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Sample records for indoor radon levels

  1. Unusually amplified summer or winter indoor levels of radon

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    The ratios of winter/summer indoor radon levels for houses in different regions of the southern Appalachians are characterized by individual log-normal distributions with geometric means both above and below unity. In some counties and cities, subpopulations of houses have unusually exaggerated winter/summer ratios of indoor radon, as well as high indoor radon levels, during periods of either warm or cool weather. It is proposed that in many instances, houses are communicating with larger than normal underground reservoirs of radon-bearing air in hilly karst terrains; differences between the outdoor and underground air temperatures are believed to provide density gradients producing aerostatic pressure differences for seasonally directed underground transport and subsequently elevated indoor radon. These seasonal movements of air are analogous to the well-known underground chimney effects, which produce interzonal flows of air inside caves.

  2. Unusually amplified summer or winter indoor levels of radon

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.

    1993-05-01

    The ratios of winter/summer indoor radon levels for houses in different regions of the southern Appalachians are characterized by individual log-normal distributions with geometric means both above and below unity. In some counties and cities, subpopulations of houses have unusually exaggerated winter/summer ratios of indoor radon, as well as high indoor radon levels, during periods of either warm or cool weather. It is proposed that in many instances, houses are communicating with larger than normal underground reservoirs of radon-bearing air in hilly karst terrains; differences between the outdoor and underground air temperatures are believed to provide density gradients producing aerostatic pressure differences for seasonally directed underground transport and subsequently elevated indoor radon. These seasonal movements of air are analogous to the well-known underground chimney effects, which produce interzonal flows of air inside caves.

  3. Indoor radon levels in Cumberland County, PA

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.L.; Nason, R.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements were made of radon levels in 165 randomly selected homes in Cumberland County, PA during Winter 1984-1985. The average and mean levels were found to be 9.1 +/- 0.7 pCi/L and 6.3 +/- 0.5 pCi/L, respectively, many times normally encountered levels. Average and mean radon levels are reported vs. various house characteristics. 4 references, 1 figure, 6 tables.

  4. Indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Polpong, P; Bovornkitti, S

    1998-01-01

    The naturally radioactive but chemically inert gas, radon, is formed from the radioactive decay of radium which is part of the uranium series. Radon gas, which has a half life of 3.8 days, must escape from soil particles through air-filled pores in order to enter the atmosphere following the decay of radium. The concentration of radon in the atmosphere varies, depending on the place, time, height above the ground and meteorological conditions. It is thus an inescapable source of radiation exposure, both at home and at work. The potential hazards posed by exposure to radiation from indoor radon gas and its daughter products are of great concern worldwide. Noting of an excessive lung cancer risk among several groups of underground miners exposed to radon and its daughter products, studies on radon concentrations in the workplace and in dwellings have been conducted in many countries. The results have shown that the distribution of radon concentrations are approximately lognormal from which population weighted; the arithmetic mean of radon concentration of 40 Bq.m-3 has been adopted worldwide for dwellings and workplaces. The principal methods for reducing a high indoor radon concentration are: reducing the radon supply by reversing the pressure difference between the building and the soil; raising the resistance of the foundations to soil gas entry; removing the radon sources such as water or underlying soil; diluting the concentration by increasing the ventilation rate; and reducing the concentration of radon progeny by filtering and increasing the circulation of indoor air. Buildings which have a radon concentration higher than 200 Bq.m-3 should be investigated by the national authorities concerned; meanwhile, householders should be advised to take simple temporary precautions, such as increasing ventilation, until a permanent remedy can be effected. PMID:9470322

  5. Indoor Radon Concentration Levels in Najran Region, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Alyami, S. H.; Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Baig, M. R.; Al-Garawi, M.S.

    2010-07-07

    Measurement of indoor radon concentration was performed in Najran region in the south west of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 dosimeter. Despite many previous studies on indoor radon concentrations in Saudi Arabia, the data available are still limited. The objective of this study, which is the first of its kind in the region, is to have preliminary data of radon in this region. Such measurement will contribute towards further studies in this region of Saudi Arabia. The indoor radon concentration was measured in the villages of Fara Al-Jabal and Badr Al-Janoob (about 2000 m above sea level), Hadadah and Al-Khanig (about 1700 m above sea level). It was found that radon distribution in these villages is normal skewed to the right, with a range of 9{+-}5 to 163{+-}32 Bqm{sup -3} and an average of 49{+-}2 Bqm{sup -3}. It was also found that the average radon concentration is independent of altitude. Our findings show that the values are below the safe limit of 150 Bqm{sup -3} set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) of the USA

  6. Regional levels of indoor radon in Virginia and Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mose, Douglas G.; Mushrush, George W.

    1988-12-01

    The levels of Rn-222 in homes located in Fairfax County, Virginia, and Montgomery County, Maryland, are currently being measured during four consecutive three-month seasonal intervals using alpha-track detectors. Significant variations occur between parts of northern Virginia and southern Maryland because the area is part of three very different geologic provinces. Results from the winter period in these three provinces show that the indoor radon levels were about twice as high as anticipated. Approximately 45 percent of the homes had winter indoor radon levels above 4 pCi/l, the EPA’s recommended action level, and in the spring period, more than 30 percent of the homes still had indoor levels above 4 pCi/l. Indoor radon variations due to seasonal control were about as significant as geological control. Worst-case combinations developed over some rock units in the winter, producing areas in which about 70 percent of the homes exceeded 4 pCi/l.

  7. Comparisons between soil radon and indoor radon

    SciTech Connect

    Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W.

    1999-10-01

    Several thousand indoor radon measurements have been obtained for homes in northern Virginia. Compilations of these data according to the geologic units under the homes show that some units have relatively high or relatively low medium indoor radon levels, and that these differences persist through all four seasons. An attempt to determine if soil radon and soil permeability could yield similar results, in terms of relative indoor radon, was not successful. Care should be taken in using such measurements to characterize the potential for radon problems in established communities and in areas of as-yet undeveloped property.

  8. A comparative study of the indoor radon level with the radon exhalation rate from soil in Alexandria city.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Zaher, Mohamed

    2013-05-01

    The assessment of the radiological risk related to the inhalation of radon and radon its progeny is based mainly on the integrated measurement of radon in both indoor and outdoor environments. The exhalation of radon from the earth's crust and building materials forms the main source of radon in the indoor environment. This study has been undertaken for the purpose of health risk assessment. In this comparative study, the indoor radon level, radium content, radon exhalation rate and concentration of soil radon are measured using the Can Technique. Soil samples were collected simultaneously from different geological formations of the same area for laboratory measurement of the radon exhalation rate. The radon exhalation rate was measured in the laboratory using LR-115 type II plastic track detectors. The indoor radon concentrations in this study area were found to vary from 44±9 to 132±31 Bq m(-3) with an average of 72±29 Bq m(-3). The seasonal variations of the indoor radon reveal the maximum values in the winter and in summer in different dwellings of Alexandria city. The annual effective dose varies from 0.75 to 2.2 mSv with an average value of 1.34 mSv. The radon exhalation rate was found to vary in the ranges 8.31-233.70×10(-3) Bq kg(-1) h(-1), 0.48-15.37 Bq m(-2) h(-1) with an average 47.97×10(-3) Bq kg(-1) h(-1), (3.14 Bq m(-2) h(-1)). The radium content in soil varies from 3.14 to 39.60 Bq kg(-1) with an average of 11.55 Bq kg(-1). The significance of this study is discussed in details from the point of view of radiation protection. PMID:23070484

  9. Study of indoor radon levels in high-rise air-conditioned office buildings.

    PubMed

    Chao, C Y

    1999-12-01

    A series of measurements were conducted to study the indoor radon pollution in air-conditioned high-rise office buildings. Continuous monitoring of indoor radon levels in nine air-conditioned premises located in six office buildings in Hong Kong was conducted from August 1996 to February 1998. Each of the tests lasted for at least 48 hours. The measurement covered both day time monitoring while the air-conditioning was on and night time monitoring while the air-conditioning was off. The indoor radon level followed inversely the operation pattern of the mechanical ventilation systems in the buildings. During office hours when the mechanical ventilation was on, the indoor radon level decayed and after the mechanical ventilation was off during non-office hours, the radon level increased. The average indoor radon level during office hours on the nine premises varied from 87 Bq/m3 to 296 Bq/m3, and the indoor averaged radon levels over both day time and night time periods without mechanical ventilation were about 25 percent higher. The air infiltration rate and the radon emission characteristics from the building materials were estimated from the radon build-up curves which were observed after the mechanical ventilation was off. The radon decay curve observed after the mechanical ventilation system was turned on was used to calculate the total fresh air intake rate. Average radon emanation rates of the building materials in the six buildings varied from 0.0019 to 0.0033 Bq/m2s. It has been found that building infiltration rate accounted for about 10-30 percent of the total building ventilation rate in the buildings depending on building tightness. PMID:10633952

  10. Indoor air radon.

    PubMed

    Cothern, C R

    1990-01-01

    This review concerns primarily the health effects that result from indoor air exposure to radon gas and its progeny. Radon enters homes mainly from the soil through cracks in the foundation and other holes to the geologic deposits beneath these structures. Once inside the home the gas decays (half-life 3.8 d) and the ionized atoms adsorb to dust particles and are inhaled. These particles lodge in the lung and can cause lung cancer. The introduction to this review gives some background properties of radon and its progeny that are important to understanding this public health problem as well as a discussion of the units used to describe its concentrations. The data describing the health effects of inhaled radon and its progeny come both from epidemiological and animal studies. The estimates of risk from these two data bases are consistent within a factor of two. The epidemiological studies are primarily for hard rock miners, although some data exist for environmental exposures. The most complete studies are those of the US, Canadian, and Czechoslovakian uranium miners. Although all studies have some deficiencies, those of major importance include uranium miners in Saskatchewan, Canada, Swedish iron miners, and Newfoundland fluorspar miners. These six studies provide varying degrees of detail in the form of dose-response curves. Other epidemiological studies that do not provide quantitative dose-response information, but are useful in describing the health effects, include coal, iron ore and tin miners in the UK, iron ore miners in the Grangesburg and Kiruna, Sweden, metal miners in the US, Navajo uranium miners in the US, Norwegian niobian and magnitite miners, South African gold and uranium miners, French uranium miners, zinc-lead miners in Sweden and a variety of small studies of environmental exposure. An analysis of the epidemiological studies reveals a variety of interpretation problem areas. The major and almost universal problem is in estimating exposure

  11. Comparative studies of indoor radon concentration levels in Jordan using CR-39 based bag and cup dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, N; Matiullah; Khatibeh, A J

    1998-07-01

    Indoor radon concentration levels have been measured in 9 major cities of Jordan using CR(-3)9 detectors placed in punched polyethylene bags to measure both radon and thoron, and in cups to measure radon only. The average value of indoor radon and thoron concentration levels measured with bag dosimeters vary from 32 to 107 Bq m(-3) and the indoor radon concentration levels measured with cup dosimeters vary from 27 to 88 Bq m(-3). The indoor radon concentration levels in Irbid and Zaraka are comparable to the world average of 27 Bq m(-3). In Ajloun, Jerash, Salt, Tafilah and Amman, the indoor radon levels are greater than the world average by a factor of up to 2, and in Madaba and Karak these levels are greater than the world average by a factor of more than 3. The large variation in the measured radon levels may be attributed to the large variation in the 226Ra activity in the soil of the region. PMID:9645667

  12. Indoor Radon Measurement in Van

    SciTech Connect

    Kam, E.; Osmanlioglu, A. E.; Celebi, N.; Dogan, I.

    2007-04-23

    In this study, indoor radon concentrations obtained from the radon surveys conducted in the Van. Radon monitoring was performed by applying a passive, time-integrating measuring technique. For this purpose, CR-39 nuclear track detectors were installed in dwellings for 2 months. After the monitoring period, detectors were collected. In order to make the alpha tracks visible, chemical etching was applied to the exposed detectors. Nuclear track numbers and the corresponding indoor radon concentrations were determined. Annual effective dose equivalents and the risk probabilities caused by indoor radon inhalation were calculated, and the found results compared with the indoor radon concentrations' data measured in different provinces of Turkey.

  13. Consideration of measurement error when using commercial indoor radon determinations for selecting radon action levels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.; Szarzi, S.L.; Dolan, Michael P.

    1998-01-01

    An examination of year-long, in-home radon measurement in Colorado from commercial companies applying typical methods indicates that considerable variation in precision exists. This variation can have a substantial impact on any mitigation decisions, either voluntary or mandated by law, especially regarding property sale or exchange. Both long-term exposure (nuclear track greater than 90 days), and short-term (charcoal adsorption 4-7 days) exposure methods were used. In addition, periods of continuous monitoring with a highly calibrated alpha-scintillometer took place for accuracy calibration. The results of duplicate commercial analysis show that typical results are no better than ??25 percent with occasional outliers (up to 5 percent of all analyses) well beyond that limit. Differential seasonal measurements (winter/summer) by short-term methods provide equivalent information to single long-term measurements. Action levels in the U.S. for possible mitigation decisions should be selected so that they consider the measurement variability; specifically, they should reflect a concentration range similar to that adopted by the European Community.

  14. Variation of annual effective dose due to radon level in indoor air in Marwar region of Rajasthan, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Asha; Mittal, Sudhir; Mehra, Rohit

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, indoor radon and thoron measurements have been carried out from different locations of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts of Northern Rajasthan, India using RAD7, a solid state alpha detector. The radon and thoron concentration in indoor air varies from 8.75 to 61.25 Bq m-3 and 32.7 to 147.2 Bq m-3 with the mean value of 32 and 73 Bq m-3 respectively. The observed indoor radon concentration values are well below the action level recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (200-300 Bq m-3) and Environmental Protection Agency (148 Bq m-3). The survey reveals that the thoron concentration values in the indoor air are well within the International Commission on Radiological Protection (2005). The calculated total annual effective dose due to radon level in indoor air varies from 0.22 to 1.54 mSv y-1 with the mean value of 0.81 mSv y-1 which is less than even the lower limit of action level 3-10 mSv y-1 recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (2005).

  15. Variation of annual effective dose due to radon level in indoor air in Marwar region of Rajasthan, India

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Asha; Mittal, Sudhir; Mehra, Rohit

    2015-08-28

    In the present work, indoor radon and thoron measurements have been carried out from different locations of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts of Northern Rajasthan, India using RAD7, a solid state alpha detector. The radon and thoron concentration in indoor air varies from 8.75 to 61.25 Bq m{sup −3} and 32.7 to 147.2 Bq m{sup −3} with the mean value of 32 and 73 Bq m{sup −3} respectively. The observed indoor radon concentration values are well below the action level recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (200-300 Bq m{sup −3}) and Environmental Protection Agency (148 Bq m{sup −3}). The survey reveals that the thoron concentration values in the indoor air are well within the International Commission on Radiological Protection (2005). The calculated total annual effective dose due to radon level in indoor air varies from 0.22 to 1.54 mSv y{sup −1} with the mean value of 0.81 mSv y{sup −1} which is less than even the lower limit of action level 3-10 mSv y{sup −1} recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection (2005)

  16. Indoor air radon

    SciTech Connect

    Cothern, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    This review concerns primarily the health effects that result from indoor air exposure to radon gas and its progeny. Radon enters homes mainly from the soil through cracks in the foundation and other holes to the geologic deposits beneath these structures. Once inside the home the gas decays (half-life 3.8 d) and the ionized atoms adsorb to dust particles and are inhaled. These particles lodge in the lung and can cause lung cancer. The introduction to this review gives some background properties of radon and its progeny that are important to understanding this public health problem as well as a discussion of the units used to describe its concentrations. The data describing the health effects of inhaled radon and its progeny come both from epidemiological and animal studies. The estimates of risk from these two data bases are consistent within a factor of two. The epidemiological studies are primarily for hard rock miners, although some data exist for environmental exposures. The most complete studies are those of the US, Canadian, and Czechoslovakian uranium miners. Although all studies have some deficiencies, those of major importance include uranium miners in Saskatchewan, Canada, Swedish iron miners, and Newfoundland fluorspar miners. These six studies provide varying degrees of detail in the form of dose-response curves. Other epidemiological studies that do not provide quantitative dose-response information, but are useful in describing the health effects, include coal, iron ore and tin miners in the UK, iron ore miners in the Grangesburg and Kiruna, Sweden, metal miners in the US, Navajo uranium miners in the US, Norwegian niobian and magnitite miners, South African gold and uranium miners, French uranium miners, zinc-lead miners in Sweden and a variety of small studies of environmental exposure. An analysis of the epidemiological studies reveals a variety of interpretation problem areas.172 references.

  17. Indoor radon in the region of Brussels

    SciTech Connect

    Tondeur, F.; Gerardy, I.; Christiaens, D.; Hallez, S.; Flemal, J.M.

    1999-12-01

    The indoor radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentration has been measured by charcoal detectors in 278 buildings in the region of Brussels, Belgium. The correlation with the nature of the subsoil can be studied in detail thanks to the available geotechnical map. With a geometrical mean indoor radon concentration of 19 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, Brussels can be considered as generally unaffected by the radon problem. No value higher than 400 Bq m{sup {minus}3} (the EU reference level for existing houses) was measured in an occupied room. However, two factors that may enhance the risk are identified: the absence of a basement or a ventilated crawl space, and the presence of loess, under the house. About one third of the houses without basements or ventilated crawl spaces built on loess show an indoor radon concentration above 200 Bq m{sup {minus}3} (the EU reference level for new houses).

  18. Investigating Indoor Radon Levels and Influencing Factors in Primary Schools of Zulfi City, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Al-Garawi, M. S.; Al-Mosa, Tahani M.; Baig, M. R.

    2011-10-27

    Measurement of indoor Concentrations were performed in Zulfi city of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 track etch detectors. This investigation focused on the influence of different parameters, namely different locations, school categories, school building types, and room type as well as on the existence of differences in radon concentration at floor levels. We divided the Zulfi city into five regions, keeping in mind their geographical locations between Tuwaiq Mountains and Al-Thuwayrat sands. The measured average radon concentrations for regions 1-5 respectively are: 87.0{+-}14.2 Bq/m{sup 3}, 83.4{+-}6.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 61.6{+-}6.4 Bq/m{sup 3}, 63.7{+-}5.4 Bq/m{sup 3} and 87.5{+-}6.Bq/m{sup 3} and the minimum concentrations are 28.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 5.5 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.1 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.0 Bq/m{sup 3} and 24 Bq/m{sup 3} respectively. These results are still within normal limits and below the action level of 148 Bqm{sup -3} set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A test of significance using Minitab program was applied to investigate if radon levels in regions are significantly different from each other. We tried all combinations, and found the following results. The ''within regions''(different location) test yielded, region 2 is not significant versus region ''1''(p = 0.783) and versus region ''5''(P = 0.646), whereas it is significant versus region ''3''(P = 0.0160) and also versus region ''4''(p = 0.018). We investigated government and rented school's building also and none was found significantly different (p = 0.052). Floors of the same building were tested in order to examine the radon concentration as a function of storey level. No significant difference was observed at floor levels (p = 0.009). When girl's schools versus Boys and kindergartens schools were tested they were found significantly different. It is believed that this significant difference is due to geographical nature of the area, since most of the girl's schools were selected from regions 2 and

  19. Investigating Indoor Radon Levels and Influencing Factors in Primary Schools of Zulfi City, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Al-Garawi, M. S.; Al-Mosa, Tahani M.; Baig, M. R.

    2011-10-01

    Measurement of indoor Concentrations were performed in Zulfi city of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 track etch detectors. This investigation focused on the influence of different parameters, namely different locations, school categories, school building types, and room type as well as on the existence of differences in radon concentration at floor levels. We divided the Zulfi city into five regions, keeping in mind their geographical locations between Tuwaiq Mountains and Al-Thuwayrat sands. The measured average radon concentrations for regions 1-5 respectively are: 87.0±14.2 Bq/m3, 83.4±6.0 Bq/m3, 61.6±6.4 Bq/m3, 63.7±5.4 Bq/m3 and 87.5±6.Bq/m3 and the minimum concentrations are 28.0 Bq/m3, 5.5 Bq/m3, 1.1 Bq/m3, 1.0 Bq/m3 and 24 Bq/m3 respectively. These results are still within normal limits and below the action level of 148 Bqm-3 set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A test of significance using Minitab program was applied to investigate if radon levels in regions are significantly different from each other. We tried all combinations, and found the following results. The "within regions" (different location) test yielded, region 2 is not significant versus region "1" (p = 0.783) and versus region "5" (P = 0.646), whereas it is significant versus region "3" ( P = 0.0160) and also versus region "4" (p = 0.018). We investigated government and rented school's building also and none was found significantly different (p = 0.052). Floors of the same building were tested in order to examine the radon concentration as a function of storey level. No significant difference was observed at floor levels (p = 0.009). When girl's schools versus Boys and kindergartens schools were tested they were found significantly different. It is believed that this significant difference is due to geographical nature of the area, since most of the girl's schools were selected from regions 2 and 3, these regions are relatively close to the Tuwaiq mountains whereas other

  20. The effects of geology and the impact of seasonal correction factors on indoor radon levels: a case study approach.

    PubMed

    Gillmore, Gavin K; Phillips, Paul S; Denman, Antony R

    2005-01-01

    Geology has been highlighted by a number of authors as a key factor in high indoor radon levels. In the light of this, this study examines the application of seasonal correction factors to indoor radon concentrations in the UK. This practice is based on an extensive database gathered by the National Radiological Protection Board over the years (small-scale surveys began in 1976 and continued with a larger scale survey in 1988) and reflects well known seasonal variations observed in indoor radon levels. However, due to the complexity of underlying geology (the UK arguably has the world's most complex solid and surficial geology over the shortest distances) and considerable variations in permeability of underlying materials it is clear that there are a significant number of occurrences where the application of a seasonal correction factor may give rise to over-estimated or under-estimated radon levels. Therefore, the practice of applying a seasonal correction should be one that is undertaken with caution, or not at all. This work is based on case studies taken from the Northamptonshire region and comparisons made to other permeable geologies in the UK. PMID:15982793

  1. Indoor radon risk potential of Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimer, G.M.; Szarzi, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation of radon risk potential in the State of Hawaii indicates that the potential for Hawaii is low. Using a combination of factors including geology, soils, source-rock type, soil-gas radon concentrations, and indoor measurements throughout the state, a general model was developed that permits prediction for various regions in Hawaii. For the nearly 3,100 counties in the coterminous U.S., National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) aerorad data was the primary input factor. However, NURE aerorad data was not collected in Hawaii, therefore, this study used geology and soil type as the primary and secondary components of potential prediction. Although the radon potential of some Hawaiian soils suggests moderate risk, most houses are built above ground level and the radon soil potential is effectively decoupled from the house. Only underground facilities or those with closed or recirculating ventilation systems might have elevated radon potential. ?? 2005 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  2. Indoor radon problem in energy efficient multi-storey buildings.

    PubMed

    Yarmoshenko, I V; Vasilyev, A V; Onishchenko, A D; Kiselev, S M; Zhukovsky, M V

    2014-07-01

    Modern energy-efficient architectural solutions and building construction technologies such as monolithic concrete structures in combination with effective insulation reduce air permeability of building envelope. As a result, air exchange rate is significantly reduced and conditions for increased radon accumulation in indoor air are created. Based on radon survey in Ekaterinburg, Russia, remarkable increase in indoor radon concentration level in energy-efficient multi-storey buildings was found in comparison with similar buildings constructed before the-energy-saving era. To investigate the problem of indoor radon in energy-efficient multi-storey buildings, the measurements of radon concentration have been performed in seven modern buildings using radon monitoring method. Values of air exchange rate and other parameters of indoor climate in energy-efficient buildings have been estimated. PMID:24723188

  3. Indoor radon survey in Visegrad countries.

    PubMed

    Műllerová, Monika; Kozak, Krzysztof; Kovács, Tibor; Smetanová, Iveta; Csordás, Anita; Grzadziel, Dominik; Holý, Karol; Mazur, Jadwiga; Moravcsík, Attila; Neznal, Martin; Neznal, Matej

    2016-04-01

    The indoor radon measurements were carried out in 123 residential buildings and 33 schools in Visegrad countries (Slovakia, Hungary and Poland). In 13.2% of rooms radon concentration exceeded 300Bqm(-3), the reference value recommended in the Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM. Indoor radon in houses shows the typical radon behavior, with a minimum in the summer and a maximum in the winter season, whereas in 32% of schools the maximum indoor radon was reached in the summer months. PMID:26774389

  4. Radon and aldehyde concentrations in the indoor environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moschandreas, D.J.; Rector, H.E.

    1981-04-01

    Findings regarding indoor air contaminants in the energy-efficient residence (EER) in Mt. Airy, Maryland are reported. The objectives of the study were to collect and analyze relevant air quality samples (specifically radon and aldehydes), characterize the indoor air quality with respect to radon and aldehydes, and develop relationships between air infiltration rates and contaminant levels. One-fifth of the measured formaldehyde concentrations were in the range that may cause health concerns. Although indoor temperature and relative humidity affect indoor HCHO concentration, the elevated formaldehyde concentrations were measured under very low air infiltration rates. The data show that ventilation of the indoor air space is somewhat effective in reducing high HCHO concentrations. The operation of the heat exchanger led to an increase of the air infiltration rate which in turn resulted in substantial reduction of formaldehyde concentrations. A considerable number of the collected samples of indoor air displayed radon concentrations at levels higher than 1.0 to 4.0 nCim/sup -3/ (assuming an equilibrium factor of 0.5, these radon levels would correspond to working levels above the health guidelines suggested by the US EPA for homes in Florida built on land reclaimed from phosphate mining). As in the case of indoor formaldehyde concentrations, elevated indoor concentrations are substantially reduced when the infiltration rate is increased. The data base shows that the use of the air to air heat exchanger leads to reduction of indoor radon concentration by increasing the residential ventilation rate. (JGB)

  5. Control of indoor radon and radon progeny concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Sextro, R.G.

    1985-05-01

    There are three general categories of techniques for the control of radon and radon progeny concentrations in indoor air - restriction of radon entry, reduction of indoor radon concentrations by ventilation or air cleaning, and removal of airborne radon progeny. The predominant radon entry process in most residences appears to be pressure driven flow of soil gas through cracks or other openings in the basement, slab, or subfloor. Sealing these openings or ventilation of the subslab or subfloor space are methods of reducing radon entry rates. Indoor radon concentrations may be reduced by increased ventilation. The use of charcoal filters for removal of radon gas in the indoor air by adsorption has also been proposed. Concentrations of radon progeny, which are responsible for most of the health risks associated with radon exposures, can be controlled by use of electrostatic or mechanical filtration. Air circulation can also reduce radon progeny concentrations in certain cases. This paper reviews the application and limitations of each of these control measures and discusses recent experimental results.

  6. A statistical evaluation of the influence of housing characteristics and geogenic radon potential on indoor radon concentrations in France.

    PubMed

    Demoury, C; Ielsch, G; Hemon, D; Laurent, O; Laurier, D; Clavel, J; Guillevic, J

    2013-12-01

    Radon-222 is a radioactive natural gas produced by the decay of radium-226, known to be the main contributor to natural background radiation exposure. Effective risk management needs to determine the areas in which the density of buildings with high radon levels is likely to be highest. Predicting radon exposure from the location and characteristics of a dwelling could also contribute to epidemiological studies. Beginning in the nineteen-eighties, a national radon survey consisting in more than 10,000 measurements of indoor radon concentrations was conducted in French dwellings by the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN). Housing characteristics, which may influence radon accumulation in dwellings, were also collected. More recently, the IRSN generated a French geogenic radon potential map based on the interpretation of geological features. The present study analyzed the two datasets to investigate the factors influencing indoor radon concentrations using statistical modeling and to determine the optimum use of the information on geogenic radon potential that showed the best statistical association with indoor radon concentration. The results showed that the variables associated with indoor radon concentrations were geogenic radon potential, building material, year of construction, foundation type, building type and floor level. The model, which included the surrounding geogenic radon potential (i.e. the average geogenic radon potential within a disc of radius 20 km centered on the indoor radon measurement point) and variables describing house-specific factors and lifestyle explained about 20% of the overall variability of the logarithm of radon concentration. The surrounding geogenic radon potential was fairly closely associated with the local average indoor radon concentration. The prevalence of exposure to radon above specific thresholds and the average exposures to radon clearly increased with increasing classes of geogenic radon

  7. Distribution of indoor radon concentrations in Pennsylvania, 1990-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, Eliza L.

    2013-01-01

    Results from 548,507 indoor radon tests from a database compiled by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Radiation Protection, Radon Division, are evaluated in this report in an effort to determine areas where concentrations of radon are highest. Indoor radon concentrations were aggregated according to geologic unit and hydrogeologic setting for spatial analysis. Indoor radon concentrations greater than or equal to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) action level of 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) were observed for 39 percent of the test results; the highest concentration was 1,866.4 pCi/L. When analyzed according to Pennsylvania’s geologic units, 93 of the 188 (49.5 percent) geologic units with indoor radon concentrations had median concentrations greater than the USEPA action level of 4 pCi/L; most of these geologic units are located in the eastern part of the State and include metamorphic rocks, limestones, sandstones, shales, and glacial deposits. When analyzed according to Pennsylvania’s hydrogeologic settings, 5 of the 20 (25 percent) settings had median indoor radon concentrations greater than the USEPA action level of 4 pCi/L; these settings are located mostly in the south-central part of the State. Median indoor radon concentrations aggregated according to geologic units and hydrogeologic settings are useful for drawing general conclusions about the occurrence of indoor radon in specific geologic units and hydrogeologic settings, but the associated data and maps have limitations. The aggregated indoor radon data have testing and spatial accuracy limitations due to lack of available information regarding testing conditions and the imprecision of geocoded test locations. In addition, the associated data describing geologic units and hydrogeologic settings have spatial and interpretation accuracy limitations, which are a result of using statewide data to define conditions at test locations and geologic data that

  8. CONTRIBUTIONS OF BUILDING MATERIALS TO INDOOR RADON LEVELS IN FLORIDA BUILDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents work to characterize potential radon sources in concretes and recommend related changes to Florida's building materials radium standard. (NOTE: The Florida Standard for Radon-resistant Residential Building Construction originally contained a provision to limi...

  9. U.S. Homes Above EPA's Radon Action Level

    EPA Science Inventory

    This indicator presents the estimated number of homes with indoor radon levels over EPA's radon action level—the recommended maximum concentration for indoor radon—and the number of homes with operating radon mitigation systems. Radon is a human carcinogen that seeps into base...

  10. Indoor Radon: The Deadliest Pollutant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Richard A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the origin, occurrence, and effects of radon gas. Cites studies which attribute 5,000 to 20,000 deaths per year to radon exposure and the synergistic effect between radon and smoking. Explains ways to reduce risks. (RT)

  11. Identifying areas with potential for high indoor radon levels: analysis of the national airborne radiometric reconnaissance data for California and the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Moed, B.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Schwehr, M.B.; Van Heuvelen, A.

    1984-04-01

    Radon-222 is an important indoor air pollutant which, through the inhalation of its radioactive decay products, accounts for nearly half of the effective dose equivalent to the public from natural ionizing radiation. Indoor radon concentrations vary widely, largely because of local and regional differences in the rate of entry from sources. The major sources are soil and rock near building foundations, earth-based building materials, and domestic water; of these, soil and rock are thought to be predominant in many buildings with higher-than-average concentrations. Thus, one key factor in determining radon source potential is the concentration of radium, the progenitor of radon, in surficial rocks and soils. Aerial radiometric data were analyzed, collected for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, for seven Western states to: (1) provide information on the spatial distribution of radium contents in surficial geologic materials for those states; and (2) investigate approaches for using the aerial data, which have been collected throughout the contiguous United States and Alaska, to identify areas where high indoor radon levels may be common. Radium concentrations were found to be relatively low in central and western portions of Washington, Oregon, and northern California; they were found to be relatively high in central and southern California. A field validation study, conducted along two flight-line segments near Spokane, Washington, showed close correspondence between the aerial data, in situ measurements of both radium content and radon flux from soil, and laboratory measurements of both radium content of and radon emanation rate from soil samples. 99 references, 11 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Seasonal Variation or Indoor Radon in Artvin-Turkey

    SciTech Connect

    Yeslbagg, Y. Ue.; Kuecuekoemeroglu, A.; Kurnaz, A.; Uzderya, F.

    2010-01-21

    Indoor radon studies have been conducted in Artvin, Eastern alack sea region of Turkey using SSNTD type nuclear track detector (CR-39). Radon measurements were done for 4 seasons in 73 dwellings, selected as uniformly distributed as possible. The radon concentrations vary from 21 aq m{sup -3} to 321 aq m{sup -3} with the annual mean concentration of 132 aq m{sup -3} for Artvin. Seasonal variation indoor radon shows high in winter low values in summer. The resulting estimated annual effective dose-equivalent due to inhalation of radon for inhabitants is 3.32 mSv y{sup -1} and the total annual effective dose lies in the range of the action level (3-10 mSv y{sup -1}) recommended by the ICRP.

  13. Variance of indoor radon concentration: Major influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Yarmoshenko, I; Vasilyev, A; Malinovsky, G; Bossew, P; Žunić, Z S; Onischenko, A; Zhukovsky, M

    2016-01-15

    Variance of radon concentration in dwelling atmosphere is analysed with regard to geogenic and anthropogenic influencing factors. Analysis includes review of 81 national and regional indoor radon surveys with varying sampling pattern, sample size and duration of measurements and detailed consideration of two regional surveys (Sverdlovsk oblast, Russia and Niška Banja, Serbia). The analysis of the geometric standard deviation revealed that main factors influencing the dispersion of indoor radon concentration over the territory are as follows: area of territory, sample size, characteristics of measurements technique, the radon geogenic potential, building construction characteristics and living habits. As shown for Sverdlovsk oblast and Niška Banja town the dispersion as quantified by GSD is reduced by restricting to certain levels of control factors. Application of the developed approach to characterization of the world population radon exposure is discussed. PMID:26409145

  14. Influence of indoor air conditions on radon concentration in a detached house.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Keramatollah; Mahmoudi, Jafar; Ghanbari, Mahdi

    2013-02-01

    Radon is released from soil and building materials and can accumulate in residential buildings. Breathing radon and radon progeny for extended periods hazardous to health and can lead to lung cancer. Indoor air conditions and ventilation systems strongly influence indoor radon concentrations. This paper focuses on effects of air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity on indoor radon concentrations in a one family detached house in Stockholm, Sweden. In this study a heat recovery ventilation system unit was used to control the ventilation rate and a continuous radon monitor (CRM) was used to measure radon levels. FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package was used to simulate radon entry into the building and air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity effects using a numerical approach. The results from analytical solution, measurements and numerical simulations showed that air change rate, indoor temperature and moisture had significant effects on indoor radon concentration. Increasing air change rate reduces radon level and for a specific air change rate (in this work Ach = 0.5) there was a range of temperature and relative humidity that minimized radon levels. In this case study minimum radon levels were obtained at temperatures between 20 and 22 °C and a relative humidity of 50-60%. PMID:23159846

  15. Bayesian Prediction of Mean Indoor Radon Concentrations for Minnesota Counties

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.N.; Nero, A.V.; Gelman, A.

    1995-08-01

    Past efforts to identify areas having higher than average indoor radon concentrations by examining the statistical relationship between local mean concentrations and physical parameters such as the soil radium concentration have been hampered by the noise in local means caused by the small number of homes monitored in some or most areas, In the present paper, indoor radon data from a survey in Minnesota are analyzed in such a way as to minimize the effect of finite sample size within counties, in order to determine the true county-to-county variation of indoor radon concentrations in the state and the extent to which this variation is explained by the variation in surficial radium concentration among counties, The analysis uses hierarchical modeling, in which some parameters of interest (such as county geometric mean (GM) radon concentrations) are assumed to be drawn from a single population, for which the distributional parameters are estimated from the data. Extensions of this technique, known as a random effects regression and mixed effects regression, are used to determine the relationship between predictive variables and indoor radon concentrations; the results are used to refine the predictions of each county's radon levels, resulting in a great decrease in uncertainty. The true county-to-county variation of GM radon levels is found to be substantially less than the county-to-county variation of the observed GMs, much of which is due to the small sample size in each county. The variation in the logarithm of surficial radium content is shown to explain approximately 80% of the variation of the logarithm of GM radon concentration among counties. The influences of housing and measurement factors, such as whether the monitored home has a basement and whether the measurement was made in a basement, are also discussed. This approach offers a self-consistent statistical method for predicting the mean values of indoor radon concentrations or other geographically

  16. Radon levels in New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, M.K.: Nicholls, G.P. ); Ranney, C.; Machever, R. )

    1988-01-01

    The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection began to assess the potential for a natural indoor radon problem in the state following the discovery in December 1984 of high radon levels in homes in northeastern Pennsylvania. A geologic feature commonly known as the Reading Prong underlying the affected homes was identified by the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources as the source of elevated indoor radon levels. The Reading Prong, which contains bands of rock bodies associated with high uranium concentrations runs in a northeasterly direction out of Pennsylvania through northern New Jersey and into New York. A review of available geologic and aeroradiometric data conducted by the New Jersey Geological Survey demonstrated that New Jersey had significant potential for a radon problem and it was likely that the problem would not be confined to the Reading Prong region, but would include areas to the north and south as well. To determine the magnitude and extent of the indoor radon problem, the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection commissioned a statewide radon study. A major component of this study and the primary subject of this paper is a survey of approximately 6,000 dwellings. Objectives of the survey are outlined and the results are presented.

  17. Monitoring trends in civil engineering and their effect on indoor radon.

    PubMed

    Ringer, W

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, the importance of monitoring new building concepts is discussed. The effect of energy-efficient construction technologies on indoor radon is presented in more detail. Comparing the radon levels of about 100 low-energy and passive houses in Austria with radon levels in conventional new houses show that, in energy-efficient new houses, the radon level is about one-third lower than in conventional new houses. Nevertheless, certain features or bad practice may cause high radon levels in energy-efficient new houses. Recommendations to avoid adverse effects were set up. Furthermore, the paper deals with the effect of thermal retrofitting on indoor radon. Results from a Swiss study where 163 dwellings were measured before and after thermal retrofit yield an increase of the radon level of 26% in average. Among the various retrofit measures, replacing windows has the greatest impact on the indoor radon level. PMID:24729564

  18. Bayesian Prediction of Mean Indoor Radon Concentrations for Minnesota Counties

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.N.; Nero, A.V.; Gelman, A.

    1996-02-01

    Past efforts to identify areas with higher than average indoor radon concentrations by examining the statistical relationship between local mean concentrations and physical parameters such as the soil radium concentration have been hampered by the variation in local means caused by the small number of homes monitored in most areas. In this paper, indoor radon data from a survey in Minnesota are analyzed to minimize the effect of finite sample size within counties, to determine the true county-to-county variation of indoor radon concentrations in the state, and to find the extent to which this variation is explained by the variation in surficial radium concentration among counties. The analysis uses hierarchical modeling, in which some parameters of interest (such as county geometric mean (GM) radon concentrations) are assumed to be drawn from a single population, for which the distributional parameters are estimated from the data. Extensions of this technique, known as a random effects regression and mixed effects regression, are used to determine the relationship between predictive variables and indoor radon concentrations; the results are used to refine the predictions of each county's radon levels, resulting in a great decrease in uncertainty. The true county-to-county variation of GM radon levels is found to be substantially less than the county-to-county variation of the observed GMs, much of which is due to the small sample size in each county. The variation in the logarithm of surficial radium content is shown to explain approximately 80% of the variation of the logarithm of GM radon concentration among counties. The influences of housing and measurement factors, such as whether the monitored home has a basement and whether the measurement was made in a basement, are also discussed. The statistical method can be used to predict mean radon concentrations, or applied to other geographically distributed environmental parameters.

  19. Exposure to radon and radon progeny in the indoor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Socolow, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this work is to measure experimentally the activity-weighted particle size distribution in conjunction with other relevant house parameters in occupied houses in order to improve the estimate of exposure to radon and radon progeny indoors. Our methodology requires that building construction and operation be studied and understood both experimentally and theoretically in a small number of buildings and that results of side applicability be inferred from the particular case studies. Results are discussed.

  20. Indoor radon levels in workplaces of Adapazarı, north-western Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapdan, Enis; Altinsoy, Nesrin

    2014-02-01

    The main objective of this study is to assess the health hazards due to radon gas accumulation and to compare the concentrations in different kinds of workplaces, in the city of Adapazarı, one of the most important industrial cities of Turkey. For this purpose, radon activity concentration measurements were carried out in schools, factories, offices and outdoors using CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD). Results show that the mean radon activity concentrations (RAC) in schools, offices and factories were found to be 66, 76 and 27 Bq/m3, respectively, with an outdoor concentration of 14 Bq/m3. The average concentrations were found to decrease as follows for different types of industries: automotive > electronic > metal > textile. Because the maximum measured radon concentrations are 151 Bq/m3 in the schools, 173 Bq/m3 in the offices and 52 Bq/m3 in the factories, the limits of ICRP are not exceeded in any of the buildings in the region. In addition, the estimated mean annual effective doses to the people in the workplace, students, office workers and factory workers have been calculated as 0.27, 0.63 and 0.20 mSv/y, respectively for the region.

  1. Radium distribution and indoor radon in the Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duval, J.S.; Otton, J.K.

    1990-01-01

    Aerial gamma-ray data were compiled to produce a map showing the distribution of radium (226Ra) in near-surface materials in the Pacific Northwest, (Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, and parts of Montana, Wyoming, California, Nevada, and Utah). A comparison of measurements of indoor concentration levels of radon (222Rn) in homes with the apparent surface concentration of radium shows that aerial gamma-ray data provide a first order estimate of the relative amounts of indoor radon for township-sized areas where soils have low to moderate permeability. Townships with average indoor radon levels above the general trend of the data are almost all characterized by soils that have higher intrinsic permeabilities. -Authors

  2. Predictors of Indoor Radon Concentrations in Pennsylvania, 1989–2013

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Joan A.; Ogburn, Elizabeth L.; Rasmussen, Sara G.; Irving, Jennifer K.; Pollak, Jonathan; Locke, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Radon is the second-leading cause of lung cancer worldwide. Most indoor exposure occurs by diffusion of soil gas. Radon is also found in well water, natural gas, and ambient air. Pennsylvania has high indoor radon concentrations; buildings are often tested during real estate transactions, with results reported to the Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP). Objectives We evaluated predictors of indoor radon concentrations. Methods Using first-floor and basement indoor radon results reported to the PADEP between 1987 and 2013, we evaluated associations of radon concentrations (natural log transformed) with geology, water source, building characteristics, season, weather, community socioeconomic status, community type, and unconventional natural gas development measures based on drilled and producing wells. Results Primary analysis included 866,735 first measurements by building, with the large majority from homes. The geologic rock layer on which the building sat was strongly associated with radon concentration (e.g., Axemann Formation, median = 365 Bq/m3, IQR = 167–679 vs. Stockton Formation, median = 93 Bq/m3, IQR = 52–178). In adjusted analysis, buildings using well water had 21% higher concentrations (β = 0.191, 95% CI: 0.184, 0.198). Buildings in cities (vs. townships) had lower concentrations (β = –0.323, 95% CI: –0.333, –0.314). When we included multiple tests per building, concentrations declined with repeated measurements over time. Between 2005 and 2013, 7,469 unconventional wells were drilled in Pennsylvania. Basement radon concentrations fluctuated between 1987 and 2003, but began an upward trend from 2004 to 2012 in all county categories (p < 0.001), with higher levels in counties having ≥ 100 drilled wells versus counties with none, and with highest levels in the Reading Prong. Conclusions Geologic unit, well water, community, weather, and unconventional natural gas development were associated with indoor radon

  3. Influence of local geology on the concentration of indoor radon in Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W.

    1999-10-01

    Approximately 58,000 indoor radon measurements are available for homes in Maryland. A comparative study between compilations of activated-charcoal and alpha-track measurements of indoor radon in zip-code-size geographic areas indicated that both of these methods are useful and are equally able to estimate regional indoor radon. Indoor radon measurements compiled according to zip code areas can be used to create state-size radon hazard maps. In Maryland the area with the highest indoor radon (mostly composed of zip code areas that average over 8 pCi/L) is the western half of the Piedmont Province and the eastern side of the Coastal Plain Province. The eastern half of the Piedmont and the eastern half of the Valley and Ridge mostly have intermediate and high indoor radon levels (4--8 and >8 pCi/L). The Blue Ridge, western side of the Valley and Ridge, and Plateau Province each has relatively few zip code areas, but the data suggest a range from low to high indoor radon levels. The western side of the Coastal Plain has the lowest indoor radon (most of the zip code areas average less than 4 pCi/L).

  4. ESTIMATING THE RISK OF LUNG CANCER FROM INHALATION OF RADON DAUGHTERS INDOORS: REVIEW AND EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A review of the dosimetric models and epidemiological studies with regard to the relation between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer indicates that the Working Level is an appropriate unit for indoor radon exposure; that the uncertainty in applying risk estimates derived from ...

  5. Study of Relation between Indoor Radon in Multi-storey Building and Outdoor Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Muellerova, Monika; Holy, Karol

    2010-01-05

    A continuous radon monitoring in indoor and outdoor air was carried out for the period of one year. The relation between indoor radon and indoor-outdoor temperature difference, as well as between indoor radon and outdoor radon was investigated. The best correlation was obtained between indoor and outdoor radon concentrations.

  6. Factors affecting indoor radon concentrations in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Gunby, J A; Darby, S C; Miles, J C; Green, B M; Cox, D R

    1993-01-01

    Data collected in a nationwide study on natural radiation exposure in UK dwellings (Wrixon et al. 1988) were re-analyzed to investigate the effects of rock type and various building and lifestyle characteristics, taken into account simultaneously, on indoor radon concentrations. A multiplicative model which takes into consideration the outdoor radon concentration is used. Indoor radon concentrations were found to be influenced by type of rock underlying the dwelling, double glazing, house type, floor level of rooms in which measurements were taken, window opening habits in the main bedroom, building materials used in the construction of the walls, floor type, and draught proofing. However, these eight factors together account for only 22% of the variation between dwellings. Estimates of the size of the effect associated with each factor are given. PMID:8416211

  7. The Spanish indoor radon mapping strategy.

    PubMed

    Sainz-Fernandez, C; Fernandez-Villar, A; Fuente-Merino, I; Gutierrez-Villanueva, J L; Martin-Matarranz, J L; Garcia-Talavera, M; Casal-Ordas, S; Quindós-Poncela, L S

    2014-11-01

    Indoor radon mapping still represents a valuable tool for drawing the picture of the exposure of general public due to radon and radon progeny inhalation in a residential context. The information provided by means of a map is useful not only as awareness and strategic element for authorities and policy-makers, but also as a scientific start-up point in the design of epidemiological and other specific studies on exposure to natural radiation. The requirements for a good mapping are related to harmonisation criteria coming from European recommendations, as well as to national/local characteristics and necessities. Around 12,000 indoor radon measurements have been made since the Spanish national radon programme began at the end of the 1980s. A significant proportion of them resulted from the last campaign performed from 2009 to 12. This campaign completed the first version of a map based on a grid 10 × 10 km(2). In this paper, the authors present the main results of a new map together with the criteria adopted to improve the number of measurements and the statistical significance of them. PMID:25013034

  8. Mitigation of indoor radon in an area with unusually high radon concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Ennemoser, O.; Oberdorfer, E.; Ambach, W.

    1995-08-01

    In an area of unusually high indoor radon concentrations of up to 270,000 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, four houses were selected for mitigation of indoor radon. Methods used were basement sealing, soil depressurization, a mechanical intake and outlet ventilation system with heat exchanger in the basement, and a multilayer floor construction using a fan to such radon from a layer between bottom slab and floor. Basement sealing proved unsuccessful, the radon concentration remained unchanged after the mitigation attempt. The most successful remedial measure was soil depressurization using two fans and loops of drainage tubes to withdraw radon from the region under the floor and outside the walls of the basement and from soil under the part of the house without a basement. This method reduced the basement radon level in winter by about a factor of 200, i.e., from 100,000 Bq m{sup {minus}3} to 500 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, and the ground-floor level by about a factor of 400. As regards the mechanical intake and outlet ventilation system with heat exchanger in the basement, it is essential to ensure that ventilation provides increased air pressure in the basement compared to outdoors. Unbalanced mechanical intake and outlet ventilation may decrease the air pressure indoors compared to outdoors, leading to increased radon concentrations. Optimization of this method reduced radon concentrations for 200,000 Bq m{sup {minus}3} to 2,000-3,000 Bq m{sup {minus}3} in winter. In one house with only a very small basement, a multilayer floor construction using a fan to such radon from a layer between the bottom slab and floor was found to reduce radon concentrations on the ground floor from 25,000 Bq m{sup {minus}3} to about 1,700 Bq m{sup {minus}3} in winter. The results show that even in areas with extremely high radon concentrations, effective mitigation of indoor radon can be accomplished if suitable techniques are used. 8 ref., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Mitigation of indoor radon in an area with unusually high radon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ennemoser, O; Oberdorfer, E; Brunner, P; Schneider, P; Purtscheller, F; Stingl, V; Ambach, W

    1995-08-01

    In an area of unusually high indoor radon concentrations of up to 270,000 Bq m-3, four houses were selected for mitigation of indoor radon. Methods used were basement sealing, soil depressurization, a mechanical intake and outlet ventilation system with heat exchanger in the basement, and a multilayer floor construction using a fan to suck radon from a layer between bottom slab and floor. Basement sealing proved unsuccessful, the radon concentration remained unchanged after the mitigation attempt. The most successful remedial measure was soil depressurization using two fans and loops of drainage tubes to withdraw radon from the region under the floor and outside the walls of the basement and from soil under the part of the house without a basement. This method reduced the basement radon level in winter by about a factor of 200, i.e., from 100,000 Bq m-3 to 500 Bq m-3, and the ground-floor level by about a factor of 400. As regards the mechanical intake and outlet ventilation system with heat exchanger in the basement, it is essential to ensure that ventilation provides increased air pressure in the basement compared to outdoors. Unbalanced mechanical intake and outlet ventilation may decrease the air pressure indoors compared to outdoors, leading to increased radon concentrations. Optimization of this method reduced radon concentrations from 200,000 Bq m-3 to 2,000-3,000 Bq m-3 in winter. In one house with only a very small basement, a multilayer floor construction using a fan to suck radon from a layer between the bottom slab and floor was found to reduce radon concentrations on the ground floor from 25,000 Bq m-3 to about 1,700 Bq m-3 in winter. The results show that even in areas with extremely high radon concentrations, effective mitigation of indoor radon can be accomplished if suitable techniques are used. The evaluation of the different mitigation methods shows good coincidence with the ICRP 65 report. PMID:7622369

  10. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

  11. Federal programs on indoor radon

    SciTech Connect

    1988-04-01

    The CIRRPC Science Panel Report No. 4, ``Radon Protection and Health Effects,`` identified five major issues and made specific recommendations in regard to each issue. These issues and recommendations involved: Needs for research on the effects of radon exposure; the need for guidance on remedial actions; the need for methods to predict high risk locations; the need for a national survey of population exposures; and the need for adequate remedial and mitigation measures. Reviews of each of these, in terms of the extent that the needs are being addressed by the various Federal agencies, follow. Each review is preceded by excerpts from Report No. 4 on the issue and related recommendation.

  12. Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Follow-up study of indoor radon in Greek buildings.

    PubMed

    Clouvas, A; Xanthos, S; Kolovou, M; Potiriadis, C; Takoudis, G; Guilhot, J

    2013-12-01

    The Nuclear Technology Laboratory of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (NTL-AUTh) and the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) have a continuous collaboration on indoor radon measurements in Greek buildings since 1999. In the present work, the existing database was enriched with 590 indoor radon measurements in 295 houses and 76 indoor radon measurements in 38 workplaces. In total in the present work, 1948 indoor radon measurements in 974 buildings performed by the NTL-AUTh and GAEC from 1999 to 2012 in 8 of the 13 administrative regions of Greece are presented and discussed. PMID:23704362

  14. Radon levels can be predicted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainger, Lisa A.

    Scientists doing a yearlong study of radon levels in houses have identified several major factors that affect concentrations and have developed a method for predicting indoor radon levels before a house is built. Douglas Mose and George Mushrush (George Mason University, Fairfax, Va.) studied 1500 homes in northern Virginia and central Maryland near Washington, D.C.Radon is a radioactive decay product of uranium that occurs in many rock types. The gas can accumulate in buildings and pose a serious health hazard. Results from the Washington-area study show that ˜35% of the houses had average yearly radon concentrations above 4 pico-Curies per liter (pCi/L), the level at which the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) suggests that a homeowner should take steps to reduce radon concentrations. At a level of 4-10 pCi/L an estimated 13-120 lung cancer deaths would be expected for every 1000 people exposed. Such a risk is comparable to having 200 chest X rays per year, according to EPA statistics.

  15. Seasonal indoor radon concentration in Eskisehir, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sogukpinar, H; Algin, E; Asici, C; Altinsoz, M; Cetinkaya, H

    2014-12-01

    Indoor radon concentrations are subject to seasonal variation, which directly depends on weather conditions. The seasonal indoor radon concentrations were measured and the annual effective dose was estimated for the city centre of Eskisehir, Turkey. In order to reflect annual averages measurements were performed over all seasons (winter, spring, summer and autumn) including also the entire year. Measurements were carried out using Kodak-Pathe LR 115 Type II passive alpha track detectors in 220 different houses. A total of 534 measurements including measurements of different seasons were taken between 2010 and 2011. The radon concentrations for winter ranged from 34 to 531 Bq m(-3), for spring ranged from 22 to 424 Bq m(-3), for summer ranged from 25 to 320 Bq m(-3), and for autumn ranged from 19 to 412 Bq m(-3). Yearly measurements ranged from 19 to 338 Bq m(-3). In this study the average annual effective total dose from radon and its decay products was calculated to be 3.398 mSv y(-1). PMID:24379436

  16. Radon as an Anthropogenic Indoor Air Pollutant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Crockett, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Radon is generally regarded as a naturally occurring radiological hazard but we report here measurements of significant, hazardous radon concentrations that arise from man-made sources, including granite ornaments/artefacts, uranium glass and glazed objects as well radium dial watches. This presentation concerns an examination and assessment of health risks from radium and uranium found in historical artefacts, many of which were once viewed as everyday items, and the radon that emanates from them. Such objects were very popular in industrialised countries such as the USA, UK and European countries) particularly between and including the two World Wars but are still readily available. A watch collection examined gave rise to a hazardous radon concentration of 13.24 kBq•m-3 approximately 67 times the Domestic Action Level of 200 Bq•m-3.The results for an aircraft altimeter are comparable to those of the watches, indicating radon activity equivalent to several watches, and also indicate an equilibrium concentration in the 16.3 m3 room ca. 33 times the UK domestic Action Level. Results from a granite block indicate a radon emanation of 19.7 Bq•kg-1, but the indicated equilibrium concentration in the 16.3 m3 room is only ca. 1.7% of the UK domestic Action Level. Uranium-glazed crockery and green uranium glass were scoped for radon activity. The former yielded a radon concentration of ca. 44 Bq•m-3 in a small (7 L) sealed container. The latter yielded a lower radon concentration in a larger (125 L) sealed container of ca. 6 Bq•m-3. This is barely above the background radon concentration in the laboratory, which was typically ca. 1-2 Bq•m-3. Individual items then are capable of giving rise to radon concentrations in excess of the UK Domestic Action Level in rooms in houses, particularly if poorly ventilated. We highlight the gap in the remediation protocols, which are focused on preventing radon entering buildings from outside, with regard to internally

  17. Seasonally enhanced indoor radon in karst regions of the southern Applachians

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The ratios of winter/summer indoor radon levels for houses in different regions of the southern Appalachians are characterized by individual log-normal distributions with geometric means both above and below unity. In some counties and cities, subpopulations of houses have unusually exaggerated winter/summer ratios of indoor radon, as well as high indoor radon levels, during periods of either warm or cool weather. It is proposed that in many instances, houses are communicating with larger than normal underground reservoirs of radon-bearing air in hilly karst terrains; differences between the outdoor and underground air temperatures are believed to provide the aerostatic pressure differences for seasonally directed underground transport and subsequently elevated indoor radon.

  18. Seasonally enhanced indoor radon in karst regions of the southern Applachians

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.

    1992-06-01

    The ratios of winter/summer indoor radon levels for houses in different regions of the southern Appalachians are characterized by individual log-normal distributions with geometric means both above and below unity. In some counties and cities, subpopulations of houses have unusually exaggerated winter/summer ratios of indoor radon, as well as high indoor radon levels, during periods of either warm or cool weather. It is proposed that in many instances, houses are communicating with larger than normal underground reservoirs of radon-bearing air in hilly karst terrains; differences between the outdoor and underground air temperatures are believed to provide the aerostatic pressure differences for seasonally directed underground transport and subsequently elevated indoor radon.

  19. Distribution of indoor radon concentrations in Pennsylvania, 1990-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, Eliza L.

    2013-01-01

    Median indoor radon concentrations aggregated according to geologic units and hydrogeologic settings are useful for drawing general conclusions about the occurrence of indoor radon in specific geologic units and hydrogeologic settings, but the associated data and maps have limitations. The aggregated indoor radon data have testing and spatial accuracy limitations due to lack of available information regarding testing conditions and the imprecision of geocoded test locations. In addition, the associated data describing geologic units and hydrogeologic settings have spatial and interpretation accuracy limitations, which are a result of using statewide data to define conditions at test locations and geologic data that represent a broad interpretation of geologic units across the State. As a result, indoor air radon concentration distributions are not proposed for use in predicting individual concentrations at specific sites nor for use as a decision-making tool for property owners to decide whether to test for indoor radon concentrations at specific property locations.

  20. Indoor radon and lung cancer. Estimating the risks.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Radon is ubiquitous in indoor environments. Epidemiologic studies of underground miners with exposure to radon and experimental evidence have established that radon causes lung cancer. The finding that this naturally occurring carcinogen is present in the air of homes and other buildings has raised concern about the lung cancer risk to the general population from radon. I review current approaches for assessing the risk of indoor radon, emphasizing the extrapolation of the risks for miners to the general population. Although uncertainties are inherent in this risk assessment, the present evidence warrants identifying homes that have unacceptably high concentrations. PMID:1734594

  1. Radon in indoor concentrations and indoor concentrations of metal dust particles in museums and other public buildings.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, G L; Braz, D; de Jesus, E F; Santos, S M; Cardoso, K; Hecht, A A; Dias da Cunha, Moore K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the public and occupational exposure to radon and metal-bearing particles in museums and public buildings located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For this study, four buildings were selected: two historic buildings, which currently house an art gallery and an art museum; and two modern buildings, a chapel and a club. Integrated radon concentration measurements were performed using passive radon detectors with solid state nuclear track detector-type Lexan used as nuclear track detector. Air samplers with a cyclone were used to collect the airborne particle samples that were analyzed by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. The average unattached-radon concentrations in indoor air in the buildings were above 40 Bq/m(3), with the exception of Building D as measured in 2009. The average radon concentrations in indoor air in the four buildings in 2009 were below the recommended reference level by World Health Organization (100 Bq/m(3)); however, in 2011, the average concentrations of radon in Buildings A and C were above this level, though lower than 300 Bq/m(3). The average concentrations of unattached radon were lower than 148 Bq/m(3) (4pCi/L), the USEPA level recommended to take action to reduce the concentrations of radon in indoor air. The unattached-radon average concentrations were also lower than the value recommended by the European Union for new houses. As the unattached-radon concentrations were below the international level recommended to take action to reduce the radon concentration in air, it was concluded that during the period of sampling, there was low risk to human health due to the inhalation of unattached radon in these four buildings. PMID:23124728

  2. SOME RESULTS FROM THE DEMONSTRATION OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION MEASURES IN BLOCK BASEMENT HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Active soil ventilation techniques have been tested in 26 block-wall basement houses in eastern Pennsylvania with significantly elevated indoor radon concentrations, generally above 740 Bq/m3, and the results indicate that radon levels can be reduced substantially often below the...

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION MEASURES FOR 10 HOMES IN CLINTON, NEW JERSEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development and demonstration of indoor radon reduction methods for 10 houses in Clinton, New Jersey, where (in the spring of 1986) the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) located a cluster of houses with extremely high radon levels. T...

  4. SOME RESULTS FROM THE DEMONSRATION OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION MEASURES IN BLOCK BASEMENT HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of tests of active soil ventilation techniques in 24 block-wall basement houses in eastern Pennsylvania having significantly elevated indoor radon concentrations, generally above 740 Bq/ cu m. he results indicate that radon levels can be reduced substantia...

  5. SOME RESULTS FROM THE DEMONSTRATION OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION MEASURES IN BLOCK BASEMENT HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of tests of active soil ventilation techniques in 24 block-wall basement houses in eastern Pennsylvania having significantly elevated indoor radon concentrations, generally above 740 Bq/cu m. The results indicate that radon levels can be reduced substantia...

  6. Measurement of Indoor Radon-222 and Radon-220 Concentrations in Central Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Oka, Mitsuaki; Shimo, Michikuni; Tokonami, Shinji; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2008-08-07

    A passive-type radon/thoron detector was used for measuring indoor radon and thoron concentrations at 90 dwellings in Aichi and Gifu prefectures in central Japan during 90 days from December, 2006 to March, 2007. The radon and thoron concentrations were 21.1 Bq/m3 and 25.1 Bq/m3, respectively. The dose due to radon and thoron in dwellings was roughly evaluated as 0.7 mSv/y and 2.4 mSv/y, respectively. The examination of the geological factor and house condition having an effect on indoor radon concentration was performed.

  7. RESEARCH AREA -- RADON MITIGATION (INDOOR ENVIRONMENT MANAGEMENT BRANCH, AIR POLLUTION PREVENTION AND CONTROL DIVISION, NRMRL)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In prior years, NRMRL's Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division's Indoor Environment Management Branch (IEMB) conducted a significant amount of research on the subject of reducing indoor radon levels in homes, schools, and other large buildings. This research is no longer a...

  8. Exposure to radon and radon progeny in the indoor environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Socolow, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    This report discusses the work done by the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies at Princeton University as part of the radon research program. It involves radon measurements in various buildings, as well as the use of natural ventilation to mitigate radon levels. The report is divided into four chapters: The use of radon entry rate measurements to understand radon concentration in buildings; Use of natural basement ventilation to control radon in single family dwellings; The effect of natural ventilation on radon and radon progeny levels in houses; and Comparison of natural and forced ventilation for radon mitigation in houses.

  9. Assessment of indoor dose from gamma ray emitters and radon daughters in Milan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, A.; Bazzano, E.; Carioni, T.

    Gamma ray doses were determined by duplicate exposure of dosimeters for two 1 month periods in 100 houses chosen at random and classified a posteriori according to location in the town, age, building materials, air ventilation, etc. Radon and radon daughters long-term determinations were carried out by passive track etch detectors. Gamma spectrometry analysis of typical building materials and spot active analysis of radon and radon daughters were carried out. No relation between house location and indoor gamma ray exposure level is noted. Higher levels are recorded in the oldest houses, and those with brick or hollow tile external walls. The first two stories have the highest radiation levels. There is no correlation between radon concentration and gamma ray exposure rates. The highest radon measures are recorded in dwellings with low occupancy factors.

  10. Problems with Estimating Annual Mean Indoor Radon Concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Marusiakova, Miriam; Hulka, Jiri

    2010-09-30

    Radon and its progeny in dwellings is responsible for the majority of the total radiation dose among the general population. The indoor radon concentration varies considerably during the daytime, individual days, seasons and even years. It is affected by many factors such as ventilation, soil concentration, quality of house insulation and others.The annual mean value of the radon concentration in buildings is important in order to estimate the effective dose to inhabitants. However, it is not always possible to perform radon measurements over a period of one year. Thus estimates based on short-term continuous measurements are suggested.We analyse hourly radon measurements obtained from one uninhabited rural house in Teleci in the Czech Republic. We study the behaviour of the radon concentration with time and its relationship to meteorological variables such as outdoor temperature, wind speed or pressure. Further we discuss various estimates of the annual mean radon concentration and their properties.

  11. Indoor radon concentration data: Its geographic and geologic distribution, an example from the Capital District, NY

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.J.; Overeynder, H.M.; Thomas, B.R.

    1995-09-01

    Most studies of the geographic distribution of indoor radon levels are plotted by county or ZIP code. This method is used for the radon potential maps produced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH). The basis for the mapping is the mean or median indoor radon count for all the data provided by NYSDOH within each geographic area. While testing the indoor radon analyses provided to the authors by CMT Independent Laboratories, we discovered data that deviated markedly from the EPA and NYSDOH means for the Capital District of New York (Albany and surrounding counties). Their screening indoor radon average concentrations in pCi/L, indicate low potential for Schenectady (3.0), Saratoga (3.2), and Albany (3.7) counties; and moderate potential for Rensselaer (6.4) and Columbia (7.0) counties. Our database of over 3,000 analyses contains over 800 records of indoor radon counts above 4 pCi/L (14-47% of each county`s analyses), many high enough to be rated as a serious health hazard. In order to obtain greater precision of information, the authors plotted their indoor radon data by street address using MapInfo, a geographic Information System (GIS), and StreetInfo, MapInfo`s TIGER address database. We compared the geographic distribution of our data to both the Bedrock Geology and Surficial Geology Maps of New York State. The results show a striking relationship of radon concentrations to bedrock, faults and permeability of surficial material. Data being compiled and mapped by street address by the NYSDOH in Erie County in western New York, confirm our results.

  12. Indoor gamma radiation and radon concentrations in a Norwegian carbonatite area.

    PubMed

    Sundal, A V; Strand, T

    2004-01-01

    Results of indoor gamma radiation and radon measurements in 95 wooden dwellings located in a Norwegian thorium-rich carbonatite area using thermoluminescent dosemeters and CR-39 alpha track detectors, respectively, are reported together with a thorough analysis of the indoor data with regard to geological factors. Slightly enhanced radium levels and thorium concentrations of several thousands Bq kg(-1) in the carbonatites were found to cause elevated indoor radon-222 levels and the highest indoor gamma dose rates ever reported from wooden houses in Norway. An arithmetic mean indoor gamma dose rate of 200 nGy h(-1) and a maximum of 620 nGy h(-1) were obtained for the group of dwellings located directly on the most thorium-rich bedrock. PMID:15312702

  13. Radon transport in soil and its relation to indoor radioactivity.

    PubMed

    Wilkening, M

    1985-10-01

    The transport of radon from soil to the indoor living space involves diffusion and viscous flow in the soil coupled with transfer to the building interior of radon-rich air which accumulates in cavities and channels below and around the foundations of buildings. Radon concentrations in soil pores at depth are dependent upon the radium content of the soil, emanating power for radium, and soil moisture content. Atmospheric pressure fluctuation, thermal gradients in fractured rocks, and air instabilities due to temperature differences allow air of high radon content to reach living space in dwellings in addition to that which comes directly from building materials and other sources. PMID:4081718

  14. Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in Chaiya and Tha Chana districts, Surat Thani province, Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titipornpun, K.; Titipornpun, A.; Sola, P.; Bhongsuwan, T.

    2015-05-01

    Chaiya and Tha Chana districts of Surat Thani province are located in the areas with high levels of equivalent uranium at the ground surface, which have been identified as sources of radon. A survey measurement of indoor radon concentrations was carried out in 248 houses, using CR-39 detectors in closed cups. The geometric mean of indoor radon concentrations in Chaiya and Tha Chana districts were 26 ± 2 Bq·m-3 and 30 ± 2 Bq·m-3, respectively. Although the minimum radon concentration was 4 Bq·m-3 in both locations, the maximum radon concentration was found to be 159 Bq·m-3 in Tha Chana district, while it was 88 Bq·m-3 in Chaiya district. The level of radon concentrations above the action level (148 Bq·m-3) recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency was only found in two houses, which accounted for 1% of the total buildings surveyed in this present study. The majority of houses, which accounted for 94% of the total buildings surveyed, showed the radon concentration below the action level. As these houses had access to air flow during the daytime through open doors and windows, it is likely that such ventilation was sufficient to keep radon at a low concentration.

  15. An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez, Faustino; Reyes, Pedro G.; Espinosa, Guillermo

    2013-07-03

    This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

  16. An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juárez, Faustino; Reyes, Pedro G.; Espinosa, Guillermo

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack®) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m-3, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m-3. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

  17. The perceived health risks of indoor radon gas and overhead powerlines: a comparative multilevel approach.

    PubMed

    Poortinga, Wouter; Cox, Patrick; Pidgeon, Nick F

    2008-02-01

    Radon and overhead powerlines are two radiation risk cases that have raised varying levels of concern among the general public and experts. Despite both involving radiation-a typically feared and unseen health hazard-individuals' perceptions of the two risk cases may invoke rather different factors. We examined individual and geographic-contextual factors influencing public perceptions of the health risks of indoor radon gas and overhead powerlines in a comparative research design, utilizing a postal questionnaire with 1,528 members of the general public (response rate 28%) and multilevel modeling techniques. This study found that beliefs about the two risk cases mainly differed according to the level of "exposure"-defined here in terms of spatial proximity. We argue that there are two alternative explanations for this pattern of findings: that risk perception itself varies directly with proximity, or that risk is more salient to concerned people in the exposed areas. We also found that while people living in high radon areas are more concerned about the risks of indoor radon gas, they find these risks more acceptable and have more trust in authorities. These results might reflect the positive effects of successive radon campaigns in high radon areas, which may have raised awareness and concern, and at the same time may have helped to increase trust by showing that the government takes the health risks of indoor radon gas seriously, suggesting that genuine risk communication initiatives may have positive impacts on trust in risk management institutions. PMID:18304120

  18. Indoor radon variations in central Iran and its geostatistical map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadad, Kamal; Mokhtari, Javad

    2015-02-01

    We present the results of 2 year indoor radon survey in 10 cities of Yazd province in Central Iran (covering an area of 80,000 km2). We used passive diffusive samplers with LATEX polycarbonate films as Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD). This study carried out in central Iran where there are major minerals and uranium mines. Our results indicate that despite few extraordinary high concentrations, average annual concentrations of indoor radon are within ICRP guidelines. When geostatistical spatial distribution of radon mapped onto geographical features of the province it was observed that risk of high radon concentration increases near the Saqand, Bafq, Harat and Abarkooh cities, this depended on the elevation and vicinity of the ores and mines.

  19. Variation of Indoor Radon Levels in Some Caves of Parque Estadual Turistico do Alto Ribeira (PETAR), SP, Brazil with Ventilation and Rain

    SciTech Connect

    Alberigi, Simone; Pecequilo, Brigitte Roxana Soreanu

    2008-08-07

    In order to assess the radon exposure for the tour guide workers, radon levels in several galleries of the most visited caves of PETAR (High Ribeira River Turistic State Park), were determined by using Makrofol E tracks detectors. A two-years surveillance, from 2003 to 2005, showed radon average levels varying from 153{+-}44 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3} to 6358{+-}1619 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3}. Those results showed that the wide variation between the minimum and maximum concentrations values are strongly related with cave ventilation. In order to establish other factors contributing to this variation, beside the well known temperature effect, rain data over the entire period were also considered, showing that, apparently, radon concentrations inside the caves rise with drought.

  20. Correlation of indoor radon concentration to commonly available geologic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, James F.; Huber, Thomas P.

    1993-03-01

    Over the last several years, the inhalation of decay products coming from radon-222 has become a national health concern. It is estimated that somewhere between 16,000 and 20,000 people die annually in the United States from lung cancer due to exposure to these decay products. Nationwide, 95% of all homes have not been tested for radon, and so it would seem that any methodology that could give a general idea of indoor radon concentrations (without actually testing the house itself) might be useful. While not intended to replace a radon test, which is both simple and inexpensive, our project attempts to predict indoor radon concentrations based on easily obtainable information from Soil Conservation Service county soil surveys and US Geological Survey surficial geology maps. We have chosen four parameters: soil permeability, surficial geology, soil shrink-swell potential, and distance to the nearest geologic fault. Of these four variables, surficial geology and distance to fault correlated well to winter indoor radon concentrations as measured by short-term (48-h) tests. While it is understood that there are limits to this methodology, primarily because of map scale problems, the correlations mentioned above were very strong and suggest further study would be useful.

  1. Prediction of indoor radon concentrations in dwellings in the Oslo region - a model based on geographical information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollerud, R.; Blaasaas, K.; Ganerød, G.; Daviknes, H. K.; Aune, E.; Claussen, B.

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to estimate the radon concentration inside each dwelling in the Oslo region, Norway. The model was based on indoor radon measurements from dwellings at predefined distances from the unmeasured dwellings. The results were evaluated by comparing them with actual indoor measurements, airborne gamma ray spectrometry measurements and bedrock geology. It is the first study to evaluate the reliability between estimated indoor radon in each dwelling with airborne measurements (eK, eTh and eU) and underlying geology around the house in a large population. A total of 28 396 indoor radon measurements showed that 42.2% of the dwellings had a radon value higher than the threshold limit of 100 Bq m-3. 18.9% of the dwellings were above the maximum action level of 200 Bq m-3. A positive correlation was found between indoor radon concentration, bedrock geology and airborne gamma measurements (Pearson correlation: eK: 0.42, eTh: 0.67 and eU: 0.65). Highest correlation was found in areas with alum shale (eU: 0.74). Intraclass Correlation Coefficients (ICCs) showed a good agreement between radon estimates from our method and radon estimates from the regression model with ICC values between 0.54 and 0.67.

  2. Lung Cancer Attributable to Indoor Radon Exposures in Two Radon--Prone Areas, Stei (Romania) and Torrelodones (Spain)

    SciTech Connect

    Dinu, Alexandra; Cosma, Constantin; Vasiliniuc, Stefan; Sainz, Carlos; Poncela, Luis Santiago Quindos

    2009-05-22

    Radon and radon progeny are present indoors, in houses and others dwellings, representing the most important contribution to dose from natural sources of radiation. Most studies have demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer at high concentration of radon for both smokers and nonsmokers. For medium and low concentrations which are the typical residential radon levels, recent researches have also demonstrated increased risks of lung cancer for people exposed. The work presents a comparative analysis of the radon exposure data in the two radon--prone areas, Stei, Transylvania, (Romania), in the near of old Romanian uranium mines and in the granitic area of Torrelodones town, Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain). One important difference between the two studied areas is related to the houses built using uranium waste as construction material in Stei area. Measurements of indoor radon were performed in 280 dwellings (Romania) and 91 dwellings (Spain) by using nuclear track detectors, CR 39. The highest value measured in Stei area was 2650 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3}. and 366 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3} in the Spanish region. The results are compute with the BEIR VI report estimates using the age-duration model at an exposure rate below 2650 Bq{center_dot}m{sup -3}. A total of 233 lung cancer deaths were calculated in the Stei area for a period of 13 years (1994-2006), which is 116.82% higher than observed from the national statistics. In comparison, in Torrelodones area, a number of 276 deaths caused by lung cancer were estimated along a period of 13 years, which is 2.09 times higher than the number observed by authorities. This represents a significantly evidence that elevated risk can strongly be associated with cumulated radon exposure.

  3. Estimation of annual effective dose from indoor radon/thoron concentrations and measurement of radon concentrations in soil.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Rohit; Bala, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Radon short-lived decay products generated from the earth is one of the serious indoor air and soil pollutants. The RAD-7 Electronic Radon Detector with a special accessory is used for the purpose of measurement. The radon and thoron concentrations in the houses of the study area are found to vary from 35±0.5 to 315.2±5.35 Bq m(-3) and 66.1±2.3 to 1710±139.36 Bq m(-3) with the average values of 98.65±1.9 and 388.19±11 Bq m(-3), respectively. From indoor air, the total annual effective dose is calculated and it varies from 0.88 to 7.94 mSv y(-1). The preliminary investigation shows that the thoron concentration is higher than the radon concentration in the houses of the study area. In general, the values of the indoor air are within the recommended action level of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, 2009. PMID:23901137

  4. Correlation between indoor radon concentration and dose rate in air from terrestrial gamma radiation in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, K

    1998-09-01

    A correlation between the indoor radon concentration and dose rate in air from terrestrial gamma radiation is studied using the results of nationwide indoor radon and external exposure surveys, although the surveys were not conducted at the same time nor at the same location. The radon concentration shows a log-normal-like distribution, whereas the terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate in air shows a normal-like distribution. A log-linear scatterplot for each pair of the indoor radon concentration and gamma-ray dose rate in air in each city reveals a clear relationship. The average, maximum, and minimum as well as regression line of radon concentration were found to increase with the gamma-ray dose rate in air. The group in higher quantile of radon concentration shows larger dependence on the gamma-ray dose rate. The rate of increase of radon concentration with the gamma-ray dose rate in air depends on the house structure. The wooden house has a larger rate of increase than the concrete house, and the regression lines cross at high air dose rate. Based on the finding in the present study a certain criterion level of air dose rate could be established and used for an effective survey to find out which houses might require a remedial action in conjunction with other screening tools. The criterion level of air dose rate might be more effective if the level is set for each house structure since the rate of increase of radon concentration depends on house structure. PMID:9721838

  5. Indoor air radon concentration in schools in Prizren, Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Bahtijari, Meleq; Stegnar, Peter; Shemsidini, Zahadin; Kobal, Ivan; Vaupotic, Janja

    2006-01-01

    Indoor air radon ((222)Rn) concentrations were measured in spring and winter in 30 rooms of 9 elementary schools and 19 rooms of 6 high schools in Prizren, Kosovo, using alpha scintillation cells. Only in three rooms of elementary schools and four rooms of high schools did winter concentrations exceed 400 Bq m(-3). PMID:16766569

  6. TESTING OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES IN 19 MARYLAND HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of testing of indoor radon reduction techniques in 19 existing houses in Maryland. The focus was on passive measures: various passive soil depressurization methods, where natural wind and temperature effects are utilized to develop suction in the system; ...

  7. Geogenic and anthropogenic impacts on indoor radon in the Techa River region.

    PubMed

    Yarmoshenko, I; Malinovsky, G; Vasilyev, A; Onischenko, A; Seleznev, A

    2016-11-15

    Indoor radon concentration was studied in the 14 settlements located near the Techa River, which was contaminated by radioactive wastes in 1950-s. Results of the radon survey were used for analysis of the relationship between the indoor radon and main geologic factors (Pre-Jurassic formations, Quaternary sediments and faults), local geogenic radon potential and anthropogenic factors. Main influencing factors explain 58% of the standard deviation of indoor radon concentration. Association of the air exchange influence over radon concentration with underlying geological media was related to different contributions of geogenic advective and diffusive radon entries. The properties of geological formation to transfer radon gas in interaction with the house can be considered within the radon geogenic potential concept. The study of the radon exposure of the Techa River population can be used to estimate the contribution of natural radon to the overall radiation exposure of the local population during the period of radioactive waste discharges. PMID:27474991

  8. Variation of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in different outdoor and indoor environments.

    PubMed

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Boev, Blazo; Zunic, Zora S; Ivanova, Kremena; Ristova, Mimoza; Tsenova, Martina; Ajka, Sorsa; Janevik, Emilija; Taleski, Vaso; Bossew, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Subject of this study is an investigation of the variations of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in outdoor and indoor environments of 40 dwellings, 31 elementary schools and five kindergartens. The buildings are located in three municipalities of two, geologically different, areas of the Republic of Macedonia. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track detectors, deployed in the most occupied room of the building, between June 2013 and May 2014. During the deploying campaign, indoor and outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were measured simultaneously at the same location. It appeared that the measured values varied from 22 to 990 Bq/m(3) for indoor radon concentrations, from 50 to 195 nSv/h for outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates, and from 38 to 184 nSv/h for indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. The geometric mean value of indoor to outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates was found to be 0.88, i.e. the outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were on average higher than the indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. All measured can reasonably well be described by log-normal distributions. A detailed statistical analysis of factors which influence the measured quantities is reported. PMID:26943159

  9. Measurement of Radon in Indoor Air.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, Daniel M.; Simolunas, Glenn

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment to teach the principles of air sampling, gamma ray spectroscopy, nuclear decay, and radioactive equilibrium. Analyzes radon by carbon adsorption and gamma ray counting. Provides methodology and rate of decay equations. (MVL)

  10. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Ternes, Mark P.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  11. Behaviour of radon, radon progenies and particle levels during room depressurisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Pirjo; Kokotti, Helmi; Kalliokoski, Pentti

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of room depressurisation (up to -28 Pa) on indoor radon, radon progenies and particle concentrations in a wooden school building (A) and in a wooden double-family house (B). The airborne concentrations of particles, radon, and radon progenies decreased with increased depressurisation. At the same time, the air exchange rates increased by a factor of 9.5 (house A) and 13 (house B). The calculated radon entry rates thus rose almost in the same ratio, 6.3 and 12, respectively. The equilibrium factors between radon progenies and radon were the same before and after the depressurisation being 0.04 in house A and 0.16 in house B. When the pressure was the lowest, radon concentrations decreased by a factor of 0.7 in house A and 0.9 in house B, and the radon progeny levels fell by a factor of 0.6 in both houses. The particle levels (particles exceeding 0.01 μm) decreased by a factor of 10 (house A) and of 1.2 (house B). The dilution by outdoor air was more effective in house A, which was less tight.

  12. AN OVERVIEW OF INDOOR RADON RISK REDUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Radon in the indoor environment is a recognized environmental hazard. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established several programs to develop, demonstrate, and transfer radon mitigation technology. Administration and management of these programs are shared by EPA's ...

  13. Comparison of retrospective and contemporary indoor radon measurements in a high-radon area of Serbia.

    PubMed

    Zunić, Z S; Yarmoshenko, I V; Kelleher, K; Paridaens, J; Mc Laughlin, J P; Celiković, I; Ujić, P; Onischenko, A D; Jovanović, S; Demajo, A; Birovljev, A; Bochicchio, F

    2007-11-15

    In Niska Banja, Serbia, which is a high-radon area, a comparison was made between two retrospective radon measuring methods and contemporary radon measurements. The two retrospective methods derive the radon concentrations that occurred in dwellings over longer periods in the past, based on the amount of trapped (210)Po on the surface of glass objects (surface traps, ST) or in the bulk of porous materials (volume traps, VT). Both surface implanted (210)Po in glass objects and contemporary radon in air were measured in 46 rooms, distributed in 32 houses of this radon spa-town, using a dual alpha track detector configuration (CR-39 and LR115) and CR-39 track etched detectors, respectively. In addition to the use of surface trap measurements, in 18 rooms (distributed in 15 houses) VT samples of suitable material were also collected, allowing to compare ST and VT retrospective radon concentration estimates. For each room, contemporary annual radon concentrations (CONT) were measured or estimated using seasonal correction factors. The distribution of the radon concentration in all data sets was found to be close to lognormal (Chi-square test>0.05). Geometric means (GM) are similar, ranging from 1040 to 1380 Bq m(-3), whereas geometric standard deviations (GSD) for both the retrospective methods are greater than for the CONT method, showing reasonable agreement between VT, ST and CONT measurements. A regression analysis, with respect to the lognormal distribution of each data set, shows that for VT-ST the correlation coefficient r is 0.85, for VT-CONT r is 0.82 and for ST-CONT r is 0.73. Comparison of retrospective and contemporary radon concentrations with regard to supposed long-term indoor radon changes further supports the principal agreement between the retrospective and conventional methods. PMID:17689589

  14. Effect of indoor-generated airborne particles on radon progeny dynamics.

    PubMed

    Trassierra, C Vargas; Stabile, L; Cardellini, F; Morawska, L; Buonanno, G

    2016-08-15

    In order to investigate the interaction between radon progeny and particles, an experimental campaign was carried out in a radon chamber at the Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology, quantifying the amount of attached and unattached radon daughters present in air, as well as the equilibrium factor in the presence of particles generated through indoor sources. A fixed radon concentration was maintained, while particles were generated using incense sticks, mosquito coils and gas combustion. Aerosols were characterized in terms of particle concentrations and size distributions. Simultaneously, radon concentration and attached/unattached potential alpha energy concentration in the air were continuously monitored by two different devices, based on alpha spectroscopy techniques. The presence of particles was found to affect the attached fraction of radon decay products, in such a way that the particles acted as a sink for radionuclides. In terms of sources which emit large particles (e.g. incense, mosquito coils), which greatly increase particle surface area concentrations, the Equilibrium Factor was found to double with respect to the background level before particle generation sessions. On the contrary, the radon decay product dynamics were not influenced by gas combustion processes, mainly due to the small surface area of the particles emitted. PMID:27131455

  15. Diffusion of radon through concrete block walls: A significant source of indoor radon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Goldberg, L.F.

    1999-01-01

    Basement modules located in southern Minnesota have been the site of continuous radon and environmental measurements during heating seasons since 1993. Concentrations of radon within the basement modules ranged from 70 Bq.m-3 to over 4000 Bq.m-3 between November to April during the three measurement periods. In the soil gas for the same times, concentrations of radon ranged between 25,000 and 70,000 Bq.m-3. Levels of radon within the basement modules changed by factors of five or more within 24 h, in concert with pressure gradients of 4 to 20 Pa that developed between the basement modules and their surroundings. Diffusion is identified as the principal method by which radon is transferred into and out of the basement modules, and appears to be relatively independent of insulating materials and vapour retarders. The variability of radon and correlations with differential pressure gradients may be related to air currents in the block walls and soil that interrupt radon diffusing inward. This yields a net decrease of radon in the basement modules by decay and outward diffusion. Levels of radon within the basement modules increase when the pressure differential is zero and air flow ceases, allowing diffusion gradients to be re-established. Radon levels in both the soil and the basement modules then increase until an equilibrium is achieved.

  16. Radon in indoor air of primary schools: determinant factors, their variability and effective dose.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Joana; Paciência, Inês; Rufo, João; Moreira, André; de Oliveira Fernandes, Eduardo; Pereira, Alcides

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a radioactive gas, abundant in granitic areas, such as in the city of Porto at the north-east of Portugal. This gas is a recognized carcinogenic agent, being appointed by the World Health Organization as the leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The aim of this preliminary survey was to determine indoor radon concentrations in public primary schools, to analyse the main factors influencing their indoor concentration levels and to estimate the effective dose in students and teachers in primary schools. Radon concentrations were measured in 45 classrooms from 13 public primary schools located in Porto, using CR-39 passive radon detectors for about 2-month period. In all schools, radon concentrations ranged from 56 to 889 Bq/m(3) (mean = 197 Bq/m(3)). The results showed that the limit of 100 Bq/m(3) established by WHO IAQ guidelines was exceeded in 92 % of the measurements, as well as 8 % of the measurements exceeded the limit of 400 Bq/m(3) established by the national legislation. Moreover, the mean annual effective dose was calculated as 1.25 mSv/y (ranging between 0.58 and 3.07 mSv/y), which is below the action level (3-10 mSv). The considerable variability of radon concentration observed between and within floors indicates a need to monitor concentrations in several rooms for each floor. A single radon detector for each room can be used, provided that the measurement error is considerably lower than variability of radon concentration between rooms. The results of the present survey will provide useful baseline data for adopting safety measures and dealing effectively with radiation emergencies. In particular, radon remediation techniques should be used in buildings located in the highest radon risk areas of Portugal. The results obtained in the current study concerning radon levels and their variations will be useful to optimize the design of future research surveys. PMID:26100326

  17. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them

    PubMed Central

    Read, Simon; McGale, Paul; Darby, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the number of deaths from lung cancer related to radon in the home and to explore the cost effectiveness of alternative policies to control indoor radon and their potential to reduce lung cancer mortality. Design Cost effectiveness analysis. Setting United Kingdom. Data sources Epidemiological data on risks from indoor radon and from smoking, vital statistics on deaths from lung cancer, survey information on effectiveness and costs of radon prevention and remediation. Main outcome measures Estimated number of deaths from lung cancer related to indoor radon, lifetime risks of death from lung cancer before and after various potential interventions to control radon, the cost per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained from different policies for control of radon, and the potential of those policies to reduce lung cancer mortality. Results The mean radon concentration in UK homes is 21 becquerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3). Each year around 1100 deaths from lung cancer (3.3% of all deaths from lung cancer) are related to radon in the home. Over 85% of these arise from radon concentrations below 100 Bq/m3 and most are caused jointly by radon and active smoking. Current policy requiring basic measures to prevent radon in new homes in selected areas is highly cost effective, and such measures would remain cost effective if extended to the entire UK, with a cost per QALY gained of £11 400 ( €12 200; $16 913). Current policy identifying and remediating existing homes with high radon levels is, however, neither cost effective (cost per QALY gained £36 800) nor effective in reducing lung cancer mortality. Conclusions Policies requiring basic preventive measures against radon in all new homes throughout the UK would be cost effective and could complement existing policies to reduce smoking. Policies involving remedial work on existing homes with high radon levels cannot prevent most radon related deaths, as these are caused by moderate exposure

  18. Predicting New Hampshire Indoor Radon Concentrations from geologic information and other covariates

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, M.G.; Price, P.N.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.

    1998-05-01

    Generalized geologic province information and data on house construction were used to predict indoor radon concentrations in New Hampshire (NH). A mixed-effects regression model was used to predict the geometric mean (GM) short-term radon concentrations in 259 NH towns. Bayesian methods were used to avoid over-fitting and to minimize the effects of small sample variation within towns. Data from a random survey of short-term radon measurements, individual residence building characteristics, along with geologic unit information, and average surface radium concentration by town, were variables used in the model. Predicted town GM short-term indoor radon concentrations for detached houses with usable basements range from 34 Bq/m{sup 3} (1 pCi/l) to 558 Bq/m{sup 3} (15 pCi/l), with uncertainties of about 30%. A geologic province consisting of glacial deposits and marine sediments, was associated with significantly elevated radon levels, after adjustment for radium concentration, and building type. Validation and interpretation of results are discussed.

  19. Time-Averaged Indoor Radon Concentrations and Infiltration RatesSampled in Four U.S. Cities

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, S.M.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.

    1983-09-01

    Indoor radon concentrations, measured in 58 houses over a four to five month period during the winter and spring of 1981-1982, varied from 0.1 to 16 pCi 1{sup -1} (4-590 Bq m{sup -3}). Average infiltration rates were determined for each house over the same period, based on a measurement of the effective leakage area and an infiltration model, and found to range from 0.2 to 2.2 air changes per hour (hr{sup -1}). Indoor radon concentrations correlated poorly with infiltration rates for houses within each city as well as for the entire sample. Differences in radon entry rates among houses thus appear to be more important than differences in infiltration rates in determining whether a house has high indoor radon levels, consistent with previous indications from grab-sample measurements. Radon entry rates and indoor radon concentrations were generally higher in houses in Fargo, ND and Colorado Springs, CO than in houses in Portland, ME and Charleston, NC.

  20. Procedure for the characterization of radon potential in existing dwellings and to assess the annual average indoor radon concentration.

    PubMed

    Collignan, Bernard; Powaga, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Risk assessment due to radon exposure indoors is based on annual average indoor radon activity concentration. To assess the radon exposure in a building, measurement is generally performed during at least two months during heating period in order to be representative of the annual average value. This is because radon presence indoors could be very variable during time. This measurement protocol is fairly reliable but may be a limiting in the radon risk management, particularly during a real estate transaction due to the duration of the measurement and the limitation of the measurement period. A previous field study defined a rapid methodology to characterize radon entry in dwellings. The objective of this study was at first, to test this methodology in various dwellings to assess its relevance with a daily test. At second, a ventilation model was used to assess numerically the air renewal of a building, the indoor air quality all along the year and the annual average indoor radon activity concentration, based on local meteorological conditions, some building characteristics and in-situ characterization of indoor pollutant emission laws. Experimental results obtained on thirteen individual dwellings showed that it is generally possible to obtain a representative characterization of radon entry into homes. It was also possible to refine the methodology defined in the previous study. In addition, numerical assessments of annual average indoor radon activity concentration showed generally a good agreement with measured values. These results are encouraging to allow a procedure with a short measurement time to be used to characterize long-term radon potential in dwellings. PMID:25011073

  1. Seasonal Variation of Indoor Radon Concentration in the Tropics: Comparative studies between Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Kerala, India

    SciTech Connect

    Mahat, R. H.; Amin, Y. M.; Jojo, P. J.; Pereira, C. E.

    2011-03-30

    The radiation dose received by man from indoor radon and its progeny is the largest at more than 50% of total dose received. The seasonal variation of indoor radon concentration in Kerala, India and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were studied. The Southwest coast of the Kerala state in India is known to have very high levels of natural background radiation owing to the rare earths rich monazite sand available in large amount. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia used to be a famous tin mining area where it was done using open cast system. One-year measurements of radon concentration in houses were done for these two regions. It was found that there is considerable seasonal variation in the levels of radon in Kerala but the variation in Kuala Lumpur is only less than 10%.

  2. Indoor radon measurements in Erzurum province of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, R.; Kiran, D.; Kavaz, E.; Ekinci, N.

    2016-04-01

    Indoor radon measurements were carried out in dwellings in Erzurum province during the winter months of February 2012 to early April 2012 and the summer months of July 2012 to early September 2012. Nuclear track detector LR-115 was used for the measurements. According to the results of investigations, it was understood that the indoor radon concentration averages in dwellings are in the range of 11 ± 6 Bq m-3 - 380 ± 91 Bq m-3 in winter season and 8 ± 3 Bq m-3 - 356 ± 64 Bq m-3 in summer season. We found that the 222Rn effective dose values in the studied dwellings in winter season range from 0.278 to 9.59 mSv y-1. Also, the 222Rn effective dose values in the studied dwellings in summer season range from 0.202 to 8.98 mSv y-1. These values are within the ICPR recommended values. The radon activity has not been found to vary with seasonal changes, but also with the age, the construction mode of houses, the ventilation conditions and with specific sites and geological materials.

  3. Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.

    1990-01-01

    This research has two main goals; (1) to quantify mechanisms for radon entry into homes of different types and to determine the fraction of indoor radon attributable to each source and (2) to model and calculate the dose (and therefore alpha particle fluence) to cells in the human and animal tracheobronchial tree that is pertinent to induction of bronchogenic carcinoma from inhaled radon daughters.

  4. Systematic indoor radon and gamma-ray measurements in Slovenian schools

    SciTech Connect

    Vaupotic, J.; Sikovec, M.; Kobal, I.

    2000-05-01

    During the winter months of 1992/93 and 1993/94, instantaneous indoor radon concentrations and gamma dose rates were measured in 890 schools in Slovenia attended in total by about 280,000 pupils. Under closed conditions, the room to be surveyed was closed for more than 12 h prior to sampling, the air was sampled into alpha scintillation cells with a volume of 700 cm{sup 3}, and alpha activity was measured. An arithmetic mean of 168 Bq m{sup {minus}3} and a geometric mean of 82 Bq m{sup {minus}3} were obtained. In 67% of schools, indoor radon concentrations were below 100 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, and in 8.7% (77 schools with about 16,000 pupils) they exceeded 400 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, which is the proposed Slovene action level. In the majority of cases, radon concentrations were high due to the geological characteristics of the ground. Approximately 70% of schools with high radon levels were found in the Karst region. Gamma dose rates were measured using a portable scintillation counter. An arithmetic mean of 102 nGy h{sup {minus}1} and a geometric mean of 95 nGy h{sup {minus}1} were obtained. No extraordinarily high values were recorded.

  5. Exposure to indoor radon and natural gamma radiation in some workplaces at Algiers, Algeria.

    PubMed

    Aït Ziane, M; Lounis-Mokrani, Z; Allab, M

    2014-07-01

    Radon activity concentrations have been measured in 34 workplaces throughout Algiers nuclear research centre, in Algeria, during some periods between March 2007 and June 2013 using Electret ion chambers, nuclear tracks detectors and an AlphaGuard system. The indoor radon levels range from 2 to 628 Bq m(-3) with an average indoor concentration equals to 92 Bq m(-3), whereas the estimated outdoor radon concentrations range from 2 to 14 Bq m(-3) with an average value of 6 Bq m(-3). This study also focused on parameters affecting radon concentration levels such as floor number, ventilation and atmospheric parameters. Furthermore, the mean gamma rates have been measured in the different investigated locations and have been found to be varying between 33 and 3300 nSv h(-1). The annual effective dose for workers calculated using the appropriate equilibrium and occupancy factors is lower than the value recommended by International Commission on Radiological Protection in its Publication 103. PMID:24711531

  6. A representative survey of indoor radon in the sixteen regions in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, G; Gammage, R B

    2003-01-01

    Mexico City, also called Federal District, covers an area of 1504 km(2), and has more than 8 million inhabitants. It is located more than 2200 m above sea level in a zone of high seismic activity, and founded on an ancient lake. At present it is one of the most crowded and contaminated cities in the world, with thermal inversions. Chemical contaminants and aerosol particles in the environmental air are high most of the year. Due to these geological, environmental and socioeconomic conditions, Federal District presents very peculiar characteristics, which are important for understanding the distribution and measurements of indoor radon concentration. In this work the results of 3 year (1998-2000) measurements of indoor radon levels in the Federal District are presented. For the detector distribution and measurements, the actual political administrative divisions of the Federal District, consisting of 16 very well defined zones, was used. Nuclear track detection methodology was selected for the measurement, with a passive device close-end-cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack) polycarbonate as the detection material, with one step chemical etching, following a very well established protocol developed at the Instituto de Física, UNAM. Calibration was carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and verification at the Instituto de Física chamber. The results show that the arithmetical mean values of the indoor radon concentration for each region of the Federal District follow a non-homogenous distribution. PMID:12596993

  7. Quality control of mitigation methods for unusually high indoor radon concentrations.

    PubMed

    Huber, J; Ennemoser, O; Schneider, P

    2001-08-01

    ventilation on and the basement door open. Mitigation method in house 4--a basement sealing technique--was unsuccessful with almost identical radon concentrations during all the five years since mitigation had started. Mitigation method in house 5--a waterproof basement technique especially for future homes--reduced mean basement radon concentration below 300 Bq m(-3) and mean ground floor radon concentration below 200 Bq m(-3), which is the Austrian action level for newly constructed buildings. These findings indicate that even in areas with extremely high radon concentrations, effective mitigation of indoor radon can be achieved provided that house-specific long-term, stable mitigation techniques are applied. PMID:11480874

  8. Hierarchical modeling of indoor radon concentration: how much do geology and building factors matter?

    PubMed

    Borgoni, Riccardo; De Francesco, Davide; De Bartolo, Daniela; Tzavidis, Nikos

    2014-12-01

    Radon is a natural gas known to be the main contributor to natural background radiation exposure and only second to smoking as major leading cause of lung cancer. The main concern is in indoor environments where the gas tends to accumulate and can reach high concentrations. The primary contributor of this gas into the building is from the soil although architectonic characteristics, such as building materials, can largely affect concentration values. Understanding the factors affecting the concentration in dwellings and workplaces is important both in prevention, when the construction of a new building is being planned, and in mitigation when the amount of Radon detected inside a building is too high. In this paper we investigate how several factors, such as geologic typologies of the soil and a range of building characteristics, impact on indoor concentration focusing, in particular, on how concentration changes as a function of the floor level. Adopting a mixed effects model to account for the hierarchical nature of the data, we also quantify the extent to which such measurable factors manage to explain the variability of indoor radon concentration. PMID:25261869

  9. How serious is the indoor radon health hazard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-07

    While cure seekers apparently skeptical of legitimate medicine pay up to $4 per hour to partake of the putative benefits of radon gas in played-out uranium mines in the west, many Americans on the eastern seaboard and elsewhere, also with good health in mind, spend thousands of dollars to rid their own homes of the very same effusion. Last month, the US Senate passed a bill that will help states set up programs to survey and monitor radon concentration in homes and schools. It calls for spending $31.5 million over three years. A similar bill is pending in the House. concern focuses on the fact that up to 20,000 cases of lung cancer annually in this country have been attributed to this inchoate enemy. The trouble is that the assertion, which sounds so reasonable, cannot - so far - be proved. Scientists in various countries at different times have attributed indoor radon to building materials, tap water, and/or soil emissions. The latter view prevails at present.

  10. Indoor radon exposure and lung cancer: a review of ecological studies.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Young; Lee, Jung-Dong; Joo, So Won; Kang, Dae Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has high mortality and incidence rates. The leading causes of lung cancer are smoking and radon exposure. Indeed, the World Health Organization (WHO) has categorized radon as a carcinogenic substance causing lung cancer. Radon is a natural, radioactive substance; it is an inert gas that mainly exists in soil or rock. The gas decays into radioactive particles called radon progeny that can enter the human body through breathing. Upon entering the body, these radioactive elements release α-rays that affect lung tissue, causing lung cancer upon long-term exposure thereto. Epidemiological studies first outlined a high correlation between the incidence rate of lung cancer and exposure to radon progeny among miners in Europe. Thereafter, data and research on radon exposure and lung cancer incidence in homes have continued to accumulate. Many international studies have reported increases in the risk ratio of lung cancer when indoor radon concentrations inside the home are high. Although research into indoor radon concentrations and lung cancer incidence is actively conducted throughout North America and Europe, similar research is lacking in Korea. Recently, however, studies have begun to accumulate and report important data on indoor radon concentrations across the nation. In this study, we aimed to review domestic and foreign research into indoor radon concentrations and to outline correlations between indoor radon concentrations in homes and lung cancer incidence, as reported in ecological studies thereof. Herein, we noted large differences in radon concentrations between and within individual countries. For Korea, we observed tremendous differences in indoor radon concentrations according to region and year of study, even within the same region. In correlation analysis, lung cancer incidence was not found to be higher in areas with high indoor radon concentrations in Korea. Through our review, we identified a need to implement a greater variety of

  11. Measurement of Indoor Radon, Thoron in Dwelling of Delhi, India Using Double Dosimeter Cups with SSNTDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anil; Mahur, Ajay Kumar; Sonkawade, R. G.; Sharma, A. C.

    In present study, Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDS) based twin chamber dosimeter cups were used for estimating Radon (222Rn) and Thoron (220Rn) gas concentration levels in the environmental air of normal background radiation area in thirty one dwellings of Dwarka city of New Delhi, India which were constructed by bricks, cement and concrete. This survey is the very first one carried out in this city and constitutes and preliminary survey to check the methodology and to have a first estimation of the indoor radon impact on Dwarka inhabitants. LR-115 type-II, films were used as detector. In the studied dwellings Radon concentration levels were found to vary from 4.4 ± 1.6 to 29.8 ± 3.8 Bqm-3 whereas thoron concentrations is found to vary from 2.8 ± 0.5 to 13.6 ± 1.7 Bqm-3. The annual effective dose from radon were found to vary from 0.12 to 0.86 mSv whereas from thoron found to vary from 0.01 to 0.07 mSv.

  12. POSSIBLE ROLE OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS IN BACK-DRAFTING RESIDENTIAL COMBUSTION APPLIANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article gives results of a computational sensitivity analysis conducted to identify conditions under which residential active soil depressurization (ASD) systems for indoor radon reduction might contribute to or create back-drafting of natural draft combustion appliances. Par...

  13. Exposure to radon and radon progeny in the indoor environment. Technical progress report, January 1, 1990--December 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Socolow, R.H.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this work is to measure experimentally the activity-weighted particle size distribution in conjunction with other relevant house parameters in occupied houses in order to improve the estimate of exposure to radon and radon progeny indoors. Our methodology requires that building construction and operation be studied and understood both experimentally and theoretically in a small number of buildings and that results of side applicability be inferred from the particular case studies. Results are discussed.

  14. INSTALLATION AND TESTING OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES IN 40 EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the installation and testing of indoor radon reduction techniques in 40 houses in eastern Pennsylvania. Early in 1985, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (PDER) started a large radon survey in communities in the Reading Prong (a granite fo...

  15. Shelter and indoor air in the twenty-first century: Radon, smoking and lung cancer risks

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-04-01

    This document describes the relationship between indoor radon exposure, cigarette smoking, and lung cancer. The author explains the sources of radon, the tissues at risk, the human populations most likely to be affected, and the estimates of lung cancer in the population. 6 refs., 2 tabs. (TEM)

  16. AN OVERVIEW OF INDOOR RADON RISK REDUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents an overview of indoor radon risk reduction in the U.S. EPA currently estimates that 15,000-20,000 Americans die each year fromradon-induced lung cancer. his estimate is based on epidemiological data which establish the link between radon and lung cancer, and su...

  17. Soil features and indoor radon concentration prediction: radon in soil gas, pedology, permeability and 226Ra content.

    PubMed

    Lara, E; Rocha, Z; Santos, T O; Rios, F J; Oliveira, A H

    2015-11-01

    This work aims at relating some physicochemical features of soils and their use as a tool for prediction of indoor radon concentrations of the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte (RMBH), Minas Gerais, Brazil. The measurements of soil gas radon concentrations were performed by using an AlphaGUARD monitor. The (226)Ra content analysis was performed by gamma spectrometry (high pure germanium) and permeabilities were performed by using the RADON-JOK permeameter. The GEORP indicator and soil radon index (RI) were also calculated. Approximately 53 % of the Perferric Red Latosols measurement site could be classified as 'high risk' (Swedish criteria). The Litholic Neosols presented the lowest radon concentration mean in soil gas. The Perferric Red Latosols presented significantly high radon concentration mean in soil gas (60.6 ± 8.7 kBq m(-3)), high indoor radon concentration, high RI, (226)Ra content and GEORP. The preliminary results may indicate an influence of iron formations present very close to the Perferric Red Latosols in the retention of uranium minerals. PMID:25920786

  18. Procedure manual for the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentrations using the radon grab-sampling method

    SciTech Connect

    George, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology established the Technical Measurements Center to provide standardization, calibration, comparability, verification of data, quality assurance, and cost-effectiveness for the measurement requirements of DOE remedial action programs. One of the remedial-action measurement needs is the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentration. One method for accomplishing such estimations in support of DOE remedial action programs is the radon grab-sampling method. This manual describes procedures for radon grab sampling, with the application specifically directed to the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentration (RDC) in highly ventilated structures. This particular application of the measurement method is for cases where RDC estimates derived from long-term integrated measurements under occupied conditions are below the standard and where the structure being evaluated is considered to be highly ventilated. The radon grab-sampling method requires that sampling be conducted under standard maximized conditions. Briefly, the procedure for radon grab sampling involves the following steps: selection of sampling and counting equipment; sample acquisition and processing, including data reduction; calibration of equipment, including provisions to correct for pressure effects when sampling at various elevations; and incorporation of quality-control and assurance measures. This manual describes each of the above steps in detail and presents an example of a step-by-step radon grab-sampling procedure using a scintillation cell.

  19. Review of low-energy construction, air tightness, ventilation strategies and indoor radon: results from Finnish houses and apartments.

    PubMed

    Arvela, H; Holmgren, O; Reisbacka, H; Vinha, J

    2014-12-01

    Low-energy and passive house construction practices are characterised by increased insulation, high air tightness of the building shell and controlled mechanical ventilation with heat recovery. As a result of the interaction of mechanical ventilation and high air tightness, the pressure difference in a building can be markedly enhanced. This may lead to elevated indoor radon levels. Minor leakages in the foundation can affect the radon concentration, even in the case where such leaks do not markedly reduce the total air tightness. The potential for high pressures to affect indoor radon concentrations markedly increases when the air tightness ACH50, i.e. the air change per hour induced by a pressure difference of 50 Pa, is <1.0 h(-1). Pressure differences in Finnish low-rise residential houses having mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation with heat recovery (MSEV) are typically 2-3 Pa, clearly lower than the values of 5-9 Pa in houses with only mechanical exhaust ventilation (MEV). In MSEV houses, radon concentrations are typically 30% lower than in MEV houses. In new MSEV houses with an ACH50 of 0.6 h(-1), the limit for passive construction, the analytical estimates predict an increase of 100% in the radon concentration compared with older houses with an ACH50 of 4.0 h(-1). This poses a challenge for efficient radon prevention in new construction. Radon concentrations are typically 30% lower in houses with two storeys compared with only one storey. The introduction of an MSEV ventilation strategy in typically very airtight apartments has markedly reduced pressure differences and radon concentrations. PMID:24243314

  20. Estimation of the indoor radon and the annual effective dose from granite samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sola, P.; Srinuttrakul, W.; Kewsuwan, P.

    2015-05-01

    Inhalation of radon and thoron daughters increases the risk of lung cancer. The main sources of indoor radon are building materials. The aim of this research is to estimate the indoor radon and the annual effective dose from the building materials. Eighteen granite samples bought from the markets in Thailand were measured using an ionization chamber (ATMOS 12 DPX) for the radon concentration in air. Radon exhalation rates were calculated from the radon concentration in chamber. The indoor radon from the granite samples ranged from 10.04 to 55.32 Bq·m-2·h-1 with an average value of 20.30 Bq·m-2·h-1 and the annual effective dose ranged from 0.25 to 1.39 mSv·y-1 with an average value of 0.48 mSv·y-1. The results showed that the annual effective doses of three granite samples were higher than the annual exposure limit for the general public (1 mSv·y-1) recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In addition, the relationship between the colours and radon exhalation rates of granite samples was also explained.

  1. Preliminary Results of Indoor Radon/thoron Concentrations and Terrestrial Gamma Doses in Gejiu, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Sun, Quafu; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Min, Xiangdong; Yoshinaga, Shinji

    2008-08-01

    A preliminary survey on indoor radon/thoron and external gamma ray dose rate was conducted for houses in Gejiu city and its neighboring village in Yunnan Province, China. As a result of the radon/thoron measurements for about 50 houses, very high thoron concentrations were found in some hoses (maximum: 7,900 Bq/m3). The mean annual dose from thoron decay products was estimated to be larger than that from radon decay products (2.9 mSv vs. 1.6 mSv). Further dosimetric and epidemiological studies are needed to investigate the possible effects of radon and thoron.

  2. Preliminary Results of Indoor Radon/thoron Concentrations and Terrestrial Gamma Doses in Gejiu, Yunnan, China

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Sun Quafu; Min Xiangdong

    2008-08-07

    A preliminary survey on indoor radon/thoron and external gamma ray dose rate was conducted for houses in Gejiu city and its neighboring village in Yunnan Province, China. As a result of the radon/thoron measurements for about 50 houses, very high thoron concentrations were found in some hoses (maximum: 7,900 Bq/m{sup 3}). The mean annual dose from thoron decay products was estimated to be larger than that from radon decay products (2.9 mSv vs. 1.6 mSv). Further dosimetric and epidemiological studies are needed to investigate the possible effects of radon and thoron.

  3. Comparison of Northern Ireland radon maps based on indoor radon measurements and geology with maps derived by predictive modelling of airborne radiometric and ground permeability data.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Young, M

    2011-03-15

    Publicly available information about radon potential in Northern Ireland is currently based on indoor radon results averaged over 1-km grid squares, an approach that does not take into account the geological origin of the radon. This study describes a spatially more accurate estimate of the radon potential of Northern Ireland using an integrated radon potential mapping method based on indoor radon measurements and geology that was originally developed for mapping radon potential in England and Wales. A refinement of this method was also investigated using linear regression analysis of a selection of relevant airborne and soil geochemical parameters from the Tellus Project. The most significant independent variables were found to be eU, a parameter derived from airborne gamma spectrometry measurements of radon decay products in the top layer of soil and exposed bedrock, and the permeability of the ground. The radon potential map generated from the Tellus data agrees in many respects with the map based on indoor radon data and geology but there are several areas where radon potential predicted from the airborne radiometric and permeability data is substantially lower. This under-prediction could be caused by the radon concentration being lower in the top 30 cm of the soil than at greater depth, because of the loss of radon from the surface rocks and soils to air. PMID:21310464

  4. Surface-deposition and Distribution of the Radon (222Rn and 220Rn) Decay Products Indoors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, G.; Tommasino, Luigi

    The exposure to radon (222Rn and 220Rn) decay products is of great concern both in dwellings and workplaces. The model to estimate the lung dose refers to the deposition mechanisms and particle sizes. Unfortunately, most of the dose data available are based on the measurement of radon concentration and the concentration of radon decay products. These combined measurements are widely used in spite of the fact that accurate dose assessments require information on the particle deposition mechanisms and the spatial distribution of radon decay products indoors. Most of the airborne particles and/or radon decay products are deposited onto indoor surfaces, which deposition makes the radon decay products unavailable for inhalation. These deposition processes, if properly known, could be successfully exploited to reduce the exposure to radon decay products. In spite of the importance of the surface deposition of the radon decay products, both for the correct evaluation of the dose and for reducing the exposure, little or no efforts have been made to investigate these deposition processes. Recently, two parallel investigations have been carried out in Rome and at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) in Mexico City respectively, which address the issue of the surface-deposited radon decay products. Even though these investigations have been carried independently, they complement one another. It is with these considerations in mind that it was decided to report both investigations in the same paper.

  5. Cost evaluation of control measures for indoor radon progeny.

    PubMed

    Moeller, D W; Fujimoto, K

    1984-06-01

    Based on assumed conditions within a typical U.S. home, annualized costs for reducing indoor airborne radon progeny concentrations have been calculated for a variety of methods of control. These analyses were limited to methods for control in existing homes. Control through modified construction techniques was not evaluated. Methods assessed included increased air circulation, increased ventilation, particle removal using electrostatic precipitation and unipolar ion generation, and the application of sealants to room surfaces. Although surface sealants proved to be reasonably cost-effective per person- sievert dose reduction, such sealants are prone to cracking and the durability of their effectiveness is questionable. Use of ceiling fans for increased air circulation and particle deposition appears to be least cost-effective, but this method may be attractive in some cases for reasons of comfort. The use of unipolar ion generators appears to be the best approach from the standpoint of cost effectiveness. These devices are also easy to install and are esthetically readily acceptable. PMID:6427137

  6. Lung Cancer Attributable to Indoor Radon Exposures in Two Radon—Prone Areas, Ştei (Romania) and Torrelodones (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinu, Alexandra; Cosma, Constantin; Sainz, Carlos; Poncela, Luis Santiago Quindós; Vasiliniuc, Ştefan

    2009-05-01

    Radon and radon progeny are present indoors, in houses and others dwellings, representing the most important contribution to dose from natural sources of radiation. Most studies have demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer at high concentration of radon for both smokers and nonsmokers. For medium and low concentrations which are the typical residential radon levels, recent researches have also demonstrated increased risks of lung cancer for people exposed. The work presents a comparative analysis of the radon exposure data in the two radon—prone areas, Ştei, Transylvania, (Romania), in the near of old Romanian uranium mines and in the granitic area of Torrelodones town, Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain). One important difference between the two studied areas is related to the houses built using uranium waste as construction material in Ştei area. Measurements of indoor radon were performed in 280 dwellings (Romania) and 91 dwellings (Spain) by using nuclear track detectors, CR 39. The highest value measured in Ştei area was 2650 Bqṡm-3. and 366 Bqṡm-3 in the Spanish region. The results are compute with the BEIR VI report estimates using the age-duration model at an exposure rate below 2650 Bqṡm-3. A total of 233 lung cancer deaths were calculated in the Ştei area for a period of 13 years (1994-2006), which is 116.82% higher than observed from the national statistics. In comparison, in Torrelodones area, a number of 276 deaths caused by lung cancer were estimated along a period of 13 years, which is 2.09 times higher than the number observed by authorities. This represents a significantly evidence that elevated risk can strongly be associated with cumulated radon exposure.

  7. RAETRAD MODEL OF RADON GAS GENERATION, TRANSPORT, AND INDOOR ENTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the theoretical basis, implementation, and validation of the Radon Emanation and Transport into Dwellings (RAETRAD) model, a conceptual and mathematical approach for simulating radon (222Rn) gas generation and transport from soils and building foundations to ...

  8. A Comparative Study of Indoor Radon Contributed by Diffusive and Advective Transport through Intact Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, R. P.; Kumar, Amit

    The present work is aimed that out of diffusive and advective transport which is dominant process for indoor radon entry under normal room conditions. For this purpose the radon diffusion coefficient and permeability of concrete were measured by specially designed experimental set up. The radon diffusion coefficient of concrete was measured by continuous radon monitor. The measured value was (3.78 ± 0.39)×10-8 m2/s and found independent of the radon gas concentration in source chamber. The radon permeability of concrete varied between 1.85×10-17 to 1.36×10-15 m2 for the bulk pressure difference fewer than 20 Pa to 73.3 kPa. From the measured diffusion coefficient and absolute permeability, the radon flux from the concrete surface having concentrations gradient 12-40 kBq/m3 and typical floor thickness 0.1 m was calculated by the application of Fick and Darcy laws. Using the measured flux attributable to diffusive and advective transport, the indoor radon concentration for a typical Indian model room having dimension (5×6×7) m3 was calculated under average room ventilation (0.63 h-1). The results showed that the contribution of diffusive transport through intact concrete is dominant over the advective transport, as expected from the low values of concrete permeability.

  9. Estimating the risk of lung cancer from inhalation of radon daughters indoors: review and evaluation. Final report, October 1986-April 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Borak, T.B.; Johnson, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    A review of the dosimetric models and epidemiological studies with regard to the relation between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer indicates that the Working Level is an appropriate unit for indoor radon exposure; that the uncertainty in applying risk estimates derived from uranium miner data may be reduced by determining nose vs. mouth breathing ratios, residential aerosol characteristics, and lung cancer risk vs. age at exposure; that there is persuasive evidence of an association between radon exposure indoors and lung cancer; and that epidemiological studies in progress may provide a basis for revision or validation of current models but only is experimental designs are employed that will permit pooling of data to obtain greater statistical power.

  10. Shelter and indoor air in the twenty-first century--radon, smoking, and lung cancer risks

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I. )

    1990-06-01

    Recognition that radon and its daughter products may accumulate to high levels in homes and in the workplace has led to concern about the potential lung cancer risk resulting from indoor domestic exposure. While such risks can be estimated with current dosimetric and epidemiological models for excess relative risks, it must be recognized that these models are based on data from occupational exposure and from underground miners' mortality experience. Several assumptions are required to apply risk estimates from an occupational setting to the indoor domestic environment. Analyses of the relevant data do not lead to a conclusive description of the interaction between radon daughters and cigarette smoking for the induction of lung cancer. The evidence compels the conclusion that indoor radon daughter exposure in homes represents a potential life-threatening public health hazard, particularly in males, and in cigarette smokers. Resolution of complex societal interactions will require public policy decisions involving the governmental, scientific, financial, and industrial sectors. These decisions impact the home, the workplace, and the marketplace, and they extend beyond the constraints of science. Risk identification, assessment, and management require scientific and engineering approaches to guide policy decisions to protect the public health. Mitigation and control procedures are only beginning to receive attention. Full acceptance for protection against what could prove to be a significant public health hazard in the twenty-first century will certainly involve policy decisions, not by scientists, but rather by men and women of government and law.

  11. High variability of indoor radon concentrations in uraniferous bedrock areas in the Balkan region.

    PubMed

    Zunić, Z S; Ujić, P; Nađđerđ, L; Yarmoshenko, I V; Radanović, S B; Komatina Petrović, S; Celiković, I; Komatina, M; Bossew, P

    2014-12-01

    In this work the strong influence of geological factors on the variability of indoor radon is found in two of three geologically very different regions of South-Eastern Europe. A method to estimate the annual mean concentration when one seasonal measurement is missing is proposed. Large differences of radon concentrations in different rooms of the same house and significant difference in radon concentrations in one season comparing it to the others are noted in certain cases. Geological factors that can lead to such behavior are discussed. PMID:25305525

  12. Survey of Indoor Radon Concentrations in California Elementary Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Joey Y.; Liu, Kai-Shen; Waldman, Jed

    This paper reports on the concentrations of radon found within a sample of 378 elementary schools in California. Long-term alpha-track radon detectors were placed in 6,485 classrooms within participating schools to detect radon levels for between 220 to 366 days. Only classrooms were tested. Results show that about 5.6 percent of the schools…

  13. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13-52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  14. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    PubMed Central

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-01-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses. PMID:27499492

  15. Dose estimation derived from the exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny in the indoor environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramola, R. C.; Prasad, Mukesh; Kandari, Tushar; Pant, Preeti; Bossew, Peter; Mishra, Rosaline; Tokonami, S.

    2016-08-01

    The annual exposure to indoor radon, thoron and their progeny imparts a major contribution to inhalation doses received by the public. In this study, we report results of time integrated passive measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations that were carried out in Garhwal Himalaya with the aim of investigating significant health risk to the dwellers in the region. The measurements were performed using recently developed LR-115 detector based techniques. The experimentally determined values of radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations were used to estimate total annual inhalation dose and annual effective doses. The equilibrium factors for radon and thoron were also determined from the observed data. The estimated value of total annual inhalation dose was found to be 1.8 ± 0.7 mSv/y. The estimated values of the annual effective dose were found to be 1.2 ± 0.5 mSv/y and 0.5 ± 0.3 mSv/y, respectively. The estimated values of radiation doses suggest no important health risk due to exposure of radon, thoron and progeny in the study area. The contribution of indoor thoron and its progeny to total inhalation dose ranges between 13–52% with mean value of 30%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation doses.

  16. TESTING OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES IN CENTRAL OHIO HOUSES: PHASE 2 (WINTER 1988-1989)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests of developmental indoor radon reduction techniques in nine slab-on-grade and four crawl-space houses near Dayton. Ohio. he slab-on-grade tests indicated that, when there is a good layer of aggregate under the slab, the sub-slab ventilation (SSV) ...

  17. TESTING OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES IN BASEMENT HOUSES HAVING ADJOINING WINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests of indoor radon reduction techniques in 12 existing Maryland houses, with the objective of determining when basement houses with adjoining wings require active soil depressurization (ASD) treatment of both wings, and when treatment of the basemen...

  18. TESTING OF INDOOR RADON REDUCTION TECHNIQUES IN EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA: AN UPDATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper updates information from EPA tests of indoor radon reduction techniques on 38 houses in the Reading Prong area of eastern Pennsylvania. All were basement houses with hollow-block or poured-concrete foundation walls. The reduction approaches tested in most houses involve...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A LUMPED-PARAMETER MODEL OF INDOOR RADON CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a simplified, lumped-parameter model to characterize indoor radon concentrations from data that are more readily available than those required for existing mathematical models. he lumped-parameter model was developed from numerous sensitivity analyses with th...

  20. Study of indoor radon concentrations and associated health risks in the five districts of Hazara division, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fayaz; Ali, Nawab; Khan, Ehsan U; Khattak, Nimat U; Raja, Iftikhar A; Baloch, Muzahir A; Rajput, Muhammad U

    2012-11-01

    A total of 200 indoor air samples were collected to measure radon concentration levels and its contribution to the mean effective doses during different seasons of the period 2009-2010 at different sites of the five districts of Hazara division, Pakistan. The major portion of the region is mountainous and is full of thick forests which receives heavy snow fall in winter. The need for conducting the present survey relied on the fact that occupants spend their lives in poorly ventilated indoor environments of the region, especially in the winter season when they use wood fire inside their residences. The measurements of indoor air samples were taken with RAD-7, a solid state α-detector. Radon concentrations in the whole region range from 41 Bq m(-3) to 254 Bq m(-3) with a geometric mean of 128 Bq m(-3). Radon progenies were measured with a surface barrier detector through alpha spectroscopy from which the Equilibrium Factor (EF) for radon and Radon Decay Products (RDPs) for the smoke-bearing as well as smoke-free indoor environments were deduced. The respective mean values of EF were calculated as 0.49 ± 0.08 and 0.40 ± 0.07. The mean effective doses from indoor air of Abbottabad, Mansehra, Haripur, Battgram and Kohistan districts were calculated as 3.5 ± 1.2, 3.7 ± 0.7, 3.9 ± 1.0, 3.6 ± 1.1 and 3.9 ± 0.7 mSv a(-1) respectively, with the maximum value of 5.1 ± 1.8 mSv a(-1) in Kohistan district during winter and the minimum value of 2.9 ± 1.0 mSv a(-1) in Abbottabad district during summer. The annual exposure dose to the inhabitants of the locality lies below the upper bound of 10 mSv a(-1), as recommended by ICRP-65, and may not pose any significant threat to the public health. PMID:23034598

  1. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny's atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

  2. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the [sup 218]Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of [center dot]OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO[sub 2] ethylene, and H[sub 2]S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H[sub 2]O and NH[sub 3] in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of [sup 218]Po[sub x][sup +] in O[sub 2] at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited [sup 210]Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  3. From radon hazard to risk prediction-based on geological maps, soil gas and indoor measurements in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemski, J.; Klingel, R.; Siehl, A.; Valdivia-Manchego, M.

    2009-02-01

    Mapped geological units can be regarded as proxies standing for a complex series of subsoil geochemical and physical properties including the assigned radon activity concentration in soil gas, which is taken as best estimator of the regional geogenic radon potential. Areal distribution of measuring sites for soil gas in Germany is adapted to spatial variation of geology. A grid-based and distance-weighted interpolation procedure is applied, following geologically defined neighbourhood relations of measuring sites and accounting for isolated outcrops of known geology but without measurements. To investigate the statistical relationship between indoor radon, house type and building ground specifications, measurements of the indoor radon concentration have been carried out in more than 10,000 dwellings in different regions of Germany. Multiple regression analyses of variance reveal that besides region-specific geological properties and building characteristics, various house type and living style variables significantly contribute to the explained variance for ground floor radon concentrations. These parameters are also dominant in controlling the radon transfer relation from soil gas to indoor air. Risk prediction maps for radon in houses indicating the probability to exceed certain indoor threshold values can be useful especially for regions with no or only a few measurements of indoor radon.

  4. Evaluation of indoor aerosol control devices and their effects on radon progeny concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Sextro, R.G.; Offermann, F.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-02-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles, and their concomitant effects on radon progeny concentrations have been investigated. Of the devices we examined the electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters had significant particle removal rates, while the particle removal rates for several small panel-filters, an ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans were found to be negligible. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in reducing radon progeny concentrations. Furthermore, at the low particle concentrations, plateout of the unattached radon progeny was found to be a significant removal mechanism. The overall removal rates due to deposition of attached and unattached progeny have been estimated from these data, and the equilibrium factors for total and unattached progeny concentrations have been calculated as a function of particle concentration. 7 references, 2 figures.

  5. National Weatherization Assistance Program Impact Evaluation: Impact of Exhaust-Only Ventilation on Radon and Indoor Humidity - A Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Pigg, Scott

    2014-09-01

    The study described here sought to assess the impact of exhaust-only ventilation on indoor radon and humidity in single-family homes that had been treated by the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).

  6. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F., A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H.

    2014-11-01

    It is well known that radon daughters up to 214Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  7. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F, A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H.

    2014-11-11

    It is well known that radon daughters up to {sup 214}Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  8. Age-dependent inhalation doses to members of the public from indoor short-lived radon progeny.

    PubMed

    Brudecki, K; Li, W B; Meisenberg, O; Tschiersch, J; Hoeschen, C; Oeh, U

    2014-08-01

    The main contribution of radiation dose to the human lungs from natural exposure originates from short-lived radon progeny. In the present work, the inhalation doses from indoor short-lived radon progeny, i.e., (218)Po, (214)Pb, (214)Bi, and (214)Po, to different age groups of members of the public were calculated. In the calculations, the age-dependent systemic biokinetic models of polonium, bismuth, and lead published by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) were adopted. In addition, the ICRP human respiratory tract and gastrointestinal tract models were applied to determine the deposition fractions in different regions of the lungs during inhalation and exhalation, and the absorption fractions of radon progeny in the alimentary tract. Based on the calculated contribution of each progeny to equivalent dose and effective dose, the dose conversion factor was estimated, taking into account the unattached fraction of aerosols, attached aerosols in the nucleation, accumulation and coarse modes, and the potential alpha energy concentration fraction in indoor air. It turned out that for each progeny, the equivalent doses to extrathoracic airways and the lungs are greater than those to other organs. The contribution of (214)Po to effective dose is much smaller compared to that of the other short-lived radon progeny and can thus be neglected in the dose assessment. In fact, 90 % of the effective dose from short-lived radon progeny arises from (214)Pb and (214)Bi, while the rest is from (218)Po. The dose conversion factors obtained in the present study are 17 and 18 mSv per working level month (WLM) for adult female and male, respectively. This compares to values ranging from 6 to 20 mSv WLM(-1) calculated by other investigators. The dose coefficients of each radon progeny calculated in the present study can be used to estimate the radiation doses for the population, especially for small children and women, in specific regions of the world

  9. Indoor radon and lung cancer in the radium dial workers

    SciTech Connect

    Neuberger, J.S.; Rundo, J.

    1996-12-31

    Internally deposited radium has long been known to have tumorigenic effects in the form of sarcomas of the bone and carcinomas of the paranasal sinuses and mastoid air cells. However, the radium dial workers were also exposed to radiation hazards other than that occurring from ingestion of the radium paint, viz., external gamma radiation and elevated concentrations of airborne radon. The uranium miners were also exposed to high concentrations of radon in the 1950s and later, and numerous cases of lung cancer have occurred in that population. However, unlike the atmosphere in the uranium mines, the air in the dial painting plants was probably rather clean and perhaps not much different from the air in many houses. In view of the current concern over the possibility of lung cancer fin the general population being caused by radon (progeny) in houses, it is important to examine the mortality due to this usually fatal disease in the dial workers and to attempt to relate it to their exposure to radon, to the extent that this is possible.

  10. Evaluation of indoor aerosol control devices and their effects on radon progeny concentrations. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Sextro, R.G.; Offermann, F.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Yater, J.

    1984-11-01

    Eleven portable air cleaning devices have been evaluated for control of indoor concentrations of respirable particles, and their concomitant effects on radon progeny concentrations have been investigated. The experiments were conducted in a room-size chamber using cigarette smoke and radon injection from an external source. Of the devices examined the electrostatic precipitators and extended surface filters had significant particle removal rates, while the particle removal rates for several small panel-filters, an ion-generator, and a pair of mixing fans were found to be essentially negligible. The evaluation of radon progeny control produced similar results; the air cleaners which were effective in removing particles were also effective in reducing radon progeny concentrations. At the low particle concentrations, deposition of the unattached radon progeny on room surfaces was found to be a significant removal mechanism. Deposition rates of attached and unattached progeny have been estimated from these data, and were used to calculate the equilibrium factors for total and unattached progeny concentrations as a function of particle concentration. While particle removal reduces total airborne radon progeny concentrations, the relative alpha decay dose to the lungs appears to change very little as the particle concentration decreases due to the greater radiological importance of unattached progeny.

  11. Retrospective assessment of indoor radon exposure by measurements of embedded 210Po activity in glass objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramola, R. C.; Gusain, G. S.; Prasad, Ganesh

    In most of the epidemiological studies contemporary radon measurements have been used as surrogates for radon concentrations in past decades even though changes in radon levels and residence may have occurred. Short-lived radon progeny may deposit on available surfaces in dwellings thus giving rise over time to a build up of long-lived progeny. Airborne radon decay products can be deposited and implanted through alpha recoil into the glass surfaces. On glass surface, activities of 210Po may arise as a result of the decay of recoil implanted activity following the alpha decay of surface deposited 218Po or 214Po. Measurement of 210Po implanted on a household glass is a method that can be employed to retrospectively determine the historic level of radon in dwellings. This method is based on the assumption that levels of recoil implanted 210Po in the glass provide a measure of time integrated radon concentration in the environment in which the glass has been located. The surface deposited activity of the radon progenies, which then become implanted in the glass by alpha recoil, is believed to reflect past exposure to airborne activity. Such retrospective measurements on glass are valuable in estimating the human dose derived from radon during the time of exposure. In this paper an account is given of the principles and some field applications of a retrospective technique, using the alpha track detectors, CR-39 and LR-115, to measure 210Po implanted in glass surfaces (surface traps). By using this CR-LR difference technique, the cumulative radon exposure in a dwelling in past decades may be estimated. This method provides reliable radon exposure data as a support to epidemiological studies concerning the health effects of radon exposure in the living environment.

  12. Indoor radon periodicities and their physical constraints: a study in the Coimbra region (Central Portugal).

    PubMed

    Neves, L J P F; Barbosa, S M; Pereira, A J S C

    2009-10-01

    Indoor radon activities were measured during a period of 6 months, as well as several physical environmental variables (temperature, pressure, humidity and rainfall). The location was a small room at an administrative building of the University of Coimbra, usually undisturbed by human activities and situated over bedrock of low-uranium Triassic red sandstones. A low average activity of radon was observed (36 Bq m(-3)), however showing a very well marked daily periodicity (10+/-5 Bq m(-3)), with maximum values occurring more frequently between 9 and 10 a.m. Daily variations are shown to have no relation with earth tides, and their amplitudes exhibit a significant correlation with outdoor temperature; no dependence on barometric pressure was found. Rainfall disturbs the observed daily radon cycles through a strong reduction of their amplitude, but has no effect on the long-term variability of the gas concentration. PMID:19632749

  13. Variation of the unattached fraction of radon progeny and its contribution to radon exposure.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lu; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Qiuju

    2016-06-01

    The unattached fraction of radon progeny is one of the most important factors for radon exposure evaluation through the dosimetric approach. To better understand its level and variation in the real environment, a series of field measurements were carried out indoors and outdoors, and radon equilibrium equivalent concentration was also measured. The dose contribution of unattached radon progeny was evaluated in addition. The results show that no clear variation trend of the unattached fraction of radon progeny is observed in an indoor or outdoor environment. The average unattached fraction of radon progeny for the indoors and outdoors are (8.7  ±  1.6)% and (9.7  ±  2.1)%, respectively. The dose contribution of unattached radon progeny to total radon exposure is some 38.8% in an indoor environment, suggesting the importance of the evaluation on unattached radon progeny. PMID:27171653

  14. Follow-up durability measurements and mitigation-performance improvement tests in 38 Eastern Pennsylvania houses having indoor radon-reduction systems. Final report, Oct 89-Feb 90

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, W.O.; Robertson, A.; Scott, A.G.

    1991-03-01

    The report gives results of follow-up tests in 38 difficult-to-mitigate Pennsylvania houses where indoor radon reduction systems had been installed 2 to 4 years earlier. Objectives were to assess system durability, methods for improving performance, and methods for reducing installation and operating costs. The durability tests indicated that the 38 systems have not experienced any significant degradation in indoor radon levels or in system flows/suctions, except in 6 houses where system fans failed, and in houses where homeowners turned off the systems. Tests to improve performance indicated that nearly all of the elevated residual radon levels are due to re-entrainment back into the house of very-high-radon exhaust gas from the soil depressurization systems, and to radon release from well water. Tests to reduce system costs showed that premitigation sub-slab suction field measurements can help prevent installation of too many suction pipes when communication is good, but suggest a need for too many pipes when communication is poor. Soil depressurization fans could not be turned down to the extent expected in some systems that were over-designed. Between 6 and 42% of the exhausted air was withdrawn from the house.

  15. Follow-up alpha-track monitoring in 40 eastern Pennsylvania houses with indoor radon-reduction systems. (Winter 1988-89). Final report, December 1988-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.G.; Robertson, A.

    1989-10-01

    The report gives results of 4-month-long alpha-track detector (ATD) measurements of indoor radon concentrations, completed during the winter of 1988-89 in 38 of 40 houses where radon reduction techniques had been installed 2-4 years previously during an earlier EPA project. The techniques, installed between June 1985 and June 1987, generally involved some form of active soil ventilation: three were air-to-air heat exchangers, and two involved carbon filters to remove radon from well water. The purpose of these measurements was to determine if the radon reduction performance of the systems had degraded compared to previous wintertime radon measurements. Comparison of the current ATD results with those from 1986-87 and 1987-88 indicates that, in the 34 houses where the system was in continuous operation during this measurement period, the radon levels generally compared well with those measured during the previous years. In only two houses did significant, unexplainable increases occur. Two soil ventilation fans failed during the previous year: 5 out of 34 fans have failed to date. One air-to-air heat exchanger has needed repair. The one water treatment unit designed specifically for radon removal is giving 97% removal, whereas the other has degraded to 65%.

  16. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the ``unattached`` fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the ``unattached`` fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos).

  17. Potential for ion-induced nucleation of volatile organic compounds by radon decay in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    There is considerable interest in the unattached'' fraction of radon progeny in indoor air because of its significance to the estimation of the risks of radon exposure. Because of its high mobility in air, the unattached fraction is more efficiently deposited in the respiratory tract. Variation in the diameter of the unattached'' fraction and in its diffusion coefficient can be due to clustering of other atmospheric species around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential for the formation of clusters of vapor phase organic compounds, found in indoor air, around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion and to determine which were most likely to form clusters. A secondary purpose was to provide a compilation of measurements of indoor organic compounds for future experiments and theoretical calculations by the radon research community. The classical charged liquid droplet theory (Thomson equation) was used to estimate the Gibbs free energy of ion-induced nucleation and to provide an indication of the indoor organic compounds most likely to undergo ion-induced nucleation. Forty-four volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds out of the more than 300 which have been reported in indoor air were investigated. Water vapor was included for comparison. The results indicate that there is a potential for the formation of clusters of organic compounds around the {sup 218}PoO{sub 2}{sup +} ion. The compounds with the greatest potential for cluster formation are the volatile oxidized hydrocarbons (e.g., n-butanol, phenol, hexanal, nonanal, benzaldehyde, the ketones and the acetates) and the semi-volatile organic compounds (pentachlorophenol, nicotine, chlordane, chlorpyrifos).

  18. {sup 210}Po as a long-term integrating radon indicator in the indoor environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    Exposure to radon (Rn-222) decay products in the indoor environment is suspected of being a significant lung cancer agent in many countries. But quantification of the contemporary lung cancer risk (i.e. probability) on an individual basis is not an easy task. Only past exposures are relevant and assessing individual exposures in retrospect is associated with large uncertainties, if possible at all. One way to extend the validity of contemporary measurements to past decades is to measure long-lived decay products of radon, the long-lived radon daughters. After our laboratory had exemplified the correlation between implanted Po-210 and the estimated radon exposures in six different dwellings, the US Department of Energy and the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute granted funds for a one-year study, ``{sup 210}Po as a Long-Term Integrating Radon Indicator in the Indoor Environment.`` In this report the work performed under these two contracts is reported.

  19. USE OF NATURAL VENTILATION TO CONTROL RADON IN SINGLE FAMILYDWELLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses an examination of a fundamental assumption inradon mitigation work, that natural ventilation is not veryeffective in lowering indoor radon levels in buildings. Themechanism by which ventilation acted to reduce radon levels wasconsidered to be simple dilution; ...

  20. Nanoaerosols Including Radon Decay Products in Outdoor and Indoor Air at a Suburban Site

    PubMed Central

    Smerajec, Mateja; Vaupotič, Janja

    2012-01-01

    Nanoaerosols have been monitored inside a kitchen and in the courtyard of a suburban farmhouse. Total number concentration and number size distribution (5–1000 nm) of general aerosol particles, as measured with a Grimm Aerosol SMPS+C 5.400 instrument outdoors, were mainly influenced by solar radiation and use of farming equipment, while, indoors, they were drastically changed by human activity in the kitchen. In contrast, activity concentrations of the short-lived radon decay products 218Po, 214Pb, and 214Bi, both those attached to aerosol particles and those not attached, measured with a Sarad EQF3020-2 device, did not appear to be dependent on these activities, except on opening and closing of the kitchen window. Neither did a large increase in concentration of aerosol particles smaller than 10 or 20 nm, with which the unattached radon products are associated, augment the fraction of the unattached decay products significantly. PMID:22523488

  1. Radon ((222)Rn) concentration in indoor air near the coal mining area of Nui Beo, North of Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nhan, Dang Duc; Fernando, Carvalho P; Thu Ha, Nguyen Thi; Long, Nguyen Quang; Thuan, Dao Dinh; Fonseca, Heloisa

    2012-08-01

    Concentrations of radioactive radon gas ((222)Rn) were measured using passive monitors based on LR115 solid state track detectors during June-July 2010 in indoor air of dwellings in the Nui Beo coal mining area, mostly in Cam Pha and Ha Long coastal towns, Quang Ninh province, in the North of Vietnam. Global results of (222)Rn concentrations indoors varied from ≤6 to 145 Bq m(-3) averaging 46 ± 26 Bq m(-3) (n = 37), with a median value of 47 Bq m(-3). This was similar to outdoor (222)Rn concentrations in the region, averaging 43 ± 19 Bq m(-3) (n = 10), with a median value of 44 Bq m(-3). Indoor (222)Rn concentrations in the coastal town dwellings only were in average lower although not significantly different from indoor (222)Rn concentrations measured at the coal storage field near the harbor, 67 ± 4 Bq m(-3) (n = 3). Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the average (222)Rn concentration in indoor air measured in the coastal towns region and those at the touristic Tuan Chau Island located about 45 km south of the coal mine, in the Ha Long Bay. The indoor (222)Rn concentration in a floating house at the Bai Tu Long Bay, and assumed as the best estimate of the baseline (222)Rn in surface air, was 27 ± 3 Bq m(-3) (n = 3). Indoor average concentration of (222)Rn in dwellings at the Ha Noi city, inland and outside the coal mining area, was determined at 30 Bq m(-3). These results suggest that (222)Rn exhalation from the ground at the Nui Beo coal mining area may have contributed to generally increase (222)Rn concentration in the surface air of that region up to 1.7 times above the baseline value measured at the Bai Tu Long Bay and Ha Noi. The average indoor concentration of (222)Rn in Cam Pha-Ha Long area is about one-third of the value of the so-called Action Level set up by the US EPA of 148 Bq m(-3). Results suggest that there is no significant public health risk from (222)Rn exposure in the study region. PMID

  2. Study of epidemiological risk of lung cancer in Mexico due indoor radon exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles, A.; Espinosa, G.

    2014-07-01

    In this work the lifetime relative risks (LRR) of lung cancer due to exposure to indoor 222Rn on the Mexican population is calculated. Cigarette smoking is the number one risk factor for lung cancer (LC), because that, to calculate the number of cases of LC due to exposure to 222Rn is necessary considers the number of cases of LC for smoking cigarette. The lung cancer mortality rates published by the "Secretaría de Salud" (SSA), the mexican population data published by the "Consejo Nacional de Población" (CONAPO), smoking data in the mexican population, published by the "Comisión Nacional Contra las Adicciones" (CONADIC), the "Organización Panamericana de la Salud" (OPS) and indoor 222Rn concentrations in Mexico published in several recent studies are used. To calculate the lifetime relative risks (LRR) for different segments of the Mexican population, firstly the Excess Relative Risk (ERR) is calculated using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee and subsequently modified by the USEPA and published in the report "EPA Assessment of Risks from Radon in Homes". The excess relative risks were then used to calculate the corresponding lifetime relative risks, again using the method developed by the BEIR VI committee. The lifetime relative risks for Mexican male and female eversmokers and Mexican male and female never-smokers were calculated for radon concentrations spanning the range found in recent studies of indoor radon concentrations in Mexico. The lifetime relative risks of lung cancer induced by lifetime exposure to the mexican average indoor radon concentration were estimated to be 1.44 and 1.40 for never-smokers mexican females and males respectively, and 1.19 and 1.17 for ever-smokers Mexican females and males respectively. The Mexican population LRR values obtained in relation to the USA and Canada LRR published values in ever-smokers for both gender are similar with differences less than 4%, in case of never-smokers in relation with Canada

  3. The planned Brazilian indoor radon survey--concepts and particular challenges.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, N C; Bossew, P

    2014-11-01

    Similar to the tendency in Europe and North America, awareness towards environmental hazards to health has been rising strongly in Brazil for some years. Among these, indoor radon (Rn) is increasingly being acknowledged as an indoor pollutant that contributes to lung cancer and which one therefore attempts to limit by regulations. Scattered regional surveys performed in Brazil have shown that Rn problem may exist in certain regions, but not much is known about its possible overall extent. Therefore, the idea of a national survey has been brought forward. It is still in the conceptual phase; in this contribution, the authors present the state of knowledge and addressing of particular challenges that can be expected to be encountered. PMID:25157199

  4. High indoor radon concentrations in an Alpine region of western Tyrol.

    PubMed

    Ennemoser, O; Ambach, W; Auer, T; Brunner, P; Schneider, P; Oberaigner, W; Purtscheller, F; Stingl, V

    1994-08-01

    In a village in western Tyrol, Austria (Umhausen, 2,600 inhabitants), unusually high indoor radon concentrations were measured, and the lung cancer mortality rate was found to be higher than that of the total population of Tyrol (620,000 inhabitants). Annual means of radon concentrations were found to be particularly high in the area between the two rivers Otztaler Ache and Hairlachbach, geologically an alluvial fan of a giant rock slide of granitic gneisses (area A, median of annual means on the ground floors: 1,868 Bq m-3); radon concentrations were comparatively low in the rest of the village (area B, median of annual means on the ground floors: 182 Bq m-3). On the basis of these medians, the annual exposures were calculated according to the ICRP model (area A: 58.8 x 10(5) Bq h m-3; area B: 5.7 x 10(5) Bq h m-3). Data taken from the Cancer Registry of Tyrol were used to determine the age- and sex-standardized lung cancer mortality rate (area A: 6.17; area B: 1.43). PMID:8026968

  5. Multi-scale variability and long-range memory in indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donner, Reik V.; Potirakis, Stelios; Barbosa, Susana

    2014-05-01

    The presence or absence of long-range correlations in the variations of indoor Radon concentrations has recently attracted considerable interest. As a radioactive gas naturally emitted from the ground in certain geological settings, understanding environmental factors controlling Radon concentrations and their dynamics is important for estimating its effect on human health and the efficiency of possible measures for reducing the corresponding exposition. In this work, we re-analyze two high-resolution records of indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal, each of which spans several months of continuous measurements. In order to evaluate the presence of long-range correlations and fractal scaling, we utilize a multiplicity of complementary methods, including power spectral analysis, ARFIMA modeling, classical and multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis, and two different estimators of the signals' fractal dimensions. Power spectra and fluctuation functions reveal some complex behavior with qualitatively different properties on different time-scales: white noise in the high-frequency part, indications of some long-range correlated process dominating time scales of several hours to days, and pronounced low-frequency variability associated with tidal and/or meteorological forcing. In order to further decompose these different scales of variability, we apply two different approaches. On the one hand, applying multi-resolution analysis based on the discrete wavelet transform allows separately studying contributions on different time scales and characterize their specific correlation and scaling properties. On the other hand, singular system analysis (SSA) provides a reconstruction of the essential modes of variability. Specifically, by considering only the first leading SSA modes, we achieve an efficient de-noising of our environmental signals, highlighting the low-frequency variations together with some distinct scaling on sub-daily time-scales resembling

  6. Raetrad model extensions for radon entry into multi-level buildings with basements or crawl spaces.

    PubMed

    Nielson, K K; Rogers, V C; Rogers, V; Holt, R B

    1997-10-01

    The RAETRAD model was generalized to characterize radon generation and movement from soils and building materials into multi-level buildings with basements or crawl spaces. With the generalization, the model retains its original simplicity and ease of use. The model calculates radon entry rates that are consistent with measurements published for basement test structures at Colorado State University, confirming approximately equal contributions from diffusion and pressure-driven air flow at indoor-outdoor air pressure differences of deltaP(i-o) = -3.5 Pa. About one-fourth of the diffusive radon entry comes from concrete slabs and three-fourths comes from the surrounding soils. Calculated radon entry rates with and without a barrier over floor-wall shrinkage cracks generally agree with Colorado State University measurements when a sustained pressure of deltaP(i-o) = -2 Pa is used to represent calm wind (<1 m s(-1)) conditions. Calculated radon distributions in a 2-level house also are consistent with published measurements and equations. PMID:9314234

  7. Theoretical modeling of indoor radon concentration and its validation through measurements in South-East Haryana, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prabhjot; Sahoo, B K; Bajwa, B S

    2016-04-15

    A three dimensional semi-empirical model deduced from the existing 1-D model has been used to predict indoor radon concentration with theoretical calculations. Since the major contributor of radon concentration in indoors originates from building materials used in construction of walls and floor which are mostly derived from soil. In this study different building materials have been analyzed for radon exhalation, diffusion length along with physical dimensions of observation area to calculate indoor radon concentration. Also calculated values have been validated by comparing with experimental measurements. The study has been carried out in the mud, brick and cement houses constructed from materials available locally in South-East region of Haryana. This region is also known for its protruding land structure consisting volcanic, felsite and granitic rocks in plane. Further, exhalation (Jw) ratio from wall and floor comparison has been plotted for each selected village dwelling to identify the high radon emanating source (building material) from the study region. All those measured factors might be useful in building construction code development and selection of material to be used in construction. PMID:26874612

  8. Radon mitigation of groundwater at a commercial fish hatchery

    SciTech Connect

    Kitto, M.; Kunz, C.; McNulty, C.; Kuhland, M.

    1995-12-31

    Groundwater radon levels of 83 Bq/L (2240 pCi/L) generated indoor radon levels >3300 Bq/m{sup 3} (89 pCi/L) at a commercial fish hatchery. Passive and active mitigation strategies to reduce the waterborne radon levels included a packed column, a waterfall through perforated grates, surface aeration, and bottom bubblers. Though waterborne concentrations were reduced up to 83% using a combination of mitigation procedures, a comparable reduction in indoor radon concentrations was not observed. Measurements by two continuous radon detectors agreed with those from grab flasks. A diurnal cycle showed that indoor radon levels peaked in early afternoon, probably as a result of warmer air being dissolved in the water during mitigation. Reduction of indoor radon levels below 148 Bq/m{sup 3} (4 Ci/L) was achieved by direct air ventilation at high flow rates.

  9. RE-ENTRAINMENT AND DISPERSION OF EXHAUSTS FROM INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS: ANALYSIS OF TRACER GAS DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tracer gas studies were conducted around four model houses in a wind tunnel, and around one house in the field, to quantify re-entrainment and dispersion of exhaust gases released from residential indoor radon reduction systems. Re-entrainment tests in the field suggest that acti...

  10. FOLLOW-UP DURABILITY MEASUREMENTS AND MITIGATION PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT TESTS IN 38 EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA HOUSES HAVING INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of follow-up tests in 38 difficult- to-mitigate Pennsylvania houses where indoor radon reduction systems had been installed 2 to 4 years earlier. bjectives were to assess system durability, methods for improving performance, and methods for reducing insta...

  11. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) Indoor-Air Quality Implementation Plan. A report to Congress under Title IV of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986: radon gas and indoor air-quality research. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    The EPA Indoor Air Quality Implementation Plan provides information on the direction of EPA's indoor air program, including the Agency's policy on indoor air and priorities for research and information dissemination over the next two years. EPA submitted the report to Congress on July 2, 1987 as required by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. There are five appendices to the report: Appendix A--Preliminary Indoor Air Pollution Information Assessment; Appendix B--FY 87 Indoor Air Research Program; Appendix C--EPA Radon Program; Appendix D--Indoor Air Resource History (Published with Appendix C); Appendix E--Indoor Air Reference Data Base.

  12. Awareness and perceptions of the risks of exposure to indoor radon: a population-based approach to evaluate a radon awareness and testing campaign in England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Poortinga, Wouter; Bronstering, Karin; Lannon, Simon

    2011-11-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate the locally directed radon roll-out program that was conducted between 2001 and 2005 in England and Wales to increase radon awareness and testing rates. A representative sample of 1,578 residents aged 16 and older were interviewed who lived in radon-affected areas of 15 local authorities in England and Wales that were eligible for participation in the program. The study systematically sampled across participating and nonparticipating local authorities, "actionable" and "nonactionable" radon-affected areas, and geographic regions with different campaign histories (Wales, Southwest England, and the rest of England). As a multistage sampling strategy was used, the data were analyzed from a multilevel perspective. This study found that participants living in participating local authorities had higher levels of awareness and were more likely to have tested their home for radon than participants living in nonparticipating local authorities. Similar results were found for participants living in "actionable" areas as compared to those living in "nonactionable" radon-affected areas. The study further found that radon awareness and testing rates were the highest in Southwest England and the lowest in Wales. This study suggests that the radon roll-out program has been effective in raising awareness and testing rates, and that ongoing domestic radon campaigns in Southwest England may have raised radon awareness and testing in these areas, showing important reinforcement effects of multiple risk communication campaigns. PMID:21477087

  13. Radon

    MedlinePlus

    ... with elevated radon underwent changes to reduce radon pollution. 1 How Can Radon Be Detected? The only ... Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule News: New Truck Efficiency Standards Expected to ...

  14. ASSESSMENT OF THE EFFECTS OF WEATHERIZATION ON RESIDENTIAL RADON LEVELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an assessment of the effects of weatherization on residential radon levels. For this assessment, time-integrated radon measurements were taken for 30- to 45-day periods both before and after weatherization in 32 Retro-Tech homes, 28 advanced homes, and...

  15. Measurement of differential pressures and radon entry in research houses and evaluation of radon control methods: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, R.C.; Rector, H.E.; Nagda, N.L.

    1988-12-01

    Experimental testing was conducted in two well-insulated bilevel research houses to evaluate the effectiveness of selected radon and radon progeny control methods and to develop a fuller understanding of the relationship between indoor-outdoor pressure differences and radon entry. Radon, radon progeny, indoor and outdoor temperatures, air infiltration rates, pressure differences, and meteorological conditions were measured continuously with an automated system. Radon and radon progeny control methods were tested in one house; the other house served as a reference to avoid the confounding effects of natural radon variation on calculations of control effectiveness. Differences in pressure between indoors and outdoors or indoors and the subslab airspace averaged less than 2 pascals throughout the year. Pressure differences were consistent with indoor-outdoor temperature differences; the downstairs of the houses were depressurized with respect to outdoors during the winter and pressurized during the summer. Seasonal differences in radon entry rates were consistent with general patterns of indoor-outdoor pressure differences, but regression techniques did not show strong correlation between pressure differences and radon entry rates. The subslab suction system was the most effective of the radon control methods tested. Radon progeny control devices tested, including common household appliances, such as ceiling fans, portable air cleaners, and electronic precipitators, reduced radon progeny levels by as much as 70 percent. 26 refs., 21 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Home radon levels and seasonal correction factors for the Isle of Man

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grainger, P.; Shalla, S. H.; Preece, A. W.; Goodfellow, S. A.

    2000-08-01

    Ionizing radiation dose levels due to home radon can rise to levels that would be illegal for workers in the nuclear industry. It is well known that radon levels within homes and from home to home, and also from month to month, vary considerably. To define an Isle of Man radon seasonal correction factor, readings were taken in eight homes over a 12 month period. An average island indoor exposure of 48 Bq m-3 (range 4-518 Bq m-3) was determined from 285 homes selected from a cohort of 1300 families participating in the European Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood (ELSPAC) in the Isle of Man. This compares with a UK home average of 20 Bq m-3 and a European Union average (excluding UK) of 68 Bq m-3. Ten homes of those measured were found to have radon levels above the National Radiological Protection Board 200 Bq m-3 action level. There are 29 377 homes on the Isle of Man, suggesting that there could be some 900 or more homes above the action level. No statistical difference was found between the NRPB and Isle of Man seasonal correction factors.

  17. Quantitative aspects of highly emanating geologic materials and their role in creating high indoor radon. Final report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gundersen, L.C.S.; Schumann, R.R.; Gates, A.E.; Price, P.

    1996-12-31

    Indoor radon hot spots, areas where indoor radon commonly exceeds 20 pCi/L, are often caused by unusually highly emanating soils or rock and their interaction with ambient climatic conditions and a building`s architecture. Highly emanating soils and rocks include glacial deposits; dry fractured clays; black shales; limestone-derived soils; karst and cave areas, fractured or sheared granitic crystalline rocks; mine tailings; uraniferous backfill; and most uranium deposits. The above list probably accounts for 90% of the Nation`s indoor radon over 20 pCi/L. In several of these high indoor radon areas, there appears to be a link between the nature of the radon source in the ground, the architecture of the home, and the relative magnitude and ease of mitigation of the indoor air problem. Quantification of geologic materials in terms of their radon potential with respect to climatic and architectural considerations has never been accomplished. Recent studies have attempted semi-quantitative rankings but rigorous analysis has not been done. In this investigation the authors have attempted to develop the quantitative aspects of geologic materials for prediction of very high indoor radon at several scales of observation from national to census tract.

  18. Radon levels in groundwaters and natural radioactivity in soils of the volcanic region of La Garrotxa, Spain.

    PubMed

    Moreno, V; Bach, J; Baixeras, C; Font, Ll

    2014-02-01

    Groundwater radon level and soil radionuclide concentration have been measured in the volcanic region of La Garrotxa (Catalonia, Spain) to further research on the origin and dynamics of high radon levels over volcanic materials found in this region. Water samples from different aquifers have been collected from wells and springs and the water radon levels obtained have been lower than 30 Bq l(-1). Soil samples have been collected from different geological formations (volcanic and non-volcanic), being Quaternary sedimentary deposits those that have presented the highest mean values of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th concentrations (448 ± 70 Bq kg(-1), 35 ± 5 Bq kg(-1) and 38 ± 5 Bq kg(-1), respectively). Additionally, indoor/outdoor terrestrial radiation absorbed dose rate in air have been measured to better characterize the region from the radiological point of view. Terrestrial radiation absorbed dose rates measurement points have been chosen on the basis of geological and demographical considerations and the results obtained, from 27 to 91 nGy h(-1), show a clear relation with geological formation materials. The highest terrestrial gamma absorbed dose rate is observed over Quaternary sedimentary deposits as well. All these results help to better understand previous surveys related with indoor and outdoor radon levels and to reinforce the hypotheses of a radon transport through the fissure network. PMID:24239577

  19. Ultra-low level radon assays in gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xin Ran

    2015-08-17

    The SuperNEMO experiment aims to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νβ β) to T{sub 1{sub /{sub 2}}}(0ν) > 10{sup 26} years, this corresponds to an effective neutrino mass of 50-100 meV. The extremely rare event rate means the minimisation of background is of critical concern. The stringent strategy instigated to ensure detector radiopurity is outlined here for all construction materials. In particular the large R&D programme undertaken to reach the challengingly low level of radon, < 0.15 mBq/m{sup 3}, required inside the SuperNEMO gaseous tracker will be detailed. This includes an experiment designed to measure radon diffusion through various materials. A “Radon Concentration Line” (RnCL) was developed to be used in conjunction with a state-of-the-art radon detector in order to achieve world leading sensitivity to {sup 222}Rn content in large gas volumes at the level of a few µBq/m{sup 3}. A radon purification system was developed and installed which has demonstrated radon suppression by several orders of magnitude depending on the carrier gas. This apparatus has now been commissioned and measurements of cylindered gas have been made to confirm radon suppression by a factor 20 when using nitrogen as the carrier gas. The results from measurements of radon content in various gases, used inside SuperNEMO, using the RnCL will be presented.

  20. Radon: Counseling patients about risk

    SciTech Connect

    Birrer, R.B. )

    1990-09-01

    Exposure to radon and its decay products has increased as the United States has changed from an outdoor society to a largely indoor society. Radon, which is found primarily in the soil, enters houses and buildings through cracks, holes and pipes in foundation walls and floors. Although radon is suspected of being a significant cause of lung cancer, comparisons with other risk factors cannot yet be made. Radon levels in the home can be measured with commercially available kits. Guidelines for reducing the amount of radon in a home are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.18 references.

  1. Radon: counseling patients about risk.

    PubMed

    Birrer, R B

    1990-09-01

    Exposure to radon and its decay products has increased as the United States has changed from an outdoor society to a largely indoor society. Radon, which is found primarily in the soil, enters houses and buildings through cracks, holes and pipes in foundation walls and floors. Although radon is suspected of being a significant cause of lung cancer, comparisons with other risk factors cannot yet be made. Radon levels in the home can be measured with commercially available kits. Guidelines for reducing the amount of radon in a home are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. PMID:2203238

  2. FOLLOW-UP ALPHA-TRACK MONITORING IN 40 EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA HOUSES WITH INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS (WINTER 1988-89)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of 4-month-long alpha-track detector (ATD) measurements of indoor radon concentrations, completed during the winter of 1988-89 in 38 of 40 houses where radon reduction techniques had been installed 2-4 years previously during an earlier EPA project. The t...

  3. FOLLOW-UP ANNUAL ALPHA-TRACK MONITORING IN 40 EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA HOUSES WITH INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS (DECEMBER 1988 - DECEMBER 1989)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of 12-month-long alpha-track detector (ATD) measurements of indoor radon concentrations, between December 1988 and December 1989 in the living areas of 38 of 40 houses where radon reduction techniques had been installed 2-4 years earlier in a previous EPA...

  4. Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.

    1992-01-01

    During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor [sup 222]Rn and in [sup 222]Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house [sup 222]Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater [sup 222]Rn concentration than the measured outdoor [sup 222]Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding [sup 222]Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

  5. RADON MITIGATION STUDIES: NASHVILLE DEMONSTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an EPA radon mitigation demonstration project involving 14 houses in the Nashville, TN, area with indoor radon levels of 5.6-47.6 pCi/L, using a variety of techniques, designed to be the most cost effective methods possible to implement, and yet adequa...

  6. Installation and testing of indoor radon reduction techniques in 40 eastern Pennsylvania houses. Final report, October 1984-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.G.; Robertson, A.; Findlay, W.O.

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the installation and testing of indoor radon-reduction techniques in 40 houses in eastern Pennsylvania. Early in 1985, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources (PDER) started a large radon survey in communities in the Reading Prong (a granite formation) in eastern Pennsylvania, following the discovery of a house with extremely high radon concentrations, greater than 1.2 MBq/cu m. Candidate houses for the program, with radon concentrations in excess of 750 Bq/cu m, were selected from this survey. A total of 40 houses with representative substructure types were chosen from this group, and mitigation methods were selected and installed from June 1985 to June 1987. Initial soil-ventilation installations achieved large reductions in radon concentrations at low cost, but these reductions were not always sustained in colder weather, and several systems were modified during the project to improve their performance. Major reductions in radon concentration were realized in all the houses worked on, with most houses with active soil ventilation systems achieving less than 150 Bq/cu m (4 pCi/L) on an annual average basis in the living areas.

  7. Radon transport into dwellings: Considering groundwater as a source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oostrom, M.; Lenhard, R. J.

    A mathematical model is used to investigate whether radon degassing from groundwater may contribute to indoor radon levels. Specifically, the transport of radon in the soil-gas phase from the groundwater-soil gas interface to under-pressurized dwellings is modelled. The question whether radon in groundwater may contribute to indoor radon levels arises from observed high radon concentrations in groundwater, and recent findings that advection in the gas phase may be an important transport mechanism for radon into slightly under-pressurized dwellings. Most previous radon transport investigations did not consider groundwater as a potential source for contributing to indoor radon. The mathematical model includes a method to directly calculate indoor radon concentrations and an equivalent continuum approach to represent cracks in concrete foundations. The results of the simulations indicate that radon, which partitions from groundwater to the soil gas, may be advectively transported by the gas phase to slightly underpressurized dwellings in relatively permeable soils such that indoor radon concentrations may exceed 148 Bq/m³, which is the action limit imposed by EPA.

  8. Indoor radon risk associated to post-tectonic biotite granites from Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton, northern Portugal.

    PubMed

    Martins, L M O; Gomes, M E P; Teixeira, R J S; Pereira, A J S C; Neves, L J P F

    2016-11-01

    At Vila Pouca de Aguiar area, northern Portugal, crops out a post-tectonic Variscan granite pluton, related with the Régua-Vila Real-Verín fault zone, comprising three types of biotite granites. Among these granites, PSG granite yield the highest average contents of U, probably due to its enrichment in accessory U-bearing minerals such as zircon. In the proximity of faults and joints, these granites are often affected by different degrees of hydrothermal alteration, forming reddish altered rocks, commonly known as "episyenites". These altered rocks are probably associated to the occurrence of hydrothermal processes, which led to uranium enrichment in the most advanced stages of episyenitization. In these granites, both average gamma absorbed dose rates in outdoor and indoor air are higher than those of the world average. Furthermore, even in the worst usage scenario, all these granites can be used as a building material, since their annual effective doses are similar to the limit defined by the European Commission. The geometric mean of radon activity of 91 dwellings located at the Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton is 568Bqm(-3), exceeding that of other northern Portuguese granites. Measurements carried out during a winter season, indicate that 62.6% of the analysed dwellings yield higher indoor radon average values than the Portuguese legislation limit (400Bqm(-3)), and annual effective doses due higher than the world's average value (1.2mSvy(-1)). The interaction of geogenic, architectural and anthropogenic features is crucial to explain the variance in the geometric mean of radon activity of dwellings from Vila Pouca de Aguiar pluton, but the role of geologic faults is probably the most important decisive factor to increase the indoor radon concentration in dwellings. Hence, the development of awareness campaigns in order to inform population about the incurred radiological risks to radon exposure are highly recommended for this specific area. PMID:27448957

  9. Radon and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Tarsheen K; El-Ghamry, Moataz N; Kloecker, Goetz H

    2012-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer, following tobacco smoke. Radon is not only an independent risk factor; it also increases the risk of lung cancer in smokers. Numerous cohort, case-control, and experimental studies have established the carcinogenic potential of radon. The possibility of radon having a causative effect on other cancers has been explored but not yet proven. One of the postulated mechanisms of carcinogenesis is DNA damage by alpha particles mediated by the production of reactive oxygen species. The latter are also thought to constitute one of the common mechanisms underlying the synergistic effect of radon and tobacco smoke. With an estimated 21,000 lung cancer deaths attributable to radon in the United States annually, the need for radon mitigation is well acknowledged. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established an indoor limit of 4 picocuries (pCi)/L, and various methods are available for indoor radon reduction when testing shows higher levels. Radon mitigation should accompany smoking cessation measures in lung cancer prevention efforts. PMID:22402423

  10. Radon

    MedlinePlus

    You can't see radon. And you can't smell it or taste it. But it may be a problem in your home. Radon comes from the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer ...

  11. Radon: The Invisible Invader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Leader, 1987

    1987-01-01

    A brief background on indoor radon and the health risks associated with radon exposure, with special emphasis on nonresidential buildings. One school district's experience in radon testing and monitoring is included. (MLF)

  12. An optimized system for measurement of radon levels in buildings by spectroscopic measurement of radon progeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fröjdh, A.; Thungström, G.; Fröjdh, C.; Petersson, S.

    2011-12-01

    Radon gas, 222Rn, is a problem in many buildings. The radon gas is not harmful in itself, but the decay chain contains charged elements such as 218Po, and 214Po ions which have a tendency to stick to the lungs when inhaled. Alpha particles from the decay of these ions cause damages to the lungs and increase the risk of lung cancer. The recent reduction in the limits for radon levels in buildings call for new simple and efficient measurement tools [1]. The system has been optimized through modifications of the detector size, changes to the filters and the design of the chamber. These changes increase the electric field in the chamber and the detection efficiency.

  13. Impact of energy conservation measures on radon and radon progeny concentrations: A controlled study

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, H.E.; Koontz, M.D.; Cade, D.R.; Nagda, N.L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of retrofitting for building tightness, air-to-air heat exchangers, and HVAC circulation fans on radon and radon progeny levels were investigated using two matched test houses. One test house was retrofitted for tightness and outfitted with an air-to-air heat exchanger. The two houses were unoccupied; selected occupant-related activities were simulated in a controlled manner. Retrofit for tightness reduced the annual average air infiltration rate by 24% and increased radon and radon progeny concentrations by a similar amount. The air-to-air heat exchanger reduced radon and radon progeny concentrations commensurate with mechanical ventilation. Increased mixing from the furnace circulation fan equalized the upstairs/downstairs concentrations. Extended use of the circulation fan reduced radon progeny levels similar to those obtained with the heat exchanger (about 50% reduction). Seasons had considerable impact on indoor radon and radon progeny; higher levels were found in the summer and fall seasons.

  14. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  15. Contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, N; Samet, J M; Cross, F T; Hess, T; Muller, J; Thomas, D

    1986-01-01

    This article reviews studies on the contribution of radon and radon daughters to respiratory cancer and proposes recommendations for further research, particularly a national radon survey. The steady-state outdoor radon concentration averages 200 pCi/m3, and indoor levels are about 4 times higher. The primary source of radon in homes is the underlying soil; entry depends on multiple variables and reduced ventilation for energy conservation increases indoor radon levels. Occupational exposures are expressed in units of radon daughter potential energy concentration or working level (WL). Cumulative exposure is the product of the working level and the time exposed. The unit for cumulative exposure is the working level month (WLM). The occupational standard for radon exposure is 4 WLM/year, and 2 WLM/year has been suggested as a guideline for remedial action in homes. Epidemiologic studies show that miners with cumulative radon daughter exposures somewhat below 100 WLM have excess lung cancer mortality. Some 3% to 8% of miners studied have developed lung cancer attributable to radon daughters. All of the underground mining studies show an increased risk of lung cancer with radon daughter exposure. All cell types of lung cancer increased with radon exposure. If radon and smoking act in a multiplicative manner, then the risk for smokers could be 10 times that for nonsmokers. The potential risk of lung cancer appears to be between 1 and 2 per 10,000/WLM, which yields a significant number of lung cancers as some 220 million persons in the United States are exposed on average to 10 to 20 WLM/lifetime. PMID:3830103

  16. Estimation of the residential radon levels and the annual effective dose in dwellings of Shiraz, Iran, in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Yarahmadi, Maryam; Shahsavani, Abbas; Mahmoudian, Mohammad Hassan; Shamsedini, Narges; Rastkari, Noushin; Kermani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Radon is the second most important cause of lung cancer after smoking. Thus, the determination of indoor radon concentrations in dwellings and workplaces is an important public health concern. The purpose of this research was to measure the concentration of radon gas in residential homes and public places in the city of Shiraz and its relationship with the type and age of the buildings as well as the type of materials used to construct the building (brick, block). We also determined the radon dosages that occupants of the building would receive. Methods The present study is a descriptive-analytical and cross-sectional research that was conducted on the building’s indoor air in the city of Shiraz in 2015. Using geographic information system (GIS) software and a spatial sampling cell with an area of 25 square kilometers, 200 points were selected. In this study, we used passive diffusive samplers as Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (SSNTD) CR-39 polycarbonate films for three months in the winter. Sampling was conducted in accordance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s protocol. We determined the concentrations of radon gas at the time of sampling, and calibration factors were determined. The data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS, version 20, descriptive statistics, Kruskal-Wallis, and Mann–Whitney tests. Results This study showed that the average radon concentration was 57.6 ± 33.06 Bq/m3 in residential dwellings. The average effective dose was 1.45 mSv/y. The concentration of radon in 5.4% of the houses was found to be greater than 100 Bq/m3, which is above the level allowed by the World Health Organization (WHO). Conclusion Since radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer, it seems necessary to increase the public’s awareness of this issue and to take action to reduce radon in homes when the concentrations are above the WHO’s guideline. PMID:27504164

  17. Influence of negative pressurization on airborne microbial and radon levels

    SciTech Connect

    Kalliokoski, P.; Korhonen, P.; Kokotti, H.; Pasanen, A.L.; Rautiala, S.; Rantamaeki, J.

    1999-07-01

    The negative pressure inside a building is the main driving force for the entry of both radon and fungal spores. This study was conducted to test the suitability of depressurization to facilitate simultaneously the detection of fungal growth within the lower parts of building envelope and the risk of radon entry. Pressure difference was increased in three steps to 24--28 Pa in two wooden buildings known to suffer from long-term water damages. At the end, pulses of negative pressure were generated. Airborne viable fungal counts, radon and particle counts were followed during the tests together with the ventilation rate and particle count. The absolute concentrations of the impurities studied did not increase significantly or even decreased during the tests due to enhanced ventilation. However, when the increase in the ventilation rate was taken into consideration it was found that the entry rate of all the contaminants increased. The changes were larger in the tighter building where the radon entry rate increased systematically with the pressure difference reaching finally 13.8-fold level compared to the initial value. In the less tight building, the corresponding highest radon entry rate ratio was 9.5. Very large increases, up to 42-fold, were observed in the viable spore count ratio in the tighter building during the tests. In the leaky building, the changes were again considerably smaller; the maximum ratio was 4.2. Increases in particle emissions were smaller than those observed in fungal counts. The pulses were less effective than continuous depressurization. The results show that negative pressurization can be used to increase the release of fungal spores in order to detect hidden fungal growth. This kind of test is especially effective if there are no major leaks in the clean part of the building envelope. The method allows simultaneous rapid checking of need for radon mitigation.

  18. Multi-Level Indoor Path Planning Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Q.; Zhu, Q.; Zlatanova, S.; Du, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Zeng, L.

    2015-05-01

    Indoor navigation is increasingly widespread in complex indoor environments, and indoor path planning is the most important part of indoor navigation. Path planning generally refers to finding the most suitable path connecting two locations, while avoiding collision with obstacles. However, it is a fundamental problem, especially for 3D complex building model. A common way to solve the issue in some applications has been approached in a number of relevant literature, which primarily operates on 2D drawings or building layouts, possibly with few attached attributes for obstacles. Although several digital building models in the format of 3D CAD have been used for path planning, they usually contain only geometric information while losing abundant semantic information of building components (e.g. types and attributes of building components and their simple relationships). Therefore, it becomes important to develop a reliable method that can enhance application of path planning by combining both geometric and semantic information of building components. This paper introduces a method that support 3D indoor path planning with semantic information.

  19. Radon daughter carousel: An automated instrument for measuring indoor concentrations of 218Po, 214Pb, and 214Bi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazaroff, William W.

    1983-09-01

    A microprocessor-controlled instrument for measuring the concentrations of radon progeny in indoor air is described. The measurement technique is based on alpha spectroscopy and uses two counting intervals following a sampling period during which radon progeny are collected on a filter. The counting intervals are selected to provide optimal precision for measuring 222Rn progeny for fixed total measurement times ranging from 30 to 60 min: concentrations as low as 0.5 pCi/1 can be measured with less than 20% uncertainty in 45 min. The instrument can also be used to estimate the potential alpha energy concentration of 220Rn decay products. The device operates under the control of a computer or a data terminal and functions for week-long periods between filter changes. The user can specify the sampling- and counting-interval timing over a wide range and select from among several operating modes. A number of performance tests are also described indicating that for typical indoor concentrations the measurement uncertainty is dominated by counting statistics.

  20. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, May 1, 1993--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    Progress is reported on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. The specific tasks addressed were to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Initial measurements were conducted of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants. A prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon are described. Methodology was developed to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  1. Personal, indoor and outdoor air pollution levels among pregnant women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schembari, Anna; Triguero-Mas, Margarita; de Nazelle, Audrey; Dadvand, Payam; Vrijheid, Martine; Cirach, Marta; Martinez, David; Figueras, Francesc; Querol, Xavier; Basagaña, Xavier; Eeftens, Marloes; Meliefste, Kees; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    AimThe aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between pregnant women's personal exposures to NOx, NO2, PM2.5 concentration and absorbance as a marker for black carbon and their indoor and outdoor concentration levels at their residence, and also to identify predictors of personal exposure and indoor levels using questionnaire and time activity data. MethodWe recruited 54 pregnant women in Barcelona who carried a personal PM2.5 sampler for two days and NOx/NO2 passive badges for one week, while indoor and outdoor PM2.5 and NOx/NO2 levels at their residence were simultaneously measured. Time activity and house characteristics were recorded. Gravimetry determinations for PM2.5 concentration and absorbance measurements were carried out on the PM2.5 filter samples. ResultsLevels of personal exposure to NOx, PM2.5 and absorbance were slightly higher than indoor and outdoor levels (geometric mean of personal NOx = 61.9 vs indoor NOx = 60.6 μg m-3), while for NO2 the indoor levels were slightly higher than the personal ones. Generally, there was a high statistically significant correlation between personal exposure and indoor levels (Spearman's r between 0.78 and 0.84). Women spent more than 60% of their time indoors at home. Ventilation of the house by opening the windows, the time spent cooking and indicators for traffic intensity were re-occurring statistically significant determinants of the personal and indoor pollutants levels with models for NOx explaining the 55% and 60% of the variability respectively, and models for NO2 explaining the 39% and 16% of the variability respectively. Models for PM2.5 and absorbance explained the least of the variability. ConclusionOur findings improve the current understanding of the characterization and inter-associations between personal, indoor and outdoor pollution levels among pregnant women. Variability in personal and indoor NOx and to a lesser extent NO2 levels could be explained well, but not the variability

  2. Determination of indoor radon concentrations at the elementary schools of Fatih district in Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurt, A.; Yalcin, L. Sahin; Oktem, Y.; Akkus, B.; Bozkurt, E.; Hafizoglu, N.; Ozturk, F. C.; Aytan, O.; Ertoprak, A.

    2016-03-01

    Radon is an odorless, tasteless, colorless noble radioactive gas which is produced within the radioactive decay chain of Uranium. The Radon forms in rocks, diffuses into soil and then escapes into atmosphere. When human exposure to high concentration of radon gas from inside, risk of developing lung cancer is increased. There are many methods to determine 222Rn concentration in the air. In this study, radon concentration of confined air spaces were measured by using LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors. 509 LR-115 nuclear trace detectors were placed to 25 schools in Fatih District and they effective dose values were calculated. The results of measurements showed that the radon concentration varies between 40-395 Bq/m3. This results compared with Turkey's limits (400 Bq/m3) are low, conversely higher compared with WHO's limits (100 Bq/m3).

  3. Radon monitoring and hazard prediction in Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elio, Javier; Crowley, Quentin; Scanlon, Ray; Hodgson, Jim; Cooper, Mark; Long, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas which forms as a decay product from uranium. It is the largest source of natural ionizing radiation affecting the global population. When radon is inhaled, its short-lived decay products can interact with lung tissue leading to DNA damage and development of lung cancer. Ireland has among the highest levels of radon in Europe and eighth highest of an OECD survey of 29 countries. Every year some two hundred and fifty cases of lung cancer in Ireland are linked to radon exposure. This new research project will build upon previous efforts of radon monitoring in Ireland to construct a high-resolution radon hazard map. This will be achieved using recently available high-resolution airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (radiometric) and soil geochemistry data (http://www.tellus.ie/), indoor radon concentrations (http://www.epa.ie/radiation), and new direct measurement of soil radon. In this regard, legacy indoor radon concentrations will be correlated with soil U and Th concentrations and other geogenic data. This is a new approach since the vast majority of countries with a national radon monitoring programme rely on indoor radon measurements, or have a spatially limited dataset of soil radon measurements. Careful attention will be given to areas where an indicative high radon hazard based on geogenic factors does not match high indoor radon concentrations. Where such areas exist, it may imply that some parameter(s) in the predictive model does not match that of the environment. These areas will be subjected to measurement of radon soil gas using a combination of time averaged (passive) and time dependant (active) measurements in order to better understand factors affecting production, transport and accumulation of radon in the natural environment. Such mapping of radon-prone areas will ultimately help to inform when prevention and remediation measures are necessary, reducing the radon exposure of the population. Therefore, given

  4. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

  5. A critical analysis of climatic influences on indoor radon concentrations: Implications for seasonal correction.

    PubMed

    Groves-Kirkby, Christopher J; Crockett, Robin G M; Denman, Antony R; Phillips, Paul S

    2015-10-01

    Although statistically-derived national Seasonal Correction Factors (SCFs) are conventionally used to convert sub-year radon concentration measurements to an annual mean, it has recently been suggested that external temperature could be used to derive local SCFs for short-term domestic measurements. To validate this approach, hitherto unanalysed radon and temperature data from an environmentally-stable location were analysed. Radon concentration and internal temperature were measured over periods totalling 1025 days during an overall period of 1762 days, the greatest continuous sampling period being 334 days, with corresponding meteorological data collected at a weather station 10 km distant. Mean daily, monthly and annual radon concentrations and internal temperatures were calculated. SCFs derived using monthly mean radon concentration, external temperature and internal-external temperature-difference were cross-correlated with each other and with published UK domestic SCF sets. Relatively good correlation exists between SCFs derived from radon concentration and internal-external temperature difference but correlation with external temperature, was markedly poorer. SCFs derived from external temperature correlate very well with published SCF tabulations, confirming that the complexity of deriving SCFs from temperature data may be outweighed by the convenience of using either of the existing domestic SCF tabulations. Mean monthly radon data fitted to a 12-month sinusoid showed reasonable correlation with many of the annual climatic parameter profiles, exceptions being atmospheric pressure, rainfall and internal temperature. Introducing an additional 6-month sinusoid enhanced correlation with these three parameters, the other correlations remaining essentially unchanged. Radon latency of the order of months in moisture-related parameters suggests that the principal driver for radon is total atmospheric moisture content rather than relative humidity. PMID:26093853

  6. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1992--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2} ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}Po{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

  7. Use of a geographic information system (GIS) for targeting radon screening programs in South Dakota.

    PubMed

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Whetstone, Zachary D; Rafique Mir, Khwaja M

    2016-01-01

    Because (222)Rn is a progeny of (238)U, the relative abundance of uranium may be used to predict the areas that have the potential for high indoor radon concentration and therefore determine the best areas to conduct future surveys. Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping software was used to construct maps of South Dakota that included levels of uranium concentrations in soil and stream water and uranium deposits. Maps of existing populations and the types of land were also generated. Existing data about average indoor radon levels by county taken from a databank were included for consideration. Although the soil and stream data and existing recorded average indoor radon levels were sparse, it was determined that the most likely locations of elevated indoor radon would be in the northwest and southwest corners of the state. Indoor radon levels were only available for 9 out of 66 counties in South Dakota. This sparcity of data precluded a study of correlation of radon to geological features, but further motivates the need for more testing in the state. Only actual measurements should be used to determine levels of indoor radon because of the strong roles home construction and localized geology play in radon concentration. However, the data visualization method demonstrated here is potentially useful for directing resources relating to radon screening campaigns. PMID:26472478

  8. Use of a geographic information system (GIS) for targeting radon screening programs in South Dakota

    PubMed Central

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; Whetstone, Zachary D.; Rafique Mir, Khwaja M.

    2016-01-01

    Because 222Rn is a progeny of 238U, the relative abundance of uranium may be used to predict the areas that have the potential for high indoor radon concentration and therefore determine the best areas to conduct future surveys. Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping software was used to construct maps of South Dakota that included levels of uranium concentrations in soil and stream water and uranium deposits. Maps of existing populations and the types of land were also generated. Existing data about average indoor radon levels by county taken from a databank were included for consideration. Although the soil and stream data and existing recorded average indoor radon levels were sparse, it was determined that the most likely locations of elevated indoor radon would be in the northwest and southwest corners of the state. Indoor radon levels were only available for 9 out of 66 counties in South Dakota. This sparcity of data precluded a study of correlation of radon to geological features, but further motivates the need for more testing in the state. Only actual measurements should be used to determine levels of indoor radon because of the strong roles home construction and localized geology play in radon concentration. However, the data visualization method demonstrated here is potentially useful for directing resources relating to radon screening campaigns. PMID:26472478

  9. A Geostatistical Approach to Assess the Spatial Association between Indoor Radon Concentration, Geological Features and Building Characteristics: The Case of Lombardy, Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    Borgoni, Riccardo; Tritto, Valeria; Bigliotto, Carlo; de Bartolo, Daniela

    2011-01-01

    Radon is a natural gas known to be the main contributor to natural background radiation exposure and second to smoking, a major leading cause of lung cancer. The main source of radon is the soil, but the gas can enter buildings in many different ways and reach high indoor concentrations. Monitoring surveys have been promoted in many countries in order to assess the exposure of people to radon. In this paper, two complementary aspects are investigated. Firstly, we mapped indoor radon concentration in a large and inhomogeneous region using a geostatistical approach which borrows strength from the geologic nature of the soil. Secondly, knowing that geologic and anthropogenic factors, such as building characteristics, can foster the gas to flow into a building or protect against this, we evaluated these effects through a multiple regression model which takes into account the spatial correlation of the data. This allows us to rank different building typologies, identified by architectonic and geological characteristics, according to their proneness to radon. Our results suggest the opportunity to differentiate construction requirements in a large and inhomogeneous area, as the one considered in this paper, according to different places and provide a method to identify those dwellings which should be monitored more carefully. PMID:21655128

  10. Geostatistical simulations for radon indoor with a nested model including the housing factor.

    PubMed

    Cafaro, C; Giovani, C; Garavaglia, M

    2016-01-01

    The radon prone areas definition is matter of many researches in radioecology, since radon is considered a leading cause of lung tumours, therefore the authorities ask for support to develop an appropriate sanitary prevention strategy. In this paper, we use geostatistical tools to elaborate a definition accounting for some of the available information about the dwellings. Co-kriging is the proper interpolator used in geostatistics to refine the predictions by using external covariates. In advance, co-kriging is not guaranteed to improve significantly the results obtained by applying the common lognormal kriging. Here, instead, such multivariate approach leads to reduce the cross-validation residual variance to an extent which is deemed as satisfying. Furthermore, with the application of Monte Carlo simulations, the paradigm provides a more conservative radon prone areas definition than the one previously made by lognormal kriging. PMID:26547362

  11. Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments. Final progress report, March 1990--August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.

    1992-12-31

    During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor {sup 222}Rn and in {sup 222}Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house {sup 222}Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater {sup 222}Rn concentration than the measured outdoor {sup 222}Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding {sup 222}Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

  12. Investigation of the relationships between seismic activities and radon level in western Turkey.

    PubMed

    Tarakçı, M; Harmanşah, C; Saç, M M; İçhedef, M

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of radon activity is determined from pre-earthquake data. Analysis using Normal, Gamma, Weibull and Rayleigh distributions indicates that the variation of radon levels in seismically active regions is best described by a normal distribution. It was observed that radon levels would change in compressive fault lines prior to earthquake. Besides that it tended to increase before the earthquake and then decrease towards the time of earthquake occurrences. PMID:24215813

  13. INDOOR RADON REDUCTION IN CRAWL-SPACE HOUSES: A REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVE APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    An analysis has been completed of the performance, mechanisms, and costs of alternative technologies for preventing radon entry into the living areas of houses having crawl-space foundations. Sub-membrane depressurization (SMD) is consistently the most effective technique, often ...

  14. PREFERENTIAL RADON TRANSPORT THROUGH HIGHLY PERMEABLE CHANNELS IN SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses preferential radon transport through highly permeable channels in soils. Indoor radon levels (that can pose a serious health risk) can be dramatically increased by air that is drawn into buildings through pipe penetrations that connect to permeable channels in...

  15. Indoor Air Quality in Schools (IAQ): The Importance of Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundersingh, David; Bearg, David W.

    This article highlights indoor air quality and exposure to pollutants at school. Typical air pollutants within schools include environmental tobacco smoke, formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, allergens, pathogens, radon, pesticides, lead, and dust. Inadequate ventilation, inefficient…

  16. Compilation of geogenic radon potential map of Pest County, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, K. Zs.; Pásztor, L.; Horváth, Á.; Bakacsi, Zs.; Szabó, J.; Szabó, Cs.

    2010-05-01

    222Rn and its effect on the human health have recently received major importance in environmental studies. This natural radioactive gas accounts for about 9% of lung cancer death and about 2% of all deaths from cancer in Europe due to indoor radon concentrations. It moves into the buildings from the natural decay chain of uranium in soils, rocks and building materials. Radon mapping regionalizes the average hazard from radon in a selected area as a radon risk map. Two major methods (concerning the applied radon data) have been used for mapping. One uses indoor radon data whereas the other is based on soil gas radon data. The outputs of the second approach are the geogenic radon potential maps. The principal objective of our work is to take the first step in geogenic radon mapping in Hungary. Soil samples collected in Pest County (Central Region of Hungary) in the frame of a countrywide soil survey (Soil Information and Monitoring System) were studied to have empirical information of the potential radon risk. As the first two steps radium concentration of soil samples, collected at 43 locations sampling soil profiles by genetic horizons from the surface level down to 60-150 cm, were determined using HPGe gamma-spectroscopy technique, as well as measurement of radon exhalation on the soil samples were carried out applying closed radon accumulation chamber coupled with RAD7 radon monitor detector. From these data the exhalation coefficient was calculated, which shows how many percent of the produced radon can come out from the sample. This rate strongly depends on the depth: at circa 100 cm a drastic decrease have been noticed, which is explained by the change in soil texture. The major source of indoor radon is the soil gas radon concentration (Barnet et al., 2005). We estimated this value from the measured radon exhalation and calculated soil porosity and density. The soil gas radon concentration values were categorized after Kemski et al. (2001) and then the

  17. Exposure to atmospheric radon.

    PubMed Central

    Steck, D J; Field, R W; Lynch, C F

    1999-01-01

    We measured radon (222Rn) concentrations in Iowa and Minnesota and found that unusually high annual average radon concentrations occur outdoors in portions of central North America. In some areas, outdoor concentrations exceed the national average indoor radon concentration. The general spatial patterns of outdoor radon and indoor radon are similar to the spatial distribution of radon progeny in the soil. Outdoor radon exposure in this region can be a substantial fraction of an individual's total radon exposure and is highly variable across the population. Estimated lifetime effective dose equivalents for the women participants in a radon-related lung cancer study varied by a factor of two at the median dose, 8 mSv, and ranged up to 60 mSv (6 rem). Failure to include these doses can reduce the statistical power of epidemiologic studies that examine the lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9924007

  18. CONTRIBUTION TO INDOOR OZONE LEVELS OF AN OZONE GENERATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report gives results of a study of a commonly used commercially available ozone generator, undertaken to determine its impact on indoor ozone levels. xperiment were conducted in a typical mechanically ventilated office and in a test house. he generated ozone and the in-room ...

  19. National radon database documentation. Volume 3. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: Year 3. Final report, 1986-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The National Radon Database has been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to distribute information collected in two recently completed radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys, Years 1 to 6; and The National Residential Radon Survey. The goals of the state radon surveys were twofold. Some measure of the distribution of radon levels among residences was desired for major geographic areas within each state and for each state as a whole. In addition, it was desired that each state survey would be able to identify areas of potentially high residential radon concentrations (hot spots) in the state, enabling the state to focus its attention on areas where indoor radon concentrations might pose a greater health threat. The document discusses year 3, 1988-89. The areas surveyed are: Alaska; Georgia; Iowa; Maine; Region 6 Indian Land; New Mexico; Ohio; Vermont; West Virginia; and Region 7 Indian Land.

  20. A comparison of radon and its decay products' behaviour in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, R; Cardellini, F; Leonardi, F; Vargas Trassierra, C; Franci, D

    2014-11-01

    The inhalation of short-lived radon decay products (RDP) yields the greatest contribution to the natural radiation exposure. This paper deals with a study carried out to improve the knowledge of the behaviour of RDPs, their interaction with particulates and the plateout during the time. The tests confirmed that a high aerosol particle concentration increases the probability that an ion sticks to aerosol and remains long in the air, leading to both an increase of F and a decrease of fp, as reported in the literature. The same experimental protocol applied in a small radon chamber showed a strong reduction of the equilibrium factor (an average of ∼10 %), because in a small environment the plateout phenomenon prevails on the attachment to particulate. PMID:25061128

  1. Fluctuation of Indoor Radon and VOC Concentrations Due to Seasonal Variations

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research was conducted to better characterize the spatial and temporal variability of vapor intrusion by collecting a full year’s dataset of weekly measurements of subslab soil gas, external soil gas, and indoor air, on a single house that is impacted by vapor intrusion of r...

  2. Radon and radon daughter measurements at and near the former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Christian, D.J.; Leggett, R.W.; Dickson, H.W.; Myrick, T.E.

    1980-03-01

    The results of the radon and radon daughter measurements made to date (1978) at the Middlesex Sampling Plant in Middlesex, New Jersey, are presented in this report. These measurements were one portion of a more comprehensive radiological survey conducted at this site and the surrounding area from 1976 to 1978. The surveyed property served as a uranium ore sampling plant during the 1940's and early 1950's and as a result contains elevated levels of surface an subsurface contamination. On-site indoor radon daughter and radon concentrations exceeded both the US Surgeon General Guidelines and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's maximum permissible concentration limits for radon (10 CFR Part 20) in all structures surveyed. Off-site structures showed concentrations of radon and radon daughters at or only slightly above background levels, except for one site where the radon levels were found to be above the 10 CFR Part 20 guidelines. Outdoor radon ad radon daughter concentrations, measured both on and off the site, were well below the guidelines, and the data give no indication of significant radon transport from the site.

  3. RESIDENTIAL RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION FEATURE SELECTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes a proposed residential radon resistant construction feature selection system. The features consist of engineered barriers to reduce radon entry and accumulation indoors. The proposed Florida standards require radon resistant features in proportion to regional...

  4. Results from time integrated measurements of indoor radon, thoron and their decay product concentrations in schools in the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Zunic, Zora S; Bossew, Peter; Bochicchio, Francesco; Carpentieri, Carmela; Venoso, Gennaro; Mishra, Rosaline; Rout, R P; Sapra, B K; Burghele, Bety D; Cucoş-Dinu, A; Boev, Blazo; Cosma, C

    2014-11-01

    As part of a survey on concentrations of radon, thoron and their decay products in different indoor environments of the Balkan region involving international collaboration, measurements were performed in 43 schools from 5 municipalities of the Republic of Macedonia. The time-integrated radon and thoron gas concentrations (CRn and CTn) were measured by CR-39 (placed in chambers with different diffusion barriers), whereas the equilibrium equivalent radon and thoron concentrations (EERC and EETC) were measured using direct radon-thoron progeny sensors consisting of LR-115 nuclear track detectors. The detectors were deployed at a distance of at least 0.5 m from the walls as well as far away from the windows and doors in order to obtain more representative samples of air from the breathing zone; detectors were exposed over a 3-month period (March-May 2012). The geometric mean (GM) values [and geometric standard deviations (GSDs)] of CRn, CTn, EERC and EETC were 76 (1.7), 12 (2.3), 27 (1.4) and 0.75 Bq m(-3) (2.5), respectively. The equilibrium factors between radon and its decay products (FRn) and thoron and its decay products (FTn (>0.5 m)) were evaluated: FRn ranged between 0.10 and 0.84 and FTn (>0.5 m) ranged between 0.003 and 0.998 with GMs (and GSDs) equal to 0.36 (1.7) and 0.07 (3.4), respectively. PMID:25084794

  5. An Environmental Chemistry Experiment: The Determination of Radon Levels in Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Lawrence E.; Mossman, Daniel M.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a radiation experiment developed to complement a new environmental chemistry laboratory curriculum. A scintillation counter is used to measure radon in water. The procedure relies on the fact that toluene will preferentially extract radon from water. Sample preparation is complete in less than 90 minutes. Because the level of…

  6. Reentry of radon from mitigation system outlets

    SciTech Connect

    Yuill, G.K.; Coughlin, R.J.

    1994-12-31

    Some radon mitigation systems draw air with a high radon concentration from under the basement floors of houses and exhaust it outdoors. The objective of this project was to measure the reentry rates of radon released at roof level and at ground level near a house to determine whether exhaust above the roof is necessary. This was done by using a portable mockup of a radon mitigation system exhaust, with sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) as a tracer gas. The roof-level exhaust produced maximum indoor sulfur hexafluoride concentrations that were significantly lower than those from the ground-level exhaust. This suggests that the better radon discharge location is on the roof of a house.

  7. Gene mutation discovery research of non-smoking lung cancer patients due to indoor radon exposure.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Ran; Park, Seong Yong; Noh, O Kyu; Koh, Young Wha; Kang, Dae Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Although the incidence and mortality for most cancers such as lung and colon are decreasing in several countries, they are increasing in several developed countries because of an unhealthy western lifestyles including smoking, physical inactivity and consumption of calorie-dense food. The incidences for lung and colon cancers in a few of these countries have already exceeded those in the United States and other western countries. Among them, lung cancer is the main cause of cancer death in worldwide. The cumulative survival rate at five years differs between 13 and 21 % in several countries. Although the most important risk factors are smoking for lung cancer, however, the increased incidence of lung cancer in never smokers(LCINS) is necessary to improve knowledge concerning other risk factors. Environmental factors and genetic susceptibility are also thought to contribute to lung cancer risk. Patients with lung adenocarcinoma who have never smoking frequently contain mutation within tyrosine kinase domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR) gene. Also, K-ras mutations are more common in individuals with a history of smoking use and are related with resistance to EFGR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Recently, radon(Rn), natural and noble gas, has been recognized as second common reason of lung cancer. In this review, we aim to know whether residential radon is associated with an increased risk for developing lung cancer and regulated by several genetic polymorphisms. PMID:26985396

  8. RADON REDUCTION AND RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION DEMONSTRATIONS IN NEW YORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report covers three tasks related to indoor radon: (1) the demonstration of radon reduction techniques in 8 houses in each of two uniquely different radon prone areas of the State of New York; (2) the evaluation and repair of 14 radon mitigation systems in houses mitigated 4 ...

  9. RADON REDUCTIONAND RADON RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION DEMONSTRATIONS IN NEW YORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report covers three tasks related to indoor radon: (1) the demonstration of radon reduction techniques in 8 houses in each of two uniquely different radon prone areas of the State of New York; (2) the evaluation and repair of 14 radon mitigation systems in houses mitigated 4 ...

  10. Map showing radon potential of rocks and soils in Fairfax County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Otton, James K.; Schumann, R. Randall; Owen, Douglass E.; Thurman, Nelson; Duval, Joseph S.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1984, indoor radon has gained national attention as a significant health hazard in the United States. Radon is a colorless, odorless, radioactive gas derived from uranium by radioactive decay. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) now projects that 5,000 to 20,000 lung-cancer deaths per year may be attributed to the long-term exposure to indoor radon and its radioactive decay products. Indoor radon has been previously recognized as a health hazard associated with uranium-bearing mill tailings or building materials, but it was not until December 1984 that some natural soils and rocks were found to be sources of indoor radon at levels comparable to those in uranium mines. It is now suspected that elevated indoor radon levels are far more widespread than initially though. The EPA considers 4 picoCuries of radon per liter of air (pCi/L) as the level (in a year-round measurement) at which actions ought to be taken to lower the concentration of indoor radon. All soils and rocks contain measurable amounts of uranium, which generate measurable amounts of radon. Certain soils and rocks, however, have a greater potential to cause indoor radon problems than others because (1) they have a higher uranium content and thus can generate higher levels of radon in soil gas (gas that occupies the pores of the soil), and (2) the permeability of the sol or rack is sufficiently high that radon-bearing soil gas can flow freely and move indoors through the foundation of the structure. This study was designed to demonstrate the correlation between the geologic environment and indoor radon levels and to demonstrate a method of assessment that could be used by other informed workers in areas of their interest. A parallel study by Gundersen and others (1988) of the radon potential of rocks and soils in Montgomery County, Md., used somewhat different methods of assessment because the data available for and assessment of Montgomery County differed.

  11. Monitoring radon reduction in clinton, new jersey houses

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, M.C.; Brennan, T.; Michaels, L.D.

    1987-05-01

    The paper discusses EPA experience in monitoring radon reduction in Clinton, NJ, houses. Both the temperature-driven stack effect and typical household appliances (e.g., furnaces, whole-house fans, clothes dryers, and bathroom fans) were observed to reduce indoor pressure and potentially increase radon levels. Radon measurements obtained during cold weather, after residential heating systems were back in full operation, showed that the radon-reduction techniques that were applied had been effective and that radon concentrations were significantly reduced. Although both grab-sample and continuous-monitor measurements were helpful in assessing radon-entry sites and hour-to-hour fluctuations, respectively, only charcoal canister data collected under near-winter conditions could be used as a valid comparison with earlier March/April 1986 generated pre-radon reduction data.

  12. Radon-hazard potential the Beaver basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.E.

    1995-06-01

    Indoor-radon levels in the Beaver basin of southwestern Utah are the highest recorded to date in Utah, ranging from 17.5 to 495 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Because the U.S. Environment Protection Agency considers indoor-radon levels above 4 pCi/L to represent a risk of lung cancer from long-term exposure, the Utah Geological Survey is preparing a radon-hazard-potential map for the area to help prioritize indoor testing and evaluate the need for radon-resistant construction. Radon is a chemically inert radioactive gas derived from the decay of uranium-238, which is commonly found in rocks and soils. Soil permeability, depth to ground water, and uranium/thorium content of source materials control the mobility and concentration of radon in the soil. Once formed, radon diffuses into the pore space of the soil and then to the atmosphere or into buildings by pressure-driven flow of air or additional diffusion. The Beaver basin has been a topographic and structural depression since late Miocene time. Paleocene to Miocene volcanic and igneous rocks border the basin. Uraniferous alluvial-fan, piedmont-slope, flood-plain, and lacustrine sediments derived from the surrounding volcanic rocks fill the basin. A soil-gas radon and ground radioactivity survey in the Beaver basin shows that soils have high levels of radon gas. In this survey, uranium concentrations range from 3 to 13 parts per million (ppm) and thorium concentrations range from 10 to 48 ppm. Radon concentrations in the soil gas ranged from 85 to 3,500 pCi/L. The highest concentrations of uranium, thorium, and radon gas and the highest radon-hazard-potential are in the well-drained permeable soils in the lower flood- plain deposits that underlie the city of Beaver.

  13. Determination of radon concentration levels in well water in Konya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, M; Eren, N; Demirel, S; Zedef, V

    2013-10-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) measurements were undertaken in 16 samples of well water representing different depths and different types of aquifers found at the city centre of Konya, Central Turkey. The radon activity concentrations of the well water samples collected in the spring and summer seasons of 2012 were measured by using the radon gas analyser (AlphaGUARD PQ 2000PRO). The radon concentrations for spring and summer seasons are 2.29 ± 0.17 to 27.25 ± 1.07 and 1.44 ± 0.18 to 27.45 ± 1.25 Bq l(-1), respectively. The results at hand revealed that the radon concentration levels of the waters strictly depend on the seasons and are slightly variable with depth. Eleven of the 16 well water samples had radon concentration levels below the safe limit of 11.11 Bq l(-1) recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. However, all measured radon concentration levels are well below the 100 Bq l(-1) safe limit declared by the World Health Organisation. The doses resulting from the consumption of these waters were calculated. The calculated minimum and maximum effective doses are 0.29 and 5.49 µSv a(-1), respectively. PMID:23595410

  14. Residential radon mitigations at Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg: comparison of above ground level (RIM JOIST) and above roof line discharge of radon mitigation SUB-SLAB depressurization systems.

    PubMed

    Brossard, Mathieu; Brascoupé, Marcel; Ottawa, Celine Brazeau; Falcomer, Renato; Ottawa, William; Scott, Arthur; Whyte, Jeff

    2012-05-01

    Radon mitigations in nine houses were conducted by installing sub-slab depressurization systems (SSDS) with two types of discharge and fan locations: Ground level discharge with the fan located in the basement or roof-discharge with the fan located in the attic. This paper presents a detailed comparative analysis of the radon reduction efficiency, condensation problems, and the cost-effectiveness of both SSDS installation scenarios in nine houses. The mitigations from both SSDS scenarios were successful in reducing radon. The results of rim-joist installations discharging above ground level with the fans located in the basement show that a sealed radon fan with proper fittings and sealed piping were able to reduce the radon to acceptable levels in a cost-effective manner. PMID:22469999

  15. Cancer risks from exposure to radon in homes.

    PubMed Central

    Axelson, O

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to radon and its decay products in mines is a well recognized risk of lung cancer in miners. A large number of epidemiologic studies from various countries are quite consistent in this respect even it the magnitude of the risk differs according to exposure levels. Indoor radon became a concern in the 1970s and about a dozen studies have been conducted since 1979, mainly of the case-control design. From first being of a simple pilot character, the designs have become increasingly sophisticated, especially with regard to exposure assessment. Crude exposure estimates based on type of house, building material and geological features have been supplemented or replaced by quite extensive measurements. Still, exposure assessment remains a difficult and uncertain issue in these studies, most of which indicate a lung cancer risk from indoor radon. Also a recent large scale study has confirmed a lung cancer risk from indoor radon. More recently there are also some studies, mainly of the correlation type, suggesting other cancers also to be related to indoor radon, especially leukemia, kidney cancer, and malignant melanoma, and some other cancers as well. The data are less consistent and much more uncertain than for indoor radon and lung cancer, however; and there is no clear support from studies of miners in this respect. PMID:7614945

  16. Radon in outdoor air in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Price, J G; Rigby, J G; Christensen, L; Hess, R; LaPointe, D D; Ramelli, A R; Desilets, M; Hopper, R D; Kluesner, T; Marshall, S

    1994-04-01

    Measurements of radon at 50 sites with varying geology indicate that outdoor air in Nevada is comparable to that measured nationwide by Hopper et al. (1991). The statewide median of 15 Bq m-3 (0.4 pCi L-1) is essentially the same as the nationwide median. The range is considerable: from 2.6-52 Bq m-3 (0.07-1.40 pCi L-1). Variations in these measurements can generally be correlated with different concentrations of radon in soils and uranium and its progeny in rocks. Silica-rich igneous rocks (rhyolites and granites) appear to be the main sources of high levels of radon in outdoor air in Nevada. Concentrations of radon in outdoor air generally correlate with levels of radon in soil gas. Measurements taken from heights of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 m above the ground suggest that radon in outdoor air reflects the local geology throughout this range of heights. Towns for which > 20% of the homes have indoor-air radon concentrations > 48 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1) generally have relatively high soil-gas radon, relatively high outdoor-air radon, or both. PMID:8138410

  17. A study of Monitoring and Mapping for Radon-Concentration Distribution in Gyeongju - 12201

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Chan Hee; Lee, Jung Min; Jang, So Young; Kim, Shin Jae; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2012-07-01

    Radon is one of the most important contributors to the radiation exposure in humans. This study measured the indoor radon concentrations at the 17 elementary school auditoriums that were sampled from those in the city of Gyeongju, Korea. The reason that an elementary school was selected as a measurement object is that many students and teachers stay for a long time in a day and it's easy to identify the characteristics of the auditorium building such as the essential building. The measurement shows that most of the indoor radon concentrations at the 17 elementary school auditoriums did not exceed 148 Bq/m{sup 3} that is the action level recommended by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This study measured the indoor radon concentrations at the elementary school auditoriums in Gyeongju. The measurements were analyzed according to the bedrock type and the time intervals per day. In this study, it was found that the indoor radon concentrations over off-duty hours were generally higher that those over on-duty hours, and the indoor radon concentration in the area whose bedrock is volcanic rock was higher than those in the area of the other types of bedrock. As mentioned above, attention has to be paid to an elementary school since many young students and teachers stay for more 6 hours a day at it. Hence, it is necessary to continuously monitor and properly manage the indoor radon concentrations in the elementary schools. (authors)

  18. Enhancement of radon exposure in smoking areas.

    PubMed

    Abdel Ghany, Hayam A

    2007-06-01

    Radium-226 is a significant source of radon-222 which enters buildings through soil, construction materials or water supply. When cigarette smoke is present, the radon daughters attach to smoke particles. Thus, the alpha radiation to a smoker's lungs from the natural radon daughters is increased because of smoking. To investigate whether the cigarette tobacco itself is a potential source of indoor radon, the alpha potential energy exposure level contents of radon ((222)Rn, 3.82d) and Thoron ((220)Rn, 55.60s) were measured in 10 different cigarette tobacco samples using CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs). The results showed that the (222, 220)Rn concentrations in these samples ranged from 128 to 266 and 49 to 148 Bqm(-3), respectively. The radon concentrations emerged from all investigated samples were significantly higher than the background level. Also, the annual equivalent doses from the samples were determined. The mean values of the equivalent dose were 3.51 (0.89) and 1.44 (0.08) mSvy(-1), respectively. Measurement of the average indoor radon concentrations in 20 café rooms was, significantly, higher than 20 smoking-free residential houses. The result refers to the dual (chemical and radioactive) effect of smoking as a risk factor for lung cancer. PMID:17342428

  19. Radon and radioactivity at a town overlying Uranium ores in northern Greece.

    PubMed

    Kourtidis, K; Georgoulias, A K; Vlahopoulou, M; Tsirliganis, N; Kastelis, N; Ouzounis, K; Kazakis, N

    2015-12-01

    Extensive measurements of (222)Rn in the town of Xanthi in N Greece show that the part of the town overlying granite deposits and the outcrop of a uranium ore has exceptionally high indoor radon levels, with monthly means up to 1500 Bq m(-3). A large number of houses (40%) in this part of the town exhibit radon levels above 200 Bq m(-3) while 11% of the houses had radon levels above 400 Bq m(-3). Substantial interannual variability as well as the highest in Europe winter/summer ratios (up to 12) were observed in this part of the town, which consist of traditional stone masonry buildings of the late 19th-early 20th century. Measurements of (238)U and (232)Th content of building materials from these houses as well as radionuclide measurements in different floors show that the high levels of indoor radon measured in these buildings are not due to high radon emanation rates from the building materials themselves but rather due to high radon flux from the soil because of the underlying geology, high radon penetration rates into the buildings from underground due to the lack of solid concrete foundations in these buildings, or a combination thereof. From the meteorological variables studied, highest correlation with indoor (222)Rn was found with temperature (r(2) = 0.65). An indoor radon prognostic regression model using temperature, pressure and precipitation as input was developed, that reproduced indoor radon with r(2) = 0.69. Hence, meteorology is the main driving factor of indoor radon, with temperature being the most important determinant. Preliminary flux measurements indicate that the soil-atmosphere (222)Rn flux should be in the range 150-250 Bq m(-2) h(-1), which is in the upper 10% of flux values for Europe. PMID:26372739

  20. Radon and radioactivity at a town overlying Uranium ores in northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourtidis, Konstantinos; Georgoulias, Aristeidis; Tsirliganis, Nestor

    2016-04-01

    Extensive measurements of Rn-222 in the town of Xanthi in N Greece show that the part of the town overlying granite deposits and the outcrop of a uranium ore has exceptionally high indoor radon levels, with monthly means up to 1500 Bq m-3. A large number of houses (40%) in this part of the town exhibit radon levels above 200 Bq m-3 while 11% of the houses had radon levels above 400 Bq/m3. Substantial interannual variability as well as the highest in Europe winter/summer ratios (up to 12) were observed in this part of the town, which consist of traditional stone masonry buildings of the late 19th- early 20th century. Measurements of U-238 and Th-232 content of building materials from these houses as well as radionuclide measurements in different floors show that the high levels of indoor radon measured in these buildings are not due to high radon emanation rates from the building materials themselves but rather due to high radon flux from the soil because of the underlying geology, high radon penetration rates into the buildings from underground due to the lack of solid concrete foundations in these buildings, or a combination thereof. From the meteorological variables studied, highest correlation with indoor Rn-222 was found with temperature (r2=0.65). An indoor radon prognostic regression model using temperature, pressure and precipitation as input was developed, that reproduced indoor radon with r2=0.69. Hence, meteorology is the main driving factor of indoor radon, with temperature being the most important determinant. Preliminary flux measurements indicate that the soil-atmosphere Rn-222 flux should be in the range 150-250 Bq m-2 hr-1, which is in the upper 10% of flux values for Europe.

  1. Radon and geology in the Atlanta area

    SciTech Connect

    Ranger, L.S.

    1995-12-31

    For the Atlanta area, 2,791 indoor radon screening tests are plotted on 40 geologic formations where there are five or more measurements. Each is presented with average, range, and house construction type. 29 formations have houses with measurements > = 4.0 pCi/l. For the region, 6.6% of homes measure > = 4.0 pCi/l. The percent of houses > = 4.0 pCi/l varies from 0 to 50% by geologic formation. The range is 0.0 to 57.3 pCi/l. Marked differences in radon levels are observed when plotted by geologic formation. Areas of higher radon potential can be determined for the purpose of planning radon surveys or testing programs in areas of highest potential. The higher potential areas do not necessarily coincide with the EPA radon potential map.

  2. On-line continuous monitoring of groundwater radon levels at L’Aquila fault, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsabaris, C.; Lampousis, A.

    2009-12-01

    This work describes in situ radon progeny measurements in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of L’Aquila region, located 60 miles north-east of Rome, Italy, conducted in December 2007. The marine radon progeny monitor KATERINA (i.e., Hellenic Centre for Marine Research patent July 2008) was submerged inside a tank filled with groundwater from the Gran Sasso Mountain. The measured spectra obtained through KATERINA exhibited photopeaks of the main gamma emitters (214Pb and 214Bi) of the primordial nucleus 238U (222Rn). High background levels of radionuclides (i.e., inside the mountain) emitting high energy gamma rays affected the measurement. In order to correct and deduce the final volumetric activities of radon progenies (214Pb and 214Bi) the system was calibrated using the simulation tool GEANT4. The first day of deployment an averaged value of radon progenies amounted to a value of (3.1 ± 0.3) Bq/l. The second day the averaged values of radon progenies were reduced by 30% due to the loss of noble gas radon from the tank. Additional spectra were recorded successfully after removing background airborne radon present in the LNGS laboratory. KATERINA operated reliably during its in situ radon monitoring. This was confirmed by further calibration using off line measurements performed in collaboration with the Marine Environmental Laboratory of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Future work includes the development of a continuous radon monitoring tool to further study the L’Aquila fault. By implementing a continuous inflow and outflow system and by controlling the radon levels both inside and outside the water tank, radon variations will be correlated with other geophysical/geochemical parameters like microseismicity, slip rates, pH, H2S, CO2, and He. Additional contributions include an increased understanding of the correlations between radon levels in the proximity of active faults and regional seismic activity. If indeed this proves to be an

  3. Follow-up annual alpha-track monitoring in 40 eastern Pennsylvania houses with indoor radon reduction systems (December 1988-December 1989). Final report, December 1988-June 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.G.; Robertson, A.

    1990-11-01

    The report gives results of 12-month-long alpha-track detector (ATD) measurements of indoor radon concentrations, between December 1988 and December 1989 in th living areas of 38 of 40 houses where radon reduction techniques has been installed 2-4 years earlier in a previous EPA project. The techniques, installed between June 1985 and June 1987, generally involved active soil depressurization. In the 28 houses in which the mitigation system operated the entire year, the annual average was < 2 pCi/L in 13, and < 4 pCi/L in 22. The residual radon in many houses is due largely to re-entrainment of ASD exhaust. Comparison of these annual ATD results with quarterly results from the past three winters shows that 22 of the 28 houses had annual measurements within 1 pCi/L of the winter-quarter result. There had been no significant degradation in system performance, except where the mitigation fans failed or where the owner had turned off the system. Six of 34 ASD fans have failed to date.

  4. Radon Levels Measured at a Touristic Thermal Spa Resort in Montagu (South Africa) and Associated Effective Doses.

    PubMed

    Botha, R; Newman, R T; Maleka, P P

    2016-09-01

    Radon activity concentrations (in water and in air) were measured at 13 selected locations at the Avalon Springs thermal spa resort in Montagu (Western Cape, South Africa) to estimate the associated effective dose received by employees and visitors. A RAD-7 detector (DURRIDGE), based on alpha spectrometry, and electret detectors (E-PERM®Radelec) were used for these radon measurements. The primary source of radon was natural thermal waters from the hot spring, which were pumped to various locations on the resort, and consequently a range of radon in-water analyses were performed. Radon in-water activity concentration as a function of time (short term and long term measurements) and spatial distributions (different bathing pools, etc.) were studied. The mean radon in-water activity concentrations were found to be 205 ± 6 Bq L (source), 112 ± 5 Bq L (outdoor pool) and 79 ± 4 Bq L (indoor pool). Radon in-air activity concentrations were found to range between 33 ± 4 Bq m (at the outside bar) to 523 ± 26 Bq m (building enclosing the hot spring's source). The most significant potential radiation exposure identified is that due to inhalation of air rich in radon and its progeny by the resort employees. The annual occupational effective dose due to the inhalation of radon progeny ranges from 0.16 ± 0.01 mSv to 0.40 ± 0.02 mSv. For the water samples collected, the Ra in-water activity concentrations from samples collected were below the lower detection limit (~0.7 Bq L) of the γ-ray detector system used. No significant radiological health risk can be associated with radon and progeny from the hot spring at the Avalon Springs resort. PMID:27472753

  5. A reconnaissance study of radon concentrations in Hamadan city, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, G. K.; Jabarivasal, N.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents results of a reconnaissance study that used CR-39 alpha track-etch detectors to measure radon concentrations in dwellings in Hamadan, western Iran, significantly, built on permeable alluvial fan deposits. The indoor radon levels recorded varied from 4 (i.e. below the lower limit of detection for the method) to 364 Bq/m3 with a mean value of 108 Bq/m3 which is 2.5 times the average global population-weighted indoor radon concentration - these data augment the very few published studies on indoor radon levels in Iran. The maximum radon concentration in Hamadan occurs during the winter period (January to March) with lower concentrations during the autumn. The effective dose equivalent to the population in Hamadan is estimated from this study to be in the region of 2.7 mSv/y, which is above the guidelines for dose to a member of the public of 1 mSv/y suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 1993. This study supports other work in a number of countries that indicates such permeable "surficial" deposits as being of intermediate to high radon potential. In western Iran, the presence of hammered clay floors, the widespread presence of excavated qanats, the textural properties of surficial deposits and human behaviour intended to cope with winds are likely to be important factors influencing radon concentrations in older buildings.

  6. Indoor Air Pollution: An Energy Management Problem?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, David M.; Kulba, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Energy conservation measures have led to airtight buildings and reduced levels of ventilation resulting in indoor air pollution. Five kinds of contaminants--tobacco smoke, combustion products, microorganisms, organic compounds, and radon--are described, their hazards considered, and countermeasures outlined. (MLF)

  7. Fungal microcolonies on indoor surfaces — an explanation for the base-level fungal spore counts in indoor air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanen, A.-L.; Heinonen-Tanski, H.; Kalliokoski, P.; Jantunen, M. J.

    In the subarctic winter, fungal spores are found in indoor air even when outdoor spore levels are very low. The results of this study support an explanation that some indoor airborne fungal spores are derived from unnoticeable fungal microcolonies, which may develop on temporarily wet surfaces. Laboratory experiments on Penicillium verrucosum indicated that the fungus germinated on new wallpaper very quickly (about half an hour) under moist conditions. Hyphal growth and sporulation of the fungus on moist wallpaper occured within one day of incubation. In gravity-settling tape samples from occasionally wet surfaces in a suburban home, large spore aggregates, hyphal fragments with some spores and spores in the germination stage were found, indicating fungal growth. These experiments showed that fungal microcolonies can develop within a week on occasionally wet indoor surfaces.

  8. NEW-CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES AND HVAC (HEATING, VENTING AND AIR CONDITIONING) OVERPRESSURIZATION FOR RADON REDUCTION IN SCHOOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Construction of a school in Fairfax County, Virginia, is being carefully monitored since elevated indoor radon levels have been identified in many existing houses near the site. Soil gas radon concentrations measured prior to pouring of the slabs were also indicative of a potenti...

  9. Relationship between air exchange rate and indoor VOC levels

    SciTech Connect

    Otson, R.; Williams, D.T.; Fellin, P.

    1998-12-31

    It is often assumed that the air quality is better in leaky than in airtight buildings. To test this anecdotal hypothesis, data from two Canadian surveys were examined. Indoor measurements of 28 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made by means of a passive sampling method during the 24 to 48 h study periods in both studies, and air exchange rates were determined by the perfluorocarbon tracer approach. The air exchange rates ranged between about 0.1 to 2.5 air changes per hour in 54 test homes in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). Other information on building age and construction, renovation activities and occupant activities that potentially influenced indoor VOC concentrations in the homes was collected by means of a questionnaire. The statistical relationships between the concentrations of VOCs and air exchange were determined. Correlation coefficients between the airborne concentrations of each VOC and the air exchange rates for the homes were all < 0.1 indicating that the relationship between the air exchange and indoor VOC concentrations is tenuous. Since the questionnaire responses did not provide quantitative estimates of indoor emissions, a quantitative correlation between responses and indoor concentrations could not be established nor was a consistent pattern evident between these responses and the occurrence of high indoor concentrations. The lack of definitive quantitative relationships is not surprising considering the complexity of indoor environments, the lack of a detailed inventory of indoor sources and their emission rates and a lack of information or understanding of indoor sinks. The findings, on the effect of air exchange rates and the value of questionnaires in studies on indoor VOCs are consistent with findings in other similar studies.

  10. Measuring radioactive noble gases by absorption in polycarbonates and other organics: From radon indoors to nuclear safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressyanov, Dobromir S.

    2013-07-01

    The report summarizes recent research and practice of using materials with high absorption ability to noble gases to measure their radioactive isotopes. Most of the studies employ bisphenol-A based polycarbonates, because of their remarkably high absorption ability to noble gases. This is the material of which commercial CDs/DVDs are made and they may serve as serendipitous, already available in dwellings, radon and thoron detectors. We present the essence of the gathered experimental evidence that the CD/DVD method can successfully address some long-lasted problems in radon dosimetry: The first is making sufficiently precise retrospective 222Rn dosimetry for the purposes of epidemiological studies and risk estimation. The second is rapid identification of buildings with radon problem. We demonstrate how this can be used to develop an integrated approach to the radon problem. Within this approach detection, diagnostic and mitigation are considered as an unified whole, and the interval between the decision to provide disks for analysis and the complete mitigation of the building, if radon problem is identified, is short. Besides radon and thoron, bisphenol-A based polycarbonates were successfully used to measure 85Kr and 133Xe for the purposes of the effluents control and nuclear safety of nuclear installations. The perspectives to employ other organic materials in which noble gases are highly soluble for measurement of their radioactive isotopes are also discussed.

  11. Mapping the geogenic radon potential of the eastern Canary Islands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiano, Jesús G.; Alonso, Hector; Arnedo, Miguel. A.; Tejera, Alicia; Martel, Pablo; Gil, Juan M.; Rodriguez, Rafael; González, Jonay

    2014-05-01

    The main contribution of indoor radon comes from soils and thus, the knowledge of the concentration of this gas in soils is important for estimating the risk of finding high radon indoor concentrations. To characterize the behavior of radon in soils, it is common to use the a quantity named Radon Potential which results of a combination of properties of the soil itself and from the underlying rock, such as concentration and distribution of radium, porosity, permeability, the moisture content and meteorological parameters, among others. In this work, the results three year of campaigns of measurement radon gas as well as the permeability in soils of the Eastern Canary Islands (Gran Canaria, Fuerteventura and Lanzarote) are presented. By combining these two parameters and through the use of geostatistic interpolation techniques, the radon potential of soils is estimated and it is used to carry on a classification of the territory into hazard zones according to their potential for radon emanation. To measure the radon soil gas a probe equipped with a "lost" sharp tip is inserted to the desired sampling depth. One of the characteristics of the Canary Islands is the absence of developed soils and so the bedrock is found typically at very shallow depth. This fact has led us to adopt a sampling depth of 50 cm at most. The probe is connected to the continuous radon monitor Durridge RAD7 equipped with a solid-state alpha spectrometer to determine concentration radon using the activity its short-lived progeny. Dried soil air is delivered to the RAD7 radon monitor by pumping. A half hour counting time for all sampling points has been taken. In parallel to the radon measurement campaign, the permeability of soils has also been determined at each point using the permeameter RADON-JOK. The principle of operation of this equipment consists of air withdrawal by means of negative pressure. The gas permeability is then calculated using the known flow of air flowing through the probe

  12. Radon and thoron levels, their spatial and seasonal variations in adobe dwellings - a case study at the great Hungarian plain.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Jordan, Gyozo; Szabó, Csaba; Horváth, Ákos; Holm, Óskar; Kocsy, Gábor; Csige, István; Szabó, Péter; Homoki, Zsolt

    2014-06-01

    Radon and thoron isotopes are responsible for approximately half of the average annual effective dose to humans. Although the half-life of thoron is short, it can potentially enter indoor air from adobe walls. Adobe was a traditional construction material in the Great Hungarian Plain. Its major raw materials are the alluvial sediments of the area. Here, seasonal radon and thoron activity concentrations were measured in 53 adobe dwellings in 7 settlements by pairs of etched track detectors. The results show that the annual average radon and thoron activity concentrations are elevated in these dwellings and that the proportions with values higher than 300 Bq m(-3) are 14-17 and 29-32% for radon and thoron, respectively. The calculated radon inhalation dose is significantly higher than the world average value, exceeding 10 mSv y(-1) in 7% of the dwellings of this study. Thoron also can be a significant contributor to the inhalation dose with about 30% in the total inhalation dose. The changes of weather conditions seem to be more relevant in the variation of measurement results than the differences in the local sedimentary geology. Still, the highest values were detected on clay. Through the year, radon follows the average temperature changes and is affected by the ventilation, whereas thoron rather seems to follow the amount of precipitation. PMID:24437932

  13. Radon Concentration by SSNTD in South-East Sicily Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immè, G.; Catalano, R.; Gianino, C.; Filincieri, R.; Mangano, G.; Morelli, D.

    Radon levels in buildings vary widely from area to area also depending on local geology. Thus, it is important to assess the radon prone area of a geographic region on the basis of geological data and to search for any possible correlation between the local geology and the indoor radon concentrations. We report about indoor radon measurements in Ragusa, a municipality of the SE Sicily, placed in the Hyblean Plateau (northern region of the African Plate), carried out in collaboration with schools. The survey was performed using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTD), CR-39 type, and a well-established methodology for chemical etching and reading, developed at the Radioactivity Laboratory of the Department of Physics - University of Catania.

  14. A Systematic Review of Radon Investigations Related to Public Exposure in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Pirsaheb, Meghdad; Najafi, Farid; Khosravi, Touba; Hemati, Lida

    2013-01-01

    Background The main sources of radiation exposure of all living organisms including humans are natural. In fact, radon and its decay products are the cause of 50% of the total dose that is derived from natural sources. Because of the significant health hazards of radon gas, its levels are widely monitored throughout the world. Accordingly, considerable researches have also been carried out in Iran. Objectives The aim of this research is a systematic review of the most recent studies associated with evaluation of radon gas levels in Iran. The main emphasis of this study was on public exposure to radon gas. Materials and Methods The most important route of exposure to such radiation is indoor places. In this investigation measurement of radon in water resources, tap water, indoor places and exhalation of radon from building material, the major sources of indoor radon gas emission, were considered. Results Significantly high levels of radon gas were found mostly in water and residenvial buildings. Conclusions It conclusion with regard to the study of building materials, granite stone and adobe coverings cannot be recommended for construction purposes. PMID:24719680

  15. Transport studies of radon in limestone underlying houses

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; Saultz, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    In hilly limestone terrains of the southern Appalachians, subterranean networks of solution cavities and fissures present circulatory systems facilitating convective and advective transport of radon-bearing gas. Evidence suggests that the primary driving forces for transport are aerostatic pressure differentials created by the difference between the underground and the outside air temperatures. Examples are presented of houses experiencing elevated indoor radon levels as a consequence of communicating with such subsurface transportation systems. The location of a house near the upper or lower end of a subterranean-circulatory system seems to produce amplification of indoor radon levels in winter or summer, respectively. The transport mechanism for radon-bearing air in karst and its impact on indoor radon need better understanding, both in regard to evaluating the geographical prevalence of the phenomenon and the induced spatial and temporal effects that are possible. This paper reports field studies made at houses in karst regions at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Huntsville, Alabama. A primary radon-transport mechanism is advocated of ascending or descending subsurface columns of air whose flows are largely driven by aerostatic pressure gradients created by the inground-outdoor air temperature differentials. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Effectiveness of radon control techniques in fifteen homes.

    PubMed

    Turk, B H; Prill, R J; Fisk, W J; Grimsrud, D T; Sextro, R G

    1991-05-01

    Radon control systems were installed and evaluated in fourteen homes in the Spokane River Valley/Rathdrum Prairie and in one home in Vancouver, Washington. Because of local soil conditions, subsurface ventilation (SSV) by pressurization was always more effective in these houses than SSV by depressurization in reducing indoor radon levels to below guidelines. Basement overpressurization was successfully applied in five houses with airtight basements where practical-sized fans could develop an overpressure of 1 to 3 Pascals. Crawlspace ventilation was more effective than crawlspace isolation in reducing radon entry from the crawlspace, but had to be used in conjunction with other mitigation techniques, since the houses also had basements. Indoor radon concentrations in two houses with air-to-air heat exchangers (AAHX) were reduced to levels inversely dependent on the new total ventilation rates and were lowered even further in one house where the air distribution system was modified. Sealing penetrations in the below-grade surfaces of substructures was relatively ineffective in controlling radon. Operation of the radon control systems (except for the AAHX's) made no measureable change in ventilation rates or indoor concentrations of other measured pollutants. Installation costs by treated floor area ranged from approximately $4/m2 for sealing to $28/m2 for the AAHX's. Based on the low electric rates for the region, annual operating costs for the active systems were estimated to be approximately $60 to $170. PMID:1863451

  17. Effectiveness of radon control techniques in fifteen homes

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, B.H.; Prill, R.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Sextro, R.G. )

    1991-05-01

    Radon control systems were installed and evaluated in fourteen homes in the Spokane River Valley/Rathdrum Prairie and in one home in Vancouver, Washington. Because of local soil conditions, subsurface ventilation (SSV) by pressurization was always more effective in these houses than SSV by depressurization in reducing indoor radon levels to below guidelines. Basement overpressurization was successfully applied in five houses with airtight basements where practical-sized fans could develop an overpressure of 1 to 3 Pascals. Crawlspace ventilation was more effective than crawlspace isolation in reducing radon entry from the crawlspace, but had to be used in conjunction with other mitigation techniques, from the crawlspace, but had to be used in conjunction with other mitigation techniques, since the houses also had basements. Indoor radon concentrations in two houses with air-to-air heat exchangers (AAHX) were reduced to levels inversely dependent on the new total ventilation rates and were lowered even further in one house where the air distribution system was modified. Sealing penetrations in the below-grade surfaces of substructures was relatively ineffective in controlling radon. Operation of the radon control systems (except for the AAHX's) made no measurable change in ventilation rates or indoor concentrations of other measured pollutants. Installation costs ranged from approximately {dollar sign}4/m{sup 2} for sealing to {dollar sign}28/m{sup 2} for the AAHXs. Annual operating costs for the active systems were estimated to be approximately {dollar sign}60 to {dollar sign}170.

  18. Radon and climatic multiparameter analysis: A one-year study on radon dynamics in a house

    SciTech Connect

    Genrich, V.

    1995-12-31

    Radon-reduction in private and public buildings is a current issue. Research has opened our eyes for the enormous fluctuations of the indoor radon level over longer observation periods. For generalizing the behavior radon in a building, care must be taken that the observation period is long enough, to mediate the pronounced climatic changes in the course of a year. The author has started a one-year observations, precisely logging up the radon level in a single family home. Six portable multiparameter-monitors, each equipped with a 0.6 liter PIC-detector (PIC = pulse ionization chamber), have been installed at different locations within the building and outdoors (incl. two soil-gas probes). Besides the radon concentration, in the same instruments the following parameters are logged cotinuously: relative humidity, differential pressure between basement and sub-slab area, soil impendance (indication water saturation) and wind speed on the roof. In the basement, the radon concentration varies between 61 Bq/m{sup 3} and 5408 Bq/m{sup 3} (mean: 1092 Bq/m{sup 3}.) By analyzing these records, the time sequence of the radon concentration can be characterized as a {open_quotes}mixture{close_quotes} of (periodic) circadian variations overlayed with (aperiodic) seasonal fluctuations. In this building, it turns out, that the pressure difference across the base plate is an important factor for radon entry as well as ventilation rate. It can be shown, that the pressure is closely related to the indoor-outdoor temperature difference. This relation was found to be non-linear. Other factors are attributed to the activities of the inhabitants. The paper points out correlations between radon and different climatic parameters mainly by using scatterplots and classical regression methods.

  19. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-01

    Measurements of radon gas (222Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the 226Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m-3 to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m-3, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m-3 to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m-3, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m-3 to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m-3, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m-3 to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m-3 and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m-3 to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m-3, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m-3, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m-3, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m-3 and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m-3, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m-3 proposed by EPA except monazite 0.15 kg, struverite 0.15 kg and 0.25 kg. Whereas

  20. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-27

    Measurements of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the {sup 226}Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 ± 76.8 Bq m{sup −3} to 571.1 ± 251.4 Bq m{sup −3}, 101.0 ± 41.0 Bq m{sup −3} to 245.3 ± 100.2 Bq m{sup −3}, 53.1 ± 7.5 Bq m{sup −3} to 181.8 ± 9.7 Bq m{sup −3}, 256.1 ± 59.3 Bq m{sup −3} to 652.2 ± 222.2 Bq m{sup −3} and 164.5 ± 75.9 Bq m{sup −3} to 653.3 ± 240.0 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 ± 194.3 Bq m{sup −3}, 192.1 ± 75.4 Bq m{sup −3}, 176.1 ± 85.9 Bq m{sup −3} and 28.4 ± 5.7 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the

  1. [The radon risk in Lombardy].

    PubMed

    Facchini, U; Sesana, L; Agostoni, G; Testa, V

    1997-10-01

    We investigated the geographical distribution of lung cancer mortality rates in some Italian regions, Lombardy and Emilia-Romagna in particular, where the investigation was mainly focused on the risk related to the presence of radon inside dwelling-houses. We referred to the death certificates provided by the Central Institute of Statistics (ISTAT) relative to the years 1980-1988 to calculate the relevant mortality rates. Mortality rates appear higher in some northern than in southern regions and in the islands and also (> a factor of 10) in the male than in the female population; the mortality rates in the male population exhibit a linear correlation with past cigarette smoking. The death rates in the male population (age range: 35-64 years) in northern Italy average 100 events/100,000 inhabitants, but several local health centers in Lombardy at the foot of the Alpine range, north of the Po River, have mortality rates over 50% higher than estimated rates. We considered radon exposure in Lombardy dwelling-houses. The Alps are rich in granite rocks, with 50-150 Bq/kg uranium concentrations, which produce the sediments, sands and gravels making the ground of the Lombardy plain. A recent survey of indoor radon exposure levels showed average values around 100 Bq/m3. The National Academy of Sciences (Washington, DC) has presented a formula to calculate the relative risk of lung cancer related to radon exposure during a lifetime. When this model was applied to excess events in Lombardy, acceptable agreement was found with the assumption that excess deaths are ascribable to higher radon exposure levels. We also compared Lombardy with Emilia-Romagna where the sediments and soil in the plain come from the Apennine range where calcareous rocks have low uranium content. Radon exposure levels in Emilia-Romagna were around 50 Bq/m3 and the radon risk factor in this region is therefore not particularly significant. PMID:9465246

  2. Homogenity of geological units with respect to the radon risk in the Walloon region of Belgium.

    PubMed

    Tondeur, François; Cinelli, Giorgia; Dehandschutter, Boris

    2014-10-01

    In the process of mapping indoor radon risk, an important step is to define geological units well-correlated with indoor radon. The present paper examines this question for the Walloon region of Belgium, using a database of more than 18,000 indoor radon measurements. With a few exceptions like the Carboniferous (to be divided into Tournaisian, Visean and Namurian-Westphalian) and the Tertiary (in which all Series may be treated together), the Series/Epoch stratigraphic level is found to be the most appropriate geological unit to classify the radon risk. A further division according to the geological massif or region is necessary to define units with a reasonable uniformity of the radon risk. In particular, Paleozoic series from Cambrian to Devonian show strong differences between different massifs. Local hot-spots are also observed in the Brabant massif. Finally, 35 geological units are defined according to their radon risk, 6 of which still present a clear weak homogeneity. In the case of 4 of these units (Jurassic, Middle Devonian of Condroz and of Fagne-Famenne, Ordovician of the Stavelot massif) homogeneity is moderate, but the data are strongly inhomogeneous for Visean in Condroz and in the Brabant massif. The 35 geological units are used in an ANOVA analysis, to evaluate the part of indoor radon variability which can be attributed to geology. The result (15.4-17.7%) agrees with the values observed in the UK. PMID:24953229

  3. Indoor Environment Program. 1992 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Daisey, J.M.

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports progress during the year 1992 in the Indoor Environment Program in the Energy and Environment Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Studies in the following areas are reported: energy performance and ventilation in buildings; physical and chemical characterization of indoor air pollutants; indoor radon; indoor air quality; exposure to indoor air pollutants and risk analysis. Pollutants of particular interest include: radon; volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic compounds; and combustion emissions including environmental tobacco smoke, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides.

  4. Enhancement of exposure to radon progeny as a consequence of passive smoking

    SciTech Connect

    Moghissi, A.A.; Seiler, M.C. )

    1989-01-01

    Among indoor air pollutants, radon and tobacco smoke take dominant positions. Because radon decay products have a relatively short residence time in air, the extent of the equilibrium between radon and its daughter products is linearly proportional to the carcinogenic risk, at least at low exposure levels. The relevant factor is the equilibrium factor F. This paper discusses the enhancement of radon exposure as a result of the presence of particulate matter originating from tobacco smoke. The presence of tobacco smoke provides a mechanism for radon progeny to be attached to inhalable particles and to remain in indoor air for a prolonged time. The results of our study indicate a significant increase in F as a consequence of passive smoking. These modeling efforts are consistent with the experimental data reported previously.

  5. Carbon monoxide levels during indoor sporting events -- Cincinnati, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) produced by internal combustion engines is an indoor health hazard. High CO levels can occur during indoor sporting events--such as tractor pulls--that involve vehicles modified to achieve high horsepower. In January and March 1992 and January 1993, the Cincinnati Health Department evaluated CO levels during tractor pulls, monster-truck jumps, and a mud race event held in an indoor arena with a seating capacity of approximately 16,000 persons. This report summarizes findings from the evaluations.

  6. RADON REDUCTION AND RADON-RESISTANT CONSTRUCTION DEMONSTRATIONS IN NEW YORK - VOLUME 1: TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of radon reduction and radon-resistant construction demonstrations in New York. The existing house evaluation demonstrated radon mitigation techniques where indoor radon concentrations exceeded 4 pCi/L. Results demonstrated that sealing all accessible fou...

  7. Radon Policy in Finland, Achievements and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Arvela, Hannu; Maekelaeinen, Ilona; Reisbacka, Heikki

    2008-08-07

    Finland is a country of high indoor radon concentrations. Since 1980 the authority regulations, guidance, radon mapping and research work supporting decision making have been developed continuously. Clear regulations directed to citizens and authorities form the basis for radon policy. Active mapping work and measurement ordered by private home owners has resulted in 100.000 houses measured. National indoor radon data base forms a good basis for decision making, communication and research. The number of new houses provided with radon preventive constructions has increased remarkably. New radon campaigns has increased measurement and mitigation activity. Furher increasing of public awareness is the key challenge.

  8. Radon reduction and radon-resistant construction demonstrations in New York. Volume 1. Technical report. Final report, March 1987-February 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Nitschke, I.; Clarkin, M.; Clark, W.; Hough, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    The report gives results of radon reduction and radon-resistant construction demonstrations in New York. The existing house evaluation demonstrated radon mitigation techniques where indoor radon concentrations exceeded 4 pCi/L. Results demonstrated that sealing all accessible foundation penetrations in the basement effectively reduced the radon concentration, although not below 4 pCi/L, and that sealing aids the effectiveness of an active depressurization system. Active depressurization systems were usually successful in achieving 4 pCi/L. The footing drain, sub-slab, and basement walls were all successfully depressurized using a standard technique after grab samples or radon 'sniffing' techniques were used to identify the radon entry sources. Basement pressurization also effectively reduced the radon level below the EPA guideline at one site. Water aeration systems effectively mitigated radon from residential water supplies, although the system tested was large and noisy. Activated charcoal filters adsorbed the radon in water, but eventually became an unacceptable source of gamma radiation. The inspection of houses where radon mitigation systems were installed in 1984 revealed that new systems and techniques, such as in-line centrifugal fans, were generally superior to the earlier methods using axial computer-type fans.

  9. Towards a Brazilian radon map: consortium radon Brazil.

    PubMed

    Silva, N C; Bossew, P; Ferreira Filho, A L; Campos, T F C; Pereira, A J S C; Yoshimura, E M; Veiga, L H S; Campos, M P; Rocha, Z; Paschuk, S A; Bonotto, D M

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the idea of generating radon map of Brazil has emerged. First attempts of coordinating radon surveys--carried out by different groups across the country--and initial discussions on how to proceed on a larger scale were made at the First Brazilian Radon Seminary, Natal, September 2012. Conventionally, it is believed that indoor radon is no major problem in Brazil, because the overall benign climate usually allows high ventilation rates. Nevertheless, scattered measurements have shown that moderately high indoor radon concentrations (up to a few hundred Bq m⁻³) do occur regionally. Brazilian geology is very diverse and there are regions where an elevated geogenic radon potential exists or is expected to exist. Therefore, a Brazilian Radon Survey is expected to be a challenge, although it appears an important issue, given the rising concern of the public about the quality of its environment. PMID:24743768

  10. Radon concentration of waters in Greece and Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, D.; Vogiannis, E.; Louizi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Radon (222Rn) is a radioactive gas generated by the decay of the naturally occurring 238U series. It is considered very important from radiological point of view, since it is the most significant natural source of human radiation exposure (approximately 50% from all natural sources). Radon is present in soil, rocks, building materials and waters. Through diffusion and convection, radon migrates and emanates to the atmosphere. Outdoors, radon concentrates at low levels (in the order of 10 Bq/m3). However indoors, radon accumulates significantly. It is trivial to observe indoor environments with high radon levels (in the order of 400 Bq/m3 or higher). Radon accumulation indoors, depends on the composition of the underlying soil and rock formation, on building materials, meteorological parameters, ventilation, heating and water use. Although soil and building materials are the most significant radon sources, there have been reported elevated radon concentrations in building structures due to entering water. It is the radon concentrations in the entering water, the volume and the way of water usage, separated or in combination, that result in large amounts of radon in indoor air. Moreover, radon is a factor of stomach radiation burden due to water consumption. This burden is estimated by measurements of radon concentrations in waters. Due to the health impact of radon exposure, the reporting team continuously measures radon. This work focused on the radon concentrations exposure due to water consumption and use in Greece and Cyprus. Various locations in Greece and Cyprus were accessed taking into consideration existing natural radioactivity data (mainly radon in water), however under the restriction of the capability of movement. Radon in water was measured by Alpha Guard (Genitron Ltd) via a special unit (Aqua Kit). This unit consists of a vessel used for forced degassing of radon diluted in water samples, a security vessel used for water drop deposition. Vessels and

  11. Radon and thoron concentrations in public workplaces in Brisbane, Australia.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Sami H; Akber, Riaz A

    2015-06-01

    Radon and thoron are radioactive gases that can emanate from soil and building materials, and it can accumulate in indoor environments. The concentrations of radon and thoron in the air from various workplace categories in Brisbane, Australia were measured using an active method. The average radon and thoron concentrations for all workplace categories were 10.5 ± 11.3 and 8.2 ± 1.4 Bq m(-3), respectively. The highest radon concentration was detected in a confined area, 86.6 ± 6.0 Bq m(-3), while the maximum thoron level was found in a storage room, 78.1 ± 14.0 Bq m(-3). At each site, the concentrations of radon and thoron were measured at two heights, 5 cm and 120 cm above the floor. The effect of the measurement heights on the concentration level was significant in the case of thoron. The monitoring of radon and thoron concentrations showed a lower radon concentration during work hours than at other times of the day. This can be attributed to the ventilation systems, including the air conditioner and natural ventilation, which normally operate during work hours. The diurnal variation was less observed in the case of thoron, as the change in its concentration during and after the working hours was insignificant. The study also investigated the influence of the floor level and flooring type on indoor radon and thoron concentrations. The elevated levels of radon and thoron were largely found in basements and ground floor levels and in rooms with concrete flooring. PMID:25827573

  12. Political Factors Affecting the Enactment of State-Level Clean Indoor Air Laws

    PubMed Central

    Vernick, Jon S.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Webster, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the effects of key political institutional factors on the advancement of state-level clean indoor air laws. Methods. We performed an observational study of state-level clean indoor air law enactment among all 50 US states from 1993 to 2010 by using extended Cox hazard models to assess risk of enacting a relevant law. Results. During the 18-year period from 1993 to 2010, 28 states passed a law covering workplaces, 33 states passed a law covering restaurants, 29 states passed a law covering bars, and 16 states passed a law covering gaming facilities. States with term limits had a 2.15 times greater hazard (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27, 3.65; P = .005) of enacting clean indoor air laws. The presence of state-level preemption of local clean indoor air laws was associated with a 3.26 times greater hazard (95% CI = 1.11, 9.53; P = .031) of state-level policy enactment. In the presence of preemption, increased legislative professionalism was strongly associated (hazard ratio = 3.28; 95% CI = 1.10, 9.75; P = .033) with clean indoor air law enactment. Conclusions. Political institutional factors do influence state-level clean indoor air law enactment and may be relevant to other public health policy areas. PMID:24825239

  13. A COMPARISON OF WINTER SHORT-TERM AND ANNUAL AVERAGE RADON MEASUREMENTS IN BASEMENTS OF A RADON-PRONE REGION AND EVALUATION OF FURTHER RADON TESTING INDICATORS

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Nirmalla G.; Steck, Daniel J.; Field, R. William

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the temporal variability between basement winter short-term (7 to 10 days) and basement annual radon measurements. Other objectives were to test the short-term measurement’s diagnostic performance at two reference levels and to evaluate its ability to predict annual average basement radon concentrations. Electret ion chamber (short-term) and alpha track (annual) radon measurements were obtained by trained personnel in Iowa residences. Overall, the geometric mean of the short-term radon concentrations (199 Bq m−3) was slightly greater than the geometric mean of the annual radon concentrations (181 Bq m−3). Short-term tests incorrectly predicted that the basement annual radon concentrations would be below 148 Bq m−3 12% of the time and 2% of the time at 74 Bq m−3. The short-term and annual radon concentrations were strongly correlated (r=0.87, p<0.0001). The foundation wall material of the basement was the only significant factor to have an impact on the absolute difference between the short-term and annual measurements. The findings from this study provide evidence of a substantially lower likelihood of obtaining a false negative result from a single short-term test in a region with high indoor radon potential when the reference level is lowered to 74 Bq m−3. PMID:24670901

  14. Human health risks of formaldehyde indoor levels: An issue of concern.

    PubMed

    Rovira, Joaquim; Roig, Neus; Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a carcinogenic substance for humans. Exposure to formaldehyde may also cause eye and respiratory tract irritation, as well as skin sensitization. The main indoor sources of formaldehyde are wood-pressed products, insulation materials, paints, varnishes, household cleaning products and cigarettes, among others. Although this chemical is a well-known indoor pollutant, data on indoor concentrations of formaldehyde are still scarce in some countries. In February 2014, 10 homes in Catalonia, Spain, were randomly selected to collect indoor (bedroom and living room) and outdoor air samples. Ten additional samples were also collected at different workplaces (e.g., offices, shops, classrooms, etc.). Formaldehyde air levels found in homes ranged from 10.7 to 47.7 μg m(-3), from 9.65 to 37.2 μg m(-3), and from 0.96 to 3.37 μg m(-3) in bedrooms, living rooms, and outdoors, respectively. Meanwhile, at workplaces, indoor air levels ranged from 5.86 to 40.4 μg m(-3). These levels are in agreement with data found in the scientific literature. Non-carcinogenic risks were above the threshold limit (HQ > 1), and carcinogenic risks were not acceptable either (>10(-4)). Despite the current study limitations, the results confirm that formaldehyde indoor levels are a matter of health concern, which must be taken into account by policymakers and regulatory bodies. PMID:26785855

  15. A reconnaissance study of radon concentration in Hamadan city, Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, G. K.; Jabari Vasal, Naghi

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents results of a reconnaissance study that used CR-39 alpha track-etch detectors to measure radon concentrations in dwellings in Hamadan, western Iran, significantly, built on permeable alluvial fan deposits. The indoor radon levels recorded varied from 4 to 364 Bq/m3 with a mean value of 107.87 Bq/m3 which is 2.5 times the average global population-weighted indoor radon concentration - these data augment the very few published studies on indoor radon levels in Iran. The maximum radon concentration in Hamadan occurs during the winter period (January to March) with lower concentrations during the autumn. The effective dose equivalent to the population in Hamadan is estimated from this reconnaissance study to be in the region of 2.7 mSv/y, which is above the guidelines for dose to a member of the public of 1 mSv/y suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in 1993, although further work is required to confirm these results. This study supports other work in a number of countries that indicates such permeable 'surficial' deposits as being of intermediate to high radon potential. In western Iran, the presence of hammered clay floors, the widespread presence of excavated qanats to distribute water underground, the textural properties of surficial deposits and human behaviour intended to cope with winds are likely to be important factors influencing radon concentrations in older buildings. Keywords: Radon; health; dwellings; clay floors; alluvial fan; surficial geology; Hamadan; Iran

  16. Characterizing the occurrence, sources, and variability of radon in Pacific Northwest homes.

    PubMed

    Turk, B H; Prill, R J; Grimsrud, D T; Moed, B A; Sextro, R G

    1990-04-01

    A compilation of data from earlier studies of 172 homes in the Pacific Northwest indicated that approximately 65 percent of the 46 homes tested in the Spokane River Valley/Rathdrum Prairie region of eastern Washington/northern Idaho had heating season indoor radon (222Rn) concentrations above the U. S. EPA guideline of 148 Bq m-3 (4 pCi L-1). A subset of 35 homes was selected for additional study. The primary source of indoor radon in the Spokane River Valley/Rathdrum Prairie was pressure-driven flow of soil gas containing moderate radon concentrations (geometric mean concentration of 16,000 Bq m-3) from the highly permeable soils (geometric mean permeability of 5 x 10(-11) m2) surrounding the house substructures. Estimated soil gas entry rates ranged from 0.4 to 39 m3h-1 and 1 percent to 21 percent of total building air infiltration. Radon from other sources, including domestic water supplies and building materials was negligible. In high radon homes, winter indoor levels averaged 13 times higher than summer concentrations, while in low radon homes winter levels averaged only 2.5 times higher. Short-term variations in indoor radon were observed to be dependent upon indoor-outdoor temperature differences, wind speed, and operation of forced-air furnace fans. Forced-air furnace operation, along with leaky return ducts and plenums, and openings between the substructure and upper floors enhanced mixing of radon-laden substructure air throughout the rest of the building. PMID:2340149

  17. Characterizing the occurrence, sources, and variability of radon in pacific northwest homes

    SciTech Connect

    Turk, B.H.; Prill, R.J.; Grimsrud, D.T.; Moed, B.A.; Sextro, R.G. )

    1990-04-01

    A compilation of data from earlier studies of 172 homes in the Pacific Northwest indicated that approximately 65 percent of the 46 homes tested in the Spokane River Valley/Rathdrum Prairie region of eastern Washington/northern Idaho had heating season indoor radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentrations above the U.S. EPA guideline of 148 Bq m{sup {minus}3} (4 pCi L{sup {minus}1}). A subset of 35 homes was selected for additional study. The primary source of indoor radon in the Spokane River Valley/Rathdrum Prairie was pressure-driven flow of soil gas containing moderate radon concentrations (geometric mean concentration of 16,000 Bq m{sup {minus}3}) from the highly permeable soils (geometric mean permeability of 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} m{sup 2}) surrounding the house substructures. Estimated soil gas entry rates ranged from 0.4 to 39 m{sup 3}h{sup {minus}1} and 1 percent to 21 percent of total building air infiltration. Radon from other sources, including domestic water supplies and building materials was negligible. In high radon homes, winter indoor levels averaged 13 times higher than summer concentrations, while in low radon homes winter levels averaged only 2.5 times higher. Short-term variations in indoor radon were observed to be dependent upon indoor-outdoor temperature differences, wind speed, and operation of forced-air furnace fans. Forced-air furnace operations, along with leaky return ducts and plenums, and openings between the substructure and upper floors enhanced mixing of radon laden substructure air throughout the rest of the building.

  18. Children's Exposure to Radon in Nursery and Primary Schools.

    PubMed

    Branco, Pedro T B S; Nunes, Rafael A O; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria C M; Martins, Fernando G; Sousa, Sofia I V

    2016-04-01

    The literature proves an evident association between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer, even at low doses. This study brings a new approach to the study of children's exposure to radon by aiming to evaluate exposure to indoor radon concentrations in nursery and primary schools from two districts in Portugal (Porto and Bragança), considering different influencing factors (occupation patterns, classroom floor level, year of the buildings' construction and soil composition of the building site), as well as the comparison with IAQ standard values for health protection. Fifteen nursery and primary schools in the Porto and Bragança districts were considered: five nursery schools for infants and twelve for pre-schoolers (seven different buildings), as well as eight primary schools. Radon measurements were performed continuously. The measured concentrations depended on the building occupation, classroom floor level and year of the buildings' construction. Although they were in general within the Portuguese legislation for IAQ, exceedances to international standards were found. These results point out the need of assessing indoor radon concentrations not only in primary schools, but also in nursery schools, never performed in Portugal before this study. It is important to extend the study to other microenvironments like homes, and in time to estimate the annual effective dose and to assess lifetime health risks. PMID:27043596

  19. Map showing radon potential of rocks and soils in Montgomery County, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gundersen, L.C.; Reimer, G.M.; Wiggs, C.R.; Rice, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes the radon potential of Montgomery County in the context of its geology. Radon is a naturally occurring gas produced by the radioactive decay of uranium. Radon produced by uraniferous rocks and soils may enter a house through porous building materials and through openings in walls and floors. Radon gases has a tendency to move from the higher pressure commonly existing in the soil to the lower pressure commonly existing in the house. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA, 1986a) estimates that elevated levels of indoor radon may be associated with 5,000 to 20,000 of the 130,000 lung cancer deaths per year. They also estimate that 8 to 12 percent of the homes in the United States will have annual average indoor radon levels exceeding 4 picoCuries per liter of air (pCi/L). Above this level, the U.S. EPA recommends homeowners take remedial action. May factors control the amount of radon which may enter a home from the geologic environment. Soil drainage, permeability, and moisture content effect the amount of radon that can be released from rocks and soils (known as the emmanation) and may limit or increase how far it can migrate. Well drained, highly permeable soils facilitate the movement of radon. Soils with water content in the 8 to 15 percent range enhance the emmanation of radon (Lindmark, 1985). Daily and seasonal variations in soil and indoor radon can be caused by meteorologic factors such as barometric pressure, temperature, and wind (Clements and Wilkening, 1974; Schery and other, 1984). Construction practices also inhibit or promote entry of radon into the home (U.S. EPA, 1986b). In general, however, geology controls the source and distribution of radon (Akerblom and Wilson, 1982; Gundersen and others, 1987, 1988; Sextro and others, 1987; U.S. EPA, 1983; Peake, 1988; Peake and Hess, 1988). The following sections describe: 1) the methods used to measure radon and equivalent uranium (eU) in soil; 2) the radon potential

  20. Lung cancer mortality and radon concentration in a chronically exposed neighborhood in Chihuahua, Mexico: a geospatial analysis.

    PubMed

    Hinojosa de la Garza, Octavio R; Sanín, Luz H; Montero Cabrera, María Elena; Serrano Ramirez, Korina Ivette; Martínez Meyer, Enrique; Reyes Cortés, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study correlated lung cancer (LC) mortality with statistical data obtained from government public databases. In order to asses a relationship between LC deaths and radon accumulation in dwellings, indoor radon concentrations were measured with passive detectors randomly distributed in Chihuahua City. Kriging (K) and Inverse-Distance Weighting (IDW) spatial interpolations were carried out. Deaths were georeferenced and Moran's I correlation coefficients were calculated. The mean values (over n = 171) of the interpolation of radon concentrations of deceased's dwellings were 247.8 and 217.1 Bq/m(3), for K and IDW, respectively. Through the Moran's I values obtained, correspondingly equal to 0.56 and 0.61, it was evident that LC mortality was directly associated with locations with high levels of radon, considering a stable population for more than 25 years, suggesting spatial clustering of LC deaths due to indoor radon concentrations. PMID:25165752

  1. Lung Cancer Mortality and Radon Concentration in a Chronically Exposed Neighborhood in Chihuahua, Mexico: A Geospatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa de la Garza, Octavio R.; Sanín, Luz H.; Montero Cabrera, María Elena; Serrano Ramirez, Korina Ivette; Martínez Meyer, Enrique; Reyes Cortés, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study correlated lung cancer (LC) mortality with statistical data obtained from government public databases. In order to asses a relationship between LC deaths and radon accumulation in dwellings, indoor radon concentrations were measured with passive detectors randomly distributed in Chihuahua City. Kriging (K) and Inverse-Distance Weighting (IDW) spatial interpolations were carried out. Deaths were georeferenced and Moran's I correlation coefficients were calculated. The mean values (over n = 171) of the interpolation of radon concentrations of deceased's dwellings were 247.8 and 217.1 Bq/m3, for K and IDW, respectively. Through the Moran's I values obtained, correspondingly equal to 0.56 and 0.61, it was evident that LC mortality was directly associated with locations with high levels of radon, considering a stable population for more than 25 years, suggesting spatial clustering of LC deaths due to indoor radon concentrations. PMID:25165752

  2. Impact of haze-fog days to radon progeny equilibrium factor and discussion of related factors.

    PubMed

    Hou, Changsong; Shang, Bing; Zhang, Qingzhao; Cui, Hongxing; Wu, Yunyun; Deng, Jun

    2015-11-01

    The equilibrium factor F between radon and its short-lived progenies is an important parameter to estimate radon exposure of humans. Therefore, indoor and outdoor concentrations of radon and its short-lived radon progeny were measured in Beijing area using a continuously measuring device, in an effort to obtain information on the F value. The results showed that the mean values of F were 0.58 ± 0.13 (0.25-0.95, n = 305) and 0.52 ± 0.12 (0.31-0.91, n = 64) for indoor and outdoor, respectively. The indoor F value during haze-fog days was higher than the typical value of 0.4 recommended by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and it was also higher than the values of 0.47 and 0.49 reported in the literature. A positive correlation was observed between indoor F values and PM2.5 concentrations (R (2) = 0.71). Since 2013, owing to frequent heavy haze-fog events in Beijing and surrounding areas, the number of the days with severe pollution remains at a high level. Future studies on the impact of the ambient fine particulate matter on indoor radon progeny equilibrium factor F could be important. PMID:26143065

  3. Experiences in radon-safe building in Finland.

    PubMed

    Arvela, H

    2001-05-14

    A study was made of radon-safe buildings in 300 Finnish low-rise residential buildings using data obtained from a questionnaire study. The study also aims at finding the main defects in design and implementation and how the guidance given on radon-safe buildings in slab-on-grade houses has been followed. According to the guidelines, the prevention of the flow of radon-bearing air from the soil into the house is recommended to be carried out through installation of aluminised bitumen felt and use of elastic sealants. Second, as a precaution perforated piping should be installed in the subsoil of the floor slab. The median indoor radon concentration in the houses was 155 Bq/m3. This is 32% lower than the median of the estimated reference values. The action level of 200 Bq/m3 was still exceeded in 40% of the houses. In most houses with slab-on-grade the prevention was based only on the installation of a sub-slab depressurisation system. Sealing was performed in a low number of houses. In 80% of houses with a sub-slab piping connected to an operating fan, radon concentration was below the action level of 200 Bq/m3. In houses with piping but no fan, the corresponding fraction was only 45%. Sub-slab piping without a fan had no remarkable effect on radon concentration. In houses with crawl-space and edge-thickened slabs, radon concentrations were low. The choice of foundation system thus significantly affects the indoor radon concentration. The importance of complete and careful sealing work should be stressed in advice and guides concerning radon prevention. PMID:11379905

  4. Mapping the radon potential of the united states: Examples from the Appalachians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gundersen, L.C.S.; Schumann, R.R.

    1997-01-01

    The geologic radon potential of the United States was recently assessed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Results indicate that approximately 33% of the U.S. population lives within geologic provinces where the average indoor radon levels have the potential to be greater than 4 pCi/L (147 Bq/m3). Rock types most commonly associated with high indoor radon include: 1) Uraniferous metamorphosed sediments, volcanics, and granite intrusives, especially those that are highly deformed or sheared. 2) Glacial deposits derived from uranium-bearing rocks and sediments. 3) Carboniferous, black shales. 4) Soils derived from carbonate rock, especially in karstic terrain. 5) Uraniferous fluvial, deltaic, marine, and lacustrine deposits. Different geologic terrains of the eastern United States illustrate some of the problems inherent in correlating indoor radon with geology. The Central and Southern Appalachian Highlands of the eastern United States have not been glaciated and most soils there are saprolitic, derived directly from the underlying bedrock. Regression analyses of bedrock geologic and radon parameters yield positive correlations (R > 0.5 to 0.9) and indicate that bedrock geology can account for a significant portion of the indoor radon variation. In glaciated areas of the United States such as the northern Appalachian Highlands and Appalachian Plateau, the correlation of bedrock geology to indoor radon is obscured or is positive only in certain cases. In these glaciated areas of the country, it is the type, composition, thickness, and permeability of glacial deposits, rather than the bedrock geology, that controls the radon source.

  5. Radon exposures in a Jerusalem public school.

    PubMed

    Richter, E D; Neeman, E; Fischer, I; Berdugo, M; Westin, J B; Kleinstern, J; Margaliot, M

    1997-12-01

    In December 1995, ambient radon levels exceeding 10,000 Bq/m3 were measured in a basement shelter workroom of a multilevel East Talpiot, Jerusalem, public elementary school (six grades, 600 students). The measurements were taken after cancers (breast and multiple myeloma) were diagnosed in two workers who spent their workdays in basement rooms. The school was located on a hill that geologic maps show to be rich in phosphate deposits, which are a recognized source for radon gas and its daughter products. Levels exceeding 1000,000 Bq/m3 were measured at the mouth of a pipe in the basement shelter workroom, the major point of radon entry. The school was closed and charcoal and electret ion chamber detectors were used to carry out repeated 5-day measurements in all rooms in the multilevel building over a period of several months. Radon concentrations were generally higher in rooms in the four levels of the building that were below ground level. There were some ground-level rooms in the building in which levels reached up to 1300 Bq/m3. In rooms above ground level, however, peak levels did not exceed 300 Bq/m3. Exposure control based on sealing and positive pressure ventilation was inadequate. These findings suggested that radon diffused from highly contaminated basement and ground-floor rooms to other areas of the building and that sealing off the source may have led to reaccumulation of radon beneath the building. Later, subslab venting of below-ground radon pockets to the outside air was followed by more sustained reductions in indoor radon levels to levels below 75 Bq/m3. Even so, radon accumulated in certain rooms when the building was closed. This sentinel episode called attention to the need for a national radon policy requiring threshold exposure levels for response and control. A uniform nationwide standard for school buildings below 75 Bq/m3 level was suggested after considering prudent avoidance, the controversies over risk assessment of prolonged low-level

  6. Radon exposures in a Jerusalem public school.

    PubMed Central

    Richter, E D; Neeman, E; Fischer, I; Berdugo, M; Westin, J B; Kleinstern, J; Margaliot, M

    1997-01-01

    In December 1995, ambient radon levels exceeding 10,000 Bq/m3 were measured in a basement shelter workroom of a multilevel East Talpiot, Jerusalem, public elementary school (six grades, 600 students). The measurements were taken after cancers (breast and multiple myeloma) were diagnosed in two workers who spent their workdays in basement rooms. The school was located on a hill that geologic maps show to be rich in phosphate deposits, which are a recognized source for radon gas and its daughter products. Levels exceeding 1000,000 Bq/m3 were measured at the mouth of a pipe in the basement shelter workroom, the major point of radon entry. The school was closed and charcoal and electret ion chamber detectors were used to carry out repeated 5-day measurements in all rooms in the multilevel building over a period of several months. Radon concentrations were generally higher in rooms in the four levels of the building that were below ground level. There were some ground-level rooms in the building in which levels reached up to 1300 Bq/m3. In rooms above ground level, however, peak levels did not exceed 300 Bq/m3. Exposure control based on sealing and positive pressure ventilation was inadequate. These findings suggested that radon diffused from highly contaminated basement and ground-floor rooms to other areas of the building and that sealing off the source may have led to reaccumulation of radon beneath the building. Later, subslab venting of below-ground radon pockets to the outside air was followed by more sustained reductions in indoor radon levels to levels below 75 Bq/m3. Even so, radon accumulated in certain rooms when the building was closed. This sentinel episode called attention to the need for a national radon policy requiring threshold exposure levels for response and control. A uniform nationwide standard for school buildings below 75 Bq/m3 level was suggested after considering prudent avoidance, the controversies over risk assessment of prolonged low-level

  7. Investigation of Relation Between Outdoor Temperature and Radon Concentration in Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Muellerova, M.; Holy, K.

    2007-11-26

    The results of measurements of radon concentration variations in two types of buildings in Slovakia are reported. The AlphaGUARD radon monitor was used for continuous monitoring of radon activity concentration in indoor air. The analysis showed that the indoor radon in both buildings had very different responses to outdoor temperature.

  8. Radon reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, M.A. )

    1990-11-01

    During a radon gas screening program, elevated levels of radon gas were detected in homes on Mackinac Island, Mich. Six homes on foundations with crawl spaces were selected for a research project aimed at reducing radon gas concentrations, which ranged from 12.9 to 82.3 pCi/l. Using isolation and ventilation techniques, and variations thereof, radon concentrations were reduced to less than 1 pCi/l. This paper reports that these reductions were achieved using 3.5 mil cross laminated or 10 mil high density polyethylene plastic as a barrier without sealing to the foundation or support piers, solid and/or perforated plastic pipe and mechanical fans. Wind turbines were found to be ineffective at reducing concentrations to acceptable levels. Homeowners themselves installed all materials.

  9. RADON GENERATION AND TRANSPORT THROUGH CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an examination of radon generation and transport through Florida residential concretes for their contribution to indoor radon concentrations. Radium concentrations in the 11 concretes tested were all <2.5 pCi/g and radon emanation coefficients were all...

  10. Radon mapping strategies in Austria.

    PubMed

    Gruber, V; Ringer, W; Wurm, G; Friedmann, H

    2015-11-01

    According to current European and international recommendations (e.g. by IAEA, WHO and European Union), countries shall identify high radon areas. In Austria, this task was initiated already in the early 1990s, which yielded the first Austrian Radon Potential Map. This map is still in use, updated with recent indoor radon data in 2012. The map is based on radon gas measurements in randomly selected dwellings, normalised to a standard situation. To meet the current (legal) requirements, uncertainties in the existing Austrian radon map should be reduced. A new indoor radon survey with a different sampling strategy was started, and possible mapping methods are studied and tested. In this paper, the methodology for the existing map as well as the planned strategies to improve this map is discussed. PMID:25911411

  11. New Methods of Energy Efficient Radon Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Prill, R.J.; Wooley, J.; Bonnefous, Y.C.; Gadgil, A.J.; Riley, W.J.

    1994-05-01

    Two new radon mitigation techniques are introduced and their evaluation in a field study complemented by numerical model predictions is described. Based on numerical predictions, installation of a sub gravel membrane at the study site resulted in a factor of two reduction in indoor radon concentrations. Experimental data indicated that installation of 'short-circuit' pipes extending between the subslab gravel and outdoors, caused an additional factor of two decrease in the radon concentration. Consequently, the combination of these two passive radon mitigation features, called the membrane and short-circuit (MASC) technique, was associated with a factor of four reduction in indoor radon concentration. The energy-efficient active radon mitigation method, called efficient active subslab pressurization (EASP), required only 20% of the fan energy of conventional active subslab depressurization and reduced the indoor radon concentration by approximately a factor of 15, including the numerically-predicted impact of the sub-gravel membrane.

  12. Children's Physical Activity Levels during Indoor Recess Dance Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Heather; Koufoudakis, Ryann; Beighle, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Background: Children's physical activity (PA) levels remain low, and schools are being asked to assume a leadership role in PA promotion. Research suggests outdoor recess contributes to children's overall PA levels. However, similar research is not available for indoor recess, which occurs frequently due to a variety of factors. The…

  13. Indoor air quality large building characterization project planning. Report for September 1992--May 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Menetrez, M.Y.; Kulp, R.N.; Pyle, B.; Williamson, A.; McDonough, S.

    1998-08-01

    Three buildings were characterized in this project by examining radon concentrations and indoor air quality (IAQ) levels as affected by building ventilation dynamics. IAQ data collection stations (IAQDS) for monitoring and data logging, remote switches (pressure and sail switches), and a weather station were installed. Measurements of indoor radon carbon dioxide, particle concentrations, temperature, humidity, pressure differentials, ambient and sub-slab radon concentrations, and outdoor air (OA) intake flow rates were collected. The OA intake was adjusted when possible, and fan cycles were controlled while tracer gas measurements were taken in all zones and IAQDS data were collected. Ventilation, infiltration, mixing rates, radon entry, pressure/temperature convective driving forces, CO{sub 2} generation/decay rates, and IAQ levels were established for baseline and OA-adjusted conditions.

  14. Home radon monitor modeled after the common smoke detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bolton, R.D.; Arnone, G.J.; Johnson, J.P.

    1995-02-01

    The EPA has declared that five million or so of the nation`s 80 million homes may have indoor radon levels that pose an unacceptably high risk of lung cancer to occupants. They estimate that four times as many people die from radon-induced lung cancers as from fires in the home. Therefore the EPA has recommended that all homes be tested and that action be taken to reduce the radon concentration in homes that test above the 4 pCi/L level. The push to have homeowners voluntarily test for elevated radon levels has been only marginally successful. A reliable, inexpensive, and accurate in-home radon monitor designed along the same general lines as a home smoke detector might overcome much of the public reluctance to test homes for radon. Such a Home Radon Monitor (HRM) is under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. To be acceptable to the public, HRMs should have the following characteristics in common with smoke detectors: low cost, small size, ease of installation and use, low maintenance, and high performance. Recent advances in Long-Range Alpha Detection technology are being used in the design of a HRM that should meet or exceed all these characteristics. A proof-of-principle HRM detector prototype has been constructed and results from tests of this prototype will be presented.

  15. Geochemical and γ ray characterization of Pennsylvanian black shales: Implications for elevated home radon levels in Vanderburgh County, Indiana.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Kent W; Elliott, William S

    2015-10-01

    Radon ((222)Rn) is a radioactive gas that results from the decay of uranium ((238)U) in the Earth's crust. This study characterizes the presence and relative quantity of radon precursors in the Pennsylvanian black shales of southwest Indiana. Cores were drilled on the campus of the University of Southern Indiana to a depth of 237.7 m (780 ft) during exploration for coal-bed methane. Gamma ray logs were taken to measure radioactive activity as a function of depth in the bore hole. Activity readings of 270, 467, 555, and 388 GAPI (American Petroleum Institute γ ray units) were measured at depths of 124.3 m (408 ft), 154.0 m (505 ft), 187.1 m (614 ft) and 214.0 m (702 ft) in four separate shale layers of the Pennsylvanian stratigraphic column. GAPI units are used in the petroleum industry when drilling to represent the relative intensities of γ radiation from (40)K, (232)Th, and (238)U in bore holes (Belknap et al., 1959). For purposes of this study, the high activity readings on the gamma ray logs were used only to identify at which depths further gamma ray spectroscopy of the cores would be completed in the laboratory. Gamma ray spectroscopic studies of these cores were conducted with a large volume NaI crystal detector to observe γ rays of specific energies. Characteristic γ rays from various isotopes were identified confirming the presence and relative quantity of radon precursors in core samples. Geochemical analysis of cores was also conducted to measure presence and quantity of trace metals and radon precursors. Of 744 homes tested in Vanderburgh County from 2007 to 2013, 169 homes (22.7 percent) had elevated radon levels greater than 148 mBq L(-1) (4.0 pCi L(-1)). Additionally, 246 homes (33.1 percent) had measured radon levels of 74-145 mBq L(-1) (2.0-3.9 pCi L(-1)). About 80 percent of elevated radon levels greater than 148 mBq L(-1) (4.0 pCi L(-1)) are located in proximity to depositional contacts between the Dugger and Shelburn formations, or the

  16. Indoor and Outdoor Levels and Sources of Submicron Particles (PM1) at Homes in Edmonton, Canada.

    PubMed

    Bari, Md Aynul; Kindzierski, Warren B; Wallace, Lance A; Wheeler, Amanda J; MacNeill, Morgan; Héroux, Marie-Ève

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to submicron particles (PM1) is of interest due to their possible chronic and acute health effects. Seven consecutive 24-h PM1 samples were collected during winter and summer 2010 in a total of 74 nonsmoking homes in Edmonton, Canada. Median winter concentrations of PM1 were 2.2 μg/m(3) (interquartile range, IQR = 0.8-6.1 μg/m(3)) and 3.3 μg/m(3) (IQR = 1.5-6.9 μg/m(3)) for indoors and outdoors, respectively. In the summer, indoor (median 4.4 μg/m(3), IQR = 2.4-8.6 μg/m(3)) and outdoor (median 4.3 μg/m(3), IQR = 2.6-7.4 μg/m(3)) levels were similar. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to identify and apportion indoor and outdoor sources of elements in PM1 mass. Nine sources contributing to both indoor and outdoor PM1 concentrations were identified including secondary sulfate, soil, biomass smoke and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), traffic, settled and mixed dust, coal combustion, road salt/road dust, and urban mixture. Three additional indoor sources were identified i.e., carpet dust, copper-rich, and silver-rich. Secondary sulfate, soil, biomass smoke and ETS contributed more than 70% (indoors: 0.29 μg/m(3), outdoors: 0.39 μg/m(3)) of measured elemental mass in PM1. These findings can aid understanding of relationships between submicron particles and health outcomes for indoor/outdoor sources. PMID:26000896

  17. Radon and lung cancer risk: taking stock at the millenium.

    PubMed Central

    Samet, J M; Eradze, G R

    2000-01-01

    Radon is a well-established human carcinogen for which extensive data are available, extending into the range of exposures experienced by the general population. Mounting epidemiologic evidence on radon and lung cancer risk, now available from more than 20 different studies of underground miners and complementary laboratory findings, indicates that risks are linear in exposure without threshold. Radon is also a ubiquitous indoor air pollutant in homes, and risk projections imply that radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. Recommended control strategies in the United States and other countries, which include testing of most homes and mitigation of those exceeding guideline levels, have been controversial. Further research is needed, drawing on molecular and cellular approaches and continuing the follow-up of the underground miner cohorts, and scientists should work toward constructing mechanistically based models that combine epidemiologic and experimental data to yield risk estimates with enhanced certainty. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931781

  18. EFFECTS OF NATURAL AND FORCED BASEMENT VENTILATION ON RADON LEVELS IN SINGLE FAMILY DWELLINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives, for the first time, results of an extensive study of the effect of ventilation on radon concentrations and radon entry rate in a single-family dwelling. Measurements of radon concentrations, building dynamics, and environmental parameters made in Princeton Unive...

  19. Impacts of Earthquake Aftermath on Indoor Carbon Monoxide Levels in Turkish Coffeehouses Environment in Duzce, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Bahcebasi, T; Guler, C; Kandis, H; Kara, İ H

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 1999, Duzce suffered two consecutive devastating earthquakes above magnitude 7 in August and November. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the indoor air quality of coffeehouses by determining carbon monoxide (CO) levels and their contributing factors in coffeehouses built before and after the earthquake. Methods: We conducted our study in 76 Turkish coffeehouses in Duzce in winter (November 2007–March 2008) during rush hours (18:00–23:00). The Turkish coffeehouses included in the study were evaluated under four categories based on smoking status and construction date. The characteristics of the coffeehouses, such as their CO levels and temperatures both indoors and outdoors, were all measured. These analyses were carried out with the SPSS 15.0 program. Results: The CO levels in Turkish coffeehouses were above the values indicated as being safe by the WHO. While stoves and cooking equipment were determined to contribute to indoor CO levels, cigarettes were found to be the main source. Indoor CO levels at second hour were very strongly correlated (r: 0.84, P<0.001) (r: 0.91, P<0.001) with indoor CO levels at initial and first hour as well as with smoking status (r: 0.69, P<0.001); they were also moderately correlated with the room volume (r: 0.34, P<0.001) and construction materials (r: 0.31, P<0.001) of the coffeehouse. Conclusion: Elevated CO levels in Turkish coffeehouses indicate the possible presence of other pollutants, particularly when the main source is smoking. In such cases, both individuals and the whole of society are affected negatively in many ways. Therefore, smoking should be prohibited by law in Turkish coffeehouses and national awareness programs should be developed based on peoples’ lifestyles. Moreover, the standards for construction and management of Turkish coffeehouses should be improved as well. PMID:23113122

  20. Characterizing the sources, range, and environmental influences of radon 222 and its decay products

    SciTech Connect

    Nero, A.V.; Sextro, R.G.; Doyle, S.M.; Moed, B.A.; Nazaroff, W.W., Revzan, K.L.; Schwehr, M.B.

    1985-06-01

    Recent results from our group directly assist efforts to identify and control excessive concentrations of radon 222 and its decay products in residential environments. We have demonstrated directly the importance of pressure-induced flow of soil gas for transport of radon from the ground into houses. Analysis of available information from measurements of concentration in US homes has resulted in a quantitative appreciation of the distribution of indoor levels, including the degree of dependence on geographic location. Experiments on the effectiveness of air cleaning devices for removal of particles and radon decay products indicate the potential and limitations of this approach to control. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Radiological risk of building materials using homemade airtight radon chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab.; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2014-02-01

    Soil based building materials known to contain various amounts of natural radionuclide mainly 238U and 232Th series and 40K. In general most individuals spend 80% of their time indoors and the natural radioactivity in building materials is a main source of indoor radiation exposure. The internal exposure due to building materials in dwellings and workplaces is mainly caused by the activity concentrations of short lived 222Radon and its progenies which arise from the decay of 226Ra. In this study, the indoor radon concentration emanating from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were measured in a homemade airtight radon chamber using continuous radon monitor 1029 model of Sun Nuclear. Radon monitor were left in the chamber for 96 hours with an hour counting time interval. From the result, the indoor radon concentrations for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples determined were 396 Bq m-3, 192 Bq m-3, 176 Bq m-3 and 28 Bq m-3, respectively. The result indicates that the radon concentration in the studied building materials have more than 100 Bq m-3 i.e. higher than the WHO action level except for Portland cement sample. The calculated annual effective dose for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were determined to be 10 mSv y-1, 4.85 mSv y-1, 4.44 mSv y-1 and 0.72 mSv y-1, respectively. This study showed that all the calculated effective doses generated from indoor radon to dwellers or workers were in the range of limit recommended ICRP action levels i.e. 3 - 10 mSv y-1. As consequences, the radiological risk for the dwellers in terms of fatal lifetime cancer risk per million for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement were calculated to be 550, 267, 244 and 40 persons respectively.

  2. Radiological risk of building materials using homemade airtight radon chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab.; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2014-02-12

    Soil based building materials known to contain various amounts of natural radionuclide mainly {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series and {sup 40}K. In general most individuals spend 80% of their time indoors and the natural radioactivity in building materials is a main source of indoor radiation exposure. The internal exposure due to building materials in dwellings and workplaces is mainly caused by the activity concentrations of short lived {sup 222}Radon and its progenies which arise from the decay of {sup 226}Ra. In this study, the indoor radon concentration emanating from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were measured in a homemade airtight radon chamber using continuous radon monitor 1029 model of Sun Nuclear. Radon monitor were left in the chamber for 96 hours with an hour counting time interval. From the result, the indoor radon concentrations for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples determined were 396 Bq m{sup −3}, 192 Bq m{sup −3}, 176 Bq m{sup −3} and 28 Bq m{sup −3}, respectively. The result indicates that the radon concentration in the studied building materials have more than 100 Bq m{sup −3} i.e. higher than the WHO action level except for Portland cement sample. The calculated annual effective dose for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement samples were determined to be 10 mSv y{sup −1}, 4.85 mSv y{sup −1}, 4.44 mSv y{sup −1} and 0.72 mSv y{sup −1}, respectively. This study showed that all the calculated effective doses generated from indoor radon to dwellers or workers were in the range of limit recommended ICRP action levels i.e. 3 - 10 mSv y{sup −1}. As consequences, the radiological risk for the dwellers in terms of fatal lifetime cancer risk per million for cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and Portland cement were calculated to be 550, 267, 244 and 40 persons respectively.

  3. Introduction to Indoor Air Quality

    MedlinePlus

    ... as conditions caused by outdoor impacts (such as climate change). Many reports and studies indicate that the following ... Air Duct Cleaning Asthma Health, Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Flood Cleanup Home Remodel Indoor airPLUS Mold Radon ...

  4. Metal levels in indoor and outdoor dust in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Rajhi, M.A.; Seaward, M.R.D.; Al-Aamer, A.S.

    1996-08-01

    Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Li, Ni, Pb, and Zn of outdoor and indoor dusts in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, have been investigated in relation to particle sizes 0.04-0.08 mm using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS). Although the results showed relatively low contamination in general, the old industrial area had appreciably high levels of toxic metals and there relatively high Pb levels near motorways. Mean concentrations of outdoor dusts for Cd, Cr, Cu, Li, Ni, Pb, and Zn were 2.5 {+-} 0.3, 35.1 {+-}2.7, 93.9 {+-}41.9, 4.6 {+-} 0.3, 43.9 {+-} 5.6, 1762 {+-} 593, and 443 {+-} 223 {mu}g.g{sup -1}, respectively, and mean concentrations of indoor dusts were 2.9 {+-} 1.1, 69.2{+-} 16.5, 271 {+-} 140, 6.2 {+-} 0.5, 52.9 {+-} 17.7, 639 {+-} 279, and 547 {+-} 197 {mu}g.g{sup -1}, respectively. The main source of these heavy metals, in both outdoor and indoor dusts, was from automobile emission. The relationship between indoor and outdoor dusts were investigated. In view of the high levels of some of these toxic metals, these can be considered a significant hand-to-mouth source of exposure, especially for children. 28 refs., 3 fig., 4 tab.

  5. USACE FUSRAP Maywood Team Develops a Mechanism to Evaluate Residual Radon Exposure Potential at Vicinity Properties Where Remediation of Accessible Contamination has been Completed

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, M.; Walnicki, S.; Hays, D.

    2008-07-01

    The Maywood FUSRAP Team is obligated, under its approved remedy selection decision document, to demonstrate substantive compliance with New Jersey Administrative Code 7:28- 12(a)2, establishing an indoor limit of three Pico-Curies per liter above background for radon-222 (Rn-222). The Maywood Team explores various avenues for dealing with the radon issue and provides an alternative for demonstrating substantive compliance with the radon remediation standard by answering the question: 'In certain conservative situations, can compliance with the radon standard be demonstrated without performing monitoring?' While monitoring may be the most definitive method for demonstrating compliance, a logical argument can be made that when radiological remediation removes the potential source for Rn-222 above background, monitoring is unnecessary. This position is defended through the use of historical physical radon measurements which illustrate that indoor radon was not a pre-remediation problem, and post-remediation soil sampling data which demonstrate that the source of the potentially elevated Rn- 222 levels have been successfully mitigated. Monitoring recommendations are made for situations where insufficient data exists to make definitive determinations or when un-remediated sources affecting habitable structures remain on a given property. Additional information regarding recommended techniques and references for effective monitoring of indoor radon are included in this paper. This paper may benefit teams that have similar regulatory commitments and/or have need to make assessments of radon exposure potential based upon historical monitoring data and available soils concentration data. (authors)

  6. Radon potential mapping of the Tralee-Castleisland and Cavan areas (Ireland) based on airborne gamma-ray spectrometry and geology.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Doyle, E; Fenton, D; Organo, C

    2011-06-01

    The probability of homes in Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is estimated on the basis of known in-house radon measurements averaged over 10 km × 10 km grid squares. The scope for using airborne gamma-ray spectrometer data for the Tralee-Castleisland area of county Kerry and county Cavan to predict the radon potential (RP) in two distinct areas of Ireland is evaluated in this study. Airborne data are compared statistically with in-house radon measurements in conjunction with geological and ground permeability data to establish linear regression models and produce radon potential maps. The best agreement between the percentage of dwellings exceeding the reference level (RL) for radon concentrations in Ireland (% > RL), estimated from indoor radon data, and modelled RP in the Tralee-Castleisland area is produced using models based on airborne gamma-ray spectrometry equivalent uranium (eU) and ground permeability data. Good agreement was obtained between the % > RL from indoor radon data and RP estimated from eU data in the Cavan area using terrain specific models. In both areas, RP maps derived from eU data are spatially more detailed than the published 10 km grid map. The results show the potential for using airborne radiometric data for producing RP maps. PMID:21617292

  7. Levels and indoor-outdoor relationships of PM 10 and soluble inorganic ions in Beirut, Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, N. A.; Atallah, M.; Al-Kadamany, G.

    2009-03-01

    PM 10, which is considered among the major indoor and outdoor pollutants, was measured in several residential homes and corresponding outdoor environments in the Great Beirut area over the summer and winter seasons of 2005. Few studies on PM 10 levels indoors in Beirut are restricted to short-term periods in public places. In this study, 78 PM 10 samples were collected on Teflon filters using an active sampler at a flow rate of 5 L/min. PM 10 mass concentrations were determined by gravimetric analysis, and inorganic chemical speciation was carried out using ion chromatography. Outdoors, PM 10 elevated mass concentrations correlated well with high traffic density. The observed high intra-site temporal variation (minimum of 34 and a maximum of 120 μg/m 3) was attributed to the dynamic air masses passing over the Eastern Mediterranean region. Indoors, PM 10 levels were highly affected by outdoor levels, but were enhanced over those of outdoors when smoking activities were recorded. In winter, the overall average outdoor concentration dropped by 19%, whereas the average indoor concentration increased by 50% over the ones calculated for the summer. Ventilation and air exchange rates were found to be approximately equal to unity during summer since most doors and windows remain open. This rate drops to almost half during winter. As for particulate ions namely nitrates and sulfates, the former showed concentrations that are higher than the values reported in the region in both winter and summer seasons, suggesting high emissions from local vehicles. However, SO 42- average concentrations were comparable to values reported in other studies conducted in Eastern Mediterranean sites. Soluble particulate nitrates and sulfates exhibited similar indoor and outdoor levels in non-smoking homes (IO ~ 1), but in smoking homes the drop in nitrate concentrations reached around 70%, indicating a high anionic reactivity with tobacco smokes.

  8. Activity measurements of radon from construction materials.

    PubMed

    Fior, L; Nicolosi Corrêa, J; Paschuk, S A; Denyak, V V; Schelin, H R; Soreanu Pecequilo, B R; Kappke, J

    2012-07-01

    This work presents the results of radon concentration measurements of construction materials used in the Brazilian industry, such as clay (red) bricks and concrete blocks. The measurements focused on the detection of indoor radon activity during different construction stages and the analysis of radionuclides present in the construction materials. For this purpose, sealed chambers with internal dimensions of approximately 60×60×60 cm3 were built within a protected and isolated laboratory environment, and stable air humidity and temperature levels were maintained. These chambers were also used for radon emanation reduction tests. The chambers were built in four major stages: (1) assembly of the walls using clay (red) bricks, concrete blocks, and mortar; (2) installation of plaster; (3) finishing of wall surface using lime; and (4) insulation of wall surface and finishing using paint. Radon measurements were performed using polycarbonate etched track detectors. By comparing the three layers applied to the masonry walls, it was concluded that only the last step (wall painting using acrylic varnish) reduced the radon emanation, by a factor of approximately 2. Samples of the construction materials (clay bricks and concrete blocks) were ground, homogenized, and subjected to gamma-ray spectrometry analysis to evaluate the activity concentrations of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K. The values for the index of the activity concentration (I), radium equivalent activity (Raeq), and external hazard index (Hext) showed that these construction materials could be used without restrictions or concern about the equivalent dose limit (1 mSv/year). PMID:22280793

  9. Home energy efficiency and radon related risk of lung cancer: modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Milner, James; Shrubsole, Clive; Das, Payel; Jones, Benjamin; Ridley, Ian; Chalabi, Zaid; Hamilton, Ian; Armstrong, Ben; Davies, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of reducing home ventilation as part of household energy efficiency measures on deaths from radon related lung cancer. Design Modelling study. Setting England. Intervention Home energy efficiency interventions, motivated in part by targets for reducing greenhouse gases, which entail reduction in uncontrolled ventilation in keeping with good practice guidance. Main outcome measures Modelled current and future distributions of indoor radon levels for the English housing stock and associated changes in life years due to lung cancer mortality, estimated using life tables. Results Increasing the air tightness of dwellings (without compensatory purpose-provided ventilation) increased mean indoor radon concentrations by an estimated 56.6%, from 21.2 becquerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3) to 33.2 Bq/m3. After the lag in lung cancer onset, this would result in an additional annual burden of 4700 life years lost and (at peak) 278 deaths. The increases in radon levels for the millions of homes that would contribute most of the additional burden are below the threshold at which radon remediation measures are cost effective. Fitting extraction fans and trickle ventilators to restore ventilation will help offset the additional burden but only if the ventilation related energy efficiency gains are lost. Mechanical ventilation systems with heat recovery may lower radon levels and the risk of cancer while maintaining the advantage of energy efficiency for the most airtight dwellings but there is potential for a major adverse impact on health if such systems fail. Conclusion Unless specific remediation is used, reducing the ventilation of dwellings will improve energy efficiency only at the expense of population wide adverse impact on indoor exposure to radon and risk of lung cancer. The implications of this and other consequences of changes to ventilation need to be carefully evaluated to ensure that the desirable health and environmental benefits of

  10. PAHs in indoor dust samples in Shanghai's universities: levels, sources and human exposure.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huan; Yang, Yi; Liu, Min; Zhou, John L

    2012-10-01

    Given the significant amount of time people spend indoors, the occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in indoor dust and their potential risks are of great concern. In the present study, ten dust samples from lecture theatres and twelve samples from dining halls were collected from university campuses in Shanghai to investigate the PAH levels, possible sources and human exposure. The total concentrations of 18 PAHs ranged from 9.84 to 21.44 μg/g for dust samples from lecture theatres, and 9.63-44.13 μg/g for samples from dining halls. Total PAH concentrations in indoor dust samples showed a better correlation to black carbon compared to total organic carbon contents. PAHs in dining halls samples showed a similar distribution pattern with that of commercial kitchen air, which indicated that cooking activities could contribute most of the PAHs found in dining halls. Principal component analysis revealed both petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. The potential health risk for PAHs was assessed in terms of BaP equivalent carcinogenic power and estimated daily intake (EDI). Relatively high EDI values compared to other studies suggested that PAHs posed a potential threat to human health in indoor environments at Shanghai's universities. PMID:22527117

  11. Radon: Detection and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Loken, S.; Loken, T. )

    1989-11-01

    Within the last few years, natural radon exposure in non-industrial settings, primarily homes, has become a health concern. Research has demonstrated that many homes throughout the United States have radon concentrations much higher than the legal federal limits set for miners. Thousands of unsuspecting people are being exposed to high levels of radiation. It is estimated that up to 15 percent of lung cancers are caused from radon. This is a significant health risk. With basic knowledge of the current information on radon, a primary health care provider can address patients' radon concerns and make appropriate referrals.

  12. Sources and Levels of PCBs in Indoor Environments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Source assessment• Primary sources – caulk and light ballasts (6 schools)• Secondary sources – paint, tile, furnishings, etc. (3 schools)• Emission rate estimation Environmental levels (6 schools except dust)• Air, surface, dust, soil PCB c...

  13. RADON MITIGATION IN SCHOOLS: HVAC SYSTEMS IN SCHOOLS TEND TO HAVE A GREATER IMPACT ON RADON LEVELS THAN HVAC SYSTEMS IN HOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first part of this two-part paper discusses radon entry into schools, radon mitigation approaches for schools, and school characteristics (e.g., heating, ventilation, and air conditioing -- HVAC-- system design and operationg) that influence radon entry and mitigation system ...

  14. RADON MITIGATION IN SCHOOLS: HVAC SYTEMS IN SCHOOLS TEND TO HAVE A GREATER IMPACT ON RADON LEVELS THAN HVAC SYSTEMS IN HOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The first part of this two-part paper discusses radon entry into schools, radon mitigation approaches for schools, and school characteristics (e.g., heating, ventilation, and air conditioing -- HVAC-- system design and operationg) that influence radon entry and mitigation system ...

  15. Radon reduction and radon monitoring in the NEMO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Nachab, A.

    2007-03-28

    The first data of the NEMO 3 neutrinoless double beta decay experiment have shown that the radon can be a non negligible component of the background. In order to reduce the radon level in the gas mixture, it has been necessary first to cover the NEMO 3 detector with an airtight tent and then to install a radon-free air factory. With the use of sensitive radon detectors, the level of radon at the exit of the factory and inside the tent is continuously controlled. These radon levels are discussed within the NEMO 3 context.

  16. Association between State Assistance on the Topic of Indoor Air Quality and School District-Level Policies That Promote Indoor Air Quality in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everett Jones, Sherry; Doroski, Brenda; Glick, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    Nationally representative data from the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study examined whether state assistance on indoor air quality (IAQ) was associated with district-level policies and practices related to IAQ and integrated pest management (IPM). Districts in states that provided assistance on IAQ were more likely than districts not…

  17. Identification and mapping of radon-prone areas in Croatia-preliminary results for Lika-Senj and the southern part of Karlovac counties.

    PubMed

    Radolić, Vanja; Miklavčić, Igor; Stanić, Denis; Poje, Marina; Krpan, Ivana; Mužević, Matko; Petrinec, Branko; Vuković, Branko

    2014-11-01

    Long-term indoor radon measurements performed by LR 115 track etched detectors in Croatian homes during 2003-04 showed that the arithmetic means of radon concentrations in Lika-Senj and the southern part of Karlovac counties were three times higher (198 Bq m(-3)) than in houses at national level (68 Bq m(-3)). Recently, indoor radon measurements in randomly selected houses were investigated. The obtained values in these new measurements have confirmed the values obtained 10 y ago (the average radon value in 225 investigated houses in this area is 223 Bq m(-3)). Radon concentrations in soil gas were measured in September and October 2012 and 2013 with the AlphaGUARD measuring system. Areas with both elevated indoor radon levels and radon in soil gas were identified (some micro locations in Korenica, Ličko Lešće, Generalski Stol, Slunj and Ogulin) and visually presented in the form of maps using the inverse distance weighting approach. PMID:24993009

  18. HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES - SIA RADON EXPERIENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Lifanov, F.A.; Kobelev, A.P.; Popkov, V.N.; Polkanov, M.A.; Savkin, A.E.; Varlakov, A.P.; Karlin, S.V.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Karlina, O.K.; Semenov, K.N.

    2003-02-27

    This review describes high temperature methods of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) treatment currently used at SIA Radon. Solid and liquid organic and mixed organic and inorganic wastes are subjected to plasma heating in a shaft furnace with formation of stable leach resistant slag suitable for disposal in near-surface repositories. Liquid inorganic radioactive waste is vitrified in a cold crucible based plant with borosilicate glass productivity up to 75 kg/h. Radioactive silts from settlers are heat-treated at 500-700 0C in electric furnace forming cake following by cake crushing, charging into 200 L barrels and soaking with cement grout. Various thermochemical technologies for decontamination of metallic, asphalt, and concrete surfaces, treatment of organic wastes (spent ion-exchange resins, polymers, medical and biological wastes), batch vitrification of incinerator ashes, calcines, spent inorganic sorbents, contaminated soil, treatment of carbon containing 14C nuclide, reactor graphite, lubricants have been developed and implemented.

  19. Radon Transport Into a Single-Family House with a Basement

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Feustel, H.; Nero, A.V.; Revzan, K.L.; Grimsrud,D.T.; Essling, M.A.; Toohey, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    outside of the basement walls, then into the basement through cracks and openings. During the final six weeks of the study, measurements were made with the water level in the sump maintained first below, then above the entrance of the pipe connected to the perimeter drain tile system. Average indoor radon concentrations during these two periods were 10.6 and 3.5 pCi {ell}{sup -1} (390 and 130 Bq m{sup -3}), respectively. The relatively high latter value compared with the mean for the first 15 weeks, combined with the observation of intervals of high airborne alpha activity at the sump during this period, suggest that the level of water in the sump does not, by itself, account for the variation in alpha activity at the sump that we had previously observed. Fireplace operation substantially increased the air-exchange state, but had only a small effect on indoor radon concentration, providing corroborative evidence that pressure-driven flow is an important mechanism for radon entry into this house.

  20. Measurement and reduction of low-level radon background in the KATRIN experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Fränkle, F. M.

    2013-08-08

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is a next generation, model independent, large scale experiment to determine the mass of the electron anti-neutrino by investigating the kinematics of tritium beta decay with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c{sup 2}. The measurement setup consists of a high luminosity windowless gaseous molecular tritium source (WGTS), a differential and cryogenic pumped electron transport and tritium retention section, a tandem spectrometer section (pre-spectrometer and main spectrometer) for energy analysis, followed by a detector system for counting transmitted beta decay electrons. Measurements performed at the KATRIN pre-spectrometer test setup showed that the decay of radon (Rn) atoms in the volume of the KATRIN spectrometers is a major background source. Rn atoms from low-level radon emanation of materials inside the vacuum region of the KATRIN spectrometers are able to penetrate deep into the magnetic flux tube so that the alpha decay of Rn contributes to the background. Of particular importance are electrons emitted in processes accompanying the Rn alpha decay, such as shake-off, internal conversion of excited levels in the Rn daughter atoms and Auger electrons. Lowenergy electrons (< 100 eV) directly contribute to the background in the signal region. High-energy electrons can be stored magnetically inside the volume of the spectrometer and are able to create thousands of secondary electrons via subsequent ionization processes with residual gas molecules. In order to reduce the Rn induced background different active and passive counter measures were developed and tested. This proceeding will give an overview on Rn sources within the KATRIN spectrometer, describes how Rn decays inside the spectrometer produce background events at the detector and presents different counter measures to reduce the Rn induced background.

  1. Children’s Exposure to Radon in Nursery and Primary Schools

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Pedro T. B. S.; Nunes, Rafael A. O.; Alvim-Ferraz, Maria C. M.; Martins, Fernando G.; Sousa, Sofia I. V.

    2016-01-01

    The literature proves an evident association between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer, even at low doses. This study brings a new approach to the study of children’s exposure to radon by aiming to evaluate exposure to indoor radon concentrations in nursery and primary schools from two districts in Portugal (Porto and Bragança), considering different influencing factors (occupation patterns, classroom floor level, year of the buildings’ construction and soil composition of the building site), as well as the comparison with IAQ standard values for health protection. Fifteen nursery and primary schools in the Porto and Bragança districts were considered: five nursery schools for infants and twelve for pre-schoolers (seven different buildings), as well as eight primary schools. Radon measurements were performed continuously. The measured concentrations depended on the building occupation, classroom floor level and year of the buildings’ construction. Although they were in general within the Portuguese legislation for IAQ, exceedances to international standards were found. These results point out the need of assessing indoor radon concentrations not only in primary schools, but also in nursery schools, never performed in Portugal before this study. It is important to extend the study to other microenvironments like homes, and in time to estimate the annual effective dose and to assess lifetime health risks. PMID:27043596

  2. Indoor Radon Gas Management For Multi-Site Companies: How To Screen For Potentially High-Risk Sites By Studying The Local Geology

    SciTech Connect

    Ruggeri, Rudi; Gigliuto, Andrea; Minnei, Tiziana; Savini, Raffaella

    2008-08-07

    In this article, ENSR presents an evaluation tool for Radon gas monitoring programs that companies with large portfolios of properties will find useful in reducing their efforts and expenditures. The World Health Organization (WHO) considers Radon gas the second cause of lung cancer and the first source of natural radiations affecting the human population. In Italy, Legal Decree No. 230 (0/17/95) is the laws that regulate gas Radon concentrations in work places. Hereunder we present the ENSR approach to executing preliminary geologic studies aimed at planning an instrumental monitoring program for companies.

  3. Indoor Radon Gas Management For Multi-Site Companies: How To Screen For Potentially High-Risk Sites By Studying The Local Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Rudi; Gigliuto, Andrea; Minnei, Tiziana; Savini, Raffaella

    2008-08-01

    In this article, ENSR presents an evaluation tool for Radon gas monitoring programs that companies with large portfolios of properties will find useful in reducing their efforts and expenditures. The World Health Organization (WHO) considers Radon gas the second cause of lung cancer and the first source of natural radiations affecting the human population. In Italy, Legal Decree No. 230 (0/17/95) is the laws that regulate gas Radon concentrations in work places. Hereunder we present the ENSR approach to executing preliminary geologic studies aimed at planning an instrumental monitoring program for companies.

  4. Are Neighborhood-Level Characteristics Associated with Indoor Allergens in the Household?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Lindsay; Rudd, Rima; Chew, Ginger L.; Emmons, Karen; Acevedo-García, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    Background Individual home characteristics have been associated with indoor allergen exposure; however, the influence of neighborhood-level characteristics has not been well-studied. We defined neighborhoods as community districts determined by the New York Department of City Planning. Objective We examined the relationship between neighborhood-level characteristics and the presence of dust mite (Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), cockroach (Bla g 2), and mouse (MUP) allergens in the household. Methods Using data from the Puerto Rican Asthma Project, a birth cohort of Puerto Rican children at risk of allergic sensitization (n=261) we examined associations between neighborhood characteristics (percent tree canopy, asthma hospitalizations per 1000 children, roadway length within 100 meters of buildings, serious housing code violations per 1000 rental units, poverty rates, and felony crime rates) and the presence of indoor allergens. Allergen cutpoints were used for categorical analyses and defined as follows: dust mite: >0.25 μg/g; cat: >1 μg/g; cockroach: >1 U/g; mouse: >1.6 μg/g. Results Serious housing code violations were statistically significantly positively associated with dust mite, cat and mouse allergens (continuous variables), adjusting for mother's income and education, and all neighborhood-level characteristics. In multivariable logistic regression analyses, medium levels of housing code violations were associated with higher dust mite and cat allergens (1.81, 95%CI: 1.08, 3.03 and 3.10, 95%CI: 1.22, 7.92, respectively). A high level of serious housing code violations was associated with higher mouse allergen (2.04, 95%CI: 1.15, 3.62). A medium level of housing code violations was associated with higher cockroach allergen (3.30, 95%CI: 1.11, 9.78). Conclusions Neighborhood-level characteristics, specifically housing code violations, appear to be related to indoor allergens, which may have implications for future research explorations and policy decisions. PMID

  5. The cost effectiveness of radon mitigation in existing German dwellings--a decision theoretic analysis.

    PubMed

    Haucke, Florian

    2010-11-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring inert radioactive gas found in soils and rocks that can accumulate in dwellings, and is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer. This study aims to analyze the cost effectiveness of different intervention strategies to reduce radon concentrations in existing German dwellings. The cost effectiveness analysis (CEA) was conducted as a scenario analysis, where each scenario represents a specific regulatory regime. A decision theoretic model was developed, which reflects accepted recommendations for radon screening and mitigation and uses most up-to-date data on radon distribution and relative risks. The model was programmed to account for compliance with respect to the single steps of radon intervention, as well as data on the sensitivity/specificity of radon tests. A societal perspective was adopted to calculate costs and effects. All scenarios were calculated for different action levels. Cost effectiveness was measured in costs per averted case of lung cancer, costs per life year gained and costs per quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Univariate and multivariate deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses (SA) were performed. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses were based on Monte Carlo simulations with 5000 model runs. The results show that legal regulations with mandatory screening and mitigation for indoor radon levels >100 Bq/m(3) are most cost effective. Incremental cost effectiveness compared to the no mitigation base case is 25,181 euro (95% CI: 7371 euro-90,593 euro) per QALY gained. Other intervention strategies focussing primarily on the personal responsibility for screening and/or mitigative actions show considerably worse cost effectiveness ratios. However, targeting radon intervention to radon-prone areas is significantly more cost effective. Most of the uncertainty that surrounds the results can be ascribed to the relative risk of radon exposure. It can be concluded that in the light of

  6. Indoor firing ranges and elevated blood lead levels - United States, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Beaucham, Catherine; Page, Elena; Alarcon, Walter A; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Methner, Mark; Schoonover, Todd M

    2014-04-25

    Indoor firing ranges are a source of lead exposure and elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) among employees, their families, and customers, despite public health outreach efforts and comprehensive guidelines for controlling occupational lead exposure. There are approximately 16,000-18,000 indoor firing ranges in the United States, with tens of thousands of employees. Approximately 1 million law enforcement officers train on indoor ranges. To estimate how many adults had elevated BLLs (≥10 µg/dL) as a result of exposure to lead from shooting firearms, data on elevated BLLs from the Adult Blood Lead Epidemiology and Surveillance (ABLES) program managed by CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) were examined by source of lead exposure. During 2002-2012, a total of 2,056 persons employed in the categories "police protection" and "other amusement and recreation industries (including firing ranges)" had elevated BLLs reported to ABLES; an additional 2,673 persons had non-work-related BLLs likely attributable to target shooting. To identify deficiencies at two indoor firing ranges linked to elevated BLLs, the Washington State Division of Occupational Safety and Health (WaDOSH) and NIOSH conducted investigations in 2012 and 2013, respectively. The WaDOSH investigation found a failure to conduct personal exposure and biologic monitoring for lead and also found dry sweeping of lead-containing dust. The NIOSH investigation found serious deficiencies in ventilation, housekeeping, and medical surveillance. Public health officials and clinicians should ask about occupations and hobbies that might involve lead when evaluating findings of elevated BLLs. Interventions for reducing lead exposure in firing ranges include using lead-free bullets, improving ventilation, and using wet mopping or high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) vacuuming to clean. PMID:24759656

  7. Radon levels and doses in dwellings in two villages in Kosovo, affected by depleted uranium.

    PubMed

    Nafezi, G; Gregoric, A; Vaupotic, J; Bahtijari, M; Kuqali, M

    2014-01-01

    The radon ((222)Rn) activity concentration in 15 dwellings in the Planej village and 10 dwellings in the Gorozhup village has been measured with the aim to complement the national radon survey and to compare the results of two different measurement techniques. The radon concentration has been measured in winter and spring using alpha scintillation cells and in winter, spring and summer by exposing solid-state nuclear track detectors. Both methods gave similar results. Radon concentrations in both villages were similar, ranging from 82 to 432 Bq m(-3); the value of 400 Bq m(-3) was exceeded only in two dwellings. The resulting annual effective doses ranged from 1.78 to 6.40 mSv, with the average values of 3.28 mSv in the Planej village and 3.87 mSv in the Gorozhup village. PMID:24051175

  8. [Indoor Deposition Flux, Seasonal Variations and Human Exposure Levels of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers in Xiamen, China].

    PubMed

    Han, Wen-liang; Liu, Yu; Chen, Hai-ming; Chen, Xing-tong; Fan, Tao

    2016-03-15

    Indoor dust was an important and even a major route of human exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). However, the vacuum dust concentrations were less correlated with indoor residents' serum concentrations of PBDEs, thus inadequat for either estimation of human exposure dose or research of deposition flux and its seasonal variations. Passive sampling of indoo dustfall could offset these shortages. A total of 49 indoor sampling sites including homes, offices, computer rooms and furniture factor were selected in Xiamen, China to collect the four season dustfall samples with glass plates (walled by clean aluminum foil). Deposition flux, concentrations, congener profiles, seasonal variations, and human exposure to PBDEs in the dustfall were studied The geometric means of the yearly round deposition flux of ∑ PBDEs (sum of 16 BDE congeners including BDE-209) in homes offices, computer rooms and furniture factory were 6.1, 3.0, 1.1 and 179.8 ng · (m² · d)⁻¹, respectively. The geometric mea deposition flux of ∑ PBDEs in homes was 2 times of that in offices, but the concentration of ∑ PBDEs in the dustfall from home (445.5 ng · g⁻¹) was only slightly higher than that of offices (384.0 ng · g⁻¹). The ∑ PBDEs deposition flux in homes, offices and computer rooms in Xiamen were at lower level compared with other cities around the world. The PBDEs deposition flux in furnitur factory was much higher than that in the ordinary indoor environment. Autumn was the season with highest deposition flux of ∑ PBDEs. Geometric means of BDE- 209's proportion of the ∑ PBDEs in dustfall in all seasons in the four types of indoo environment were above 80% . The deposition flux of PBDEs was correlated to the dustfall deposition flux in homes, offices and computer rooms, but not that in furniture factory. ∑₁₅ PBDEs in homes and offices were significantly correlated with the age of computers, but not quantities of electrical and electronic products

  9. Radon levels in drinking water and soil samples of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts of Rajasthan, India.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Sudhir; Rani, Asha; Mehra, Rohit

    2016-07-01

    Radon causes lung cancer when it is trapped inside the lungs. Therefore it is very important to analyze the radon concentration in water and soil samples. In the present investigation, water and soil samples collected from 20 different locations of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts of Northern Rajasthan, India have been studied by using RAD7. The measured radon concentration in water samples varies from 0.5 to 15Bql(-1). The observed values lie within the safe limit as set by UNSCEAR, 2008. The total annual effective dose due to radon in water corresponding to all studied locations has been found to be well within the safe limit of 0.1mSvy(-1) as recommended by World Health Organization (WHO, 2004) and European Council (EU, 1998). The measurements carried out on radon concentration in soil samples reveal a variation from 1750 to 9850Bqm(-3). These results explore that the water of Jodhpur and Nagaur districts is suitable for drinking purpose without posing any health hazard but soil hazards depend upon its permeability and radon concentration. PMID:27135605

  10. Indoor air quality in Portuguese schools: levels and sources of pollutants.

    PubMed

    Madureira, J; Paciência, I; Pereira, C; Teixeira, J P; Fernandes, E de O

    2016-08-01

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) parameters in 73 primary classrooms in Porto were examined for the purpose of assessing levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), aldehydes, particulate matter, ventilation rates and bioaerosols within and between schools, and potential sources. Levels of VOCs, aldehydes, PM2.5 , PM10 , bacteria and fungi, carbon dioxide (CO2 ), carbon monoxide, temperature and relative humidity were measured indoors and outdoors and a walkthrough survey was performed concurrently. Ventilation rates were derived from CO2 and occupancy data. Concentrations of CO2 exceeding 1000 ppm were often encountered, indicating poor ventilation. Most VOCs had low concentrations (median of individual species <5 μg/m(3) ) and were below the respective WHO guidelines. Concentrations of particulate matter and culturable bacteria were frequently higher than guidelines/reference values. The variability of VOCs, aldehydes, bioaerosol concentrations, and CO2 levels between schools exceeded the variability within schools. These findings indicate that IAQ problems may persist in classrooms where pollutant sources exist and classrooms are poorly ventilated; source control strategies (related to building location, occupant behavior, maintenance/cleaning activities) are deemed to be the most reliable for the prevention of adverse health consequences in children in schools. PMID:26182845

  11. Gonadal Development, Spawning and Plasma Sex Steroid Levels of the Indoor Cultured Grunt, Hapalogenys nitens

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Woong; Cho, Jae-Kwon; Son, Maeng-Hyun; Park, Jong Youn; Hong, Chang Gi; Chung, Jae Seung; Chung, Ee-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The gonadosomatic index (GSI), gonadal development and changes in hormones in plasma level of the indoor cultured grunt (Hapalogenys nitens) were investigated by histological study from August 2011 to October 2012. The GSI showed similar trends with gonad developmental stages during the culture periods. Changes in plasma level of estradiol-17β of female H. nitens reached the highest value before the spawning period, and seasonal changes in plasma level of estradiol-17β were similar in trends of oocyte developments and GSI changes. Testosterone levels of male H. nitens reached the highest value before and after the spent stage. Ovarian developmental stages of H. nitens could be classified into early growing stage, late growing stage, mature stage, ripe and spawning stage, recovery and resting stage. The testicular developmental stages could be divided into growing stage, mature stage, ripe and spent stage, and recovery and resting stage. PMID:25949208

  12. Radon: a bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Lepman, S.R.; Boegel, M.L.; Hollowell, C.D.

    1981-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with the support of the Department of Energy, has developed a computerized database to manage research information in the area of building ventilation and indoor air quality. This literature survey contains references pertaining to the physical properties of radon and its daughters, instrumentation for their measurement, health effects, surveys and measurements, and regulatory information. The references in the bibliography are sequenced in alphabetical order and abstracts are included when supplied by the author. The objective of this report is to disseminate the bibliographic references compiled at the laboratory relating to radon research portion of the program. Interested database users are encouraged to contact the laboratory to receive instructions for direct database acess. A flyer describing the database is supplied at the end of the bibliography and a brief overview of the Radon Research porgram is given.

  13. Pilot study of the application of Tellus airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data for radon mapping.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Miles, J C H; Green, B M R; Larmour, R

    2008-10-01

    The scope for using Tellus Project airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and soil geochemical data to predict the probability of houses in Northern Ireland having high indoor radon concentrations is evaluated, in a pilot study in the southeast of the province, by comparing these data statistically with in-house radon measurements. There is generally good agreement between radon maps modelled from the airborne radiometric and soil geochemical data using multivariate linear regression analysis and conventional radon maps which depend solely on geological and indoor radon data. The radon maps based on the Tellus Project data identify some additional areas where the radon risk appears to be relatively high compared with the conventional radon maps. One of the ways of validating radon maps modelled on the Tellus Project data will be to carry out additional indoor measurements in these areas. PMID:18562054

  14. A follow-up study on indoor 222Rn, 220Rn their decay product concentrations in a mineralised zone of Himachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Bajwa, B S; Singh, Parminder; Singh, Prabhjot; Saini, Komal; Singh, Surinder; Sahoo, B K; Sapra, B K

    2016-03-01

    A follow-up study was taken up in a mineralised zone situated in Hamirpur district, Himachal Pradesh, India, to investigate high values of radon concentrations reported in past studies as well to update the old radon data based on bare SSNTD technique. In the present investigation, the concentrations of indoor radon, thoron and their decay products have been measured using the newly developed radon/thoron discriminating diffusion chamber with single entry face, direct radon and thoron progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS), respectively. The measurements have been carried out in 75 dwellings of 14 different villages where the previous studies were carried out using bare SSNTD technique. It was observed that high values of earlier reported radon concentrations were mainly due to thoron interference in the Solid State Nuclear Track Detector (LR-115 type II) exposed in bare mode. Now, the average concentration values and the estimated annual inhalation dose in these villages have been found to be within the reference level as recommended by the ICRP. The annual average indoor radon and thoron concentrations observed in these dwellings have been found to vary from 44±12 to 157±73 Bq m(-3) and 44±11 to 240±125 Bq m(-3), respectively. The equilibrium equivalent concentrations of radon and thoron decay products have been observed to be in the range of 10 to 63 and 1 to 5 Bq m(-3), respectively. PMID:26184660

  15. Method for determining individual deposition velocities of radon progeny.

    PubMed

    Angell, C T; Pedretti, M; Norman, E B

    2015-04-01

    The deposition velocity of radon progeny is used to model the removal of progeny from the air by surfaces in assessing indoor air quality. It can also be used to assess radon-induced background in sensitive, low-background experiments. A single value of the deposition velocity is typically used for all radon progeny for modeling purposes. This paper presents a method for uniquely determining the individual deposition velocities of radon progeny. Measurements demonstrating the method were carried out. PMID:25618737

  16. Measurements of radon concentration levels in thermal waters in the region of Konya, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Mehmet; Ozdemir, Fatih; Eren, Nuretdin

    2013-01-01

    (222)Rn (radon) is one of the most important sources of natural radiation to which people are exposed. It is an alpha-emitting noble gas and it can be found in various concentrations in soil, air and in different kinds of water. In this study, we present the results of radon concentration measurements in thermal waters taken from the sources in the region of Konya located in the central part of Turkey. The radon activity concentrations in 10 thermal water samples were measured by using the AlphaGUARD PQ 2000PRO radon gas analyser in spring and summer of the year 2012. We found that radon activity concentrations range from 0.60±0.11 to 70.34±3.55 kBq m(-3) and from 0.67±0.03 to 36.53±4.68 kBq m(-3) in spring and summer, respectively. We also calculated effective doses per treatment in the spas for the spring and summer seasons. It was found that the minimum and maximum effective doses per treatment are in the range of 0.09-10.13 nSv in spring and in the range of 0.1-5.26 nSv in summer. PMID:23937805

  17. Radon: The Silent Danger.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoffel, Jennifer

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses the public health dangers associated with radon exposure in homes and schools. In addition, testing and corrective efforts by federal and state agencies are discussed. A map indicating areas in the U.S. with potentially high radon levels is included. (IAH)

  18. Indoor air quality levels in a University Hospital in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, Mahmoud F.; Noweir, Mohamed E. H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the Study: The complex hospital environment requires special attention to ensure a healthy indoor air quality (IAQ) to protect patients and healthcare workers against hospital-acquired infections and occupational diseases. Poor hospital IAQ may cause outbreaks of building-related illness such as headaches, fatigue, eye, and skin irritations, and other symptoms. The general objective for this study was to assess IAQ inside a large University hospital at Al-Khobar City in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: Different locations representing areas where most activities and tasks are performed were selected as sampling points for air pollutants in the selected hospital. In addition, several factors were studied to determine those that were most likely to affect the IAQ levels. The temperature and relative percent humidity of different air pollutants were measured simultaneously at each location. Results: The outdoor levels of all air pollutant levels, except volatile organic compounds (VOCs), were higher than the indoor levels which meant that the IAQ inside healthcare facilities (HCFs) were greatly affected by outdoor sources, particularly traffic. The highest levels of total suspended particulates (TSPs) and those less than 10 microns (PM10) inside the selected hospital were found at locations that are characterized with m4ore human activity. Conclusions: Levels of particulate matter (both PM10 and TSP) were higher than the Air Quality Guidelines (AQGs). The highest concentrations of the fungal species recorded were Cladosporium and Penicillium. Education of occupants of HCF on IAQ is critical. They must be informed about the sources and effects of contaminants and the proper operation of the ventilation system. PMID:24696632

  19. Statistical analysis of the radon-222 potential of rocks in Virginia, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, C. Erwin; Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W.; Chrosniak, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    More than 3,200 indoor radon-222 (222Rn) measurements were made seasonally in an area of about 1,000 square kilometers of the Coastal Plain and Piedmont physiographic provinces in Virginia, U.S.A. Results of these measurements indicate that some geological units are associated, on the average, with twice as much indoor222Rn as other geological units, and that indoor222Rn varies seasonally. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to test whether indoor222Rn concentrations for data gathered over the winter and summer seasons differ significantly by rock unit. The tests concluded that indoor222Rn concentrations for different rock units were not equal at the 5-percent significance level. The rocks associated with the highest median indoor222Rn concentration are specific rocks in the Mesozoic Culpeper basin, including shale and siltstone units with Jurassic diabase intrusives, and mica schists in the Piedmont physiographic province. The pre-Triassic Peters Creek Schist has the highest ranking in terms of indoor222Rn concentration. The rocks associated with the lowest indoor222Rn concentrations include coastal plain sediments, the Occoquan Granite, Falls Church Tonalite, Piney Branch Mafic and Ultramafic complex, and unnamed mafic and ultramafic inclusions, respectively. The rocks have been ranked according to observed222Rn concentration by transforming the average rank of indoor222Rn concentrations to z scores. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  20. Radon survey and soil gamma doses in primary schools of Batman, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Damla, Nevzat; Aldemir, Kamuran

    2014-06-01

    A survey was conducted to evaluate levels of indoor radon and gamma doses in 42 primary schools located in Batman, southeastern Anatolia, Turkey. Indoor radon measurements were carried out using CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detector-based radon dosimeters. The overall mean annual (222)Rn activity in the surveyed area was found to be 49 Bq m(-3) (equivalent to an annual effective dose of 0.25 mSv). However, in one of the districts (Besiri) the maximum radon value turned out to be 307 Bq m(-3). The estimated annual effective doses are less than the recommended action level (3-10 mSv). It is found that the radon concentration decreases with increasing floor number. The concentrations of natural and artificial radioisotopes were determined using gamma-ray spectroscopy for soil samples collected in close vicinity of the studied schools. The mean gamma activity concentrations in the soil samples were 31, 25, 329 and 12 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, (232)Th, (40)K and (137)Cs, respectively. The radiological parameters such as the absorbed dose rate in air and the annual effective dose equivalent were calculated. These radiological parameters were evaluated and compared with the internationally recommended values. PMID:24437644

  1. The history, development and the present status of the radon measurement programme in the United States of America.

    PubMed

    George, A C

    2015-11-01

    The US radon measurement programme began in the late 1950s by the US Public Health Service in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah during the uranium frenzy. After the 1967 Congressional Hearings on the working conditions in uranium mines, the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was asked to conduct studies in active uranium mines to assess the exposure of the miners on the Colorado Plateau and in New Mexico. From 1967 to 1972, the Health and Safety Laboratory of the US AEC in New York investigated more than 20 uranium mines for radon and radon decay product concentrations and particle size in 4 large uranium mines in New Mexico. In 1970, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was established and took over some of the AEC radon measurement activities. Between 1975 and 1978, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory of the US Department of Energy conducted the first detailed indoor radon survey in the USA. Later in 1984, the very high concentrations of radon found in Pennsylvania homes set the wheels in motion and gave birth to the US Radon Industry. The US EPA expanded its involvement in radon issues and assumed an active role by establishing the National Radon Proficiency Program to evaluate the effectiveness of radon measurement and mitigation methods. In 1998, due to limited resources EPA privatised the radon programme. This paper presents a personal perspective of past events and current status of the US radon programme. It will present an update on radon health effects, the incidence rate of lung cancer in the USA and the number of radon measurements made from 1988 to 2013 using short-term test methods. More than 23 million measurements were made in the last 25 y and as a result more than 1.24 million homes were mitigated successfully. It is estimated that <2 % of the radon measurements performed in the USA are made using long-term testing devices. The number of homes above the US action level of 148 Bq m(-3) (4 pCi l(-1)) may be ∼8.5 million because ∼50

  2. A study of atmospheric radon gas concentrations in water extraction wells of Hamadan, western Iran.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Jabari Vasal, Naghi

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that half of the radiation received by humans is due to the presence of radon (222Rn) in the built environment. As part of a project measuring indoor radon in Hamadan, western Iran, a survey was undertaken of atmospheric radon in 28 wells in the region using a Sarad Doseman. Specific geological features of this settlement include highly permeable alluvial fan deposits which result in radon being released to the atmosphere. The observed radon concentrations in well shafts(between 1,000 Bq m3 and 36,600 Bq m3) show considerable variability both in space and time. One aspect of this study was to also assess whether there was a relationship between the depth of a well and the measured atmospheric radon concentration. The importance of such measurements in this region is highlighted by the fact that radon levels in homes in Hamadan are probably greatly influenced by the porous nature of this underlying geology and its use as a water reservoir / conduit through the application of qanat technology.

  3. Air cleaning and radon decay product mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K. ); Li, C.S. . John B. Pierce Foundation Lab.); Ramamurthi, M. )

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated air cleaning as a means to mitigate risks arising from exposure to indoor radon progeny in several single-family houses in the northeastern United States, using a new, automated, semi-continuous activity-weighted size distribution measurement system. Measurements included radon concentration, condensation nuclei count, and activity-weighted size distribution of radon decay products. Measurements were made with and without the air cleaning system operating. The influence of particles generated by various sources common to normal indoor activities on radon progeny behavior was evaluated. Aerosols were generated by running water in a shower, burning candles, smoking cigarettes, vacuuming, opening doors, and cooking. Both a filtration unit and an electrostatic precipitator were evaluated. Using a room model, the changes in attachment rates, average attachment diameters, and deposition rates of the unattached'' fraction with and without the air cleaning systems were calculated. The air cleaner typically reduced the radon progeny concentrations by 50 to 60%.

  4. Air cleaning and radon decay product mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hopke, P.K.; Li, C.S.; Ramamurthi, M.

    1990-12-31

    We evaluated air cleaning as a means to mitigate risks arising from exposure to indoor radon progeny in several single-family houses in the northeastern United States, using a new, automated, semi-continuous activity-weighted size distribution measurement system. Measurements included radon concentration, condensation nuclei count, and activity-weighted size distribution of radon decay products. Measurements were made with and without the air cleaning system operating. The influence of particles generated by various sources common to normal indoor activities on radon progeny behavior was evaluated. Aerosols were generated by running water in a shower, burning candles, smoking cigarettes, vacuuming, opening doors, and cooking. Both a filtration unit and an electrostatic precipitator were evaluated. Using a room model, the changes in attachment rates, average attachment diameters, and deposition rates of the ``unattached`` fraction with and without the air cleaning systems were calculated. The air cleaner typically reduced the radon progeny concentrations by 50 to 60%.

  5. Radon exposure at a radioactive waste storage facility.

    PubMed

    Manocchi, F H; Campos, M P; Dellamano, J C; Silva, G M

    2014-06-01

    The Waste Management Department of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN) is responsible for the safety management of the waste generated at all internal research centers and that of other waste producers such as industry, medical facilities, and universities in Brazil. These waste materials, after treatment, are placed in an interim storage facility. Among them are (226)Ra needles used in radiotherapy, siliceous cake arising from conversion processes, and several other classes of waste from the nuclear fuel cycle, which contain Ra-226 producing (222)Rn gas daughter.In order to estimate the effective dose for workers due to radon inhalation, the radon concentration at the storage facility has been assessed within this study. Radon measurements have been carried out through the passive method with solid-state nuclear track detectors (CR-39) over a period of nine months, changing detectors every month in order to determine the long-term average levels of indoor radon concentrations. The radon concentration results, covering the period from June 2012 to March 2013, varied from 0.55 ± 0.05 to 5.19 ± 0.45 kBq m(-3). The effective dose due to (222)Rn inhalation was further assessed following ICRP Publication 65. PMID:24705248

  6. Comparison of background levels of culturable fungal spore concentrations in indoor and outdoor air in southeastern Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, D.; Habib, J.; Luxner, J.; Galler, H.; Zarfel, G.; Schlacher, R.; Friedl, H.; Reinthaler, F. F.

    2014-12-01

    Background concentrations of airborne fungi are indispensable criteria for an assessment of fungal concentrations indoors and in the ambient air. The goal of this study was to define the natural background values of culturable fungal spore concentrations as reference values for the assessment of moldy buildings. The concentrations of culturable fungi were determined outdoors as well as indoors in 185 dwellings without visible mold, obvious moisture problems or musty odor. Samples were collected using the MAS-100® microbiological air sampler. The study shows a characteristic seasonal influence on the background levels of Cladosporium, Penicillium and Aspergillus. Cladosporium sp. had a strong outdoor presence, whereas Aspergillus sp. and Penicillium sp. were typical indoor fungi. For the region of Styria, the median outdoor concentrations are between 100 and 940 cfu/m³ for culturable xerophilic fungi in the course of the year. Indoors, median background levels are between 180 and 420 cfu/m³ for xerophilic fungi. The I/O ratios of the airborne fungal spore concentrations were between 0.2 and 2.0. For the assessment of indoor and outdoor air samples the dominant genera Cladosporium, Penicillium and Aspergillus should receive special consideration.

  7. Combustion Processes as a Source of High Levels of Indoor Hydroxyl Radicals through the Photolysis of Nitrous Acid.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, V; Gomez Alvarez, E; Wittmer, J; Tlili, S; Strekowski, R; Temime-Roussel, B; Quivet, E; Wortham, H; Zetzsch, C; Kleffmann, J; Gligorovski, S

    2015-06-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (OH) are known to control the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere but their influence on reactivity within indoor environments is believed to be of little importance. Atmospheric direct sources of OH include the photolysis of ozone and nitrous acid (HONO) and the ozonolysis of alkenes. It has been argued that the ultraviolet light fraction of the solar spectrum is largely attenuated within indoor environments, thus, limiting the extent of photolytic OH sources. Conversely, the ozonolysis of alkenes has been suggested as the main pathway of OH formation within indoor settings. According to this hypothesis the indoor OH radical concentrations span in the range of only 10(4) to 10(5) cm(-3). However, recent direct OH radical measurements within a school classroom yielded OH radical peak values at moderate light intensity measured at evenings of 1.8 × 10(6) cm(-3) that were attributed to the photolysis of HONO. In this work, we report results from chamber experiments irradiated with varying light intensities in order to mimic realistic indoor lighting conditions. The exhaust of a burning candle was introduced in the chamber as a typical indoor source causing a sharp peak of HONO, but also of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The photolysis of HONO yields peak OH concentration values, that for the range of indoors lightning conditions were estimated in the range 5.7 ×· 10(6) to 1.6 × 10(7) cm(-3). Excellent agreement exists between OH levels determined by a chemical clock and those calculated by a simple PSS model. These findings suggest that significant OH reactivity takes place at our dwellings and the consequences of this reactivity-that is, formation of secondary oxidants-ought to be studied hereafter. PMID:25942056

  8. Hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarwar, Golam; Corsi, Richard; Kimura, Yosuke; Allen, David; Weschler, Charles J.

    Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations were estimated using a new indoor air quality model which employs the SAPRC-99 atmospheric chemistry model to simulate indoor homogenous reactions. Model results indicate that typical indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are lower than typical outdoor summertime urban hydroxyl radical levels of 5-10×10 6 molecules cm -3; however, indoor levels can be similar to or greater than typical nighttime outdoor hydroxyl radical levels of approximately 5×10 4 molecules cm -3. Effects of selected parameters on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are presented herein. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations are predicted to increase non-linearly with increasing outdoor ozone concentrations, indoor alkene emission rates, and air exchange rates. Indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations decrease with increasing outdoor nitric oxide concentrations. Indoor temperature and indoor light intensity have moderate impacts on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Outdoor hydroxyl radical concentrations, outdoor nitrate (NO 3rad ) radical concentrations, outdoor hydroperoxy radical concentrations, and hydroxyl radical removal by indoor surfaces are predicted to have no appreciable impact on indoor hydroxyl radical concentrations. Production of hydroxyl radicals in indoor environments appears to be controlled primarily by reactions of alkenes with ozone, and nitric oxide with hydroperoxy radical. Estimated indoor hydroxyl radical levels may potentially affect indoor air quality. Two examples are presented in which reactions of d-limonene and α-pinene with indoor hydroxyl radicals produce aldehydes, which may be of greater concern than the original compounds.

  9. The Department of Energy`s radon testing program

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, H.L.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; Gammage, R.B.

    1993-07-01

    The US Department of Energy recently completed an initial survey of indoor radon in its buildings in response to Public Law 100--551, the Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988. Other federal agencies have also conducted radon surveys. This paper presents an overview of the results from radon testing of several thousand buildings ranging from 100 m{sup 2} to over 10,000 M{sup 2} in size. In addition, we have examined results from groups of buildings, classified according to ventilation and usage characteristics. So far, there is no apparent difference among building classes. The paper also discusses our proposal for phased radon surveys. We suggest that first-phase results can be used to identify facilities with radon problems. In the second phase, we suggest measurements be made at a much higher sampling density at facilities with radon problems. The results of the second phase are expected to identify all buildings in need of mitigation.

  10. Indoor air and human health: major indoor air pollutants and their health implications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This publication is a collection of abstracts of papers presented at the Indoor Air and Human Health symposium. Session titles include: Radon, Microorganisms, Passive Cigarette Smoke, Combustion Products, Organics, and Panel and Audience Discussion.

  11. Radon mitigation studies: South Central Florida demonstration. Final report, November 1987-January 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.S.; Williamson, A.D.; Pyle, B.E.; Belzer, F.E.; Coker, R.N.

    1992-10-01

    The report gives results of an EPA radon mitigation project involving 14 slab-on-grade houses in Polk County, FL, having indoor radon levels of 320-3810 Bq/cu m (8.7-103 pCi/L), using sub-slab depressurization (SSD) in a variety of applications to evaluate optimal design criteria to be recommended as cost-effective and capable of reducing indoor radon concentrations in houses built over compacted soil fills. For all houses, obvious accessible radon entry points were sealed, and 53-90 L (12-20 gal.) suction pits were dug into the fill material. Two of the houses were mitigated with exterior horizontal suction holes drilled through the stem walls. In four houses, one or more suction pipes were in the garage. The remainder of the interior suction holes were in closets or some other unobtrusive location. Except for the two houses with exterior systems, the other 12 had mitigation fans in the attic. In-line centrifugal fans were used to mitigate each house, although a larger radial blower was installed overnight for experimental purposes in one house, and a vaccumcleaner was used to simulate a larger suction in another house for pressure field measurements only. Post-mitigation worst-case radon concentrations in these houses ranged from 40 to 290 Bq/cu m.

  12. Indoor Pollutants: Environmental Hazards to Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noyes, Dorothy

    1987-01-01

    Alerts parents, teachers, and others to some of the leading indoor environmental hazards to young children which are caused by various types of indoor pollutants: cigarette smoke; heating/cooking equipment; asbestos; pesticides; art supplies; radon; and lead. Also suggests ways to reduce these health hazards. (BB)

  13. Radon-thoron discriminative measurements in the high natural radiation areas of southwestern Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Saïdou; Tokonami, Shinji; Janik, Miroslaw; Samuel, Bineng Guillaume; Abdourahimi; Joseph Emmanuel, Ndjana Nkoulou I I

    2015-12-01

    Although indoor radon was initially measured in the uranium regions of Poli and Lolodorf using Electret Ionization Chambers, discriminative RADUET detectors were deployed in 70 houses of the high natural radiation areas of Bikoue and Ngombas in the uranium region of Lolodorf in Southwestern Cameroon. Radon and thoron concentrations were determined using Image-J and Microscope Methods for track evaluation. Radon and thoron concentrations follow lognormal distributions and ranged respectively from 27 ± 26 to 937 ± 5 Bq m(-3) and from 48 ± 40 to 700 ± 128 Bq m(-3). The arithmetic means of radon and thoron concentrations were found to be 92 ± 3 Bq m(-3) and 260 ± 13 Bq m(-3.) Less than 2% of houses have indoor radon above the reference level of 300 Bq m(-3) and 30% of houses have thoron concentrations above 300 Bq m(-3.) Inhalation doses due to radon and thoron range respectively between 0.6-17.7 mSv yr(-1) and 0.2-3 mSv yr(-1) with the mean values of 1.4 mSv yr(-1) and 1 mSv yr(-1). The contribution of indoor thoron to the total inhalation dose ranges between 15%- 78.5% with the mean value of 47%. Thus thoron cannot be neglected when assessing radiation dose. PMID:26372741

  14. Radon permeability and radon exhalation of building materials.

    PubMed

    Keller, G; Hoffmann, B; Feigenspan, T

    2001-05-14

    High radon concentrations indoors usually depend on the possibilities of radon penetration from the surrounding soil into the buildings. Radon concentrations in dwellings up to 100 kBq/m3 were found in some special regions (i.e. Schneeberg/Saxony, Umhausen/Tyrol), where the soil shows a high uranium content and additionally, a fast radon transport in the soil is possible. To reduce the radon exposure of the inhabitants in these 'radon prone areas' it is necessary to look for building and insulating materials with low radon permeability. We examined several building materials, like cements, concretes and bricks of different constitutions for their diffusion coefficients and their exhalation rates. The insulating materials, like foils and bitumen were tested also on their radon tightness. The measurements were performed with an online radon measuring device, using electrostatic deposition of 218Po ions onto a surface barrier detector and subsequent alpha spectroscopy. The mean diffusion lengths for the investigated building materials range from lower than 0.7 mm (i.e. for plastic foil), up to 1.1 m for gypsum. The diffusion length R was calculated from the diffusion coefficient D with R = square root(D/lambda). If the thickness of the material is more than 3 times the diffusion length, then it is called radon-tight. The mean 222Rn exhalation rates for the building materials varied between 0.05 and 0.4 mBq/m2s. The samples were investigated as stones, plates, blocks, foils, coatings, powders etc., no statement can be made about working at the construction site of a building. Also the fabrication and processing of the materials has to be considered, because the material characteristics may have changed. PMID:11379942

  15. A study of indoor carbon dioxide levels and sick leave among office workers

    PubMed Central

    Myatt, Theodore A; Staudenmayer, John; Adams, Kate; Walters, Michael; Rudnick, Stephen N; Milton, Donald K

    2002-01-01

    Background A previous observational study detected a strong positive relationship between sick leave absences and carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations in office buildings in the Boston area. The authors speculated that the observed association was due to a causal effect associated with low dilution ventilation, perhaps increased airborne transmission of respiratory infections. This study was undertaken to explore this association. Methods We conducted an intervention study of indoor CO2 levels and sick leave among hourly office workers employed by a large corporation. Outdoor air supply rates were adjusted periodically to increase the range of CO2 concentrations. We recorded indoor CO2 concentrations every 10 minutes and calculated a CO2 concentration differential as a measure of outdoor air supply per person by subtracting the 1–3 a.m. average CO2 concentration from the same-day 9 a.m. – 5 a.m. average concentration. The metric of CO2 differential was used as a surrogate for the concentration of exhaled breath and for potential exposure to human source airborne respiratory pathogens. Results The weekly mean, workday, CO2 concentration differential ranged from 37 to 250 ppm with a peak CO2 concentration above background of 312 ppm as compared with the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) recommended maximum differential of 700 ppm. We determined the frequency of sick leave among 294 hourly workers scheduled to work approximately 49,804.2 days in the study areas using company records. We found no association between sick leave and CO2 differential Conclusions The CO2 differential was in the range of very low values, as compared with the ASHRAE recommended maximum differential of 700 ppm. Although no effect was found, this study was unable to test whether higher CO2 differentials may be associated with increased sick leave. PMID:12495450

  16. Radon testing behavior in a sample of individuals with high home radon screening measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.W.; Kross, B.C.; Vust, L.J. )

    1993-08-01

    Although radon exposure has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer, fewer than 6% of US homeowners test their homes for radon. This report examines participants' follow-up radon testing behavior subsequent to receiving an initial screening radon level greater than 20 pCi/L. Sixty-two participants in the Iowa State-Wide Rural Radon Screening Survey who had radon screening measurements over 20 pCi/L were questioned by phone survey 3 months after receipt of their radon screening result to assess: whether participants were aware of radon's health risk; if participants recalled the radon screening results; how participants perceived the relative health risk of radon and whether participants planned follow-up radon testing. Only 19% of the respondents specifically identified lung cancer as the possible adverse health outcome of high radon exposure, and the majority of participants underestimated the health risks high radon levels pose when compared to cigarettes and x-rays. In addition, less than one third (29%) of the participants actually remembered their radon screening level within 10 pCi/L 3 months after receiving their screening results. Only 53% of the individuals correctly interpreted their screening radon level as being in the high range, and only 39% of the participants planned follow-up radon measurements. Receipt of radon screening test results indicating high radon levels was not an adequate motivational factor in itself to stimulate further radon assessment or mitigation. The findings suggest that free radon screening will not result in a dramatic increase in subsequent homeowner initiated remediation or further recommended radon testing. 13 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  17. BTEX in indoor air of waterpipe cafés: Levels and factors influencing their concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hazrati, Sadegh; Rostami, Roohollah; Fazlzadeh, Mehdi

    2015-08-15

    BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) concentrations, factors affecting their levels, and the exposure risks related to these compounds were studied in waterpipe (Ghalyun/Hookah) cafés of Ardabil city in Islamic Republic of Iran. 81 waterpipe cafés from different districts of Ardabil city were selected and their ambient air was monitored for BTEX compounds. Air samples were taken from standing breathing zone of employees, ~150 cm above the ground level, and were analyzed using GC-FID. In each case, the types of smoked tobacco (regular, fruit flavored), types of ventilation systems (natural/artificial), and the floor level at which the café was located were investigated. A high mean concentration of 4.96±2.63 mg/m(3) corresponding to long term exposure to benzene-related cancer risk of 4314×10(-6) was estimated. The levels of the remaining compounds were lower than the national guideline limits, but their hazard quotients (HQ) for long term exposure to ethylbenzene (1.15) and xylene (17.32) exceeded the HQ unit value. Total hazard indices (HI) of 63.23 were obtained for non-cancer risks. Type of the smoked tobacco was the most important factor influencing BTEX concentrations in the cafés. BTEX concentrations in indoor ambient air of Ardabil waterpipe cafés were noticeably high, and therefore may pose important risks for human health on both short and long term exposures. PMID:25912530

  18. Radon exhalation rate of some building materials used in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Maged, A F; Ashraf, F A

    2005-09-01

    Indoor radon has been recognized as one of the health hazards for mankind. Common building materials used for construction of houses, which are considered as one of the major sources of this gas in indoor environment, have been studied for exhalation rate of radon. Non-nuclear industries, such as coal fired power plants or fertilizer production facilities, generate large amounts of waste gypsum as by-products. Compared to other building materials waste gypsum from fertilizer production facilities (phosphogypsum) shows increased rates of radon exhalation. In the present, investigation solid state alpha track detectors, CR-39 plastic detectors, were used to measure the indoor radon concentration and the radon exhalation rates from some building materials used in Egypt. The indoor radon concentration and the radon exhalation rate ranges were found to be 24-55 Bq m(-3 )and 11-223 mBq m(-2) h(-1), respectively. The effective dose equivalent range for the indoor was found 0.6-1.4 mSv y(-1). The equilibrium factor between radon and its daughters increased with the increase of relative humidity. PMID:16237604

  19. An investigation of infiltration and indoor air quality

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    A multitask study was performed in the State of New York to provide information for guiding home energy conservation programs while maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. During this study, the statistical distribution of radon concentrations inside 2400 homes was determined. The relationships among radon levels, house characteristics, and sources were also investigated. The direct impact that two specific air infiltration reduction measures -- caulking and weatherstripping of windows and doors, and installation of storm windows and storm doors -- have on house air leakage was investigated in 60 homes. The effect of house age on the impact of weatherization was also evaluated. Indoor and outdoor measurements of NO{sub 2}, CO, SO{sub 2}, and respirable suspended particulates (RSP) were made for 400 homes to determine the effect of combustion sources on indoor air quality and to characterize the statistical distribution of the concentrations. Finally, the combustion source data were combined with the information on air infiltration reduction measures to estimate the potential impact of these measures on indoor air quality. 87 tabs.

  20. Uranium distribution and radon exhalation from Brazilian dimension stones.

    PubMed

    Amaral, P G Q; Galembeck, T M B; Bonotto, D M; Artur, A C

    2012-04-01

    This paper provides evaluations of the radiometric behavior and exhalation patterns of radon gas in decorative and dimension stones explored in the Brazilian states of Minas Gerais and Espírito Santo, given the importance of determining radon gas concentrations in human-inhabited environments. A total of 10 silicate rock types were studied, featuring different petrographic/petrophysical characteristics given by seven magmatic rocks (three of which are granitic pegmatites) and three metamorphic rocks. The study, comprising radiometric data of U and monitoring of (222)Rn gas exhalation, shows a strong correlation between petrographic parameters and the physical properties of rocks. U levels ranged between 2.9 and 37 ppm, revealing a good coherence between the presence and the absence of radioactive element-bearing accessory minerals for each rock type. The rate of radon exhalation from the stones is related to the petrographic/petrophysical features of each material. By comparing the (222)Rn level generated by a rock to the amount effectively emanated by it, the rate of emanated gas proves to be insignificant; also, a rock that produces more Rn will not always emanate more. Simulations performed to estimate the radon levels inside residences or any given indoor environment showed that nine samples attained values below the 4 pCi/L EPA limit, whereas one was above that limit. PMID:22244194

  1. Indoor Dust Allergen Levels in the Homes of Patients with Childhood Asthma: An Experience From Southwestern Iran.

    PubMed

    Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Farjadian, Shirin; Fereidouni, Mohammad; Nasiri, Mahboubeh; Nejat, Arsalan

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to indoor allergens plays an important role in the etiology of asthma. This study was designed to quantify indoor allergens from homes of families that had at least one case of childhood asthma at home in a southwestern city of Iran. The relationship between the indoor allergen levels and home characteristics was also investigated. Dust samples were collected from the bedrooms and the kitchens of 35 homes where children with persistent asthma were living. The levels of indoor allergens were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Detectable amounts of mite, mouse and cockroach allergens were found in all evaluated places. None of our patients were exposed to a threshold concentration of indoor allergen for sensitizing at home. Regarding of mite allergens, the levels of Der f1 were significantly higher than Der p1 and a direct correlation was observed between living in an apartment and Der f1 levels. Moreover, Fel d1 (cat) and Bla g1 (cockroach) allergens were found in the children's bedrooms more frequently than those in the kitchens. In this study, direct associations were obtained between Bla g1 allergen and the duration of occupancy and between Fel d1 and average home size. A total of 34.2% of the patients showed positive skin reactions to at least one of the tested allergens as 17.1% of them showed reactivity to D. pteronyssinus. Proper controlling of cockroaches and mice by public health officials would be a practical approach to avoid inducing asthma or worsening the symptoms. PMID:27090366

  2. Regional and Detailed Survey for Radon Activities in Soil-Gas and Groundwater in the Okchon Zone, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je, H.-K.; Chon, H.-T.

    2012-04-01

    The Okchon zone in Korea provides a typical example of natural geological materials enriched in potentially toxic elements including uranium which is parent nuclide for radon gas. For the purpose of radon radioactivity risk assessment, making the map of radon risk grade from Okchon zone, regional and detailed field surveys were carried out during 3 years. The study area is located in the central part of Korea, called the Okchon zone (about 5,100 km2), which occur in a 80km wide, northeast-trending belt that extends across the Korean Peninsula. The Okchon zone is underlain by metasedimentary rocks of unknown age that are composed mainly of black slate, phyllite, shale, and limestone. The three research areas (defined as Boeun, Chungju, and Nonsan) for detailed survey were selected from the results of regional survey. Results of detailed radon survey indicated a wide range of radon activities for soil-gases (148-1,843 pCi/L) and ground waters (23-5,540 pCi/L). About 15 percent of soil-gas samples exceeded 1,000 pCi/L and 84 percent of ground water samples exceeded the MCL (maximum contaminant level) of drinking water, 300 pCi/L, which proposed by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1999. For detailed survey, radon activities of soil-gas and ground water were classified as bedrock geology, based on 1/50,000 geological map and field research. For soil-gas measurements, mean values of radon activity from black slate-shale (789 pCi/L) were highest among the other base rocks. And for groundwater measurements, mean value of radon activities were decreased in the order of granite (1,345 pCi/L) > black shale-slate (915 pCi/L) > metasediments (617 pCi/L). Result of indoor radon measurement from detailed survey areas showed that about 50% of houses exceeded the indoor guideline, 4 pCi/L. For the radon risk assessment in indoor environment showed that probability of lung cancer risk from the houses located on the granite base rock (3.0×10-2) was highest among the other

  3. Alerting the apathetic and reassuring the alarmed: communicating about radon risk in three communities. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chess, C.; Hance, B.J.

    1988-08-01

    Public reaction to the risk from radon varied widely in three communities chosen for qualitative analysis. In Boyertown, PA, some residents were very alarmed, but most were apathetic toward this newly identified environmental risk. In Clinton, NJ, residents were concerned and worked with the mayor and the state to determine whether they were at risk and to disseminate information about mitigation of high indoor radon levels. Residents in Vernon, New Jersey were very alarmed and actively opposed the state's decision to site low-level radium wastes there. The qualitative study examines why reactions differed among the three communities, and extracts lessons for communicating about the risk from radon. These lessons should apply to communicating about other environmental hazards to individuals and communities.

  4. Contribution of 222Rn in domestic water supplies to 222Rn in indoor air in Colorado homes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lawrence, E.P.; Wanty, R.B.; Nyberg, P.

    1992-01-01

    The contribution of 222Rn from domestic water wells to indoor air was investigated in a study of 28 houses near Conifer, CO. Air concentrations determined by alpha-track detectors (ATDs) and continuous radon monitors were compared with the predictions of a single-cell model. In many of the houses, the water supply was shown to contribute significantly to levels of indoor 222Rn. The data from the ATD study were augmented with a continuous monitoring study of a house near Lyons, CO. The well water in that house has the highest known concentration of 222Rn in water yet reported (93 MBq m-3). The temporal pattern in the indoor 222Rn concentration corresponds to water-use records. In general, it is difficult to quantify the proportion of indoor radon attributable to water use. Several lines of evidence suggest that the single-cell model underestimates this proportion. Continuous- monitoring data, although useful, are impractical due to the cost of the equipment. We propose a protocol for 222Rn measurement based on three simultaneous integrating radon detectors that may help estimate the proportion of indoor 222Rn derived from the water supply.

  5. Instrumentation for a radon research house

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.; Robb, A.W.

    1981-07-01

    A highly automated monitoring and control system for studying radon and radon-daughter behavior in residences has been designed and built. The system has been installed in a research house, a test space contained in a two-story wood-framed building, which allows us to conduct controlled studies of (1) pollutant transport within and between rooms, (2) the dynamics of radon daughter behavior, and (3) techniques for controlling radon and radon daughters. The system's instrumentation is capable of measuring air-exchange rate, four-point radon concentration, individual radon daughter concentrations, indoor temerature and humidity, and outdoor weather parameters (temperature, humidity, modules, wind speed, and wind direction). It is also equipped with modules that control the injection of radon and tracer gas into the test space, the operation of the forced-air furnace, the mechanical ventilation system, and the mixing fans located in each room. A microcomputer controls the experiments and records the data on magnetic tape and on a printing terminal. The data on tape is transferred to a larger computer system for reduction and analysis. In this paper we describe the essential design and function of the instrumentation system, as a whole, singling out those components that measure ventilation rate, radon concentration, and radon daughter concentrations.

  6. Radon in homes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-08-07

    Radon 222 and its radioactive decay products can enter buildings and, through inhalation, expose the inhabitants' pulmonary tissues to ionizing radiation. Studies of radon levels in the US indicate that variations of 100-fold or greater exist among private dwellings. In one region, 55% of homes had levels exceeding 4 pCi/L (0.15 Bq/L), which is the guidance level recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Ventilation and tightness of construction are important determinants of radon levels. In some instances, fans or heat exchangers can reduce excessive concentrations, but in others more elaborate remedial measures may be required. Physicians may obtain information about radon through Environmental Protection Agency regional offices and state radiation control programs. The risk of radiogenic cancer is believed to increase with exposure to ionizing radiation. According to some estimates, concentrations of radon decay products in US homes could be responsible for several thousand cases of lung cancer per year. Studies of radon levels in representative buildings and guidelines are needed to ensure safe, effective, and cost-effective counter-measures. Architects, contractors, designers, building code administrators, health physicists, and biomedical investigators can help with solutions.

  7. Monitoring and evaluation of radon mitigation systems over a two-year period

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, R.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Turk, B.H.

    1988-09-01

    Fourteen single-family detached houses in the Spokane, Washington, and Coeur D'Alene, Idaho, area were tracked for two years following mitigation for elevated indoor concentrations of radon. Each house was monitored quarterly using mailed alpha-track radon detectors deployed in each zone of the structure. During the second heating season following mitigation, radon concentrations were monitored continuously for several weeks in seven of the houses, each house and mitigation system was inspected and selected measurements were performed in order to access mitigation system performance. Occupants were also interviewed regarding their maintenance, operation, and subjective evaluation of the radon mitigation system(s). The quarterly alpha-track measurements showed an increase in radon levels in a majority of the homes during many of the follow-up measurement periods compared to concentrations measured immediately after mitigation. The greatest increases in radon concentrations occurred in 3 of the 4 houses equipped with basement pressurization systems where radon levels approached the pre-mitigation levels during at least one of the follow-up measurement periods. In some of the houses mitigated with subsurface ventilation, radon concentrations generally increased over the course of the follow-up periods. Factors causing decreased mitigation system performance included: (1) build up of debris on the soil at the outlet of subsurface pressurization pipes; (2) noisy and vibrating fans were turned off; (3) air-to-air heat exchanger, basement pressurization, and subsurface ventilation fans were turned off and fan speeds reduced; and (4) crawl space vents were closed or sealed. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The Distribution of Exposure to Radon: Effects of Population Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.J.; Rein, S.; Nero, A.V.; Wollenberg Jr., H.A.

    1993-01-01

    The distribution of population exposures to radon, rather than the distribution of indoor radon concentrations, determines the fraction of population exposed to exceptionally high risk from radon exposures. Since this fraction at high risk has prompted the development of public policies on radon, it is important to first determine the magnitude of this fraction, and then how it much would decrease with different implementation program options for radon mitigation. This papers presents an approach to determining the distribution of population exposures to radon from public domain data, and illustrates it with application to the state of Minnesota. During this work, we are led to define a radon entry potential index which appears useful in the search for regions with high radon houses.

  9. Experimental study of effectiveness of four radon mitigation solutions, based on underground depressurization, tested in prototype housing built in a high radon area in Spain.

    PubMed

    Frutos Vázquez, Borja; Olaya Adán, Manuel; Quindós Poncela, Luis Santiago; Sainz Fernandez, Carlos; Fuente Merino, Ismael

    2011-04-01

    The present paper discusses the results of an empirical study of four approaches to reducing indoor radon concentrations based on depressurization techniques in underground sumps. The experiments were conducted in prototype housing built in an area of Spain where the average radon concentration at a depth of 1 m is 250 kBq m(-3). Sump effectiveness was analysed in two locations: underneath the basement, which involved cutting openings into the foundation, ground storey and roof slabs, and outside the basement walls, which entailed digging a pit alongside the building exterior. The effectiveness of both sumps was likewise tested with passive and forced ventilation methods. The systems proved to be highly efficient, lowering radon levels by 91-99%, except in the solution involving passive ventilation and the outside sump, where radon levels were reduced by 53-55%. At wind speeds of over 8 m/s, however, passive ventilation across an outside sump lowered radon levels by 95% due to a Venturi effect induced drop in pressure. PMID:21382656

  10. Mercury poisoning dentistry: high-level indoor air mercury contamination at selected dental sites.

    PubMed

    Khwaja, Mahmood A; Abbasi, Maryam Shabbir

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg), also known as quick silver, is an essential constituent of dental amalgam. It is a toxic substance of global concern. Children are more at risk from mercury poisoning which affects their neurological development and brain. In the past, a number of studies at dental sites in many countries have been carried out and reported. The present report briefly describes and discusses our recent investigations carried out at 34 dental sites (teaching institutions, hospitals and private clinics) in Pakistan. It is evident from the data that at many sites the indoor mercury vapor levels exceed far above the permissible limit recommended for safe physical and mental health. At these sites, public in general and the medical, paramedical staff and vulnerable population in particular, are at most serious risk to health resulting from exposure to toxic and hazardous mercury. To minimize such risk, some of the recommendations are, best in-house environmental practices for occupational health and safety, mercury contaminated waste reduction at source, mercury specific legislation and ratification of Minamata convention on mercury by Pakistan and other world governments at the earliest time possible. PMID:24552960

  11. Radon Prevention in the Design and Construction of Schools and Other Large Buildings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leovic, Kelly W.; Craig, A. B.

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas in ambient air that is estimated to cause thousands of deaths from lung cancer each year. This report outlines ways in which to ameliorate the presence of radon in schools buildings. The first section is a general introduction for those who need background information on the indoor radon problem and…

  12. First-phase study design for the US Navy Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program (NAVRAMP)

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Wilson, D.L.; Dudney, C.S.; Matthews, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    In 1988, the Navy initiated a multi-year program for the assessment and mitigation of radon inside buildings at its worldwide distribution of bases. During the first two years of the program, a survey is being made of indoor radon levels in residences occupied by Navy personnel and their dependents. In addition, a small random sample of other structures is being monitored for elevated radon. Passive alpha-track detectors, numbering about 25,000, are being used as monitoring devices. A substantial fraction of the monitors (20%) are being used for quality assurance. Data management programs have been developed to record the chain of custody of the monitors and handle the associated questionnaire data. Program objectives and implementation emphasize quality assurance, records maintenance and monitor placement and retrieval. 5 refs., 2 tabs.

  13. Reducing Radon in Schools: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligman, Bryan K.; Fisher, Eugene J.

    This document presents the process of radon diagnostics and mitigation in schools to help educators determine the best way to reduce elevated radon levels found in a school. The guidebook is designed to guide school leaders through the process of measuring radon levels, selecting the best mitigation strategy, and directing the efforts of a…

  14. REENTRY OF RADON FROM MITIGATION SYSTEM OUTLETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of the measurement of reentry rates for radon released at roof level and at ground level near a house, to determine whether or not exhaust is necessary above the roof. (NOTE: Some radon mitigation systems draw air with a high radon concentration from under...

  15. Simulation of background from low-level tritium and radon emanation in the KATRIN spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Leiber, B.; Collaboration: KATRIN Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment is a large-scale experiment for the model independent determination of the mass of electron anti-neutrinos with a sensitivity of 200 meV/c{sup 2}. It investigates the kinematics of electrons from tritium beta decay close to the endpoint of the energy spectrum at 18.6 keV. To achieve a good signal to background ratio at the endpoint, a low background rate below 10{sup −2} counts per second is required. The KATRIN setup thus consists of a high luminosity windowless gaseous tritium source (WGTS), a magnetic electron transport system with differential and cryogenic pumping for tritium retention, and electro-static retarding spectrometers (pre-spectrometer and main spectrometer) for energy analysis, followed by a segmented detector system for counting transmitted beta-electrons. A major source of background comes from magnetically trapped electrons in the main spectrometer (vacuum vessel: 1240 m{sup 3}, 10{sup −11} mbar) produced by nuclear decays in the magnetic flux tube of the spectrometer. Major contributions are expected from short-lived radon isotopes and tritium. Primary electrons, originating from these decays, can be trapped for hours, until having lost almost all their energy through inelastic scattering on residual gas particles. Depending on the initial energy of the primary electron, up to hundreds of low energetic secondary electrons can be produced. Leaving the spectrometer, these electrons will contribute to the background rate. This contribution describes results from simulations for the various background sources. Decays of {sup 219}Rn, emanating from the main vacuum pump, and tritium from the WGTS that reaches the spectrometers are expected to account for most of the background. As a result of the radon alpha decay, electrons are emitted through various processes, such as shake-off, internal conversion and the Auger deexcitations. The corresponding simulations were done using the KASSIOPEIA

  16. Exposure to Elevated Carbon Monoxide Levels at an Indoor Ice Arena--Wisconsin, 2014.

    PubMed

    Creswell, Paul D; Meiman, Jon G; Nehls-Lowe, Henry; Vogt, Christy; Wozniak, Ryan J; Werner, Mark A; Anderson, Henry

    2015-11-20

    On December 13, 2014, the emergency management system in Lake Delton, Wisconsin, was notified when a male hockey player aged 20 years lost consciousness after participation in an indoor hockey tournament that included approximately 50 hockey players and 100 other attendees. Elevated levels of carbon monoxide (CO) (range = 45 ppm-165 ppm) were detected by the fire department inside the arena. The emergency management system encouraged all players and attendees to seek medical evaluation for possible CO poisoning. The Wisconsin Department of Health Services (WDHS) conducted an epidemiologic investigation to determine what caused the exposure and to recommend preventive strategies. Investigators abstracted medical records from area emergency departments (EDs) for patients who sought care for CO exposure during December 13-14, 2014, conducted a follow-up survey of ED patients approximately 2 months after the event, and conducted informant interviews. Ninety-two persons sought ED evaluation for possible CO exposure, all of whom were tested for CO poisoning. Seventy-four (80%) patients had blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels consistent with CO poisoning; 32 (43%) CO poisoning cases were among hockey players. On December 15, the CO emissions from the propane-fueled ice resurfacer were demonstrated to be 4.8% of total emissions when actively resurfacing and 2.3% when idling, both above the optimal range of 0.5%-1.0%. Incomplete fuel combustion by the ice resurfacer was the most likely source of elevated CO. CO poisonings in ice arenas can be prevented through regular maintenance of ice resurfacers, installation of CO detectors, and provision of adequate ventilation. PMID:26583915

  17. Radon concentration and working level in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF)

    SciTech Connect

    Stiver, J.H.; Tung, Chao-Hsiung

    1995-06-01

    Radon-222 ({sup 222}Rn) and {sup 222}Rn progeny WL monitoring in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) was initiated to support regulatory compliance. Measurements were taken over two periods, in Test Alcove No. 1 of the ESF, about 60 m from the tunnel entrance. For both periods, {sup 222}Rn concentration was less than 10% of the Derived Air Concentration (DAC) set forth in DOE Order 5480.11. Thus, these assessments were sufficient to demonstrate regulatory compliance. Based on these findings, quarterly {sup 222}Rn and {sup 222}Rn progeny monitoring was initiated. Two systems each were employed for {sup 222}Rn and {sup 222}Rn progeny measurement. No significant differences were observed between the respective systems. An interesting finding was that at the time the measurements were taken, barometric pressure appeared to be the predominant factor controlling {sup 222}Rn concentration in the ESF. This was true even during periods of ventilation shutdown.

  18. Lung cancer mortality and airways obstruction among metal miners exposed to silica and low levels of radon daughters.

    PubMed

    Carta, P; Cocco, P; Picchiri, G

    1994-04-01

    Starting from a cross-sectional survey in 1973, the mortality of two cohorts of Sardinian metal miners was followed through December 31, 1988. In mine A, the quartz concentration in respirable dust ranged between 0.2% and 2.0% and the exposure to radon daughters averaged 0.13 working level (WL), with the highest estimated cumulative exposure around 80-120 WLM. In mine B, the silica content was much higher (6.5-29%), but exposure to radon daughters was significantly lower than in mine A. More than 98% of the overall work force in 1973 (1,741 miners) entered the cohort, providing 25,842.5 person-years. Smoking, occupational history, chest radiographs, and lung function tests were available for the cohort members at admission. Mortality for all causes was slightly lower than expected. A significant excess for nonmalignant chronic respiratory diseases was noticed in both mines. Twenty-four subjects died of lung cancer, 17 from mine A (SMR: 128; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 75-205) and 7 from mine B (SMR: 85; 95% CI: 34-175). The SMR for lung cancer was highest among the underground workers from mine A (SMR: 148; 95% CI: 74-265), with a significant upward trend by duration of employment in underground jobs. Mine B underground miners showed lung cancer SMRs close to 100 without a significant trend by duration of employment. Among underground miners with spirometric airways obstruction in 1973, those from mine A showed the highest risk (SMR: 316; 95% CI: 116-687). The relationship did not change after adjusting for age and smoking. Based on the present findings, crystalline silica per se does not appear to affect lung cancer mortality. A slight association between lung cancer mortality and exposure to radon daughters, though within relatively low levels, may be considered for underground miners from mine A. Impaired pulmonary function may be an independent predictor of lung cancer and an important risk factor enhancing the residence time of inhaled carcinogens, i

  19. Environmental radon and cancer correlations in Maine.

    PubMed

    Hess, C T; Weiffenbach, C V; Norton, S A

    1983-08-01

    The distribution of 222Rn has been measured in the sixteen counties of Maine, U.S.A. by liquid scintillation counting of water samples from more than two thousand public and private wells. Three hundred and fifty of these wells have been characterized for geology and hydrology. Airborne radon has been measured in seventy houses with grab samples and in eighteen houses for 5-7 days each with continuously recording diffusion-electrostatic radon detectors. Concentrations of radon in water ranged from 20 to 180,000 pCi/l. Granite areas yielded the highest average levels (mean = 22,100 pCi/l.; n = 136), with considerable intra-granite variation. Metasedimentary rocks yielded levels characteristic of the lithology for metamorphic grades ranging from chlorite to andalusite. Sillimanite and higher-grade rocks yielded higher 222Rn levels, probably due to the intrusion of uranium-bearing pegmatites in these terranes. Airborne 222Rn in homes ranged from 0.05 to 210 pCi/l. At the high end of this range, doses will exceed recommended industrial limits. In some homes only a small fraction of the airborne 222Rn was due to the water supply. Average 222Rn levels in domestic water supplies for each of the 16 counties, calculated by areally averaging rock types and their associated 222Rn levels, were found to be significantly correlated with rates for all cancers combined and rates for lung and reproductive cancers in the counties. Although numerous factors other than cancer induction by indoor daughter exposures may be responsible for the observed correlations, these have not been investigated in detail. PMID:6885433

  20. Using geographic information systems for radon exposure assessment in dwellings in the Oslo region, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollerud, R.; Blaasaas, K.; Ganerød, G.; Daviknes, H. K.; Aune, E.; Claussen, B.

    2014-04-01

    Radon exposures were assigned to each residential address in the Oslo region using a geographic information system (GIS) that included indoor radon measurements. The results will be used in an epidemiologic study regarding leukemia and brain cancer. The model is based on 6% of measured residential buildings. High density of indoor radon measurements allowed us to develop a buffer model where indoor radon measurements found around each dwelling were used to assign a radon value for homes lacking radon measurement. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used to study the agreement between radon values from the buffer method, from indoor radon values of measured houses, and from a regression model constructed with radiometric data (eTh, eU) and bedrock geology. We obtained good agreement for both comparisons with ICC values between 0.54 and 0.68. GIS offers a useful variety of tools to study the indoor-radon exposure assessment. By using the buffer method it is more likely that geological conditions are similar within the buffer and this may take more into account the variation of radon over short distances. It is also probable that short-distance-scale correlation patterns express similarities in building styles and living habits. Although the method has certain limitations, we regard it as acceptable for use in epidemiological studies.

  1. Radon in ground water of the Lower Susqehanna and Potomac River basins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindsey, Bruce D.; Ator, Scott W.

    1996-01-01

    Ground-water samples collected from 267 wells were analyzed for radon as part of a water-quality reconnaissance of subunits of the Lower Susquehanna and Potomac River Basins conducted by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program. Radon is a product of the radioactive decay of uranium. Airborne radon has been cited by the Surgeon General of the United States as the second-leading cause of lung cancer and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has identified ground-water supplies as possible contributing sources of indoor radon. Eighty percent of ground-water samples collected for this study were found to contain radon at activities greater than 300 pCi/L (picocuries per liter), the USEPA's proposed Maximum Contaminant Level for radon in drinking water, and 31 percent of samples contained radon at activities greater than 1,000 pCi/L. The 10 subunits where samples were collected were grouped into three classes - median ground-water radon activity less than 300 pCi/L, between 300 pCi/L and 1,000 pCi/L, and greater than 1,000 pCi/L. Subunits underlain by igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Piedmont Physiographic Province typically have the highest median ground-water radon activities (greater than 1,000 pCi/L); although there is a large variation in radon activities within most of the subunits. Lower median radon activities (between 300 pCi/L and 1,000 pCi/L) were found in ground water in subunits underlain by limestone and dolomite. Of three subunits underlain by sandstone and shale, one fell into each of the three radon-activity classes. The large variability within these subunits may be attributed to the fact that the uranium content of sandstone and shale is related to the uranium content of the sediments from which they formed.

  2. Simplified modeling for infiltration and radon entry

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    Air leakage in the envelopes of residential buildings is the primary mechanism for provided ventilation to those buildings. For radon the same mechanisms that drive the ventilation, drive the radon entry This paper attempts to provide a simplified physical model that can be used to understand the interactions between the building leakage distribution, the forces that drive infiltration and ventilation, and indoor radon concentrations, Combining both ventilation and entry modeling together allows an estimation of Radon concentration and exposure to be made and demonstrates how changes in the envelope or ventilation system would affect it. This paper will develop simplified modeling approaches for estimating both ventilation rate and radon entry rate based on the air tightness of the envelope and the driving forces. These approaches will use conventional leakage values (i.e. effective leakage area ) to quantify the air tightness and include natural and mechanical driving forces. This paper will introduce a simplified parameter, the Radon Leakage Area, that quantifies the resistance to radon entry. To be practical for dwellings, modeling of the occupant exposures to indoor pollutants must be simple to use and not require unreasonable input data. This paper presents the derivation of the simplified physical model, and applies that model to representative situations to explore the tendencies to be expected under different circumstances.

  3. High Radon concentration in the karst area of south Puglia, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taroni, Mattia; Bartolomei, Paolo; Esposito, Massimo; Vaccaro, Carmela

    2010-05-01

    The Radon mapping are normally based on regular grids or on geological maps. The geological maps are advantageous because foresee little areas with high hazard in zones which are otherwise considered like a low risk. The Italian national maps consider the South Puglia, Lecce Karst, as a zone with low risk, but this region presents local important anomalies that can be seen with the geological Radon map. The methodology used to understand the natural phenomena (that are the basis of the analysis of potential Radon risk) is based on a preliminary study from literature: Geological study, general classification, environment formation in which it has developed the area or part of it, detailed studies of the area investigated, the underground structure, level of fracturing, cracking, and primary and secondary porosity, seismic of area. The Area's identification with different risk degrees of Radon production, concentration and emanation characterized by natural boundaries, geological, geomorphological, etc... Information obtained from paragraphs 1 and 2 provide the "Indices of potential risk of the generation, emanation and diffusion of Radon'; this hazard indices allow to optimize the measurements distribution in soils. We Identify the sub-areas of the zone study that can be characterized by high Radon concentrations, dividing these by "natural" hypothetical lines such as the lithology changing, permeability, subsoil structure, etc. ... The preliminary study allows the optimisation of sampling strategy based on not Uniform distribution of 'in situ' measures, where to intensive the measures and where to make only control points of Radon concentration. With these information and with Uranium concentration in samples of different geological formations and Radon measures in water and in soil air we obtained thematic maps and box-plots linking the natural geological indices and we identified the factors that govern the Radon rise and diffusion. The Lecce Karst's study have

  4. Results of simultaneous radon and thoron measurements in 33 metropolitan areas of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Bergman, Lauren; Falcomer, Renato; Whyte, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer after tobacco smoking. 222Rn (radon gas) and 220Rn (thoron gas) are the most common isotopes of radon. In order to assess thoron contribution to indoor radon and thoron exposure, a survey of residential radon and thoron concentrations was initiated in 2012 with ∼4000 homes in the 33 census metropolitan areas of Canada. The survey confirmed that indoor radon and thoron concentrations are not correlated and that thoron concentrations cannot be predicted from widely available radon information. The results showed that thoron contribution to the radiation dose varied from 0.5 to 6 % geographically. The study indicated that, on average, thoron contributes ∼3 % of the radiation dose due to indoor radon and thoron exposure in Canada. Even though the estimated average thoron concentration of 9 Bq m−3 (population weighted) in Canada is low, the average radon concentration of 96 Bq m−3 (population weighted) is more than double the worldwide average indoor radon concentration. It is clear that continued efforts are needed to further reduce the exposure and effectively reduce the number of lung cancers caused by radon. PMID:24748485

  5. Indoor and outdoor BTX levels in Barcelona City metropolitan area and Catalan rural areas.

    PubMed

    Gallego, E; Roca, F X; Guardino, X; Rosell, M G

    2008-01-01

    Five aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, and three isomeric xylenes) were monitored in indoor and outdoor air of 7 public buildings and 54 private homes, located in Barcelona City metropolitan area and in several rural areas of Catalonia. The sampling was carried out over four periods: spring-summer and winter of 2000, and summer and winter of 2001. Passive ORSA 5 Dräger samplers were used for benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) adsorption. BTX were extracted with carbon disulphide and analysed using a gas chromatograph coupled to a FID detector. In Barcelona metropolitan area the outdoor average concentrations of BTX were 3.5, 34.2, and 31.3 microg/m3 in urban areas, and 1.4, 9.2, and 9.2 microg/m3 in rural areas, respectively. Average indoor air concentrations of BTX were respectively 4.3, 64.8, and 47.6 microg/m3 in urban areas and 5.8, 67.0, and 51.4 microg/m3 in rural areas, respectively. A direct connection between the house and garage was one of the most influential factors for indoor BTX concentrations in rural areas. In urban areas, diffuse traffic sources were the predominant BTX source, slightly influenced by tobacco smoke in indoor air. PMID:19143312

  6. Researching Radon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucidi, Louis; Mecca, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a project in which students examined the physics, chemistry, and geology of radon and used available technology to measure radon concentrations in their homes. Uses the inquiry process, analytical skills, communication skills, content knowledge, and production of authentic products for student assessment. (YDS)

  7. Indoor-outdoor levels of size segregated particulate matter and mono/polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons among urban areas using solid fuels for heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kliucininkas, Linas; Krugly, Edvinas; Stasiulaitiene, Inga; Radziuniene, Inga; Prasauskas, Tadas; Jonusas, Arunas; Kauneliene, Violeta; Martuzevicius, Dainius

    2014-11-01

    Emissions from the fuel combustion in the energy production are causes of concern due to associated health risks, but little information is available on the impact of residential fuel burning on indoor air quality, where most of the human exposure occurs. In this complex study, concentrations of size-segregated particulate matter (PM), monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic compounds (MAHs and PAHs) at indoor and outdoor sites in six urban homes in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania, were determined over winter and summer sampling campaigns, specifically targeting the impact of the local fuel burning to the indoor air quality. PM levels observed in Kaunas during winter measurement campaign were higher compared to those in many other European settlements utilizing biomass for energy production. The particle size distribution analysis revealed that the major part of the PM mass in winter period consisted of fine particles (PM2.5). Both MAH and PAH levels were higher in winter. The indoor to outdoor ratios (I/O) of MAHs and PAHs revealed specific patterns depending on the presence of emissions sources indoors. Irrespectively of the season, I/O values were <1, suggesting that in case of the absence of an indoor pollution, the dominant source of organic compounds was from the outdoor environment. In homes with no PAH source inside, the I/O ratio equalled ranged from 0.05 to 0.36, suggesting the penetrated portion of outdoor combustion particles to the indoor air.

  8. Long-term measurements of radon, thoron and their airborne progeny in 25 schools in Republic of Srpska.

    PubMed

    Ćurguz, Z; Stojanovska, Z; Žunić, Z S; Kolarž, P; Ischikawa, T; Omori, Y; Mishra, R; Sapra, B K; Vaupotič, J; Ujić, P; Bossew, P

    2015-10-01

    This article reports results of the first investigations on indoor radon, thoron and their decay products concentration in 25 primary schools of Banja Luka, capital city of Republic Srpska. The measurements have been carried out in the period from May 2011 to April 2012 using 3 types of commercially available nuclear track detectors, named: long-term radon monitor (GAMMA 1)- for radon concentration measurements (C(Rn)); radon-thoron discriminative monitor (RADUET) for thoron concentration measurements (C(Tn)); while equilibrium equivalent radon concentration (EERC) and equilibrium equivalent thoron concentrations (EETC) measured by Direct Radon Progeny Sensors/Direct Thoron Progeny Sensors (DRPS/DTPS) were exposed in the period November 2011 to April 2012. In each school the detectors were deployed at 10 cm distance from the wall. The obtained geometric mean concentrations were C(Rn) = 99 Bq m(-3) and C(Tn) = 51 Bq m(-3) for radon and thoron gases respectively. Those for equilibrium equivalent radon concentration (EERC) and equilibrium equivalent thoron concentrations (EETC) were 11.2 Bq m(-3) and 0.4 Bq m(-3), respectively. The correlation analyses showed weak relation only between C(Rn) and C(Tn) as well as between C(Tn) and EETC. The influence of the school geographical locations and factors linked to buildings characteristic in relation to measured concentrations were tested. The geographical location and floor level significantly influence C(Rn) while C(Tn) depend only from building materials (ANOVA, p ≤ 0.05). The obtained geometric mean values of the equilibrium factors were 0.123 for radon and 0.008 for thoron. PMID:26171822

  9. Microenvironmental air and soil monitoring of contaminants: An evaluation of indoor and outdoor levels in Chihuahua City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Rios, Marcos

    Like most of the cities around the world Chihuahua City suffers atmospheric and soil pollution. This is a problem that requires immediate attention from both public authorities and the scientific community. Although it is known that high levels of heavy metals are present in the airborne particulate matter, soil and dust in many urban regions, the information about personal exposure to these pollutants in Chihuahua City is nonexistent. This study focuses on the analysis and characterization of lead and arsenic in the airborne and soil particulate matter present in the interiors of households and their surrounding outdoor environments in the southern part of Chihuahua City. The sampling area chosen for this study was located in the southern part of Chihuahua City. An atmospheric sampling point selected by the Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV) was selected as a geographical center, with a 2 km radius forming the sampling area. The households selected for analyses were located on Lombardo Toledano Street, a high-traffic street. The main objectives of this study were to establish the maximum exposure level in outdoor and indoor environments for particulate matter less than 10 mum (PM 10), Pb, and As, to determine the background level of Chihuahua City for these same elements, to determine the isotopic ratios of Pb206 and Pb207 in the indoor and outdoor atmospheric samples, and to verify if the source of the pollution is from anthropogenic and/or natural sources. Additionally, a comparison of the analytical data from X-ray fluorescence (XRF) versus the analytical data from inductively coupled plasma with optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was conducted. The comparison of these techniques was based on sample preparation, speed of analysis, and accuracy of results. In the case of sample preparation, two extraction techniques were performed for a comparison of the extraction/leaching of Pb and As from the samples. These microwave

  10. Mapping radon-prone areas using γ-radiation dose rate and geological information.

    PubMed

    García-Talavera, M; García-Pérez, A; Rey, C; Ramos, L

    2013-09-01

    Identifying radon-prone areas is key to policies on the control of this environmental carcinogen. In the current paper, we present the methodology followed to delineate radon-prone areas in Spain. It combines information from indoor radon measurements with γ-radiation and geological maps. The advantage of the proposed approach is that it lessens the requirement for a high density of measurements by making use of commonly available information. It can be applied for an initial definition of radon-prone areas in countries committed to introducing a national radon policy or to improving existing radon maps in low population regions. PMID:23803560

  11. Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems & Indoor Air Quality - Exhaust Fan Mitigation.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1987-07-01

    Overall, the findings show that exhaust fans basically provide small amounts of ventilation compensation. By monitoring the common indoor air pollutants (radon, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor), it was found that the quality of the indoor air was not adversely affected by the use of exhaust fans. Nor did their use provide any measurable or significant benefits since no improvement in air quality was ascertained. While exhaust fans of this small size did not increase radon, which is the contaminant of most concern, the researchers caution that operation of a larger fan or installation in a very tight home could result in higher levels because depressurization is greater. The daily energy consumption for use of these appliances during the heating season was calculated to be 1.5 kilowatt hours or approximately 3% of the energy consumption in the study homes. The information collected in this collaborative field study indicates that the use of these particular ventilation systems has no significant effect on indoor air quality.

  12. Association Between State Assistance on the Topic of Indoor Air Quality and School District-Level Policies That Promote Indoor Air Quality in Schools.

    PubMed

    Everett Jones, Sherry; Doroski, Brenda; Glick, Sherry

    2015-12-01

    Nationally representative data from the 2012 School Health Policies and Practices Study examined whether state assistance on indoor air quality (IAQ) was associated with district-level policies and practices related to IAQ and integrated pest management (IPM). Districts in states that provided assistance on IAQ were more likely than districts not in such states to (1) have an IAQ management program (p < .001); (2) require schools to conduct periodic inspections of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system (p < .05); of the building for cracks, leaks, or past water damage (p < .01); for mold (p < .01); for clutter that prevents effective cleaning and maintenance (p < .05); of the plumbing system (p < .01); and for condensation in and around school facilities (p < .001); (3) have an engine idling reduction program ( < .001); (4) have a policy to purchase low-emitting products (p < .05); and (5) require IPM strategies (p < .05). Increasing the number of states that provide IAQ-related assistance to school districts and schools may improve school IAQ. PMID:25920318

  13. A tentative protocol for measurement of radon availability from the ground

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure is being tested in order to determine its suitability for assessing the intrinsic ability of the ground at a particular site to supply radon (222Rn) to a basement structure to be built on the site. The mean migration distance, multiplied by the measured radon concentration gives the "Radon Availability Number' (RAN). Measurements at sites of known indoor radon concentration suggest that RANs below 2 kBq/m2 (5x104 pCi/m2) indicate little chance of elevated indoor radon and RANs above 20 kBq/m2 (5x105 pCi/m2) indicate that elevated indoor radon is likely. The range of uncertainty and the point-to-point and seasonal variations to be expected are under investigation. -from Author

  14. Mapping the geogenic radon potential in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kemski, J; Siehl, A; Stegemann, R; Valdivia-Manchego, M

    2001-05-14

    Mapping the geogenic radon potential in Germany is a research project initiated by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Conservation and Reactor Safety. The project was aimed to develop a standard methodology for the estimation of a geogenic radon potential and to apply this method to map the region of Germany as an overview for planning purposes. The regionalisation results from a distance-weighted interpolation of the site-specific values of radon concentration in soil gas and in situ gas permeability of soils on a regular grid considering the corresponding geological units. The map of Germany in a scale of 1:2 million is based on the radon concentration in soil gas as an estimator of the geogenic radon potential assuming the 'worst case' of uniform highest permeability. The distribution is subdivided into categories of low (< 10 kBq/m3), medium (10-100 kBq/m3), increased (100-500 kBq/m3) and high (> 500 kBq/m3) radon concentration. High values occur especially in regions with granites and basement rocks of Paleozoic age, and are proven by measurements in 0.03% of the total area. Many of these regions are also known for their enhanced indoor values. The class with increased values takes a portion of 7.86% and likewise occurs mainly in regions with outcrops of folded and metamorphic basement, but also of some Meso- and Cenozoic sediments with increased uranium contents and/or higher emanation coefficients. For 67.3% of the country, the radon concentration is classified as 'medium', and an assignment to specific geological units cannot be made at the map scale considered. Low radon contents, where protective measures against radon are usually not considered, are found in the geologically rather homogeneous part of northern Germany with unconsolidated Cenozoic sediments, covering approximately 25% of the total country. It is of course not possible to predict the indoor radon concentration of single houses from these maps, because construction type and

  15. Airborne trichloramine (NCl(3)) levels and self-reported health symptoms in indoor swimming pool workers: dose-response relationships.

    PubMed

    Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Righi, Elena; Predieri, Guerrino; Giacobazzi, Pierluigi; Petra, Berchotd; Aggazzotti, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that attendance at indoor chlorinated swimming pool is a risk factor for irritative ocular and respiratory symptoms and bronchial asthma is well known in literature, although epidemiological evidence is still inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between airborne trichloramine (NCl(3)) levels and irritative symptoms in swimming pool employees in order to obtain detailed data regarding dose-response relationships and to identify the airborne NCl(3) exposure level, if any, without health effects. A total of 20 indoor swimming pools in the Emilia Romagna region of Italy were included in the study. Information about the health status of 128 employees was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Exposure to airborne NCl(3) was evaluated in indoor swimming pools by a modified DPD/KI method. The results of the study evidenced a mean value of airborne NCl(3) of 0.65±0.20 mg/m(3) (ranging from 0.20 to 1.02 mg/m(3)). Both ocular and upper respiratory symptoms, in particular red eyes, runny nose, voice loss and cold symptoms, were declared more frequently by lifeguards and trainers when compared with employees working in other areas of the facility (office, cafe, and so on). Pool attendants exposed to airborne NCl(3) levels of >0.5 mg/m(3) experienced higher risks for runny nose (OR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.22-6.93) red eyes (OR: 3.16; 95% CI: 1.46-6.82), voice loss (OR: 3.56; 95% CI: 1.60-7.95) and itchy eyes (OR: 2.23; 95% CI: 1.04-4.78) than other employees. Moreover, red eyes, itchy eyes, runny nose and voice loss are related to airborne NCl(3) levels, with strong dose-response relationships. In conclusion, this study shows that lifeguards and trainers experience ocular and respiratory irritative symptoms more frequently than employees not exposed. Irritative symptoms become significant starting from airborne NCl(3) levels of >0.5 mg/m(3), confirming that the WHO-recommended value can be considered protective in

  16. Evaluation of radon mitigation systems in 14 houses over a two-year period.

    PubMed

    Prill, R J; Fisk, W J; Turk, B H

    1990-05-01

    Fourteen single-family detached houses in Spokane, Washington, and Coeur D'Alene, Idaho, were monitored for two years after high concentrations of indoor radon had been mitigated. Each house was monitored quarterly using mailed alpha-track radon detectors deployed in each zone of the structure. To assess performance of mitigation systems during the second heating season after mitigation, radon concentrations in seven houses were monitored continuously for several weeks, mitigation systems in all houses were inspected, and selected other measurements were taken. In addition, occupants were also interviewed regarding their maintenance, operation, and subjective evaluation of the radon mitigation systems. Quarterly alpha-track measurements showed that radon levels had increased in most of the homes during many follow-up measurement periods when compared with concentrations measured immediately after mitigation. Mitigation-system performance was adversely affected by (1) accumulated outdoor debris blocking the outlets of subsurface pressurization pipes; (2) fans being turned off (e.g., because of excessive noise or vibration); (3) air-to-air heat exchanger, basement pressurization, and subsurface ventilation fans being turned off and fan speeds reduced; and (4) crawl-space vents being closed or sealed. PMID:2354048

  17. Evaluation of radon mitigation systems in 14 houses over a two-year period

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, R.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Turk, B.H. )

    1990-05-01

    Fourteen single-family detached houses in Spokane, Washington, and Coeur D'Alene, Idaho, were monitored for two years after high concentrations of indoor radon had been mitigated. Each house was monitored quarterly using mailed alpha-track radon detectors deployed in each zone of the structure. To assess performance of mitigation systems during the second heating season after mitigation, radon concentrations in seven houses were monitored continuously for several weeks, mitigation systems in all houses were inspected, and selected other measurements were taken. In addition, occupants were also interviewed regarding their maintenance, operation, and subjective evaluation of the radon mitigation systems. Quarterly alpha-track measurements showed that radon levels had increased in most of the homes during many follow-up measurement periods when compared with concentrations measured immediately after mitigation. Mitigation-system performance was adversely affected by (1) accumulated outdoor debris blocking the outlets of subsurface pressurization pipes; (2) fans being turned off (e.g., because of excessive noise or vibration); (3) air-to-air heat exchanger, basement pressurization, and subsurface ventilation fans being turned off and fan speeds reduced; and (4) crawl-space vents being closed or sealed.

  18. Radon exhalation from building materials used in Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, A. F.; Al-Awami, Hend H.; Hussein, N. A.

    2014-08-01

    Radon exhalation rates have been determined for various different samples of domestic and imported building materials available in the Libyan market for home construction and interior decoration. Radon exhalation rates were measured by the sealed-can technique based on CR-39 nuclear track detectors (NTDs). The results show that radon exhalation rates from some imported building materials used as foundations and for decoration are extremely high, and these samples are the main sources of indoor radon emanation. Radium contents and annual effective doses have also been estimated.

  19. Effects of Floor Level and Building Type on Residential Levels of Outdoor and Indoor Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Black Carbon, and Particulate Matter in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyung Hwa; Bernabé, Kerlly; Moors, Kathleen; Yan, Beizhan; Chillrud, Steven N.; Whyatt, Robin; Camann, David; Kinney, Patrick L.; Perera, Frederica P.; Miller, Rachel L.

    2011-01-01

    Consideration of the relationship between residential floor level and concentration of traffic-related airborne pollutants may predict individual residential exposure among inner city dwellers more accurately. Our objective was to characterize the vertical gradient of residential levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH; dichotomized into Σ8PAHsemivolatile (MW 178–206), and Σ8PAHnonvolatile (MW 228–278), black carbon (BC), PM2.5 (particulate matter) by floor level (FL), season and building type. We hypothesize that PAH, BC and PM2.5 concentrations may decrease with higher FL and the vertical gradients of these compounds would be affected by heating season and building type. PAH, BC and PM2.5 were measured over a two-week period outdoor and indoor of the residences of a cohort of 5–6 year old children (n = 339) living in New York City’s Northern Manhattan and the Bronx. Airborne-pollutant levels were analyzed by three categorized FL groups (0–2nd, 3rd–5th, and 6th–32nd FL) and two building types (low-rise versus high-rise apartment building). Indoor Σ8PAHnonvolatile and BC levels declined with increasing FL. During the nonheating season, the median outdoor Σ8PAHnonvolatile, but not Σ8PAHsemivolatile, level at 6th–2nd FL was 1.5–2 times lower than levels measured at lower FL. Similarly, outdoor and indoor BC concentrations at 6th–32nd FL were significantly lower than those at lower FL only during the nonheating season (p < 0.05). In addition, living in a low-rise building was associated significantly with higher levels of Σ8PAHnonvolatile and BC. These results suggest that young inner city children may be exposed to varying levels of air pollutants depending on their FL, season, and building type. PMID:21886868

  20. Indoor Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Takeji

    The reduction of intake of outdoor air volume in air conditioned buildings, adopted as the strategy for saving energy, has caused sick building syndrome abroad. Such symptoms of sick building as headache, stimuli of eye and nose and lethargy, appears to result from cigarette smoke, folmaldehyde and volatile organic carbons. On the other hand, in airtight residences not only carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides from domestic burning appliances but also allergens of mite, fungi, pollen and house dust, have become a subject of discussion. Moreover, asbestos and radon of carcinogen now attract a great deal of attention. Those indoor air pollutants are discussed.

  1. PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE INSTALLATION AND OPERATING COSTS OF ACTIVE SOIL DEPRESSURIZATION SYSTEMS FOR RESIDENTIAL RADON MITIGATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a recent analysis showing that cost- effective indoor radon reduction technology is required for houses with initial radon concentrations < 4 pCi/L, because 78-86% of the national lung cancer risk due to radon is associated with those houses. ctive soi...

  2. Indoor air quality in 300 homes in Kingston/Harriman, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Aldrich, T.E.; Vo-Dinh, T.; Uziel, M.; Cohen, M.A.; Hamilton, C.B.; Orebaugh, C.T.; Miller, G.H.; Ironsides, K.; Monar, K.P.

    1988-07-01

    Supplemental indoor air quality measurements were conducted in the Kingston/Harriman area for radon, formaldehyde, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and airborne micoorganisms. Eight groups of houses were chosen based on the presence or absence of the following sources: cigarette smoking, woodstoves, and kerosene heaters. Core measurements were made for a two/endash/week period in each house during the winter season again during the summer season. In addition, both vapor phase and particulate phase polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons were monitored. Viable airborne bacteria and fungi were also sampled in a large subset of houses. Detailed energy use/weatherization surveys were conducted in 120 homes by utility trained auditors. Preliminary results indicate that mean winter radon levels were 2.4 pCi/L and mean summer radon levels were 1.3 pCi/L (excluding basement measurements). Mean formaldehyde levels were 0. 0444 ppm in winter and 0.065 ppm in summer. Polynuclear aromatic compounds were higher in homes with smokers, with levels positively related to the reported consumption of cigarettes. Higher levels of airborne bacteria and fungi were found indoors than outdoors, with approximately 50/percent/ of the homes exhibiting concentrations greater than 1000 CFU/m/sup 3/. 51 figs., 81 tabs.

  3. Health Effects of High Radon Environments in Central Europe: Another Test for the LNT Hypothesis?

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    , including some historical references, recent results primarily in three areas, namely the possible effects of the inhalation of very high radon concentrations on miners; the effect of increased residential radon concentrations on the population; and the therapeutic use of radon. With many of the results still evolving and/or under intense discussion among the experts, more evidence is emerging that radon, which has been inhaled at extremely high concentrations in the multimillion Bq/m3 range by many of older miners (however, with substantial confounders, and large uncertainties in retrospective dosimetry), was perhaps an important but not the dominating factor for an increase in lung cancer rates. Other factors such as smoking, inhalation of quartz and mineral dust, arsenic, nitrous gases, etc. are likely to be more serious contributors to increased miner lung cancer rates. An extrapolation of miner data to indoor radon situations is not feasible. Concerning indoor radon studies, the by far dominating effect of smoking on the lung cancer incidence makes the results of some studies, apparently showing a positive dose-response relationship, questionable. According to recent studies in several countries, there are no, or beneficial, residential radon effects below about 600 to 1000 Bq/m3 (the extensive studies in the U.S., in particular by B. Cohen, and the discussions about these data, will not be part of this review, because they have already been discussed in detail in the U.S. literature). As a cause of lung cancer, radon seems to rank — behind active and passive smoking, and probably also air pollution in densely populated and/or industrial areas (diesel exhaust soot, etc.) — as a minor contributor in cases of extremely high residential radon levels, combined with heavy smoking of the residents. As demonstrated in an increasing number of randomized double-blind clinical studies for various painful inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatism, arthritic problems, and

  4. Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act. Report (To Accompany S. 1697) from the Committee on Environment and Public Works, United States Senate, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works.

    This report was written to accompany the Radon Testing for Safe Schools Act (S.1697), a bill that provides for radon testing of schools located in high risk radon areas and provides limited financial assistance to schools for mitigation of high levels of radon. A description of radon, its harmful effects, and the radon levels detected in schools…

  5. Fluid-based radon mitigation technology development for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.V.; Gabor, J.D.; Holtz, R.E.; Gross, K.C.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of the radon mitigation technology development effort is to develop an efficient and economical radon gas removal technology based on a fluid absorption process. The technology must be capable of cleaning up a wide range of radon gas stream concentrations to a level that meets EPA gas emission standards for residential and industrial applications. Argonne has recently identified a phenomenon that offers the possibility of radon recovery from the atmosphere with high efficiency at room temperature, and radon release at slightly elevated temperatures (50-60 degrees C.) such a device would offer numerous substantial advantages over conventional cryogenic charcoal systems for the removal of radon. Controlled sources of radon in Argonne`s radon research facility are being used to quantitatively assess the performance of a selected class of absorbing fluids over a range of radon concentrations. This paper will discuss the design of laboratory- and engineering-scale radon absorption units and present some preliminary experimental test results.

  6. Levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in indoor dust and human exposure estimates from Makurdi, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olukunle, O I; Okonkwo, O J; Sha'ato, R; Wase, G A

    2015-10-01

    Information on polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in the indoor environment in developing countries is still relatively scarce. In this study, house (n=10) and office (n=11) dusts samples collected from Makurdi, Benue State Nigeria were extracted and analysed for most abundant PBDEs congeners in the environment. Soxhlet extraction followed by GC-EIMS was employed for the measurement of PBDEs (BDE-47, -100, -99, -154, -153, -183 and -209). The mean concentration of ∑7 PBDEs ranged from 57ngg(-1) to 80ngg(-1) and a median value of 45ngg(-1)and 63ngg(-1) were obtained for house and office dust respectively. The daily exposure and ingestion dose estimates were calculated based on the assumption that 30mg and 60mgday(-1) dust represent the ingestion rate. In addition, the corresponding time spent indoors was assumed to be 87.5% (adult) and 69% (children) in homes and 22% in offices and day care. The average value exposure rate of ∑7PBDEs for children and adults were 2ngday(-1) and 0.84ngday(-1) respectively. The results in the present study, showed higher exposure estimates for both children and adults' in house dust from Nigeria compared to South Africa. PMID:26117364

  7. Radon in earth-sheltered structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.

    1984-01-01

    Radon concentration in the indoor air of six residential and three non-residential earth-sheltered buildings in eastern Colorado was monitored quarterly over a nine-month period using passive, integrating detectors. Average radon concentrations during the three-month sampling periods ranged from about 1 to 9 pCi/L, although one building, a poorly ventilated storage bunker, had concentrations as high as 39 pCi/L. These radon concentrations are somewhat greater than those typically reported for conventional buildings (around 1 pCi/L); but they are of the same order of magnitude as radon concentrations reported for energy-efficient buildings which are not earth-sheltered. ?? 1984.

  8. Measuring radon source magnitude in residential buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Boegel, M.L.; Nero, A.V.

    1981-08-01

    A description is given of procedures used in residences for rapid grab-sample and time-dependent measurements of the air-exchange rate and radon concentration. The radon source magnitude is calculated from the results of simultaneous measurements of these parameters. Grab-sample measurements in three survey groups comprising 101 US houses showed the radon source magnitude to vary approximately log-normally with a geometric mean of 0.37 and a range of 0.01 to 6.0 pCi 1/sup -1/ h/sup -1/. Successive measurements in six houses in the northeastern United States showed considerable variability in source magnitude within a given house. In two of these houses the source magnitude showed a strong correlation with the air-exchange rate, suggesting that soil gas influx can be an important transport process for indoor radon.

  9. Long term performance of radon mitigation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Prill, R.; Fisk, W.J.

    2002-03-01

    Researchers installed radon mitigation systems in 12 houses in Spokane, Washington and Coeur d'Alene, Idaho during the heating season 1985--1986 and continued to monitor indoor radon quarterly and annually for ten years. The mitigation systems included active sub-slab ventilation, basement over-pressurization, and crawlspace isolation and ventilation. The occupants reported various operational problems with these early mitigation systems. The long-term radon measurements were essential to track the effectiveness of the mitigation systems over time. All 12 homes were visited during the second year of the study, while a second set 5 homes was visited during the fifth year to determine the cause(s) of increased radon in the homes. During these visits, the mitigation systems were inspected and measurements of system performance were made. Maintenance and modifications were performed to improve system performance in these homes.

  10. A Three Year Study on 14 VOCs at One Site in Rome: Levels, Seasonal Variations, Indoor/Outdoor Ratio and Temporal Trends

    PubMed Central

    Fuselli, Sergio; De Felice, Marco; Morlino, Roberta; Turrio-Baldassarri, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    Fourteen volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—twelve hydrocarbons and two organochlorine compounds—were monitored both outdoors and indoors for three years at one site in Rome. Results showed that 118 out of 168 indoor seasonal mean values were higher than the corresponding outdoor concentrations. The most relevant source of outdoor hydrocarbons was automotive exhaust emissions. Due to the enforcement of various measures to protect health and the environment, outdoor levels of monoaromatic hydrocarbons decreased about ten fold over 15 years, and aliphatic hydrocarbons also decreased. With the decrease in these outdoor concentrations, indoor air sources are likely to be more relevant for indoor air exposures. Winter outdoor values for monoaromatic hydrocarbons were generally markedly higher than the summer ones. The gradual replacement of the current fleet of circulating cars with new cars complying with EURO 5 standards, further reducing hydrocarbon emissions, may possibly lead to an increase in the observed indoor/outdoor ratios. It is indeed more difficult to remove indoor sources, some of which are still unknown. PMID:21139860

  11. Radon transport and entry in hilly karst terrains

    SciTech Connect

    Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.

    1991-08-01

    This report consists of copies of the view graphs used for the talk Radon Transport and Entry in Hilly Karst Terrains,'' presented at the DOE-OHER Radon Contractors' Meeting held in Albuquerque in August, 1991. The report describes how aerostatic effects can alter indoor radon concentrations, using houses in Oak Ridge and Huntsville as examples. Due to differing terrain topologies, houses in Huntsville have peak radon concentrations in the summer, roughly twice as high as winter values; Oak Ridge houses have peak radon concentrations in the winter, up to 50 times higher than summer values. A critical parameter for subsurface aerostatic transport of radon is the temperature differential between outside air and air in the underground solution cavities. The transport mechanism identified here should operate in other hilly region with karst or fractured/porous bedrock; some of the 100,000 hottest'' houses in the US are in karst regions. 3 figs., 1 tab. (MHB)

  12. Geologic and climatic controls on the radon emanation coefficient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumann, R.R.; Gundersen, L.C.S.

    1997-01-01

    Geologic, pedologic, and climatic factors, including radium content, grain size, siting of radon parents within soil grains or on grain coatings, and soil moisture conditions, determine a soil's emanating power and radon transport characteristics. Data from field studies indicate that soils derived from similar parent rocks in different regions have significantly different emanation coefficients due to the effects of climate on these soil characteristics. An important tool for measuring radon source strength (i.e., radium content) is ground-based and aerial gamma radioactivity measurements. Regional correlations between soil radium content, determined by gamma spectrometry, and soil-gas or indoor radon concentrations can be traced to the influence of climatic and geologic factors on intrinsic permeability and radon emanation coefficients. Data on soil radium content, permeability, and moisture content, when combined with data on emanation coefficients, can form a framework for development of quantitative predictive models for radon generation in rocks and soils.

  13. Characterizing wave propagation to improve indoor step-level person localization using floor vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirshekari, Mostafa; Pan, Shijia; Zhang, Pei; Noh, Hae Young

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to characterize frequency-dependent wave propagation of footstep induced floor vibration to improve robustness of vibration-based occupant localization. Occupant localization is an essential part of many smart structure applications (e.g., energy management, patient/customer tracking, etc.). Exist- ing techniques include visual (e.g. cameras and IR sensors), acoustic, RF, and load-based approaches. These approaches have many deployment and operational requirements that limits their adaptation. To overcome these limitations, prior work has utilized footstep-induced vibrations to allow sparse sensor configuration and non-intrusive detection. However, frequency dependent propagation characteristics and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of footstep-induced vibrations change the shape of the signal. Furthermore, estimating the wave propagation velocity for forming the multilateration equations and localizing the footsteps is a challenging task. They, in turn, lead to large errors of localization. In this paper, we present a structural vibration based indoor occupant localization technique using improved time-difference-of-arrival between multiple vibration sensors. In particular we overcome signal distortion by decomposing the signal into frequency components and focusing on high energy components for accurate indoor localization. Such decomposition leverages the frequency-specific propagation characteristics and reduces the effect of low SNR (by choosing the components of highest energy). Furthermore, we develop a velocity calibration method that finds the optimal velocity which minimizes the localization error. We validate our approach through field experiments in a building with human participants. We are able to achieve an average localization error of less than 0.21 meters, which corresponds to a 13X reduction in error when compared to the baseline method using raw data.

  14. Measurements of indoor 222RN activity in dwellings and workplaces of Curitiba (Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrêa, Janine N.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Del Claro, Flávia; Kappke, Jaqueline; Perna, Allan F. N.; Schelin, Hugo R.; Denyak, Valeriy

    2014-11-01

    The present work describes the results of systematic measurements of radon (222Rn) in residential environments and workplaces in the Metropolitan Region of Curitiba (Paraná State, Brazil) during the period 2004-2012. For radon in air activity measurements, polycarbonate Track Etch Detectors CR-39, mounted in diffusion chambers protected by borosilicate glass fiber filters, were used. After being exposed in air, the CR-39 detectors were submitted to a chemical etching in a 6.25 M NaOH solution at 70 °C for 14 h. The alpha particle tracks were identified and manually counted with an optical microscope, and with the results of previously performed calibrations, the indoor activity concentration of 222Rn was calculated. The calibration of CR-39 and the alpha particle tracks chemical development procedures were performed in collaboration the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS, Japan). The major part of indoor 222Rn concentration in residences was found to be below 100 Bq/m3. In the case of working places, all measurements of 222Rn concentrations were below 100 Bq/m3. These values are considered within the limits set by international regulatory agencies, such as the US EPA and ICRP, which adopt up to 148 and 300 Bq/m3 as upper values for the reference levels for radon gas activity in dwellings, respectively. The latest value of 300 Bq/m3 for radon activity in air is proposed by ICRP considering the upper value for the individual dose reference level for radon exposure of 10 mSv/yr.

  15. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  16. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1994-01-01

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

  17. Characterization of the radon source in North-Central Florida. Final report part 1 -- Final project report; Final report part 2 -- Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This report contains two separate parts: Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (final report part 1 -- final project report); and Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (technical report). The objectives were to characterize the radon 222 source in a region having a demonstrated elevated indoor radon potential and having geology, lithology, and climate that are different from those in other regions of the U.S. where radon is being studied. Radon availability and transport in this region were described. Approaches for predicting the radon potential of lands in this region were developed.

  18. Radon potential, geologic formations, and lung cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Gokun, Yevgeniya; Andrews, William M.; Overfield, Bethany L.; Robertson, Heather; Wiggins, Amanda; Rayens, Mary Kay

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exposure to radon is associated with approximately 10% of U.S. lung cancer cases. Geologic rock units have varying concentrations of uranium, producing fluctuating amounts of radon. This exploratory study examined the spatial and statistical associations between radon values and geological formations to illustrate potential population-level lung cancer risk from radon exposure. Method This was a secondary data analysis of observed radon values collected in 1987 from homes (N = 309) in Kentucky and geologic rock formation data from the Kentucky Geological Survey. Radon value locations were plotted on digital geologic maps using ArcGIS and linked to specific geologic map units. Each map unit represented a package of different types of rock (e.g., limestone and/or shale). Log-transformed radon values and geologic formation categories were compared using one-way analysis of variance. Results Observed radon levels varied significantly by geologic formation category. Of the 14 geologic formation categories in north central Kentucky, four were associated with median radon levels, ranging from 8.10 to 2.75 pCi/L. Conclusion Radon potential maps that account for geologic factors and observed radon values may be superior to using observed radon values only. Knowing radon-prone areas could help target population-based lung cancer prevention interventions given the inequities that exist related to radon. PMID:26844090

  19. Radon reduction and radon-resistant construction demonstrations in New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) cosponsored a project in New York State to demonstrate radon migration techniques in existing homes with elevated radon concentrations and to test radon-resistant construction techniques in new houses. The first part of the existing home evaluation demonstrated radon migration techniques in homes where the indoor radon concentrations exceeded the EPA guidance of 4 pCi/L. Results demonstrated that sealing all accessible foundation penetrations in the basement was an effective way to reduce the radon concentration, although not below the EPA guideline, and that sealing aids in the effectiveness of an active depressurization system. Basement pressurization also proved to be an effective method. Water aeration systems were effective at mitigating radon from residential water supplied although the system tested was large and noisy. Activated charcoal filters adsorbed the radon and eventually became an unacceptable source of gamma radiation. The second part of the existing home evaluation involved the inspection of homes where radon mitigation systems were installed in 1984 as part of an earlier NYSERDA/Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMPC) project. It was found that new systems and techniques, such as in- line centrifugal fans, were generally superior to the earlier method using axial computer-type fans. Polyurethane caulk was found to be in good condition; butyl caulk, on the other hand, had deteriorated. In the new house task, a radon-resistant system was developed for integration into a house during construction. This system included sealing foundation floors, sealing concrete block foundation walls, and passive sub-slab ventilation. This integrated system reduced the radon concentration in new test houses below that of control houses, but the reduction was not usually sufficient to meet the EPA guideline.

  20. Radon reduction and radon-resistant construction demonstrations in New York State. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) cosponsored a project in New York State to demonstrate radon migration techniques in existing homes with elevated radon concentrations and to test radon-resistant construction techniques in new houses. The first part of the existing home evaluation demonstrated radon migration techniques in homes where the indoor radon concentrations exceeded the EPA guidance of 4 pCi/L. Results demonstrated that sealing all accessible foundation penetrations in the basement was an effective way to reduce the radon concentration, although not below the EPA guideline, and that sealing aids in the effectiveness of an active depressurization system. Basement pressurization also proved to be an effective method. Water aeration systems were effective at mitigating radon from residential water supplied although the system tested was large and noisy. Activated charcoal filters adsorbed the radon and eventually became an unacceptable source of gamma radiation. The second part of the existing home evaluation involved the inspection of homes where radon mitigation systems were installed in 1984 as part of an earlier NYSERDA/Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation (NMPC) project. It was found that new systems and techniques, such as in- line centrifugal fans, were generally superior to the earlier method using axial computer-type fans. Polyurethane caulk was found to be in good condition; butyl caulk, on the other hand, had deteriorated. In the new house task, a radon-resistant system was developed for integration into a house during construction. This system included sealing foundation floors, sealing concrete block foundation walls, and passive sub-slab ventilation. This integrated system reduced the radon concentration in new test houses below that of control houses, but the reduction was not usually sufficient to meet the EPA guideline.

  1. An investigation of factors affecting the entry of radon into structures on the Island of Guam

    SciTech Connect

    Kladder, D.L.; Burkhart, J.F.; Thorburn, M.S.

    1995-12-31

    Factors affecting the entry of radon-222 gas into structures on the Island of Guam were investigated during the summer of 1993. Research findings indicated that radon transport into buildings on Guam, and perhaps in other tropical areas, is driven by sub-grade soil pressure (positive with respect to atmospheric pressure) rather than interior buildings vacuums. Immediate and substantive increases in indoor radon concentrations were associated with environmental effects of wind and rain. Radon entry, and hence indoor radon concentrations, is significantly greater during the rainy season as opposed to the dry season. In the absence of mechanically induced interior vacuums in buildings, external environmental forces creating sub-slab pressures are the predominant factor in affecting radon entry in Guam. Indoor radon potentials can be correlated to the locations where the underlying geology is limestone. Furthermore, the radon source appears to be within the first few feet of the surface of these limestones rather than uniformly distributed throughout the limestone. The effects of seismic activity on radon entry are short-lived unless significant damage occurs to a structure. Radon entry during calm weather conditions may also be a function of the rising and falling of ocean tides.

  2. Indoor air quality study of forty east Tennessee homes

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Gammage, R.B.; Dudney, C.S.; Hingerty, B.E.; Schuresko, D.D.; Parzyck, D.C.; Womack, D.R.; Morris, S.A.; Westley, R.R.; White, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    Over a one-year period, measurements of indoor air pollutants (CO/sub x/, NO/sub x/, formaldehyde, volatile organics, particulates, and radon) were made in 40 homes in East Tennessee. The houses were of various ages with different types of insulation and heating. Over one-half of the houses exceeded the ASHRAE indoor ceiling guideline of 0.1 ppM for formaldehyde on at least one occasion. Over the duration of the study, older houses averaged 0.04 ppM of formaldehyde while houses less than 5 years old averaged 0.08 ppM (P < 0.01). The highest concentration of formaldehyde measured was 0.4 ppM in a new home. Diurnal and seasonal fluctuations in levels of formaldehyde in some homes were as much as twofold and tenfold, respectively. The highest levels of formaldehyde were usually recorded during summer months. The concentration in indoor air of various organics was at least tenfold higher than in outdoor air. Carbon monoxide and nitrgen oxides were usually <2 and <0.02 ppM, respectively, except when gas stoves or kerosene space heaters were operating, or when a car was running in the garage. In 30% of the houses, the annual indoor guideline for radon, 4 pCi/L, was exceeded. The mean radon level in houses built on the ridgelines was 4.4 pCi/L, while houses located in the valleys had a mean level of 1.7 pCi/L (P < 0.01). The factor having the most impact on infiltration was operation of the central duct fan of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning system. The mean rate of air exchange increased from 0.39 to 0.74 h/sup -1/ when the duct fan was operated (measurements prior to December 1982). This report presents the study design and implementation, describes the monitoring protocols, and provides a complete set of the data collected during the project. 25 references, 29 figures, 42 tables.

  3. [Radon 222Rn in residential buildings of Swieradów Zdrój and Czerniawa Zdrój].

    PubMed

    Pachocki, K A; Gorzkowski, B; Rózycki, Z; Wilejczyk, E; Smoter, J

    2000-01-01

    Swieradrów Zdrój and Czerniawa Zdrój are located in Region Izera Block. A total of 789 radon passive dosimeters were distributed in 183 dwellings in these town Swieradów Zdrój and Czerniawa Zdrój to measure the indoor radon concentration in 1999. Three-five measurements were performed in each dwelling, one in the basement, and the others in the main bedroom, in the kitchen, in the bathroom, since these rooms are the most frequently occupied. In addition, the occupants of each dwelling were requested to answer a questionnaire in which a number of questions about the building, ventilation habits and other related aspects were formulated. A charcoal detectors (Pico-Rad system) were used in experiment. It is a passive short-term screening method of radon gas concentration measurements. The indoor radon level was found to range from 14.8 Bq/m3 to 5,723.9 Bq/m3. The arithmetic mean overall indoor concentration was 420.4 Bq/m3 and the geometric mean was 159.7 Bq/m3. The average concentration of indoor radon, which reflects the real risk for inhabitants, is 193.5 Bq/m3. The results hand a log-normal distribution. In Poland, an action level of 400 Bq/m3 was recommended for existing buildings and 200 Bq/m3 for newly built (after 1.01.1998) buildings. In about 23% rooms the level of Rn-222 were above the top limit of 400 Bq/m3. The highest average concentrations were present in a basement (mean 919.9 Bq/m3). A decrease of average activity were observed at the upper levels: at the ground floor (225.2 Bq/m3), at the first floor and at the higher floors (137.6 Bq/m3). The above results indicate that radon emission from the ground provides the main contribution to the radon concentration measured in dwellings indoors in Swieradów Zdrój and Czerniawa Zdrój. The effective dose to the population of the Swieradów Zdrój and Czerniawa Zdrój from indoor radon and its progeny can be derived from this data if we use an equilibrium factor of 0.4 between radon and its progeny

  4. New insight into the levels, distribution and health risk diagnosis of indoor and outdoor dust-bound FRs in colder, rural and industrial zones of Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Usman; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-09-01

    This is the first robust study designed to probe selected flame retardants (FRs) in the indoor and outdoor dust of industrial, rural and background zones of Pakistan with special emphasis upon their occurrence, distribution and associated health risk. For this purpose, we analyzed FRs such as polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), dechlorane plus (DP), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) and organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) in the total of 82 dust samples (indoor and outdoor) collected three from each zone: industrial, rural and background. We found higher concentrations of FRs (PBDEs, DP, NBFRs and OPFRs) in industrial zones as compared to the rural and background zones. Our results reveal that the concentrations of studied FRs are relatively higher in the indoor dust samples being compared with the outdoor dust and they are ranked as: ∑OPFRs > ∑NBFRs > ∑PBDEs > ∑DP. A significant correlation in the FRs levels between the indoor and outdoor dust suggest the potential intermixing of these compounds between them. The principal component analysis/multiple linear regression predicts the percent contribution of FRs from different consumer products in the indoor and outdoor dust of industrial, rural and background zones to trace their source origin. The FRs detected in the background zones reveal the dust-bound FRs suspended in the air might be shifted from different warmer zones or consumers products available/used in the same zones. Hazard quotient (HQ) for FRs via indoor and outdoor dust intake at mean and high dust scenarios to the exposed populations (adults and toddlers) are found free of risk (HQ < 1) in the target zones. Furthermore, our nascent results will provide a baseline record of FRs (PBDEs, DP, NBFRs and OPFRs) concentrations in the indoor and outdoor dust of Pakistan. PMID:27346442

  5. ANALYSIS OF RADON MITIGATION TECHNIQUES USED IN EXISTING U.S. HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews the full range of techniques that have been installed in existing US houses for the purpose of reducing indoor radon concentrations resulting from soil gas entry. The review addresses the performance, installation and operating costs, applicability, mechanisms,...

  6. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W J

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

  7. Indoor air quality and health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, A. P.

    During the last two decades there has been increasing concern within the scientific community over the effects of indoor air quality on health. Changes in building design devised to improve energy efficiency have meant that modern homes and offices are frequently more airtight than older structures. Furthermore, advances in construction technology have caused a much greater use of synthetic building materials. Whilst these improvements have led to more comfortable buildings with lower running costs, they also provide indoor environments in which contaminants are readily produced and may build up to much higher concentrations than are found outside. This article reviews our current understanding of the relationship between indoor air pollution and health. Indoor pollutants can emanate from a range of sources. The health impacts from indoor exposure to combustion products from heating, cooking, and the smoking of tobacco are examined. Also discussed are the symptoms associated with pollutants emitted from building materials. Of particular importance might be substances known as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which arise from sources including paints, varnishes, solvents, and preservatives. Furthermore, if the structure of a building begins to deteriorate, exposure to asbestos may be an important risk factor for the chronic respiratory disease mesothelioma. The health effects of inhaled biological particles can be significant, as a large variety of biological materials are present in indoor environments. Their role in inducing illness through immune mechanisms, infectious processes, and direct toxicity is considered. Outdoor sources can be the main contributors to indoor concentrations of some contaminants. Of particular significance is Radon, the radioactive gas that arises from outside, yet only presents a serious health risk when found inside buildings. Radon and its decay products are now recognised as important indoor pollutants, and their effects are

  8. Radon 222

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Radon 222 ; CASRN 14859 - 67 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effec

  9. Radon Testing in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Schools may be a significant source of radon exposure for children and staff. Describes radon detection kits and technologies, when to use them, and what action to take given the results of a radon test. (MLF)

  10. Indoor air pollution: Sources and control. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning indoor air pollution in residential, commercial, industrial, and institutional buildings. Indoor air quality assessment, health hazard evaluation, and contaminant identification and measurement are discussed. Indoor air pollution control methods and equipment are evaluated. Air quality analyses of energy efficient buildings are presented. Indoor air pollution from radon and asbestos are discussed in other bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  11. Indoor air pollution: Sources and control. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning indoor air pollution in residential, commercial, industrial, and institutional buildings. Indoor air quality assessment, health hazard evaluation, and contaminant identification and measurement are discussed. Indoor air pollution control methods and equipment are evaluated. Air quality analyses of energy efficient buildings are presented. Indoor air pollution from radon and asbestos are discussed in other bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Indoor air pollution: Sources and control. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning indoor air pollution in residential, commercial, industrial, and institutional buildings. Indoor air quality assessment, health hazard evaluation, and contaminant identification and measurement are discussed. Indoor air pollution control methods and equipment are evaluated. Air quality analyses of energy efficient buildings are presented. Indoor air pollution from radon and asbestos are discussed in other bibliographies.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Indoor air pollution: Sources and control. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning indoor air pollution in residential, commercial, industrial, and institutional buildings. Indoor air quality assessment, health hazard evaluation, and contaminant identification and measurement are discussed. Indoor air pollution control methods and equipment are evaluated. Air quality analyses of energy efficient buildings are presented. Indoor air pollution from radon and asbestos are discussed in other bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Indoor air pollution: Sources and control. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning indoor air pollution in residential, commercial, industrial, and institutional buildings. Indoor air quality assessment, health hazard evaluation, and contaminant identification and measurement are discussed. Indoor air pollution control methods and equipment are evaluated. Air quality analyses of energy efficient buildings are presented. Indoor air pollution from radon and asbestos are discussed in other bibliographies. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. High indoor CO2 concentrations in an office environment increases the transcutaneous CO2 level and sleepiness during cognitive work.

    PubMed

    Vehviläinen, Tommi; Lindholm, Harri; Rintamäki, Hannu; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Hirvonen, Ari; Niemi, Olli; Vinha, Juha

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform a multiparametric analysis on the environmental factors, the physiological stress reactions in the body, the measured alertness, and the subjective symptoms during simulated office work. Volunteer male subjects were monitored during three 4-hr work meetings in an office room, both in a ventilated and a non-ventilated environment. The environmental parameters measured included CO(2), temperature, and relative humidity. The physiological test battery consisted of measuring autonomic nervous system functions, salivary stress hormones, blood's CO(2)- content and oxygen saturation, skin temperatures, thermal sensations, vigilance, and sleepiness. The study shows that we can see physiological changes caused by high CO(2) concentration. The findings support the view that low or moderate level increases in concentration of CO(2) in indoor air might cause elevation in the blood's transcutaneously assessed CO(2). The observed findings are higher CO(2) concentrations in tissues, changes in heart rate variation, and an increase of peripheral blood circulation during exposure to elevated CO(2) concentration. The subjective parameters and symptoms support the physiological findings. This study shows that a high concentration of CO(2) in indoor air seem to be one parameter causing physiological effects, which can decrease the facility user's functional ability. The correct amount of ventilation with relation to the number of people using the facility, functional air distribution, and regular breaks can counteract the decrease in functional ability. The findings of the study suggest that merely increasing ventilation is not necessarily a rational solution from a technical-economical viewpoint. Instead or in addition, more comprehensive, anthropocentric planning of space is needed as well as instructions and new kinds of reference values for the design and realization of office environments. PMID:26273786

  16. Residents in a High Radon Potential Geographic Area: Their Risk Perception and Attitude toward Testing and Mitigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferng, Shiaw-Fen; Lawson, Jay K.

    1996-01-01

    Results of a study in Boone County, Indiana--a high radon potential geographic area--show that residents' knowledge about radon is at a relatively superficial level. A significant correlation between radon knowledge and home radon tests is observed. Respondents chose the newspaper as the favorite medium through which to launch radon health…

  17. U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY'S NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR RADON REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper provides an historical summary of the evolution of the U.S. EPA's national strategy for indoor radon remediation, recent developments, and anticipated future directions. uring the past 10 years, EPA has pursued a national strategy to address radon remediation in buildin...

  18. RADON EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT AND DOSIMETRY APPLIED TO EPIDEMIOLOGY AND RISK ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies of underground miners provide the primary basis for radon risk estimates for indoor exposures as well as mine exposures. A major source of uncertainty in these risk estimates is the uncertainty in radon progeny exposure estimates for the miners. In addit...

  19. Effect of radon dose on cleanup criteria and using RESRAD for chemical risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, C.; Cheng, J.-J. ); Wallo, A. III )

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy has used RESRAD, a pathway analysis program developed at Argonne National Laboratory, in conjunction with the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) principle to develop site-specific residual radioactive material guidelines (cleanup criteria) for many sites. This study examines the effects of the radon pathway, recently added to the RESRAD program, on the calculation of uranium, radium, and thorium cleanup criteria. The results show that the derived uranium guidelines will not be affected by the radon ingrowth considerations. The effect of radon on radium and thorium generic guidelines is more significant, but the model does indicate that at the generic soil limits used for radium and thorium the indoor radon decay product concentrations would be below the 0.02 working level standard. This study also examines the feasibility of applying RESRAD to chemical risk assessment. The results show that RESRAD can perform risk assessment of toxic chemicals after simple modifications. Expansion of the RESRAD database to include chemical compounds will increase its capability to handle chemical risk assessments. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Intercomparison of active and passive instruments for radon and radon progeny in North America

    SciTech Connect

    George, A.C.; Tu, Keng-Wu; Knutson, E.O.

    1995-02-01

    An intercomparison exercise for radon and radon progeny instruments and methods was held at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) from April 22--May 2, 1994. The exercise was conducted in the new EML radon test and calibration facility in which conditions of exposure are very well controlled. The detection systems of the intercompared instruments consisted of. (1) pulse ionization chambers, (2) electret ionization chambers, (3) scintillation detectors, (4) alpha particle spectrometers with silicon diodes, surface barrier or diffused junction detectors, (5) registration of nuclear tracks in solid-state materials, and (6) activated carbon collectors counted by gamma-ray spectrometry or by alpha- and beta-liquid scintillation counting. 23 private firms, government laboratories and universities participated with a 165 passive integrating devices consisting of: Activated carbon collectors, nuclear alpha track detectors and electret ionization chambers, and 11 active and passive continuous radon monitors. Five portable integrating and continuous instruments were intercompared for radon progeny. Forty grab samples for radon progeny were taken by five groups that participated in person to test and evaluate their primary instruments and methods that measure individual radon progeny and the potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) in indoor air. Results indicate that more than 80% of the measurements for radon performed with a variety of instruments, are within {plus_minus}10% of actual value. The majority of the instruments that measure individual radon progeny and the PAEC gave results that are in good agreement with the EML reference value. Radon progeny measurements made with continuous and integrating instruments are satisfactory with room for improvement.

  1. Soil-gas radon analyses in the Mt. Rose and Lovelock areas, west-central Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ramelli, A.R.; Rigby, J.G.; LaPointe, D.D. )

    1993-04-01

    Soil-gas radon has been sampled and analyzed in two area of differing surficial geology in west-central Nevada. Elevated levels of indoor radon have been found in both area. The Mt. Rose alluvial fan complex, located just southwest of Reno, is an alluvial fan/pediment formed by flow from major drainages in the Carson Range. The surface of the Mt. Rose fan is dominated by glacial outwash deposits believed to be of Donner Lake and Tahoe age. These two units have somewhat differing lithologies and degrees of soil development. The Donner Lake outwash is dominated by volcanic clasts and typically has a thick argillic B-horizon and a moderately to strongly developed duripan. The Tahoe outwash has a mixture of volcanic and granitic clasts and typically has a thinner argillic B-horizon and no duripan. Soil-gas radon levels are generally higher in the Tahoe outwash, probably reflecting either greater emanation from granitic clasts or differences in soil gas permeability. Radon levels along Holocene faults cutting these outwash deposits are fairly typical for the study area and minor differences may be due to the faults' effects on soil gas permeability. Lovelock, about 90 miles northeast of Reno, is located within the Humboldt Sink, one of the lowest parts of the pluvial Lake Lahontan basin. Surficial geology in this area is dominated by fine-grained lacustrine deposits and overbank alluvium from the Humboldt River. During interpluvial periods, this is commonly a marshy area resulting from Humboldt River flow into the basin. Elevated radon levels are likely due to uranium accumulation in black, organic-rich clay layers.

  2. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE, TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER, AND DISSEMINATION OF EPA SCIENCE ON INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical Assistance, technology transfer, and dissemination of EPA science on maintenance of good indoor air quality, reducing exposure to radon, reducing exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, and the environmental management of asthma and asthma trigger reduction. This is a...

  3. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  4. The use of radon as tracer in environmental sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quindos Poncela, Luis; Sainz Fernandez, Carlos; Fuente Merino, Ismael; Gutierrez Villanueva, Jose; Gonzalez Diez, Alberto

    2013-08-01

    Radon can be used as a naturally occurring tracer for environmental processes. By means of grab-sampling or continuous monitoring of radon concentration, it is possible to assess several types of dynamic phenomena in air and water. We present a review of the use of radon and its progeny at the University of Cantabria. Radon can be an atmospheric dynamics indicator related with air mass interchange near land-sea discontinuities as well as for the study of vertical variations of air parameters (average values of different types of stability: 131-580 Bq m-3). Concerning indoor gas, we present some results obtained at Altamira Cave (Spain): from 222 to 6549 Bq m-3 (Hall) and from 999 to 6697 Bq m-3 (Paintings Room). Finally, variations of radon concentration in soil (0.3 to 9.1 kBq m-3) and underground water (values up to 500 Bq l-1) provide relevant information about different geophysical phenomena.

  5. The Japanese Radon and Thoron Reference Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    Passive detectors used for large-scale and long-term surveys are generally calibrated in a well-controlled environment such as a radon chamber. It has been also pointed out that some of them are sensitive to thoron. Thus it is necessary to check the thoron contribution to the detector response with the proposed or similar test before practical use. The NIRS accommodates radon/aerosol and thoron chambers for quality assurance and quality control of radon measurements. Thus both chambers work so well that they can supply us with the calibration technique and consequently, a good level of knowledge of the radon and thoron issue.

  6. The role of the implementation of policies for the prevention of exposure to Radon in Brazil-a strategy for controlling the risk of developing lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lino, Aline da Rocha; Abrahão, Carina Meira; Amarante, Marcus Paulo Fernandes; de Sousa Cruz, Marcelo Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and other industrialised countries. The most important risk factor is active smoking. However, given the increased incidence of lung cancer in non-smokers, it is necessary to improve knowledge regarding other risk factors. Radon (Rn) is a noble gas and is the most important natural source of human exposure to ionizing radiation. Exposure to high levels of this radioactive gas is related to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The objective of this work is to highlight the importance of measuring indoor concentration of this gas and identify which steps should be taken for achieving radiological protection. A survey was conducted on the websites of the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA), LAMIN (Mineral Analysis Laboratory), CPRM (Geological Survey of Brazil), Ministry of Health and PubMed. Using the words 'radon', 'lung', 'cancer', and PubMed®, 1,371 results were obtained; when using the words 'radon', 'lung', 'cancer', and with 'Brazil' or 'Brazilians', only six results were obtained. We emphasise that lung cancer is a major public health problem and the exposure to Rn indoors should be considered as a risk factor for lung cancer in non-smokers. Buildings or houses with high concentrations of Rn should be identified. However, currently in Brazil-a country with great potential for mineral extraction-there are no specific regulated recommendations to control indoor exposure to Rn. PMID:26435745

  7. The performance of charcoal-based radon detection under time-varying radon conditions: Experimental and theoretical results

    SciTech Connect

    Sextro, R.G.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-10-01

    Radon adsorption by charcoal is a widely used technique for measuring indoor radon concentration, particularly when short-term results are desired. There are several different devices available, ranging from permeable envelopes filled with charcoal and open-face charcoal-filled canisters to devices incorporating diffusion limiting features to reduce losses of radon due to desorption. However, the integration characteristics of these samplers are not well understood, particularly under conditions of highly varying radon concentrations. A model for predicting the response of various types of charcoal based detectors to time-variant radon concentrations has been developed; the model predictions compare well with results from chamber experiments. Both the experimental and theoretical results have also been compared with integrated continuous-sampling measurements. The implications of these comparisons for use of charcoal for screening measurements is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Failure of urinary trans,trans-muconic acid as a biomarker for indoor environmental benzene exposure at PPB levels.

    PubMed

    Sanguinetti, G; Accorsi, A; Barbieri, A; Raffi, G B; Violante, F S

    2001-08-24

    Benzene is a widespread pollutant whose main source in the environment is automotive emission. There is increasing interest in the exposure of the population to this pollutant as benzene is present also in the indoor environment due to cigarette smoke, drinking water, and food. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in an adult nonsmoking population not occupationally exposed to benzene, whether it is possible to detect differences in the urinary concentration of trans,trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) between low and high environmental exposure to benzene. A study sample of 31 employees working in pharmacies in a large town in Italy with low environmental exposure to benzene (4.8 microg/m3) was compared to a high (8.1 microg/m3) benzene exposure group. Analysis of urinary t,t-MA was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC; photodiode array detector); analysis of environmental benzene samples was by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). The statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in urinary levels of t,t-MA of subjects with high (mean concentration: 157.9 microg/g creatinine) versus low exposure (mean concentration: 114.2 microg/g creatinine). Data show that it is difficult to correlate urinary t,t-MA with benzene exposure at parts per billion levels. PMID:11549119

  9. Annual transition and seasonal variation of indoor air pollution levels of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol in large-scale buildings in Nagoya, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kiyoshi; Kamijima, Michihiro; Shibata, Eiji; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Tamie

    2009-11-01

    2-Ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) is a possible causative chemical for sick building symptoms; however, thus far, we do not have a clear understanding of the indoor air pollution levels caused by it. In this study, first, airborne 2E1H concentrations were measured during summer and winter from 2004 to 2007 in 67 rooms of 56 large-scale buildings in Nagoya, Japan, in order to show the seasonal variation of indoor air pollution levels of 2E1H. Then, a follow-up survey was conducted in five rooms of five buildings for more than 2 years in order to establish the annual transition of their 2E1H indoor air pollution levels. 2E1H was found to be one of the predominant volatile organic compounds in the indoor air of large-scale buildings. Its geometric mean concentration was significantly higher during summer (55.4 microg/m3) than during winter (13.7 microg/m3) (p < 0.01), although there was a significant difference in the concentrations among the buildings. High 2E1H concentrations may have been caused by high emission rates of 2E1H from floors, because of the hydrolysis of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in polyvinyl chloride flooring materials or of adhesives containing 2-ethylhexyl moieties. Follow-up observations showed little decrease in the indoor air 2E1H concentrations from one year to the next, although they did show seasonal fluctuations, with an evident increase in concentrations during summer and an evident decrease during winter. PMID:19890564

  10. Models of radon entry: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.J.

    1991-08-01

    This paper reviews existing models of radon entry into houses. The primary mechanism of radon entry in houses with high indoor concentrations is, in most cases, convective entry of radon bearing soil-gas from the surrounding soil. The driving force for this convective entry is the small indoor-outdoor pressure difference arising from the stack effect and other causes. Entry points for the soil-gas generally are the cracks or gaps in the building substructure, or though other parts of the building shell in direct contact with the soil, although entry may also occur by flow though permeable concrete or cinder block walls of the substructure. Models using analytical solutions to idealized geometrical configurations with simplified boundary conditions obtain analytical tractability of equations to be solved at the cost of severe approximations; their strength is in the insights they offer with their solutions. Models based on lumped parameters attempt to characterize the significant physical behavioral characteristics of the soil-gas and radon flow. When realistic approximations are desired for the boundary conditions and terms in the governing equations, numerical models must be used; these are usually based on finite difference or finite element solutions to the governing equations. Limited data are now available for experimental verification of model predictions. The models are briefly reviewed and their strengths and limitations are discussed.

  11. Radon concentrations in elementary schools in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Maged, A F

    2006-03-01

    Measurements of indoor radon concentrations were performed in 25 classrooms in the capital city of Kuwait from September 2003 to March 2004 using track etch detectors. The investigation was focused on area, ventilation, windows, air conditioners, fans, and floor number. All the schools have nearly the same design. Mean indoor radon concentration was higher for case subjects (classrooms) than for control subjects (locations in inert gas, p < 0.001). The mean alpha dose equivalent rate for case subjects, 0.97 +/- 0.25 mSv y, was higher than the radiation dose equivalent rate value of control subjects, 0.43 +/- 0.11 mSv y. The average radon concentrations were found to be 16 +/- 4 Bq m for the first floor and 19 +/- 4.8 Bq m for the second floor after subtraction of the control. These values lead to average effective dose equivalent rates of 0.40 +/- 0.10 and 0.48 +/- 0.12 mSv y, respectively. The equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny was found to be 0.6 +/- 0.2. PMID:16505623

  12. Adolescents’ Use of Indoor Tanning: A Large-Scale Evaluation of Psychosocial, Environmental, and Policy-Level Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Susan I.; Slymen, Donald J.; Sallis, James F.; Forster, Jean L.; Clapp, Elizabeth J.; Hoerster, Katherine D.; Pichon, Latrice C.; Weeks, John R.; Belch, George E.; Weinstock, Martin A.; Gilmer, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated psychosocial, built-environmental, and policy-related correlates of adolescents’ indoor tanning use. Methods. We developed 5 discrete data sets in the 100 most populous US cities, based on interviews of 6125 adolescents (aged 14–17 years) and their parents, analysis of state indoor tanning laws, interviews with enforcement experts, computed density of tanning facilities, and evaluations of these 3399 facilities’ practices regarding access by youths. After univariate analyses, we constructed multilevel models with generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs). Results. In the past year, 17.1% of girls and 3.2% of boys had used indoor tanning. The GLMMs indicated that several psychosocial or demographic variables significantly predicted use, including being female, older, and White; having a larger allowance and a parent who used indoor tanning and allowed their adolescent to use it; and holding certain beliefs about indoor tanning's consequences. Living within 2 miles of a tanning facility also was a significant predictor. Residing in a state with youth-access legislation was not significantly associated with use. Conclusions. Current laws appear ineffective in reducing indoor tanning; bans likely are needed. Parents have an important role in prevention efforts. PMID:21421947

  13. Elimination of radon from the body

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, J.H.; Jetter, E.S.; Nelson, N.

    1994-01-01

    A series of experiments were run on the retention of inhaled radon. The radon absorbed by the body is present in a multiphase system, showing five distinct elimination coefficients. After high-level radon exposure for a normal working day, an appreciable breath radon output is found 72 h after removal from exposure. This is a practical consideration in breath radon sampling, and it must be realized that the breath measurement may indicate a higher body radium content than that actually present. Another valuable result is that the radon retention figures allow us to reconcile the results of breath radon analyses and total body radium analyses on unexposed persons. The results of our breath measurements averaged 6[times]10[sup [minus]9] g on ten unexposed individuals. It is apparent that the breath radon measurement is not capable of measuring normal body radium, due both to the small quantity present, and to the interference of radon absorbed by the body from the normal environment. 2 refs., 3 figs., 4 tab.

  14. Radon Measurements in Schools: An Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Radiation Programs.

    Radon-222 is a colorless, odorless, tasteless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally in soil, rocks, underground water, and air. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other scientific organizations have identified an increased risk of lung cancer associated with exposure to elevated levels of radon in homes. Schools in many…

  15. Radon Treatment Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojewicz, Zygmunt; Strzelczyk, Jadwiga (Jodi)

    2006-01-01

    In spite of long traditions, treatments utilizing radon-rich air or water have not been unequivocally embraced by modern medicine. The objective of this work is to examine factors that contribute to this continuing controversy. While the exact mechanism of radon's effect on human body is not completely understood, recent advances in radiobiology offer new insights into biochemical processes occurring at low-level exposures to ionizing radiation. Medical evidence and patients' testimonials regarding effectiveness of radon spa treatments of various ailments, most notably rheumatoid arthritis are accumulating worldwide. They challenge the premise of the Linear-No-Threshold (LNT) theory that the dose-effect response is the same per unit dose regardless of the total dose. Historically, such inference overshadowed scientific inquiries into the low-dose region and lead to a popular belief that no amount of radiation can be good. Fortunately, the LNT theory, which lacks any scientific basis, did not remain unchallenged. As the reviewed literature suggests, a paradigm shift, reflected in the consideration of hormetic effects at low-doses, is gaining momentum in the scientific community worldwide. The impetus comes from significant evidence of adaptive and stimulatory effects of low-levels of radiation on human immune system. PMID:18648641

  16. Health Effects of High Radon Environments in Central Europe: Another Test for the LNT Hypothesis?

    PubMed

    Becker, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    some historical references, recent results primarily in three areas, namely the possible effects of the inhalation of very high radon concentrations on miners; the effect of increased residential radon concentrations on the population; and the therapeutic use of radon. With many of the results still evolving and/or under intense discussion among the experts, more evidence is emerging that radon, which has been inhaled at extremely high concentrations in the multimillion Bq/m(3) range by many of older miners (however, with substantial confounders, and large uncertainties in retrospective dosimetry), was perhaps an important but not the dominating factor for an increase in lung cancer rates. Other factors such as smoking, inhalation of quartz and mineral dust, arsenic, nitrous gases, etc. are likely to be more serious contributors to increased miner lung cancer rates. An extrapolation of miner data to indoor radon situations is not feasible.Concerning indoor radon studies, the by far dominating effect of smoking on the lung cancer incidence makes the results of some studies, apparently showing a positive dose-response relationship, questionable. According to recent studies in several countries, there are no, or beneficial, residential radon effects below about 600 to 1000 Bq/m(3) (the extensive studies in the U.S., in particular by B. Cohen, and the discussions about these data, will not be part of this review, because they have already been discussed in detail in the U.S. literature). As a cause of lung cancer, radon seems to rank - behind active and passive smoking, and probably also air pollution in densely populated and/or industrial areas (diesel exhaust soot, etc.) - as a minor contributor in cases of extremely high residential radon levels, combined with heavy smoking of the residents.As demonstrated in an increasing number of randomized double-blind clinical studies for various painful inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatism, arthritic problems, and Morbus

  17. IAQPC: AN INDOOR AIR QUALITY SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses an Indoor Air Quality Simulator for Personal Computers (IAQPC), developed in response to the growing need for quick accurate predictions of indoor air contamination levels. eating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) system designers need ways to determin...

  18. Indoor air quality and infiltration in multifamily naval housing

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Wilfert, G.L.; Dennis, G.W.

    1984-11-01

    Measurements of indoor air quality and air infiltration were taken in three units of a multifamily housing complex at the Naval Submarine base in Bangor, Washington, over 5 consecutive days during the heating season of 1983. Three dwelling units of identical size constructed in 1978 were monitored, each in a separate two-story four-unit complex. One unit was a downstairs unit and the other two units were upstairs units. Two of the units were occupied by smokers (one downstairs and one upstairs). None of the units had combustion appliances. Pollutants monitored indoors included radon, formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, particulate matter, and nitrogen dioxide. Indoor and outdoor temperature and windspeed were also recorded. Outdoor formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide were also measured. Air exchange was measured about three times during each 24-h period, using a perfluorocarbon tracer with automatic tracer sampling. The daily average air exchange rate ranged from 0.22 to 0.91 air changes per hour (ACH). Pollutant concentrations were generally low except for particulate matter in the units with smokers, which were two to four times higher than in the unit with nonsmokers. Levels of carbon monoxide were also slightly elevated in one of the units with a smoker compared to the unit with nonsmokers. 5 references, 4 figures, 4 tables.

  19. Results of a Test and Win Contest to Raise Radon Awareness in Urban and Rural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Ellen J.; Rayens, Mary Kay; Kercsmar, Sarah E.; Robertson, Heather; Adkins, Sarah M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Radon is a leading cause of lung cancer, but few test their homes to determine radon levels. Purpose: The study assessed feasibility and success of a Test and Win Contest to promote radon testing in rural and urban communities. Methods: The prospective, quasi-experimental study tested a novel contest to raise radon awareness. Paid and…

  20. Estimation of exposure to atmospheric pollutants during pregnancy integrating space-time activity and indoor air levels: Does it make a difference?

    PubMed

    Ouidir, Marion; Giorgis-Allemand, Lise; Lyon-Caen, Sarah; Morelli, Xavier; Cracowski, Claire; Pontet, Sabrina; Pin, Isabelle; Lepeule, Johanna; Siroux, Valérie; Slama, Rémy

    2015-11-01

    Studies of air pollution effects during pregnancy generally only consider exposure in the outdoor air at the home address. We aimed to compare exposure models differing in their ability to account for the spatial resolution of pollutants, space-time activity and indoor air pollution levels. We recruited 40 pregnant women in the Grenoble urban area, France, who carried a Global Positioning System (GPS) during up to 3 weeks; in a subgroup, indoor measurements of fine particles (PM2.5) were conducted at home (n=9) and personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was assessed using passive air samplers (n=10). Outdoor concentrations of NO2, and PM2.5 were estimated from a dispersion model with a fine spatial resolution. Women spent on average 16 h per day at home. Considering only outdoor levels, for estimates at the home address, the correlation between the estimate using the nearest background air monitoring station and the estimate from the dispersion model was high (r=0.93) for PM2.5 and moderate (r=0.67) for NO2. The model incorporating clean GPS data was less correlated with the estimate relying on raw GPS data (r=0.77) than the model ignoring space-time activity (r=0.93). PM2.5 outdoor levels were not to moderately correlated with estimates from the model incorporating indoor measurements and space-time activity (r=-0.10 to 0.47), while NO2 personal levels were not correlated with outdoor levels (r=-0.42 to 0.03). In this urban area, accounting for space-time activity little influenced exposure estimates; in a subgroup of subjects (n=9), incorporating indoor pollution levels seemed to strongly modify them. PMID:26300245

  1. Estimation of exposure to atmospheric pollutants during pregnancy integrating space-time activity and indoor air levels: does it make a difference?

    PubMed Central

    Marion, OUIDIR; Lise, GIORGIS-ALLEMAND; Sarah, LYON-CAEN; Xavier, MORELLI; Claire, CRACOWSKI; Sabrina, PONTET; Isabelle, PIN; Johanna, LEPEULE; Valérie, SIROUX; Rémy, SLAMA

    2016-01-01

    Studies of air pollution effects during pregnancy generally only consider exposure in the outdoor air at the home address. We aimed to compare exposure models differing in their ability to account for the spatial resolution of pollutants, space-time activity and indoor air pollution levels. We recruited 40 pregnant women in the Grenoble urban area, France, who carried a Global Positioning System (GPS) during up to 3 weeks; in a subgroup, indoor measurements of fine particles (PM2.5) were conducted at home (n=9) and personal exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) was assessed using passive air samplers (n=10). Outdoor concentrations of NO2, and PM2.5 were estimated from a dispersion model with a fine spatial resolution. Women spent on average 16 h per day at home. Considering only outdoor levels, for estimates at the home address, the correlation between the estimate using the nearest background air monitoring station and the estimate from the dispersion model was high (r=0.93) for PM2.5 and moderate (r=0.67) for NO2. The model incorporating clean GPS data was less correlated with the estimate relying on raw GPS data (r=0.77) than the model ignoring space-time activity (r=0.93). PM2.5 outdoor levels were not to moderately correlated with estimates from the model incorporating indoor measurements and space-time activity (r=−0.10 to 0.47), while NO2 personal levels were not correlated with outdoor levels (r=−0.42 to 0.03). In this urban area, accounting for space-time activity little influenced exposure estimates; in a subgroup of subjects (n=9), incorporating indoor pollution levels seemed to strongly modify them. PMID:26300245

  2. Influences of vertical transport and scavenging on aerosol particle surface area and radon decay product concentrations at the Jungfraujoch (3454 m above sea level)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugauer, M.; Baltensperger, U.; Furger, M.; GäGgeler, H. W.; Jost, D. T.; Nyeki, S.; Schwikowski, M.

    2000-08-01

    Concentrations of the aerosol particle surface area (SA) and aerosol-attached radon decay products 214Pb and 212Pb have been measured by means of an aerosol and a radon epiphaniometer at the Jungfraujoch research station (JFJ; 3454 m above sea level, Switzerland). These parameters exhibit a pronounced seasonal cycle with minimum values in winter and maximum values in summer. In summer, pronounced diurnal variations with a maximum at 1800 LST are often present. Highest concentrations and most pronounced diurnal variations occur during anticyclonic weather conditions in summer. Thermally driven vertical transport over alpine topography is responsible for this observation. During this synoptic condition, concentrations vary greatly with the 500 hPa wind direction, exhibiting low concentrations for NW-N winds and high concentrations for weak or S-SW winds. Lead-214 and SA are highly correlated during anticyclonic conditions, indicating transport equivalence of the gaseous 214Pb precursor, 222Rn, and of aerosol particles. When cyclonic lifting is the dominant vertical transport, wet scavenging of aerosol particles can explain the weak correlation of 214Pb and SA. This conclusion is corroborated by the 214Pb/SA ratio, being twice as high during cyclonic than during anticyclonic conditions. Lead-212 is a tracer for the influence of surface contact on a local scale due to its short lifetime of 15.35 hours. The analysis of this parameter suggests that high-alpine surfaces play an important role in thermally driven transport to the JFJ.

  3. Geothermal prospecting by ground radon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, N. E.

    1984-04-01

    Radon-222 was measured using Kodak LR-115 film in the soils of 2500 locations near the Ngawha hot springs region, New Zealand, which is being exploited for geothermal power; the object was to determine its usefulness for predicting good drill sites. Unlike other surveys, which have shown large areas with consistent high radon values, anomalies here were scattered, and corresponded mainly with fault lineaments. The results suggested a major previously unnoticed fault. The sampling distance was 50 m. There was a strong seasonal effect on ground radon levels, with summer levels about ten times higher than winter levels. Swamps usually had measured radon levels of near zero because of the slow diffusion of radon in stagnant water, and even thermal areas (mainly in the swamps) usually had low measured values. However, where a fault crossed swamp it was sometimes detected, and with high signal/noise ratio, so swamps should be surveyed. Arguments from the radon levels found on different geologies show that at Ngawha radon has a maximum half value diffusion thickness of 7 m for lacustrine sediment and 25 m for basalt unless a permeable area is present (e.g., a fault). There was a weak correlation of radon levels with the temperatures found on drilling deep bores. Comparisons with the ROAC system and Alphacard system for measuring radon showed no statistical inter-correlations, but some qualitative correspondence of radon contours. The main strength of the method in regions with impermeable soils (such as at Ngawha), seems to be in detecting or confirming the presence of faults, and possibly (through them) indicating geological structure as deep as 300 m.

  4. A summary of EPA radon chamber tests and results for rounds 3 and 4 of the National Radon Measurement Proficiency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.M.; Sensintaffar, E.L.

    1993-02-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency`s Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (ORIA) established the National Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program in 1986. Through this voluntary program, participants can demonstrate their ability to measure radon and/or radon decay products by submitting their detection devices to a blind test in a designated radon chamber. In this report, two EPA radon and radon decay products test chambers (chambers A and C) located at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory in Montgomery, Alabama are described. These chambers were used to expose detectors submitted for testing in Round 4 of the National Radon Measurement Proficiency Program and are used routinely for calibration purposes. Also described are the measurement and calibration procedures which were used to establish the official target values for radon and radon decay products concentrations during RMP Round 4 testing. The results for RMP Round 3 (conducted at the US DOE Environmental Measurements Laboratory radon chamber in New York) and RMP Round 4 (conducted in the two NAREL chambers) are discussed and compared. Following Round 4, the NAREL staff analyzed the collective performance for each measurement method tested in these rounds and found that all methods agreed with the target values within expected limits except for RPISU`s and charcoal adsorbers. After analyzing the RMP4 results, NAREL staff spent several months evaluating the difference in charcoal adsorber response between Round 3 and 4 by performing radon chamber tests using EPA 4-inch, open-faced charcoal adsorbers.

  5. Radon prevention in new construction in Finland: a nationwide sample survey in 2009.

    PubMed

    Arvela, H; Holmgren, O; Reisbacka, H

    2012-03-01

    The building code for radon prevention and the associated practical guidelines were revised in Finland in 2003-2004. Thereafter, preventive measures have become more common and effective and indoor radon concentrations have been markedly reduced. In this study, the indoor radon concentration was measured in 1500 new low-rise residential houses. The houses were randomly selected and represented 7 % of the houses that received building permission in 2006. The average radon concentration of all the houses measured, which were completed in 2006-2008, was 95 Bq m(-3), the median being 58 Bq m(-3). The average was 33 % lower than in houses completed in 2000-2005. The decrease was 47 % in provinces with the highest indoor radon concentration and 26 % elsewhere in the country. In houses with a slab-on-ground foundation that had both passive radon piping and sealing measures carried out using a strip of bitumen felt in the joint between the foundation wall and floor slab, the radon concentration was on average reduced by 57 % compared with houses with no preventive measures. Preventive measures were taken nationwide in 54 % of detached houses and in provinces with the highest radon concentration in 92 % of houses. PMID:21632585

  6. Air conditioning impact on the dynamics of radon and its daughters concentration.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Krzysztof; Grządziel, Dominik; Połednik, Bernard; Mazur, Jadwiga; Dudzińska, Marzenna R; Mroczek, Mariusz

    2014-12-01

    Radon and its decay products are harmful pollutants present in indoor air and are responsible for the majority of the effective dose due to ionising radiation that people are naturally exposed to. The paper presents the results of the series of measurements of radon and its progeny (in unattached and attached fractions) as well as indoor air parameters: temperature, relative humidity, number and mass concentrations of fine aerosol particles. The measurements were carried out in the auditorium (lecture hall), which is an indoor air quality laboratory, in controlled conditions during two periods of time: when air conditioning (AC) was switched off (unoccupied auditorium) and when it was switched on (auditorium in normal use). The significant influence of AC and of students' presence on the dynamics of radon and its progeny was confirmed. A decrease in the mean value of radon and its attached progeny was found when AC was working. The mean value of radon equilibrium factor F was also lower when AC was working (0.49) than when it was off (0.61). The linear correlations were found between attached radon progeny concentration and particle number and mass concentration only when the AC was switched off. This research is being conducted with the aim to study the variability of radon equilibrium factor F which is essential to determine the effective dose due to radon and its progeny inhalation. PMID:24375376

  7. Long-term radon concentrations estimated from 210Po embedded in glass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lively, R.S.; Steck, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measured surface-alpha activity on glass exposed in radon chambers and houses has a linear correlation to the integrated radon exposure. Experimental results in chambers and houses have been obtained on glass exposed to radon concentrations between 100 Bq m-3 and 9 MBq m-3 for periods of a few days to several years. Theoretical calculations support the experimental results through a model that predicts the fractions of airborne activity that deposit and become embedded or adsorbed. The combination of measured activity and calculated embedded fraction for a given deposition environment can be applied to most indoor areas and produces a better estimate for lifetime radon exposure than estimates based on short-term indoor radon measurements.

  8. MONITORING RADON REDUCTION IN CLINTON, NEW JERSEY HOUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses EPA experience in monitoring radon reduction in Clinton, NJ, houses. Both the temperature-driven stack effect and typical household appliances (e.g., furnaces, whole-house fans, clothes dryers, and bathroom fans) were observed to reduce indoor pressure and pot...

  9. Radon exhalation from granites used in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    al-Jarallah, M

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of radon exhalation for a total of 50 selected samples of construction materials used in Saudi Arabia were taken using a radon gas analyzer. These materials included sand, aggregate, cement, gypsum, hydrated lime, ceramics and granite. It was found that the granite samples were the main source of radon emanations. A total of 32 local and imported granite samples were tested. It was found that the radon exhalation rates per unit area from these granite samples varied from not detectable to 10.6 Bq m-2 h-1 with an average of 1.3 Bq m-2 h-1. The linear correlation coefficient between emanated radon and radium content was 0.92. The normalized radon exhalation rates from 2.0 cm thick granite samples varied from not detectable to 0.068 (Bq m-2 h-1)/(Bq kg-1) with an average of 0.030 (Bq m-2 h-1)/(Bq kg-1). The average radon emanation of the granite samples was found to be 21% of the total radium concentration. Therefore, granite can be a source of indoor radon as well as external gamma-radiation from the uranium decay series. PMID:11378931

  10. Radon gas: Health risks and toxicity. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning health risks and toxicity associated with indoor and outdoor exposure to radon gas. Citations discuss radon sources from tobacco smoke, fossil fuel combustion, phosphate mining, uranium mining, granitic rocks, building materials, and water supplies. Discussed also are risk assessment, regulations, radon gas monitoring, exposure modeling and control, biological pathways, and occupational exposure. Radionuclides in groundwater, and radon analysis and detection, are examined in separate bibliographies. (Contains a minimum of 125 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Estimating outdoor and indoor dust lead levels from accidental bridge repair containment releases

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.T.; Conway, R.F.

    1999-07-01

    A 1998 New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) environmental impact statement (EIS) evaluated the proposed removal of deteriorated lead paint from NYCDOT-owned bridges. The EIS health risk assessment quantified the potential impact of particulate releases on blood lead levels among members of the public living and working near affected bridges. The risk assessment consisted of a fate and transport component and an exposure-dose component. The fate and transport component, modeled using the EPA's Industrial Source Complex (ISC3) model, calculated the impact of paint removal activities on ambient air lead concentrations and dust lead deposition rates. The exposure-dose component, modeled using EPA's Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model, the Bowers et al. Adult Lead model, and the O'Flaherty lead model, calculated the impact of additional lead in air, street dust, interior house dust, and soil on blood lead levels, a conventional measure of body lead burden. The analysis was complicated because the ISC3 model provides a dust lead deposition rate ({micro}g/m{sup 2}-day), while the IEUBK, Bowers et al., and O'Flaherty models demand as input specification of dust lead concentrations ({micro}g lead per g dust). This paper describes a model developed for the EIS that quantifies long term average dust lead concentrations associated with typical bridge containment releases, and short term dust lead concentration spikes following worst case release events associated with bridge repair containment structure failures. The model reflects the influence of both lead and other debris associated with bridge repair activities, the contribution of background debris to street dust, and the impact of rainfall on removal of both lead and other material from the street dust reservoir.

  12. Radon Risk Communication Strategies: A Regional Story.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Winnie

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication on the health effects of radon encounters many challenges and requires a variety of risk communication strategies and approaches. The concern over radon exposure and its health effects may vary according to people's level of knowledge and receptivity. Homeowners in radon-prone areas are usually more informed and have greater concern over those not living in radon-prone areas. The latter group is often found to be resistant to testing. In British Columbia as well as many other parts of the country, some homes have been lying outside of the radon-prone areas have radon levels above the Canadian guideline, which is the reason Health Canada recommends that all homes should be tested. Over the last five years, the Environment Health Program (EHP) of Health Canada in the British Columbia region has been using a variety of different approaches in their radon risk communications through social media, workshops, webinars, public forums, poster contests, radon distribution maps, public inquiries, tradeshows and conference events, and partnership with different jurisdictions and nongovernmental organizations. The valuable lessons learned from these approaches are discussed in this special report. PMID:26867298

  13. Parametric modelling of temporal variations in radon concentrations in homes

    SciTech Connect

    Revzan, K.L.; Turk, B.H.; Harrison, J.; Nero, A.V.; Sextro, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The /sup 222/Rn concentrations in the living area, the basement, and the undelying soil of a New Jersey home have been measured at half-hour intervals over the course of a year, as have indoor and outdoor temperatures, wind speed and direction, and indoor-outdoor and basement-subslab pressures; in addition, periods of furnace opration have been logged. We generalize and extend an existing radon entry model in order to demonstrate the dependence of the radon concentration on the environmental variales and the extent of furnace use. The model contains parameters which are dependent on geological and structural factors which have not been measured or otherwise determined; statistical methods are used to find the best values of the parameters. The non-linear regression of the model predictions (over time) on the measured living area radon concentrations yields an R)aup 2) of 0.88. 9 refs., 2 figs

  14. Comparative risk assessment of residential radon exposures in two radon-prone areas, Stei (Romania) and Torrelodones (Spain).

    PubMed

    Sainz, Carlos; Dinu, Alexandra; Dicu, Tiberius; Szacsvai, Kinga; Cosma, Constantin; Quindós, Luis Santiago

    2009-07-15

    Radon and radon progeny are present indoors, in houses and others dwellings, representing the most important contribution to dose from natural sources of radiation. Most studies have demonstrated an increased risk of lung cancer at high concentration of radon for both smokers and nonsmokers. The work presents a comparative analysis of the radon exposure data in the two radon-prone areas, Stei, Transylvania, (Romania), in the near of old Romanian uranium mines and in the granitic area of Torrelodones town, Sierra de Guadarrama (Spain). Measurements of indoor radon were performed in 280 dwellings (Romania) and 91 dwellings (Spain) by using nuclear track detectors, CR 39. The highest value measured in Stei area was 2650 Bq m(-3) and 366 Bq m(-3) in the Spanish region. The results are computed with the BEIR VI report estimates using the age-duration model at an exposure rate below 2650 Bq m(-3). We used the EC Radon Software to calculate the lifetime lung cancer death risks for individuals groups in function of attained age, radon exposures and tobacco consumption. A total of 233 lung cancer deaths were observed in the Stei area for a period of 13 years (1994-2006), which is 116.82% higher than expected from the national statistics. In addition, the number of deaths estimated for the year 2005 is 28, which is worth more than 2.21 times the amount expected by authorities. In comparison, for Torrelodones was rated a number of 276 deaths caused by lung cancer for a period of 13 years, which is 2.09 times higher than the number expected by authorities. For the year 2005 in the Spanish region were reported 32 deaths caused by pulmonary cancer, the number of deaths exceeding seen again with a factor of 2.10 statistical expectations. This represents a significantly evidence that elevated risk can strongly be associated with cumulated radon exposure. PMID:19428051

  15. Soil gas radon assessment and development of a radon risk map in Bolsena, Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Cinelli, G; Tositti, L; Capaccioni, B; Brattich, E; Mostacci, D

    2015-04-01

    Vulsini Volcanic district in Northern Latium (Central Italy) is characterized by high natural radiation background resulting from the high concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium in the volcanic products. In order to estimate the radon radiation risk, a series of soil gas radon measurements were carried out in Bolsena, the principal urban settlement in this area NE of Rome. Soil gas radon concentration ranges between 7 and 176 kBq/m(3) indicating a large degree of variability in the NORM content and behavior of the parent soil material related in particular to the occurrence of two different lithologies. Soil gas radon mapping confirmed the existence of two different areas: one along the shoreline of the Bolsena lake, characterized by low soil radon level, due to a prevailing alluvial lithology; another close to the Bolsena village with high soil radon level due to the presence of the high radioactive volcanic rocks of the Vulsini volcanic district. Radon risk assessment, based on soil gas radon and permeability data, results in a map where the alluvial area is characterized by a probability to be an area with high Radon Index lower than 20 %, while probabilities higher than 30 % and also above 50 % are found close to the Bolsena village. PMID:25239677

  16. One-year follow-up study of performance of radon mitigation systems installed in Tennessee Valley houses

    SciTech Connect

    Dudney, C.S.; Wilson, D.L.; Saultz, R.J.; Matthews, T.G.

    1990-01-01

    Subbarrier depressurization systems were installed for radon mitigation in two basement ranchers in Oak Ridge, TN, and in two ranchers with partial basements in Huntsville, AL. System performance parameters, including pressure field extension, subslab permeability, and indoor radon concentrations were followed in each house for a year or longer. 9 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1982-06-01

    The quantitative estimation of the carcinogenic risk of low-dose, high-LET radiation in the case of exposure to radon daughters and lung-cancer is subject to numerous uncertainties. The greatest of these concerns the parametric values of the dose-response curve. We lack knowledge and an understanding of the dosimetry and the distribution of aggregates of radioactivity that remain localized as hot spots in specific regions of the lungs and the influence on greater or lesser risk of lung cancer per average lung dose than uniformly deposited radiation (NRC76). We have only a limited understanding of the response to exposure to high-LET radiations, such as alpha particles, for which linear risk estimates for low doses are less likely to overestimate the risk, and may, in fact, underestimate the risk (BEIR80). Other uncertainties include the length of the latency period, the RBE for alpha radiation relative to gamma radiation, the period during which the radiation risk is expressed, the risk projection model used - whether absolute or relative - for projecting risk beyond the period of observation, the effect of dose rate and protraction of dose, and the influence of differences in the natural incidence of lung cancer in different populations. In addition, uncertainties are introduced by the biological and life-style risk characteristics of humans, for example, the effect of sex, the effect of age at the time of irradiation and at the time of appearance of the cancer, the influence of length of observation or follow-up of the study populations, and the influence of perhaps the most important confounding bias, cigarette-smoking. The collective influence of these uncertainties is such as to deny great credibility to any estimate of human lung cancer risk and other cancer risk that can be made for low-dose, high-LET radon daughter radiation exposure.

  18. Environmental Assessment for moving the Pacific Northwest Laboratory radon generators from Life Sciences Laboratory II, Richland North Area, to Life Sciences Laboratory I, 300 Area, and their continued use in physical and biological research

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, I.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) radon generators are a core resource of the overall U. S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Radon Research Program and are administratively controlled within the ``Radon Hazards in Homes`` project. This project primarily focuses on radon exposures of animals and addresses the major biologic effects and factors influencing risks of indoor radon exposures. For example, the ``Mechanisms of Radon Injury`` and ``In vivo/In vitro Radon-Induced Cellular Damage`` projects specifically address the cytogenetic and DNA damage produced by radon exposure as part of a larger effort to understand radon carcinogenesis. Several other ongoing PNL projects, namely: ``Biological Effectiveness of Radon Alpha Particles: A Microbeam Study of Dose Rate Effects,`` ``Laser Measurements of Pb-210,`` ``Radon Transport Modeling in Soils,`` ``Oncogenes in Radiation Carcinogenesis,`` ``Mutation of DNA Targets,`` ``Dosimetry of Radon Progeny,`` and ``Aerosol Technology Development`` also use the radon exposure facilities in the conduct of their work. While most, but not all, studies in the PNL Radon Research Program are funded through DOE`s Office of Health and Environmental Research, PNL also has ongoing collaborative radon studies with investigators worldwide; many of these use the radon exposure facilities. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide for relocation of the radon generators to a DOE-owned facility and to continue to provide a controlled source of radon-222 for continued use in physical and biological research.

  19. Radon risk perception and testing: Sociodemographic correlates

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.T.; Warner, K.E. . Technology Assessment and Policy Research Center)

    1994-03-01

    While numerous health education campaigns have been carried out to alert the public to radon's potential dangers and to encourage testing and mitigation, there has been little follow-up to determine which segments of the public are now most aware of the possible hazards of radon. Using information from the 1990 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), the authors have examined beliefs regarding radon and radon-testing activities among different sociodemographic groups. They used logistic regression to determine the relationship between these beliefs and actions and age, gender, education, income, minority status, and smoking status. The results suggest relatively superficial knowledge regarding radon, and very little testing, within the survey population. In particular, significantly less knowledge was observed among female and minority respondents, while less testing behavior was seen among older respondents. Lower educational levels and lower family income were associated with both decreased knowledge and testing. Recommendations for future education campaigns are discussed.

  20. Radon exposure and oropharyngeal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Salgado-Espinosa, Tania; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Oropharyngeal cancer is a multifactorial disease. Alcohol and tobacco are the main risk factors. Radon is a human carcinogen linked to lung cancer risk, but its influence in other cancers is not well known. We aim to assess the effect of radon exposure on the risk of oral and pharyngeal cancer through a systematic review of the scientific literature. This review performs a qualitative analysis of the available studies. 13 cohort studies were included, most of them mortality studies, which analysed the relationship between occupational or residential radon exposure with oropharyngeal cancer mortality or incidence. Most of the included studies found no association between radon exposure and oral and pharyngeal cancer. This lack of effect was observed in miners studies and in general population studies. Further research is necessary to quantify if this association really exists and its magnitude, specially performing studies in general population, preferably living in areas with high radon levels. PMID:26335172

  1. Quality assurance for radon exposure chambers at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory, Montgomery, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Semler, M.O.; Sensintaffar, E.L.

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), operates six radon exposure chambers in its two laboratories, the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory (NAREL) in Montgomery, Alabama, and the Las Vegas Facility, Las Vegas, Nevada. These radon exposure chambers are used to calibrate and test portable radon measuring instruments, test commercial suppliers of radon measurement services through the Radon Measurement Proficiency Program, and expose passive measurement devices to known radon concentrations as part of a quality assurance plan for federal and state studies measuring indoor radon concentrations. Both laboratories participate in national and international intercomparisons for the measurement of radon and are presently working with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to receive a certificate of traceability for radon measurements. NAREL has developed an estimate of the total error in its calibration of each chamber`s continuous monitors as part of an internal quality assurance program. This paper discusses the continuous monitors and their calibration for the three chambers located in Montgomery, Alabama, as well as the results of the authors intercomparisons and total error analysis.

  2. A radon progeny deposition model

    SciTech Connect

    Rielage, Keith; Elliott, Steven R; Hime, Andrew; Guiseppe, Vincente E; Westerdale, S.

    2010-12-01

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  3. A Radon Progeny Deposition Model

    SciTech Connect

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K.; Westerdale, S.

    2011-04-27

    The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

  4. Evaporative Cooler Use Influences Temporal Indoor Relative Humidity but Not Dust Mite Allergen Levels in Homes in a Semi-Arid Climate.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James D; Tuttle, Steven C; Nelson, Morgan C; Bradshaw, Rebecca K; Hoybjerg, Taylor G; Johnson, Julene B; Kruman, Bryce A; Orton, Taylor S; Cook, Ryan B; Eggett, Dennis L; Weber, K Scott

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy consumption and climate change make residential evaporative coolers a popular alternative to central air conditioning in arid and semi-arid climates. However, evaporative coolers have been shown to significantly increase indoor relative humidity and dust mite allergen levels in some studies, while showing no association in other studies. Improved measurement of temporal fluctuations in indoor relative humidity may help identify factors that promote mite growth in homes in dry climates. Dust samples and continuous indoor relative humidity measurements were collected from homes with central air conditioning and homes with evaporative coolers in Utah. Samples were collected over two seasons, winter/spring (Jan-Apr) and summer (July-Sept), 2014. Dust samples were analyzed for Der p 1 and Der f 1 using a two-site monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Housing characteristics including age of home, occupant density, and age of mattresses, furniture, and carpeting were also measured. Positive Der p 1 or Der f 1 samples were found in 25.0% of the homes and there was no difference in mean allergen levels by type of air conditioning. Indoor relative humidity was significantly higher in homes with evaporative coolers compared to those with central air conditioning during the summer. Homes with evaporative coolers also spent significantly more time during summer above 55.0% and 65.0% relative humidity compared to central air homes, but not above 75.0%. Findings from this study suggest that increased humidity from evaporative coolers may not be sufficient to exceed the critical equilibrium humidity or maintain humidity excursions for sufficient duration in relatively larger single-family homes in semi-arid climates to support mite growth and reproduction. PMID:26808528

  5. Evaporative Cooler Use Influences Temporal Indoor Relative Humidity but Not Dust Mite Allergen Levels in Homes in a Semi-Arid Climate

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, James D.; Tuttle, Steven C.; Nelson, Morgan C.; Bradshaw, Rebecca K.; Hoybjerg, Taylor G.; Johnson, Julene B.; Kruman, Bryce A.; Orton, Taylor S.; Cook, Ryan B.; Eggett, Dennis L.; Weber, K. Scott

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy consumption and climate change make residential evaporative coolers a popular alternative to central air conditioning in arid and semi-arid climates. However, evaporative coolers have been shown to significantly increase indoor relative humidity and dust mite allergen levels in some studies, while showing no association in other studies. Improved measurement of temporal fluctuations in indoor relative humidity may help identify factors that promote mite growth in homes in dry climates. Dust samples and continuous indoor relative humidity measurements were collected from homes with central air conditioning and homes with evaporative coolers in Utah. Samples were collected over two seasons, winter/spring (Jan–Apr) and summer (July–Sept), 2014. Dust samples were analyzed for Der p 1 and Der f 1 using a two-site monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Housing characteristics including age of home, occupant density, and age of mattresses, furniture, and carpeting were also measured. Positive Der p 1 or Der f 1 samples were found in 25.0% of the homes and there was no difference in mean allergen levels by type of air conditioning. Indoor relative humidity was significantly higher in homes with evaporative coolers compared to those with central air conditioning during the summer. Homes with evaporative coolers also spent significantly more time during summer above 55.0% and 65.0% relative humidity compared to central air homes, but not above 75.0%. Findings from this study suggest that increased humidity from evaporative coolers may not be sufficient to exceed the critical equilibrium humidity or maintain humidity excursions for sufficient duration in relatively larger single-family homes in semi-arid climates to support mite growth and reproduction. PMID:26808528

  6. Adult myeloid leukaemia, geology, and domestic exposure to radon and gamma radiation: a case control study in central Italy

    PubMed Central

    Forastiere, F.; Sperati, A.; Cherubini, G.; Miceli, M.; Biggeri, A.; Axelson, O.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether indoor randon or gamma radiation might play a part in myeloid leukaemia as suggested by studies based on crude geographical or geological data for exposure assessment. METHODS: For six months randon and gamma radiation was measured with solid state nuclear track detectors and thermoluminescent dosimeters in dwellings of 44 adult male cases of acute myeloid leukaemia and 211 controls (all subjects deceased). Conditional logistic regression ORs (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated for quartiles of radon and gamma radiation and for municipality and dwelling characteristics. RESULTS: The risk of leukaemia was associated with an increasing urbanisation index (p value for trend = 0.008). An increased OR was found among those living in more modern houses (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4 to 6.6). Confirming the findings of a previous study in the same area, geological features bore a positive association with myeloid leukemia, even by adjusting for level of urbanisation. Contrary to expectations from the previous study, however, no association appeared between myeloid leukaemia and radon and gamma radiation; for the highest quartiles of exposure, ORs were 0.56 (95% CI 0.2 to 1.4) and 0.52 (95% CI 0.2 to 1.4), respectively. Considering only subjects who had lived > or = 20 years in the monitored home and adjusting for urbanisation, there was still no effect of exposure to radiation. CONCLUSIONS: In view of the limited numbers, the results do not in general refute a possible risk of myeloid leukaemia from exposure to indoor radon or gamma radiation, but decrease the credibility of such a relation in the area studied and also of other studies suggesting an effect without monitoring indoor radiation. Some other fairly strong determinants have appeared--that is, level of urbanisation and living in modern houses-- that might need further consideration.   PMID:9614394

  7. Comparison of Indoor Air Quality Management Strategies between the School and District Levels in New York State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shao; Kielb, Christine L.; Reddy, Amanda L.; Chapman, Bonnie R.; Hwang, Syni-An

    2012-01-01

    Background: Good school indoor air quality (IAQ) can affect the health and functioning of school occupants. Thus, it is important to assess the degree to which schools and districts employ strategies to ensure good IAQ management. We examined and compared the patterns of IAQ management strategies between public elementary schools and their school…

  8. What Is Radon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Learn About Cancer » What Causes Cancer? » Other Carcinogens » Pollution » Radon Share this Page Close Push escape to ... can move into the air and into underground water and surface water. Radon is present outdoors and ...

  9. Radon removal method

    SciTech Connect

    Lamarre, B.L.

    1989-09-26

    This patent describes a method of removing radon from water without recycling. It comprises: distributing radon-laden water in the upper portion of a vertically oriented hollow column containing mass transfer packing material, forcing air through the column to evaporate radon gas out of the radon-laden water as the water splashes through the packing material, venting air laden with radon evaporated from the radon-laden water out of the column, collecting water significantly purified by removal of radon as the water falls to the lower portion of the column, and pumping the collected water into a water storage container remote from the source of the radon-laden water. Thereby the collected and stored water is available for immediate residential use without recycling through the mass transfer packing material.

  10. Undisturbed dust as a metric of long-term indoor insecticide exposure: Residential DDT contamination from indoor residual spraying and its association with serum levels in the VHEMBE cohort.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Fraser W; Chevrier, Jonathan; Bornman, Riana; Crause, Madelein; Obida, Muvhulawa; Barr, Dana Boyd; Bradman, Asa; Bouwman, Henk; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2015-12-01

    Although approximately 123 million people may be exposed to high levels of insecticides through the use of indoor residual spraying (IRS) for malaria control, few studies exist on indoor insecticide contamination due to IRS and its relationship with human exposure. In the present study, we developed a sampling method to collect undisturbed dust from 50 homes in Limpopo, South Africa, a region where dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) has been used in IRS programs to prevent malaria for ~70years. We quantified DDT and its degradation products, dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) in dust samples to determine dust loading levels and compared these levels to paired serum concentrations of p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE in women residents. p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE had the highest detection frequencies in both dust (58% and 34% detection, respectively) and serum samples (98% and 100% detection, respectively). Significantly higher detection frequencies for o,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE, and p,p'-DDD were observed in dust samples collected in buildings that had been previously sprayed for malaria control. We also observed a significant, positive association between dust loading and serum concentrations of p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE (Spearman's rho=0.68 and 0.54, respectively). Despite the low detection frequency in dust, our results indicate that undisturbed dust may be a good metric to quantify long-term home exposure to DDT-related compounds and that contamination of the home environment may be an important determinant/source of DDT and DDE exposure. PMID:26398044

  11. Radon emanation from giant landslides of Koefels (Tyrol, Austria) and Langtang Himal (Nepal)

    SciTech Connect

    Purtscheller, F.; Pirchl, T.; Sieder, G.

    1995-07-01

    The identification of extremely high indoor radon concentrations in the village Umhausen (Tyrol, Austria) initiated a scientific program to get information about the source and distribution of this noble gas. The high concentrations can not be related to U anomalies or large-scale fault zones. The nearby giant landslide of Koefels, with its highly fractured and crushed orthogneisses, are the only possible source of radon, despite the fact that the U and Ra content of the rocks is by no means exceptional. The reasons for the high emanation rates from the landslide are discussed and compared to results gained from a similar examination of the giant landslide of Langtang Himal (Nepal). The exceptional geologic situation in both cases, as well as the spatial distribution of different concentration levels, indicate that both landslides must be considered as the production sites of radon. Independent of the U and Ra contents of the rocks, the most important factors producing high emanation rates are the production of a high active surface area in circulation pathways for Rn-enriched soil air by brittle deformation due to the impact of the landslidemass. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Evaluation of radiation level and radon exhalation rate of rock samples from Mahd Ad Dahab mine in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroor, A.; Dawood, N.

    2011-04-01

    Mahd Ad Dahab mine is the largest and oldest gold mine in the middle East, situated in the western region of Al-Madina Al-Munawara in Saudi Arabia. By using a high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy system, various radionuclides in about 20 rock samples, collected from four different locations of the Mahd Ad Dahab mine, have been identified quantitatively based on their characteristic spectral peaks. The activity concentrations of the natural radionuclides uranium (238U), thorium (232Th), and potassium (40K) as well as some radiological parameters were measured in the rock samples. The activity concentration of uranium was found to vary from 7.94 to 38.52 Bq/kg, thorium from 3.14 to 17.79 Bq/kg and potassium activity from 93.51 to 175.83 Bq/kg. The radon emanation coefficient of the rock samples was estimated. It ranged between 0.48 and 0.55. Moreover, the radium equivalent activity in the samples ranged between 19.3 and 77.49 Bq/kg, which is lower than the allowed maximum value for worker safety. The external and internal hazard indices and gamma-radiation hazard index were found not to exceed the permissible limits.

  13. An assessment of radon in groundwater in New York state.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Stephen B; Eckhardt, David A V

    2012-09-01

    A set of 317 samples collected from wells throughout New York State (excluding Long Island) from 2003 through 2008 was used to assess the distribution of radon gas in drinking water. Previous studies have documented high concentrations of radon in groundwater from granitic and metamorphic bedrock, but there have been only limited characterizations of radon in water from sedimentary rock and unconsolidated sand-and-gravel deposits in New York. Approximately 8% of the samples from bedrock wells exceed 89 Bq L (eight times the proposed regulatory limit), but only 2% of samples from sand-and-gravel wells exceed 44 Bq L. Specific metamorphic and sedimentary rock formations in New York are associated with the high radon concentrations, indicating that specific areas of New York could be targeted with efforts to reduce the risk of exposure to radon in groundwater. Additionally, radon in groundwater from the sand-and-gravel aquifers was found to be directly correlated to radon in indoor air when assessed by county. PMID:22850237

  14. An assessment of radon in groundwater in New York State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, Stephen B.; Eckhardt, David A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: A set of 317 samples collected from wells throughout New York State (excluding Long Island) from 2003 through 2008 was used to assess the distribution of radon gas in drinking water. Previous studies have documented high concentrations of radon in groundwater from granitic and metamorphic bedrock, but there have been only limited characterizations of radon in water from sedimentary rock and unconsolidated sand-and-gravel deposits in New York. Approximately 8% of the samples from bedrock wells exceed 89 Bq L-1 (eight times the proposed regulatory limit), but only 2% of samples from sand-and-gravel wells exceed 44 Bq L-1. Specific metamorphic and sedimentary rock formations in New York are associated with the high radon concentrations, indicating that specific areas of New York could be targeted with efforts to reduce the risk of exposure to radon in groundwater. Additionally, radon in groundwater from the sand-and-gravel aquifers was found to be directly correlated to radon in indoor air when assessed by county.

  15. Interior Landscape Plants for Indoor Air Pollution Abatement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Johnson, Anne; Bounds, Keith

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the leaves, roots, soil, and associated microorganisms of plants have been evaluated as a possible means of reducing indoor air pollutants. Additionally, a novel approach of using plant systems for removing high concentrations of indoor air pollutants such as cigarette smoke, organic solvents, and possibly radon has been designed from this work. This air filter design combines plants with an activated carbon filter. The rationale for this design, which evolved from wastewater treatment studies, is based on moving large volumes of contaminated air through an activated carbon bed where smoke, organic chemicals, pathogenic microorganisms (if present), and possibly radon are absorbed by the carbon filter. Plant roots and their associated microorganisms then destroy the pathogenic viruses, bacteria, and the organic chemicals, eventually converting all of these air pollutants into new plant tissue. It is believed that the decayed radon products would be taken up the plant roots and retained in the plant tissue.

  16. High radon levels in subterranean environments: monitoring and technical criteria to ensure human safety (case of Castañar cave, Spain).

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Gallego, Miriam; Garcia-Anton, Elena; Fernandez-Cortes, Angel; Cuezva, Soledad; Sanchez-Moral, Sergio

    2015-07-01

    Castañar cave contains the highest radon gas ((222)Rn) concentration in Spain with an annual average of 31.9 kBq m(-)(3). Seasonal variations with summer minimums and maximum values in fall were recorded. The reduction of air-filled porosity of soil and rock by condensation or rainfalls hides the radon exchange by gas diffusion, determining this seasonal stair-step pattern of the radon activity concentration in underground air. The effective total dose and the maximum hours permitted have been evaluated for the guides and public safety with a highly detailed radon measurement along 2011 and 2012. A network of 12 passive detectors (kodalphas) has been installed, as well as, two radon continuous monitoring in the most interesting geological sites of the subterranean environment. A follow up of the recomme