) of agency were protected against both diarrhea (adjusted OR 0.68, 95 % CI 0.60-0.77) and ARTIs (adjusted OR 0.77, 95 % CI 0.66-0.91). Stratified analyses with child's age and mother's education, and tests of interaction, showed that agency had a stronger effect on diarrhea and ARTIs prevalence in children <2 years of age. Maternal caretaking, especially agency, is strongly associated with lower prevalence of diarrhea and ARTIs in younger children. Interventions specifically designed to promote maternal autonomy and decision-making may lead to improved child health. PMID:25108503

  16. The connection of the Indonesian Throughflow, South Indian Ocean Countercurrent and the Leeuwin Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Erwin; Le Bars, Dewi; de Ruijter, Wilhelmus P. M.

    2016-06-01

    East of Madagascar, the shallow "South Indian Ocean Counter Current (SICC)" flows from west to east across the Indian Ocean against the direction of the wind-driven circulation. The SICC impinges on west Australia and enhances the sea level slope, strengthening the alongshore coastal jet: the Leeuwin Current (LC), which flows poleward along Australia. An observed transport maximum of the LC around 22° S can likely be attributed to this impingement of the SICC. The LC is often described as a regional coastal current that is forced by an offshore meridional density gradient or sea surface slope. However, little is known about the controls of these open-ocean gradients. The regional circulation system is embedded in the subtropical "super gyre" that connects the Indo-Pacific via the Tasman Gateway and the Indonesian passages. The Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) circulates through the Indian Ocean back into the Pacific south of Australia. This return pathway appears to be partly trapped in the upper layer north of an outcrop line. It is redirected along this outcrop line and joins the eastward flow of the SICC. To study the connection of the basin-scale and the inter-ocean-scale dynamics, we apply both an ocean general circulation model and a conceptual two-layer model. Shutdown of the ITF in the models leads to a large decrease in Leeuwin Current transport. Most of the SICC was found to then reconnect to the internal gyre circulation in the Indian Ocean. ITF, SICC and LC thus appear to be dynamically connected.

  17. Large-scale sea level, thermocline, and wind variations in the Indonesian throughflow region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, Nancy A.; Hautala, Susan; Chong, Jackson; Pariwono, John

    1996-05-01

    The Indonesian throughflow is presumed to be driven by a sea level gradient from the Pacific to the Indian Ocean. Deep throughflow transport may also be driven by a steric gradient between the two basins. The sea level gradient, in turn, is thought to be maintained by the differing wind patterns in the two basins: monsoonal in the Indian Ocean and trades in the western equatorial Pacific. In the interaction between sea level, wind stress, and thermocline depth as identified from historical measurements, we find (1) over the Indian, Indonesian, and equatorial Pacific basins and specifically within the throughflow region, sea level, and thermocline seasonal variations are negatively correlated (sea level rise corresponding to thermocline deepening) and sea level and meridional wind stress are also correlated; (2) the expected strong seasonal gradients in sea level through the eastern throughflow region (near the island of Timor) are found, though without an accompanying thermocline depth gradient; (3) seasonal convergence in baroclinic, upper ocean throughflow transport previously identified [Meyers et al., 1995] in the Timor Sea is associated with changes in sea level as well as upper ocean dynamic height at annual period but not at semiannual; (4) interannual variability explains more of the sea level variance in the eastern throughflow region than is explained by seasonal harmonics; however, there does not appear to be a strong interannual signal in the sea level gradient to drive fluctuations in the upper ocean throughflow. We hypothesize that seasonal variability in the upper layer throughflow and interannual variability in the deep throughflow are the predominant results of the complex interaction of forcing mechanisms.

  18. The construction of community participation: village family planning groups and the Indonesian state.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Jeremy

    2002-04-01

    Indonesia's family planning program has been one of the most effective in the developing world in promoting contraceptive use and contributing to fertility transition. In evaluating why the program has worked, analysts have given much credit to a network of village family planning groups that developed from the 1970s to the 1990s and that blanketed the archipelago. These groups, composed primarily of female volunteers, made contraception available to women in even the most remote parts of the country, and acted as agents of family planning motivation. They have been labeled by the Indonesian state family planning agency as an example of effective community participation on a national scale. In this paper, I investigate this claim and find it to be simplistic. I provide extensive evidence that the creation of this network was orchestrated by the Indonesian state. On the other hand, I show that these groups are not fully state entities, as they have several characteristics that mark them as socially embedded institutions. They are best labeled as unusual state-society hybrids. In my investigation I draw on one of the newest paradigms in the discipline of political science--the state-society approach--to uncover the odd nature of this family planning network. More deeply, I argue that the state-society approach ought to be adopted in family planning analysis on a comprehensive basis. The traditional organizational and social-demographic approaches that have dominated the field offer only limited understanding of the nature of family planning programs in developing countries. The state-society approach is ideally suited to identifying how family planning programs are institutions of a political nature, embedded in states and societies, and transformed by and transformative of each. PMID:11989957

  19. Abrupt increase in east Indonesian rainfall from flooding of the Sunda Shelf ˜9500 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Michael L.; Drysdale, Russell N.; Gagan, Michael K.; Zhao, Jian-xin; Hellstrom, John C.; Ayliffe, Linda K.; Hantoro, Wahyoe S.

    2013-08-01

    We present a precisely dated, multi-proxy stalagmite record from Liang Luar Cave, Flores (southeast Indonesia) that reveals a rapid increase in Indonesian monsoon rainfall at ˜9.5 ka. A "ramp-fitting" method for detecting statistically significant inflections in a time-series was applied to the stalagmite δ18O, Mg/Ca, and Sr/Ca profiles to quantify the precise timing and magnitude of an abrupt increase in monsoon strength over a period of ˜350 years. Previously published lake-level records from the monsoon-affected Australian interior show a sudden intensification of the Australian monsoon at ˜14 ka. However, our records indicate that monsoon intensification in Flores occured ˜4-5 kyr later. The timing of the monsoon shift in Flores is synchronous with the rapid expansion of rainforest in northeast Australia and regional freshening of the southern Makassar Strait which, under present-day conditions, is sensitive to monsoon variability. The freshening of southern Makassar was coeval with an abrupt ˜1.5 °C cooling in the upper thermocline of the Timor Sea ˜9.5 ka, indicative of reduced surface heat transport by the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) when the Java Sea opened during postglacial sea-level rise. This suggests that the abrupt increase in monsoon rainfall on Flores was not due to a change in the ITF - because a decrease in rainfall would be expected to accompany cooler local sea surface temperatures (SSTs) - but rather by the sudden increase in ocean surface area and/or temperature in the monsoon source region as the Sunda Shelf flooded during deglaciation. We propose that it was the abrupt intensification of the monsoon through the late deglaciation that maintained the subsequent structure of the ITF following the flooding of the Sunda Shelf at ˜9.5 ka.

  20. Interactions between the Indonesian Throughflow and circulations in the Indian and Pacific Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreary, Julian P.; Miyama, Toru; Furue, Ryo; Jensen, Tommy; Kang, Hyoun-Woo; Bang, Bohyun; Qu, Tangdong

    2007-10-01

    Circulations associated with the Indonesian Throughflow (IT), particularly concerning subsurface currents in the Pacific Ocean, are studied using three types of models: a linear, continuously stratified (LCS) model and a nonlinear, 4{1}/{2}-layer model (LOM), both confined to the Indo-Pacific basin; and a global, ocean general circulation model (COCO). Solutions are wind forced, and obtained with both open and closed Indonesian passages. Layers 1-4 of LOM correspond to near-surface, thermocline, subthermocline (thermostad), and upper-intermediate (AAIW) water, respectively, and analogous layers are defined for COCO. The three models share a common dynamics. When the Indonesian passages are abruptly opened, barotropic and baroclinic waves radiate into the interiors of both oceans. The steady-state, barotropic flow field from the difference (open - closed) solution is an anticlockwise circulation around the perimeter of the southern Indian Ocean, with its meridional branches confined to the western boundaries of both oceans. In contrast, steady-state, baroclinic flows extend into the interiors of both basins, a consequence of damping of baroclinic waves by diapycnal processes (internal diffusion, upwelling and subduction, and convective overturning). Deep IT-associated currents are the subsurface parts of these baroclinic flows. In the Pacific, they tend to be directed eastward and poleward, extend throughout the basin, and are closed by upwelling in the eastern ocean and Subpolar Gyre. Smaller-scale aspects of their structure vary significantly among the models, depending on the nature of their diapycnal mixing. At the exit to the Indonesian Seas, the IT is highly surface trapped in all the models, with a prominent, deep core in the LCS model and in LOM. The separation into two cores is due to near-equatorial, eastward-flowing, subsurface currents in the Pacific Ocean, which drain layer 2 and layer 3 waters from the western ocean to supply water for the upwelling

  1. 36 CFR 1275.52 - Restriction of materials of general historical significance unrelated to abuses of governmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... general historical significance unrelated to abuses of governmental power. 1275.52 Section 1275.52 Parks... PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE PRESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL MATERIALS OF THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION Access by the Public § 1275.52 Restriction of materials of general historical significance unrelated...

  2. 36 CFR 1275.52 - Restriction of materials of general historical significance unrelated to abuses of governmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... general historical significance unrelated to abuses of governmental power. 1275.52 Section 1275.52 Parks... PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE PRESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL MATERIALS OF THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION Access by the Public § 1275.52 Restriction of materials of general historical significance unrelated...

  3. 36 CFR 1275.52 - Restriction of materials of general historical significance unrelated to abuses of governmental...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... general historical significance unrelated to abuses of governmental power. 1275.52 Section 1275.52 Parks... PRESERVATION AND PROTECTION OF AND ACCESS TO THE PRESIDENTIAL HISTORICAL MATERIALS OF THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION Access by the Public § 1275.52 Restriction of materials of general historical significance unrelated...

  4. The New Zealand Experiment: Assessment-Driven Curriculum--Managing Standards, Competition and Performance to Strengthen Governmentality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Following the Tomorrow's Schools administrative restructuring, a second wave of educational change installed globalised discourses as governmentality policies in Aotearoa New Zealand. Drawing on Foucault's "toolkit", this genealogical policy chronology traces the transformation of curriculum and assessment into a specific political…

  5. The Role of International Non-Governmental Organisations in Promoting Adult Education for Social Change: A Research Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Lutz; Hickling-Hudson, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the role of International Non-Governmental Organisations (INGOs) in adult education as one instrument of global civil society to effect social change. Postcolonial theory is utilized to explore the complex relationships between the concepts of "globalisation", "global civil, society", and "adult education for social change". In…

  6. A Conceptual Model for Supporting Para-Teacher Learning in an Indian Non-Governmental Organization (NGO)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raval, Harini; McKenney, Susan; Pieters, Jules

    2010-01-01

    Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are being recognized globally for their influential role in realizing the UN Millennium Development Goal of education for all in developing countries. NGOs mostly employ untrained para-educators for grassroots activities. The professional development of these teachers is critical for NGO effectiveness, yet…

  7. 34 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Appendix I, Standards for Audit of Governmental Organizations, Programs, Activities, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... expression of an opinion on financial reports of governmental organizations, only fully qualified public... shall be conducted * * * by independent certified public accountants or by independent licensed public... of a State or other political subdivision of the United States: Except that independent...

  8. 36 CFR 212.53 - Coordination with Federal, State, county, and other local governmental entities and tribal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Roads, Trails, and Areas for Motor Vehicle Use § 212.53 Coordination with Federal, State, county, and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coordination with Federal, State, county, and other local governmental entities and tribal governments. 212.53 Section 212.53...

  9. 36 CFR 212.53 - Coordination with Federal, State, county, and other local governmental entities and tribal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Roads, Trails, and Areas for Motor Vehicle Use § 212.53 Coordination with Federal, State, county, and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coordination with Federal, State, county, and other local governmental entities and tribal governments. 212.53 Section 212.53...

  10. 36 CFR 212.53 - Coordination with Federal, State, county, and other local governmental entities and tribal...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Roads, Trails, and Areas for Motor Vehicle Use § 212.53 Coordination with Federal, State, county, and... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coordination with Federal, State, county, and other local governmental entities and tribal governments. 212.53 Section 212.53...

  11. Planning State Fiscal Policies to Meet Local Needs. Special Education in America: Its Legal and Governmental Foundations Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weintraub, Frederick J.; Higgins, Scottie

    Part of a series on the legal and governmental foundations governing education of handicapped and gifted children, the document explores the local variables that uniquely affect the cost of educating handicapped children and which thereby should be considered when developing state special education fiscal policies. An initial section outlines…

  12. Hospital Library Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  13. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  14. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature. PMID:10283019

  15. Governmental responses and smallholders' adaptations to climatic variability in southeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardero Jimenez, Silvia Sofia; Schmook, Birgit; Christman, Zachary; Radel, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Maize agriculture comprises a third of the area under cultivation in Mexico (75 million hectares), with only a quarter of this crop irrigated artificially. With the great dependence of the country's dominant crop on natural rainfall, there is potential for major losses in maize production due to climatic events, such as irregular rainfalls, droughts, and hurricanes. In 2012, droughts alone caused losses of 16 billion Mexican pesos nationwide in the agricultural sector. Over the last decades, political and economic pressures in the agrarian sector have further stressed Mexican smallholder farmers, as they have to respond to a combination of economic and climatic factors. This interdisciplinary study first documents local climate changes and then explores smallholder farmers' adaptations and governmental policy responses to the variable and changing precipitation and temperature patterns across southeastern Mexico. To assess local climate changes, we analyzed precipitation and temperature data from the land-based weather station network of CONAGUA for the 1973-2012 period. Precipitation anomalies were estimated to evaluate the annual and seasonal stability, deficit, or surplus; and linear regressions used to evaluate precipitation and temperature trends. Climatic analysis demonstrated, 1) a considerable increase in temperature across the study area; 2) a decline in precipitation across a sub-section; 3) increased drought frequency; and 4) an increase in negative anomalies in recent years. We then combine findings from our previous research (Mardero et al. 2014 and Mardero et al. 2015), based on interviews with 150 swidden maize smallholders in 10 communities, to new data from in-depth interviews with managers of local and regional agricultural associations and with members of governmental institutions in charge of climate policy implementation (n=19). The new data allow us to explore governmental responses to climatic variability in the agricultural sector in direct

  16. The effects of governmental protected areas and social initiatives for land protection on the conservation of Mexican amphibians.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Ochoa, Leticia; Urbina-Cardona, J Nicolás; Vázquez, Luis-Bernardo; Flores-Villela, Oscar; Bezaury-Creel, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, biodiversity conservation gap analyses have been focused on governmental protected areas (PAs). However, an increasing number of social initiatives in conservation (SICs) are promoting a new perspective for analysis. SICs include all of the efforts that society implements to conserve biodiversity, such as land protection, from private reserves to community zoning plans some of which have generated community-protected areas. This is the first attempt to analyze the status of conservation in Latin America when some of these social initiatives are included. The analyses were focused on amphibians because they are one of the most threatened groups worldwide. Mexico is not an exception, where more than 60% of its amphibians are endemic. We used a niche model approach to map the potential and real geographical distribution (extracting the transformed areas) of the endemic amphibians. Based on remnant distribution, all the species have suffered some degree of loss, but 36 species have lost more than 50% of their potential distribution. For 50 micro-endemic species we could not model their potential distribution range due to the small number of records per species, therefore the analyses were performed using these records directly. We then evaluated the efficiency of the existing set of governmental protected areas and established the contribution of social initiatives (private and community) for land protection for amphibian conservation. We found that most of the species have some proportion of their potential ecological niche distribution protected, but 20% are not protected at all within governmental PAs. 73% of endemic and 26% of micro-endemic amphibians are represented within SICs. However, 30 micro-endemic species are not represented within either governmental PAs or SICs. This study shows how the role of land conservation through social initiatives is therefore becoming a crucial element for an important number of species not protected by

  17. The Effects of Governmental Protected Areas and Social Initiatives for Land Protection on the Conservation of Mexican Amphibians

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-Ochoa, Leticia; Urbina-Cardona, J. Nicolás; Vázquez, Luis-Bernardo; Flores-Villela, Oscar; Bezaury-Creel, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, biodiversity conservation gap analyses have been focused on governmental protected areas (PAs). However, an increasing number of social initiatives in conservation (SICs) are promoting a new perspective for analysis. SICs include all of the efforts that society implements to conserve biodiversity, such as land protection, from private reserves to community zoning plans some of which have generated community-protected areas. This is the first attempt to analyze the status of conservation in Latin America when some of these social initiatives are included. The analyses were focused on amphibians because they are one of the most threatened groups worldwide. Mexico is not an exception, where more than 60% of its amphibians are endemic. We used a niche model approach to map the potential and real geographical distribution (extracting the transformed areas) of the endemic amphibians. Based on remnant distribution, all the species have suffered some degree of loss, but 36 species have lost more than 50% of their potential distribution. For 50 micro-endemic species we could not model their potential distribution range due to the small number of records per species, therefore the analyses were performed using these records directly. We then evaluated the efficiency of the existing set of governmental protected areas and established the contribution of social initiatives (private and community) for land protection for amphibian conservation. We found that most of the species have some proportion of their potential ecological niche distribution protected, but 20% are not protected at all within governmental PAs. 73% of endemic and 26% of micro-endemic amphibians are represented within SICs. However, 30 micro-endemic species are not represented within either governmental PAs or SICs. This study shows how the role of land conservation through social initiatives is therefore becoming a crucial element for an important number of species not protected by

  18. Final Technical Report. Sault Tribe Building Efficiency Audits of Tribally-Owned Governmental Buildings and Residential Tribal Housing

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, Jeffrey W.

    2015-03-27

    The Tribe is working to reduce energy consumption and expense in Tribally-owned governmental buildings and low income housing sites. In 2009, the Tribe applied to the U. S. Department of Energy for funding to conduct energy audits of Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Findings from the energy audits would define the extent and types of energy efficiency improvements needed, establish a basis for energy priorities, strategies and action plans, and provide a benchmark for measuring improvements from energy efficiency implementations. In 2010, the DOE awarded a grant in the amount of $95,238 to the Tribe to fund the energy audits of nine governmental buildings and to pay for travel expenses associated with attendance and participation at the DOE annual program reviews. In 2011, the Tribe applied for and was awarded a DOE grant in the amount of $75,509 to conduct energy audits of the remaining 30 Tribally-owned governmental buildings. Repeating mobilization steps performed during the first DOE energy audits grant, the Tribe initiated the second round of governmental building energy audits by completing energy auditor procurement. The selected energy auditor successfully passed DOE debarment and Sault Tribe background clearances. The energy audits contract was awarded to U. P. Engineers and Architects, Inc. of Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan. The Tribe continued mobilizing for the energy audits by providing the energy auditor with one year of electric, gas and water utility invoice copies per building, as well as supplemental building information, such as operating hours. The Tribe also contacted building occupants to coordinate scheduling for the on-site energy audit inspections and arranged for facilities management personnel to guide the energy auditor through the buildings and answer questions regarding building systems.

  19. 20 CFR 661.110 - What is the role of the Department of Labor as the Federal governmental partner in the governance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... as the Federal governmental partner in the governance of the workforce investment system? 661.110... AND LOCAL GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT... governmental partner in the governance of the workforce investment system? (a) Successful governance of...

  20. 20 CFR 661.120 - What are the roles of the local and State governmental partner in the governance of the workforce...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... governmental partner in the governance of the workforce investment system? 661.120 Section 661.120 Employees... GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT General Governance Provisions § 661.120 What are the roles of the local and State governmental partner in...

  1. 20 CFR 661.120 - What are the roles of the local and State governmental partner in the governance of the workforce...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... governmental partner in the governance of the workforce investment system? 661.120 Section 661.120 Employees... GOVERNANCE OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT General Governance Provisions § 661.120 What are the roles of the local and State governmental partner in...

  2. Hospital Board Infrastructure and Functions: The Role of Governance in Financial Performance

    PubMed Central

    Culica, Dan; Prezio, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Increased stake of boards in the leadership of the hospitals makes them play a significant role in the financial health of their institutions. Understanding of the correct approach to successfully fulfill this purpose is critical for preparing their organizations for positioning adequately in the health care market. Governmental agencies and public companies, including insurers, will be interested in the extent to which hospital boards have adopted the provisions of accounting reform laws like those introduced by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. It will remain for the boards to balance their oversight role for financial performance with the pressures of financial accountability. PMID:19440418

  3. Preliminary investigation of biogenic gas production in Indonesian low rank coals and implications for a renewable energy source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susilawati, Rita; Papendick, Sam L.; Gilcrease, Patrick C.; Esterle, Joan S.; Golding, Suzanne D.; Mares, Tennille E.

    2013-11-01

    Indonesia has abundant coal resources at depths suitable to contain substantial volumes of naturally occurring methane, which are currently being explored. Most Indonesian coals are thermally immature, but are composed of hydrogen-rich organic components that are presumed to make them excellent substrates for biogenic methane production. Gas isotope results from pilot wells in South Sumatra, reported in this study, are interpreted to indicate biogenic origins for the methane. Corresponding formation water samples were collected and incubated, and show the presence of indigenous microbial communities capable of producing methane from Indonesian and Australian coal. Although these results are only preliminary, they are promising and support the possibility of Indonesia developing bio renewable energy from coal seams.

  4. Analysis prediction of Indonesian banks (BCA, BNI, MANDIRI) using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) and investment strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trianto, Andriantama Budi; Hadi, I. M.; Liong, The Houw; Purqon, Acep

    2015-09-01

    Indonesian economical development is growing well. It has effect for their invesment in Banks and the stock market. In this study, we perform prediction for the three blue chips of Indonesian bank i.e. BCA, BNI, and MANDIRI by using the method of Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) with Takagi-Sugeno rules and Generalized bell (Gbell) as the membership function. Our results show that ANFIS perform good prediction with RMSE for BCA of 27, BNI of 5.29, and MANDIRI of 13.41, respectively. Furthermore, we develop an active strategy to gain more benefit. We compare between passive strategy versus active strategy. Our results shows that for the passive strategy gains 13 million rupiah, while for the active strategy gains 47 million rupiah in one year. The active investment strategy significantly shows gaining multiple benefit than the passive one.

  5. A case study of the elder care functions of a Chilean non-governmental organization.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Javier; Angel, Ronald J; Angel, Jacqueline L

    2007-05-01

    This paper examines the history and role of a faith-based Chilean nonprofit organization, Hogar de Cristo (Christ's Home), in providing elderly care in the context of recent economic and sociopolitical changes in the country. Chile has been at the forefront of market-based reforms in the delivery of social services and its experience provides insights into the intersecting roles of the state, the market, and the non-governmental sector in addressing basic human needs. Based on in-depth interviews, archival data, and field observations, we investigate the institutional, political, and social factors that account for the organization's success. These result from a number of factors including a capacity to adapt to changing client needs, the successful adoption of an entrepreneurial style of management and outreach, and the building of trust through effective public relations. Although conditions unique to the situation of this faith-based organization in a highly Catholic country may account for its success, the experience of Hogar de Cristo provides useful lessons for the future of elder care policy in the Americas. PMID:17376575

  6. Exploring fragility: industrial delocalization, occupational and environmental risks, and non-governmental organizations.

    PubMed

    Rigotto, Raquel Maria

    2009-03-01

    What is the role of non-governmental organizations--NGOs--in the process of industrial delocalization and socio-spatial redistribution of occupational and environmental risks? In an attempt to contribute to this debate, this study approaches the issue in a very specific socio-historical context, marked by recent accelerated industrialization in a small town in Northeast Brazil. Based on semi-structured interviews with leaders of four local NGOs, the way they perceive and value the risks introduced into the area and relations between industrialization and local development are analyzed. Findings show a strong adherence to the industrial plan by workers' trade unions, whilst other NGOs are highly critical with regard thereto, but undertake no social or political activity regarding the issues they identify. This phenomenon is discussed in terms of the modus operandi of ideology and its strategies for symbolic construction, enabling a comprehensive reinterpretation of how capital also benefits, in its mobility, from local society's fragility in organizing and protecting quality of life and public health. PMID:19440428

  7. Exploring Fragility: Industrial Delocalization, Occupational and Environmental Risks, and Non-Governmental Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Rigotto, Raquel Maria

    2009-01-01

    What is the role of non-governmental organizations – NGOs – in the process of industrial delocalization and socio-spatial redistribution of occupational and environmental risks? In an attempt to contribute to this debate, this study approaches the issue in a very specific socio-historical context, marked by recent accelerated industrialization in a small town in Northeast Brazil. Based on semi-structured interviews with leaders of four local NGOs, the way they perceive and value the risks introduced into the area and relations between industrialization and local development are analyzed. Findings show a strong adherence to the industrial plan by workers’ trade unions, whilst other NGOs are highly critical with regard thereto, but undertake no social or political activity regarding the issues they identify. This phenomenon is discussed in terms of the modus operandi of ideology and its strategies for symbolic construction, enabling a comprehensive reinterpretation of how capital also benefits, in its mobility, from local society’s fragility in organizing and protecting quality of life and public health. PMID:19440428

  8. The role of space related non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in capacity building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukaszczyk, A.; Williamson, R.

    2010-02-01

    Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) play a unique role in international affairs, providing access to resources, expertise, and assistance to supplement State resources. Sometimes the diplomatic skills and unofficial access of NGOs to policymakers through Track Two diplomacy can move a previously stalled critical issue forward and assist policymakers from different countries to find common ground outside official channels. Because they work outside of official channels, they are not bound by State policy that may inhibit negotiations between States. Some also have a convening power that sometimes makes it possible for State representatives to meet discipline experts and each other for informal discussions on issues of mutual interest. Finally, NGOs can draw attention to issues that may be overlooked or avoided by State organizations. This paper examines the ways in which NGOs can assist in building scientific, technical, educational, and legal and policy expertise related to space and Earth science, technology and governance of space activities. In particular, it will explore and analyze the ways in which organizations such as the Space Generation Advisory Council, EURISY, the Planetary Society and Secure World Foundation contribute to building capacity in developing countries.

  9. Financial management of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Speranzo, A J

    1984-05-01

    The effect of hospital reimbursement systems on the financial management of hospitals is briefly discussed, and the organization of hospital financial operations is reviewed. The implementation of Medicare prospective pricing will change the way in which hospital finances are managed. Health-care managers will be concerned with the profitability of product lines, or diagnosis-related groups, in future strategic planning efforts. The hospital's finance department consists of several traditional areas that exist in almost all financial organizations. The functions and interactions of these various areas are discussed in light of previous and current hospital reimbursement strategies. Staffing of the finance department and the duties of the hospital's chief financial officer are also described. The prospective pricing system of hospital reimbursement and increasing pressure from the business community to stem the rising costs of health care will produce changes in the medical and financial operations of the hospital industry over the next decade. PMID:6375357

  10. Intake of essential fatty acids in Indonesian children: secondary analysis of data from a nationally representative survey.

    PubMed

    Neufingerl, Nicole; Djuwita, Ratna; Otten-Hofman, Anke; Nurdiani, Reisi; Garczarek, Ursula; Sulaeman, Ahmad; Zock, Peter L; Eilander, Ans

    2016-02-28

    Essential fatty acids (EFA) such as α-linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA) are needed for healthy growth and development of children. Worldwide, reliable intake data of EFA are often lacking. The objective of this study was to investigate dietary intake of EFA in Indonesian children. Dietary intake data of 4-12-year-old children (n 45,821) from a nationally representative Indonesian survey were used to estimate median intake and distribution of population fatty acid intake. Missing data on individual fatty acids in the Indonesian food composition table were complemented through chemical analyses of national representative food samples and imputation of data from the US nutrient database. Nutrient adequacy ratios were calculated as a percentage of FAO/WHO intake recommendations. The medians of total fat intake of the children was 26·7 (10th-90th percentile 11·2-40·0) percentage of total daily energy (%E). Intakes of fatty acids were 4·05 (10th-90th percentile 1·83-7·22) %E for total PUFA, 3·36 (10th-90th percentile 1·14-6·29) %E for LA and 0·20 (10th-90th percentile 0·07-0·66) %E for ALA. Median intake of PUFA was 67 % and that of ALA 40 % of the minimum amounts recommended by FAO/WHO. These data indicate that a majority of Indonesian children has intakes of PUFA and specifically ALA that are lower than recommended intake levels. Total fat and LA intakes may be suboptimal for a smaller yet considerable proportion of children. Public health initiatives should provide practical guidelines to promote consumption of PUFA-rich foods. PMID:26824732

  11. Management challenges at the intersection of public policy environments and strategic decision making in public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Longest, Beaufort B

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals in the United States are heavily impacted by public policies that affect them. For example, Medicare and Medicaid programs account for more than half the revenue in most of the nation's almost 5,000 community hospitals, including the almost 1,100 public hospitals controlled by state and local governments (American Hospital Association, 2012). The public hospitals are especially closely aligned with and controlled by governmental entities compared with hospitals with other kinds of sponsorship. This article addresses the management challenges at the intersection of the strategic management of public hospitals and their public policy environments. Public hospitals are complicated entities designed not only to provide health services but also in many cases to play key roles in health-related research and education and to play important general economic development roles in their communities. The multi-faceted strategic decision making in these organizations is as heavily affected by their public policy environments as by their business, demographic, technological or other external environments. Effectively managing the intersection of their public policy environments and their strategic management is indeed vital for contemporary public hospitals. This article is intended to clarify certain aspects of this intersection through a description and model of the strategic activity in public hospitals and the connection between this activity and their external environments. Specific attention is focused on the concept of public policy environments and their features. Attention is also given to how managers can assess public policy environments and incorporate the results into strategic activities. PMID:23113418

  12. Identification of a novel nonsense mutation in RP1 that causes autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa in an Indonesian family

    PubMed Central

    Siemiatkowska, Anna M.; Astuti, Galuh D.N.; Arimadyo, Kentar; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Faradz, Sultana M.H.; Cremers, Frans P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to identify the underlying molecular genetic defect in an Indonesian family with three affected individuals who had received a diagnosis of retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Methods Clinical evaluation of the family members included measuring visual acuity and fundoscopy, and assessing visual field and color vision. Genomic DNA of the three affected individuals was analyzed with Illumina 700k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, and homozygous regions were identified using PLINK software. Mutation analysis was performed with sequence analysis of the retinitis pigmentosa 1 (RP1) gene that resided in one of the homozygous regions. The frequency of the identified mutation in the Indonesian population was determined with TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Results A novel homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 4 of the RP1 gene, c.1012C>T (p.R338*), was identified in the proband and her two affected sisters. Unaffected family members either carried two wild-type alleles or were heterozygous carriers of the mutation. The mutation was not present in 184 Indonesian control samples. Conclusions Most of the previously reported RP1 mutations are inherited in an autosomal dominant mode, and appear to cluster in exon 4. Here, we identified a novel homozygous p.R338* mutation in exon 4 of RP1, and speculate on the mutational mechanisms of different RP1 mutations underlying dominant and recessive RP. PMID:23077400

  13. The Influence of the 2006 Indonesian Biomass Burning Aerosols on Tropical Dynamics Studied with the GEOS-5 AGCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Lesley; Duncan, Bryan; Pawson, Steven; Colarco, Peter; Chin, Mian; Randles, Cynthia; Diehl, Thomas; Nielsen, Eric

    2009-01-01

    The direct and semi-direct effects of aerosols produced by Indonesian biomass burning (BB) during August November 2006 on tropical dynamics have been examined using NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). The AGCM includes CO, which is transported by resolved and sub-grid processes and subject to a linearized chemical loss rate. Simulations were driven by two sets of aerosol forcing fields calculated offline, one that included Indonesian BB aerosol emissions and one that did not. In order to separate the influence of the aerosols from internal model variability, the means of two ten-member ensembles were compared. Diabatic heating from BB aerosols increased temperatures over Indonesia between 150 and 400 hPa. The higher temperatures resulted in strong increases in upward grid-scale vertical motion, which increased water vapor and CO over Indonesia. In October, the largest increases in water vapor were found in the mid-troposphere (25%) while the largest increases in CO occurred just below the tropopause (80 ppbv or 50%). Diabatic heating from the Indonesian BB aerosols caused CO to increase by 9% throughout the tropical tropopause layer in November and 5% in the lower stratosphere in December. The results demonstrate that aerosol heating plays an important role in the transport of BB pollution and troposphere-to-stratosphere transport. Changes in vertical motion and cloudiness induced by aerosol heating can also alter the transport and phase of water vapor in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere.

  14. Awareness, agreement, adoption and adherence to type 2 diabetes mellitus guidelines: a survey of Indonesian primary care physicians

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To assess the degree of awareness, agreement, adoption and adherence of physicians in Indonesia to type 2 diabetes mellitus guidelines, and their association with characteristics of the responders. Methods Questionnaire survey among General Practitioners (GPs) attending the Indonesian Association of Family Practitioners annual conference in November 2012. The proportion of GPs who were aware of, agreed with, adopted and adhered to the seven recommendations in the guidelines (screening for diabetes, diagnosis, lifestyle modification, use of sulfonylurea, target blood glucose, target blood pressure and use of statin) were calculated in the total number of responders. Results Of the 399 GPs participating, 383 (89%) were aware of the existence of Indonesian type 2 diabetes guidelines. Awareness for each recommendation varied from 66 to 91%. The recommendation to use a random blood glucose test for diagnosing patients with classic diabetes symptoms had the least awareness (265/399, 66%) and least agreement (163/399, 41%). The recommendation on statin use was the least adopted (192/399, 48%), while the least adherence (7/399, 2%) was found for the recommendation on screening for diabetes for patients with risk factors. Years of practice experience and proportion of diabetes patients seen in their practice were independently related with adherence to statin prescription. Conclusions High awareness of the Indonesian type 2 diabetes guideline does not necessary lead to adoption or adherence to recommendations important for outcomes and quality of care. The awareness-to-adherence model helps in identifying barriers for the use of guidelines. PMID:24755412

  15. Hospital demand for physicians.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, M A; Jensen, G A

    1990-01-01

    This article develops a derived demand for physicians that is general enough to encompass physician control, simple profit maximization and hospital utility maximization models of the hospital. The analysis focuses on three special aspects of physician affiliations: the price of adding a physician to the staff is unobserved; the physician holds appointments at multiple hospitals, and physicians are not homogeneous. Using 1983 American Hospital Association data, a system of specialty-specific demand equations is estimated. The results are consistent with the model and suggest that physicians should be concerned about reduced access to hospitals, particularly as the stock of hospitals declines. PMID:10104050

  16. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  17. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority. PMID:23424818

  18. Physical Climatology of Indonesian Maritime Continent: An Overview of Observational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    The Indonesian maritime continent (IMC) is a miniature of our land-sea coexisting planet Earth. Firstly, without interior activity, the Earth becomes an even-surfaced "aqua-planet" with both atmosphere and ocean flowing almost zonally, and solar differential heating generates (global thermal tides and) Hadley's meridional circulations with ITCZ along the equator as observed actually over open (Indian and Pacific) oceans in the both sides of IMC. ITCZ involves intraseasonal variations or super cloud clusters moving eastward. Secondly, the lands and seas over the actual Earth have been keeping the area ratio of 3:7 (similar to that of islands and inland/surrounding seas in IMC), but their displacements have produced IMC near the equator, which turns equatorial Pacific easterly current northward (Kuroshio) and reflects equatorial oceanic waves inducing coupled ocean-atmosphere interannual variations such as ENSO and IOD, or displacements of Walker's zonal circulations. Thirdly, because IMC consists of many large/small islands with very long coastlines, many narrow straits become a dam for the global (Pacific to Indian) ocean circulation, and the land-sea heat capacity contrasts along the coastlines generate the world's largest rainfall with diurnal cycles (sea-land breeze circulations). The diurnal cycles are dominant in the rainy season (austral summer in Jawa and Bali), because rainfall-induced sprinkler-like land cooling reverses the trans-coastal temperature gradient before sunrise, and subsequent clear sky on land until around noon provides solar heating dependent on season. These processes lead to rapid land/hydrosphere-atmosphere water exchange, local air pollutant washout, and transequatorial boreal winter monsoon (cold surge). In El Niño years the cooler sea-surface temperature suppresses the morning coastal-sea rainfall, and induces often serious smog over IMC. Lastly, high-resolution observations/models covering both over islands and seas are necessary. A

  19. Retrospect on the tsunami simulation efforts for the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakowsky, Natalja; Androsov, Alexey; Harig, Sven; Immerz, Antonia; Behrens, Jörn; Danilov, Sergey; Hiller, Wolfgang; Schröter, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Starting in 2005, the GITEWS project (German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System) established from scratch a fully operational tsunami warning system at BMKG in Jakarta. GITEWS was succeeded in 2011 by the smaller project PROTECTS for training the Indonesian staff and consolidating the technical system. With the official end in March 2014, it is time to draw a balance and evaluate the approach. This presentation focuses on the contribution of the tsunami modelling group at the Alfred Wegener Institute. We will give a short overview on the developments of the numerical tsunami simulation model TsunAWI, of the scenario database built with TsunAWI, and of the simulation module SIM that interfaces the database to the decision support system. Some distinctive experiences will be highlighted. Topics include the modeling part as well as the matching process after the database is already set up. On the modeling side, unstructured mesh generation with focus on local bathymetric features and inclusion of precise coastline position as well as numerical parametrization and post processing are covered. The matching of pre calculated scenarios with incoming data in case of a tsunamigenic earthquake is performed in the simulation system SIM, which processes the data of multiple sensors and employs various metrics to limit the choice of possible scenarios from the database. One challenge was that the development of the matching algorithm had to start without having access to real sensor data except seismic information on epicenter and magnitude. Therefore, the algorithm is designed with robustness in mind. Still, the conservative approach allows to narrow down the scenario selection even with limited sensor information. Given more experience in the typical behaviour of sensor data in real events, the algorithm parameters can easily be calibrated towards a more restrictive scenario selection. Another challenge was to ensure the quality control of the data products derived from

  20. Physical climatology of Indonesian maritime continent: An outline to comprehend observational studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Manabu D.

    2016-09-01

    The Indonesian maritime continent (IMC) is a miniature of our land-sea coexisting planet Earth. Firstly, without interior activity, the Earth becomes an even-surfaced "aqua-planet" with both atmosphere and ocean flowing almost zonally, and solar differential heating generates (global thermal tides and) Hadley's meridional circulations with the inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) along the equator as observed actually over the open (Indian and Pacific) oceans on the both sides of the IMC. The ITCZ involves intraseasonal variations or super cloud clusters moving eastward with hierarchical substructures moving also westward. Secondly, the lands and seas over the actual Earth have been keeping the area ratio of 3:7 (similar to that of islands and inland/surrounding seas in the IMC), but their displacements have produced the IMC near the equator, which turns equatorial Pacific easterly ocean current northward (Kuroshio) and reflects equatorial oceanic waves that affect coupled ocean-atmosphere interannual variations such as ENSO and IOD, or displacements of Walker's zonal circulations. Thirdly, because the IMC consists of many large/small islands with very long coastlines, many narrow straits control the global (Pacific to Indian) ocean circulation, and the land-sea heat capacity contrasts along the coastlines generate the world's largest rainfall with diurnal cycles (sea-land breeze circulations). The diurnal cycles are dominant even in the rainy season (austral summer in Jawa and Bali), because rainfall-induced sprinkler-like land cooling reverses the trans-coastal temperature gradient before sunrise, and subsequent clear sky on land until around noon provides solar heating dependent on season. These processes lead to rapid land/hydrosphere-atmosphere water exchange, local air pollutant washout, and transequatorial boreal winter monsoon (cold surge). In El Niño years, for example, the cooler sea-surface temperature suppresses the morning coastal-sea rainfall, and

  1. The strategies, experiences and future challenges of the information component in the Indonesian Family Planning Programme.

    PubMed

    Suyono, H

    1988-12-01

    In 1957, the Indonesian Planned Parenthood Federation was established. In 1970, the National Family Planning Board (BKKBN) was created. The current contraceptive prevalence rate is 45-50%. The family planning program began with a health-oriented approach. To promote acceptance, religious leaders were asked to provide legitimacy to the program. Through their efforts, it became possible to include all the means and medication used for family planning services within the program. In developing an IEC strategy to encourage couples to accept family planning, 3 main factors were studied: 1) the types of innovations that were to be introduced, 2) the characteristics of the Indonesian community, and 3) the need for an IEC strategy to convey the programs messages the community and make the community itself the agent of the innovation being introduced. The elements of the strategy were introduced stage by stage to avoid unnecessary debate. Another strategic step was the introduction of family planning using a community approach. A 3rd strategic step was a shift from couples as family planning acceptors to the introduction of the norm of a small, happy, and prosperous family. The 1st stage, expansion of program coverage, 1) promoted the need for and desirability of family planning to make the small and happy family the norm and 2) supplied contraceptives and information about contraceptives throughout Indonesia. The 2nd stage, the program maintenance approach, included 1) an increase in the frequency of visits to villages by mobile family planning teams, 2) the integration of family planning activities with other health-related activities, and 3) giving people a wider choice of methods and helping them to choose the most suitable method for them. The 3rd stage made family planning a community activity, integrated within the economic and social fabric of community life. The general strategy of the IEC program is to make the various target groups full family planning

  2. Monitoring and Maintenance of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gensch, S.; Günther, M.; Henneberger, R.

    2012-04-01

    This article discusses aspects of and experiences with monitoring and maintenance of the geographically widely distributed components of a Tsunami Early Warning System (TEWS) in the Indian Ocean. Many of the issues, encountered during work within the GITEWS project (German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System, Rudloff et al., 2009) on the design and implementation of the monitoring system, are also relevant for other types of warning systems. With this article, insights and lessons learned are shared with the community. Failure to deliver a warning has fatal consequences. Based on an analysis of the criticalness, vulnerability and availability of single components, we describe the design and implementation of a communication and monitoring architecture and development of standard operating procedures (SOP) for maintenance (Communication architecture of an early warning system, Angermann et al., 2010). The GITEWS project is composed of several thousand integrated system components and software processes. During the establishment of the currently existing system, complexity grew and monitoring and maintenance needed further automation to capture any critical states of the whole system and to establish the correct responsive means. One means of monitoring is the use of an adapted Nagios monitoring implementation covering a large number of infrastructure assets (hosts, network components, remote sensor stations, storage) and business processes (processes and applications). This is to be extended in the future for further operational monitoring of station parameters (power voltage, battery levels) with the challenge of monitoring in on- and offline modes. An aspect of maintenance is the development of a practical and precise means of documenting all system properties. Providing a platform for continuous documentation of system changes and maintenance and enabling information-exchange/ collaboration between the different responsible institutions, departments and

  3. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  4. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  5. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting the help you need, consider hiring a medical-billing advocate. Advocates charge an hourly fee or a ... American Hospital Association. Hospital Billing and Collection ... 15, 2015. Family Doctor.org. Understanding your Medical Bills. ...

  6. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  7. The Role and Responsibility of the Non-Governmental Organization in Bridging Science and Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellen, B.; Pearson, P.; Quinn, P.; Matthews, E.

    2008-12-01

    Bridging science and decision usually falls in the domain of scientists and governments, however there are also examples where these efforts have been tackled by the non-governmental communities as well. These organizations frequently have more of an advocacy leaning than occurs in the public sector, but still need to be careful in their handling of the science. This talk will look at two parallel projects focused on the role of non-CO2 climate forcings (largely black carbon and methane) and climate. In the first, a coalition of researchers from Columbia University's Earth Institute, the Clean Air Task Force (CATF) , NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, the University of Illinois have investigated the extent to which a focus on reductions of methane and carbonaceous aerosols can play a role in constraining radiative forcing (and temperature). This has been undertaken by 1) developing at a menu of plausible actions that are amenable to mitigation which could be targeted to reduce emissions and 2) modeling the responses to quantify the potential climate and health impacts of reductions. Results will be shared widely with decision-makers in government and elsewhere. In a second project, CATF, Clean Air Policy Center of the Clean Air Cool Planet, NOAA/PMEL, Arctic countries and university researchers are examining the extent to which reductions in methane, black carbon and tropospheric ozone could help slow Arctic warming and melting. This group is collectively examining the scientific understanding and developing mitigation strategies and other programmatic ideas that can be applied by member governments. In both projects, the need to translate the science has been key, with constant need to provide ease in understanding and offer assurance where there is evidence to support action, but, at the same time, being cautious to not overstate the case or compromise accuracy.

  8. The Invisible Hand: Governmental Influences on the Field of Play During the Production and Diffusion of Mobile TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Su-Yi; Chiasson, Mike W.

    The purpose of this paper is to examine how government agencies alter the context around the production and diffusion of technologies, and how this strengthens or weakens particular ICT trajectories. An embedded case is conducted to address this question in Taiwan, as governmental actions affected the early production and diffusion of DVB-H technology and WiMAX technology, both of which enable mobile TV services. The context around and across these two technologies are analyzed from an institutional perspective, including the framework proposed by King et al (1994). The key lesson of this paper is that government agencies are capable of influencing the diffusion of nomadic technologies through their legitimating powers, specific national policies, the allocation of radio frequency spectrum, the implementation of regulations, and the allocation of financial resources. However, the ultimate effects are determined by mixed institutional factors and sometimes contradictory governmental interventions, stemming from historical differences and conflicts across the various government agencies involved. The implications for ICT diffusion research and governmental policy makers are discussed.

  9. Identification of Elaiophylin Skeletal Variants from the Indonesian Streptomyces sp. ICBB 9297.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yan; Lam, Phillip W; Shahab, Salmah; Santosa, Dwi Andreas; Proteau, Philip J; Zabriskie, T Mark; Mahmud, Taifo

    2015-11-25

    Four new elaiophylin macrolides (1-4), together with five known elaiophylins (5-9), have been isolated from cultures of the Indonesian soil bacterium Streptomyces sp. ICBB 9297. The new compounds have macrocyclic skeletons distinct from those of the known dimeric elaiophylins in that one or both of the polyketide chains contain(s) an additional pendant methyl group. Further investigations revealed that 1 and 2 were derived from 3 and 4, respectively, during isolation processes. Compounds 1-3 showed comparable antibacterial activity to elaiophylin against Staphylococcus aureus. However, interestingly, only compounds 1 and 3, which contain a pendant methyl group at C-2, showed activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis, whereas compound 2, which has two pendant methyl groups at C-2 and C-2', and the known elaiophylin analogues (5-7), which lack pendant methyl groups at C-2 and/or C-2', showed no activity. The production of 3 and 4 in strain ICBB 9297 indicates that one of the acyltransferase (AT) domains in the elaiophylin polyketide synthases (PKSs) can recruit both malonyl-CoA and methylmalonyl-CoA as substrates. Bioinformatic analysis of the AT domains of the elaiophylin PKSs revealed that the ela_AT7 domain contains atypical active site amino acid residues, distinct from those conserved in malonyl-CoA- or methylmalonyl-CoA-specific ATs. PMID:26510047

  10. Effect of counseling by paraprofessionals on depression, anxiety, somatization, and functioning in Indonesian torture survivors.

    PubMed

    Larson-Stoa, Deborah; Jacobs, Gerard A; Jonathan, Abraham; Poudyal, Bhava

    2015-01-01

    The Indonesian population has faced political violence, victimization, and torture throughout the last 70 years. Due to the scarcity of mental health professionals in many low and middle-income countries, counseling programs are increasingly utilizing paraprofessionals to provide support to the affected population as a strategy of task shifting. In this article, we would like to examine the effectiveness of counseling services provided by such trained paraprofessionals. This study was part of program evaluation to determine whether the participants (torture survivors) improved after counseling services provided by trained paraprofessionals in Indonesia. Local communities were invited to join the psychosocial program created and implemented by an NGO in 2005. The 178 participants were recruited from Jakarta, Papua, and Aceh, Indonesia for the program, which aimed to help survivors of violence suffering from "heavy hearts." The intervention lasted three months, and the follow-up intake was conducted after four months. The results indicated the participants' anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, somatic symptoms, and functioning improved from the intake to the follow-up. The program appeared to have been effective in reducing the participants' symptoms and impairment in functioning. This indicates that in countries where there is a scarcity of mental health professionals, working with paraprofessionals has the potential to help survivors of torture and violence. PMID:26932126

  11. Screening of BRCA1/2 Mutations Using Direct Sequencing in Indonesian Familial Breast Cancer Cases.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Sumadi Lukman; Haryono, Samuel J; Aryandono, Teguh; Datasena, I Gusti Bagus

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer has emerged as the most prevalent cancer among women worldwide, including in Indonesia. The contribution of genes associated with high-risk breast-ovarian cancers, BRCA1 and BRCA2, in the Indonesian population is relatively unknown. We have characterized family history of patients with moderate- to high-risk of breast cancer predisposition in 26 unrelated cases from Indonesia for BRCA1/2 mutation analyses using direct sequencing. Known deleterious mutations were not found in either BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes. Seven variants in BRCA2 were documented in 10 of 26 patients (38%). All variants were categorized as unclassified (VUSs). Two synonymous variants, c.3623A>G and c.4035T>C, were found in 5 patients. One variant, c4600T>C, was found in a 38 year old woman with a family history of breast cancer. We have found 4 novel variants in BRCA2 gene including c.6718C>G, c.3281A>G, c.10176C>G, and c4490T>C in 4 unrelated patients, all of them having a positive family history of breast cancer. In accordance to other studies in Asian population, our study showed more frequent variants in BRCA2 compared to BRCA1. Further studies involving larger numbers of hereditary breast cancer patients are required to reveal contribution of BRCA1/2 mutations and/or other predisposing genes among familial breast cancer patients in Indonesia. PMID:27221885

  12. Migration, social structure and old-age support networks: a comparison of three Indonesian communities.

    PubMed

    Kreager, Philip

    2006-01-01

    Contemporary trends in population ageing and urbanisation in the developing world imply that the extensive out-migration of young people from rural areas coincides with, and is likely to exacerbate, a rise in the older share of the rural population. This paper examines the impact of migration on vulnerability at older ages by drawing on the results of anthropological and demographic field studies in three Indonesian communities. The methodology for identifying vulnerable older people has a progressively sharper focus, beginning first with important differences between the communities, then examining variations by socio-economic strata, and finally the variability of older people's family networks. Comparative analysis indicates considerable heterogeneity in past and present migration patterns, both within and between villages. The migrants' contributions are a normal and important component of older people's support, often in combination with those of local family members. Higher status families are commonly able to reinforce their position by making better use of migration opportunities than the less advantaged. Although family networks in the poorer strata may effect some redistribution of the children's incomes, their social networks are smaller and insufficient to overcome their marked disadvantages. Vulnerability thus arises where several factors, including migration histories, result in unusually small networks, and when the migrations are within rural areas. PMID:23750063

  13. Migration, social structure and old-age support networks: a comparison of three Indonesian communities

    PubMed Central

    KREAGER, PHILIP

    2007-01-01

    Contemporary trends in population ageing and urbanisation in the developing world imply that the extensive out-migration of young people from rural areas coincides with, and is likely to exacerbate, a rise in the older share of the rural population. This paper examines the impact of migration on vulnerability at older ages by drawing on the results of anthropological and demographic field studies in three Indonesian communities. The methodology for identifying vulnerable older people has a progressively sharper focus, beginning first with important differences between the communities, then examining variations by socio-economic strata, and finally the variability of older people's family networks. Comparative analysis indicates considerable heterogeneity in past and present migration patterns, both within and between villages. The migrants' contributions are a normal and important component of older people's support, often in combination with those of local family members. Higher status families are commonly able to reinforce their position by making better use of migration opportunities than the less advantaged. Although family networks in the poorer strata may effect some redistribution of the children's incomes, their social networks are smaller and insufficient to overcome their marked disadvantages. Vulnerability thus arises where several factors, including migration histories, result in unusually small networks, and when the migrations are within rural areas. PMID:23750063

  14. 'Desa SIAGA', the 'Alert Village': the evolution of an iconic brand in Indonesian public health strategies.

    PubMed

    Hill, Peter S; Goeman, Lieve; Sofiarini, Rahmi; Djara, Maddi M

    2014-07-01

    In 1999, the Ministry of Women's Empowerment in Indonesia worked with advertisers in Jakarta and international technical advisors to develop the concept of 'Suami SIAGA', the 'Alert Husband', confronting Indonesian males with their responsibilities to be aware of their wives' needs and ensure early access if needed to trained obstetrics care. The model was rapidly expanded to apply to the 'Desa SIAGA', the 'Alert Village', with communities assuming the responsibility for awareness of the risks of pregnancy and childbirth, and supporting registered pregnant mothers with funding and transportation for emergency obstetric assistance, and identified blood donors. Based on the participant observation, interviews and documentary analysis, this article uses a systems perspective to trace the evolution of that iconic 'brand' as new national and international actors further developed the concept and its application in provincial and national programmes. In 2010, it underwent a further transformation to become 'Desa Siaga Aktif', a national programme with responsibilities expanded to include the provision of basic health services at village level, and the surveillance of communicable disease, monitoring of lifestyle activities and disaster preparedness, in addition to the management of obstetric emergencies. By tracking the use of this single 'brand', the study provides insights into the complex adaptive system of policy and programme development with its rich interactions between multiple international, national, provincial and sectoral stakeholders, the unpredictable responses to feedback from these actors and their activities and the resultant emergence of new policy elements, new programmes and new levels of operation within the system. PMID:23650333

  15. Hepatitis B vaccine freezing in the Indonesian cold chain: evidence and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Carib M.; Wibisono, Hariadi; Purwanto, Hary; Mansyur, Isa; Moniaga, Vanda; Widjaya, Anton

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To document and characterize freezing temperatures in the Indonesian vaccine cold chain and to evaluate the feasibility of changes designed to reduce the occurrence of freezing. METHODS: Data loggers were used to measure temperatures of shipments of hepatitis B vaccine from manufacturer to point of use. Baseline conditions and three intervention phases were monitored. During each of the intervention phases, vaccines were removed progressively from the standard 2-8 degrees C cold chain. FINDINGS: Freezing temperatures were recorded in 75% of baseline shipments. The highest rates of freezing occurred during transport from province to district, storage in district-level ice-lined refrigerators, and storage in refrigerators in health centres. Interventions reduced freezing, without excessive heat exposure. CONCLUSIONS: Inadvertent freezing of freeze-sensitive vaccines is widespread in Indonesia. Simple strategies exist to reduce freezing - for example, selective transport and storage of vaccines at ambient temperatures. The use of vaccine vial monitors reduces the risk associated with heat-damaged vaccines in these scenarios. Policy changes that allow limited storage of freeze-sensitive vaccines at temperatures >2-8 degrees C would enable flexible vaccine distribution strategies that could reduce vaccine freezing, reduce costs, and increase capacity. PMID:15042231

  16. Validation of Urine Test for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Indonesian Population

    PubMed Central

    Syam, Ari Fahrial; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Uwan, Willy Brodus; Simanjuntak, David; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We measured the accuracy of the urine test (RAPIRUN) for detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in Indonesia (Jakarta, Pontianak, and Jayapura) using histology confirmed by immunohistochemistry and/or culture as gold standards. We also used immunohistochemistry to identify CagA phenotype and analyzed H. pylori CagA diversity in Indonesia. The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection in 88 consecutive dyspeptic patients based on the urine test was 15.9% (14/88), 38.1% for patients in Jayapura that had higher prevalence of H. pylori infection than that in Jakarta (9.7%, P = 0.02) and Pontianak (8.3%, P = 0.006). Overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of RAPIRUN were 83.3%, 94.7%, 71.4%, 97.3%, and 93.2%, respectively. All of the H. pylori-positive patients were immunoreactive for anti-CagA antibody but not immunoreactive for East Asian specific anti-CagA antibody in all H. pylori-positive subjects. We confirmed the high accuracy of RAPIRUN in Indonesian population. In general, we found less virulent type of H. pylori in Indonesia, which partly explained the low incidence gastric cancer in Indonesia. PMID:26824034

  17. When Sukamo sought the bomb: Indonesian nuclear aspirations in the mid-1960s

    SciTech Connect

    Cornejo, R.M.

    1999-03-01

    Proponents of nuclear nonproliferation, such as the United States, seek to develop policies that address the root causes of nuclear proliferation. The discipline of international relations aids in this effort by providing theories that attempt to explain why states choose to build nuclear weapons. Most theories simplify the process of proliferation by using only one of three generally accepted explanations: security, domestic politics, or norms. The case of Indonesia, however, illustrates that proliferation is best explained by investigating all three dimensions as well as the role of technology. This thesis evaluates competing theories of nuclear proliferation using a historical case study of Indonesia's aspirations to acquire nuclear weapons during 1964--1965, and supports the view that multiple variables are necessary to explain the spread of nuclear weapons. As evidence, this thesis examines Indonesian President Sukamo's little-known nuclear aspirations in the mid-1960s. Although Sukamo was ultimately unsuccessful in his effort to acquire atomic weapons, his decision to seek them was influenced by a variety of factors that included Indonesia's security needs, domestic political considerations, norms, and available nuclear energy technology.

  18. New Manzamine Alkaloids with Activity against Infectious and Tropical Parasitic Diseases from an Indonesian Sponge

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Karumanchi V.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Tekwani, Babu L.; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Eleven manzamine type alkaloids, two β-carbolines, and five nucleosides have been isolated from an Indonesian sponge. Among these are the previously characterized 12,34-oxamanzamine A, 12,34-oxamanzamine E, manzamine A (1), 8-hydroxymanzamine A, 6-deoxymanzamine X, manzamine E (2), manzamine X, manzamine F (4), norharman, thymine, 2′,3′-didehydro-2′,3′-dideoxyuridine, uracil, thymidine, and 2′-deoxyuridine. The structures for the five new compounds have been assigned as 32,33-dihydro-31-hydroxymanzamine A (3), 32,33-dihydro-6-hydroxymanzamine A-35-one (5), des-N-methylxestomanzamine A (6), 32,33-dihydro-6,31-dihydroxymanzamine A (7), and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronorharman-1-one (8), on the basis of NMR and X-ray data. The bioactivity and SAR of the manzamines against malaria, TB, and leishmania are also presented. The structural revision of two previously reported pyrazoles as uracil and thymine is also discussed. PMID:12828469

  19. Intraseasonal coastal upwelling signal along the southern coast of Java observed using Indonesian tidal station data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horii, Takanori; Ueki, Iwao; Syamsudin, Fadli; Sofian, Ibnu; Ando, Kentaro

    2016-04-01

    Sea level variations along the coasts of Sumatra and Java were investigated to determine the coastal upwelling signal that is linked to local sea surface temperature (SST) variability. We used Indonesian tidal station data together with satellite SST data and atmospheric reanalysis data. The sea level variations along the southern coast of Java have a significant coherence with remote wind, local wind, and local SST variations, with an intraseasonal time scale of 20-50 days. Assuming that a coastal upwelling signal would appear as a sea level drop (SLD), we focused on intraseasonal-scale SLD events in the data. Significant upwelling signals are frequently observed during both the boreal summer and winter. To evaluate the impact of the coastal upwelling on local SST, we examined statistical relationships between sea level and SST variations. The results demonstrated that events that occurred during April-August were associated with local SST cooling. The horizontal distribution of the SST cooling was analogous with annual mean SST, suggesting the importance of intraseasonal-scale coastal upwelling in forming the climatic conditions of the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean.

  20. Assessment results of the Indonesian TRIGA SNF to be shipped to INEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Jefimoff, J.; Robb, A.K.; Wendt, K.M.; Syarip, I.; Alfa, T.

    1997-10-09

    This paper describes the Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomics (TRIGA) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) examination performed by technical personnel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) at the Bandung and Yogyakarta research reactor facilities in Indonesia. The examination was required before the SNF would be accepted for transportation to and storage at the INEEL. This paper delineates the Initial Preparations prior to the Indonesian foreign research reactor (FRR) fuel examination. The technical basis for the examination, the TRIGA SNF Acceptance Criteria, and the physical condition required for transportation, receipt and storage of the TRIGA SNF at the INEEL is explained. In addition to the initial preparations, preparation descriptions of the Work Plan For TRIGA Fuel Examination, the Underwater Examination Equipment used, and personnel Examination Team Training are included. Finally, the Fuel Examination and Results of the aluminum and stainless steel clad TRIGA fuel examination have been summarized. Lessons learned from all the activities completed to date is provided in an addendum. The initial preparations included: (1) coordination between the INEEL, FRR or Badan Tenaga Atom Nasional (BATAN), DOE-HQ, and the US State Department and Embassy; (2) incorporating Savannah River Site (SRS) FRR experience and lessons learned; (3) collecting both FRR facility and spent fuel data, and issuing a radionuclide report (Radionuclide Mass Inventory, Activity, Decay Heat, and Dose Rate Parametric Data for TRIGA Spent Nuclear Fuels) needed for transportation and fuel acceptance at the INEEL; and (4) preexamination work at the research reactor for the fuel examination.

  1. The role of students' activities in Indonesian realistic mathematics education in primary schools of Aceh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubainur, Cut Morina; Veloo, Arsaythamby; Khalid, Rozalina

    2015-05-01

    This study aims to explore the implementation of the Indonesian Realistic Mathematics Education (PMRI) in Aceh primary schools, Indonesia. This study investigates the students' mathematics activities involved in the implementation of PMRI and for this purpose; students' mathematics activities in the classroom were observed. Students were observed three times within five weeks during mathematics class, based on PMRI. A total of 25 year five students from a public school participated in this study. Observation check list was used in this study based on ten items. The observation conducted was based on two different time periods which were 105 minutes for group A and 70 minutes for group B. The observation was conducted every 5 minutes. The results show that PMRI is being practised in Aceh, but not completely. This study shows that mathematics activities for those who were taught using PMRI are higher than for those using the traditional approach. Overall, the findings showed that the number of student activities undertaken in PMRI achieved 90.56%. The higher percentage of activities suggests that the Aceh Education Office expands the implementation of PMRI in all primary schools so that learning of mathematics is more effective. This indirectly increases the mathematics achievement of students in Aceh to a higher level on par with Indonesia's national achievement.

  2. Analysis of swing voter in the Indonesian election of 2014 presidential candidates using Twitter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfarisy, Muhammad Salman; Putra, Rizki M.; Liong, The Houw; Purqon, Acep

    2015-09-01

    Ahead of the 2014 elections would be interesting to predict which candidate will hold the highest authority in the Republic of Indonesia. Entering the 2014 presidential election there is no infidelity tendency of voters who initially settled on a party or a candidate then choose another party or candidate in the next election. Changes in the tendency to make the condition of society in a state that has not been to given the choice of a candidate is commonly called swing voters. On this occasion, an examination of the swing voters who use social media twitter. By utilizing the advanced search facility to collect data from the response of tweeps (twitter users) on the twitter to Indonesian presidential candidate. The data will be used to describe how much the popularity of a candidate among tweeps, knowing the candidates who have the largest positive response and negative response, as well as the growing popularity of the candidate. The data is expected to predict the RI presidential candidate in 2014.

  3. Interannual variability of the Indonesian Throughflow transport: A revisit based on 30 year expendable bathythermograph data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin-Yan; Feng, Ming; Wang, Dongxiao; Wijffels, Susan

    2015-12-01

    Based on 30 year repeated expendable bathythermograph (XBT) deployments between Fremantle, Western Australia, and the Sunda Strait, Indonesia, from 1984 to 2013, interannual variability of geostrophic transport of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) and its relationships with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) are investigated. The IOD induced coastal Kelvin waves propagate along the Sumatra-Java coast of Indonesia, and ENSO induced coastal Kelvin waves propagate along the northwest coast of Australia, both influencing interannual variations of the ITF transport. The ITF geostrophic transport is stronger during La Niña phase and weaker during El Niño phase, with the Niño3.4 index leading the ITF variability by 7 months. The Indian Ocean wind variability associated with the IOD to a certain extent offset the Pacific ENSO influences on the ITF geostrophic transport during the developing and mature phases of El Niño and La Niña, due to the covarying IOD variability with ENSO. The ITF geostrophic transport experiences a strengthening trend of about 1 Sv every 10 years over the study period, which is mostly due to a response to the strengthening of the trade winds in the Pacific during the climate change hiatus period. Decadal variations of the temperature-salinity relationships need to be considered when estimating the geostrophic transport of the ITF using XBT data.

  4. Pornography consumption and non-marital sexual behaviour in a sample of young Indonesian university students.

    PubMed

    Hald, Gert Martin; Mulya, Teguh Wijaya

    2013-01-01

    Using a sample of Indonesian university students and a cross sectional design, this study investigated prevalence rates and patterns of pornography consumption in Indonesia, a religious, sexually conservative, Muslim-majority nation with strict anti-pornography laws. Further, the association between pornography consumption and common non-marital sexual behaviours was explored. The study found that in this sample, pornography is as widely and readily consumed as in comparable international studies predominantly utilising Western background samples from more sexually liberal and less religious countries with very few laws on pornography. Gender differences in patterns of pornography consumption were pronounced and comparable with findings in international counterpart studies. For men only, pornography consumption was found to significantly predict common sexual behaviours in non-marital relations. The study is the first to provide insights into prevalence rates and patterns of pornography consumption and its association with common non-marital sexual behaviours in a sexually conservative, Muslim-majority nation with strict anti-pornography laws. PMID:23782270

  5. Selenium Intake in Hypertensive and Normotensive Post-Menopausal Indonesian Women.

    PubMed

    Adriani, Merryana; Diarry, Vella I P; Abdulah, Rizky; Wirjatmadi, Bambang

    2015-01-01

    The Indonesian Ministry of Health has predicted that the national prevalence of hypertension in Indonesia may reach 26.5% in 2013. Increasing age, stress, lack of physical activity, obesity and passive smoking are known to be risk factors of hypertension. In women over 50 y, hormonal changes that occur post-menopause may also increase the risk of hypertension and other vascular diseases. Antioxidant precursors, such as selenium, however, are known to provide protection against the development of several oxidative stress-related diseases, including hypertension. To prove the hypothesis, we compared the levels of consumption of selenium in hypertensive and normotensive post-menopausal women. An observational comparative study with cross-sectional design was conducted in groups of post-menopausal women with hypertension and those who are normotensive. Structured interviews and food recall of 2×24 h were used to determine the level of consumption, and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS) questionnaire was used to measure the level of stress. The result suggests a significant difference in the levels of selenium intake between the normotensive and hypertensive groups (p=0.008). Furthermore, the passive smoking and stress levels of the hypertensive group were significantly higher than those of the normotensive group. These result support the hypothesis that selenium may play a protective role in vascular disease. PMID:26440639

  6. Preparation of graphite oxide by sodium cholate intercalation and sonication from Indonesian natural graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panatarani, Camellia; Maulana, Ayu Oktama; Rianto, Anton; Joni, I. Made

    2016-02-01

    Graphite oxide is widely use in renewable energy application such as solar cells, fuel-cells, battery electrodes, catalyst support, etc. This paper reports the preparation of graphite oxide from Indonesian natural graphite by sodium cholate intercalation. The enrichment process of as received graphite with carbon content of 60% was carried out by using acid leaching (HF) method. The enrichment process successfully obtained graphite with carbon content 95.61% with contaminant minerals observed by EDS were magnesium and aluminum. Purified graphite was then intercalated by sodium cholate at various concentration and sonication time. The XRD results shows that preparation with concentration of sodium cholate 2 Wt.% and sonication 10 hours formed a peak characteristic of graphite oxide at 2θ=15°. In addition, the successful oxidation process designated by the C/O ratio of 15.75 observed from EDS and supported by the present of functional C-H and C-O obtained from the FTIR observation. It is concluded that the graphite oxide successfully prepared by intercalation using sodium cholate and sonication.

  7. Challenges in the management of chronic noncommunicable diseases by Indonesian community pharmacists

    PubMed Central

    Puspitasari, Hanni P.; Aslani, Parisa; Krass, Ines

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We explored factors influencing Indonesian primary care pharmacists’ practice in chronic noncommunicable disease management and proposed a model illustrating relationships among factors. Methods: We conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with pharmacists working in community health centers (Puskesmas, n=5) and community pharmacies (apotek, n=15) in East Java Province. We interviewed participating pharmacists using Bahasa Indonesia to explore facilitators and barriers to their practice in chronic disease management. We audiorecorded all interviews, transcribed ad verbatim, translated into English and analyzed the data using an approach informed by “grounded-theory”. Results: We extracted five emergent themes/factors: pharmacists’ attitudes, Puskesmas/apotek environment, pharmacy education, pharmacy professional associations, and the government. Respondents believed that primary care pharmacists have limited roles in chronic disease management. An unfavourable working environment and perceptions of pharmacists’ inadequate knowledge and skills were reported by many as barriers to pharmacy practice. Limited professional standards, guidelines, leadership and government regulations coupled with low expectations of pharmacists among patients and doctors also contributed to their lack of involvement in chronic disease management. We present the interplay of these factors in our model. Conclusion: Pharmacists’ attitudes, knowledge, skills and their working environment appeared to influence pharmacists’ contribution in chronic disease management. To develop pharmacists’ involvement in chronic disease management, support from pharmacy educators, pharmacy owners, professional associations, the government and other stakeholders is required. Our findings highlight a need for systematic coordination between pharmacists and stakeholders to improve primary care pharmacists’ practice in Indonesia to achieve continuity of care. PMID:26445618

  8. Physical sexual and intimate relationship concerns among Indonesian cervical cancer survivors: A phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Afiyanti, Yati; Milanti, Ariesta

    2013-06-01

    Cervical cancer often leads to sexuality and intimacy concerns for the affected woman within a marital relationship.This study aimed to explore physical sexual concerns and their impact on the intimate partner relationships experienced by cervical cancer survivors. Using a descriptive phenomenological approach, data were collected through in-depth interviews with Indonesian women survivors of cervical cancer. Two themes and five sub-themes were constructed from the thematic analysis. The first theme was the physical sexual concerns following cervical cancer treatment, with the subthemes: red spotting and massive vaginal discharge after having sexual intercourse; narrower, smaller and less lubricated vagina; pain during sexual intercourse; feeling of shortened vagina as if it had been cut. The second theme of impact of sexual concerns on intimate partner had five subthemes of: looking for reasons to refuse sexual intercourse; prejudice towards the spouse; feeling forced to fulfil husband's sexual needs; accepting spouse's anger; willingness to let the spouse marry another woman. The findings provide nurses with a greater understanding on how women adapt to their altered sexuality and intimacy with their partner following cancer treatments. PMID:23171291

  9. Sea Surface Temperature Coupling to Madden-Julian Oscillations over the Indonesian Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, A. M.; Gordon, A. L.; Pujiana, K.

    2014-12-01

    The intraseasonal SST characteristics within the Indonesian Seas and their responses to the Madden-Julian Oscillations [MJO] are examined through analyses of observed and reanalysis datasets. Intraseasonal variation accounts for about 30% of SST variability, with the strongest signature is observed in Banda and Timor seas. The MJO signature in SST is evident in the form of energy peak at 35-45 days, amplification during the Northwest Monsoon (boreal winter), and eastward propagation. SST responds to sea-air heat flux associated with MJO with net heat flux into the ocean (atmosphere) characterizing the suppressed (active) phase of MJO. The influence of MJO on Banda Sea SST is greatest during La Niña periods, which are favorable for deeper thermocline conditions, which diminish the role of ocean processes driving vertical heat transfer between subsurface and surface layers. Diminished influence of ocean processes results in dominance of surface heat fluxes associated with MJO in governing intraseasonal SST variability. During El Niño, the role of ocean processes is favorable to mediate heat transfer between lower and upper layer of the ocean surface as thermocline is shallower. The ocean component heat fluxes then compete with MJO forced heat fluxes in governing SST variability as indicated by less pronounced eastward propagation.

  10. Interannual variation of the Indonesian throughflow in the Timor Passage as revealed in SODA: 1958 - 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskandar, I.; Mardiansyah, W.; Setiabudidaya, D.; Poerwono, P.; Syamsuddin, F.

    2015-09-01

    Temporal variability of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) in the Timor Passage was evaluated with special focus on its interannual variation. The ITF transport was estimated as a latitudinal averaged of an along strait currents in the Timor Passage based on the output of Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) experiment from 1958 - 2008. A Complex Empirical Orthogonal Function (CEOF), then, was applied to the interannual estimated ITF transport to extract the dominant mode of variability. The result has shown that the leading CEOF mode was explaining 67.2% of the total interannual variation. The reconstructed first CEOF time series shows strong positive anomalies (towards the Pacific Ocean) during 1962 - 1969, 1972 - 1978, 1997 - 1999, 2002 - 2005 and 2007. The transport was reversed (towards the Indian Ocean) during other periods. The upper layer transport above ˜200m depth is significantly correlated with the zonal wind stress in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean, with the transport lagging the winds by about 10 months. The middle layer transport between about 200 - 600m depth is significantly influenced by the zonal wind from the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean in which the zonal winds lag the ITF by about 5 months. In addition, the deeper layer transport below about 600m depth shows significant zero lag correlation with the zonal wind stress in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean, though the impact of the equatorial Indian Ocean zonal wind stress is not negligible.

  11. A Stalagmite record of Holocene Indonesian-Australian summer monsoon variability from the Australian tropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denniston, Rhawn F.; Wyrwoll, Karl-Heinz; Polyak, Victor J.; Brown, Josephine R.; Asmerom, Yemane; Wanamaker, Alan D.; LaPointe, Zachary; Ellerbroek, Rebecca; Barthelmes, Michael; Cleary, Daniel; Cugley, John; Woods, David; Humphreys, William F.

    2013-10-01

    Oxygen isotopic data from a suite of calcite and aragonite stalagmites from cave KNI-51, located in the eastern Kimberley region of tropical Western Australia, represent the first absolute-dated, high-resolution speleothem record of the Holocene Indonesian-Australian summer monsoon (IASM) from the Australian tropics. Stalagmite oxygen isotopic values track monsoon intensity via amount effects in precipitation and reveal a dynamic Holocene IASM which strengthened in the early Holocene, decreased in strength by 4 ka, with a further decrease from ˜2 to 1 ka, before strengthening again at 1 ka to years to levels similar to those between 4 and 2 ka. The relationships between the KNI-51 IASM reconstruction and those from published speleothem time series from Flores and Borneo, in combination with other data sets, appear largely inconsistent with changes in the position and/or organization of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). Instead, we argue that the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) may have played a dominant role in driving IASM variability since at least the middle Holocene. Given the muted modern monsoon rainfall responses to most El Niño events in the Kimberley, an impact of ENSO on regional monsoon precipitation over northwestern Australia would suggest non-stationarity in the long-term relationship between ENSO forcing and IASM rainfall, possibly due to changes in the mean state of the tropical Pacific over the Holocene.

  12. Improving hydrocarbon/water ratios in producing wells - An Indonesian case history study

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, F.O.; Marnoch, E.; Tanggu, P.S.

    1996-12-31

    Excessive water production is consistently burdening the oil industry, especially as lifting and facility costs rise and disposal of produced water becomes increasingly difficult, expensive and environmentally sensitive. A previously developed amphoteric polymer material (APM) (SPE Paper No. 14822) has been successfully applied in Indonesia. This product reduces volumes of produced water and very often increases hydrocarbon production by effectively reducing the permeability to water without significantly changing the formation permeability to hydrocarbons. This paper will review the mechanism, application and associated lab results by which the APM polymer reduces water cut with the primary emphasis on the Indonesian case histories and placement techniques. Results indicate that high permeability sandstone reservoirs, with water production problems, can benefit from APM treatments. The product can successfully and economically reduce water production with the added benefit of increased hydrocarbon production often noted. Laboratory and field results indicate good product application under high shear situations and at temperatures up to 275 {degrees}F. Careful candidate selection and good placement techniques, in conjunction with production logging to determine water location, are important to the success of APM jobs.

  13. 2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  14. Barriers and challenges of implementing tobacco control policies in hospitals: applying the institutional analysis and development framework to the Catalan Network of Smoke-Free Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Cristina

    2009-08-01

    This article analyzes tobacco control policies in hospitals based on the experience of the Catalan Network of Smoke-Free Hospitals, Spain. The objective is to understand through this case study how tobacco policies are designed and implemented in health care organizations. Because tobacco control is a public health issue, governmental, institutional, and professional involvement is necessary. This article identifies and examines the structure and relationships among the different actors involved in the tobacco control policies in health care organizations using Ostrom's Institutional Analysis and Development framework.This theory helps one understand the policy failures and rethink the future challenges. Critical issues should be reviewed to enhance implementation of smoke-free hospitals-such as assuring the compliance of nonsmoking areas and introducing compulsory tobacco cessation activities that are promoted and monitored by the public administration. The author suggests that relying primarily on an organization's interpretation of rules leads to irregular implementation. PMID:19900946

  15. Evaluation of organizational maturity based on people capacity maturity model in medical record wards of Iranian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Tavakoli, Nahid; Shams, Assadollah; Hatampour, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Context: People capacity maturity model (PCMM) is one of the models which focus on improving organizational human capabilities. Aims: The aim of this model's application is to increase people ability to attract, develop, motivate, organize and retain the talents needed to organizational continuous improvement. Settings and Design: In this study, we used the PCMM for investigation of organizational maturity level in medical record departments of governmental hospitals and determination strengths and weaknesses of their staff capabilities. Materials and Methods: This is an applied research and cross sectional study in which data were collected by questionnaires to investigation of PCMM model needs in medical record staff of governmental hospitals at Isfahan, Iran. We used the questionnaire which has been extracted from PCMM model and approved its reliability with Cronbach's Alpha 0.96. Statistical Analysis Used: Data collected by the questionnaire was analyzed based on the research objectives using SPSS software and in accordance with research questions descriptive statistics were used. Results: Our findings showed that the mean score of medical record practitioners, skill and capability in governmental hospitals was 35 (62.5%) from maximum 56 (100%). There is no significant relevance between organizational maturity and medical record practitioners, attributes. Conclusions: Applying PCMM model is caused increasing staff and manager attention in identifying the weaknesses in the current activities and practices, so it will result in improvement and developing processes. PMID:25077147

  16. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. PMID:25223156

  17. Implementing Clinical governance in Iranian hospitals: purpose, process and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Mohaghegh, Bahram; Ravaghi, Hamid; Mannion, Russell; Heidarpoor, Peigham; Sajadi, Haniye Sadat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Clinical governance as an approach to improving the quality and safety of clinical care has been run in all Iranian hospitals since 2009. This study aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of the processes and challenges faced in implementing clinical governance (CG) in acute-care hospitals in Iran. Methods We conducted an in-depth, qualitative, multi-case study using semi-structured interviews with a range of key stakeholders and review of relevant documents. This study was conducted in 2011–2012 in six governmental hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The data were analyzed using framework analysis. Results The interviewees, predominantly senior managers and nurses, expressed generally positive attitudes towards the benefits of CG. Four out of the six hospitals had a formal strategic plan to implement and execute CG. The emergent barriers to the implementation of CG included insufficient resources, the absence of clear supporting structures, a lack of supportive cultures, and inadequate support from senior management. The main facilitating factors were the reverse of the barriers noted above in addition to developing good relationships with key stakeholders, raising the awareness of CG among staff, and well-designed incentives. Conclusions There is a positive sense towards CG, but its successful implementation in Iran will require raising the awareness of CG among staff and key stakeholders and the successful collaboration of internal staff and external agencies. PMID:26952249

  18. Cenozoic History of the Equatorial Indian Ocean Recorded by Nd Isotopes: The Closure of the Indonesian Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourlan, A. T.; Meynadier, L.; Allegre, C. J.

    2005-12-01

    The northward tectonic motion of the Australian plate and the evolution of the Indonesian Island Arcs through the last 20 Ma, generate changes in the flow and the origin of the circulation between the Pacific and the Southern Indian Oceans. Indeed, the emergence of the Indonesian Archipelago and probably the rapid uplift of the island of Halmahera have dramatically reduced the Indonesian Gateway. However, the precise dating of this event is still a matter of debate. The Neodymium isotopic composition of marine sediments is an extremely good proxy to reconstruct the major changes in the past ocean circulation. The residence time of Nd is shorter than the circulation time of the global ocean. Therefore, the Nd isotopic composition varies between the different ocean basins and is function of changes in source provenances, paleocirculation, orogenic processes, and intensity of weathering on the continents as well as on the volcanic arcs. To reconstruct the evolution of the oceanic flow from the Pacific to the equatorial Indian Ocean since the Miocene, we have applied on high carbonates content sediments a leaching technique using acetic acid. The reliability of our technique has been assessed by comparison with the Hydroxylamine hydrochloride technique developed by Bayon et al (1). The Nd isotopic composition is determinated in the past seawater from the record in Fe-Mn oxides. The sedimentary sequences are accurately dated using bio and chimiostratigraphy. Three ODP Sites were chosen in the Indian Ocean with a water depth ranging from 1600 to 2800 m and mutually distant by about 3000 km. From West to East: Site 761 which is at the western edge of the Indonesian Gateway on the central northeastern part of the Wombat Plateau off NW Australia, Site 757 is located on the south of the Ninetyeast ridge and Site 707 is located in the western tropical Indian Ocean near the Seychelles Islands. Our data are compared with the first results from Site 807 located in the Pacific

  19. Identify the ability to purchase a house in the five major cities of Java for the Indonesian middle class using correspondence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginanjar, Irlandia; Indratno, Sapto W.

    2015-12-01

    Ministry of Housing Republic of Indonesia explained that the Constitution mandates that every citizen has the right to reside. Jakarta, Surabaya, Bandung, Semarang, and Yogyakarta are five of Java's major cities with high population and investment opportunities, so the housing needs in that five cities is very high. Market sentiment analysis recorded the average of property purchasing power for Indonesian society around Rp 250 million, which the author assumes that the highest price for Indonesian middle class. Based on the fact, does the Indonesian middle class have the ability to purchase a house in the five major cities of Java? What facilities do they get? Both questions can be answered using the results of correspondence analysis.

  20. Carbon storage and release in Indonesian peatlands since the last deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommain, René; Couwenberg, John; Glaser, Paul H.; Joosten, Hans; Suryadiputra, I. Nyoman N.

    2014-08-01

    Peatlands have been recognised as globally important carbon sinks over long timescales that produced a global, net-climatic cooling effect over the Holocene. However, little is known about the role of tropical peatlands in the global carbon cycle. We therefore determine the past rates of carbon storage and release in the Indonesian peatlands of Kalimantan and Sumatra - the largest global concentration of tropical peatlands - since 20 ka (kiloannum before present). Using a novel GIS (geographic information system) approach we provide a spatially-explicit reconstruction of peatland expansion in a series of paleogeographic maps. Sea-level change is identified as the principal driver for peatland formation and expansion in western Indonesia as it controls both atmospheric moisture supply and the hydrological gradient on the islands. Initiation of inland peatlands in Kalimantan was coupled to periods of rapid deglacial sea-level rise with rates of over 10 mm yr-1 whereas coastal peatlands could only form after 7 ka when the rate of sea-level rise had slowed to 2.4 mm yr-1. Falling sea levels after 5 ka led to rapid peatland expansion in coastal lowlands and a doubling of the total peatland area in western Indonesia to 131,500 km2 between 2.3 ka and 0 ka. As a result of slow peatland expansion from 15 to 6 ka and rapid expansion afterwards the rate of annual carbon storage of all western Indonesian peatlands remained <1 Tg C yr-1 until 6 ka and then increased to 7.2 Tg C yr-1 by 0 ka. Associated with this rise in carbon storage was an exponential growth of the peat carbon pool from 0.01 Pg C by 15 ka to 23.2 Pg C at present, of which 70% is stored in coastal peatlands. In inland Kalimantan peatlands, falling sea levels together with increased El Niño activity induced an annual carbon release of 0.15 Tg C yr-1 from aerobic peat decay since 2 ka. Cumulative carbon losses from anaerobic decomposition do not seem to limit peat bog growth in the tropical peatlands of

  1. Spreading of the Indonesian Throughflow in the Indian Ocean: Tracer Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Q.; Gordon, A. L.; Visbeck, M.

    2002-12-01

    The Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) spreading pathways and time scales are investigated in two numerical tracer experiments, one being a transit time probability density function (PDF) tracer experiment and the other Lagrangian trajectory experiment, in an ocean general circulation model. The model climatology is in agreement with observations and other model results except within the region of the Leeuwin Current. The thermocline ITF water eventually exits the Indian Ocean along the western boundary, that is, the Mozambique Channel and the east coast of Madagascar and, further south, the Agulhas Current region. Crossing the Indian Ocean within the South Equatorial Current (SEC), the ITF water is affected by the bifurcation at the western boundary, with about 40% flowing southward to join the Agulhas Current consequently exiting the Indian Ocean and the rest about 60% northward to the northern Indian Ocean. Most of the ITF water that turns to the north rejoins the SEC and subsequently is advected to the western boundary by undergoing vertical transfer from the thermocline to the surface layer through upwelling, mainly the summer coastal upwelling off the coast of Somalia and the year-round open ocean upwelling in a broad region between the Equator and about 13°S, and southward horizontal advection in the surface layer by Ekman transport. The fate of this branch of ITF water is determined, again, at the western boundary. The spreading time scales, represented by the elapsed time corresponding to the maximum of transit time PDF, show that in the thermocline the ITF crosses the Indian Ocean, from the Makassar Strait to the east coast of African continent, on a time scale of 9 years, reaches the Arabian Sea on a time scale of 20 years and returns to the eastern Indian Ocean in the southern subtropics on a time scale of 18 years.

  2. The anti-inflammatory effect of Indonesian Areca catechu leaf extract in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang Pa; Sudjarwo, Giftania Wardani; Kim, Ji-Su; Dirgantara, Septrianto; Maeng, Won Jai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme can cause inflammation. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is also involved in the inflammatory response through regulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Areca catechu is one of the known fruit plants of the Palmaceae family. It has been used for a long time as a source of herbal medicine in Indonesia. In this study, we explored the effect of Indonesian Areca catechu leaf ethanol extract (ACE) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation and carrageenan-induced paw edema models. Recently, this natural extract has been in the spotlight because of its efficacy and limited or no toxic side effects. However, the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory effect remains to be elucidated. MATERIALS/METHODS We measured NO production by using the Griess reagent, and determined the expression levels of inflammation-related proteins, such as iNOS, COX2, and NF-κB, by western blot. To confirm the effect of ACE in vivo, we used the carrageenan-induced paw edema model. RESULTS Compared to untreated cells, LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells treated with ACE showed reduced NO generation and reduced iNOS and COX-2 expression. We found that the acute inflammatory response was significantly reduced by ACE in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model. CONCLUSION Taken together, these results suggest that ACE can inhibit inflammation and modulate NO generation via downregulation of iNOS levels and NF-κB signaling in vitro and in vivo. ACE may have a potential medical benefit as an anti-inflammation agent. PMID:24944770

  3. Low-frequency fluctuations in the Indonesian throughflow through Lombok Strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arief, Dharma; Murray, Stephen P.

    1996-05-01

    A significant component of the Indonesian throughflow, apparently about 25%, passes through the Lombok Strait. Direct observations in 1985 reported a ˜2 Sv annual average, with an annual cycle of amplitude ˜2 Sv. There are also significant fluctuations in this transport in the 0.01-0.1 cpd frequency band. Shallow pressure gauge data (sea level) inside the strait during the current meter observations were of limited use in explaining the large fluctuations in currents. Sea level data at Cilacap, 720 km west (upcoast), however, overlap the current observations for 5 months and correlate exceedingly well (r = 0.87) with the observations inside the strait at these frequencies. These sea level oscillations in the Indian Ocean force fluctuations in the Lombok throughflow that reach 50-70 cm/s, equivalent to 2-3 Sv. Lagged regression analysis indicates Cilacap sea level leads Lombok currents by 1-2 days, suggesting a low-frequency, progressive wave. Simultaneous data in 1989 from four stations extending from the near-equatorial station at Padang at 1°S to Benoa in the Lombok Strait (2000 km downcoast) clearly show the persistent propagation of low-frequency waves of 20- to 40-cm range along this coast. Lagged correlation on station pairs indicates a phase speed consistent with coastally trapped internal Kelvin waves. We speculate that further eastward progression of these waves to the Timor Passage of Ombai Strait will further modulate the throughflow. The forcing of these waves is not yet identified, but it appears likely that intraseasonal oscillations in the equatorial Indian Ocean winds, as demonstrated by Enfield [1987] for the Pacific, are a probable mechanism. Improved wind data quality in 1991 due to the assimilation of satellite data (special sensor microwave/imager) will allow investigation of remote forcing on more recent data sets.

  4. Rising floodwaters: mapping impacts and perceptions of flooding in Indonesian Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jessie A.; Wilson, Kerrie A.; Abram, Nicola K.; Nunn, Malcolm; Gaveau, David L. A.; Runting, Rebecca K.; Tarniati, Nina; Mengersen, Kerrie L.; Meijaard, Erik

    2016-06-01

    The roles of forest and wetland ecosystems in regulating flooding have drawn increasing attention in the contexts of climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction. However, data on floods are scarce in many of the countries where people are most exposed and vulnerable to their impacts. Here, our separate analyses of village interview surveys (364 villages) and news archives (16 sources) show that floods have major impacts on lives and livelihoods in Indonesian Borneo, and flooding risks are associated with features of the local climate and landscape, particularly land uses that have seen rapid expansions over the past 30 years. In contrast with government assessments, we find that flooding is far more widespread, and that frequent, local, events can have large cumulative impacts. Over three years, local news agencies reported floods that affected 868 settlements, 966 times (including 89 in urban areas), inundated at least 197 000 houses, and displaced more than 776 000 people, possibly as many as 1.5 million (i.e. 5%–10% of the total population). Spatial analyses based on surveys in 364 villages show that flood frequency is associated with land use in catchment areas, including forest cover and condition, and the area of wetlands, mines (open-cut coal or gold mines), and oil palm. The probability that floods have become more frequent over the past 30 years was higher for villages closer to mines, and in watersheds with more extensive oil palm, but lower in watersheds with greater cover of selectively-logged or intact forests. We demonstrate that in data-poor regions, multiple sources of information can be integrated to gain insights into the hydrological services provided by forest and wetland ecosystems, and motivate more comprehensive assessment of flooding risks and options for ecosystem-based adaptation.

  5. Assessing risks of climate variability and climate change for Indonesian rice agriculture.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Rosamond L; Battisti, David S; Vimont, Daniel J; Falcon, Walter P; Burke, Marshall B

    2007-05-01

    El Niño events typically lead to delayed rainfall and decreased rice planting in Indonesia's main rice-growing regions, thus prolonging the hungry season and increasing the risk of annual rice deficits. Here we use a risk assessment framework to examine the potential impact of El Niño events and natural variability on rice agriculture in 2050 under conditions of climate change, with a focus on two main rice-producing areas: Java and Bali. We select a 30-day delay in monsoon onset as a threshold beyond which significant impact on the country's rice economy is likely to occur. To project the future probability of monsoon delay and changes in the annual cycle of rainfall, we use output from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change AR4 suite of climate models, forced by increasing greenhouse gases, and scale it to the regional level by using empirical downscaling models. Our results reveal a marked increase in the probability of a 30-day delay in monsoon onset in 2050, as a result of changes in the mean climate, from 9-18% today (depending on the region) to 30-40% at the upper tail of the distribution. Predictions of the annual cycle of precipitation suggest an increase in precipitation later in the crop year (April-June) of approximately 10% but a substantial decrease (up to 75% at the tail) in precipitation later in the dry season (July-September). These results indicate a need for adaptation strategies in Indonesian rice agriculture, including increased investments in water storage, drought-tolerant crops, crop diversification, and early warning systems. PMID:17483453

  6. Parasites of the grouper fish Epinephelus coioides (Serranidae) as potential environmental indicators in Indonesian coastal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Kleinertz, S; Palm, H W

    2015-01-01

    A total of 195 Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton, 1822) were studied for fish parasites from Javanese (Segara Anakan lagoon) and Balinese waters. Up to 25 different parasite species belonging to the following taxa: one Ciliata, one Microsporea, five Digenea, one Monogenea, four Cestoda, four Nematoda, one Acanthocephala, one Hirudinea and seven Crustacea were identified with four new host and locality records. The dominant parasites included the monogenean Pseudorhabdosynochus lantauensis (53.3-97.1%), the nematode Spirophilometra endangae (23.3-42.9%), the digenean Didymodiclinus sp. (2.9-40.0%), the nematodes Philometra sp. (22.6-34.3%) and Raphidascaris sp. (2.9-28.6%), and the isopod Alcirona sp. (6.7-31.4%). Regional differences for E. coioides were found in terms of endoparasite diversity, total diversity according to Shannon-Wiener, Simpson index and Evenness. A comparison with published data from Sumatera revealed highest endoparasite diversity (Shannon-Wiener: 1.86/1.67-2.04) and lowest ectoparasite/endoparasite ratio (0.73/0.57-0.88) off the Balinese coast, followed by Lampung Bay, Sumatera (1.84; 0.67), off the coast of Segara Anakan lagoon (1.71; 0.71), and in the lagoon (0.30/0.19-0.66; 0.85/0.67-1.00). The presented data demonstrate the natural range of these parameters and parasite prevalences according to habitat and region, allowing adjustment of the scale that has been used in the visual integration of the parasite parameters into a star graph. The parasite fauna of E. coioides in Segara Anakan lagoon 'improved' from 2004 until 2008/09, possibly related to earlier oil spill events in 2002 and 2004. The use of grouper fish parasites as an early warning system for environmental change in Indonesian coastal ecosystems is discussed. PMID:24018181

  7. Derivation of burn scar depths and estimation of carbon emissions with LIDAR in Indonesian peatlands.

    PubMed

    Ballhorn, Uwe; Siegert, Florian; Mason, Mike; Limin, Suwido

    2009-12-15

    During the 1997/98 El Niño-induced drought peatland fires in Indonesia may have released 13-40% of the mean annual global carbon emissions from fossil fuels. One major unknown in current peatland emission estimations is how much peat is combusted by fire. Using a light detection and ranging data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after the severe peatland fires of 2006, we determined an average burn scar depth of 0.33 +/- 0.18 m. Based on this result and the burned area determined from satellite imagery, we estimate that within the 2.79 million hectare study area 49.15 +/- 26.81 megatons of carbon were released during the 2006 El Niño episode. This represents 10-33% of all carbon emissions from transport for the European Community in the year 2006. These emissions, originating from a comparatively small area (approximately 13% of the Indonesian peatland area), underline the importance of peat fires in the context of green house gas emissions and global warming. In the past decade severe peat fires occurred during El Niño-induced droughts in 1997, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2009. Currently, this important source of carbon emissions is not included in IPCC carbon accounting or in regional and global carbon emission models. Precise spatial measurements of peat combusted and potential avoided emissions in tropical peat swamp forests will also be required for future emission trading schemes in the framework of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation in developing countries. PMID:19940252

  8. Derivation of burn scar depths and estimation of carbon emissions with LIDAR in Indonesian peatlands

    PubMed Central

    Ballhorn, Uwe; Siegert, Florian; Mason, Mike; Limin, Suwido

    2009-01-01

    During the 1997/98 El Niño-induced drought peatland fires in Indonesia may have released 13–40% of the mean annual global carbon emissions from fossil fuels. One major unknown in current peatland emission estimations is how much peat is combusted by fire. Using a light detection and ranging data set acquired in Central Kalimantan, Borneo, in 2007, one year after the severe peatland fires of 2006, we determined an average burn scar depth of 0.33 ± 0.18 m. Based on this result and the burned area determined from satellite imagery, we estimate that within the 2.79 million hectare study area 49.15 ± 26.81 megatons of carbon were released during the 2006 El Niño episode. This represents 10–33% of all carbon emissions from transport for the European Community in the year 2006. These emissions, originating from a comparatively small area (approximately 13% of the Indonesian peatland area), underline the importance of peat fires in the context of green house gas emissions and global warming. In the past decade severe peat fires occurred during El Niño-induced droughts in 1997, 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2009. Currently, this important source of carbon emissions is not included in IPCC carbon accounting or in regional and global carbon emission models. Precise spatial measurements of peat combusted and potential avoided emissions in tropical peat swamp forests will also be required for future emission trading schemes in the framework of Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation in developing countries. PMID:19940252

  9. Persistent Effects of Oil Palm Plantation Agriculture on Freshwater Stream Function in Indonesian Borneo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, K. M.; Curran, L.; Ratnasari, D.

    2012-12-01

    Conversion of forests to agricultural land uses alters freshwater stream ecosystems by changing flows of physical, chemical, and biological stream inputs. In contrast with annual agricultural crops, oil palm agribusiness may have distinctive effects on stream function because these plantations replace existing land cover with 1,000-20,000 ha tree-like monocultures that have 20-30 year rotation cycles. From 2008 to 2012 in Kalimantan (Indonesian Borneo), we measured water temperature, metabolism, and sediment and nutrient loads in four streams draining watersheds dominated (> ~70%) by intact and logged forests, agroforests and agricultural fallows, and young (< 3 y) and mature (> 10 y) oil palm plantations. We find that mean daily stream temperature was elevated 12% at the mature and 8% at the young oil palm site compared to the forest stream (25.5 ± 0.3°C). No clear relationship emerged between land cover type and ecosystem respiration (ER, g O2 m-2 d-1) or gross primary production (GPP, g O2 m-2 d-1). Yet GPP:ER ratios were 600% and 650% greater at young and mature oil palm watersheds, respectively, than the forested watershed (0.020 ± 0.005). Sediment loads (t d-1) across measured water yields (m d-1) were higher in the young oil palm stream compared to all other streams. Total phosphorous, total dissolved phosphorous, and total nitrogen loads for measured water yields were elevated in the agroforest and young oil palm sites compared to the forest site. Our results indicate that oil palm plantation land use alters tropical stream temperature, metabolism, nutrient loads, and sediment loads; moreover, these conditions appear to persist for ≥ 15 years. We discuss the implications of these findings for local human communities and ecosystems.

  10. Childhood Acute Respiratory Infections and Household Environment in an Eastern Indonesian Urban Setting

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Wilson, James L.; Watson, Lindsey M.; LeDuc, Alyse; Meng, Can; Ansariadi; La Ane, Ruslan; Manyullei, Syamsuar; Maidin, Alimin

    2014-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the potential effect of household environmental factors such as income, maternal characteristics, and indoor air pollution on children’s respiratory status in an Eastern Indonesian community. Household data were collected from cross-sectional (n = 461 participants) and preliminary childhood case-control surveys (pneumonia cases = 31 diagnosed within three months at a local health clinic; controls = 30). Particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) was measured in living rooms, kitchens, children’s bedrooms, and outside areas in close proximity once during the case-control household interviews (55 homes) and once per hour from 6 a.m. to midnight in 11 homes. The household survey showed that children were 1.98 times (p = 0.02) more likely to have coughing symptoms indicating respiratory infection, if mothers were not the primary caregivers. More children exhibited coughing if they were not exclusively breastfed (OR = 2.18; p = 0.06) or there was a possibility that their mothers were exposed to environmental tobacco smoke during pregnancy (OR = 2.05; p = 0.08). This study suggests that household incomes and mother’s education have an indirect effect on childhood pneumonia and respiratory illness. The concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 ranged from 0.5 to 35.7 µg/m3 and 7.7 to 575.7 µg/m3, respectively, based on grab samples. PM was significantly different between the case and control groups (p < 0.01). The study also suggests that ambient air may dilute indoor pollution, but also introduces pollution into the home from the community environment. Effective intervention programs need to be developed that consider multiple direct and indirect risk factors to protect children. PMID:25429685

  11. Childhood acute respiratory infections and household environment in an Eastern Indonesian urban setting.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Wilson, James L; Watson, Lindsey M; LeDuc, Alyse; Meng, Can; Ansariadi; La Ane, Ruslan; Manyullei, Syamsuar; Maidin, Alimin

    2014-12-01

    This pilot study evaluated the potential effect of household environmental factors such as income, maternal characteristics, and indoor air pollution on children's respiratory status in an Eastern Indonesian community. Household data were collected from cross-sectional (n = 461 participants) and preliminary childhood case-control surveys (pneumonia cases = 31 diagnosed within three months at a local health clinic; controls = 30). Particulate matter (PM2.5 and PM10) was measured in living rooms, kitchens, children's bedrooms, and outside areas in close proximity once during the case-control household interviews (55 homes) and once per hour from 6 a.m. to midnight in 11 homes. The household survey showed that children were 1.98 times (p = 0.02) more likely to have coughing symptoms indicating respiratory infection, if mothers were not the primary caregivers. More children exhibited coughing if they were not exclusively breastfed (OR = 2.18; p = 0.06) or there was a possibility that their mothers were exposed to environmental tobacco smoke during pregnancy (OR = 2.05; p = 0.08). This study suggests that household incomes and mother's education have an indirect effect on childhood pneumonia and respiratory illness. The concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 ranged from 0.5 to 35.7 µg/m3 and 7.7 to 575.7 µg/m3, respectively, based on grab samples. PM was significantly different between the case and control groups (p < 0.01). The study also suggests that ambient air may dilute indoor pollution, but also introduces pollution into the home from the community environment. Effective intervention programs need to be developed that consider multiple direct and indirect risk factors to protect children. PMID:25429685

  12. The GNSS data processing component within the Indonesian tsunami early warning centre provided by GITEWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, M.; Merx, A.; Falck, C.; Ramatschi, M.

    2010-05-01

    Introduction Within the GITEWS (German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System) project a near real-time GNSS processing system has been developed, which analizes on- and offshore measured GNSS data. It is the first system of its kind that was integrated into an operational tsunami early warning system. (Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning Centre INATEWS, inaugurated at BMKG Jakarta on November, 11th 2008) Brief system description The GNSS data to be processed are received from sensors (GNSS antenna and receiver) installed on buoys, at tide gauges and as real-time reference stations (RTR stations), either stand-alone or co-located with seismic sensors. The GNSS data are transmitted to the warning centre in real-time as a stream (RTR stations) or file-based and are processed in a near real-time data processing chain. The fully automatized system uses the BERNESE GPS software as processing core. Kinematic coordinate timeseries with a resolution of 1 Hz (landbased stations) and 1/3 Hz (buoys) are estimated every five minutes. In case of a recently occured earthquake the processing interval decreases from five to two minutes. All stations are processed with the relative technique (baseline-technique) using GITEWS-stations and stations available via IGS as reference. The most suitable reference stations are choosen by querying a database where continiously monitored quality data of GNSS observations are stored. In case of an earthquake at least one reference station should be located on a different tectonic plate to ensure that relative movements can be detected. The primary source for satellite orbit information is the IGS IGU product. If this source is not available for any reason, the system switches automatically to other orbit sources like CODE products or broadcast ephemeris data. For sensors on land the kinematic coordinates are used to detect deviations from their normal, mean coordinates. The deviations or so called displacements are indicators for land mass

  13. The GNSS-based component for the new Indonesian tsunami early warning centre provided by GITEWS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falck, C.; Ramatschi, M.; Bartsch, M.; Merx, A.; Hoeberechts, J.; Rothacher, M.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction Nowadays GNSS technologies are used for a large variety of precise positioning applications. The accuracy can reach the mm level depending on the data analysis methods. GNSS technologies thus offer a high potential to support tsunami early warning systems, e.g., by detection of ground motions due to earthquakes and of tsunami waves on the ocean by GNSS instruments on a buoy. Although GNSS-based precise positioning is a standard method, it is not yet common to apply this technique under tight time constraints and, hence, in the absence of precise satellite orbits and clocks. The new developed GNSS-based component utilises on- and offshore measured GNSS data and is the first system of its kind that was integrated into an operational early warning system. (Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning Centre INATEWS, inaugurated at BMKG, Jakarta on November, 11th 2008) Motivation After the Tsunami event of 26th December 2004 the German government initiated the GITEWS project (German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System) to develop a tsunami early warning system for Indonesia. The GFZ Potsdam (German Research Centre for Geosciences) as the consortial leader of GITEWS also covers several work packages, most of them related to sensor systems. The geodetic branch (Department 1) of the GFZ was assigned to develop a GNSS-based component. Brief system description The system covers all aspects from sensor stations with new developed hard- and software designs, manufacturing and installation of stations, real-time data transfer issues, a new developed automatic near real-time data processing and a graphical user interface for early warning centre operators including training on the system. GNSS sensors are installed on buoys, at tide gauges and as real-time reference stations (RTR stations), either stand-alone or co-located with seismic sensors. The GNSS data are transmitted to the warning centre where they are processed in a near real-time data processing chain. For

  14. Measuring Hospital Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Leveson, Irving

    1974-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive method for quantifying hospital output and estimating hospital productivity. A number of less comprehensive productivity measures that can be quantified from data available from regional third-party payers and from the American Hospital Association are also developed and evaluated as proxies for the comprehensive measure, which is based on local area data. Methods are discussed for estimating the necessary variables on a regional or national level. PMID:4461703

  15. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  16. Availability of treatment resources for the management of acute toxic exposures and poisonings in emergency departments among various types of hospitals in Palestine: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Poisoning exposures continue to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The lack of facilities, treatment resources, and antidotes in hospitals may affect the treatments provided and outcomes. This study aimed to determine the availability of gastrointestinal (GI) decontamination, stabilisation, elimination enhancement resources, and antidotes for the management of acute toxic exposures and poisonings in emergency departments (EDs) among various types of governmental and private hospitals in Palestine. Methods A cross-sectional study using semi-structured questionnaire was performed. Data were collected based on hospital resources; GI decontamination, stabilisation, elimination enhancement resources and antidotes from Palestinian hospitals. Results Eighteen hospitals (94.7%) have responded. Among them, paracetamol poisoning was the most frequently reported cases by EDs (mean frequency score = 7.6 ± 2.1), followed by bee stings (mean = 6.9 ± 2.7) and organophosphate poisoning (mean = 6.7 ± 2.7). The availabilities of most resources related to GI decontamination items varied substantially with hospital type, but these differences were not statistical significant. The availability of stabilisation resources was not significantly different between hospitals types. For the availability of techniques used to enhance the elimination of toxic substances, there were variations between the hospitals types. However, these differences were not statistical significant, except for haemodialysis (p = 0.003) which was more available in governmental hospitals. For the availability of antidotes, none of the hospitals had sufficient stock of all antidotes listed. In relation to hospital type, there was variability in the availability of antidotes, but this did not reach statistical significance, except for deferoxamine (p < 0.001), which was available in all governmental hospitals but none of the private hospitals

  17. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  18. Library Services in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Social Security, London (England).

    The memorandum gives guidance to the provision and organization of library services at hospitals both for staff and for patients. It also draws attention to the assistance available from outside sources towards the development and maintenance of these services so hospital authorities may make the most effective use of the available facilities.…

  19. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  20. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  1. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  2. [Music in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy. PMID:20684389

  3. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider. PMID:10127850

  4. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  5. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  6. Hospital efficiency and debt.

    PubMed

    Bernet, Patrick Michael; Rosko, Michael D; Valdmanis, Vivian G

    2008-01-01

    U.S. Hospitals rely heavily on debt financing to fund major capital investments. Hospital efficiency is at least partly determined by the amount and quality of plant and equipment it uses. As such, a hospital's access to debt and credit rating may be related to its efficiency. This study explores this relationship using a broad sample of hospitals and associated bond issuance histories. Employing stochastic frontier analysis (SFA), we measure cost inefficiency to gauge the impact of debt issuance and debt rating. We find that hospitals with recent bond issues were less inefficient. Although we do not find a perfectly linear relationship between debt rating and inefficiency, we have evidence that hints at such a relation. Finally, we find an increase in inefficiency in the years following bond issues, consistent with the possibility of a debt death spiral. PMID:21110482

  7. [Hospital medicine in Chile].

    PubMed

    Eymin, Gonzalo; Jaffer, Amir K

    2013-03-01

    After 15 years of development of Hospital Medicine in Chile, there are several benefits of this discipline. Among others, a reduction in the length of hospital stay, readmissions, costs, and improved medical teaching of students, residents and fellows have been observed. However, in South América there are only isolated groups dedicated to Hospital Medicine in Chile, Argentina and Brazil, with a rather slow growth. The unjustified fear of competition from sub specialists, and the fee for service system of payment in our environment may be important factors to understand this phenomenon. The aging of the population makes imperative to improve the safety of our patients and to optimize processes and resources within the hospital, to avoid squandering healthcare resources. The following is a detailed and evidence-based article, on how hospital medicine might benefit both the public and prívate healthcare systems in Chile. PMID:23900327

  8. Observational Study Of The Pacific Western Boundary Currents And The Indonesian Throughflow by the CAS Strategic Priority Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, D.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    The warm pool in the western Pacific Ocean has significant impact on the evolution of ENSO and the East Asian monsoon. Ocean circulation in the western Pacific Ocean and in Indonesian seas plays an important role in the interannual climate variations and predictability of the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean. A major observational program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences is recently launched to study the western Pacific Ocean circulation and the warm pool to test these scientific hypotheses. The physical oceanography project called the "Western Pacific Ocean Circulation and the Warm Pool Variability" is by far the largest and the most intensive observational program in history in the western Pacific ocean study. In this talk, the background and scientific hypotheses of the project, the observational design in the western Pacific Ocean, Indonesian seas, and the eastern Indian Ocean region, and some preliminary results of the program will be presented. The talk serves to encourage more scientists to collaborate in the studies of the ocean circulation and climate in the western Pacific and eastern Indian Oceans.

  9. Hospitality as an Environmental Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwood, Bert

    1991-01-01

    Compares stewardship and hospitality as they relate to the biosphere. Traces the origin of the word "hospitality," discusses cultural traditions of hospitality, and applies the concept of hospitality to the natural world. Considers forms of symbiosis in nature: commensals, mutualism, and parasitism. Hospitality promotes respect, humility, and…

  10. Design rules for successful governmental payments for ecosystem services: Taking agri-environmental measures in Germany as an example.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Claas; Reutter, Michaela; Matzdorf, Bettina; Sattler, Claudia; Schomers, Sarah

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to financial environmental policy instruments that have played important roles in solving agri-environmental problems throughout the world, particularly in the European Union and the United States. The ample and increasing literature on Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) and agri-environmental measures (AEMs), generally understood as governmental PES, shows that certain single design rules may have an impact on the success of a particular measure. Based on this research, we focused on the interplay of several design rules and conducted a comparative analysis of AEMs' institutional arrangements by examining 49 German cases. We analyzed the effects of the design rules and certain rule combinations on the success of AEMs. Compliance and noncompliance with the hypothesized design rules and the success of the AEMs were surveyed by questioning the responsible agricultural administration and the AEMs' mid-term evaluators. The different rules were evaluated in regard to their necessity and sufficiency for success using Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA). Our results show that combinations of certain design rules such as environmental goal targeting and area targeting conditioned the success of the AEMs. Hence, we generalize design principles for AEMs and discuss implications for the general advancement of ecosystem services and the PES approach in agri-environmental policies. Moreover, we highlight the relevance of the results for governmental PES program research and design worldwide. PMID:25909439

  11. Eugenics, sexual pedagogy and social change: constructing the responsible subject of governmentality in the Spanish Second Republic.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Alonso, Belén

    2008-06-01

    This study focuses on eugenics in Spain, and more specifically on the 'official' eugenics whose platform was the Primeras Jornadas Eugénicas Españolas (First Spanish Eugenic Days, FSED). The aim of this paper is to relate eugenics to 'governmentality' rather than to State politics alone and to 'Latin eugenics' rather than to 'mainline eugenics'. On the one hand, the FSED were largely centred on the development of a new sexual code which would set Catholic sexual morality aside. For this reason, sexual pedagogy was one of the most relevant topics during the FSED, personal responsibility becoming the first step to social change. The concern about making people play an active role in their own self-regulation is typical of governmentality. The latter refers to societies where power is decentered and where the objective is to structure the field of action of others (the conduct of conduct). On the other hand, the FSED emphasised preventive eugenics such as welfare programmes and health campaigns rather than negative eugenics such as the sterilisation of the unfit. The situation in Spain was mirrored in countries such as Brazil, Argentina and Mexico, which allows us to think about them in terms of 'Latin eugenics' rather than 'mainline eugenics' from countries such as Great Britain, Germany and the USA. PMID:18534356

  12. Annual variations of carbonaceous PM2.5 in Malaysia: influence by Indonesian peatland fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Y.; Tohno, S.; Amil, N.; Latif, M. T.; Oda, M.; Matsumoto, J.; Mizohata, A.

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we quantified carbonaceous PM2.5 in Malaysia through annual observations of PM2.5, focusing on organic compounds derived from biomass burning. We determined organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and concentrations of solvent-extractable organic compounds (biomarkers derived from biomass burning sources and n-alkanes). We observed seasonal variations in the concentrations of pyrolyzed OC (OP), levoglucosan (LG), mannosan (MN), galactosan, syringaldehyde, vanillic acid (VA) and cholesterol. The average concentrations of OP, LG, MN, galactosan, VA and cholesterol were higher during the southwest monsoon season (June-September) than during the northeast monsoon season (December-March), and these differences were statistically significant. Conversely, the syringaldehyde concentration during the southwest monsoon season was lower. The PM2.5 OP/OC4 mass ratio allowed distinguishing the seven samples, which have been affected by the Indonesian peatland fires (IPFs). In addition, we observed significant differences in the concentrations between the IPF and other samples of many chemical species. Thus, the chemical characteristics of PM2.5 in Malaysia appeared to be significantly influenced by IPFs during the southwest monsoon season. Furthermore, we evaluated two indicators, the vanillic acid/syringic acid (VA/SA) and LG/MN mass ratios, which have been suggested as indicators of IPFs. The LG/MN mass ratio ranged from 14 to 22 in the IPF samples and from 11 to 31 in the other samples. Thus, the respective variation ranges partially overlapped. Consequently, this ratio did not satisfactorily reflect the effects of IPFs in Malaysia. In contrast, the VA/SA mass ratio may serve as a good indicator, since it significantly differed between the IPF and other samples. However, the OP/OC4 mass ratio provided more remarkable differences than the VA/SA mass ratio, offering an even better indicator. Finally, we extracted biomass burning emissions' sources such as IPF

  13. Antiviral activities of Indonesian medicinal plants in the East Java region against hepatitis C virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of liver disease and a potential cause of substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. The overall prevalence of HCV infection is 2%, representing 120 million people worldwide. Current standard treatment using pegylated interferon and ribavirin is effective in only 50% of the patients infected with HCV genotype 1, and is associated with significant side effects. Therefore, it is still of importance to develop new drugs for treatment of HCV. Antiviral substances obtained from natural products, including medicinal plants, are potentially good targets to study. In this study, we evaluated Indonesian medicinal plants for their anti-HCV activities. Methods Ethanol extracts of 21 samples derived from 17 species of medicinal plants explored in the East Java region were tested. Anti-HCV activities were determined by a cell culture method using Huh7.5 cells and HCV strains of 9 different genotypes (1a to 7a, 1b and 2b). Results Four of the 21 samples tested showed antiviral activities against HCV: Toona sureni leaves (TSL) with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of 13.9 and 2.0 μg/ml against the HCV J6/JFH1-P47 and -P1 strains, respectively, Melicope latifolia leaves (MLL) with IC50 of 3.5 and 2.1 μg/ml, respectively, Melanolepis multiglandulosa stem (MMS) with IC50 of 17.1 and 6.2 μg/ml, respectively, and Ficus fistulosa leaves (FFL) with IC50 of 15.0 and 5.7 μg/ml, respectively. Time-of-addition experiments revealed that TSL and MLL inhibited both at the entry and post-entry steps while MMS and FFL principally at the entry step. TSL and MLL inhibited all of 11 HCV strains of all the genotypes tested to the same extent. On the other hand, FFL showed significantly weaker inhibitory activities against the HCV genotype 1a strain, and MMS against the HCV strains of genotypes 2b and 7a to a lesser extent, compared to the other HCV genotypes. Conclusions Ethanol extracts of TSL, MLL, MMS and FFL showed antiviral

  14. Control Costs, Enhance Quality, and Increase Revenue in Three Top General Public Hospitals in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lue-Ping; Yu, Guo-Pei; Liu, Hui; Ma, Xie-Min; Wang, Jing; Kong, Gui-Lan; Li, Yi; Ma, Wen; Cui, Yong; Xu, Beibei; Yu, Na; Bao, Xiao-Yuan; Guo, Yu; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jun; Li, Yan; Xie, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Bao-Guo; Ke, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background With market-oriented economic and health-care reform, public hospitals in China have received unprecedented pressures from governmental regulations, public opinions, and financial demands. To adapt the changing environment and keep pace of modernizing healthcare delivery system, public hospitals in China are expanding clinical services and improving delivery efficiency, while controlling costs. Recent experiences are valuable lessons for guiding future healthcare reform. Here we carefully study three teaching hospitals, to exemplify their experiences during this period. Methods We performed a systematic analysis on hospitalization costs, health-care quality and delivery efficiencies from 2006 to 2010 in three teaching hospitals in Beijing, China. The analysis measured temporal changes of inpatient cost per stay (CPS), cost per day (CPD), inpatient mortality rate (IMR), and length of stay (LOS), using a generalized additive model. Findings There were 651,559 hospitalizations during the period analyzed. Averaged CPS was stable over time, while averaged CPD steadily increased by 41.7% (P<0.001), from CNY 1,531 in 2006 to CNY 2,169 in 2010. The increasing CPD seemed synchronous with the steady rising of the national annual income per capita. Surgical cost was the main contributor to the temporal change of CPD, while medicine and examination costs tended to be stable over time. From 2006 and 2010, IMR decreased by 36%, while LOS reduced by 25%. Increasing hospitalizations with higher costs, along with an overall stable CPS, reduced IMR, and shorter LOS, appear to be the major characteristics of these three hospitals at present. Interpretations These three teaching hospitals have gained some success in controlling costs, improving cares, adopting modern medical technologies, and increasing hospital revenues. Effective hospital governance and physicians' professional capacity plus government regulations and supervisions may have played a role. However, purely

  15. What Do You Want to Be When You Grow Up? Self-Construction in Indonesian Street Children's Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewayani, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    The "Education for All policy" is one of the Indonesian government's solutions to return children who work in the street to formal schooling. Unfortunately, access to higher education, which can enable vertical mobility for these children, is constrained by many factors, including financial opportunities. This study examines the…

  16. Government-Based Training Agencies and the Professional Development of Indonesian Teachers of English for Young Learners: Perspectives from Complexity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zein, Mochamad Subhan

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to identify suggestions to improve PD programmes held by government-based training agencies to help enhance Indonesian EYL teachers' instructional practice. For the purpose of the study, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 51 participants. The findings suggest the theorisation of a PD model that involves complex…

  17. Building the Capacity of Indonesian Education Universities for ICT in Pre-Service Teacher Education: A Case Study of a Strategic Planning Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Cher Ping; Pannen, Paulina

    2012-01-01

    This paper documents how four Indonesian teacher education institutions (TEIs) engaged in strategic planning to build their capacity in developing pre-service teachers' ICT in education competencies. These TEIs adopted a holistic approach towards strategic planning by drawing upon the six dimensions of the "Capacity Building Toolkit" for TEIs in…

  18. Laboratory measurements of smoke optical properties from the burning of Indonesian peat and other types of biomass - article no. L12819

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, D.; Schmid, O.; Gwaze, P.; Parmar, R.S.; Helas, G.; Zeromskiene, K.; Wiedensohler, A.; Massling, A.; Andreae, M.O.

    2005-06-30

    We present the first results on optical properties ({lambda}{approximately} 540 nm) of fresh aerosols from the combustion of Indonesian peat, German peat and other types of biomass, measured under controlled laboratory conditions. The mass scattering and mass absorption efficiencies for Indonesian and German peat aerosols are in the range of 6.0-8.1 and 0.04-0.06 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, respectively. A very high single scattering albedo ( 0.99) is observed for the peat smoke aerosols, reflecting the smoldering burning conditions (emission ratio, {Delta}CO/{Delta}CO{sub 2} = 19-50%). The relative increase in light scattering f(RH) due to an increase in relative humidity (RH) from 15% to 90% is very low (i.e., f(90) = 1.05) for both Indonesian and German peat aerosols. This value is considerably smaller than for aged Indonesian peat smoke particles (f(80) = 1.65) ( Gras et al., 1999). This suggests that atmospheric aging processes may be an important factor for aerosol hygroscopicity.

  19. Philanthropy and hospital financing.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Clement, J P; Wheeler, J R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explores the relationships among donations to not-for-profit hospitals, the returns provided by these hospitals, and fund-raising efforts. It tests a model of hospital behavior and addresses an earlier debate regarding the supply price of donations. DATA SOURCES. The main data source is the California Office of Statewide Health Planning data tapes of hospital financial disclosure reports for fiscal years 1980/1981 through 1986/1987. Complete data were available for 160 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. Three structural equations (donations, returns, and fund-raising) are estimated as a system using a fixed-effects, pooled cross-section, time-series least squares regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Estimation results reveal the expected positive relation between donations and returns. The reverse relation between returns and donations is insignificant. The estimated effect of fund-raising on donations is insignificantly different from zero, and the effect of donations on fund-raising is negative. Fund-raising and returns are negatively associated with one another. CONCLUSION. The empirical results presented here suggest a positive donations-returns relations and are consistent with a positive supply price for donations. Hospitals appear to view a trade-off between providing returns and soliciting donations, but donors do not respond equally to these two activities. Attempts to increase free cash flow through expansion of community returns or fund-raising activity, at least in the short run, are not likely to be highly successful financing strategies for many hospitals. PMID:8537223

  20. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  1. Hospitals' internal accountability.

    PubMed

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  2. Evaluation of governmental oral health-care infrastructure in the state of Haryana.

    PubMed

    Vashist, Ashish; Parhar, Swati; Gambhir, Ramandeep Singh; Sohi, Ramandeep Kaur; Talwar, Puneet Singh

    2016-01-01

    Health system should be organized to meet the needs of entire population of the nation. Oral diseases are the most common of the chronic diseases, but there are few efficient dental care systems to cope with these problems. The present cross-sectional study was conducted among 135 dental care units of various primary health centers, community health centers, and general hospitals existing in the state to evaluate the government oral health-care infrastructure in Haryana. Data regarding provision of water and electricity supply, dental workforce and their qualification, number and type of instruments in the dental operatory unit, etc., were collected on a structured format. There is a shortfall in infrastructure and significant problem with the adequacy of working facilities. This can prove to be a big hurdle in the provision of adequate oral health care to people with greatest health-care needs. A great deal of effort is required to harmonize the oral health-care delivery system. PMID:27561403

  3. Traceability from governmental producers of radiopharmaceuticals in measuring (18)F in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A E; Iwahara, A; Silva, C J; Cruz, P A L; Poledna, R; Silva, R L; Laranjeira, A S; Delgado, J U; Tauhata, L; Loureiro, J S; Toledo, B C; Braghirolli, A M S; Andrade, E A L; Silva, J L; Hernandes, H O K; Valente, E S; Dalle, H M; Almeida, V M; Silva, T G; Fragoso, M C F; Oliveira, M L; Nascimento, E S S; Oliveira, E M; Herrerias, R; Souza, A A; Bambalas, E; Bruzinga, W A

    2016-03-01

    Since the inception of its proficiency test program to evaluate radionuclide measurement in hospitals and clinics, the National Metrology Laboratory of Ionizing Radiation-LNMRI, that represents Brazilian National Metrology Institute (NMI) for ionizing radiation has expanded its measurement and calibration capability. Requirements from the National Health Surveillance Agency from Ministry of Health (ANVISA), to producers of radiopharmaceuticals provided an opportunity to improve the full traceability chain to the highest level. Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-(18)F) is the only radiopharmaceutical simultaneously produced by all Brazilian radiopharmaceutical production centers (RPCs). By running this proficiency test, LNMRI began to provide them with the required traceability. For evaluation, the ratio of RPC to reference value results and ISO/IEC17043:2010 criteria were used. The reference value established as calibration factor on the secondary standard ionization chamber was obtained from three absolute measurements systems, and routinely confirmed in each round of proficiency test by CIEMAT/NIST liquid scintillation counting. The γ-emitting impurities were checked using a High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. The results show that Brazilian RPCs are in accordance with (accuracy within ±10%) the Brazilian standard for evaluation of measurements with radionuclide calibrators (CNEN NN 3.05., 2013). Nevertheless, the RPCs should improve the methodology of uncertainty estimates, essential when using the statistical criteria of ISO/IEC 17043 standard, in addition to improving accuracy to levels consistent with their position in the national traceability chain. PMID:26688362

  4. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  5. Nature and frequency of medication errors in a geriatric ward: an Indonesian experience

    PubMed Central

    Ernawati, Desak Ketut; Lee, Ya Ping; Hughes, Jeffery David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the nature and frequency of medication errors during medication delivery processes in a public teaching hospital geriatric ward in Bali, Indonesia. Methods A 20-week prospective study on medication errors occurring during the medication delivery process was conducted in a geriatric ward in a public teaching hospital in Bali, Indonesia. Participants selected were inpatients aged more than 60 years. Patients were excluded if they had a malignancy, were undergoing surgery, or receiving chemotherapy treatment. The occurrence of medication errors in prescribing, transcribing, dispensing, and administration were detected by the investigator providing in-hospital clinical pharmacy services. Results Seven hundred and seventy drug orders and 7,662 drug doses were reviewed as part of the study. There were 1,563 medication errors detected among the 7,662 drug doses reviewed, representing an error rate of 20.4%. Administration errors were the most frequent medication errors identified (59%), followed by transcription errors (15%), dispensing errors (14%), and prescribing errors (7%). Errors in documentation were the most common form of administration errors. Of these errors, 2.4% were classified as potentially serious and 10.3% as potentially significant. Conclusion Medication errors occurred in every stage of the medication delivery process, with administration errors being the most frequent. The majority of errors identified in the administration stage were related to documentation. Provision of in-hospital clinical pharmacy services could potentially play a significant role in detecting and preventing medication errors. PMID:24940067

  6. Safe: a status update on information security and the hospital community.

    PubMed

    Fundner, Rita

    2003-01-01

    IT Security and Privacy are becoming increasingly visible "hot topics" across the full spectrum of industry and service sectors. Legislation and global "best practices" are working hard to defend organizations and individuals against escalating, rapidly evolving cyber-threats. Predictably, the threat landscape is having an impact on all levels to varying degrees: governmental, organizational and individual. This article introduces the basic context for information security and offers insight into how a number of hospitals are addressing the situation, what barriers they currently face and what opportunities they see unfolding. PMID:14674180

  7. Evaluation of an operational ocean model configuration at 1/12° spatial resolution for the Indonesian seas - Part 1: Ocean physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranchant, B.; Reffray, G.; Greiner, E.; Nugroho, D.; Koch-Larrouy, A.; Gaspar, P.

    2015-08-01

    INDO12, a 1/12° regional version of the NEMO physical ocean model covering the whole Indonesian EEZ has been developed and is now running every week in the framework of the INDESO project (Infrastructure Development of Space Oceanography) implemented by the Indonesian Ministry of Marine Affairs and Fisheries. The initial hydrographic conditions as well as open boundary conditions are derived from the operational global ocean forecasting system at 1/4° operated by Mercator Ocean. Atmospheric forcing fields (3 hourly ECMWF analyses) are used to force the regional model. INDO12 is also forced by tidal currents and elevations, and by the inverse barometer effect. The turbulent mixing induced by internal tides is taken into account through a specific parameterization. In this study we evaluate the model skill through comparisons with various datasets including outputs of the parent model, climatologies, in situ temperature and salinity measurements, and satellite data. The simulated and altimeter-derived Eddy Kinetic Energy fields display similar patterns and confirm that tides are a dominant forcing in the area. The volume transport of the Indonesian ThroughFlow is in good agreement with the INSTANT current meter estimates while the transport through Luzon Strait is, on average, westward but probably too weak. Significant water mass transformation occurs along the main routes of the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) and compares well with observations. Vertical mixing is able to erode the South and North Pacific subtropical waters salinity maximum as seen in TS diagrams. Compared to satellite data, surface salinity and temperature fields display marked biases in the South China Sea. Altogether, INDO12 proves to be able to provide a very realistic simulation of the ocean circulation and water mass transformation through the Indonesian Archipelago. A few weaknesses are also detected. Work is on-going to reduce or eliminate these problems in the second INDO12 version.

  8. Hospital Waste Management in Nonteaching Hospitals of Lucknow City, India

    PubMed Central

    Manar, Manish Kumar; Sahu, Krishna Kumar; Singh, Shivendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess hospital waste management in nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted on the staffs of nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow from September 2012 to March 2013. A total of eight hospitals were chosen as the study sample size. Simple random sampling technique was used for the selection of the nonteaching hospitals. A pre-structured and pre-tested interview questionnaire was used to collect necessary information regarding the hospitals and biomedical waste (BMW) management of the hospitals. The general information about the selected hospitals/employees of the hospitals was collected. Results: Mean hospital waste generated in the eight nonteaching hospitals of Lucknow was 0.56 kg/bed/day. About 50.5% of the hospitals did not have BMW department and colored dustbins. In 37.5% of the hospitals, there were no BMW records and segregation at source. Incinerator was used only by hospital A for treatment of BMW. Hospital G and hospital H had no facilities for BMW treatment. Conclusion: There is a need for appropriate training of staffs, strict implementation of rules, and continuous surveillance of the hospitals of Lucknow to improve the BMW management and handling practices. PMID:25657950

  9. Hospital financing in Norway.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, F

    1994-05-01

    The Norwegian block grant reform of 1980 replaced state reimbursements to hospitals by block grants allocated to counties according to objective criteria. The reform was accompanied by a general decentralization of budget authority to local level. The reform aimed to promote primary care, equalize the supply of health care across regions and give counties incentives to improve hospital efficiency. A decade later, the reform was reversed. The government has imposed restrictions which reduce the budget discretion of the counties and part of the block grant has been made dependent on the performance of the hospitals in the counties. The government has also issued a 'waiting-list guarantee' which states that patients who suffer from a serious disease are entitled to medical treatment within six months. This paper provides an overview of hospital financing in Norway during the last two decades and discusses why the block grant system did not fulfil the expectations of its architects. PMID:10136059

  10. Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications

    MedlinePlus

    Patient Education Sheet Sjögren’s, Surgery, Hospitals, and Medications The SSF thanks Lynn Petruzzi, RN, MSN, for this Patient Education Sheet. Educate your healthcare givers! • Tell your surgeon, ...

  11. Critical Access Hospitals (CAH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CAH Conditions of Participation . What are the location requirements for CAH status? Critical Access Hospitals must be ... clinic that does not meet the CAH distance requirements? As of January 1, 2008, all CAHs, including ...

  12. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know whether your hospital charged a fair price. There are some web sites you can use ... zip code to find an average or estimated price in your area. www.healthcarebluebook.com www.fairhealth. ...

  13. Practice Hospital Bed Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bed? Todd says that there is no standard definition for hospital beds, a fact that consumers shopping ... in retail stores that don’t meet the definition of medical devices under the law, but which ...

  14. Hospital free cash flow.

    PubMed

    Kauer, R T; Silvers, J B

    1991-01-01

    Hospital managers may find it difficult to admit their investments have been suboptimal, but such investments often lead to poor returns and less future cash. Inappropriate use of free cash flow produces large transaction costs of exit. The relative efficiency of investor-owned and tax-exempt hospitals in the product market for hospital services is examined as the free cash flow theory is used to explore capital-market conditions of hospitals. Hypotheses concerning the current competitive conditions in the industry are set forth, and the implications of free cash flow for risk, capital-market efficiency, and the cost of capital to tax-exempt institution is compared to capital-market norms. PMID:1743965

  15. [Ryazan hospital--80 years].

    PubMed

    Klimov, A S; Gromov, M F

    2012-02-01

    In December 2011 marked 80 years of the founding of the Ryazan garrison hospital, originally housed in two buildings: "Redut housed"--a monument of architecture of the XVIII century and the former almshouses room "for the maimed in the war", was built in 1884 now Ryazan garrison hospital (from 2010--Branch No 6 FSI "in 1586 the district military hospital in the Western Military District", the Defense Ministry of Russia)--a multi-field medical preventive institution on the basis of which soldiers, military retirees, family members and military retirees from Ryazan, Moscow, Tambov regions are treated. Every year more than 7 thousand patients get treatment here. During the counterterrorism operations in Chechnya over 800 wounded were brought to the hospital from the battle area. PMID:22558855

  16. ["Working together" at hospital?].

    PubMed

    Divay, Sophie

    2015-02-01

    Working well together at hospital depends on several factors, on the level of a team as well as that of the ministry in charge of health. How can we encourage and promote cooperation between caregivers? If the hospital is the reflection of society as a whole, an analysis of the functioning of this universe provides a better understanding of the challenges and the missions of each player for the benefit of the patient. PMID:26144821

  17. Fast tracking hospital construction.

    PubMed

    Quirk, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    Hospital leaders should consider four factors in determining whether to fast track a hospital construction project: Expectations of project length, quality, and cost. Whether decisions can be made quickly as issues arise. Their own time commitment to the project, as well as that of architects, engineers, construction managers, and others. The extent to which they are willing to share with the design and construction teams how and why decisions are being made. PMID:23513759

  18. Management of Feedyard Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Fox, J T

    2015-11-01

    There are many considerations when managing feedyard hospitals. The type of hospital system must fit the facility design, the type of cattle fed at the feedyard, the crew that is employed by the feedyard, and the protocol established by the veterinarian. Ensuring the animals are well-cared for and have their basic needs met should be the priority of the feedyard personnel and the veterinarian maintaining the veterinarian-client-patient relationship with the feedyard. PMID:26210766

  19. Hospital air is sick.

    PubMed

    Brownson, K

    2000-11-01

    Indoor air quality has deteriorated so much since the 1970s oil shortage and subsequent energy-efficient construction of buildings that people are becoming seriously ill by just breathing the indoor air. This is a problem with all industrial buildings and hospital staff are at particular risk. There are various things that hospital managers from different departments can do to make the air safe for staff and patients to breathe. PMID:11185833

  20. Recurrent psychiatric hospitalization.

    PubMed Central

    Voineskos, G.; Denault, S.

    1978-01-01

    Undue emphasis has been placed on rising rates of readmission to psychiatric facilities. After a decade of preoccupation with discharge rates, readmission statistics have been singled out in the last 15 years as the key factor for assessing hospital effectiveness. A study of a group of patients at high risk for recurrent hospitalization revealed that these patients were characterized more by features relating to environmental supports than by diagnosis. The operational definition for recurrent hospitalization (five or more admissions during the 2-year period preceding the latest admission) was effective in identifying this group; this is the first reported instance in which the definition has specified a certain number of admissions within a time-limited period. The findings of this study, as well as of an analysis of case histories and consumer opinion, led to the design of a pilot program for persons undergoing recurrent hospitalization. Readmission statistics are useless or misleading as measures of hospital effectiveness and efficiency; what matters is the way the former patients function in the community after discharge. Rather than simply trying to reduce the readmission rate psychiatric facilities should be examining the types of persons who are hospitalized recurrently to develop programs aimed at improving the functioning of these people in the community. PMID:630483