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Sample records for induce aid expression

  1. Macrophage-derived BAFF induces AID expression through the p38MAPK/CREB and JNK/AP-1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-A; Seo, Goo-Young; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2011-03-01

    BAFF is expressed primarily by macrophages and DCs. BAFF stimulates the differentiation and survival of B cells and induces Ig production. We have demonstrated previously that murine macrophages treated with TGF-β1 or IFN-γ express membrane-bound and soluble forms of BAFF. The ability of these two forms of BAFF to induce expression of AID, which plays a critical role in Ig CSR in B cells, was investigated. Both forms of BAFF, derived from macrophages activated by IFN-γ or TGF-β1, can increase AID expression. Subsequent analysis of BAFF signaling suggested that BAFF induces AID through BCMA, a BAFF-receptor, and p38MAPK and CREB act as intermediates in AID expression. In addition, JNK and AP-1 have similar activities. Our findings suggest that macrophage-derived BAFF stimulates B cells to express AID through BCMA and at least two different pathways, including the p38MAPK/CREB and the JNK/AP-1 pathways. PMID:21169521

  2. Regulation of Aicda expression and AID activity.

    PubMed

    Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in a B cell differentiation stage-specific fashion and is essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). CSR and SHM play a central role in the maturation of antibody and autoantibody responses. AID displays a mutagenic activity by catalyzing targeted deamination of deoxycytidine (dC) residues in DNA resulting in dU:dG mismatches, which are processed into point-mutations in SHM or double-strand breaks (DSBs) in CSR. Although AID specifically targets the Ig gene loci (IgH, Igκ and Igλ), it can also home into a wide array of non-Ig genes in B-and non-B-cell backgrounds. Aberrant expression of AID is associated with multiple diseases such as allergy, inflammation, autoimmunity and cancer. In autoimmune systemic lupus erythematosus, dysregulated AID expression underpins increased CSR, SHM and autoantibody production. As a potent mutator, AID is under stringent transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation. AID is also regulated in its targeting and enzymatic function. In resting naïve or memory B cells, AID transcripts and protein are undetectable. These, however, are readily and significantly up-regulated in B cells induced to undergo CSR and/or SHM. Transcription factors, such as HoxC4 and NF-κB, which are up-regulated in a B cell lineage-and/or differentiation stage-specific manner, regulate the induction of AID. HoxC4 induces AID expression by directly binding to the AID gene promoter through an evolutionarily conserved 5'-ATTT-3' motif. HoxC4 is induced by the same stimuli that induce AID and CSR. It is further up-regulated by estrogen through three estrogen responsive elements in its promoter region. The targeting of AID to switch (S) regions is mediated by 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, which specifically bind to 5'-AGCT-3' repeats that are exist at high frequency in S region cores. Like HoxC4, 14-3-3 adaptors are induced

  3. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein EBNA3C directly induces expression of AID and somatic mutations in B cells.

    PubMed

    Kalchschmidt, Jens S; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Paschos, Kostas; Gillman, Adam C T; Styles, Christine T; Kellam, Paul; Allday, Martin J

    2016-05-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme responsible for induction of sequence variation in immunoglobulins (Igs) during the process of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and also Ig class switching, can have a potent mutator phenotype in the development of lymphoma. Using various Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) recombinants, we provide definitive evidence that the viral nuclear protein EBNA3C is essential in EBV-infected primary B cells for the induction of AID mRNA and protein. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) established with EBV recombinants conditional for EBNA3C function, this was confirmed, and it was shown that transactivation of the AID gene (AICDA) is associated with EBNA3C binding to highly conserved regulatory elements located proximal to and upstream of the AICDA transcription start site. EBNA3C binding initiated epigenetic changes to chromatin at specific sites across the AICDA locus. Deep sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the IgH V-D-J region from the conditional LCL was used to formally show that SHM is activated by functional EBNA3C and induction of AID. These data, showing the direct targeting and induction of functional AID by EBNA3C, suggest a novel role for EBV in the etiology of B cell cancers, including endemic Burkitt lymphoma. PMID:27217538

  4. Attenuating homologous recombination stimulates an AID-induced antileukemic effect

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Kristin R.; Hasham, Muneer G.; Donghia, Nina M.; Branca, Jane; Chavaree, Margaret; Chase, Betsy; Breggia, Anne; Hedlund, Jacquelyn; Emery, Ivette; Cavallo, Francesca; Jasin, Maria; Rüter, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is critical in normal B cells to initiate somatic hypermutation and immunoglobulin class switch recombination. Accumulating evidence suggests that AID is also prooncogenic, inducing cancer-promoting mutations or chromosome rearrangements. In this context, we find that AID is expressed in >40% of primary human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cases, consistent with other reports. Using a combination of human B lymphoid leukemia cells and mouse models, we now show that AID expression can be harnessed for antileukemic effect, after inhibition of the RAD51 homologous recombination (HR) factor with 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2-2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS). As a proof of principle, we show that DIDS treatment inhibits repair of AID-initiated DNA breaks, induces apoptosis, and promotes cytotoxicity preferentially in AID-expressing human CLL. This reveals a novel antineoplastic role of AID that can be triggered by inhibition of HR, suggesting a potential new paradigm to treat AID-expressing tumors. Given the growing list of tumor types with aberrant AID expression, this novel therapeutic approach has potential to impact a significant patient population. PMID:23589568

  5. AID-expressing epithelium is protected from oncogenic transformation by an NKG2D surveillance pathway.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Pérez-Durán, Pablo; Wossning, Thomas; Sernandez, Isora V; Mur, Sonia M; Cañamero, Marta; Real, Francisco X; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2015-10-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates secondary antibody diversification in germinal center B cells, giving rise to higher affinity antibodies through somatic hypermutation (SHM) or to isotype-switched antibodies through class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are triggered by AID-mediated deamination of cytosines in immunoglobulin genes. Importantly, AID activity in B cells is not restricted to Ig loci and can promote mutations and pro-lymphomagenic translocations, establishing a direct oncogenic mechanism for germinal center-derived neoplasias. AID is also expressed in response to inflammatory cues in epithelial cells, raising the possibility that AID mutagenic activity might drive carcinoma development. We directly tested this hypothesis by generating conditional knock-in mouse models for AID overexpression in colon and pancreas epithelium. AID overexpression alone was not sufficient to promote epithelial cell neoplasia in these tissues, in spite of displaying mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Instead, we found that heterologous AID expression in pancreas promotes the expression of NKG2D ligands, the recruitment of CD8(+) T cells, and the induction of epithelial cell death. Our results indicate that AID oncogenic potential in epithelial cells can be neutralized by immunosurveillance protective mechanisms. PMID:26282919

  6. AID-expressing epithelium is protected from oncogenic transformation by an NKG2D surveillance pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-García, Arantxa; Pérez-Durán, Pablo; Wossning, Thomas; Sernandez, Isora V; Mur, Sonia M; Cañamero, Marta; Real, Francisco X; Ramiro, Almudena R

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) initiates secondary antibody diversification in germinal center B cells, giving rise to higher affinity antibodies through somatic hypermutation (SHM) or to isotype-switched antibodies through class switch recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR are triggered by AID-mediated deamination of cytosines in immunoglobulin genes. Importantly, AID activity in B cells is not restricted to Ig loci and can promote mutations and pro-lymphomagenic translocations, establishing a direct oncogenic mechanism for germinal center-derived neoplasias. AID is also expressed in response to inflammatory cues in epithelial cells, raising the possibility that AID mutagenic activity might drive carcinoma development. We directly tested this hypothesis by generating conditional knock-in mouse models for AID overexpression in colon and pancreas epithelium. AID overexpression alone was not sufficient to promote epithelial cell neoplasia in these tissues, in spite of displaying mutagenic and genotoxic activity. Instead, we found that heterologous AID expression in pancreas promotes the expression of NKG2D ligands, the recruitment of CD8+ T cells, and the induction of epithelial cell death. Our results indicate that AID oncogenic potential in epithelial cells can be neutralized by immunosurveillance protective mechanisms. PMID:26282919

  7. Regulation of aicda expression and AID activity: Relevance to somatic hypermutation and class switch DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhenming; Pone, Egest J.; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Park, Seok-Rae; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Expression and activity of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) encoded by the aicda gene are essential for immunoglobulin (Ig) gene somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch DNA recombination (CSR). SHM and CSR unfold in general in germinal centers and are central to the maturation of effective antibody responses. AID expression is induced by activated B cell CD40 signaling, which is critical for the germinal center reaction, and is further enhanced by other stimuli, including interleukin-4 (IL-4) secreted from CD4+ T cells or Toll-like receptor (TLR)-activating bacterial and/or viral molecules. Integration of different intracellular signal transduction pathways, as activated by these stimuli, leads to a dynamic aicda-regulating program, which involves both positively acting trans-factors, such as Pax5, HoxC4, E47 and Irf8, and negative modulators, such as Blimp1 and Id2, to restrict aicda expression primarily to germinal center B cells. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-K), which functions downstream of activated B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, likely plays an important role in triggering the downregulation of aicda expression in post-germinal center B cells and throughout plasmacytoid differentiation. In B cells undergoing SHM and CSR, AID activity and, possibly, AID targeting to the Ig locus are regulated at a post-translational level, including AID dimerization/oligomerization, nuclear/cytoplasmic AID translocation and phosphorylation of the AID Ser38 residue by protein kinase A (PKA). Here, we will discuss the role of B cell activation signals, transcription regulation programs and post-translational modifications in controlling aicda expression and AID activity, thereby delineating an integrated model of modulation of SHM and CSR in the germinal center reaction. PMID:18197815

  8. AID induces intraclonal diversity and genomic damage in CD86+ chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Huemer, Michael; Rebhandl, Stefan; Zaborsky, Nadja; Gassner, Franz J; Hainzl, Stefan; Weiss, Lukas; Hebenstreit, Daniel; Greil, Richard; Geisberger, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mediates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes by directly deaminating cytosines to uracils. As AID causes a substantial amount of off-target mutations, its activity has been associated with lymphomagenesis and clonal evolution of B-cell malignancies. Although it has been shown that AID is expressed in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a clear analysis of in vivo AID activity in this B-cell malignancy remained elusive. In this study performed on primary human CLL samples, we report that, despite the presence of a dominant VDJ heavy chain region, a substantial intraclonal diversity was observed at VDJ as well as at IgM switch regions (Sμ), showing ongoing AID activity in vivo during disease progression. This AID-mediated heterogeneity was higher in CLL subclones expressing CD86, which we identified as the proliferative CLL fraction. Finally, CD86 expression correlated with shortened time to first treatment and increased γ-H2AX focus formation. Our data demonstrate that AID is active in CLL in vivo and thus, AID likely contributes to clonal evolution of CLL. PMID:25179679

  9. AIDS dementia is associated with massive, activated HIV-1 infection and concomitant expression of several cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Nuovo, G. J.; Alfieri, M. L.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We recently showed that acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) dementia is associated with activated infection of microglia, neurons, and astrocytes by HIV-1. However, it is doubtful whether infection per se is responsible for the dramatic symptoms associated with AIDS dementia. The purpose of this study was to determine the histologic distribution of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) of several cytokines that have been implicated in AIDS pathogenesis and to correlate this expression pattern with the in situ localization of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified HIV-1 nucleic acids in the central nervous system (CNS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: HIV-1 DNA was detected by PCR in situ hybridization. HIV-1 RNA and cytokine expression, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS), and macrophage inflammatory protein alpha (MIP-1 alpha) and MIP-1 beta mRNA were detected by reverse transcriptase (RT) in situ PCR. RESULTS: Amplified viral DNA was detected in each of the seven HIV-1-positive cases and in none of the five negative controls. In people with AIDS dementia, many HIV-1 DNA-positive cells were detected in regions of the CNS that corresponded to clinical symptomatology. In AIDS patients with minimal CNS involvement, rare HIV-1-infected microglial cells were noted. Viral RNA was detected primarily in cases of AIDS dementia. TNF, iNOS, MIP-1 alpha and MIP-1 beta expression localized to tissues from AIDS dementia cases where HIV-1 infected cells were plentiful. Colocalization experiments showed that these cytokines were transcribed mostly by viral-negative cells. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that two key elements in AIDS dementia are massive productive viral infection, involving microglia, neurons, and astrocytes, and concomitant stimulation of cytokine transcription in the neighboring uninfected cells. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 PMID:8784788

  10. APRIL stimulates NF-κB-mediated HoxC4 induction for AID expression in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun; Lee, Kyu-Seon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Seo, Goo-Young; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Casali, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) plays a key role in B cell immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). We have previously reported that the highly conserved homeodomain HoxC4 transcription factor binds to the Aicda (AID gene) promoter to induce AID expression. Here, we investigated the regulation of HoxC4 transcription by a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and B cell-activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF) in mouse B cells. APRIL substantially increased both HoxC4 and AID expression, whereas BAFF induced the expression of AID but not HoxC4. To elucidate the underlying mechanisms, we constructed a HoxC4 gene promoter reporter vector and analyzed the promoter induction after APRIL stimulation. APRIL enhanced the HoxC4 promoter activity by 2.3-fold, and this increase disappeared when the second putative NF-κB-binding promoter element (NBE2) was mutated. Based on ChIP assays, we found that NF-κB bound to the HoxC4 promoter NBE2 region. Furthermore, the overexpression of NF-κB augmented the APRIL-induced HoxC4 promoter activity, while the expression of dominant negative-IκBα suppressed it. Taken together, our findings suggest that NF-κB mediates APRIL-induced HoxC4 transcription. PMID:23178148

  11. Mechanisms underlying the effects of LPS and activation-induced cytidine deaminase on IgA isotype expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Hyun-A; Chun, Sung-Ki; Park, Jae-Bong; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2005-06-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is needed for Ig class switch recombination (CSR). We explored the effect of LPS on the expression of AID during B cell differentiation, and the role of AID in IgA isotype expression. In normal spleen B cells, LPS increased AID transcription up to 48 h post-stimulation, i.e. around the time of Ig CSR. TGF-b1 and AID were required for IgA expression, and LPS contributed to TGFb1-induced IgA production largely by inducing AID. Interestingly, LPS repressed AID transcription in sIgA+ B cells but still stimulated IgA production mainly by increasing the rate of IgA secretion. Our data indicate that LPS contributes to TGFb1-induced IgA isotype expression in at least two ways: by stimulating AID transcription before CSR and by enhancing the IgA secretion rate after CSR. PMID:15995363

  12. AID expression increased by TNF-α is associated with class switch recombination of Igα gene in cancers.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhi; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Haidan; Li, Ming; Tang, Min; Weng, Xinxian; Yi, Wei; Bode, Ann M; Cao, Ya

    2016-07-01

    Recently, immunoglobulins (Igs) were unexpectedly found to be expressed in epithelial cancers. Immunoglobulin class switching or class switch recombination (CSR) is a natural biological process that alters a B cell's production of antibodies (immunoglobulins) from one class to another. However, the mechanism of CSR of Ig genes in cancer is still unknown. Here, we confirmed by detecting the hallmark of CSR that the Igα gene in cancer underwent CSR. Then we focused on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a crucial factor for initiating CSR. Further studies using tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulation and specific inhibitor of NF-κB revealed that TNF-α could increase AID expression through NF-κB signaling. Finally, we demonstrated that AID could co-localize with protein kinase A and bind to the switching (Sα) region of the Igα gene. Overexpression of AID obviously enhanced Igα heavy chain expression and its binding ability to the Sα region. These findings indicated that TNF-α-induced AID expression is involved with CSR in cancer. PMID:25849121

  13. AID expression increased by TNF-α is associated with class switch recombination of Igα gene in cancers

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhi; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Haidan; Li, Ming; Tang, Min; Weng, Xinxian; Yi, Wei; Bode, Ann M.; Cao, Ya

    2016-01-01

    Recently, immunoglobulins (Igs) were unexpectedly found to be expressed in epithelial cancers. Immunoglobulin class switching or class switch recombination (CSR) is a natural biological process that alters a B cell's production of antibodies (immunoglobulins) from one class to another. However, the mechanism of CSR of Ig genes in cancer is still unknown. Here, we confirmed by detecting the hallmark of CSR that the Igα gene in cancer underwent CSR. Then we focused on activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a crucial factor for initiating CSR. Further studies using tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α stimulation and specific inhibitor of NF-κB revealed that TNF-α could increase AID expression through NF-κB signaling. Finally, we demonstrated that AID could co-localize with protein kinase A and bind to the switching (Sα) region of the Igα gene. Overexpression of AID obviously enhanced Igα heavy chain expression and its binding ability to the Sα region. These findings indicated that TNF-α-induced AID expression is involved with CSR in cancer. PMID:25849121

  14. Generation and characterization of induced pluripotent stem cells from Aid-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Ren; Amano, Naoki; Ichisaka, Tomoko; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okita, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that DNA demethylation plays a pivotal role in the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this action is still unclear. Previous reports indicated that activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aid, also known as Aicda) is involved in DNA demethylation in several developmental processes, as well as cell fusion-mediated reprogramming. Based on these reports, we hypothesized that Aid may be involved in the DNA demethylation that occurs during the generation of iPS cells. In this study, we examined the function of Aid in iPS cell generation using Aid knockout (Aid⁻/⁻) mice expressing a GFP reporter under the control of a pluripotent stem cell marker, Nanog. By introducing Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, Nanog-GFP-positive iPS cells could be generated from the fibroblasts and primary B cells of Aid⁻/⁻ mice. Their induction efficiency was similar to that of wild-type (Aid⁺/⁺) iPS cells. The Aid⁻/⁻ iPS cells showed normal proliferation and gave rise to chimeras, indicating their capacity for self-renewal and pluripotency. A comprehensive DNA methylation analysis showed only a few differences between Aid⁺/⁺ and Aid⁻/⁻ iPS cells. These data suggest that Aid does not have crucial functions in DNA demethylation during iPS cell generation. PMID:24718089

  15. The auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system enables versatile conditional protein depletion in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangyu; Ward, Jordan D; Cheng, Ze; Dernburg, Abby F

    2015-12-15

    Experimental manipulation of protein abundance in living cells or organisms is an essential strategy for investigation of biological regulatory mechanisms. Whereas powerful techniques for protein expression have been developed in Caenorhabditis elegans, existing tools for conditional disruption of protein function are far more limited. To address this, we have adapted the auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system discovered in plants to enable conditional protein depletion in C. elegans. We report that expression of a modified Arabidopsis TIR1 F-box protein mediates robust auxin-dependent depletion of degron-tagged targets. We document the effectiveness of this system for depletion of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in diverse somatic and germline tissues throughout development. Target proteins were depleted in as little as 20-30 min, and their expression could be re-established upon auxin removal. We have engineered strains expressing TIR1 under the control of various promoter and 3' UTR sequences to drive tissue-specific or temporally regulated expression. The degron tag can be efficiently introduced by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing. We have harnessed this system to explore the roles of dynamically expressed nuclear hormone receptors in molting, and to analyze meiosis-specific roles for proteins required for germ line proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that the AID system provides a powerful new tool for spatiotemporal regulation and analysis of protein function in a metazoan model organism. PMID:26552885

  16. The auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system enables versatile conditional protein depletion in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangyu; Ward, Jordan D.; Cheng, Ze; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental manipulation of protein abundance in living cells or organisms is an essential strategy for investigation of biological regulatory mechanisms. Whereas powerful techniques for protein expression have been developed in Caenorhabditis elegans, existing tools for conditional disruption of protein function are far more limited. To address this, we have adapted the auxin-inducible degradation (AID) system discovered in plants to enable conditional protein depletion in C. elegans. We report that expression of a modified Arabidopsis TIR1 F-box protein mediates robust auxin-dependent depletion of degron-tagged targets. We document the effectiveness of this system for depletion of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins in diverse somatic and germline tissues throughout development. Target proteins were depleted in as little as 20-30 min, and their expression could be re-established upon auxin removal. We have engineered strains expressing TIR1 under the control of various promoter and 3′ UTR sequences to drive tissue-specific or temporally regulated expression. The degron tag can be efficiently introduced by CRISPR/Cas9-based genome editing. We have harnessed this system to explore the roles of dynamically expressed nuclear hormone receptors in molting, and to analyze meiosis-specific roles for proteins required for germ line proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that the AID system provides a powerful new tool for spatiotemporal regulation and analysis of protein function in a metazoan model organism. PMID:26552885

  17. AID-induced remodeling of immunoglobulin genes and B cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Laffleur, Brice; Denis-Lagache, Nicolas; Péron, Sophie; Sirac, Christophe; Moreau, Jeanne; Cogné, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Survival and phenotype of normal and malignant B lymphocytes are critically dependent on constitutive signals by the B cell receptor (BCR) for antigen. In addition, either antigen ligation of the BCR or various mitogenic stimuli result in B cell activation and induction of activation-induced deaminase (AID). AID activity can in turn mediate somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin (Ig) V regions and also deeply remodel the Ig heavy chain locus through class switch recombination (CSR) or locus suicide recombination (LSR). In addition to changes linked to affinity for antigen, modifying the class/isotype (i.e. the structure and function) of the BCR or suddenly deleting BCR expression also modulates the fate of antigen-experienced B cells. PMID:24851241

  18. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is localized to subnuclear domains enriched in splicing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yi Ericsson, Ida Doseth, Berit Liabakk, Nina B. Krokan, Hans E. Kavli, Bodil

    2014-03-10

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is the mutator enzyme in adaptive immunity. AID initiates the antibody diversification processes in activated B cells by deaminating cytosine to uracil in immunoglobulin genes. To some extent other genes are also targeted, which may lead to genome instability and B cell malignancy. Thus, it is crucial to understand its targeting and regulation mechanisms. AID is regulated at several levels including subcellular compartmentalization. However, the complex nuclear distribution and trafficking of AID has not been studied in detail previously. In this work, we examined the subnuclear localization of AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 and found that they associate with spliceosome-associated structures including Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. Moreover, protein kinase A (PKA), which activates AID by phosphorylation at Ser38, is present together with AID in nuclear speckles. Importantly, we demonstrate that AID physically associates with the major spliceosome subunits (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins, snRNPs), as well as other essential splicing components, in addition to the transcription machinery. Based on our findings and the literature, we suggest a transcription-coupled splicing-associated model for AID targeting and activation. - Highlights: • AID and its interaction partner CTNNBL1 localize to Cajal bodies and nuclear speckles. • AID associates with its activating kinase PKA in nuclear speckles. • AID is linked to the splicing machinery in switching B-cells. • Our findings suggest a transcription-coupled splicing associated mechanism for AID targeting and activation.

  19. Enhanced expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 correlates with development of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gupta, P; Kingsley, L; Armstrong, J; Ding, M; Cottrill, M; Rinaldo, C

    1993-10-01

    The progression to AIDS may be significantly related to the level of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. We have used quantitative cell culture and quantitative DNA and RNA PCR to measure viral load and expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained cross-sectionally and longitudinally from HIV-1-seropositive homosexual men enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Our results indicate that the number of circulating CD4+ T-lymphocytes producing HIV-1 increased as the total number of CD4+ T-cells declined. However, there was no correlation between the number of HIV-1-producing CD4+ cells and the duration of infection. Furthermore, the level of HIV-1 gag RNA increased as the disease progressed and CD4+ cell numbers declined. Subjects who remained asymptomatic with stable CD4+ cell counts, however, maintained a very low level of HIV-1 RNA expression during the entire period of follow-up (38-71 months). In contrast to viral RNA expression, the level of proviral DNA did not change significantly as the disease progressed. However, the level of proviral DNA was significantly higher in AIDS patients than in men who remained asymptomatic. Such increased levels of HIV-1 DNA were detected 34-68 months before the development of AIDS. These results support the role of HIV-1 RNA expression in the development of AIDS. PMID:8103948

  20. The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) efficiently targets DNA in nucleosomes but only during transcription

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hong Ming; Poirier, Michael G.; Allen, Michael J.; North, Justin; Lal, Ratnesh; Widom, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    The activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation, class-switch recombination, and gene conversion of immunoglobulin genes. In vitro, AID has been shown to target single-stranded DNA, relaxed double-stranded DNA, when transcribed, or supercoiled DNA. To simulate the in vivo situation more closely, we have introduced two copies of a nucleosome positioning sequence, MP2, into a supercoiled AID target plasmid to determine where around the positioned nucleosomes (in the vicinity of an ampicillin resistance gene) cytidine deaminations occur in the absence or presence of transcription. We found that without transcription nucleosomes prevented cytidine deamination by AID. However, with transcription AID readily accessed DNA in nucleosomes on both DNA strands. The experiments also showed that AID targeting any DNA molecule was the limiting step, and they support the conclusion that once targeted to DNA, AID acts processively in naked DNA and DNA organized within transcribed nucleosomes. PMID:19380635

  1. A critical role for AID in the initiation of reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Nidhi; Decker, Matthew N.; Brady, Jennifer J.; Bussat, Rose T.; Burns, David M.; Corbel, Stephane Y.; Blau, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanistic insights into the reprogramming of fibroblasts to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are limited, particularly for early acting molecular regulators. Here we use an acute loss of function approach to demonstrate that activation-induced deaminase (AID) activity is necessary for the initiation of reprogramming to iPSCs. While AID is well known for antibody diversification, it has also recently been shown to have a role in active DNA demethylation in reprogramming toward pluripotency and development. These findings suggested a potential role for AID in iPSC generation, yet, iPSC yield from AID-knockout mouse fibroblasts was similar to that of wild-type (WT) fibroblasts. We reasoned that an acute loss of AID function might reveal effects masked by compensatory mechanisms during development, as reported for other proteins. Accordingly, we induced an acute reduction (>50%) in AID levels using 4 different shRNAs and determined that reprogramming to iPSCs was significantly impaired by 79 ± 7%. The deaminase activity of AID was critical, as coexpression of WT but not a catalytic mutant AID rescued reprogramming. Notably, AID was required only during a 72-h time window at the onset of iPSC reprogramming. Our findings show a critical role for AID activity in the initiation of reprogramming to iPSCs.—Bhutani, N., Decker, M. N., Brady, J. J., Bussat, R. T., Burns, D. M., Corbel, S. Y., Blau, H. M. A critical role for AID in the initiation of reprogramming to induced pluripotent stem cells. PMID:23212122

  2. Flavin-Induced Oligomerization in Escherichia coli Adaptive Response Protein AidB

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The process known as “adaptive response” allows Escherichia coli to respond to small doses of DNA-methylating agents by upregulating the expression of four proteins. While the role of three of these proteins in mitigating DNA damage is well understood, the function of AidB is less clear. Although AidB is a flavoprotein, no catalytic role has been established for the bound cofactor. Here we investigate the possibility that flavin plays a structural role in the assembly of the AidB tetramer. We report the generation and biophysical characterization of deflavinated AidB and of an AidB mutant that has greatly reduced affinity for flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Using fluorescence quenching and analytical ultracentrifugation, we find that apo AidB has a high affinity for FAD, as indicated by an apparent dissociation constant of 402.1 ± 35.1 nM, and that binding of substoichiometric amounts of FAD triggers a transition in the AidB oligomeric state. In particular, deflavinated AidB is dimeric, whereas the addition of FAD yields a tetramer. We further investigate the dimerization and tetramerization interfaces of AidB by determining a 2.8 Å resolution crystal structure in space group P32 that contains three intact tetramers in the asymmetric unit. Taken together, our findings provide strong evidence that FAD plays a structural role in the formation of tetrameric AidB. PMID:22004173

  3. Nbs1 ChIP-Seq Identifies Off-Target DNA Double-Strand Breaks Induced by AID in Activated Splenic B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Linehan, Erin K.; Schrader, Carol E.; Stavnezer, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for initiation of Ig class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of antibody genes during immune responses. AID has also been shown to induce chromosomal translocations, mutations, and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) involving non-Ig genes in activated B cells. To determine what makes a DNA site a target for AID-induced DSBs, we identify off-target DSBs induced by AID by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) for Nbs1, a protein that binds DSBs, followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq). We detect and characterize hundreds of off-target AID-dependent DSBs. Two types of tandem repeats are highly enriched within the Nbs1-binding sites: long CA repeats, which can form Z-DNA, and tandem pentamers containing the AID target hotspot WGCW. These tandem repeats are not nearly as enriched at AID-independent DSBs, which we also identified. Msh2, a component of the mismatch repair pathway and important for genome stability, increases off-target DSBs, similar to its effect on Ig switch region DSBs, which are required intermediates during CSR. Most of the off-target DSBs are two-ended, consistent with generation during G1 phase, similar to DSBs in Ig switch regions. However, a minority are one-ended, presumably due to conversion of single-strand breaks to DSBs during replication. One-ended DSBs are repaired by processes involving homologous recombination, including break-induced replication repair, which can lead to genome instability. Off-target DSBs, especially those present during S phase, can lead to chromosomal translocations, deletions and gene amplifications, resulting in the high frequency of B cell lymphomas derived from cells that express or have expressed AID. PMID:26263206

  4. HIV-induced immunodeficiency and mortality from AIDS-defining and non-AIDS-defining malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate deaths from AIDS-defining malignancies (ADM) and non-AIDS-defining malignancies (nADM) in the D:A:D Study and to investigate the relationship between these deaths and immunodeficiency. Design Observational cohort study. Methods Patients (23 437) were followed prospectively for 104 921 person-years. We used Poisson regression models to identify factors independently associated with deaths from ADM and nADM. Analyses of factors associated with mortality due to nADM were repeated after excluding nADM known to be associated with a specific risk factor. Results Three hundred five patients died due to a malignancy, 298 prior to the cutoff for this analysis (ADM: n=110; nADM: n=188). The mortality rate due to ADM decreased from 20.1/1000 person-years of follow-up [95% confidence interval (CI) 14.4, 25.9] when the most recent CD4 cell count was <50 cells/μl to 0.1 (0.03, 0.3)/1000 person-years of follow-up when the CD4 cell count was more than 500 cells/μl; the mortality rate from nADM decreased from 6.0 (95% CI 3.3, 10.1) to 0.6 (0.4, 0.8) per 1000 person-years of follow-up between these two CD4 cell count strata. In multivariable regression analyses, a two-fold higher latest CD4 cell count was associated with a halving of the risk of ADM mortality. Other predictors of an increased risk of ADM mortality were homosexual risk group, older age, a previous (non-malignancy) AIDS diagnosis and earlier calendar years. Predictors of an increased risk of nADM mortality included lower CD4 cell count, older age, current/ex-smoking status, longer cumulative exposure to combination antiretroviral therapy, active hepatitis B infection and earlier calendar year. Conclusion The severity of immunosuppression is predictive of death from both ADM and nADM in HIV-infected populations. PMID:18832878

  5. [Acetaminophen-induced hypothermia, an AIDS related side-effect? About 4 cases].

    PubMed

    Denes, Eric; Amaniou, Monique; Rogez, Jean-Philippe; Weinbreck, Pierre; Merle, Louis

    2002-10-01

    Hypothermia is an uncommon side effect of acetaminophen. We report 4 cases of HIV-infected patients who developed hypothermia after intravenous injection of propacetamol (the parenteral formulation of acetaminophen). The mechanism of this hypothermia is unknown. AIDS-induced changes in the metabolism of acetaminophen, could be an explanation. AIDS-associated opportunistic diseases may account for part of the mechanism. These hypothermias occur within 6 hours after the injection, are well tolerated and regress spontaneously. PMID:12486392

  6. Isotype-switched follicular lymphoma displays dissociation between activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and somatic hypermutation.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Florian; Navarrete, Marcelo A; Bertinetti-Lapatki, Cristina; Boehm, Joachim; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Veelken, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    In B-cells, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is required for somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) of immunoglobulin genes. AID introduces mutations in immunoglobulin variable regions (IGV) during B-cell receptor affinity maturation, but may also introduce aberrant mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes, most commonly BCL6. Follicular lymphoma (FL) B-cells constitutively express AID and undergo CSR, SHM and aberrant SHM. We have studied AID expression, the presence of SHM mutations, CSR, and aberrant SHM in BCL6 in a cohort of 75 FL patients. Whereas IgM-expressing (non-switched) FL were characterized by an expected positive correlation between AID and IGV and BCL6 mutations, isotype-switched FL showed dissociation between AID expression and aberrant SHM, and inverse correlation between SHM and AID expression. Our results unveil two manifest biological subgroups of FL and indicate that the specific dissociation between AID and SHM after isotype switch may correlate with the clinical outcome of this heterogeneous disease. PMID:25860234

  7. Aberrant activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression in Philadelphia chromosome-positive B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yang; Zhao, Xiaoxian; Durkin, Lisa; Rogers, Heesun Joyce; Hsi, Eric D

    2016-06-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is expressed in germinal center B cells and plays a critical role in somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes. Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carries a poor prognosis and is specifically treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Interestingly, AID has been shown to be aberrantly expressed and functional in Ph+ ALL and is thought to contribute to genetic instability. We hypothesized that AID might be detectable in routinely processed bone marrow biopsies by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and assist in identifying Ph+ ALL. We found that AID was expressed in 26 (70%) of 37 cases of Ph+ ALL but only 1 (2.9%) of 38 cases of Ph- ALL cases. There was a significant difference in AID expression between these 2 ALL groups (P < .001, Fisher exact test). The expression of AID was confirmed by RT-PCR (reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction) and correlated with IHC scoring. AID protein is expressed in a large proportion of Ph+ ALL cases at levels detectable by IHC in clinical samples and might be useful to rapidly identify cases likely to have a BCR/ABL1 fusion. PMID:26980048

  8. Salt induced gene expression in Prosopis farcta

    SciTech Connect

    Heimer, I.M.; Golan, A.; Lips, H.

    1987-04-01

    The authors hypothesize that in facultative halophytes, the genes which impart salt tolerance are expressed when the plants are exposed to salt. As a first step towards possible identification of these genes, they examined salt induced changes of gene expression in the facultative halophyte Prosopis farcta at the protein level, by SDS-PAGE. Exposure to salt of aseptically grown, two-week old seedlings, was carried out in one of two ways: (1) a one step transfer of seedlings from medium without salt to that with the indicated concentrations followed by 5 hr or 24 hr incubation periods. During the last 2 hrs of each incubation period the seedlings were pulse-labelled with /sup 35/S Sulfate or L-Methionine; (2) a gradual increase of the salt concentration at 50 mM increments at 2-4 day intervals. Two days after reaching the desired salt concentration, the seedlings were pulse-labelled for 2 hrs with /sup 35/S sulfate or L-methionine. Protein from roots were extracted and analyzed. Polypeptides were visualized by staining with coomassie blue or by fluorography. Qualitative as well as quantitative changes of gene expression as induced by salt could be observed. Their significance regarding salt tolerance will be discussed.

  9. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G.; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H.; Goodman, Myron F.; Rueda, David

    2015-12-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ~5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer.

  10. Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) co-transcriptional scanning at single-molecule resolution.

    PubMed

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Bertram, Jeffrey G; Jaszczur, Malgorzata; Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Pham, Phuong; Mak, Chi H; Goodman, Myron F; Rueda, David

    2015-01-01

    Activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) generates antibody diversity in B cells by initiating somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) during transcription of immunoglobulin variable (IgV) and switch region (IgS) DNA. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that AID binds to transcribed dsDNA and translocates unidirectionally in concert with RNA polymerase (RNAP) on moving transcription bubbles, while increasing the fraction of stalled bubbles. AID scans randomly when constrained in an 8 nt model bubble. When unconstrained on single-stranded (ss) DNA, AID moves in random bidirectional short slides/hops over the entire molecule while remaining bound for ∼ 5 min. Our analysis distinguishes dynamic scanning from static ssDNA creasing. That AID alone can track along with RNAP during transcription and scan within stalled transcription bubbles suggests a mechanism by which AID can initiate SHM and CSR when properly regulated, yet when unregulated can access non-Ig genes and cause cancer. PMID:26681117

  11. Gravity-Induced Gene Expression in Plants.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederoff, Heike; Heber, Steffen; Howard, Brian; Myburg-Nichols, Henrietta; Hammond, Rebecca; Salinas-Mondragon, Raul; Brown, Christopher S.

    Plants sense changes in their orientation towards the vector of gravity and respond with directional growth. Several metabolites in the signal transduction cascade have been identified. However, very little is known about the interaction between these sensing and signal transduction events and even less is known about their role in the differential growth response. Gravity induced changes in transcript abundance have been identified in Arabidopsis whole seedlings and root apices (Moseyko et al. 2002; Kimbrough et al. 2004). Gravity induced transcript abundance changes can be observed within less than 1 min after stimulation (Salinas-Mondragon et al. 2005). Gene expression however requires not only transcription but also translation of the mRNA. Translation can only occur when mRNA is associated with ribosomes, even though not all mRNA associated with ribosomes is actively translated. To approximate translational capacity we quantified whole genome transcript abundances in corn stem pulvini during the first hour after gravity stimulation in total and poly-ribosomal fractions. As in Arabidopsis root apices, transcript abundances of several clusters of genes responded to gravity stimulation. The vast majority of these transcripts were also found to associate with polyribosomes in the same temporal and quantitative pattern. These genes are transcriptionally regulated by gravity stimulation, but do not exhibit translational regulation. However, a small group of genes showed increased transcriptional regulation after gravity stimulation, but no association with polysomes. These transcripts likely are translationally repressed. The mechanism of translational repression for these transcripts is unknown. Based on the hypothesis that the genes essential for gravitropic responses should be expressed in most or all species, we compared the temporal gravity induced expression pattern of all orthologs identified between maize and Arabidopsis. A small group of genes showed high

  12. Increased expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase is associated with anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Chen, Jian; Grizzle, William E.; Chatham, W. Winn; Stockard, Cecil R.; Wu, Qi; Yang, PingAr; Holers, V. Michael; Mountz, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with higher levels of autoantibodies and IL-17. Here, we investigated if ectopic lymphoid follicles and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from RA patients exhibit increased activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and if increased AID is correlated with serum levels of autoantibodies and IL-17. The results of immunohistochemical staining showed that organized germinal centers were observed in 6 of the 12 RA synovial samples, and AID+ cells were found almost exclusively in the B-cell areas of these follicles. Aggregated but not organized lymphoid follicles were found in only one OA synovial sample without AID+ cells. Significantly higher levels of AID mRNA (Aicda) detected by RT-PCR were found in the PBMCs from RA patients than PBMCs from normal controls (p<0.01). In the PBMCs from RA patients, AID was expressed predominately by the CD10+IgM+CD20+ B-cell population and the percentage of these cells that expressed AID was significantly higher than in normal controls (p < 0.01). Aicda expression in the PBMCs correlated significantly and positively with the serum levels of rheumatoid factor (RF) (p ≤ 0.0001) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) (p = 0.0005). Serum levels of IFN-γ (p = 0.0005) and IL-17 (p = 0.007), but not IL-4, also exhibited positive correlation with the expression of AID. These results suggest that the higher levels of AID expression in B cells of RA patients correlate with, and may be associated with the higher levels of T helper cell cytokines IFN-γ and IL-17, leading to the development of anti-CCP and RF. PMID:19703021

  13. Live Cell MicroRNA Imaging Using Exonuclease III-Aided Recycling Amplification Based on Aggregation-Induced Emission Luminogens.

    PubMed

    Min, Xuehong; Zhang, Mengshi; Huang, Fujian; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan

    2016-04-13

    Enzyme-assisted detection strategies of microRNAs (miRNAs) in vitro have accomplished both great sensitivity and specificity. However, low expression of miRNAs and a complex environment in cells induces big challenges for monitoring and tracking miRNAs in vivo. The work reports the attempt to carry miRNA imaging into live cells, by enzyme-aided recycling amplification. We utilize facile probes based yellow aggregation-induced emission luminogens (AIEgens) with super photostable property but without quencher, which are applied to monitor miRNAs not only from urine sample extracts (in vitro) but also in live cells (in vivo). The assay could distinguish the cancer patients' urine samples from the healthy urine due to the good specificity. Moreover, the probe showed much higher fluorescence intensity in breast cancer cells (MCF-7) (miR-21 in high expression) than that in cervical cancer cells (HeLa) and human lung fibroblast cells (HLF) (miR-21 in low expression) in more than 60 min, which showed the good performance and super photostability for the probe in vivo. As controls, another two probes with FAM/Cy3 and corresponding quenchers, respectively, could perform miRNAs detections in vitro and parts of in vivo tests but were not suitable for the long-term cell tracking due to the photobleach phenomena, which also demonstrates that the probe with AIEgens is a potential candidate for the accurate identification of cancer biomarkers. PMID:27011025

  14. A combined nuclear and nucleolar localization motif in activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) controls immunoglobulin class switching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yi; Ericsson, Ida; Torseth, Kathrin; Methot, Stephen P; Sundheim, Ottar; Liabakk, Nina B; Slupphaug, Geir; Di Noia, Javier M; Krokan, Hans E; Kavli, Bodil

    2013-01-23

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is a DNA mutator enzyme essential for adaptive immunity. AID initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytosine to uracil in specific immunoglobulin (Ig) gene regions. However, other loci, including cancer-related genes, are also targeted. Thus, tight regulation of AID is crucial to balance immunity versus disease such as cancer. AID is regulated by several mechanisms including nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here we have studied nuclear import kinetics and subnuclear trafficking of AID in live cells and characterized in detail its nuclear localization signal. Importantly, we find that the nuclear localization signal motif also directs AID to nucleoli where it colocalizes with its interaction partner, catenin-β-like 1 (CTNNBL1), and physically associates with nucleolin and nucleophosmin. Moreover, we demonstrate that release of AID from nucleoli is dependent on its C-terminal motif. Finally, we find that CSR efficiency correlates strongly with the arithmetic product of AID nuclear import rate and DNA deamination activity. Our findings suggest that directional nucleolar transit is important for the physiological function of AID and demonstrate that nuclear/nucleolar import and DNA cytosine deamination together define the biological activity of AID. This is the first study on subnuclear trafficking of AID and demonstrates a new level in its complex regulation. In addition, our results resolve the problem related to dissociation of deamination activity and CSR activity of AID mutants. PMID:23183374

  15. Putting the diet back into diet-induced obesity: diet-induced hypothalamic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Julian G; Archer, Zoë A

    2008-05-01

    A wealth of detailed mechanistic information relating to obesity and body weight regulation has emerged from study of single gene mutation models, and continues to be generated by engineered rodent models targeting specific genes. However, as an early step in translational research, many researchers are turning to models of diet-induced obesity. Interpretation of data generated from such models is not aided by the variety of diets and rodent strains employed in these studies and a strong case could be made for rationalisation. Differences in experimental protocol, which may deploy a single obligatory solid diet, a choice of solid diets, or liquid/solid combinations, and which may or may not allow a preferred macronutrient composition to be selected, mean that different models of diet-induced obesity achieve that obesity by different routes. The priority should be to mimic the palatability- and choice-driven over-consumption that probably underlies the majority of human obesity. Some of the hypothalamic energy balance genes apparently 'recognise' developing diet-induced obesity as indicated by counter-regulatory changes in expression levels. However, substantial changes in gene expression on long-term exposure to obesogenic diets are not able to prevent weight gain. Forebrain reward systems are widely assumed to be overriding hypothalamic homeostatic energy balance systems under these circumstances. More mechanism-based research at the homeostatic/reward/diet interface may enable diets to be manipulated with therapeutic benefit, or define the contribution of these interactions to susceptibility to diet-induced obesity. PMID:18342851

  16. Synthetic riboswitches that induce gene expression in diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Topp, Shana; Reynoso, Colleen M K; Seeliger, Jessica C; Goldlust, Ian S; Desai, Shawn K; Murat, Dorothée; Shen, Aimee; Puri, Aaron W; Komeili, Arash; Bertozzi, Carolyn R; Scott, June R; Gallivan, Justin P

    2010-12-01

    We developed a series of ligand-inducible riboswitches that control gene expression in diverse species of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including human pathogens that have few or no previously reported inducible expression systems. We anticipate that these riboswitches will be useful tools for genetic studies in a wide range of bacteria. PMID:20935124

  17. The expression of endothelial cell surface antigens by AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma. Evidence for a vascular endothelial cell origin.

    PubMed Central

    Rutgers, J. L.; Wieczorek, R.; Bonetti, F.; Kaplan, K. L.; Posnett, D. N.; Friedman-Kien, A. E.; Knowles, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigated 19 cases of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) obtained from patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) for their expression of Factor VIII-related antigen (FVIIIRAg), HLA-DR (Ia) antigens, OKM1, and three distinctive vascular, but not lymphatic, endothelial-cell-associated antigens, E92, OKM5, and HCl. Antigen expression was demonstrated by immunoperoxidase staining of cryostat sections. FVIIIRAg is strongly expressed by the cells lining the vascular spaces (VCs) but is absent, weakly or focally, and variably expressed by the spindle cell (SC) component of KS. The VC component of each KS lesion examined strongly expressed E92, moderately expressed HCl, and weakly expressed OKM5. In contrast, the entire SC component of each KS lesion studied strongly expressed E92 and OKM5 and weakly expressed HCl. Neither the VCs nor the SCs expressed OKM1. These studies provide strong and compelling evidence for the vascular endothelial cell histogenesis of both the vascular and spindle cell components of KS, demonstrate the intertumor and intratumor phenotypic heterogeneity of KS, and suggest that monoclonal antibodies OKM5 and anti-E92 are the best currently available immunohistochemical markers for identifying the spindle cell component of AIDS-associated KS in cryostat sections. Images Figure 1 PMID:3953772

  18. Expression of immunohistochemical markers in patients with AIDS-related lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Luciana; Azambuja, Denize; Morais, José Carlos de

    2012-01-01

    AIDS-related lymphomas (ARL) present high biological heterogeneity. For better characterization of this type of lymphoma, the objectives of the present study were to evaluate the expression of immunohistochemical markers of cell differentiation (CD10, Bcl-6, MUM-1) and determine cell origin profile according to Hans' classification of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in AIDS patients. This study included 72 consecutive patients with ARL diagnosed at the University Hospital, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and at the Brazilian Instituto Nacional de Câncer (INCA) from 2000 to 2006. The morphologic distribution of the lymphomas was the following: 61% were diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs), 15% were Burkitt's lymphomas, 13% were plasmablastic lymphomas, 10% were high-grade lymphomas and 1% was follicular lymphoma. The positivity for each immunohistochemical marker in DLBCLs, Burkitt's lymphoma and plasmablastic lymphoma was respectively: CD20, 84%, 100%, and 0; CD10, 55%, 100%, and 0; Bcl-6, 45%, 80%, and 0; MUM-1, 41%, 20%, and 88%. A higher positivity of CD20 (84% x 56%, p = 0.01) was found in DLBCL compared to non-DLBCL; in Burkitt's lymphomas a higher positivity of CD10 (100% x 49%, p = 0.04) and Bcl-6 (80% x 39%, p = 0.035) were found compared to non-Burkitt's lymphomas. Germinal center (GC) profile was detected in 60% of DLBCLs. Our study suggests particular findings in ARL, as the most frequent phenotype was GC, different from HIV-negative patients. PMID:22358360

  19. Benzoic Acid-Inducible Gene Expression in Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dragset, Marte S.; Barczak, Amy K.; Kannan, Nisha; Mærk, Mali; Flo, Trude H.; Valla, Svein; Rubin, Eric J.; Steigedal, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression is a powerful tool to investigate the role of bacterial genes. Here, we adapt the Pseudomonas putida-derived positively regulated XylS/Pm expression system to control inducible gene expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of human tuberculosis. By making simple changes to a Gram-negative broad-host-range XylS/Pm-regulated gene expression vector, we prove that it is possible to adapt this well-studied expression system to non-Gram-negative species. With the benzoic acid-derived inducer m-toluate, we achieve a robust, time- and dose-dependent reversible induction of Pm-mediated expression in mycobacteria, with low background expression levels. XylS/Pm is thus an important addition to existing mycobacterial expression tools, especially when low basal expression is of particular importance. PMID:26348349

  20. Histone deacetylase inhibitors upregulate B cell microRNAs that silence AID and Blimp-1 expression for epigenetic modulation of antibody and autoantibody responses.

    PubMed

    White, Clayton A; Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Tat, Connie; Hayama, Ken L; Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Casali, Paolo

    2014-12-15

    Class-switch DNA recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM), which require activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), and plasma cell differentiation, which requires B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1), are critical for the generation of class-switched and hypermutated (mature) Ab and autoantibody responses. We show that histone deacetylase inhibitors valproic acid and butyrate dampened AICDA/Aicda (AID) and PRDM1/Prdm1 (Blimp-1) mRNAs by upregulating miR-155, miR-181b, and miR-361 to silence AICDA/Aicda, and miR-23b, miR-30a, and miR-125b to silence PRDM1/Prdm1, in human and mouse B cells. This led to downregulation of AID, Blimp-1, and X-box binding protein 1, thereby inhibiting CSR, SHM, and plasma cell differentiation without altering B cell viability or proliferation. The selectivity of histone deacetylase inhibitor-mediated silencing of AICDA/Aicda and PRDM1/Prdm1 was emphasized by unchanged expression of HoxC4 and Irf4 (important inducers/modulators of AICDA/Aicda), Rev1 and Ung (central elements for CSR/SHM), and Bcl6, Bach2, or Pax5 (repressors of PRDM1/Prdm1 expression), as well as unchanged expression of miR-19a/b, miR-20a, and miR-25, which are not known to regulate AICDA/Aicda or PRDM1/Prdm1. Through these B cell-intrinsic epigenetic mechanisms, valproic acid blunted class-switched and hypermutated T-dependent and T-independent Ab responses in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, it decreased class-switched and hypermutated autoantibodies, ameliorated disease, and extended survival in lupus MRL/Fas(lpr/lpr) mice. Our findings outline epigenetic mechanisms that modulate expression of an enzyme (AID) and transcription factors (Blimp-1 and X-box binding protein 1) that are critical to the B cell differentiation processes that underpin Ab and autoantibody responses. They also provide therapeutic proof-of-principle in autoantibody-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:25392531

  1. Implications of interferon-induced tryptophan catabolism in cancer, auto-immune diseases and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Brown, R R; Ozaki, Y; Datta, S P; Borden, E C; Sondel, P M; Malone, D G

    1991-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) is an indispensable amino acid required for biosynthesis of proteins, serotonin and niacin. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is induced by infections, viruses, lipopolysaccharides, or interferons (IFNs) and this results in significant catabolism of Trp along the kynurenine (Kyn) pathway. Intracellular growth of Toxoplasma gondii and Chlamydia psittaci in human fibroblasts in vitro is inhibited by IFN-gamma and this inhibition is negated by extra Trp in the medium. Similarly, growth of a number of human cell lines in vitro is inhibited by IFN-gamma and addition of extra Trp restores growth. Thus, in some in vitro systems, antiproliferative effects of IFN-gamma are mediated by induced depletion of Trp. We find that cancer patients given Type I or Type II IFNs can induce IDO which results in decreased serum Trp levels (20-50% of pretreatment) and increased urinary metabolites of the Kyn pathway (5 to 500 fold of pretreatment). We speculate that in vivo antineoplastic effects of IFNs and clinical side effects are mediated, at least in part, by a general or localized depletion of Trp. In view of reported increases of IFNs in autoimmune diseases and our earlier findings of elevated urinary Trp metabolites in autoimmune diseases, it seems likely that systemic or local depletion of Trp occurs in autoimmune diseases and may relate to degeneration, wasting and other symptoms in such diseases. We find high levels of IDO in cells isolated from synovia of arthritic joints. IFNs are also elevated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and increasing IFN levels are associated with a worsening prognosis. We propose that IDO is induced chronically by HIV infection, is further increased by opportunistic infections, and that this chronic loss of Trp initiates mechanisms responsible for the cachexia, dementia, diarrhea and possibly immunosuppression of AIDS patients. In these symptoms, AIDS resembles classical pellagra due to dietary deficiency of Trp and

  2. Successfully treated HIV-infected patients have differential expression of NK cell receptors (NKp46 and NKp30) according to AIDS status at presentation.

    PubMed

    Bisio, Francesca; Bozzano, Federica; Marras, Francesco; Di Biagio, Antonio; Moretta, Lorenzo; De Maria, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Differences in innate immune responses may be associated with different capabilities of controlling HIV infection, not necessarily reflected by CD4(+) T-cell counts alone. We investigated by cytofluorometry the expression of NK cell receptors and ligands in 19 treated HIV-infected patients with CD4(+)<220 ml(-1) at presentation (11 AIDS, 8 non-AIDS) and 10 healthy donors. Expression of NKp46 and NKp30 was significantly higher in non-AIDS vs. AIDS patients. Overall, the level of NKp46 expression directly correlated with the degree of NK cell cytotoxicity. As compared to healthy donors, in both groups, there was a similar increase of CD69 and HLA-DR expression in NK cells that directly correlated with the presence of activation markers (HLA-DR) on CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. As compared to AIDS, in non-AIDS patients in vitro activated CD4(+) showed higher expression of MIC-A (NKG2D ligand), with significantly higher Nectin-2/DNAM-1 and MIC-A/NKG2D ratios. Thus, NK cell responses in AIDS and non-AIDS patients with similar CD4(+) counts significantly differ despite similar treatment. This suggests an involvement of innate mechanisms, in preventing AIDS-defining opportunistic infections in HIV infection and further suggests, that CD4(+) absolute counts alone, may be inadequate to explain differences in the clinical outcome. PMID:23538009

  3. Isoprenaline Induces Periostin Expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xiao; Xi, Hong-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Yan; Geng, Zhi-Jun; Yang, Shao-Wei; Lu, Yan-Jie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Periostin mediates critical steps in gastric cancer and is involved in various signaling pathways. However, the roles of periostin in promoting gastric cancer metastasis are not clear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevance between periostin expression and gastric cancer progression and the role of stress-related hormones in the regulation of cancer development and progression. Materials and Methods Normal, cancerous and metastatic gastric tissues were collected from patients diagnosed with advanced gastric cancer. The in vivo expression of periostin was evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescent staining. Meanwhile, human gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines MKN-45 and BGC-803 were used to detect the in vitro expression of periostin by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blotting. Results Periostin is expressed in the stroma of the primary gastric tumors and metastases, but not in normal gastric tissue. In addition, we observed that periostin is located mainly in pericryptal fibroblasts, but not in the tumor cells, and strongly correlated to the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA). Furthermore, the distribution patterns of periostin were broader as the clinical staging of tumors progressed. We also identified a role of stress-related signaling in promoting cancer development and progression, and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. Conclusion These findings suggest that the distribution pattern of periostin was broader as the clinical staging of the tumor progressed and found that isoprenaline upregulated expression levels of periostin in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26996552

  4. Amitriptyline Activates TrkA to Aid Neuronal Growth and Attenuate Anesthesia-Induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiaochun; Chen, Feng; Zheng, Ting; Huang, Fengyi; Chen, Jianghu; Tu, Wenshao

    2016-05-01

    Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (AM) has been shown to exert neurotrophic activity on neurons. We thus explored whether AM may aid the neuronal development and protect anesthesia-induced neuro-injury in young spinal cord dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.The DRG explants were prepared from 1-day-old rats. The effect of AM on aiding DRG neural development was examined by immunohistochemistry at dose-dependent manner. AM-induced changes in gene and protein expressions, and also phosphorylation states of tyrosine kinases receptor A (TrkA) and B (TrkB) in DRG, were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The effect of AM on attenuating lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration was examined by immunohistochemistry, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TrkA/B down-regulation.Amitriptyline stimulated DRG neuronal development in dose-dependent manner, but exerted toxic effect at concentrations higher than 10 M. AM activated TrkA in DRG through phosphorylation, whereas it had little effect on TrkB-signaling pathway. AM reduced lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration by regenerating neurites and growth cones. Moreover, the neuroprotection of AM on lidocaine-injured neurodegeneration was blocked by siRNA-mediated TrkA down-regulation, but not by TrkB down-regulation.Amitriptyline facilitated neuronal development and had protective effect on lidocaine-induced neurodegeneration, very likely through the activation of TrkA-signaling pathway in DRG. PMID:27149473

  5. Amitriptyline Activates TrkA to Aid Neuronal Growth and Attenuate Anesthesia-Induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaochun; Chen, Feng; Zheng, Ting; Huang, Fengyi; Chen, Jianghu; Tu, Wenshao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline (AM) has been shown to exert neurotrophic activity on neurons. We thus explored whether AM may aid the neuronal development and protect anesthesia-induced neuro-injury in young spinal cord dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. The DRG explants were prepared from 1-day-old rats. The effect of AM on aiding DRG neural development was examined by immunohistochemistry at dose-dependent manner. AM-induced changes in gene and protein expressions, and also phosphorylation states of tyrosine kinases receptor A (TrkA) and B (TrkB) in DRG, were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blot. The effect of AM on attenuating lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration was examined by immunohistochemistry, and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated TrkA/B down-regulation. Amitriptyline stimulated DRG neuronal development in dose-dependent manner, but exerted toxic effect at concentrations higher than 10 M. AM activated TrkA in DRG through phosphorylation, whereas it had little effect on TrkB-signaling pathway. AM reduced lidocaine-induced DRG neurodegeneration by regenerating neurites and growth cones. Moreover, the neuroprotection of AM on lidocaine-injured neurodegeneration was blocked by siRNA-mediated TrkA down-regulation, but not by TrkB down-regulation. Amitriptyline facilitated neuronal development and had protective effect on lidocaine-induced neurodegeneration, very likely through the activation of TrkA-signaling pathway in DRG. PMID:27149473

  6. Vocalization Induced CFos Expression in Marmoset Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Cory T.; DiMauro, Audrey; Pistorio, Ashley; Hendry, Stewart; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2010-01-01

    All non-human primates communicate with conspecifics using vocalizations, a system involving both the production and perception of species-specific vocal signals. Much of the work on the neural basis of primate vocal communication in cortex has focused on the sensory processing of vocalizations, while relatively little data are available for vocal production. Earlier physiological studies in squirrel monkeys had shed doubts on the involvement of primate cortex in vocal behaviors. The aim of the present study was to identify areas of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) cortex that are potentially involved in vocal communication. In this study, we quantified cFos expression in three areas of marmoset cortex – frontal, temporal (auditory), and medial temporal – under various vocal conditions. Specifically, we examined cFos expression in these cortical areas during the sensory, motor (vocal production), and sensory–motor components of vocal communication. Our results showed an increase in cFos expression in ventrolateral prefrontal cortex as well as the medial and lateral belt areas of auditory cortex in the vocal perception condition. In contrast, subjects in the vocal production condition resulted in increased cFos expression only in dorsal premotor cortex. During the sensory–motor condition (antiphonal calling), subjects exhibited cFos expression in each of the above areas, as well as increased expression in perirhinal cortex. Overall, these results suggest that various cortical areas outside primary auditory cortex are involved in primate vocal communication. These findings pave the way for further physiological studies of the neural basis of primate vocal communication. PMID:21179582

  7. An IPTG Inducible Conditional Expression System for Mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ravishankar, Sudha; Ambady, Anisha; Ramu, Haripriya; Mudugal, Naina Vinay; Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Anbarasu, Anand; Sharma, Umender K.; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K.; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression strains serve as a valuable tool to study the essentiality and to establish the vulnerability of a target under investigation in a drug discovery program. While essentiality implies an absolute requirement of a target function, vulnerability provides valuable information on the extent to which a target function needs to be depleted to achieve bacterial growth inhibition followed by cell death. The critical feature of an ideal conditional expression system is its ability to tightly regulate gene expression to achieve the full spectrum spanning from a high level of expression in order to support growth and near zero level of expression to mimic conditions of gene knockout. A number of bacterial conditional expression systems have been reported for use in mycobacteria. The utility of an isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG) inducible system in mycobacteria has been reported for protein overexpression and anti-sense gene expression from a replicating multi-copy plasmid. Herein, we report the development of a versatile set of non-replicating IPTG inducible vectors for mycobacteria which can be used for generation of conditional expression strains through homologous recombination. The role of a single lac operator versus a double lac operator to regulate gene expression was evaluated by monitoring the expression levels of β-galactosidase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. These studies indicated a significant level of leaky expression from the vector with a single lac operator but none from the vector with double lac operator. The significance of the double lac operator vector for target validation was established by monitoring the growth kinetics of an inhA, a rpoB and a ftsZ conditional expression strain grown in the presence of different concentrations of IPTG. The utility of this inducible system in identifying target specific inhibitors was established by screening a focussed library of small molecules using an inhA and a rpoB conditional expression

  8. An IPTG Inducible Conditional Expression System for Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ravishankar, Sudha; Ambady, Anisha; Ramu, Haripriya; Mudugal, Naina Vinay; Tunduguru, Ragadeepthi; Anbarasu, Anand; Sharma, Umender K; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    Conditional expression strains serve as a valuable tool to study the essentiality and to establish the vulnerability of a target under investigation in a drug discovery program. While essentiality implies an absolute requirement of a target function, vulnerability provides valuable information on the extent to which a target function needs to be depleted to achieve bacterial growth inhibition followed by cell death. The critical feature of an ideal conditional expression system is its ability to tightly regulate gene expression to achieve the full spectrum spanning from a high level of expression in order to support growth and near zero level of expression to mimic conditions of gene knockout. A number of bacterial conditional expression systems have been reported for use in mycobacteria. The utility of an isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG) inducible system in mycobacteria has been reported for protein overexpression and anti-sense gene expression from a replicating multi-copy plasmid. Herein, we report the development of a versatile set of non-replicating IPTG inducible vectors for mycobacteria which can be used for generation of conditional expression strains through homologous recombination. The role of a single lac operator versus a double lac operator to regulate gene expression was evaluated by monitoring the expression levels of β-galactosidase in Mycobacterium smegmatis. These studies indicated a significant level of leaky expression from the vector with a single lac operator but none from the vector with double lac operator. The significance of the double lac operator vector for target validation was established by monitoring the growth kinetics of an inhA, a rpoB and a ftsZ conditional expression strain grown in the presence of different concentrations of IPTG. The utility of this inducible system in identifying target specific inhibitors was established by screening a focussed library of small molecules using an inhA and a rpoB conditional expression

  9. Vaccine-Induced CD107a+ CD4+ T Cells Are Resistant to Depletion following AIDS Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Terahara, Kazutaka; Ishii, Hiroshi; Nomura, Takushi; Takahashi, Naofumi; Takeda, Akiko; Shiino, Teiichiro; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD4+ T-cell responses are crucial for effective antibody and CD8+ T-cell induction following virus infection. However, virus-specific CD4+ T cells can be preferential targets for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV-specific CD4+ T-cell induction by vaccination may thus result in enhancement of virus replication following infection. In the present study, we show that vaccine-elicited CD4+ T cells expressing CD107a are relatively resistant to depletion in a macaque AIDS model. Comparison of virus-specific CD107a, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-2 responses in CD4+ T cells of vaccinated macaques prechallenge and 1 week postchallenge showed a significant reduction in the CD107a− but not the CD107a+ subset after virus exposure. Those vaccinees that failed to control viremia showed a more marked reduction and exhibited significantly higher viral loads at week 1 than unvaccinated animals. Our results indicate that vaccine-induced CD107a− CD4+ T cells are depleted following virus infection, suggesting a rationale for avoiding virus-specific CD107a− CD4+ T-cell induction in HIV vaccine design. IMPORTANCE Induction of effective antibody and/or CD8+ T-cell responses is a principal vaccine strategy against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. CD4+ T-cell responses are crucial for effective antibody and CD8+ T-cell induction. However, virus-specific CD4+ T cells can be preferential targets for HIV infection. Here, we show that vaccine-induced virus-specific CD107a− CD4+ T cells are largely depleted following infection in a macaque AIDS model. While CD4+ T-cell responses are important in viral control, our results indicate that virus-specific CD107a− CD4+ T-cell induction by vaccination may not lead to efficient CD4+ T-cell responses following infection but rather be detrimental and accelerate viral replication in the acute phase. This suggests that HIV vaccine design

  10. Impact of Residual Inducer on Titratable Expression Systems

    PubMed Central

    Afroz, Taliman; Luo, Michelle L.; Beisel, Chase L.

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are widely employed for the titratable control of gene expression, yet molecules inadvertently present in the growth medium or synthesized by the host cells can alter the response profile of some of these systems. Here, we explored the quantitative impact of these residual inducers on the apparent response properties of inducible systems. Using a simple mathematical model, we found that the presence of residual inducer shrinks the apparent dynamic range and causes the apparent Hill coefficient to converge to one. We also found that activating systems were more sensitive than repressing systems to the presence of residual inducer and the response parameters were most heavily dependent on the original Hill coefficient. Experimental interrogation of common titratable systems based on an L-arabinose inducible promoter or a thiamine pyrophosphate-repressing riboswitch in Escherichia coli confirmed the predicted trends. We finally found that residual inducer had a distinct effect on “all-or-none” systems, which exhibited increased sensitivity to the added inducer until becoming fully induced. Our findings indicate that residual inducer or repressor alters the quantitative response properties of titratable systems, impacting their utility for scientific discovery and pathway engineering. PMID:26348036

  11. Impact of Residual Inducer on Titratable Expression Systems.

    PubMed

    Afroz, Taliman; Luo, Michelle L; Beisel, Chase L

    2015-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are widely employed for the titratable control of gene expression, yet molecules inadvertently present in the growth medium or synthesized by the host cells can alter the response profile of some of these systems. Here, we explored the quantitative impact of these residual inducers on the apparent response properties of inducible systems. Using a simple mathematical model, we found that the presence of residual inducer shrinks the apparent dynamic range and causes the apparent Hill coefficient to converge to one. We also found that activating systems were more sensitive than repressing systems to the presence of residual inducer and the response parameters were most heavily dependent on the original Hill coefficient. Experimental interrogation of common titratable systems based on an L-arabinose inducible promoter or a thiamine pyrophosphate-repressing riboswitch in Escherichia coli confirmed the predicted trends. We finally found that residual inducer had a distinct effect on "all-or-none" systems, which exhibited increased sensitivity to the added inducer until becoming fully induced. Our findings indicate that residual inducer or repressor alters the quantitative response properties of titratable systems, impacting their utility for scientific discovery and pathway engineering. PMID:26348036

  12. Issues of expressed stigma of HIV/AIDS among professionals in Southern Sudan.

    PubMed

    Machine, Edwin M; Ross, Michael W; McCurdy, Sheryl A

    2011-08-01

    HIV-related stigma continues to be a significant barrier to HIV testing, treatment, and care. Understanding the factors that underlie this stigma could help remove barriers to HIV/AIDS intervention. We identified these factors among nurses as well as community leaders in Lui, Southern Sudan. Participants included health workers at a local hospital, a women's group, local market traders, religious leaders, and teachers. We categorized the responses generated from group interaction forums as concerns, fears, and perceptions. We found that stigma persisted not only toward people with conspicuous signs of full-blown AIDS, but also toward community programs, like voluntary counseling and testing centers. Future interventions, including delabeling the counseling and testing centers and demonstrating the efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy, will be critical in reducing the stigma of HIV/AIDS in communities. PMID:21149851

  13. Cytokine induced expression of programmed death ligands in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Bankey, Paul E.; Banerjee, Sanjib; Zucchiatti, Andrea; De, Mita; Sleem, Rami W.; Lin, Chuen-Fu L.; Miller-Graziano, Carol L.; De, Asit K.

    2010-01-01

    1. Summary Recent evidence indicates that human neutrophils can serve as non-professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Although expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules on human neutrophils is limited, these molecules can be significantly induced following in vitro exposure to the cytokines IFNγ and GM-CSF. Since professional APCs such as dendritic cells express both co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules for activation and regulation of adaptive immunity, we determined whether cytokines induce increased expression of specific co-signaling molecules on human neutrophils. We report here that circulating human neutrophils express co-inhibitory molecules such as immunoglobulin–like transcript (ILT) 4 and 5, and also comparatively low and highly variable levels of ILT2 and 3, but the expression of these ILTs was not significantly changed by cytokine treatment. In contrast, we demonstrate for the first time that human peripheral blood neutrophils, although do not express the co-inhibitory molecule, programmed death ligand (PD-L) 1 on their surface, can express this molecule at moderate levels following cytokine exposure. Although moderate PD-L1 levels on healthy volunteers’ neutrophils were not inhibitory to T cells, our findings do not exclude a possible robust increase in neutrophil PD-L1 expression in pathological conditions with immunosuppressive functions. These results suggest a possible immunoregulatory role for human neutrophils in adaptive immunity. PMID:20123111

  14. Inducing a Concurrent Motor Load Reduces Categorization Precision for Facial Expressions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Motor theories of expression perception posit that observers simulate facial expressions within their own motor system, aiding perception and interpretation. Consistent with this view, reports have suggested that blocking facial mimicry induces expression labeling errors and alters patterns of ratings. Crucially, however, it is unclear whether changes in labeling and rating behavior reflect genuine perceptual phenomena (e.g., greater internal noise associated with expression perception or interpretation) or are products of response bias. In an effort to advance this literature, the present study introduces a new psychophysical paradigm for investigating motor contributions to expression perception that overcomes some of the limitations inherent in simple labeling and rating tasks. Observers were asked to judge whether smiles drawn from a morph continuum were sincere or insincere, in the presence or absence of a motor load induced by the concurrent production of vowel sounds. Having confirmed that smile sincerity judgments depend on cues from both eye and mouth regions (Experiment 1), we demonstrated that vowel production reduces the precision with which smiles are categorized (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, we replicated this effect when observers were required to produce vowels, but not when they passively listened to the same vowel sounds. In Experiments 4 and 5, we found that gender categorizations, equated for difficulty, were unaffected by vowel production, irrespective of the presence of a smiling expression. These findings greatly advance our understanding of motor contributions to expression perception and represent a timely contribution in light of recent high-profile challenges to the existing evidence base. PMID:26618622

  15. Gene expression profiling of replicative and induced senescence.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Maggie; Kruger, Adele; Tainsky, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a cell cycle arrest accompanied by high expression of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors which counteract overactive growth signals, which serves as a tumor suppressive mechanism. Senescence can be a result of telomere shortening (natural or replicative senescence) or DNA damage resulting from exogenous stressors (induced senescence). Here, we performed gene expression profiling through RNA-seq of replicative senescence, adriamycin-induced senescence, H2O2-induced senescence, and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine-induced senescence in order to profile the pathways controlling various types of senescence. Overall, the pathways common to all 4 types of senescence were related to inflammation and the innate immune system. It was also evident that 5-aza-induced senescence mirrors natural replicative senescence due to telomere shortening. We also examined the prevalence of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) factors in the RNA-seq data, showing that it is a common characteristic of all 4 types of senescence. In addition, we could discriminate changes in gene expression due to quiescence during cellular senescence from those that were specific to senescence. PMID:25483067

  16. Salmonella induces prominent gene expression in the rat colon

    PubMed Central

    Rodenburg, Wendy; Keijer, Jaap; Kramer, Evelien; Roosing, Susanne; Vink, Carolien; Katan, Martijn B; van der Meer, Roelof; Bovee-Oudenhoven, Ingeborg MJ

    2007-01-01

    Background Salmonella enteritidis is suggested to translocate in the small intestine. In vivo it induces gene expression changes in the ileal mucosa and Peyer's patches. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary prebiotics fermented in colon suggests involvement of the colon as well. However, effects of Salmonella on colonic gene expression in vivo are largely unknown. We aimed to characterize time dependent Salmonella-induced changes of colonic mucosal gene expression in rats using whole genome microarrays. For this, rats were orally infected with Salmonella enteritidis to mimic a foodborne infection and colonic gene expression was determined at days 1, 3 and 6 post-infection (n = 8 rats per time-point). As fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) affect colonic physiology, we analyzed colonic mucosal gene expression of FOS-fed versus cellulose-fed rats infected with Salmonella in a separate experiment. Colonic mucosal samples were isolated at day 2 post-infection. Results Salmonella affected transport (e.g. Chloride channel calcium activated 6, H+/K+ transporting Atp-ase), antimicrobial defense (e.g. Lipopolysaccharide binding protein, Defensin 5 and phospholipase A2), inflammation (e.g. calprotectin), oxidative stress related genes (e.g. Dual oxidase 2 and Glutathione peroxidase 2) and Proteolysis (e.g. Ubiquitin D and Proteosome subunit beta type 9). Furthermore, Salmonella translocation increased serum IFNγ and many interferon-related genes in colonic mucosa. The gene most strongly induced by Salmonella infection was Pancreatitis Associated Protein (Pap), showing >100-fold induction at day 6 after oral infection. Results were confirmed by Q-PCR in individual rats. Stimulation of Salmonella translocation by dietary FOS was accompanied by enhancement of the Salmonella-induced mucosal processes, not by induction of other processes. Conclusion We conclude that the colon is a target tissue for Salmonella, considering the abundant changes in mucosal gene expression

  17. Inducible regulation of GDNF expression in human neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, ShuYan; Ren, Ping; Guan, YunQian; Zou, ChunLin; Fu, LinLin; Zhang, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) holds promises for treating neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) have proved to be a suitable cell delivery vehicle for the safe and efficient introduction of GDNF into the brain. In this study, we used hNSCs-infected with a lentivirus encoding GDNF and the hygromycin resistance gene as such vehicles. A modified tetracycline operator 7 (tetO7) was inserted into a region upstream of the EF1-α promoter to drive GDNF expression. After hygromycin selection, hNSCs were infected with a lentivirus encoding a KRAB-tetracycline repressor fusion protein (TTS). TTS bound to tetO7 and suppressed the expression of GDNF in hNSCs. Upon administration of doxycycline (Dox) the TTS-tetO7 complex separated and the expression of GDNF resumed. The hNSCs infected with GDNF expressed the neural stem cell specific markers, nestin and sox2, and exhibited no significant change in proliferation rate. However, the rate of apoptosis in hNSCs expressing GDNF was lower compared with normal NSCs in response to actinomycin treatment. Furthermore, a higher percentage of Tuj-1 positive cells were obtained from GDNF-producing NSCs under conditions that induced differentiation compared to control NSCs. The inducible expression of GDNF in hNSCs may provide a system for the controllable delivery of GDNF in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23269553

  18. Tanshinone IIA Induces Heme Oxygenase 1 Expression and Inhibits Cyclic Strain-Induced Interleukin 8 Expression in Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Shaowei; Cheng, Tzu-Hurng; Shih, Nang-Lang; Liu, Ju-Chi; Chen, Jin-Jer; Hong, Hong-Jye; Chan, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Tanshinone IIA is the main effective component of Salvia miltiorrhiza, known as "Danshen," which has been used in many therapeutic remedies in traditional Chinese medicine. However, the direct effects of tanshinone IIA on vascular endothelial cells have not yet been fully described. In the present study, we demonstrated that tanshinone IIA increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Western blot analyses and experiments with specific inhibitors indicated tanshinone IIA enhanced HO-1 expression through the activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and the subsequent induction of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) nuclear translocation. In addition, tanshinone IIA inhibited cyclic strain induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression. HO-1 silencing significantly abrogated the repressive effects of tanshinone IIA on strain-induced IL-8 expression, which suggests HO-1 has a role in mediating the effects of tanshinone IIA. This study reports for the first time that tanshinone IIA inhibits cyclic strain-induced IL-8 expression via the induction of HO-1 in endothelial cells, providing valuable new insight into the molecular pathways that may contribute to the effects of tanshinone IIA. PMID:27080946

  19. Talk radio as the soundtrack of our lives: Participatory HIV/AIDS communication, public self-expression and Positive Talk.

    PubMed

    Burger, Mariekie

    2015-01-01

    article explores a wider range of participatory principles and the potential workings of these in an internally initiated communication initiative aimed at addressing the epidemic. More specifically, this article investigates ways in which radio listeners experience the reality broadcast genre--the talk radio show, Positive Talk--as participatory communication. Positive Talk is not an externally initiated project, as it is not part of a pre-planned, goal-oriented project that is owned and controlled outside the target community. In contrast, it has been initiated by Criselda Kananda, an individual not linked to any of the existing initiatives outside the community. She started the show to earn a living. She became a well-known person, is fairly knowledgeable in the field and was granted this opportunity as she is HIV-positive. In order to investigate how radio listeners use the show to engage in HIV/AIDS communication, 20 in-depth interviews were held with avid listeners of the show. The respondents indicated that they appreciate ordinary people phoning in. When expressing their opinions about the show, they found Kananda's life story credible, believed her public and private life to be congruent, valued Kananda's personality and respectful manner and could identify with the views expressed. In the article, it is argued that these ideas are largely in line with the principles of participatory communication tied to democracy, the participatory turn, the ordinary, validation of identity and respectful dialogue. Although the findings of this qualitative study cannot be generalised to the whole listening population of the show, they indicate that it is worth investigating the value of communication initiatives that emerge spontaneously from communities (instead of those strategically engineered from outside the general population) as a future direction of HIV/AIDS communication in the country. PMID:26700267

  20. Mechanical stretch induces lung α-epithelial Na(+) channel expression.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Isaac, John; Seidner, Steven R; Dixon, Patricia S; Henson, Barbara M; DiGeronimo, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT During fetal development physiological stretching helps drive lung growth and maturation. At birth, the α-subunit of the alveolar epithelial sodium channel (α-ENaC) is a critical factor in helping to facilitate clearance of lung fluid during the perinatal period. The effects of stretch, however, on α-ENaC expression in the fetal lung have yet to be elucidated. In an effort to explore this question, we used both an in vitro cell culture model that exposes cells to repetitive cyclic stretch (CS) as well as an in vivo preterm animal model of mechanical ventilation (MV). We found that murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells exposed to repetitive CS showed a significant rise in α-ENaC mRNA expression. Total and cell-surface protein abundance of α-ENaC were also elevated after 24 h of CS. Stretch-induced increases in α-ENaC expression were suppressed in the presence of either actinomycin D or cycloheximide. Pharmacological inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) did not attenuate stretch-induced increases in α-ENaC protein, whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK or c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) did. In 29-day preterm rabbits, alveolar stretching secondary to postnatal MV markedly elevated fetal lung α-ENaC expression compared to spontaneously breathing counterparts. In summary, our findings indicate that mechanical stretch promotes α-ENaC expression. PMID:25058750

  1. Does expressed acceptance reflect genuine attitudes? A bogus pipeline study of the effects of mortality salience on acceptance of a person with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Grover, Kristin W; Miller, Carol T

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined whether expressed acceptance of a person with AIDS reflects genuine acceptance or a desire to appear to be accepting. Theory and research on the effects of mortality salience on acceptance of stigmatized people provided the framework for investigating this question. After writing about death or another aversive topic, participants indicated their acceptance of a target with AIDS while connected to physiological equipment that they believed could detect lies (bogus pipeline) or was simply measuring physiological responses to participation in the study. As predicted, participants in the mortality salience/bogus pipeline condition indicated significantly less acceptance of the target with AIDS than participants in the other three conditions, suggesting that acceptance of a person with AIDS is at least partially a result of wanting to appear to be accepting, without necessarily genuinely accepting someone with AIDS. PMID:22468415

  2. Gas-inducible product gene expression in bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wilfried; Rimann, Markus; de Glutz, François-Nicolas; Weber, Eric; Memmert, Klaus; Fussenegger, Martin

    2005-05-01

    Inducible transgene expression technologies are of unmatched potential for biopharmaceutical manufacturing of unstable, growth-impairing and cytotoxic proteins as well as conditional metabolic engineering to improve desired cell phenotypes. Currently available transgene dosing modalities which rely on physical parameters or small-molecule drugs for transgene fine-tuning compromise downstream processing and/or are difficult to implement technologically. The recently designed gas-inducible acetaldehyde-inducible regulation (AIR) technology takes advantage of gaseous acetaldehyde to modulate product gene expression levels. At regulation effective concentrations gaseous acetaldehyde is physiologically inert and approved as food additive by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA). During standard bioreactor operation, gaseous acetaldehyde could simply be administered using standard/existing gas supply tubing and eventually eliminated by stripping with inducer-free air. We have determined key parameters controlling acetaldehyde transfer in three types of bioreactors and designed a mass balance-based model for optimal product gene expression fine-tuning using gaseous acetaldehyde. Operating a standard stirred-tank bioreactor set-up at 10 L scale we have validated AIR technology using CHO-K1-derived serum-free suspension cultures transgenic for gas-inducible production of human interferon-beta (IFN-beta). Gaseous acetaldehyde-inducible IFN-beta production management was fully reversible while maintaining cell viability at over 95% during the entire process. Compatible with standard bioreactor design and downstream processing procedures AIR-based technology will foster novel opportunities for pilot and large-scale manufacturing of difficult-to-produce protein pharmaceuticals. PMID:15885616

  3. Highly potent, synthetically accessible prostratin analogs induce latent HIV expression in vitro and ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Beans, Elizabeth J.; Fournogerakis, Dennis; Gauntlett, Carolyn; Heumann, Lars V.; Kramer, Rainer; Marsden, Matthew D.; Murray, Danielle; Zack, Jerome A.; Wender, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) decreases plasma viremia below the limits of detection in the majority of HIV-infected individuals, thus serving to slow disease progression. However, HAART targets only actively replicating virus and is unable to eliminate latently infected, resting CD4+ T cells. Such infected cells are potentially capable of reinitiating virus replication upon cessation of HAART, thus leading to viral rebound. Agents that would eliminate these reservoirs, when used in combination with HAART, could thus provide a strategy for the eradication of HIV. Prostratin is a preclinical candidate that induces HIV expression from latently infected CD4+ T cells, potentially leading to their elimination through a virus-induced cytopathic effect or host anti-HIV immunity. Here, we report the synthesis of a series of designed prostratin analogs and report in vitro and ex vivo studies of their activity relevant to induction of HIV expression. Members of this series are up to 100-fold more potent than the preclinical lead (prostratin) in binding to cell-free PKC, and in inducing HIV expression in a latently infected cell line and prostratin-like modulation of cell surface receptor expression in primary cells from HIV-negative donors. Significantly, selected members were also tested for HIV induction in resting CD4+ T cells isolated from infected individuals receiving HAART and were found to exhibit potent induction activity. These more potent agents and by extension related tunable analogs now accessible through the studies described herein should facilitate research and preclinical advancement of this strategy for HIV/AIDS eradication. PMID:23812750

  4. Fatigue Hardening Behavior of 1.5 GPa Grade Transformation-Induced Plasticity-Aided Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Koh-Ichi; Hojo, Tomohiko

    2016-04-01

    Low cycle fatigue hardening/softening behavior of a 0.2 pct C-1.5 pct Si-1.5 pct Mn-1.0 pct Cr-0.2 pct Mo-0.05 pct Nb transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP)-aided steel consisting of a wide lath martensite structure matrix and a narrow lath martensite-metastable retained austenite mixture was investigated. The steel exhibited notable fatigue hardening in the same way as TRIP-aided bainitic ferrite steel, although conventional martensitic steel such as SCM420 steel with the same tensile strength exhibited fatigue softening. The considerable fatigue hardening of this steel is believed to be associated mainly with the compressive internal stress that results from a difference in flow stress between the matrix and the martensite-austenite-like phase, with a small contribution from the strain-induced transformation and dislocation hardenings.

  5. Microarray studies of psychostimulant-induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Yuferov, Vadim; Nielsen, David; Butelman, Eduardo; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2005-03-01

    Alterations in the expression of multiple genes in many brain regions are likely to contribute to psychostimulant-induced behaviours. Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for the simultaneous interrogation of gene expression levels of a large number of genes. Several recent experimental studies, reviewed here, demonstrate the power, limitations and progress of microarray technology in the field of psychostimulant addiction. These studies vary in the paradigms of cocaine or amphetamine administration, drug doses, route and also mode of administration, duration of treatment, animal species, brain regions studied and time of tissue collection after final drug administration. The studies also utilize different microarray platforms and statistical techniques for analysis of differentially expressed genes. These variables influence substantially the results of these studies. It is clear that current microarray techniques cannot detect small changes reliably in gene expression of genes with low expression levels, including functionally significant changes in components of major neurotransmission systems such as glutamate, dopamine, opioid and GABA receptors, especially those that may occur after chronic drug administration or drug withdrawal. However, the microarray studies reviewed here showed cocaine- or amphetamine-induced alterations in the expression of numerous genes involved in the modulation of neuronal growth, cytoskeletal structures, synaptogenesis, signal transduction, apoptosis and cell metabolism. Application of laser capture microdissection and single-cell cDNA amplification may greatly enhance microarray studies of gene expression profiling. The combination of rapidly evolving microarray technology with established methods of neuroscience, molecular biology and genetics, as well as appropriate behavioural models of drug reinforcement, may provide a productive approach for delineating the neurobiological underpinnings of drug responses that lead to

  6. Controlled expression of functional miR-122 with a ligand inducible expression system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To study the biological function of miRNAs, and to achieve sustained or conditional gene silencing with siRNAs, systems that allow controlled expression of these small RNAs are desirable. Methods for cell delivery of siRNAs include transient transfection of synthetic siRNAs and expression of siRNAs in the form of short hairpins using constitutive RNA polymerase III promoters. Systems employing constitutive RNA polymerase II promoters have been used to express miRNAs. However, for many experimental systems these methods do not offer sufficient control over expression. Results We present an inducible mammalian expression system that allows for the conditional expression of short hairpin RNAs that are processed in vivo to generate miRNAs or siRNAs. Using modified nuclear receptors in a two hybrid format and a synthetic ligand, the Rheoswitch system allows rapid and reversible induction of mRNA expression. We evaluated the system's properties using miR-122 as a model miRNA. A short hairpin encoding miR-122 cloned into the expression vector was correctly processed to yield mature miRNA upon induction with ligand and the amount of miRNA produced was commensurate with the concentration of ligand. miR-122 produced in this way was capable of silencing both endogenous target genes and appropriately designed reporter genes. Stable cell lines were obtained, resulting in heritable, consistent and reversible expression of miR-122, a significant advantage over transient transfection. Based on these results, obtained with a microRNA we adapted the method to produce a desired siRNA by designing short hairpins that can be accurately and efficiently processed. Conclusion We established an Inducible expression system with a miR-122 backbone that can be used for functional studies of miRNAs and their targets, in heterologous cells that do not normally express the miRNA. Additionally we demonstrate the feasibility of using the miR-122 backbone to express shRNA with a desired

  7. iAID: an improved auxin-inducible degron system for the construction of a 'tight' conditional mutant in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Seiji; Miyazawa-Onami, Mayumi; Iida, Tetsushi; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Isolation of a 'tight' conditional mutant of a gene of interest is an effective way of studying the functions of essential genes. Strategies that use ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation to eliminate the product of a gene of interest, such as heat-inducible degron (td) and auxin-inducible degron (AID), are powerful methods for constructing conditional mutants. However, these methods do not work with some genes. Here, we describe an improved AID system (iAID) for isolating tight conditional mutants in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this method, transcriptional repression by the 'Tet-OFF' promoter is combined with proteolytic elimination of the target protein by the AID system. To provide examples, we describe the construction of tight mutants of the replication factors Dpb11 and Mcm10, dpb11-iAID, and mcm10-iAID. Because Dpb11 and Mcm10 are required for the initiation of DNA replication, their tight mutants are unable to enter S phase. This is the case for dpb11-iAID and mcm10-iAID cells after the addition of tetracycline and auxin. Both the 'Tet-OFF' promoter and the AID system have been shown to work in model eukaryotes other than budding yeast. Therefore, the iAID system is not only useful in budding yeast, but also can be applied to other model systems to isolate tight conditional mutants. PMID:26081484

  8. Insulin decreases atherosclerosis by inducing endothelin receptor B expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoungmin; Mima, Akira; Li, Qian; Rask-Madsen, Christian; He, Pingnian; Mizutani, Koji; Katagiri, Sayaka; Maeda, Yasutaka; Wu, I-Hsien; Khamaisi, Mogher; Preil, Simone Rordam; Maddaloni, Ernesto; Sørensen, Ditte; Rasmussen, Lars Melholt; Huang, Paul L.; King, George L.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) insulin resistance and dysfunction, caused by diabetes, accelerates atherosclerosis. It is unknown whether specifically enhancing EC-targeted insulin action can decrease atherosclerosis in diabetes. Accordingly, overexpressing insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) in the endothelia of Apoe−/− mice (Irs1/Apoe−/−) increased insulin signaling and function in the aorta. Atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in Irs1/ApoE−/− mice on diet-induced hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia. The mechanism of insulin’s enhanced antiatherogenic actions in EC was related to remarkable induction of NO action, which increases endothelin receptor B (EDNRB) expression and intracellular [Ca2+]. Using the mice with knockin mutation of eNOS, which had Ser1176 mutated to alanine (AKI), deleting the only known mechanism for insulin to activate eNOS/NO pathway, we observed that IRS1 overexpression in the endothelia of Aki/ApoE−/− mice significantly decreased atherosclerosis. Interestingly, endothelial EDNRB expression was selectively reduced in intima of arteries from diabetic patients and rodents. However, endothelial EDNRB expression was upregulated by insulin via P13K/Akt pathway. Finally EDNRB deletion in EC of Ldlr−/− and Irs1/Ldlr−/− mice decreased NO production and accelerated atherosclerosis, compared with Ldlr−/− mice. Accelerated atherosclerosis in diabetes may be reduced by improving insulin signaling selectively via IRS1/Akt in the EC by inducing EDNRB expression and NO production. PMID:27200419

  9. AID downregulation is a novel function of the DNMT inhibitor 5-aza-deoxycytidine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chiou-Tsun; Yang, Pei-Ming; Chern, Ting-Rong; Chuang, Shu-Hui; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Klemm, Lars; Müschen, Markus; Chen, Ching-Chow

    2014-01-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) was originally identified as an inducer of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) in immunoglobulin genes. However, AID can also cause mutations in host genes and contribute to cancer progression and drug resistance. In this study, molecular docking showed the interaction of free 5-aza-CdR and Zebularine (Zeb) with AID. However, only 5-aza-CdR-incorporated ssDNA bound to the active site of AID and inhibited AID expression through proteasomal degradation. 5-aza-CdR demonstrated cytotoxicity against AID-positive and -negative hematopoietic cancer cells. In contrast, Zeb exhibited a cytotoxic effect only in AID-negative cells due to its inability to inhibit AID expression. This differential effect might be due to the DNMT1 stabilization induced by AID, thus restricting the ability of Zeb to deplete DNMT1 and induce tumor suppressor genes (TSGs), such as p21, in AID-positive cells. Moreover, the in vivo anticancer effect of 5-aza-CdR but not Zeb in AID-positive hematopoietic cancer cells was demonstrated. The study not only displays the association of AID and DNMT1 and identifies a novel biological function of AID, but also provides novel information regarding the use of DNMT inhibitors to treat AID-positive hematopoietic cancers. PMID:24457556

  10. Hypergravity-induced changes in gene expression in Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, R.; Soga, K.; Wakabayashi, K.; Takeba, G.; Hoson, T.

    2003-05-01

    Under hypergravity conditions, the cell wall of stem organs becomes mechanically rigid and elongation growth is suppressed, which can be recognized as the mechanism for plants to resist gravitational force. The changes in gene expression by hypergravity treatment were analyzed in Arabidopsis hypocotyls by the differential display method, for identifying genes involved in hypergravity-induced growth suppression. Sixty-two cDNA clones were expressed differentially between the control and 300 g conditions: the expression levels of 39 clones increased, whereas those of 23 clones decreased under hypergravity conditions. Sequence analysis and database searching revealed that 12 clones, 9 up-regulated and 3 down-regulated, have homology to known proteins. The expression of these genes was further analyzed using RT-PCR. Finally, six genes were confirmed to be up-regulated by hypergravity. One of such genes encoded 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), which catalyzes a reaction producing mevalonic acid, a key precursor ofterpenoids such as membrane sterols and several types of hormones. The expression of HMGR gene increased within several hours after hypergravity treatment. Also, compactin, an inhibitor of HMGR, prevented hypergravity-induced growth suppression, suggesting that HMGR is involved in suppression of Arabidopsis hypocotyl growth by hypergravity. In addition, hypergravity increased the expression levels of genes encoding CCR1 and ERD15, which were shown to take part in the signaling pathway of environmental stimuli such as temperature and water, and those of the α-tubulin gene. These genes may be involved in a series of cellular events leading to growth suppression of stem organs under hypergravity conditions.

  11. Facial Expression Recognition: Can Preschoolers with Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids Catch It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yifang; Su, Yanjie; Fang, Ping; Zhou, Qingxia

    2011-01-01

    Tager-Flusberg and Sullivan (2000) presented a cognitive model of theory of mind (ToM), in which they thought ToM included two components--a social-perceptual component and a social-cognitive component. Facial expression recognition (FER) is an ability tapping the social-perceptual component. Previous findings suggested that normal hearing…

  12. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  13. Gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 expression counteracts its actions by inducing tumor neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa; Li, Ying-Yi; Furukawa, Kaoru; Tanabe, Yamato; Matsugo, Seiichi; Sasaki, Soichiro; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2015-03-06

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are frequently complicated with metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors, and consequently need chemotherapy. Gemcitabine is commonly used for PDAC treatment, but with limited efficacy. The capacity of gemcitabine to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human pancreatic cancer cells, prompted us to examine its effects on the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We observed that gemcitabine enhanced selectively the expression of CXCL8 in human pancreatic cancer cells through ROS generation and NF-κB activation. In vitro blocking of CXCL8 failed to modulate gemcitabine-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression in pancreatic cancer cells in xenografted tumor tissues. Moreover, anti-CXCL8 antibody treatment in vivo attenuated tumor formation as well as intra-tumoral vascularity in nude mice, which were transplanted with Miapaca-2 cells and treated with gemcitabine. Thus, gemcitabine-induced CXCL8 may counteract the drug through inducing neovascularization. - Highlights: • Gemcitabine induced CXCL8 expression in human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 expression required ROS generation and NF-κB activation. • CXCL8 did not affect in vitro proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells. • CXCL8 in vivo counteracted gemcitabine by inducing neovascularization.

  14. Co-expression analysis of differentially expressed genes in hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingfeng; Zhao, Chang; Ou, Shengqiu; Meng, Zhibin; Kang, Ping; Fan, Liwei; Qi, Feng; Ma, Yilong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the expression profiles of HCV-infected Huh7 cells at different time points. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified with the Samr package in R software once the data were normalized. Functional and pathway enrichment analysis of the identified DEGs was also performed. Subsequently, MCODE in Cytoscape software was applied to conduct module analysis of the constructed co-expression networks. A total of 1,100 DEGs were identified between the HCV-infected and control samples at 12, 18, 24 and 48 h post-infection. DEGs at 24 and 48 h were involved in the same signaling pathways and biological processes, including sterol biosynthetic processes and tRNA amino-acylation. There were 22 time series genes which were clustered into 3 expression patterns, and the demarcation point of the 2 expression patterns that 401 overlapping DEGs at 24 and 48 h clustered into was 24 h post-infection. tRNA synthesis-related biological processes emerged at 24 and 48 h. Replication and assembly of HCV in HCV-infected Huh7 cells occurred mainly at 24 h post-infection. In view of this, the screened time series genes have the potential to become candidate target molecules for monitoring, diagnosing and treating HCV-induced HCC. PMID:25339452

  15. Co-expression analysis of differentially expressed genes in hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SONG, QINGFENG; ZHAO, CHANG; OU, SHENGQIU; MENG, ZHIBIN; KANG, PING; FAN, LIWEI; QI, FENG; MA, YILONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatitis C virus (HCV)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) using the expression profiles of HCV-infected Huh7 cells at different time points. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified with the Samr package in R software once the data were normalized. Functional and pathway enrichment analysis of the identified DEGs was also performed. Subsequently, MCODE in Cytoscape software was applied to conduct module analysis of the constructed co-expression networks. A total of 1,100 DEGs were identified between the HCV-infected and control samples at 12, 18, 24 and 48 h post-infection. DEGs at 24 and 48 h were involved in the same signaling pathways and biological processes, including sterol biosynthetic processes and tRNA amino-acylation. There were 22 time series genes which were clustered into 3 expression patterns, and the demarcation point of the 2 expression patterns that 401 overlapping DEGs at 24 and 48 h clustered into was 24 h post-infection. tRNA synthesis-related biological processes emerged at 24 and 48 h. Replication and assembly of HCV in HCV-infected Huh7 cells occurred mainly at 24 h post-infection. In view of this, the screened time series genes have the potential to become candidate target molecules for monitoring, diagnosing and treating HCV-induced HCC. PMID:25339452

  16. Characterization of Chemically Induced Liver Injuries Using Gene Co-Expression Modules

    PubMed Central

    Tawa, Gregory J.; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M.; Yu, Xueping; Kumar, Kamal; Ippolito, Danielle L.; Lewis, John A.; Stallings, Jonathan D.; Wallqvist, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Liver injuries due to ingestion or exposure to chemicals and industrial toxicants pose a serious health risk that may be hard to assess due to a lack of non-invasive diagnostic tests. Mapping chemical injuries to organ-specific damage and clinical outcomes via biomarkers or biomarker panels will provide the foundation for highly specific and robust diagnostic tests. Here, we have used DrugMatrix, a toxicogenomics database containing organ-specific gene expression data matched to dose-dependent chemical exposures and adverse clinical pathology assessments in Sprague Dawley rats, to identify groups of co-expressed genes (modules) specific to injury endpoints in the liver. We identified 78 such gene co-expression modules associated with 25 diverse injury endpoints categorized from clinical pathology, organ weight changes, and histopathology. Using gene expression data associated with an injury condition, we showed that these modules exhibited different patterns of activation characteristic of each injury. We further showed that specific module genes mapped to 1) known biochemical pathways associated with liver injuries and 2) clinically used diagnostic tests for liver fibrosis. As such, the gene modules have characteristics of both generalized and specific toxic response pathways. Using these results, we proposed three gene signature sets characteristic of liver fibrosis, steatosis, and general liver injury based on genes from the co-expression modules. Out of all 92 identified genes, 18 (20%) genes have well-documented relationships with liver disease, whereas the rest are novel and have not previously been associated with liver disease. In conclusion, identifying gene co-expression modules associated with chemically induced liver injuries aids in generating testable hypotheses and has the potential to identify putative biomarkers of adverse health effects. PMID:25226513

  17. Induction of fibroblast apolipoprotein E expression during apoptosis, starvation-induced growth arrest and mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Carmel M; Kågedal, Katarina; Terman, Alexei; Stroikin, Uri; Brunk, Ulf T; Jessup, Wendy; Garner, Brett

    2004-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) mediates the hepatic clearance of plasma lipoproteins, facilitates cholesterol efflux from macrophages and aids neuronal lipid transport. ApoE is expressed at high levels in hepatocytes, macrophages and astrocytes. In the present study, we identify nuclear and cytosolic pools of apoE in human fibroblasts. Fibroblast apoE mRNA and protein levels were up-regulated during staurosporine-induced apoptosis and this was correlated with increased caspase-3 activity and apoptotic morphological alterations. Because the transcription of apoE and specific pro-apoptotic genes is regulated by the nuclear receptor LXR (liver X receptor) alpha, we analysed LXRalpha mRNA expression by quantitative real-time PCR and found it to be increased before apoE mRNA induction. The expression of ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) mRNA, which is also regulated by LXRalpha, was increased in parallel with apoE mRNA, indicating that LXRalpha probably promotes apoE and ABCA1 transcription during apoptosis. Fibroblast apoE levels were increased under conditions of serum-starvation-induced growth arrest and hyperoxia-induced senescence. In both cases, an increased nuclear apoE level was observed, particularly in cells that accumulated lipofuscin. Nuclear apoE was translocated to the cytosol when mitotic nuclear disassembly occurred and this was associated with an increase in total cellular apoE levels. ApoE amino acid sequence analysis indicated several potential sites for phosphorylation. In vivo studies, using 32P-labelling and immunoprecipitation, revealed that fibroblast apoE can be phosphorylated. These studies reveal novel associations and potential roles for apoE in fundamental cellular processes. PMID:14656220

  18. AIDing cancer treatment: Reducing AID activity via HSP90 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rebhandl, Stefan; Geisberger, Roland

    2015-08-01

    The activation induced deaminase (AID) catalyses the two key events underlying humoral adaptive immunity: class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation of antibody genes in B lymphocytes. AID accomplishes this task by directly deaminating cytosines within the genomic immunoglobulin locus, thereby triggering a complex mutagenic process eventually leading to improved effector function of antibodies. However, it has long been noticed that AID can be aberrantly expressed in cancer and that its activity is not absolutely restricted to antibody genes, as substantial genome-wide off-target mutations have been observed, which contribute to tumorigenesis and clonal evolution of AID-expressing malignancies. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Montamat-Sicotte et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 2365-2376] investigate the feasibility and efficacy of in vivo inhibition of AID with HSP90 inhibitors in a mouse model of B-cell leukemia and in vitro with a human breast cancer cell line, thereby demonstrating that cancer patients may benefit from preventing noncanonical AID functions. PMID:26151367

  19. Expression of GADS enhances FLT3-induced mitogenic signaling.

    PubMed

    Chougule, Rohit A; Cordero, Eugenia; Moharram, Sausan A; Pietras, Kristian; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U

    2016-03-22

    GADS is a member of a family of SH2 and SH3 domain-containing adaptors that functions in tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling cascades. Its expression is largely restricted to hematopoietic tissues and cell lines. Therefore, GADS is mainly involved in leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase signaling. GADS is known to interact with tyrosine-phosphorylated SHC, BCR-ABL and KIT. The SH2 domain of GADS has a similar binding specificity to that of GRB2 but its SH3 domain displays a different binding specificity, and thus it is involved in other downstream signaling pathways than GRB2. In the present study, we examined the role of GADS in FLT3 signaling. FLT3 is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, which is mutated in more than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the most common mutations is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations. We observed that expression of GADS enhanced oncogenic FLT3-ITD-induced cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. In a mouse xenograft model, GADS accelerated FLT3-ITD-dependent tumor formation. Furthermore, expression of GADS induced a transcriptional program leading to upregulation of MYC and mTORC1 target genes. GADS localizes to the cell membrane and strongly binds to ligand-stimulated wild-type FLT3 or is constitutively associated with the oncogenic mutant FLT3-ITD. We mapped the binding sites in FLT3 to pY955 and pY969 which overlaps with the GRB2 binding sites. Expression of GADS enhanced FLT3-mediated phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, p38 and STAT5. Taken together, our data suggests that GADS is an important downstream component of FLT3 signaling and expression of GADS potentiates FLT3-mediated mitogenic signaling. PMID:26895103

  20. Expression of GADS enhances FLT3-induced mitogenic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chougule, Rohit A.; Cordero, Eugenia; Moharram, Sausan A.; Pietras, Kristian; Rönnstrand, Lars; Kazi, Julhash U.

    2016-01-01

    GADS is a member of a family of SH2 and SH3 domain-containing adaptors that functions in tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling cascades. Its expression is largely restricted to hematopoietic tissues and cell lines. Therefore, GADS is mainly involved in leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase signaling. GADS is known to interact with tyrosine-phosphorylated SHC, BCR-ABL and KIT. The SH2 domain of GADS has a similar binding specificity to that of GRB2 but its SH3 domain displays a different binding specificity, and thus it is involved in other downstream signaling pathways than GRB2. In the present study, we examined the role of GADS in FLT3 signaling. FLT3 is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, which is mutated in more than 30% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the most common mutations is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations. We observed that expression of GADS enhanced oncogenic FLT3-ITD-induced cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. In a mouse xenograft model, GADS accelerated FLT3-ITD-dependent tumor formation. Furthermore, expression of GADS induced a transcriptional program leading to upregulation of MYC and mTORC1 target genes. GADS localizes to the cell membrane and strongly binds to ligand-stimulated wild-type FLT3 or is constitutively associated with the oncogenic mutant FLT3-ITD. We mapped the binding sites in FLT3 to pY955 and pY969 which overlaps with the GRB2 binding sites. Expression of GADS enhanced FLT3-mediated phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, p38 and STAT5. Taken together, our data suggests that GADS is an important downstream component of FLT3 signaling and expression of GADS potentiates FLT3-mediated mitogenic signaling. PMID:26895103

  1. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M. ); Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R. )

    1993-01-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following [gamma]-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of [beta]-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following [gamma]-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not [gamma]-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to [gamma] rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  2. Low doses of neutrons induce changes in gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Panozzo, J.; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Studies were designed to identify genes induced following low-dose neutron but not following {gamma}-ray exposure in fibroblasts. Our past work had shown differences in the expression of {beta}-protein kinase C and c-fos genes, both being induced following {gamma}-ray but not neutron exposure. We have identified two genes that are induced following neutron, but not {gamma}-ray, exposure: Rp-8 (a gene induced by apoptosis) and the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the human immunodeficiency (HIV). Rp-8 mRNA induction was demonstrated in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts and was found to be induced in cells exposed to neutrons administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) and at high dose rate (12 cGy/min). The induction of transcription from the LTR of HIV was demonstrated in HeLa cells bearing a transfected construct of the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene driven by the HIV-LTR promoter. Measures of CAT activity and CAT transcripts following irradiation demonstrated an unresponsiveness to {gamma} rays over a broad range of doses. Twofold induction of the HIV-LTR was detected following neutron exposure (48 cGy) administered at low (0.5 cGy/min) but not high (12 cGy/min) dose rates. Ultraviolet-mediated HIV-LTR induction was inhibited by low-dose-rate neutron exposure.

  3. EGR-1 regulates Ho-1 expression induced by cigarette smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Huaqun; Wang, Lijuan; Gong, Tao; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Chunhua; Li, Fen; Wang, Li; Li, Chaojun

    2010-05-28

    As an anti-oxidant molecule, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been implicated in the protection of lung injury by cigarette smoke (CS). The mechanisms regulating its expression have not been defined. In this report, the role of early growth response 1 (EGR-1) in the regulation of Ho-1 expression was investigated. In C57BL/6 mice with CS exposure, HO-1 was greatly increased in bronchial epithelial cells and alveolar inflammatory cells. In primary cultured mouse lung fibroblasts and RAW264.7 cells exposed to cigarette smoke water extract (CSE), an increase in HO-1 protein level was detected. In addition, CSE induced HO-1 expression was decreased in Egr-1 deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (Egr-1{sup -/-} MEFs). Nuclear localization of EGR-1 was examined in mouse lung fibroblasts after exposure to CSE. Luciferase reporter activity assays showed that the enhancer region of the Ho-1 gene containing a proposed EGR-1 binding site was responsible for the induction of HO-1. A higher increase of alveolar mean linear intercept (Lm) was observed in lung tissues, and a larger increase in the number of total cells and monocytes/macrophages from bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was found in CS-exposed mice by loss of function of EGR-1 treatment. In summary, the present data demonstrate that EGR-1 plays a critical role in HO-1 production induced by CS.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide induces autotaxin expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Song; Zhang Junjie

    2009-01-09

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted enzyme with lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which converts lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive phospholipid involved in numerous biological activities, including cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration. In the present study, we found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a well-known initiator of the inflammatory response, induced ATX expression in monocytic THP-1 cells. The activation of PKR, JNK, and p38 MAPK was required for the ATX induction. The LPS-induced ATX in THP-1 cells was characterized as the {beta} isoform. In the presence of LPC, ATX could promote the migrations of THP-1 and Jurkat cells, which was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi-mediated LPA receptor signaling. In summary, LPS induces ATX expression in THP-1 cells via a PKR, JNK and p38 MAPK-mediated mechanism, and the ATX induction is likely to enhance immune cell migration in proinflammatory response by regulating LPA levels in the microenvironment.

  5. Regulation of somatic cell reprogramming through inducible mir-302 expression.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shi-Lung; Chang, Donald C; Lin, Chun-Hung; Ying, Shao-Yao; Leu, Davey; Wu, David T S

    2011-02-01

    Global demethylation is required for early zygote development to establish stem cell pluripotency, yet our findings reiterate this epigenetic reprogramming event in somatic cells through ectopic introduction of mir-302 function. Here, we report that induced mir-302 expression beyond 1.3-fold of the concentration in human embryonic stem (hES) H1 and H9 cells led to reprogramming of human hair follicle cells (hHFCs) to induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. This reprogramming mechanism functioned through mir-302-targeted co-suppression of four epigenetic regulators, AOF2 (also known as KDM1 or LSD1), AOF1, MECP1-p66 and MECP2. Silencing AOF2 also caused DNMT1 deficiency and further enhanced global demethylation during somatic cell reprogramming (SCR) of hHFCs. Re-supplementing AOF2 in iPS cells disrupted such global demethylation and induced cell differentiation. Given that both hES and iPS cells highly express mir-302, our findings suggest a novel link between zygotic reprogramming and SCR, providing a regulatory mechanism responsible for global demethylation in both events. As the mechanism of conventional iPS cell induction methods remains largely unknown, understanding this microRNA (miRNA)-mediated SCR mechanism may shed light on the improvements of iPS cell generation. PMID:20870751

  6. Elaboration of gene expression-based clinical decision aids for kidney transplantation: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    Brouard, Sophie; Giral, Magali; Soulillou, Jean-Paul; Ashton-Chess, Joanna

    2011-04-15

    Successful kidney transplant management throughout the graft lifespan depends on adequate diagnosis (i.e., recognition of a particular type of graft rejection or injury) and prognosis (i.e., predicting future events or outcome). The currently used methods (mainly graft histology, immunosuppressive drug level monitoring, measurement of renal function, and DSA) have proven highly useful on a population level by indicating good or bad outcome, but are difficult to translate into meaningful tests for individual patients. There is thus a need for diagnostic and predictive tests that add value by being more informative to each patient, more powerful, addressing more specific questions or providing less invasive interventions. Gene expression profiling using microarrays or quantitative PCR has become a benchmark in research into novel and informative monitoring assays for transplantation. A wealth of gene expression studies are reported in the literature spanning two decades. There is now a need for clinical validation so that such tests can become standardized and approved for widespread integration into the standard of care to improve outcome for kidney transplant recipients. PMID:21283062

  7. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  8. Insight into HIV of IFN-Induced Myxovirus Resistance 2 (MX2) Expressed by Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Tzu-Chieh; Lee, Wen-Yuan; Chen, Kuen-Bao; Chan, Yueh-Chiu

    2014-01-01

    Recently, an important topic of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had been published in 2013. In this report, the expression of the IFN-induced myxovirus resistance 2 (MX2) had been defined the function to kill the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The screening from the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) database by simulating molecular docking and molecular dynamics could select candidate compounds, which may express MX2 against HIV. Saussureamine C, Crotalaburnine, and Precatorine are selected based on the highest docking score and other TCM compounds. The data from molecular dynamics are helpful in the analysis and detection of protein-ligand interactions. According to the docking poses, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bond with structure variations, this research could assess the interaction between protein and ligand interaction. In addition to the detection of TCM compound efficacy, we suggest that Saussureamine C is better than the others in protein-ligand interaction and the structural variation to express MX2. PMID:25045710

  9. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is expressed in synovial fluid granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    CEDERGREN, J; FORSLUND 2, T; SUNDQVIST 2, T; SKOGH 1, T

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the NO-producing potential of synovial fluid (SF) cells. SF from 15 patients with arthritis was compared with blood from the same individuals and with blood from 10 healthy controls. Cellular expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was analysed by flow cytometry. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure l-arginine and l-citrulline. Nitrite and nitrate were measured colourimetrically utilizing the Griess’ reaction. Compared to whole blood granulocytes in patients with chronic arthritis, a prominent iNOS expression was observed in SF granulocytes (P < 0·001). A slight, but statistically significant, increase in iNOS expression was also recorded in lymphocytes and monocytes from SF. l-arginine was elevated in SF compared to serum (257 ± 78 versus 176 ± 65 µmol/l, P = 0·008), whereas a slight increase in l-citrulline (33 ± 11 versus 26 ± 9 µmol/l), did not reach statistical significance. Great variations but no significant differences were observed comparing serum and SF levels of nitrite and nitrate, respectively, although the sum of nitrite and nitrate tended to be elevated in SF (19·2 ± 20·7 versus 8·6 ± 6·5 µmol/l, P = 0·054). Synovial fluid leucocytes, in particular granulocytes, express iNOS and may thus contribute to intra-articular NO production in arthritis. PMID:12296866

  10. High magnetic field induced changes of gene expression in arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Anna-Lisa; Ferl, Robert J; Meisel, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    Background High magnetic fields are becoming increasingly prevalent components of non-invasive, biomedical imaging tools (such as MRI), thus, an understanding of the molecular impacts associated with these field strengths in biological systems is of central importance. The biological impact of magnetic field strengths up to 30 Tesla were investigated in this study through the use of transgenic Arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Methods Magnetic field induced Adh/GUS activity was evaluated with histochemical staining to assess tissue specific expression and distribution, and with quantitative, spectrofluometric assays to measure degree of activation. The evaluation of global changes in the Arabidopsis genome in response to exposure to high magnetic fields was facilitated with Affymetrix Gene Chip microarrays. Quantitative analyses of gene expression were performed with quantitative real-time polymerase-chain-reaction (qRT-PCR). Results Field strengths in excess of about 15 Tesla induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. From the microarray analyses that surveyed 8000 genes, 114 genes were differentially expressed to a degree greater than 2.5 fold over the control. These results were quantitatively corroborated by qRT-PCR examination of 4 of the 114 genes. Conclusion The data suggest that magnetic fields in excess of 15 Tesla have far-reaching effect on the genome. The wide-spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism, are prominent examples. The roles of magnetic field orientation of macromolecules and magnetophoretic effects are discussed as possible factors that contribute to the mounting of this response. PMID:17187667

  11. Strong Magnetic Field Induced Changes of Gene Expression in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, A.-L.; Ferl, R. J.; Klingenberg, B.; Brooks, J. S.; Morgan, A. N.; Yowtak, J.; Meisel, M. W.

    2005-07-01

    We review our studies of the biological impact of magnetic field strengths of up to 30 T on transgenic arabidopsis plants engineered with a stress response gene consisting of the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) gene promoter driving the β-glucuronidase (GUS) gene reporter. Field strengths in excess of 15 T induce expression of the Adh/GUS transgene in the roots and leaves. Microarray analyses indicate that such field strengths have a far reaching effect on the genome. Wide spread induction of stress-related genes and transcription factors, and a depression of genes associated with cell wall metabolism are prominent examples.

  12. B cell Rab7 mediates induction of activation-induced cytidine deaminase expression and class-switching in T-dependent and T-independent antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Pone, Egest J; Lam, Tonika; Lou, Zheng; Wang, Rui; Chen, Yuhui; Liu, Dongfang; Edinger, Aimee L; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    Class switch DNA recombination (CSR) is central to the maturation of the Ab response because it diversifies Ab effector functions. Like somatic hypermutation, CSR requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), whose expression is restricted to B cells, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR-BCR engagement (primary CSR-inducing stimuli). By constructing conditional knockout Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice, we identified a B cell-intrinsic role for Rab7, a small GTPase involved in intracellular membrane functions, in mediating AID induction and CSR. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) mice displayed normal B and T cell development and were deficient in Rab7 only in B cells undergoing Igh(C)γ(1-cre) Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1-cre transcription, as induced--like Igh germline Iγ1-Sγ1-Cγ1 and Iε-Sε-Cε transcription--by IL-4 in conjunction with a primary CSR-inducing stimulus. These mice could not mount T-independent or T-dependent class-switched IgG1 or IgE responses while maintaining normal IgM levels. Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells showed, in vivo and in vitro, normal proliferation and survival, normal Blimp-1 expression and plasma cell differentiation, as well as intact activation of the noncanonical NF-κB, p38 kinase, and ERK1/2 kinase pathways. They, however, were defective in AID expression and CSR in vivo and in vitro, as induced by CD40 engagement or dual TLR1/2-, TLR4-, TLR7-, or TLR9-BCR engagement. In Igh(+/C)γ(1-cre)Rab7(fl/fl) B cells, CSR was rescued by enforced AID expression. These findings, together with our demonstration that Rab7-mediated canonical NF-κB activation, as critical to AID induction, outline a novel role of Rab7 in signaling pathways that lead to AID expression and CSR, likely by promoting assembly of signaling complexes along intracellular membranes. PMID:25740947

  13. Hearing Aid-Induced Plasticity in the Auditory System of Older Adults: Evidence from Speech Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavie, Limor; Banai, Karen; Karni, Avi; Attias, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We tested whether using hearing aids can improve unaided performance in speech perception tasks in older adults with hearing impairment. Method: Unaided performance was evaluated in dichotic listening and speech-­in-­noise tests in 47 older adults with hearing impairment; 36 participants in 3 study groups were tested before hearing aid…

  14. PPR (pentatricopeptide repeat) proteins in mammals: important aids to mitochondrial gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, Robert N; Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Zofia M A

    2008-11-15

    Genes encoding PPR (pentatricopeptide repeat)-containing proteins constitute one of the largest gene families in plants. The majority of these proteins are predicted to target organelles and to bind to RNA. Strikingly, there is a dearth of these proteins in mammals, although genomic searches reveal six candidates, all of which are also predicted to target the mitochondrion. Two of these proteins, POLRMT (the mitochondrial RNA polymerase) and MRPS27, a mitoribosomal protein, are involved in transcription and translation respectively. PTCD1 (pentatricopeptide repeat domain protein 1) and PTCD3 are predicted to be involved in the assembly of respiratory chain complexes, whereas mutations in one other protein, LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat cassette), have been shown to cause defects in the levels of cytochrome c oxidase, the terminal member of the respiratory chain. In this issue of the Biochemical Journal, Xu et al. turn their attention to the remaining candidate, PTCD2. Depletion in a mouse model led to deficiencies of the third complex of the respiratory chain that caused profound ultrastructural changes in the heart. The exact molecular function of PTCD2 remains unclear, but depletion leads to an apparent lack of processing of the mitochondrial transcript encoding apocytochrome b, a critical member of complex III. These data are consistent with PTCD2 playing an important role in the post-transcriptional expression of the mitochondrial genome. PMID:18939947

  15. MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is regulated by butyrate induced epigenetic modulation of gene expression in bovine cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present evidence that butyrate induced histone acetylation regulates miRNA expression. MicroRNA expression microarray profiling revealed that 35 miRNA transcripts are significantly (p <0.05) differentially expressed after cells were treated with 10 mM butyrate. Among them, 11 transcripts are dif...

  16. Roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-06-01

    Some gene regulatory systems can exhibit bimodal distributions of mRNA or protein although the deterministic counterparts are monostable. This noise-induced bimodality is an interesting phenomenon and has important biological implications, but it is unclear how different sources of expression noise (each source creates so-called factorial noise that is defined as a component of the total noise) contribute separately to this stochastic bimodality. Here we consider a minimal model of gene regulation, which is monostable in the deterministic case. Although simple, this system contains factorial noise of two main kinds: promoter noise due to switching between gene states and transcriptional (or translational) noise due to synthesis and degradation of mRNA (or protein). To better trace the roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodality, we also analyze two limit models, continuous and adiabatic approximations, apart from the exact model. We show that in the case of slow gene switching, the continuous model where only promoter noise is considered can exhibit bimodality; in the case of fast switching, the adiabatic model where only transcriptional or translational noise is considered can also exhibit bimodality but the exact model cannot; and in other cases, both promoter noise and transcriptional or translational noise can cooperatively induce bimodality. Since slow gene switching and large protein copy numbers are characteristics of eukaryotic cells, whereas fast gene switching and small protein copy numbers are characteristics of prokaryotic cells, we infer that eukaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced mainly by promoter noise, whereas prokaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced primarily by transcriptional or translational noise. PMID:26172735

  17. Roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodal gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peijiang; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Huang, Lifang; Zhou, Tianshou

    2015-06-01

    Some gene regulatory systems can exhibit bimodal distributions of mRNA or protein although the deterministic counterparts are monostable. This noise-induced bimodality is an interesting phenomenon and has important biological implications, but it is unclear how different sources of expression noise (each source creates so-called factorial noise that is defined as a component of the total noise) contribute separately to this stochastic bimodality. Here we consider a minimal model of gene regulation, which is monostable in the deterministic case. Although simple, this system contains factorial noise of two main kinds: promoter noise due to switching between gene states and transcriptional (or translational) noise due to synthesis and degradation of mRNA (or protein). To better trace the roles of factorial noise in inducing bimodality, we also analyze two limit models, continuous and adiabatic approximations, apart from the exact model. We show that in the case of slow gene switching, the continuous model where only promoter noise is considered can exhibit bimodality; in the case of fast switching, the adiabatic model where only transcriptional or translational noise is considered can also exhibit bimodality but the exact model cannot; and in other cases, both promoter noise and transcriptional or translational noise can cooperatively induce bimodality. Since slow gene switching and large protein copy numbers are characteristics of eukaryotic cells, whereas fast gene switching and small protein copy numbers are characteristics of prokaryotic cells, we infer that eukaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced mainly by promoter noise, whereas prokaryotic stochastic bimodality is induced primarily by transcriptional or translational noise.

  18. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung

    SciTech Connect

    Gate, Laurent . E-mail: laurent.gate@inrs.fr; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Herve; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stephane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 {sup o}C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  19. UV radiation induces CXCL5 expression in human skin.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Olga; Kolbe, Ludger; Terstegen, Lara; Staeb, Franz; Wenck, Horst; Schmelz, Martin; Genth, Harald; Kaever, Volkhard; Roggenkamp, Dennis; Neufang, Gitta

    2015-04-01

    CXCL5 has recently been identified as a mediator of UVB-induced pain in rodents. To compare and to extend previous knowledge of cutaneous CXCL5 regulation, we performed a comprehensive study on the effects of UV radiation on CXCL5 regulation in human skin. Our results show a dose-dependent increase in CXCL5 protein in human skin after UV radiation. CXCL5 can be released by different cell types in the skin. We presumed that, in addition to immune cells, non-immune skin cells also contribute to UV-induced increase in CXCL5 protein. Analysis of monocultured dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes revealed that only fibroblasts but not keratinocytes displayed up regulated CXCL5 levels after UV stimulation. Whereas UV treatment of human skin equivalents, induced epidermal CXCL5 mRNA and protein expression. Up regulation of epidermal CXCL5 was independent of keratinocyte differentiation and keratinocyte-keratinocyte interactions in epidermal layers. Our findings provide first evidence on the release of CXCL5 in UV-radiated human skin and the essential role of fibroblast-keratinocyte interaction in the regulation of epidermal CXCL5. PMID:25690483

  20. Lentivirus infection in the brain induces matrix metalloproteinase expression: role of envelope diversity.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J B; Jiang, Y; van Marle, G; Mayne, M B; Ni, W; Holden, J; McArthur, J C; Power, C

    2000-08-01

    Infection of the brain by lentiviruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), causes inflammation and results in neurodegeneration. Molecular diversity within the lentivirus envelope gene has been implicated in the regulation of cell tropism and the host response to infection. Here, we examine the hypothesis that envelope sequence diversity modulates the expression of host molecules implicated in lentivirus-induced brain disease, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and related transcription factors. Infection of primary macrophages by chimeric HIV clones containing brain-derived envelope fragments from patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD) or nondemented AIDS patients (HIV-ND) showed that MMP-2 and -9 levels in conditioned media were significantly higher for the HAD clones. Similarly, STAT-1 and JAK-1 levels were higher in macrophages infected by HAD clones. Infections of primary feline macrophages by the neurovirulent FIV strain (V(1)CSF), the less neurovirulent strain (Petaluma), and a chimera containing the V(1)CSF envelope in a Petaluma background (FIV-Ch) revealed that MMP-2 and -9 levels were significantly higher in conditioned media from V(1)CSF- and FIV-Ch-infected macrophages, which was associated with increased intracellular STAT-1 and JAK-1 levels. The STAT-1 inhibitor fludarabine significantly reduced MMP-2 expression, but not MMP-9 expression, in FIV-infected macrophages. Analysis of MMP mRNA and protein levels in brain samples from HIV-infected persons or FIV-infected cats showed that MMP-2 and -9 levels were significantly increased in lentivirus-infected brains compared to those of uninfected controls. Elevated MMP expression was accompanied by significant increases in STAT-1 and JAK-1 mRNA and protein levels in the same brain samples. The present findings indicate that two lentiviruses, HIV and FIV, have common mechanisms of MMP-2 and -9 induction, which is modulated in part by envelope

  1. Inducible Expression of CXCL1 within the Central Nervous System Amplifies Viral-Induced Demyelination

    PubMed Central

    Marro, Brett S.; Grist, Jonathan J.

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of the ELR+ chemokine CXCL1 in host defense and disease following infection of the CNS with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) was examined. Mice in which expression of CXCL1 is under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter active within glial fibrillary acidic protein–positive cells were generated and this allowed for selectively increasing CNS expression of CXCL1 in response to JHMV infection and evaluating the effects on neuroinflammation, control of viral replication, and demyelination. Inducible expression of CNS-derived CXCL1 resulted in increased levels of CXCL1 protein within the serum, brain, and spinal cord that correlated with increased frequency of Ly6G+CD11b+ neutrophils present within the CNS. Elevated levels of CXCL1 did not influence the generation of virus-specific T cells, and there was no difference in control of JHMV replication compared with control mice, indicating that T cell infiltration into the CNS is CXCL1-independent. Sustained CXCL1 expression within the CNS resulted in increased mortality that correlated with elevated neutrophil infiltration, diminished numbers of mature oligodendrocytes, and an increase in the severity of demyelination. Neutrophil ablation in CXCL1-transgenic mice reduced the severity of demyelination in mice, arguing for a role for these cells in white matter damage. Collectively, these findings illustrate that sustained CXCL1 expression amplifies the severity of white matter damage and that neutrophils can contribute to this process in a model of viral-induced neurologic disease. PMID:26773148

  2. Inducible Expression of CXCL1 within the Central Nervous System Amplifies Viral-Induced Demyelination.

    PubMed

    Marro, Brett S; Grist, Jonathan J; Lane, Thomas E

    2016-02-15

    The functional role of the ELR(+) chemokine CXCL1 in host defense and disease following infection of the CNS with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) was examined. Mice in which expression of CXCL1 is under the control of a tetracycline-inducible promoter active within glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells were generated and this allowed for selectively increasing CNS expression of CXCL1 in response to JHMV infection and evaluating the effects on neuroinflammation, control of viral replication, and demyelination. Inducible expression of CNS-derived CXCL1 resulted in increased levels of CXCL1 protein within the serum, brain, and spinal cord that correlated with increased frequency of Ly6G(+)CD11b(+) neutrophils present within the CNS. Elevated levels of CXCL1 did not influence the generation of virus-specific T cells, and there was no difference in control of JHMV replication compared with control mice, indicating that T cell infiltration into the CNS is CXCL1-independent. Sustained CXCL1 expression within the CNS resulted in increased mortality that correlated with elevated neutrophil infiltration, diminished numbers of mature oligodendrocytes, and an increase in the severity of demyelination. Neutrophil ablation in CXCL1-transgenic mice reduced the severity of demyelination in mice, arguing for a role for these cells in white matter damage. Collectively, these findings illustrate that sustained CXCL1 expression amplifies the severity of white matter damage and that neutrophils can contribute to this process in a model of viral-induced neurologic disease. PMID:26773148

  3. Gene expression changes consistent with neuroAIDS and impaired working memory in HIV-1 transgenic rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A thorough investigation of the neurobiology of HIV-induced neuronal dysfunction and its evolving phenotype in the setting of viral suppression has been limited by the lack of validated small animal models to probe the effects of concomitant low level expression of multiple HIV-1 products in disease-relevant cells in the CNS. Results We report the results of gene expression profiling of the hippocampus of HIV-1 Tg rats, a rodent model of HIV infection in which multiple HIV-1 proteins are expressed under the control of the viral LTR promoter in disease-relevant cells including microglia and astrocytes. The Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) algorithm was used for pathway analysis. Gene expression changes observed are consistent with astrogliosis and microgliosis and include evidence of inflammation and cell proliferation. Among the genes with increased expression in HIV-1 Tg rats was the interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG-15), which was previously shown to be increased in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV patients and to correlate with neuropsychological impairment and neuropathology, and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) synthase (Ptgds), which has been associated with immune activation and the induction of astrogliosis and microgliosis. GSEA-based pathway analysis highlighted a broad dysregulation of genes involved in neuronal trophism and neurodegenerative disorders. Among the latter are genesets associated with Huntington’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, mitochondrial, peroxisome function, and synaptic trophism and plasticity, such as IGF, ErbB and netrin signaling and the PI3K signal transduction pathway, a mediator of neural plasticity and of a vast array of trophic signals. Additionally, gene expression analyses also show altered lipid metabolism and peroxisomes dysfunction. Supporting the functional significance of these gene expression alterations, HIV-1 Tg rats showed working memory impairments in spontaneous alternation behavior in the T-Maze, a

  4. Light-induced currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing bovine rhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Knox, B E; Khorana, H G; Nasi, E

    1993-01-01

    1. We have investigated the functioning of bovine rod opsin, which is efficiently synthesized from RNA made by in vitro transcription, following injection into Xenopus oocytes. We found that oocytes expressing the gene for opsin exhibit light-dependent ionic currents only after pigment generation by incubation with 11-cis-retinal. These currents are similar to the endogenous muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) response of oocytes, but their amplitude is substantially smaller. 2. In order to optimize the conditions for obtaining light-induced currents in RNA-injected oocytes, the native ACh response was examined under several conditions. It was found that elevated external calcium markedly enhances the muscarinic response and that these currents have a non-linear dependence on membrane voltage, increasing substantially with depolarization. 3. Using the optimal conditions for evoking the largest ACh responses, (28 mM [Ca2+]o, 0 mV, omission of serum and Hepes from the media), the light-evoked currents obtained in RNA-injected oocytes were remarkably enhanced, and responses to multiple light stimuli could be obtained. 4. The light response appeared to desensitize, even after long periods of recovery and pigment regeneration. By contrast, the ACh responses continued to appear normal. These results suggest that desensitization of photoresponses expressed in Xenopus oocytes involve changes at early stages of the pathway, resulting in a reduced ability of rhodopsin to couple to the endogenous signalling system. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7692039

  5. Decreased RARβ expression induces abundant inflammation and cervical precancerous lesions.

    PubMed

    Albino-Sanchez, M E; Vazquez-Hernandez, J; Ocadiz-Delgado, R; Serafin-Higuera, N; León-Galicia, I; Garcia-Villa, E; Hernandez-Pando, R; Gariglio, P

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that vitamin A and its receptors protect against cancer development and that Retinoid Acid Receptor β (RARβ) is epigenetically silenced during tumoral progression. Cervical Cancer (CC) has been causally linked to high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection. However, host factors are important in determining the outcome of persistent HR-HPV infection as most cervical precancerous lesions containing HR-HPVs do not progress to invasive carcinomas. Increasing evidence suggests that low diet in vitamin A and their receptors participate in the development of CC. The aim of this study has been to investigate the effects of abated RARβ expression in the development of cervical premalignant lesions in 4 month-old conditional mice (RARβ(L-/L-)). Results demonstrated the development of spontaneous squamous metaplasia, inflammatory infiltrate, enhanced mitotic activity, loss of cell differentiation, as well as decreased apoptosis and p16(INK4a) protein levels in RARβ(L-/L-) mice cervix. All these changes are hallmarks of moderate dysplasia. Importantly, our results suggest that the low expression of RARβ, may induce the down regulation of p16(INK4a), chronic inflammation and decreased apoptosis and may be involved in vulnerability to HR-HPV and early stage cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:27207583

  6. Glomerulonephritis-induced changes in kidney gene expression in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pavkovic, Mira; Riefke, Björn; Frisk, Anna-Lena; Gröticke, Ina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated a glomerulonephritis (GN) model in rats induced by nephrotoxic serum (NTS) which contains antibodies against the glomerular basement membrane (GBM). The anti-GBM GN model in rats is widely used since its biochemical and histopathological characteristics are similar to crescentic nephritis and Goodpasture's disease in humans (Pusey, 2003[2]). Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were dosed once with 1, 2.5 and 5 ml/kg nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or 1.5 and 5 ml/kg NTS, respectively. GN and tubular damage were observed histopathologically in all treated rats after 14 days. To obtain insight into molecular processes during GN pathogenesis, mRNA expression was investigated in WKY and SD kidneys using Affymetrix's GeneChip Rat genome 230_2.0 arrays (GSE64265). The immunopathological processes during GN are still not fully understood and likely involve both innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, several hundred mRNAs were found deregulated, which functionally were mostly associated with inflammation and regeneration. The β-chain of the major histocompatibility complex class II RT1.B (Rt1-Bb) and complement component 6 (C6) were identified as two mRNAs differentially expressed between WKY and SD rat strains which could be related to known different susceptibilities to NTS of different rat strains; both were increased in WKY and decreased in SD rats (Pavkovic et al., 2015 [1]). Increased Rt1-Bb expression in WKY rats could indicate a stronger and more persistent cellular reaction of the adaptive immune system in this strain, in line with findings indicating adaptive immune reactions during GN. The complement cascade is also known to be essential for GN development, especially terminal cascade products like C6. PMID:26697341

  7. Calcitonin Induces Expression of the Inducible cAMP Early Repressor in Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Maobin; Kream, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    The cAMP response element modulator gene (Crem) encodes a variety of transcriptional regulators including the inducible cAMP early repressor, ICER. We previously showed that Crem knockout mice, which are deficient in CREM and ICER factors, display slightly increased long bone mass and decreased osteoclast number. These data are consistent with the notion that Crem regulates bone mass in part through an effect on osteoclast formation and/or function. Since ICER is strongly induced by cAMP, we asked whether the calcium-regulating hormone calcitonin, which stimulates cAMP production and inhibits osteoclastic bone resorption, could induce ICER in osteoclasts. The monocytic cell line RAW264.7 was treated with receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) to induce osteoclast formation. Calcitonin caused a time- and dose-dependent induction of ICER mRNA and an increase in ICER protein abundance in RANKL-treated RAW264.7 cells. Calcitonin also induced ICER mRNA and protein in osteoclasts derived from primary mouse bone marrow cell cultures. Calcitonin-treated osteoclasts showed immunoreactivity with an anti-CREM antibody. Calcitonin decreased the activity of wild type and Crem knockout osteoclasts in vitro, and this inhibitory effect was greater in Crem knockout osteoclasts. Furthermore, calcitonin decreased calcitonin receptor mRNA expression in wild type osteoclasts but not in Crem knockout osteoclasts. These data suggest that calcitonin induction of ICER in osteoclasts might regulate osteoclast activity. PMID:19016003

  8. Factor-induced Reprogramming and Zinc Finger Nuclease-aided Gene Targeting Cause Different Genome Instability in β-Thalassemia Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs)*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Shan, Yongli; Liao, Baojian; Kong, Guanyi; Wang, Cheng; Huang, Ke; Zhang, Hui; Cai, Xiujuan; Chen, Shubin; Pei, Duanqing; Chen, Nansheng; Pan, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    The generation of personalized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) followed by targeted genome editing provides an opportunity for developing customized effective cellular therapies for genetic disorders. However, it is critical to ascertain whether edited iPSCs harbor unfavorable genomic variations before their clinical application. To examine the mutation status of the edited iPSC genome and trace the origin of possible mutations at different steps, we have generated virus-free iPSCs from amniotic cells carrying homozygous point mutations in β-hemoglobin gene (HBB) that cause severe β-thalassemia (β-Thal), corrected the mutations in both HBB alleles by zinc finger nuclease-aided gene targeting, and obtained the final HBB gene-corrected iPSCs by excising the exogenous drug resistance gene with Cre recombinase. Through comparative genomic hybridization and whole-exome sequencing, we uncovered seven copy number variations, five small insertions/deletions, and 64 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in β-Thal iPSCs before the gene targeting step and found a single small copy number variation, 19 insertions/deletions, and 340 single nucleotide variations in the final gene-corrected β-Thal iPSCs. Our data revealed that substantial but different genomic variations occurred at factor-induced somatic cell reprogramming and zinc finger nuclease-aided gene targeting steps, suggesting that stringent genomic monitoring and selection are needed both at the time of iPSC derivation and after gene targeting. PMID:25795783

  9. Femtosecond laser induced tunable surface transformations on (111) Si aided by square grids diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Weina; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xiaowei Liu, Yang

    2015-12-21

    We report an extra freedom to modulate the femtosecond laser energy distribution to control the surface ablated structures through a copper-grid mask. Due to the reduced deposited pulse energy by changing the scanning speed or the pulse fluence, a sequential evolution of three distinctly different surface patterns with periodic distributions is formed, namely, striped ripple lines, ripple microdots, and surface modification. By changing the scanning speed, the number of the multiple dots in a lattice can be modulated. Moreover, by exploring the ablation process through the copper grid mask, it shows an abnormal enhanced ablation effect with strong dependence of the diffraction-aided fs laser ablated surface structures on polarization direction. The sensitivity shows a quasi-cosinusoid-function with a periodicity of π/2. Particularly, the connection process of striped ripple lines manifests a preferential formation direction with the laser polarization.

  10. AID-Induced Genotoxic Stress Promotes B Cell Differentiation in the Germinal Center via ATM and LKB1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Mara H.; Kuraishy, Ali I.; Deshpande, Chetan; Hong, Jason S.; Cacalano, Nicholas A.; Gatti, Richard A.; Manis, John P.; Damore, Michael A.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Teitell, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY During an immune response, B cells undergo rapid proliferation and AID-dependent remodeling of immunoglobulin (IG) genes within germinal centers (GCs) to generate memory B and plasma cells. Unfortunately, the genotoxic stress associated with the GC reaction also promotes most B cell malignancies. Here we report that exogenous- and intrinsic AID-induced DNA strand breaks activate ATM, which signals through an LKB1 intermediate to inactivate CRTC2, a transcriptional coactivator of CREB. Using genome-wide location analysis, we determined that CRTC2 inactivation unexpectedly represses a genetic program that controls GC B cell proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation while opposing lymphomagenesis. Inhibition of this pathway results in increased GC B cell proliferation, reduced antibody secretion, and impaired terminal differentiation. Multiple distinct pathway disruptions were also identified in human GC B cell lymphoma patient samples. Combined, our data show that CRTC2 inactivation, via physiologic DNA damage response signaling, promotes B cell differentiation in response to genotoxic stress. PMID:20864035

  11. Hearing aid or tinnitus masker: which one is the best treatment for blast-induced tinnitus? The results of a long-term study on 974 patients.

    PubMed

    Jalilvand, Hamid; Pourbakht, Akram; Haghani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to explore whether a hearing aid or noise generator would be an effective audiological treatment for blast-induced chronic tinnitus. The amount of satisfaction from different hearing devices (hearing aid, noise generator, or both) during different time periods (1, 6, 12 and 24 months after fitting) was assessed. The 974 subjects enrolled in this study were Iran-Iraq war veterans, suffering from tinnitus for at least 2 years. About 84% of the subjects preferred just a hearing aid. Only 2.7% chose the noise generator, and the others preferred to use both devices. There were no significant differences between the hearing thresholds of the 3 groups. The satisfaction score for the hearing aid and combined devices increased by time but decreased for the noise generator. There was no correlation between the satisfaction score and parameters such as hearing thresholds, audiogram configuration and tinnitus pitch. We concluded that, compared with a noise generator, the most long-lasting treatment for blast-induced tinnitus is a hearing aid. The possible cause for such a performance is probably the recovery of the auditory function and neuroplasticity through the hearing aid. PMID:25924663

  12. Octylphenol induced gene expression in testes of Frog, Rana chensinensis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinyi; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Yuhui

    2016-06-01

    Octylphenol (OP) is an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC), which can disrupt the reproductive system. To understand the effect of OP, a subtractive cDNA library was constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to identify alterations of gene transcription in the testes of the frog Rana chensinensis after OP exposure. Two hundred positive clones were selected and 134 sequences of gene fragments were produced from the subtractive library randomly. These genes were identified to be involved in metabolic process, cellular process, biological regulation, stimulus, immune system and female pregnancy process. In order to verify the efficiency of the subtractive cDNA library, PSG9 and PAPP-A were analyzed further as two representatives of differentially expressed transcription genes using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Our result was the first successful construction of the subtractive cDNA library in frog testes after OP treatment. Based on this cDNA library, OP was shown to affect multiple physiological processes including inducing immune response, disrupting the steroid hormone synthesis and influencing spermatogenesis in the testis by up-regulation of specific genes. PMID:26896894

  13. Computer-aided detection of radiation-induced cerebral microbleeds on susceptibility-weighted MR images☆

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Wei; Hess, Christopher P.; Chang, Susan M.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Lupo, Janine M.

    2013-01-01

    Recent interest in exploring the clinical relevance of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) has motivated the search for a fast and accurate method to detect them. Visual inspection of CMBs on MR images is a lengthy, arduous task that is highly prone to human error because of their small size and wide distribution throughout the brain. Several computer-aided CMB detection algorithms have recently been proposed in the literature, but their diagnostic accuracy, computation time, and robustness are still in need of improvement. In this study, we developed and tested a semi-automated method for identifying CMBs on minimum intensity projected susceptibility-weighted MR images that are routinely used in clinical practice to visually identify CMBs. The algorithm utilized the 2D fast radial symmetry transform to initially detect putative CMBs. Falsely identified CMBs were then eliminated by examining geometric features measured after performing 3D region growing on the potential CMB candidates. This algorithm was evaluated in 15 patients with brain tumors who exhibited CMBs on susceptibility-weighted images due to prior external beam radiation therapy. Our method achieved heightened sensitivity and acceptable amount of false positives compared to prior methods without compromising computation speed. Its superior performance and simple, accelerated processing make it easily adaptable for detecting CMBs in the clinic and expandable to a wide array of neurological disorders. PMID:24179783

  14. United States aid policy and induced abortion in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Patrick; Miller, Grant

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether the Mexico City Policy, a United States government policy that prohibits funding to nongovernmental organizations performing or promoting abortion, was associated with the induced abortion rate in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods Women in 20 African countries who had induced abortions between 1994 and 2008 were identified in Demographic and Health Surveys. A country’s exposure to the Mexico City Policy was considered high (or low) if its per capita assistance from the United States for family planning and reproductive health was above (or below) the median among study countries before the policy’s reinstatement in 2001. Using logistic regression and a difference-in-difference design, the authors estimated the differential change in the odds of having an induced abortion among women in high exposure countries relative to low exposure countries when the policy was reinstated. Findings The study included 261 116 women aged 15 to 44 years. A comparison of 1994–2000 with 2001–2008 revealed an adjusted odds ratio for induced abortion of 2.55 for high-exposure countries versus low-exposure countries under the policy (95% confidence interval, CI: 1.76–3.71). There was a relative decline in the use of modern contraceptives in the high-exposure countries over the same time period. Conclusion The induced abortion rate in sub-Saharan Africa rose in high-exposure countries relative to low-exposure countries when the Mexico City Policy was reintroduced. Reduced financial support for family planning may have led women to substitute abortion for contraception. Regardless of one’s views about abortion, the findings may have important implications for public policies governing abortion. PMID:22271944

  15. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression in experimental cirrhosis: correlation with vascular endothelial growth factor expression and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bozova, Sevgi; Elpek, Gülsüm Ozlem

    2007-07-01

    Angiogenesis progresses together with fibrogenesis during chronic liver injury. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), a master regulator of homeostasis, plays a pivotal role in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis through its regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The association between hypoxia, angiogenesis and VEGF expression has been demonstrated in experimental cirrhosis. However, expression of HIF-1alpha has yet to be reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of HIF-1alpha expression during experimental liver fibrosis and the relationships between HIF-1alpha expression, VEGF expression and angiogenesis. Cirrhosis was induced in male Wistar rats by intraperitoneal administration of diethyl nitrosamine (DEN) (100 mg/kg, once a week). The serial sections from liver tissues were stained with anti-HIF-1alpha, anti-VEGF and anti-CD34 antibodies before being measured by light microscopy. Our results showed that HIF-1alpha expression gradually increases according to the severity of fibrosis (p<0.01). Moreover, its expression was found to be correlated with angiogenesis (r=0.916) and VEGF expression (r=0.969). The present study demonstrates that HIF-1alpha might have a role in the development of angiogenesis via regulation of VEGF during experimental liver fibrogenesis and suggests that this factor could be a potential target in the manipulation of angiogenesis in chronic inflammatory diseases of the liver. PMID:17614845

  16. Opposing effects of Arkadia and Smurf on TGFbeta1-induced IgA isotype expression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Seo, Goo-Young; Nam, Eun-Hee; Jeon, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-A; Park, Jae-Bong; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2007-10-31

    TGF-beta1 induces Ig germ-line alpha (GLalpha) transcription and subsequent class switching recombination (CSR) to IgA. In the present study, we investigated the roles of two E3-ubiquitin ligases, Smurfs (HECT type) and Arkadia (RING finger type) on TGFbeta1-induced IgA CSR. We found that over-expression of Smurf1 and Smurf2 decreased TGFbeta1-induced GLalpha promoter activity and strengthened the inhibitory effect of Smad7 on the promoter activity. Further, over-expression of Smurf1 and Smurf2 decreased both Smad3/4-mediated and Runx3-mediated GLalpha promoter activities, suggesting that the Smurfs can down-regulate the major TGF-beta1 signaling pathway and decrease GLalpha gene expression. In parallel, the over-expressed Smurf1 decreased the expression of endogenous IgA CSR-predictive transcripts (GLT(alpha), PST(alpha), and CT(alpha)) and also TGFbeta1-induced IgA secretion. Conversely over-expression of Arkadia abolished the inhibitory effect of Smad7 on TGFbeta1-induced GLT(alpha) expression and IgA secretion. Similar results were obtained in the presence of over-expressed Smad7 and Smurf1. These results indicate that Arkadia can amplify TGFbeta1-induced IgA CSR by degrading Smad7, which interacts with Smurf1. We conclude that Smurf and Arkadia have opposite roles in the regulation of TGFbeta1-induced IgA isotype expression. PMID:17978583

  17. Listeria monocytogenes can grow in macrophages without the aid of proteins induced by environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, T; Yamamoto, T; Kamiya, S

    1995-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen which is able to survive and grow within phagocytic cells. Some facultative intracellular bacteria have been shown to respond to the hostile environment within phagocytic cells by producing a set of stress proteins. Since L. monocytogenes has a mechanism for intracellular survival that is distinct from those of other bacteria, we studied the phenotypic response of the bacterium to phagocytosis by macrophages. After phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes EGD by J774-1 macrophage cells, the microorganism rapidly increased in numbers about 20-fold during an incubation period of 5 h. In this phase of phagocytosis, the selective induction of 32 proteins was observed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The responses to the environmental stresses of heat and hydrogen peroxide were also studied, and it was found that 14 heat shock proteins and 13 oxidative stress proteins were induced. Five of the induced proteins were common to both heat and oxidative stresses. By amino acid sequencing analysis, homologs of DnaK and GroEL were confirmed among the heat shock proteins. A comparison of the autoradiograms of the two-dimensional gels revealed that none of these stress proteins were among the proteins induced by L. monocytogenes within the macrophages. This behavior is entirely different from that shown by other facultative intracellular pathogens. Stress proteins known to be induced by environmental stresses were absent in intracellularly grown L. monocytogenes in the present study. This absence could be due to the mechanism by which the microorganisms rapidly escape from this stressful environment at a very early phase of phagocytosis. PMID:7591111

  18. Aspergillus parasiticus SU-1 genome sequence, predicted chromosome structure, and comparative gene expression under aflatoxin-inducing conditions: evidence that differential expression contributes to species phenotype.

    PubMed

    Linz, John E; Wee, Josephine; Roze, Ludmila V

    2014-08-01

    The filamentous fungi Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus produce the carcinogenic secondary metabolite aflatoxin on susceptible crops. These species differ in the quantity of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 produced in culture, in the ability to produce the mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid, and in morphology of mycelia and conidiospores. To understand the genetic basis for differences in biochemistry and morphology, we conducted next-generation sequence (NGS) analysis of the A. parasiticus strain SU-1 genome and comparative gene expression (RNA sequence analysis [RNA Seq]) analysis of A. parasiticus SU-1 and A. flavus strain NRRL 3357 (3357) grown under aflatoxin-inducing and -noninducing culture conditions. Although A. parasiticus SU-1 and A. flavus 3357 are highly similar in genome structure and gene organization, we observed differences in the presence of specific mycotoxin gene clusters and differential expression of specific mycotoxin genes and gene clusters that help explain differences in the type and quantity of mycotoxins synthesized. Using computer-aided analysis of secondary metabolite clusters (antiSMASH), we demonstrated that A. parasiticus SU-1 and A. flavus 3357 may carry up to 93 secondary metabolite gene clusters, and surprisingly, up to 10% of the genome appears to be dedicated to secondary metabolite synthesis. The data also suggest that fungus-specific zinc binuclear cluster (C6) transcription factors play an important role in regulation of secondary metabolite cluster expression. Finally, we identified uniquely expressed genes in A. parasiticus SU-1 that encode C6 transcription factors and genes involved in secondary metabolism and stress response/cellular defense. Future work will focus on these differentially expressed A. parasiticus SU-1 loci to reveal their role in determining distinct species characteristics. PMID:24951444

  19. The effect of aided AAC modeling on the expression of multi-symbol messages by preschoolers who use AAC.

    PubMed

    Binger, Cathy; Light, Janice

    2007-03-01

    A single subject, multiple probe design across participants was used to evaluate the impact of using aided AAC modeling to support multi-symbol message production. Five preschoolers (three who used voice output communication systems, two who used non-electronic communication boards) participated in the study. Aided AAC models were provided by pointing to two symbols on the child's aided AAC system and then providing a grammatically complete spoken model while engaging in play activities. Four of the five preschoolers learned to consistently produce multi-symbol messages; the fifth did not demonstrate consistent gains. The four preschoolers who met criterion all evidenced long-term use of symbol combinations and generalized use of symbol combinations to novel play routines. Results, clinical implications, and future research directions are discussed. PMID:17364486

  20. AID targeting: old mysteries and new challenges.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Vivek; Bortnick, Alexandra; Murre, Cornelis

    2015-09-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mediates cytosine deamination and underlies two central processes in antibody diversification: somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination. AID deamination is not exclusive to immunoglobulin loci; it can instigate DNA lesions in non-immunoglobulin genes and thus stringent checks are in place to constrain and restrict its activity. Recent findings have provided new insights into the mechanisms that target AID activity to specific genomic regions, revealing an involvement for noncoding RNAs associated with polymerase pausing and with enhancer transcription as well as genomic architecture. We review these findings and integrate them into a model for multilevel regulation of AID expression and targeting in immunoglobulin and non-immunoglobulin loci. Within this framework we discuss gaps in understanding, and outline important areas of further research. PMID:26254147

  1. Elemental analysis of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy aided by an empirical spectral database

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, Steven; Marcano, Aristides; Markushin, Yuri; Sabanayagam, Chandran; Melikechi, Noureddine

    2008-11-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is commonly used to identify elemental compositions of various samples. To facilitate this task, we propose the use of an elemental spectral library for single-pulsed, nanosecond LIBS in the spectral range 198-968 nm. This spectroscopic library is generated by measuring optical emissions from plasmas of 40 pure elements. To demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed database, we measure and analyze the LIBS spectra of pure iron and of ethanol and show that we identify these samples with a high degree of certainty.

  2. Fulminant inflammatory leukoencephalopathy associated with HAART-induced immune restoration in AIDS-related progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Vendrely, Aurélie; Bienvenu, Boris; Gasnault, Jacques; Thiebault, Jean Baptiste; Salmon, Dominique; Gray, Françoise

    2005-04-01

    HAART-induced immune restoration is beneficial for patients with AIDS-related progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). However, in rare instances, an immune-reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) may cause paradoxical clinical deterioration. We report the neuropathological study of an AIDS patient who presented with progressive cognitive deterioration; CD4(+) count was 117 and the HIV viral load >10(4); imaging showed non-enhancing lesions consistent with PML. Following initiation of HAART, CD4(+) was 300 and HIV viral load <10(3), but his neurological symptoms continued to deteriorate. Imaging revealed an increase in the size and number of lesions and enhancement of all the lesions. A stereotactic biopsy showed severe inflammatory and demyelinating lesions with marked infiltration by macrophages and T lymphocytes in the absence of a detectable infectious agent. Despite high doses of steroids, the patient died 3 months after admission. Autopsy showed two types of lesions: (1) active inflammatory PML changes with abundant JC virus, and intraparenchymal and perivascular infiltration by T lymphocytes, and (2) acute perivenous leukoencephalitis devoid of JC virus. Most lymphocytes were CD8(+) lymphocytes; CD4(+) lymphocytes were virtually absent. Two pathological reactions were associated with the paradoxical clinical deterioration related to dysregulation of the immune response characteristic of IRIS in PML: (1) an accentuation of JCV infection, and (2) a nonspecific acute perivenous leukoencephalitis. We suggest that both these types of lesions are due to an imbalance of CD8(+)/CD4(+) T cells, with massive infiltration of the cerebral parenchyma by CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the absence of sufficient CD4(+) response. Better understanding of the mechanisms of the IRIS may enable prevention or cure of this severe, sometimes fatal complication of HAART. PMID:15739098

  3. Highly inducible expression from vectors containing multiple GRE's in CHO cells overexpressing the glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Israel, D I; Kaufman, R J

    1989-01-01

    A conditional glucocorticoid-responsive expression vector system is described for highly inducible expression of heterologous genes in mammalian cells. This host-vector system requires high level expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein in the host cell and multiple copies of the receptor binding site within the expression vector. Transfection and selection of Chinese hamster ovary cells with expression vectors encoding the rat GR yielded cell lines which express functional receptor at high levels. Insertion of multiple copies of the MMTV enhancer (glucocorticoid responsive element, GRE) into an Adenovirus major late promoter (AdMLP) based expression vector yielded greater than 1000-fold inducible expression by dexamethasone (dex) in transient DNA transfection assays. The induced expression level was 7-fold greater than that obtained with an AdMLP based vector containing an SV40 enhancer, but lacking GRE's. Vectors containing the SV40 enhancer in combination with multiple GRE's exhibited elevated basal expression in the absence of dex, but retained inducibility in both transient assays and after integration and amplification in the CHO genome. This expression system should be of general utility for studying gene regulation and for expressing heterologous genes in a regulatable fashion. Images PMID:2546123

  4. Nutrient induced type 2 and chemical induced type 1 experimental diabetes differently modulate gastric GLP-1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Olga; Broide, Efrat; Ben-Yehudah, Gilad; Cantrell, Dror; Shirin, Haim; Rapoport, Micha J

    2015-01-01

    T2DM patients demonstrate reduced GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) expression in their gastric glands. Whether induced T2DM and T1DM differently affect the gastric GLP-1R expression is not known. This study assessed extrapancreatic GLP-1R system in glandular stomach of rodents with different types of experimental diabetes. T2DM and T1DM were induced in Psammomys obesus (PO) by high-energy (HE) diet and by streptozotocin (STZ) in Sprague Dawly (SD) rats, respectively. GLP-1R expression was determined in glandular stomach by RT PCR and immunohistomorphological analysis. The mRNA expression and cellular association of the GLP-1R in principal glands were similar in control PO and SD rats. However, nutrient and chemical induced diabetes resulted in opposite alterations of glandular GLP-1R expression. Diabetic PO demonstrated increased GLP-1R mRNA expression, intensity of cellular GLP-1R immunostaining, and frequency of GLP-1R positive cells in the neck area of principal glands compared with controls. In contrast, SD diabetic rats demonstrated decreased GLP-1 mRNA, cellular GLP-1R immunoreactivity, and frequency of GLP-1R immunoreactive cells in the neck area compared with controls. In conclusion, nutrient and chemical induced experimental diabetes result in distinct opposite alterations of GLP-1R expression in glandular stomach. These results suggest that induced T1DM and T2DM may differently modulate GLP-1R system in enteropancreatic axis. PMID:25893200

  5. Spatial Control of Gene Expression within a Scaffold by Localized Inducer Release

    PubMed Central

    Baraniak, Priya R.; Nelson, Devin M.; Leeson, Cory E.; Katakam, Anand K.; Friz, Jennifer L.; Cress, Dean E.; Hong, Yi; Guan, Jianjun; Wagner, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression can be controlled in genetically modified cells by employing an inducer/promoter system where presence of the inducer molecule regulates the timing and level of gene expression. By applying the principles of controlled release, it should be possible to control gene expression on a biomaterial surface by the presence or absence of inducer release from the underlying material matrix, thus avoiding alternative techniques that rely upon uptake of relatively labile DNA from material surfaces. To evaluate this concept, a modified ecdysone-responsive gene expression system was transfected into B16 murine cells and the ability of an inducer ligand, which was released from elastomeric poly(ester urethane) urea (PEUU), to initiate gene expression was studied. The synthetic inducer ligand was first loaded into PEUU to demonstrate extended release of the bioactive molecule at various loading densities over a one year period in vitro. Patterning films of PEUU variably-loaded with inducer resulted in spatially controlled cell expression of the gene product (green fluorescent protein, GFP). In porous scaffolds made from PEUU by salt leaching, where the central region was exclusively loaded with inducer, cells expressed GFP predominately in the loaded central regions whereas expression was minimal in outer regions where ligand was omitted. This scaffold system may ultimately provide a means to precisely control progenitor cell commitment in a spatially-defined manner in vivo for soft tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:21269687

  6. CD28 costimulation and CD28 expression in T lymphocyte subsets in HIV-1 infection with and without progression to AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Choremi-Papadopoulou, H; Panagiotou, N; Samouilidou, E; Kontopidou, F; Viglis, V; Antoniadou, A; Kosmidis, J; Kordossis, T

    2000-01-01

    In a prospective study of 152 HIV-1 patients (with and without progression to AIDS) we examined CD28 MoAb costimulation and CD3 MoAb response using whole blood culture at baseline and up to either the time of AIDS diagnosis or the end of the observation period. CD28 antigen expression on both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes was also studied in both groups of patients. In patients who progressed to AIDS, CD28 MoAb costimulation was found to be decreased. Univariate time-dependent analysis showed that decreases in (i) absolute numbers of either CD4+, CD4+CD28+, CD8+CD28+ T cells, (ii) CD28 MoAb costimulation, and (iii) CD3 MoAb response, and an increase in CD8+CD28− %, are significant predictors for progression to AIDS. In addition, multivariate time-dependent analysis demonstrated that a decrease in CD28 MoAb costimulation (but not a decrease in CD3 MoAb response) was predictive for progression to AIDS, as were decreases in the percentage of CD4+ T cells and the absolute number of CD4+CD28+ T cells. Thus, CD28 MoAb costimulation can be considered a useful assay for monitoring HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, apart from the early increase in the percentage of CD8+CD28− T cells and an increase in the percentage of CD28− on CD8+ T cells in both groups of patients at baseline compared with normal controls, a negative correlation was found to exist between the percentages of CD4+ or CD4+CD28+ T cells and the percentage of CD8+CD28− T cells; this suggests that these cells are probably mutually regulated. PMID:10691923

  7. Azithromycin differentially affects the IL-13-induced expression profile in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Tinne C J; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Taube, Christian

    2016-08-01

    The T helper 2 (Th2) cytokine interleukin(IL)-13 is a central regulator in goblet cell metaplasia and induces the recently described Th2 gene signature consisting of periostin (POSTN), chloride channel regulator 1 (CLCA1) and serpin B2 (SERPINB2) in airway epithelial cells. This Th2 gene signature has been proposed as a biomarker to classify asthma into Th2-high and Th2-low phenotypes. Clinical studies have shown that the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin reduced clinical symptoms in neutrophilic asthma, but not in the classical Th2-mediated asthma despite the ability of azithromycin to reduce IL-13-induced mucus production. We therefore hypothesize that azithromycin differentially affects the IL-13-induced expression profile. To investigate this, we focus on IL-13-induced mucin and Th2-signature expression in human bronchial epithelial cells and how this combined expression profile is affected by azithromycin treatment. Primary bronchial epithelial cells were differentiated at air liquid interface in presence of IL-13 with or without azithromycin. Azithromycin inhibited IL-13-induced MUC5AC, which was accompanied by inhibition of IL-13-induced CLCA1 and SERPINB2 expression. In contrast, IL-13-induced expression of POSTN was further increased in cells treated with azithromycin. This indicates that azithromycin has a differential effect on the IL-13-induced Th2 gene signature. Furthermore, the ability of azithromycin to decrease IL-13-induced MUC5AC expression may be mediated by a reduction in CLCA1. PMID:27246785

  8. Effect of dexamethasone and ACC on bacteria-induced mucin expression in human airway mucosa.

    PubMed

    Hauber, Hans-Peter; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria can stimulate mucin production, but excessive mucus supports bacterial infection and consequently leads to airway obstruction. Therefore, the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and the antioxidant acetyl-cysteine (ACC) on bacteria-induced mucus expression was investigated. Explanted human airway mucosa and mucoepidermoid cells (Calu-3) were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PAM3 (a synthetic lipoprotein). DEX or ACC were added to either LPS- or PAM3-stimulated airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells. Mucin mRNA expression (MUC5AC) and total mucus glycoconjugates (mucin protein) were quantified using real-time PCR and periodic acid Schiff staining. LPS and PAM3 significantly increased mucin expression in airway mucosa and Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). DEX alone had no significant effect on mucin expression in airway mucosa or Calu-3 cells (P > 0.05). In contrast, DEX significantly reduced LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression in explanted mucosal tissue and mucin expression in Calu-3 cells (P < 0.05). In explanted human airway mucosa ACC alone significantly increased mucin expression (P < 0.05). In contrast, ACC significantly decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression (P < 0.05). In Calu-3 cells ACC alone had no significant effect on mucin expression (P > 0.05). ACC decreased LPS- and PAM3-induced mucin expression, but this effect was not significant (P > 0.05). These data suggest that DEX can effectively reduce bacteria-induced mucin expression in the airways. ACC alone may increase mucin expression in noninfected mucosa, but it decreased bacteria-induced mucin expression. Further studies are warranted to evaluate whether the effect of DEX or ACC is clinically relevant. PMID:17600317

  9. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Karin; Wirta, Valtteri; Dahl, Lina; Bruce, Sara; Lundeberg, Joakim; Carlsson, Leif; Williams, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox). These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin. PMID:16600034

  10. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Understanding HIV/AIDS AIDS was first reported in the United States in ... and has since become a major worldwide epidemic. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or ...

  11. Preferential effects of the chemotherapeutic DNA crosslinking agent mitomycin C on inducible gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Caron, R M; Hamilton, J W

    1995-01-01

    The immediate effects of a single dose of the chemotherapeutic DNA crosslinking agent, mitomycin C (MMC), on the expression of several constitutive and drug-inducible genes were examined in a simple in vivo system, the 14 day chick embryo. We observed no effect of MMC on the steady-state mRNA expression of the constitutively expressed beta-actin, transferrin, or albumin genes. In contrast, MMC treatment significantly altered both the basal and drug-inducible mRNA expression of two glutethimide-inducible genes, 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthase and cytochrome P450 CYP2H1. The basal expression of these genes was transiently but significantly increased over a 24 hr period following a single dose of MMC. Conversely, MMC significantly suppressed the glutethimide-inducible expression of these genes when administered 1 to 24 hr prior to the inducing drug. The effects of MMC on both basal and drug-inducible ALA synthase and CYP2H1 mRNA expression were principally a result of changes in the transcription rates of these genes. In contrast, MMC treatment had little or no effect on glutethimide-induced expression of ALA synthase or CYP2H1 when administered 1 hr after the inducing drug, suggesting that a very early event in the induction process represents the target for these MMC effects. Covalent binding studies demonstrated that the effects of MMC on gene expression were closely correlated temporally with formation of [3H]-porfiromycin-DNA adducts. These results support the hypothesis that genotoxic chemicals specifically target their effects to inducible genes in vivo. PMID:7875125

  12. Therapeutical Neurotargeting via Magnetic Nanocarrier: Implications to Opiate-Induced Neuropathogenesis and NeuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Vidya; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Atluri, Venkata S R; Ding, Hong; Arias, Adriana Y; Jayant, Rahul D; Kaushik, Ajeet; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-10-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is the most commonly and extensively explored magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for drug-targeting and imaging in the field of biomedicine. Nevertheless, its potential application as safe and effective drug-carrier for CNS (Central Nervous System) anomalies is very limited. Previous studies have shown an entangled epidemic of opioid use and HIV infection and increased neuropathogenesis. Opiate such as morphine, heroine, etc. are used frequently as recreational drugs. Existing treatments to alleviate the action of opioid are less effective at CNS level due to impermeability of therapeutic molecules across brain barriers. Thus, development of an advanced nanomedicine based approach may pave the way for better treatment strategies. We herein report magnetic nanoformulation of a highly selective and potent morphine antagonist, CTOP (D-Pen-Cys-Tyr-DTrp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2), which is impenetrable to the brain. MNPs, synthesized in size range from 25 to 40 nm, were characterized by Transmission electron microscopy and assembly of MNPs-CTOP nanoformulations were confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and fluorescent detection. Flow-cytometry analysis showed that biological efficacy of this nanoformulation in prevention of morphine induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells remains equivalent to that of free CTOP. Similarly, confocal microscopy reveals comparable efficacy of free and MNPs bound CTOP in protecting modulation of neuronal dendrite and spine morphology during morphine exposure and morphine-treated HIV infection. Further, typical transmigration assay showed increased translocation of MNPs across in vitro blood-brain barrier upon exposure of external magnetic force where barrier integrity remains unaltered. Thus, the developed nanoformulation could be effective in targeting brain by application of external magnetic force to treat morphine addiction in HIV patients. PMID:26502636

  13. Therapeutical Neurotargeting via Magnetic Nanocarrier: Implications to Opiate-Induced Neuropathogenesis and NeuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Sagar, Vidya; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Atluri, Venkata S. R.; Ding, Hong; Arias, Adriana Y.; Jayant, Rahul D.; Kaushik, Ajeet; Nair, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is the most commonly and extensively explored magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for drug-targeting and imaging in the field of biomedicine. Nevertheless, its potential application as safe and effective drug-carrier for CNS (Central Nervous System) anomalies is very limited. Previous studies have shown an entangled epidemic of opioid use and HIV infection and increased neuropathogenesis. Opiate such as morphine, heroine, etc. are used frequently as recreational drugs. Existing treatments to alleviate the action of opioid are less effective at CNS level due to impermeability of therapeutic molecules across brain barriers. Thus, development of an advanced nanomedicine based approach may pave the way for better treatment strategies. We herein report magnetic nanoformulation of a highly selective and potent morphine antagonist, CTOP (D-Pen-Cys-Tyr-DTrp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2), which is impenetrable to the brain. MNPs, synthesized in size range from 25 to 40 nm, were characterized by Transmission electron microscopy and assembly of MNPs-CTOP nanoformulations were confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy and fluorescent detection. Flow-cytometry analysis showed that biological efficacy of this nanoformulation in prevention of morphine induced apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells remains equivalent to that of free CTOP. Similarly, confocal microscopy reveals comparable efficacy of free and MNPs bound CTOP in protecting modulation of neuronal dendrite and spine morphology during morphine exposure and morphine-treated HIV infection. Further, typical transmigration assay showed increased translocation of MNPs across in vitro blood-brain barrier upon exposure of external magnetic force where barrier integrity remains unaltered. Thus, the developed nanoformulation could be effective in targeting brain by application of external magnetic force to treat morphine addiction in HIV patients. PMID:26502636

  14. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan; Surh, Young-Joon

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  15. Inducible transgenic expression in the short-lived fish Nothobranchius furzeri.

    PubMed

    Allard, J B; Kamei, H; Duan, C

    2013-05-01

    This study demonstrates inducible transgenic expression in the exceptionally short-lived turquoise killifish Nothobranchius furzeri, which is a useful vertebrate model for ageing research. Transgenic N. furzeri bearing a green fluorescent protein (Gfp) containing construct under the control of a heat shock protein 70 promoter were generated, heat shock-induced and reversible Gfp expression was demonstrated and germline transmission of the transgene to the F1 and F2 generations was achieved. The availability of this inducible transgenic expression system will make the study of ageing-related antagonistically pleiotropic genes possible using this unique vertebrate model organism. PMID:23639168

  16. Glucose Oxidase Induces Cellular Senescence in Immortal Renal Cells through ILK by Downregulating Klotho Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Troyano-Suárez, Nuria; del Nogal-Avila, María; Mora, Inés; Sosa, Patricia; López-Ongil, Susana; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Olmos, Gemma; Ruíz-Torres, María Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence can be prematurely induced by oxidative stress involved in aging. In this work, we were searching for novel intermediaries in oxidative stress-induced senescence, focusing our interest on integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a scaffold protein at cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion sites, and on the Klotho gene. Cultured renal cells were treated with glucose oxidase (GOx) for long time periods. GOx induced senescence, increasing senescence associated β-galactosidase activity and the expression of p16. In parallel, GOx increased ILK protein expression and activity. Ectopic overexpression of ILK in cells increased p16 expression, even in the absence of GOx, whereas downregulation of ILK inhibited the increase in p16 due to oxidative stress. Additionally, GOx reduced Klotho gene expression and cells overexpressing Klotho protein did not undergo senescence after GOx addition. We demonstrated a direct link between ILK and Klotho since silencing ILK expression in cells and mice increases Klotho expression and reduces p53 and p16 expression in renal cortex. In conclusion, oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in kidney cells by increasing ILK protein expression and activity, which in turn reduces Klotho expression. We hereby present ILK as a novel downregulator of Klotho gene expression. PMID:26583057

  17. Glucose Oxidase Induces Cellular Senescence in Immortal Renal Cells through ILK by Downregulating Klotho Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Troyano-Suárez, Nuria; del Nogal-Avila, María; Mora, Inés; Sosa, Patricia; López-Ongil, Susana; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Olmos, Gemma; Ruíz-Torres, María Piedad

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence can be prematurely induced by oxidative stress involved in aging. In this work, we were searching for novel intermediaries in oxidative stress-induced senescence, focusing our interest on integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a scaffold protein at cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion sites, and on the Klotho gene. Cultured renal cells were treated with glucose oxidase (GOx) for long time periods. GOx induced senescence, increasing senescence associated β-galactosidase activity and the expression of p16. In parallel, GOx increased ILK protein expression and activity. Ectopic overexpression of ILK in cells increased p16 expression, even in the absence of GOx, whereas downregulation of ILK inhibited the increase in p16 due to oxidative stress. Additionally, GOx reduced Klotho gene expression and cells overexpressing Klotho protein did not undergo senescence after GOx addition. We demonstrated a direct link between ILK and Klotho since silencing ILK expression in cells and mice increases Klotho expression and reduces p53 and p16 expression in renal cortex. In conclusion, oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in kidney cells by increasing ILK protein expression and activity, which in turn reduces Klotho expression. We hereby present ILK as a novel downregulator of Klotho gene expression. PMID:26583057

  18. Hypoxia-induced expression of phosducin-like 3 regulates expression of VEGFR-2 and promotes angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Srimathi; Chitalia, Vipul; Meyer, Rosana D.; Hartsough, Edward; Mehta, Manisha; Harrold, Itrat; Anderson, Nicole; Feng, Hui; Smith, Lois E. H.; Jiang, Yan; Costello, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Expression and activation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) by VEGF ligands are the main events in the stimulation of pathological angiogenesis. VEGFR-2 expression is generally low in the healthy adult blood vessels, but its expression is markedly increased in the pathological angiogenesis. In this report, we demonstrate that phosducin-like 3 (PDCL3), a recently identified chaperone protein involved in the regulation of VEGFR-2 expression, is required for angiogenesis in zebrafish and mouse. PDCL3 undergoes N-terminal methionine acetylation, and this modification affects PDCL3 expression and its interaction with VEGFR-2. Expression of PDCL3 is regulated by hypoxia, the known stimulator of angiogenesis. The mutant PDCL3 that is unable to undergo N-terminal methionine acetylation was refractory to the effect of hypoxia. The siRNA-mediated silencing of PDCL3 decreased VEGFR-2 expression resulting in a decrease in VEGF-induced VEGFR-2 phosphorylation, whereas PDCL3 over-expression increased VEGFR-2 protein. Furthermore, we show that PDCL3 protects VEGFR-2 from misfolding and aggregation. The data provide new insights for the chaperone function of PDCL3 in angiogenesis and the roles of hypoxia and N-terminal methionine acetylation in PDCL3 expression and its effect on VEGFR-2. PMID:26059764

  19. Behavioral experience induces zif268 expression in mature granule cells but suppresses its expression in immature granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Huckleberry, Kylie A.; Kane, Gary A.; Mathis, Rita J.; Cook, Sarah G.; Clutton, Jonathan E.; Drew, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of neurons are born each day in the dentate gyrus (DG), but many of these cells die before reaching maturity. Both death and survival of adult-born neurons are regulated by neuronal activity in the DG. The immediate-early gene (IEG) zif268 appears to be an important mediator of these effects, as its expression can be induced by neural activity and knockout of zif268 impairs survival of adult-born neurons (Richardson et al., 1992; Veyrac et al., 2013). Despite the apparent importance of zif268 for adult neurogenesis, its behavior-induced expression has not been fully characterized in adult-born neurons. Here we characterize behavior-evoked expression of zif268 in mature and newborn dentate granule cells (DGCs). We first quantified zif268 expression in doublecortin-positive (DCX+) immature neurons and in the general granule cell population after brief exposure to a novel environment (NE). In the general granule cell population, zif268 expression peaked 1 h after NE exposure and returned to baseline by 8 h post-exposure. However, in the DCX+ cells, zif268 expression was suppressed relative to home cage for at least 8 h post-exposure. We next asked whether suppression of zif268 in DCX+ immature cells occurs in other behavioral paradigms that recruit the hippocampus. Exposure to Morris water maze (MWM) training, an enriched environment, or a NE caused approximately equal suppression of zif268 expression in DCX+ cells and approximately equal activation of zif268 expression among the general granule cell population. The same behavioral procedures activated zif268 expression in 6-week-old BrdU-labeled adult-born neurons, indicating that zif268 suppression is specific to immature neurons. Finally, we asked whether zif268 suppression varied as a function of age within the DCX+ population, which ranges in age from 0 to approximately 4 weeks. NE exposure had no significant effect on zif268 expression in 2- or 4-week-old BrdU-labeled neurons, but it significantly

  20. Heat-Stable Molecule Derived from Streptococcus cristatus Induces APOBEC3 Expression and Inhibits HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Qiujia; Kinlock, Ballington L.; Wang, Chenliang; Hildreth, James E. K.; Xie, Hua; Liu, Bindong

    2014-01-01

    Although most human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) cases worldwide are transmitted through mucosal surfaces, transmission through the oral mucosal surface is a rare event. More than 700 bacterial species have been detected in the oral cavity. Despite great efforts to discover oral inhibitors of HIV, little information is available concerning the anti-HIV activity of oral bacterial components. Here we show that a molecule from an oral commensal bacterium, Streptococcus cristatus CC5A can induce expression of APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F) and inhibit HIV-1 replication in THP-1 cells. We show by qRT-PCR that expression levels of A3G and A3F increase in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of a CC5A extract, as does A3G protein levels by Western blot assay. In addition, when the human monocytic cell line THP-1 was treated with CC5A extract, the replication of HIV-1 IIIB was significantly suppressed compared with IIIB replication in untreated THP-1 cells. Knock down of A3G expression in THP-1 cells compromised the ability of CC5A to inhibit HIV-1 IIIB infectivity. Furthermore, SupT1 cells infected with virus produced from CC5A extract-treated THP-1 cells replicated virus with a higher G to A hypermutation rate (a known consequence of A3G activity) than virus used from untreated THP-1 cells. This suggests that S. cristatus CC5A contains a molecule that induces A3G/F expression and thereby inhibits HIV replication. These findings might lead to the discovery of a novel anti-HIV/AIDS therapeutic. PMID:25165817

  1. Mifepristone-inducible transgene expression in neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hjelm, BE; Grunseich, C; Gowing, G; Avalos, P; Tian, J; Shelley, BC; Mooney, M; Narwani, K; Shi, Y; Svendsen, CN; Wolfe, JH; Fischbeck, KH; Pierson, TM

    2016-01-01

    Numerous gene and cell therapy strategies are being developed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Many of these strategies use constitutive expression of therapeutic transgenic proteins, and although functional in animal models of disease, this method is less likely to provide adequate flexibility for delivering therapy to humans. Ligand-inducible gene expression systems may be more appropriate for these conditions, especially within the central nervous system (CNS). Mifepristone’s ability to cross the blood–brain barrier makes it an especially attractive ligand for this purpose. We describe the production of a mifepristone-inducible vector system for regulated expression of transgenes within the CNS. Our inducible system used a lentivirus-based vector platform for the ex vivo production of mifepristone-inducible murine neural progenitor cells that express our transgenes of interest. These cells were processed through a series of selection steps to ensure that the cells exhibited appropriate transgene expression in a dose-dependent and temporally controlled manner with minimal background activity. Inducible cells were then transplanted into the brains of rodents, where they exhibited appropriate mifepristone-inducible expression. These studies detail a strategy for regulated expression in the CNS for use in the development of safe and efficient gene therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:26863047

  2. Mifepristone-inducible transgene expression in neural progenitor cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hjelm, B E; Grunseich, C; Gowing, G; Avalos, P; Tian, J; Shelley, B C; Mooney, M; Narwani, K; Shi, Y; Svendsen, C N; Wolfe, J H; Fischbeck, K H; Pierson, T M

    2016-05-01

    Numerous gene and cell therapy strategies are being developed for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Many of these strategies use constitutive expression of therapeutic transgenic proteins, and although functional in animal models of disease, this method is less likely to provide adequate flexibility for delivering therapy to humans. Ligand-inducible gene expression systems may be more appropriate for these conditions, especially within the central nervous system (CNS). Mifepristone's ability to cross the blood-brain barrier makes it an especially attractive ligand for this purpose. We describe the production of a mifepristone-inducible vector system for regulated expression of transgenes within the CNS. Our inducible system used a lentivirus-based vector platform for the ex vivo production of mifepristone-inducible murine neural progenitor cells that express our transgenes of interest. These cells were processed through a series of selection steps to ensure that the cells exhibited appropriate transgene expression in a dose-dependent and temporally controlled manner with minimal background activity. Inducible cells were then transplanted into the brains of rodents, where they exhibited appropriate mifepristone-inducible expression. These studies detail a strategy for regulated expression in the CNS for use in the development of safe and efficient gene therapy for neurological disorders. PMID:26863047

  3. Inducible and Reversible Lentiviral and Recombination Mediated Cassette Exchange (RMCE) Systems for Controlling Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bersten, David C.; Sullivan, Adrienne E.; Li, Dian; Bhakti, Veronica; Bent, Stephen J.; Whitelaw, Murray L.

    2015-01-01

    Manipulation of gene expression to invoke loss of function (LoF) or gain of function (GoF) phenotypes is important for interrogating complex biological questions both in vitro and in vivo. Doxycycline (Dox)-inducible gene expression systems are commonly used although success is often limited by high background and insufficient sensitivity to Dox. Here we develop broadly applicable platforms for reliable, tightly controlled and reversible Dox-inducible systems for lentiviral mediated generation of cell lines or FLP Recombination-Mediated Cassette Exchange (RMCE) into the Collagen 1a1 (Col1a1) locus (FLP-In Col1a1) in mouse embryonic stem cells. We significantly improve the flexibility, usefulness and robustness of the Dox-inducible system by using Tetracycline (Tet) activator (Tet-On) variants which are more sensitive to Dox, have no background activity and are expressed from single Gateway-compatible constructs. We demonstrate the usefulness of these platforms in ectopic gene expression or gene knockdown in multiple cell lines, primary neurons and in FLP-In Col1a1 mouse embryonic stem cells. We also improve the flexibility of RMCE Dox-inducible systems by generating constructs that allow for tissue or cell type-specific Dox-inducible expression and generate a shRNA selection algorithm that can effectively predict potent shRNA sequences able to knockdown gene expression from single integrant constructs. These platforms provide flexible, reliable and broadly applicable inducible expression systems for studying gene function. PMID:25768837

  4. Eicosapentaenoic acid inhibits UV-induced MMP-1 expression in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Ho; Shin, Chung Min; Park, Chi-Hyun; Kim, Kyu Han; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Eun, Hee Chul; Chung, Jin Ho

    2005-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation regulates UV-responsive genes, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Moreover, UV-induced MMPs cause connective tissue damage and the skin to become wrinkled and aged. Here, we investigated the effect of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), a dietary omega-3 fatty acid, on UV-induced MMP-1 expression in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). We found that UV radiation increases MMP-1 expression and that this is mediated by p44 and p42 MAP kinase (ERK) and Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation but not by p38 activation. Pretreatment of HDFs with EPA inhibited UV-induced MMP-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner and also inhibited the UV-induced activation of ERK and JNK by inhibiting ERK kinase (MEK1) and SAPK/ERK kinase 1 (SEK1) activation, respectively. Moreover, inhibition of ERK and JNK by EPA resulted in the decrease of c-Fos expression and c-Jun phosphorylation/expression induced by UV, respectively, which led to the inhibition of UV-induced activator protein-1 DNA binding activity. This inhibitory effect of EPA on MMP-1 was not mediated by an antioxidant effect. We also found that EPA inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- or tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced MMP-1 expression in HDFs and UV-induced MMP-1 expression in HaCaT cells. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that EPA can inhibit UV-induced MMP-1 expression by inhibiting the MEK1/ERK/c-Fos and SEK1/JNK/c-Jun pathways. Therefore, EPA is a potential agent for the prevention and treatment of skin aging. PMID:15930517

  5. Repeatable, Inducible Micro-RNA-Based Technology Tightly Controls Liver Transgene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Iulian I; Viola, Joana R; Moreno, Pedro M D; Simonson, Oscar E; Rodin, Sergey; Teller, Nathalie; Tryggvason, Karl; Lundin, Karin E; Girnita, Leonard; Smith, Carl Inge Edvard

    2014-01-01

    Inducible systems for gene expression emerge as a new class of artificial vectors offering temporal and spatial exogenous control of gene expression. However, most inducible systems are less efficient in vivo and lack the target-organ specificity. In the present study, we have developed and optimized an oligonucleotide-based inducible system for the in vivo control of transgenes in the liver. We generated a set of simple, inducible plasmid-vectors based on the addition of four units of liver-specific miR-122 target sites to the 3′untranslated region of the gene of interest. Once the vector was delivered into hepatocytes this modification induced a dramatic reduction of gene expression that could be restored by the infusion of an antagomir for miR-122. The efficiency of the system was tested in vivo, and displayed low background and strong increase in gene expression upon induction. Moreover, gene expression was repeatedly induced even several months after the first induction showing no toxic effect in vivo. By combining tissue-specific control elements with antagomir treatment we generated, optimized and validated a robust inducible system that could be used successfully for in vivo experimental models requiring tight and cyclic control of gene expression. PMID:24983837

  6. Homocysteine induces cardiac hypertrophy by up-regulating ATP7a expression

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhanwei; Zhang, Yanzhou; Sun, Tongwen; Zhang, Shuguang; Yu, Weiya; Zhu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study is to investigate the molecular mechanism by which homocysteine (Hcy) induces cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Primary cardiomyocytes were obtained from baby Sprague-Dawley rats within 3 days after birth. Flow cytometry was used to measure cell sizes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the expression of β-myosin heavy chain and atrial natriuretic peptide genes. Western blotting assay was employed to determine ATP7a protein expression. Cytochrome C oxidase (COX) activity test was used to evaluate the activity of COX. Atomic absorption spectroscopy was performed to determine copper content. siRNAs were used to target-silence the expression of ATP7a. Results: Hcy induced cardiac hypertrophy and increased the expression of cardiac hypertrophy-related genes. ATP7a was a key factor in cardiac hypertrophy induced by Hcy. Reduced ATP7a expression inhibited cardiac hypertrophy induced by Hcy. Elevated ATP7a expression induced by Hcy inhibited COX activity. Enhanced ATP7a expression inhibited COX activity by lowering intracellular copper content. Conclusions: Hcy elevates ATP7a protein expression, reduces copper content, and lowers COX activity, finally leading to cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26722473

  7. Combinatorial Measurement of CDKN1A/p21 and KIF20A Expression for Discrimination of DNA Damage-Induced Clastogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Rina; Morikawa, Yuji; Kondo, Chiaki; Oka, Hiroyuki; Miyajima, Hirofumi; Kubo, Kihei; Uehara, Takeki

    2014-01-01

    In vitro mammalian cytogenetic tests detect chromosomal aberrations and are used for testing the genotoxicity of compounds. This study aimed to identify a supportive genomic biomarker could minimize the risk of misjudgments and aid appropriate decision making in genotoxicity testing. Human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were treated with each of six DNA damage-inducing genotoxins (clastogens) or two genotoxins that do not cause DNA damage. Cells were exposed to each compound for 4 h, and gene expression was comprehensively examined using Affymetrix U133A microarrays. Toxicogenomic analysis revealed characteristic alterations in the expression of genes included in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A/p21)-centered network. The majority of genes included in this network were upregulated on treatment with DNA damage-inducing clastogens. The network, however, also included kinesin family member 20A (KIF20A) downregulated by treatment with all the DNA damage-inducing clastogens. Downregulation of KIF20A expression was successfully confirmed using additional DNA damage-inducing clastogens. Our analysis also demonstrated that nucleic acid constituents falsely downregulated the expression of KIF20A, possibly via p16 activation, independently of the CDKN1A signaling pathway. Our results indicate the potential of KIF20A as a supportive biomarker for clastogenicity judgment and possible mechanisms involved in KIF20A downregulation in DNA damage and non-DNA damage signaling networks. PMID:25264741

  8. Shigella dysenteriae Modulates BMP Pathway to Induce Mucin Gene Expression In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ashidha; Iyer, Soumya Chidambaram; Gopal, Udhayakumar; Devaraj, Niranjali; Halagowder, Devaraj

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal epithelial cells in the intestine act as the first line of host defense against pathogens by increasing mucin production for clearance. Despite this fact, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which Shigella dysenteriae transduce mucin gene expression remain poorly defined. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway in mucin gene expression during S. dysenteriae infection. In this study we demonstrate that S. dysenteriae activates BMP signaling to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression in rat ileal loop model and in vitro. We also observed that BMP pathway regulates CDX2 expression which plays a critical role in induction of MUC2 gene during S. dysenteriae infection. In SMAD4 silenced cells S. dysenteriae infection did not abrogate MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression whereas in CDX2 silenced cells it induces differential expression of MUC5AC gene. These results suggest that SMAD4-CDX2 induces MUC2 gene expression whereas SMAD4 directly influences differential expression of MUC5AC gene. Altogether, our results show that during S. dysenteriae infection the BMP pathway modulates inflammatory transcription factors CDX2 and SMAD4 to induce MUC2 and MUC5AC gene expression which plays a key role in the regulation of host mucosal defense thereby paving a cue for therapeutic application. PMID:25365201

  9. METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    METHYL METHANESULFONATE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Re...

  10. AGE-RELATED GENE EXPRESSION CHANGES IN HUMAN SKIN FIBROBLASTS INDUCED BY MMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Age-Related Gene Expression Changes In Human Skin Fibroblasts Induced By methyl methanesulfonate. Geremy W. Knapp, Alan H. Tennant, and Russell D. Owen. Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U. S. Environmental Prote...

  11. Infrared laser-induced gene expression in targeted single cells of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Motoshi; Toyoda, Naoya; Shimojou, Masaki; Takagi, Shin

    2013-05-01

    Since the dawn of transgenic technology some 40 years ago, biologists have sought ways to manipulate, at their discretion, the expression of particular genes of interest in living organisms. The infrared laser-evoked gene operator (IR-LEGO) is a recently developed system for inducing gene expression in living organisms in a targeted fashion. It exploits the highly efficient capacity of an infrared laser for heating cells, to provide a high level of gene expression driven by heat-inducible promoters. By irradiating living specimens with a laser under a microscope, heat shock responses can be induced in individual cells, thereby inducing a particular gene, under the control of a heat shock promoter, in specifically targeted cells. In this review we first summarize previous attempts to drive transgene expression in organisms by using heat shock promoters, and then introduce the basic principle of the IR-LEGO system, and its applications. PMID:23614811

  12. X-Radiation Induces Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Apoptosis by Upregulation of Axin Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Han Yang; Wang Yan; Xu Hongtao; Yang Lianhe; Wei Qiang; Liu Yang; Zhang Yong; Zhao Yue; Dai Shundong; Miao Yuan; Yu Juanhan; Zhang Junyi; Li, Guang; Yuan Ximing; Wang Enhua

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: Axis inhibition (Axin) is an important negative regulator of the Wnt pathway. This study investigated the relationship between Axin expression and sensitivity to X-rays in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to find a useful indicator of radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: Tissue from NSCLC patients, A549 cells, and BE1 cells expressing Axin were exposed to 1-Gy of X-radiation. Axin and p53 expression levels were detected by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-PCR. Apoptosis was determined by TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) assay and FACS (fluorescence-activate cell sorter) analysis. Caspase-3 activity was determined by Western blotting. Phospho-JNK expression was determined by immunofluorescence. Results: The expression of Axin was significantly lower in NSCLC tissues than in normal lung tissues (p < 0.05). Axin expression correlates with differentiation, TNM staging, and lymph node metastasis of NSCLC (p < 0.05). Its expression negatively correlates with the expression of p53(mt) (p=0.000) and positively correlates with apoptosis (p=0.002). The prognosis of patients with high expression of Axin was better than those with low expression. X-radiation increases Axin expression in NSCLC tissue, and caspase-3 is significantly higher in samples in which Axin is increased (p < 0.05). Both X-radiation and Axin induce apoptosis of A549 and BE1 cells; however, the combination of the two enhances the apoptotic effect (p < 0.05). In A549 cells, inhibition of p53 blocks Axin-induced apoptosis, whereas in BE1 cells, the JNK pathway is required. Conclusions: Axin induces the p53 apoptotic pathway in cells where this pathway is intact; however, in cells expressing p53(mt), Axin induces apoptosis via the JNK pathway. Elevated Axin expression following X-ray exposure is a reliable indicator for determining the radiosensitivity of NSCLC.

  13. Glutathione peroxidase-1 inhibits UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lei; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Coleman, Mitchell C.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Wertz, Philip W.; Domann, Frederick E. . E-mail: frederick-domann@uiowa.edu

    2006-12-29

    In this study, we found a role for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression in the HaCaT human keratinocyte cell line. UVA irradiation not only increased AP-2{alpha}, but also caused accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the cell culture media, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by itself could induce the expression of AP-2{alpha}. By catalyzing the removal of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} from cells through over-expression of GPx-1, induction of AP-2{alpha} expression by UVA was abolished. Induction of transcription factor AP-2{alpha} by UVA had been previously shown to be mediated through the second messenger ceramide. We found that not only UVA irradiation, but also H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by itself caused increases of ceramide in HaCaT cells, and C2-ceramide added to cells induced the AP-2{alpha} signaling pathway. Finally, forced expression of GPx-1 eliminated UVA-induced ceramide accumulation as well as AP-2{alpha} expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that GPx-1 inhibits UVA-induced AP-2{alpha} expression by suppressing the accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  14. Estradiol-induced gene expression in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowman, C.J.; Kroll, K.J.; Gross, T.G.; Denslow, N.D.

    2002-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) and estrogen receptor (ER) gene expression levels were measured in largemouth bass to evaluate the activation of the ER-mediated pathway by estradiol (E2). Single injections of E2 ranging from 0.0005 to 5 mg/kg up-regulated plasma Vtg in a dose-dependent manner. Vtg and ER mRNAs were measured using partial cDNA sequences corresponding to the C-terminal domain for Vtg and the ligand-binding domain of ER?? sequences. After acute E2-exposures (2 mg/kg), Vtg and ER mRNAs and plasma Vtg levels peaked after 2 days. The rate of ER mRNA accumulation peaked 36-42 h earlier than Vtg mRNA. The expression window for ER defines the primary response to E2 in largemouth bass and that for Vtg a delayed primary response. The specific effect of E2 on other estrogen-regulated genes was tested during these same time windows using differential display RT-PCR. Specific up-regulated genes that are expressed in the same time window as Vtg were ERp72 (a membrane-bound disulfide isomerase) and a gene with homology to an expressed gene identified in zebrafish. Genes that were expressed in a pattern that mimics the ER include the gene for zona radiata protein ZP2, and a gene with homology to an expressed gene found in winter flounder. One gene for fibrinogen ?? was down-regulated and an unidentified gene was transiently up-regulated after 12 h of exposure and returned to basal levels by 48 h. Taken together these studies indicate that the acute molecular response to E2 involves a complex network of responses over time. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Low dose hydroxylated PCB induces c-Jun expression in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Noriaki; Miyazaki, Wataru; Iwasaki, Toshiharu; Koibuchi, Noriyuki

    2006-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are known as environmental pollutants that may cause adverse health problems. Recently, accumulating evidence shows that PCBs express neurotoxicity through alteration of gene expression and signal transduction. On the other hand, c-Jun, a component of AP-1, is likely to coordinate transcription programs in response to various extracellular signals. However, little is known about the effects of PCBs on c-Jun expression. Here we investigated the expression of c-Jun in response to PCB. PC12 cells were incubated with hydroxylated PCB (4(OH)-2',3,3',4',5'-penta chlorobiphenyl, OH-PCB) at a final concentration from 10(-8) to 10(-5)M. The level of c-Jun expression was increased by OH-PCB at relatively low-dose; concentration of OH-PCB at 10(-8)M and 10(-7)M produced a 2.4- and 3.5-fold increase of c-Jun expression in respectively, compared with the values without OH-PCB treatment. Thyroid hormone (T3) did not induce such c-Jun expression, indicating that the effect of OH-PCB is not mediated through thyroid hormone signaling pathway. OH-PCB also enhanced phosphorylation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases. To determine whether the activation of Ca2+ channel is involved in the OH-PCB-induced c-Jun expression, we examined it using a L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel blocker nimodipine. Nimodipine partially inhibited OH-PCB-induced c-Jun expression by 50%. Moreover, Na+ channel antagonist tetrodotoxin inhibited OH-PCB-induced c-Jun expression completely. Taken together, our results indicate that exposure to OH-PCB induces c-Jun expression, and the response may be triggered by depolarization of a plasma membrane via Na+ influx, followed by Ca2+ influx partially through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. PMID:16300829

  16. Regulation of sesquiterpene cyclase gene expression. Characterization of an elicitor- and pathogen-inducible promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Yin, S; Mei, L; Newman, J; Back, K; Chappell, J

    1997-01-01

    The promoter for a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) sesquiterpene cyclase gene, a key regulatory step in sesquiterpene phytoalexin biosynthesis, has been analyzed. The EAS4 promoter was fused to the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene, and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of GUS activity were examined in stably transformed plants and in transient expression assays using electroporated protoplasts of tobacco. No GUS activity was observed in any tissues under normal growth conditions. A low level of GUS activity was detected in wounded leaf, root, and stem tissues, whereas a much higher level was observed when these tissues were challenged with elicitors or microbial pathogens. The GUS expression pattern directed by the EAS4 promoter was identical to the induction patterns observed for the endogenous sesquiterpene cyclase genes. Neither exogenous salicylic acid nor methyl jasmonate induced GUS expression; and H2O2 induced GUS expression to only a limited extent. Although the EAS4 promoter contains cis-sequences resembling previously identified transcriptional control motifs, other cis-sequences important for quantitative and qualitative gene expression were identified by deletion and gain-of-function analyses. The EAS4 promoter differs from previously described pathogen-/elicitor-inducible promoters because it only supports inducible gene expression and directs unique spatial expression patterns. PMID:9342864

  17. Intracellular insulin-like growth factor-1 induces Bcl-2 expression in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chand, Hitendra S; Harris, Jennifer Foster; Mebratu, Yohannes; Chen, Yangde; Wright, Paul S; Randell, Scott H; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes

    2012-05-01

    Bcl-2, a prosurvival protein, regulates programmed cell death during development and repair processes, and it can be oncogenic when cell proliferation is deregulated. The present study investigated what factors modulate Bcl-2 expression in airway epithelial cells and identified the pathways involved. Microarray analysis of mRNA from airway epithelial cells captured by laser microdissection showed that increased expression of IL-1β and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) coincided with induced Bcl-2 expression compared with controls. Treatment of cultured airway epithelial cells with IL-1β and IGF-1 induced Bcl-2 expression by increasing Bcl-2 mRNA stability with no discernible changes in promoter activity. Silencing the IGF-1 expression using short hairpin RNA showed that intracellular IGF-1 (IC-IGF-1) was increasing Bcl-2 expression. Blocking epidermal growth factor receptor or IGF-1R activation also suppressed IC-IGF-1 and abolished the Bcl-2 induction. Induced expression and colocalization of IC-IGF-1 and Bcl-2 were observed in airway epithelial cells of mice exposed to LPS or cigarette smoke and of patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis but not in the respective controls. These studies demonstrate that IC-IGF-1 induces Bcl-2 expression in epithelial cells via IGF-1R and epidermal growth factor receptor pathways, and targeting IC-IGF-1 could be beneficial to treat chronic airway diseases. PMID:22461702

  18. MiRNA expression signatures induced by Marek disease virus infection in chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MMicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Emerging evidence suggests that differential miRNA expression is associated with viral infection and cancer. Marek's disease virus infection induces lymphoma in chickens. However, the host...

  19. Albumin induced cytokine expression in porcine adipose tissue explants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albumin has historically been included in medium designed for use with adipose tissue when evaluating metabolism, gene expression or protein secretion. However, recent studies with mouse adipocytes (Ruan et al., J. Biol. Chem. 278:47585-47593, 2003) and human adipose tissue (Schlesinger et al., Ame...

  20. Transposon-induced nuclear mutations that alter chloroplast gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Barkan, A.

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this project is to use mutant phenotypes as a guide to nuclear genes that determine the timing and localization of chloroplast development The immediate goals are to identify nuclear mutants with defects in chloroplast gene expression from maize lines harboring active Mu transposons; characterize their phenotypes to determine the precise defect in gene expression; clone several of the most interesting mutations by exploiting the transposon tag; and use the clones to further define the roles of these genes in modulating chloroplast gene expression. Three mutants were described earlier that had global defects in chloroplast gene expression. We have found that two of these mutations are allelic. Both alleles have global defects in chloroplast translation initiation, as revealed by the failure to assemble chloroplast mRNAs into polysomes. We have isolated and characterized three new mutants from Mu lines that have novel defects in chloroplast RNA metabolism. We are now ready to begin the task of cloning several of these genes, by using the Mu transposon tag.

  1. Constitutively expressed Siglec-9 inhibits LPS-induced CCR7, but enhances IL-4-induced CD200R expression in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Hiroshi; Shoji, Toru; Iijima, Shinji; Nishijima, Ken-Ichi

    2016-06-01

    Siglecs recognize the sialic acid moiety and regulate various immune responses. In the present study, we compared the expression levels of Siglecs in human monocytes and macrophages using a quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The differentiation of monocytes into macrophages by macrophage colony-stimulating factor or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhanced the expression of Siglec-7 and Siglec-9. The differentiated macrophages were stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon (IFN)-γ or interleukin (IL)-4. The expression of Siglec-10 was enhanced by IL-4, whereas that of Siglec-7 was reduced by LPS plus IFN-γ. The expression of Siglec-9 was not affected by these stimuli. The knockdown of Siglec-9 enhanced the expression of CCR7 induced by the LPS or the LPS plus IFN-γ stimulation, and decreased the IL-4-induced expression of CD200R. These results suggest that Siglec-9 is one of the main Siglecs in human blood monocytes/macrophages and modulates innate immunity. PMID:26923638

  2. Bioinforrnatics of Gene Expression Profiling Data Provide Mechanistic Understanding of Acute Ozone-Induced Lung injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation are well characterized. A few studies have used gene expression profiling to determine the types of changes induced by ozone; however the mechanisms or the pathways involved are less well understood. We presumed that robust bi...

  3. FORMALDEHYDE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN F344 RAT NASAL RESPIRATORY EPITHELIUM.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Formaldehyde-induced gene expression in F344 rat nasal respiratory epithelium

    ABSTRACT

    Formaldehyde, an occupational and environmental toxicant used extensively in the manufacturing of many household and personal use products, is known to induce squamous cell carci...

  4. Light-induced expression of fatty acid desaturase genes

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Mihály; Zsiros, Otto; Farkas, Tibor; Wada, Hajime; Nagy, Ferenc; Gombos, Zoltán

    1998-01-01

    In cyanobacterial cells, fatty acid desaturation is one of the crucial steps in the acclimation processes to low-temperature conditions. The expression of all the four acyl lipid desaturase genes of Synechocystis PCC 6803 was studied as a function of temperature and separately as a function of light. We used cells grown at 25°C in light-activated heterotrophic growth conditions. In these cells, the production of α-linolenic acid and 18:4 fatty acids was negligible and the synthesis of γ-linolenic acid was remarkably suppressed compared with those of the cells grown photoautotrophically. The cells grown in the light in the presence of glucose showed no difference in fatty acid composition compared with cells grown photoautotrophically. The level of desC mRNA for Δ9 desaturase was not affected by either the temperature or the light. It was constitutively expressed at 25°C with and without illumination. The level of desB transcripts was negligible in the dark-grown cells and was enhanced about 10-fold by exposure of the cells to light. The maximum level of expression occurred within 15 min. The level of desA and desD mRNAs was higher in dark-grown cells than that of desB mRNA for ω3 desaturase. However, the induction of both desA and desD mRNAs for Δ12 and Δ6 desaturases, respectively, was enhanced by light about 10-fold. Rifampicin, chloramphenicol, and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea completely blocked the induction of the expression of desA, desB, and desD. Consequently, we suggest the regulatory role of light via photosynthetic processes in the induction of the expression of acyl lipid desaturases. PMID:9539715

  5. Tert-butylhydroquinone ameliorates doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin-Feng; Su, Su-Wen; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Rong; Niu, Yu-Jie; Guo, Yan-Su; Li, Chun-Yan; Jiang, Wen-Bo; Liu, Yi; Guo, Hui-Cai

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiotoxicity. Nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that orchestrates the antioxidant and cytoprotective responses to oxidative stress. In the present study, we tested whether tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) could protect against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity in vivo and, if so, whether the protection was associated with the up-regulation of the Nrf2 pathway. The results showed that treatment with tBHQ significantly decreased the DOX-induced cardiac injury in wild-type mice. Moreover, tBHQ ameliorated the DOX-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. Further studies suggested that tBHQ increased the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 and the Nrf2-regulated gene expression, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxido-reductase-1 (NQO-1) expression. Knocking out Nrf2 in mice abolished the protective effect of tBHQ on the DOX-induced cardiotoxicity. These results indicate that tBHQ has a beneficial effect on DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, and this effect was associated with the enhanced expression of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant genes, HO-1 and NQO-1. PMID:26692920

  6. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  7. Light-dependent expression of flg22-induced defense genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Satoshi; Aoyama, Mayu; Nakai, Kana; Shimotani, Koji; Yamasaki, Kanako; Sato, Masa H.; Tojo, Daisuke; Suwastika, I. Nengah; Nomura, Hironari; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplasts have been reported to generate retrograde immune signals that activate defense gene expression in the nucleus. However, the roles of light and photosynthesis in plant immunity remain largely elusive. In this study, we evaluated the effects of light on the expression of defense genes induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellins which acts as a potent elicitor in plants. Whole-transcriptome analysis of flg22-treated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under light and dark conditions for 30 min revealed that a number of (30%) genes strongly induced by flg22 (>4.0) require light for their rapid expression, whereas flg22-repressed genes include a significant number of genes that are down-regulated by light. Furthermore, light is responsible for the flg22-induced accumulation of salicylic acid (SA), indicating that light is indispensable for basal defense responses in plants. To elucidate the role of photosynthesis in defense, we further examined flg22-induced defense gene expression in the presence of specific inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB). Light-dependent expression of defense genes was largely suppressed by DBMIB, but only partially suppressed by DCMU. These findings suggest that photosynthetic electron flow plays a role in controlling the light-dependent expression of flg22-inducible defense genes. PMID:25346742

  8. Induced myelomonocytic differentiation in leukemia cells is accompanied by noncanonical transcription factor expression

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Holly A.; Yourish, Harmony B.; Bunaciu, Rodica P.; Varner, Jeffrey D.; Yen, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors that drive non-neoplastic myelomonocytic differentiation are well characterized but have not been systematically analyzed in the leukemic context. We investigated widely used, patient-derived myeloid leukemia cell lines with proclivity for differentiation into granulocytes by retinoic acid (RA) and/or monocytes by 1,25-dihyrdroxyvitamin D3 (D3). Using K562 (FAB M1), HL60 (FAB M2), RA-resistant HL60 sublines, NB4 (FAB M3), and U937 (FAB M5), we correlated nuclear transcription factor expression to immunophenotype, G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and functional inducible oxidative metabolism. We found that myelomonocytic transcription factors are aberrantly expressed in these cell lines. Monocytic-lineage factor EGR1 was not induced by D3 (the monocytic inducer) but instead by RA (the granulocytic inducer) in lineage bipotent myeloblastic HL60. In promyelocytic NB4 cells, EGR1 levels were increased by D3, while Gfi-1 expression (which promotes the granulocytic lineage) was upregulated during D3-induced monocytic differentiation in HL60, and by RA treatment in monocytic U937 cells. Furthermore, RARα and VDR expression were not strongly correlated to differentiation. In response to different differentiation inducers, U937 exhibited the most distinct transcription factor expression profile, while similarly mature NB4 and HL60 were better coupled. Overall, the differentiation induction agents RA and D3 elicited cell-specific responses across these common FAB M1-M5 cell lines. PMID:26566473

  9. Mycobacterium fortuitum induces A20 expression that impairs macrophage inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gippeum Joy; Lee, Hye-Mi; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyung; Sohn, Kyung Mok; Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that has been regarded as an etiological agent of a variety of human infections. However, little is known about the host inflammatory responses and the molecular mechanisms by which MF-induced inflammation is regulated in macrophages. In this study, we report that MF infection leads to the induction of an anti-inflammatory molecule, A20 (also known as TNFAIP3), which is essential for the regulation of MF-induced inflammatory responses in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). MF triggered the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in BMDMs through signaling of the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88. Additionally, MF rapidly induced the expression of A20, which inhibited proinflammatory cytokine expression and nuclear factor (NF)-κB reporter gene activities in BMDMs. Notably, MF-induced activation of NF-κB signaling was required for A20 expression and proinflammatory responses in BMDMs. Furthermore, the rough morphotype of the MF clinical strain induced a higher level of proinflammatory signaling activation, but less A20 induction in BMDMs, compared to the smooth morphotype. Taken together, these results suggest that MF-induced activation of host proinflammatory responses is negatively regulated through TLR2-dependent A20 expression. PMID:26940588

  10. Inducible virus-mediated expression of a foreign protein in suspension-cultured plant cells.

    PubMed

    Dohi, K; Nishikiori, M; Tamai, A; Ishikawa, M; Meshi, T; Mori, M

    2006-06-01

    Although suspension-cultured plant cells have many potential merits as sources of useful proteins, the lack of an efficient expression system has prevented using this approach. In this study, we established an inducible tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) infection system in tobacco BY-2 suspension-cultured cells to inducibly and efficiently produce a foreign protein. In this system, a modified ToMV encoding a foreign protein as replacement of the coat protein is expressed from stably transformed cDNA under the control of an estrogen-inducible promoter in transgenic BY-2 cells. Estrogen added to the culture activates an estrogen-inducible transactivator expressed constitutively from the transgene and induces transcription and replication of viral RNA. In our experiments, accumulation of viral RNA and expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoded in the virus were observed within 24 h after induction. The amount of GFP reached approximately 10% of total soluble protein 4 d after induction. In contrast, neither viral RNA nor GFP were detected in uninduced cells. The inducible virus infection system established here should be utilized not only for the expression of foreign proteins, but also for investigations into the viral replication process in cultured plant cells. PMID:16421635

  11. Paclitaxel induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression through reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Sun; Oh, Jin Mi; Jin, Dong Hoon; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2008-01-01

    The antineoplastic drug paclitaxel is known to block cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle through stabilization of microtubules. The development of paclitaxel resistance in tumors is one of the most significant obstacles to successful therapy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) are important regulators of neovascularization. HIF-1 regulates VEGF expression at the transcriptional level. Here, we investigated whether paclitaxel treatment affects VEGF expression for the development of paclitaxel resistance. Paclitaxel treatment induced dose-dependent cell death and increased VEGF expression. Paclitaxel also induced nuclear factor-kappaB activation and stabilized HIF-1alpha, which stimulated luciferase activity of HIF-1alpha response element on VEGF gene. As paclitaxel treatment produced reactive oxygen species (ROS), VEGF expression was increased by H2O2 treatment and reduced by various ROS scavengers such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and diphenylene iodonium. Paclitaxel-induced cell death was aggravated by incubation with those ROS scavengers. Collectively, this suggests that paclitaxel-induced VEGF expression could be mediated by paclitaxel-induced ROS production through nuclear factor-kappaB activation and HIF-1alpha stabilization, which could affect resistance induction to antitumor therapeutics during cancer treatment. PMID:18322419

  12. Dexmedetomidine Modulates Histamine-induced Ca2+ Signaling and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongki

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that exerts its effects by selectively agonizing α2 adrenoceptor. Histamine is a pathophysiological amine that activates G protein-coupled receptors, to induce Ca2+ release and subsequent mediate or progress inflammation. Dexmedetomidine has been reported to exert inhibitory effect on inflammation both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, it is unclear that dexmedetomidine modulates histamine-induced signaling and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. This study was carried out to assess how dexmedetomidine modulates histamine-induced Ca2+ signaling and regulates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes encoding interleukin (IL)-6 and -8. To elucidate the regulatory role of dexmedetomidine on histamine signaling, HeLa cells and human salivary gland cells which are endogenously expressed histamine 1 receptor were used. Dexmedetomidine itself did not trigger Ca2+ peak or increase in the presence or absence of external Ca2+. When cells were stimulated with histamine after pretreatment with various concentrations of dexmedetomidine, we observed inhibited histamine-induced [Ca2+]i signal in both cell types. Histamine stimulated IL-6 mRNA expression not IL-8 mRNA within 2 hrs, however this effect was attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Collectively, these findings suggest that dexmedetomidine modulates histamine-induced Ca2+ signaling and IL-6 expression and will be useful for understanding the antagonistic properties of dexmedetomidine on histamine-induced signaling beyond its sedative effect. PMID:26330753

  13. A self-inducible heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Briand, L.; Marcion, G.; Kriznik, A.; Heydel, J. M.; Artur, Y.; Garrido, C.; Seigneuric, R.; Neiers, F.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important experimental, medical and industrial cell factory for recombinant protein production. The inducible lac promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for heterologous protein expression in E. coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) is currently the most efficient molecular inducer for regulating this promoter’s transcriptional activity. However, limitations have been observed in large-scale and microplate production, including toxicity, cost and culture monitoring. Here, we report the novel SILEX (Self-InducibLe Expression) system, which is a convenient, cost-effective alternative that does not require cell density monitoring or IPTG induction. We demonstrate the broad utility of the presented self-inducible method for a panel of diverse proteins produced in large amounts. The SILEX system is compatible with all classical culture media and growth temperatures and allows protein expression modulation. Importantly, the SILEX system is proven to be efficient for protein expression screening on a microplate scale. PMID:27611846

  14. Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gajbhiye, Virendra; Escalante, Leah; Chen, Guojun; Laperle, Alex; Zheng, Qifeng; Steyer, Benjamin; Gong, Shaoqin; Saha, Krishanu

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives. PMID:24232694

  15. A self-inducible heterologous protein expression system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Briand, L; Marcion, G; Kriznik, A; Heydel, J M; Artur, Y; Garrido, C; Seigneuric, R; Neiers, F

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is an important experimental, medical and industrial cell factory for recombinant protein production. The inducible lac promoter is one of the most commonly used promoters for heterologous protein expression in E. coli. Isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) is currently the most efficient molecular inducer for regulating this promoter's transcriptional activity. However, limitations have been observed in large-scale and microplate production, including toxicity, cost and culture monitoring. Here, we report the novel SILEX (Self-InducibLe Expression) system, which is a convenient, cost-effective alternative that does not require cell density monitoring or IPTG induction. We demonstrate the broad utility of the presented self-inducible method for a panel of diverse proteins produced in large amounts. The SILEX system is compatible with all classical culture media and growth temperatures and allows protein expression modulation. Importantly, the SILEX system is proven to be efficient for protein expression screening on a microplate scale. PMID:27611846

  16. IL-10 induces gene expression in macrophages: partial overlap with IL-5 but not with IL-4 induced genes.

    PubMed

    Stumpo, Rita; Kauer, Manfred; Martin, Stephan; Kolb, Hubert

    2003-10-01

    The hypothesis that IL-10, in addition to down-regulating pro-inflammatory activities of macrophages, induces an alternative state of macrophage reactivity was tested. We therefore conducted a systematic search for genes induced by IL-10 using the method of suppression subtractive hybridisation. Of an initial 1,300 candidate clones obtained, several screening rounds led to the identification of 51 clones which were reproducibly at least twofold up-regulated in mouse J774 macrophages in response to treatment with IL-10. Of these, 41 genes were homologous to known genes involved in cell metabolism or immunoregulation, five contained novel sequences and another five were homologous to ESTs without known function. One major finding was that about 25% of the IL-10 genes were also found expressed in response to IFNgamma, and several of these also reappeared in IL-4 or IL-5 induced mRNA species. Hence, Th1 and Th2 type cytokines may elicit a common basal activation response in macrophages. The second major finding was that 57% of IL-10 induced genes reappeared in IL-5 induced mRNA but no more than 18% were also found in IL-4 induced mRNA of J774 cells. We conclude that the gene expression response to IL-10 in macrophages is partially different from the response to IL-5 and is substantially different from the response to IL-4, which suggests an unexpected diversity of biological phenotypes induced by different Th2 type cytokines. PMID:14561490

  17. Na+/H+ Exchanger Isoform 1-Induced Osteopontin Expression Facilitates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Iman A.; Gadeau, Alain-Pierre; Fliegel, Larry; Lopaschuk, Gary; Mlih, Mohamed; Abdulrahman, Nabeel; Fillmore, Natasha; Mraiche, Fatima

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced expression and activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) has been implicated in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in various experimental models. The upregulation of NHE1 was correlated with an increase in osteopontin (OPN) expression in models of cardiac hypertrophy (CH), and the mechanism for this remains to be delineated. To determine whether the expression of active NHE1-induces OPN and contributes to the hypertrophic response in vitro, cardiomyocytes were infected with the active form of the NHE1 adenovirus or transfected with OPN silencing RNA (siRNA-OPN) and characterized for cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Expression of NHE1 in cardiomyocytes resulted in a significant increase in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy markers: cell surface area, protein content, ANP mRNA and expression of phosphorylated-GATA4. NHE1 activity was also significantly increased in cardiomyocytes expressing active NHE1. Interestingly, transfection of cardiomyocytes with siRNA-OPN significantly abolished the NHE1-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. siRNA-OPN also significantly reduced the activity of NHE1 in cardiomyocytes expressing NHE1 (68.5±0.24%; P<0.05), confirming the role of OPN in the NHE1-induced hypertrophic response. The hypertrophic response facilitated by NHE1-induced OPN occurred independent of the extracellular-signal-regulated kinases and Akt, but required p90-ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK). The ability of OPN to facilitate the NHE1-induced hypertrophic response identifies OPN as a potential therapeutic target to reverse the hypertrophic effect induced by the expression of active NHE1. PMID:25884410

  18. Non-coding RNA generated following lariat-debranching mediates targeting of AID to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Simin; Vuong, Bao Q.; Vaidyanathan, Bharat; Lin, Jia-Yu; Huang, Feng-Ting; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcription through immunoglobulin switch (S) regions is essential for class switch recombination (CSR) but no molecular function of the transcripts has been described. Likewise, recruitment of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) to S regions is critical for CSR; however, the underlying mechanism has not been fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that intronic switch RNA acts in trans to target AID to S region DNA. AID binds directly to switch RNA through G-quadruplexes formed by the RNA molecules. Disruption of this interaction by mutation of a key residue in the putative RNA-binding domain of AID impairs recruitment of AID to S region DNA, thereby abolishing CSR. Additionally, inhibition of RNA lariat processing leads to loss of AID localization to S regions and compromises CSR; both defects can be rescued by exogenous expression of switch transcripts in a sequence-specific manner. These studies uncover an RNA-mediated mechanism of targeting AID to DNA. PMID:25957684

  19. Rel Induces Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (IRF-4) Expression in Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grumont, Raelene J.; Gerondakis, Steve

    2000-01-01

    In lymphocytes, the Rel transcription factor is essential in establishing a pattern of gene expression that promotes cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Here we show that mitogen-induced expression of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 4 (IRF-4), a lymphoid-specific member of the IFN family of transcription factors, is Rel dependent. Consistent with IRF-4 functioning as a repressor of IFN-induced gene expression, the absence of IRF-4 expression in c-rel−/− B cells coincided with a greater sensitivity of these cells to the antiproliferative activity of IFNs. In turn, enforced expression of an IRF-4 transgene restored IFN modulated c-rel−/− B cell proliferation to that of wild-type cells. This cross-regulation between two different signaling pathways represents a novel mechanism that Rel/nuclear factor κB can repress the transcription of IFN-regulated genes in a cell type–specific manner. PMID:10770796

  20. Interleukin-13 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BPIFA1 Expression in Nasal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Hui-Ying; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Tsu-Fang; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Peng, Ming-Te; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is expressed in human nasopharyngeal and respiratory epithelium and has demonstrated antimicrobial activity. SPLUNC1 is now referred to as bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). Reduced BPIFA1 expression is associated with bacterial colonization in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Interleukin 13 (IL-13), predominately secreted by T helper 2 (TH2) cells, has been found to contribute to airway allergies and suppress BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanism of IL-13 perturbation of bacterial infection and BPIFA1 expression in host airways remains unclear. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells was mediated through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway and AP-1 activation. We further demonstrated that IL-13 downregulated the LPS-induced activation of phosphorylated JNK and c-Jun, followed by attenuation of BPIFA1 expression. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-13 prominently suppressed BPIFA1 expression in eosinophilic CRSwNP patients with bacterial infection. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-13 plays a critical role in attenuation of bacteria-induced BPIFA1 expression that may result in eosinophilic CRSwNP. PMID:26646664

  1. Interleukin-13 Inhibits Lipopolysaccharide-Induced BPIFA1 Expression in Nasal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Tsou, Yung-An; Lin, Chia-Der; Chen, Hui-Chen; Hsu, Hui-Ying; Wu, Lii-Tzu; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Chen, Chih-Jung; Wu, Tsu-Fang; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Peng, Ming-Te; Tsai, Ming-Hsui; Chen, Chuan-Mu; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) protein is expressed in human nasopharyngeal and respiratory epithelium and has demonstrated antimicrobial activity. SPLUNC1 is now referred to as bactericidal/permeability-increasing fold containing family A, member 1 (BPIFA1). Reduced BPIFA1 expression is associated with bacterial colonization in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP). Interleukin 13 (IL-13), predominately secreted by T helper 2 (TH2) cells, has been found to contribute to airway allergies and suppress BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells. However, the molecular mechanism of IL-13 perturbation of bacterial infection and BPIFA1 expression in host airways remains unclear. In this study, we found that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced BPIFA1 expression in nasal epithelial cells was mediated through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway and AP-1 activation. We further demonstrated that IL-13 downregulated the LPS-induced activation of phosphorylated JNK and c-Jun, followed by attenuation of BPIFA1 expression. Moreover, the immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-13 prominently suppressed BPIFA1 expression in eosinophilic CRSwNP patients with bacterial infection. Taken together, these results suggest that IL-13 plays a critical role in attenuation of bacteria-induced BPIFA1 expression that may result in eosinophilic CRSwNP. PMID:26646664

  2. Periostin expression induced by oxidative stress contributes to myocardial fibrosis in a rat model of high salt-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    WU, HAN; CHEN, LIANG; XIE, JUN; LI, RAN; LI, GUAN-NAN; CHEN, QIN-HUA; ZHANG, XIN-LIN; KANG, LI-NA; XU, BIAO

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein involved in fibrosis. The present study investigated the importance of periostin in hypertension-induced myocardial fibrosis. Rats were randomly divided into either the normal group (0.4% NaCl diet; n=8) or hypertension group (8% NaCl diet; n=8). For 36 weeks, the blood pressure and heart rate of the rats were monitored. At week 36, the hearts were extracted for further analysis. Masson's staining and western blotting were performed to determine the levels of periostin protein expression, oxidative stress and fibrosis. In addition, fibroblasts were isolated from adult rats and cultured in vitro, and following treatment with angiotensin II (Ang II) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), western blotting, immunofluorescence and 2′,7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescin staining were performed to examine reactive oxygen species production, and periostin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression levels. The results demonstrated that periostin expression and oxidative stress were increased in hypertensive hearts compared with normal hearts. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that Ang II upregulated the expression levels of periostin and α-SMA compared with the control, whereas, pretreatment with NAC inhibited oxidative stress, periostin and α-SMA expression in fibroblasts. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggested that oxidative stress-induced periostin is involved in myocardial fibrosis and hypertension. The present study demonstrated that periostin inhibition may be a promising approach for the inhibition of hypertension-induced cardiac remodeling. PMID:27220372

  3. Transforming Growth Factor-β2 Induces Bronchial Epithelial Mucin Expression in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Hong Wei; Balzar, Silvana; Seedorf, Gregory J.; Westcott, Jay Y.; Trudeau, John B.; Silkoff, Phil; Wenzel, Sally E.

    2004-01-01

    The transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family is important for tissue repair in pathological conditions including asthma. However, little is known about the impact of either TGF-β1 or TGF-β2 on asthmatic airway epithelial mucin expression. We evaluated bronchial epithelial TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 expression and their effects on mucin expression, and the role of TGF-β1 or TGF-β2 in interleukin (IL)-13-induced mucin expression. Epithelial TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and mucin expression were evaluated in endobronchial biopsies from asthmatics and normal subjects. The effects of TGF-β1 or TGF-β2 on mucin MUC5AC protein and mRNA expression, and the impact of IL-13 on epithelial TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and MUC5AC were determined in cultured bronchial epithelial cells from endobronchial brushings of both subject groups. In biopsy tissue, epithelial TGF-β2 expression levels were higher than TGF-β1 in both asthmatics and normals. TGF-β2, but not TGF-β1, was increased in asthmatics compared with normals, and significantly correlated with mucin expression. TGF-β2, but not TGF-β1, increased mucin expression in cultured epithelial cells from both subject groups. IL-13 increased the release of TGF-β2, but not TGF-β1, from epithelial cells. A neutralizing TGF-β2 antibody partially inhibited IL-13-induced mucin expression. These data suggest that TGF-β2 production by asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells may increase airway mucin expression. IL-13-induced mucin expression may occur in part through TGF-β2 up-regulation. PMID:15466377

  4. Transforming growth factor-beta2 induces bronchial epithelial mucin expression in asthma.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hong Wei; Balzar, Silvana; Seedorf, Gregory J; Westcott, Jay Y; Trudeau, John B; Silkoff, Phil; Wenzel, Sally E

    2004-10-01

    The transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta family is important for tissue repair in pathological conditions including asthma. However, little is known about the impact of either TGF-beta1 or TGF-beta2 on asthmatic airway epithelial mucin expression. We evaluated bronchial epithelial TGF-beta1 and TGF-beta2 expression and their effects on mucin expression, and the role of TGF-beta1 or TGF-beta2 in interleukin (IL)-13-induced mucin expression. Epithelial TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, and mucin expression were evaluated in endobronchial biopsies from asthmatics and normal subjects. The effects of TGF-beta1 or TGF-beta2 on mucin MUC5AC protein and mRNA expression, and the impact of IL-13 on epithelial TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2, and MUC5AC were determined in cultured bronchial epithelial cells from endobronchial brushings of both subject groups. In biopsy tissue, epithelial TGF-beta2 expression levels were higher than TGF-beta1 in both asthmatics and normals. TGF-beta2, but not TGF-beta1, was increased in asthmatics compared with normals, and significantly correlated with mucin expression. TGF-beta2, but not TGF-beta1, increased mucin expression in cultured epithelial cells from both subject groups. IL-13 increased the release of TGF-beta2, but not TGF-beta1, from epithelial cells. A neutralizing TGF-beta2 antibody partially inhibited IL-13-induced mucin expression. These data suggest that TGF-beta2 production by asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells may increase airway mucin expression. IL-13-induced mucin expression may occur in part through TGF-beta2 up-regulation. PMID:15466377

  5. Ectopic ERK Expression Induces Phenotypic Conversion of C10 Cells and Alters DNA Methyltransferase Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2012-05-04

    In some model systems constitutive extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) activation is sufficient to promote an oncogenic phenotype. Here we investigate whether constitutive ERK expression influences phenotypic conversion in murine C10 type II alveolar epithelial cells. C10 cells were stably transduced with an ERK1-green fluorescent protein (ERK1-GFP) chimera or empty vector and ectopic ERK expression was associated with the acquisition of soft agar focus-forming potential in late passage, but not early passage cells. Late passage ERK1-GFP cells exhibited a significant increase in the expression of DNA methyl transferases (DNMT1 and 3b) and a marked increase in sensitivity to 5-azacytidine (5-azaC)-mediated toxicity, relative to early passage ERK1-GFP cells and vector controls. The expression of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A (XPA) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) were significantly increased in late passage cells, suggesting enhanced DNA damage recognition and repair activity which we interpret as a reflection of genomic instability. Phospho-ERK levels were dramatically decreased in late passage ERK1-GFP cells, relative to early passage and vector controls, and phospho-ERK levels were restored by treatment with sodium orthovanadate, indicating a role for phosphatase activity in this response. Collectively these observations suggest that ectopic ERK expression promotes phenotypic conversion of C10 cells that is associated with latent effects on epigenetic programming and phosphatase activities.

  6. Human white adipocytes express the cold receptor TRPM8 which activation induces UCP1 expression, mitochondrial activation and heat production.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Marco; Granzotto, Marnie; Macchi, Veronica; Porzionato, Andrea; Petrelli, Lucia; Calcagno, Alessandra; Vencato, Juri; De Stefani, Diego; Silvestrin, Valentina; Rizzuto, Rosario; Bassetto, Franco; De Caro, Raffaele; Vettor, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Mammals possess two types of adipose tissue, white (WAT) and brown (BAT). The uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) is a hallmark of BAT, being the pivotal player for cold-induced thermogenesis. WAT can acquire BAT characteristics with up-regulation of UCP1 after cold exposure or adrenergic stimulation. In the present study we demonstrated that human white adipocytes express the cold-sensing receptor TRPM8 which activation by menthol and icilin induced a rise in [Ca²⁺](i) and UCP1 expression, increased mitochondrial membrane potential, glucose uptake and heat production. The induction of "brown-like" phenotype in human white adipocytes after TRPM8 activation was supported by ultrastructural morphological changes of mitochondrial morphology and of their intracellular localization, with no modifications of the genes regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. In conclusion human white adipocytes express the cold receptor TRPM8 which activation induces their "browning" supporting a possible role of this receptor in the control of adipose tissue metabolism and body energy balance. PMID:24342393

  7. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  8. AIDS (image)

    MedlinePlus

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medication can suppress symptoms. ...

  9. Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) in Microglia of the Developing Quail Retina

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Ana; Navascués, Julio; Cuadros, Miguel A.; Calvente, Ruth; Martín-Oliva, David; Ferrer-Martín, Rosa M.; Martín-Estebané, María; Carrasco, María-Carmen; Marín-Teva, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which produce large amounts of nitric oxide (NO), is induced in macrophages and microglia in response to inflammatory mediators such as LPS and cytokines. Although iNOS is mainly expressed by microglia that become activated in different pathological and experimental situations, it was recently reported that undifferentiated amoeboid microglia can also express iNOS during normal development. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development and after their activation with LPS by using the quail retina as model. iNOS expression was analyzed by iNOS immunolabeling, western-blot, and RT-PCR. NO production was determined by using DAR-4M AM, a reliable fluorescent indicator of subcellular NO production by iNOS. Embryonic, postnatal, and adult in situ quail retinas were used to analyze the pattern of iNOS expression in microglial cells during normal development. iNOS expression and NO production in LPS-treated microglial cells were investigated by an in vitro approach based on organotypic cultures of E8 retinas, in which microglial cell behavior is similar to that of the in situ retina, as previously demonstrated in our laboratory. We show here that amoeboid microglia in the quail retina express iNOS during normal development. This expression is stronger in microglial cells migrating tangentially in the vitreal part of the retina and is downregulated, albeit maintained, when microglia differentiate and become ramified. LPS treatment of retina explants also induces changes in the morphology of amoeboid microglia compatible with their activation, increasing their lysosomal compartment and upregulating iNOS expression with a concomitant production of NO. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that immature microglial cells express iNOS during normal development, suggesting a certain degree of activation. Furthermore, LPS treatment induces overactivation of amoeboid

  10. Toll-Like Receptor Stimulation Induces Nondefensin Protein Expression and Reverses Antibiotic-Induced Gut Defense Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ying-Ying; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Chen, Pei-Hsuan; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2014-01-01

    Prior antibiotic exposure is associated with increased mortality in Gram-negative bacteria-induced sepsis. However, how antibiotic-mediated changes of commensal bacteria promote the spread of enteric pathogenic bacteria in patients remains unclear. In this study, the effects of systemic antibiotic treatment with or without Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation on bacterium-killing activity, antibacterial protein expression in the intestinal mucosa, and bacterial translocation were examined in mice receiving antibiotics with or without oral supplementation of dead Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus. We developed a systemic ampicillin, vancomycin, and metronidazole treatment protocol to simulate the clinical use of antibiotics. Antibiotic treatment decreased the total number of bacteria, including aerobic bacteria belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae and the genus Enterococcus as well as organisms of the anaerobic genera Lactococcus and Bifidobacterium in the intestinal mucosa and lumen. Antibiotic treatment significantly decreased the bacterium-killing activity of the intestinal mucosa and the expression of non-defensin-family proteins, such as RegIIIβ, RegIIIγ, C-reactive protein-ductin, and RELMβ, but not the defensin-family proteins, and increased Klebsiella pneumoniae translocation. TLR stimulation after antibiotic treatment increased NF-κB DNA binding activity, nondefensin protein expression, and bacterium-killing activity in the intestinal mucosa and decreased K. pneumoniae translocation. Moreover, germfree mice showed a significant decrease in nondefensin proteins as well as intestinal defense against pathogen translocation. Since TLR stimulation induced NF-κB DNA binding activity, TLR4 expression, and mucosal bacterium-killing activity in germfree mice, we conclude that the commensal microflora is critical in maintaining intestinal nondefensin protein expression and the intestinal barrier. In turn, we suggest that TLR stimulation induces

  11. Protective effects of L-selenomethionine on space radiation induced changes in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J; Ko, Y-H; Kennedy, A R

    2007-06-01

    Ionizing radiation can produce adverse biological effects in astronauts during space travel. Of particular concern are the types of radiation from highly energetic, heavy, charged particles known as HZE particles. The aims of our studies are to characterize HZE particle radiation induced biological effects and evaluate the effects of L-selenomethionine (SeM) on these adverse biological effects. In this study, microarray technology was used to measure HZE radiation induced changes in gene expression, as well as to evaluate modulation of these changes by SeM. Human thyroid epithelial cells (HTori-3) were irradiated (1 GeV/n iron ions) in the presence or in the absence of 5 microM SeM. At 6 h post-irradiation, all cells were harvested for RNA isolation. Gene Chip U133Av2 from Affymetrix was used for the analysis of gene expression, and ANOVA and EASE were used for a determination of the genes and biological processes whose differential expression is statistically significant. Results of this microarray study indicate that exposure to small doses of radiation from HZE particles, 10 and 20 cGy from iron ions, induces statistically significant differential expression of 196 and 610 genes, respectively. In the presence of SeM, differential expression of 77 out of 196 genes (exposure to 10 cGy) and 336 out of 610 genes (exposure to 20 cGy) is abolished. In the presence or in the absence of SeM, radiation from HZE particles induces differential expression of genes whose products have roles in the induction of G1/S arrest during the mitotic cell cycle, as well as heat shock proteins. Some of the genes, whose expressions were affected by radiation from HZE particles and were unchanged in irradiated cells treated with SeM, have been shown to have altered expression levels in cancer cells. The conclusions of this report are that radiation from HZE particles can induce differential expression of many genes, some of which are known to play roles in the same processes that have

  12. Kinetics of the cellular intake of a gene expression inducer at high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tran, Huy; Oliveira, Samuel M D; Goncalves, Nadia; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2015-09-01

    From in vivo single-event measurements of the transient and steady-state transcription activity of a single-copy lac-ara-1 promoter in Escherichia coli, we characterize the intake kinetics of its inducer (IPTG) from the media. We show that the empirical data are well-fit by a model of intake assuming a bilayer membrane, with the passage through the second layer being rate-limiting, coupled to a stochastic, sub-Poissonian, multi-step transcription process. Using this model, we show that for a wide range of extracellular inducer levels (up to 1.25 mM) the intake process is diffusive-like, suggesting unsaturated membrane permeability. Inducer molecules travel from the periplasm to the cytoplasm in, on average, 31.7 minutes, strongly affecting cells' response time. The novel methodology followed here should aid the study of cellular intake mechanisms at the single-event level. PMID:26223179

  13. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... type and degree of loss. Are there different styles of hearing aids? Styles of hearing aids Source: NIH/NIDCD Behind-the- ... the ear canal and are available in two styles. The in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid is ...

  14. Sugar-inducible expression of a gene for beta-amylase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Mita, S; Suzuki-Fujii, K; Nakamura, K

    1995-01-01

    The levels of beta-amylase activity and of the mRNA for beta-amylase in rosette leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. increased significantly, with the concomitant accumulation of starch, when whole plants or excised mature leaves were supplied with sucrose. A supply of glucose or fructose, but not of mannitol or sorbitol, to plants also induced the expression of the gene for beta-amylase, and the induction occurred not only in rosette leaves but also in roots, stems, and bracts. These results suggest that the gene for beta-amylase of Arabidopsis is subject to regulation by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and expression of the gene in various tissues may be regulated by the carbon partitioning and sink-source interactions in the whole plant. The sugar-inducible expression of the gene in Arabidopsis was severely repressed in the absence of light. The sugar-inducible expression in the light was not inhibited by 3(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or by chloramphenicol, but it was inhibited by cycloheximide. These results suggest that a light-induced signal and de novo synthesis of proteins in the cytoplasm are involved in the regulation. A fusion gene composed of the 5' upstream region of the gene for beta-amylase from Arabidopsis and the coding sequence of beta-glucuronidase showed the sugar-inducible expression in a light-dependent manner in rosette leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis. PMID:7716246

  15. Sphingosine kinase-1 pathway mediates high glucose-induced fibronectin expression in glomerular mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Tian; Liu, Weihua; Xie, Xi; Xu, Suowen; Huang, Kaipeng; Peng, Jing; Shen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Peiqing; Wang, Lijing; Xia, Pu; Huang, Heqing

    2011-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by accumulation of glomerular extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin (FN). Here, we investigated whether sphingosine kinase (SphK)1 pathway is responsible for the elevated FN expression in diabetic nephropathy. The SphK1 pathway and FN expression were examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat kidney and glomerular mesangial cells (GMC) exposed to high glucose (HG). FN up-regulation was concomitant with activation of the SphK1 pathway as reflected in an increase in the expression and activity of SphK1 and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) production in both diabetic kidney and HG-treated GMC. Overexpression of wild-type SphK1 (SphK(WT)) significantly induced FN expression, whereas treatment with a SphK inhibitor, N,N-dimethylsphingosine, or transfection of SphK1 small interference RNA or dominant-negative SphK1 (SphK(G82D)) abolished HG-induced FN expression. Furthermore, addition of exogenous S1P significantly induced FN expression in GMC with an induction of activator protein 1 (AP-1) activity. Inhibition of AP-1 activity by curcumin attenuated the S1P-induced FN expression. Finally, by inhibiting SphK1 activity, both N,N-dimethylsphingosine and SphK(G82D) markedly attenuated the HG-induced AP-1 activity. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the SphK1 pathway plays a critical role in matrix accumulation in GMC under diabetic condition, suggesting that the SphK1 pathway could be a potential therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21998146

  16. Sphingosine Kinase-1 Pathway Mediates High Glucose-Induced Fibronectin Expression in Glomerular Mesangial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tian; Liu, Weihua; Xie, Xi; Xu, Suowen; Huang, Kaipeng; Peng, Jing; Shen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Peiqing; Wang, Lijing; Xia, Pu

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by accumulation of glomerular extracellular matrix proteins, such as fibronectin (FN). Here, we investigated whether sphingosine kinase (SphK)1 pathway is responsible for the elevated FN expression in diabetic nephropathy. The SphK1 pathway and FN expression were examined in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat kidney and glomerular mesangial cells (GMC) exposed to high glucose (HG). FN up-regulation was concomitant with activation of the SphK1 pathway as reflected in an increase in the expression and activity of SphK1 and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) production in both diabetic kidney and HG-treated GMC. Overexpression of wild-type SphK1 (SphKWT) significantly induced FN expression, whereas treatment with a SphK inhibitor, N,N-dimethylsphingosine, or transfection of SphK1 small interference RNA or dominant-negative SphK1 (SphKG82D) abolished HG-induced FN expression. Furthermore, addition of exogenous S1P significantly induced FN expression in GMC with an induction of activator protein 1 (AP-1) activity. Inhibition of AP-1 activity by curcumin attenuated the S1P-induced FN expression. Finally, by inhibiting SphK1 activity, both N,N-dimethylsphingosine and SphKG82D markedly attenuated the HG-induced AP-1 activity. Taken together, these results demonstrated that the SphK1 pathway plays a critical role in matrix accumulation in GMC under diabetic condition, suggesting that the SphK1 pathway could be a potential therapeutic target for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21998146

  17. Serum amyloid A induces interleukin-33 expression through an IRF7-dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lei; Zhu, Ziyan; Cheng, Ni; Yan, Qian; Ye, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33), an IL-1 family cytokine and nuclear alarmin, is constitutively expressed in epithelial barrier tissues and human blood vessels. However, little is known about the induced expression of IL-33 in monocytes and macrophages, which are major cytokine-producing cells of the innate immune system. Here we report the induction of IL-33 expression in both human monocytes and mouse macrophages from C57BL/6 mice by the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). SAA induced transcriptional activation of the IL-33 gene, resulting in nuclear accumulation of the IL-33 protein. TLR2, one of the SAA receptors, was primarily responsible for the induction of IL-33. Progressive deletion of the human IL-33 promoter led to the identification of two potential binding sites for interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), one of which (−277/−257) was found to be important for SAA-stimulated IL-33 promoter activity. IRF7 was recruited to the IL-33 promoter upon SAA stimulation, and silencing IRF7 expression in THP-1 cells abrogated SAA-induced IL-33 expression. SAA also promoted an interaction between TRAF6 and IRF7. Taken together, these results identify IRF7 as a critical transcription factor for SAA-induced IL-33 expression in monocytes and macrophages. PMID:24777946

  18. Involvement of a Stat3 binding site in inflammation-induced enteric apelin expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Song; Wang, Guiyun; Qi, Xiang; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2008-11-01

    Apelin is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor; both are expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. Experimental colitis in rodents and inflammatory bowel disease in humans are associated with increased intestinal apelin production. Our aim was to use LPS and proinflammatory cytokine-treated (IL-6 and IFN-gamma) rodents or enteric cells to identify signaling mechanisms underlying inflammation-induced enteric apelin expression. LPS, IL-6, or IFN-gamma treatment of rodents increased enteric apelin expression. Pharmacological blockade of Jak/Stat signaling or IL-6 antibody administration inhibited elevations in enteric apelin expression. Transient transfection experiments showed that LPS, IL-6, or IFN-gamma increased apelin expression by stimulation of apelin promoter activity, and blockade of Jak/Stat signaling abolished elevations in apelin promoter activity. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that IL-6 induced binding of phospho-Stat3 to a putative Stat3 site in the apelin promoter; mutation of this site abrogated the LPS-induced elevation in apelin promoter activity. Together, our findings indicate that binding of phospho-Stat3 to the apelin promoter is the final step underlying proinflammatory cytokine-induced enteric apelin expression during intestinal inflammation. PMID:18818315

  19. TGF-β induces fascin expression in gastric cancer via phosphorylation of smad3 linker area

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liling; Cao, Fang; Liu, Baoan; Luo, Xiaojuan; Ma, Xin; Hu, Zhongliang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fascin is an actin-bundling protein critical for tumor invasion. TGF-β could induce fascin expression in gastric cancer cells. In this study, we attempted to explore the role of p-smad3L in the expression of fascin induced by TGF-β in gastric cancer cells. Methods: Pseudopodia were evaluated by immunofluorescence. Fascin expression was detected by RT-PCR and western blot. Smad3 siRNA was used to repress the endogenous smad3. The phosphorylations of smad3 linker region at sites s204, s208 and s213 were detected by western blot. The fascin promoter reporter activity was measured by dual luciferase assay. Results: TGF-β could increase the formation of pseudopodia and the expression of fascin in gastric cancer cells. Smad3 depletion abrogated the expression of fascin induced by TGF-β. The phosphorylation of smad3 linker region at serine 204, 208 and 213 was enhanced in gastric cancer cells after TGF-β treatment. The fascin promoter reporter activity was significantly enhanced with TGF-β treatment in both wild-type Smad3 group and Smad3EPSM group (P<0.05). Furthermore, the fascin promoter reporter activity in the wild-type Smad3 transfectant cells was significantly higher than that in Smad3EPSM cells (P<0.05). Conclusions: fascin expression induced by TGF-β depends on smad3, at least in part, depends on smad3 linker phosphorylation. PMID:26269751

  20. Induced over-expression of AtDREB2A CA improves drought tolerance in sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Reis, Rafaela Ribeiro; da Cunha, Bárbara Andrade Dias Brito; Martins, Polyana Kelly; Martins, Maria Thereza Bazzo; Alekcevetch, Jean Carlos; Chalfun, Antônio; Andrade, Alan Carvalho; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Qin, Feng; Mizoi, Junya; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Nakashima, Kazuo; Carvalho, Josirley de Fátima Corrêa; de Sousa, Carlos Antônio Ferreira; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima; Kobayashi, Adilson Kenji; Molinari, Hugo Bruno Correa

    2014-05-01

    Drought is one of the most challenging agricultural issues limiting sustainable sugarcane production and, in some cases, yield losses caused by drought are nearly 50%. DREB proteins play vital regulatory roles in abiotic stress responses in plants. The transcription factor DREB2A interacts with a cis-acting DRE sequence to activate the expression of downstream genes that are involved in drought-, salt- and heat-stress response in Arabidopsis thaliana. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of stress-inducible over-expression of AtDREB2A CA on gene expression, leaf water potential (ΨL), relative water content (RWC), sucrose content and gas exchanges of sugarcane plants submitted to a four-days water deficit treatment in a rhizotron-grown root system. The plants were also phenotyped by scanning the roots and measuring morphological parameters of the shoot. The stress-inducible expression of AtDREB2A CA in transgenic sugarcane led to the up-regulation of genes involved in plant response to drought stress. The transgenic plants maintained higher RWC and ΨL over 4 days after withholding water and had higher photosynthetic rates until the 3rd day of water-deficit. Induced expression of AtDREB2A CA in sugarcane increased sucrose levels and improved bud sprouting of the transgenic plants. Our results indicate that induced expression of AtDREB2A CA in sugarcane enhanced its drought tolerance without biomass penalty. PMID:24656336

  1. Prokineticin 1 induces Dickkopf 1 expression and regulates cell proliferation and decidualization in the human endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Linsay J.; Sales, Kurt J.; Grant, Vivien; Brown, Pamela; Jabbour, Henry N.; Catalano, Rob D.

    2011-01-01

    Prokineticin 1 (PROK1) signalling via prokineticin receptor 1 (PROKR1) regulates the expression of several genes with important roles in endometrial receptivity and implantation. This study investigated PROK1 regulation of Dickkopf 1 (DKK1) expression, a negative regulator of canonical Wnt signalling, and its function in the non-pregnant endometrium and first trimester decidua. DKK1 mRNA expression is elevated during the mid-secretory phase of the menstrual cycle and expression increases further in first trimester decidua. DKK1 protein expression is localized to glandular epithelial and stromal cells during the proliferative, early- and mid-secretory phases, whereas expression is confined to the stroma in the late-secretory phase and first trimester decidua. PROK1 induces the expression of DKK1 in endometrial epithelial cells stably expressing PROKR1 and in first trimester decidua explants, via a Gq-calcium-calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T-cells-mediated pathway. Endometrial epithelial cell proliferation is negatively regulated by PROK1-PROKR1 signalling. We demonstrate that this effect on cell proliferation occurs via DKK1 expression, as siRNA targeted against DKK1 reduces the PROK1-induced decrease in proliferation. Furthermore, decidualization of primary human endometrial stromal cells with progesterone and cyclic adenosine monophosphate is inhibited by miRNA knock down of PROK1 or DKK1. These data demonstrate important roles for PROK1 and DKK1 during endometrial receptivity and early pregnancy, which include regulation of endometrial cell proliferation and decidualization. PMID:21546446

  2. Interlaboratory evaluation of rat hepatic gene expression changes induced by methapyrilene.

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Jeffrey F; Ulrich, Roger G; Flint, Nick; Morfitt, David; Kalkuhl, Arno; Staedtler, Frank; Lawton, Michael; Beekman, Johanna M; Suter, Laura

    2004-01-01

    Several studies using microarrays have shown that changes in gene expression provide information about the mechanism of toxicity induced by xenobiotic agents. Nevertheless, the issue of whether gene expression profiles are reproducible across different laboratories remains to be determined. To address this question, several members of the Hepatotoxicity Working Group of the International Life Sciences Institute Health and Environmental Sciences Institute evaluated the liver gene expression profiles of rats treated with methapyrilene (MP). Animals were treated at one facility, and RNA was distributed to five different sites for gene expression analysis. A preliminary evaluation of the number of modulated genes uncovered striking differences between the five different sites. However, additional data analysis demonstrated that these differences had an effect on the absolute gene expression results but not on the outcome of the study. For all users, unsupervised algorithms showed that gene expression allows the distinction of the high dose of MP from controls and low dose. In addition, the use of a supervised analysis method (support vector machines) made it possible to correctly classify samples. In conclusion, the results show that, despite some variability, robust gene expression changes were consistent between sites. In addition, key expression changes related to the mechanism of MP-induced hepatotoxicity were identified. These results provide critical information regarding the consistency of microarray results across different laboratories and shed light on the strengths and limitations of expression profiling in drug safety analysis. PMID:15033593

  3. Bifidobacterium bifidum actively changes the gene expression profile induced by Lactobacillus acidophilus in murine dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Gudrun; Rasmussen, Simon; Nielsen Fink, Lisbeth; Jarmer, Hanne; Nøhr Nielsen, Birgit; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal regulatory role in activation of both the innate as well as the adaptive immune system by responding to environmental microorganisms. We have previously shown that Lactobacillus acidophilus induces a strong production of the pro-inflammatory and Th1 polarizing cytokine IL-12 in DC, whereas bifidobacteria do not induce IL-12 but inhibit the IL-12 production induced by lactobacilli. In the present study, genome-wide microarrays were used to investigate the gene expression pattern of murine DC stimulated with Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM and Bifidobacterium bifidum Z9. L. acidophilus NCFM strongly induced expression of interferon (IFN)-beta, other virus defence genes, and cytokine and chemokine genes related to the innate and the adaptive immune response. By contrast, B. bifidum Z9 up-regulated genes encoding cytokines and chemokines related to the innate immune response. Moreover, B. bifidum Z9 inhibited the expression of the Th1-promoting genes induced by L. acidophilus NCFM and had an additive effect on genes of the innate immune response and Th2 skewing genes. The gene encoding Jun dimerization protein 2 (JDP2), a transcription factor regulating the activation of JNK, was one of the few genes only induced by B. bifidum Z9. Neutralization of IFN-beta abrogated L. acidophilus NCFM-induced expression of Th1-skewing genes, and blocking of the JNK pathway completely inhibited the expression of IFN-beta. Our results indicate that B. bifidum Z9 actively inhibits the expression of genes related to the adaptive immune system in murine dendritic cells and that JPD2 via blocking of IFN-beta plays a central role in this regulatory mechanism. PMID:20548777

  4. Radiation-induced gene expression in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Jones, Tamako A.; Chesnut, Aaron; Smith, Anna L.

    2002-01-01

    We used the nematode C. elegans to characterize the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation in a simple animal model emphasizing the unique effects of charged particle radiation. Here we demonstrate by RT-PCR differential display and whole genome microarray hybridization experiments that gamma rays, accelerated protons and iron ions at the same physical dose lead to unique transcription profiles. 599 of 17871 genes analyzed (3.4%) showed differential expression 3 hrs after exposure to 3 Gy of radiation. 193 were up-regulated, 406 were down-regulated and 90% were affected only by a single species of radiation. A novel statistical clustering technique identified the regulatory relationships between the radiation-modulated genes and showed that genes affected by each radiation species were associated with unique regulatory clusters. This suggests that independent homeostatic mechanisms are activated in response to radiation exposure as a function of track structure or ionization density.

  5. Titanium With Nanotopography Induces Osteoblast Differentiation by Regulating Endogenous Bone Morphogenetic Protein Expression and Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    M S Castro-Raucci, Larissa; S Francischini, Marcelo; N Teixeira, Lucas; P Ferraz, Emanuela; B Lopes, Helena; T de Oliveira, Paulo; Hassan, Mohammad Q; Losa, Adalberto L; Beloti, Marcio M

    2016-07-01

    We aimed at evaluating the effect of titanium (Ti) with nanotopography (Nano) on the endogenous expression of BMP-2 and BMP-4 and the relevance of this process to the nanotopography-induced osteoblast differentiation. MC3T3-E1 cells were grown on Nano and machined (Machined) Ti surfaces and the endogenous BMP-2/4 expression and the effect of BMP receptor BMPR1A silencing in both osteoblast differentiation and expression of genes related to TGF-β/BMP signaling were evaluated. Nano supported higher BMP-2 gene and protein expression and upregulated the osteoblast differentiation compared with Machined Ti surface. The BMPR1A silencing inhibited the osteogenic potential induced by Nano Ti surface as indicated by reduced alkaline phosphatase (ALP), osteocalcin and RUNX2 gene expression, RUNX2 protein expression and ALP activity. In addition, the expression of genes related to TGF-β/BMP signaling was deeply affected by BMPR1A-silenced cells grown on Nano Ti surface. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that nanotopography induces osteoblast differentiation, at least in part, by upregulating the endogenous production of BMP-2 and modulating BMP signaling pathway. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1718-1726, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26681207

  6. Dual-promoter lentiviral system allows inducible expression of noxious proteins in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Hui; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Eruslanov, Evgeny; Kotton, Darrell N.

    2008-01-01

    In-depth studies of innate immunity require efficient genetic manipulation of macrophages, which is especially difficult in primary macrophages. We have developed a lentiviral system for inducible gene expression both in macrophage cell lines and in primary macrophages. A transgenic mouse strain C3H.TgN(SRA-rtTA) that expresses reverse tetracycline transactivator (rtTA) under the control of macrophage-specific promoter, a modified human scavenger receptor A (SR-A) promoter was generated. For gene delivery, we constructed a dual-promoter lentiviral vector, in which expression of a “gene-of-interest” is driven by a doxycycline-inducible promoter and the expression of a selectable surface marker is driven by an independent constitutive promoter UBC. This vector is used for transduction of bone marrow-derived macrophage precursors. The transduced cells can be enriched to 95–99% purity using marker-specific monoclonal antibodies, expanded and differentiated into mature macrophages or myeloid dendritic cells. We also successfully used this approach for inducible protein expression in hard to transfect macrophage cell lines. Because many proteins, which are expressed by activated or infected macrophages, possess cytotoxic, anti-proliferative or pro-apoptotic activities, generation of stable macrophage cell lines that constitutively express those proteins is impossible. Our method will be especially useful to study immunity-related macrophage proteins in their physiological context during macrophage activation or infection. PMID:17967462

  7. ERα Mediates Estrogen-Induced Expression of the Breast Cancer Metastasis Suppressor Gene BRMS1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongtao; Gollahon, Lauren S.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, estrogen has been reported as putatively inhibiting cancer cell invasion and motility. This information is in direct contrast to the paradigm of estrogen as a tumor promoter. However, data suggests that the effects of estrogen are modulated by the receptor isoform with which it interacts. In order to gain a clearer understanding of the role of estrogen in potentially suppressing breast cancer metastasis, we investigated the regulation of estrogen and its receptor on the downstream target gene, breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1) in MCF-7, SKBR3, TTU-1 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Our results showed that estrogen increased the transcription and expression of BRMS1 in the ERα positive breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Additionally, the ERα specific agonist PPT also induced the transcription and expression of BRMS1. However, the two remaining estrogen receptor (ER) subtype agonists had no effect on BRMS1 expression. In order to further examine the influence of ERα on BRMS1 expression, ERα expression was knocked down using siRNA (siERα). Western blot analysis showed that siERα reduced estrogen-induced and PPT-induced BRMS1 expression. In summary, this study demonstrates estrogen, via its α receptor, positively regulates the expression of BRMS1, providing new insight into a potential inhibitory effect of estrogen on metastasis suppression. PMID:26821020

  8. Hypoxia-induced Bcl-2 expression in endothelial cells via p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cui-Li; Song, Fei; Zhang, Jing; Song, Q.H.

    2010-04-16

    Angiogenesis and apoptosis are reciprocal processes in endothelial cells. Bcl-2, an anti-apoptotic protein, has been found to have angiogenic activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of Bcl-2 in hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in endothelial cells and to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were exposed to hypoxia followed by reoxygenation. Myocardial ischemia and reperfusion mouse model was used and Bcl-2 expression was assessed. Bcl-2 expression increased in a time-dependent manner in response to hypoxia from 2 to 72 h. Peak expression occurred at 12 h (3- to 4-fold, p < 0.05). p38 inhibitor (SB203580) blocked hypoxia-induced Bcl-2 expression, whereas PKC, ERK1/2 and PI3K inhibitors did not. Knockdown of Bcl-2 resulted in decreased HAECs' proliferation and migration. Over-expression of Bcl-2 increased HAECs' tubule formation, whereas knockdown of Bcl-2 inhibited this process. In this model of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, Bcl-2 expression was increased and was associated with increased p38 MAPK activation. Our results showed that hypoxia induces Bcl-2 expression in HAECs via p38 MAPK pathway.

  9. High-Density Lipoprotein Prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Downregulation of Liver LOX-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Dan; Li, Ling-Fang; Gao, Hai-Chao; Wang, Xiang; Li, Chuan-Chang; Luo, Ying; Bai, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a specific cell-surface receptor for oxidized-low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). The impact of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated alteration of the LOX-1 level in hepatocytes remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the impact on LOX-1 expression by tunicamycin (TM)-induced ER stress and to determine the effect of HDL on TM-affected LOX-1 expression in hepatic L02 cells. Overexpression or silencing of related cellular genes was conducted in TM-treated cells. mRNA expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Protein expression was analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. Lipid uptake was examined by DiI-ox-LDL, followed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that TM induced the upregulation of ER chaperone GRP78, downregulation of LOX-1 expression, and lipid uptake. Knock down of IRE1 or XBP-1 effectively restored LOX-1 expression and improved lipid uptake in TM-treated cells. HDL treatment prevented the negative impact on LOX-1 expression and lipid uptake induced by TM. Additionally, 1-10 μg/mL HDL significantly reduced the GRP78, IRE1, and XBP-1 expression levels in TM-treated cells. Our findings reveal that HDL could prevent the TM-induced reduction of LOX-1 expression via inhibiting the IRE1/XBP-1 pathway, suggesting a new mechanism for beneficial roles of HDL in improving lipid metabolism. PMID:25923692

  10. Enhancement of RANKL-induced MITF-E expression and osteoclastogenesis by TGF-β.

    PubMed

    Asai, Kumiko; Funaba, Masayuki; Murakami, Masaru

    2014-07-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) is a transcription factor that is expressed in limited types of cells, including osteoclasts, but the expression and role of MITF during osteoclastogenesis have not been fully elucidated. The expression of the MITF-E isoform but not that of the MITF-A isoform was induced in response to differentiation stimulation towards osteoclasts by receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in both RAW264.7 cells and primary bone marrow cells. The RANKL-induced formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinucleated cells was inhibited in RAW264.7 cells expressing siRNA for MITF-E. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) enhanced RANKL-induced MITF-E expression and -TRAP positive multinucleated cell formation. In particular, TGF-β potentiated the formation of larger osteoclasts. The expression levels of NFATc1, TRAP and CtsK, genes related to osteoclast development and activity, were concurrently enhanced by TGF-β in the presence of RANKL. Furthermore, the expression of dendritic cell-specific transmembrane protein (DC-STAMP), Itgav, Itga2, Itga5, Itgb1, Itgb3 and Itgb5, genes related to cell adhesion and fusion, were up-regulated by co-treatment with TGF-β. In particular, the regulatory expression of Itgav and Itgb5 in response to RANKL with or without TGF-β resembled that of MITF-E. Because MITF is involved in cell fusion in some cell systems, these results imply a role for MITF-E as an enhancer of osteoclastogenesis and that RANKL-induced levels of both MITF-E mRNA and of MITF-dependent gene expression are enhanced by treatment with TGF-β. PMID:24519885

  11. SPARC expression induces cell cycle arrest via STAT3 signaling pathway in medulloblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, Chandramu; Dontula, Ranadheer; Gujrati, Meena; Lakka, Sajani S.

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ectopic expression of SPARC impaired cell proliferation in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression induces STAT3 mediated cell cycle arrest in medulloblastoma cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPARC expression significantly inhibited pre-established tumor growth in nude-mice. -- Abstract: Dynamic cell interaction with ECM components has profound influence in cancer progression. SPARC is a component of the ECM, impairs the proliferation of different cell types and modulates tumor cell aggressive features. We previously reported that SPARC expression significantly impairs medulloblastoma tumor growth in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of SPARC inhibits medulloblastoma cell proliferation. MTT assay indicated a dose-dependent reduction in tumor cell proliferation in adenoviral mediated expression of SPARC full length cDNA (Ad-DsRed-SP) in D425 and UW228 cells. Flow cytometric analysis showed that Ad-DsRed-SP-infected cells accumulate in the G2/M phase of cell cycle. Further, immunoblot and immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that SPARC induced G2/M cell cycle arrest was mediated through inhibition of the Cyclin-B-regulated signaling pathway involving p21 and Cdc2 expression. Additionally, expression of SPARC decreased STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr-705; constitutively active STAT3 expression reversed SPARC induced G2/M arrest. Ad-DsRed-SP significantly inhibited the pre-established orthotopic tumor growth and tumor volume in nude-mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor sections from mice treated with Ad-DsRed-SP showed decreased immunoreactivity for pSTAT3 and increased immunoreactivity for p21 compared to tumor section from mice treated with mock and Ad-DsRed. Taken together our studies further reveal that STAT3 plays a key role in SPARC induced G2/M arrest in medulloblastoma cells. These new findings provide a molecular basis for the mechanistic understanding of the

  12. Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) Attenuates TNF-Induced Pathologic Bone Resorption and Suppresses Osteoclastogenesis by Inducing A20 Expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Joon; Lim, Elisha; Mun, Se-Hwan; Bae, Seyeon; Murata, Koichi; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Investigations on the therapeutic effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) have focused on the suppression of autoantibody and immune complex-mediated inflammatory pathogenesis. Inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are often accompanied by excessive bone erosion but the effect of IVIG on osteoclasts, bone-resorbing cells, has not been studied. Here, we investigate whether IVIG directly regulates osteoclast differentiation and has therapeutic potential for suppressing osteoclast-mediated pathologic bone resorption. IVIG or cross-linking of Fcγ receptors with plate-bound IgG suppressed receptor activator of nuclear factor-κ B ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis and expression of osteoclast-related genes such as integrin β3 and cathepsin K in a dose-dependent manner. Mechanistically, IVIG or plate-bound IgG suppressed osteoclastogenesis by downregulating RANKL-induced expression of NFATC1, the master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. IVIG suppressed NFATC1 expression by attenuating RANKL-induced NF-κB signaling, explained in part by induction of the inflammatory signaling inhibitor A20. IVIG administration attenuated in vivo osteoclastogenesis and suppressed bone resorption in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced calvarial osteolysis model. Our findings show that, in addition to suppressing inflammation, IVIG directly inhibits osteoclastogenesis through a mechanism involving suppression of RANK signaling. Direct suppression of osteoclast differentiation may provide beneficial effects on preserving bone mass when IVIG is used to treat rheumatic disorders. PMID:26189496

  13. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Liztler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Muschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert non-canonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications. PMID:25912253

  14. HSP90 inhibitors decrease AID levels and activity in mice and in human cells.

    PubMed

    Montamat-Sicotte, Damien; Litzler, Ludivine C; Abreu, Cecilia; Safavi, Shiva; Zahn, Astrid; Orthwein, Alexandre; Müschen, Markus; Oppezzo, Pablo; Muñoz, Denise P; Di Noia, Javier M

    2015-08-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination of the Ig genes in antigen-activated B cells, underpinning antibody affinity maturation and isotype switching. AID can also be pathogenic by contributing to autoimmune diseases and oncogenic mutations. Moreover, AID can exert noncanonical functions when aberrantly expressed in epithelial cells. The lack of specific inhibitors prevents therapeutic applications to modulate AID functions. Here, we have exploited our previous finding that the HSP90 molecular chaperoning pathway stabilizes AID in B cells, to test whether HSP90 inhibitors could target AID in vivo. We demonstrate that chronic administration of HSP90 inhibitors decreases AID protein levels and isotype switching in immunized mice. HSP90 inhibitors also reduce disease severity in a mouse model of acute B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia in which AID accelerates disease progression. We further show that human AID protein levels are sensitive to HSP90 inhibition in normal and leukemic B cells, and that HSP90 inhibition prevents AID-dependent epithelial to mesenchymal transition in a human breast cancer cell line in vitro. Thus, we provide proof-of-concept that HSP90 inhibitors indirectly target AID in vivo and that endogenous human AID is widely sensitive to them, which could have therapeutic applications. PMID:25912253

  15. Cold-inducible RNA binding protein regulates mucin expression induced by cold temperatures in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ran, DanHua; Chen, LingXiu; Xie, WenYue; Xu, Qing; Han, Zhong; Huang, HuaPing; Zhou, XiangDong

    2016-08-01

    Mucus overproduction is an important manifestation of chronic airway inflammatory diseases, however, the mechanisms underlying the association between cold air and mucus overproduction remain unknown. We found that the expression of the cold-inducible RNA binding protein (CIRP) was increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In the present study, we tested whether CIRP was involved in inflammatory factors and mucin5AC (MUC5AC) expression after cold stimulation and investigated the potential signaling pathways involved in this process. We found that CIRP was highly expressed in the bronchi of COPD patients. The expression of CIRP, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) were increased, and the CIRP was localized in cytoplasm after cold stimulation. MUC5AC mRNA and protein expression levels were elevated in a temperature- and time-dependent manner after cold stimulation and were associated with the phosphorylation of ERK and NF-κB, which reflected their activation. These responses were suppressed by knockdown of CIRP with a specific siRNA or the ERK and NF-κB inhibitors. These results demonstrated that CIRP was expressed in the bronchi of human COPD patients and was involved in inflammatory factors and MUC5AC expression after cold stimulation through the ERK and NF-κB pathways. PMID:27184164

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clade B and C Tat differentially induce indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and serotonin in immature dendritic cells: Implications for neuroAIDS.

    PubMed

    Samikkannu, Thangavel; Rao, Kurapati V K; Gandhi, Nimisha; Saxena, Shailendra K; Nair, Madhavan P N

    2010-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is commonly associated with immune dysfunctions and the suppression of antigen-presenting cells. This results in immune alterations, which could lead to impaired neuronal functions, such as neuroAIDS. The neurotoxic factor kynurenine (KYN), the rate-limiting enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), serotonin (5-HT), and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) may play a role in tryptophan deficiency and serotogenic dysfunction in neuroAIDS. HIV-1 transactivator regulatory protein (Tat) is known to play a major role in immune dysfunction. Previous studies suggest that HIV-1 B and C clades differentially manifest neuronal dysfunctions in the infected host. In the present study we examine the effect of HIV-1 B and C clade-derived Tat on IDO and 5-HTT gene and protein expressions by dendritic cells as studied by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and Western blot. In addition, the intracellular IDO expression, IDO enzyme activity, and the levels of 5-HT and KYN were also measured. Results indicate that HIV-1 clade B Tat up-regulates IDO and down-regulates 5-HTT gene and protein expressions. Further, HIV-1 clade B Tat caused a reduction of 5-HT with simultaneous increase in KYN levels as compared to HIV-1 clade C Tat. These studies suggest that HIV-1 clade B and C Tat proteins may play a differential role in the neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) or HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). PMID:20602605

  17. Cyclooxygenase inhibitor induces the upregulation of connexin-43 expression in C6 glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    QIN, LI-JUAN; JIA, YONG-SEN; ZHANG, YI-BING; WANG, YIN-HUAN

    2016-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine whether aspirin, a cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, has an effect on the expression of connexin 43 (Cx43) in C6 glioma cells. Using an in vitro glioma invasion model, the expression of Cx43 protein in C6 cells was significantly increased following aspirin treatment at a dose of 8 mmol/l for 30, 60 and 120 min via western blot analysis. The peak value of the Cx43 expression was observed in C6 cells after 120 min of aspirin treatment, which was significantly reduced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In addition, aspirin also significantly increased the gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) activity and reduced glioma invasion, which was induced by PGE2. This led to the conclusion that the aspirin-induced glioma invasion decrease may be associated with the increased expression of Cx43 protein and formation of GJIC. PMID:27073629

  18. Pim kinase expression is induced by LTP stimulation and required for the consolidation of enduring LTP.

    PubMed Central

    Konietzko, U; Kauselmann, G; Scafidi, J; Staubli, U; Mikkers, H; Berns, A; Schweizer, M; Waltereit, R; Kuhl, D

    1999-01-01

    In animals and several cellular models of synaptic plasticity, long-lasting changes in synaptic strength are dependent on gene transcription and translation. Here we demonstrate that Pim-1, a serine/threonine kinase closely related to Pim-2 and Pim-3, is induced in hippocampus in response to stimuli that evoke long-term potentiation (LTP). Mice deficient for Pim-1 show normal synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity. However, they fail to consolidate enduring LTP even though Pim-2 and Pim-3 are constitutively expressed in the hippocampus and Pim-3 expression is similarly induced by synaptic activity. Thus, expression of Pim-1 is required for LTP. Its level of expression and, consequently, its capacity to phosphorylate target proteins in dendritic and nuclear compartments of stimulated neurons might be a determining factor for the establishment of long-lasting changes in synaptic strength. PMID:10369676

  19. Interleukin-1β induces the upregulation of caveolin-1 expression in a rat brain tumor model

    PubMed Central

    QIN, LI-JUAN; JIA, YONG-SEN; ZHANG, YI-BING; WANG, YIN-HUAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of caveolin-1 in rat brain glioma tissue, and to determine whether interleukin-1β (IL-1β) has a role in this process. Using glioma cells, a tumor-burdened rat model was established, and the expression of caveolin-1 protein in the tumor sites was significantly increased following intracarotid infusion of IL-1β (3.7 ng/kg/min), as indicated by western blot analysis. The maximum value of the caveolin-1 expression was observed in tumor-burdened rats after 60 min of IL-1β perfusion, and which was significantly enhanced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In addition, VEGF also significantly increased IL-1β-induced blood tumor barrier (BTB) permeability. The results suggest that the IL-1β-induced BTB permeability increase may be associated with the expression of caveolin-1 protein, and VEGF may be involved in this process. PMID:27073627

  20. Development of an inducible gene expression system for primary murine keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Priyadharsini

    2008-01-01

    Background The tetracycline (Tet) responsive system is a valuable tool that is routinely used in a wide variety of mammalian cells for regulatable expression of gene products. However, technical difficulties such as harsh selection conditions and extensive screening processes to identify suitably responsive clones limit the generation of stable cell lines. Hence, application of this system in mammalian cells with relatively slow growth rates and / or the capacity to undergo terminal differentiation such as primary mouse keratinocytes is particularly challenging. Objective To our knowledge, no Tet-responsive stable cell lines have been generated from mouse keratinocytes, presumably due to their sensitivity to selection conditions. Our goal was to utilize a modified and robust Tet-expression system to generate a stable primary mouse keratinocyte cell line. These cells could be then utilized for conditional expression of potentially toxic proteins in an inducible fashion. Methods We utilized a eukaryotic promoter instead of a viral promoter to express a modified reverse tetracycline transactivator in mouse keratinocytes and optimized the selection process for generating stable cell lines. Results Here, we report the generation of a stable mouse keratinocyte cell line for Tet-regulated gene expression with minimal leakiness and high degree of Tet responsivity. This mouse keratinocyte cell line was further engineered for generation of a double stable cell line, which expresses the transcription factor AP-2α in an inducible manner. Importantly, the selected cells retain their inherent keratinocyte morphology, respond to differentiation signals and exhibit a persistent and highly tunable Tet inducibility upon continuous culturing. Conclusion We have generated a tetracycline inducible gene expression model system in mouse epidermal keratinocytes. Such inducible cell lines will serve as valuable in vitro models for future gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies. PMID

  1. Hepatitis B virus induces hypoxia-inducible factor-2α expression through hepatitis B virus X protein.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian-Li; Liu, Li-Ping; Yang, Sheng-Li; Fang, Xiefan; Wen, Lu; Ren, Quan-Guang; Yu, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A growing number of studies suggest that the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) enhances the protein stability of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α). However, the relationship between hepatitis B virus (HBV), HBx and hypoxia-inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α) has not yet been fully elucidated. Immunohistochemical analysis was employed to detect the expression of HIF-2α in normal liver, HBV-related chronic hepatitis, and HBV-related and non-HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissues. Quantitative real‑time PCR (qPCR) and western blotting were used to investigate the impact of HBV and HBx on the expression of HIF‑2α. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence were applied to explore the underlying mechanisms. The HIF‑2α expression was found to be higher in HBV‑related chronic hepatitis tissues than in normal liver tissues. Furthermore, it was higher in HBV‑related HCC tissues and HBV‑integrated HepG2 cells than in the corresponding non‑HBV‑related HCC tissues and HepG2 cells. Both HBV and HBx enhanced the protein stability of HIF‑2α. HBx‑mediated upregulation of HIF‑2α resulted mainly from an inhibition of the degradation of HIF‑2α due to the binding of HBx to the von Hippel‑Lindau protein (pVHL). In addition, HBx upregulated the expression of HIF‑2α by activating the NF‑κB signaling pathway. Thus, the present study identified that HBV induces the HIF‑2α expression through its encoded protein HBx. This upregulates the HIF-2α expression by binding to the pVHL activating the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26647960

  2. Hypoxia induces TFE3 expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhi-Jun; Yu, Guang-Tao; Huang, Cong-Fa; Bu, Lin-Lin; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ma, Si-Rui; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Lu

    2016-03-01

    To assess the role of transcription factor μE3 (TFE3) in the tumorigenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), human HNSCC tissue arrays were investigated for TFE3 expression. Human HNSCC tissues with neoadjuvant inductive chemotherapey (docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil, TPF) and mice HNSCC tissues from transgenic mice model were evaluated for TFE3 expression and the hypoxia pathway. The roles of EGF/EGFR mediated hypoxia in TFE3 nuclear expression were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. TFE3 expression was higher in human HNSCC tissues compared with that in normal oral mucosa. Moreover, high TFE3 expression was related to HIF-1α, PAI-1, and EGFR, which demonstrated the activation of the hypoxia pathway in HNSCC tissues. Furthermore, elevated TFE3 expression was observed in HNSCC after cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and high TFE3 expression may indicate poor response to TPF inductive chemotherapy. Furthermore, similar changes with increased TFE3 were observed in HNSCC of the transgenic mouse HNSCC model. Hypoxic culture in the human HNSCC cell line increased TFE3 expression, which promoted cell survival under hypoxia. EGFR inhibiton by cetuximab could attenuate hypoxia-induced TFE3 in the HNSCC cell line and transgenic mouse HNSCC model. These findings indicated that TFE3 was an important hypoxia-induced transcriptional factor in HNSCC. TFE3 could be regarded as a durgable therapeutic oncotarget by EGFR inhibition. PMID:26872381

  3. Hypoxia induces TFE3 expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhi-Jun; Yu, Guang-Tao; Huang, Cong-Fa; Bu, Lin-Lin; Liu, Jian-Feng; Ma, Si-Rui; Zhang, Wen-Feng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    To assess the role of transcription factor μE3 (TFE3) in the tumorigenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), human HNSCC tissue arrays were investigated for TFE3 expression. Human HNSCC tissues with neoadjuvant inductive chemotherapey (docetaxel, cisplatin and fluorouracil, TPF) and mice HNSCC tissues from transgenic mice model were evaluated for TFE3 expression and the hypoxia pathway. The roles of EGF/EGFR mediated hypoxia in TFE3 nuclear expression were analyzed in vitro and in vivo. TFE3 expression was higher in human HNSCC tissues compared with that in normal oral mucosa. Moreover, high TFE3 expression was related to HIF-1α, PAI-1, and EGFR, which demonstrated the activation of the hypoxia pathway in HNSCC tissues. Furthermore, elevated TFE3 expression was observed in HNSCC after cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and high TFE3 expression may indicate poor response to TPF inductive chemotherapy. Furthermore, similar changes with increased TFE3 were observed in HNSCC of the transgenic mouse HNSCC model. Hypoxic culture in the human HNSCC cell line increased TFE3 expression, which promoted cell survival under hypoxia. EGFR inhibiton by cetuximab could attenuate hypoxia-induced TFE3 in the HNSCC cell line and transgenic mouse HNSCC model. These findings indicated that TFE3 was an important hypoxia-induced transcriptional factor in HNSCC. TFE3 could be regarded as a durgable therapeutic oncotarget by EGFR inhibition. PMID:26872381

  4. Cigarette Smoke Modulates Expression of Human Rhinovirus-Induced Airway Epithelial Host Defense Genes

    PubMed Central

    Proud, David; Hudy, Magdalena H.; Wiehler, Shahina; Zaheer, Raza S.; Amin, Minaa A.; Pelikan, Jonathan B.; Tacon, Claire E.; Tonsaker, Tabitha O.; Walker, Brandie L.; Kooi, Cora; Traves, Suzanne L.; Leigh, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections trigger acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. The human airway epithelial cell is the primary site of HRV infection and responds to infection with altered expression of multiple genes, the products of which could regulate the outcome to infection. Cigarette smoking aggravates asthma symptoms, and is also the predominant risk factor for the development and progression of COPD. We, therefore, examined whether cigarette smoke extract (CSE) modulates viral responses by altering HRV-induced epithelial gene expression. Primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells were exposed to medium alone, CSE alone, purified HRV-16 alone or to HRV-16+ CSE. After 24 h, supernatants were collected and total cellular RNA was isolated. Gene array analysis was performed to examine mRNA expression. Additional experiments, using real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and/or western blotting, validated altered expression of selected gene products. CSE and HRV-16 each induced groups of genes that were largely independent of each other. When compared to gene expression in response to CSE alone, cells treated with HRV+CSE showed no obvious differences in CSE-induced gene expression. By contrast, compared to gene induction in response to HRV-16 alone, cells exposed to HRV+CSE showed marked suppression of expression of a number of HRV-induced genes associated with various functions, including antiviral defenses, inflammation, viral signaling and airway remodeling. These changes were not associated with altered expression of type I or type III interferons. Thus, CSE alters epithelial responses to HRV infection in a manner that may negatively impact antiviral and host defense outcomes. PMID:22808255

  5. β2-Agonists Inhibit TNF-α-Induced ICAM-1 Expression in Human Airway Parasympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Zhenying; Fryer, Allison D.; Jacoby, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Major basic protein released from eosinophils to airway parasympathetic nerves blocks inhibitory M2 muscarinic receptors on the parasympathetic nerves, increasing acetylcholine release and potentiating reflex bronchoconstriction. Recruitment of eosinophils to airway parasympathetic neurons requires neural expression of both intercellular adhesion molecular-1 (ICAM-1) and eotaxin. We have shown that inflammatory cytokines induce eotaxin and ICAM-1 expression in parasympathetic neurons. Objective To test whether the β2 agonist albuterol, which is used to treat asthma, changes TNF-alpha-induced eotaxin and ICAM-1 expression in human parasympathetic neurons. Methods Parasympathetic neurons were isolated from human tracheas and grown in serum-free medium for one week. Cells were incubated with either (R)-albuterol (the active isomer), (S)-albuterol (the inactive isomer) or (R,S)-albuterol for 90 minutes before adding 2 ng/ml TNF-alpha for another 4 hours (for mRNA) or 24 hours (for protein). Results and Conclusions Baseline expression of eotaxin and ICAM-1 were not changed by any isomer of albuterol as measured by real time RT-PCR. TNF-alpha induced ICAM-1 expression was significantly inhibited by (R)-albuterol in a dose dependent manner, but not by (S) or (R,S)-albuterol. Eotaxin expression was not changed by TNF-alpha or by any isomer of albuterol. The β-receptor antagonist propranolol blocked the inhibitory effect of (R)-albuterol on TNF-alpha-induced ICAM-1 expression. Clinical Implication The suppressive effect of (R)-albuterol on neural ICAM-1 expression may be an additional mechanism for decreasing bronchoconstriction, since it would decrease eosinophil recruitment to the airway nerves. PMID:23049757

  6. A small-molecule inducer of PDX1 expression identified by high-throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yuan; Hartland, Kate; Boskovic, Zarko; Wang, Yikai; Walpita, Deepika; Lysy, Philippe A.; Zhong, Cheng; Young, Damian W.; Kim, Young-kwon; Tolliday, Nicola J; Sokal, Etienne M.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wagner, Bridget K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX1), a member of the homedomain-containing transcription factor family, is a key transcription factor important for both pancreas development and mature beta-cell function. The ectopic overexpression of Pdx1, Neurog3, and MafA in mice reprograms acinar cells to insulin-producing cells. We developed a qPCR-based gene-expression assay to screen >60,000 compounds for expression of each of these genes in the human PANC-1 ductal carcinoma cell line. We identified BRD7552, which up-regulated PDX expression in both primary human islets and ductal cells, and induced epigenetic changes in the PDX1 promoter consistent with transcriptional activation. Prolonged compound treatment induced insulin mRNA and protein, and enhanced insulin expression induced by the three-gene combination. These results provide a proof of principle for identifying small molecules that induce expression of transcription factors to control cellular reprogramming. PMID:24290880

  7. ox-LDL induces endothelial dysfunction by promoting Arp2/3 complex expression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Zhao, Jianting; Shen, Liming; Jin, Yiqi; Zhang, Zhixuan; Xu, Guoxiong; Huang, Xianchen

    2016-06-24

    Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (ox-LDL) play a critical role in endothelial injury including cytoskeleton reorganization, which is closely related to actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Arp2/3 complex in ox-LDL-induced endothelial dysfunction. In this study, we found that Arp2 and Arp3 expression was increased under atherosclerotic conditions both in ApoE-/- mice and in ox-LDL-stimulated human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). Arp2/3 complex inhibitor CK666 significantly reduced ox-LDL-induced ROS generation and cytoskeleton reorganization, and increased NO release in HCAECs. Pretreatment with LOX-1- but not CD36-blocking antibody markedly decreased ox-LDL-induced Arp2 and Arp3 expression. Moreover, Rac-1 siRNA remarkably suppressed ox-LDL-stimulated Arp2 and Arp3 expression. Additionally, CK666 reduced endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and atherosclerotic lesions in ApoE-/- mice. Collectively, ox-LDL induces endothelial dysfunction by activating LOX-1/Rac-1 signaling and upregulating Arp2/3 complex expression. PMID:27181356

  8. Inducible expression of photoacoustic reporter gene tyrosinase in cells using a single plasmid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that tyrosinase is a reporter gene for photoacoustic imaging since tyrosinase is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of melanin, a pigment capable of producing strong photoacoustic signals. We previously created a cell line capable of inducible tyrosinase expression (important due to toxicity of melanin) by stably transfecting tyrosinase in MCF-7 Tet-OnR cell line (Clontech) which expresses a doxycycline-controlled transactivator. Unfortunately, Clontech provides few Tet-On Advanced cell lines making it difficult to have inducible tyrosinase expression in cell lines not provided by Clontech. In order to simplify the creation of cell lines with inducible expression of tyrosinase, we created a single plasmid that encodes both the transactivator as well as tyrosinase. PCR was used to amplify both the transactivator and tyrosinase from the Tet-OnR Advanced and pTRE-Tight-TYR plasmids, respectively. Both PCR products were cloned into the pEGFP-N1 plasmid and the newly created plasmid was transfected into ZR-75-1, MCF-7, and MIA PaCa-1 cells using lipofectamine. After several days, brown melanin was only observed in cells incubated with doxycycline, suggesting that the newly created single plasmid allowed inducible tyrosinase expression in many different cells lines.

  9. Compressive forces induce osteogenic gene expression in calvarial osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Rath, Bjoern; Nam, Jin; Knobloch, Thomas J; Lannutti, John J; Agarwal, Sudha

    2008-01-01

    Bone cells and their precursors are sensitive to changes in their biomechanical environment. The importance of mechanical stimuli has been observed in bone homeostasis and osteogenesis, but the mechanisms responsible for osteogenic induction in response to mechanical signals are poorly understood. We hypothesized that compressive forces could exert an osteogenic effect on osteoblasts and act in a dose-dependent manner. To test our hypothesis, electrospun poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds were used as a 3-D microenvironment for osteoblast culture. The scaffolds provided a substrate allowing cell exposure to levels of externally applied compressive force. Pre-osteoblasts adhered, proliferated and differentiated in the scaffolds and showed extensive matrix synthesis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and increased Young's modulus (136.45+/-9.15 kPa) compared with acellular scaffolds (24.55+/-8.5 kPa). Exposure of cells to 10% compressive strain (11.81+/-0.42 kPa) resulted in a rapid induction of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2), runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), and MAD homolog 5 (Smad5). These effects further enhanced the expression of genes and proteins required for extracellular matrix (ECM) production, such as alkaline phosphatase (Akp2), collagen type I (Col1a1), osteocalcin/bone gamma carboxyglutamate protein (OC/Bglap), osteonectin/secreted acidic cysteine-rich glycoprotein (ON/Sparc) and osteopontin/secreted phosphoprotein 1 (OPN/Spp1). Exposure of cell-scaffold constructs to 20% compressive strain (30.96+/-2.82 kPa) demonstrated that these signals are not osteogenic. These findings provide the molecular basis for the experimental and clinical observations that appropriate physical activities or microscale compressive loading can enhance fracture healing due in part to the anabolic osteogenic effects. PMID:18191137

  10. Enforced expression of miR-125b attenuates LPS-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhongliang; Gu, Yutong; Wang, Chunhong; Zhang, Jie; Shan, Shan; Gu, Xia; Wang, Kailing; Han, Yang; Ren, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a severe form of acute lung injury (ALI) in humans, is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Despite decades of research, few therapeutic strategies for clinical ARDS have emerged. Recent evidence implicated a potential role of miR-125b in development of ALI. Here we evaluated the miR-125b-based strategy in treatment of ARDS using the murine model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. We found that up-regulation of miR-125b expression maintained the body weight and survival of ALI mice, and significantly reduced LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation as reflected by reductions in total cell and neutrophil counts, proinflammatory cytokines, as well as chemokines in BAL fluid. Further, enforced expression of miR-125b resulted in remarkable reversal of LPS-induced increases in lung permeability as assessed by reductions in total protein, albumin and IgM in BAL fluid, and ameliorated the histopathology changes of lung in LPS-induced ALI mice. Of interest, serum miR-125b expression was also decreased and inversely correlated with the disease severity in patients with ARDS. Our findings strongly demonstrated that enforced expression of miR-125b could effectively ameliorate the LPS-induced ALI, suggesting a potential application for miR-125b-based therapy to treat clinical ARDS. PMID:25004393

  11. Dux4 induces cell cycle arrest at G1 phase through upregulation of p21 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Zhaoxia; Jin, Suqin; Hao, Hongjun; Zheng, Lemin; Zhou, Boda; Zhang, Wei; Lv, He; Yuan, Yun

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Dux4 induced TE671 cell proliferation defect and G1 phase arrest. • Dux4 upregulated p21 expression without activating p53. • Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. • Sp1 binding site was required for Dux4-induced p21 promoter activation. - Abstract: It has been implicated that Dux4 plays crucial roles in development of facioscapulohumeral dystrophy. But the underlying myopathic mechanisms and related down-stream events of this retrogene were far from clear. Here, we reported that overexpression of Dux4 in a cell model TE671 reduced cell proliferation rate, and increased G1 phase accumulation. We also determined the impact of Dux4 on p53/p21 signal pathway, which controls the checkpoint in cell cycle progression. Overexpression of Dux4 increased p21 mRNA and protein level, while expression of p53, phospho-p53 remained unchanged. Silencing p21 rescued Dux4 mediated proliferation defect and cell cycle arrest. Furthermore, we demonstrated that enhanced Dux4 expression increased p21 promoter activity and elevated expression of Sp1 transcription factor. Mutation of Sp1 binding site decreased dux4 induced p21 promoter activation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed the Dux4-induced binding of Sp1 to p21 promoter in vivo. These results suggest that Dux4 might induce proliferation inhibition and G1 phase arrest through upregulation of p21.

  12. NFAT5 Contributes to Osmolality-Induced MCP-1 Expression in Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-X.; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Increased expression of the C-C chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in mesothelial cells in response to high glucose concentrations and/or high osmolality plays a crucial role in the development of peritoneal fibrosis during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Recent studies suggest that in kidney cells osmolality-induced MCP-1 upregulation is mediated by the osmosensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5). The present study addressed the question of whether activation of NFAT5 by hyperosmolality, as present in PD fluids, contributes to MCP-1 expression in the mesothelial cell line Met5A. Hyperosmolality, induced by addition of glucose, NaCl, or mannitol to the growth medium, increased NFAT5 activity and stimulated MCP-1 expression in Met5A cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of NFAT5 attenuated osmolality-induced MCP-1 upregulation substantially. Hyperosmolality also induced activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB significantly decreased osmolality-induced MCP-1 expression. Taken together, these results indicate that high osmolalities activate the transcription factor NFAT5 in mesothelial cells. NFAT5 in turn upregulates MCP-1, likely in combination with NF-κB, and thus may participate in the development of peritoneal fibrosis during CAPD. PMID:22619484

  13. Glucose deprivation induces chemoresistance in colorectal cancer cells by increasing ATF4 expression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ya-Ling; Yin, Yuan; Liu, He-Yong; Feng, Yu-Yang; Bian, Ze-Hua; Zhou, Le-Yuan; Zhang, Ji-Wei; Fei, Bo-Jian; Wang, Yu-Gang; Huang, Zhao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) in glucose deprivation (GD) induced colorectal cancer (CRC) drug resistance and the mechanism involved. METHODS: Chemosensitivity and apoptosis were measured under the GD condition. Inhibition of ATF4 using short hairpin RNA in CRC cells under the GD condition and in ATF4-overexpressing CRC cells was performed to identify the role of ATF4 in the GD induced chemoresistance. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of drug resistance gene 1 (MDR1), respectively. RESULTS: GD protected CRC cells from drug-induced apoptosis (oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil) and induced the expression of ATF4, a key gene of the unfolded protein response. Depletion of ATF4 in CRC cells under the GD condition can induce apoptosis and drug re-sensitization. Similarly, inhibition of ATF4 in the ATF4-overexpressing CRC cells reintroduced therapeutic sensitivity and apoptosis. In addition, increased MDR1 expression was observed in GD-treated CRC cells. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that GD promotes chemoresistance in CRC cells through up-regulating ATF4 expression. PMID:27468213

  14. Resveratrol attenuates norepinephrine-induced ovarian cancer invasiveness through downregulating hTERT expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Hwa; Cho, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Yu Na; Jeong, Bo Young; Park, Chang Gyo; Hur, Gang Min; Lee, Hoi Young

    2016-02-01

    Stress hormone norepinephrine (NE) has been associated with acquisition of cancer progression, and naturally occurring phytoalexin resveratrol (REV) has been known to suppress cancer growth and progression. In the present study, we determine the effect of REV on NE-induced ovarian cancer invasiveness. Pretreatment of REV significantly inhibited NE-induced ovarian cancer cell epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition with concomitant recovery of E-cadherin expression. In addition, our data showed that REV downregulates NE-induced human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression through inhibiting Src phosphorylation and HIF-1α expression. Further, REV reduced NE-induced Slug expression and subsequent ovarian cancer invasion. More importantly, combined treatment of REV with a pharmacological inhibitor of beta adrenergic receptor significantly attenuated NE-induced ovarian cancer invasion compared to single treatment. Therefore, we demonstrate interference of a Src and HIF-1α/hTERT/Slug signaling cascade by REV, providing potential therapeutic targets and inhibition of ovarian cancer. PMID:26428673

  15. Particle irradiation induces FGF2 expression in normal human lens cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, P. Y.; Bjornstad K, A.; Chang, E.; McNamara, M.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Lin, S. P.; Aragon, G.; Polansky, J. R.; Lui, G. M.; Blakely, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Particle Irradiation Induces FGF2 Expression in Normal Human Lens Cells. Particle radiations, including both proton and helium-ion beams, have been used to successfully treat choroidal melanoma, but with the complication of radiation-induced cataract. We have investigated a role for radiation-induced changes in the expression of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2) gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury associated with cataract. Normal human lens epithelial (HLE) cells were cultured in vitro on extracellular matrix (ECM) originated from bovine corneal endothelial cells. This study reports evidence for rapid but transient induction of FGF2 transcripts, an increase of between 5- and 8-fold, within 0.5 h after exposure to particle radiation, followed by another wave of increased transcription at 2-3 h postirradiation. Immunofluorescence results confirm the enhanced levels of FGF2 protein rapidly after exposure to protons or helium ions, followed by another wave of increased activity unique to helium at 6 h postirradiation. This second wave of increased immunoreactivity was not observed in the proton-irradiated samples. Total FGF2 protein analysis after helium-ion exposures shows induced expression of three FGF2 isoforms, with an increase of up to 2-fold in the 18-kDa low-molecular-weight species. Studies of the effects of protons on individual FGF2 protein isoforms are in progress. Several mechanisms involving a role for FGF2 in radiation-induced cataract are discussed.

  16. Regulation and clinical significance of the hypoxia-induced expression of ANGPTL4 in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    KUBO, HIROSHI; KITAJIMA, YOSHIHIKO; KAI, KEITA; NAKAMURA, JUN; MIYAKE, SHUUSUKE; YANAGIHARA, KAZUYOSHI; MORITO, KIYOTO; TANAKA, TOMOKAZU; SHIDA, MASAAKI; NOSHIRO, HIROKAZU

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors are often exposed to hypoxia. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α upregulates numerous target genes associated with the malignant behavior of hypoxic cancer cells. A member of the angiopoietin family, angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is a hypoxia-inducible gene. The present study aimed to clarify whether ANGPTL4 is regulated by HIF-1α in gastric cancer cells. The study also assessed whether ANGPTL4 expression is associated with clinicopathological factors or HIF-1α expression in gastric cancer tissues. Hypoxia-induced ANGPTL4 expression was quantitatively analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in 10 gastric cancer cell lines. RT-qPCR was further employed to investigate the HIF-1α dependency of ANGPTL4 expression using HIF-1α-knockdown transfectant 58As9-KD and control 58As9-SC gastric cancer cells. The HIF-1α and ANGPTL4 expression levels were immunohistochemically analyzed in 170 gastric cancer tissue specimens and were assessed for any correlations with the clinicopathological factors and/or patient survival. Subsequently, hypoxia-induced ANGPTL4 expression was observed in 7 out of 10 gastric cancer cell lines. The hypoxic induction of ANGPTL4 was almost preserved in the 58As9-KD cells compared with that observed in the 58As9-SC cells, while the induction of known HIF-1α target gene, carbonic anhydrase 9, was completely suppressed in the 58As9-KD cells. In the gastric cancer tissues, ANGPTL4 expression was inversely correlated with the tumor depth, whereas HIF-1α expression was positively correlated with venous invasion. A survival analysis revealed that the expression of ANGPTL4 was significantly correlated with a longer survival time, whereas that of HIF-1α was correlated with a shorter survival time. In conclusion, the present findings indicate that hypoxia-induced ANGPTL4 expression is independent of HIF-1α in hypoxic gastric cancer cells. ANGPTL4 may be a favorable marker for predicting

  17. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present study we report that cotreatment of human endothelial cells with certain hydroxyflavones and flavanols blocks cytokine-induced ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin expression on human endothelial cells. One of the most potent flavones, apigenin, exhibited a dose- and time-dependent, reversible effect on adhesion protein expression as well as inhibiting adhesion protein upregulation at the transcriptional level. Apigenin also inhibited IL-1 alpha-induced prostaglandin synthesis and TNF-alpha-induced IL-6 and IL-8 production, suggesting that the hydroxyflavones may act as general inhibitors of cytokine-induced gene expression. Although apigenin did not inhibit TNF-alpha-induced nuclear translocation of NF-kappa B(p50(NFKB1)/p65(RelA)) we found this flavonoid did inhibit TNF-alpha induced beta-galactosidase activity in SW480 cells stably transfected with a beta-galactosidase reporter construct driven by four NF-kappa B elements, suggesting an action on NF-kappa B transcriptional activation. Adhesion of leukocytes to cytokine-treated endothelial cells was blocked in endothelial cells cotreated with apigenin. Finally, apigenin demonstrated potent anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw edema and delayed type hypersensitivity in the mouse. We conclude that flavonoids offer important therapeutic potential for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory diseases involving an increase in leukocyte adhesion and trafficking. Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:7543732

  18. Hypertonic saline reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced mouse brain edema through inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Three percent sodium chloride (NaCl) treatment has been shown to reduce brain edema and inhibited brain aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression in bacterial meningitis induced by Escherichia coli. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the main pathogenic component of E. coli. We aimed to explore the effect of 3% NaCl in mouse brain edema induced by LPS, as well as to elucidate the potential mechanisms of action. Methods Three percent NaCl was used to treat cerebral edema induced by LPS in mice in vivo. Brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, immunoglobulin G (IgG), AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in brain tissues. IL-1β, 3% NaCl and calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C) were used to treat the primary astrocytes in vitro. AQP4 mRNA and protein were measured in astrocytes. Differences in various groups were determined by one-way analysis of variance. Results Three percent NaCl attenuated the increase of brain water content, IL-1β, TNFα, IgG, AQP4 mRNA and protein in brain tissues induced by LPS. Three percent NaCl inhibited the increase of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by IL-1β in vitro. Calphostin C blocked the decrease of AQP4 mRNA and protein in astrocytes induced by 3% NaCl in vitro. Conclusions Osmotherapy with 3% NaCl ameliorated LPS-induced cerebral edema in vivo. In addition to its osmotic force, 3% NaCl exerted anti-edema effects possibly through down-regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNFα) and inhibiting the expression of AQP4 induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Three percent NaCl attenuated the expression of AQP4 through activation of protein kinase C in astrocytes. PMID:23036239

  19. Myogenin, MyoD, and myosin expression after pharmacologically and surgically induced hypertrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mozdziak, P. E.; Greaser, M. L.; Schultz, E.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between myogenin or MyoD expression and hypertrophy of the rat soleus produced either by clenbuterol and 3,3', 5-triiodo-L-thyronine (CT) treatment or by surgical overload was examined. Mature female rats were subjected to surgical overload of the right soleus with the left soleus serving as a control. Another group received the same surgical treatment but were administered CT. Soleus muscles were harvested 4 wk after surgical overload and weighed. Myosin heavy chain isoforms were separated by using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis while myogenin and MyoD expression were evaluated by Northern analysis. CT and functional overload increased soleus muscle weight. CT treatment induced the appearance of the fast type IIX myosin heavy chain isoform, depressed myogenin expression, and induced MyoD expression. However, functional overload did not alter myogenin or MyoD expression in CT-treated or non-CT-treated rats. Thus pharmacologically and surgically induced hypertrophy have differing effects on myogenin and MyoD expression, because their levels were associated with changes in myosin heavy chain composition (especially type IIX) rather than changes in muscle mass.

  20. Bioprocess applications of a Sindbis virus-based temperature-inducible expression system.

    PubMed

    Boorsma, M; Hoenke, S; Marrero, A; Fischer, R; Bailey, J E; Renner, W A; Bachmann, M F

    2002-09-20

    The production and study of toxic proteins requires inducible expression systems with low basal level expression and high inducibility. Here, we describe bioprocess applications of the pCytTS temperature-regulatable Sindbis virus replicon-based expression system. We used green fluorescent protein as a marker protein to optimize the selection of stable transfected clones with increased expression levels. Using the optimized protocol, clones were constructed that produced the growth-inhibiting, anti-viral protein interferon beta (beta-IFN). Selected clones were analyzed for temperature-dependent beta-IFN production in adherent and suspension cultures in serum free medium. Specific expression levels were around 1.0 x 10(5) IU/10(6) cells/day (0.5 microg/10(6) cells/day) in suspension cultures and over 1.5 x 10(6) IU/mL/day (7.5 microg/mL/day) in hollow fiber reactors using adherent cells. Hexahistidine-tagged beta-IFN purified from T-flask cultures was highly glycosylated and showed high specific activity. beta-IFN mRNA amplified by the viral replicase for 10 days did not show an accumulation of mutations. These data suggest the applicability of the pCytTS-inducible expression system for the production of high-quality glycoproteins in different reactors. PMID:12209807

  1. Abiotic stresses affecting water balance induce phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase expression in roots of wheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    González, María-Cruz; Sánchez, Rosario; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2003-04-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, EC 4.1.1.31) plays an important role in CO(2) fixation in C4 and CAM plants. In C3 plants, PEPC is widely expressed in most organs; however, its function is not yet clearly established. With the aim of providing clues on the function of PEPC in C3 plants, we have analyzed its pattern of expression in wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) seedlings. Roots showed almost double the level of PEPC activity of shoots. Further analysis of PEPC expression in roots by in situ localization techniques showed a high accumulation of PEPC transcripts and polypeptides in meristematic cells, whereas in the rest of the root PEPC localized preferentially to the vascular tissue. Treatment with NaCl and LiCl induced PEPC expression in roots. Similarly, other abiotic stresses affecting water status, such as drought or cold, induced PEPC expression. Induction was root-specific except for the cold treatment, which also induced PEPC in shoots, although to a lesser extent. In contrast, hypoxia, which does not affect water balance, did not promote any induction of PEPC expression. These results suggest an important role for this enzyme in the adaptation of plants to environmental changes. PMID:12687366

  2. Individual expression of influenza virus PA protein induces degradation of coexpressed proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-Ezquerro, J J; de la Luna, S; Ortín, J; Nieto, A

    1995-01-01

    In the process of in vivo reconstitution of influenza virus transcriptase-replicase complex, an inhibitory effect was observed when the level of PA protein expression was increased. This inhibition was paralleled by a decrease in the accumulation of the other influenza virus core proteins. The sole expression of PA protein was sufficient to reduce the accumulation level of the proteins encoded by the coexpressed genes. The PA effect was observed upon influenza virus and non-influenza virus proteins and independently of the expression system chosen and the origin of cell line used. The expression of PA protein did not induce variations in the translation of the target proteins but did induce variations on their half-lives, which were clearly reduced. A functional PA subunit seems to be necessary to induce this negative effect, because an inactive point mutant was unable to decrease the steady-state levels or the half-lives of the reporter proteins. The PA effect was observed as early as 5 h after its expression, and continuous synthesis of proteins was not required for performance of its biological activity. The results presented represent the first biological activity of individually expressed PA polymerase subunit. PMID:7884889

  3. Ethanol inducible expression of a mesophilic cellulase avoids adverse effects on plant development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Plant-produced biomass-degrading enzymes are promising tools for the processing of lignocellulose to fermentable sugars. A major limitation of in planta production is that high-level expression of such enzymes could potentially affect the structure and integrity of the plant cell wall and negatively influence plant growth and development. Results Here, we evaluate the impact on tobacco plant development of constitutive versus alcohol-inducible expression of the endoglucanase TrCel5A from the mesophilic fungus Trichoderma reesei. Using this system, we are able to demonstrate that constitutive expression of the enzyme, controlled by the doubled Cauliflower Mosaic Virus promoter, leads to lower cellulose content of the plant combined with severe effects on plant growth. However, using an alcohol-inducible expression of the endoglucanase in the plant leaves, we achieved similar enzymatic expression levels with no changes in the crystalline cellulose content. Conclusion We were able to produce significant amounts of cellulase in the plant leaves without detrimental effects to plant development. These results demonstrate the potential feasibility of an inducible expression system for producing biomass degrading enzymes in plants. PMID:23587418

  4. Sugar-Dependent Gibberellin-Induced Chalcone Synthase Gene Expression in Petunia Corollas.

    PubMed Central

    Moalem-Beno, D.; Tamari, G.; Leitner-Dagan, Y.; Borochov, A.; Weiss, D.

    1997-01-01

    The induction of anthocyanin synthesis and anthocyanin biosynthetic gene expression in detached petunia (Petunia hybrida) corollas by gibberellic acid (GA3) requires sucrose. Neither sucrose nor GA3 alone can induce these processes. We found that GA3 enhances sucrose uptake by 20 to 30%, and we tested whether this is the mechanism by which the hormone induces gene expression. Changing the intracellular level of sucrose with the inhibitors p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid and vanadate did not inhibit the induction of chalcone synthase gene (chs) expression by GA3. Growing detached corollas in various sucrose concentrations did not affect the induction of the gene but did affect its level of expression and the level of anthocyanin accumulated. Only metabolic sugars promoted GA3-induced anthocyanin accumulation. Mannitol and sorbitol had no effect and 3-O-methylglucose only slightly promoted chs expression and anthocyanin accumulation. Our results do not support the suggestion that sugars act as specific signals in the activation of anthocyanin biosynthetic gene expression during petunia corolla development. We suggest that sugars are essential as general sources of carbohydrates for carbon metabolism, upon which the induction of pigmentation is dependent. PMID:12223616

  5. Choline kinase alpha expression during RA-induced neuronal differentiation: role of C/EBPβ.

    PubMed

    Domizi, Pablo; Aoyama, Chieko; Banchio, Claudia

    2014-04-01

    Neuronal differentiation is a complex process characterized by a halt in proliferation and extension of neurites from the cell body. This process is accompanied by changes in gene expression that mediate the redirection leading to neurite formation and function. Acceleration of membrane phospholipids synthesis is associated with neurite elongation, and phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) is the major membrane phospholipid in mammalian cells. The transcription of two genes in particular encoding key enzymes in the CDP-choline pathway for PtdCho biosynthesis are stimulated; the Chka gene for choline kinase (CK) alpha isoform and the Pcyt1a gene for the CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT) alpha isoform. We report that the stimulation of CKα expression during retinoic acid (RA) induced differentiation depends on a promoter region that contains two CCAAT/Enhancer-binding Protein-β (C/EBPβ) sites. We demonstrate that during neuronal differentiation of Neuro-2a cells, RA induces Chka expression by a mechanism that involves ERK1/2 activation which triggers C/EBPβ expression. Elevated levels of C/EBPβ bind to the Chka proximal promoter (Box1) inducing CKα expression. In addition we identified a downstream sequence named Box2 which together with Box1 is required for the promoter to reach the full induction. This is the first elucidation of the mechanism by which the expression of Chka is coordinately regulated during neuronal differentiation. PMID:24440820

  6. Exercise-induced differential changes in gene expression among arterioles of skeletal muscles of obese rats.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, M Harold; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T; Thorne, Pamela K; Martin, Jeffrey S; Rector, R Scott; Akter, Sadia; Davis, J Wade

    2015-09-15

    Using next-generation, transcriptome-wide RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) technology we assessed the effects of exercise training on transcriptional profiles in skeletal muscle arterioles isolated from the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles of Otsuka Long Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats that underwent an endurance exercise training program (EX; n = 13), interval sprint training program (SPRINT; n = 14), or remained sedentary (Sed; n = 12). We hypothesized that the greatest effects of exercise would be in the gastrocnemius arterioles. Results show that EX caused the largest number of changes in gene expression in the soleus and white gastrocnemius 2a arterioles with little to no changes in the feed arteries. In contrast, SPRINT caused substantial changes in gene expression in the feed arteries. IPA canonical pathway analysis revealed 18 pathways with significant changes in gene expression when analyzed across vessels and revealed that EX induces increased expression of the following genes in all arterioles examined: Shc1, desert hedgehog protein (Dhh), adenylate cyclase 4 (Adcy4), G protein binding protein, alpha (Gnat1), and Bcl2l1 and decreased expression of ubiquitin D (Ubd) and cAMP response element modulator (Crem). EX increased expression of endothelin converting enzyme (Ece1), Hsp90b, Fkbp5, and Cdcl4b in four of five arterioles. SPRINT had effects on expression of Crem, Dhh, Bcl2l1, and Ubd that were similar to EX. SPRINT also increased expression of Nfkbia, Hspa5, Tubb 2a and Tubb 2b, and Fkbp5 in all five arterioles and increased expression of Gnat1 in all but the soleus second-order arterioles. Many contractile and/or structural protein genes were increased by SPRINT in the gastrocnemius feed artery, but the same genes exhibited decreased expression in red gastrocnemius arterioles. We conclude that training-induced changes in arteriolar gene expression patterns differ by muscle fiber type composition and along the arteriolar tree. PMID:26183477

  7. High-level expression of the bacterial opd gene in Drosophila melanogaster: improved inducible insecticide resistance.

    PubMed

    Benedict, M Q; Scott, J A; Cockburn, A F

    1994-11-01

    The bacterial parathion hydrolase gene (opd) was expressed in transformed D. melanogaster under the control of an hsp70 promoter. Transformed lines carrying chimaeric genes designed for either cytoplasmic or secretory expression exhibited high- or low-level heat-shock-inducible transient resistance to paraoxon respectively. Greatest levels of resistance occurred approximately 12-16 h after heat shock and well after periods of maximal transcription. Insecticide resistance conferred by the cytoplasmic form of opd is expressed as a semidominant trait. PMID:7704308

  8. Constitutive and Inducible Expression of the rRNA Methylase Gene erm(B) in Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Fengru; Shen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Maojun; Wu, Congming

    2015-01-01

    Macrolides are the antimicrobials of choice for treating human campylobacteriosis. The recent emergence of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria threatens the utility of this class of antibiotics. Here we report the constitutive and inducible expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter isolates derived from diarrheal patients and food-producing animals. Constitutive expression of erm(B) was associated with insertion and deletion in the regulatory region of the gene, providing the first documentation of the differential expression of erm(B) in Campylobacter bacteria. PMID:26259800

  9. Involvement of SULF2 in γ-irradiation-induced invasion and resistance of cancer cells by inducing IL-6 expression

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Chan-Hun; Ho, Jin-Nyoung; Park, Jong Kuk; Kim, Eun Mi; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Um, Hong-Duck

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells that survive radiotherapy often display enhanced invasiveness and resistance to death stimuli. Previous findings have suggested that ionizing radiation (IR) induces such undesirable effects by stimulating the STAT3/Bcl-XL pathway. To identify novel cellular components that mediate these actions of IR, we irradiated lung cancer cells with sublethal doses of γ-rays and screened for the induction of IR-responsive genes by microarray analysis. The genes encoding 2 extracellular proteins, SULF2 and IL-6, were found to be upregulated, and these results were confirmed by polymerase chain reactions and western blot analyses. Because the IR-mediated induction of SULF2 was a novel finding, we also confirmed the phenomenon in vivo using xenograft tumors in mice. Analyses of signaling processes revealed that IR induced SULF2 expression via p53, which then promoted IL-6 expression by stabilizing β-catenin, followed by stimulation of the STAT3/Bcl-XL pathway. Consistently, both SULF2 and IL-6 mediated IR-induced invasion and resistance to death stimuli. To investigate whether SULF2 contributes to IR-induced tumor metastasis, we irradiated tumors in mice with sublethal doses of IR. This treatment promoted the entry of tumor cells into the blood stream (intravasation), which was abolished by downregulating SULF2 expression in tumor cells. These results demonstrated that SULF2 can mediate the detrimental effects of IR in vivo. Therefore, SULF2 may be potentially used as a therapeutic and diagnostic target to predict and overcome the malignant effects of IR, particularly in tumors expressing p53 wild-type. PMID:26895473

  10. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by xanthanolides isolated from Xanthium strumarium.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Hoon; Lim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Hwa Jin; Kim, Hee-Doo; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha

    2008-03-15

    Three sesquiterpenoids, xanthatin (1), xanthinosin (2), and 4-oxo-bedfordia acid (3) were isolated from Xanthium strumarium as inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis in activated microglia (IC(50) values: 0.47, 11.2, 136.5 microM, respectively). Compounds 1 and 2 suppressed the expression of iNOS and COX-2 and the activity of NF-kappaB through the inhibition of LPS-induced I-kappaB-alpha degradation in microglia. PMID:18276135

  11. β-Cryptoxanthin Alleviates Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kobori, Masuko; Ni, Yinhua; Takahashi, Yumiko; Watanabe, Natsumi; Sugiura, Minoru; Ogawa, Kazunori; Nagashimada, Mayumi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Naito, Shigehiro; Ota, Tsuguhito

    2014-01-01

    Recent nutritional epidemiological surveys showed that serum β-cryptoxanthin inversely associates with the risks for insulin resistance and liver dysfunction. Consumption of β-cryptoxanthin possibly prevents nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), which is suggested to be caused by insulin resistance and oxidative stress from nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. To evaluate the effect of β-cryptoxanthin on diet-induced NASH, we fed a high-cholesterol and high-fat diet (CL diet) with or without 0.003% β-cryptoxanthin to C56BL/6J mice for 12 weeks. After feeding, β-cryptoxanthin attenuated fat accumulation, increases in Kupffer and activated stellate cells, and fibrosis in CL diet-induced NASH in the mice. Comprehensive gene expression analysis showed that although β-cryptoxanthin histochemically reduced steatosis, it was more effective in inhibiting inflammatory gene expression change in NASH. β-Cryptoxanthin reduced the alteration of expression of genes associated with cell death, inflammatory responses, infiltration and activation of macrophages and other leukocytes, quantity of T cells, and free radical scavenging. However, it showed little effect on the expression of genes related to cholesterol and other lipid metabolism. The expression of markers of M1 and M2 macrophages, T helper cells, and cytotoxic T cells was significantly induced in NASH and reduced by β-cryptoxanthin. β-Cryptoxanthin suppressed the expression of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inducible and/or TNFα-inducible genes in NASH. Increased levels of the oxidative stress marker thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were reduced by β-cryptoxanthin in NASH. Thus, β-cryptoxanthin suppresses inflammation and the resulting fibrosis probably by primarily suppressing the increase and activation of macrophages and other immune cells. Reducing oxidative stress is likely to be a major mechanism of inflammation and injury suppression in the livers of mice with NASH. PMID:24858832

  12. Expression and function of fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 in human corneal myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Nobuyuki; Nakayama, Masafumi; Tokura, Tomoko; Ushio, Hiroko; Murakami, Akira

    2009-08-01

    The interaction of fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) and, its ligand tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is known to be important in wound healing of tissues. However, to our knowledge, expression and function of Fn14 in corneal myofibroblasts, which have a crucial role in wound healing of corneal stroma, has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of Fn14 in corneal myofibroblasts. Expression of Fn14 protein was assessed by flow cytometry. Corneal myofibroblasts showed strong expression of Fn14 protein, while keratocytes did not. TGF-beta(1) promoted the differentiation of keratocytes into corneal myofibroblasts, and induced Fn14 expression. These data reveal that keratocytes phenotype determines the level of Fn14 expression. ELISA was used to detect chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases in the supernatant of corneal myofibroblasts cultured with or without stimulation by TWEAK and/or TGF-beta(1). TWEAK increased the production of IL-8, MCP-1, and RANTES by corneal myofibroblasts via Fn14. TGF-beta(1) augmented the TWEAK-induced production of these chemokines. TWEAK also increased the production of MMP-1 and -3 by corneal myofibroblasts via Fn14, while TGF-beta(1) inhibited this effect of TWEAK on MMP production. TWEAK-induced phosphorylation of NF-kappaB and MAP kinase in corneal myofibroblasts. Furthermore, TWEAK partially inhibited the differentiation of keratocytes into corneal myofibroblasts promoted by TGF-beta(1). These data suggest that the Fn14/TWEAK system may have several roles in wound healing by corneal myofibroblasts. In the future, modulation of the TWEAK/Fn14 system may become a novel approach for control corneal wound healing. PMID:19344712

  13. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27478804

  14. MicroRNA expression changes during zebrafish development induced by perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zeng, Huai-Cai; Wei, Jie; Wan, Yan-Jian; Chen, Jun; Xu, Shun-Qing

    2011-04-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a kind of widely distributed environmentally organic compound, has been found to cause developmental toxicity. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in many metabolic tasks, whether and how they are involved in the process of PFOS-induced toxicity is largely unknown. To address this problem, PFOS-induced changes in miRNAs and target gene expression in zebrafish embryos, and the potential mechanism of PFOS-induced toxic action were studied in this research. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 1 µg ml(-1) PFOS or DMSO control from 6 h post-fertilization (hpf) to 24 or 120 hpf. Subsequently, RNA was isolated from the embryo pool and the expression profiles of 219 known zebrafish miRNAs were analyzed using microarray. Finally, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to validate several miRNAs expression of microarray data. The analysis revealed that PFOS exposure induced significant changes in miRNA expression profiles. A total of 39 and 81 miRNAs showed significantly altered expression patterns after PFOS exposure 24 and 120 hpf. Of the changed miRNAs, 20 were significantly up-regulated and 19 were significantly down-regulated (p < 0.01) at 24 hpf, whereas 41 were significantly up-regulated and 40 were significantly down-regulated (p < 0.01) at 120 hpf. These miRNAs were involved in development, apoptosis and cell signal pathway, cell cycle progression and proliferation, oncogenesis, adipose metabolism and hormone secretion, whereas there is still little functional information available for 32 miRNAs. Our results demonstrate that PFOS exposure alters the expression of a suite of miRNAs and may induce developmental toxicity. PMID:20878907

  15. Expression of Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteriocins Is Induced by Antibiotics via Regulatory Interplay with the Competence System

    PubMed Central

    Slager, Jelle; Lake, Frank B.; Gericke, Oliver; Roberts, Ian S.; Rozen, Daniel E.; Veening, Jan-Willem

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal bacteriocins (pneumocins) are antibacterial toxins that mediate intra-species competition within the human host. However, the triggers of pneumocin expression are poorly understood. Using RNA-sequencing, we mapped the regulon of the pneumocin cluster (blp) of Streptococcus pneumoniae D39. Furthermore, by analogy with pneumococcal competence, we show that several antibiotics activate the blp-genes. Using real-time gene expression measurements we show that while the promoter driving expression of the two-component regulatory system blpR/H is constitutive, the remaining blp-promoters that control pneumocin expression, immunity and the inducer peptide BlpC, are pH-dependent and induced in the late exponential phase. Intriguingly, competence for genetic transformation, mediated by the paralogous ComD/E two-component quorum system, is induced by the same environmental cues. To test for interplay between these regulatory systems, we quantified the regulatory response to the addition of synthetic BlpC and competence-stimulating peptide (CSP). Supporting the idea of such interplay, we found that immediately upon addition of CSP, the blp-promoters were activated in a comD/E-dependent manner. After a delay, blp-expression was highly induced and was strictly dependent on blpRH and blpC. This raised the question of the mechanism of BlpC export, since bioinformatic analysis showed that the genes encoding the putative exporter for BlpC, blpAB, are not intact in strain D39 and most other strains. By contrast, all sequenced pneumococcal strains contain intact comAB genes, encoding the transport system for CSP. Consistent with the idea that comAB mediate BlpC export, we finally show that high-level expression of the blp-genes requires comAB. Together, our results demonstrate that regulation of pneumocin expression is intertwined with competence, explaining why certain antibiotics induce blp-expression. Antibiotic-induced pneumocin expression might therefore have

  16. Inhibitory PAS domain protein is a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Yuichi; Cao, Renhai; Svensson, Kristian; Bertilsson, Göran; Asman, Mikael; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Cao, Yihai; Berkenstam, Anders; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2001-11-01

    Alteration of gene expression is a crucial component of adaptive responses to hypoxia. These responses are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Here we describe an inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein, IPAS, which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS protein structurally related to HIFs. IPAS contains no endogenous transactivation function but demonstrates dominant negative regulation of HIF-mediated control of gene expression. Ectopic expression of IPAS in hepatoma cells selectively impairs induction of genes involved in adaptation to a hypoxic environment, notably the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, and results in retarded tumour growth and tumour vascular density in vivo. In mice, IPAS was predominantly expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in corneal epithelium of the eye. Expression of IPAS in the cornea correlates with low levels of expression of the VEGF gene under hypoxic conditions. Application of an IPAS antisense oligonucleotide to the mouse cornea induced angiogenesis under normal oxygen conditions, and demonstrated hypoxia-dependent induction of VEGF gene expression in hypoxic corneal cells. These results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for negative regulation of angiogenesis and maintenance of an avascular phenotype.

  17. Neurochemical characterization of pERK-expressing spinal neurons in histamine-induced itch

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guan-Yu; Dai, Meng-Han; Huang, Kun; Chai, Guo-Dong; Chen, Jia-Yin; Chen, Ling; Lang, Bing; Wang, Qing-Xiu; St Clair, David; McCaig, Colin; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Zhang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Acute itch is divided into histamine- and non-histamine-dependent subtypes, and our previous study has shown that activation of ERK signaling in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) is required selectively for histamine-induced itch sensation. Morphological characteristics of pERK-expressing neurons are required for exploring the mechanism underlying spinal itch sensation. To investigate whether pERK-expressing neurons are supraspinally-projecting neurons, we injected Fluorogold (FG) into the ventrobasal thalamic complex (VB) and parabrachial region, the two major spinal ascending sites in rodents. A small number (1%) of pERK-positive neurons were labeled by FG, suggesting that histamine-induced activation of ERK is primarily located in local SDH neurons. We then examined the co-localization of pERK with Calbindin and Lmx1b, which are expressed by excitatory neurons, and found that more than half (58%) of pERK-positive neurons expressed Lmx1b, but no co-expression with Calbindin was observed. On the other hand, approximately 7% of pERK-positive neurons expressed GAD67, and 27% of them contained Pax2. These results support the idea that pERK-expressing neurons serve as a component of local neuronal circuits for processing itch sensation in the spinal cord. PMID:26248539

  18. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyanka L.; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc–dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  19. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyanka L; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-08-23

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc-dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  20. Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling changes C2C12 myoblast proliferation and differentiation by inducing Id3 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Long; Shi, Songting; Zhang, Juan; Zhou, Fangfang; Dijke, Peter ten

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of Id3 but not Id1 is induced by Wnt3a stimulation in C2C12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a induces Id3 expression via canonical Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wnt3a-induced Id3 expression does not depend on BMP signaling activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Induction of Id3 expression is critical determinant in Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and differentiation. -- Abstract: Canonical Wnt signaling plays important roles in regulating cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we report that inhibitor of differentiation (Id)3 is a Wnt-inducible gene in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Wnt3a induced Id3 expression in a {beta}-catenin-dependent manner. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) also potently induced Id3 expression. However, Wnt-induced Id3 expression occurred independent of the BMP/Smad pathway. Functional studies showed that Id3 depletion in C2C12 cells impaired Wnt3a-induced cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity, an early marker of osteoblast cells. Id3 depletion elevated myogenin induction during myogenic differentiation and partially impaired Wnt3a suppressed myogenin expression in C2C12 cells. These results suggest that Id3 is an important Wnt/{beta}-catenin induced gene in myoblast cell fate determination.

  1. HLA-D subregion expression by thyroid epithelium in autoimmune thyroid diseases and induced in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, I; Pujol-Borrell, R; Abdul-Karim, B A; Hammond, L J; Feldmann, M; Bottazzo, G F

    1987-01-01

    Human thyroid epithelial cells (thyrocytes) express HLA Class II molecules in autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD). Normal thyrocytes do not express Class II, but can be induced to do so by culture with interferon-gamma (gamma-IFN). We have examined HLA-D subregion expression in sections and monolayers of thyroid by indirect immunofluorescence using appropriate monoclonal antibodies. The results indicate that, in ATD, the incidence and intensity of Class II subregion expression by thyrocytes varies between patients, and follows the pattern DR greater than DP greater than DQ. The same hierarchy is observed in cultured normal thyrocytes treated with gamma-IFN: strong induction of Class II, and of DP and DQ in particular, requires relatively high concentrations of gamma-IFN or additional factors such as thyroid stimulating hormone. These findings suggest that HLA-D subregion expression by thyrocytes in on-going ATD is determined by the levels of disease related factors in the affected tissue. PMID:3117460

  2. Hypoxia induces expression of connective tissue growth factor in scleroderma skin fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hong, K-H; Yoo, S-A; Kang, S-S; Choi, J-J; Kim, W-U; Cho, C-S

    2006-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays a role in the fibrotic process of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Because hypoxia is associated with fibrosis in several profibrogenic conditions, we investigated whether CTGF expression in SSc fibroblasts is regulated by hypoxia. Dermal fibroblasts from patients with SSc and healthy controls were cultured in the presence of hypoxia or cobalt chloride (CoCl2), a chemical inducer of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α. Expression of CTGF was evaluated by Northern and Western blot analyses. Dermal fibroblasts exposed to hypoxia (1% O2) or CoCl2 (1–100 µM) enhanced expression of CTGF mRNA. Skin fibroblasts transfected with HIF-1α showed the increased levels of CTGF protein and mRNA, as well as nuclear staining of HIF-1α, which was enhanced further by treatment of CoCl2. Simultaneous treatment of CoCl2 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β additively increased CTGF mRNA in dermal fibroblasts. Interferon-γ inhibited the TGF-β-induced CTGF mRNA expression dose-dependently in dermal fibroblasts, but they failed to hamper the CoCl2-induced CTGF mRNA expression. In addition, CoCl2 treatment increased nuclear factor (NF)-κB binding activity for CTGF mRNA, while decreasing IκBα expression in dermal fibroblasts. Our data suggest that hypoxia, caused possibly by microvascular alterations, up-regulates CTGF expression through the activation of HIF-1α in dermal fibroblasts of SSc patients, and thereby contributes to the progression of skin fibrosis. PMID:17034590

  3. Cohort of estrogen-induced microRNAs regulate adrenomedullin expression.

    PubMed

    Wetzel-Strong, Sarah E; Li, Manyu; Espenschied, Scott T; Caron, Kathleen M

    2016-01-15

    Estrogen regulates the expression of many genes and has been correlated with differences in cardiac contraction; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly defined. Adrenomedullin (Adm = gene; AM = protein) is a multifunctional peptide with inotropic actions. Previous studies have demonstrated that estrogen enhances the expression of Adm, suggesting a relationship between AM and estrogen in cardiac contraction during physiological and pathological states. In this study, female mice in a mouse model of genetic Adm overexpression, abbreviated as Adm(hi/hi), were found to express 60 times more Adm in the heart than wild-type littermates, compared with the three-fold elevation of Adm previously reported in Adm(hi/hi) male hearts. Thus, this study sought to further investigate any functional consequences of increased cardiac Adm expression and begin exploring the mechanisms that regulate Adm expression in an estrogen-dependent fashion. This study revealed that heart function is enhanced in Adm(hi/hi) females, which along with Adm expression levels, was reversed following ovariectomization. Since the Adm(hi/hi) line was generated by the displacement of the 3' untranslated region (UTR), the native 3'UTR was examined for estrogen-induced microRNAs target sites to potentially explain the aberrant overexpression observed in Adm(hi/hi) female hearts. Using a bioinformatic approach, it was determined that the mouse Adm 3'UTR contains many target sites for previously characterized estrogen-induced microRNAs. This study also determined that the novel microRNA, miR-879, is another estrogen-induced microRNA that interacts with the 3'UTR of Adm to destabilize the mRNA. Together, these studies revealed that estrogen-induced microRNAs are important for balancing cardiac Adm expression in females. PMID:26582637

  4. Development of a heat-shock inducible gene expression system in the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae.

    PubMed

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Misumi, Osami; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2014-01-01

    The cell of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae contains a single chloroplast and mitochondrion, the division of which is tightly synchronized by a light/dark cycle. The genome content is extremely simple, with a low level of genetic redundancy, in photosynthetic eukaryotes. In addition, transient transformation and stable transformation by homologous recombination have been reported. However, for molecular genetic analyses of phenomena that are essential for cellular growth and survival, inducible gene expression/suppression systems are needed. Here, we report the development of a heat-shock inducible gene expression system in C. merolae. CMJ101C, encoding a small heat shock protein, is transcribed only when cells are exposed to an elevated temperature. Using a superfolder GFP as a reporter protein, the 200-bp upstream region of CMJ101C orf was determined to be the optimal promoter for heat-shock induction. The optimal temperature to induce expression is 50°C, at which C. merolae cells are able to proliferate. At least a 30-min heat shock is required for the expression of a protein of interest and a 60-min heat shock yields the maximum level of protein expression. After the heat shock, the mRNA level decreases rapidly. As an example of the system, the expression of a dominant negative form of chloroplast division DRP5B protein, which has a mutation in the GTPase domain, was induced. Expression of the dominant negative DRP5B resulted in the appearance of aberrant-shaped cells in which two daughter chloroplasts and the cells are still connected by a small DRP5B positive tube-like structure. This result suggests that the dominant negative DRP5B inhibited the final scission of the chloroplast division site, but not the earlier stages of division site constriction. It is also suggested that cell cycle progression is not arrested by the impairment of chloroplast division at the final stage. PMID:25337786

  5. Mycobacterium bovis BCG priming induces a strong potentiation of the antibody response induced by recombinant BCG expressing a foreign antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Gheorghiu, M; Lagranderie, M R; Gicquel, B M; Leclerc, C D

    1994-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that strong cellular or humoral immune responses can be induced against foreign antigens expressed by recombinant Mycobacterium bovis BCG. It has therefore been suggested that BCG could represent one of the best candidate vectors for live recombinant vaccines. However, a large percentage of the human population has been immunized by BCG, and this priming could modify the immune response to future recombinant BCG vaccines. In the present study, we have therefore compared the immune responses induced in naive and BCG-primed mice by two recombinant BCG vaccines expressing either beta-galactosidase or human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef antigens. Our results demonstrated that BCG priming limits the growth of recombinant BCG in mouse spleen or lymph nodes. This reduction in BCG growth was associated with decreased proliferative responses against Nef or beta-galactosidase antigens. This suppression, however, never exceeded 50%. Interestingly, in contrast to these reduced T-cell responses, BCG-primed mice developed high levels of anti-beta-galactosidase antibodies after immunization with recombinant BCG expressing this antigen. This stimulation of antibody responses was not due to polyclonal stimulation or to a nonspecific adjuvant effect of BCG. The isotypic patterns of anti-beta-galactosidase antibody responses induced by the recombinant BCG were similar in naive and BCG-primed mice. These results indicate that priming with BCG will not be a limitation for the use of recombinant BCG vaccines in humans. PMID:7927686

  6. AG490 inhibits NFATc1 expression and STAT3 activation during RANKL induced osteoclastogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chang-hong; Zhao, Jin-xia; Sun, Lin; Yao, Zhong-qiang; Deng, Xiao-li; Liu, Rui; Liu, Xiang-yuan

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •AG490 inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RAW264.7 cells. •AG490 affects cell proliferation and cell cycle distribution. •AG490 reduces NFATc1 expression during RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. •AG490 disrupts the activation of RANKL-mediated JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. •STAT3 depletion partly mimics the effect of AG490 on RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. -- Abstract: Commonly, JAK/STAT relays cytokine signals for cell activation and proliferation, and recent studies have shown that the elevated expression of JAK/STAT is associated with the immune rejection of allografts and the inflammatory processes of autoimmune disease. However, the role which JAK2/STAT3 signaling plays in the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated osteoclastogenesis is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of AG490, specific JAK2 inhibitor, on osteoclast differentiation in vitro. AG490 significantly inhibited osteoclastogenesis in murine osteoclast precursor cell line RAW264.7 induced by RANKL. AG490 suppressed cell proliferation and delayed the G1 to S cell cycle transition. Furthermore, AG490 also suppressed the expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) c1 but not c-Fos in RAW264.7. Subsequently, we investigated various intracellular signaling components associated with osteoclastogenesis. AG490 had no effects on RANKL-induced activation of Akt, ERK1/2. Interestingly, AG490 partly inhibited RANKL-induced phosphorylation of Ser{sup 727} in STAT3. Additionally, down-regulation of STAT3 using siRNA resulted in suppression of TRAP, RANK and NFATc1 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated that AG490 inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by suppressing NFATc1 production and cell proliferation via the STAT3 pathway. These results suggest that inhibition of JAK2 may be useful for the treatment of bone diseases characterized by excessive osteoclastogenesis.

  7. Cellular localization of transforming growth factor-beta expression in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, K.; Flanders, K. C.; Phan, S. H.

    1995-01-01

    Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis is associated with increased lung transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) gene expression, but cellular localization of the source of this expression has not been unequivocally established. In this study, lung fibrosis was induced in rats by endotracheal bleomycin injection on day 0 and, on selected days afterwards, lungs were harvested for in situ hybridization, immunohistochemical and histochemical analyses for TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein expression, and cell identification. The results show that control lungs express essentially no detectable TGF-beta 1 mRNA or protein in the parenchyma. Before day 3 after bleomycin treatment, scattered bronchiolar epithelial cells, mononuclear cells, and eosinophils expressed elevated levels of TGF-beta 1. Between days 3 and 14, there was a major increase in the number of eosinophils, myofibroblasts, and fibroblasts strongly expressing TGF-beta 1 mRNA and protein. TGF-beta 1-producing cells were predominantly localized within areas of injury and active fibrosis. After day 14, the intensity and number of TGF-beta 1-expressing cells significantly declined and were predominantly found in fibroblasts in fibrotic areas. The expression of TGF-beta 1 protein was generally coincident with that for mRNA with the exception of bronchiolar epithelial cells in which strong protein expression was unaccompanied by a commensurate increase in mRNA. The study demonstrates that myofibroblasts, fibroblasts, and eosinophils represent the major sources of increased lung TGF-beta 1 expression in this model of pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7543734

  8. Multiple transcription factor binding sites predict AID targeting in non-immunoglobulin genes

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Jamie L.; Liu, Man; Yaari, Gur; Khalil, Ashraf M.; Tomayko, Mary M.; Shlomchik, Mark J.; Schatz, David G.; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant targeting of the enzyme Activation Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) results in the accumulation of somatic mutations in approximately 25% of expressed genes in germinal center B cells. Observations in Ung−/− Msh2−/− mice suggest that many other genes efficiently repair AID-induced lesions, so that up to 45% of genes may actually be targeted by AID. It is important to understand the mechanisms that recruit AID to certain genes, as this mis-targeting represents an important risk for genome instability. We hypothesize that several mechanisms will combine to target AID to each locus. In order to resolve which mechanisms affect AID targeting, we analyze 7.3Mb of sequence data, along with the regulatory context, from 83 genes in Ung−/− Msh2−/− mice to identify common properties of AID targets. This analysis identifies the involvement of three transcription factor binding sites (E-box motifs, along with YY1 and C/EBP-beta binding sites) that may work together to recruit AID. Based on previous knowledge and these newly discovered features, a classification tree model was built to predict genome-wide AID targeting. Using this predictive model we were able to identify a set of 101 high-interest genes that are likely targets of AID. PMID:23514741

  9. Increasing TRPV4 expression restores flow-induced dilation impaired in mesenteric arteries with aging

    PubMed Central

    Du, Juan; Wang, Xia; Li, Jie; Guo, Jizheng; Liu, Limei; Yan, Dejun; Yang, Yunyun; Li, Zhongwen; Zhu, Jinhang; Shen, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The flow-stimulated intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) rise in endothelial cells is an important early event leading to flow-induced blood vessel dilation. Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 4 (TRPV4), a Ca2+-permeable cation channel, facilitates the flow-stimulated [Ca2+]i rise. To determine whether TRPV4 is involved in age-related flow-induced blood vessel dilation impairment, we measured blood vessel diameter and nitric oxide (NO) levels and performed Ca2+ imaging, immunoblotting, and immunostaining assays in rats. We found that the flow-induced and TRPV4 activator 4α-PDD-induced dilation of mesenteric arteries from aged rats were significantly decreased compared with those from young rats. The flow- or 4α-PDD-induced [Ca2+]i rise was also markedly reduced in primary cultured mesenteric artery endothelial cells (MAECs) from aged rats. Immunoblotting and immunostaining results showed an age-related decrease of TRPV4 expression levels in MAECs. Additionally, the 4α-PDD-induced NO production was significantly reduced in aged MAECs. Compared with lentiviral GFP-treated aged rats, lentiviral vector delivery of TRPV4 increased TRPV4 expression level in aged MAECs and restored the flow- and 4α-PDD-induced vessel dilation in aged mesenteric arteries. We concluded that impaired TRPV4-mediated Ca2+ signaling causes endothelial dysfunction and that TRPV4 is a potential target for clinical treatment of age-related vascular system diseases. PMID:26947561

  10. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed. PMID:19660100

  11. A wound-induced Wnt expression program controls planarian regeneration polarity.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Christian P; Reddien, Peter W

    2009-10-01

    Regeneration requires specification of the identity of new tissues to be made. Whether this process relies only on intrinsic regulative properties of regenerating tissues or whether wound signaling provides input into tissue repatterning is not known. The head-versus-tail regeneration polarity decision in planarians, which requires Wnt signaling, provides a paradigm to study the process of tissue identity specification during regeneration. The Smed-wntP-1 gene is required for regeneration polarity and is expressed at the posterior pole of intact animals. Surprisingly, wntP-1 was expressed at both anterior- and posterior-facing wounds rapidly after wounding. wntP-1 expression was induced by all types of wounds examined, regardless of whether wounding prompted tail regeneration. Regeneration polarity was found to require new expression of wntP-1. Inhibition of the wntP-2 gene enhanced the polarity phenotype due to wntP-1 inhibition, with new expression of wntP-2 in regeneration occurring subsequent to expression of wntP-1 and localized only to posterior-facing wounds. New expression of wntP-2 required wound-induced wntP-1. Finally, wntP-1 and wntP-2 expression changes occurred even in the absence of neoblast stem cells, which are required for regeneration, suggesting that the role of these genes in polarity is independent of and instructive for tail formation. These data indicate that wound-induced input is involved in resetting the normal polarized features of the body axis during regeneration. PMID:19805089

  12. Severe hypoxia induces chemo-resistance in clinical cervical tumors through MVP over-expression.

    PubMed

    Lara, Pedro C; Lloret, Marta; Clavo, Bernardino; Apolinario, Rosa M; Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Bordón, Elisa; Fontes, Fausto; Rey, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen molecule modulates tumour response to radiotherapy. Higher radiation doses are required under hypoxic conditions to induce cell death. Hypoxia may inhibit the non-homologous end-joining DNA repair through down regulating Ku70/80 expression. Hypoxia induces drug resistance in clinical tumours, although the mechanism is not clearly elucidated. Vaults are ribonucleoprotein particles with a hollow barrel-like structure composed of three proteins: major vault protein (MVP), vault poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and telomerase associated protein-1 and small untranslated RNA. Over-expression of MVP has been associated with chemotherapy resistance. Also, it has been related to poor outcome in patients treated with radiotherapy alone. The aim of the present study was to assess the relation of Major Vault Protein expression and tumor hypoxia in clinical cervical tumors. MVP, p53 and angiogenesis, together with tumor oxygenation, were determined in forty-three consecutive patients suffering from localized cervix carcinoma. High MVP expression was related to severe hypoxia compared to low MVP expressing tumors (p = 0.022). Tumors over-expressing MVP also showed increased angiogenesis (p = 0.003). Besides it, in this study we show for the first time that severe tumor hypoxia is associated with high MVP expression in clinical cervical tumors. Up-regulation of MVP by hypoxia is of critical relevance as chemotherapy is currently a standard treatment for those patients. From our results it could be suggested that hypoxia not only induces increased genetic instability, oncogenic properties and metastatization, but through the correlation observed with MVP expression, another pathway of chemo and radiation resistance could be developed. PMID:19660100

  13. Hydroxytyrosol induces phase II detoxifying enzyme expression and effectively protects dopaminergic cells against dopamine- and 6-hydroxydopamine induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guohua; Deng, Ajun; Tang, Wanbin; Ma, Junzhi; Yuan, Chonggang; Ma, Jiyan

    2016-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common late-age onset neurodegenerative disease. Except for the symptomatic alleviating treatment, no disease modifying therapy is currently available. In this study, we investigated the potential neuroprotective role of hydroxytyrosol (HT), a major phenolic compound present in olive oil, against dopaminergic cell death. We found that HT effectively protected dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells against dopamine (DA) and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced cell death, but had no apparent effect on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we have shown that HT efficiently induced the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes, including NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1). Using an NQO1 inhibitor, we revealed that increased NQO1 expression contributed to the protective effect of HT against dopaminergic cell death. Together, our findings suggest that HT has a protective effect against DA- and 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic cell death, supporting the beneficial effect of olive oil in preventing DA-metabolism related dopaminergic neuron dysfunction. PMID:26970393

  14. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  15. High Cholesterol Diet Induces IL-1β Expression in Adult but Not Larval Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Man-Young; Na, Yirang; Ko, Youngho; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2013-01-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that high cholesterol diet induced hypercholesterolemia and vascular lipid oxidation and accumulation in zebrafish larvae, suggesting that zebrafish is a new promising atherosclerosis model in addition to mouse models. However, up to date, there was no report regarding inflammatory cytokine expression during the lipid accumulation in zebrafish larva and adult fish. In this study, we first demonstrated the expression levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in high cholesterol diet (HCD)-fed zebrafish larvae, and found that although HCD induced vascular lipid accumulation, the cytokine expressions in the larvae were not changed by HCD. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in leukocyte accumulation in vessels between control and HCD fed group. But prolonged HCD induced IL-1β expression in spleen and liver compared to those of control zebrafish, and produced very early stage of fatty streak lesion in dorsal aorta of 19 week HCD-fed zebrafish. These results indicate that HCD induced hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerotic changes in zebrafish are very early stage, and suggest the necessity of the generation of mutant zebrafish having a disruption in a lipid metabolism-related gene leading to severe hypercholesterolemia and advanced atherosclerosis. PMID:23825600

  16. Morphine-6beta-glucuronide modulates the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Lysle, D T; Carrigan, K A

    2001-08-01

    The immunomodulatory effects of morphine are well established; however, suprisingly little is known about the immunomodulatory properties of the major metabolites of morphine. The present study tests the hypothesis that expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is modulated by the administration of the morphine metabolite, morphine-6beta-glucuronide. The initial study using rats shows that morphine-6beta-glucuronide administration (0, 1.0, 3.163, 10 mg/kg s.c.) results in a pronounced reduction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced expression of iNOS (inducible nitricoxide synthease) in spleen, lung, and liver tissue as measured by western blotting. Morphine-6beta-glucuronide also produces a reduction in the level of plasma nitrite/nitrate, the more stable end-product of nitric oxide degradation. In a subsequent study, administration of the opioid receptor antagonist, naltrexone (0.1 mg/kg) prior to the injection of morphine-6beta-glucuronide (10 mg/kg) blocks the morphine-6beta-glucuronide induced reduction of iNOS expression and plasma nitrite/nitrite levels indicating that the effect is mediated via the opioid-receptor. This study provides the first evidence that morphine-6beta-glucuronide alters the expression of iNOS. PMID:11580103

  17. MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory


    MICROARRAY ANALYSIS OF DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION

    Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a major by-product of water disinfection by chlorination. Several studies have demonstrated the hepatocarcinogenicity of DCA in rodents when administered in dri...

  18. ZN2+ INDUCES COX-2 EXPRESSION THROUGH DOWNREGULATION OF LIPID PHOSPHATASE PTEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zn2+ Induces COX-2 Expression through Downregulation of Lipid Phosphatase PTEN
    Weidong Wu*, James M. Samet, Philip A. Bromberg*?, Young E. Whang?, and Lee M. Graves* ?
    *CEMALB, ?Department of Medicine, and ?Department of Pharmacology, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC27599; Human Studie...

  19. Cadmium induces retinoic acid signaling by regulating retinoic acid metabolic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H

    2009-09-11

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, beta,beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1-6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1-6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 microm cadmium in Hepa 1-6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  20. T Lymphocytes Induce Endothelial Cell Matrix Metalloproteinase Expression by a CD40L-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Mach, François; Schönbeck, Uwe; Fabunmi, Rosalind P.; Murphy, Curran; Atkinson, Elizabeth; Bonnefoy, Jean-Yves; Graber, Pierre; Libby, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Neovascularization frequently accompanies chronic immune responses characterized by T cell infiltration and activation. Angiogenesis requires endothelial cells (ECs) to penetrate extracellular matrix, a process that involves matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We report here that activated human T cells mediate contact-dependent expression of MMPs in ECs through CD40/CD40 ligand signaling. Ligation of CD40 on ECs induced de novo expression of gelatinase B (MMP-9), increased interstitial collagenase (MMP-1) and stromelysin (MMP-3), and activated gelatinase A (MMP-2). Recombinant human CD40L induced expression of MMPs by human vascular ECs to a greater extent than did maximally effective concentrations of interleukin-1β or tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, activation of human vascular ECs through CD40 induced tube formation in a three-dimensional fibrin matrix gel assay, an effect antagonized by a MMP inhibitor. These results demonstrated that activation of ECs by interaction with T cells induced synthesis and release of MMPs and promoted an angiogenic function of ECs via CD40L-CD40 signaling. As vascular cells at the sites of chronic inflammation, such as atherosclerotic plaques, express CD40 and its ligand, our findings suggest that ligation of CD40 on ECs can mediate aspects of vascular remodeling and neovessel formation during atherogenesis and other chronic immune reactions. PMID:9916937

  1. Age and vitamin E-induced changes in Gene Expression Profiles of T cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    T cell is vulnerable to age associated changes and vitamin E has been shown to improve T cell functions in the old. We studied the gene expression profile of T cells to better understand the underlying mechanisms of age and vitamin E-induced changes in T cell function. Young and old C57BL mice were ...

  2. Wounding induces expression of genes involved in tuber closing layer and wound-periderm development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little is known about the coordinate induction of genes that may be involved in important wound-healing events. In this study, wound-healing events were determined together with wound-induced expression profiles of selected cell cycle, cell wall protein, and pectin methyl esterase genes using tuber...

  3. Cadmium Induces Retinoic Acid Signaling by Regulating Retinoic Acid Metabolic Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2009-01-01

    The transition metal cadmium is an environmental teratogen. In addition, cadmium and retinoic acid can act synergistically to induce forelimb malformations. The molecular mechanism underlying the teratogenicity of cadmium and the synergistic effect with retinoic acid has not been addressed. An evolutionarily conserved gene, β,β-carotene 15,15′-monooxygenase (BCMO), which is involved in retinoic acid biosynthesis, was studied in both Caenorhabditis elegans and murine Hepa 1–6 cells. In C. elegans, bcmo-1 was expressed in the intestine and was cadmium inducible. Similarly, in Hepa 1–6 cells, Bcmo1 was induced by cadmium. Retinoic acid-mediated signaling increased after 24-h exposures to 5 and 10 μm cadmium in Hepa 1–6 cells. Examination of gene expression demonstrated that the induction of retinoic acid signaling by cadmium may be mediated by overexpression of Bcmo1. Furthermore, cadmium inhibited the expression of Cyp26a1 and Cyp26b1, which are involved in retinoic acid degradation. These results indicate that cadmium-induced teratogenicity may be due to the ability of the metal to increase the levels of retinoic acid by disrupting the expression of retinoic acid-metabolizing genes. PMID:19556237

  4. Effects of diet-induced obesity on secondary tumor development and plasma cytokine expression in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigated the effects of diet-induced obesity on secondary tumor development and expression of plasma cytokines in mice. Three-wk old male C57BL/6 mice were fed the AIN-93G diet or a 45% fat diet (kcal %; n=25/group) for 7 wks before they were subcutaneously injected with 2.5 x ...

  5. EFFECTS OF DIETARY FOLATE ON ARSENIC-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Dietary Folate on Arsenic-induced Gene Expression in Mice

    Arsenic, a drinking water contaminant, is a known carcinogen. Human exposure to inorganic arsenic has been linked to tumors of skin, bladder, lung, and to a lesser extent, kidney and liver. Dietary fola...

  6. Microarray analysis of acaricide inducible gene expression in the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acaricide-inducible differential gene expression was studied in larvae of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using a microarray-based approach. The acaricides used were: coumaphos, permethrin, ivermectin, and amitraz. The microarrays contained over 13,000 probes, having been derived from a previous...

  7. Increased hepatic CD36 expression contributes to dyslipidemia associated with diet-induced obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The etiology of type 2 diabetes often involves diet-induced obesity (DIO), which is associated with elevated plasma fatty acids and lipoprotein associated triglycerides. Since aberrant hepatic fatty acid uptake may contribute to this, we investigated whether increased expression of a fatty acid tran...

  8. HIGH GLUCOSE INDUCES TOLL-LIKE RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN HUMAN MONOCYTES: MECHANISM OF ACTIVATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Hyperglycemia induced inflammation is central in diabetes complications and monocytes are important in orchestrating these effects. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a key role in innate immune responses as well as inflammation. However, there is a paucity of data examining the expression a...

  9. Expression and characterization of genetically engineered human immunodeficiency virus-like particles containing modified envelope glycoproteins: implications for development of a cross-protective AIDS vaccine.

    PubMed

    Rovinski, B; Haynes, J R; Cao, S X; James, O; Sia, C; Zolla-Pazner, S; Matthews, T J; Klein, M H

    1992-07-01

    Noninfectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viruslike particles containing chimeric envelope glycoproteins were expressed in mammalian cells by using inducible promoters. We engineered four expression vectors in which a synthetic oligomer encoding gp120 residues 306 to 328 (amino acids YNKRKRIHIGP GRAFYTTKNIIG) from the V3 loop of the MN viral isolate was inserted at various positions within the endogenous HIV-1LAI env gene. Expression studies revealed that insertion of the heterologous V3(MN) loop segment at two different locations within the conserved region 2 (C2) of gp120, either 173 or 242 residues away from the N terminus of the mature subunit, resulted in the secretion of fully assembled HIV-like particles containing chimeric LAI/MN envelope glycoproteins. Both V3 loop epitopes were recognized by loop-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, insertion of the V3(MN) loop segment into other regions of gp120 led to the production of envelope-deficient viruslike particles. Immunization with HIV-like particles containing chimeric envelope proteins induced specific antibody responses against both the autologous and heterologous V3 loop epitopes, including cross-neutralizing antibodies against the HIV-1LAI and HIV-1MN isolates. This study, therefore, demonstrates the feasibility of genetically engineering optimized HIV-like particles capable of eliciting cross-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:1602531

  10. Cryptosporidium parvum Induces B7-H1 Expression in Cholangiocytes by Downregulating MicroRNA-513

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ai-Yu; Zhou, Rui; Hu, Guoku; Liu, Jun; Sosnowska, Danuta; Drescher, Kristen M.; Dong, Haidong; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Expression of B7 costimulatory molecules represents an important compartment of immune response of epithelial cells following microbial infection. We reported here that the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum induced B7-H1 expression in cultured human cholangiocytes. Induced expression of B7-H1 was identified in cells after exposure to infective C. parvum parasite or parasite lysate. Interestingly, microRNA-513 (miR-513) level was reduced in cells after exposure to C. parvum, resulting in a relief of 3′-untranslated region-mediated translational suppression of B7-H1. Overexpression of miR-513 through transfection of miR-513 precursor inhibited C. parvum-induced B7-H1 protein expression. Moreover, enhanced apoptotic cell death was identified in activated human T cells following co-culture with C. parvum-infected cholangiocytes. The apoptosis of activated T cells was partially blocked by a neutralizing antibody to B7-H1 or transfection of cholangiocytes with miR-513 precursor. These data suggest a role of miR-513 in regulating B7-H1 expression by cholangiocytes in response to C. parvum infection. PMID:19916867

  11. Inhibitory effect of GSPE on RAGE expression induced by advanced glycation end products in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng-Lei; Gao, Hai-Qing; Shen, Lin

    2007-10-01

    Advanced glycation end products' (AGEs) engagement of a cell-surface receptor for AGEs (RAGE) has been causally implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications via induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent alteration of many gene expressions, including RAGE itself. Grapeseed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE), which is a naturally occurring polyphenolic compound, has been reported to possess potent radical-scavenging and antioxidant properties and to display significant cardiovascular protective action. In this study, we investigated whether GSPE could inhibit AGE-induced RAGE expression through interference with ROS generation in human umbilical-vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). AGE-modified bovine serum albumin (AGE-BSA) was prepared by incubating BSA with high-concentration glucose. Stimulation of cultured HUVECs with 200 microg/mL of AGE-BSA significantly enhanced intracellular ROS formation and subsequently upregulated the protein and mRNA expression of RAGE; unmodified BSA and GSPE alone had no effect. However, GSPE preincubation markedly downregulated AGE-induced surface expression of RAGE in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. In AGE-stimulated HUVECs, GSPE also dose-dependently decreased RAGE mRNA levels and inhibited AGE-induced ROS generation at defined time periods. These results demonstrate that GSPE can inhibit enhanced RAGE expression in AGE-exposed endothelial cells by suppressing ROS generation, thereby limiting the AGE-RAGE interaction. Hence, GSPE may have therapeutic potential in the prevention and treatment of vascular complications in diabetic patients. PMID:18049312

  12. One-step knockin for inducible expression in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yong Jun; Son, Mi Young; Hasty, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Transgenesis enables the elucidation of gene function; however, constant transgene expression is not always desired. The tetracycline responsive system was devised to turn on and off transgene expression at will. It has two components: a doxycycline (dox)-controlled transactivator (TA) and an inducible expression cassette. Integration of these transgenes requires two transfection steps usually accomplished by sequential random integration. Unfortunately, random integration can be problematic due to chromatin position effects, integration of variable transgene units, and mutation at the integration site. Therefore, targeted transgenesis and knockin were developed to target the TA and the inducible expression cassette to a specific location, but these approaches can be costly in time, labor, and money. Here, we describe a one-step Cre-mediated knockin system in mouse embryonic stem cells that positions the TA and inducible expression cassette to a single location. Using this system, we show dox-dependent regulation of eGFP at the DNA topoisomerase 3β promoter. Because Cre-mediated recombination is used in lieu of gene targeting, this system is fast and efficient. PMID:21344611

  13. Multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging of inducible tyrosinase reporter gene expression in xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Paproski, Robert J; Heinmiller, Andrew; Wachowicz, Keith; Zemp, Roger J

    2014-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is an emerging hybrid imaging technology capable of breaking through resolution limits of pure optical imaging technologies imposed by optical-scattering to provide fine-resolution optical contrast information in deep tissues. We demonstrate the ability of multi-wavelength photoacoustic imaging to estimate relative gene expression distributions using an inducible expression system and co-register images with hemoglobin oxygen saturation estimates and micro-ultrasound data. Tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin production, is used as a reporter gene owing to its strong optical absorption and enzymatic amplification mechanism. Tetracycline-inducible melanin expression is turned on via doxycycline treatment in vivo. Serial multi-wavelength imaging reveals very low estimated melanin expression in tumors prior to doxycycline treatment or in tumors with no tyrosinase gene present, but strong signals after melanin induction in tumors tagged with the tyrosinase reporter. The combination of new inducible reporters and high-resolution photoacoustic and micro-ultrasound technology is poised to bring a new dimension to the study of gene expression in vivo. PMID:24936769

  14. Requirement for metabolic activation of acetylaminofluorene to induce multidrug gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Gant, T W; Schrenk, D; Silverman, J A; Thorgeirsson, S S

    1994-01-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that several xenobiotics can induce multidrug (mdr) gene expression in cultures of primary isolated hepatocytes. One of the best of these xenobiotic inducers in rat hepatocytes is 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), which induces mdr expression by an enhancement of mdr gene transcription. In all species studied to date, AAF is extensively and variously metabolized. In this study we have sought to determine if AAF per se or a metabolite is responsible for mediating the increase in mdr gene transcription and expression. This study demonstrates that AAF per se is not active, but that the effect of AAF we have observed on mdr gene transcription and expression in the rat is due to the formation of a reactive metabolite(s). Our data indicate that this reactive metabolite is probably N-acetoxy-2-aminofluorene or the sulfate ester of N-hydroxy-AAF. The requirement for the formation of one of these metabolites may explain the differences in species response to AAF, in terms of mdr gene expression, that we have observed. We hypothesize that the mechanism by which mdr gene transcription is increased in response to AAF involves a covalent interaction between a reactive metabolite and an mdr gene regulatory protein. Our current work is concerned with the exploration of this hypothesis. PMID:7889850

  15. Arsenite enhances tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, T.-C. . E-mail: tctsou@nhri.org.tw; Yeh, Szu Ching; Tsai, E.-M.; Tsai, F.-Y.; Chao, H.-R.; Chang, Louis W.

    2005-11-15

    Epidemiological studies demonstrated a high association of vascular diseases with arsenite exposure. We hypothesize that arsenite potentiates the effect of proinflammatory cytokines on vascular endothelial cells, and hence contributes to atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of arsenite and its induction of glutathione (GSH) on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) protein expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in response to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a typical proinflammatory cytokine. Our study demonstrated that arsenite pretreatment potentiated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with up-regulations of both activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). To elucidate the role of GSH in regulation of AP-1, NF-{kappa}B, and VCAM-1 expression, we employed L-buthionine (S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a specific {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) inhibitor, to block intracellular GSH synthesis. Our investigation revealed that, by depleting GSH, arsenite attenuated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression as well as a potentiation of AP-1 and an attenuation of NF-{kappa}B activations by TNF-{alpha}. Moreover, we found that depletion of GSH would also attenuate the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with a down-regulation of the TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activation and without significant effect on AP-1. On the other hand, the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression could be completely abolished by inhibition of AP-1 or NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B was necessary for VCAM-1 expression. In summary, we demonstrate that arsenite enhances the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in HUVECs via regulation of AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B activities in a GSH-sensitive manner. Our present study suggested a potential mechanism for arsenite in the induction of vascular inflammation and vascular diseases via modulating the actions

  16. Drug-loaded nanoparticles induce gene expression in human pluripotent stem cell derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Virendra; Escalante, Leah; Chen, Guojun; Laperle, Alex; Zheng, Qifeng; Steyer, Benjamin; Gong, Shaoqin; Saha, Krishanu

    2013-12-01

    Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained higher fibroblast proliferation levels and MMP activity. The results demonstrate that the PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle system provides an effective tool to controlling gene expression in human stem cell derivatives.Tissue engineering and advanced manufacturing of human stem cells requires a suite of tools to control gene expression spatiotemporally in culture. Inducible gene expression systems offer cell-extrinsic control, typically through addition of small molecules, but small molecule inducers typically contain few functional groups for further chemical modification. Doxycycline (DXC), a potent small molecule inducer of tetracycline (Tet) transgene systems, was conjugated to a hyperbranched dendritic polymer (Boltorn H40) and subsequently reacted with polyethylene glycol (PEG). The resulting PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticle exhibited pH-sensitive drug release behavior and successfully controlled gene expression in stem-cell-derived fibroblasts with a Tet-On system. While free DXC inhibited fibroblast proliferation and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, PEG-H40-DXC nanoparticles maintained

  17. Lipopolysaccharide induces H1 receptor expression and enhances histamine responsiveness in human coronary artery endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Raveendran, Vineesh V; Tan, Xiaoyu; Sweeney, Matthew E; Levant, Beth; Slusser, Joyce; Stechschulte, Daniel J; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2011-04-01

    Summary Histamine is a well-recognized modulator of vascular inflammation. We have shown that histamine, acting via H1 receptors (H1R), synergizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of prostaglandin I(2) (PGI(2)), PGE(2) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by endothelial cells. The synergy between histamine and LPS was partly attributed to histamine -induced expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). In this study, we examined whether LPS stimulates the H1R expression in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAEC) with resultant enhancement of histamine responsiveness. Incubation of HCAEC with LPS (10-1000 ng/ml) resulted in two-fold to fourfold increases in H1R mRNA expression in a time-dependent and concentration-dependent fashion. In contrast, LPS treatment did not affect H2R mRNA expression. The LPS-induced H1R mRNA expression peaked by 4 hr after LPS treatment and remained elevated above the basal level for 20-24 hr. Flow cytometric and Western blot analyses revealed increased expression of H1R protein in LPS-treated cells. The specific binding of [(3)H]pyrilamine to H1R in membrane proteins from LPS-treated HCAEC was threefold higher than the untreated cells. The LPS-induced H1R expression was mediated through TLR4 as gene silencing by TLR4-siRNA and treatment with a TLR4 antagonist inhibited the LPS effect. When HCAEC were pre-treated with LPS for 24 hr, washed and challenged with histamine, 17-, 10- and 15-fold increases in PGI(2), PGE(2) and IL-6 production, respectively, were noted. Histamine-induced enhancement of the synthesis of PGI(2), PGE(2) and IL-6 by LPS-primed HCAEC was completely blocked by an H1R antagonist. The results demonstrate that LPS, through TLR4 activation, up-regulates the expression and function of H1R and amplifies histamine-induced inflammatory responses in HCAEC. PMID:21255012

  18. Silymarin downregulates COX-2 expression and attenuates hyperlipidemia during NDEA-induced rat hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Gopalakrishnan; Elinos-Báez, Carmen Martha; Jagan, Sundaram; Augustine, Titto Alby; Kamaraj, Sattu; Anandakumar, Pandi; Devaki, Thiruvengadam

    2008-06-01

    Silymarin is a naturally available bioflavonoid and is a strong antioxidant with a capacity to inhibit the formation of tumors in several cancer models. In the present study, we investigated whether dietary supplementation of silymarin has any role in lipid components, lipid-metabolizing enzymes, free fatty acid profile, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-induced hepatocellular carcinoma in rats. NDEA-induced rats showed severe hyperlipidemia along with upregulated expression of COX-2 as revealed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Dietary silymarin supplementation attenuated this hyperlipidemia and downregulated the expression of COX-2. Thus we conclude that compounds like silymarin with potent hypolipidemic effect are strong candidates as chemopreventive agents for the treatment of liver cancer. PMID:18373278

  19. Reactive oxygen species induce Cox-2 expression via TAK1 activation in synovial fibroblast cells

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Yuta; Teramura, Takeshi; Takehara, Toshiyuki; Shigi, Kanae; Fukuda, Kanji

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress within the arthritis joint has been indicated to be involved in generating mediators for tissue degeneration and inflammation. COX-2 is a mediator in inflammatory action, pain and some catabolic reactions in inflamed tissues. Here, we demonstrated a direct relationship between oxidative stress and Cox-2 expression in the bovine synovial fibroblasts. Furthermore, we elucidated a novel mechanism, in which oxidative stress induced phosphorylation of MAPKs and NF-κB through TAK1 activation and resulted in increased Cox-2 and prostaglandin E2 expression. Finally, we demonstrated that ROS-induced Cox-2 expression was inhibited by supplementation of an antioxidant such as N-acetyl cysteamine and hyaluronic acid in vitro and in vivo. From these results, we conclude that oxidative stress is an important factor for generation of Cox-2 in synovial fibroblasts and thus its neutralization may be an effective strategy in palliative therapy for chronic joint diseases. PMID:26110105

  20. Inducible Gene Expression in Tumors Colonized by Modified Oncolytic Vaccinia Virus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Huppertz, Sascha; Zhang, Qian; Geissinger, Ulrike; Härtl, Barbara; Gentschev, Ivaylo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Exogenous gene induction of therapeutic, diagnostic, and safety mechanisms could be a considerable improvement in oncolytic virotherapy. Here, we introduced a doxycycline-inducible promoter system (comprised of a tetracycline repressor, several promoter constructs, and a tet operator sequence) into oncolytic recombinant vaccinia viruses (rVACV), which were further characterized in detail. Experiments in cell cultures as well as in tumor-bearing mice were analyzed to determine the role of the inducible-system components. To accomplish this, we took advantage of the optical reporter construct, which resulted in the production of click-beetle luciferase as well as a red fluorescent protein. The results indicated that each of the system components could be used to optimize the induction rates and had an influence on the background expression levels. Depending on the given gene to be induced in rVACV-colonized tumors of patients, we discuss the doxycycline-inducible promoter system adjustment and further optimization. IMPORTANCE Oncolytic virotherapy of cancer can greatly benefit from the expression of heterologous genes. It is reasonable that some of those heterologous gene products could have detrimental effects either on the cancer patient or on the oncolytic virus itself if they are expressed at the wrong time or if the expression levels are too high. Therefore, exogenous control of gene expression levels by administration of a nontoxic inducer will have positive effects on the safety as well as the therapeutic outcome of oncolytic virotherapy. In addition, it paves the way for the introduction of new therapeutic genes into the genome of oncolytic viruses that could not have been tested otherwise. PMID:25056902

  1. Interferon-inducible protein-10 is highly expressed in rats with experimental nephrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Chiarri, M.; Ortiz, A.; González-Cuadrado, S.; Serón, D.; Emancipator, S. N.; Hamilton, T. A.; Barat, A.; Plaza, J. J.; González, E.; Egido, J.

    1996-01-01

    Interferon-inducible protein (IP)-10 is a small glycoprotein member of a family of chemotactic cytokines structurally related to interleukin-8. We have recently described the induction of IP-10 mRNA in mouse mesangial cells stimulated with lipopolysacharide, interferon-gamma, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. To further evaluate a possible role for this chemokine in renal injury, we have studied IP-10 in an experimental model of nephrosis induced in rats by adriamycin. High levels of glomerular IP-10 mRNA expression and glomerular and tubulointerstitial IP-10 protein were seen on day 21, coinciding with maximal proteinuria, glomerular tumor necrosis factor mRNA expression, and interstitial cellular infiltrates. Maintenance on a low protein diet not only delayed the appearance of proteinuria and interstitial cellular infiltrate but also decreased glomerular IP-10 mRNA expression. Isolated normal glomeruli and cultured glomerular epithelial and mesangial cells from normal rats expressed IP-10 mRNA upon stimulation with 100 U/ml interferon or 1 microgram/ml lipopolysaccharide for 3 hours. IP-10 mRNA expression was also inducible by lipopolysaccharide and cytokines in NRK 49F renal interstitial fibroblasts and, to a lesser extent, in NRK 52E tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, IP-10 protein was inducible in murine mesangial cells. We conclude that IP-10 is highly inducible in vitro and in vivo in resident glomerular and tubulointerstitial cells. IP-10 may participate in the modulation of renal damage in experimental nephrosis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:8546219

  2. Prevention of UVB Radiation-induced Epidermal Damage by Expression of Heat Shock Protein 70*

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Minoru; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Maji, Daisuke; Sato, Keizo; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Ihn, Hironobu; Funasaka, Yoko; Mizushima, Tohru

    2010-01-01

    Irradiation with UV light, especially UVB, causes epidermal damage via the induction of apoptosis, inflammatory responses, and DNA damage. Various stressors, including UV light, induce heat shock proteins (HSPs) and the induction, particularly that of HSP70, provides cellular resistance to such stressors. The anti-inflammatory activity of HSP70, such as its inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), was recently revealed. These in vitro results suggest that HSP70 protects against UVB-induced epidermal damage. Here we tested this idea by using transgenic mice expressing HSP70 and cultured keratinocytes. Irradiation of wild-type mice with UVB caused epidermal damage such as induction of apoptosis, which was suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. UVB-induced apoptosis in cultured keratinocytes was suppressed by overexpression of HSP70. Irradiation of wild-type mice with UVB decreased the cutaneous level of IκB-α (an inhibitor of NF-κB) and increased the infiltration of leukocytes and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the epidermis. These inflammatory responses were suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. In vitro, the overexpression of HSP70 suppressed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and increased the level of IκB-α in keratinocytes irradiated with UVB. UVB induced an increase in cutaneous levels of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, both of which were suppressed in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. This study provides genetic evidence that HSP70 protects the epidermis from UVB-induced radiation damage. The findings here also suggest that the protective action of HSP70 is mediated by anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-DNA damage effects. PMID:20018843

  3. The ectopic expression of Snail in MDBK cells does not induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    IZAWA, GENYA; KOBAYASHI, WAKAKO; HARAGUCHI, MISAKO; SUDO, AKIHARU; OZAWA, MASAYUKI

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in the tumor metastatic cascade, is characterized by the loss of cell-cell junctions and cell polarity, as well as by the acquisition of migratory and invasive properties. However, the precise molecular events that initiate this complex EMT process are poorly understood. Snail expression induces EMT in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells and the human epidermoid carcinoma cell line, A431. Snail is a zinc finger transcription factor and triggers EMT by suppressing E-cadherin expression. In the present study, to broaden our knowledge of Snail-induced EMT, we generated stable Snail transfectants using Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Contrary to the MDCK or A431 cells examined in our previous studies, the MDBK cells transfected with the Snail construct maintained an epithelial morphology and showed no sign of reduced cell-cell adhesiveness compared to the control cells. Consistent with these observations, the down-regulation of epithelial marker proteins, e.g. E-cadherin and desmoglein, and the upregulation of mesenchymal marker proteins, e.g., N-cadherin and fibronectin, were not detected. Furthermore, the E-cadherin promoter was not methylated. Therefore, in the MDBK cells, the ectopic expression of Snail failed to induce EMT. As previously demonstrated, in MDCK cells, Snail expression is accompanied by the increased expression of other EMT-inducing transcription factors, e.g., Slug and zinc finger E-box-binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1). However, the MDBK cells transfected with the Snail construct did not exhibit an increased expression of these factors. Thus, it is possible that the failure to upregulate other EMT-related transcription factors may explain the lack of Snail-mediated induction of EMT in MDBK cells. PMID:25998899

  4. Understanding collision-induced dissociation of dofetilide: a case study in the application of density functional theory as an aid to mass spectral interpretation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Patricia; Alex, Alexander; Harvey, Sophie; Parsons, Teresa; Pullen, Frank

    2013-11-21

    Fragmentation of molecules under collision-induced dissociation (CID) conditions is not well-understood. This may make interpretation of MSMS spectra difficult and limit the effectiveness of software tools intended to aid mass spectral interpretation. Density Functional Theory (DFT) has been successfully applied to explain the thermodynamics of fragmentation in the gas phase by the modelling the effect that protonation has on the bond lengths (and hence bond strengths). In this study, dofetilide and four methylated analogues were used to investigate further the potential for using DFT to understand and predict the CID fragmentation routes. The products ions present in the CID spectra of all five compounds were consistent with charge-directed fragmentation, with protonation adjacent to the cleavage site being required to initiate fragmentation. Protonation at the dissociative site may have occurred either directly or via proton migration. A correlation was observed between protonation-induced bond lengthening and the bonds which were observed to break in the CID spectra. This correlation was quantitative in that the bonds calculated to elongate to the greatest extent gave rise to the most abundant of the major product ions. Thus such quantum calculations may offer the potential for contributing to a predictive tool for aiding the accuracy and speed mass spectral interpretation by generating numerical data in the form of bond length increases to act as descriptors flagging potential bond cleavages. PMID:24071718

  5. Probiotic bacteria change Escherichia coli-induced gene expression in cultured colonocytes: Implications in intestinal pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Pinaki; Braileanu, Gheorghe T; Chen, Hegang; Stine, O Colin

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the change in eukaryotic gene expression profile in Caco-2 cells after infection with strains of Escherichia coli and commensal probiotic bacteria. METHODS: A 19200 gene/expressed sequence tag gene chip was used to examine expression of genes after infection of Caco-2 cells with strains of normal flora E. coli, Lactobacillus plantarum, and a combination of the two. RESULTS: The cDNA microarray revealed up-regulation of 155 and down-regulation of 177 genes by E. coli. L. plantarum up-regulated 45 and down-regulated 36 genes. During mixed infection, 27 genes were up-regulated and 59 were down-regulated, with nullification of stimulatory/inhibitory effects on most of the genes. Expression of several new genes was noted in this group. CONCLUSION: The commensal bacterial strains used in this study induced the expression of a large number of genes in colonocyte-like cultured cells and changed the expression of several genes involved in important cellular processes such as regulation of transcription, protein biosynthesis, metabolism, cell adhesion, ubiquitination, and apoptosis. Such changes induced by the presence of probiotic bacteria may shape the physiologic and pathologic responses they trigger in the host. PMID:18081226

  6. Gene expression profile analysis in astaxanthin-induced Haematococcus pluvialis using a cDNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Eom, Hyunsuk; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Jin, EonSeon

    2006-05-01

    The unicellular green alga Haematococcus pluvialis (Volvocales) is known for the ketocarotenoid astaxanthin (3, 3'-dihydroxy-beta, beta-carotene-4, 4'-dione) accumulation, which is induced under unfavorable culture conditions. In this work, we used cDNA microarray analysis to screen differentially expressed genes in H. pluvialis under astaxanthin-inductive culture conditions, such as combination of cell exposure to high irradiance and nutrient deprivation. Among the 965 genes in the cDNA array, there are 144 genes exhibiting differential expression (twofold changes) under these conditions. A significant decrease in the expression of photosynthesis-related genes was shown in astaxanthin-accumulating cells (red cells). Defense- or stress-related genes and signal transduction genes were also induced in the red cells. A comparison of microarray and real-time PCR analysis showed good correlation between the differentially expressed genes by the two methods. Our results indicate that the cDNA microarray approach, as employed in this work, can be relied upon and used to monitor gene expression profiles in H. pluvialis. In addition, the genes that were differentially expressed during astaxanthin induction are suitable candidates for further study and can be used as tools for dissecting the molecular mechanism of this unique pigment accumulation process in the green alga H. pluvialis. PMID:16320067

  7. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V.; Ennis, Riley C.; Griswold, Karl E.; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-01-01

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42 °C as compared to 30 °C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions. PMID:25820125

  8. IFN-γ induced IDO and WRS expression in microglia is differentially regulated by IL-4

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Manisha C.; Burudi, E.M.E.; Alirezaei, Mehrdad; Flynn, Claudia C.; Watry, Debbie D.; Lanigan, Caroline M.; Fox, Howard S.

    2008-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), a tryptophan catabolizing enzyme, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurological disorders. IDO expression is induced by IFN-γ and leads to neurotoxicity by generating quinolinic acid. Additionally, it inhibits the immune response through both tryptophan depletion and generating other tryptophan catabolites. IL-4 and IL-13 have been shown to control IDO expression by antagonizing the effects of IFN-γ in different cell types. Here, we investigated the effects of these cytokines on IDO expression in microglia. Interestingly, we observed that both IL-4 and IL-13 greatly enhanced IFN-γ induced IDO expression. However, tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (WRS), which is coinduced with IDO by IFN-γ, is downregulated by IL-4 and IL-13. The effect of IL-4 and IL-13 was independent of STAT-6. Modulation of IDO but not WRS was eliminated by inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway further differentiated the regulation of these two enzymes, as inhibiting the PI3K pathway eliminated IFN-γ induction of IDO, whereas such inhibition greatly enhanced WRS expression. These findings show discordance between modulations of expression of two distinct enzymes utilizing tryptophan as a common substrate, and raise the possibility of their involvement in regulating immune responses in various neurological disorders. PMID:17661345

  9. IL-13 Augments Compressive Stress-Induced Tissue Factor Expression in Human Airway Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Mitchel, Jennifer A; Antoniak, Silvio; Lee, Joo-Hyeon; Kim, Sae-Hoon; McGill, Maureen; Kasahara, David I; Randell, Scott H; Israel, Elliot; Shore, Stephanie A; Mackman, Nigel; Park, Jin-Ah

    2016-04-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is best known as a cellular initiator of coagulation, but it is also a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in multiple pathophysiologic conditions, including asthma. In the lung, airway epithelial cells express TF, but it is unknown how TF expression is regulated by asthma-associated mediators. We investigated the role of IL-13, a type 2 cytokine, alone and in combination with compressive stress, which mimics asthmatic bronchoconstriction, on TF expression and release of TF-positive extracellular vesicles from primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells. Well-differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial cells were treated with IL-13 and compressive stress, alone and in combination. TF mRNA, protein and activity were measured in the cells and conditioned media. TF was also measured in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of allergen-challenged mice and patients with asthma. IL-13 and compressive stress increased TF expression, but only compressive stress induced TF-positive extracellular vesicle release. Pretreatment with IL-13 augmented compressive stress-induced TF expression and release. TF protein and activity in BAL fluid were increased in allergen-sensitized and -challenged mice. TF was elevated in the BAL fluid of patients with mild asthma after an allergen challenge. Our in vitro and in vivo data indicate close cooperation between mechanical and inflammatory stimuli on TF expression and release of TF-positive extracellular vesicles in the lungs, which may contribute to pathophysiology of asthma. PMID:26407210

  10. Among-lake reciprocal transplants induce convergent expression of immune genes in threespine stickleback.

    PubMed

    Stutz, William E; Schmerer, Matthew; Coates, Jessica L; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2015-09-01

    Geographic variation in parasite communities can drive evolutionary divergence in host immune genes. However, biotic and abiotic environmental variation can also induce plastic differences in immune function among populations. At present, there is little information concerning the relative magnitudes of heritable vs. induced immune divergence in natural populations. We examined immune gene expression profiles of threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from six lakes on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Parasite community composition differs between lake types (large or small, containing limnetic- or benthic-like stickleback) and between watersheds. We observed corresponding differences in immune gene expression profiles among wild-caught stickleback, using a set of seven immune genes representing distinct branches of the immune system. To evaluate the role of environmental effects on this differentiation, we experimentally transplanted wild-caught fish into cages in their native lake, or into a nearby foreign lake. Transplanted individuals' immune gene expression converged on patterns typical of their destination lake, deviating from their native expression profile. Transplant individuals' source population had a much smaller effect, suggesting relatively weak genetic underpinning of population differences in immunity, as viewed through gene expression. This strong environmental regulation of immune gene expression provides a counterpoint to the large emerging literature documenting microevolution and genetic diversification of immune function. Our findings illustrate the value of studying immunity in natural environmental settings where the immune system has evolved and actively functions. PMID:26118468

  11. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia induced cytosine deaminase expression in microencapsulated E. coli for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

    PubMed

    Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Ennis, Riley C; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2015-06-10

    Engineered bacterial cells that are designed to express therapeutic enzymes under the transcriptional control of remotely inducible promoters can mediate the de novo conversion of non-toxic prodrugs to their cytotoxic forms. In situ cellular expression of enzymes provides increased stability and control of enzyme activity as compared to isolated enzymes. We have engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli), designed to express cytosine deaminase at elevated temperatures, under the transcriptional control of thermo-regulatory λpL-cI857 promoter cassette which provides a thermal switch to trigger enzyme synthesis. Enhanced cytosine deaminase expression was observed in cultures incubated at 42°C as compared to 30°C, and enzyme expression was further substantiated by spectrophotometric assays indicating enhanced conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil. The engineered cells were subsequently co-encapsulated with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in immunoprotective alginate microcapsules, and cytosine deaminase expression was triggered remotely by alternating magnetic field-induced hyperthermia. The combination of 5-fluorocytosine with AMF-activated microcapsules demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity comparable to direct treatment with 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy. Such enzyme-prodrug therapy, based on engineered and immunoisolated E. coli, may ultimately yield an improved therapeutic index relative to monotherapy, as AMF mediated hyperthermia might be expected to pre-sensitize tumors to chemotherapy under appropriate conditions. PMID:25820125

  12. Optimizing heat shock protein expression induced by prostate cancer laser therapy through predictive computational models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylander, Marissa N.; Feng, Yusheng; Zhang, Yongjie; Bass, Jon; Stafford, Roger J.; Hazle, John D.; Diller, Kenneth R.

    2006-07-01

    Thermal therapy efficacy can be diminished due to heat shock protein (HSP) induction in regions of a tumor where temperatures are insufficient to coagulate proteins. HSP expression enhances tumor cell viability and imparts resistance to chemotherapy and radiation treatments, which are generally employed in conjunction with hyperthermia. Therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced HSP expression within the targeted tumor must be incorporated into the treatment plan to optimize the thermal dose delivery and permit prediction of the overall tissue response. A treatment planning computational model capable of predicting the temperature, HSP27 and HSP70 expression, and damage fraction distributions associated with laser heating in healthy prostate tissue and tumors is presented. Measured thermally induced HSP27 and HSP70 expression kinetics and injury data for normal and cancerous prostate cells and prostate tumors are employed to create the first HSP expression predictive model and formulate an Arrhenius damage model. The correlation coefficients between measured and model predicted temperature, HSP27, and HSP70 were 0.98, 0.99, and 0.99, respectively, confirming the accuracy of the model. Utilization of the treatment planning model in the design of prostate cancer thermal therapies can enable optimization of the treatment outcome by controlling HSP expression and injury.

  13. Intermedilysin induces EGR-1 expression through calcineurin/NFAT pathway in human cholangiocellular carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Susilowati, Heni; Okamura, Hirohiko; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Shono, Masayuki; Yoshida, Kaya; Murakami, Keiji; Tabata, Atsushi; Nagamune, Hideaki; Haneji, Tatsuji; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} ILY leads to the accumulation of [Ca{sup 2+}]i in the nucleus in HuCCT1 cells. {yields} ILY induced activation of NFAT1 through a calcineurin-dependent pathway. {yields} Calcineuri/NFAT pathway is involved in EGR-1 expression in response to ILY treatment. -- Abstract: Intermedilysin (ILY) is a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin produced by Streptococcus intermedius, which is associated with human brain and liver abscesses. Although intrahepatic bile duct cells play a valuable role in the pathogenesis of liver abscess, the molecular mechanism of ILY-treated intrahepatic bile duct cells remains unknown. In this study, we report that ILY induced a nuclear accumulation of intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]i) in human cholangiocellular cells HuCCT1. We also demonstrate that 10 ng/ml ILY induced NFAT1 dephosphorylation and its nuclear translocation in HuCCT1 cells. In contrast to the result that ILY induced NF-{kappa}B translocation in human hepatic HepG2 cells, ILY did not affect NF-{kappa}B localization in HuCCT1 cells. Dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NFAT1 caused by ILY were prevented by [Ca{sup 2+}]i calcium chelator, BAPTA/AM, and calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine A and tacrolimus. ILY induced early growth response-1 (EGR-1) expression and it was inhibited by the pre-treatment with cyclosporine A, indicating that the calcineurin/NFAT pathway was involved in EGR-1 expression in response to ILY. ILY-induced calcineurin/NFAT1 activation and sequential EGR-1 expression might be related to the pathogenesis of S. intermedius in human bile duct cells.

  14. Novel and tightly regulated resorcinol and cumate-inducible expression systems for Streptomyces and other actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Horbal, Liliya; Fedorenko, Victor; Luzhetskyy, Andriy

    2014-10-01

    Inducible expression is a versatile genetic tool for controlling gene transcription, determining gene functions and other uses. Herein, we describe our attempts to create several inducible systems based on a cumate or a resorcinol switch, a hammerhead ribozyme, the LacI repressor, and isopropyl β-d-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG). We successfully developed a new cumate (p-isopropylbenzoic acid)-inducible gene switch in actinobacteria that is based on the CymR regulator, the operator sequence (cmt) from the Pseudomonas putida cumate degradation operon and P21 synthetic promoter. Resorcinol-inducible expression system is also functional and is composed of the RolR regulator and the PA3 promoter fused with the operator (rolO) from the Corynebacterium glutamicum resorcinol catabolic operon. Using the gusA (β-glucuronidase) gene as a reporter, we showed that the newly generated expression systems are tightly regulated and hyper-inducible. The activity of the uninduced promoters is negligible in both cases. Whereas the induction factor reaches 45 for Streptomyces albus in the case of cumate switch and 33 in the case of resorcinol toggle. The systems are also dose-dependent, which allows the modulation of gene expression even from a single promoter. In addition, the cumate system is versatile, given that it is functional in different actinomycetes. Finally, these systems are nontoxic and inexpensive, as these are characteristics of cumate and resorcinol, and they are easy to use because inducers are water-soluble and easily penetrate cells. Therefore, the P21-cmt-CymR and PA3-rolO-RolR systems are powerful tools for engineering actinobacteria. PMID:25012786

  15. Knocking down nucleolin expression in gliomas inhibits tumor growth and induces cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Joshi, Neel; Agarwal, Ashima; Dahiya, Sonika; Bittner, Patrice; Smith, Erin; Taylor, Sara; Piwnica-Worms, David; Weber, Jason; Leonard, Jeffrey R

    2012-05-01

    Nucleolin is a multifunctional protein whose expression often correlates with increased cellular proliferation. While the expression of nucleolin is often elevated in numerous cancers, its expression in normal human brain and in astrocytomas has not been previously reported. Using paraffin-embedded sections from normal adult autopsy specimens and glioma resection specimens, we demonstrate that nucleolin expression is limited in the normal human brain specifically to mature neurons, ependymal cells, and granular cells of the dentate gyrus. While astrocytes in the normal human brain do not express nucleolin at significant levels, glioblastoma cell lines and primary human astrocytoma cells exhibit considerable nucleolin expression. Reduction of nucleolin expression through siRNA-mediated knockdown in the U87MG glioblastoma cell line caused a dramatic decrease in cell proliferation and induced cell cycle arrest in vitro. Moreover, conditional siRNA knockdown of nucleolin expression in U87MG intracranial xenografts in nude mice caused dramatic reduction in tumor size. Taken together, these results implicate nucleolin in the regulation of human astrocytoma proliferation in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo and suggest that nucleolin may represent a potential novel therapeutic target for astrocytomas. PMID:22382782

  16. The profile of β-amyloid precursor protein expression of rats induced by aluminum.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Bo; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Yin, Li-Hong; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2012-03-01

    The environmental agent aluminum has been extensively investigated for a potential relationship with amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression. Despite many investigations, there is at present no definite proof from which to draw a conclusion. Since APP is an integral membrane protein expressed in different tissues and capable of fluxes across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which may ultimately affect APP level in brain, it is necessary to assess the expression profile among vital body organs. The present study compared aluminum oxide and aluminum chloride injected rats with control rats (saline treated) to observe if aluminum affected APP expression patterns in different organs by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The expression of APP was observed in the brain of aluminum chloride treated rats and in the liver of aluminum oxide injected group. Results of double IHC staining showed that it is Kupffer cells, which are located in liver sinus and expressed APP after aluminum oxide treatment. Oxidative stress is suggested as the potential pathway that aluminum chloride exert effects in brain. These results suggest that different aluminum compounds may impact the expression of APP in brain and liver tissues. The mechanism that aluminum induced liver APP expression still needs further investigation. PMID:22209725

  17. IL-24 is Expressed During Wound Repair and Inhibits TGFα induced Migration and Proliferation of Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Poindexter, Nancy J.; Williams, Ryan R.; Powis, Garth; Jen, Emily; Caudle, Abigail S.; Chada, Sunil; Grimm, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-24 is the protein product of melanoma differentiation-associated gene 7 (MDA-7). Originally identified as a tumor suppressor molecule, MDA-7 was renamed IL-24 and classified as a cytokine because of its chromosomal location in the IL-10 locus, its mRNA expression in leukocytes, and its secretory sequence elements. We previously reported that IL-24 is expressed by cytokine-activated monocytes and T lymphocytes. Here, we show that IL-24 is expressed in keratinocytes during wound repair. Paraffin-embedded tissues prepared from human skin sampled at days 2, 6, and 10 after wounding were examined by immunohistochemistry for expression of IL-24. Protein expression was detected in the keratinocyte population with maximum expression at days 2 and 6; and no expression by day 10 (4 of 4 subjects). In vitro studies showed that cytokines involved in wound repair, most notably TGFα, TGFβ, IFNγ and IFNβ, upregulated IL-24 protein expression in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK). Examination of the function of IL-24 in both in vitro wound repair and migration assays demonstrated that IL-24 inhibits TGFα induced proliferation and migration of NHEKs. These data support the hypothesis that IL-24 functions during an inflammatory response in the skin by inhibiting the proliferation and migration of keratinocytes. PMID:20545760

  18. Financial Aid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Mary A.

    This workbook assists college and vocational school bound American Indian students in determining their financial needs and in locating sources of financial aid. A checklist helps students assess the state of their knowledge of financial programs; a glossary defines terms pertinent to the realm of financial aid (i.e., graduate study programs,…

  19. IL-27 induces the expression of IDO and PD-L1 in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Carbotti, Grazia; Barisione, Gaia; Airoldi, Irma; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Bagnoli, Marina; Ferrero, Simone; Petretto, Andrea; Fabbi, Marina; Ferrini, Silvano

    2015-01-01

    IL-27 is a member of the IL-12 family that is produced by macrophages and dendritic cells. IL-27 inhibits the growth and invasiveness of different cancers and therefore represents a potential anti-tumor agent. By contrast, it may exert immune-regulatory properties in different biological systems. We reported that IL-27 induces the expression of the IL-18 inhibitor IL-18BP, in human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC) cells, thus potentially limiting the immune response. Here, we tested whether IL-27 may modulate other immune-regulatory molecules involved in EOC progression, including Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and Programmed Death-Ligand (PD-L)1. IDO and PD-L1 were not constitutively expressed by EOC cells in vitro, but IL-27 increased their expression through STAT1 and STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation. Differently, cells isolated from EOC ascites showed constitutive activation of STAT1 and STAT3 and IDO expression. These findings, together with the expression of IL-27 in scattered leukocytes in EOC ascites and tissues, suggest a potential role of IL-27 in immune-regulatory networks of EOC. In addition, IL-27 induced IDO or PD-L1 expression in monocytes and in human PC3 prostate and A549 lung cancer cells. A current paradigm in tumor immunology is that tumor cells may escape from immune control due to “adaptive resistance” mediated by T cell-secreted IFN-γ, which induces PD-L1 and IDO expression in tumor cells. Our present data indicate that also IL-27 has similar activities and suggest that the therapeutic use of IL-27 as anti-cancer agent may have dual effects, in some tumors. PMID:26657115

  20. EWS represses cofilin 1 expression by inducing nuclear retention of cofilin 1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Kuwahara, I; Matsumoto, K

    2014-06-01

    In Ewing's sarcoma family tumors (ESFTs), the proto-oncogene EWS that encodes an RNA-binding protein is fused by chromosomal translocation to the gene encoding one of the E-twenty six (ETS) family of transcription factors, most commonly friend leukemia virus integration 1 (FLI-1). Although EWS/FLI-1 chimeric proteins are necessary for carcinogenesis, additional events seem to be required for transformation to occur. We have previously reported that a protein product of an EWS mRNA target, whose expression is negatively regulated by EWS but not by EWS/FLI-1, contributes to ESFT development. However, the mechanism by which EWS represses protein expression remains to be elucidated. Here, we report that overexpression of full-length EWS repressed protein expression and induced nuclear retention of reporter mRNAs in a tethering assay. In contrast, when a mutant lacking the EWS C-terminal nuclear localization signal (classified as a PY-NLS) was expressed, reporter protein expression was upregulated, and the number of cells exporting reporter mRNA to the cytoplasm increased. EWS binds to the 3'-untranslated region in another mRNA target, cofilin 1 (CFL1), and negatively regulates the expression of CFL1. Overexpression of EWS induced nuclear retention of CFL1 mRNA. Furthermore, ESFT cell proliferation and metastatic potential were suppressed by small interfering RNA-mediated CFL1 knockdown. Together, our findings suggest that EWS induces nuclear retention of CFL1 mRNA, thereby suppressing expression of CFL1, and that CFL1 promotes development of ESFT. Targeting CFL1 might therefore provide another novel approach for treatment of this aggressive disease. PMID:23831569

  1. Restoration of XAF1 expression induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tu, Shui Ping; Liston, Peter; Cui, Jian Tao; Lin, Marie C M; Jiang, Xiao Hua; Yang, Yi; Gu, Qing; Jiang, Shi Hu; Lum, Ching Tung; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Korneluk, Robert G; Wong, Benjamin Chun-Yu

    2009-08-01

    XAF1 (XIAP-associated factor 1) is a novel XIAP binding protein that can antagonize XIAP and sensitize cells to other cell death triggers. Our previous results have shown that aberrant hypermethylation of the CpG sites in XAF1 promoter is strongly associated with lower expression of XAF1 in gastric cancers. In our study, we investigated the effect of restoration of XAF1 expression on growth of gastric cancers. We found that the restoration of XAF1 expression suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth and increased sensitivity to TRAIL and drug-induced apoptosis. Stable cell clones expressing XAF1 exhibited delayed tumor initiation in nude mice. Restoration of XAF1 expression mediated by adenovirus vector greatly increased apoptosis in gastric cancer cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner and sensitized cancer cells to TRAIL and drugs-induced apoptosis. Adeno-XAF1 transduction induced cell cycle G2/M arrest and upregulated the expression of p21 and downregulated the expression of cyclin B1 and cdc2. Notably, adeno-XAF1 treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth, strongly enhanced the antitumor activity of TRAIL in a gastric cancer xenograft model in vivo, and significantly prolonged the survival time of animals bearing tumor xenografts. Complete eradication of established tumors was achieved on combined treatment with adeno-XAF1 and TRAIL. Our results document that the restoration of XAF1 inhibits gastric tumorigenesis and tumor growth and that XAF1 is a promising candidate for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19358264

  2. A reporter mouse line with doxycyclin-inducible expression of β-glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Jay, Freya F; Schneider, Marlon R

    2014-12-01

    Mouse lines allowing the inducible expression of transgenes became essential tools for studying gene function and for developing accurate animal models for human diseases. A key component of this tool is the availability of "reporter" lines, mice expressing transgenes encoding easily detectable enzymes or other proteins normally not associated with eukaryotic tissues. Such lines may be suitable for a number of applications, including lineage tracing, label-retaining experiments, and the identification and monitoring of regulatory elements important for tissue-specific gene expression. However, only a limited number of reporter lines suitable for inducible expression systems are available. Here, we employed pronuclear DNA microinjection to generate a new reporter mouse line that allows the inducible expression of β-glucosidase, a recently reported stable and easily detectable protein, upon administration of doxycyclin to the drinking water. This novel line was established in the widely used inbreed background C57BL/6, and the transgene is transmitted between generations in a Mendelian fashion. When crossed to a K14-rtTA mouse line, activation of β-glucosidase expression in the epidermal basal layer is easily detected in double-transgenic animals receiving doxycyclin, while no expression is seen in double-transgenic mice without doxycyclin treatment or in animals carrying only one transgene. We anticipate that this new mouse line will become a valuable tool for a number of applications in vivo, including label-retaining experiments and testing the appropriate regulation of rtTA cassettes under different promoters in novel transgenic mouse lines. PMID:25091595

  3. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin-D3 Induces Avian β-Defensin Gene Expression in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guolong; Ouyang, Linghua; Robinson, Kelsy; Tang, Yanqiang; Zhu, Qing; Li, Diyan; Hu, Yaodong; Liu, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in innate immunity. Specific modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis by dietary compounds has been regarded as a novel approach to boost immunity and disease resistance in animal production. 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3 (1,25D3) is well known as a powerful HDP inducer in humans, but limited information about the effect of 1,25D3 on HDPs in poultry is available. Here, we sought to examine whether 1,25D3 could stimulate avian β-defensin (AvBD) expression in chickens. We used chicken embryo intestinal epithelial cells (CEIEPCs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to study the effect of 1,25D3 on the expression of AvBDs. We observed that 1,25D3 is able to up-regulate the expression of several AvBDs in CEIEPCs and PBMCs, whereas it increased the amounts of AvBD4 mRNA in CEIEPCs only in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). On the other hand, LPS treatment not only inhibited the expression of CYP24A1 but also altered the expression pattern of VDR in CEIEPCs. Furthermore, AvBDs were not directly regulated by 1,25D3, as cycloheximide completely blocked 1,25D3-induced expression of AvBDs. Our observations suggest that 1,25D3 is capable of inducing AvBD gene expression and is a potential antibiotic alternative through augmentation of host innate immunity as well as disease control in chickens. PMID:27135828

  4. Long-term inducible expression in striatal neurons from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors that contain the tetracycline-inducible promoter system

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qingshen; Sun, Mei; Wang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Guo-rong; Geller, Alfred I.

    2006-01-01

    Direct gene transfer into neurons in the brain via a virus vector system has potential for both examining neuronal physiology and for developing gene therapy treatments for neurological diseases. Many of these applications require precise control of the levels of recombinant gene expression. The preferred method for controlling the levels of expression is by use of an inducible promoter system, and the tetracycline (tet)-inducible promoter system is the preferred system. Helper virus-free Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vectors have a number of the advantages, including their large size and efficient gene transfer. Also, we have reported long-term (14 months) expression from HSV-1 vectors that contain a modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter. A number of studies have reported short-term, inducible expression from helper virus-containing HSV-1 vector systems. However, long-term, inducible expression has not been reported using HSV-1 vectors. The goal of this study was to obtain long-term, inducible expression from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors. We examined two different vector designs for adapting the tet promoter system to HSV-1 vectors. One design was an autoregulatory design; one transcription unit used a tet-regulated promoter to express the tet-regulated transcription factor tet-off, and another transcription unit used a tet-regulated promoter to express the Lac Z gene. In the other vector design, one transcription unit used the modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter to express tet-off, and another transcription unit used a tet-regulated promoter to express the Lac Z gene. The results showed that both vector designs supported inducible expression in cultured fibroblast or neuronal cell lines and for a short time (4 days) in the rat striatum. Of note, only the vector design that used the modified neurofilament promoter to express tet-off supported long-term (2 months) inducible expression in striatal neurons. PMID:16545782

  5. Differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1) induces gene and protein expression of the Dictyostelium nuclear calmodulin-binding protein nucleomorphin.

    PubMed

    O'Day, Danton H; Poloz, Yekaterina; Myre, Michael A

    2009-02-01

    The nucleomorphin gene numA1 from Dictyostelium codes for a multi-domain, calmodulin binding protein that regulates nuclear number. To gain insight into the regulation of numA, we assessed the effects of the stalk cell differentiation inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), an extracellular signalling molecule, on the expression of numA1 RNA and protein. For comparison, the extracellular signalling molecules cAMP (mediates chemotaxis, prestalk and prespore differentiation) and ammonia (NH(3)/NH(4)(+); antagonizes DIF) were also studied. Starvation, which is a signal for multicellular development, results in a greater than 80% decrease in numA1 mRNA expression within 4 h. Treatment with ammonium chloride led to a greater than 90% inhibition of numA1 RNA expression within 2 h. In contrast, the addition of DIF-1 completely blocked the decrease in numA1 gene expression caused by starvation. Treatment of vegetative cells with cAMP led to decreases in numA1 RNA expression that were equivalent to those seen with starvation. Western blotting after various morphogen treatments showed that the maintenance of vegetative levels of numA1 RNA by DIF-1 in starved cells was reflected in significantly increased numA1 protein levels. Treatment with cAMP and/or ammonia led to decreased protein expression and each of these morphogens suppressed the stimulatory effects of DIF-1. Protein expression levels of CBP4a, a calcium-dependent binding partner of numA1, were regulated in the same manner as numA1 suggesting this potential co-regulation may be related to their functional relationship. NumA1 is the first calmodulin binding protein shown to be regulated by developmental morphogens in Dictyostelium being upregulated by DIF-1 and down-regulated by cAMP and ammonia. PMID:19000924

  6. Influence factors and gene expression patterns during MeJa-induced gummosis in peach.

    PubMed

    Li, Minji; Liu, Meiyan; Peng, Futian; Fang, Long

    2015-06-15

    Jasmonates (JAs) play important roles in gummosis in peach. Mechanical damage, methyl jasmonate (MeJa), and ethylene can induce gummosis on peach shoots in the field. In this study, we used MeJa (2%, w/w) to induce gummosis on current-year shoots in peach on high temperature (35°C). Based on the experimental model, we studied the influence of factors on the development of peach gummosis. Our experimental results showed that high temperature could promote gummosis development induced by MeJa. Exogenous CaCl2 treatment reduced the degree of gummosis by increasing the calcium content in shoots, which is conducive to the synthesis and maintenance of the cell wall. Using digital gene expression (DGE), 3831 differentially expressed genes were identified in the MeJa treatment versus the control. By analyzing changes in gene expression associated with cell wall degradation, genes encoding pectin methylesterase (PME) and endo-polygalacturonase (PG) were found to be significantly induced, suggesting that they are key enzymes in cell wall degradation that occurs during MeJa-induced gummosis. Genes for glycosyltransferase (GT) and cellulose synthase (CS) were also significantly upregulated by MeJa. This result suggests that MeJa treatment not only promotes the degradation of polysaccharides to destroy the cell wall, but also promotes the synthesis of new polysaccharides. We also analyzed changes in gene expression associated with sugar metabolism, senescence, and defense. MeJa treatment affected the expression of genes related to sugar metabolism and promoted plant senescence. Among the defense genes, the expression pattern of phenylalanine ammonium lyase (PAL) suggested that PAL may play an important role in protecting against the effects of MeJa treatment. Our experimental results showed that MeJa treatment can promote the biosynthesis and signal transduction of ethylene in peach shoots; they can induce gummosis on peach shoots respectively, and there are overlaps between

  7. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression through induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Gyun; Han, Eun Hee; Im, Ji Hye; Lee, Eun Ji; Jin, Sun Woo; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2015-09-25

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural component of propolis, is reported to have anticarcinogenic properties, although its precise chemopreventive mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we examined the effects of CAPE on 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MC)-induced CYP1A1 expression and activities. CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. Moreover, CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 activity, mRNA expression, protein level, and promoter activity. CAPE treatment also decreased 3-MC-inducible xenobiotic-response element (XRE)-linked luciferase, aryl hydrocarbons receptor (AhR) transactivation and nuclear localization. CAPE induced hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein level and HIF-1α responsible element (HRE) transcriptional activity. CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 protein expression. Taken together, CAPE decreases 3-MC-mediated CYP1A1 expression, and this inhibitory response is associated with inhibition of AhR and HIF-1α induction. - Highlights: • CAPE reduced the formation of the benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct. • CAPE inhibited 3-MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. • CAPE induced HIF-1α induction. • CAPE-mediated HIF-1α reduced 3-MC-inducible CYP1A1 expression.

  8. Inducible gene expression from the plastid genome by a synthetic riboswitch.

    PubMed

    Verhounig, Andreas; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph

    2010-04-01

    Riboswitches are natural RNA sensors that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Riboswitches have been identified in prokaryotes and eukaryotes but are unknown in organelles (mitochondria and plastids). Here we have tested the possibility to engineer riboswitches for plastids (chloroplasts), a genetic system that largely relies on translational control of gene expression. To this end, we have used bacterial riboswitches and modified them in silico to meet the requirements of translational regulation in plastids. These engineered switches were then tested for functionality in vivo by stable transformation of the tobacco chloroplast genome. We report the identification of a synthetic riboswitch that functions as an efficient translational regulator of gene expression in plastids in response to its exogenously applied ligand theophylline. This riboswitch provides a novel tool for plastid genome engineering that facilitates the tightly regulated inducible expression of chloroplast genes and transgenes and thus has wide applications in functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:20308585

  9. Inducible gene expression from the plastid genome by a synthetic riboswitch

    PubMed Central

    Verhounig, Andreas; Karcher, Daniel; Bock, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Riboswitches are natural RNA sensors that regulate gene expression in response to ligand binding. Riboswitches have been identified in prokaryotes and eukaryotes but are unknown in organelles (mitochondria and plastids). Here we have tested the possibility to engineer riboswitches for plastids (chloroplasts), a genetic system that largely relies on translational control of gene expression. To this end, we have used bacterial riboswitches and modified them in silico to meet the requirements of translational regulation in plastids. These engineered switches were then tested for functionality in vivo by stable transformation of the tobacco chloroplast genome. We report the identification of a synthetic riboswitch that functions as an efficient translational regulator of gene expression in plastids in response to its exogenously applied ligand theophylline. This riboswitch provides a novel tool for plastid genome engineering that facilitates the tightly regulated inducible expression of chloroplast genes and transgenes and thus has wide applications in functional genomics and biotechnology. PMID:20308585

  10. Inducible expression of beta defensins by human respiratory epithelial cells exposed to Aspergillus fumigatus organisms

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus, a saprophytic mould, is responsible for life-threatening, invasive pulmonary diseases in immunocompromised hosts. The role of the airway epithelium involves a complex interaction with the inhaled pathogen. Antimicrobial peptides with direct antifungal and chemotactic activities may boost antifungal immune response. Results The inducible expression of defensins by human bronchial epithelial 16HBE cells and A549 pneumocyte cells exposed to A. fumigatus was investigated. Using RT-PCR and real time PCR, we showed an activation of hBD2 and hBD9 defensin genes: the expression was higher in cells exposed to swollen conidia (SC), compared to resting conidia (RC) or hyphal fragments (HF). The kinetics of defensin expression was different for each one, evoking a putative distinct function for each investigated defensin. The decrease of defensin expression in the presence of heat-inactivated serum indicated a possible link between defensins and the proteins of the host complement system. The presence of defensin peptide hBD2 was revealed using immunofluorescence that showed a punctual cytoplasmic and perinuclear staining. Quantification of the cells stained with anti hBD2 antibody demonstrated that SC induced a greater number of cells that synthesized hBD2, compared to RC or HF. Labelling of the cells with anti-hBD-2 antibody showed a positive immunofluorescence signal around RC or SC in contrast to HF. This suggests co-localisation of hBD2 and digested conidia. The HBD2 level was highest in the supernatants of cells exposed to SC, as was determined by sandwich ELISA. Experiments using neutralising anti-interleukine-1β antibody reflect the autocrine mechanism of defensin expression induced by SC. Investigation of defensin expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels demonstrated the requirement of transcription as well as new protein synthesis during A. fumigatus defensin induction. Finally, induced defensin expression in

  11. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 3α in hepatocellular carcinoma and its association with other hypoxia-inducible factors

    PubMed Central

    LIU, PING; FANG, XIEFAN; SONG, YANG; JIANG, JIAN-XIN; HE, QIAN-JIN; LIU, XIANG-JIE

    2016-01-01

    The functional role of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-3α in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is not yet fully understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the association between HIF-3α expression and the clinicopathological features as well as prognosis of HCC patients. In addition, we investigated the association between HIF-3α expression and the expression of HIF-1α and HIF-2α in tumor tissues. The protein levels of HIF-3α were determined using immunohistochemical analysis of paraffin sections of 126 paired HCC and peritumoral tissues. PLC/PRF/5 cells, a human HCC cell line, were transfected with HIF-1α and HIF-2α vectors and HIF-3α mRNA and protein expression was detected using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis, respectively. The expression of HIF-3α was upregulated in 46.0% (58/126) and downregulated in 42.9% (54/126) of tumor tissues, respectively, when compared to peritumoral tissues. HIF-3α protein expression was not associated with peripheral blood vessel invasion, overall survival, or disease-free survival in HCC patients (P>0.05). In HCC tissues, the levels of HIF-3α protein were positively correlated with HIF-2α, but not with HIF-1α expression in HCC tissues. HIF-3α was upregulated in PLC/PRF/5 and Hep3B cells overexpressed with HIF-1α or HIF-2α. The hypoxic microenvironment of liver cancer did not lead to elevated HIF-3α protein expression, indicating that HIF-3α is regulated differently from HIF-1α in vivo. The correlation between HIF-3α and HIF-2α expression at the cellular and tissue levels indicated that HIF-3α may be a target gene of HIF-2α. The hypoxic microenvironment did not lead to elevation of HIF-3α protein expression in liver cancer; thus, HIF-3α may be a target gene of HIF-2α. PMID:27284334

  12. Rhythmic expression of cryptochrome induces the circadian clock of arrhythmic suprachiasmatic nuclei through arginine vasopressin signaling.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mathew D; Brancaccio, Marco; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Hastings, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). SCN neurons define circadian time using transcriptional/posttranslational feedback loops (TTFL) in which expression of Cryptochrome (Cry) and Period (Per) genes is inhibited by their protein products. Loss of Cry1 and Cry2 stops the SCN clock, whereas individual deletions accelerate and decelerate it, respectively. At the circuit level, neuronal interactions synchronize cellular TTFLs, creating a spatiotemporal wave of gene expression across the SCN that is lost in Cry1/2-deficient SCN. To interrogate the properties of CRY proteins required for circadian function, we expressed CRY in SCN of Cry-deficient mice using adeno-associated virus (AAV). Expression of CRY1::EGFP or CRY2::EGFP under a minimal Cry1 promoter was circadian and rapidly induced PER2-dependent bioluminescence rhythms in previously arrhythmic Cry1/2-deficient SCN, with periods appropriate to each isoform. CRY1::EGFP appropriately lengthened the behavioral period in Cry1-deficient mice. Thus, determination of specific circadian periods reflects properties of the respective proteins, independently of their phase of expression. Phase of CRY1::EGFP expression was critical, however, because constitutive or phase-delayed promoters failed to sustain coherent rhythms. At the circuit level, CRY1::EGFP induced the spatiotemporal wave of PER2 expression in Cry1/2-deficient SCN. This was dependent on the neuropeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) because it was prevented by pharmacological blockade of AVP receptors. Thus, our genetic complementation assay reveals acute, protein-specific induction of cell-autonomous and network-level circadian rhythmicity in SCN never previously exposed to CRY. Specifically, Cry expression must be circadian and appropriately phased to support rhythms, and AVP receptor signaling is required to impose circuit-level circadian function. PMID:26903624

  13. Differential expression analysis of genes involved in high-temperature induced sex differentiation in Nile tilapia.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun Ge; Wang, Hui; Chen, Hong Ju; Zhao, Yan; Fu, Pei Sheng; Ji, Xiang Shan

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, high temperature effects on the molecular pathways during sex differentiation in teleosts need to be deciphered. In this study, a systematic differential expression analysis of genes involved in high temperature-induced sex differentiation was done in the Nile tilapia gonad and brain. Our results showed that high temperature caused significant down-regulation of CYP19A1A in the gonad of both sexes in induction group, and FOXL2 in the ovary of the induction group. The expressions of GTHα, LHβ and ERα were also significantly down-regulated in the brain of both sexes in the induction and recovery groups. On the contrary, the expression of CYP11B2 was significantly up-regulated in the ovary, but not in the testis in both groups. Spearman rank correlation analysis showed that there are significant correlations between the expressions of CYP19A1A, FOXL2, or DMRT1 in the gonads and the expression of some genes in the brain. Another result in this study showed that high temperature up-regulated the expression level of DNMT1 in the testis of the induction group, and DNMT1 and DNMT3A in the female brain of both groups. The expression and correlation analysis of HSPs showed that high temperature action on tilapia HSPs might indirectly induce the expression changes of sex differentiation genes in the gonads. These findings provide new insights on TSD and suggest that sex differentiation related genes, heat shock proteins, and DNA methylation genes are new candidates for studying TSD in fish species. PMID:25199961

  14. Claudin-7 expression induces mesenchymal to epithelial transformation (MET) to inhibit colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A A; Pope, J L; Smith, J J; Ahmad, R; Chen, X; Washington, M K; Beauchamp, R D; Singh, A B; Dhawan, P

    2015-08-27

    In normal colon, claudin-7 is one of the highly expressed claudin proteins and its knockdown in mice results in altered epithelial cell homeostasis and neonatal death. Notably, dysregulation of the epithelial homeostasis potentiates oncogenic transformation and growth. However, the role of claudin-7 in the regulation of colon tumorigenesis remains poorly understood. Using a large colorectal cancer (CRC) patient database and mouse models of colon cancer, we found claudin-7 expression to be significantly downregulated in cancer samples. Most notably, forced claudin-7 expression in poorly differentiated and highly metastatic SW620 colon cancer cells induced epithelial characteristics and inhibited their growth in soft agar and tumor growth in vivo. By contrast, knockdown of claudin-7 in HT-29 or DLD-1 cells induced epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), colony formation, xenograft-tumor growth in athymic mice and invasion. Importantly, a claudin-7 signature gene profile generated by overlapping the DEGs (differentially expressed genes in a high-throughput transcriptome analysis using claudin-7-manipulated cells) with human claudin-7 signature genes identified high-risk CRC patients. Furthermore, Rab25, a colon cancer suppressor and regulator of the polarized cell trafficking constituted one of the highly upregulated DEGs in claudin-7 overexpressing cells. Notably, silencing of Rab25 expression counteracted the effects of claudin-7 expression and not only increased proliferation and cell invasion but also increased the expression of p-Src and mitogen-activated protein kinase-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 that were suppressed upon claudin-7 overexpression. Of interest, CRC cell lines, which exhibited decreased claudin-7 expression, also exhibited promoter DNA hypermethylation, a modification associated with transcriptional silencing. Taken together, our data demonstrate a previously undescribed role of claudin-7 as a colon cancer suppressor and suggest

  15. Paeoniflorin inhibits doxorubicin-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by downregulating microRNA-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIAN-ZHE; TANG, XIU-NENG; LI, TING-TING; LIU, LI-JUAN; YU, SHU-YI; ZHOU, GUANG-YU; SHAO, QING-RUI; SUN, HUI-PING; WU, CHENG; YANG, YANG

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is an effective anthracycline anti-tumor antibiotic. Because of its cardiotoxicity, the clinical application of DOX is limited. Paeoniflorin (PEF), a monoterpene glucoside extracted from the dry root of Paeonia, is reported to exert multiple beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. The present study was designed to explore the protective effect of PEF against DOX-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the underlying mechanism. In cultured H9c2 cells, PEF (100 µmol/l) was added for 2 h prior to exposure to DOX (5 µmol/l) for 24 h. Cell viability, creatine kinase activity, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and the expression of microRNA-1 (miR-1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) were measured following treatment with PEF and/or DOX. The results showed that treatment with DOX notably induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, concomitantly with enhanced ROS generation, upregulated miR-1 expression and downregulated Bcl-2 expression. These effects of DOX were significantly inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with PEF. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of PEF on DOX-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis may be associated with downregulation of miR-1 expression via a reduction in ROS generation. PMID:27284328

  16. Expression Profile of Cationic Amino Acid Transporters in Rats with Endotoxin-Induced Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shu-Wen; Lee, Yi-An; Kao, Tzu-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The transcellular arginine transportation via cationic amino acid transporter (CAT) is the rate-limiting step in nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, which is crucial in intraocular inflammation. In this study, CAT isoforms and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was investigated in endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU). Methods. EIU was induced in Lewis rats by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection. In the treatment group, the rats were injected intraperitoneally with the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib before EIU induction. After 24 hours, leukocyte quantification, NO measurement of the aqueous humor, and histopathological examination were evaluated. The expression of CAT isoforms and iNOS was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunofluorescence staining. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) binding activity was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 was used to validate the in vivo findings. Results. LPS significantly stimulated iNOS, CAT-2A, and CAT-2B mRNA and protein expression but did not affect CAT-1 in EIU rats and RAW 264.7 cells. Bortezomib attenuated inflammation and inhibited iNOS, CAT-2A, and CAT-2B expression through NF-κB inhibition. Conclusions. CAT-2 and iNOS, but not CAT-1, are specifically involved in EIU. NF-κB is essential in the induction of CAT-2 and iNOS in EIU. PMID:27413255

  17. VCC-1 over-expression inhibits cisplatin-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Zhitao; Lu, Xiao; Zhu, Ping; Zhu, Wei; Mu, Xia; Qu, Rongmei; Li, Ming

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCC-1 is hypothesized to be associated with carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Levels of VCC-1 are increased significantly in HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of VCC-1 could promotes cellular proliferation rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of VCC-1 inhibit the cisplatin-provoked apoptosis in HepG2 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VCC-1 plays an important role in control the tumor growth and apoptosis. -- Abstract: Vascular endothelial growth factor-correlated chemokine 1 (VCC-1), a recently described chemokine, is hypothesized to be associated with carcinogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms by which aberrant VCC-1 expression determines poor outcomes of cancers are unknown. In this study, we found that VCC-1 was highly expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tissue. It was also associated with proliferation of HepG2 cells, and inhibition of cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Conversely, down-regulation of VCC-1 in HepG2 cells increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells. In summary, these results suggest that VCC-1 is involved in cisplatin-induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells, and also provides some evidence for VCC-1 as a potential cellular target for chemotherapy.

  18. Heme oxygenase-1 expression protects melanocytes from stress-induced cell death: implications for vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Elassiuty, Yasser E.; Klarquist, Jared; Speiser, Jodi; Yousef, Randa M.; EL Refaee, Abdelaziz A.; Hunter, Nahla S.; Shaker, Olfat G.; Gundeti, Mohan; Nieuweboer-Krobotova, Ludmila; Le Poole, I. Caroline

    2013-01-01

    To study protection of melanocytes from stress-induced cell death by heme oxygenases during depigmentation and repigmentation in vitiligo, expression of isoforms 1 and 2 was studied in cultured control and patient melanocytes and normal skin explants exposed to UV or bleaching agent 4-TBP. Similarly, expression of heme oxygenases was followed in skin from vitiligo patients before and after PUVA treatment. Single and double immunostainings were used in combination with light and confocal microscopic analysis and Western blotting. Melanocyte expression of heme oxygenase 1 is upregulated, whereas heme oxygenase 2 is reduced in response to UV and 4-TBP. Upregulation of inducible heme oxygenase 1 was also observed in UV-treated explant cultures, in skin of successfully PUVA-treated patients and in melanocytes cultured from vitiligo non-lesional skin. Heme oxygenase encoding genes were subsequently cloned to study consequences of either gene product on cell viability, demonstrating that HO-1 but not HO-2 overexpression offers protection from stress-induced cell death in MTT assays. HO-1 expression by melanocytes may contribute to beneficial effects of UV treatment for vitiligo patients. PMID:21426408

  19. Cells change their sensitivity to an EGF morphogen gradient to control EGF-induced gene expression

    PubMed Central

    van Zon, Jeroen Sebastiaan; Kienle, Simone; Huelsz-Prince, Guizela; Barkoulas, Michalis; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    How cells in developing organisms interpret the quantitative information contained in morphogen gradients is an open question. Here we address this question using a novel integrative approach that combines quantitative measurements of morphogen-induced gene expression at single-mRNA resolution with mathematical modelling of the induction process. We focus on the induction of Notch ligands by the LIN-3/EGF morphogen gradient during vulva induction in Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that LIN-3/EGF-induced Notch ligand expression is highly dynamic, exhibiting an abrupt transition from low to high expression. Similar transitions in Notch ligand expression are observed in two highly divergent wild C. elegans isolates. Mathematical modelling and experiments show that this transition is driven by a dynamic increase in the sensitivity of the induced cells to external LIN-3/EGF. Furthermore, this increase in sensitivity is independent of the presence of LIN-3/EGF. Our integrative approach might be useful to study induction by morphogen gradients in other systems. PMID:25958991

  20. Trimetazidine protects against hypoxia-reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by increasing microRNA-21 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiong; Yang, Kan; Li, An-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial tissue injury caused by ischemia and hypoxia is a major cause of fatal diseases, including coronary atherosclerosis resulting from myocardial infarction and stroke. Trimetazidine (TMZ), as an anti-ischemic and antioxidant agent, has been demonstrated to preventing ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, the anti-apoptosis mechanism of TMZ has not been fully elucidated. The present study demonstrated that miR-21 involved trimetazidine-induced anti-apoptosis during H/R injury in H9C2 cell. In this study, TMZ increased miR-21 expression which further upregulated the Akt signaling activity via suppressing the expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in H/R H9C2 cell. The increased activity of Akt signaling decreased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and the expression of caspase-3 and inhibited H/R induced apoptosis. In conclusion, this study revealed the mechanism that TMZ up-regulated miR-21 expression, then miR-21 targeted PTEN increasing the PI3K pathway and finally the activation of this pathway counteracted the apoptotic effect of hypoxia/reperfusion. PMID:26097555

  1. Trimetazidine protects against hypoxia-reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by increasing microRNA-21 expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiong; Yang, Kan; Li, An-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial tissue injury caused by ischemia and hypoxia is a major cause of fatal diseases, including coronary atherosclerosis resulting from myocardial infarction and stroke. Trimetazidine (TMZ), as an anti-ischemic and antioxidant agent, has been demonstrated to preventing ischemia/reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. However, the anti-apoptosis mechanism of TMZ has not been fully elucidated. The present study demonstrated that miR-21 involved trimetazidine-induced anti-apoptosis during H/R injury in H9C2 cell. In this study, TMZ increased miR-21 expression which further upregulated the Akt signaling activity via suppressing the expression of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in H/R H9C2 cell. The increased activity of Akt signaling decreased the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and the expression of caspase-3 and inhibited H/R induced apoptosis. In conclusion, this study revealed the mechanism that TMZ up-regulated miR-21 expression, then miR-21 targeted PTEN increasing the PI3K pathway and finally the activation of this pathway counteracted the apoptotic effect of hypoxia/reperfusion. PMID:26097555

  2. p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects Aβ42-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Eun Sun; Choi, Hyunjung; Song, Hyundong; Hwang, Yu Jin; Kim, Ahbin; Ryu, Hoon; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia and age-related neurodegenerative disease. Elucidating the cellular changes that occur during ageing is an important step towards understanding the pathogenesis and progression of neurodegenerative disorders. SIRT6 is a member of the mammalian sirtuin family of anti-aging genes. However, the relationship between SIRT6 and AD has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that SIRT6 protein expression levels are reduced in the brains of both the 5XFAD AD mouse model and AD patients. Aβ42, a major component of senile plaques, decreases SIRT6 expression, and Aβ42-induced DNA damage is prevented by the overexpression of SIRT6 in HT22 mouse hippocampal neurons. Also, there is a strong negative correlation between Aβ42-induced DNA damage and p53 levels, a protein involved in DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition, upregulation of p53 protein by Nutlin-3 prevents SIRT6 reduction and DNA damage induced by Aβ42. Taken together, this study reveals that p53-dependent SIRT6 expression protects cells from Aβ42-induced DNA damage, making SIRT6 a promising new therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:27156849

  3. Hyperthermia Induces Apoptosis of 786-O Cells through Suppressing Ku80 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Defeng; Hu, Yuan; Li, Jinhui; Peng, Tao; Su, Jialin; He, Yun; Ji, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia as an anticancer method has been paid increasing attention in recent years. Several studies have shown that hyperthermia can kill tumor cells by inducing apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of hyperthermia-induced apoptosis are largely unknown. To investigate the effects and molecular mechanism of hyperthermia on the apoptosis in renal carcinoma 786-O cells, we firstly examined apoptosis and Ku expression in 786-O cell line treated with heat exposure (42°C for 0-4 h). The results showed that hyperthermia induced apoptosis of 786-O cells, and suppressed significantly Ku80 expression, but not Ku70 expression. Next, we knock-down Ku80 in 786-O cells, generating stable cell line 786-O-shKu80, and detected apoptosis, cell survival and cell cycle distribution. Our data showed higher apoptotic rate and lower surviving fraction in the stable cell line 786-O-shKu80 compared with those in control cells, exposed to the same heat stress (42°C for 0-4 h). Moreover, the results also showed suppression of Ku80 led to G2/M phase arrest in the stable cell line 786-O-shKu80 following heat treatment. Together, these findings indicate that Ku80 may play an important role in hyperthermia-induced apoptosis and heat-sensitivity of renal carcinoma cells through influencing the cell cycle distribution. PMID:25902193

  4. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  5. Differential gene expression and lipid metabolism in fatty liver induced by acute ethanol treatment in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Huquan; Kim, Mingoo; Kim, Ju-Han; Kong, Gu; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Yoon, Byung-IL; Lee, Mi-Ock; Lee, Byung-Hoon

    2007-09-15

    Ethanol induces cumulative liver damage including steatosis, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the global intrahepatic gene expression profile in the mouse liver treated with ethanol. A single oral dose of 0.5 or 5 g/kg ethanol was administered to male ICR mice, and liver samples were obtained after 6, 24 and 72 h. Histopathological evaluation showed typical fatty livers in the high-dose group at 24 h. Microarray analysis identified 28 genes as being ethanol responsive (two-way ANOVA; p < 0.05), after adjustment by the Benjamini-Hochberg multiple testing correction; these genes displayed {>=} 2-fold induction or repression. The expression of genes that are known to be involved in fatty acid synthesis was examined. The transcript for lipogenic transcription factor, sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding factor 1 (Srebf1), was upregulated by acute ethanol exposure. Of the genes known to contain SRE or SRE-like sequences and to be regulated by SRE-binding protein 1 (SREBP1), those encoding malic enzyme (Mod1), ATP-citrate lyase (Acly), fatty acid synthase (Fasn) and stearyl-CoA desaturase (Scd1) were induced by ethanol. Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed the changes in the expression levels of the selected genes. The change in the Srebf1 mRNA level correlates well with that of the SREBP1 protein expression as well as its binding to the promoters of the target genes. The present study identifies differentially expressed genes that can be applied to the biomarkers for alcohol-binge-induced fatty liver. These results support the hypothesis by which ethanol-induced steatosis in mice is mediated by the fatty acid synthetic pathway regulated by SREBP1.

  6. Xylitol Inhibits Inflammatory Cytokine Expression Induced by Lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Su-Ji; Jeong, So-Yeon; Nam, Yun-Ju; Yang, Kyu-Ho; Lim, Hoi-Soon; Chung, Jin

    2005-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is one of the suspected periodontopathic bacteria. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of P. gingivalis is a key factor in the development of periodontitis. Inflammatory cytokines play important roles in the gingival tissue destruction that is a characteristic of periodontitis. Macrophages are prominent at chronic inflammatory sites and are considered to contribute to the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Xylitol stands out and is widely believed to possess anticaries properties. However, to date, little is known about the effect of xylitol on periodontitis. The aim of the present study was to determine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression when RAW 264.7 cells were stimulated with P. gingivalis LPS (hereafter, LPS refers to P. gingivalis LPS unless stated otherwise) and the effect of xylitol on the LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β expression. The kinetics of TNF-α and IL-1β levels in culture supernatant after LPS treatment showed peak values at 1 h (TNF-α) and 2 to 4 h (IL-1β), respectively. NF-κB, a transcription factor, was also activated by LPS treatment. These cytokine expressions and NF-κB activation were suppressed by pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (an inhibitor of NF-κB). Pretreatment with xylitol inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and IL-1β gene expression and protein synthesis. LPS-induced mobilization of NF-κB was also inhibited by pretreatment with xylitol in a dose-dependent manner. Xylitol also showed inhibitory effect on the growth of P. gingivalis. Taken together, these findings suggest that xylitol may have good clinical effect not only for caries but also for periodontitis by its inhibitory effect on the LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:16275942

  7. Construction of vectors for inducible and constitutive gene expression in Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Duong, Tri; Miller, Michael J; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Azcarate-Peril, M Andrea; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2011-05-01

    Microarray analysis of the genome of Lactobacillus acidophilus identified a number of operons that were differentially expressed in response to carbohydrate source or constitutively expressed regardless of carbohydrate source. These included operons implicated in the transport and catabolism of fructooligosaccharides (FOS), lactose (lac), trehalose (tre) and genes directing glycolysis. Analysis of these operons identified a number of putative promoter and repressor elements, which were used to construct a series of expression vectors for use in lactobacilli, based on the broad host range pWV01 replicon. A β-glucuronidase (GusA3) reporter gene was cloned into each vector to characterize expression from each promoter. GUS reporter assays showed FOS, lac and tre based vectors to be highly inducible by their specific carbohydrate and repressed by glucose. Additionally, a construct based on the phosphoglycerate mutase (pgm) promoter was constitutively highly expressed. To demonstrate the potential utility of these vectors, we constructed a plasmid for the overexpression of the oxalate degradation pathway (Frc and Oxc) of L. acidophilus NCFM. This construct was able to improve oxalate degradation by L. gasseri ATCC 33323 and compliment a L. acidophilus oxalate-deficient mutant. Development of these expression vectors could support several novel applications, including the expression of enzymes, proteins, vaccines and biotherapeutics by intestinal lactobacilli. PMID:21375708

  8. Hypoxia induces PDK4 gene expression through induction of the orphan nuclear receptor ERRγ.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja Hee; Kim, Eun-Jin; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Lee, In-Kyu; Harris, Robert A; Lee, Mi-Ock; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Multiple cellular signaling pathways that control metabolism and survival are activated when cell are incubated under hypoxic conditions. Activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 promotes expression of genes that increase the capacity to cope with the stress imposed by a reduced oxygen environment. Here we show that the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a critical role in hypoxia-mediated activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) gene expression. ERRγ mRNA and protein levels were increased by hypoxia or desferrioxamine (DFO) treatment in hepatoma cell lines. Co-expression of HIF-1α and β increased ERRγ promoter activity as well as mRNA expression, while knockdown of endogenous HIF-1α reduced the hypoxia-mediated induction of ERRγ. In addition, hypoxia also increased the promoter activity and mRNA level of PDK4 in HepG2 cells. Adenovirus mediated-overexpression of ERRγ specifically increased PDK4 gene expression, while ablation of endogenous ERRγ significantly decreased hypoxia-mediated induction of PDK4 gene expression. Finally, GSK5182, an inverse agonist of ERRγ, strongly inhibited the hypoxia-mediated induction of PDK4 protein and promoter activity. Regulation of the transcriptional activity of ERRγ may provide a therapeutic approach for the regulation of PDK4 gene expression under hypoxia. PMID:23050013

  9. Hypoxia Induces PDK4 Gene Expression through Induction of the Orphan Nuclear Receptor ERRγ

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Lee, In-Kyu; Harris, Robert A.; Lee, Mi-Ock; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Multiple cellular signaling pathways that control metabolism and survival are activated when cell are incubated under hypoxic conditions. Activation of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 promotes expression of genes that increase the capacity to cope with the stress imposed by a reduced oxygen environment. Here we show that the orphan nuclear receptor estrogen related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a critical role in hypoxia–mediated activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) gene expression. ERRγ mRNA and protein levels were increased by hypoxia or desferrioxamine (DFO) treatment in hepatoma cell lines. Co-expression of HIF-1α and β increased ERRγ promoter activity as well as mRNA expression, while knockdown of endogenous HIF-1α reduced the hypoxia-mediated induction of ERRγ. In addition, hypoxia also increased the promoter activity and mRNA level of PDK4 in HepG2 cells. Adenovirus mediated-overexpression of ERRγ specifically increased PDK4 gene expression, while ablation of endogenous ERRγ significantly decreased hypoxia-mediated induction of PDK4 gene expression. Finally, GSK5182, an inverse agonist of ERRγ, strongly inhibited the hypoxia-mediated induction of PDK4 protein and promoter activity. Regulation of the transcriptional activity of ERRγ may provide a therapeutic approach for the regulation of PDK4 gene expression under hypoxia. PMID:23050013

  10. Multi-walled carbon nanotube-induced gene expression in vitro: concordance with in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Snyder-Talkington, Brandi N.; Dong, Chunlin; Zhao, Xiangyi; Dymacek, Julian; Porter, Dale W.; Wolfarth, Michael G.; Castranova, Vincent; Qian, Yong; Guo, Nancy L.

    2014-01-01

    There is a current interest in reducing the in vivo toxicity testing of nanomaterials in animals by increasing toxicity testing using in vitro cellular assays; however, toxicological results are seldom concordant between in vivo and in vitro models. This study compared global multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-induced gene expression from human lung epithelial and microvascular endothelial cells in monoculture and coculture with gene expression from mouse lungs exposed to MWCNT. Using a cutoff of 10% false discovery rate and 1.5 fold change, we determined that there were more concordant genes (gene expression both up- or downregulated in vivo and in vitro) expressed in both cell types in coculture than in monoculture. When reduced to only those genes involved in inflammation and fibrosis, known outcomes of in vivo MWCNT exposure, there were more disease-related concordant genes expressed in coculture than monoculture. Additionally, different cellular signaling pathways are activated in response to MWCNT dependent upon culturing conditions. As coculture gene expression better correlated with in vivo gene expression, we suggest that cellular cocultures may offer enhanced in vitro models for nanoparticle risk assessment and the reduction of in vivo toxicological testing. PMID:25511174

  11. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  12. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants. PMID:27472324

  13. Molecular analysis, developmental function and heavy metal-induced expression of ABCC5 in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Long, Yong; Li, Qing; Li, Jie; Cui, Zongbin

    2011-01-01

    ABCC5/MRP5 is an organic anion transporter that participates in tissue defense and cellular signal transduction through efflux of anticancer drugs, toxicants and a second messenger cGMP, but its physiological functions in zebrafish remain to be defined. Herein, we report the characterization, spatiotemporal expression and developmental function of zebrafish ABCC5 and its transcriptional responses to heavy metals. Zebrafish abcc5 gene is located on chromosome 18 and comprised of 28 exons. The deduced polypeptide of zebrafish ABCC5 consists of 1426 amino acids, which shares high sequence identity with those from other species. Zebrafish abcc5 is maternally expressed and its transcripts are mainly distributed in brain, lens, liver and intestine of developing embryos. In adults, zebrafish abcc5 is extensively expressed, at higher levels in testis, brain, eye, ovary, intestine and kidney, but at relatively lower levels in gill, liver, heart and muscle. Blockage of endogenous ABCC5 activity by its dominant-negative led to the developmental retardation of zebrafish embryos in which activity of p21 signaling was markedly stimulated and cellular cGMP content was significantly increased. In addition, expression of abcc5 in ZF4 cells and zebrafish embryos was significantly induced by cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), mercury (Hg) or arsenic (As). The induced expression of ABCC5 by heavy metals was mainly detected in the liver of embryos at 96-h post-fertilization (hpf). In adult zebrafish, expression of abcc5 in brain, intestine, liver, kidney and ovary was significantly induced by one or more of these heavy metals. Furthermore, overexpression of ABCC5 attenuated the toxicity of Cd to zebrafish embryos, but did not affect the toxicity of Hg or As. Thus, ABCC5 is likely to play an active role in embryonic development and heavy metal detoxification through the export of second messenger molecules and toxicants out of cells in zebrafish. PMID:20869459

  14. Anti-interleukin-33 Reduces Ovalbumin-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Expression of Kidney Injury Molecule-1

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of anti-interleukin-33 (anti-IL-33) on a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Methods: Twenty-four female BALB/c mice were assigned to 4 groups: group A (control, n=6) was administered sterile saline intraperitoneally (i.p.) and intranasally (i.n.); group B (allergic, n=6) was administered i.p./i.n. OVA challenge; group C (null treatment, n=6) was administered control IgG i.p. before OVA challenge; and group D (anti-IL-33, n=6) was pretreated with 3.6 µg of anti-IL-33 i.p. before every OVA challenge. The following were evaluated after sacrifice: serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels, Kidney injury molecule-1 gene (Kim-1) and protein (KIM-1) expression in renal parenchyma, and expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), phosphorylated endothelial NOS (p-eNOS), and phosphorylated AMP kinase (p-AMPK) proteins in renal parenchyma. Results: After OVA injection and intranasal challenge, mice in groups B and C showed significant increases in the expression of Kim-1 at both the mRNA and protein levels. After anti-IL-33 treatment, mice in group D showed significant Kim-1 down-regulation at the mRNA and protein levels. Group D also showed significantly lower COX-2 protein expression, marginally lesser iNOS expression than groups B and C, and p-eNOS and p-AMPK expression at baseline levels. Conclusions: Kim-1 could be a useful marker for detecting early-stage renal injury in mouse models of OVA-induced AKI. Further, anti-IL-33 might have beneficial effects on these mouse models. PMID:27377943

  15. Hexane Extract of Orthosiphon stamineus Induces Insulin Expression and Prevents Glucotoxicity in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hae-Jung; Choi, Yoon-Jung; Park, So-Young; Kim, Jong-Yeon; Won, Kyu-Chang; Son, Jong-Keun

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyperglycemia, a characteristic feature of diabetes, induces glucotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells, resulting in further impairment of insulin secretion and worsening glycemic control. Thus, preservation of insulin secretory capacity is essential for the management of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we evaluated the ability of an Orthosiphon stamineus (OS) extract to prevent glucotoxicity in insulin-producing cells. Methods We measured insulin mRNA expression and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in OS-treated INS-1 cells after exposure to a high glucose (HG; 30 mM) concentration. Results The hexane extract of OS elevated mRNA expression of insulin as well as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 of INS-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The hexane OS extract also increased the levels of phosphorylated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, Akt phosphorylation was elevated by treatment with 100 and 200 µmol of the hexane OS extract. Three days of HG exposure suppressed insulin mRNA expression and GSIS; these expressions were restored by treatment with the hexane OS extract. HG elevated peroxide levels in the INS-1 cells. These levels were unaffected by OS treatment under both normal and hyperglycemic conditions. Conclusion Our results suggested that the hexane extract of OS elevates insulin mRNA expression and prevents glucotoxicity induced by a 3-day treatment with HG. This was associated with the activation of PI-3K and Akt. PMID:25729713

  16. Gene expression during imidacloprid-induced hormesis in green peach aphid.

    PubMed

    Ayyanath, Murali-Mohan; Cutler, G Christopher; Scott-Dupree, Cynthia D; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan; Kandasamy, Saveetha; Prithiviraj, Kalyani

    2014-07-01

    Imidacloprid-induced hormesis in the form of stimulated reproduction has previously been reported in green peach aphid, Myzus persicae. Changes in gene expression accompanying this hormetic response have not been previously investigated. In this study, expression of stress response (Hsp60), dispersal (OSD, TOL and ANT), and developmental (FPPS I) genes were examined for two generations during imidacloprid-induced reproductive stimulation in M. persicae. Global DNA methylation was also measured to test the hypothesis that changes in gene expression are heritable. At hormetic concentrations, down-regulation of Hsp60 was followed by up-regulation of this gene in the subsequent generation. Likewise, expression of dispersal-related genes and FPPS I varied with concentration, life stage, and generation. These results indicate that reproductive hormesis in M. persicae is accompanied by a complex transgenerational pattern of up- and down-regulation of genes that likely reflects trade-offs in gene expression and related physiological processes during the phenotypic dose-response. Moreover, DNA methylation in second generation M. persicae occurred at higher doses than in first-generation aphids, suggesting that heritable adaptability to low doses of the stressor might have occurred. PMID:25249837

  17. Gene expression profiling of breast cells induced by X-rays and heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Roy, D; Guida, P; Zhou, G; Echiburu-Chau, C; Calaf, G M

    2008-05-01

    Several genetic aberrations and gene expression changes have been shown to occur when cells are exposed to various types of radiation. The integrity of DNA depends upon several processes that include DNA damage recognition and repair, replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Ionizing radiation has many sources, including radon decay from the soil and X-rays from medical practice. Epidemiological evidence indicates a risk for cancer by inducing genetic alterations through DNA damage, and molecular alterations have been reported in epidemiological studies of the A-bomb survivors. A spontaneously immortalized human breast epithelial cell model, MCF-10F, was used to examine the gene expression profiling of breast cells induced by X-ray and heavy ion exposure, by a cDNA expression array of DNA damage and repair genes. This cell line was exposed to 10, 50, 100 and 200 cGy of either X-rays or heavy ions and gene expression profiles were studied. Results indicated that out of a total of 161 genes, 38 were differentially expressed by X-ray treatment and 24 by heavy ion (Fe(+2)) treatment. Eight genes were common to both treatments and were confirmed by Northern blot analysis: BRCA1, BIRC2/CIAP1, CENP-E, DDB1, MRE11A, RAD54/ATRX, Wip1 and XPF/ERCC4. A number of candidate genes reported here may be useful molecular biomarkers of radiation exposure in breast cells. PMID:18425356

  18. Autoregulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression by RNA Interference Provides Neuroprotection in Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi; Feng, Chenzhuo; Zhao, Huijuan; Ren, Xiaoyan; Peng, Shuling; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that autoregulation of gene expression by RNA interference is achievable in cell cultures. To determine whether this novel concept could be used to produce neuroprotection under in vivo condition, postnatal day (PND) 3 rats received intracerebroventricular injection of lentivirus that carried or did not carry code for short hairpin RNA (shRNA) of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). The expression of this shRNA was controlled by an iNOS promoter (piNOS-shRNA) or cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMV-shRNA). The rats were subjected to brain hypoxia-ischemia at PND7. Ischemic brain tissues had increased iNOS expression. This increase was attenuated by virus carrying piNOS-shRNA. Virus carrying pCMV-shRNA reduced iNOS to a level that was lower than control. Brain tissue loss and functional impairment after the hypoxia-ischemia were attenuated by the virus carrying piNOS-shRNA but not by pCMV-shRNA. Our results provide proof-of-concept evidence that autoregulation of iNOS expression by RNA interference induces neuroprotection in vivo and that appropriate regulation of gene expression is important. PMID:25767617

  19. A possible role for hypoxia-induced apelin expression in enteric cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Han, Song; Wang, Guiyun; Qi, Xiang; Lee, Heung M; Englander, Ella W; Greeley, George H

    2008-06-01

    Apelin is the endogenous ligand for the APJ receptor, and apelin and APJ are expressed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Intestinal inflammation increases intestinal hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and apelin expression. Hypoxia and inflammation are closely linked cellular insults. The purpose of these studies was to investigate the influence of hypoxia on enteric apelin expression. Exposure of rat pups to acute hypoxia increased hepatic, stomach-duodenal, and colonic apelin mRNA levels 10-, 2-, and 2-fold, respectively (P < 0.05 vs. controls). Hypoxia also increased colonic APJ mRNA levels, and apelin treatment during hypoxia exposure enhanced colonic APJ mRNA levels further. In vitro hypoxia also increased apelin and APJ mRNA levels. The hypoxia-induced elevation in apelin expression is most likely mediated by HIF, since HIF-activated apelin transcriptional activity is dependent on an intact, putative HIF binding site in the rat apelin promoter. Acute exposure of rat pups to hypoxia lowered gastric and colonic epithelial cell proliferation; hypoxia in combination with apelin treatment increased epithelial proliferation by 50%. In vitro apelin treatment of enteric cells exposed to hypoxia increased cell proliferation. Apelin treatment during normoxia was ineffective. Our studies imply that the elevation in apelin expression during hypoxia and inflammation in the GI tract functions in part to stimulate epithelial cell proliferation. PMID:18367654

  20. ESAT-6 induced COX-2 expression involves coordinated interplay between PI3K and MAPK signaling.

    PubMed

    A, Senthil Kumar; Bansal, Kushagra; Holla, Sahana; Verma-Kumar, Shalu; Sharma, Pawan; Balaji, Kithiganahalli Narayanaswamy

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages, as sentinels of robust host immunity, are key regulators of innate immune responses against invading mycobacteria; however, pathogenic mycobacteria survive in the infected host by subverting host innate immunity. Infection dependent expression of early secreted antigenic target protein 6 (ESAT-6) by Mycobacterium tuberculosis is strongly correlated with subversion of innate immune responses against invading mycobacteria. As a part of multifaceted immunity to mycobacterial infection, induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) may act as an important influencing factor towards effective host immunity. In the current investigation, we demonstrate that ESAT-6 triggers COX-2 expression both in vitro and in vivo in a TLR2 dependent manner. Signaling perturbation data suggest that signaling dynamics of PI3K and p38 and JNK1/2 MAPK assume critical importance in ESAT-6 triggered expression of COX-2 in macrophages. Interestingly, ESAT-6 triggered PI3K-MAPK signaling axis holds the capacity to regulate coordinated activation of NF-κB and AP-1. Overall, current investigation provides mechanistic insights into ESAT-6 induced COX-2 expression and unravels TLR2 mediated interplay of PI3K and MAPK signaling axis as a rate-determining step during intricate host immune responses. These findings would serve as a paradigm to understand pathogenesis of mycobacterial infection and clearly pave a way towards development of novel therapeutics. PMID:22154837

  1. Expression in the human brain of retinoic acid induced 1, a protein associated with neurobehavioural disorders.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Yara Dadalti; Stoney, Patrick N; Shearer, Kirsty D; Sementilli, Angelo; Nanescu, Sonia E; Sementilli, Pietro; McCaffery, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Retinoic acid induced 1 (RAI1) is a protein of uncertain mechanism of action which nevertheless has been the focus of attention because it is a major contributing factor in several human developmental disorders including Smith-Magenis and Potocki-Lupski syndromes. Further, RAI1 may be linked to adult neural disorders with developmental origins such as schizophrenia and autism. The protein has been extensively examined in the rodent but very little is known about its distribution in the human central nervous system. This study demonstrated the presence of RAI1 transcript in multiple regions of the human brain. The cellular expression of RAI1 protein in the human brain was found to be similar to that described in the mouse, with high levels in neurons, but not glia, of the dentate gyrus and cornus ammonis of the hippocampus. In the cerebellum, a second region of high expression, RAI1 was present in Purkinje cells, but not granule cells. RAI1 was also found in neurons of the occipital cortex. The expression of this retinoic acid-induced protein matched well in the hippocampus with expression of the retinoic acid receptors. The subcellular distribution of human neuronal RAI1 indicated its presence in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Overall, human RAI1 protein was found to be a highly expressed neuronal protein whose distribution matches well with its role in cognitive and motor skills. PMID:24519454

  2. UVB-induced gene expression in the skin of Xiphophorus maculatus Jp 163 B☆

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kuan; Boswell, Mikki; Walter, Dylan J.; Downs, Kevin P.; Gaston-Pravia, Kimberly; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Shen, Yingjia; Mitchell, David L.; Walter, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Xiphophorus fish and interspecies hybrids represent long-standing models to study the genetics underlying spontaneous and induced tumorigenesis. The recent release of the Xiphophorus maculatus genome sequence will allow global genetic regulation studies of genes involved in the inherited susceptibility to UVB-induced melanoma within select backcross hybrids. As a first step toward this goal, we report results of an RNA-Seq approach to identify genes and pathways showing modulated transcription within the skin of X. maculatus Jp 163 B upon UVB exposure. X. maculatus Jp 163 B were exposed to various doses of UVB followed by RNA-Seq analysis at each dose to investigate overall gene expression in each sample. A total of 357 genes with a minimum expression change of 4-fold (p-adj < 0.05) were identified as responsive to UVB. The molecular genetic response of Xiphophorus skin to UVB exposure permitted assessment of; (1) the basal expression level of each transcript for each skin sample, (2) the changes in expression levels for each gene in the transcriptome upon exposure to increasing doses of UVB, and (3) clusters of genes that exhibit similar patterns of change in expression upon UVB exposure. These data provide a foundation for understanding the molecular genetic response of fish skin to UVB exposure. PMID:24556253

  3. Anti-inflammatory effect of resveratrol on TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 expression in adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Jian; Yong Wei; Wu Xiaohong; Yu Ying; Lv Jinghuan; Liu Cuiping; Mao Xiaodong; Zhu Yunxia; Xu Kuanfeng; Han Xiao Liu Chao

    2008-05-02

    Chronic low-grade inflammation characterized by adipose tissue macrophage accumulation and abnormal cytokine production is a key feature of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Adipose-tissue-derived monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, induced by cytokines, has been shown to play an essential role in the early events during macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue. In this study we investigated the effects of resveratrol upon both tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 gene expression and its underlying signaling pathways in 3T3-L1 adipoctyes. Resveratrol was found to inhibit TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 secretion and gene transcription, as well as promoter activity, which based on down-regulation of TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 transcription. Nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B was determined to play a major role in the TNF-{alpha}-induced MCP-1 expression. Further analysis showed that resveratrol inhibited DNA binding activity of the NF-{kappa}B complex and subsequently suppressed NF-{kappa}B transcriptional activity in TNF-{alpha}-stimulated cells. Finally, the inhibition of MCP-1 may represent a novel mechanism of resveratrol in preventing obesity-related pathologies.

  4. Coptisine Prevented IL-β-Induced Expression of Inflammatory Mediators in Chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kai; Hu, Li; Liao, Wenjun; Yin, Defeng; Rui, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) is a pleiotropic pro-inflammatory cytokine that plays a critical role in the development of osteoarthritis (OA). Coptisine is an isoquinoline alkaloid extracted from Coptidis rhizome and has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory activity. However, the anti-inflammatory effects of coptisine on interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β)-stimulated chondrocytes have not been reported. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of coptisine on IL-1β-induced inflammation in human articular chondrocytes. Our results showed that coptisine greatly inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), as well as suppressed the expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human OA chondrocytes induced by IL-1β. It also inhibited the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and MMP-13 in IL-1β-stimulated human OA chondrocytes. Furthermore, coptisine significantly inhibited the IL-1β-induced NF-kB activation in human OA chondrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that coptisine inhibits the IL-1β-induced inflammatory response by suppressing the NF-kB signaling pathway. Thus, coptisine may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:27294276

  5. Hydroxycamptothecin-induced apoptotic gene expression profiling by PCR array in human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei; Zhang, Yinong; Zhang, Qing; Wang, Qinghua; Wu, Zhifeng

    2015-01-01

    Studies have indicated that hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) induces apoptosis of fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated the apoptotic gene expression profiling in HCPT-treated -human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts (HTCFs) and identify the most implicated gene in apoptotic signaling of HTCFs by HCPT. Method HTCFs were incubated with HCPT at 0, 0.25 and 4 mg/L for 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Anti-proliferative effects were measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis was determined using the Annexin V-FITC/PI apoptosis detection kit and apoptotic cells were identified by flow cytometry. A PCR array was employed to analyze the most implicated apoptotic genes during HCPT-induced apoptosis in HTCFs. Results from our studies showed that HCPT induced apoptosis in HTCFs in a concentration-and time-dependent manner. The apoptotic HTCFs was increased by 9.38% with a multiplicity at 4 mg/L HCPT. PCR array demonstrated remarkable changes in 88 apoptotic genes, including 9 up-regulated genes and 36 down-regulated genes. HCPT treatment induced the upregulation of CHOP and downregulation of XIAP in HTCFs. To conclude, our results support HCPT induced the apoptosis of HTCFs, involving the activation of mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stresses as well as the downregulation expression of XIAP. PMID:26045770

  6. Thermally induced osteocyte damage initiates pro-osteoclastogenic gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Eimear B; Tallon, David; Cheung, Wing-Yee; Schaffler, Mitchell B; Kennedy, Oran D; McNamara, Laoise M

    2016-06-01

    Bone is often subject to harsh temperatures during orthopaedic procedures resulting in thermally induced bone damage, which may affect the healing response. Postsurgical healing of bone is essential to the success of surgery, therefore, an understanding of the thermally induced responses of bone cells to clinically relevant temperatures in vivo is required. Osteocytes have been shown to be integrally involved in the bone remodelling cascade, via apoptosis, in micro-damage systems. However, it is unknown whether this relationship is similar following thermal damage. Sprague-Dawley rat tibia were exposed to clinically relevant temperatures (47°C or 60°C) to investigate the role of osteocytes in modulating remodelling related factors. Immunohistochemistry was used to quantify osteocyte thermal damage (activated caspase-3). Thermally induced pro-osteoclastogenic genes (Rankl, Opg and M-csf), in addition to genes known to mediate osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation via prostaglandin production (Cox2), vascularization (Vegf) and inflammatory (Il1a) responses, were investigated using gene expression analysis. The results demonstrate that heat-treatment induced significant bone tissue and cellular damage. Pro-osteoclastogenic genes were upregulated depending on the amount of temperature elevation compared with the control. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrate the in vivo effect of thermally induced osteocyte damage on the gene expression profile. PMID:27335224

  7. AIDS in Africa.

    PubMed

    Wilson, D; Armstrong, M; Lavelle, S

    1991-01-01

    Works on epidemiological, and social and behavioral science aspects of AIDS prevention and support in Africa are reviewed from the 7th Conference on AIDS. Participants were especially concerned with why AIDS spreads at disparate rates in different countries and regions of the world. Research on the casual factors of the spread of HIV generally focused upon patterns of sex behavior, the presence of other STDs, and the effect of circumcision. The roles of certain vaginal tightening agents used by Zairian prostitutes, vaginal bruising and bleeding, sex during menses, and oral contraception were also considered. Further, participants explored the possibility of a more coordinated, integrated approach to research and intervention development between the medical and social disciplines, and expressed the overall need for concurrent mass education interventions. In the face of ever increasing rates of HIV infection, including vertical transmission, making condoms ubiquitous, affordable, and highly publicized should garner higher general acceptance and use rates in these populations. Papers and models on the micro- and macro-socioeconomic impact of AIDS were finally discussed, followed by recommendations for a complete reassessment and reworking of policy for AIDS prevention. AIDS activities should, in fact, be integrated into the daily fabric of society, with prevention measures considered an ultimate necessity for social survival. PMID:1786270

  8. A vaccine strategy against AIDS: an HIV gp41 peptide immunization prevents NKp44L expression and CD4+ T cell depletion in SHIV-infected macaques.

    PubMed

    Vieillard, Vincent; Le Grand, Roger; Dausset, Jean; Debré, Patrice

    2008-02-12

    We previously showed that a gp41 peptide (3S) induces expression of a natural killer (NK) ligand (NKp44L) on CD4+ T cells during HIV-1 infection and that those cells are highly sensitive to NK lysis. In HIV-infected patients, anti-3S antibodies are associated with the maintenance of CD4+ T cell counts close to their baseline values, and CD4+ T cells decrease with the antibody titer. This study sought to determine whether anti-3S immunization could prevent NKp44L expression on these CD4+ T cells in vivo and inhibits the subsequent decline in CD4+ T cell counts by immunizing macaques with 3S and then infecting them with simian HIV(162P3). The results show that anti-3S antibodies inhibited NKp44L expression and NK activity and cytotoxicity. They also decreased the apoptosis rate of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes. These data raise questions about the pathogenesis of HIV and present opportunities for both preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:18234855

  9. A vaccine strategy against AIDS: An HIV gp41 peptide immunization prevents NKp44L expression and CD4+ T cell depletion in SHIV-infected macaques

    PubMed Central

    Vieillard, Vincent; Le Grand, Roger; Dausset, Jean; Debré, Patrice

    2008-01-01

    We previously showed that a gp41 peptide (3S) induces expression of a natural killer (NK) ligand (NKp44L) on CD4+ T cells during HIV-1 infection and that those cells are highly sensitive to NK lysis. In HIV-infected patients, anti-3S antibodies are associated with the maintenance of CD4+ T cell counts close to their baseline values, and CD4+ T cells decrease with the antibody titer. This study sought to determine whether anti-3S immunization could prevent NKp44L expression on these CD4+ T cells in vivo and inhibits the subsequent decline in CD4+ T cell counts by immunizing macaques with 3S and then infecting them with simian HIV162P3. The results show that anti-3S antibodies inhibited NKp44L expression and NK activity and cytotoxicity. They also decreased the apoptosis rate of CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes. These data raise questions about the pathogenesis of HIV and present opportunities for both preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccine strategies. PMID:18234855

  10. Activation induced deaminase: how much and where?

    PubMed

    Orthwein, Alexandre; Di Noia, Javier M

    2012-08-01

    Activation induced deaminase (AID) plays a central role in adaptive immunity by initiating the processes of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR). On the other hand, AID also predisposes to lymphoma and plays a role in some autoimmune diseases, for which reasons AID expression and activity are regulated at various levels. Post-translational mechanisms regulating the amount and subcellular localization of AID are prominent in balancing AID physiological and pathological functions in B cells. Mechanisms regulating AID protein levels include stabilizing chaperones in the cytoplasm and proteins efficiently targeting AID to the proteasome within the nucleus. Nuclear export and cytoplasmic retention contribute to limit the amount of AID accessing the genome. Additionally, a number of factors have been implicated in AID active nuclear import. We review these intertwined mechanisms proposing two scenarios in which they could interact as a network or as a cycle for defining the optimal amount of AID protein. We also comparatively review the expression levels of AID necessary for its function during the immune response, present in different cancers as well as in those tissues in which AID has been implicated in epigenetic remodeling of the genome by demethylating DNA. PMID:22687198

  11. Identification of intracellular signaling pathways that induce myotonic dystrophy protein kinase expression during myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Marta; Canicio, Judith; Palacín, Manuel; Zorzano, Antonio; Kaliman, Perla

    2002-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is the most common inherited adult neuromuscular disorder. DM is caused by a CTG expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of a protein kinase gene (DMPK). Decreased DMPK protein levels may contribute to the pathology of DM, as revealed by gene target studies. However, the postnatal regulation of DMPK expression and its pathophysiological role remain undefined. We studied the regulation of DMPK protein and mRNA expression during myogenesis in rat L6E9 myoblasts, mouse C2C12 myoblasts, and 10T1/2 fibroblasts stably expressing the myogenic transcription factor MyoD (10T1/2-MyoD). We detected DMPK as an 80-kDa protein mainly localized to the cytosolic fraction of skeletal muscle cells. DMPK expression and protein kinase activity were enhanced in IGF-II-differentiated cells. In L6E9 and C2C12 cells, DMPK expression was regulated through the same signaling pathways (i.e. phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, nuclear factor-kappaB, nitric oxide synthase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase) that had been described as being crucial for the myogenesis induced by either low serum or IGF-II. However, in 10T1/2-MyoD cells, p38 MAPK inhibition blocked cell fusion and caveolin-3 expression without affecting DMPK up-regulation. These results suggest that although DMPK is induced during myogenesis, its expression cannot be totally associated with the development of a fully differentiated phenotype. PMID:12130568

  12. Gibberellin-induced expression of Fe uptake-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Keita; Furukawa, Jun; Bidadi, Haniyeh; Asahina, Masashi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro; Satoh, Shinobu

    2014-01-01

    In dicots, iron (Fe) is acquired from the soil by IRT1 (IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1) and FRO2 (FERRIC REDUCTION OXIDASE 2) that are localized at the root epidermis. IRT1 and FRO2 expression is induced by local and systemic signals under Fe-deficient conditions in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the expression of IRT1, FRO2, bHLH038 and bHLH39 (the latter two of which control IRT1 and FRO2 expression) was promoted by GA4 treatment of gibberellin (GA) deficient ga3ox1 ga3ox2 mutants. In contrast, the expression of FIT, which encodes a transcription factor necessary for IRT1 and FRO2 induction under Fe deficiency, was not induced by the application of GA4. The induction of those genes triggered by shoot-applied GA4 was observed, even in the fit-2 mutant which had reduced endogenous GA levels caused by treatment with paclobutrazol (PBZ), a GA biosynthesis inhibitor. These results suggested that FIT was not a key regulator in the GA responses under Fe-sufficient conditions. On the other hand, among Fe uptake-related genes, the expression of IRT1, bHLH038 and bHLH39 was lower in ga3ox1 ga3ox2 compared with the wild type (WT) under Fe-sufficient conditions, but the expression of all Fe uptake-related genes decreased under Fe-deficient conditions. Additionally, the PBZ treatment decreased IRT1 expression in the WT under Fe-deficient conditions, but not in the fit-2 mutant. These data suggest the contribution of GA to the induction of Fe uptake-related genes under Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient conditions, possibly in FIT-independent and FIT-dependent manners, respectively. PMID:24192296

  13. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase expression in mouse liver is increased in obesity- and fasting-induced steatosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jialin; Kulkarni, Supriya R; Li, Liya; Slitt, Angela L

    2012-02-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (Ugt) catalyze phase II conjugation reactions with glucuronic acid, which enhances chemical polarity and the elimination from the body. Few studies have addressed whether Ugt expression and activity are affected by liver disease, such as steatosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether steatosis induced by obesity or fasting could affect liver Ugt mRNA expression and activity. Male C57BL/6J and Lep(ob/ob) (ob/ob) mice were fed ad libitum or food was withheld for 24 h. In steatotic livers of ob/ob mice, Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a9, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression increased. Fasting, which also induced steatosis, increased hepatic Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a7, -1a9, -2b1, -2b5, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression in mouse liver. Likewise, acetaminophen glucuronidation increased by 47% in hepatic microsomes from ob/ob mice compared with that in C57BL/6J mice, but not after fasting. In both steatosis models, Ugt induction was accompanied by increased aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, pregnane X receptor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α mRNA expression. In addition, fasting increased CAR, PPAR, and Nrf2 binding activity. The work points to hepatic triglyceride concentrations corresponding with nuclear receptor and Ugt expression. The findings indicate that steatosis significantly alters hepatic Ugt expression and activity, which could have a significant impact on determining circulating hormone levels, drug efficacy, and environmental chemical clearance. PMID:22031624

  14. Resveratrol and fenofibrate ameliorate fructose-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by modulation of genes expression

    PubMed Central

    Abd El-Haleim, Enas A; Bahgat, Ashraf K; Saleh, Samira

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of resveratrol, alone and in combination with fenofibrate, on fructose-induced metabolic genes abnormalities in rats. METHODS: Giving a fructose-enriched diet (FED) to rats for 12 wk was used as a model for inducing hepatic dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. Adult male albino rats (150-200 g) were divided into a control group and a FED group which was subdivided into 4 groups, a control FED, fenofibrate (FENO) (100 mg/kg), resveratrol (RES) (70 mg/kg) and combined treatment (FENO + RES) (half the doses). All treatments were given orally from the 9th week till the end of experimental period. Body weight, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), liver index, glucose, insulin, insulin resistance (HOMA), serum and liver triglycerides (TGs), oxidative stress (liver MDA, GSH and SOD), serum AST, ALT, AST/ALT ratio and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured. Additionally, hepatic gene expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS-3), sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), malonyl CoA decarboxylase (MCD), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and adipose tissue genes expression of leptin and adiponectin were investigated. Liver sections were taken for histopathological examination and steatosis area were determined. RESULTS: Rats fed FED showed damaged liver, impairment of glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, oxidative stress and dyslipidemia. As for gene expression, there was a change in favor of dyslipidemia and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) development. All treatment regimens showed some benefit in reversing the described deviations. Fructose caused deterioration in hepatic gene expression of SOCS-3, SREBP-1c, FAS, MDA and TGF-β1 and in adipose tissue gene expression of leptin and adiponectin. Fructose showed also an increase in body weight, insulin resistance (OGTT, HOMA), serum and liver TGs, hepatic MDA, serum AST, AST/ALT ratio and TNF-α compared to control. All

  15. Hyperosmotic stress induces cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer cells by stimulating aquaporin-5 expression

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, XUEJUN; ZHOU, CHUNXIA; YAN, CHUNXIAO; MA, JIONG; ZHENG, WEI

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are important mediators of water permeability and are closely associated with tumor cell proliferation, migration, angiogenesis and chemoresistance. Moreover, the chemosensitivity of tumor cells to cisplatin (CDDP) is potentially affected by osmotic pressure. The present study was undertaken to determine whether hyperosmosis regulates ovarian cancer cell sensitivity to CDDP in vitro and to explore whether this is associated with AQP expression. The hyperosmotic stress was induced by D-sorbitol. 3AO ovarian cancer cells were treated with different concentrations of hypertonic medium and/or CDDP for various times, followed by measuring the inhibition rate of cell proliferation using an MTT assay. In addition, AQP expression in response to osmotic pressure and/or CDDP was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Cell proliferation in response to hypertonic stress was also measured when AQP5 was knocked down by small interfering (si)RNA. 3AO cell proliferation was inhibited by hyperosmotic stress, while the expression of AQP5, but not that of AQP1, AQP3 or AQP9, was increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner in hypertonic sorbitol-containing medium. When AQP5 was silenced by siRNA, cells were susceptible to hypertonic stress. MTT analyses showed that the inhibition of cell proliferation by a low dose of CDDP increased significantly with exposure to a hyperosmotic stimulus, and this effect was reduced when a high dose of CDDP was used. AQP5 expression was induced by a low dose of CDDP, but was reduced by a high dose of CDDP. However, hyperosmosis enhanced AQP5 mRNA expression at every dose of CDDP tested, compared with isotonic medium. With prolonged treatment time, AQP5 expression was reduced by CDDP in hypertonic and isotonic culture medium. Thus, the effects of hyperosmosis on cell sensitivity to CDDP were associated with AQP5 expression. These results suggest that AQP5 expression in ovarian

  16. Hearing Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Food and Drug Administration Staff FDA permits marketing of new laser-based hearing aid with potential ... feeds Follow FDA on Twitter Follow FDA on Facebook View FDA videos on YouTube View FDA photos ...

  17. Teaching Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, W. Robert, Ed.

    1976-01-01

    Provides evaluations of several aids for teaching chemistry. Included are The Use of Chemical Abstracts, Practical Technical Writing, Infrared Spectroscopy Programs, and a film titled "You Can't Go Back." (RH)

  18. Developing tTA transgenic rats for inducible and reversible gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongxia; Huang, Cao; Yang, Min; Landel, Carlisle P; Xia, Pedro Yuxing; Liu, Yong-Jian; Xia, Xu Gang

    2009-01-01

    To develop transgenic lines for conditional expression of desired genes in rats, we generated several lines of the transgenic rats carrying the tetracycline-controlled transactivator (tTA) gene. Using a vigorous, ubiquitous promoter to drive the tTA transgene, we obtained widespread expression of tTA in various tissues. Expression of tTA was sufficient to strongly activate its reporter gene, but was below the toxicity threshold. We examined the dynamics of Doxycycline (Dox)-regulated gene expression in transgenic rats. In the two transmittable lines, tTA-mediated activation of the reporter gene was fully subject to regulation by Dox. Dox dose-dependently suppressed tTA-activated gene expression. The washout time for the effects of Dox was dose-dependent. We tested a complex regime of Dox administration to determine the optimal effectiveness and washout duration. Dox was administered at a high dose (500 microg/ml in drinking water) for two days to reach the effective concentration, and then was given at a low dose (20 microg/ml) to maintain effectiveness. This regimen of Dox administration can achieve a quick switch between ON and OFF statuses of tTA-activated gene expression. In addition, administration of Dox to pregnant rats fully suppressed postnatal tTA-activated gene expression in their offspring. Sufficient levels of Dox are present in mother's milk to produce maximal efficacy in nursing neonates. Administration of Dox to pregnant or nursing rats can provide a continual suppression of tTA-dependent gene expression during embryonic and postnatal development. The tTA transgenic rat allows for inducible and reversible gene expression in the rat; this important tool will be valuable in the development of genetic rat models of human diseases. PMID:19214245

  19. Targeting receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression induces apoptosis and inhibits prostate tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Elangovan, Indira; Thirugnanam, Sivasakthivel; Chen, Aoshuang; Zheng, Guoxing; Bosland, Maarten C.; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Gnanasekar, Munirathinam

    2012-01-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeting RAGE by RNAi induces apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing RAGE expression abrogates rHMGB1 mediated cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of RAGE by RNAi inhibits PSA secretion of prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knock down of RAGE abrogates prostate tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disruption of RAGE expression in prostate tumor activates death receptors. -- Abstract: Expression of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays a key role in the progression of prostate cancer. However, the therapeutic potential of targeting RAGE expression in prostate cancer is not yet evaluated. Therefore in this study, we have investigated the effects of silencing the expression of RAGE by RNAi approach both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study showed that down regulation of RAGE expression by RNAi inhibited the cell proliferation of androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (DU-145) prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, targeting RAGE expression resulted in apoptotic elimination of these prostate cancer cells by activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3 death signaling. Of note, the levels of prostate specific antigen (PSA) were also reduced in LNCaP cells transfected with RAGE RNAi constructs. Importantly, the RAGE RNAi constructs when administered in nude mice bearing prostate tumors, inhibited the tumor growth by targeting the expression of RAGE, and its physiological ligand, HMGB1 and by up regulating death receptors DR4 and DR5 expression. Collectively, the results of this study for the first time show that targeting RAGE by RNAi may be a promising alternative therapeutic strategy for treating prostate cancer.

  20. Localized low-level re-expression of high-affinity mesolimbic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors restores nicotine-induced locomotion but not place conditioning.

    PubMed

    Mineur, Y S; Brunzell, D H; Grady, S R; Lindstrom, J M; McIntosh, J M; Marks, M J; King, S L; Picciotto, M R

    2009-04-01

    High-affinity, beta2-subunit-containing (beta2*) nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are essential for nicotine reinforcement; however, these nAChRs are found on both gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and also on terminals of glutamatergic and cholinergic neurons projecting from the pedunculopontine tegmental area and the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus. Thus, systemic nicotine administration stimulates many different neuronal subtypes in various brain nuclei. To identify neurons in which nAChRs must be expressed to mediate effects of systemic nicotine, we investigated responses in mice with low-level, localized expression of beta2* nAChRs in the midbrain/VTA. Nicotine-induced GABA and DA release were partially rescued in striatal synaptosomes from transgenic mice compared with tissue from beta2 knockout mice. Nicotine-induced locomotor activation, but not place preference, was rescued in mice with low-level VTA expression, suggesting that low-level expression of beta2* nAChRs in DA neurons is not sufficient to support nicotine reward. In contrast to control mice, transgenic mice with low-level beta2* nAChR expression in the VTA showed no increase in overall levels of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) but did show an increase in CREB phosphorylation in response to exposure to a nicotine-paired chamber. Thus, CREB activation in the absence of regulation of total CREB levels during place preference testing was not sufficient to support nicotine place preference in beta2 trangenic mice. This suggests that partial activation of high-affinity nAChRs in VTA might block the rewarding effects of nicotine, providing a potential mechanism for the ability of nicotinic partial agonists to aid in smoking cessation. PMID:19077117

  1. Salivary binding antibodies induced by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 recombinant gp120 vaccine. The NIAID AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Group.

    PubMed Central

    Gorse, G J; Yang, E Y; Belshe, R B; Berman, P W

    1996-01-01

    Salivary binding antibodies induced by candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines in healthy, HIV-1 uninfected volunteers were assessed in a clinical trial evaluating intramuscularly injected HIV-1MN recombinant gp120 (rgp120) vaccine alone or with HIV-1IIIB rgp120 vaccine. The two rgp120 vaccines induced envelope glycoprotein-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies in whole saliva and serum. PMID:8914773

  2. Dexamethasone-induced muscular atrophy is mediated by functional expression of connexin-based hemichannels.

    PubMed

    Cea, Luis A; Balboa, Elisa; Puebla, Carlos; Vargas, Aníbal A; Cisterna, Bruno A; Escamilla, Rosalba; Regueira, Tomás; Sáez, Juan C

    2016-10-01

    Long-term treatment with high glucocorticoid doses induces skeletal muscle atrophy. However, the molecular mechanism of such atrophy remains unclear. We evaluated the possible involvement of connexin-based hemichannels (Cx HCs) in muscle atrophy induced by dexamethasone (DEX), a synthetic glucocorticoid, on control (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl)) and Cx43/Cx45 expression-deficient (Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre) skeletal myofibers. Myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice treated with DEX (5h) expressed several proteins that form non-selective membrane channels (Cx39, Cx43, Cx45, Panx1, P2X7 receptor and TRPV2). After 5h DEX treatment in vivo, myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) mice showed Evans blue uptake, which was absent in myofibers of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre mice. Similar results were obtained in vitro using ethidium as an HC permeability probe, and DEX-induced dye uptake in control myofibers was blocked by P2X7 receptor inhibitors. DEX also induced a significant increase in basal intracellular Ca(2+) signal and a reduction in resting membrane potential in Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) myofibers, changes that were not elicited by myofibers deficient in Cx43/Cx45 expression. Moreover, treatment with DEX induced NFκB activation and increased mRNA levels of TNF-α in control but not in Cx43/Cx45 expression-deficient myofibers. Finally, a prolonged DEX treatment (7days) increased atrogin-1 and Murf-1 and reduced the cross sectional area of Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl) myofibers, but these parameters remained unaffected in Cx43(fl/fl)Cx45(fl/fl):Myo-Cre myofibers. Therefore, DEX-induced expression of Cx43 and Cx45 plays a critical role in early sarcolemma changes that lead to atrophy. Consequently, this side effect of chronic glucocorticoid treatment might be avoided by co-administration with a Cx HC blocker. PMID:27437607

  3. Glial cell-expressed mechanosensitive channel TRPV4 mediates infrasound-induced neuronal impairment.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Du, Fang; Liu, Yang; Li, Li; Cai, Jing; Zhang, Guo-Feng; Xu, Xiao-Fei; Lin, Tian; Cheng, Hao-Ran; Liu, Xue-Dong; Xiong, Li-Ze; Zhao, Gang

    2013-11-01

    Vibroacoustic disease, a progressive and systemic disease, mainly involving the central nervous system, is caused by excessive exposure to low-frequency but high-intensity noise generated by various heavy transportations and machineries. Infrasound is a type of low-frequency noise. Our previous studies demonstrated that infrasound at a certain intensity caused neuronal injury in rats but the underlying mechanism(s) is still largely unknown. Here, we showed that glial cell-expressed TRPV4, a Ca(2+)-permeable mechanosensitive channel, mediated infrasound-induced neuronal injury. Among different frequencies and intensities, infrasound at 16 Hz and 130 dB impaired rat learning and memory abilities most severely after 7-14 days exposure, a time during which a prominent loss of hippocampal CA1 neurons was evident. Infrasound also induced significant astrocytic and microglial activation in hippocampal regions following 1- to 7-day exposure, prior to neuronal apoptosis. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of glial activation in vivo protected against neuronal apoptosis. In vitro, activated glial cell-released proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were found to be key factors for this neuronal apoptosis. Importantly, infrasound induced an increase in the expression level of TRPV4 both in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of TRPV4 expression by siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV4 in cultured glial cells decreased the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α, attenuated neuronal apoptosis, and reduced TRPV4-mediated Ca(2+) influx and NF-κB nuclear translocation. Finally, using various antagonists we revealed that calmodulin and protein kinase C signaling pathways were involved in TRPV4-triggered NF-κB activation. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that glial cell-expressed TRPV4 is a potential key factor responsible for infrasound-induced neuronal impairment. PMID:24002225

  4. Treatment with estrogen protects against ovariectomy-induced hepatic steatosis by increasing AQP7 expression.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaohua; Xing, Lili; Xu, Weihai; Shu, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the marked decrease in ovarian secretion of estrogens in postmenopausal women may be associated with the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The present study aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which low levels of estrogen induce fatty liver disease using an ovariectomized (OVX) mouse model and an in vitro cell model. A total of 24 female C57/BL6 mice were divided into four groups: Sham operation, sham operation plus subcutaneous implantation of tamoxifen (TAM), bilateral OVX, and OVX plus subcutaneous implantation of 17β-estradiol (E2). Marked hepatic steatosis and increased expression of lipogenic genes (acetyl‑CoA carboxylase, fatty acid synthase and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase) was observed in the estrogen‑depleted mice (TAM and OVX groups), as compared with in the sham operation group. Treatment with E2 significantly improved hepatic steatosis by decreasing the expression of the aforementioned lipogenic genes. Furthermore, hepatic aquaporin 7 (AQP7) expression was decreased in the estrogen‑depleted mice, but was increased in the OVX + E2 treatment group, as compared with in the sham operation group. These results suggested an association between AQP7 and low estrogen‑induced hepatic steatosis. Subsequently, the functions of AQP7 in hepatic steatosis were investigated using an oleic acid‑induced HepG2 cell model of steatosis. Treatment with E2 alleviated lipid accumulation and decreased the expression of lipogenic genes in vitro; however, such effects were attenuated following transfection with AQP7 small interfering RNA. The present study suggested a mechanism by which low levels of estrogen induce fatty liver disease, and may provide useful information regarding the prevention and treatment of fatty liver disease in postmenopausal women. PMID:27176782

  5. Profiling status epilepticus-induced changes in hippocampal RNA expression using high-throughput RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Katelin F; Sakamoto, Kensuke; Pelz, Carl; Impey, Soren; Obrietan, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) is a life-threatening condition that can give rise to a number of neurological disorders, including learning deficits, depression, and epilepsy. Many of the effects of SE appear to be mediated by alterations in gene expression. To gain deeper insight into how SE affects the transcriptome, we employed the pilocarpine SE model in mice and Illumina-based high-throughput sequencing to characterize alterations in gene expression from the induction of SE, to the development of spontaneous seizure activity. While some genes were upregulated over the entire course of the pathological progression, each of the three sequenced time points (12-hour, 10-days and 6-weeks post-SE) had a largely unique transcriptional profile. Hence, genes that regulate synaptic physiology and transcription were most prominently altered at 12-hours post-SE; at 10-days post-SE, marked changes in metabolic and homeostatic gene expression were detected; at 6-weeks, substantial changes in the expression of cell excitability and morphogenesis genes were detected. At the level of cell signaling, KEGG analysis revealed dynamic changes within the MAPK pathways, as well as in CREB-associated gene expression. Notably, the inducible expression of several noncoding transcripts was also detected. These findings offer potential new insights into the cellular events that shape SE-evoked pathology. PMID:25373493

  6. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana. PMID:27493613

  7. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana. PMID:27493613

  8. Adiponectin exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis via enhancing Th17 response and prompting RANKL expression.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoxuan; Feng, Xiaoke; Tan, Wenfeng; Lin, Na; Hua, Minhui; Wei, Yu; Wang, Fang; Li, Ningli; Zhang, Miaojia

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported adiponectin (AD) is highly expressed in the inflamed synovial joint tissue and correlates closely with progressive bone erosion in Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Here, we investigate the role of adiponectin in regulating Th17 response and the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) in mice with CIA mice by intraarticularly injection of adiponectin into knee joints on day 17, day 20 and day 23 post first collagen immunization. The increased adiponectin expression was found in inflamed joint tissue of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Adiponectin injection resulted in an earlier onset of arthritis, an aggravated arthritic progression, more severe synovial hyperplasia, bone erosion and osteoporosis in CIA mice. CD4(+)IL-17(+) Th17 cells, IL-17 mRNA and RANKL mRNA expression were markedly increased in the joint tissue of adiponectin treated CIA mice. Moreover, adiponectin treatment markedly enhanced Th17 cell generation from naive CD4(+) T cells in vitro, which accompanied by the high expression of Th17 transcription factor ROR-γt, and Th17 cytokine genes included IL-22 and IL-23. This study reveals a novel effect of adiponectin in exacerbating CIA progression by enhancing Th17 cell response and RANKL expression. PMID:26063682

  9. Lead Poisoning Disturbs Oligodendrocytes Differentiation Involved in Decreased Expression of NCX3 Inducing Intracellular Calcium Overload

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Teng; Wu, Xiyan; Cai, Qiyan; Wang, Yun; Xiao, Lan; Tian, Yanping; Li, Hongli

    2015-01-01

    Lead (Pb) poisoning has always been a serious health concern, as it permanently damages the central nervous system. Chronic Pb accumulation in the human body disturbs oligodendrocytes (OLs) differentiation, resulting in dysmyelination, but the molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this study, Pb at 1 μM inhibits OLs precursor cells (OPCs) differentiation via decreasing the expression of Olig 2, CNPase proteins in vitro. Moreover, Pb treatment inhibits the sodium/calcium exchanger 3 (NCX3) mRNA expression, one of the major means of calcium (Ca2+) extrusion at the plasma membrane during OPCs differentiation. Also addition of KB-R7943, NCX3 inhibitor, to simulate Pb toxicity, resulted in decreased myelin basic protein (MBP) expression and cell branching. Ca2+ response trace with Pb and KB-R7943 treatment did not drop down in the same recovery time as the control, which elevated intracellular Ca2+ concentration reducing MBP expression. In contrast, over-expression of NCX3 in Pb exposed OPCs displayed significant increase MBP fluorescence signal in positive regions and CNPase expression, which recovered OPCs differentiation to counterbalance Pb toxicity. In conclusion, Pb exposure disturbs OLs differentiation via affecting the function of NCX3 by inducing intracellular calcium overload. PMID:26287169

  10. Smad, but not MAPK, pathway mediates the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Hiroyuki; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Nakamura, Miki; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Matsuo, Noritaka; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine how radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of collagen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TGF-{beta}1 mRNA is elevated earlier than those of collagen genes after irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Smad pathway mediates the expression of collagen in radiation induced fibrosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK pathways are not affected in the expression of collagen after irradiation. -- Abstract: Radiation induced fibrosis occurs following a therapeutic or accidental radiation exposure in normal tissues. Tissue fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components. This study investigated how ionizing radiation affects the expression level and signal pathway of type I collagen. Real time RT-RCR showed that both {alpha}1and {alpha}2 chain of type I collagen mRNA were elevated from 48 h after irradiation with 10 Gy in NIH3T3 cells. The relative luciferase activities of both genes and type I collagen marker were elevated at 72 h. TGF-{beta}1 mRNA was elevated earlier than those of type I collagen genes. A Western blot analysis showed the elevation of Smad phosphorylation at 72 h. Conversely, treatment with TGF-{beta} receptor inhibitor inhibited the mRNA and relative luciferase activity of type I collagen. The phosphorylation of Smad was repressed with the inhibitor, and the luciferase activity was cancelled using a mutant construct of Smad binding site of {alpha}2(I) collagen gene. However, the MAPK pathways, p38, ERK1/2 and JNK, were not affected with specific inhibitors or siRNA. The data showed that the Smad pathway mediated the expression of type I collagen in radiation induced fibrosis.

  11. Cyclic strain is a weak inducer of prostacyclin synthase expression in bovine aortic endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segurola, R. J. Jr; Oluwole, B.; Mills, I.; Yokoyama, C.; Tanabe, T.; Kito, H.; Nakajima, N.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that hemodynamic forces such as cyclic strain and shear stress can increase prostacyclin (PGI2) secretion by endothelial cells (EC) but the effect of these forces on prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) gene expression remains unclear and is the focus of this study. Bovine aortic EC were seeded onto type I collagen coated flexible membranes and grown to confluence. The membranes and attached EC were subjected to 10% average strain at 60 cpm (0.5 sec deformation alternating with 0.5 sec relaxation) for up to 5 days. PGIS gene expression was determined by Northern blot analysis and protein level by Western blot analysis. The effect of cyclic strain on the PGIS promoter was determined by the transfection of a 1-kb human PGIS gene promoter construct coupled to a luciferase reporter gene into EC, followed by determination of luciferase activity. PGIS gene expression increased 1.7-fold in EC subjected to cyclic strain for 24 hr. Likewise, EC transfected with a pGL3B-PGIS (-1070/-10) construct showed an approximate 1.3-fold elevation in luciferase activity in EC subjected to cyclic strain for 3, 4, 8, and 12 hr. The weak stimulation of PGIS gene expression by cyclic strain was reflected in an inability to detect alterations in PGIS protein levels in EC subjected to cyclic strain for as long as 5 days. These data suggest that strain-induced stimulation of PGIS gene expression plays only a minor role in the ability of cyclic strain to stimulate PGI2 release in EC. These findings coupled with our earlier demonstration of a requisite addition of exogenous arachidonate in order to observe strain-induced PGI2 release, implicates a mechanism that more likely involves strain-induced stimulation of PGIS activity.

  12. Intravesical epinephrine preserves uroplakin II expression in urinary bladder from cyclophosphamide-induced rat cystitis.

    PubMed

    Kyung, Yoon Soo; Park, Heeyoon; Lee, Gilho

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the attenuated effect of intravesical epinephrine (EPI) on uroplakin II (UPII) expression in cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced rat cystitis. Sixty-eight Sprague-Dawley female rats were divided into one negative control group (GI) and five intraperitoneally CYP (150 mg CYP/kg)-injected groups (GII-VI) consisting of a positive control group (GII), three groups (GIII-V) with retaining intravesically instillated ameliorating agents for 90 min by urethral ligation until sacrifice, and one group (GVI) with freely voiding after intravesical EPI instillation. The retention groups were further classified into null-treated- (GIII), EPI- (GIV), and vehicle group (GV). All rats were euthanized 24 h after CYP injection. The UPII and α1-adrenergic receptors (AR) levels were measured with real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method and the morphological changes were also evaluated. CYP induced severe cystitis and decreased vesical UPII mRNA level. The EPI-treated groups had showed attenuation effects against submucosal edema and hemorrhage, and preserved UPII expression. Concurrently, intravesical EPI resulted in a significant preservation of both subtypes of α1A- and α1B AR expressions, which was well correlated with the hemostatic pattern in the samples. The obstructed and null-treated group (GIII) revealed severe cystitis and maximally decreased UPII levels, and the diluting effect of vehicle (GV) on CYP toxicity was insignificant on UPII preservation. The UPII level of RT-PCR was well correlated with the UPII immunohistological expression and their morphological changes. Intravesical instillation of EPI preserves UPII expression and attenuates the toxic responses in the bladder in CYP-induced rat cystitis. PMID:22638760

  13. Nitric oxide modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression via interleukin-10.

    PubMed

    Hebeda, C B; Teixeira, S A; Tamura, E K; Muscará, M N; de Mello, S B V; Markus, R P; Farsky, S H P

    2011-08-01

    We have shown previously that nitric oxide (NO) controls platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) expression on both neutrophils and endothelial cells under physiological conditions. Here, the molecular mechanism by which NO regulates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endothelial PECAM-1 expression and the role of interleukin (IL)-10 on this control was investigated. For this purpose, N-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg/day for 14 days dissolved in drinking water) was used to inhibit both constitutive (cNOS) and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) synthase activities in LPS-stimulated Wistar rats (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). This treatment resulted in reduced levels of serum NO. Under this condition, circulating levels of IL-10 was enhanced, secreted mainly by circulating lymphocytes, dependent on transcriptional activation, and endothelial PECAM-1 expression was reduced independently on reduced gene synthesis. The connection between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 expression was examined by incubating LPS-stimulated (1 µg/ml) cultured endothelial cells obtained from naive rats with supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes, which were obtained from blood of control or L-NAME-treated rats. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from L-NAME-treated rats, which contained higher levels of IL-10, reduced LPS-induced PECAM-1 expression by endothelial cells, and this reduction was reversed by adding the anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody. Therefore, an association between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 was found and may represent a novel mechanism by which NO controls endothelial cell functions. PMID:21564091

  14. Induction and characterization of hepatic metallothionein expression from cadmium-induced channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.S.; Schlenk, D.

    1995-08-01

    Two low-molecular-weight proteins of approximately 10,000 daltons (DA) were isolated from the hepatic tissue of catfish intraperitoneally injected with CdCl{sub 2} (5 mg/kg). Each protein was significantly induced following Cd treatment. Bound Cd, co-eluted from DEAE anion-exchange HPLC with rabbit hepatic metallothioneins I and II, did not possess UV absorption indicative of aromatic amino acids and corresponded to the expression of two mRNA transcripts of approximately 400 base pairs, which hybridized to a full-length cDNA probe to winter flounder metallothionein (MT). Because these data indicated that these two low molecular weight proteins were hepatic MT isoforms, induction of MT mRNA expression was studied in livers of channel catfish exposed to aqueous CdCl{sub 2} utilizing the ribonuclease protection assay. Following a 7-d exposure to 10, 50, and 100 {micro}g/L CdCl{sub 2}, expression of two MT mRNAs increased in a dose-dependent manner (MT-a, r{sup 2} = 0.95; MT-b, r{sup 2} = 0.98). Each transcript was maximally induced 48 h after exposure to 100 {micro}g/L CdCl{sub 2} and then gradually declined to approximately 20% above controls after 96 h and maintained this level of expression for 7 d. Although MT expression is rapidly induced in channel catfish by Cd, and MT mRNA measurement is a sensitive indicator of MT induction, the use of hepatic MT of channel catfish may not be a sensitive bioindicator of short-term, low-level aqueous exposures of Cd.

  15. MicroRNA Expression Signature Is Altered in the Cardiac Remodeling Induced by High Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Elaine Castilho; França, Gustavo Starvaggi; Lino, Caroline Antunes; Koyama, Fernanda Christtanini; Moreira, Luana do Nascimento; Alexandre, Juliana Gomes; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; Diniz, Gabriela Placoná

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have revealed the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the control of cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial function. In addition, several reports have demonstrated that high fat (HF) diet induces cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling. In the current study, we investigated the effect of diets containing different percentages of fat on the cardiac miRNA expression signature. To address this question, male C57Bl/6 mice were fed with a low fat (LF) diet or two HF diets, containing 45 kcal% fat (HF45%) and 60 kcal% fat (HF60%) for 10 and 20 weeks. HF60% diet promoted an increase on body weight, fasting glycemia, insulin, leptin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and induced glucose intolerance. HF feeding promoted cardiac remodeling, as evidenced by increased cardiomyocyte transverse diameter and interstitial fibrosis. RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that HF feeding induced distinct miRNA expression patterns in the heart. HF45% diet for 10 and 20 weeks changed the abundance of 64 and 26 miRNAs in the heart, respectively. On the other hand, HF60% diet for 10 and 20 weeks altered the abundance of 27 and 88 miRNAs in the heart, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that insulin signaling pathway was overrepresented in response to HF diet. An inverse correlation was observed between cardiac levels of GLUT4 and miRNA-29c. Similarly, we found an inverse correlation between expression of GSK3β and the expression of miRNA-21a-3p, miRNA-29c-3p, miRNA-144-3p, and miRNA-195a-3p. In addition, miRNA-1 overexpression prevented cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Taken together, our results revealed differentially expressed miRNA signatures in the heart in response to different HF diets. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1771-1783, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26638879

  16. Low oxygen tension induces Krüppel-Like Factor 6 expression in trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Racca, A C; Ridano, M E; Bandeira, C L; Bevilacqua, E; Avvad Portari, E; Genti-Raimondi, S; Graham, C H; Panzetta-Dutari, G M

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor Krüppel-Like Factor 6 (KLF6) has important roles in cell differentiation, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and proliferation. Furthermore, there is evidence that KLF6 is required for proper placental development. While oxygen is a critical mediator of trophoblast differentiation and function, the involvement of oxygen in the regulation of KLF6 expression remains unexplored. In the present study we examined the expression of KLF6 in placental tissue from uncomplicated and preeclamptic pregnancies, the latter often characterized by an inadequately perfused placenta. We also determined the effect of hypoxia and the involvement of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α (HIF-1α) on the expression of KLF6 in cultured trophoblast cells and placental tissues. Results revealed that villous, interstitial and endovascular extravillous cytotrophoblasts from placentas from normal and preeclamptic pregnancies express KLF6. In addition, KLF6 immunoreactivity was higher in the placental bed of preeclamptic pregnancies than in those of uncomplicated pregnancies. We demonstrated that hypoxia induced an early and transient increase in KLF6 protein levels in HTR8/SVneo extravillous cytotrophoblast cells and in placental explants. Reoxygenation returned KLF6 protein to basal levels. Moreover, hypoxia-induced up-regulation of KLF6 expression was dependent on HIF-1α as revealed by siRNA knockdown in HTR8/SVneo cells. These results indicate that KLF6 may mediate some of the effects of hypoxia in placental development. The regulation of KLF6 protein levels by oxygen has significant implications for understanding its putative role in diseases affected by tissue hypoxia. PMID:27577710

  17. Triptolide suppresses proinflammatory cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase and aggrecanase-1 gene expression in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liacini, Abdelhamid; Sylvester, Judith; Zafarullah, Muhammad

    2005-02-01

    A hallmark of rheumatoid- and osteoarthritis (OA) is proinflammatory cytokine-induced degeneration of cartilage collagen and aggrecan by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases (ADAMTS). Effects of the Chinese herb, Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F (TWHF), on cartilage and its anti-arthritic mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the impact of a purified derivative of TWHF, PG490 (triptolide), on cytokine-stimulated expression of the major cartilage damaging proteases, MMP-3, MMP-13, and ADAMTS4. PG490 inhibited cytokine-induced MMP-3, MMP-13 gene expression in primary human OA chondrocytes, bovine chondrocytes, SW1353 cells, and human synovial fibroblasts. Triptolide was effective at low doses and blocked the induction of MMP-13 by IL-1 in human and bovine cartilage explants. TWHF extract and PG490 also suppressed IL-1-, IL-17-, and TNF-alpha-induced expression of ADAMTS-4 in bovine chondrocytes. Thus, PG490 could protect cartilage from MMP- and aggrecanase-driven breakdown. The immunosuppressive, cartilage protective, and anti-inflammatory properties could make PG490 potentially a new therapeutic agent for arthritis. PMID:15629465

  18. Caveolin-1 Expression Ameliorates Nephrotic Damage in a Rabbit Model of Cholesterol-Induced Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Hui; Lin, Wei-Wen; Liu, Chin-San; Hsu, Li-Sung; Lin, Yueh-Min; Su, Shih-Li

    2016-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (CAV-1) participates in regulating vesicular transport, signal transduction, tumor progression, and cholesterol homeostasis. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that CAV-1 improves dyslipidemia, inhibits cyclophilin A (CypA)- mediated ROS production, prevents mitochondrial compensatory action and attenuates oxidative stress responses in cholesterol-induced hypercholesterolemia. To determine the role of CAV-1 in mediating oxidative and antioxidative as well as cholesterol homeostasis, hypercholesterolemic rabbits were intravenously administered antenapedia-CAV-1 (AP-CAV-1) peptide for 2 wk. AP-CAV-1 enhanced CAV-1 expression by ˃15%, inhibited CypA expression by ˃50% (P < 0.05) and significantly improved dyslipidemia, thus reducing neutral lipid peroxidation. Moreover, CAV-1 attenuated hypercholesterolemia-induced changes in mitochondrial morphology and biogenesis and preserved mitochondrial respiratory function. In addition, CAV-1 protected against hypercholesterol-induced oxidative stress responses by reducing the degree of oxidative damage and enhancing the expression of antioxidant enzymes. CAV-1 treatment significantly suppressed apoptotic cell death, as evidenced by the reduction in the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end-labeling-positive cells. We concluded that CAV-1 plays a critical role in inhibiting CypA-mediated ROS production, improving dyslipidemia, maintaining mitochondrial function, and suppressing oxidative stress responses that are vital for cell survival in hypercholesterol-affected renal organs. PMID:27124120

  19. Surfactin suppresses TPA-induced breast cancer cell invasion through the inhibition of MMP-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Kim, Ji-Hee; Lee, Young Ji; Lee, Sang Joon; Kim, Younghee

    2013-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of cancer mortality. In this study, we investigated the effects of surfactin, a cyclic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus subtilis, on cancer metastasis in vitro and the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. Surfactin inhibited the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced invasion, migration and colony formation of human breast carcinoma cells. Western blot analysis, gelatin zymography and reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression and activation was significantly suppressed by surfactin in a dose-dependent manner. Surfactin attenuated TPA-induced nuclear translocation and activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 (AP-1). Furthermore, surfactin strongly repressed the TPA-induced phosphorylation of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Treatment with specific inhibitors of Akt and ERK suppressed MMP-9 expression and activation. These results suggest that the surfactin-mediated inhibition of breast cancer cell invasion and MMP-9 expression involves the suppression of the NF-κB, AP-1, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K)/Akt and the ERK signaling pathways. Thus surfactin may have potential value in therapeutic strategies for the treatment of breast cancer metastasis. PMID:23151889

  20. Cord blood administration induces oligodendrocyte survival through alterations in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, D.D.; Leonardo, C.C.; Hall, A.A.; Shahaduzzaman, M.D.; Collier, L.A.; Willing, A.E.; Pennypacker, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes (OLs), the predominant cell type found in cerebral white matter, are essential for structural integrity and proper neural signaling. Very little is known concerning stroke-induced OL dysfunction. Our laboratory has shown that infusion of human umbilical cord blood (HUCB) cells protects striatal white matter tracts in vivo and directly protects mature primary OL cultures from oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD). Microarray studies of RNA prepared from OL cultures subjected to OGD and treated with HUCB cells showed an increase in the expression of 33 genes associated with OL proliferation, survival, and repair functions, such as myelination. The microarray results were verified using quantitative RT-PCR for the following eight genes: U2AF homology motif kinase 1 (Uhmk1), insulin induce gene 1 (Insig1), metallothionein ( Mt3), tetraspanin 2 (Tspan2), peroxiredoxin 4 (Prdx4), stathmin-like 2 (Stmn2), myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), and versican (Vcan). Immunohistochemistry showed that MOG, Prdx4, Uhmk1, Insig1 and Mt3 protein expression were upregluated in the ipsilateral white matter tracts of rats infused with HUCB cells 48 hrs after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Furthermore, promoter region analysis of these genes revealed common transcription factor binding sites, providing insight into the shared signal transduction pathways activated by HUCB cells to enhance transcription of these genes. These results show expression of genes induced by HUCB cell therapy that could confer oligoprotection from ischemia. PMID:20883670

  1. Differential Expression of AMPA Subunits Induced by NMDA Intrahippocampal Injection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fachim, Helene A.; Pereira, Adriana C.; Iyomasa-Pilon, Melina M.; Rosa, Maria L. N. M.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamate is involved in excitotoxic mechanisms by interacting with different receptors. Such interactions result in neuronal death associated with several neurodegenerative disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). The aim of this work was to study the time course of changes in the expression of GluR1 and GluR2 subunits of glutamate amino-acid-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors in rat hippocampus induced by NMDA intrahippocampal injection. Rats were submitted to stereotaxic surgery for NMDA or saline (control) microinjection into dorsal hippocampus and the parameters were evaluated 24 h, 1, 2, and 4 weeks after injection. The extension and efficacy of the NMDA-induced injury were evaluated by Morris water maze (MWM) behavioral test and Nissl staining. The expression of GluR1 and GluR2 receptors, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and neuronal marker (NeuN) was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. It was observed the impairment of learning and memory functions, loss of neuronal cells, and glial proliferation in CA1 area of NMDA compared with control groups, confirming the injury efficacy. In addition, NMDA injection induced distinct changes in GluR1 and GluR2 expression over the time. In conclusion, such changes may be related to the complex mechanism triggered in response to NMDA injection resulting in a local injury and in the activation of neuronal plasticity. PMID:26912994

  2. Lymphocytes from wasted mice express enhanced spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Chung, Jen; Libertin, C.R.

    1993-09-01

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive mutation wasted (wst/wst) display a disease pattern including faulty repair of DNA damage in lymphocytes after radiation exposure, neurologic abnormalities, and immunodeficiency. Many of the features of this mouse model have suggested a premature or increased spontaneous frequency of apoptosis in thymocytes; past work has shown an inability to establish cultured T cell lines, an abnormally high death rate of stimulated T cells in culture, and an increased sensitivity of T cells to the killing effects of ionizing radiations in wst/wst mice relative to controls. The experiments reported here were designed to examine splenic and thymic lymphocytes from wasted and control mice for signs of early apoptosis. Our results revealed enhanced expression of Rp-8 mRNA (associated with apoptosis) in thymic lymphocytes and reduced expression in splenic lymphocytes of wst/wst mice relative to controls; expression of Rp-2 and Td-30 mRNA (induced during apoptosis) were not detectable in spleen or thymus. Higher spontaneous DNA fragmentation was observed in wasted mice than in controls; however, {gamma}-ray-induced DNA fragmentation peaked at a lower dose and occurred to a greater extent in wasted mice relative to controls. These results provide evidence for high spontaneous and {gamma}-ray-induced apoptosis in T cells of wasted mice as a mechanism underlying the observed lymphocyte and DNA repair abnormalities.

  3. Arctiin induces cell growth inhibition through the down-regulation of cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Youichirou; Koyama, Makoto; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Yokota, Tomoya; Kawanaka, Mayumi; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Germain, Doris; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2008-03-01

    Arctiin is a major lignan constituent of Arctium lappa and has anti-cancer properties in animal models. It was recently reported that arctiin induces growth inhibition in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. However, the growth inhibitory mechanism of arctiin remains unknown. Herein we report that arctiin induces growth inhibition and dephosphorylates the tumor-suppressor retinoblastoma protein in human immortalized keratinocyte HaCaT cells. We also show that the growth inhibition caused by arctiin is associated with the down-regulation of cyclin D1 protein expression. Furthermore, the arctiin-induced suppression of cyclin D1 protein expression occurs in various types of human tumor cells, including osteosarcoma, lung, colorectal, cervical and breast cancer, melanoma, transformed renal cells and prostate cancer. Depletion of the cyclin D1 protein using small interfering RNA-rendered human breast cancer MCF-7 cells insensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of arctiin, implicates cyclin D1 as an important target of arctiin. Taken together, these results suggest that arctiin down-regulates cyclin D1 protein expression and that this at least partially contributes to the anti-proliferative effect of arctiin. PMID:18288407

  4. Irradiation induced expression of CD31, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Quarmby, S; Hunter, R D; Kumar, S

    The adherence and migration of leukocytes through the endothelium of blood vessels is an important early event which occurs in normal tissues following ionizing irradiation but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and CD31 are membrane proteins of endothelial cells, mediate this process when the vasculature is exposed to other inflammatory stimuli. In this study, expression of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and CD31 on human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) at 72 hours post-irradiation using flow cytometry and northern analysis was determined. Dose-dependent increases in the surface expression and mRNA of ICAM-1 and CD31 were observed. In contrast VCAM-1 was practically undetectable on both control and irradiated HDMECs but was strongly expressed in TNF-alpha activated positive control HDMECs. The upregulation in ICAM-1 and CD31 was independent of radiation-induced changes in cell size, number and cell cycle stage. We suggest that ICAM-1 is active over a prolonged period whereas VCAM-1 acts only transiently in leukocyte-endothelial interactions in the irradiated microvasculature. The late upregulation of CD31 is a novel finding and may have a function in radiation-induced leukocyte extravasation, platelet adherence to the vascular wall and abnormal endothelial cell proliferation. Both ICAM-1 and CD31 seem to be therapeutic targets for the amelioration of radiation-induced normal tissue damage. PMID:11131637

  5. Mirtazapine prevents induction and expression of cocaine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Juárez, Alberto; Barbosa-Méndez, Susana; Jurado, Noe; Hernández-Miramontes, Ricardo; Leff, Philippe; Antón, Benito

    2016-07-01

    Cocaine abuse is a major health problem worldwide. Treatment based on both 5-HT2A/C and 5-HT3 receptor antagonists attenuate not only the effects of cocaine abuse but also the incentive/motivational effect related to cocaine-paired cues. Mirtazapine, an antagonist of postsynaptic α2-adrenergic, 5-HT2A/C and 5HT3 receptors and inverse agonist of the 5-HT2C receptor, has been shown to effectively modify, at the preclinical and clinical levels, various behavioral alterations induced by drugs abuse. Therefore, it is important to assess whether chronic dosing of mirtazapine alters locomotor effects of cocaine as well as induction and expression of cocaine sensitization. Our results reveal that a daily mirtazapine regimen administered for 30days effectively induces a significant attenuation of cocaine-dependent locomotor activity and as well as the induction and expression of behavioral sensitization. These results suggest that mirtazapine may be used as a potentially effective therapy to attenuate induction and expression of cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. PMID:26922897

  6. Changes in Gene Expression during G-CSF-Induced Emergency Granulopoiesis in Humans.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Corinna C; Borup, Rehannah; Fischer-Nielsen, Anne; Mora-Jensen, Helena; Fossum, Anna; Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Emergency granulopoiesis refers to the increased production of neutrophils in bone marrow and their release into circulation induced by severe infection. Several studies point to a critical role for G-CSF as the main mediator of emergency granulopoiesis. However, the consequences of G-CSF stimulation on the transcriptome of neutrophils and their precursors have not yet been investigated in humans. In this work, we examine the changes in mRNA expression induced by administration of G-CSF in vivo, as a model of emergency granulopoiesis in humans. Blood samples were collected from healthy individuals after 5 d of G-CSF administration. Neutrophil precursors were sorted into discrete stages of maturation by flow cytometry, and RNA was subjected to microarray analysis. mRNA levels were compared with previously published expression levels in corresponding populations of neutrophil precursors isolated from bone marrow of untreated, healthy individuals. One thousand one hundred and ten mRNAs were differentially expressed >2-fold throughout terminal granulopoiesis. Major changes were seen in pathways involved in apoptosis, cytokine signaling, and TLR pathways. In addition, G-CSF treatment reduced the levels of four of five measured granule proteins in mature neutrophils, including the proantibacterial protein hCAP-18, which was completely deficient in neutrophils from G-CSF-treated donors. These results indicate that multiple biological processes are altered to satisfy the increased demand for neutrophils during G-CSF-induced emergency granulopoiesis in humans. PMID:27481851

  7. Inducible gene and shRNA expression in resident hematopoietic stem cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Laurenti, Elisa; Barde, Isabelle; Verp, Sonia; Offner, Sandra; Wilson, Anne; Quenneville, Simon; Wiznerowicz, Maciej; Macdonald, H Robson; Trono, Didier; Trumpp, Andreas

    2010-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are probably the best understood somatic stem cells and often serve as a paradigm for other stem cells. Nevertheless, most current techniques to genetically manipulate them in vivo are either constitutive and/or induced in settings of hematopoietic stress such as after irradiation. Here, we present a conditional expression system that allows for externally controllable transgenesis and knockdown in resident HSCs, based on a lentiviral vector containing a tet-O sequence and a transgenic mouse line expressing a doxycyclin-regulated tTR-KRAB repressor protein. HSCs harvested from tTR-KRAB mice are transduced with the lentiviral vector containing a cDNA (i.e., Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP)) and/or shRNA (i.e., p53) of interest and then transplanted into lethally irradiated recipients. While the vector is effectively repressed by tTR-KRAB during homing and engraftment, robust GFP/shp53 expression is induced on doxycyclin treatment in HSCs and their progeny. Doxycylin-controllable transcription is maintained on serial transplantation, indicating that repopulating HSCs are stably modified by this approach. In summary, this easy to implement conditional system provides inducible and reversible overexpression or knock down of genes in resident HSCs in vivo using a drug devoid of toxic or activating effects. PMID:20641037

  8. Ferrous Iron Induces Nrf2 Expression in Mouse Brain Astrocytes to Prevent Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhenwen; Zhong, Zhihong; Yang, Yong; Wang, Baofeng; Sun, Yuhao; Sun, Qingfang; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Bian, Liuguan

    2016-08-01

    Free radical damage caused by ferrous iron is involved in the pathogenesis of secondary brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a major phase II gene regulator that binds to antioxidant response element, represents an important cellular cytoprotective mechanism against oxidative damage. We hypothesized that Nrf2 might protect astrocytes from damage by Fe(2+) . Therefore, we examined cytotoxicity in primary astrocytes induced by iron overload and evaluated the effects of Fe(2+) on Nrf2 expression. The results demonstrated that 24-h Fe(2+) exposure exerted time- and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity in astrocytes. Furthermore, Fe(2+) exposure in astrocytes resulted in time- and concentration-dependent increases in Nrf2 expression, which preceded Fe(2+) toxicity. Nrf2-specific siRNA further knocked down Nrf2 levels, resulting in greater Fe(2+) -induced astrocyte cytotoxicity. These data indicate that induction of Nrf2 expression could serve as an adaptive self-defense mechanism, although it is insufficient to completely protect primary astrocytes from Fe(2+) -induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27037625

  9. Afadin requirement for cytokine expressions in keratinocytes during chemically induced inflammation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Toshiyuki; Iwata, Takanori; Takai, Yoshimi; Birchmeier, Walter; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo

    2014-01-01

    Afadin is a filamentous actin-binding protein and a mediator of nectin signaling. Nectins are Ig-like cell adhesion molecules, and the nectin family is composed of four members, nectin-1 to nectin-4. Nectins show homophilic and heterophilic interactions with other nectins or proteins on adjacent cells. Nectin signaling induces formation of cell–cell junctions and is required for the development of epithelial tissues, including skin. This study investigated the role of afadin in epithelial tissue development and established epithelium-specific afadin-deficient (CKO) mice. Although showing no obvious abnormality in the skin development and homeostasis, the mice showed the reduced neutrophil infiltration into the epidermis during chemical-induced inflammation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Immunohistochemical and quantitative real-time PCR analyses showed that the expression levels of cytokines including Cxcl2, Il-1β and Tnf-α were reduced in CKO keratinocytes compared with control keratinocytes during TPA-induced inflammation. Primary-cultured skin keratinocytes from CKO mice also showed reduced expression of these cytokines and weak activation of Rap1 compared with those from control mice after the TPA treatment. These results suggested a remarkable function of afadin, which was able to enhance cytokine expression through Rap1 activation in keratinocytes during inflammation. PMID:25297509

  10. Resveratrol Inhibits Hypoxia-Induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and Pathological Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Christopher Seungkyu; Choi, Eun Young; Lee, Sung Chul; Koh, Hyoung Jun; Lee, Joon Haeng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of resveratrol on the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human adult retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells, and on experimental choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in mice. Materials and Methods ARPE-19 cells were treated with different concentrations of resveratrol and then incubated under hypoxic conditions with subsequent evaluation of cell viability, expression of HIF-1α, and expression of VEGF. The effects of resveratrol on the synthesis and degradation of hypoxia-induced HIF-1α were evaluated using inhibitors of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and the ubiquitin proteasome pathways. In animal studies, CNV lesions were induced in C57BL/6 mice by laser photocoagulation. After 7 days of oral administration of resveratrol or vehicle, which began one day after CNV induction, image analysis was used to measure CNV areas on choroidal flat mounts stained with isolectin IB4. Results In ARPE-19 cells, resveratrol significantly inhibited HIF-1α and VEGF in a dose-dependent manner, by blocking the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and by promoting proteasomal HIF-1α degradation. In mice experiments, orally administered resveratrol significantly inhibited CNV growth in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion Resveratrol may have therapeutic value in the management of diseases involving pathological neovascularization. PMID:26446654

  11. Ammonia-induced miRNA expression changes in cultured rat astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oenarto, Jessica; Karababa, Ayse; Castoldi, Mirco; Bidmon, Hans J.; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric syndrome evolving from cerebral osmotic disturbances and oxidative/nitrosative stress. Ammonia, the main toxin of hepatic encephalopathy, triggers astrocyte senescence in an oxidative stress-dependent way. As miRNAs are critically involved in cell cycle regulation and their expression may be regulated by oxidative stress, we analysed, whether astrocyte senescence is a consequence of ammonia-induced miRNA expression changes. Using a combined miRNA and gene microarray approach, 43 miRNA species which were downregulated and 142 genes which were upregulated by NH4Cl (5 mmol/l, 48 h) in cultured rat astrocytes were found. Ammonia-induced miRNA and gene expression changes were validated by qPCR and 43 potential miRNA target genes, including HO-1, were identified by matching upregulated mRNA species with predicted targets of miRNA species downregulated by ammonia. Inhibition of HO-1 targeting miRNAs which were downregulated by NH4Cl strongly upregulated HO-1 mRNA and protein levels and inhibited astrocyte proliferation in a HO-1-dependent way. Preventing ammonia-induced upregulation of HO-1 by taurine (5 mmol/l) as well as blocking HO-1 activity by tin-protoporphyrine IX fully prevented ammonia-induced proliferation inhibition and senescence. The data suggest that ammonia induces astrocyte senescence through NADPH oxidase-dependent downregulation of HO-1 targeting miRNAs and concomitant upregulation of HO-1 at both mRNA and protein level. PMID:26755400

  12. Ammonia-induced miRNA expression changes in cultured rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Oenarto, Jessica; Karababa, Ayse; Castoldi, Mirco; Bidmon, Hans J; Görg, Boris; Häussinger, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric syndrome evolving from cerebral osmotic disturbances and oxidative/nitrosative stress. Ammonia, the main toxin of hepatic encephalopathy, triggers astrocyte senescence in an oxidative stress-dependent way. As miRNAs are critically involved in cell cycle regulation and their expression may be regulated by oxidative stress, we analysed, whether astrocyte senescence is a consequence of ammonia-induced miRNA expression changes. Using a combined miRNA and gene microarray approach, 43 miRNA species which were downregulated and 142 genes which were upregulated by NH4Cl (5 mmol/l, 48 h) in cultured rat astrocytes were found. Ammonia-induced miRNA and gene expression changes were validated by qPCR and 43 potential miRNA target genes, including HO-1, were identified by matching upregulated mRNA species with predicted targets of miRNA species downregulated by ammonia. Inhibition of HO-1 targeting miRNAs which were downregulated by NH4Cl strongly upregulated HO-1 mRNA and protein levels and inhibited astrocyte proliferation in a HO-1-dependent way. Preventing ammonia-induced upregulation of HO-1 by taurine (5 mmol/l) as well as blocking HO-1 activity by tin-protoporphyrine IX fully prevented ammonia-induced proliferation inhibition and senescence. The data suggest that ammonia induces astrocyte senescence through NADPH oxidase-dependent downregulation of HO-1 targeting miRNAs and concomitant upregulation of HO-1 at both mRNA and protein level. PMID:26755400

  13. Regulation of endogenous human gene expression by ligand-inducible TALE transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Andrew C; Gaj, Thomas; Sirk, Shannon J; Lamb, Brian M; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-10-17

    The construction of increasingly sophisticated synthetic biological circuits is dependent on the development of extensible tools capable of providing specific control of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. Here, we describe a new class of synthetic transcription factors that activate gene expression in response to extracellular chemical stimuli. These inducible activators consist of customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins combined with steroid hormone receptor ligand-binding domains. We demonstrate that these ligand-responsive TALE transcription factors allow for tunable and conditional control of gene activation and can be used to regulate the expression of endogenous genes in human cells. Since TALEs can be designed to recognize any contiguous DNA sequence, the conditional gene regulatory system described herein will enable the design of advanced synthetic gene networks. PMID:24251925

  14. Human Cementum Protein 1 induces expression of bone and cementum proteins by human gingival fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Rodriguez, Bruno; Alvarez-Perez, Marco Antonio; Narayanan, A. Sampath; Zeichner-David, Margarita; Reyes-Gasga, Jose; Molina-Guarneros, Juan; Garcia-Hernandez, Ana Lilia; Suarez-Franco, Jose Luis; Chavarria, Ivet Gil; Villarreal-Ramirez, Eduardo; Arzate, Higinio . E-mail: harzate@servidor.unam.mx

    2007-07-06

    We recently presented evidence showing that a human cementoblastoma-derived protein, named Cementum Protein 1 (CEMP1) may play a role as a local regulator of cementoblast differentiation and cementum-matrix mineralization. This protein was shown to be expressed by cementoblasts and progenitor cells localized in the periodontal ligament. In this study we demonstrate that transfection of CEMP1 into human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) induces mineralization and expression of bone and cementum-matrix proteins. The transfected HGF cells had higher alkaline phosphatase activity and proliferation rate and they expressed genes for alkaline phosphatase, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin, the transcription factor Runx2/Cbfa1, and cementum attachment protein (CAP). They also produced biological-type hydroxyapatite. These findings indicate that the CEMP1 might participate in differentiation and mineralization of nonosteogenic cells, and that it might have a potential function in cementum and bone formation.

  15. Silencing of Inducible Immunoproteasome Subunit Expression by Chemically Modified siRNA and shRNA.

    PubMed

    Gvozdeva, Olga V; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Zenkova, Marina A; Vlassov, Valentin V; Chernolovskaya, Elena L

    2016-08-01

    Overexpression of inducible subunits of immunoproteasome is related to pathogenesis of some chronic diseases. Specific inhibition of the immunosubunits may be used for the treatment of these diseases and RNA interference is one of the potent methods used in this area. We designed 2'-O-methyl modified siRNAs with selectively protected nuclease-sensitive sites, which efficiently silence LMP2, LMP7, and MECL-1 genes expression. To provide stable long-lasting inhibition of target genes, short-hairpin RNAs (shRNA) expressed by lentiviral vectors were constructed. Our results demonstrated that chemically modified siRNAs inhibited the expression of target genes with similar efficiency or with efficiency exceeding that of corresponding shRNAs and provide silencing effect for 5 days. PMID:27351110

  16. Sublethal Photothermal Stimulation with a Micropulse Laser Induces Heat Shock Protein Expression in ARPE-19 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Keiji; Shuo, Takuya; Katakura, Kanae; Ebihara, Nobuyuki; Murakami, Akira; Ohkoshi, Kishiko

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Aim of the Study. Subthreshold micropulse diode laser photocoagulation is an effective treatment for macular edema. The molecular mechanisms underlying treatment success are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated the effects of sublethal laser energy doses on a single layer of densely cultured ARPE-19 cells as a model of the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Materials and Methods. A single layer of densely cultured human ARPE-19 cells was perpendicularly irradiated with a micropulse diode laser. Nonirradiated cells served as controls. Sublethal laser energy was applied to form a photocoagulation-like area in the cultured cell layers. Hsp70 expression was evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Results. Photocoagulation-like areas were successfully created in cultured ARPE-19 cell layers using sublethal laser energy with our laser irradiation system. Hsp70 mRNA expression in cell layers was induced within 30 min of laser irradiation, peaking at 3 h after irradiation. This increase was dependent on the number of laser pulses. Hsp70 upregulation was not observed in untreated cell layers. Immunostaining indicated that Hsp70 expression occurred concentrically around laser irradiation sites and persisted for 24 h following irradiation. Conclusion. Sublethal photothermal stimulation with a micropulse laser may facilitate Hsp70 expression in the RPE without inducing cellular damage. PMID:26697211

  17. Activation of TIM1 induces colon cancer cell apoptosis via modulating Fas ligand expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Zhang, Xueyan; Sun, Wenjing; Hu, Xiaocui; Li, Xiaolin; Fu, Songbin; Liu, Chen

    2016-04-29

    The pathogenesis of colon cancer is unclear. It is proposed that TIM1 has an association with human cancer. The present study aims to investigate the role of TIM1 activation in the inhibition of human colon cancer cells. In this study, human colon cancer cell line, HT29 and T84 cells were cultured. The expression of TIM1 was assessed by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. The TIM1 on the cancer cells was activated in the culture by adding recombinant TIM4. The chromatin structure at the FasL promoter locus was assessed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The apoptosis of the cancer cells was assessed by flow cytometry. The results showed that human colon cancer cell lines, HT29 cells and T84 cells, expressed TIM1. Activation of TIM1 by exposing the cells to TIM4 significantly increased the frequency of apoptotic colon cancer cells. The expression of FasL was increased in the cancer cells after treating by TIM4. Blocking Fas or FasL abolished the exposure to TIM4-induced T84 cell apoptosis. In conclusion, HT29 cells and T84 cells express TIM1; activation TIM1 can induce the cancer cell apoptosis. TIM1 may be a novel therapeutic target of colon cancer. PMID:26921445

  18. RNA toxicity in myotonic muscular dystrophy induces NKX2-5 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yadava, Ramesh S; Frenzel-McCardell, Carla D; Yu, Qing; Srinivasan, Varadamurthy; Tucker, Amy L; Puymirat, Jack; Thornton, Charles A; Prall, Owen W; Harvey, Richard P; Mahadevan, Mani S

    2010-01-01

    Myotonic muscular dystrophy (DM1) is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder in adults and is considered the first example of a disease caused by RNA toxicity. Using a reversible transgenic mouse model of RNA toxicity in DM1, we provide evidence that DM1 is associated with induced NKX2-5 expression. Transgene expression resulted in cardiac conduction defects, increased expression of the cardiac-specific transcription factor NKX2-5 and profound disturbances in connexin 40 and connexin 43. Notably, overexpression of the DMPK 3′ UTR mRNA in mouse skeletal muscle also induced transcriptional activation of Nkx2-5 and its targets. In human muscles, these changes were specific to DM1 and were not present in other muscular dystrophies. The effects on NKX2-5 and its downstream targets were reversed by silencing toxic RNA expression. Furthermore, using Nkx2-5+/− mice, we show that NKX2-5 is the first genetic modifier of DM1-associated RNA toxicity in the heart. PMID:18084293

  19. Circadian-disruption-induced gene expression changes in rodent mammary tissues

    PubMed Central

    Kochan, David Z.; Ilnytskyy, Yaroslav; Golubov, Andrey; Deibel, Scott H.; McDonald, Robert J.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is mounting that circadian disruption (CD) is a potential carcinogen in breast cancer development. However, despite the growing concern, to our knowledge, no studies have attempted a genome-wide analysis of CD-induced gene expression changes in mammary tissues. Using a rodent model system, a proven photoperiod-shifting paradigm, varying degrees of CD, and Illumina sequencing, we performed an exploratory genome-wide mRNA analysis in mammary tissues. Even though our analysis did not identify any significant patterns in mRNA levels based on the degree of CD, and the majority of groups did not show changes in gene expression on a large-scale, one group (two-week chronic ZT19) displayed 196 differentially expressed genes, 51 of which have been linked to breast cancer. Through gene-specific pathway analysis, the data illustrate that CD may promote breast cancer development through downregulation of DNA repair and p53 signaling pathways, thus promoting genomic instability and cancer development. Although these results have to be interpreted with caution because only a single group illustrated drastic changes in transcript levels, they indicate that chronic CD may directly induce changes in gene expression on a large-scale with potentially malignant consequences. PMID:27014724

  20. The tobacco smoke component acrolein induces glucocorticoid resistant gene expression via inhibition of histone deacetylase.

    PubMed

    Randall, Matthew J; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bouwman, Freek G; van der Vliet, Albert; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of cigarette smoke-related death worldwide. Acrolein, a crucial reactive electrophile found in cigarette smoke mimics many of the toxic effects of cigarette smoke-exposure in the lung. In macrophages, cigarette smoke is known to hinder histone deacetylases (HDACs), glucocorticoid-regulated enzymes that play an important role in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistant inflammation, a common feature of COPD. Thus, we hypothesize that acrolein plays a role in COPD-associated glucocorticoid resistance. To examine the role of acrolein on glucocorticoid resistance, U937 monocytes, differentiated with PMA to macrophage-like cells were treated with acrolein for 0.5h followed by stimulation with hydrocortisone for 8h, or treated simultaneously with LPS and hydrocortisone for 8h without acrolein. GSH and nuclear HDAC activity were measured, or gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Acrolein-mediated TNFα gene expression was not suppressed by hydrocortisone whereas LPS-induced TNFα expression was suppressed. Acrolein also significantly inhibited nuclear HDAC activity in macrophage-like cells. Incubation of recombinant HDAC2 with acrolein led to the formation of an HDAC2-acrolein adduct identified by mass spectrometry. Therefore, these results suggest that acrolein-induced inflammatory gene expression is resistant to suppression by the endogenous glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone. PMID:26481333

  1. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  2. Serum Starvation Induces DRAM Expression in Liver Cancer Cells via Histone Modifications within Its Promoter Locus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changqiang; Wang, Jiayi; Liu, Xiangfan; Hu, Yiqun; Fan, Qishi; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Lu, Yang

    2012-01-01

    DRAM is a lysosomal membrane protein and is critical for p53-mediated autophagy and apoptosis. DRAM has a potential tumor-suppressive function and is downregulated in many human cancers. However, the regulation of DRAM expression is poorly described so far. Here, we demonstrated that serum deprivation strongly induces DRAM expression in liver cancer cells and a core DNA sequence in the DRAM promoter is essential for its responsiveness to serum deprivation. We further observed that euchromatin markers for active transcriptions represented by diacetyl-H3, tetra-acetyl-H4 and the trimethyl-H3K4 at the core promoter region of DRAM gene are apparently increased in a time-dependent manner upon serum deprivation, and concomitantly the dimethyl-H3K9, a herterochromatin marker associated with silenced genes, was time-dependently decreased. Moreover, the chromatin remodeling factor Brg-1 is enriched at the core promoter region of the DRAM gene and is required for serum deprivation induced DRAM expression. These observations lay the ground for further investigation of the DRAM gene expression. PMID:23251372

  3. Rutaecarpine Reverses the Altered Connexin Expression Pattern Induced by Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein in Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Fu, Yan-Qi; Peng, Wei-Jie; Yu, Yan-Rong; Wu, Yu-Si; Yan, Hang; Huang, Qi-Ren; He, Ming; Luo, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Adhesion of monocytes to the vascular endothelium is crucial in atherosclerosis development. Connexins (Cxs) which form hemichannels or gap junctions, modulate monocyte-endothelium interaction. We previously found that rutaecarpine, an active ingredient of the Chinese herbal medicine Evodia, reversed the altered Cx expression induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, and consequently decreases the adhesive properties of endothelial cells to monocytes. This study further investigated the effect of rutaecarpine on Cx expression in monocytes exposed to ox-LDL. In cultured human monocytic cell line THP-1, ox-LDL rapidly reduced the level of atheroprotective Cx37 but enhanced that of atherogenic Cx43, thereby inhibiting adenosine triphosphate release through hemichannels. Pretreatment with rutaecarpine recovered the expression of Cx37 but inhibited the upregulation of Cx43 induced by ox-LDL, thereby improving adenosine triphosphate-dependent hemichannel activity and preventing monocyte adhesion. These effects of rutaecarpine were attenuated by capsazepine, an antagonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1. The antiadhesive effects of rutaecarpine were also attenuated by hemichannel blocker 18α-GA. This study provides additional evidence that rutaecarpine can modulate Cx expression through transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 activation in monocytes, which contributes to the antiadhesive properties of rutaecarpine. PMID:26859198

  4. Association between Paraoxonases Gene Expression and Oxidative Stress in Hepatotoxicity Induced by CCl4

    PubMed Central

    Hafez, Mohamed M.; Al-Shabanah, Othman A.; Al-Harbi, Naif O.; Al-Harbi, Mohamed M.; Al-Rejaie, Salim S.; Alsurayea, Saad M.; Sayed-Ahmed, Mohamed M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of rutin in carbon tetrachloride- (CCl4-) induced liver injuries in rat model. Methods. Forty male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups. Group I was the control group and received dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) and olive oil. Group II received rutin. Groups III was treated with CCl4. Group IV was administered rutin after 48 h of CCl4 treatment. Liver enzymes level, lipid profile, lipid peroxidation, and hydrogen peroxide were measured. The genes expression levels were monitored by real time RT-PCR and western blot techniques. Results. CCl4 group showed significant increase in alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBAR), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and lipid profile and a significant decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), paraoxonase-3 (PON-3), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (PPAR-δ), and ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABAC1) genes expression levels. Interestingly, rutin supplementation completely reversed the biochemical and gene expression levels induced by CCl4 to control values. Conclusion. CCl4 administration causes aberration of genes expression levels in oxidative stress pathway resulting in DNA damage and hepatotoxicity. Rutin causes hepatoprotective effect through enhancing the antioxidant genes. PMID:25478064

  5. Drug-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 on lesional keratinocytes in fixed drug eruption.

    PubMed Central

    Teraki, Y.; Moriya, N.; Shiohara, T.

    1994-01-01

    The mechanism(s) and the factor(s) that contribute to preferential localization of fixed drug eruption (FDE) lesions to certain skin sites remain speculative. Previous studies suggested that populations of T cells residing in the lesional epidermis may be involved in selective destruction of the epidermis in FDE. In this study, to define the earliest cellular and molecular events with potential relevance to activation of the epidermal T cells, expression of adhesion molecules on keratinocytes (KC) and vascular endothelium was examined sequentially in the lesional skin of FDE patients after challenge with the causative drug. Rapid and intense intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression was induced on the vascular endothelium and KC as early as 1.5 hours after challenge, at which time E-selectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) were not up-regulated. In vitro studies using skin organ culture showed that the lesional KC and endothelium responded more rapidly and intensely to express ICAM-1 to tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interferon-gamma compared with those in the nonlesional skin. Surprisingly, such selective induction of KC ICAM-1 restricted to the lesional skin was also observed after exposure to the causative drug alone in skin organ culture. Pretreatment of the lesional skin with anti-tumor necrosis factor completely abrogated in vitro induction of KC ICAM-1 expression by the drug. Drug-induced, TNF-alpha-dependent KC ICAM-1 expression in the lesional skin suggests that induction of ICAM-1 expression by the lesional KC after ingestion of the drug would probably provide a localized initiating stimulus for activation of the disease-associated epidermal T cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7915886

  6. IGF-1 attenuates LPS induced pro-inflammatory cytokines expression in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Onnureddy, K; Ravinder; Onteru, Suneel Kumar; Singh, Dheer

    2015-03-01

    Interaction between immune and endocrine system is a diverse process influencing cellular function and homeostasis in animals. Negative energy balance (NEB) during postpartum period in dairy animals usually suppresses these systems resulting in reproductive tract infection and infertility. These negative effects could be due to competition among endocrine and immune signaling pathways for common signaling molecules. The present work studied the effect of IGF-1 (50 ng/ml) on LPS (1 μg/ml) mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and aromatase (CYP19A1) genes' expressions as well as proliferation of buffalo granulosa cells. The crosstalk between LPS and IGF-1 was also demonstrated through studying the activities of downstream signaling molecules (ERK1/2, Akt, NF-κB) by western blot and immunostaining. Gene expression analysis showed that IGF-1 significantly reduced the LPS induced expression of IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. LPS alone inhibited the CYP19A1 expression. However, co-treatment with IGF-1 reversed the inhibitory effect of LPS on CYP19A1 expression. LPS alone did not affect granulosa cell proliferation, but co-treatment with IGF-1, and IGF-1 alone enhanced the proliferation. Western blot results demonstrated that LPS caused the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB and increased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt maximum at 15 min and 60 min, respectively. Nonetheless, co-treatment with IGF-1 delayed LPS induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 (peak at 120 min), while promoting early Akt phosphorylation (peak at 5 min) with no effect on NF-κB translocation. Overall, IGF-1 delayed and reversed the effects of LPS, suggesting that high IGF-1 levels may combat infection during critical periods like NEB in postpartum dairy animals. PMID:25433435

  7. Structure and functional analysis of wheat ICE (inducer of CBF expression) genes.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Mohamed; Reddy, Yedulla Venkat; Agharbaoui, Zahra; Tominaga, Yoko; Danyluk, Jean; Sarhan, Fathey; Houde, Mario

    2008-08-01

    Two different inducers of CBF expression (ICE1-like genes), TaICE41 and TaICE87, were isolated from a cDNA library prepared from cold-treated wheat aerial tissues. TaICE41 encodes a protein of 381 aa with a predicted MW of 39.5 kDa while TaICE87 encodes a protein of 443 aa with a predicted MW of 46.5 kDa. TaICE41 and TaICE87 share 46% identity while they share 50 and 47% identity with Arabidopsis AtICE1 respectively. Expression analysis revealed that mRNA accumulation was not altered by cold treatment suggesting that both genes are expressed constitutively. Gel mobility shift analysis showed that TaICE41 and TaICE87 bind to different MYC elements in the wheat TaCBFIVd-B9 promoter. Transient expression assays in Nicotiana benthamiana, showed that both TaICE proteins can activate TaCBFIVd-B9 transcription. The different affinities of TaICE41 and TaICE87 for MYC variants suggest that ICE binding specificity may be involved in the differential expression of wheat CBF genes. Furthermore, analysis of MYC elements demonstrates that a specific variant is present in the wheat CBF group IV that is associated with freezing tolerance. Overexpression of either TaICE41 or TaICE87 genes in Arabidopsis enhanced freezing tolerance only upon cold acclimation suggesting that other factors induced by low temperature are required for their activity. The increased freezing tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis is associated with a higher expression of the cold responsive activators AtCBF2, AtCBF3, and of several cold-regulated genes. PMID:18635580

  8. Distension of the uterus induces HspB1 expression in rat uterine smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    White, B G; MacPhee, D J

    2011-11-01

    The uterine musculature, or myometrium, demonstrates tremendous plasticity during pregnancy under the influences of the endocrine environment and mechanical stresses. Expression of the small stress protein heat shock protein B1 (HspB1) has been reported to increase dramatically during late pregnancy, a period marked by myometrial hypertrophy caused by fetal growth-induced uterine distension. Thus, using unilaterally pregnant rat models and ovariectomized nonpregnant rats with uteri containing laminaria tents to induce uterine distension, we examined the effect of uterine distension on myometrial HspB1 expression. In unilaterally pregnant rats, HspB1 mRNA and Ser(15)-phosphorylated HspB1 (pSer(15) HspB1) protein expression were significantly elevated in distended gravid uterine horns at days 19 and 23 (labor) of gestation compared with nongravid horns. Similarly, pSer(15) HspB1 protein in situ was only readily detectable in the distended horns compared with the nongravid horns at days 19 and 23; however, pSer(15) HspB1 was primarily detectable in situ at day 19 in membrane-associated regions, while it had primarily a cytoplasmic localization in myometrial cells at day 23. HspB1 mRNA and pSer(15) HspB1 protein expression were also markedly increased in ovariectomized nonpregnant rat myometrium distended for 24 h with laminaria tents compared with empty horns. Therefore, uterine distension plays a major role in the stimulation of myometrial HspB1 expression, and increased expression of this small stress protein could be a mechanoadaptive response to the increasing uterine distension that occurs during pregnancy. PMID:21900647

  9. Dexamethasone-induced expression of the glucocorticoid response gene lipocalin 2 in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Owen, H C; Roberts, S J; Ahmed, S F; Farquharson, C

    2008-06-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are commonly used anti-inflammatory drugs, but long-term use can result in marked growth retardation in children due to their actions on growth plate chondrocytes. To gain an insight into the mechanisms involved in GC-induced growth retardation, we performed Affymetrix microarray analysis of the murine chondrogenic cell line ATDC5, incubated with 10(-6) M dexamethasone (Dex) for 24 h. Downregulated genes included secreted frizzled-related protein and IGF-I, and upregulated genes included serum/GC-regulated kinase, connective-tissue growth factor, and lipocalin 2. Lipocalin 2 expression increased 40-fold after 24-h Dex treatment. Expression increased further after 48-h (75-fold) and 96-h (84-fold) Dex treatment, and this response was Dex concentration dependent. Lipocalin 2 was immunolocalized to both proliferating and hypertrophic growth plate zones, and its expression was increased by Dex in primary chondrocytes at 6 h (3-fold, P < 0.05). The lipocalin 2 response was blocked by the GC-receptor antagonist RU-486 and was increased further by the protein synthesis blocker cycloheximide. Proliferation in lipocalin 2-overexpressing cells was less than in control cells (49%, P < 0.05), and overexpression caused an increase in collagen type X expression (4-fold, P < 0.05). The effects of lipocalin 2 overexpression on chondrocyte proliferation (64%, P < 0.05) and collagen type X expression (8-fold, P < 0.05) were further exacerbated with the addition of 10(-6) M Dex. This synergistic effect may be explained by a further increase in lipocalin 2 expression with Dex treatment of transfected cells (45%, P < 0.05). These results suggest that lipocalin 2 may mediate Dex effects on chondrocytes and provides a potential novel mechanism for GC-induced growth retardation. PMID:18381927

  10. Endogenous PGE(2) induces MCP-1 expression via EP4/p38 MAPK signaling in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingrui; Wang, Yuxin; Han, Sihuan; Guo, Shu; Xu, Nan; Guo, Jiayan

    2013-02-01

    It has been demonstrated that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is expressed in melanoma tissues and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) is produced by melanoma cells in vitro. However, the roles of COX-2/PGE(2) in melanoma are largely unknown. In the present study, we set out to analyze the correlation of endogenous PGE(2) with the expression of macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and to identify the signaling pathway involved. It was found that MCP-1 mRNA was heterogeneously expressed in 18 melanoma tissue specimens, and the levels of MCP-1 mRNA were positively correlated with those of COX-2 mRNA. Inhibition of endogenous PGE(2) production by a COX-2 inhibitor, COX-2 siRNA or an NFκB inhibitor suppressed MCP-1 expression, whereas treatment with TNF-α (to stimulate endogenous PGE(2) production) or exogenous PGE(2) enhanced MCP-1 expression in melanoma cells. Both the EP4 antagonist and the p38 MAPK inhibitor reduced MCP-1 production in melanoma cells, and abrogated the increased MCP-1 secretion induced by TNF-α or exogenous PGE(2). Conditioned medium from melanoma cells promoted macrophage migration, which was blocked by inhibitors of the PGE(2)/EP4/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. These results indicate that endogenous PGE(2) induces MCP-1 expression via EP4/p38 MAPK signaling in an autocrinal manner in melanoma, and melanoma cell-derived PGE(2) may be involved in macrophage recruitment in the melanoma microenvironment. PMID:23420676

  11. Inducible Knockdown of Plasmodium Gene Expression Using the glmS Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Prommana, Parichat; Uthaipibull, Chairat; Wongsombat, Chayaphat; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Knuepfer, Ellen; Holder, Anthony A.; Shaw, Philip J.

    2013-01-01

    Conventional reverse genetic approaches for study of Plasmodium malaria parasite gene function are limited, or not applicable. Hence, new inducible systems are needed. Here we describe a method to control P. falciparum gene expression in which target genes bearing a glmS ribozyme in the 3′ untranslated region are efficiently knocked down in transgenic P. falciparum parasites in response to glucosamine inducer. Using reporter genes, we show that the glmS ribozyme cleaves reporter mRNA in vivo leading to reduction in mRNA expression following glucosamine treatment. Glucosamine-induced ribozyme activation led to efficient reduction of reporter protein, which could be rapidly reversed by removing the inducer. The glmS ribozyme was validated as a reverse-genetic tool by integration into the essential gene and antifolate drug target dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (PfDHFR-TS). Glucosamine treatment of transgenic parasites led to rapid and efficient knockdown of PfDHFR-TS mRNA and protein. PfDHFR-TS knockdown led to a growth/arrest mutant phenotype and hypersensitivity to pyrimethamine. The glmS ribozyme may thus be a tool for study of essential genes in P. falciparum and other parasite species amenable to transfection. PMID:24023691

  12. Cardamonin Regulates miR-21 Expression and Suppresses Angiogenesis Induced by Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fu-Sheng; Tian, Sha-Sha; Lu, Jin-Jian; Ding, Xing-Hong; Qian, Chao-Dong; Ding, Bin; Ding, Zhi-Shan; Jin, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Cardamonin has promising potential in cancer prevention and therapy by interacting with proteins and modifying the expressions and activities, including factors of cell survival, proliferation, and angiogenesis. In our precious study, we have demonstrated that cardamonin suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor- (VEGF-) induced angiogenesis as evaluated in the mouse aortic ring assay. It is also known that microRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in angiogenesis. Herein, we hypothesized whether antiangiogenesis effect of cardamonin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) triggered by VEGF was associated with miRNAs. We found that cardamonin reduced the miR-21 expression induced by VEGF in HUVECs. Treatment with miR-21 mimics abolished the effects of cardamonin on VEGF-induced cell proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis in HUVECs. However, treatment with miR-21 inhibitors presented the opposite effects, indicating the vital role of miR-21 in this process. Our study provides a new insight of the preliminary mechanism of anti-VEGF-induced angiogenesis by cardamonin in HUVECs. PMID:26266258

  13. Upregulation of Sestrin2 Expression Protects Against Macrophage Apoptosis Induced by Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hong-Juan; Shi, Ze-Ya; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Chen, San-Mei; Wang, Qing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Sestrin2 is involved in a different cellular response to stress conditions. However, the function of Sestrin2 in the cardiovascular system remains unknown. In the present study, we tested whether Sestrin2 has a beneficial effect on macrophage cell apoptosis induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). We found that oxLDL induces expression of Sestrin2 in RAW264.7 cells in a time-dependent and dose-dependent manner. We also found that knockdown of Sestrin2 using small RNA interference promotes cell apoptosis and reactive oxygen species production induced by oxLDL. In addition, our results show that the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK)/c-Jun pathway is activated by oxLDL. Inhibiting the activity of the JNK pathway abolishes the increase of Sestrin2 induced by oxLDL. These findings suggest that the inductive effect of Sestrin2 is mediated by the JNK/c-Jun pathway. Our results indicate that the induction of Sestrin2 acts as a compensatory response to oxLDL for survival, implying that stimulating expression of Sestrin2 might be an effective pharmacological target for the treatment of lipid-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25692450

  14. Diosgenin inhibits IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory mediators in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Leisheng; Ma, Tian; Zheng, Yanpin; Lv, Shiqiao; Li, Yu; Liu, Shaoxian

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the inflammatory cytokines play important roles in osteoarthritis (OA). Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species and possesses diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory properties. However, the role of diosgenin in inflammatory responses in OA chondrocytes is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of diosgenin in human OA chondrocytes. We found that diosgenin inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induced by interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β). Diosgenin significantly inhibited the IL-1β-stimulated expression of metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), MMP-13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, diosgenin suppressed the degradation of IκB-α in IL-1β-induced human OA chondrocytes. Taken together, this study showed that diosgenin can effectively inhibit the IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory mediators, suggesting that diosgenin may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:26191174

  15. Diosgenin inhibits IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory mediators in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Leisheng; Ma, Tian; Zheng, Yanpin; Lv, Shiqiao; Li, Yu; Liu, Shaoxian

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the inflammatory cytokines play important roles in osteoarthritis (OA). Diosgenin is a steroidal saponin found in several plants including Solanum and Dioscorea species and possesses diverse biological activities including anti-inflammatory properties. However, the role of diosgenin in inflammatory responses in OA chondrocytes is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of diosgenin in human OA chondrocytes. We found that diosgenin inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induced by interleukin-1-beta (IL-1β). Diosgenin significantly inhibited the IL-1β-stimulated expression of metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), MMP-13, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, diosgenin suppressed the degradation of IκB-α in IL-1β-induced human OA chondrocytes. Taken together, this study showed that diosgenin can effectively inhibit the IL-1β-induced expression of inflammatory mediators, suggesting that diosgenin may be a potential agent in the treatment of OA. PMID:26191174

  16. Ah receptor expression in cardiomyocytes protects adult female mice from heart dysfunction induced by TCDD exposure.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Hisaka; Carreira, Vinicius S; Fan, Yunxia; Jiang, Min; Naticchioni, Mindi; Koch, Sheryl; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2016-04-29

    Epidemiological studies in humans and experimental work in rodents suggest that exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a persistent environmental toxicant, is associated with incidence of heart disease. Although TCDD toxicity depends by and large on the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), the role of the cardiac AHR in TCDD induced cardiovascular disease is not well defined. To determine whether the Ahr gene mediates disruption of heart function by TCDD, we generated a cardiomyocyte-specific Ahr knockout mouse by crossing Ahr(fx/fx) mice with βMhc:cre/+ mice, in which expression of Cre recombinase is driven by the promoter of the βMhc (myosin heavy chain-beta) gene. Starting at three months of age, mice with cardiomyocyte-specific Ahr ablation were exposed to 1μg/kg/week of TCDD or control vehicle by oral gavage for an additional three months. Relative to unexposed controls, TCDD-exposure induced cardiomyocyte Ahr-independent changes in males but not females, including a significant increase in body weight, blood pressure, and cardiac hypertrophy and a decrease in cardiac ejection fraction. TCDD exposure also induced cardiomyocyte Ahr-dependent changes in fibrosis and calcium signaling gene expression in both males and females. TCDD exposure appears to cause sexually dimorphic effects on heart function and induce fibrosis and changes in calcium signaling in both males and females through activation of the cardiomyocyte-specific Ahr. PMID:27163630

  17. Quercetin negatively regulates TLR4 signaling induced by lipopolysaccharide through Tollip expression.

    PubMed

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Yang, Mi-So; Choi, Han-Gyu; Sung, Nak-Yun; Song, Du-Sup; Sin, Sung-Jae; Byun, Eui-Hong

    2013-02-22

    Polyphenolic compounds have been regarded as one of the most promising dietary agents for the prevention and treatment of inflammation-related chronic diseases; however, the anti-inflammatory activities of flavonoids, such as quercetin, are not completely characterized, and many features remain to be elucidated. In this study, we showed the molecular basis for the downregulation of TLR4 signal transduction by quercetin. Quercetin markedly elevated the expression of the Toll-interacting protein, a negative regulator of TLR signaling. Lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of cell surface molecules (CD80, CD86, and MHC class I/II) and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12p70) were inhibited by quercetin, and this action was prevented by Toll-interacting protein silencing. In addition, quercetin-treated macrophages inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and the translocation of nuclear factor-κB and p65 through Toll-interacting protein. Treatment with quercetin resulted in a significant decrease in prostaglandin E2 and cyclooxygenase-2 levels as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase-mediated nitric oxide production induced by lipopolysaccharide. Taken together, these findings represent new insights into the understanding of negative regulatory mechanisms of the TLR4 signaling pathway and effective therapeutic intervention for the treatment of inflammatory disease. PMID:23353651

  18. Hypoxia-Induced Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Precedes Neovascularization after Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Hugo J. H.; Bernaudin, Myriam; Bellail, Anita; Schoch, Heike; Euler, Monika; Petit, Edwige; Risau, Werner

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that hypoxia induces angiogenesis and thereby may counteract the detrimental neurological effects associated with stroke. Forty-eight to seventy-two hours after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion we found a strong increase in the number of newly formed vessels at the border of the infarction. Using the hypoxia marker nitroimidazole EF5, we detected hypoxic cells in the ischemic border of the neocortex. Expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is the main regulator of angiogenesis and is inducible by hypoxia, was strongly up-regulated in the ischemic border, at times between 6 and 24 hours after occlusion. In addition, both VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) were up-regulated at the border after 48 hours and later in the ischemic core. Finally, the two transcription factors, hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and HIF-2, known to be involved in the regulation of VEGF and VEGFR gene expression, were increased in the ischemic border after 72 hours, suggesting a regulatory function for these factors. These results strongly suggest that the VEGF/VEGFR system, induced by hypoxia, leads to the growth of new vessels after cerebral ischemia. Exogenous support of this natural protective mechanism might lead to enhanced survival after stroke. PMID:10702412

  19. Nucleotide Pool Depletion Induces G-Quadruplex-Dependent Perturbation of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Charikleia; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Schiavone, Davide; Sale, Julian E.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nucleotide pool imbalance has been proposed to drive genetic instability in cancer. Here, we show that slowing replication forks by depleting nucleotide pools with hydroxyurea (HU) can also give rise to both transient and permanent epigenetic instability of a reporter locus, BU-1, in DT40 cells. HU induces stochastic formation of Bu-1low variants in dividing cells, which have lost the H3K4me3 present in untreated cells. This instability is potentiated by an intragenic G quadruplex, which also promotes local H2Ax phosphorylation and transient heterochromatinization. Genome-wide, gene expression changes induced by HU significantly overlap with those resulting from loss of the G4-helicases FANCJ, WRN, and BLM. Thus, the effects of global replication stress induced by nucleotide pool depletion can be focused by local replication impediments caused by G quadruplex formation to induce epigenetic instability and changes in gene expression, a mechanism that may contribute to selectable transcriptional changes in cancer. PMID:26686635

  20. Cigarette smoke induces the expression of Notch3, not Notch1, protein in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, ZHENSHUN; TAN, QIUYUE; TAN, WEIJUN; ZHANG, LI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of cigarette smoke on the expression of Notch proteins in lung adenocarcinoma (LAC). Protein expression levels of Notch1 and Notch3 were analyzed using immunohistochemistry in 102 human LAC specimens. Of these, 52 were obtained from smokers and 50 from non-smokers. In addition, cigarette smoke extract (CSE) at varying concentrations (1, 2.5 and 5%) was administered to A549 cells. The expression of Notch1 and Notch3 protein was then detected by western blot analysis at different time points (0, 8, 24 and 48 h). Of the 102 LAC specimens, 42 (41.2%) were positive for Notch1 and 63 (61.8%) were positive for Notch3. There was no significant difference in the level of Notch1 expression between smokers and non-smokers with LAC (P>0.05). The positive rate and staining intensity of Notch3 expression were increased in the smokers compared with the non-smokers (P<0.05). The expression of Notch3 protein in A549 cells increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner following treatment with CSE, whilst the expression of Notch1 protein appeared stable. The results suggested that cigarette smoke was able to induce the expression of Notch3, not Notch1, protein in LAC. The data revealed an upregulation of Notch3 in LAC following cigarette smoke exposure. Such findings may provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of LAC. PMID:26622547

  1. Cigarette smoke-induced epithelial expression of WNT-5B: implications for COPD.

    PubMed

    Heijink, Irene H; de Bruin, Harold G; Dennebos, Robin; Jonker, Marnix R; Noordhoek, Jacobien A; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; van den Berge, Maarten; Postma, Dirkje S

    2016-08-01

    Wingless/integrase-1 (WNT) signalling is associated with lung inflammation and repair, but its role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) pathogenesis is unclear. We investigated whether cigarette smoke-induced dysregulation of WNT-5B contributes to airway remodelling in COPD.We analysed WNT-5B protein expression in the lung tissue of COPD patients and (non)smoking controls, and investigated the effects of cigarette smoke exposure on WNT-5B expression in COPD and control-derived primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs). Additionally, we studied downstream effects of WNT-5B on remodelling related genes fibronectin, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and SnaiI in BEAS-2B and air-liquid interface (ALI)-cultured PBECs.We observed that airway epithelial WNT-5B expression is significantly higher in lung tissue from COPD patients than controls. Cigarette smoke extract significantly increased mRNA expression of WNT-5B in COPD, but not control-derived PBECs. Exogenously added WNT-5B augmented the expression of remodelling related genes in BEAS-2B cells, which was mediated by transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/Smad3 signalling. In addition, WNT-5B upregulated the expression of these genes in ALI-cultured PBECs, particularly PBECs from COPD patients.Together, our results provide evidence that exaggerated WNT-5B expression upon cigarette smoke exposure in the bronchial epithelium of COPD patients leads to TGF-β/Smad3-dependent expression of genes related to airway remodelling. PMID:27126693

  2. TLR9 expression is required for the development of cigarette smoke-induced emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Foronjy, Robert F; Salathe, Matthias A; Dabo, Abdoulaye J; Baumlin, Nathalie; Cummins, Neville; Eden, Edward; Geraghty, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    The expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-9, a pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes unmethylated CpG sequences in microbial DNA molecules, is linked to the pathogenesis of several lung diseases. TLR9 expression and signaling was investigated in animal and cell models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We observed enhanced TLR9 expression in mouse lungs following exposure to cigarette smoke. Tlr9(-/-) mice were resistant to cigarette smoke-induced loss of lung function as determined by mean linear intercept, total lung capacity, lung compliance, and tissue elastance analysis. Tlr9 expression also regulated smoke-mediated immune cell recruitment to the lung; apoptosis; expression of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), the CXCL5 protein, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2); and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) activity in the lung. PTP1B, a phosphatase with anti-inflammatory abilities, was identified as binding to TLR9. In vivo delivery of a TLR9 agonist enhanced TLR9 binding to PTP1B, which inactivated PTP1B. Ptp1b(-/-) mice had elevated lung concentrations of G-CSF, CXCL5, and MMP-2, and tissue expression of type-1 interferon following TLR9 agonist administration, compared with wild-type mice. TLR9 responses were further determined in fully differentiated normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells isolated from nonsmoker, smoker, and COPD donors, and then cultured at air liquid interface. NHBE cells from smokers and patients with COPD expressed more TLR9 and secreted greater levels of G-CSF, IL-6, CXCL5, IL-1β, and MMP-2 upon TLR9 ligand stimulation compared with cells from nonsmoker donors. Although TLR9 combats infection, our results indicate that TLR9 induction can affect lung function by inactivating PTP1B and upregulating expression of proinflammatory cytokines. PMID:27288485

  3. c-Src tyrosine kinase mediates high glucose-induced endothelin-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Manea, Simona-Adriana; Fenyo, Ioana Madalina; Manea, Adrian

    2016-06-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of diabetes-associated cardiovascular disorders. The molecular mechanisms leading to ET-1 upregulation in diabetes are not entirely defined. c-Src tyrosine kinase regulates important pathophysiological aspects of vascular response to insults. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether high glucose-activated c-Src signaling plays a role in the regulation of ET-1 expression. Human endothelial cells EAhy926 (ECs) were exposed to normal or high levels of glucose for 24h. Male C57BL/6J mice were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin and then treated with a specific c-Src inhibitor (Src I1) or c-Src siRNA. Real-time PCR, Western blot, and ELISA, were used to investigate ET-1 regulation. The c-Src activity and expression were selectively downregulated by pharmacological inhibition and siRNA-mediated gene silencing, respectively. High glucose dose-dependently up-regulated c-Src phosphorylation and ET-1 gene and protein expression levels in human ECs. Chemical inhibition or silencing of c-Src significantly decreased the high-glucose augmented ET-1 expression in cultured ECs. In vivo studies s