Science.gov

Sample records for induced burial regions

  1. Trend in groundwater quality near FMD burials in agricultural region, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kang-Kun

    2015-04-01

    After the nation-wide outbreak of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) in winter of 2010-2011, thousands of mass burial site had been built all over the country in Korea. Though the burial pits were partially lined with impermeable material, potential threat of leachate leakage was still in concern. In worry of leachate release from those livestock burials during decomposition of carcasses, groundwater samples from wells near the burials were collected and analyzed in between 2011 and 2013. Among the sample locations, 250 wells with monitoring priorities were chosen and had been watched continuously through the years. For trend analysis of groundwater quality, relations between land use types, distances to burial and nitrate concentrations are studied. Types of land use within 300 m radius of each well were investigated. Nitrate concentrations show proportional relations to the area of agricultural activity and inversely proportional to the area of forest. The proportionality decreased with both agricultural and forest area since 2011. When seasonal variation is concerned, slightly stronger proportionality is shown in dry season for both agricultural and forested area. For a qualitative analysis of the trend, non-parametric Kendall test is applied. Especially, regional Kendall test is implemented to find out spatial feature of nitrate concentration. Nitrate concentrations show slow but statistically significant deceasing trend for every well. When the wells are group according to their distances from the nearest burial pit, decreasing trend of nitrate concentration is shown in all groups. However, there was no consistency in significant factor among the groups. Considering the above mentioned results, the groundwater wells near the burials seem to be influence more from agricultural activities near the wells than from the burial leachate. The slow but significant decreasing trend in nitrate concentration is supposed as the result of an increasing governmental interest in

  2. Predicting seabed burial of cylinders by wave-induced scour: Application to the sandy inner shelf off Florida and Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trembanis, A.C.; Friedrichs, Carl T.; Richardson, M.D.; Traykovski, P.; Howd, P.A.; Elmore, P.A.; Wever, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    A simple parameterized model for wave-induced burial of mine-like cylinders as a function of grain-size, time-varying, wave orbital velocity and mine diameter was implemented and assessed against results from inert instrumented mines placed off the Indian Rocks Beach (IRB, FL), and off the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO, Edgartown, MA). The steady flow scour parameters provided by Whitehouse (1998) for self-settling cylinders worked well for predicting burial by depth below the ambient seabed for O (0.5 m) diameter mines in fine sand at both sites. By including or excluding scour pit infilling, a range of percent burial by surface area was predicted that was also consistent with observations. Rapid scour pit infilling was often seen at MVCO but never at IRB, suggesting that the environmental presence of fine sediment plays a key role in promoting infilling. Overprediction of mine scour in coarse sand was corrected by assuming a mine within a field of large ripples buries only until it generates no more turbulence than that produced by surrounding bedforms. The feasibility of using a regional wave model to predict mine burial in both hindcast and real-time forecast mode was tested using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA, Washington, DC) WaveWatch 3 (WW3) model. Hindcast waves were adequate for useful operational forcing of mine burial predictions, but five-day wave forecasts introduced large errors. This investigation was part of a larger effort to develop simple yet reliable predictions of mine burial suitable for addressing the operational needs of the U.S. Navy. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  3. Stress-induced chemical waves in sediment burial diagenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifeng; Budd, David A

    2012-01-01

    Lateral metre-scale periodic variations in porosity and composition are found in many dolomite strata. Such variations may embed important information about dolomite formation and transformation. Here we show that these variations could be fossilized chemical waves emerging from stress-mediated mineral-water interaction during sediment burial diagenesis. Under the overlying loading, crystals in higher porosity domains are subjected to a higher effective stress, causing pressure solution. The dissolved species diffuse to and precipitate in neighbouring lower porosity domains, further reducing the porosity. This positive feedback leads to lateral porosity and compositional patterning in dolomite. The pattern geometry depends on fluid flow regimes. In a diffusion-dominated case, the low- and high-porosity domains alternate spatially with no directional preference, while, in the presence of an advective flow, this alternation occurs only along the flow direction, propagating like a chemical wave. Our work provides a new perspective for interpreting diagenetic signatures in sedimentary rocks. PMID:22353716

  4. Multibeam observations of mine burial near Clearwater, FL, including comparisons to predictions of wave-induced burial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolfson, M.L.; Naar, D.F.; Howd, P.A.; Locker, S.D.; Donahue, B.T.; Friedrichs, Carl T.; Trembanis, A.C.; Richardson, M.D.; Wever, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    A Kongsberg Simrad EM 3000 multibeam sonar (Kongsberg Simrad, Kongsberg, Norway) was used to conduct a set of six repeat high-resolution bathymetric surveys west of Indian Rocks Beach (IRB), just to the south of Clearwater, FL, between January and March 2003, to observe in situ scour and burial of instrumented inert mines and mine-like cylinders. Three closely located study sites were chosen: two fine-sand sites, a shallow one located in ??? 13 m of water depth and a deep site located in ???14 m of water depth; and a coarse-sand site in ???13 m. Results from these surveys indicate that mines deployed in fine sand are nearly buried within two months of deployment (i.e., they sunk 74.5% or more below the ambient seafloor depth). Mines deployed in coarse sand showed a lesser amount of scour, burying until they present roughly the same hydrodynamic roughness as the surrounding rippled bedforms. These data were also used to test the validity of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS, Gloucester Point, VA) 2-D burial model. The model worked well in areas of fine sand, sufficiently predicting burial over the course of the experiment. In the area of coarse sand, the model greatly overpredicted the amount of burial. This is believed to be due to the presence of rippled bedforms around the mines, which affect local bottom morphodynamics and are not accounted for in the model, an issue currently being addressed by the modelers. This paper focuses specifically on two instrumented mines: an acoustic mine located in fine sand and an optical instrumented mine located in coarse sand. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  5. Structure of AscE and induced burial regions in AscE and AscG upon formation of the chaperone needle-subunit complex of type III secretion system in Aeromonas hydrophila

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yih Wan; Yu, Hong Bing; Leung, Ka Yin; Sivaraman, J.; Mok, Yu-Keung

    2008-01-01

    In the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Aeromonas hydrophila, the putative needle complex subunit AscF requires both putative chaperones AscE and AscG for formation of a ternary complex to avoid premature assembly. Here we report the crystal structure of AscE at 2.7 Å resolution and the mapping of buried regions of AscE, AscG, and AscF in the AscEG and AscEFG complexes using limited protease digestion. The dimeric AscE is comprised of two helix–turn–helix monomers packed in an antiparallel fashion. The N-terminal 13 residues of AscE are buried only upon binding with AscG, but this region is found to be nonessential for the interaction. AscE functions as a monomer and can be coexpressed with AscG or with both AscG and AscF to form soluble complexes. The AscE binding region of AscG in the AscEG complex is identified to be within the N-terminal 61 residues of AscG. The exposed C-terminal substrate-binding region of AscG in the AscEG complex is induced to be buried only upon binding to AscF. However, the N-terminal 52 residues of AscF remain exposed even in the ternary AscEFG complex. On the other hand, the 35-residue C-terminal region of AscF in the complex is resistant to protease digestion in the AscEFG complex. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that two C-terminal hydrophobic residues, Ile83 and Leu84, of AscF are essential for chaperone binding. PMID:18662905

  6. Structure of AscE and Induced Burial Regions in AscE and AscG upon Formation of the Chaperone Needle-subunit Complex of Type III Secretion System in Aeromonas Hydrophila

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Y.; Yu, H; Leung, K; Sivaraman, J; Mok, Y

    2008-01-01

    In the type III secretion system (T3SS) of Aeromonas hydrophila, the putative needle complex subunit AscF requires both putative chaperones AscE and AscG for formation of a ternary complex to avoid premature assembly. Here we report the crystal structure of AscE at 2.7 A resolution and the mapping of buried regions of AscE, AscG, and AscF in the AscEG and AscEFG complexes using limited protease digestion. The dimeric AscE is comprised of two helix-turn-helix monomers packed in an antiparallel fashion. The N-terminal 13 residues of AscE are buried only upon binding with AscG, but this region is found to be nonessential for the interaction. AscE functions as a monomer and can be coexpressed with AscG or with both AscG and AscF to form soluble complexes. The AscE binding region of AscG in the AscEG complex is identified to be within the N-terminal 61 residues of AscG. The exposed C-terminal substrate-binding region of AscG in the AscEG complex is induced to be buried only upon binding to AscF. However, the N-terminal 52 residues of AscF remain exposed even in the ternary AscEFG complex. On the other hand, the 35-residue C-terminal region of AscF in the complex is resistant to protease digestion in the AscEFG complex. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that two C-terminal hydrophobic residues, Ile83 and Leu84, of AscF are essential for chaperone binding.

  7. Human-induced C erosion and burial across spatial and temporal scales. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van oost, K.

    2013-12-01

    Anthropogenic land cover change and soil erosion are tightly coupled: accelerated erosion and deposition of soil are inevitable consequences of the removal of vegetative cover and increased exposure of the soil surface to erosion. A significant portion of the earth surface has now been disturbed and this has locally accelerated erosion 10- to 100-fold. Although there is now growing awareness that the erosion-induced C flux may be an important factor determining global and regional net terrestrial ecosystem C balances, the significance of this disturbance for the past, present and future C cycle remains uncertain. In this paper, we argue that the significance for both past and present C budgets remains poorly quantified due to uncertainty about the contribution of biotic versus erosion-induced C fluxes because of their intrinsically different space and time scales. Carbon erosion research in agro-ecosystems has traditionally focused on short-term processes, i.e. single events to a few decades and longer-term observations of C and sediment dynamics are therefore rare. Likewise, C cycling is typically studied at the profile-scale while erosion processes operate over various spatial scales and whole-watershed approaches are therefore needed. We address this issue here by synthesizing 3 case studies where we report results of a measurement campaign to characterize the erosional control on vertical carbon fluxes from degraded land. First, using signatures in soil sedimentary archives, we integrate the effects of accelerated C erosion across point, hillslope and catchment scale for a temperate river catchment over the period of agriculture to demonstrate that accounting for the non-steady-state C dynamics in geomorphic active systems is pertinent to understand both past and future anthropogenic global change. Secondly, we report year-round soil respiration measurements with high temporal resolution along an erosion gradient on cultivated sloping land in the Chinese Loess

  8. Legacy of human-induced C erosion and burial on soil-atmosphere C exchange.

    PubMed

    Van Oost, Kristof; Verstraeten, Gert; Doetterl, Sebastian; Notebaert, Bastiaan; Wiaux, François; Broothaerts, Nils; Six, Johan

    2012-11-20

    Carbon exchange associated with accelerated erosion following land cover change is an important component of the global C cycle. In current assessments, however, this component is not accounted for. Here, we integrate the effects of accelerated C erosion across point, hillslope, and catchment scale for the 780-km(2) Dijle River catchment over the period 4000 B.C. to A.D. 2000 to demonstrate that accelerated erosion results in a net C sink. We found this long-term C sink to be equivalent to 43% of the eroded C and to have offset 39% (17-66%) of the C emissions due to anthropogenic land cover change since the advent of agriculture. Nevertheless, the erosion-induced C sink strength is limited by a significant loss of buried C in terrestrial depositional stores, which lagged the burial. The time lag between burial and subsequent loss at this study site implies that the C buried in eroded terrestrial deposits during the agricultural expansion of the last 150 y cannot be assumed to be inert to further destabilization, and indeed might become a significant C source. Our analysis exemplifies that accounting for the non-steady-state C dynamics in geomorphic active systems is pertinent to understanding both past and future anthropogenic global change. PMID:23134723

  9. Burial diagenesis in the Upper Devonian reef complexes of the Geikie Gorge region, Canning basin, Western Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, M.W. ); Kerans, C. ); Playford, P.E. ); McManus, A. )

    1991-06-01

    The Devonian carbonates of the Geikie Gorge region, Canning basin, have undergone a long and complex diagenetic history that began in Devonian seawater with extensive marine cementation of platform-margin lithologies. Devonian-Lower Carboniferous burial diagenesis was the most important porosity occluding episode because almost all primary porosity was destroyed by equant calcite cements during this interval. Dolomitization and consequent secondary porosity development also occurred during early burial diagenesis. The distribution and geochemistry of the major calcite cements and dolomite types are consistent with these phases having been precipitated from connate marine or basinal brines. Karstification and minor calcite cementation took place during late Carboniferous subaerial exposure. Minor calcite cementation occurred during Permian-Cenozoic burial, predominantly in secondary porosity within pervasively dolomitized lithologies. Karstification, dedolomitization, and calcite recrystallization took place in association with Cenozoic meteoric diagenesis. Secondary moldic and intercrystalline porosity within the completely dolomitized lithologies were the longest lived porosity types in the carbonates. Some secondary porosity escaped both Devonian-Carboniferous and Permian-Cenozoic burial cementation, probably due to a lack of nucleation sites for calcite cements within completely dolomitized lithologies.

  10. Earthquake-induced subsidence and burial of late holocene archaeological sites, northern Oregon coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minor, R.; Grant, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    Fire hearths associated with prehistoric Native American occupation lie within the youngest buried lowland soil of the estuaries along the Salmon and Nehalem rivers on the northern Oregon coast. This buried soil is the result of sudden subsidence induced by a great earthquake about 300 years ago along the Cascadia subduction zone, which extends offshore along the North Pacific Coast from Vancouver Island to northern California. The earthquake 300 years ago was the latest in a series of subsidence events along the Cascadia subduction zone over the last several thousand years. Over the long term, subsidence and burial of prehistoric settlements as a result of Cascadia subduction zone earthquakes have almost certainly been an important factor contributing to the limited time depth of the archaeological record along this section of the North Pacific Coast. Copyright ?? by the Society for American Archaeology.

  11. Burial diagenesis, hydraulic conductivity and pore water chemistry in the Marshall Sandstone regional aquifer, Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharias, K.F.; Sibley, D.F.; Long, D.T. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    The Marshall Sandstone (MS) is a regional aquifer and local natural-gas reservoir in the Michigan basin. Hydraulic conductivities measured of sandstone cores range from 10[sup [minus]4] to 10[sup [minus]9] cm/s. Low hydraulic conductivities were measured in samples with abundant kaolinite, chlorite and illite; quartz and carbonate cemented sandstones have consistently higher values. Dissolved solids concentrations of the water from the MS range from 260 to 418, 169 mg/l. Geochemical modeling of pore water elemental composition and stable isotopes indicates mixing between meteoric water and evaporated seawater. The authors analyzed cements precipitated in the MS to determine whether or not they reflect this mixture of brine and meteoric water. Chlorite is a pre- to syn-compaction cement. Dolomite-ankerite is a syn- to post-compaction cement. Kaolinite and illite are post-compaction cements. Kaolinite overlies and therefore post-dates the carbonate cements. Illite overlies and therefore post-dates the kaolinite. Cement stable isotopes and a mineral paragenesis are consistent with carbonate and phyllosilicate precipitation during burial diagenesis at approximately 50--120 C in brine similar to the brine in the saline portion of the aquifer today. Cements occur throughout the basin, regardless of present pore water composition. Also, secondary porosity due to feldspar and carbonate dissolution occurs throughout the basin. Solid phase analyses and pore water analyses indicate that mixing of meteoric water and brine may have caused some carbonate cement dissolution but otherwise has not influenced mineral paragenesis or hydraulic properties.

  12. Earthquake-induced burial of archaeological sites along the southern Washington coast about A.D. 1700

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cole, S.C.; Atwater, B.F.; McCutcheon, P.T.; Stein, J.K.; Hemphill-Haley, E.

    1996-01-01

    Although inhabited by thousands of people when first reached by Europeans, the Pacific coast of southern Washington has little recognized evidence of prehistoric human occupation. This apparent contradiction may be explained partly by geologic evidence for coastal submergence during prehistoric earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone. Recently discovered archaeological sites, exposed in the banks of two tidal streams, show evidence for earthquake-induced submergence and consequent burial by intertidal mud about A.D. 1700. We surmise that, because of prehistoric earthquakes, other archaeological sites may now lie hidden beneath the surfaces of modern tidelands. Such burial of archaeological sites raises questions about the estimation of prehistoric human population densities along coasts subject to earthquake-induced submergence. ?? 1996 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  13. In situ spectroscopic detection of SMSI effect in a Ni/CeO2 system: hydrogen-induced burial and dig out of metallic nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, Alfonso; Holgado, Juan P.; Gonzalez-delaCruz, Victor M.; Habas, Susan e.; Herranz, Tirma; Salmeron, Miquel

    2010-06-29

    In situ APPES technique demonstrates that the strong metal support interaction effect (SMSI) in the Ni-ceria system is associated with the decoration and burial of metallic particles by the partially reduced support, a phenomenon reversible by evacuation at high temperature of the previously absorbed hydrogen.

  14. Burial Ground Expansion Hydrogeologic Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Gaughan , T.F.

    1999-02-26

    Sirrine Environmental Consultants provided technical oversight of the installation of eighteen groundwater monitoring wells and six exploratory borings around the location of the Burial Ground Expansion.

  15. 78 FR 76574 - Burial Benefits

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... rewrite in plain language its regulations that govern entitlement to monetary burial benefits, which... published in the Federal Register on April 8, 2008 (73 FR 19,021), VA proposed to reorganize and rewrite in plain language provisions applicable to burial benefits. This proposed rule would build upon...

  16. Indien Personhood III: Water Burial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Water burial is a way to return a body to its key primal element. It revives and transforms both the soul and the person. Sometimes water burial leads to a new life floating in a womb. Sometimes it disperses to provide a moist and nutrient-rich medium for a vast variety of other lives, making a contribution to the much larger whole. In this…

  17. High rates of organic carbon burial in fjord sediments globally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Richard W.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Allison, Mead; Savage, Candida; Galy, Valier

    2015-06-01

    The deposition and long-term burial of organic carbon in marine sediments has played a key role in controlling atmospheric O2 and CO2 concentrations over the past 500 million years. Marine carbon burial represents the dominant natural mechanism of long-term organic carbon sequestration. Fjords--deep, glacially carved estuaries at high latitudes--have been hypothesized to be hotspots of organic carbon burial, because they receive high rates of organic material fluxes from the watershed. Here we compile organic carbon concentrations from 573 fjord surface sediment samples and 124 sediment cores from nearly all fjord systems globally. We use sediment organic carbon content and sediment delivery rates to calculate rates of organic carbon burial in fjord systems across the globe. We estimate that about 18 Mt of organic carbon are buried in fjord sediments each year, equivalent to 11% of annual marine carbon burial globally. Per unit area, fjord organic carbon burial rates are one hundred times as large as the global ocean average, and fjord sediments contain twice as much organic carbon as biogenous sediments underlying the upwelling regions of the ocean. We conclude that fjords may play an important role in climate regulation on glacial-interglacial timescales.

  18. Superfund record of decision (EPA region 10): Idaho National Engineering Lab, (USDOE) Operable Unit 26 (Stationary Low-Power Reactor-1 and Boiling Water Reactor Experiment-I Burial Grounds), Idaho Falls, ID, December 1, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    This document presents the selected remedial action for the Stationary Low-Power Reactor-1 (SL-1) burial ground, the Boiling Water Reactor Experiment-I (BORAX-I) burial ground, and 10 no action sites in Waste Area Group 5. Actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances from the SL-1 and BORAX-I burial grounds, if not addressed by implementing the response action selected in this Record of Decision, may present a current or potential threat to public health, welfare, or the environment. The 10 no action sites do not present a threat to human health or the environment.

  19. Burial Level Change Defines a High Energetic Relevance for Protein Binding Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; He, Ying; Wong, Limsoon; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interfaces defined through atomic contact or solvent accessibility change are widely adopted in structural biology studies. But, these definitions cannot precisely capture energetically important regions at protein interfaces. The burial depth of an atom in a protein is related to the atom's energy. This work investigates how closely the change in burial level of an atom/residue upon complexation is related to the binding. Burial level change is different from burial level itself. An atom deeply buried in a monomer with a high burial level may not change its burial level after an interaction and it may have little burial level change. We hypothesize that an interface is a region of residues all undergoing burial level changes after interaction. By this definition, an interface can be decomposed into an onion-like structure according to the burial level change extent. We found that our defined interfaces cover energetically important residues more precisely, and that the binding free energy of an interface is distributed progressively from the outermost layer to the core. These observations are used to predict binding hot spots. Our approach's F-measure performance on a benchmark dataset of alanine mutagenesis residues is much superior or similar to those by complicated energy modeling or machine learning approaches. PMID:26357227

  20. Burial affects the biogeochemistry of headwater streams in a midwestern US metropolitan area - slides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in stream networks is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of headwater streams in urban basins. Urban stream burial has only recently been recognized by ecologists as a regional environmental impact and little resea...

  1. Controls on biogenic silica burial in the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Zanna; Kohfeld, Karen E.; Matsumoto, Katsumi

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the controls on opal export in the Southern Ocean can inform both the prediction of how the leakage of silicic acid from the Southern Ocean responds to climate and the interpretation of paleo-proxies. We have compiled a database of 185 230Thorium-normalized opal burial rates and 493 opal concentration measurements in Southern Ocean sediments and matched these with environmental climatologies. By subdividing the Southern Ocean on the basis of oceanographic regions and interpolating the opal burial rates, we estimate a total biogenic Si burial south of 40°S of 2.3 ± 1.0 Tmol Si yr-1. In both the seasonally ice-covered and permanently ice-free regions we can explain 73% of opal burial variability from surface ocean properties. Where sea ice is present for at least part of the year, the length of the ice-free season determines the upper limit of opal burial in the underlying sediments. In the ice-free regions of the Southern Ocean, the supply of silicic acid through winter mixing is the most important factor. Our results do not support a strong role of iron in controlling opal burial. We do however find that satellite-derived net primary production increases with increasing (modeled) dust delivery. These findings support the decoupling between carbon and opal fluxes in the Southern Ocean. When corrected for opal dissolution, the observed opal fluxes are in reasonable agreement with fluxes simulated using an ocean biogeochemical model. However, the results suggest current preservation algorithms for opal could be improved by incorporating the composition of particle flux, not only its magnitude.

  2. Changes in CaCO3 Burial Trump the Biological Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toggweiler, J.; Dunne, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    The dramatic increases in atmospheric CO2 at the ends of ice ages are usually attributed to a one-two punch coming from the ocean. First, a weakened biological pump vents organically cycled CO2 from the deep ocean via changes in the ventilation of the deep ocean around Antarctica. The initial CO2 increase is then augmented by an enhancement of CaCO3 burial due to a process called CaCO3 compensation (after Broecker, W. S and T.-H. Peng, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 1, 15-29, 1987). Here, we argue that the importance of the biological pump has been exaggerated. The main effect comes from circulation-induced changes in the burial of CaCO3. As shown in a recent paper by Andreas Schmittner and co-authors (Schmittner, A., E. Brook and J. Ahn, Impact of the ocean's overturning circulation on atmospheric CO2, in Ocean Circulation: Mechanisms and Impacts, Geophys. Monogr. 173, A. Schmittner, J. Chiang, and S. Hemming, eds., pp. 209-246, AGU, 2007) changes in the ventilation of the deep ocean around Antarctica gave rise to 20-30 ppm increases in atmospheric CO2 every 5,000-7,000 years during isotope stages 3 and 4 (30,000 to 70,000 years ago). None of these venting events gave rise to a compensation response. Meanwhile, Jaccard et al. (Science, 308, 1003-1006, 2005) show that all the big CO2 increases during terminations through stage 11 were accompanied by huge increases in CaCO3 burial. This suggests that the enhanced burial of CaCO3 is obligatory rather than compensatory with respect to the dramatic CO2 increases. Broecker and Peng's compensation idea is based on an assumption that the rain of CaCO3 to the sea floor is the same everywhere. More specifically, it assumes that there is no spatial correlation between the production of CaCO3 at the surface and the burial on the sea floor. We find instead that the production and burial of CaCO3 tend to be co-located in regional "hot spots" and that burial in the hot spots balances the input of Ca++ and HCO3- ions in rivers. The

  3. Carbon sequestration via wood burial

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Ning

    2008-01-01

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1), followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1) and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1). Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be $14/tCO2($50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is low because CO2 is removed from the atmosphere by the natural process of photosynthesis at little cost. The technique is low tech, distributed, easy to monitor, safe, and reversible, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market. PMID:18173850

  4. 38 CFR 3.1703 - Claims for burial benefits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... benefits. 3.1703 Section 3.1703 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits Burial Benefits: General § 3.1703 Claims for burial benefits. Pt. 3, Subpt. B, Nt... after the burial of the veteran. There are no other time limitations to file claims for burial...

  5. 38 CFR 3.1610 - Burial in national cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies. 3.1610 Section 3.1610 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... unclaimed bodies. The statutory burial allowance and permissible transportation charges as provided in §§ 3... from the officers having jurisdiction over burials in national cemeteries; or (b) Where the body of...

  6. 38 CFR 3.1610 - Burial in national cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies. 3.1610 Section 3.1610 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... unclaimed bodies. The statutory burial allowance and permissible transportation charges as provided in §§ 3... from the officers having jurisdiction over burials in national cemeteries; or (b) Where the body of...

  7. 38 CFR 3.1610 - Burial in national cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies. 3.1610 Section 3.1610 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... unclaimed bodies. The statutory burial allowance and permissible transportation charges as provided in §§ 3... from the officers having jurisdiction over burials in national cemeteries; or (b) Where the body of...

  8. 38 CFR 3.1610 - Burial in national cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies. 3.1610 Section 3.1610 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... unclaimed bodies. The statutory burial allowance and permissible transportation charges as provided in §§ 3... from the officers having jurisdiction over burials in national cemeteries; or (b) Where the body of...

  9. 38 CFR 3.1610 - Burial in national cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... cemeteries; burial of unclaimed bodies. 3.1610 Section 3.1610 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... unclaimed bodies. The statutory burial allowance and permissible transportation charges as provided in §§ 3... from the officers having jurisdiction over burials in national cemeteries; or (b) Where the body of...

  10. Shallow land burial technology: Humid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, E. C.; Yeh, G. T.

    Trench lining and grouting, are being demonstrated and evaluated experimental trenches containing compacted low-level waste. Two finite-element hydrologic models were developed to model water movement and solute transport at a waste disposal site. Though the economic analysis of the two trench treatments favored Hypalon lining, results of field experiments examining waste hydrologic isolation favored the cement-bentonite grout treatment. Data from water pump-out and water pump-in tests suggest that the original goal of constructing watertight liners in three experimental trenches was not achieved. Trench-cover subsidence measured over two of the three lined trenches did not occur over any of the three grouted or three control (untreated) trenches. Results indicate that the cement-bentonite treatment provides a degree of waste isolation not afforded by the lined and control trenches and should be considered for use at shallow land burial (SLB) sites with water-related problems.

  11. Micromorphology of two prehistoric ritual burials from Yemen, and considerations on methodological aspects of sampling the burial matrix - work in progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usai, Maria-Raimonda; Brothwell, Don; Buckley, Stephen; Ai-Thour, Kalid; Canti, Matthew

    2010-05-01

    Introduction In the central area of Yemen, two burial sites placed high in the crevices of vertical cliff face of Cretaceous sandstone (Tawilah Group) provided evidence of human remains and yielded burial soils. Radiocarbon dating indicated c.2500-2900 years BP for the burials. In other local comparable sites the deep horizontal crevices yielded Bronze Age human remains, in exceptional state of preservation Questions: What was the nature of the burial matrix? Are other human influences superimposed on the soils derived from it? Is it simply decomposed crevice rock, scraped together at the time of burial, or the result of a more complex burial practice? Such questions are also relevant to a variety of other burials of different periods and world regions. Methods Seven matrix samples from Cliff Burials (A) Talan (Layers 4,10,12,14,18,20 and 22, from top to bottom) and (B) Shiban Kawkaban (Layer 1 and 9) were analysed with micromorphology, supplemented by SEM microprobe, X-ray diffraction, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results Cliff Burial Site Talan. The presence of cholesterol was confirmed in the lower sample. The second layer contained darker earth with fibrous plant material. A hard calcareous upper capping contrasted with the other levels of matrix, and it displayed a highly birefingent material with a significant component of uric acid. The other levels had variable organic content and plant inclusions, and possibly pollen. In Layer 10, aromatic acids indicative of balsam and sugar markers suggested plant gum. Cholesterol was the major sterol in Layers 10 and 22, but whilst in Layer 10 its oxidation products were present and cholestanol was abundant as normally in soils, it was only a minor component of Layer 22 where, rather, a significant amount of coprostanol indicated faecal input, and cholesterol oxidation products were absent. Cliff Burial Site Shiban Kawkaban. Although no stratification was visible to the naked eye, variation was observed at a

  12. Depth of burial experiments at Balapan

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, L.A.; Myers, S.C.

    1997-11-01

    We report of a series of experiments designed to discriminate underground explosion sources at various depths by means of their seismic signatures at regional distances. This series was a joint effort of the US Department of Energy (DOE), the US Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA), and the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan (NNC). The series consisted of three 25-ton explosions, at depths of 55 m, 300 m, and 50 m. In addition, a 5-ton checkout explosion was fired at a depth of 630 m, and small-scale explosions at each site were carried out so that the empirical Green`s functions could be derived. Broadband and short-period seismic data were recorded at an eight-station network within Kazakhstan, at nominal ranges varying from 100-1500 km, and with good azimuthal coverage for regional phases. In addition, seismic measurements were made at former NRDC sites (BAY and KKL), infrasound recordings were made at the cross array at Kurchatov, and close-in seismic measurements were also made at ranges from ground zero to 20 km. Although the main objective of this series was to study depth-of- burial (DOB) effects on the excitation of regional phases such as LG and RG, and to determine whether peaks in the coda spectral shape correlate well with DOB, a secondary objective was to help calibrate the site of the Kazakhstan seismic network, especially the primary IMS station at MAKanchi, and the auxiliary IMS stations at KURchatov and AKTyubinsk.

  13. View southwest toward Eldred Avenue from within Friend's Burial Ground, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest toward Eldred Avenue from within Friend's Burial Ground, Benjamin Carr Farm in distance through the trees - Friends' Burial Ground, Eldred & Beacon Avenues, Jamestown, Newport County, RI

  14. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Hendrick, Vicki J; Hutchison, Zoë L; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  15. Sediment Burial Intolerance of Marine Macroinvertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Hendrick, Vicki J.; Hutchison, Zoë L.; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    The marine environment contains suspended particulate matter which originates from natural and anthropogenic sources. Settlement of this material can leave benthic organisms susceptible to smothering, especially if burial is sudden i.e. following storms or activities such as dredging. Their survival will depend on their tolerance to, and their ability to escape from burial. Here we present data from a multi-factorial experiment measuring burial responses incorporating duration, sediment fraction and depth. Six macroinvertebrates commonly found in sediment rich environments were selected for their commercial and/or conservation importance. Assessments revealed that the brittle star (Ophiura ophiura), the queen scallop (Aequipecten opercularis) and the sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) were all highly intolerant to burial whilst the green urchin (Psammichinus miliaris) and the anemone (Sagartiogeton laceratus), showed intermediate and low intolerance respectively, to burial. The least intolerant, with very high survival was the Ross worm (Sabellaria spinulosa). With the exception of C. intestinalis, increasing duration and depth of burial with finer sediment fractions resulted in increased mortality for all species assessed. For C. intestinalis depth of burial and sediment fraction were found to be inconsequential since there was complete mortality of all specimens buried for more than one day. When burial emergence was assessed O. ophiura emerged most frequently, followed by P. miliaris. The former emerged most frequently from the medium and fine sediments whereas P. miliaris emerged more frequently from coarse sediment. Both A. opercularis and S. laceratus showed similar emergence responses over time, with A. opercularis emerging more frequently under coarse sediments. The frequency of emergence of S. laceratus increased with progressively finer sediment and C. intestinalis did not emerge from burial irrespective of sediment fraction or depth. Finally, and perhaps

  16. Organic Carbon Burial in Lakes and Reservoirs of the Conterminous United States.

    PubMed

    Clow, David W; Stackpoole, Sarah M; Verdin, Kristine L; Butman, David E; Zhu, Zhiliang; Krabbenhoft, David P; Striegl, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    Organic carbon (OC) burial in lacustrine sediments represents an important sink in the global carbon cycle; however, large-scale OC burial rates are poorly constrained, primarily because of the sparseness of available data sets. Here we present an analysis of OC burial rates in water bodies of the conterminous U.S. (CONUS) that takes advantage of recently developed national-scale data sets on reservoir sedimentation rates, sediment OC concentrations, lake OC burial rates, and water body distributions. We relate these data to basin characteristics and land use in a geostatistical analysis to develop an empirical model of OC burial in water bodies of the CONUS. Our results indicate that CONUS water bodies sequester 20.8 (95% CI: 9.4-65.8) Tg C yr(-1), and spatial patterns in OC burial are strongly influenced by water body type, size, and abundance; land use; and soil and vegetation characteristics in surrounding areas. Carbon burial is greatest in the central and southeastern regions of the CONUS, where cultivation and an abundance of small water bodies enhance accumulation of sediment and OC in aquatic environments. PMID:26061185

  17. Land-use change, not climate, controls organic carbon burial in lakes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, N. J.; Dietz, R. D.; Engstrom, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    Lakes are a central component of the carbon cycle, both mineralizing terrestrially derived organic matter and storing substantial amounts of organic carbon (OC) in their sediments. However, the rates and controls on OC burial by lakes remain uncertain, as do the possible effects of future global change processes. To address these issues, we derived OC burial rates in 210Pb-dated sediment cores from 116 small Minnesota lakes that cover major climate and land-use gradients. Rates for individual lakes presently range from 7 to 127 g C m–2 yr–1 and have increased by up to a factor of 8 since Euro-American settlement (mean increase: 2.8×). Mean pre-disturbance OC burial rates were similar (14–22 g C m–2 yr–1) across all land-cover categories (prairie, mixed deciduous and boreal forest), indicating minimal effect of the regional temperature gradient (approx. 4°C) on background carbon burial. The relationship between modern OC burial rates and temperature was also not significant after removal of the effect of total phosphorus. Contemporary burial rates were strongly correlated with lake-water nutrients and the extent of agricultural land cover in the catchment. Increased OC burial, documented even in relatively undisturbed boreal lake ecosystems, indicates a possible role for atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Our results suggest that globally, future land-cover change, intensification of agriculture and associated nutrient loading together with atmospheric N-deposition will enhance OC sequestration by lakes. PMID:23966637

  18. Cover integrity in shallow land burial of low-level wastes: hydrology and erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, L.J.; Nyhan, J.W.

    1981-01-01

    Applications of a state-of-the-art technology for simulating hydrologic processes and erosion affecting cover integrity at shallow land waste burial sites are described. A nonpoint source pollution model developed for agricultural systems has been adapted for application to waste burial sites in semiarid and arid regions. Applications include designs for field experiments, evaluation of slope length and steepness, evaluation of various soil types, and evaluation of vegetative cover influencing erosion rates and the water balance within the soil profile.

  19. Solid waste burial grounds interim safety analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, G.H.

    1994-10-01

    This Interim Safety Analysis document supports the authorization basis for the interim operation and restrictions on interim operations for the near-surface land disposal of solid waste in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. The Solid Waste Burial Grounds Interim Safety Basis supports the upgrade progress for the safety analysis report and the technical safety requirements for the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds. Accident safety analysis scenarios have been analyzed based on the significant events identified in the preliminary hazards analysis. The interim safety analysis provides an evaluation of the operations in the Solid Waste Burial Grounds to determine if the radiological and hazardous material exposures will be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint to the worker, the onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  20. Cleanup Verification Package for the 618-2 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    W. S. Thompson

    2006-12-28

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 618-2 Burial Ground, also referred to as Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2; Burial Ground No. 2; 318-2; and Dry Waste Burial Site No. 2. This waste site was used primarily for the disposal of contaminated equipment, materials and laboratory waste from the 300 Area Facilities.

  1. [Effects of sand burial on growth and physiological process of Agriophyllum squarrosum seedlings in Horqin Sand Land of Inner Mongolia, North China].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ha-Lin; Qu, Hao; Zhou, Rui-Lian; Wang, Jin; Li, Jin; Yun, Jian-Ying

    2013-12-01

    In 2010-2011, a sand burial experiment was conducted on the Horqin Sand Land of Inner Mongolia to study the growth characteristics and physiological properties of Agriophyllum squarrosum seedlings under different depths of sand burial. The A. squarrosum seedlings had stronger tolerance against sand burial. The seedling growth could be severely inhibited when the burial depth exceeded seedling height, but some seedlings could still be survived when the burial depth exceeded 1.66 times of seedling height. When the burial depth did not exceed the seedling height, the seedling MDA content and membrane permeability had no significant change, but the lipid peroxidation was aggravated and the cell membrane was damaged with increasing burial depth. Under sand burial stress, the seedling SOD and POD activities and proline content increased significantly, while the seedling CAT activity and soluble sugar content deceased. Sand burial decreased the leaf photosynthetic area and damaged cell membrane, inducing the increase of seedling mortality and the inhibition of seedling growth. The increase of SOD and POD activities and proline content played a definite role in reducing the sand burial damage to A. squarrosum seedlings. PMID:24697053

  2. Geologic setting of the low-level burial grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, K.A.; Jaeger, G.K.; Slate, J.L.; Swett, K.J.; Mercer, R.B.

    1994-10-13

    This report describes the regional and site specific geology of the Hanford Sites low-level burial grounds in the 200 East and West Areas. The report incorporates data from boreholes across the entire 200 Areas, integrating the geology of this area into a single framework. Geologic cross-sections, isopach maps, and structure contour maps of all major geological units from the top of the Columbia River Basalt Group to the surface are included. The physical properties and characteristics of the major suprabasalt sedimentary units also are discussed.

  3. Identification of leachate from livestock mortality burial using electrical resistivity and small-loop EM survey: case history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Ho; Cho, In-Ky; Choi, Kwang-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Leachate from livestock mortality burial is harmful to the soil and groundwater environment and adequate assessment approaches are necessary to manage burial sites. Among the methods used to detect leachate, geophysical surveys, including electrical resistivity and electromagnetic (EM) techniques, are used in many engineering approaches to environmental problems, such as identifying contaminant plumes and evaluating hydrogeological conditions. Electrical resistivity, with a small-loop EM survey, was used in this study as a reconnaissance technique to identify the burial shape and distribution of leachate from livestock mortality burial in five small separate zones. We conducted a multi-frequency small-loop EM survey using lattice nets and acquired apparent conductivity values along several parallel and perpendicular lines over a burial site. We also compared geophysical results to the geochemical analysis of samples from both a leachate collection well and a downstream observation well within the study area. Depth slices of apparent conductivities at each frequency (obtained from the small-loop EM survey data) clearly identified the subsurface structure of the burial shape and the extent of leachate transport. Low-resistivity zones, identified from two-dimensional (2D) electrical resistivity imaging results, were matched to the five burial zones (within a depth of 5 m), as well as high electrical conductivity of the leachate obtained from leachate collection wells, and depth slices of the apparent conductivity distribution obtained from the small-loop EM survey. A three-dimensional (3D) inversion of resistivity data provided a detailed 3D structure of the overall burial site and leachate pathways. Moreover, these zones were widely spread over the burial site, indicating that leachate potentially extended through damaged regions of the composite liner to a depth of 10 m along the downstream groundwater flow. Both the small-loop EM method and the electrical

  4. 20 CFR 416.1231 - Burial spaces and certain funds set aside for burial expenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... parental deeming situations. If an individual is an eligible child, the burial funds (up to $1,500) that... separation; i.e., a circumstance beyond an individual's control which makes conversion/separation...

  5. Late Quaternary strata and carbon burial records in the Yellow River delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangming; Ye, Siyuan; Li, Guangxue; Ding, Xigui; Yuan, Hongming

    2015-06-01

    Sediment carbon sequestration plays an essential role in mitigating atmospheric CO2 increases and the subsequently global greenhouse effect. To clarify the late Quaternary strata and carbon burial records in Yellow River delta (YRD), detailed analysis of benthic foraminifera, total carbon (TC), organic carbon (Corg), sedimentary characteristics and moisture contents of sediments, was performed on core ZK3, 30.3 m in length and obtained from YRD in 2007. Eight depositional units (designated U1-U8 in ascending order) were identified. A comprehensive analysis method of historical geography and sedimentary geology was used to determine the precise depositional ages of the modern Yellow River delta (MYRD), from which pre-MYRD ages were deduced. The results indicates that the maximum burial rates of TC, inorganic carbon (IC) and Corg occurred in the delta front (U5), and the minimum in the shallow sea (U3). Remarkable high sedimentation rates in the MYRD are responsible for burial efficiency of carbon, with an average rate of Corg burial reaching 2087±251 g (m2 yr)-1, and that of IC reaching 13741±808 g (m2 yr)-1, which are much higher than those of other regions with high contents of Corg. Therefore, YRD has a significant burial efficiency for carbon sequestration.

  6. Wake-induced unsteady stagnation-region heat transfer measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, P.J.; LaGraff, L.E. . Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    An experimental investigation of wake-induced unsteady heat transfer in the stagnation region of a cylinder was conducted. The objective of the study was to create a quasi-steady representation of the stator/rotor interaction in a gas turbine using two stationary cylinders in crossflow. In this simulation, a larger cylinder, representing the leading-edge region of a rotor blade, was immersed in the wake of a smaller cylinder, representing the trailing-edge region of a stator vane. Time-averaged and time-resolved heat transfer results were obtained over a wide range of Reynolds number at two Mach number: one incompressible and one transonic. The tests were conducted at Reynolds numbers, Mach numbers, and gas-to-wall temperature ratios characteristic of turbine engine conditions in an isentropic compression-heated transient wind tunnel (LICH tube). The augmentation of the heat transfer in the stagnation region due to wake unsteadiness was documented by comparison with isolated cylinder tests. It was found that the time-averaged heat transfer rate at the stagnation line, expressed in terms of the Frossling number (Nu/[radical]RE), reached a maximum independent of the Reynolds number. The power spectra and cross-correlation of the heat transfer signals in the stagnation region revealed the importance of large vortical structures shed from upstream wake generator. These structures caused large positive and negative excursions about the mean heat transfer rate in the stagnation region.

  7. Burial at Srebrenica: linking place and trauma.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Craig Evan

    2003-02-01

    Five years after the massacre at Srebrenica in Bosnia-Herzegovina, survivors were faced with the decision: where did they want their loved ones buried? This report explores the reasons for their choice in qualitative interviews with 37 survivors of the massacre and 22 key informants performed over the summer 2000. Survivors wanted the loved ones buried at Potocari, a site just outside of Srebrenica, because it represented the site of ultimate horror, was connected to their sense of home, and underscored the various power relationships. The data points to the importance of place for health. Trauma, as it occurs in particular locations, breaks the sense of attachment to a particular place. Restoring the physical and social environment through burial and memorials mitigates the consequences of the trauma. The burial at Potocari provides a window into the mourning, politics, and recovery after mass violence. PMID:12560012

  8. Soil temperature calculation for burial site analysis.

    PubMed

    Prangnell, Jonathan; McGowan, Glenys

    2009-10-30

    The effect of air and water temperature upon the decomposition of human remains and upon biological activity has been extensively studied. However, less attention has been devoted to the temperature of the soil surrounding burials, despite its potential influence upon chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of human remains, drugs and toxins, as well as upon microbial and insect activity. A soil temperature calculation equation usually employed in civil engineering was used to calculate soil temperature at various depths in a cemetery located in Brisbane, Australia, in order to explain the extensive degradation of human remains and funerary objects observed at exhumation. The results showed that for the 160 years of the site's history, ground temperature at burial level had been sufficiently high for biological activity and chemical degradation reactions to continue right up until the time of exhumation. The equation used has potential in the analysis of both cemetery and clandestine burials, since it allows ground temperature to be calculated from ambient air temperature figures, for a variety of depths, soil types and vegetation conditions. PMID:19656646

  9. Variations in Organic Matter Burial and Composition in Sediments from the Indian Ocean Continental Margin Off SW Indonesia (Sumatra - Java - Flores) Since the Last Glacial Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennerjahn, T. C.; Gesierich, K.; Schefuß, E.; Mohtadi, M.

    2014-12-01

    Global climate change is a mosaic of regional changes to a large extent determined by region-specific feedbacks between climate and ecosystems. At present the ocean is forming a major sink in the global carbon cycle. Organic matter (OM) storage in sediments displays large regional variations and varied over time during the Quaternary. Upwelling regions are sites of high primary productivity and major depocenters of organic carbon (OC), the least understood of which is the Indian Ocean upwelling off Indonesia. In order to reconstruct the burial and composition of OM during the Late Quaternary, we analyzed five sediment cores from the Indian Ocean continental margin off the Indonesian islands Sumatra to Flores spanning the last 20,000 years (20 kyr). Sediments were analyzed for bulk composition, stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes of OM, amino acids and hexosamines and terrestrial plant wax n-alkanes and their stable carbon isotope composition. Sedimentation rates hardly varied over time in the western part of the transect. They were slightly lower in the East during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and deglaciation, but increased strongly during the Holocene. The amount and composition of OM was similar along the transect with maximum values during the deglaciation and the late Holocene. High biogenic opal covarying with OM content indicates upwelling-induced primary productivity dominated by diatoms to be a major control of OM burial in sediments in the East during the past 20 kyr. The content of labile OM was low throughout the transect during the LGM and increased during the late Holocene. The increase was stronger and the OM less degraded in the East than in the West indicating that continental margin sediments off Java and Flores were the major depocenter of OC burial along the Indian Ocean margin off SW Indonesia. Temporal variations probably resulted from changes in upwelling intensity and terrestrial inputs driven by variations in monsoon strength.

  10. Phosphorus burial in the ocean over glacial-interglacial time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, F.; Föllmi, K. B.

    2008-12-01

    The role of nutrients and their impact on primary productivity and the fluctuations in atmospheric CO2 over glacial-interglacial periods are intensely debated. One of the cornerstones is the role of phosphorus (P; in the form of phosphate). Suggestions as to the importance of P evolved from an earlier proposal that P actively participated in changing productivity rates and therefore climate change, to the most recent one that changes in the glacial ocean inventory of phosphorus were small and not influential if compared to other macronutrients, such as nitrogen. Using new data coming from a selection of ODP sites, we illustrate oceanic P sedimentary phases distribution and reactive P burial fluxes, and we show how P burial fluxes changed over the last glacial-interglacial period. Concentrations of reactive P are generally lower during glacial times, while mass accumulation rates (MAR) show higher variability. On a global scale, glacial burial fluxes of reactive P are lower than those during interglacial periods by 7-10%, because lack of burial of reactive P on the glacial reduced shelf was apparently not compensated by burial in other regions of the ocean. Using the calculated changes in P burial, we try to infer their possible impact on the phosphate inventory in the world oceans. Using a simple mathematical approach, we find that these changes alone could have increased the phosphate inventory of glacial ocean waters by 20-40% compared to interglacial stages. Variations in the C/P reactive ratios and in the P sedimentary phases distribution at the investigated sites seem to indicate that at the onset of interglacial stages, shallower sites experienced an increase in reactive P concentrations. This seems to point to P-richer waters at glacial terminations, supporting the shelf-nutrient hypothesis and giving phosphorus a role as a potential player in climate change.

  11. Phosphorus burial in the ocean over glacial-interglacial time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, F.; Föllmi, K. B.

    2009-04-01

    The role of nutrients, such as phosphorus (P), and their impact on primary productivity and the fluctuations in atmospheric CO2 over glacial-interglacial periods are intensely debated. Suggestions as to the importance of P evolved from an earlier proposal that P actively participated in changing productivity rates and therefore climate change, to most recent ones that changes in the glacial ocean inventory of phosphorus were important but not influential if compared to other macronutrients, such as nitrate. Using new data coming from a selection of ODP sites, we analyzed the distribution of oceanic P sedimentary phases and calculate reactive P burial fluxes, and we show how P burial fluxes changed over the last glacial-interglacial period at these sites. Concentrations of reactive P are generally lower during glacial times, while mass accumulation rates (MAR) of reactive P show higher variability. If we extrapolate for the analyzed sites, we may assume that in general glacial burial fluxes of reactive P are lower than those during interglacial periods by about 8%, because the lack of burial of reactive P on the glacial shelf reduced in size, was apparently not compensated by burial in other regions of the ocean. Using the calculated changes in P burial, we evaluate their possible impact on the phosphate inventory in the world oceans. Using a simple mathematical approach, we find that these changes alone could have increased the phosphate inventory of glacial ocean waters by 17-40% compared to interglacial stages. Variations in the distribution of sedimentary P phases at the investigated sites seem to indicate that at the onset of interglacial stages, shallower sites experienced an increase in reactive P concentrations, which seems to point to P-richer waters at glacial terminations. All these findings would support the Shelf-Nutrient Hypothesis, which assumes that during glacial low stands nutrients are transferred from shallow sites to deep sea with possible

  12. Experimental sand burial affects seedling survivorship, morphological traits, and biomass allocation of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa in the Horqin Sandy Land, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiao; Busso, Carlos Alberto; Jiang, Deming; Musa, Ala; Wu, Dafu; Wang, Yongcui; Miao, Chunping

    2016-07-01

    As a native tree species, Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa (sandy elm) is widely distributed in the Horqin Sandy Land, China. However, seedlings of this species have to withstand various depths of sand burial after emergence because of increasing soil degradation, which is mainly caused by overgrazing, climate change, and wind erosion. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the changes in its survivorship, morphological traits, and biomass allocation when seedlings were buried at different burial depths: unburied controls and seedlings buried vertically up to 33, 67, 100, or 133 % of their initial mean seedling height. The results showed that partial sand burial treatments (i.e., less than 67 % burial) did not reduce seedling survivorship, which still reached 100 %. However, seedling mortality increased when sand burial was equal to or greater than 100 %. In comparison with the control treatment, seedling height and stem diameter increased at least by 6 and 14 % with partial burial, respectively. In the meantime, seedling taproot length, total biomass, and relative mass growth rates were at least enhanced by 10, 15.6, and 27.6 %, respectively, with the partial sand burial treatment. Furthermore, sand burial decreased total leaf area and changed biomass allocation in seedlings, partitioning more biomass to aboveground organs (e.g., leaves) and less to belowground parts (roots). Complete sand burial after seedling emergence inhibited its re-emergence and growth, even leading to death. Our findings indicated that seedlings of sandy elm showed some resistance to partial sand burial and were adapted to sandy environments from an evolutionary perspective. The negative effect of excessive sand burial after seedling emergence might help in understanding failures in recruitments of sparse elm in the study region.

  13. Bilateral ECT induces bilateral increases in regional cortical thickness.

    PubMed

    van Eijndhoven, P; Mulders, P; Kwekkeboom, L; van Oostrom, I; van Beek, M; Janzing, J; Schene, A; Tendolkar, I

    2016-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective treatment for patients suffering from severe or treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). Unfortunately its underlying neurobiological mechanisms are still unclear. One line of evidence indicates that the seizures produced by ECT induce or stimulate neuroplasticity effects. Although these seizures also affect the cortex, the effect of ECT on cortical thickness is not investigated until now. We acquired structural magnetic resonance imaging data in 19 treatment-resistant MDD patients before and after a bilateral ECT course, and 16 healthy controls at 2 time points, and compared changes in cortical thickness between the groups. Our results reveal that ECT induces significant, bilateral increases in cortical thickness, including the temporal pole, inferior and middle temporal cortex and the insula. The pattern of increased cortical thickness was predominant in regions that are associated with seizure onset in ECT. Post hoc analyses showed that the increase in thickness of the insular cortex was larger in responders than in non-responders, which may point to a specific relationship of this region with treatment effects of ECT. PMID:27552587

  14. Pesticide burial grounds in Poland: a review.

    PubMed

    Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Migaszewski, Zdzisław M; Manecki, Piotr

    2011-10-01

    Obsolete pesticides were stored in Poland from the middle sixties until the late eighties of the 20th century mostly in underground disposal sites, called "pesticide burial grounds" or "pesticide tombs". The total amount of pesticide waste and packaging materials disposed of in these landfills exceeded 20000 Mg. Typically, the content of a pesticide tomb was dominated by organochlorine pesticides (comprising 10-100% of the total waste volume) with DDT as the prevailing compound. Other pesticide types, such as phosphoroorganic, carbamate insecticides, dinitrophenols, phenoxyacids, and inorganic compounds were stored in smaller quantities, usually not exceeding 10-20% of the total waste volume. With the growing awareness of the threats that these landfills posed to the environment, the first inventory for the whole country was made in 1993 and remediation was initiated in 1999. The total amount of waste, which had to be removed from the known pesticide tombs (hazardous substances, contaminated soils, construction materials etc.) was about 100000 Mg. According to the National Waste Management Plan, the reclamation of pesticide tombs was assumed to have been finished by the end of 2010, however, this goal has not been achieved. The aim of this review is to present a historical perspective of pesticide burial grounds in Poland with an emphasis on their creation, function, inventory, and remediation. Based on unpublished reports, and other published materials of limited availability written in Polish, this review may serve as a source of information for representatives of other countries, where remediation of pesticide burial grounds is still in progress. The experience gained over a ten-year period, when restoration of pesticide tombs was implemented in Poland, reveals that there are many obstacles to this action arising not only from technical, but also from economic and social issues. PMID:21531026

  15. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    E. J. Farris and H. M. Sulloway

    2008-01-10

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-1 Burial Ground on the Hanford Site. This burial ground is a combination of two locations formerly called Minor Construction Burial Ground No. 2 and Solid Waste Burial Ground No. 2. This waste site received radioactive equipment and other miscellaneous waste from 105-F Reactor operations, including dummy elements and irradiated process tubing; gun barrel tips, steel sleeves, and metal chips removed from the reactor; filter boxes containing reactor graphite chips; and miscellaneous construction solid waste.

  16. Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds. Environmental Information Document

    SciTech Connect

    Jaegge, W.J.; Kolb, N.L.; Looney, B.B.; Marine, I.W.; Towler, O.A.; Cook, J.R.

    1987-03-01

    This document provides environmental information on postulated closure options for the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds at the Savannah River Plant and was developed as background technical documentation for the Department of Energy`s proposed Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on waste management activities for groundwater protection at the plant. The results of groundwater and atmospheric pathway analyses, accident analysis, and other environmental assessments discussed in this document are based upon a conservative analysis of all foreseeable scenarios as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (CFR, 1986). The scenarios do not necessarily represent actual environmental conditions. This document is not meant to be used as a closure plan or other regulatory document to comply with required federal or state environmental regulations. The closure options considered for the Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds are waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action. The predominant pathways for human exposure to chemical and/or radioactive constituents are through surface, subsurface, and atmospheric transport. Modeling calculations were made to determine the risks to human population via these general pathways for the three postulated closure options. An ecological assessment was conducted to predict the environmental impacts on aquatic and terrestrial biota. The relative costs for each of the closure options were estimated.

  17. Relative Burial Depths of Nakhlites: An Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Miyamoto, M.; Koizumi, E.; Makishima, J.; McKay, G.

    2006-01-01

    Nakhlites are augite-rich cumulate rocks with variable amounts of olivine and groundmass plus minor Fe, Ti oxides [e.g., 1]. Our previous studies revealed that nakhlites showed correlated petrography and mineralogy that could be explained by different locations (burial depths) in a common cooling cumulate pile [e.g., 2]. We so far analyzed six of the seven currently known nakhlites, Nakhla (Nak), Governador Valadares (GV), Lafayette (Laf), NWA817, Y000593 (Y) and MIL03346 (MIL) [e.g., 2,3] and calculated cooling rates of four nakhlites (Nak, GV, Laf, and NWA817) by using chemical zoning of olivine [e.g., 4]. In this abstract, we complete our examination of petrographic and mineralogical variation of all currently known nakhlites by adding petrology and mineralogy of NWA998. We also report results of cooling calculations for Y, MIL and NWA998. Then, we update our model of the nakhlite igneous body in terms of relative burial depth of each sample.

  18. Development of regional liquefaction-induced deformation hazard maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosinski, A.; Knudsen, K.-L.; Wu, J.; Seed, R.B.; Real, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes part of a project to assess the feasibility of producing regional (1:24,000-scale) liquefaction hazard maps that are based-on potential liquefaction-induced deformation. The study area is the central Santa Clara Valley, at the south end of San Francisco Bay in Central California. The information collected and used includes: a) detailed Quaternary geological mapping, b) over 650 geotechnical borings, c) probabilistic earthquake shaking information, and d) ground-water levels. Predictions of strain can be made using either empirical formulations or numerical simulations. In this project lateral spread displacements are estimated and new empirical relations to estimate future volumetric and shear strain are used. Geotechnical boring data to are used to: (a) develop isopach maps showing the thickness of sediment thatis likely to liquefy and deform under earthquake shaking; and (b) assess the variability in engineering properties within and between geologic map units. Preliminary results reveal that late Holocene deposits are likely to experience the greatest liquefaction-induced strains, while Holocene and late Pleistocene deposits are likely to experience significantly less horizontal and vertical strain in future earthquakes. Development of maps based on these analyses is feasible.

  19. Carbon cycling and burial in New Zealand's fjords

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa, Jessica L.; Moy, Christopher M.; Stirling, Claudine H.; Wilson, Gary S.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2014-10-01

    carbon cycling in continental margin settings is critical for constraining the global carbon cycle. Here we apply a multiproxy geochemical approach to evaluate regional carbon cycle dynamics in six New Zealand fjords. Using carbon and nitrogen concentrations and isotopes, lipid biomarkers, and redox-sensitive element concentrations, we show that the New Zealand fjords have carbon-rich surface sediments in basins that promote long-term storage (i.e., semirestricted basins with sediment accumulation rates of up to 4 mm yr-1). Using δ13C distributions to develop a mixing model, we find that organic carbon in fjord sediments is well-mixed from marine and terrestrial sources in down-fjord gradients. This is driven by high regional precipitation rates of >6 m yr-1, which promote carbon accumulation in fjord basins through terrestrial runoff. In addition, we have identified at least two euxinic subbasins, based on uranium, molybdenum, iron, and cadmium enrichment, that contain >7% organic carbon. Because the strength and position of the Southern Hemisphere westerly winds control precipitation and fjord circulation, carbon delivery and storage in the region are intimately linked to westerly wind variability. We estimate that the fjord region (759 km2) may be exporting up to 1.4 × 107 kgC yr-1, outpacing other types of continental margins in rates of carbon burial by up to 3 orders of magnitude.

  20. Urban Stream Burial Increases Watershed-Scale Nitrate Export.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Jake J; Golden, Heather E; Knightes, Christopher D; Mayer, Paul M; Kaushal, Sujay S; Pennino, Michael J; Arango, Clay P; Balz, David A; Elonen, Colleen M; Fritz, Ken M; Hill, Brian H

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) uptake in streams is an important ecosystem service that reduces nutrient loading to downstream ecosystems. Here we synthesize studies that investigated the effects of urban stream burial on N-uptake in two metropolitan areas and use simulation modeling to scale our measurements to the broader watershed scale. We report that nitrate travels on average 18 times farther downstream in buried than in open streams before being removed from the water column, indicating that burial substantially reduces N uptake in streams. Simulation modeling suggests that as burial expands throughout a river network, N uptake rates increase in the remaining open reaches which somewhat offsets reduced N uptake in buried reaches. This is particularly true at low levels of stream burial. At higher levels of stream burial, however, open reaches become rare and cumulative N uptake across all open reaches in the watershed rapidly declines. As a result, watershed-scale N export increases slowly at low levels of stream burial, after which increases in export become more pronounced. Stream burial in the lower, more urbanized portions of the watershed had a greater effect on N export than an equivalent amount of stream burial in the upper watershed. We suggest that stream daylighting (i.e., uncovering buried streams) can increase watershed-scale N retention. PMID:26186731

  1. URBAN STREAM BURIAL INCREASES WATERSHED-SCALE NITRATE EXPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) uptake in streams is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of streams in stormwater pipes in urban watersheds. We predicted that stream burial reduces the capacity of streams to remove nitrate (NO3-) from the water column by in...

  2. 40 CFR 229.1 - Burial at sea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Burial at sea. 229.1 Section 229.1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING GENERAL PERMITS § 229.1 Burial at sea. (a) All persons subject to title I of the Act are hereby granted a general permit...

  3. 40 CFR 229.1 - Burial at sea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Burial at sea. 229.1 Section 229.1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING GENERAL PERMITS § 229.1 Burial at sea. (a) All persons subject to title I of the Act are hereby granted a general permit to transport human remains from the...

  4. Fire hazards analysis for solid waste burial grounds

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, K.M.

    1995-09-28

    This document comprises the fire hazards analysis for the solid waste burial grounds, including TRU trenches, low-level burial grounds, radioactive mixed waste trenches, etc. It analyzes fire potential, and fire damage potential for these facilities. Fire scenarios may be utilized in future safety analysis work, or for increasing the understanding of where hazards may exist in the present operation.

  5. Long-length contaminated equipment burial containers fabrication process procedures

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, W.A., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-11

    These special process procedures cover the detailed step-by-step procedures required by the supplier who will manufacture the Long-Length Contaminated Equipment (LLCE) Burial Container design. Also included are detailed step-by-step procedures required by the disposal process for completion of the LLCE Burial Containers at Hanford.

  6. Urban Stream Burial Increases Watershed-Scale Nitrate Export

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Jake J.; Golden, Heather E.; Knightes, Christopher D.; Mayer, Paul M.; Kaushal, Sujay S.; Pennino, Michael J.; Arango, Clay P.; Balz, David A.; Elonen, Colleen M.; Fritz, Ken M.; Hill, Brian H.

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) uptake in streams is an important ecosystem service that reduces nutrient loading to downstream ecosystems. Here we synthesize studies that investigated the effects of urban stream burial on N-uptake in two metropolitan areas and use simulation modeling to scale our measurements to the broader watershed scale. We report that nitrate travels on average 18 times farther downstream in buried than in open streams before being removed from the water column, indicating that burial substantially reduces N uptake in streams. Simulation modeling suggests that as burial expands throughout a river network, N uptake rates increase in the remaining open reaches which somewhat offsets reduced N uptake in buried reaches. This is particularly true at low levels of stream burial. At higher levels of stream burial, however, open reaches become rare and cumulative N uptake across all open reaches in the watershed rapidly declines. As a result, watershed-scale N export increases slowly at low levels of stream burial, after which increases in export become more pronounced. Stream burial in the lower, more urbanized portions of the watershed had a greater effect on N export than an equivalent amount of stream burial in the upper watershed. We suggest that stream daylighting (i.e., uncovering buried streams) can increase watershed-scale N retention. PMID:26186731

  7. A preliminary regional assessment of earthquake-induced landslide susceptibility for Vrancea Seismic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micu, Mihai; Balteanu, Dan; Ionescu, Constantin; Havenith, Hans; Radulian, Mircea; van Westen, Cees; Damen, Michiel; Jurchescu, Marta

    2015-04-01

    ) with head scarps near mountain tops and close to faults is similar to the one of large mass movements for which a seismic origin is proved (such as in the Tien Shan, Pamir, Longmenshan, etc.). Thus, correlations between landslide occurrence and combined seismotectonic and climatic factors are needed to support a regional multi-hazard risk assessment. The purpose of this paper is to harmonize for the first time at a regional scale the landslide predisposing factors and seismotectonic triggers and to present a first qualitative insight into the earthquake-induced landslide susceptibility for the Vrancea Seismic Region in terms of a GIS-based analysis of Newmark displacement (ND). In this way, it aims at better defining spatial and temporal distribution patterns of earthquake-triggered landslides. Arias Intensity calculation involved in the assessment considers both regional seismic hazard aspects and singular earthquake scenarios (adjusted by topography amplification factors). The known distribution of landslides mapped through digital stereographic interpretation of high-resolution aerial photos is compared with digital active fault maps and the computed ND maps to statistically outline the seismotectonic influence on slope stability in the study area. The importance of this approach resides in two main outputs. The fist one, of a fundamental nature, by providing the first regional insight into the seismic landslides triggering framework, is allowing us to understand if deep-focus earthquakes may trigger massive slope failures in an area with a relatively smooth relief (compared to the high mountain regions in Central Asia, the Himalayas), considering possible geologic and topographic site effects. The second one, more applied, will allow a better accelerometer instrumentation and monitoring of slopes and also will provide a first correlation of different levels of seismic shaking with precipitation recurrences, an important relationship within a multi-hazard risk

  8. Modelling Regional Hotspots of Water Pollution Induced by Salinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malsy, M.; Floerke, M.

    2014-12-01

    Insufficient water quality is one of the main global topics causing risk to human health, biodiversity, and food security. At this, salinization of water and land resources is widely spread especially in arid to semi-arid climates, where salinization, often induced by irrigation agriculture, is a fundamental aspect of land degradation. High salinity is crucial to water use for drinking, irrigation, and industrial purposes, and therefore poses a risk to human health and ecosystem status. However, salinization is also an economic problem, in particular in those regions where agriculture makes a significant contribution to the economy and/or where agriculture is mainly based on irrigation. Agricultural production is exposed to high salinity of irrigation water resulting in lower yields. Hence, not only the quantity of irrigation water is of importance for growing cops but also its quality, which may further reduce the available resources. Thereby a major concern for food production and security persists, as irrigated agriculture accounts for over 30% of the total agricultural production. In this study, the large scale water quality model WorldQual was applied to simulate recent total dissolved solids (TDS) loadings and in-stream concentrations from point and diffuse sources to get an insight on potential environmental impacts as well as risks to food security. Regional focus in this study is on developing countries, as these are most threatened by water pollution. Furthermore, insufficient water quality for irrigation and therefore restrictions in irrigation water use were examined, indicating limitations to crop production. For this purpose, model simulations were conducted for the year 2010 to show the recent status of surface water quality and to identify hotspots and main causes of pollution. Our results show that salinity hotspots mainly occur in peak irrigation regions as irrigated agriculture is by far the dominant sector contributing to water abstractions as

  9. Hypercapnia increases core temperature cooling rate during snow burial.

    PubMed

    Grissom, Colin K; Radwin, Martin I; Scholand, Mary Beth; Harmston, Chris H; Muetterties, Mark C; Bywater, Tim J

    2004-04-01

    Previous retrospective studies report a core body temperature cooling rate of 3 degrees C/h during avalanche burial. Hypercapnia occurs during avalanche burial secondary to rebreathing expired air, and the effect of hypercapnia on hypothermia during avalanche burial is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the core temperature cooling rate during snow burial under normocapnic and hypercapnic conditions. We measured rectal core body temperature (T(re)) in 12 subjects buried in compacted snow dressed in a lightweight clothing insulation system during two different study burials. In one burial, subjects breathed with a device (AvaLung 2, Black Diamond Equipment) that resulted in hypercapnia over 30-60 min. In a control burial, subjects were buried under identical conditions with a modified breathing device that maintained normocapnia. Mean snow temperature was -2.5 +/- 2.0 degrees C. Burial time was 49 +/- 14 min in the hypercapnic study and 60 min in the normocapnic study (P = 0.02). Rate of decrease in T(re) was greater with hypercapnia (1.2 degrees C/h by multiple regression analysis, 95% confidence limits of 1.1-1.3 degrees C/h) than with normocapnia (0.7 degrees C/h, 95% confidence limit of 0.6-0.8 degrees C/h). In the hypercapnic study, the fraction of inspired carbon dioxide increased from 1.4 +/- 1.0 to 7.0 +/- 1.4%, minute ventilation increased from 15 +/- 7 to 40 +/- 12 l/min, and oxygen saturation decreased from 97 +/- 1 to 90 +/- 6% (P < 0.01). During the normocapnic study, these parameters remained unchanged. In this study, T(re) cooling rate during snow burial was less than previously reported and was increased by hypercapnia. This may have important implications for prehospital treatment of avalanche burial victims. PMID:14660514

  10. Holocene age of the Yuha burial: Direct radiocarbon determinations by accelerator mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stafford, Thomas W., Jr.; Jull, A.J.T.; Zabel, T.H.; Donahue, D.J.; Duhamel, R.C.; Brendel, K.; Haynes, C.V., Jr.; Bischoff, J.L.; Payen, L.A.; Taylor, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    The view that human populations may not have arrived in the Western Hemisphere before about 12,000 radiocarbon yr BP1,2 has been challenged by claims of much greater antiquity for a small number of archaeological sites and human skeleton samples. One such site is the Homo sapiens sapiens cairn burial excavated in 1971 from the Yuha desert, Imperial County, California3-5. Radiocarbon analysis of caliche coating one of the bones of the skeleton yielded a radiocarbon age of 21,500??1,000 yr BP4, while radiocarbon and uranium series analyses of caliche coating a cairn boulder yielded ages of 22,125??400 and 19,000??3,000 yr BP, respectively5. The late Pleistocene age assignment to the Yuha burial has been challenged by comparing the cultural context of the burial with other cairn burials in the same region6, on the basis of the site's geomorphological context and from radiocarbon analyses of soil caliches. 7,8 In rebuttal, arguments in defence of the original age assignment have been presented9,10 as well as an amino acid racemization analysis on the Yuha skeleton indicating an age of 23,600??2,600 yr BP11. The tandem accelerator mass spectrometer at the University of Arizona has now been used to measure the ratio of 14C/13C in several organic and inorganic fractions of post-cranial bone from the Yuha H. sapiens sapiens skeleton. Isotope ratios from six chemical fractions all yielded radiocarbon ages for the skeleton of less than 4,000 yr BP. These results indicate that the Yuha skeleton is of Holocene age, in agreement with the cultural context of the burial, and in disagreement with the previously assigned Pleistocene age of 19,000-23,000 yr. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  11. Nationwide Surveillance for Pathogenic Microorganisms in Groundwater near Carcass Burials Constructed in South Korea in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Joung, Ha Kyung; Han, Sang Ha; Park, Su-Jung; Jheong, Weon-Hwa; Ahn, Tae Seok; Lee, Joong-Bok; Jeong, Yong-Seok; Jang, Kyung Lib; Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Rhee, Ok-Jae; Park, Jeong-Woong; Paik, Soon Young

    2013-01-01

    Widespread outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease and avian influenza occurred in South Korea during 2010. In response to the culling of many animals to attenuate the spread of disease, South Korea used mass burial sites to dispose of the large number of carcasses; consequently, concerns about groundwater contamination by leachate from these burial sites are increasing. Groundwater is one of the main sources of drinking water, and its cleanliness is directly related to public health. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the safety of groundwater around the burial sites (total of 600 sites). A total of 1,200 groundwater samples were collected though the country, and microbial analysis was conducted during two time periods: during the spring (n = 600; April to June 2012) and after rainfall (n = 600; August to October, 2012; fall). Fecal coliform and Escherichia coli were detected in 173 (14.4%) and 85 (7.1%) of the 1,200 samples, respectively. Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. each were detected only once (0.083%). Clostridium perfringens was detected from 7 groundwater samples (0.583%), and E. coli O157:H7 was not detected. With respect to norovirus, only the GII type was detected from six groundwater samples (0.5%), and enterovirus was detected in 15 groundwater samples (1.25%). The frequency of E. coli that we detected was lower than that found in previous studies conducted in South Korea, but we detected higher frequency of fecal coliform than that observed in a previous report. The contamination frequencies of Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. were very low, but C. perfringens, which could be an indicator of fecal pollution, was detected in seven regions. Overall, the results of the present study indicate a low possibility of contamination from burial sites. However, consistent monitoring is required to prevent microbial contamination of groundwater near the burial sites. PMID:24351737

  12. Nationwide surveillance for pathogenic microorganisms in groundwater near carcass burials constructed in South Korea in 2010.

    PubMed

    Joung, Ha Kyung; Han, Sang Ha; Park, Su-Jung; Jheong, Weon-Hwa; Ahn, Tae Seok; Lee, Joong-Bok; Jeong, Yong-Seok; Jang, Kyung Lib; Lee, Gyu-Cheol; Rhee, Ok-Jae; Park, Jeong-Woong; Paik, Soon Young

    2013-12-01

    Widespread outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease and avian influenza occurred in South Korea during 2010. In response to the culling of many animals to attenuate the spread of disease, South Korea used mass burial sites to dispose of the large number of carcasses; consequently, concerns about groundwater contamination by leachate from these burial sites are increasing. Groundwater is one of the main sources of drinking water, and its cleanliness is directly related to public health. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the safety of groundwater around the burial sites (total of 600 sites). A total of 1,200 groundwater samples were collected though the country, and microbial analysis was conducted during two time periods: during the spring (n = 600; April to June 2012) and after rainfall (n = 600; August to October, 2012; fall). Fecal coliform and Escherichia coli were detected in 173 (14.4%) and 85 (7.1%) of the 1,200 samples, respectively. Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. each were detected only once (0.083%). Clostridium perfringens was detected from 7 groundwater samples (0.583%), and E. coli O157:H7 was not detected. With respect to norovirus, only the GII type was detected from six groundwater samples (0.5%), and enterovirus was detected in 15 groundwater samples (1.25%). The frequency of E. coli that we detected was lower than that found in previous studies conducted in South Korea, but we detected higher frequency of fecal coliform than that observed in a previous report. The contamination frequencies of Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. were very low, but C. perfringens, which could be an indicator of fecal pollution, was detected in seven regions. Overall, the results of the present study indicate a low possibility of contamination from burial sites. However, consistent monitoring is required to prevent microbial contamination of groundwater near the burial sites. PMID:24351737

  13. Evaluation method of leachate leaking from carcass burial site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.; Kim, H.; Lee, M.; Lee, K.; Kim, S.; Kim, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T.; Han, J.

    2012-12-01

    More than 150,000 cattle carcasses and 3,140,000 pig carcasses were buried all over the nation in Korea because of 2010 outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD). Various disposal Techniques such as incineration, composting, rendering, and burial have been developed and applied to effectively dispose an animal carcass. Since a large number of carcasses should be disposed for a short-term period to prevent the spread of FMD virus, most of the carcasses were disposed by mass burial technique. However, a long-term management and monitoring of leachate discharges are required because mass burial can cause soil and groundwater contamination. In this study, we used key parameters related to major components of leachate such as NH4-N, NO3-N, Cl-, E.coli and electrical conductivity as potential leachate contamination indicator to determine leachate leakage from the site. We monitored 300 monitoring wells in both burial site and the monitoring well 5m away from burial sites to identify leachate leaking from burial site. Average concentration of NH3-N in 300 monitoring wells, both burial site and the well 5m away from burial sites, were 2,593 mg/L and 733 mg/L, respectively. 24% out of 300 monitoring wells showed higher than 10 mg/L NH4-N, 100 mg/L Cl- and than 800 μS/cm electrical conductivity. From this study, we set up 4 steps guidelines to evaluate leachate leakage like; step 1 : High potential step of leachate leakage, step 2 : Middle potential step of leachate leakage, step 3 : Low potential step of leachate leakage, step 4 : No leachate leakage. On the basis of this result, we moved 34 leachate leaking burial sites to other places safely and it is necessary to monitor continuously the monitoring wells for environmental protection and human health.

  14. Identification and Tracing Groundwater Contamination by Livestock Burial Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, K.; Ha, K.; Park, S.; Kim, Y.; Lee, K.

    2011-12-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) or hoof-and-mouth disease is a severe plague for animal farming that affects cloven-hoofed animals such as cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Since it is highly infectious and can be easily proliferated by infected animals, contaminated equipments, vehicles, clothing, people, and predators. It is widely known that the virus responsible for FMD is a picornavirus, the prototypic member of the genus Aphthovirus. A serious outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease, leading to the stamping out of 3.53 millions of pigs and cattle and the construction of 4,538 burial sites until 15th March, 2011. The build-up of carcass burial should inevitably produce leachate by the decomposition of buried livestock affecting the surround environment such as air, soil, groundwater, and surface water. The most important issues which are currently raised by scientists are groundwater contamination by leachate from the livestock burial sites. This study examined the current status of FMD outbreak occurred in 2010-2011 and the issues of groundwater contamination by leachate from livestock burial sites. The hydrogeochemical, geophysical, and hydrogeological studies were executed to identify and trace groundwater contamination by leachate from livestock burial sites. Generally livestock mortality leachate contains high concentrations of NH3-N, HCO3-, Cl-, SO42-, K+, Na+, P along with relative lesser amounts of iron, calcium, and magnesium. The groundwater chemical data around four burial sites showed high NH3-N, HCO3-, and K+ suggesting the leachate leakage from burial sites. This is also proved by resistivity monitoring survey and tracer tests. The simulation results of leachate dispersion showed the persistent detrimental impacts for groundwater environment for a long time (~50 years). It is need to remove the leachate of burial sites to prevent the dispersion of leachate from livestock burial to groundwater and to monitor the groundwater quality. The most important

  15. Burial and thermal history of the central Appalachian basin, based on three 2-D models of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, Elisabeth L.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Three regional-scale, cross sectional (2-D) burial and thermal history models are presented for the central Appalachian basin based on the detailed geologic cross sections of Ryder and others (2004), Crangle and others (2005), and Ryder, R.T., written communication. The models integrate the available thermal and geologic information to constrain the burial, uplift, and erosion history of the region. The models are restricted to the relatively undeformed part of the basin and extend from the Rome trough in West Virginia and Pennsylvania northwestward to the Findlay arch in Ohio. This study expands the scope of previous work by Rowan and others (2004) which presented a preliminary burial/thermal history model for a cross section (E-E') through West Virginia and Ohio. In the current study, the burial/thermal history model for E-E' is revised, and integrated with results of two additional cross sectional models (D-D' and C-C'). The burial/thermal history models provide calculated thermal maturity (Ro%) values for the entire stratigraphic sequence, including hydrocarbon source rocks, along each of the three cross sections. In contrast, the Ro and conodont CAI data available in the literature are sparse and limited to specific stratigraphic intervals. The burial/thermal history models also provide the regional temperature and pressure framework that is needed to model hydrocarbon migration.

  16. Criticality assessment of TRU burial ground culverts

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    1990-09-26

    An effort to assess the criticality risks of {sup 239}Pu in TRU Burial Ground Culverts has been underway for several years. The concern arose from discrepancies in two types of monitors that have been used to assay the {sup 239}Pu waste prior to storage in 55-gallon drums that are placed in the culverts. One type is the solid waste monitor (SWM), which is based on gamma-ray measurements; the other is the neutron coincidence monitor, which is based on neutron measurements. The NCC was put into routine service after 1985 and has generally yielded higher 239 Pu assays than the SWM. Culverts with pre-1986 waste only had SWM assays of {sup 239}Pu; thus, it was questioned whether their actual {sup 239}Pu loadings could be high enough to pose criticality concerns. Studies to characterize the culvert criticality potential have included appraisal of NCC vs SWM, neutron measurements atop the culverts, gamma-ray measurements atop the culverts, and probabilistic risk analyses. Overall, these studies have implied that the culverts are critically safe; however, their results have not been examined collectively. The present report uses the collective information of the preceding studies to arrive at a more complete assessment of the culvert criticality aspects. A conservative k{sub eff} is estimated for an individual suspicious culvert and a PRA is evaluated for its {open_quotes}worst{close_quotes} drum. These two pieces of information form the basis of the appraisal, but other evidence is also included as support.

  17. SECTION D, WITH FLAT GROUP BURIAL MARKER AT RIGHT FOREGROUND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SECTION D, WITH FLAT GROUP BURIAL MARKER AT RIGHT FOREGROUND. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, 0.25 mile north of southern tip of Rock Island, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  18. Organic carbon burial efficiency in a large tropical hydroelectric reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Raquel; Sobek, Sebastian; Kosten, Sarian; Cole, Jonathan; Cardoso, Simone; Roland, Fábio

    2014-05-01

    Because hydroelectric reservoirs receive relatively high inputs of sediments when compared to lakes and oceans, these systems are important sites for organic carbon (OC) accumulation. Nevertheless, the actual magnitude of carbon accumulating in reservoirs is poorly known due to a lack of whole-system studies of carbon burial. Hydroelectric reservoirs are also particularly heterogeneous systems in terms of organic carbon sources and sedimentation rates. Such heterogeneity leads to strong variations on carbon fluxes, even though the effect on OC burial has not yet been discussed. The aim of this paper was to determine the OC burial rate and efficiency in a large tropical reservoir and evaluate the importance of spatial heterogeneity affecting OC burial. Burial rates were determined through a novel approach which combines sediment sample analyses and a seismic survey. Our results confirm the major effect of sedimentation heterogeneity on OC burial efficiency which varied from 9 to 89% in the reservoir. In addition to the river-dam gradient of sedimentation, our data reinforce the importance of basin morphometry in determining the patterns of sediment deposition and carbon accumulation. No carbon accumulation occurred along the margins of the reservoir and irregular bottom morphology leaded to irregular carbon deposition. An integrative analysis, including the reservoir's heterogeneity, indicated that the whole system accumulates 42.2 g C m-2 yr-1 and that roughly 67% of the total OC load to the sediments is actually buried. The data also suggest that the sediment of the reservoir is mainly composed of terrestrial OC and that the heterogeneity in OC sources plays a minor role determining OC burial efficiency, which was strongly determined by sediment accumulation rate. Finally, our results in combination with literature data suggest that the high sedimentation rates cause hydroelectric reservoirs to accumulate carbon more efficiently than lakes, regardless of

  19. 25 CFR 20.326 - Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Does Burial Assistance cover transportation costs? 20.326... cover transportation costs? Transportation costs directly associated with burials are normally a part of the established burial rate. If a provider adds an additional transportation charge to the burial...

  20. Tritium in the burial ground of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.

    1993-06-01

    This memorandum reviews the available information on tritium-contaminated material discarded to burial grounds. Tritium was the first isotope studied because it represents the most immediate concern with regard to release to the environment. Substantial amounts of tritium are known to be present in the ground water underneath the area, and outcropping of this ground water in springs and seeps has been observed. The response to this release of tritium from the burial ground is a current concern. The amount of tritium emplaced in the burial ground facilities is very uncertain, however, some general conclusions can be made. In particular, most of the tritium buried is associated with spent equipment and other waste, rather than spent melts. Correspondingly, most of the tritium in the ground water seems to be associated with burials of this type, rather than the spent melts. Maps are presented showing the location of burials of tritiated waste by type, and the location of the largest individual burials according to COBRA records.

  1. Source of silicate and carbonate cements during deep burial diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, P.K.

    1986-05-01

    Detrital silicate minerals and silicate cements (formed during shallow burial) of siliciclastic sandstones commonly dissolve during deep burial diagenesis. Quartz, feldspars, mica, and garnet among detrital silicate minerals, and quartz and kaolinite among authigenic silicate minerals show extensive dissolution features during deep burial diagenesis of siliciclastic sandstones of the Gondwana Supergroup, India. No dissolution features were observed in zircon, tourmalene, and rutile among detrital minerals or in chlorite and smectite among early formed authigenic minerals. Dissolution enriched the pore fluids in silica, potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, iron, and aluminum. Authigenic cements formed during this stage are illite, quartz, feldspar, iron oxide, and carbonates of calcium, magnesium, and iron. Mass-balance calculations show that the source of all silicate cements formed during deep burial diagenesis was internally derived from the dissolution of both detrital and early formed authigenic cements. However, a considerable gap exists between the amounts of cations (calcium, magnesium, and iron) derived internally and the respective amounts of these cations needed to form the various carbonate cements at this stage. Therefore, an outside source for these cations is needed to explain the formation of carbonate cements. A large mass transfer of cations from outside the sediment source seems remote since ground-water movement, which probably carried cement from an external source, is extremely restricted at great burial depths. Therefore, carbonate cements may have been major constituents during shallow burial diagenesis in Gondwana sandstones. Subsequently, these early formed carbonates were completely dissolved and remobilized as late-stage carbonate cement.

  2. Multiple Palaeoproterozoic carbon burial episodes and excursions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. P.; Prave, A. R.; Condon, D. J.; Lepland, A.; Fallick, A. E.; Romashkin, A. E.; Medvedev, P. V.; Rychanchik, D. V.

    2015-08-01

    Organic-rich rocks (averaging 2-5% total organic carbon) and positive carbonate-carbon isotope excursions (δ13C > + 5 ‰ and locally much higher, i.e. the Lomagundi-Jatuli Event) are hallmark features of Palaeoproterozoic successions and are assumed to archive a global event of unique environmental conditions following the c. 2.3 Ga Great Oxidation Event. Here we combine new and published geochronology that shows that the main Palaeoproterozoic carbon burial episodes (CBEs) preserved in Russia, Gabon and Australia were temporally discrete depositional events between c. 2.10 and 1.85 Ga. In northwest Russia we can also show that timing of the termination of the Lomagundi-Jatuli Event may have differed by up to 50 Ma between localities, and that Ni mineralisation occurred at c. 1920 Ma. Further, CBEs have traits in common with Mesozoic Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs); both are exceptionally organic-rich relative to encasing strata, associated with contemporaneous igneous activity and marked by organic carbon isotope profiles that exhibit a stepped decrease followed by a stabilisation period and recovery. Although CBE strata are thicker and of greater duration than OAEs (100 s of metres versus metres, ∼106 years versus ∼105 years), their shared characteristics hint at a commonality of cause(s) and feedbacks. This suggests that CBEs represent processes that can be either basin-specific or global in nature and a combination of circumstances that are not unique to the Palaeoproterozoic. Our findings urge circumspection and re-consideration of models that assume CBEs are a Deep Time singularity.

  3. Hydrology of the Melton Valley radioactive-waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, D.A.; Bradley, M.W.

    1988-12-31

    Burial grounds 4, 5, and 6 were used sequentially from 1951 to the present for the disposal of solid, low-level radioactive waste by burial in shallow trenches and auger holes. Abundant rainfall, a generally thin unsaturated zone, geologic media of inherently low permeability, and the operational practices employed have contributed to partial saturation of the buried waste, leaching of radionuclides, and transport of dissolved matter from the burial areas. Two primary methods of transport from these sites are by dissolution in circulating ground water, and the overflow of fluids in trenches and subsequent flow across land surface. The waste-disposal areas are underlain by the Conasauga Group (Cambrian age), a complex sequence of mudstone, siltstone, and limestone interbeds grading from one lithotype to the other, both laterally and vertically. Compressional forces that caused regional thrust faulting also caused much internal deformation of the beds. Folds, bedding-plane faults, and joints are widespread. Small solution openings have developed in some areas where the structurally-related openings have provided ingress to ground water.

  4. Sediment organic carbon burial in agriculturally eutrophic impoundments over the last century

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, J.A.; Cole, J.J.; Middelburg, J.J.; Striegl, R.G.; Duarte, C.M.; Kortelainen, Pirkko; Prairie, Y.T.; Laube, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    We estimated organic carbon (OC) burial over the past century in 40 impoundments in one of the most intensively agricultural regions of the world. The volume of sediment deposited per unit time varied as a function of lake and watershed size, but smaller impoundments had greater deposition and accumulation rates per unit area. Annual water storage losses varied from 0.1-20% and were negatively correlated with impoundment size. Estimated sediment OC content was greatest in lakes with low ratios of watershed to impoundment area. Sediment OC burial rates were higher than those assumed for fertile impoundments by previous studies and were much higher than those measured in natural lakes. OC burial ranged from a high of 17,000 g C m-2 a-1 to a low of 148 g C m-2 a-1 and was significantly greater in small impoundments than large ones. The OC buried in these lakes originates in both autochthonous and allochthonous production. These analyses suggest that OC sequestration in moderate to large impoundments may be double the rate assumed in previous analyses. Extrapolation suggests that they may bury 4 times as much carbon (C) as the world's oceans. The world's farm ponds alone may bury more OC than the oceans and 33% as much as the world's rivers deliver to the sea. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Patterns of Irregular Burials in Western Europe (1st-5th Century A.D.)

    PubMed Central

    Milella, Marco; Mariotti, Valentina; Belcastro, Maria Giovanna; Knüsel, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Irregular burials (IB—burials showing features that contrast with the majority of others in their geographic and chronological context) have been the focus of archaeological study because of their relative rarity and enigmatic appearance. Interpretations of IB often refer to supposed fear of the dead or to social processes taking place in time-specific contexts. However, a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of IB for various geographical contexts is still lacking, a fact that hampers any discussion of these burials on a larger scale. Methods Here, we collected a bibliographic dataset of 375 IB from both Britain and Continental Europe, altogether spanning a time period from the 1st to the 5th century AD. Each burial has been coded according to ten dichotomous variables, further analyzed by means of chi-squared tests on absolute frequencies, non-metric multidimensional scaling, and cluster analysis. Results Even acknowledging the limits of this study, and in particular the bias represented by the available literature, our results point to interesting patterns. Geographically, IB show a contrast between Britain and Continental Europe, possibly related to historical processes specific to these regions. Different types of IB (especially prone depositions and depositions with the cephalic extremity displaced) present a series of characteristics and associations between features that permit a more detailed conceptualization of these occurrences from a socio-cultural perspective that aids to elucidate their funerary meaning. Conclusions and Significance Altogether, the present work stresses the variability of IB, and the need to contextualize them in a proper archaeological and historical context. It contributes to the discussion of IB by providing a specific geographic and chronological frame of reference that supports a series of hypotheses about the cultural processes possibly underlying their occurrence. PMID:26115408

  6. Sediment accretion and organic carbon burial relative to sea-level rise and storm events in two mangrove forests in Everglades National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoak, Joseph M.; Breithaupt, Joshua L.; Smith, Thomas J., III; Sanders, Christian J.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this investigation was to examine how sediment accretion and organic carbon (OC) burial rates in mangrove forests respond to climate change. Specifically, will the accretion rates keep pace with sea-level rise, and what is the source and fate of OC in the system? Mass accumulation, accretion and OC burial rates were determined via 210Pb dating (i.e. 100 year time scale) on sediment cores collected from two mangrove forest sites within Everglades National Park, Florida (USA). Enhanced mass accumulation, accretion and OC burial rates were found in an upper layer that corresponded to a well-documented storm surge deposit. Accretion rates were 5.9 and 6.5 mm yr−1 within the storm deposit compared to overall rates of 2.5 and 3.6 mm yr−1. These rates were found to be matching or exceeding average sea-level rise reported for Key West, Florida. Organic carbon burial rates were 260 and 393 g m−2 yr−1 within the storm deposit compared to 151 and 168 g m−2 yr−1 overall burial rates. The overall rates are similar to global estimates for OC burial in marine wetlands. With tropical storms being a frequent occurrence in this region the resulting storm surge deposits are an important mechanism for maintaining both overall accretion and OC burial rates. Enhanced OC burial rates within the storm deposit could be due to an increase in productivity created from higher concentrations of phosphorus within storm-delivered sediments and/or from the deposition of allochthonous OC. Climate change-amplified storms and sea-level rise could damage mangrove forests, exposing previously buried OC to oxidation and contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, the processes described here provide a mechanism whereby oxidation of OC would be limited and the overall OC reservoir maintained within the mangrove forest sediments.

  7. Hydraulic roughness of earth covers at a cold-desert waste burial site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, B.F.; Bent, G.C.; Hart, G.E.

    1992-01-01

    A kinematic wave model of overland flow was used to calculate hydraulic roughness coefficients for earth covers and native hillslope surfaces at a waste burial site. Manning's n roughness coefficients were greater on earth cover plots planted to crested wheatgrass (n = 0.076) than on those planted to streambank wheatgrass (n = 0.030). Mound and intermound microtopography strongly influenced overland flow geometry on the bare native hillslope plots resulting in low apparent roughness values (n = 0.013). Time-related changes in hydraulic roughness appeared to be caused by development of a rain-induced crust on exposed soil surfaces that reduced infiltration and increased plot smoothness. -from Authors

  8. Regional deposition of particles in human lung after induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Svartengren, M; Philipson, K; Linnman, L; Camner, P

    1986-01-01

    The percentage 24-hr lung retention (Ret24), a measure of penetration to the aveoli, of 4 micron monodispersed Teflon particles, aerodynamic diameter 6 micron, was studied in 8 healthy nonsmokers. The particles were inhaled at 0.2 1/sec with maximally deep breaths. Bronchoconstriction was induced by inhalation of a methacholinebromide aerosol for one exposure before and for one exposure after inhalation of the Teflon particles. Airway resistance (Raw) was measured using a whole body pletysmograph before and after the induction of bronchoconstriction and increased on an average by a factor 2-3. Ret24 was significantly lower when the Teflon particles were inhaled during bronchoconstriction than when bronchoconstriction was induced after inhalation of the Teflon particles, 26 +/- 12% and 48 +/- 6% (mean +/- SD), respectively. These experimental data agree fairly well with data on deposition due to impaction and sedimentation using a lung model where the diameters of the airways were varied so that an increase in airway resistance occurs similar to that produced in our experimental subjects. However, the experimental data tended to be lower than the theoretical ones when the particles were inhaled during the induced bronchoconstriction. In this study, where the mucociliary transport system was stimulated by methacholinebromide, the percentage 3-hr retention (Ret3) was highly correlated with Ret24, r = 0.97, i.e., Ret3 can be used instead of the Ret24. This implies that radionuclides with shorter half-lives which give lower radiation doses, can be used, and that subjects can be studied within shorter periods of time. PMID:3516667

  9. Analysis of pumping-induced unsaturated regions beneath aperennial river

    SciTech Connect

    Su, G.W.; Jasperse, J.; Seymour, D.; Constantz, J.; Zhou, Q.

    2007-05-15

    The presence of an unsaturated region beneath a streambedduring groundwater pumping near streams reduces the pumping capacity whenit reaches the well screens, changes flow paths, and alters the types ofbiological transformations in the streambed sediments. Athree-dimensional, multi-phase flow model of two horizontal collectorwells along the Russian River near Forestville, California was developedto investigate the impact of varying the ratio of the aquifer tostreambed permeability on (1) the formation of an unsaturated regionbeneath the stream, (2) the pumping capacity, (3) stream-water fluxesthrough the streambed, and (4) stream-water travel times to the collectorwells. The aquifer to streambed permeability ratio at which theunsaturated region was initially observed ranged from 10 to 100. The sizeof the unsaturated region beneath the streambed increased as the aquiferto streambed permeability ratio increased. The simulations also indicatedthat for a particular aquifer permeability, decreasing the streambedpermeability by only a factor of 2-3 from the permeability wheredesaturation initially occurred resulted in reducing the pumpingcapacity. In some cases, the stream-water fluxes increased as thestreambed permeability decreased. However, the stream water residencetimes increased and the fraction of stream water that reached that thewells decreased as the streambed permeability decreased, indicating thata higher streambed flux does not necessarily correlate to greaterrecharge of stream water around the wells.

  10. Genome-wide identification of hypoxia-induced enhancer regions

    PubMed Central

    Preston, Jessica L.; Randel, Melissa A.; Johnson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a genome-wide method for de novo identification of enhancer regions. This approach enables massively parallel empirical investigation of DNA sequences that mediate transcriptional activation and provides a platform for discovery of regulatory modules capable of driving context-specific gene expression. The method links fragmented genomic DNA to the transcription of randomer molecule identifiers and measures the functional enhancer activity of the library by massively parallel sequencing. We transfected a Drosophila melanogaster library into S2 cells in normoxia and hypoxia, and assayed 4,599,881 genomic DNA fragments in parallel. The locations of the enhancer regions strongly correlate with genes up-regulated after hypoxia and previously described enhancers. Novel enhancer regions were identified and integrated with RNAseq data and transcription factor motifs to describe the hypoxic response on a genome-wide basis as a complex regulatory network involving multiple stress-response pathways. This work provides a novel method for high-throughput assay of enhancer activity and the genome-scale identification of 31 hypoxia-activated enhancers in Drosophila. PMID:26713262

  11. Major Effects on Teratogen-Induced Facial Clefting in Mice Determined by a Single Genetic Region

    PubMed Central

    Karolyi, J.; Erickson, R. P.; Liu, S.; Killewald, L.

    1990-01-01

    A major correlation has been found between the incidence of glucocorticoid-induced cleft palate and the chromosome 8 segment identified by N-acetyl transferase in mice. The resistant strain became fully susceptible while the susceptible strain became resistant when this chromosomal region, representing <0.7% of the genome, was transferred from one strain to the other by the construction of congenic strains. 6-Aminonicotinamide-induced cleft palate and phenytoin-induced cleft lip with or without cleft palate are also influenced by this genetic region but not as strongly. In both cases the susceptible strain became quite resistant to the teratogen-induced clefting when the N-acetyl transferase region of chromosome 8 was transferred. However, this chromosomal region does not make the resistant strain susceptible to these two teratogens. PMID:2227380

  12. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  13. Influence of Anchoring on Burial Depth of Submarine Pipelines.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Li, Yang; Su, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the twenty-first century, there has been widespread construction of submarine oil-gas transmission pipelines due to an increase in offshore oil exploration. Vessel anchoring operations are causing more damage to submarine pipelines due to shipping transportation also increasing. Therefore, it is essential that the influence of anchoring on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines is determined. In this paper, mathematical models for ordinary anchoring and emergency anchoring have been established to derive an anchor impact energy equation for each condition. The required effective burial depth for submarine pipelines has then been calculated via an energy absorption equation for the protection layer covering the submarine pipelines. Finally, the results of the model calculation have been verified by accident case analysis, and the impact of the anchoring height, anchoring water depth and the anchor weight on the required burial depth of submarine pipelines has been further analyzed. PMID:27166952

  14. Investigation of the induced gate noise of nanoscale MOSFETs in the very high frequency region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Jongwook; Kim, Yoon; Kang, Myounggon

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we investigated the induced gate current noise of nanoscale N/PMOS devices. To analyze the induced gate noise, the induced gate current noise source model was analytically derived. By using the proposed model, the induced gate noise source was compared with other noise sources, and its impact on noise parameters was also analyzed in long-channel and nanoscale N/PMOS devices in the very high frequency region (>100 GHz). The results showed that the induced gate noise of sub-40 nm CMOS technology is negligible, even in the design of very high frequency circuits.

  15. Imaging of cocaine-induced global and regional myocardial ischemia

    SciTech Connect

    Oster, Z.H.; Som, P.; Wang, G.J.; Weber, D.A. )

    1991-08-01

    Severe and often fatal cardiac complications have been reported in cocaine users with narrowed coronary arteries caused by atherosclerosis as well as in young adults with normal coronaries. The authors have found that in normal dogs cocaine induces severe temporary hypoperfusion of the left ventricle as indicated by a significantly lower 201Tl concentration compared to the baseline state. The most significant decrease in uptake occurred 5 min after injection and was more pronounced in the septal and apical segments. Following intravenous administration of cocaine, instead of gradual disappearance of 201Tl from the left ventricle, there was continuous increase in 201Tl concentration in the left ventricle. These imaging experiments indicate that the deleterious effects of cocaine on the heart are probably due to spasm of the coronaries and decreased myocardial perfusion. Since spasm of the large subpericardial vessels does not seem to explain the magnitude of the increased coronary resistance and decreased coronary flow after cocaine as described in the literature, it is suggested that microvascular spasm of smaller vessels plays a major role in the temporary decrease in perfusion. The data may also suggest that severe temporary myocardial ischemia is probably the initiating factor for the cardiac complications induced by cocaine.

  16. Alternatives to the burial of low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J. Mark

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The approach for management of LLRW in different countries has evolved differently due to many factors such as culture and public sentiment, systems of government, public policy, and geography. There are also various methods to disposition LLRW including but not limited to: - Long term statutes and unconditional or conditional release of material, - Direct Burial, - Treatment (Processing) {yields} Burial, - Treatment {yields} Unconditional Release, - Recycle for Unconditional Release or Reuse Within Any Industry, - Controlled Recycle within Nuclear Industry. (author)

  17. Carnosine reverses the aging-induced down regulation of brain regional serotonergic system.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Ghosh, Tushar K; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the role of carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide biomolecule, on brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) serotonergic system during aging. Results showed an aging-induced brain region specific significant (a) increase in Trp (except cerebral cortex) and their 5-HIAA steady state level with an increase in their 5-HIAA accumulation and declination, (b) decrease in their both 5-HT steady state level and 5-HT accumulation (except cerebral cortex). A significant decrease in brain regional 5-HT/Trp ratio (except cerebral cortex) and increase in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio were also observed during aging. Carnosine at lower dosages (0.5-1.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) didn't produce any significant response in any of the brain regions, but higher dosages (2.0-2.5μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) showed a significant response on those aging-induced brain regional serotonergic parameters. The treatment with carnosine (2.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days), attenuated these brain regional aging-induced serotonergic parameters and restored towards their basal levels that observed in 4 months young control rats. These results suggest that carnosine attenuates and restores the aging-induced brain regional down regulation of serotonergic system towards that observed in young rats' brain regions. PMID:26364584

  18. Antipsychotic Induced Gene Regulation in Multiple Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Girgenti, Matthew James; Nisenbaum, Laura K.; Bymaster, Franklin; Terwilliger, Rosemarie; Duman, Ronald S; Newton, Samuel Sathyanesan

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of action of antipsychotic drugs is not well understood. Their complex receptor affinity profiles indicate that their action could extend beyond dopamine receptor blockade. Single gene expression studies and high-throughput gene profiling have shown the induction of genes from several molecular classes and functional categories. Using a focused microarray approach we investigated gene regulation in rat striatum, frontal cortex and hippocampus after chronic administration of haloperidol or olanzapine. Regulated genes were validated by in-situ hybridization, realtime PCR and immunohistochemistry. Only limited overlap was observed in genes regulated by haloperidol and olanzapine. Both drugs elicited maximal gene regulation in the striatum and least in the hippocampus. Striatal gene induction by haloperidol was predominantly in neurotransmitter signaling, G-protein coupled receptors and transcription factors. Olanzapine prominently induced retinoic acid and trophic factor signaling genes in the frontal cortex. The data also revealed the induction of several genes that could be targeted in future drug development efforts. The study uncovered the induction of several novel genes, including somatostatin receptors and metabotropic glutamate receptors. The results demonstrating the regulation of multiple receptors and transcription factors suggests that both typical and atypical antipsychotics could possess a complex molecular mechanism of action. PMID:20070867

  19. Emplacement, rapid burial, and exhumation of 90-Ma plutons in southeastern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Himmelberg, G.R.; Haeussler, P.J.; Brew, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    In southeastern Alaska, granodiorite-tonalite plutons of the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt intruded the Jurassic-Cretaceous Gravina belt along the eastern side of the Alexander terrane around 90 Ma. These plutons postdate some deformation related to a major contractional event between the previously amalgamated Wrangellia and Alexander terranes and the previously accreted terranes of the North American margin. We studied the aureole mineral assemblages of these plutons near Petersburg, Alaska, determined pressure and temperature of equilibration, and examined structures that developed within and adjacent to these plutons. Parallelism of magmatic and submagmatic fabrics with fabrics in the country rock indicates synchroneity of pluton emplacement with regional deformation and suggests that magma transport to higher crustal levels was assisted by regional deformation. Replacement of andalusite by kyanite or sillimanite indicates crustal thickening soon after pluton emplacement. Regional structural analysis indicates the crustal thickening was accomplished by thrust burial. Thermobarometric analyses indicate the aureoles reached near-peak temperatures of 525 to 635 ??C at pressures of 570 to 630 MPa. Consideration of the rate of thermal decay of the aureoles suggests that burial was rapid and occurred at rates around 5 to 8 mm/year. Structural observations indicate there was contractional deformation before, during, and after emplacement of the 90-Ma plutons. Initial exhumation of the Admiralty-Revillagedo belt in the Petersburg area may have occurred along a thrust west of the pluton belt within the Gravina belt. ?? 2004 NRC Canada.

  20. Wind-induced upwelling in the Kerguelen Plateau Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gille, S. T.; Carranza, M. M.; Cambra, R.; Morrow, R.

    2014-06-01

    In contrast to most of the Southern Ocean, the Kerguelen Plateau supports an unusually strong spring chlorophyll (Chl a) bloom, likely because the euphotic zone in the region is supplied with higher iron concentrations. This study uses satellite wind, sea surface temperature (SST), and ocean color data to explore the impact of wind-driven processes on upwelling of cold (presumably iron-rich) water to the euphotic zone. High wind speeds typically correlate with cold sea surface temperatures, implying that wind-mixing leads to enhanced vertical mixing. Negative wind-stress curl also correlates with cold SSTs, implying that Ekman pumping can further enhance upwelling, and coupling between winds and SSTs associated with mesoscale eddies can locally modulate the wind-stress curl. Kerguelen has a significant wind shadow on its downwind side, which generates a wind-stress curl dipole that shifts location depending on wind direction. This leads to locally enhanced Ekman pumping on the downstream side of the Kerguelen Plateau, where Chl a blooms are observed most years.

  1. Large increases in carbon burial in northern lakes during the Anthropocene.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, Adam J; Anderson, N John; Prairie, Yves T; Engstrom, Daniel R; del Giorgio, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    Northern forests are important ecosystems for carbon (C) cycling and lakes within them process and bury large amounts of organic-C. Current burial estimates are poorly constrained and may discount other shifts in organic-C burial driven by global change. Here we analyse a suite of northern lakes to determine trends in organic-C burial throughout the Anthropocene. We found burial rates increased significantly over the last century and are up to five times greater than previous estimates. Despite a correlation with temperature, warming alone did not explain the increase in burial, suggesting the importance of other drivers including atmospherically deposited reactive nitrogen. Upscaling mean lake burial rates for each time period to global northern forests yields up to 4.5 Pg C accumulated in the last 100 years--20% of the total burial over the Holocene. Our results indicate that lakes will become increasingly important for C burial under future global change scenarios. PMID:26607672

  2. Large increases in carbon burial in northern lakes during the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heathcote, Adam J.; Anderson, N. John; Prairie, Yves T.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2015-11-01

    Northern forests are important ecosystems for carbon (C) cycling and lakes within them process and bury large amounts of organic-C. Current burial estimates are poorly constrained and may discount other shifts in organic-C burial driven by global change. Here we analyse a suite of northern lakes to determine trends in organic-C burial throughout the Anthropocene. We found burial rates increased significantly over the last century and are up to five times greater than previous estimates. Despite a correlation with temperature, warming alone did not explain the increase in burial, suggesting the importance of other drivers including atmospherically deposited reactive nitrogen. Upscaling mean lake burial rates for each time period to global northern forests yields up to 4.5 Pg C accumulated in the last 100 years--20% of the total burial over the Holocene. Our results indicate that lakes will become increasingly important for C burial under future global change scenarios.

  3. Large increases in carbon burial in northern lakes during the Anthropocene

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Adam J.; Anderson, N. John; Prairie, Yves T.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Northern forests are important ecosystems for carbon (C) cycling and lakes within them process and bury large amounts of organic-C. Current burial estimates are poorly constrained and may discount other shifts in organic-C burial driven by global change. Here we analyse a suite of northern lakes to determine trends in organic-C burial throughout the Anthropocene. We found burial rates increased significantly over the last century and are up to five times greater than previous estimates. Despite a correlation with temperature, warming alone did not explain the increase in burial, suggesting the importance of other drivers including atmospherically deposited reactive nitrogen. Upscaling mean lake burial rates for each time period to global northern forests yields up to 4.5 Pg C accumulated in the last 100 years—20% of the total burial over the Holocene. Our results indicate that lakes will become increasingly important for C burial under future global change scenarios. PMID:26607672

  4. 38 CFR 3.1704 - Burial allowance based on service-connected death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... under § 3.1709, Transportation expenses for burial in a national cemetery; and (2) VA may pay the plot or interment allowance for burial in a State veterans cemetery under § 3.1707(a), Plot or...

  5. Organic carbon burial efficiency in a large tropical hydroelectric reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, R.; Kosten, S.; Sobek, S.; Cardoso, S. J.; Figueiredo-Barros, M. P.; Estrada, C. H. D.; Roland, F.

    2015-11-01

    Hydroelectric reservoirs bury significant amounts of organic carbon (OC) in their sediments. Many reservoirs are characterized by high sedimentation rates, low oxygen concentrations in bottom water, and a high share of terrestrially derived OC, and all of these factors have been linked to a high efficiency of OC burial. However, investigations of OC burial efficiency (OCBE, i.e. the ratio between OC buried and deposited) in reservoirs is limited to a few studies, none of which include spatially resolved analyses. In this study we determined the spatial variation in OCBE in a large tropical reservoir and related it to sediment characteristics. Our results show that the sediment accumulation rate explains up to 92 % of the spatial variability in OCBE, outweighing the effect of other variables, such as OC source and oxygen exposure time. OCBE at the pelagic sites varied from 48 to 86 % (mean 67 %) and decreased towards the dam. At the margins, OCBE was lower (9 to 17 %) due to the low sediment accumulation in shallow areas. Our data show that the variability in OCBE both along the rivers-dam and the margin-pelagic axes must be considered in whole-reservoir assessments. Combining these results with a spatially resolved assessment of sediment accumulation and OC burial in the studied reservoir, we estimated a whole-basin OC burial efficiency of 57 %. Being the first whole-basin assessment of OCBE in a reservoir, these results suggest that reservoirs may bury OC more efficiently than natural lakes.

  6. 40 CFR 229.1 - Burial at sea.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Burial at sea. 229.1 Section 229.1 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING GENERAL PERMITS § 229.1... materials which are readily de-com-pos-a-ble in the marine environment may be disposed of under the...

  7. Organic carbon burial efficiency in a subtropical hydroelectric reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Raquel; Kosten, Sarian; Sobek, Sebastian; Jaqueline Cardoso, Simone; Figueiredo-Barros, Marcos Paulo; Henrique Duque Estrada, Carlos; Roland, Fábio

    2016-06-01

    Hydroelectric reservoirs bury significant amounts of organic carbon (OC) in their sediments. Many reservoirs are characterized by high sedimentation rates, low oxygen concentrations in bottom water and a high share of terrestrially derived OC, and all of these factors have been linked to a high efficiency of OC burial. However, investigations of OC burial efficiency (OCBE, i.e., the ratio between buried and deposited OC) in reservoirs are limited to a few studies, none of which include spatially resolved analyses. In this study we determined the spatial variation in OCBE in a large subtropical reservoir and related it to sediment characteristics. Our results show that the sediment accumulation rate explains up to 92 % of the spatial variability in OCBE, outweighing the effect of other variables, such as OC source and oxygen exposure time. OCBE at the pelagic sites varied from 48 to 86 % (mean 67 %) and decreased towards the dam. At the margins, OCBE was lower (9-17 %) due to the low sediment accumulation in shallow areas. Our data show that the variability in OCBE both along the rivers-dam and the margin-pelagic axes must be considered in whole-reservoir assessments. Combining these results with a spatially resolved assessment of sediment accumulation and OC burial in the studied reservoir, we estimated a spatially resolved mean OC burial efficiency of 57 %. Being the first assessment of OCBE with such a high spatial resolution in a reservoir, these results suggest that reservoirs may bury OC more efficiently than natural lakes.

  8. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    H. M. Sulloway

    2008-10-02

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-6 Burial Ground located in the 100-FR-2 Operable Unit of the 100-F Area on the Hanford Site. The trenches received waste from the 100-F Experimental Animal Farm, including animal manure, animal carcasses, laboratory waste, plastic, cardboard, metal, and concrete debris as well as a railroad tank car.

  9. The effect of lake browning and respiration mode on the burial and fate of carbon and mercury in the sediment of two boreal lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidorova, Anastasija; Bravo, Andrea G.; Riise, Gunnhild; Bouchet, Sylvain; Björn, Erik; Sobek, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In many northern temperate regions, the water color of lakes has increased over the past decades ("lake browning"), probably caused by an increased export of dissolved organic matter from soils. We investigated if the increase in water color in two lakes in Norway has resulted in increased burial of organic carbon (OC) and mercury (Hg) in the sediments and if the Hg was prone to methylation. Lake Solbergvann experienced a threefold water color increase, and OC burial increased approximately twofold concomitant to the water color increase. This lake had prolonged periods of anoxic bottom water, and anoxic OC mineralization rates were only about half of the oxic OC mineralization rates (7.7 and 17.5 g C m-2 yr-1, respectively), contributing to an efficient OC burial. In Lake Elvåga, where water color increase was only approximately twofold and bottom water was oxygenated, no recent increase in OC burial could be observed. Hg burial increased strongly in both lakes (threefold and 1.6-fold in Lake Solbergvann and Lake Elvåga, respectively), again concomitant to the recent water color increase. The proportion of methylated Hg (MeHg) in surficial sediment was 1 order of magnitude higher in Lake Elvåga (up to 6% MeHg) than in Lake Solbergvann (0.2-0.6% MeHg), probably related to the different oxygenation regimes. We conclude that lake browning can result in increased OC and Hg burial in lake sediments, but the extent of browning and the dominating mode of sediment respiration (aerobic or anaerobic) strongly affect burial and fate of OC and Hg in sediments.

  10. 76 FR 61148 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes) Activity... comments on the information needed to determine eligibility for issuance of a burial flag for a deceased... information technology. Title: Application for United States Flag for Burial Purposes, VA Form 21-2008....

  11. 38 CFR 3.1600 - Payment of burial expenses of deceased veterans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Payment of burial expenses of deceased veterans. 3.1600 Section 3.1600 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1600 Payment of burial expenses of deceased veterans....

  12. National and regional approaches for the prediction of rainfall-induced landslides in Italy: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruccacci, Silvia; Brunetti, Maria Teresa; Capparelli, Giovanna; Di Pilla, Sergio; Guzzetti, Fausto; Molari, Maurizio; Niccoli, Raffaele; Pagliara, Paola; Pizziolo, Marco; Ponziani, Francesco; Ratto, Sara Maria; Segoni, Samuele; Speranza, Gabriella; Tiranti, Davide; Tonellato, Robero; Vischi, Matteo

    2014-05-01

    In Italy, rainfall-induced landslides with severe consequences in terms of economic damage and casualties occur every year. The Italian National Department for Civil Protection (DPC) has the responsibility, in agreement with regional and local governments, to protect individuals and communities from natural hazards, including landslides. In particular, the DPC has a guiding role in projects and activities for the prevention, forecast and monitoring of landslide risk. The alert system for the landslide risk is assured by the DPC and by the Italian Regions through the network of the regional functional centres, the regional structures and the competence centres. More specifically, each Region has to define procedures and methods to set up customized early warning system for the prediction of rainfall-induced landslides. In this work, we report an overview of approaches, methods and early warning systems adopted by the DPC and by the Italian Regions to forecast the occurrence of rainfall-induced slope failures. This study is a description of the state of the art in the prediction of landslides triggered by rainfall at national and regional scale. The collection and organization of this information is of considerable interest both for the DPC, and for the individual Regions. This overview can be a starting point for a constructive debate about the local expertise, in order to improve the landslide prediction capability and to contribute to reducing landslide risk.

  13. Terrestrial sedimentation and the carbon cycle: coupling weathering and erosion to carbon burial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallard, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the linkages between the carbon cycle and sedimentary processes on land. Available data suggest that sedimentation on land can bury vast quantities of organic carbon, roughly 1015 g C yr-1. To evaluate the relative roles of various classes of processes in the burial of carbon on land, terrestrial sedimentation was modeled as a series of 864 scenarios. Each scenario represents a unique choice of intensities for seven classes of processes and two different global wetland distributions. Comparison was made with presumed preagricultural conditions. The classes of processes were divided into two major component parts: clastic sedimentation of soil-derived carbon and organic sedimentation of autochthonous carbon. For clastic sedimentation, masses of sediment were considered for burial as reservoir sediment, lake sediment, and combined colluvium, alluvium, and aeolian deposits. When the ensemble of models is examined, the human-induced burial of 0.6-1.5.1015 g yr-1 of carbon on land is entirely plausible. This sink reaches its maximum strength between 30 ?? and 50??N. Paddy lands stand out as a type of land use that warrants future study, but the many faces of rice agriculture limit generalization. In an extreme scenario, paddy lands alone could be made to bury about 1.1015 g C yr-1. Arguing that terrestrial sedimentation processes could be much of the sink for the so called 'missing carbon' is reasonable. Such a hypothesis, however, requires major redesign of how the carbon cycle is modeled. Unlike ecosystem processes that are amenable to satellite monitoring and parallel modeling, many aspects of terrestrial sedimentation are hidden from space.

  14. Apotropaic practices and the undead: a biogeochemical assessment of deviant burials in post-medieval poland.

    PubMed

    Gregoricka, Lesley A; Betsinger, Tracy K; Scott, Amy B; Polcyn, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Apotropaic observances-traditional practices intended to prevent evil-were not uncommon in post-medieval Poland, and included specific treatment of the dead for those considered at risk for becoming vampires. Excavations at the Drawsko 1 cemetery (17th-18th c. AD) have revealed multiple examples (n = 6) of such deviant burials amidst hundreds of normative interments. While historic records describe the many potential reasons why some were more susceptible to vampirism than others, no study has attempted to discern differences in social identity between individuals within standard and deviant burials using biogeochemical analyses of human skeletal remains. The hypothesis that the individuals selected for apotropaic burial rites were non-local immigrants whose geographic origins differed from the local community was tested using radiogenic strontium isotope ratios from archaeological dental enamel. 87Sr/86Sr ratios ( = 0.7112±0.0006, 1σ) from the permanent molars of 60 individuals reflect a predominantly local population, with all individuals interred as potential vampires exhibiting local strontium isotope ratios. These data indicate that those targeted for apotropaic practices were not migrants to the region, but instead, represented local individuals whose social identity or manner of death marked them with suspicion in some other way. Cholera epidemics that swept across much of Eastern Europe during the 17th century may provide one alternate explanation as to the reason behind these apotropaic mortuary customs, as the first person to die from an infectious disease outbreak was presumed more likely to return from the dead as a vampire. PMID:25427197

  15. Apotropaic Practices and the Undead: A Biogeochemical Assessment of Deviant Burials in Post-Medieval Poland

    PubMed Central

    Gregoricka, Lesley A.; Betsinger, Tracy K.; Scott, Amy B.; Polcyn, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Apotropaic observances-traditional practices intended to prevent evil-were not uncommon in post-medieval Poland, and included specific treatment of the dead for those considered at risk for becoming vampires. Excavations at the Drawsko 1 cemetery (17th–18th c. AD) have revealed multiple examples (n = 6) of such deviant burials amidst hundreds of normative interments. While historic records describe the many potential reasons why some were more susceptible to vampirism than others, no study has attempted to discern differences in social identity between individuals within standard and deviant burials using biogeochemical analyses of human skeletal remains. The hypothesis that the individuals selected for apotropaic burial rites were non-local immigrants whose geographic origins differed from the local community was tested using radiogenic strontium isotope ratios from archaeological dental enamel. 87Sr/86Sr ratios ( = 0.7112±0.0006, 1σ) from the permanent molars of 60 individuals reflect a predominantly local population, with all individuals interred as potential vampires exhibiting local strontium isotope ratios. These data indicate that those targeted for apotropaic practices were not migrants to the region, but instead, represented local individuals whose social identity or manner of death marked them with suspicion in some other way. Cholera epidemics that swept across much of Eastern Europe during the 17th century may provide one alternate explanation as to the reason behind these apotropaic mortuary customs, as the first person to die from an infectious disease outbreak was presumed more likely to return from the dead as a vampire. PMID:25427197

  16. Evolution of stocks and massifs from burial of salt sheets, continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Salt structures in a 4000-km{sup 2} region of the continental slope, the northeast Green Canyon area, include stocks, massifs, remnant structures, and an allochthonous sheet. Salt-withdrawal basins include typical semicircular basins and an extensive linear trough that is largely salt-free. Counterregional growth faults truncate the landward margin of salt sheets that extend 30-50 km to the Sigsbee Escarpment. The withdrawal basins, stocks, and massifs occur within a large graben between an east-northeast-trending landward zone of shelf-margin growth faults and a parallel trend of counterregional growth faults located 48-64 km basinward. The graben formed by extension and subsidence as burial of the updip portion of a thick salt sheet produced massifs and stocks by downbuilding. Differential loading segmented the updip margin of the salt sheet into stocks and massifs separated by salt-withdrawal basins. Initially, low-relief structures evolved by trap-door growth as half-graben basins buried the salt sheet. Remnant-salt structures and a turtle-structure anticline overlay a salt-weld disconformity in sediments formerly separated by a salt sheet. Age of sediments below the weld is inferred to be be late Miocene to early Pliocene (4.6-5.3 Ma); age of sediments above the weld is late Pliocene (2.8-3.5 Ma). The missing interval of time (1-2.5 Ma) is the duration between emplacement of the salt sheet and burial of the sheet. Sheet extrusion began in the late Miocene to early Pliocene, and sheet burial began in the late Pliocene in the area of the submarine trough to early Pleistocene in the area of the massifs.

  17. Design and evaluation of a bioreactor with application to forensic burial environments.

    PubMed

    Dunphy, Melissa A; Weisensee, Katherine E; Mikhailova, Elena A; Harman, Melinda K

    2015-12-01

    Existing forensic taphonomic methods lack specificity in estimating the postmortem interval (PMI) in the period following active decomposition. New methods, such as the use of citrate concentration in bone, are currently being considered; however, determining the applicability of these methods in differing environmental contexts is challenging. This research aims to design a forensic bioreactor that can account for environmental factors known to impact decomposition, specifically temperature, moisture, physical damage from animals, burial depth, soil pH, and organic matter content. These forensically relevant environmental variables were characterized in a soil science context. The resulting metrics were soil temperature regime, soil moisture regime, slope, texture, soil horizon, cation exchange capacity, soil pH, and organic matter content. Bioreactor chambers were constructed using sterilized thin-walled polystyrene boxes housed in calibrated temperature units. Gravesoil was represented using mineral soil (Ultisols), and organic soil proxy for Histosols, horticulture mix. Gravesoil depth was determined using mineral soil horizons A and Bt2 to simulate surface scatter and shallow grave burial respectively. A total of fourteen different environmental conditions were created and controlled successfully over a 90-day experiment. These results demonstrate successful implementation and control of forensic bioreactor simulating precise environments in a single research location, rather than site-specific testing occurring in different geographic regions. Bone sections were grossly assessed for weathering characteristics, which revealed notable differences related to exposure to different temperature regimes and soil types. Over the short 90-day duration of this experiment, changes in weathering characteristics were more evident across the different temperature regimes rather than the soil types. Using this methodology, bioreactor systems can be created to replicate many

  18. U-Th Burial Dates on Ostrich Eggshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, W. D.; Fylstra, N. D.; Tryon, C. A.; Faith, J. T.; Peppe, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Obtaining precise and accurate dates at archaeological sites beyond the range of radiocarbon dating is challenging but essential for understanding human origins. Eggshells of ratites (large flightless birds including ostrich, emu and others) are common in many archaeological sequences in Africa, Australia and elsewhere. Ancient eggshells are geochemically suitable for the U-Th technique (1), which has about ten times the range of radiocarbon dating (>500 rather than 50 ka), making eggshells attractive dating targets. Moreover, C and N isotopic studies of eggshell provide insights into paleovegetation and paleoprecipitation central to assessing past human-environment interactions (2,3). But until now, U-Th dates on ratite eggshell have not accounted for the secondary origin of essentially all of their U. We report a novel approach to U-Th dating of eggshell that explicitly accounts for secondary U uptake that begins with burial. Using ostrich eggshell (OES) from Pleistocene-Holocene east African sites, we have measured U and 232Th concentration profiles across OES by laser ablation ICP-MS. U commonly peaks at 10s to 100s of ppb and varies 10-fold or more across the ~2 mm thickness of OES, with gradients modulated by the layered structure of the eggshell. Common Th is high near the shell surfaces, but low in the middle "pallisade" layer of OES, making it optimal for U-Th dating. We determine U-Th ages along the U concentration gradient by solution ICP-MS analyses of two or more fractions of the pallisade layer. We then estimate OES burial dates using a simple model for diffusive uptake of uranium. Comparing such "U-Th burial dates" with radiocarbon dates for OES calcite from the same shells, we find good agreement in 7 out of 9 cases, consistent with rapid burial and confirming the accuracy of the approach. The remaining 2 eggshells have anomalous patterns of apparent ages that reveal they are unsuitable for U-Th dating, thereby providing reliability criteria innate

  19. Anthropogenic perturbation of the global carbon cycle as a result of agricultural carbon erosion and burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengang; Govers, Gerard; Kaplan, Jed; Hoffmann, Thomas; Doetterl, Sebastian; Six, Johan; Van Oost, Kristof

    2016-04-01

    Changes in terrestrial carbon storage exert a strong control over atmospheric CO2 concentrations but the underlying mechanisms are not fully constrained. Anthropogenic land cover change is considered to represent an important carbon loss mechanism, but current assessments do not consider the associated acceleration of carbon erosion and burial in sediments. We evaluated the role of anthropogenic soil erosion and the resulting carbon fluxes between land and atmosphere from the onset of agriculture to the present day. We show, here, that agricultural erosion induced a significant cumulative net uptake of 198±57 Pg carbon on terrestrial ecosystems. This erosion-induced soil carbon sink is estimated to have offset 74±21% of carbon emissions. Since 1850, erosion fluxes have increased 3-fold. As a result, the erosion and lateral transfer of organic carbon in relation to human activities is an important driver of the global carbon cycle at millennial timescales.

  20. Estimation of the release and migration of lead through soils and groundwater at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, K.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Lewis, R.E.; Teel, S.S.; Cantrell, K.J.; Serne, R.J.; Smoot, J.L.; Kincaid, C.T.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1992-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the potential for transport of lead from the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground to the surrounding surface- and groundwater. Burial of metal components containing nickel alloy steel and lead at this location may eventually result in release of lead to the subsurface environment, including groundwater aquifers that may be used for domestic and agricultural purposes in the future and, ultimately, to the Columbia River. The rate at which lead is transported to downgradient locations depends on a complex set of factors, such as climate, soil and groundwater chemistry, and the geologic and hydrologic configuration of the subsurface region between the burial ground and a potential receptor location. The groundwater transport analysis was conducted using a one-dimensional screening model with a relatively conservative matrix of parameters obtained from the hydrogeologic and geochemical studies.

  1. Estimation of the release and migration of lead through soils and groundwater at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Rhoads, K.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Lewis, R.E.; Teel, S.S.; Cantrell, K.J.; Serne, R.J.; Smoot, J.L.; Kincaid, C.T.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1992-10-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the potential for transport of lead from the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground to the surrounding surface- and groundwater. Burial of metal components containing nickel alloy steel and lead at this location may eventually result in release of lead to the subsurface environment, including groundwater aquifers that may be used for domestic and agricultural purposes in the future and, ultimately, to the Columbia River. The rate at which lead is transported to downgradient locations depends on a complex set of factors, such as climate, soil and groundwater chemistry, and the geologic and hydrologic configuration of the subsurface region between the burial ground and a potential receptor location. The groundwater transport analysis was conducted using a one-dimensional screening model with a relatively conservative matrix of parameters obtained from the hydrogeologic and geochemical studies.

  2. Direct burial and vault emplacement data quality comparison at Dotson Ranch, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, B. C.; Aderhold, K.; Anderson, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Parker, T.; Miller, P. E.; Slad, G. W.; Reusch, A.

    2013-12-01

    We compare the data quality of two emplacement methods for portable broadband seismic stations, traditional vault and direct burial, using power spectral density analysis to examine temporal trends in noise, the ratio of signal-to-noise for local, regional and teleseismic earthquakes, coherence of both noise and earthquake signal recordings as well as overall data return. Sensor emplacement in the past has been overwhelmingly dominated by traditional vaults requiring more materials, manpower and time. A new technique of directly burying sensors drastically reduces the expense, personnel and time required to install a seismic station. Comparisons between the data quality of vault and direct buried sensors are needed to show that the time and money saved in emplacement does not downgrade the quality of the data collected. Two identical shallow vaults were installed adjacent to two identical direct burial sites at Dotson Ranch in San Antonio, New Mexico, in a deliberately-chosen noisy, wet and generally inhospitable location. These four sites each used a Guralp 3T sensor retrofitted with a waterproof lid and connector. Eight months of data recorded during 2012 from these four sensors are compared in order to determine if the emplacement method has a profound and systematic effect on data quality using several different metrics that mimic the actual use of seismic data in research. A posthole installation with a Nanometrics Trillium 120PH sensor was also installed at the site for a portion of the study and six months of data are included in the analysis. Overall the variability in data quality metrics used in this study is comparable between sites with differing emplacement method as it is between sites with the same emplacement method. Noise in the vaults is higher in amplitude during the transition from spring to summer as compared to the direct burials and is especially evident on the horizontal components at long periods between 20-170 seconds. Diurnal changes in

  3. Two contemporaneous mitogenomes from terminal Pleistocene burials in eastern Beringia

    PubMed Central

    Tackney, Justin C.; Potter, Ben A.; Raff, Jennifer; Powers, Michael; Watkins, W. Scott; Warner, Derek; Reuther, Joshua D.; Irish, Joel D.; O’Rourke, Dennis H.

    2015-01-01

    Pleistocene residential sites with multiple contemporaneous human burials are extremely rare in the Americas. We report mitochondrial genomic variation in the first multiple mitochondrial genomes from a single prehistoric population: two infant burials (USR1 and USR2) from a common interment at the Upward Sun River Site in central Alaska dating to ∼11,500 cal B.P. Using a targeted capture method and next-generation sequencing, we determined that the USR1 infant possessed variants that define mitochondrial lineage C1b, whereas the USR2 genome falls at the root of lineage B2, allowing us to refine younger coalescence age estimates for these two clades. C1b and B2 are rare to absent in modern populations of northern North America. Documentation of these lineages at this location in the Late Pleistocene provides evidence for the extent of mitochondrial diversity in early Beringian populations, which supports the expectations of the Beringian Standstill Model. PMID:26504230

  4. Evaluation of local structure alphabets based on residue burial.

    PubMed

    Karchin, Rachel; Cline, Melissa; Karplus, Kevin

    2004-05-15

    Residue burial, which describes a protein residue's exposure to solvent and neighboring atoms, is key to protein structure prediction, modeling, and analysis. We assessed 21 alphabets representing residue burial, according to their predictability from amino acid sequence, conservation in structural alignments, and utility in one fold-recognition scenario. This follows upon our previous work in assessing nine representations of backbone geometry.1 The alphabet found to be most effective overall has seven states and is based on a count of C(beta) atoms within a 14 A-radius sphere centered at the C(beta) of a residue of interest. When incorporated into a hidden Markov model (HMM), this alphabet gave us a 38% performance boost in fold recognition and 23% in alignment quality. PMID:15103615

  5. Preliminary report on a glass burial experiment in granite

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.E.; Zhu, B.F.; Robinson, R.S.; Wicks, G.G.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary results of a two-year burial experiment in granite are discussed. Three compositions of simulated alkali borosilicate waste glasses were placed in boreholes approximately 350 meters deep. The glass sample configurations include mini-cans (stainless steel rings into which glass has been cast) and pineapple slices (thin sections from cylindrical blocks). Assemblies of these glass samples were prepared by stacking them together with granite, compacted bentonite and metal rings to provide several types of interfaces that are expected to occur in the repository. The assemblies were maintained at either ambient mine temperature (8 to 10/sup 0/C) or 90/sup 0/C. The glasses were analyzed before burial and after one month storage at 90/sup 0/C. The most extensive surface degradation occurred on the glasses interfaced with bentonite. In general, very little attack was observed on glass surfaces in contact with the other materials. The limited field and laboratory data are compared.

  6. Spatial and temporal patterns of stream burial and its effect on habitat connectivity across headwater stream communities of the Potomac River Basin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitzell, R.; Guinn, S. M.; Elmore, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    The process of directing streams into culverts, pipes, or concrete-lined ditches during urbanization, known as stream burial, alters the primary physical, chemical, and biological processes of streams. Knowledge of the cumulative impacts of reduced structure and ecological function within buried stream networks is crucial for informing management of stream ecosystems, in light of continued growth in urban areas, and the uncertain response of freshwater ecosystems to the stresses of global climate change. To address this need, we utilized recently improved stream maps for the Potomac River Basin (PRB) to describe the extent and severity of stream burial across the basin. Observations of stream burial made from high resolution aerial photographs (>1% of total basin area) and a decision tree using spatial statistics from impervious cover data were used to predict stream burial at 4 time-steps (1975, 1990, 2001, 2006). Of the roughly 95,500 kilometers (km) of stream in the PRB, approximately 4551 km (4.76%) were buried by urban development as of 2001. Analysis of county-level burial trends shows differential patterns in the timing and rates of headwater stream burial, which may be due to local development policies, topographical constraints, and/or time since development. Consistently higher rates of stream burial were observed for small streams, decreasing with stream order. Headwater streams (1st-2nd order) are disproportionately affected, with burial rates continuing to increase over time in relation to larger stream orders. Beyond simple habitat loss, headwater burial decreases connectivity among headwater populations and habitats, with potential to affect a wide range of important ecological processes. To quantify changes to regional headwater connectivity we applied a connectivity model based on electrical circuit theory. Circuit-theoretical models function by treating the landscape as a resistance surface, representing hypothesized relationships between

  7. Solid Waste Burial Grounds/Central Waste Complex hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-30

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning Activities for Solid Waste Burial Grounds/Central Waste Complex on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE Order 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is documented.

  8. Enhanced Site Characterization of the 618-4 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Chien, Yi-Ju

    2001-09-25

    This report describes the results obtained from deployment of the Enhanced Site Characterization System (ESCS) at the Hanford Site's 618-4 Burial Ground. The objective of this deployment was to use advanced geostatistical methods to integrate and interpret geophysical and ground truth data, to map the physical types of waste materials present in unexcavated portions of the burial ground. One issue of particularly interest was the number of drums (containing depleted uranium metal shavings or uranium-oxide powder) remaining in the burial ground and still requiring removal.Fuzzy adaptive resonance theory (ART), a neural network classification method, was used to cluster the study area into 3 classes based on their geophysical signatures. Multivariate statistical analyses and discriminant function analysis (DFA) indicated that the drum area as well as a second area (the SW anomaly) had similar geophysical signatures that were different from the rest of the burial ground. Further analysis of the drum area suggested that as many as 770 drums to 850 drums may remain in that area. Similarities between the geophysical signatures of the drum area and the SW anomaly suggested that excavation of the SW anomaly area also proceed with caution.Deployment of the ESCS technology was successful in integrating multiple geophysical variables and grouping these observations into clusters that are relevant for planning further excavation of the buried ground. However, the success of the technology could not be fully evaluated because reliable ground truth data were not available to enable calibration of the different geophysical signatures against actual waste types.

  9. Plant Sensitivity to Burial and Coastal Foredune Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, E. B.; Moore, L. J.; deVries, E.; Jass, T. L.; Duran Vinent, O.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal dunes arise from a feedback between plant growth and aeolian sediment transport. Dune plants are uniquely adapted to the harsh coastal environment, and are able to tolerate high temperature, drought, salt spray, and burial by sand. Accurate modeling of coastal dunes relies on understanding how coastal plants respond to these stresses, and how the dune building feedback is modified as a result. We use two years of data from an experimental planting on Hog Island, VA, USA to parameterize a logistic growth model that explicitly includes the effects of plant burial on three species of common dune plants on the US East Coast: Spartina patens, Ammophila breviligulata, and Uniola paniculata. We couple this new plant growth model to the Coastal Dune Model of Durán and Moore (2013). Using this enhanced model we explore the consequences of plant sensitivity to burial on coastal dune growth. These results will add to the growing literature on coupled vegetation and sand transport models, specifically the modeling of coastal dunes.

  10. Undulation frequency affects burial performance in living and model flatfishes.

    PubMed

    McKee, Amberle; MacDonald, Ian; Farina, Stacy C; Summers, Adam P

    2016-04-01

    Flatfishes bury themselves under a thin layer of sand to hide from predators or to ambush prey. We investigated the role of undulation frequency of the body in burial in five species of flatfishes (Isopsetta isolepis, Lepidopsetta bilineata, Hippoglossoides elassodon, Parophrys vetulus, and Psettichthys melanostictus). High-speed videos show that undulations begin cranially and pass caudally while burying, as in forward swimming in many other fishes. The flatfishes also flick the posterior edge of their dorsal and anal fins during burial, which may increase the total surface area covered by substrate. We built a simple physical model - a flexible, oval silicone plate with a motorized, variable-speed actuator - to isolate the effect of undulation frequency on burial. In both the model and actuated dead flatfish, increased undulation frequency resulted in an increase in the area of sand coverage. Complete coverage required an undulation frequency of no more than 10Hz for our models, and that was also sufficient for live flatfishes. The model shows that undulation is sufficient to bury the animal, but live flatfishes showed a superior ability to bury, which we attribute to the action of the median fins. PMID:26763759

  11. Self-burial mechanics of hygroscopically responsive awns.

    PubMed

    Jung, Wonjong; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2014-12-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the mechanics of self-burial of some plant seeds whose morphologies respond to environmental changes in humidity. The seeds of Erodium and Pelargonium have hygroscopically responsive awns that play a critical role in their self-burial into soil. The awn, coiled in a dry state, uncoils to stretch linearly under highly humid condition because of a tilted arrangement of cellulose microfibrils in one of the layers of the awn's bilayered structure. By measuring the mechanical characteristics of the awns of Pelargonium carnosum, we find that the extensional force of the awn can be aptly modeled by the theory of elasticity for a coiled spring. We further show that although the resistance to the seed-head penetrating relatively coarse soils without spinning is large enough to block the digging seed, the rotation of the seed greatly reduces the soil's resistance down to a level the awn can easily overcome. Our mechanical analysis reveals that the self-burial of the seed is a sophisticated outcome of the helically coiled configuration of the awn. PMID:24760793

  12. Self-burial mechanics of hygroscopically active awns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Wonjong; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the mechanics of self-burial of some plant seeds whose morphologies respond to humidity change of the surroundings. The seeds of Pelargonium species have hygroscopically active awns that play a critical role in the dispersal from the parent plant and burial in soil. While the awn uncoils to a linear shape in a highly humid condition, it recoils to a helical shape when dry. The rotation is driven by the structure of the cell walls that are comprised of cellulose microfibers aligned in a tilted helix. During uncoiling of the awn, the revolving tail generates thrust to burrow into soil, so that the seed is self-buried. We present the direct observation of the self-burial of the seed with the thrust into a soft substrate being measured at the same time. The elastica theory allows us to rationalize this botanical digging mechanics using the structural deformations of the hygroexpansive tissues. This work was supported by the Sogang University Research Grant of 2013 (201310009.01) and the National Research Foundation of Korea (grant no. 2012-008023).

  13. Ground resistance influences lizard burial in dry and wet sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Sarah; Kuckuk, Robyn; Goldman, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Many terrestrial animals move within soil in which water content can vary, and little is known about how water content affects locomotor performance. To investigate the effect of water content on burial, we created controlled dry and wet substrates. We used 0.3 mm glass particles and varied water content W, the mass of water to mass of dry loosely packed sand. Drag force on a submerged 1.6 cm diameter rod increased by a factor of 4 as W increased from 0 to 0.03, after which force increases were small. Drag force in wet media periodically fluctuated with time and corresponded with surface fracturing. We characterized how W affected burial performance and strategy of a generalist burrower, the ocellated skink lizard (Chalcides ocellatus). High speed x-ray imaging was used to measure head, body and limb kinematics in substrates with W= 0 and W= 0.03. In both states during burial the body was maintained in a curved posture and the animal moved using a start-stop motion. During movement, the head oscillated and the forelimb on the convex side of the body was used to push the animal forward. Both speed and angular excursion of the head oscillation decreased in the W= 0.03 state. The differences in locomotion were attributed to the changing resistance force within the media.

  14. Littoral assessment of mine burial signatures (LAMBS): buried-landmine hyperspectral data collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenton, Arthur C.; Geci, Duane M.; McDonald, James A.; Ray, Kristofer J.; Thomas, Clayton M.; Holloway, John H., Jr.; Petee, Danny A.; Witherspoon, Ned H.

    2003-09-01

    The objective of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Rapid Overt Reconnaissance (ROR) program and the Airborne Littoral Reconnaissance Technologies project's Littoral Assessment of Mine Burial Signatures (LAMBS) contract is to determine if electro-optical spectral discriminants exist that are useful for the detection of land mines located in littoral regions. Statistically significant buried mine overburden and background signature data were collected over a wide spectral range (0.35 to 14 μm) to identify robust spectral features that might serve as discriminants for new airborne sensor concepts. The LAMBS program further expands the hyperspectral database previously collected and analyzed on the U.S. Army's Hyperspectral Mine Detection Phenomenology program [see "Detection of Land Mines with Hyperspectral Data," and "Hyperspectral Mine Detection Phenomenology Program," Proc. SPIE Vol. 3710, pp 917-928 and 819-829, AeroSense April 1999] to littoral areas where tidal, surf, and wind action can additionally modify spectral signatures. This work summarizes the LAMBS buried mine collections conducted at three beach sites - an inland bay beach site (Eglin AFB, FL, Site A-22), an Atlantic beach site (Duck, NC), and a Gulf beach site (Eglin AFB, FL, Site A-15). Characteristics of the spectral signatures of the various dry and damp beach sands are presented. These are then compared to buried land mine signatures observed for the tested background types, burial ages, and environmental conditions experienced.

  15. Resetting of RbSr ages of volcanic rocks by low-grade burial metamorphism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asmeroma, Y.; Damon, P.; Shafiqullah, M.; Dickinson, W.R.; Zartman, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    We report a nine-point RbSr whole-rock isochron age of 70??3 Ma (MSWD 3.97) for Mid-Jurassic volcanic rocks. The same rocks have also been dated by the UThPb method on zircon, giving a crystallization age of 166 ?? 11 Ma, over twice as old as the RbSr age. The data demonstrate that whole-rock RbSr ages of volcanic rocks, even lava flows with SiO2 content as low as 57 wt.%, are susceptible to complete resetting. The rocks range in composition from rhyodacite tuffs to andesite lavas. The complete breakdown of all major minerals that contain Rb and Sr resulted in an alteration mineral assemblage consisting of phengite, albite, secondary quartz, and minor amounts of chlorite and epidote. Phengite is the K-bearing product of the breakdown of biotite and K-feldspar. Pressure during low-grade metamorphism of the volcanic rocks, estimated from phengite composition to have been in the range of 4 to 6 kbar, points to thrust-related burial as the main cause of resetting. Consequently, such reset isochrons may date large-scale events such as regional thrusting and metamorphism. The coherent resetting of the RbSr isochron suggests large-scale pervasive fluid movement during thrust-related burial metamorphism. ?? 1991.

  16. Late burial diagenesis of Niagaran (Middle Silurian) pinnacle reefs in Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect

    Cercone, K.R.; Lohmann, K.C. )

    1987-02-01

    Core samples from Middle Silurian pinnacle reefs in northern Michigan exhibit a regionally consistent assemblage of late diagenetic phases including geopetal diagenetic sediment, disseminated pyrite, pyrobitumen, rhombic dolomite cement, and equant calcite spar. High (> 80{degree}C) fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and inclusions of Silurian-sourced oil in these diagenetic phases indicate that they formed between the Mississippian and Jurassic, when pinnacle reefs resided in the deep subsurface. Fluid inclusion salinities and stable carbon/oxygen isotopic ratios suggest that late diagenetic carbonates did not precipitate from connate fluids but from basinal brines that were conducted to pinnacle reefs by two regional carbonate aquifers. These data confirm that late burial diagenesis can affect carbonate rocks residing in high-salinity, low-permeability fluid environments. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Habitat requirements and burrowing depths of rodents in relation to shallow waste burial sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gano, K.A.; States, J.B.

    1982-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the literature and summarize information on factors affecting habitat selection and maximum recorded burrowing depths for representative small mammals that we consider most likely to inhibit waste burial sites in arid and semi-arid regions of the West. The information is intended for waste management designers who need to know what to expect from small mammals that may be present at a particular site. Waste repositories oculd be designed to exclude the deep burrowing rodents of a region by creating an unattractive habitat over the waste. Summaries are given for habitat requirements of each group along with generalized modifications that could be employed to deter habitation. Representatives from the major groups considered to be deep burrowers are discussed. Further, detailed information about a particular species can be obtained from the references cited.

  18. Evidence of regional subsidence and associated interior wetland loss induced by hydrocarbon production, Gulf Coast region, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Robert A.; Bernier, Julie C.; Barras, John A.

    2006-05-01

    Analysis of remote images, elevation surveys, stratigraphic cross-sections, and hydrocarbon production data demonstrates that extensive areas of wetland loss in the northern Gulf Coast region of the United States were associated with large-volume fluid production from mature petroleum fields. Interior wetland losses at many sites in coastal Louisiana and Texas are attributed largely to accelerated land subsidence and fault reactivation induced by decreased reservoir pressures as a result of rapid or prolonged extraction of gas, oil, and associated brines. Evidence that moderately-deep hydrocarbon production has induced land-surface subsidence and reactivated faults that intersect the surface include: (1) close temporal and spatial correlation of fluid production with surficial changes including rapid subsidence of wetland sediments near producing fields, (2) measurable offsets of shallow strata across the zones of wetland loss, (3) large reductions in subsurface pressures where subsidence rates are high, (4) coincidence of orientation and direction of displacement between surface fault traces and faults that bound the reservoirs, and (5) accelerated subsidence rates near producing fields compared to subsidence rates in surrounding areas or compared to geological rates of subsidence. Based on historical trends, subsidence rates in the Gulf Coast region near producing fields most likely will decrease in the future because most petroleum fields are nearly depleted. Alternatively, continued extraction of conventional energy resources as well as potential production of alternative energy resources (geopressured-geothermal fluids) in the Gulf Coast region could increase subsidence and land losses and also contribute to inundation of areas of higher elevation.

  19. Distinct atmospheric patterns and associations with acute heat-induced mortality in five regions of England.

    PubMed

    Petrou, Ilias; Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2015-10-01

    The main objective of this paper was to identify possible acute heat-induced summer mortality in five regions of England namely the Yorkshire and the Humber, West Midlands, North East, North West and South East regions and reveal associations with specific air flows. For this purpose, backward air mass trajectories corresponding to daily episodes of increased temperatures were produced and divided to clusters, in order to define atmospheric pathways associated with warm air mass intrusions. A statistically significant at 95 % confidence interval increase in daily total mortality (DTMORT) was observed during the selected episodes at all five regions and thus, heat-induced mortality was indicated. The calculated raise was more intense in the West Midlands, North West and South East regions, whereas the results in the North East and Yorkshire and the Humber regions were less evident. Large fractions of thermal episodes, elevated average temperature values and higher average DTMORT levels were primarily associated with the short-medium range South West (SW) and/or East-South East (E-SE) trajectory clusters, suggesting relations among heat-induced mortality and specific atmospheric circulations. Short-medium length of SW and E-SE airflows, calculated by an application of Haversine formula along the centroid trajectory of each cluster, implies the arrival of slow moving air masses. Atmospheric stagnation could enhance human thermal stress due to low wind speed. PMID:25605407

  20. Distinct atmospheric patterns and associations with acute heat-induced mortality in five regions of England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Ilias; Dimitriou, Konstantinos; Kassomenos, Pavlos

    2015-10-01

    The main objective of this paper was to identify possible acute heat-induced summer mortality in five regions of England namely the Yorkshire and the Humber, West Midlands, North East, North West and South East regions and reveal associations with specific air flows. For this purpose, backward air mass trajectories corresponding to daily episodes of increased temperatures were produced and divided to clusters, in order to define atmospheric pathways associated with warm air mass intrusions. A statistically significant at 95 % confidence interval increase in daily total mortality (DTMORT) was observed during the selected episodes at all five regions and thus, heat-induced mortality was indicated. The calculated raise was more intense in the West Midlands, North West and South East regions, whereas the results in the North East and Yorkshire and the Humber regions were less evident. Large fractions of thermal episodes, elevated average temperature values and higher average DTMORT levels were primarily associated with the short-medium range South West (SW) and/or East-South East (E-SE) trajectory clusters, suggesting relations among heat-induced mortality and specific atmospheric circulations. Short-medium length of SW and E-SE airflows, calculated by an application of Haversine formula along the centroid trajectory of each cluster, implies the arrival of slow moving air masses. Atmospheric stagnation could enhance human thermal stress due to low wind speed.

  1. A 37,000-year environmental magnetic record of aeolian dust deposition from Burial Lake, Arctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, J. M.; Stoner, J. S.; Finkenbinder, M. S.; Abbott, M. B.; Xuan, C.; St-Onge, G.

    2015-11-01

    Environmental magnetism and radiocarbon dating of Burial Lake sediments constrain the timing and magnitude of regional aeolian deposition for the Noatak region of western Arctic Alaska for the last ˜37,000 years. Burial Lake (68.43°N, 159.17°W, 21.5 m water depth) is optimally located to monitor regional dust deposition because it is perched above local drainage and isolated from glacial processes. Cores collected in the summer of 2010 were studied through the application of magnetizations and progressive alternating field (AF) demagnetization of u-channel samples, with additional data provided by computed tomography (CT) derived density, hysteresis measurements, isothermal remanent magnetization (IRM) acquisition experiments, organic carbon content, biogenic silica, physical grain size, radiocarbon dating of wood, seeds, and plant macrofossils, point source magnetic susceptibility, and X-ray fluorescence (XRF). With similar magnetic properties to regional Alaskan loess deposits, low coercivity, highly magnetic material deposited during the late-Pleistocene contrasts with a high coercivity, weakly magnetic component found throughout the record, consistent with locally-derived detritus. The relative proportion of low coercivity to high coercivity magnetic material, defined by the S-Ratios, is used to reconstruct the regional input of dust to the basin over time. A four-fold decrease in the low coercivity component through the deglacial transition is interpreted to reflect diminished dust input to the region. Comparisons with potential sources of dust show that the timing of deposition in Burial Lake is largely consistent with general aridity, lack of vegetative cover, and increased windiness, rather than glacial advances or retreats. The influence from subaerial exposure of continental shelves cannot be ruled out as a significant far-field source of dust to interior Alaska during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), but is unlikely to have been the sole source, or to

  2. Burial Duration and Frequency Influences Resilience of Differing Propagule Types in a Subtidal Seagrass, Posidonia australis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation that leads to periodic, and often prolonged, burial events is becoming more common on the world’s coastlines as human populations expand and create urbanised marine environments. Different seagrass species react differently to sediment burial but many species in the southern hemisphere are yet to be examined. How seagrasses react to burial has restoration implications. There is a need to critically assess seagrass transplant propagule responses to periodic (pulse) and prolonged (press) burial events before selecting the most appropriate species, transplant propagule, and transplant site. In my study, mesocosm experiments, coupled with field measurements were used to assess how sexual (seedlings) and vegetative (sprigs) propagules of Posidonia australis responded to pulse and press burial events. Seedlings were highly susceptible to burial (both pulse and press), with no survival at the end of the experimental period. In contrast, rhizome growth in vegetative propagules was stimulated by pulse burial, although press burial events resulted in mortality. The implication for Posidonia australis restoration efforts in areas where burial is periodic, was that vegetative propagules are optimal transplant units, in comparison to seedlings. Press burial however, renders a transplant site sub-optimal for both seedling and sprig transplants. PMID:27526020

  3. Transient and persistent pain induced connectivity alterations in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles; Grant, P Ellen; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS. PMID:23526938

  4. Transient and Persistent Pain Induced Connectivity Alterations in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Linnman, Clas; Becerra, Lino; Lebel, Alyssa; Berde, Charles; Grant, P. Ellen; Borsook, David

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of pain-induced changes in functional connectivity was performed in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) patients. High field functional magnetic resonance imaging was done in the symptomatic painful state and at follow up in the asymptomatic pain free/recovered state. Two types of connectivity alterations were defined: (1) Transient increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb vs. unaffected limb in the CRPS state, but with normalized connectivity patterns in the recovered state; and (2) Persistent increases in functional connectivity that identified regions with increased cold-induced functional connectivity in the affected limb as compared to the unaffected limb that persisted also in the recovered state (recovered affected limb versus recovered unaffected limb). The data support the notion that even after symptomatic recovery, alterations in brain systems persist, particularly in amygdala and basal ganglia systems. Connectivity analysis may provide a measure of temporal normalization of different circuits/regions when evaluating therapeutic interventions for this condition. The results add emphasis to the importance of early recognition and management in improving outcome of pediatric CRPS. PMID:23526938

  5. Effect of Burial Depth on the Clumped Isotope Thermometer: An Example from the Green River and Washakie Basins (WY)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacroix, B.; Niemi, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    The mass-47 clumped isotope thermometer allows one to elucidate the temperature of carbonate formation and avoids speculation about the composition of precipitating water and/or oxygen composition of another mineral phase, as is required for conventional stable isotope thermometry. Recent studies have tried to reconstruct surface paleotemperatures to resolve paleoclimate or paleoelevation using this technique. Mass-47 measured from carbonates preserved in the geologic record; however, are potentially affected by burial and/or diagenetic alteration. These effects are poorly understood. Here we investigate the effect of burial on the ∆-47 composition of lacustrine carbonates. We collected samples, on the surface and recovered from drill cores, from two regions in the greater Green River Basin (Wyoming), the Washakie Basin and the Pinedale Anticline. Both basins were filled with thick, continuous Cretaceous - Eocene lacustrine strata. From these two sections, lacustrine carbonates were sampled over a paleodepth range of 1-6 km. The ∆-47 compositions of the carbonates have been measured over the first two kilometers of depth and the clumped temperatures compared with peak temperatures estimated from vitrinite reflectance, fluid inclusion thermometry and basin thermal models. Although slightly warmer than MAT estimates from Eocene paleosol geochemistry (~24°C), clumped isotope temperatures are consistently ~40°C across this depth range, similar to clumped-isotope paleotemperature estimates for the Eocene Bighorn Basin. Peak temperatures of the carbonate samples reached 120°C, while modern downhole temperatures of the deepest samples are 50°C. These results suggest that the ∆-47 thermometer preserves a record of surficial temperatures during Eocene time and that the ∆-47 thermometry is not apparently affected by burial to temperatures of at least 120°C. Effects of burial to greater depths (~6 km) and higher temperatures (~200°C) is in progress to evaluate

  6. Experimental assessment of critical anthropogenic sediment burial in eelgrass Zostera marina.

    PubMed

    Munkes, Britta; Schubert, Philipp R; Karez, Rolf; Reusch, Thorsten B H

    2015-11-15

    Seagrass meadows, one of the world's most important and productive coastal habitats, are threatened by a range of anthropogenic actions. Burial of seagrass plants due to coastal activities is one important anthropogenic pressure leading to the decline of local populations. In our study, we assessed the response of eelgrass Zostera marina to sediment burial from physiological, morphological, and population parameters. In a full factorial field experiment, burial level (5-20cm) and burial duration (4-16weeks) were manipulated. Negative effects were visible even at the lowest burial level (5cm) and shortest duration (4weeks), with increasing effects over time and burial level. Buried seagrasses showed higher shoot mortality, delayed growth and flowering and lower carbohydrate storage. The observed effects will likely have an impact on next year's survival of buried plants. Our results have implications for the management of this important coastal plant. PMID:26388446

  7. Burial history influence on the generation of some Italian oils

    SciTech Connect

    Mattavelli, L.; Novelli, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Many Italian oils were sourced by Triassic source rock; evidence of this exists in the Po Plain. In the Adriatic Sea, and offshore southern Sicily. Bulk and geochemical characteristics of these oils are quite dissimilar: heavy oils as well as gasolines were discovered. Such differences are partly attributable to the organic matter type and to environmental conditions, but the role of the source rock's burial histories is fundamental in determining oil characteristics. The different burial histories in these two areas definitely account for these differences. In the Po Plain, the Raethian Argilliti di Riva di Solto Formation, source rock of condensates of the Malossa area, started to generate very early as a consequence of the noticeable Rhaetian-Liassic subsidence. The generation of oil continued for a long geological time, but probably hydrocarbons were lost for the lack of traps. Only condensates, generated by the further Pliocene-Quaternary burial, were accumulated in the Neogene traps. In the western part of the Po Plain, Gaggiano and Villafortuna oils (34 and 40{degree} API), sourced by the Ladinian Meride Formation, were generated only during the sizeable Neogene-Quaternary subsidence. The high heating rate in this case probably enhanced expulsion efficiency, allowing secondary migration toward shallower depths and, consequently, preventing hydrocarbons from secondary cracking. Offshore in southern Sicily (Gela field), the recent subsidence (Pliocene-Pleistocene) is responsible for Triassic source rock maturation. In this case the shallower depth reached by the source rock and, consequently, the lower temperatures at which maturity occurred are partly responsible for the generation of heavy oils, even if other factors such as early expulsion due to tectonics and organic matter type probably play a more important role.

  8. Biomass burial and storage to reduce atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, N.

    2012-04-01

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a theoretical carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC/y, but probably 1-3 GtC/y can be realized in practice. Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other environmental concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from forest industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be 14/tCO2 (50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The low cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is possible because the technique uses the natural process of photosynthesis to remove carbon from the atmosphere. The technique is low tech, distributed, safe, and can be stopped at any time, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  9. Paleomagnetic dating of burial diagenesis in Mississippian carbonates, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumstein, Angela M.; Elmore, R. Douglas; Engel, Michael H.; Elliot, Crawford; Basu, Ankan

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this study is to test models for the origin of widespread secondary magnetizations in the Mississippian Deseret Limestone. The Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone is a source rock for hydrocarbons, and modeling studies indicate that it entered the oil window in the Early Cretaceous during the Sevier orogeny. Paleomagnetic and rock magnetic results from the Deseret Limestone and the stratigraphically equivalent Chainman Shale in central and western Utah indicate that the units contain two ancient magnetizations residing in magnetite. Burial temperatures are too low for the magnetizations to be thermoviscous in origin, and they are interpreted to be chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs). Fold tests from western Utah indicate the presence of a prefolding Triassic to Jurassic CRM. Geochemical (87Sr/86Sr, δ13C, and δ18O) and petrographic analyses suggest that externally derived fluids did not alter these rocks. This CRM was acquired at the beginning of the oil window and is interpreted to be the result of burial diagenesis of organic matter. A second younger CRM in western central Utah is apparently postfolding and is probably Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary in age. On the basis of the thermal modeling, the timing overlaps with the oil window. These results are consistent with a connection between organic matter maturation and remagnetization. Modeling of the smectite-to-illite transformation in the Deseret Limestone suggests a mean age prior to acquisition of both CRMs, although the range for illitization overlaps with the Triassic to Jurassic CRM. The results of this study support the hypothesis that pervasive CRMs can be related to burial diagenetic processes. In addition, paleomagnetism can be used to determine the timing of such processes, which can benefit hydrocarbon exploration efforts.

  10. Neutron Induced Capture Reaction Studies in the Resonance Region at GELINA

    SciTech Connect

    Schillebeeckx, Peter; Borella, A.; Kopecky, S.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Siegler, P.; Sirakov, I.; Massimi, C.; Moxon, M.; Ware, T.

    2009-01-28

    The neutron time-of-flight facility GELINA installed at the IRMM Geel (B) has been designed to study neutron-induced reactions in the resonance region. It is a multi-user facility, providing a pulsed white neutron source, with a neutron energy range between 10 meV and 20 MeV and a time resolution of 1 ns. The research program concentrates on cross section data needs for nuclear energy applications. In this paper efforts to improve the quality of cross section data for neutron induced capture reactions in the resolved and unresolved resonance region are presented together with examples of cross section data to support the development of advanced reactor concepts and to optimize the use of present nuclear power plants.

  11. Precipitation data for Burial Grounds 5 and 6, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee, 1976-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, D A; Beatty, J S; Benjamin, P M; Tranum, W M

    1982-01-01

    As part of a hydrogeologic investigation, precipitation data were collected at two stations, one each in Burial Grounds 5 and 6 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee. Daily, monthly, and annual values are reported herein for the period from January 1976 through December 1980. During this period, annual values ranged from about 25% above to about 25% below the calculated mean of 51.96 inches at Burial Ground 5 and 49.60 inches at Burial Ground 6.

  12. Closure Plan for Active Low Level Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    2000-11-16

    This plan has been prepared in response to direction from the U.S. Department of Energy. The purpose of the plan is to define approaches that will be implemented to ensure protection of the public and the environment when active Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) at the Hanford Site are closed. Performance assessments for active burial grounds in the 200 East and West 200 Areas provide current estimates of potential environmental contamination and doses to the ''maximum exposed individual'' from burial ground operation and closure and compare dose estimates to performance objective dose limits for the facilities. This is an Operational Closure Plan. The intent of the guidance in DOE Order 435.1 is that this plan will be a living document, like the facility performance assessments, and will be revised periodically through the operational life of the LLBGs to reflect updated information on waste inventory. management practices, facility transition planning, schedule dates, assessments of post-closure performance, and environmental consequences. Out year dates identified in this plan are tentative. A Final Closure Plan will be prepared in the future when the timing and extent of closure-related activities for LLBGs can be established with greater certainty. After current operations at the LLBGs are concluded, this plan proposes transitioning of these facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program. This action will enable the Environmental Restoration Program to design and implement consistent and coordinated final remedial actions for active and inactive LLBGs. Active and inactive burial grounds in the 200 West and 200 East Areas are commingled. This plan describes approaches that will be implemented during Interim Closure, Final Closure, and Institutional Control Periods to prepare LLBGs for surface barriers, and the construction of barriers, as well as the scope of inspection, monitoring and maintenance practices that will be performed during and after closure

  13. Identifying induced seismicity in active tectonic regions: A case study of the San Joaquin Basin, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, F.; Göbel, T.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the connection between petroleum-industry activities, and seismic event occurrences is essential to monitor, quantify, and mitigate seismic risk. While many studies identified anthropogenically-induced seismicity in intraplate regions where background seismicity rates are generally low, little is known about how to distinguish naturally occurring from induced seismicity in active tectonic regions. Further, it is not clear how different oil and gas operational parameters impact the frequency and magnitude of the induced seismic events. Here, we examine variations in frequency-size and spatial distributions of seismicity within the Southern Joaquin basin, an area of both active petroleum production and active fault systems. We analyze a newly available, high-quality, relocated earthquake catalog (Hauksson et al. 2012). This catalog includes many seismic events with magnitudes up to M = 4.5 within the study area. We start by analyzing the overall quality and consistence of the seismic catalog, focusing on temporal variations in seismicity rates and catalog completeness which could indicate variations in network sensitivity. This catalog provides relatively homogeneous earthquake recordings after 1981, enabling us to compare seismicity rates before and after the beginning of more pervasive petroleum-industry activities, for example, hydraulic-fracturing and waste-water disposals. We conduct a limited study of waste-water disposal wells to establish a correlation between seismicity statistics (i.e. rate changes, fractal dimension, b-value) within specific regions and anthropogenic influences. We then perform a regional study, to investigate spatial variations in seismicity statistics which are then correlated to oil field locations and well densities. In order to distinguish, predominantly natural seismicity from induced seismicity, we perform a spatial mapping of b-values and fractal dimensions of earthquake hypocenters. Seismic events in the proximity to

  14. Engineering of core promoter regions enables the construction of constitutive and inducible promoters in Halomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Li, Teng; Ji, Weiyue; Wang, Qiuyue; Zhang, Haoqian; Chen, Guo-Qiang; Lou, Chunbo; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-02-01

    Halomonas strain TD01, a newly identified halophilic bacterium, has proven to be a promising low-cost host for the production of chemicals. However, genetic manipulation in Halomonas sp. is still difficult due to the lack of well-characterized and tunable expression systems. In this study, a systematic, efficient method was exploited to construct both a constitutive promoter library and inducible promoters. Porin, a highly expressed protein in Halomonas TD01, was first identified from the Halomonas TD01 proteome. Subsequent study of the intergenic region upstream of porin led to the identification of a core promoter region, including -10 and -35 elements. By randomizing the sequence between the -35 and -10 elements, a constitutive promoter library was obtained with 310-fold variation in transcriptional activity; an inducible promoter with a >200-fold induction was built by integrating a lac operator into the core promoter region. As two complementary expression systems, the constitutive and inducible promoters were then employed to regulate the biosynthetic pathway of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) in Halomonas TD01, demonstrating the usefulness of the expression systems, furthermore, they could be applied in future metabolic engineering of Halomonas TD strains, and the systematic method used in this study can be generalized to other less-characterized bacterial strains. PMID:26332342

  15. Flexibility in the inducer binding region is crucial for allostery in the Escherichia coli lactose repressor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Matthews, Kathleen S

    2009-06-01

    Lactose repressor protein (LacI) utilizes an allosteric mechanism to regulate transcription in Escherichia coli, and the transition between inducer- and operator-bound states has been simulated by targeted molecular dynamics (TMD). The side chains of amino acids 149 and 193 interact and were predicted by TMD simulation to play a critical role in the early stages of the LacI conformational change. D149 contacts IPTG directly, and variations at this site provide the opportunity to dissect its role in inducer binding and signal transduction. Single mutants at D149 or S193 exhibit a minimal change in operator binding, and alterations in inducer binding parallel changes in operator release, indicating normal allosteric response. The observation that the double mutant D149A/S193A exhibits wild-type properties excludes the requirement for inter-residue hydrogen bond formation in the allosteric response. The double mutant D149C/S193C purified from cell extracts shows decreased sensitivity to inducer binding while retaining wild-type binding affinities and kinetic constants for both operator and inducer. By manipulating cysteine oxidation, we show that the more reduced state of D149C/S193C responds to inducer more like the wild-type protein, whereas the more oxidized state displays diminished inducer sensitivity. These features of D149C/S193C indicate that the novel disulfide bond formed in this mutant impedes the allosteric transition, consistent with the role of this region predicted by TMD simulation. Together, these results establish the requirement for flexibility in the spatial relationship between D149 and S193 rather than a specific D149-S193 interaction in the LacI allosteric response to inducer. PMID:19368358

  16. Regional alterations of type I collagen in rat tibia induced by skeletal unloading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiiba, Masashi; Arnaud, Sara B.; Tanzawa, Hideki; Kitamura, Eiji; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2002-01-01

    Skeletal unloading induces loss of mineral density in weight-bearing bones that leads to inferior bone mechanical strength. This appears to be caused by a failure of bone formation; however, its mechanisms still are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize collagen, the predominant matrix protein in bone, in various regions of tibia of rats that were subjected to skeletal unloading by 4 weeks tail suspension. Sixteen male Sprague-Dawley rats (4 months old) were divided into tail suspension and ambulatory controls (eight rats each). After the tail suspension, tibias from each animal were collected and divided into five regions and collagen was analyzed. The collagen cross-linking and the extent of lysine (Lys) hydroxylation in unloaded bones were significantly altered in proximal epiphysis, diaphysis, and, in particular, proximal metaphysis but not in distal regions. The pool of immature/nonmineralized collagen measured by its extractability with a chaotropic solvent was significantly increased in proximal metaphysis. These results suggest that skeletal unloading induced an accumulation of post-translationally altered nonmineralized collagen and that these changes are bone region specific. These alterations might be caused by impaired osteoblastic function/differentiation resulting in a mineralization defect.

  17. Discriminating Mining Induced Seismicity from Natural Tectonic Earthquakes in the Wasatch Plateau Region of Central Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, J. R.; Pankow, K. L.; Koper, K. D.; McCarter, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    On average, several hundred earthquakes are located each year within the Wasatch Plateau region of central Utah. This region includes the boundary between the relatively stable Colorado Plateau and the actively extending Basin and Range physiographic provinces. Earthquakes in this region tend to fall in the intermountain seismic belt (ISB), a continuous band of seismicity that extends from Montana to Arizona. While most of the earthquakes in the ISB are of tectonic origin, events in the Wasatch Plateau also include mining induced seismicity (MIS) from local underground coal mining operations. Using a catalog of 16,182 seismic events (-0.25 < M < 4.5) recorded from 1981 to 2011, we use double difference relocation and waveform cross correlation techniques to help discriminate between these two populations of events. Double difference relocation greatly improves the relative locations between the many events that occur in this area. From the relative relocations, spatial differences between event types are used to differentiate between shallow MIS and considerably deeper events associated with tectonic seismicity. Additionally, waveform cross-correlation is used to cluster events with similar waveforms—meaning that events in each cluster should have a similar source location and mechanism—in order to more finely group seismic events occurring in the Wasatch Plateau. The results of this study provide both an increased understanding of the influence mining induced seismicity has on the number of earthquakes detected within this region, as well as better constraints on the deeper tectonic structure.

  18. Fluid-induced Crystallization of Majoritic Garnet During Deep Continental Subduction (Western Gneiss Region, Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambelluri, M.; Pettke, T.; van Roermund, H. L.

    2008-12-01

    In ultrahigh pressure (UHP) rocks, garnet containing pyroxene exsolutions derives from breakdown of majorite crystallized at depths > 200 km. Presence of microdiamonds in some of these rocks [1], including those of the Western Gneiss Region (WGR) of Norway [2], may suggest a fluid-bearing environment for the genesis of majorite. The WGR UHP gneisses host garnet peridotite and websterite recording uplift from extraordinary depths prior to uptake in a subducting slab [2]. These ultramafic rocks (islands of Otrøy and Bardane) derive from depleted Archean transition-zone mantle (350 km depth) upwelled and accreted to a cratonic lithosphere (M2 stage). Evidence for this are decimetric garnets (grt) preserved in Otrøy, hosting up to 20 volume% orthopyroxene (opx) and clinopyroxene (cpx) exsolved from precursor majoritic garnet (M1 stage). The pyroxene lamellae (20-30 ¥ìm thick, hundreds of ¥ìm long) [3] were exsolved under high-T, as shown by the garnet/cpx REE distribution [4]. This Archean-mid Proterozoic record is overprinted by the 425- 390 Ma Scandian continental subduction (M3 stage), forming new grt + cpx + opx + phlogopite (phl) + spinel (sp) that contain diamond-bearing micro-inclusions witnessing deep COH subduction fluids [2]. Here we document formation of new majoritic garnet in the M3 assemblage and in veins at Bardane [5]. Textural characteristics, together with the LREE and LILE enrichments of the M3 minerals, indicate that the new majorite is linked to infiltration of subduction fluids during renewed burial towards sub-lithospheric depths. It represents the deepest occurrence of fluid-related microstructures in mantle rocks. The new majoritic garnet crystallized at grain boundaries and in micro-veins at 7 Gpa and 900-1000 °C. It hosts thin pyroxene needles (5 mm thick, 100 mm long) exsolved under comparatively low-T, as indicated by the garnet/cpx REE distribution. The trace element signature of the majorite-bearing subduction assemblage is LREE

  19. REGION-SPECIFIC MECHANISMS FOR TESTOSTERONE-INDUCED FOS IN HAMSTER BRAIN

    PubMed Central

    Nagypál, Anita; Wood, Ruth I.

    2007-01-01

    Hamsters self-administer androgens. Previously, we determined that testosterone (T) activates select steroid- and opiate-sensitive brain regions. Is T-stimulated neuronal activation androgenic? 35 castrated males with physiologic T replacement (n=7/group) were pre-treated with the androgen antagonist flutamide (15 mg/kg sc) or ethanol (0.25 ml), and infused into the lateral ventricle (ICV) for 4h with 40 μg T (TF and TE, respectively) or 40 μl vehicle (VF and VE). To determine if androgens and opiates activate overlapping brain areas, 7 additional males received 20 μg morphine sulfate ICV following ethanol injection (ME). Immediately after ICV infusion, animals were perfused. 60 μm coronal brain slices were stained for Fos. Fos-positive neurons were counted in a 0.3 mm2 area from 5 regions previously shown to express T-induced Fos: the posteromedial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTPM), posteromedial amygdala (MeP), lateral habenula (LHb), ventral tegmental area, and lateral pontine nucleus. T induced Fos in all areas reported previously (TE vs. VE, p<0.05), except LHb (p>0.05). Morphine induced Fos in all 5 brain regions (ME vs. VE, p<0.05), indicating that androgens and opiates activate overlapping brain regions. Flutamide alone did not induce Fos (VF vs. VE, p>0.05). Moreover, flutamide treatment blocked T-induced Fos expression only in the steroid-sensitive BSTPM, suggesting that androgens mediate neuronal activation in this area (mean±SEM: TF: 68.4±13.2 vs. TE: 137.9±17.6, p<0.05). The absence of flutamide effects on T-induced Fos in the steroid-sensitive MeP (TE: 210.6±50.0 vs. TF: 215.3±28.2, p>0.05) suggests that distinct mechanisms activate Fos in individual androgen-responsive nuclei. PMID:17276422

  20. Wake-induced unsteady stagnation-region heat-transfer measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magari, P. J.; Lagraff, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of wake-induced unsteady heat transfer in the stagnation region of a cylinder are presented. A quasi-steady representation of the stator/rotor interaction in a gas turbine using two stationary cylinders in crossflow is created. Time-averaged and time-resolved heat-transfer results are obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers at two Mach numbers: one incompressible and one transonic. The augmentation of the heat transfer in the stagnation region due to wake unsteadiness is documented by comparison with isolated cylinder tests. The time-averaged heat-transfer rate at the stagnation line, expressed in terms of the Frossling number, is found to reach a maximum independent of the Reynolds number. The power spectra and cross correlation of the heat-transfer signals in the stagnation region reveal the importance of large vortical structures shed from the upstream wake generator.

  1. Wake-induced unsteady stagnation-region heat-transfer measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, P.J.; Lagraff, L.E. )

    1992-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of wake-induced unsteady heat transfer in the stagnation region of a cylinder are presented. A quasi-steady representation of the stator/rotor interaction in a gas turbine using two stationary cylinders in crossflow is created. Time-averaged and time-resolved heat-transfer results are obtained over a wide range of Reynolds numbers at two Mach numbers: one incompressible and one transonic. The augmentation of the heat transfer in the stagnation region due to wake unsteadiness is documented by comparison with isolated cylinder tests. The time-averaged heat-transfer rate at the stagnation line, expressed in terms of the Frossling number, is found to reach a maximum independent of the Reynolds number. The power spectra and cross correlation of the heat-transfer signals in the stagnation region reveal the importance of large vortical structures shed from the upstream wake generator. 30 refs.

  2. Functional photoacoustic imaging to observe regional brain activation induced by cocaine hydrochloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2011-09-01

    Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) was used to detect small animal brain activation in response to drug abuse. Cocaine hydrochloride in saline solution was injected into the blood stream of Sprague Dawley rats through tail veins. The rat brain functional change in response to the injection of drug was then monitored by the PAM technique. Images in the coronal view of the rat brain at the locations of 1.2 and 3.4 mm posterior to bregma were obtained. The resulted photoacoustic (PA) images showed the regional changes in the blood volume. Additionally, the regional changes in blood oxygenation were also presented. The results demonstrated that PA imaging is capable of monitoring regional hemodynamic changes induced by drug abuse.

  3. A burial cave in the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

    PubMed

    West, Dixie; Lefèvre, Christine; Corbett, Debra; Crockford, Susan

    2003-01-01

    During the 1998 field season, the Western Aleutians Archaeological and Paleobiological Project (WAAPP) team located a cave in the Near Islands, Alaska. Near the entrance of the cave, the team identified work areas and sleeping/sitting areas surrounded by cultural debris and animal bones. Human burials were found in the cave interior. In 2000, with permission from The Aleut Corporation, archaeologists revisited the site. Current research suggests three distinct occupations or uses for this cave. Aleuts buried their dead in shallow graves at the rear of the cave circa 1,200 to 800 years ago. Aleuts used the front of the cave as a temporary hunting camp as early as 390 years ago. Finally, Japanese and American military debris and graffiti reveal that the cave was visited during and after World War II. Russian trappers may have also taken shelter there 150 to 200 years ago. This is the first report of Aleut cave burials west of the Delarof Islands in the central Aleutians. PMID:21755641

  4. The Application of GPR in Florida for Detecting Forensic Burials

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Koppenjan; J. J. Schultz; S. Ono; H. Lee

    2003-01-01

    A study was performed at the University of Florida to measure ground penetrating radar(GPR) performance for detecting forensic burials. In controlled scenarios, 24 burials were constructed with pig cadavers. Two soils were utilized to represent two of the most common soil orders in Florida: an Entisol and an Ultisol. Graves were monitored on a monthly basis for time periods up to 21 months with grid data acquired with pulsed and swept-frequency GPR systems incorporating several different frequency antennas. A small subset of the graves was excavated to assess decomposition and relate to the GPR images during the test. The grave anomalies in the GPR depth profiles became less distinctive over time due to body decomposition and settling of the disturbed soil (backfill) as it compacted. Soil type was a major factor. Grave anomalies became more difficult to recognize over time for deep targets that were within clay. Forensic targets that were in sandy soil were recognized for the duration of this study. Time elapsed imagery will be presented to elucidate the changes, or lack thereof, of grave anomalies over the duration of this study. Further analysis was performed using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) reconstruction of images in 2-D and 3-D.

  5. Burial dolomitization of Lower Cambrian platform margin, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, R.J.; Read, J.F.

    1989-03-01

    Shady Dolomite platform carbonates (Lower Cambrian) record several episodes of dolomite replacement and cementation during deep burial. Rare relict nonluminescent dolomite cores (zone 1) were replaced and overgrown by dark orange-red cathodoluminescent (CL) dolomite (zone 2A), the dominant replacement phase. Zone 2A dolomite was corroded, fractured, brecciated, and overgrown by Mississippi-Valley-type or lead-zinc minerals. Dark orange-red CL saddle dolomite (zone 2B) precipitated after mineralization and was fractured, corroded, and overgrown by bright orange-red CL saddle dolomite (zone 3). Cementation by later dark orange-red CL saddle dolomite (zone 4) was followed by quartz, calcite, and dedolomite. Only late-stage dolomite (zones 3 and 4) and calcite cement have elevated /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values (0.7103-0.7111) relative to marine carbonate and earlier dolomites (0.7090-0.7097), recording influx of radiogenic strontium-enriched fluids during late Paleozoic thrusting. Although the replacement dolomites are buried, it is unclear whether they replaced limestone or an unstable near-surface precursor dolomite. If a precursor dolomite were present, it was completely overprinted during burial diagenesis, preserving no trace of its initial composition.

  6. Genetic research at a fivefold children's burial from medieval Berlin.

    PubMed

    Rothe, Jessica; Melisch, Claudia; Powers, Natasha; Geppert, Maria; Zander, Judith; Purps, Josephine; Spors, Birgit; Nagy, Marion

    2015-03-01

    Berlin originated from the two twin cities Berlin and Cölln, which both were founded at the beginning of the 13th century. However the real date of their foundation as well as the origin of the first settlers is still unknown. On the Berlin site the historic city center is still visible in the Nikolaiviertel, but the medieval origin of Cölln disappeared almost completely. In 2007 a large scale excavation, which comprised an area of about 1700m(2) of the historical center of the St. Peters church, recovers the remains of Cölln's first citizens and span a period of 500 years of medieval population. Here we present the first genetic analysis of a fivefold children's burial from excavations in Berlin. The genetic data unveiled next to ancestry and eye color data also the kinship and the gender of the five individuals. Together with the archeological context the new gained information help to shed more light on the possible reasons for this burial. PMID:25466970

  7. Burial increases seed longevity of two Artemisia tridentata (Asteraceae) subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wijayratne, Upekala C.; Pyke, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Premise of the study: Seed longevity and persistence in soil seed banks may be especially important for population persistence in ecosystems where opportunities for seedling establishment and disturbance are unpredictable. The fire regime, an important driver of population dynamics in sagebrush steppe ecosystems, has been altered by exotic annual grass invasion. Soil seed banks may play an active role in postfire recovery of the foundation shrub Artemisia tridentata, yet conditions under which seeds persist are largely unknown. Methods: We investigated seed longevity of two Artemisia tridentata subspecies in situ by retrieving seed bags that were placed at varying depths over a 2 yr period. We also sampled naturally dispersed seeds in litter and soil immediately after seed dispersal and before flowering in subsequent seasons to estimate seed persistence. Key results: After 24 mo, seeds buried at least 3 cm below the soil surface retained 30–40% viability whereas viability of seeds on the surface and under litter declined to 0 and Artemisia tridentata has the potential to form a short-term soil seed bank that persists longer than has been commonly assumed, and that burial is necessary for seed longevity. Use of seeding techniques that promote burial of some seeds to aid in formation of a soil seed bank may increase restoration potential.

  8. Aging-induced changes in brain regional serotonin receptor binding: Effect of Carnosine.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Poddar, M K

    2016-04-01

    Monoamine neurotransmitter, serotonin (5-HT) has its own specific receptors in both pre- and post-synapse. In the present study the role of carnosine on aging-induced changes of [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding in different brain regions in a rat model was studied. The results showed that during aging (18 and 24 months) the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding was reduced in hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD but in cerebral cortex the [(3)H]-5-HT binding was increased with the increase of its only Bmax. The aging-induced changes in [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with carnosine (2.0 μg/kg/day, intrathecally, for 21 consecutive days) attenuated in (a) 24-month-aged rats irrespective of the brain regions with the attenuation of its Bmax except hypothalamus where both Bmax and KD were significantly attenuated, (b) hippocampus and hypothalamus of 18-month-aged rats with the attenuation of its Bmax, and restored toward the [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding that observed in 4-month-young rats. The decrease in pons-medullary [(3)H]-5-HT binding including its Bmax of 18-month-aged rats was promoted with carnosine without any significant change in its cerebral cortex. The [(3)H]-5-HT receptor binding with the same dosages of carnosine in 4-month-young rats (a) increased in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus with the increase in their only Bmax whereas (b) decreased in hypothalamus and pons-medulla with a decrease in their both Bmax and KD. These results suggest that carnosine treatment may (a) play a preventive role in aging-induced brain region-specific changes in serotonergic activity (b) not be worthy in 4-month-young rats in relation to the brain regional serotonergic activity. PMID:26808776

  9. A multi-proxy reconstruction of environmental change spanning the last 37,000 years from Burial Lake, Arctic Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkenbinder, M. S.; Abbott, M. B.; Finney, B. P.; Stoner, J. S.; Dorfman, J. M.

    2015-10-01

    Sediment cores from Burial Lake located in the western Brooks Range in Arctic Alaska record paleoenvironmental changes that span the last 37,000 calendar years before present (cal yr BP). We identified four distinct lithologic subunits based on physical properties (dry bulk density, magnetic susceptibility), sediment composition, and geochemical proxies (organic matter, biogenic silica, C/N, organic matter δ13C and δ15N, and elemental data from scanning X-ray fluorescence). The multi-proxy approach and relatively high temporal resolution (at multi-decadal to centennial time scales) of our proxy analysis, compared with previous studies of intermediate water depth cores from Burial Lake, provide new insights into the paleoenvironmental history of the region spanning the period prior to the Last Glacial Maximum. Relatively high lake-levels and gradually decreasing in-lake and terrestrial productivity occur during the mid-Wisconsin interstadial from 37,200 to 29,600 cal yr BP. The subsequent period is defined by falling and lower lake-levels with decreasing effective-moisture, windier conditions, and sustained low aquatic productivity throughout the LGM between 29,600 and 19,600 cal yr BP. The last deglaciation that commenced by 19,600 cal yr BP is characterized by gradual changes in several sediment physical and geochemical proxies, including increasing C/N ratios and terrestrial productivity, decreasing magnetic susceptibility and clastic sediment flux, along with rising and relatively higher lake-levels. A decrease in aeolian activity after 16,500 cal yr BP is inferred from the appearance of fine (very fine sandy silt) sediment, compared to coarse sediments through the LGM and last deglaciation. The highest levels of terrestrial inputs along with increasing and variable aquatic productivity occur during the Lateglacial to early Holocene interval between 16,500 and 8800 cal yr BP. The absence of multi-proxy evidence for a strong climatic reversal during the Younger

  10. Downsizing the pelagic carbonate factory: Impacts of calcareous nannoplankton evolution on carbonate burial over the past 17 million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchéras-Marx, Baptiste; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2014-12-01

    Cenozoic deep-sea carbonates ("calcareous oozes") are predominantly biogenic in origin and offer detailed records of the evolution of calcifying plankton groups, such as coccolithophores and foraminifera. The size and abundance of calcifying plankton determine the strength of the calcium carbonate "pump" in the open ocean, which acts as a short-term source of CO2, while the burial of pelagic carbonates serves as a long-term sink of carbon. Here, we show how the macroevolutionary size decrease in calcareous nannoplankton (coccoliths and calcareous nannoliths) has affected burial rates of calcareous ooze over the past 17 million years. We quantified nannofossil carbonate burial rates (g CaCO3/m2/yr) at five DSDP/ODP sites in the Atlantic, Indian, and Western Pacific oceans. The proportion of nannofossil-dominated fine fraction carbonate (< 38 μm) and its mass accumulation rates were regionally and temporally variable, but our combined data reveal globally consistent long-term trends. Mean nannofossil carbonate mass decreased about four-fold between 9 and 4 Ma, but this had little or only minor impact on the burial of pelagic carbonate until ~ 4 Ma. After ~ 4 Ma, when small-sized coccolith-bearing species prevailed, nannofossil carbonate burial rates decreased by one order of magnitude to the lowest values during the Pleistocene. In contrast, mass accumulation rates of the foraminifera-dominated > 38 μm fraction remained stable over the past 17 Myr. This suggests that changes in the deposition of calcareous ooze were primarily driven by calcareous nannoplankton, and that foraminifera did not compensate for the lower nannofossil-carbonate accumulation rates since the Pliocene. Despite a deepening of the lysocline over the past 4 Myr, global pelagic carbonate mass accumulation likely decreased. Whether, or how, this may relate to changes in weathering or other components within the long-term carbonate cycle remains unclear. Explanations for the macroevolutionary size

  11. Dynamics of Carbon Burial in the Coastal Oceans through the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Mor, A.; Bowen, G. J.

    2008-12-01

    Climatic recovery from the Paleocene-Eocene boundary thermal maximum (PETM) involved the rapid burial of thousands of petagrams of carbon, a significant fraction of which may have been sequestered in marginal marine sediments. This burial flux may have been modulated by changes in climate, biology, sea level, and sediment flux, but the primary pathways and controls on excess carbon burial have remained speculative to this point. Using the global PETM carbon isotope excursion and C/N ratios as tracer of organic carbon source, we investigated preservation of organic carbon through the PETM as particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral-bound carbon (MBC) at three coastal ocean sites (Tawanui, New Zealand; IODP leg 302, Arctic Ocean; and Wilson Lake, NJ, USA). We show that an increase in total organic carbon burial during the PETM is dominated by burial of young (<10,000 year old), land-derived POC, but that elevated POC burial was limited to sites with high sedimentation rates through the event (ca. 5 cm/kyr). In contrast, MBC sources were more variable, both among sites and through the PETM, and although there was no conclusive evidence for reburial of kerogen-derived MBC at the study sites the carbon isotope data suggest that a fraction of the MBC at each site may have had a long (>10,000 years) residence time prior to burial. MBC dominated the organic burial flux only at the low sedimentation-rate site (Tawanui), but also contributed significantly to changes in total burial at the Arctic site where bottom water anoxia or suboxia has been inferred during the PETM. Our results demonstrate that changes in total carbon burial rates in marginal marine sediments were determined by decoupled responses of the POC and MBC burial pathways that varied substantially among locations, and that the strongest feedbacks on PETM climate involved changes in the transfer of sediment and particulate organic carbon from the continents to the coastal oceans.

  12. Dating Pliocene lacustrine sediments in the central Jordan Valley, Israel — Implications for cosmogenic burial dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, M.; Matmon, A.; Fink, D.; Ron, H.; Niedermann, S.

    2011-05-01

    Cosmogenic burial dating of sediments is usually used at sites with relatively simple or known exposure-burial histories, such as in caves. In an attempt to extend the applicability of the method to other common geological settings (i.e. the dating of late Neogene sedimentary formations), where much less is known about the exposure-burial history, we apply the cosmogenic burial method on Pliocene-early Pleistocene (1.5-4.5 Ma) lacustrine sediments in the central Jordan Valley, Israel. 26Al, 10Be, and 21Ne concentrations in quartz were obtained from a 170 m tectonically-tilted section. Assuming fast burial and no post-burial production we obtained burial ages which range between 3.5 and 5.3 Ma. Integrating simple geological reasoning and the cosmogenic nuclide data, post burial production is found to be insignificant. We also found that the samples contain two distinct populations of grains (chert and quartz) from two different sources which experienced different pre-burial exposure histories. The cosmogenic nuclide concentrations in the samples are in accordance with those expected for the mixing of two sources, and the burial ages computed for both end members agree. Theoretical calculations of two-source mixing show that initial 26Al/10Be ratios are depressed relative to the expected surface ratios and may result in burial ages overestimated by as much as 500 ka. Using ages derived from cosmogenic nuclides, independent age constraints, and magnetostratigraphy we correlate the bottom of the section to the Cochiti Normal magnetic subchron (4.19-4.30 Ma) within the Reverse Gilbert chron, and the top of the section to the Reverse subchron at the top of the Gilbert chron (3.60-4.19 Ma).

  13. Variability of island-induced ocean vortex trains, in the Kuroshio region southeast of Taiwan Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhe-Wen; Zheng, Quanan

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the horizontal scale and spatial characteristics of island-induced ocean vortex trains (IOVTs) in the Kuroshio region southeast of Taiwan Island using European remote sensing satellite ERS-1 SAR imagery. US Aqua satellite Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data are used to analyze the sea surface temperature (SST) features of the study area. Seasonal composites of SST images show that the IOVTs are current-induced vortexes rather than wind-induced ones. Furthermore, using the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model/Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (HYCOM/NCODA) system that generated current and sea surface height anomaly data, the temporal and spatial variability of the Green Island IOVTs is analyzed. The variability of IOVTs within this region shows a distinct seasonality. This seasonal variability of IOVTs is closely associated with the shoreward shift of Kuroshio mainstream driven by the winter northeasterly monsoon. This scenario is verified by vector empirical orthogonal function analysis focused on the weak IOVT period in 2012. In addition to meandering of the Kuroshio, westward-propagating mesoscale eddies and the arrival of typhoons play an important role in modifying the variability of IOVTs at intraseasonal timescale.

  14. The Role of Anthropogenic-Induced Surface Temperature Change on Regional Enhanced Warming over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, X.; Huang, J.; Guo, R.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, the long-term trend and decadal variability of surface air temperature (SAT) are studied by using observation data from 1901-2009. We found that the warming trends of the semi-arid regions are higher than other lands, which have increased 2.42°C as compared to the global annual mean temperature increase of 1.13°C over land. To investigate the causes of Enhanced Semi-Arid Warming (ESAW), we used an advanced dynamic-adjusted method proposed by Wallace et al. (2012) to analyse the contribution of dynamically-induced and anthropogenic-induced SAT changes to ESAW. In the process of dynamic adjustment, the temperature has been divided into two parts, one for the dynamic forcing induced temperature, and the other for the temperature associated with the build-up of greenhouse gases and the other various radiative forcing. The results show that the anthropogenic-warming peak over semi-arid region plays the main role in the ESAW. Such anthropogenic warming peak may be related to reduction of snow cover due to black carbon (BC) emission by fuels for winter residential heating. Besides the impact of BC in snow, the agricultural mulch creation, wind farms and other types of human activities may also make attribution to local SAT changes that need to be further studied.

  15. [Influence factors of deposition induced by melt water erosion in Naqu region, China].

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun-yuan; Cai, Qiang-guo; Li, Zhao-xia; Sun, Li-ying

    2015-02-01

    Melt water erosion is one of the important soil erosion forms caused by the melt water from glacier and snow in high altitude cold areas of China. This paper investigated the influencing factors of deposition caused by melt water erosion in Naqu region. Alluvial fan ratio was presented as an index to characterize the degree of the deposition induced by melt water erosion. Minimum polygon was determined based on spatial overlay technology of Geographic Information System (GIS). The regression equation between the deposition index and the influencing factors was established through the stepwise regression analysis based on minimum polygon. Key influencing factors were identified according to the stepwise regression equation. The results showed that large amounts of alluvial fan were observed in Naqu region; extensive alluvial fans were centered at gentle slope areas in the central part of Naqu region with great spatial differences; alluvial fans were mainly distributed at valley exits, most of which were at large scale with vast differences in area and thickness. Wind speed, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), K value of soil erodibility, annual temperature range and the steep slope area ratio were identified as the key influencing factors on the deposition induced by melt water erosion in the studied area. Index of deposition was positively correlated with the wind speed and NDVI, and showed negative relationships with the K value of soil erodibility, the annual temperature range and steep slope area ratio. PMID:26094471

  16. 618-10 Burial Ground Trench Remediation and 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Ground Nonintrusive Characterization of Vertical Pipe Units Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    Darby, J. W.

    2012-06-28

    A “lessons learned” is a noteworthy practice or innovative approach that is captured and shared to promote repeat application, or an adverse work practice/experience that is captured and shared to avoid reoccurrence. This document provides the lessons learned identified by the 618-10 Burial Ground trench remediation and the 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Ground nonintrusive characterization of the vertical pipe units (VPUs).

  17. Neutron Diffraction of Aqueous Tetramethylammonium Chloride (TMA) Solutions and TMA Intercalated Swelling Clays Under Burial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R.; Howard, C. A.; Greenwell, C.; Youngs, T.; Soper, A. K.; Skipper, N. T.

    2014-12-01

    There is a need for the improvement and optimisation of clay swelling inhibitors for the enhancement of oil and gas exploration. The hydration region of both ions and the possibility of ion pairing in 1 molar aqueous solution of clay swelling inhibitor, tetramethylammonium chloride (TMACl), in D2O, under elevated hydrostatic-pressures and temperatures has been determined with unprecedented detail using a combination of neutron diffraction and small-angle scattering in conjunction with hydrogen/deuterium isotopic labeling. The O-H correlation function (H-bonds) for the water in the 1.0M solution is measured and compared with that for pure D2O. Also investigated is the effect of burial conditions on the d-spacing of TMA-intercalated vermiculite. Contrary to expectations, no aggregation of TMA ions due to hydrophobic interactions is observed, nor are any ionic pairs of TMA+ and Cl- at these burial conditions. The data revealed a more ordered water-water structure with the addition of TMACl from bulk D2O. There is no change in the hydration structure measured at the applied elevated conditions. This is in remarkable contrast to pure water at the same conditions which is well known to be compressible. The dry d-spacing of the TMA-exchanged Eucatex vermiculite is measured at 13.66 Å which increases to 14.03 Å with the addition of D2O. Beyond this, there is no change in d-spacing with increasing pressure and temperature indicating the strength of the TMA ions binding to the clay interlayers and therefore its performance as a clay-swelling inhibitor.

  18. 38 CFR 3.1603 - Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... certain unclaimed bodies. 3.1603 Section 3.1603 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1603 Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies. If the body of a deceased veteran is unclaimed, there being no relatives or friends to claim the...

  19. 38 CFR 3.1603 - Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... certain unclaimed bodies. 3.1603 Section 3.1603 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1603 Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies. If the body of a deceased veteran is unclaimed, there being no relatives or friends to claim the...

  20. 38 CFR 3.1603 - Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... certain unclaimed bodies. 3.1603 Section 3.1603 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1603 Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies. If the body of a deceased veteran is unclaimed, there being no relatives or friends to claim the...

  1. 38 CFR 3.1603 - Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... certain unclaimed bodies. 3.1603 Section 3.1603 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUDICATION Burial Benefits § 3.1603 Authority for burial of certain unclaimed bodies. If the body of a deceased veteran is unclaimed, there being no relatives or friends to claim the...

  2. Burial affects the biogeochemistry of headwater streams in a midwestern US metropolitan area

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in stream networks is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of headwater streams in urban basins. Urban stream burial has only recently been recognized by ecologists and little research has addressed the extent to whi...

  3. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel and J. M. Capron

    2007-07-25

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes.

  4. 78 FR 40738 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Double H Pesticide Burial Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Double H Pesticide Burial Site AGENCY... incurred for the Double H Pesticide Burial Site in Grandview, Yakima County, Washington. Under this proposed settlement, the settling parties are Double H, L.P.; James T. Hansen; Linda L. Hansen; George...

  5. 32 CFR 553.17 - Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery. 553.17 Section 553.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.17 Persons ineligible for burial in an Army national cemetery....

  6. Effects of Urban Stream Burial on Organic Matter Dynamics and Reach Scale Nitrate Retention

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in streams is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of streams in stormwater pipes in urban watersheds. We predicted that stream burial suppresses the capacity of streams to retain nitrate (NO3-) by eliminating primar...

  7. The Influence of Organic Material and Temperature on the Burial Tolerance of the Blue Mussel, Mytilus edulis: Considerations for the Management of Marine Aggregate Dredging

    PubMed Central

    Cottrell, Richard S.; Black, Kenny D.; Hutchison, Zoë L.; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Experimental Approach Aggregate dredging is a growing source of anthropogenic disturbance in coastal UK waters and has the potential to impact marine systems through the smothering of benthic fauna with organically loaded screening discards. This study investigates the tolerance of the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis to such episodic smothering events using a multi-factorial design, including organic matter concentration, temperature, sediment fraction size and duration of burial as important predictor variables. Results and Discussion Mussel mortality was significantly higher in organically loaded burials when compared to control sediments after just 2 days. Particularly, M. edulis specimens under burial in fine sediment with high (1%) concentrations of organic matter experienced a significantly higher mortality rate (p<0.01) than those under coarse control aggregates. Additionally, mussels exposed to the summer maximum temperature treatment (20°C) exhibited significantly increased mortality (p<0.01) compared to those in the ambient treatment group (15°C). Total Oxygen Uptake rates of experimental aggregates were greatest (112.7 mmol m-2 day-1) with 1% organic loadings in coarse sediment at 20°C. Elevated oxygen flux rates in porous coarse sediments are likely to be a function of increased vertical migration of anaerobically liberated sulphides to the sediment-water interface. However, survival of M. edulis under bacterial mats of Beggiatoa spp. indicates the species’ resilience to sulphides and so we propose that the presence of reactive organic matter within the burial medium may facilitate bacterial growth and increase mortality through pathogenic infection. This may be exacerbated under the stable interstitial conditions in fine sediment and increased bacterial metabolism under high temperatures. Furthermore, increased temperature may impose metabolic demands upon the mussel that cannot be met during burial-induced anaerobiosis. Summary Lack of

  8. Metal-dependent SV40 viruses containing inducible enhancers from the upstream region of metallothionein genes.

    PubMed Central

    Serfling, E; Lübbe, A; Dorsch-Häsler, K; Schaffner, W

    1985-01-01

    We have isolated SV40 recombinant viruses which are dependent on heavy metal ions for efficient propagation. They were obtained after-co-transfection of enhancerless SV40 DNA (the so-called enhancer trap) with sonicated DNA from the mouse metallothionein-I (mMT-I) or human metallothionein-IIA (hMT-IIA) upstream regions. To substitute for the SV40 enhancer, these viruses have incorporated a segment of the immediate upstream region of the metallothionein genes. Two recombinant viruses of the SVMT-I type carry segments of the mMT-I gene from positions -73 to -187 and -39 to -194 inverted with respect to their natural configuration. The overlapping segment contains two of the four metal-responsive elements involved in the induction of the mMT-I gene by heavy metal ions. The SVMT-II recombinant virus contains a segment of the hMT-IIA gene from position -39 to -366 which harbors the metal- and hormone-responsive elements of the hMT-IIA gene. Insertion of the mMT-I segment downstream of a rabbit beta-globin test gene enhances beta-globin transcription upon metal ion stimulation. This shows that the immediate upstream region of the mouse metalliothionein-I gene, when detached from its TATA box, can act as an inducible enhancer. It may be generally true that the enhancer/promoters of inducible genes are composed of several regulatory sequence elements which are interspersed with constitutive elements. The number and spatial arrangement of these elements probably determines the basal versus induced level of expression. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2419129

  9. Evidence supporting an intentional Neandertal burial at La Chapelle-aux-Saints

    PubMed Central

    Rendu, William; Beauval, Cédric; Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Balzeau, Antoine; Bismuth, Thierry; Bourguignon, Laurence; Delfour, Géraldine; Faivre, Jean-Philippe; Lacrampe-Cuyaubère, François; Tavormina, Carlotta; Todisco, Dominique; Turq, Alain; Maureille, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The bouffia Bonneval at La Chapelle-aux-Saints is well known for the discovery of the first secure Neandertal burial in the early 20th century. However, the intentionality of the burial remains an issue of some debate. Here, we present the results of a 12-y fieldwork project, along with a taphonomic analysis of the human remains, designed to assess the funerary context of the La Chapelle-aux-Saints Neandertal. We have established the anthropogenic nature of the burial pit and underlined the taphonomic evidence of a rapid burial of the body. These multiple lines of evidence support the hypothesis of an intentional burial. Finally, the discovery of skeletal elements belonging to the original La Chapelle aux Saints 1 individual, two additional young individuals, and a second adult in the bouffia Bonneval highlights a more complex site-formation history than previously proposed. PMID:24344286

  10. Distribution of maximum burial temperatures across northern Appalachian Basin and implications for Carboniferous sedimentation patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Johnsson, M.J.

    1986-05-01

    Clay-mineral diagenesis and apatite fission-track age data indicate that the maximum burial temperatures to which the Middle Devonian Tioga metabentonite was exposed rise abruptly from low values in western New York State to higher values in the east. The highest temperatures, which approach 175/sup 0/C, were reached just west of Syracuse. Neither the pattern nor the magnitude of burial temperatures can be explained solely by burial of the metabentonite beneath Upper Devonian sediments. Although spatial variations in the geothermal gradient could have produced the observed pattern of burial temperatures, it is more likely that Carboniferous sediments, no longer preserved in the area, were responsible for the indicated burial. The inferred presence of thick Carboniferous sequences in western New York State suggests that the Allegheny orogeny had a stronger influence on sedimentation in the northern Appalachian Basin than has been previously recognized. 25 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  11. Neutrino-induced meson productions off nucleon at forward limit in nucleon resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, S. X.; Kamano, H.; Lee, T.-S. H.; Sato, T.

    2015-05-15

    We study forward neutrino-induced meson production off the nucleon in the resonance region. Our calculation is based on a dynamical coupled-channels (DCC) model that reasonably describes π(γ)N → πN, ηN, KΛ, KΣ data in the resonance region. We apply the PCAC hypothesis to the DCC model to relate the πN reaction amplitude to the forward neutrino reaction amplitude. In this way, we give a prediction for νN → πN, ππN, ηN, KΛ, KΣ reaction cross sections. The predicted νN → ππN, ηN, KΛ, KΣ cross sections are, for the first time, based on a model extensively tested by data. We compare our results with those from the Rein-Sehgal model that has been very often used in the existing Monte Carlo simulators for neutrino experiments. We find a significant difference between them.

  12. Earthquake triggering in the peri-adriatic regions induced by stress diffusion: insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Onza, F.; Viti, M.; Mantovani, E.; Albarello, D.

    2003-04-01

    EARTHQUAKE TRIGGERING IN THE PERI-ADRIATIC REGIONS INDUCED BY STRESS DIFFUSION: INSIGHTS FROM NUMERICAL MODELLING F. D’Onza (1), M. Viti (1), E. Mantovani (1) and D. Albarello (1) (1) Dept. of Earth Sciences, University of Siena - Italy (donza@unisi.it/Fax:+39-0577-233820) Significant evidence suggests that major earthquakes in the peri-Adriatic Balkan zones may influence the seismicity pattern in the Italian area. In particular, a seismic correlation has been recognized between major earthquakes in the southern Dinaric belt and those in southern Italy. It is widely recognized that such kind of regularities may be an effect of postseismic relaxation triggered by strong earthquakes. In this note, we describe an attempt to quantitatively investigate, by numerical modelling, the reliability of the above interpretation. In particular, we have explored the possibility to explain the last example of the presumed correlation (triggering event: April, 1979 Montenegro earthquake, MS=6.7; induced event: November, 1980 Irpinia event, MS=6.9) as an effect of postseismic relaxation through the Adriatic plate. The triggering event is modelled by imposing a sudden dislocation in the Montenegro seismic fault, taking into account the fault parameters (length and average slip) recognized from seismological observations. The perturbation induced by the seismic source in the neighbouring lithosphere is obtained by the Elsasser diffusion equation for an elastic lithosphere coupled with a viscous asthenosphere. The results obtained by numerical experiments indicate that the strain regime induced by the Montenegro event in southern Italy is compatible with the tensional strain field observed in this last zone, that the amplitude of the induced strain is significantly higher than that induced by Earth tides and that this amplitude is comparable with the strain perturbation recognized as responsible for earthquake triggering. The time delay between the triggering and the induced

  13. Determination of post-burial interval using entomology: A review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajinder; Sharma, Sahil; Sharma, Arun

    2016-08-01

    Insects and other arthropods are used in different matters pertinent to the criminal justice system as they play very important role in the decomposition of cadavers. They are used as evidence in a criminal investigation to determine post mortem interval (PMI). Various researches and review articles are available on forensic entomology to determine PMI in the terrestrial environment but very less work has been reported in context to buried bodies. Burring the carcass, is one of the methods used by criminals to conceal the crime. So, to drive the attention of researchers toward this growing field and to help various investigating agencies, the present paper reviews the studies done on determination of post-burial interval (PBI), its importance and future prospective. PMID:27235895

  14. 77 FR 58591 - Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning Waste Disposal Costs at Low-Level...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Burial Facilities AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft NUREG; request for comment... document entitled: NUREG-1307 Revision 15, ``Report on Waste Burial Charges: Changes in Decommissioning... a document is referenced. The NUREG-1307, Revision 15 is available electronically under...

  15. Effects of urban stream burial on nitrogen uptake and ecosystem metabolism: implications for watershed nitrogen and carbon fluxes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urbanization has resulted in extensive burial and channelization of headwater streams, yet little is known about impacts on stream ecosystem functions critical for reducing downstream nitrogen pollution. To characterize the biogeochemical impact of stream burial, we measured NO3...

  16. Investigation and simulation on fate and transport of leachate from a livestock mortality burial site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J.-W.; Lee, S.; Kaown, D.; Lee, K.-K.

    2012-04-01

    Leachate released from livestock mortality burial during decomposition of carcasses can be a threat to groundwater quality. Monitoring study of groundwater quality in the vicinity of livestock burial reported that a caution is needed to prevent contamination of both groundwater and soil, especially in case of mortality burial (Glanville, 2000; Ritter and Chirnside, 1995). The average concentration of ammonium-N and chloride is reported to be 12,600 mg/l and 2,600 mg/l respectively, which is 2-4 times higher than leachate from earthen manure storages and landfills (Pratt, 2009). To assess the potential threat of burial leachate to groundwater quality, simulation of leachate transport is performed based on a hydrogeologic model of an actual mortality burial site. At the burial site of this study located at a hill slope, two mortality pits have been constructed along the slope to bury swine during the outbreak of nationwide foot and mouth disease(FMD) in 2011. Though the pits were partially lined with impermeable material, potential threat of leachate leakage is still in concern. Electrical resistivity survey has been performed several times at the burial site and abnormal resistivity zones have been detected which are supposed as leachate leakage from the burial. Subsurface model including unsaturated zone is built since the leakage is supposed to occur mainly in lateral of the burial pits which is in unsaturated zone. When examining leachate transport, main focus is given to a nitrogenous compound and colloidal character of FMD virus. Nitrifying of denitrifying characters of nitrogenous compound and transport of colloidal particles are affected mainly by soil water content in unsaturated zone. Thus, the fate and transport of burial leachate affected by seasonal variation in recharge pattern is investigated.

  17. Burial trench dynamic compaction demonstration at a humid site

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, B.P.

    1985-01-01

    This task has the objective of determining the degree of consolidation which can be achieved by dynamic compaction of a closed burial trench within a cohesive soil formation. A seven-year-old burial trench in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was selected for this demonstration. This 251 m/sup 3/ trench contained about 80 Ci of mixed radionuclides, mostly /sup 90/Sr, in 25 m/sup 3/ of waste consisting of contaminated equipment, dry solids, and demolition debris. Prior to compaction, a total trench void space of 79 m/sup 3/ was measured by pumping the trench full of water with corrections for seepage. Additional pre-compaction characterization included trench cap bulk density (1.68 kg/L), trench cap permeability (3 x 10/sup -7/ m/s), and subsurface waste/backfill hydraulic conductivity (>0.01 m/s). Compaction was achieved by repeatedly dropping a 4-ton steel-reinforced concrete cylinder from heights of 4 to 8 m using the whipline of a 70-ton crane. The average trench ground surface was depressed 0.79 m, with some sections over 2 m, yielding a surveyed volumetric depression which totaled to 64% of the measured trench void space. Trench cap (0 to 60 cm) bulk density and permeability were not affected by compaction indicating that the consolidation was largely subsurface. Neither surface nor airborne radioactive contamination were observed during repeated monitoring during the demonstration. Dynamic compaction was shown to be an excellent and inexpensive (i.e., about $20/m/sup 2/) method to collapse trench void space, thereby hastening subsidence and stabilizing the land surface. 15 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. CHALLENGES WITH RETRIEVING TRANSURANIC WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS

    SciTech Connect

    SWAN, R.J.; LAKES, M.E.

    2007-08-06

    The U.S. DOE's Hanford Reservation produced plutonium and other nuclear materials for the nation's defense starting in World War II. The defense mission generated wastes that were either retrievably stored (i.e. retrievably stored waste) and/or disposed of in burial grounds. Challenges have emerged from retrieving suspect TRU waste including adequacy of records, radiological concerns, container integrity, industrial hygiene and safety issues, the lack of processing/treatment facilities, and the integration of regulatory requirements. All retrievably stored waste is managed as mixed waste and assumed to be TRU waste, unless documented otherwise. Mixed waste is defined as radioactive waste that contains hazardous constituents. The Atomic Energy Act governs waste with radionuclides, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) governs waste with hazardous constituents. Waste may also be governed by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and a portion may be managed under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1970, TRU waste was required to be placed in 20-year retrievable storage and segregated from other Waste. Prior to that date, segregation did not occur. Because of the changing definition of TRU over the years, and the limitations of early assay equipment, all retrievably stored waste in the burial grounds is managed as suspect TRU. Experience has shown that some of this waste will be characterized as low-level (non-TRU) waste after assay. The majority of the retrieved waste is not amenable to sampling due to waste type and/or radiological issues. Key to waste retrieval and disposition are characterization, historical investigation and research, knowledge of past handling and packaging, as well as a broad understanding and application of the regulations.

  19. Sodium tungstate induced neurological alterations in rat brain regions and their response to antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Sherry; Pant, Satish C; Kushwaha, Pramod; Bhargava, Rakesh; Flora, Swaran J S

    2015-08-01

    Tungsten, recognized recently as an environmental contaminant, is being used in arms and ammunitions as substitute to depleted uranium. We studied the effects of sodium tungstate on oxidative stress, few selected neurological variables like acetylcholinesterase, biogenic amines in rat brain regions (cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum) and their prevention following co-administration of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), naringenin and quercetin. Animals were sub-chronically exposed to sodium tungstate (100 ppm in drinking water) and orally co-supplemented with different antioxidants (0.30 mM) for three months. Sodium tungstate significantly decreased the activity of acetylcholinesterase, dopamine, nor-epinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine levels while it increased monoamine oxidase activity in different brain regions. Tungstate exposure produced a significant increase in biochemical variables indicative of oxidative stress while, neurological alterations were more pronounced in the cerebral cortex compared to other regions. Co-administration of NAC and flavonoids with sodium tungstate significantly restored glutathione, prevented changes in the brain biogenic amines, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and TBARS levels in the different brain regions. The protection was more prominent in the animals co-administered with NAC. We can thus conclude that sodium tungstate induced brain oxidative stress and the alterations in some neurological variables can effectively be reduced by co-supplementation of NAC. PMID:25983264

  20. Constraining multi-stage exposure-burial scenarios for boulders preserved beneath cold-based glacial ice in Thule, northwest Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Lee B.; Bierman, Paul R.; Rood, Dylan H.

    2016-04-01

    Boulders and landscapes preserved beneath cold-based, non-erosive glacial ice violate assumptions associated with simple cosmogenic exposure dating. In such a setting, simple single isotope exposure ages over-estimate the latest period of surface exposure; hence, alternate approaches are required to constrain the multi-stage exposure/burial histories of such samples. Here, we report 28 paired analyses of 10Be and 26Al in boulder samples from Thule, northwest Greenland. We use numerical models of exposure and burial as well as Monte Carlo simulations to constrain glacial chronology and infer process in this Arctic region dominated by cold-based ice. We investigate three specific cases that can arise with paired nuclide data: (1) exposure ages that are coeval with deglaciation and 26Al/10Be ratios consistent with constant exposure; (2) exposure ages that pre-date deglaciation and 26Al/10Be ratios consistent with burial following initial exposure; and (3) exposure ages that pre-date deglaciation and 26Al/10Be ratios consistent with constant exposure. Most glacially-transported boulders in Thule have complex histories; some were exposed for tens of thousands of years and buried for at least hundreds of thousands of years, while others underwent only limited burial. These boulders were probably recycled through different generations of till over multiple glacial/interglacial cycles, likely experiencing partial or complete shielding during interglacial periods due to rotation or shallow burial by sediments. Our work demonstrates that the landscape in Thule, like many high-latitude landscapes, was shaped over long time durations and multiple glacial and interglacial periods throughout the Quaternary.

  1. Regional Estimates of Drought-Induced Tree Canopy Loss across Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwantes, A.; Swenson, J. J.; González-Roglich, M.; Johnson, D. M.; Domec, J. C.; Jackson, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    The severe drought of 2011 killed millions of trees across the state of Texas. Drought-induced tree-mortality can have significant impacts to carbon cycling, regional biophysics, and community composition. We quantified canopy cover loss across the state using remotely sensed imagery from before and after the drought at multiple scales. First, we classified ~200 orthophotos (1-m spatial resolution) from the National Agriculture Imagery Program, using a supervised maximum likelihood classification. Area of canopy cover loss in these classifications was highly correlated (R2 = 0.8) with ground estimates of canopy cover loss, measured in 74 plots across 15 different sites in Texas. These 1-m orthophoto classifications were then used to calibrate and validate coarser scale (30-m) Landsat imagery to create wall-to-wall tree canopy cover loss maps across the state of Texas. We quantified percent dead and live canopy within each pixel of Landsat to create continuous maps of dead and live tree cover, using two approaches: (1) a zero-inflated beta distribution model and (2) a random forest algorithm. Widespread canopy loss occurred across all the major natural systems of Texas, with the Edwards Plateau region most affected. In this region, on average, 10% of the forested area was lost due to the 2011 drought. We also identified climatic thresholds that controlled the spatial distribution of tree canopy loss across the state. However, surprisingly, there were many local hot spots of canopy loss, suggesting that not only climatic factors could explain the spatial patterns of canopy loss, but rather other factors related to soil, landscape, management, and stand density also likely played a role. As increases in extreme droughts are predicted to occur with climate change, it will become important to define methods that can detect associated drought-induced tree mortality across large regions. These maps could then be used (1) to quantify impacts to carbon cycling and regional

  2. Regional differences in neostigmine-induced contraction and relaxation of stomach from diabetic guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Cellini, Joseph; DiNovo, Karyn; Harlow, Jessica; LePard, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    Delayed gastric emptying and autonomic neuropathy have been documented in patients with diabetes mellitus. Some medications used to treat delayed gastric emptying enhance release of acetylcholine from autonomic neurons to strengthen gastric contractions. Autonomic coordination among gastric regions may be altered in diabetes resulting in poor outcomes in response to prokinetic drugs. Fundus, antrum, and pylorus from STZ or control guinea pigs were treated with neostigmine to mimic release of acetylcholine from autonomic neurons by prokinetic agents. In diabetic animals, neostigmine-induced contractions were weaker in fundus and pylorus but similar in antrum. The muscarinic receptor antagonist 4-DAMP or the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium reduced neostigmine-induced contractions. Activation of presynaptic muscarinic receptors on nitrergic neurons was impaired in fundus and antrum from diabetic animals. Nerve-stimulated contractions and relaxations, number of nNOS myenteric neurons, and tissue choline content were reduced in fundus from diabetic animals. Despite reduced number of myenteric neurons, tissue choline content was increased in antrum from diabetic animals. Since cholinergic motility of each gastric region was affected differently by diabetes, prokinetic drugs that nondiscriminately enhance acetylcholine release from autonomic neurons may not effectively normalize delayed gastric emptying in patients with diabetes and more selective medications may be warranted. PMID:21075692

  3. Runoff changes in Czech headwater regions after deforestation induced by acid rains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchtele, J.; Buchtelova, M.; Hrkal, Z.; Koskova, R.

    2003-04-01

    Tendencies in water regime resulting from land-use change represent an important subject for research and in the region of so called Black Triangle at the borders of Czech Republic, Germany and Poland urgent practical problem. Namely extensive deforestation in Czech hilly basins induced by acid rains, which appeared in seventies and eighties, requires attention. Discussions among professionals and public, sometimes having emotional character, took place after large floods on the rivers Odra and Morava in 1997 and in Vltava and Elbe river basins in August 2002. The influence of deforestation induced by acid rains in the Central Europe has been considered as important contribution to disastrous character of floods. Simulations of rainfall-runoff process in several catchments and experimental basins in two distinct headwater regions along German borders, with different extent of deforestation have been carried out using daily time series up to 40 years long. The outputs of two hydrological models of different structure have been compared in these investigations: - the conceptual model SAC-SMA - Sacramento soil moisture accounting - physically based 1- D model BROOK´90 The differences between observed and simulated discharge, which could show the tendencies in the runoff have been followed. They indicate increase of runoff after deforestation.

  4. 38 CFR 1.10 - Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. 1.10 Section 1.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS The United States Flag for Burial Purposes § 1.10 Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. (a) Eligibility...

  5. 38 CFR 1.10 - Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. 1.10 Section 1.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS The United States Flag for Burial Purposes § 1.10 Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. (a) Eligibility...

  6. 38 CFR 1.10 - Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. 1.10 Section 1.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS The United States Flag for Burial Purposes § 1.10 Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. (a) Eligibility...

  7. 38 CFR 1.10 - Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. 1.10 Section 1.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS The United States Flag for Burial Purposes § 1.10 Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. (a) Eligibility...

  8. 31 CFR 538.535 - Importation and exportation of human remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized. 538.535 Section 538.535 Money and Finance... Policy § 538.535 Importation and exportation of human remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized. (a) The importation into the United States of human remains for burial, cremation, or...

  9. 31 CFR 538.535 - Importation and exportation of human remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized. 538.535 Section 538.535 Money and Finance... Policy § 538.535 Importation and exportation of human remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized. (a) The importation into the United States of human remains for burial, cremation, or...

  10. 31 CFR 538.535 - Importation and exportation of human remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized. 538.535 Section 538.535 Money and Finance... Policy § 538.535 Importation and exportation of human remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized. (a) The importation into the United States of human remains for burial, cremation, or...

  11. Tgf-beta induced Erk phosphorylation of smad linker region regulates smad signaling.

    PubMed

    Hough, Chris; Radu, Maria; Doré, Jules J E

    2012-01-01

    The Transforming Growth Factor-Beta (TGF-β) family is involved in regulating a variety of cellular processes such as apoptosis, differentiation, and proliferation. TGF-β binding to a Serine/Threonine kinase receptor complex causes the recruitment and subsequent activation of transcription factors known as smad2 and smad3. These proteins subsequently translocate into the nucleus to negatively or positively regulate gene expression. In this study, we define a second signaling pathway leading to TGF-β receptor activation of Extracellular Signal Regulated Kinase (Erk) in a cell-type dependent manner. TGF-β induced Erk activation was found in phenotypically normal mesenchymal cells, but not normal epithelial cells. By activating phosphotidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), TGF-β stimulates p21-activated kinase2 (Pak2) to phosphorylate c-Raf, ultimately resulting in Erk activation. Activation of Erk was necessary for TGF-β induced fibroblast replication. In addition, Erk phosphorylated the linker region of nuclear localized smads, resulting in increased half-life of C-terminal phospho-smad 2 and 3 and increased duration of smad target gene transcription. Together, these data show that in mesenchymal cell types the TGF-β/PI3K/Pak2/Raf/MEK/Erk pathway regulates smad signaling, is critical for TGF-β-induced growth and is part of an integrated signaling web containing multiple interacting pathways rather than discrete smad/non-smad pathways. PMID:22880011

  12. Rainfall Induced Natural Disaster in Central America, a challenge for Regional Risk Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estuardo Guinea Barrientos, Héctor; Swain, Ashok

    2013-04-01

    Rainfall induced natural disasters rank first among all natural disasters in Central America. According to the records of the EM-DAT international database, 248 out of 486 disasters registered in Central America were disasters triggered by rainfall invents, in countries like Belize and Honduras, rainfall-induced natural disasters, mainly floods and landslides, account for more than 90% of the total number of casualties as well as the economic damage of all the disasters. Due to the natural conditions of the Central American Isthmus, precipitation events often struck more than one country at the time, for example Hurricane Mitch in 1998 affected the entire Central American region causing more than 18,000 casualties. In this context, the Central America countries have been working on joint programs and policies aiming transboundary cooperation and management of natural disasters, a clear example of this effort is CEPREDENAC which is the intergovernmental body with the mandate of promoting activities, projects and programs towards reduction of the risks to disasters in order to avoid loss of life and economic assets in the Central America, however, transnational management face several challenges that fall mostly in the political, economical and technical areas. In this paper we described and analyzed the rainfall induced natural disasters, their impacts and the inherent management challenges in the Central American context. Key words: Central America, Natural Disasters, Risk Management, International Cooperation

  13. IODP Expedition 354: A Bengal fan record of Himalayan erosion, weathering and organic carbon burial during the Neogene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France-Lanord, C.; Spiess, V.; Klaus, A.; Galy, A.; Galy, V.

    2015-12-01

    The development of the Himalayan orogen induced a major change in continental distribution, topography and climate that impacted the global biogeochemical cycles. The development of the highest mountain range coupled to the intense monsoonal precipitation regime generated an intense erosional flux that enhanced both organic carbon burial and silicate weathering. The largest part of the sediment flux was exported to the Bengal Fan, accumulating a long-term archive of this erosion. These sediments record the nature of eroded formations in the Himalaya and allow the documentation of weathering as well as organic carbon fluxes. In February-March 2015, IODP Expedition 354 drilled an E-W transect in the middle fan at 8°N to investigate interactions between the growth of the Himalaya, the development of the Indian monsoon, and processes affecting the carbon cycle. This expedition obtained a comprehensive record of turbiditic deposition since the Late Oligocene. Shipboard results reveal that the chemical and mineralogical compositions of turbiditic sediments cored across the transect are relatively stable throughout the Neogene. They reveal a weak regime of chemical weathering with no significant variation through time. This differs from the distal fan record (Leg 116) where from ~7 to 1 Ma, weathered and smectite rich sediments dominated. This difference implies that the distal fan record is not related to a direct evolution of the erosion regime but rather is controlled by a change in sediment transport within the fan. Shipboard estimates of organic carbon loading and behavior resemble observations made in the modern Ganga-Brahmaputra river sediments, suggesting efficient terrestrial organic carbon burial in the Bengal Fan [1]. Preliminary observations support the idea that Himalayan erosion has consumed atmospheric CO2 through the burial of organic carbon, more than by silicate weathering. [1] http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature06273

  14. Multiple regions within the promoter of the murine Ifnar-2 gene confer basal and inducible expression.

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Matthew P; Hertzog, Paul J; Owczarek, Catherine M

    2002-01-01

    The (murine) type I interferon (IFN) receptor, muIfnar-2, is expressed ubiquitously, and exists as both transmembrane and soluble forms. In the present study we show that the gene encoding muIfnar-2 spans approx. 33 kb on mouse chromosome 16, and consists of nine exons and eight introns. The three mRNA splice variants resulting in one transmembrane (muIfnar-2c) and two soluble (muIfnar-2a/2a') mRNA isoforms are generated by alternative RNA processing of the muIfnar-2 gene. Treatment of a range of murine cell lines with a combination of type I and II IFN showed that the muIfnar-2a and -2c mRNA isoforms were up-regulated independently of each other in L929 fibroblasts and hepa-1c1c7 hepatoma cells, but not in M1 myeloid leukaemia cells. Analysis of the 5' flanking region of muIfnar-2 using promoter-luciferase reporter constructs defined three regulatory regions: a region proximal to exon 1, conferring high basal expression, a distal region conferring inducible expression, and a negative regulatory region between the two. These data represent the first promoter analysis of a type I IFN receptor and, taken together with our previous data demonstrating high expression levels and dual biological functions for muIfnar-2a protein, suggests that the regulation of muIfnar-2 isoform expression may be an important way of modulating type I IFN responses. PMID:11939908

  15. Unraveling burial heating and sediment recycling in retroarc foreland basins: Detrital thermochronologic insights from the northern Magallanes Basin, Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fosdick, J. C.; Grove, M. J.; Graham, S. A.; Hourigan, J. K.; Lovera, O. M.; Romans, B.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment recycling is expected in many tectonic settings, such as foreland basins, where the path followed by grains initially derived from erosion of a basement source region typically involves significant intermediate stages of crustal evolution before the detritus is finally incorporated into tectonically stable basin strata. The shallow-crustal thermal histories experienced by eroded sediment may go undetected by traditional provenance methods but are potentially recoverable by thermochronologic methods. The Patagonian Magallanes retroarc foreland basin affords an excellent case study of sediment burial and recycling within a thrust belt setting. Combined detrital zircon U-Pb geochronology and (U-Th)/He thermochronology data and thermal modeling results confirm delivery of both rapidly cooled, first-cycle volcanogenic sediments from the Patagonian magmatic arc and recycled sediment from deeply buried and exhumed Cretaceous foredeep strata to the Cenozoic Magallanes basin depocenter. Numerical models of temperature-time histories indicate that ca. 54-45 Ma burial of the Maastrichtian Dorotea Formation produced 164-180°C conditions and heating to within the zircon He partial retention zone. Such deep burial is unusual for Andean foreland basins and may have resulted from combined effects of high basal heat flow and high sediment accumulation within a rapidly subsiding foredeep that was floored by basement weakened by previous Late Jurassic rifting. In this interpretation, Cenozoic thrust-related deformation deeply eroded the Dorotea Formation and underlying strata from ~5 km burial depths and may be associated with the development of a regionally extensive Paleogene unconformity. Results from the Cenozoic Río Turbio and Santa Cruz formations confirm that they contain both Cenozoic first-cycle zircon from the Patagonian magmatic arc and highly outgassed recycled zircon. This work suggests that Middle Miocene sediments were most likely derived from recycling of

  16. Upwelling and downwelling induced by mesoscale circulation in the DeSoto Canyon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. T.; Chassignet, E.; Morey, S. L.; Dukhovskoy, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    Ocean dynamics are complex over irregular topography areas, and the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, specifically the DeSoto Canyon region, is a challenge for modelers and oceanographers. Vertical movement of waters, especially upwelling, is observed to take place over the canyon's head and along the coast; however, it is not well understood. We focus on upwelling/downwelling processes induced by the Loop Current and its associated eddy field using multi-decadal Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model simulations. The Loop Current, part of the Gulf Stream, can develop northward into the Gulf through the Yucatan Channel and exit through the Florida Straits. It can reach the continental slope of the study domain and directly depress the isopycnals. Cyclonic eddies in front of the Loop Current also induce upwelling underneath. On the other hand, the Loop Current sometimes impinges on the West Florida Shelf and generates a high pressure disturbance, which travels northward along the shelf into the study region. Consequently, large-scale downwelling occurs across the continental slopes. Our analysis of sea surface height shows that the Loop Current pressure disturbance tends to propagate along the shallow isobaths of 100 to 300 m in the topographic wave direction from south of the West Florida Shelf to the Mississippi Delta. In addition, after shedding a large anticyclonic eddy, the Loop Current retracts southward and can touch the southeastern corner of the West Florida Shelf. This can result in a higher pressure disturbance, and therefore stronger large-scale downwelling in the DeSoto Canyon region.

  17. Emerging genetic patterns of the European Neolithic: perspectives from a late Neolithic Bell Beaker burial site in Germany.

    PubMed

    Lee, Esther J; Makarewicz, Cheryl; Renneberg, Rebecca; Harder, Melanie; Krause-Kyora, Ben; Müller, Stephanie; Ostritz, Sven; Fehren-Schmitz, Lars; Schreiber, Stefan; Müller, Johannes; von Wurmb-Schwark, Nicole; Nebel, Almut

    2012-08-01

    The transition from hunting and gathering to agriculture in Europe is associated with demographic changes that may have shifted the human gene pool of the region as a result of an influx of Neolithic farmers from the Near East. However, the genetic composition of populations after the earliest Neolithic, when a diverse mosaic of societies that had been fully engaged in agriculture for some time appeared in central Europe, is poorly known. At this period during the Late Neolithic (ca. 2,800-2,000 BC), regionally distinctive burial patterns associated with two different cultural groups emerge, Bell Beaker and Corded Ware, and may reflect differences in how these societies were organized. Ancient DNA analyses of human remains from the Late Neolithic Bell Beaker site of Kromsdorf, Germany showed distinct mitochondrial haplotypes for six individuals, which were classified under the haplogroups I1, K1, T1, U2, U5, and W5, and two males were identified as belonging to the Y haplogroup R1b. In contrast to other Late Neolithic societies in Europe emphasizing maintenance of biological relatedness in mortuary contexts, the diversity of maternal haplotypes evident at Kromsdorf suggests that burial practices of Bell Beaker communities operated outside of social norms based on shared maternal lineages. Furthermore, our data, along with those from previous studies, indicate that modern U5-lineages may have received little, if any, contribution from the Mesolithic or Neolithic mitochondrial gene pool. PMID:22552938

  18. Scientific services related to climate-induced natural hazards in the Vrancea Seismic Region, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sima, M.; Micu, D.; Dragota, C.; Chendes, V.; Micu, M.; Balteanu, D.

    2012-04-01

    Scientific services, regarded as a tool for offering different stakeholders and users with the necessary information adapted to their needs, are a major challenge to researchers nowadays. The paper aims to present an example of user-researcher interaction on issues related to climate-induced hazards in a highly seismic region of Romania. It is a case-study included in the FP7 ECLISE project which has in view the assessment of landslide and floods hazard and risk, as being the most important climate-induced natural hazards in the region. The main climate signals derived from the observational data indicate a tendency of precipitation concentration over short time intervals and the increase of their torrential character, combined during spring with long-lasting rains and snowmelt which generally led to a higher instability of the slopes due to landslides and flash floods. The Vrancea Seismic Region, considered being the most active sub-crustal earthquake province of Europe, with 3-5 earthquakes over magnitude 7 per century, is represented by the Curvature sector of the Carpathians and Subcarpathians of Romania. The region is affected by a large diversity of slope processes (especially landslides and mudflows) and flood and flash-flood events, generated by the morphometric traits of the small catchments, the loose lithology, the torrential features of rainfalls especially during the summer and by the severe changes occurred in the land cover characteristics after 1989 (large deforestation, property fragmentation, lack of interest in land-management works). Based on a comprehensive landslide inventory, the landslide susceptibility map (showing the probability of occurrence in space), obtained through statistical analysis and field/statistically-validated, would be completed with the hazard assessment, resulting from the correlation of landslide frequency and magnitude, rainfall triggering threshold and its returning period. The numerous elements at risk (transport and

  19. Geology and hydrology of radioactive solid-waste burial grounds at the Hanford Reservation, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaSala, Albert Mario; Doty, Gene C.

    1976-01-01

    The geology and hydrology of radioactive solid waste burial grounds at the Hanford Reservation were investigated, using existing data, by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the waste management plan of the Richland Operations Office of the Energy Research and Development Administration. The purpose of the investigation was to assist the operations office in characterizing the burial sites as to present environmental safety and as to their suitability for long-term storage (several thousand to tens of thousands of years) of radioactive sol id wastes. The burial ground sites fall into two classifications: (1) those on the low stream terraces adjacent to the Columbia River, mainly in the 100 Areas and 300 Area, and (2) those lying on the high terraces south of Gable Mountain in the 200 Areas. Evaluation of the suitability of the burial grounds for long-term storage was made almost entirely on hydrologic, geologic, and topographic criteria. Of greatest concern was the possibility that radionuclides might be leached from the buried wastes by infiltrating water and carried downward to the water table. The climate is semi-arid and the average annual precipitation is 6.4 inches at the Hanford Meteorological Station. However, the precipitation is seasonally distributed with about 50 percent occurring during the months of November, December, January, and February when evapotranspiration is negligible and conditions for infiltration are most favorable. None of the burial grounds are instrumented with monitoring devices that could be used to determine if radionuclides derived from them are reaching the water table. Burial grounds on the low stream terraces are mainly underlain by permeable materials and the water table lies at relatively shallow depths. Radionuclides conceivably could be leached from these burial grounds by percolating soil water, and radionuclides might reach the Columbia River in a relatively short time. These sites could also be inundated by erosion

  20. Meteor Induced Ridge and Trough Formation and Structuring of the Nighttime E-Region Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, M. M.; Dimant, Y.

    2006-12-01

    A meteoroid penetrating the Earth's atmosphere leaves behind a trail of dense plasma embedded in the E-region ionosphere. As the trail diffuses into the background plasma, large ambipolar electric fields develop. These fields are strongest perpendicular to the Earth's geomagnetic field (ěc B) and generally extend many kilometers along ěc B before gradually diminishing in amplitude. Away from the trail, this same field will cause plasma to collect into a long ridge extending along ěc B, enhancing the density by as much as a factor of 2. The field will also dig out density depressions on each side of the ridge, removing up to 90% of the plasma. We predict that meteor-induced, large-amplitude, density perturbations may fill as much as 20% of the ionosphere between 95 and 120 km altitude. This paper will present finite-element simulations and theory to show how meteors produce plasma ridges and troughs. We will estimate the extent of these as a function of altitude and meteor density. Finally, we will estimate the importance of these to the nighttime E-region density profile, a previous unexplained feature of the E-region, measured by rockets

  1. Heavy ion induced damage to plasmid DNA: plateau region vs. spread out Bragg-peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2011-08-01

    We have investigated the damage of synthetic plasmid pBR322 DNA in dilute aqueous solutions induced by fast carbon ions. The relative contribution of indirect damage and direct damage to the DNA itself is expected to vary with linear energy transfer along the ion track, with the direct damage contribution increasing towards the Bragg peak. Therefore, 12C ions at the spread-out Bragg peak (dose averaged LET∞ = 189 ± 15 keV/ μm) and in the plateau region of the Bragg curve (LET = 40 keV/ μm) were employed and the radical scavenger concentration in the plasmid solution was varied to quantify the indirect effect. In order to minimize the influence of 12C break-up fragments, a relatively low initial energy of 90 MeV/nucleon was employed for the carbon ions. DNA damage has been quantified by subsequent electrophoresis on agarose gels. We find that strand breaks due to both indirect and direct effects are systematically higher in the plateau region as compared to the Bragg peak region with the difference being smallest at high scavenging capacities. In view of the fact that the relative biological effectiveness for many biological endpoints is maximum at the Bragg peak our findings imply that DNA damage at the Bragg peak is qualitatively most severe.

  2. Isochron-burial dating of glacially-driven sediments: first results from the Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akçar, Naki; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Alfimov, Vasily; Claude, Anne; Reber, Regina; Christl, Marcus; Vockenhuber, Christof; Schlunegger, Fritz; Dehnert, Andreas; Rahn, Meinert; Schlüchter, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The recently introduced method of isochron-burial dating, employs the fact that the samples from a well-defined single bed in a deposit would have the same post-burial but different pre-burial histories. The analysis of cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al in such samples enables the modeling of the post-burial component and the determination of the 26Al/10Be at the time of burial. The isochron-burial age can then be calculated from the initial and the measured ratios. In this study, we focus on the isochron-burial dating of the oldest Quaternary deposits of the Alpine Foreland. These are called Swiss Deckenschotter (cover gravels) as they build mesa-type hill tops on the Mesozoic or Cenozoic bedrock of the Swiss Alpine forelands. Deckenschotter consists of glaciofluvial gravel layers intercalated with glacial and/or overbank deposits. Although previously morphostratigraphically correlated with Günz and Mindel glaciations of Penck and Brückner, the Swiss Deckenschotter is likely much older, and their chronostratigraphy is not well constrained. In order to reconstruct the chronology of these deposits, we collected more than 30 clasts of different lithology, shape and size from a single stratigraphic horizon in an abandoned gravel pit in Siglistorf (canton Zurich). We processed 19 clasts for cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al. Four samples did not yield successful 26Al measurements and two were unsuccessful for 10Be. Most of the samples have low nuclide concentrations, i.e. <20000 10Be at/g and <150000 26Al at/g. Finally, using the 26Al/10Be ratio of the samples we calculated an isochron-burial age of around 1.5 Ma. Our results from this study indicate that glaciofluvial sediments can well be time-calibrated with isochron-burial dating despite the low cosmogenic nuclide concentrations.

  3. Study of cataclastic deformation in compressive tectonic regime of a sandstone from south central Pyrenees, Spain: Timing of deformation bands occurrence during burial history and comparison with geomechanical models.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Romain; Robion, Philippe; David, Christian; Souloumiac, Pauline; Saillet, Elodie

    2016-04-01

    In high porosity sandstone lithologies, deformation bands (DBs) are characterized by changes in micro-structural characteristics inducing a localized change in the petrophysical properties of the rock. These DBs, which are generally planar structures from millimeters to few centimeters thick, can be used at the field scale to decipher extensional or compactional tectonic regime. However, numerous parameters in addition to the tectonic regime may affect development of DBs, and particularly the evolution of porosity during burial history. The aim of this work is to understand the relationship between the DBs occurrence in tectonic shortening regime and the timing of grain cementation that occurs during burial for an analogue to siliciclastic reservoir. For that purpose, we have focused our analysis on the Aren syn-tectonic sandstone maastrichtian formation localized on the front of the Boixols thrust, on the southern side of the San Corneli anticline, in the south central Pyrenees (Spain). The outcrops are localized in the Tremp-Graus basin, all along a 30 km East-West trend where 10 different sites, in which deformation bands are observable, have been investigated and sampled. The structural geometry of the basin is constrained with 3 serial N-S oriented cross sections showing an increase of the shortening from West to East. Our field work strategy was to, 1) measure the orientation of the DBs in each site, 2) take cores both within the DBs and the host rock to conduct systematic thin section investigations and 3) take oriented cores in order to study the magnetic fabric giving information on the internal deformation linked to a set of deformation band and regional N-S shortening. Field data show a minimum of two sets of DBs on each site with variation of orientations and densities. These DBs are perpendicular to the strata which prove their early occurrence, recording the initial stages of local deformation and evolution of the Boixols fold and thrust. At the

  4. General description of the hydrology and burial trenches at the low-level radioactive waste burial facility near Barnwell, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McDonald, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    The Barnwell low-level radioactive solid waste burial site is located in Barnwell County, South Carolina, 5 miles west of the city of Barnwell. Approximately 1,050 feet of stratified gravel, sand, silt, clay, and limestone, ranging in age from Late Cretaceous to Holocene, underlie the burial site. Ground water within the study area occurs under water table, semi-confined, and artesian conditions. Overland flow and most precipitation that recharges the ground-water system at the burial site is discharged to Marys Branch Creek. This creek originates as a spring about 3,000 feet south of the burial site and flows to the southwest into lower Three Runs. Lower Three Runs discharges into the Savannah River. Waste shipments to the site were reduced from 200,000 cubic feet per month for the period 1971 to 1979 to 100,000 cubic feet per month by October 1981. The wastes consist of both nonfuel cycle and nuclear fuel-cycle wastes. The standard trench dimensions at the burial site are 100 feet wide by 1,000 feet long and 22 feet deep. Trench bottoms are a minimum of 5 feet above the water table. Seven soil mapping units occur at the waste disposal facility. The three major soil types are all well drained and cover approximately 84 percent of the study area. (USGS)

  5. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground. Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    Safety and cost information are developed for the conceptual decommissioning of commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial grounds. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are used as reference facilities for the study. The two burial grounds are assumed to have the same site capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology. and hydrology of the two sites are chosen to be typical of real western and eastern sites. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed analyses and data needed to support the results given in Volume 1.

  6. Hydrogeological influences on radionuclide migration from the major radioactive waste burial sites at Chernobyl (A review)

    SciTech Connect

    Dgepo, S.P.; Skalsky, A.S.; Bugai, D.A.; Marchuk, V.V.; Waters, R.D.

    1994-03-01

    This paper summarizes the recent hydrogeological investigations of several research organizations on waste confinement at the major radioactive waste (RW) burial sites immediately adjacent to the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (Ch. NPP). Hydrogeological conditions and radiologic ground-water contamination levels are described. Ongoing ground-water monitoring practices are evaluated. The chemical and physical characteristics of the radionuclides within the burial sites are considered. Ground water and radionuclide transport modeling studies related to problems of the RW disposal sites are also reviewed. Current concerns on future impacts of the RW burial sites on the hydrological environment and water resources of the Ch.NPP area are discussed.

  7. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning a Reference Low-Level Waste Burial Ground. Main Report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, E. S.; Holter, G. M.

    1980-06-01

    Safety and cost information are developed for the conceptual decommissioning of commercial low-level waste (LLW) burial grounds. Two generic burial grounds, one located on an arid western site and the other located on a humid eastern site, are used as reference facilities for the study. The two burial grounds are assumed to have the same site capacity for waste, the same radioactive waste inventory, and similar trench characteristics and operating procedures. The climate, geology. and hydrology of the two sites are chosen to be typical of real western and eastern sites. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains background information and study results in summary form.

  8. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) regulatory region variation in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Roodgar, Morteza; Ross, Cody T.; Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Marcelino, Gretchen; Smith, David Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is an enzyme that plays a key role in intracellular immune response against respiratory infections. Since various species of nonhuman primates exhibit different levels of susceptibility to infectious respiratory diseases, and since variation in regulatory regions of genes is thought to play a key role in expression levels of genes, two candidate regulatory regions of iNOS were mapped, sequenced, and compared across five species of nonhuman primates: African green monkeys (chlorocebus sabeus), pig-tailed macaques (Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Indian rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and Chinese rhesus macaques (M. mulatta). In addition, we conducted an in silico analysis of the transcription factor binding sites associated with genetic variation in these two candidate regulatory regions across species. We found that only one of the two candidate regions showed strong evidence of involvement in iNOS regulation. Specifically, we found evidence of 13 conserved binding site candidates linked to iNOS regulation: AP-1, C/EBPB, CREB, GATA-1, GATA-3, NF-AT, NF-AT5, NF-κB, KLF4, Oct-1, PEA3, SMAD3, and TCF11. Additionally, we found evidence of interspecies variation in binding sites for several regulatory elements linked to iNOS (GATA-3, GATA-4, KLF6, SRF, STAT-1, STAT-3, OLF-1 and HIF-1) across species, especially in African green monkeys relative to other species. Given the key role of iNOS in respiratory immune response, the findings of this study might help guide the direction of future studies aimed to uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the increased susceptibility of African green monkeys to several viral and bacterial respiratory infections. PMID:25675838

  9. Climate change influence on organic carbon remobilization, transport and burial in mangrove forests of Everglades National Park, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoak, J. M.; Breithaupt, J.; Smith, T. J.; Sanders, C. J.

    2013-05-01

    Mangrove ecosystems store large quantities of organic carbon (OC), burying it in their soils at a greater rate than terrestrial forests, thus providing an important negative climate change feedback. However, mangrove ecosystem response to climate change-induced stressors will determine if mangrove ecosystems continue to be a sink for OC. The threats of rising sea level outpacing mangrove forest soil accretion and the increased wave energy associated with this rise are two potential climate change stressors that may alter the carbon balance in mangrove ecosystems. The threat from wave energy is amplified during storm events, which may become more intense and/or frequent with climate change. Climate change-amplified storms could increasingly damage mangrove forests along the coastline, remobilizing and exposing previously buried OC to oxidation, and contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We investigate the fate of this remobilized OC by examining soil cores from two sites within Everglades National Park. Soil accretion rates and OC burial rates within a storm surge deposit are compared to long-term rates (i.e., last 100 years). The sites are 4 and 10 km inland from the coast and data show these mangrove soils are accreting at a rate sufficient to keep pace with the current rate of sea-level rise. The accretion rates range from 2.5 to 3.6 mm yr-1 and are much greater within the storm surge deposit, reaching as high as 6.5 mm yr-1. We also discovered enhanced rates of OC burial within this same storm surge deposit which are approximately 2-fold greater than the long-term rates. Our findings indicate that these enhanced accretion and OC burial rates are due to inland transport of marine carbonate material and OC remobilized from along the coast during the storm. Furthermore, we find OC burial rates within the storm deposit at the site 10 km inland are substantially greater than the site 4 km inland, while mass accumulation rates show the opposite trend

  10. Morphogenetic evolution of the Têt river valley (eastern Pyrenees) using 10Be/21Ne cosmogenic burial dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartégou, Amandine; Blard, Pierre-Henri; Braucher, Régis; Bourlès, Didier L.; Calvet, Marc; Zimmermann, Laurent; Tibari, Bouchaïb; Hez, Gabriel; Gunnell, Yanni; Aumaitre, Georges; Keddadouche, Karim

    2016-04-01

    The rates and chronologies of valley incision are closely modulated by the tectonic uplift of active mountain ranges and were controlled by repeated climate changes during the Quaternary. The continental collision between the Iberian and Eurasian plates induced a double vergence orogen, the Pyrenees, which has been considered as a mature mountain range in spite of significant seismicity (e.g. Chevrot et al., 2011) and evidence of neotectonics (e.g. Goula et al., 1999). Nevertheless, recent studies indicate that the range may have never reached a steady state (Ford et al., in press). One option for resolving this controversy is to quantify the incision rates since the Miocene by reconstructing the vertical movement of geometric markers such as fluvial terraces. However, the few available ages from the Pyrenean terrace systems do not exceed the middle Pleistocene. Thus, to enlarge the time span of this dataset, we studied alluvium-filled horizontal epiphreatic passages in limestone karstic networks. Such landforms are used as substitutes of fluvial terraces because they represent former valley floors (e.g. Palmer, 2007; Audra et al., 2013). They record the transient position of former local base levels during the process of valley deepening. The Têt river valley (southern Pyrenees) was studied near the Villefranche-de-Conflent limestone gorge where 8 cave levels have been recognized over a vertical height of 600 meters. Given that 26Al/10Be cosmogenic burial dating in this setting was limited to the last ~5 Ma (Calvet et al., 2015), here we used the cosmogenic 10Be/21Ne method in order to restore a more complete chronology of valley incision (e.g. Balco & Shuster, 2009; McPhilipps et al., 2016). Burial age results for alluvial deposits from 12 caves document incision rates since the Langhian (~14 Ma). Preliminary results indicate a history of valley deepening in successive stages. The data show a regular incision rate of 70-80 mm/a from the Langhian to the Messinian

  11. Did greater burial depth increase the seed size of domesticated legumes?

    PubMed

    Kluyver, Thomas A; Charles, Michael; Jones, Glynis; Rees, Mark; Osborne, Colin P

    2013-10-01

    The independent domestication of crop plants in several regions of the world formed the basis of human civilizations, and attracts considerable interest from archaeologists and biologists. Selection under cultivation led to a suite of domestication traits which distinguish crops from their wild progenitors, including larger seeds in most seed crops. This selection may be classified as 'conscious' or 'unconscious' selection according to whether humans were aware of the changes that they were driving. The hypothesis that human cultivation buried seeds deeper than natural dispersal, exerting unconscious selection favouring larger seeds with greater reserves, was tested. Using a comparative approach, accessions of eight grain legumes, originating from independent domestication centres across several continents, were sampled. Seeds were planted at different depths in a controlled environment, and seedling emergence scored for 5 weeks after sowing. Domestication in all species was associated with increased seed mass. In three species, greater mass was not correlated with increased ability to emerge from depth. In five species, emergence depth did correlate with mass, suggesting that selection during domestication may have acted on emergence depth. However, domestication only had a significant effect in two of these species (lentil and mung bean), and the increase in depth was no more than predicted by a cube-root allometric relationship with seed mass. The results do not support the hypothesis that burial under cultivation was a general selection mechanism for increased seed mass during the domestication of grain legumes, but it may have acted in particular species or regions. PMID:24058143

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of 400-year-old human remains found in two Yakut burial sites.

    PubMed

    Ricaut, François-Xavier; Kolodesnikov, Sergei; Keyser-Tracqui, Christine; Alekseev, Anatoly Nikoyevich; Crubézy, Eric; Ludes, Bertrand

    2006-01-01

    The excavation of five frozen graves at the Sytygane Syhe and Istekh-Myrane burial sites (dated at 400 years old) in central Yakutia revealed five human skeletons belonging to the Yakut population. To investigate the origin and evolution of the Yakut population as well as the kinship system between individuals buried in these two sites, DNA was extracted from bone samples and analyzed by autosomal short tandem repeats (STRs) and by sequencing hypervariable region I (HV1) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region. The results showed a diversity of sepulchral organizations linked probably to the social or genetic background of the subjects. Comparison of STR profiles, mitochondrial haplotypes, and haplogroups with data from Eurasian populations indicated affinities with Asian populations and suggested a relative specificity and continuity of part of the Yakut mitochondrial gene pool during the last five centuries. Moreover, our results did not support a Central Asian (with the exception of maternal lineage of West Eurasian origin) or Siberian origin of the maternal lineages of these ancient Yakut subjects, implying an ethnogenesis of the Yakut population probably more complex than previously proposed. PMID:16229028

  13. Large difference in carbon emission - burial balances between boreal and arctic lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundin, E. J.; Klaminder, J.; Bastviken, D.; Olid, C.; Hansson, S. V.; Karlsson, J.

    2015-09-01

    Lakes play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle by burying C in sediments and emitting CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. The strengths and control of these fundamentally different pathways are therefore of interest when assessing the continental C balance and its response to environmental change. In this study, based on new high-resolution estimates in combination with literature data, we show that annual emission:burial ratios are generally ten times higher in boreal compared to subarctic - arctic lakes. These results suggest major differences in lake C cycling between biomes, as lakes in warmer boreal regions emit more and store relatively less C than lakes in colder arctic regions. Such effects are of major importance for understanding climatic feedbacks on the continental C sink - source function at high latitudes. If predictions of global warming and northward expansion of the boreal biome are correct, it is likely that increasing C emissions from high latitude lakes will partly counteract the presumed increasing terrestrial C sink capacity at high latitudes.

  14. Large difference in carbon emission – burial balances between boreal and arctic lakes

    PubMed Central

    Lundin, E. J.; Klaminder, J.; Bastviken, D.; Olid, C.; Hansson, S. V.; Karlsson, J.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle by burying C in sediments and emitting CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere. The strengths and control of these fundamentally different pathways are therefore of interest when assessing the continental C balance and its response to environmental change. In this study, based on new high-resolution estimates in combination with literature data, we show that annual emission:burial ratios are generally ten times higher in boreal compared to subarctic – arctic lakes. These results suggest major differences in lake C cycling between biomes, as lakes in warmer boreal regions emit more and store relatively less C than lakes in colder arctic regions. Such effects are of major importance for understanding climatic feedbacks on the continental C sink – source function at high latitudes. If predictions of global warming and northward expansion of the boreal biome are correct, it is likely that increasing C emissions from high latitude lakes will partly counteract the presumed increasing terrestrial C sink capacity at high latitudes. PMID:26370519

  15. HAARP-based Investigations of Lightning-induced Nonlinearities within the D-Region Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    It is well-documented that energetic lightning can produce fantastical events with the lower ionosphere. Although the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) transmitter is not as powerful as lightning, it can be used to investigate the nonlinear interactions that occur within the lower ionosphere, many of which also occur during lightning-induced ionospheric events. This paper presents the best experimental results obtained during D-region modification experiments performed by the University of Florida at the HAARP observatory between 2007 and 2014, including ELF/VLF wave generation experiments, wave-wave mixing experiments, and cross-modulation experiments. We emphasize the physical processes important for lightning-ionosphere interactions that can be directly investigated using HAARP.

  16. Stellate ganglion pulsed radiofrequency ablation for stretch induced complex regional pain syndrome type II

    PubMed Central

    Singh Rana, Shiv Pratap; Abraham, Mary; Gupta, Varun; Biswas, Shubhashish; Marda, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) following injury or nerve damage, as its name signifies, is a challenging entity, and its successful management requires a multidisciplinary approach. It not only manifests as severe pain, but also gives rise to functional disability, lack of sleep, lack of enjoyment of life and poor quality of life. Various pain interventional techniques have been described in the literature for the management of CRPS ranging from sympathetic blocks to spinal cord stimulator. A 34-year-old liver transplant donor, who developed position-induced right upper limb neuropathic pain suggestive of CRPS type II was managed initially with medications and later with stellate ganglion block under fluoroscopic guidance at cervical C7 position. Following an initial significant improvement in pain and allodynia, which was transient, a pulsed radiofrequency ablation of stellate ganglion was performed successfully to provide prolonged and sustained pain relief, which persisted up to 14 months of follow-up. PMID:26543471

  17. Chronic heart failure selectively induces regional heterogeneity of insulin-responsive glucose transporters

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Bruce; Bevier, Marie; Nishijima, Yoshinori; Rogers, Suzanne; Carnes, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    Glucose uptake across the sarcolemma is regulated by a family of membrane proteins called glucose transporters (GLUTs), which includes GLUT4 (the major cardiac isoform) and GLUT12 (a novel, second insulin-sensitive isoform). Potential regional patterns in glucose transport across the cardiac chambers have not been examined; thus, we hypothesized that insulin-responsive GLUT4 and -12 protein and gene expression would be chamber specific in healthy subjects and during chronic heart failure (HF). Using a canine model of tachypacing-induced, progressive, chronic HF, total GLUT protein and messenger RNA in both ventricles and atria (free wall and appendage) were investigated by immunoblotting and real-time PCR. In controls, GLUT4, but not GLUT12, protein content was significantly higher in the atria compared with the ventricles, with the highest content in the right atrium (RA; P < 0.001). GLUT4 and GLUT12 mRNA levels were similar across the cardiac chambers. During chronic HF, GLUT4 and GLUT12 protein content was highest in the left ventricle (LV; by 2.5- and 4.2-fold, respectively, P < 0.01), with a concomitant increase in GLUT4 and GLUT12 mRNA (P < 0.001). GLUT4, but not GLUT12, protein content was decreased in RA during chronic HF (P = 0.001). In conclusion, GLUT4 protein was differentially expressed across the chambers in the healthy heart, and this regional pattern was reversed during HF. Our data suggest that LV was the primary site dependent on both GLUT4 and GLUT12 during chronic HF. In addition, the paradoxical decrease in GLUT4 content in RA may induce perturbations in atrial energy production during chronic HF. PMID:21849635

  18. Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m/sup 3/) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time.

  19. Identifying intrinsically disordered protein regions likely to undergo binding-induced helical transitions.

    PubMed

    Glover, Karen; Mei, Yang; Sinha, Sangita C

    2016-10-01

    Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) lacking stable secondary and ordered tertiary structure. IDRs are often implicated in macromolecular interactions, and may undergo structural transitions upon binding to interaction partners. However, as binding partners of many protein IDRs are unknown, these structural transitions are difficult to verify and often are poorly understood. In this study we describe a method to identify IDRs that are likely to undergo helical transitions upon binding. This method combines bioinformatics analyses followed by circular dichroism spectroscopy to monitor 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced changes in secondary structure content of these IDRs. Our results demonstrate that there is no significant change in the helicity of IDRs that are not predicted to fold upon binding. IDRs that are predicted to fold fall into two groups: one group does not become helical in the presence of TFE and includes examples of IDRs that form β-strands upon binding, while the other group becomes more helical and includes examples that are known to fold into helices upon binding. Therefore, we propose that bioinformatics analyses combined with experimental evaluation using TFE may provide a general method to identify IDRs that undergo binding-induced disorder-to-helix transitions. PMID:27179590

  20. Hypoglycaemia-induced changes in regional brain volume and memory function

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, B. A.; Lugar, H. M.; Smith, S. E.; Meyer, E. J.; Perantie, D. C.; Kolody, B. C.; Koller, J. M.; Arbelaez, A. M.; Shimony, J. S.; Hershey, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypoglycaemic events can be a serious complication of insulin therapy in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Severe hypoglycaemic exposure can lead to episodic memory impairments, including anterograde amnesia. However, relatively little is known regarding the long-term impact of severe hypoglycaemia on brain structure in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. The goals of the present study were to gain a greater understanding of the long-term effects of severe hypoglycaemia exposure on brain structure and the neural correlates of memory impairments in Type 1 diabetes mellitus. Case report Regional grey and white matter volume and total white matter lesion volume were quantified in an individual with long-standing hypoglycaemia-induced anterograde amnesia and compared with age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Our patient has significant reductions in grey matter volume in the hippocampus, thalamus and pallidum, and significant reductions in white matter volume in the splenium, isthmus of the cingulate and cerebellum. He also has a significantly larger total white matter lesion volume than control subjects. Conclusion This case study highlights the potential of hypoglycaemia for permanent deleterious effects on brain structure and memory function. Our results suggest that subcortical grey matter, periventricular white matter and posterior white matter may be most susceptible to injury from hypoglycaemia exposure, and that structural damage to the hippocampus and isthmus of the cingulate may play a central role in hypoglycaemia-induced memory impairments. PMID:23330574

  1. Regional drought-induced reduction in the biomass carbon sink of Canada's boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhihai; Peng, Changhui; Zhu, Qiuan; Chen, Huai; Yu, Guirui; Li, Weizhong; Zhou, Xiaolu; Wang, Weifeng; Zhang, Wenhua

    2012-02-14

    The boreal forests, identified as a critical "tipping element" of the Earth's climate system, play a critical role in the global carbon budget. Recent findings have suggested that terrestrial carbon sinks in northern high-latitude regions are weakening, but there has been little observational evidence to support the idea of a reduction of carbon sinks in northern terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we estimated changes in the biomass carbon sink of natural stands throughout Canada's boreal forests using data from long-term forest permanent sampling plots. We found that in recent decades, the rate of biomass change decreased significantly in western Canada (Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba), but there was no significant trend for eastern Canada (Ontario and Quebec). Our results revealed that recent climate change, and especially drought-induced water stress, is the dominant cause of the observed reduction in the biomass carbon sink, suggesting that western Canada's boreal forests may become net carbon sources if the climate change-induced droughts continue to intensify. PMID:22308340

  2. Neoplasms induced by megavoltage radiation in the head and neck region

    SciTech Connect

    Steeves, R.A.; Bataini, J.P.

    1981-04-01

    Radiation-induced cancer, although fortunately a rare complication of radiotherapy, is nonetheless observed occasionally even after megavoltage radiation has been used. Over a 22-year period at the Curie Institute, four patients were found to have malignant neoplasms within the fields of megavoltage treatment given for various cancers of the head and neck region. Three of the neoplasms were sarcomas, two osteogenic and one fibrosarcoma, and the other tumor was a sarcomatoid epithelioma. The latent period ranged from 3 1/2-15 years. Although the evidence is strong that the neoplasms were causally related to the precedent irradiation, it is acknowledged that rare examples of the double primary phenomenon exist, even separated by five or more years, and that only one such instance would induce a large error in the estimated frequency of postirradiation neoplasms. Because clinical estimates after megavoltage irradiation are usually compounded by an association with a relatively high total absorbed dose, the issue of the incidence of postirradiation neoplasms as a function of the type of external beam (orthovoltage vs. megavoltage) may require resolution by experimental means. Another rare sequela of radiotherapy is injury to a peripheral nerve. One of the four patients with a second neoplasm after radiation also developed left hypoglossal nerve palsy 2 1/2 years post-therapy, and left optic nerve atrophy seven years postradiation treatment of a squamous cell carcinoma of the ethmoid and maxillary sinuses. The 51-year-old patient had received a tumor dose of 6800 rads (2043 rets).

  3. Neoplasms induced by megavoltage radiation in the head and neck region

    SciTech Connect

    Steeves, R.A.; Bataini, J.P.

    1981-04-01

    Radiation-induced cancer, although fortunately a rare complication of radiotherapy, is nonetheless observed occasionally even after megavoltage radiation has been used. Over a 22-year period at the Curie Institute, four patients were found to have malignant neoplasms within the fields of megavoltage treatment given for various cancers of the head and neck region. Three of the neoplasms were sarcomas, two osteogenic and one fibrosarcoma, and the other tumor was a sarcomatoid epithelioma. The latent period ranged from 3 1/2 to 15 years. Although the evidence is strong that the neoplasms were causally related to the precedent irradiation, it is acknowledged that rare examples of the double primary phenomenon exist, even separated by five or more years, and that only one such instance would induce a large error in the estimated frequency of postirradiation neoplasms. Because clinical estimates after megavoltage irradiation are usually compounded by an association with a relatively high total absorbed dose, the issue of the incidence of postirradiation neoplasms as a function of the type of external beam (orthovoltage vs megavoltage) may require resolution by experimental means. Another rare sequela of radiotherapy is injury to a peripheral nerve. One of the four patients with a second neoplasm after radiation also developed left hypoglossal nerve palsy 2 1/2 years post-therapy, and left optic nerve atrophy seven years postradiation treatment of a squamous cell carcinoma of the ethmoid and maxillary sinuses. The 51-year-old patient had received a tumor dose of 6800 rads (2043 rets).

  4. Particulate Organic Carbon Transport and Burial in the Colville River Delta, Beaufort Sea, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, T. S.; Schreiner, K. M.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Allison, M.

    2013-12-01

    Terrestrial particulate organic carbon (tPOC) delivery to nearshore deltaic regions is an important mechanism of OC storage and burial, and river deltas and continental margins worldwide account for approximately 90% of the carbon burial in the ocean. The Arctic Ocean has the greatest percentage of continental shelf area as a proportion of total ocean basin area of any of the world's oceans, and receives freshwater and sediment from numerous large river systems. Increasing warming in the Arctic is leading to an acceleration of the hydrologic cycle, warming and breakdown of permafrost, and broad shifts in vegetation. All of these changes are likely to affect the delivery and burial of tPOC in nearshore regions. However, to date, most studies of tPOC delivery from North America to the Arctic Ocean have focused on large Arctic rivers like the Mackenzie and Yukon, and a significant portion of the watersheds of those rivers lie in sub-Arctic latitudes, indicating that their tPOC delivery is likely not representative of the high Arctic tundra. This study focuses on tPOC delivery by the Colville River, the largest North American river (in terms of both freshwater delivery and sediment load) with a watershed that does not include sub-Arctic latitudes. Sediment samples from the river delta and nearby Simpson's Lagoon were taken in August of 2010 and subsequently fractionated by density, in order to study the delivery of both discrete and sediment-sorbed tPOC. Samples were analyzed for stable carbon isotopes, bulk radiocarbon, terrestrial biomarkers (including lignin-phenols and non-lignin phenols, specifically those that are indicative of peat input), and aquatic biomarkers (algal pigments), and additionally a subset of the samples were analyzed by ramped pyrolysis-14C. Results show that tPOC delivery is concentrated near the river mouth sourced from coastal plain tundra, with additional delivery of tPOC from peat released into the lagoon from the seaward limit of the

  5. A Protein Solvation Model Based on Residue Burial.

    PubMed

    Ceres, Nicoletta; Pasi, Marco; Lavery, Richard

    2012-06-12

    The influence of solvent on the individual amino acids of a protein depends not simply on their surface exposure but rather on the degree of their burial within the structure. This property can be related to a simple geometrical measure termed circular variance. Circular variance depends on the spatial distribution of neighboring residues and varies from zero to one as a residue becomes buried. Its only adjustable parameter is a cutoff distance for selecting neighbors. Here, we show that circular variance can be used to build a fast and effective model of protein solvation energies. For this, we combine a coarse-grain protein representation with statistical potentials derived by Boltzmann inversion of circular variance probability distributions for different classes of pseudoatom within a large protein structure database. The method is shown to work well for distinguishing native protein structures from decoy structures generated in a variety of ways. It can also be used to detect specific residues in unfavorable solvent environments. Compared to surface accessibility, circular variance calculations are faster, less sensitive to small conformational changes, and able to account for the longer-range interactions that characterize the electrostatic component of solvent effects. The resulting solvation energies can be used alone or as part of a more general coarse-grain protein model. PMID:26593844

  6. Osteology of a slave burial population from Barbados, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Corruccini, R S; Handler, J S; Mutaw, R J; Lange, F W

    1982-12-01

    A unique seventeenth-nineteenth century slave cemetery population from Newton plantation, Barbados, allows examination of craniodental characters in relation to ethnohistorical data. Age-at-death estimates suggest life expectancy at birth of 29 years and low infant mortality; historical demography, however, suggests life expectancy of 20 years and very high infant mortality. Tooth decay, bilateral tooth loss, periodontal disease, root hypercementosis, and severe enamel hypoplasia are high in frequency. The teeth yield evidence of such cultural practices as pipe-smoking and incisor mutilation. Several skeletal features reflect periodic near-starvation. Directional and fluctuating dental asymmetry, relative tooth size, and hypoplasia distribution suggest slaves experienced considerable weaning trauma; metabolic stress at this time exceeded that of prenatal and immediate postnatal periods. Odontometrics and dental and cranial nonmetric traits indicate that modern Blacks are intermediate between the ancestral slaves and modern Whites but more similar to the latter, suggesting effects of environmental covariance exceed those of genetic admixture. Nonmetric trait distributions show nonrandom patterns according to area of burial in the cemetery, a possible result of family segregation. PMID:6762099

  7. The Dispersion and Burial of Well-Mixed Gravels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschenburger, J. K.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last two decades, results from numerous tracing experiments have shed light on grain kinematics in gravel-bed channels, including the distance of grain displacement and the depth of vertical mixing. However, most of these studies report results for relatively short temporal and spatial scales, when the behavior of tagged gravels may not reflect the overall streambed dynamics. The purpose of this talk is to highlight the grain kinematics of well-mixed gravels. Field observations come from a tracing experiment operated for nearly 20 years in Carnation Creek, which is located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada. The small gravel-bed river with pool-riffle-bar morphology and large woody debris experiences an average of 15 ± 5 floods per year, which facilitates frequent streambed activity and relatively high bed material transport rates typically under partial sediment transport conditions. The magnetically tagged gravels, which range in size from 16 to 180 mm, have been recovered more than 10 times over the study period. Evaluation of the spatial distribution of tagged gravels over time documents the complex evolution of streamwise dispersion. Once tracers are well mixed vertically, the displacement of mobile gravels is only partly influenced by the tracer starting position in the bed morphology and its depth of burial before a given flooding period.

  8. Phonon anomalies induced by polar nano-regions in a relaxor ferroelectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyong; Wen, Jinsheng; Stock, Chris; Gehring, Peter

    2007-03-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to measure both acoustic and optic phonons polarized along (110) (T2 mode) in the relaxor ferroelectric compound PZN-4.5PT. In the low temperature rhombohedral phase, a single domain state was achieved by cooling the single crystal sample under an external electric field of 2 kV/cm along the [111] direction. Phonon measurements were performed near the (2,2,0) and (2,-2,0) Bragg peaks. We have found that the TA2 phonon couples closely to the diffuse scattering, which arises from polar nano-regions in the system. With the redistribution of diffuse scattering under the external field (see Ref. 1), a clear hardening of TA2 mode was observed near the (2,2,0) Bragg peak, while the TA2 mode near (2,-2,0) Bragg peak softens significantly and becomes over-damped. Our results indicate local inhomogeneities such as the PNR can have direct and significant effects on the lattice dynamics and stability of the whole system. Ref. 1: ``Electric-field-induced redistribution of polar nano-regions in a relaxor ferroelectric'', Guangyong Xu, Z. Zhong, Y. Bing, Z.-G. Ye, and G. Shirane, Nature Materials 5, 134, (2006).

  9. Regional enzymatic analysis of UV-B and streptozotocin induced diabetic cataract lens.

    PubMed

    Kojima, M

    1990-01-01

    As the UV-B cataract and early stages of diabetic cataract in rats only touches the epithelium and anterior superficial cortex, a whole lens analysis is not meaningful, but a regional analysis with the freeze-sectioning device has to be performed. Scheimpflug photography with microdensitometric image analysis enables the scientist to discern in vivo single layers along the optical axis of the lens. UV-B cataracts (0.2 J/cm2, every 2nd day) and diabetic cataracts (Streptozotocin (STZ), 70 mg/kg BW) were induced in Brown-Norway rats. The stages of lens opacification were documented by Scheimpflug photography. 8 weeks after start of UV-B treatment and at several dates before onset of visible diabetic cataractous changes, the animals were sacrificed. The lenses were divided reproducibly into 4 or 7 parts such as an equatorial ring and several layers of the central cylinder from anterior to posterior part. The enzyme activity spectrum shows highly region related pattern that would not have been found in a whole lens analysis. Aldose reductase was activated before appearance of visible cataractous changes due to diabetes compared to normal lenses. In contrast Fructose-1,6-biphosphate-aldolase activity was lower before onset of visible changes than in normal lenses, but only within the 1st section where later visible cataractous changes of UV-B cataract could be detected. PMID:1966039

  10. Regional electric field induced by electroconvulsive therapy: a finite element simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won Hee; Deng, Zhi-De; Kim, Tae-Seong; Laine, Andrew F; Lisanby, Sarah H; Peterchev, Angel V

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the regional distribution of the electric field (E-field) strength induced by electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and to contrast clinically relevant electrode configurations through finite element (FE) analysis. An FE human head model incorporating tissue heterogeneity and white matter anisotropy was generated based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI (DT-MRI) data. We simulated the E-field spatial distributions of three standard ECT electrode placements [bilateral (BL), bifrontal (BF), and right unilateral (RUL)] and an investigational electrode configuration [focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST)]. A quantitative comparison of the E-field strength was subsequently carried out in various brain regions of interests (ROIs) that have putative role in the therapeutic action and/or adverse side effects of ECT. This study illustrates how the realistic FE head model provides quantitative insight in the biophysics of ECT, which may shed light on the differential clinical outcomes seen with various forms of ECT, and may guide the development of novel stimulation paradigms with improved risk/benefit ratio. PMID:21096148

  11. Adventitious Root Production and Plastic Resource Allocation to Biomass Determine Burial Tolerance in Woody Plants from Central Canadian Coastal Dunes

    PubMed Central

    DECH, JEFFERY P.; MAUN, M. ANWAR

    2006-01-01

    • Background and Aims Burial is a recurrent stress imposed upon plants of coastal dunes. Woody plants are buried on open coastal dunes and in forested areas behind active blowouts; however, little is known about the burial responses and adaptive traits of these species. The objectives of this study were: (a) to determine the growth and morphological responses to burial in sand of seven woody plant species native to central Canadian coastal dunes; and (b) to identify traits that determine burial tolerance in these species. • Methods Field experiments were conducted to determine the responses of each species to burial. Saplings were exposed to burial treatments of 0, 10, 25, 50 and 75 % of their height. Burial responses were evaluated based on regressions of total biomass, height, adventitious root production and percentage allocation to shoot, root and adventitious root biomass on percentage burial. • Key Results Pinus strobus and Picea glauca lacked burial tolerance. In response to the burial gradient, these species showed a strong linear decline in total biomass, minimal adventitious root production that peaked at moderate levels (25–50 % burial) and no change in allocation to shoots vs. roots. The tolerant species Juniperus virginiana, Thuja occidentalis and Picea mariana showed a quadratic response to burial, with little change in biomass up to 50 % burial, but a large decline at 75 %. These species produced abundant adventitious roots up to 50 % burial, but did not alter allocation patterns over the range of burial levels. Populus balsamifera and Salix cordata were stimulated by burial. These species showed linear increases in biomass with increasing burial, produced copious adventitious roots across the gradient and showed a clear shift in allocation to vertical shoot growth and adventitious root production at the expense of the original roots under high burial conditions. • Conclusions Adventitious root production and plastic resource

  12. Miscellaneous information regarding operation and inventory of 618-11 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    This report is a compilation of inventories and radiation surveys taken for the 618-11 Burial Ground at Hanford. This report deals with waste management activities at the facility during the early to mid-1960s.

  13. 38 CFR 3.1706 - Burial allowance for a veteran who died while hospitalized by VA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... within a State, or to the border limits of the United States. (2) VA may pay the plot or interment allowance for burial in a veterans cemetery under § 3.1707, Plot or interment allowance. (Authority: 38...

  14. 38 CFR - § 3.1705 Burial allowance based on non-service-connected death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... claim for, or award of, pension; and (2) VA may pay the plot or interment allowance for burial in a State veterans cemetery under § 3.1707(a), Plot or interment allowance. (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 2302,...

  15. 32 CFR 553.16 - Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.16 Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. The Board of Commissioners of the US Soldiers'...

  16. 32 CFR 553.16 - Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.16 Persons eligible for burial in Soldiers' Home National Cemetery. The Board of Commissioners of the US Soldiers'...

  17. 76 FR 31683 - Proposed Information Collection (NCA PreNeed Burial Evaluation) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ...: National Cemetery Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Cemetery Administration (NCA), Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), is announcing an opportunity for public... claimant's eligibility for burial at a National Cemetery. DATES: Written comments and recommendations...

  18. Radio Induced Fluorescence (RIF) Imaging Of E-region Quasi-periodic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.

    The horizontal structure of sporadic-E layers has been imaged using artificial airglow excited by high power radio waves. In January 1998, the HF facility at Arecibo, Puerto Rico beamed a 80 MW signal upward at 3.175 MHz. The beam reflected in the E- region near 120 km altitude to excite green-line emissions at 557.7 nm. Ground based images showed quasi-periodic structures with periods near 2 and 10 km. These struc- tures been interpreted as being produced by Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instabilities in the neutral atmosphere. The excitation of radio induced fluorescence (RIF) emissions has been studied with both one-dimensional and two-dimensional computer simulations of the conversion of electromagnetic waves into electron plasma waves. The steep gradients on the bottomside of the E-layer provide conditions for efficient mode conversion. The re- sulting Langmuir waves accelerate electrons to energies between 2 and 10 eV. These suprathermal electrons collide with oxygen atoms to produce green-line emissions. The optical glow only occurs in the parts of the E-region where the plamsa is dense enough to reflect the 3.175 MHz radio waves. Results of the E-layer observations using the RIF technique have shown horizontal stuctures that are most likely produced by the K-H instability. A numerical model has been generated to demonstrate the effects of neutral wind shears on the E-region structures. The model includes the effects of both speed-shear and turning shear dy- namics. The results of the numerical model are used to suggest future research using high-power radio wave to study the ion dynamics of the lower thermosphere.

  19. Earthquake swarms reveal submarine magma unrest induced by distant mega-earthquakes: Andaman Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špičák, Aleš; Vaněk, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    Little is known about earthquake-triggered magma intrusions or eruptions of submarine volcanoes. The analysis of teleseismic earthquake occurrence performed in this study offers a tool to address such enigmatic and inaccessible processes. In the past ten years, the Andaman Sea region repeatedly became a site of shallow earthquake swarms that followed distant mega-earthquakes by days to weeks. The MW 9.1 December 26, 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake was followed by two earthquake swarms about 600 km northward in the Andaman Sea region, delayed by 30 and 35 days, respectively. Earthquakes of one of these seismic episodes, the extensive January 2005 earthquake swarm, migrated laterally at a rate of about 0.25 km per hour during the swarm evolution. The strong Indian Ocean MW 8.6 and 8.2 April 11, 2012 earthquake doublet west of Northern Sumatra was followed by an earthquake swarm approximately 800 km northward in the Andaman Sea region, delayed by 13 days. All the three swarms that followed the 2004 and 2012 mega-earthquakes occurred beneath distinct seamounts and seafloor ridges. Based on the observations of migration of earthquakes during the swarm and swarm occurrence beneath distinct highs at the seafloor, we conclude that these earthquake swarms probably resulted as a consequence of magma unrest induced by static and/or dynamic stress changes following the distant mega-earthquakes. Repeated occurrence of such a phenomenon suggests that the arc magma reservoirs beneath the Andaman Sea have recently reached some form of criticality and are vulnerable to even small stress changes. The Andaman seafloor could thus become a site of submarine volcanic eruptions in near future and deserves close attention of Earth scientists.

  20. Dexamethasone induces apoptosis in the developing rat amygdala in an age, region, and sex specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Zuloaga, Damian G.; Carbone, David L.; Hiroi, Ryoko; Chong, David L.; Handa, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to glucocorticoids (GCs) in early development can lead to long-term changes in brain function and behavior although little is known about the underlying neural mechanisms. Perinatal exposure to GCs alters adult anxiety and neuroendocrine responses to stress. Therefore, we investigated the effects of either late gestational or neonatal exposure to the GC receptor agonist dexamethasone (DEX), on apoptosis within the amygdala, a region critical for emotional regulation. DEX was administered to timed-pregnant rat dams from gestational day 18 until parturition, or postnatal day 4-6. Offspring were sacrificed the day following the last DEX treatment and tissue was processed for immunohistochemical detection of cleaved caspase-3, a marker for apoptotic cells. Prenatal DEX treatment significantly increased the number of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells in the amygdala of both sexes, largely due to increases within the medial and basomedial sub-regions. Postnatal DEX treatment also increased cleaved caspase-3 immunoreactivity within the amygdala, although effects reached significance only in the central nucleus of females. Overall, DEX induction of cleaved caspase-3 in the amygdala was greater following prenatal compared to postnatal treatment, yet in both instances elevations in cleaved caspase-3 correlated with an increase in pro-apoptotic Bax mRNA expression. Dual-label immunohistochemistry of cleaved caspase-3 and the neuronal marker NeuN confirmed that virtually all cleaved caspase-3 positive cells in the amygdala were neurons and a subset of these cells (primarily following postnatal treatment) expressed a GABAergic calcium binding protein phenotype (calbindin or calretinin). Together these results indicate that early developmental GC exposure induces neuronal apoptosis within the amygdala in an age, sex, and region dependent manner. PMID:22008524

  1. Improving burial practices and cemetery management during an Ebola virus disease epidemic - Sierra Leone, 2014.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Carrie F; Kidd, Sarah; Sillah, Ansumana R M; Davis, Edward; Mermin, Jonathan; Kilmarx, Peter H

    2015-01-16

    As of January 3, 2015, Ebola virus disease (Ebola) has killed more than 2,500 persons in Sierra Leone since the epidemic began there in May 2014. Ebola virus is transmitted principally by direct physical contact with an infected person or their body fluids during the later stages of illness or after death. Contact with the bodies and fluids of persons who have died of Ebola is especially common in West Africa, where family and community members often touch and wash the body of the deceased in preparation for funerals. These cultural practices have been a route of Ebola transmission. In September 2014, CDC, in collaboration with the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation (MOH), assessed burial practices, cemetery management, and adherence to practices recommended to reduce the risk for Ebola virus transmission. The assessment was conducted by directly observing burials and cemetery operations in three high-incidence districts. In addition, a community assessment was conducted to assess the acceptability to the population of safe, nontraditional burial practices and cemetery management intended to reduce the risk for Ebola virus transmission. This report summarizes the results of these assessments, which found that 1) there were not enough burial teams to manage the number of reported deaths, 2) Ebola surveillance, swab collection, and burial team responses to a dead body alert were not coordinated, 3) systematic procedures for testing and reporting of Ebola laboratory results for dead bodies were lacking, 4) cemetery space and management were inadequate, and 5) safe burial practices, as initially implemented, were not well accepted by communities. These findings were used to inform the development of a national standard operating procedure (SOP) for safe, dignified medical burials, released on October 1. A second, national-level, assessment was conducted during October 10-15 to assess burial team practices and training and resource needs for SOP

  2. 3D GPR Modeling and Imaging of Burials: Mueschke Historic Cemetery, Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul Aziz, A.; Stewart, R.; Green, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    3D ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys consisting of 6 grids were conducted from October 2013 until April 2014 to delineate burials at the historic Mueschke Cemetery in Houston, Texas. The surveys were primarily to assist historians and archeologists from the Mueschke Cemetery Association and Lone Star College in locating some 13 postulated unmarked burials. Antenna with three frequencies were used: 100 MHz, 250 MHz and 1000 MHz. Most surveys were conducted with the 250 MHz Sensors and Software NOGGIN System which has a maximum penetration of about 3 m. Three methods were used to estimate the soil velocity for time-to-depth conversion: Common mid-point (CMP) surveys, time-to-known depth matching, and hyperbola fitting. All three methods gave an average velocity of 0.06 m/ns in the upper 2 m of the soil. The time-to-known depth method was accomplished by digging a trench (1.5 m deep by 1.5 m wide by 3 m long) about 10 m from the cemetery entrance using a back-hoe. Rebar was hammered horizontally into the trench wall at 0.25 m increments from depths of 1.5 m to 0.25 m. The excavation also allowed us to observe soil strata which transitions from loam, to silty clay to mostly clay with increasing depth. We used finite-difference, time-domain computer modeling to synthesize the response of two types of burials: vaulted or concrete enclosed (post-1940) and non-vaulted or casket only (pre-1940). Modeling results indicate that vaulted burials have a flattened apex signature while non-vaulted burials have signatures that are more hyperbolic. The data were processed using gain, dewow, background removal, filtering, and migration. Survey data over known burials show distinct diffractions and a rectangular shape-correspondent to the computer modeling results. Burials before 1940 have weaker diffractions which complicates their detection. Tree roots, clay patches, and rocks can also present anomalies that must be carefully investigated. Nonetheless, several strong burial

  3. Deep burial dolomitization driven by plate collision: Evidence from strontium-isotopes of Jurassic Arab IV dolomites from offshore Qatar

    SciTech Connect

    Vahrenkamp, V.C.; Taylor, S.R. )

    1991-03-01

    The use of strontium-isotope ratios of dolomites to constrain timing and mechanism of diagenesis has been investigated on Jurassic Arab IV dolomites from offshore Qatar. Reservoir quality is determined by two types of dolomites, which were differentiated geochemically (cathodoluminescence, fluid inclusions, and carbon and oxygen stable isotopes): (1) stratigraphically concordant sucrosic dolomites with high porosity formed during early near-surface diagenesis (Jurassic) and (2) stratigraphically discordant cylindrical bodies of massive, porosity-destroying dolomites formed late during deep burial diagenesis (Eocene-Pliocene). Detailed Sr-isotope analysis of dolomites from the Arab IV confirms an Early Jurassic age of the sucrosic, high porosity dolomites ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}SR = 0.70707 for NBS 987 = 0.71024) with magnesium and strontium being derived from Jurassic seawater. Late Tertiary compressional orogeny of the Zagros belt to the north is proposed to have caused large-scale squeezing of fluids from the pore system of sedimentary rocks. A regional deep fluid flow system developed dissolving infra-Cambrian evaporites upflow and causing large-scale deep burial dolomitization downflow.

  4. Pore water evolution during sediment burial from isotopic and mineral chemistry of calcite, dolomite and siderite concretions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, C. D.; Coleman, M. L.; Love, L. G.

    1986-10-01

    Coal measures often contain concretions; segregations of diagenetic minerals originally formed within unconsolidated sediments. Three different types (calcite/pyrite, dolomite/pyrite and siderite) occurring spatially quite close together in the Central Pennine Region of England vary widely in carbon isotope composition (+10.35%. > δ13C > -21.49%.) and in major cation chemistry (Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn). Within some siderite concretions, very high Mn/Fe ratios were found in central subsamples; these were also most enriched in 13C. The Fe/Mg ratio decreases systematically from centre to edge (early, shallow to deeper, later precipitation). The calcite/pyrite and dolomite/pyrite concretions developed completely prior to significant burial. Both have high Mn/Fe ratios but negative δ 13C values (calcite -21.49%., dolomite -8.67 to -10.48%.). All of these patterns can be equated precisely with theories of pore water evolution developed on the basis of geochemical investigations of modem sediments. Microbial processes (sulphate reduction, methanogenesis) contributed significantly, as did thermal decarboxylation (to siderite precipitated at considerable burial depth). Mn(IV) and Fe(III) acted differentially as oxidants; producing CO 2 and increasing alkalinity. The interplay of fresh and marine depositional waters is seen most obviously in the presence or absence of sulphate reduction. This controlled mineral type (iron sulphide or carbonate) as well as isotopic and mineral chemistry.

  5. Electrical Resistivity Monitoring for Leachate Distribution at Two Foot-and-Mouth- Disease (FMD) Burial Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Kaown, D.; Lee, K.; Leem, K.; Ko, K.

    2011-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to provide the basic information on leachate distribution with time changes through the electrical resistivity monitoring for a certain period of time in the Foot-and-Mouth-Disease (FMD) burial facilities which is needed to prevent further soil and groundwater contamination and to build an effective plan for stabilization of the burial site. In this study, dipole-dipoles surveys were carried out around two FMD burial sites in Iceon-si, Gyeonggi-do. The FMD burial facility installed at Daewall-myeon is consists of one block but, at Yul-myeon, it is divided into 2 blocks named A and B blocks. Dipole-Dipole surveys with 8 lines at Yul-myeon and 3 lines at Daewall-myeon were carried out. The observed leachate distribution along survey lines was not clearly evident as time passes at Daewall-myeon site, but, at Yul-myeon site, the leachate distribution around the survey lines showed a decrease of resistivity around the burial facility. At and around A and B blocks of Yul-myeon site, interpretations of the survey data show low resistivity zones below 10 Ωm from a depth 3 m to 10 m and such low resistivity zones of the A block are thicker than the B block by about 5~10 m. From the geochemical data and resistivity survey at two FMD burial sites, it is inferred that the groundwater within a 50-meter radius around burial facilities of the Yul-myeon site are contaminated by leachate. The general resistivity distribution around the burial site is seemed affected by the leachate with high electrical conductivity. The detail distribution patterns can be explained by local distributions of soil and weathered rocks and associated leachate flow. This subject is supported by Brain Korea 21 and Korea Ministry of Environment as 'The GAIA Project (173-092-009)'.

  6. 133. ARAII SL1 burial ground. Shows gravel path from ARAII ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    133. ARA-II SL-1 burial ground. Shows gravel path from ARA-II compound to the burial ground, detail of security fence and entry gate, and sign "Danger radiation hazard." F. C. Torkelson Company 842-area-101-1. Date: October 1961. Ineel index code no. 059-0101-00-851-150723. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Army Reactors Experimental Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Induced precipitation recycling (IPR) strategy to increase forest growth and regional rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, K. M.; Ellison, D.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation describes a project designed to capitalize on observed natural interactions between forest cover and the hydrologic cycle in order to increase available water supplies in arid regions, and to purify degraded water resources. An approach is presented to transition observed precipitation recycling effects into practical applications. Higher regional precipitation can be induced by promoting favorable conditions through afforestation and the irrigation of afforested land (IPR). Waste-water streams processed by the forest can increase local precipitation through the by-product evapotranspiration (ET). The proposed project illustrates how increased runoff from induced precipitation can help mitigate chronic regional water shortages in Southern California, using available degraded water resources. Each day, several hundred million gallons of treated sewage and excess storm water from the Los Angeles basin are channeled to the ocean for disposal. A portion of this can irrigate afforested land, initiating the IPR process. The afforested site likewise produces additional beneficial ecosystem services including nutrient management (of the sewage stream), carbon sequestration (from new growth), cooling of urban 'heat islands', and flood control. Research will explore interactions between ET plumes and local geography to aid the selection of afforestation sites and ensure increased precipitation over land, supporting the regional water supply. The IPR project is designed to manage risk and complexity through phased implementation. While no unproven technologies are used, there are uncertainties in applying theories from scientific research. During the 'pilot phase', initial afforestation site(s) will support research to examine the interactions of irrigated forest cover and IPR. As a proof of concept, this will develop the analytical basis for large-scale expansion. Once the theoretical foundation has been established, the project can expand to more irrigated

  8. Hydrology of the Melton Valley radioactive-waste burial grounds at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Webster, D.A.; Bradley, Michael W.

    1988-01-01

    Burial grounds 4, 5, and 6 of the Melton Valley Radioactive-waste Burial Grounds, Oak Ridge, TN, were used sequentially from 1951 to the present for the disposal of solid, low level radioactive waste by burial in shallow trenches and auger holes. Abundant rainfall, a generally thin unsaturated zone, geologic media of inherently low permeability, and the operational practices employed have contributed to partial saturation of the buried waste, leaching of radionuclides, and transport of dissolved matter from the burial areas. Two primary methods of movement of wastes from these sites are transport in groundwater, and the overflow of fluid in trenches and subsequent flow across land surface. Whiteoak Creek and its tributaries receive all overland flow from trench spillage, surface runoff from each site, and discharge of groundwater from the regolith of each site. Potentiometric data, locally, indicate that this drainage system also receives groundwater discharges from the bedrock of burial ground 5. By projection of the bedrock flow patterns characteristic of this site to other areas of Melton Valley, it is inferred that discharges from the bedrock underlying burial grounds 4 and 6 also is to the Whiteoak Creek drainage system. The differences in potentiometric heads and a comparatively thin saturated zone in bedrock do not favor the development of deep flow through bedrock from one river system to another. (USGS)

  9. Burial diagenesis of upper Mississippian Greenbrier limestone in central Appalachian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, C.

    1987-09-01

    As carbonate sediments undergo progressive burial under conditions of increasing temperature and pressure, they go through a variety of changes. Burial diagenesis includes processes such as mechanical and chemical compaction, mineralogic change, cementation, dolomitization, and various types of neomorphic fabric change. Identifying the products of burial diagenesis may be useful in predicting porosity and reservoir quality in the subsurface. The Upper Mississippian Greenbrier Limestone and equivalents are exposed throughout the central Appalachians. Important textural and mineralogical changes have been recognized in these shallow shelf limestones, which indicate burial to different depths. Variations in trace- and minor-element concentrations occur with increasing diagenesis. Textural alterations include increased matrix (micrite) crystal size and increased twinning of echinoderm fragments. The Greenbrier Limestone can be divided into three diagenetic provinces. Zone 1, located on the extreme western side of the basin, is characterized by little evidence of compaction, mineralogic variation, or textural change. In this area, the limestones were never buried to any great depth. Zone 3, on the eastern side of the basin, is characterized by significant mechanical and chemical compaction, and mineralogic and textural change. Limestones of this diagenetic province have been subjected to relatively high paleotemperatures during deep burial. Zone 2 is of intermediate burial depth and diagenesis and is present between zones 1 and 3.

  10. Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Variable Region and Major Histocompatibility Region Genes Are Linked to Induced Graves' Disease in Females From Two Very Large Families of Recombinant Inbred Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aliesky, Holly; Banuelos, Bianca; Magana, Jessica; Williams, Robert W.; Rapoport, Basil

    2014-01-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is caused by antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR) that mimic thyroid stimulation by TSH. Stimulating TSHR antibodies and hyperthyroidism can be induced by immunizing mice with adenovirus expressing the human TSHR A-subunit. Prior analysis of induced Graves' disease in small families of recombinant inbred (RI) female mice demonstrated strong genetic control but did not resolve trait loci for TSHR antibodies or elevated serum T4. We investigated the genetic basis for induced Graves' disease in female mice of two large RI families and combined data with earlier findings to provide phenotypes for 178 genotypes. TSHR antibodies measured by inhibition of TSH binding to its receptor were highly significantly linked in the BXD set to the major histocompatibility region (chromosome 17), consistent with observations in 3 other RI families. In the LXS family, we detected linkage between T4 levels after TSHR-adenovirus immunization and the Ig heavy chain variable region (Igvh, chromosome 12). This observation is a key finding because components of the antigen binding region of Igs determine antibody specificity and have been previously linked to induced thyroid-stimulating antibodies. Data from the LXS family provide the first evidence in mice of a direct link between induced hyperthyroidism and Igvh genes. A role for major histocompatibility genes has now been established for genetic susceptibility to Graves' disease in both humans and mice. Future studies using arrays incorporating variation in the complex human Ig gene locus will be necessary to determine whether Igvh genes are also linked to Graves' disease in humans. PMID:25051451

  11. Littoral assessment of mine burial signatures (LAMBS): buried landmine/background spectral-signature analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenton, Arthur C.; Geci, Duane M.; Ray, Kristofer J.; Thomas, Clayton M.; Salisbury, John W.; Mars, John C.; Crowley, James K.; Witherspoon, Ned H.; Holloway, John H., Jr.

    2004-09-01

    The objective of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Rapid Overt Reconnaissance (ROR) program and the Airborne Littoral Reconnaissance Technologies (ALRT) project's LAMBS effort is to determine if electro-optical spectral discriminants exist that are useful for the detection of land mines in littoral regions. Statistically significant buried mine overburden and background signature data were collected over a wide spectral range (0.35 to 14 μm) to identify robust spectral features that might serve as discriminants for new airborne sensor concepts. LAMBS has expanded previously collected databases to littoral areas - primarily dry and wet sandy soils - where tidal, surf, and wind conditions can severely modify spectral signatures. At AeroSense 2003, we reported completion of three buried mine collections at an inland bay, Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico beach sites. We now report LAMBS spectral database analyses results using metrics which characterize the detection performance of general types of spectral detection algorithms. These metrics include mean contrast, spectral signal-to-clutter, covariance, information content, and spectral matched filter analyses. Detection performance of the buried land mines was analyzed with regard to burial age, background type, and environmental conditions. These analyses considered features observed due to particle size differences, surface roughness, surface moisture, and compositional differences.

  12. Littoral Assessment of Mine Burial Signatures (LAMBS) buried land mine/background spectral signature analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenton, A.C.; Geci, D.M.; Ray, K.J.; Thomas, C.M.; Salisbury, J.W.; Mars, J.C.; Crowley, J.K.; Witherspoon, N.H.; Holloway, J.H., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Rapid Overt Reconnaissance (ROR) program and the Airborne Littoral Reconnaissance Technologies (ALRT) project's LAMBS effort is to determine if electro-optical spectral discriminants exist that are useful for the detection of land mines in littoral regions. Statistically significant buried mine overburden and background signature data were collected over a wide spectral range (0.35 to 14 ??m) to identify robust spectral features that might serve as discriminants for new airborne sensor concepts. LAMBS has expanded previously collected databases to littoral areas - primarily dry and wet sandy soils - where tidal, surf, and wind conditions can severely modify spectral signatures. At AeroSense 2003, we reported completion of three buried mine collections at an inland bay, Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico beach sites.1 We now report LAMBS spectral database analyses results using metrics which characterize the detection performance of general types of spectral detection algorithms. These metrics include mean contrast, spectral signal-to-clutter, covariance, information content, and spectral matched filter analyses. Detection performance of the buried land mines was analyzed with regard to burial age, background type, and environmental conditions. These analyses considered features observed due to particle size differences, surface roughness, surface moisture, and compositional differences.

  13. Nonlinear geochemical dynamics and petrography: Burial dolomitization (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merino, E.

    2010-12-01

    Many geochemical self-patterned structures exist in nature [1]: pisolitic, liesegang, orbicular, and agate bandings [2]; igneous and metamorphic bandings [3]; displacive dolomitic and serpentine “zebra” veins [4]; sets of stylolites [5]; oscillatory zoning in single crystals [6]. Large-scale examples: weathering profiles [7], banded iron formations [8], burial dolomitization [9], karst sinkholes [7]; etc. All involve disequilibrium and feedback, the two necessary conditions for self-patterning, but each case is unique. A good model should incorporate force(s), feedbacks, reactions, and boundary and initial conditions that are likely to apply to the genesis of the phenomenon under study. Problems: to confuse mass balances for local mineral reactions; whether the mineral pattern is made at a moving reaction front (as in agates [2]) or throughout the system at once (as in stylolitization [5] and zebra veins [4]). Self-consistent scaling of variables and linear instability analysis may tell us for what ranges of dynamic parameter values the system oscillates. A model may seem to work well - yet this does not prove that the initial choices of forcing, feedback and reactions were correct. Model predictions should be tested against petrographic and field evidence not used in constructing the model in the first place [2]. Recent models of dolomitization [10] and weathering are inconsistent with field and petrographic evidence. (P. K. Weyl, the first geochemical modeler: “We are not interested in what [a rock] is now but in how it became that way … Instead of looking at a rock and asking for an explanation of its past …”, J. Geophys. Res. 1959, p. 2001). A new dynamic model of dolomitization [9] correctly predicts a multitude of petrographic and other properties of burial dolostones. According to the model, the self-accelerating dolomite-for-calcite replacement forces a seamless rheological transition from replacive to displacive dolomite growth which predicts

  14. Use of controlled release herbicides in waste burial sites

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, F.G.; Cataldo, D.A.; Cline, J.F.; Skiens, W.E.

    1981-07-01

    Controlled-release formulations of herbicides have been applied to the soil in the manner traditional for herbicides: on the surface or mixed into the top few inches of soil. The controlled-release formulation allows another option that we propose to use: to place herbicides, contained in controlled-release formulations, in a layer at least a foot below the surface of the soil, in order to prevent root penetration below that level. Ideally, the herbicide will prevent root tip cell division but will not translocate within the plant, thus assuring that the plant will survive, preserving the ground cover. Trifluralin is one of the herbicides which does not translocate and was chosen for use in this study. A number of applications for this technology are possible; particularly in waste management. In the present studies, we used two different forms of polymeric carrier/delivery (PCD) systems to investigate the controlled release of herbicides. In the initial study, a sheet was made of homogeneous mixtures of an individual polymer and trifluralin. We made several of these sheets, using a different polymer each time (with trifluralin) to compare release rates from the various polymers. We also fabricated cylindrical pellets in two sizes from mixtures of Profax/sup a/ PS-1600 polypropylene and trifluralin, formulated to determine the interaction of PCD systems with soil. Also developed is a trifluralin-releasing device with a theoretical effective lifetime approaching 100 years. The system was designed specifically to protect the asphalt layer or clay/aggregate barriers on uranium mill tailings piles. PCD devices composed of pellets could also be implanted over burial sites for radioactive and/or toxic materials, preventing translocation of those materials to plant shoots, and thence into the biosphere.

  15. Dating floodplain sediments using tree-ring response to burial

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.M.; Vincent, K.R.; Shafroth, P.B.

    2005-01-01

    Floodplain sediments can be dated precisely based on the change in anatomy of tree rings upon burial. When a stem of tamarisk (Tamarix ramosissima) or sandbar willow (Salix exigua) is buried, subsequent annual rings in the buried section resemble the rings of roots: rings become narrower, vessels within the rings become larger, and transitions between rings become less distinct. We combined observations of these changes with tree-ring counts to determine the year of deposition of sedimentary beds exposed in a 150-m-long trench across the floodplain of the Rio Puerco, a rapidly filling arroyo in New Mexico. This method reliably dated most beds thicker than about 30 cm to within a year of deposition. Floodplain aggradation rates varied dramatically through time and space. Sediment deposition was mostly limited to brief overbank flows occurring every few years. The most rapid deposition occurred on channel-margin levees, which migrated laterally during channel narrowing. At the decadal timescale, the cross-section-average sediment deposition rate was steady, but there was a shift in the spatial pattern of deposition in the 1980s. From 1936 to 1986, sediment deposition occurred by channel narrowing, with little change in elevation of the thalweg. After 1986 sediment deposition occurred by vertical aggradation. From 1936 to 2000 about 27 per cent of the arroyo cross-section filled with sediment. The rate of filling from 1962 to 2000 was 0-8 vertical m/decade or 85 m2/decade. Published in 2005 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Vegetation uptake from burial ground alpha waste trenches

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Tuckfield, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted as part of an evaluation of the potential radiological consequences of reinhabiting the SRS burial ground. The objective was to determine the uptake of buried, low-level, transuranic waste from unlined earthen trenches by forest vegetation. Two tree plots were established in 1979. One plot was put over a trench containing alpha waste and the other in an area without trenches. When the tree seedlings were sampled during 1979 and 1980, and analysized for {sup 239}Pu and {sup 238}Pu, there was only a small difference in radionuclude concentration between trees planted over the trench and those planted on the control plot because of the limited root intrusion into the trench by the seedlings. However, when trees were sample in 1986, 1987, and 1988 and analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 237}Np activity, the average activity of all of these isotopes was significantly higher over the trenches than in the control plot. These measurements indicate that tree roots will extract transuranic isotopes from buried, low-level waste. The amount of radioisotopes moved from the trenches to the surface is small and the level in the trees is low enough that dose from exposure will be small. The long term effects of transport of radioisotopes from the trenches to the surface soil was evaluated by estimating the accumulation in the surface soil. Transuranic activity in selected food crops was calculated using the soil activity and the literature derived concentration factors. In all cases, the activity of the transuranic isotopes in the edible portion of the plants was quite low. The activity in the leaf tissue was much higher than in the seed. However, it should be noted that in only one case was the activity higher than the naturally occurring activity of {sup 40}K in the pine foliage.

  17. Burial, Uplift and Exhumation History of the Atlantic Margin of NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, Peter; Bonow, Johan M.; Green, Paul F.; Cobbold, Peter R.; Chiossi, Dario; Lilletveit, Ragnhild

    2010-05-01

    We have undertaken a regional study of landscape development and thermo-tectonic evo-lution of NE Brazil. Our results reveal a long history of post-Devonian burial and exhuma-tion across NE Brazil. Uplift movements just prior to and during Early Cretaceous rifting led to further regional denudation, to filling of rift basins and finally to formation of the Atlantic margin. The rifted margin was buried by a km-thick post-rift section, but exhumation began in the Late Cretaceous as a result of plate-scale forces. The Cretaceous cover probably extended over much of NE Brazil where it is still preserved over extensive areas. The Late Cretaceous exhumation event was followed by events in the Paleogene and Neogene. The results of these events of uplift and exhumation are two regional peneplains that form steps in the landscape. The plateaux in the interior highlands are defined by the Higher Surface at c. 1 km above sea level. This surface formed by fluvial erosion after the Late Cretaceous event - and most likely after the Paleogene event - and thus formed as a Paleogene pene-plain near sea level. This surface was reburied prior to the Neogene event, in the interior by continental deposits and along the Atlantic margin by marine and coastal deposits. Neo-gene uplift led to reexposure of the Palaeogene peneplain and to formation of the Lower Surface by incision along rivers below the uplifted Higher Surface that characterise the pre-sent landscape. Our results show that the elevated landscapes along the Brazilian margin formed during the Neogene, c. 100 Myr after break-up. Studies in West Greenland have demonstrated that similar landscapes formed during the late Neogene, c. 50 Myr after break-up. Many passive continental margins around the world are characterised by such elevated plateaus and it thus seems possible, even likely, that they may also post-date rifting and continental separation by many Myr.

  18. Subducted sedimentary serpentinite mélanges: Record of multiple burial-exhumation cycles and subduction erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, John

    2012-09-01

    Serpentinite matrix mélanges give insight into large-scale convergent plate margin processes, particularly because of the derivation of the serpentinite from oceanic mantle. Similar to shale-matrix mélanges, a field geologist may easily recognize the sedimentary origins of little-deformed serpentinite matrix mélanges, but mélanges within accretionary prisms have undergone significant deformation and recrystallization of matrix. Serpentinite mélanges of the Franciscan subduction complex of California have a seemingly intact and foliated matrix. Such exposures contrast sharply with the granular undeformed sedimentary serpentinite mélanges of the coeval Great Valley Group (GVG) forearc basin deposits that depositionally overlie Coast Range Ophiolite (that structurally overlies the Franciscan). Nonetheless, Franciscan serpentinite mélanges display evidence of sedimentary origins, including sedimentary breccia composed of exotic block material (Tolay Ridge), sedimentary serpentinite breccia (Panoche Pass Road), basal serpentinite conglomerate with exotic clasts (Sunol Regional Wilderness), and serpentinite sandstones and conglomerates, including a basal conglomerate overlying coherent metagraywacke (Tiburon Peninsula). These examples record two burial-exhumation cycles to blueschist facies depths. In addition, a mélange/breccia in the Panoche Pass area may have components that record three burial-exhumation cycles to blueschist (or greater) depth. Exhumation rates for various cycles ranged from about 1.2 to 10 mm/year. The Tiburon Peninsula serpentinite mélange occupies the structurally highest horizon in the Franciscan of the San Francisco Bay area, and regional field relationships indicate deposition at ca. 100 Ma. Apparently, about 65 Ma of subduction erosion/non accretion followed initiation of Franciscan subduction in this region. The oldest Franciscan serpentinite mélanges are at least 35 Ma younger than sedimentary serpentinites of the GVG. Subduction

  19. The C-terminal region of alpha-crystallin: involvement in protection against heat-induced denaturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takemoto, L.; Emmons, T.; Horwitz, J.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the alpha-crystallins can protect other proteins against heat-induced denaturation and aggregation. To determine the possible involvement of the C-terminal region in this activity, the alpha-crystallins were subjected to limited tryptic digestion, and the amount of cleavage from the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of the alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin chains was assessed using antisera specific for these regions. Limited tryptic digestion resulted in cleavage only from the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin. This trypsin-treated alpha-A crystallin preparation showed a decreased ability to protect proteins from heat-induced aggregation using an in vitro assay. Together, these results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of alpha-A crystallin is important for its ability to protect against heat-induced aggregation, which is consistent with the hypothesis that post-translational changes that are known to occur at the C-terminal region may have significant effects on the ability of alpha-A crystallin to protect against protein denaturation in vivo.

  20. Typhoon-induced Microseisms Recorded Offshore and Onland Western Pacific Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W.; Chi, W.; Dolenc, D.; Kuo, B.; Lin, C.; Collins, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Microseisms usually are generated by continuous forcing of winds and ocean waves in shallow water, with the frequency controlled by the fetch area. Here we study microseisms during extreme weather conditions. In 2006 we deployed the first broadband ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) offshore Taiwan. The OBSs at 1749 meters and 4726 meters water depths recorded strong microseisms signals (0.02 to 1 Hz passband) when Shan-Shan typhoon passed over the OBSs. This provides a unique opportunity to study how the microseisms wavefield evolves with a moving source. We studied the displacement waveforms recorded by OBSs, F-net and GSN onland stations. The spectrograms show primary peak energy between 0.05 to 0.1 Hz, and the stronger secondary peak appeared between 0.1 and 0.2 Hz. The primary peak has longer duration than the secondary peak. The arrival time of the peak typhoon-induced displacement for each station is consistently earlier than the time when the eye of typhoon gets closest to the station. We also see the microseisms ground motion energy migrating from south to north, and its primary energy frequency does not correlate with fetch areas. In sum, we have recorded strong microseisms motions in deep water, and the frequency band of the strong microseisms may not change with different fetch areas. Besides, the moving typhoon lits up the seismic stations along the track, showing clear evidence of a moving microseism source region.

  1. Angiotensin II Induces Region-Specific Medial Disruption during Evolution of Ascending Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Rateri, Debra L.; Davis, Frank M.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A.; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; O’Connor, William N.; Charnigo, Richard; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) promotes development of ascending aortic aneurysms (AAs), but progression of this pathology is undefined. We evaluated factors potentially involved in progression, and determined the temporal sequence of tissue changes during development of Ang II–induced ascending AAs. Ang II infusion into C57BL/6J mice promoted rapid expansion of the ascending aorta, with significant increases within 5 days, as determined by both in vivo ultrasonography and ex vivo sequential acquisition of tissues. Rates of expansion were not significantly different in LDL receptor–null mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet, demonstrating a lack of effect of hypercholesterolemia. Augmenting systolic blood pressure with norepinephrine infusion had no significant effect on ascending aortic expansion. Pathological changes observed within 5 days of Ang II infusion included increased medial thickness and intramural hemorrhage characterized by erythrocyte extravasation in outer lamellar layers of the media. Intramedial hemorrhage was not observed after prolonged Ang II infusion, although partial medial disruption was present. Elastin fragmentation and transmural medial breaks of the ascending aorta were observed with continued Ang II infusion, which were restricted to anterior aspects. CD45+ cells accumulated in adventitia but were minimal in media. Similar pathology was observed in tissues obtained from patients with ascending AAs. In conclusion, Ang II promotes ascending AAs through region-specific changes that are independent of hypercholesterolemia or systolic blood pressure. PMID:25038458

  2. Angiotensin II induces region-specific medial disruption during evolution of ascending aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Rateri, Debra L; Davis, Frank M; Balakrishnan, Anju; Howatt, Deborah A; Moorleghen, Jessica J; O'Connor, William N; Charnigo, Richard; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2014-09-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) promotes development of ascending aortic aneurysms (AAs), but progression of this pathology is undefined. We evaluated factors potentially involved in progression, and determined the temporal sequence of tissue changes during development of Ang II-induced ascending AAs. Ang II infusion into C57BL/6J mice promoted rapid expansion of the ascending aorta, with significant increases within 5 days, as determined by both in vivo ultrasonography and ex vivo sequential acquisition of tissues. Rates of expansion were not significantly different in LDL receptor-null mice fed a saturated fat-enriched diet, demonstrating a lack of effect of hypercholesterolemia. Augmenting systolic blood pressure with norepinephrine infusion had no significant effect on ascending aortic expansion. Pathological changes observed within 5 days of Ang II infusion included increased medial thickness and intramural hemorrhage characterized by erythrocyte extravasation in outer lamellar layers of the media. Intramedial hemorrhage was not observed after prolonged Ang II infusion, although partial medial disruption was present. Elastin fragmentation and transmural medial breaks of the ascending aorta were observed with continued Ang II infusion, which were restricted to anterior aspects. CD45(+) cells accumulated in adventitia but were minimal in media. Similar pathology was observed in tissues obtained from patients with ascending AAs. In conclusion, Ang II promotes ascending AAs through region-specific changes that are independent of hypercholesterolemia or systolic blood pressure. PMID:25038458

  3. HF wave propagation and induced ionospheric turbulence in the magnetic equatorial region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliasson, B.; Papadopoulos, K.

    2016-03-01

    The propagation and excitation of artificial ionospheric turbulence in the magnetic equatorial region by high-frequency electromagnetic (EM) waves injected into the overhead ionospheric layer is examined. EM waves with ordinary (O) mode polarization reach the critical layer only if their incidence angle is within the Spitze cone. Near the critical layer the wave electric field is linearly polarized and directed parallel to the magnetic field lines. For large enough amplitudes, the O mode becomes unstable to the four-wave oscillating two-stream instability and the three-wave parametric decay instability driving large-amplitude Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. The interaction between the induced Langmuir turbulence and electrons located within the 50-100 km wide transmitter heating cone at an altitude of 230 km can potentially accelerate the electrons along the magnetic field to several tens to a few hundreds of eV, far beyond the thresholds for optical emissions and ionization of the neutral gas. It could furthermore result in generation of shear Alfvén waves such as those recently observed in laboratory experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles Large Plasma Device.

  4. Summertime thermally-induced circulations over the Lake Nam Co region of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xianyu; Lü, Yaqiong; Ma, Yaoming; Wen, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Performance of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University/National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5) over the Lake Nam Co region of the Tibetan Plateau was evaluated based on the data from five surface observation sites in 2006. The interaction between two thermally-induced circulations (lake breezes and mountain-valley winds) was also investigated. The results show that MM5 could be used to simulate 2-m air temperature; however, MM5 needs improvement in wind field simulation. Two numerical simulations were conducted to study the effect of the lake on the local weather and wind system. The original land cover of the model was used in the control experiment, and the lake was replaced with grassland resembling the area surrounding the lake in the sensitive experiment. The results of the simulations indicate that the lake enhanced the north slope mountain-valley wind and the mountain changed the offshore flow direction at the north shore. During the day, a clear convergent zone and a strong upflow were observed over the north slope of the Nyainq'entanglha Range, which may cause frequent precipitation over the north slope. During the night, the entire area was controlled by a south flow.

  5. Study of Organic Matter in Soils of the Amazon Region Employing Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tadini, Amanda Maria; Nicolodelli, Gustavo; Mounier, Stéphane; Montes, Célia Regina; Marcondes Bastos Pereira Milori, Débora

    2014-05-01

    In the face of climate change and increasing CO2 levels in the atmosphere, the global carbon cycle, soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration, and the role of different world biomes as potential sources and sinks of carbon are receiving increasing attention. Carbon quantification is an important environmental indicator, but the structure of organic matter is also important because is related to carbon stability. The synthesis of soil organic matter (SOM), as presented in soils of forest vegetation, can be originated from condensation polymeric polyphenols and quinones that are responsible for controlling the main physical-chemical properties of soils. These systems are present in humic substances, representing the major fluorophore of SOM[1-3]. Abiotic factors, such as soil texture, use and occupation of soil, can influence on the process of SOM formation, molecular structure and in its humification index[4]. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) have become a promising technique for assessing humification index of SOM (HLIFS). In this context, the aim of this study was to analyze the humification index of the SOM in the region of Barcelos (Amazon) employing LIFS. The study area was the region of Barcelos, close the river Demeni. The whose vegetation distribution in this area, is two biomes the Dense Ombrophylous Forest (DPQD) and Campinarana (DPQT), with areas of edaphic contacts between these two phytophysiognomies, which ranged from Open field (FDE) to closed Depression (DPQ). Preliminary results showed that the area closed Depression (DPQ) there was a continuous gradient of humification with increasing soil depth. A similar behavior was verified for area Forest (DPQD), where the highest values of HLIFS were obtained between the four points analyzed, indicating the magnitude of the molecular recalcitrance this organic matter in this area. The results obtained for area Campinarana (DPQT) and Open field (FDE) showed an opposite behavior. These points there

  6. Time-temperature-burial significance of Devonian anthracite implies former great (approx. 6. 5 km) depth of burial of Catskill Mountains, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, G.M.; Sanders, J.E.

    1982-02-01

    Specimens of coalified plant debris in Tully-correlative strata of the Gilboa Formation (uppermost Middle Devonian) within the eastern Catskill Mountains of New York State have been converted to anthracite having a vitrinite reflectance of 2.5%. This implies a level of organic metamorphism (LOM) of 16. The specimens are about 350 m.y. old; if 200 m.y. is taken as the duration of the time of exposure to the maximum geothermal temperature, then the LOM of 16 and other thermal indicators imply a maximum temperature of 190/sup 0/C. Using a geothermal gradient of 26/sup 0/C.km/sup -1/ (17/sup 0/F.1,000 ft/sup -1/), a former depth of burial of 6.5 km is implied. Such former deep burial is not usually inferred for the Catskills, but it is consistent with the idea that the thick (about 6.4 km or 21,000 ft) Carboniferous strata of northeastern Pennsylvania formerly extended northeast far enough to bury the Catskills. The lack of metamorphism of the Paleozoic strata lying about 4.5 km beneath the Tully-correlative rocks and exposed in the adjacent Hudson Valley places low limits on the former geothermal gradient; this supports the concept of great depth of former burial of the Catskills. For example, 6.5 km of former burial and a geothermal gradient of 26/sup 0/C.km/sup -1/ imply a temperature of 307/sup 0/C for the base of the Paleozoic. By contrast, only 1 km of former burial requires a geothermal gradient of 170/sup 0/C.km/sup -1/, which would have subjected the base of the Paleozoic to a temperature of 955/sup 0/GAMMA, which is far higher than the 600 to 650/sup 0/C recently inferred for the Acadian-age metamorphism of the Taconic allochthon in southwestern Massachusetts and adjoining areas.

  7. Deep-burial diagenesis in carbonates. Final report, January 16, 1984-March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, G.M.

    1985-03-01

    The objectives were to gain an understanding of what makes or breaks porosity in carbonate rocks as a result of deep-burial, to develop criteria for deep-burial diagenesis in carbonate rocks, and to apply these criteria for interpretation of carbonate rocks now at shallow depth. Compaction tests reveal that ooid samples show substantial reductions of bulk-volume and porosity when squeezed at temperatures and pressures comparable to overburden of 3.5 to 6.5 km. Particle breakage and deformed particle contacts developed that are comparable to those reported from oolites from the rock record. Reproducibility of pressure solution by compaction supports the conclusion that initial pore-volume reduction through mechanical grain adjustments and ultimate pressure solution are major processes in the diagenetic evolution of limestone. In the deep Analdarko Basin of Oklahoma and Texas, the Hunton Group carbonate rocks of Upper Ordovician to Lower Devonian show that dolostones alone provide porosity. Studies reveal that corrected measurement of bulk densities yield improved estimates of true porosity and water saturation. The mechanism of burial dolomitization was suggested to be the underlying marine Sylvan Shale which provided necessary Mg+2 and Fe+2 during smectite-to-illite transition. Also detailed studies of core samples and thin sections from the Lower Ordovician Ellenberger carbonate rocks in the Permian Basin demonstrated that carbonate rocks below 10,000 ft are exclusively dolostone showing some evidence of deep-burial dolomitization. Lower Ordovician carbonate strata in undeformed belts of the northern Appalachian Basin yield depth of burial and paleotemperature data implying a former depth of burial which has not been usually inferred for this area. Fluid-inclusion suggests burial depth of several kilometers. 41 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. The effect of burial depth on removal of seeds of Phytolacca americana.

    SciTech Connect

    Orrock, John, L.: Damschen, Ellen, I.

    2007-04-01

    Abstract - Although burial is known to have important effects on seed predation in a variety of habitats, the role of burial depth in affecting the removal of seeds in early successional systems is poorly known. Phytolacca American (pokeweed) is a model species to examine the role of burial depth in affecting seed removal because it is common in early-successional habitats, studies suggest that seed removal is indicative of seed predation, and seed predation is related to the recruitment of mature plants. To determine how burial depth affects P. americana seed removal, 20 seeds of P. americana were buried at depths of 0, 1, or 3 cm in early-successional habitats at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina for over 6 weeks. The frequency with which seeds were encountered (as measured by the removal of at least one seed) and the proportion of seeds removed was significantly greater when seeds were on the soil surface (0 cm depth) compared to seeds that were buried 1 cm or 3 cm; there was no difference in encounter or removal between seeds at 1 cm or 3 cm. Our findings suggest that burial may have important consequences for P. americana population dynamics, because seed survival depends upon whether or not the seed is buried, and relatively shallow burial can yield large increases in seed survival. Because seed limitation is known to be an important determinant of plant community composition in early successional systems, our work suggests that burial may play an unappreciated role in the dynamics of these communities by reducing predator-mediated seed limitation.

  9. Field demonstration of in situ grouting of radioactive solid waste burial trenches with polyacrylamide. [Polyacrylamide

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, B.P.; Fontaine, T.A.

    1990-01-01

    Demonstrations of in situ grouting with polyacrylamide were carried out on two undisturbed burial trenches and one dynamically compacted burial trench in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The injection of polyacrylamide was achieved quite facilely for the two undisturbed burial trenches which were filled with grout, at typical pumping rates of 95 L/min, in several batches injected over several days. The compacted burial trench, however, failed to accept grout at more than 1.9 L/min even when pressure was applied. Thus, it appears that burial trenches, stabilized by dynamic compaction, have a permeability too low to be considered groutable. The water table beneath the burial trenches did not respond to grout injections indicating a lack of hydrologic connection between fluid grout and the water table which would have been observed if the grout failed to set. Because grout set times were adjusted to less than 60 min, the lack of hydrologic connection was not surprising. Postgrouting penetration testing revealed that the stability of the burial trenches was increased from 26% to 79% that measured in the undisturbed soil surrounding the trenches. In situ permeation tests on the grouted trenches indicated a significant reduction in hydraulic conductivity of the trench contents from a mean of 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} to 1.85 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm/s. Preliminary observations indicated that grouting with polyacrylamide is an excellent method for both improved stability and hydrologic isolation of radioactive waste and its incidental hazardous constituents.

  10. Molybdenum isotope signatures from the Yangtze block continental margin and its indication to organic burial rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, L.; Zhou, H. B.; Huang, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    The paper presents the molybdenum isotope data, along with the trace element content, to investigate the geochemical behavior of authigenic Mo during long-term burial in sediments in continental margin settings of the Yangtze block, as well as their indication to the burial of original organic carbon. The burial rate of original organic carbon were estimated on the basis of the amount of sedimentary sulfur (TS content), whilst the carbon loss by aerobic degradation was estimated according to calculated Mn contents. On these points, the original organic carbon flux was calculated, exhibiting a large range of variation (2.54-15.82 mmol/m2/day). The strong correlation between sedimentary Mo isotope values and organic carbon burial rates previously proposed on the basis of the investigations on modern ocean sediments was also used here to estimate the organic carbon burial rate. The data gained through this model showed that organic carbon burial rates have large variations, ranging from 0.43- 2.87mmol/m2/day. Although the two sets of data gained through different geochemical records in the Yangtze block show a deviation of one order of magnitude, they do display a strong correlation. It is thus tempting to speculate that the Mo isotope signature of sediments may serve as a tracer for the accumulation rate of original organic carbon in the continental margin sediments. Keywords: Molybdenum isotopes; organic carbon burial rate; ancient continental margin setting ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We thank Professor Xie Shucheng for his constructive review comments. This research is co-supported by the Program for Changjiang Scholars and Innovative Research Team in University (grants IRT0441), the SinoPec project (grant no. G0800-06-ZS-319) and the National Nature Science Foundation of China (grants 40673020).

  11. [Nucleotide polymorphism in the drought induced transcription factor CBF4 region of Arabidopsis thaliana and its molecular evolution analyses].

    PubMed

    Hao, Gang-Ping; Wu, Zhong-Yi; Cao, Ming-Qing; Pelletier, Georges; Brunel, Dominique; Huang, Cong-Lin; Yang, Qing

    2004-12-01

    Intraspecific nucleotide polymorphism in the drought induced transcription factor CBF4 region of Arabidopsis thaliana was analyzed with 17 core accessions growing in different ecoclimate. High density of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and insertion/deletion (Indel) were found, on average 1 SNP per 35.8 bp and 1 Indel per 143 bp. Nucleotide polymorphism in non-coding region was three times higher than that in coding region. In coding region of CBF4, SNP frequency is one SNP per 96.4 bp, one nonsynonymous mutation was detected from 25 av, 203 av and 244 av accessions, which is the 205th site amino acid variation: gly <--> val caused by the 1034th site (corresponding to 19,696 site nucleotide of GenBank No. AB015478 as 1) nucleotide variation: G <--> T. Statistical result of nucleotide diversity showed that linkage disequilibrium (LD) existed in large-scale region of CBF4 and recombination event was also detected in 5' non-coding region. Identical to the results of other genes of Arabidopsis, different regions of the gene were seemingly under different selective pressures. Balancing selection resulted in high nucleotide diversity in 3' non-coding region, and the neutral mutation hypothesis can explain the DNA polymorphism in coding region, whereas, nature positive selection in the population affected nucleotide variation in 5' non-coding region of gene. PMID:15633649

  12. Evaluation of Elevated Tritium Levels in Groundwater Downgradient from the 618-11 Burial Ground Phase I Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Dresel, P.E.; Smith, R.M.; Williams, B.A.; Thompson, C.J.; Evans, J.C.; Hulstrom, L.C.

    2000-05-01

    This report describes the results of the preliminary investigation of elevated tritium in groundwater discovered near the 618-11 burial ground, located in the eastern part of the Hanford Site. Tritium in one well downgradient of the burial ground was detected at levels up to 8,140,000 pCi/L. The 618-11 burial ground received a variety of radioactive waste from the 300 Area between 1962 and 1967. The burial ground covers 3.5 hectare (8.6 acre) and contains trenches, large diameter caissons, and vertical pipe storage units. The burial ground was stabilized with a native sediment covering. The Energy Northwest reactor complex was constructed immediately east of the burial ground.

  13. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Samarium, Europium, and Gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Kelley, K; Dietrich, F S; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2004-11-30

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of samarium, europium and gadolinium (62 {le} Z {le} 64, 82 {le} N {le} 96).

  14. Neutron and Charged-Particle Induced Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the Region of Bromine and Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R; Dietrich, F; Bauer, R; Kelley, K; Mustafa, M

    2004-07-23

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron and proton induced nuclear reaction cross sections in the mass region of bromine and krypton (34 {le} Z {le} 37, 40 {le} N {le} 47).

  15. Buried Alive: The Behavioural Response of the Mussels, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis to Sudden Burial by Sediment.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Zoë L; Hendrick, Vicki J; Burrows, Michael T; Wilson, Ben; Last, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation in the sea occurs through natural processes, such as wave and tidal action, which can be exacerbated during storms and floods. Changes in terrestrial land use, marine aggregate extraction, dredging, drilling and mining are known to result in substantial sediment deposition. Research suggests that deposition will also occur due to the modern development of marine renewable energy. The response to individual burial under three depths of sediment, three sediment fractions and five burial durations was investigated in two mussel species, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis in specialist mesocosms. Both mussel species showed substantial mortality, which increased with duration of burial and burial by finer sediment fractions. M. modiolus was better able to survive short periods of burial than M. edulis, but at longer durations mortality was more pronounced. No mortality was observed in M. modiolus in burial durations of eight days or less but by 16 days of burial, over 50% cumulative mortality occurred. Under variable temperature regimes, M. edulis mortality increased from 20% at 8°C to over 60% at 14.5 and 20°C. Only M. edulis was able to emerge from burial, facilitated by increased byssus production, laid mostly on vertical surfaces but also on sediment particles. Emergence was higher from coarse sediment and shallow burials. Byssus production in M. edulis was not related to the condition index of the mussels. Results suggest that even marginal burial would result in mortality and be more pronounced in warm summer periods. Our results suggest that in the event of burial, adult M. modiolus would not be able to emerge from burial unless local hydrodynamics assist, whereas a small proportion of M. edulis may regain contact with the sediment water interface. The physiological stress resulting in mortality, contribution of local hydrodynamics to survival and other ecological pressures such as mussels existing in aggregations, are discussed. PMID:26982582

  16. Buried Alive: The Behavioural Response of the Mussels, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis to Sudden Burial by Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Zoë L.; Hendrick, Vicki J.; Burrows, Michael T.; Wilson, Ben; Last, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    Sedimentation in the sea occurs through natural processes, such as wave and tidal action, which can be exacerbated during storms and floods. Changes in terrestrial land use, marine aggregate extraction, dredging, drilling and mining are known to result in substantial sediment deposition. Research suggests that deposition will also occur due to the modern development of marine renewable energy. The response to individual burial under three depths of sediment, three sediment fractions and five burial durations was investigated in two mussel species, Modiolus modiolus and Mytilus edulis in specialist mesocosms. Both mussel species showed substantial mortality, which increased with duration of burial and burial by finer sediment fractions. M. modiolus was better able to survive short periods of burial than M. edulis, but at longer durations mortality was more pronounced. No mortality was observed in M. modiolus in burial durations of eight days or less but by 16 days of burial, over 50% cumulative mortality occurred. Under variable temperature regimes, M. edulis mortality increased from 20% at 8°C to over 60% at 14.5 and 20°C. Only M. edulis was able to emerge from burial, facilitated by increased byssus production, laid mostly on vertical surfaces but also on sediment particles. Emergence was higher from coarse sediment and shallow burials. Byssus production in M. edulis was not related to the condition index of the mussels. Results suggest that even marginal burial would result in mortality and be more pronounced in warm summer periods. Our results suggest that in the event of burial, adult M. modiolus would not be able to emerge from burial unless local hydrodynamics assist, whereas a small proportion of M. edulis may regain contact with the sediment water interface. The physiological stress resulting in mortality, contribution of local hydrodynamics to survival and other ecological pressures such as mussels existing in aggregations, are discussed. PMID:26982582

  17. Inside the “African Cattle Complex”: Animal Burials in the Holocene Central Sahara

    PubMed Central

    di Lernia, Savino; Tafuri, Mary Anne; Gallinaro, Marina; Alhaique, Francesca; Balasse, Marie; Cavorsi, Lucia; Fullagar, Paul D.; Mercuri, Anna Maria; Monaco, Andrea; Perego, Alessandro; Zerboni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Cattle pastoralism is an important trait of African cultures. Ethnographic studies describe the central role played by domestic cattle within many societies, highlighting its social and ideological value well beyond its mere function as ‘walking larder’. Historical depth of this African legacy has been repeatedly assessed in an archaeological perspective, mostly emphasizing a continental vision. Nevertheless, in-depth site-specific studies, with a few exceptions, are lacking. Despite the long tradition of a multi-disciplinary approach to the analysis of pastoral systems in Africa, rarely do early and middle Holocene archaeological contexts feature in the same area the combination of settlement, ceremonial and rock art features so as to be multi-dimensionally explored: the Messak plateau in the Libyan central Sahara represents an outstanding exception. Known for its rich Pleistocene occupation and abundant Holocene rock art, the region, through our research, has also shown to preserve the material evidence of a complex ritual dated to the Middle Pastoral (6080–5120 BP or 5200–3800 BC). This was centred on the frequent deposition in stone monuments of disarticulated animal remains, mostly cattle. Animal burials are known also from other African contexts, but regional extent of the phenomenon, state of preservation of monuments, and associated rock art make the Messak case unique. GIS analysis, excavation data, radiocarbon dating, zooarchaeological and isotopic (Sr, C, O) analyses of animal remains, and botanical information are used to explore this highly formalized ritual and the lifeways of a pastoral community in the Holocene Sahara. PMID:23437260

  18. Are the different patterns of stress-induced (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy explained by regional mechanical overload and demand: supply mismatch in selected ventricular regions?

    PubMed

    Redfors, Bjorn; Shao, Yangzhen; Ali, Anwar; Omerovic, Elmir

    2013-11-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TCM) or stress-induced cardiomyopathy is an increasingly recognized syndrome characterized by severe regional left ventricular dysfunction in the absence of an explanatory coronary lesion. TCM may lead to lethal complications but is completely reversible if the patient survives the acute phase. The pathogenesis of TCM and the mechanism behind this remarkable recovery are unknown. Plasma levels of catecholamine are elevated in many TCM patients and exogenously administered catecholamine induces TCM-like cardiac dysfunction in both humans and rats. A catecholamine excess increases myocardial metabolic demand by increasing the force of contraction as well as the heart rate, and also alters cardiac depolarization patterns. We propose that an altered spatiotemporal pattern of cardiac contraction and excessive force of contraction may lead to a redistribution of wall stresses in the left ventricle. This redistribution of wall stress causes regional mechanical overload of regions where wall tension becomes disproportionately great and renders these cardiomyocytes "metabolically insufficient". In other words, these cardiomyocytes experience a demand: supply mismatch on the basis of excessive metabolic demand. In order to prevent the death of these cardiomyocytes and to prevent excessive wall tension from developing in neighboring regions, a protective metabolic shutdown occurs in the affected cardiomyocytes. This metabolic shutdown, i.e., acute down regulation of non-vital cellular functions, serves to protect the affected regions from necrosis and explains the apparently complete recovery observed in TCM. We propose that this phenomenon may share important characteristics with phenomena such as ischemic conditioning, stunning and hibernation. In this manuscript, we discuss our hypothesis in the context of available knowledge and discuss important experiments that would help to corroborate or refute the hypothesis. PMID:24075594

  19. Difference of brightness temperatures between 19.35 GHz and 37.0 GHz in CHANG'E-1 MRM: implications for the burial of shallow bedrock at lunar low latitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wen; Li, Xiongyao; Wei, Guangfei; Wang, Shijie

    2016-03-01

    Indications of buried lunar bedrock may help us to understand the tectonic evolution of the Moon and provide some clues for formation of lunar regolith. So far, the information on distribution and burial depth of lunar bedrock is far from sufficient. Due to good penetration ability, microwave radiation can be a potential tool to ameliorate this problem. Here, a novel method to estimate the burial depth of lunar bedrock is presented using microwave data from Chang'E-1 (CE-1) lunar satellite. The method is based on the spatial variation of differences in brightness temperatures between 19.35 GHz and 37.0 GHz (ΔTB). Large differences are found in some regions, such as the southwest edge of Oceanus Procellarum, the area between Mare Tranquillitatis and Mare Nectaris, and the highland east of Mare Smythii. Interestingly, a large change of elevation is found in the corresponding region, which might imply a shallow burial depth of lunar bedrock. To verify this deduction, a theoretical model is derived to calculate the ΔTB. Results show that ΔTB varies from 12.7 K to 15 K when the burial depth of bedrock changes from 1 m to 0.5 m in the equatorial region. Based on the available data at low lunar latitude (30°N-30°S), it is thus inferred that the southwest edge of Oceanus Procellarum, the area between Mare Tranquillitatis and Mare Nectaris, the highland located east of Mare Smythii, the edge of Pasteur and Chaplygin are the areas with shallow bedrock, the burial depth is estimated between 0.5 m and 1 m.

  20. Awn length variation and its effect on dispersal unit burial of Trachypogon spicatus (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erica E; Baruch, Zdravko

    2014-03-01

    Trachypogon spicatus, formerly known as Trachypogon plumosus, is a dominant grass in some savannas of Northern South America. Its dispersal unit, like many other species of the Andropogoneae tribe, bears a hygroscopic awn which facilitates its establishment in favorable microsites. Some authors have previously proposed that there is a positive correlation between awn length and dispersal unit burial, and that this relationship increases the probability of seed survival in the event of a fire, since soil acts as insulator. In this study we experimentally tested this relationship for T. spicatus. A total of 192 diaspores were placed in randomized blocks, in aluminum trays filled with soil under greenhouse conditions. Diaspores were sprayed with water daily for a month to guarantee awn movement; on the last day of the experiment, they were sprayed with red aerosol paint to determine burial depth. The effects of awn length, presence of caryopses, and presence of a pivot for the passive segment of the awn on diaspore burial were evaluated. Germination viability was tested using a tetrazolium salt test for 35 caryopses. No significant differences in diaspore burial were observed between diaspores with and without caryopses (F(2,126) = 0.034, p=0.853). A positive correlation between awn length and diaspore burial was observed only if the passive awn lacked a pivot (r(66)=0.394, p<0.05). Diaspores whose awns had a pivot point achieved significantly deeper burial distances than their counterparts (F(2,126)=7.063, p=0.005). Viability test found that 0% of caryopses tested were able to germinate; this is possibly due to the time difference between sampling and testing. We considered the presence or absence of caryopsis as an important factor, since previous studies have not yet considered it and the high production of sterile diaspores in grasses. These results suggest that the physical mechanism behind T. spicatus diaspore burial is awn torque. This would explain why our

  1. Measurement of Helium-3/Helium-4 Ratios in Soil Gas at the 618-11 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Khris B.; Dresel, P Evan; Evans, John C.

    2001-10-31

    Seventy soil gas-sampling points were installed around the perimeter of the 618-11 Burial Ground, approximately 400 feet downgradient of well 699-13-3A, and in four transects downgradient of the burial ground to a maximum distance of 3,100 feet. Soil gas samples were collected and analyzed for helium-3/helium-4 ratios from these 70 points. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios determined from the soil gas sampling points showed significant enrichments, relative to ambient air helium-3 concentrations. The highest concentrations were located along the northern perimeter of the burial ground. Helium-3/helium-4 ratios (normalized to the abundances in ambient air) ranged from 1.0 to 62 around the burial ground. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios from the 4 transect downgradient of the burial ground ranged from 0.988 to 1.68. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios from around the burial ground suggest there is a vadose zone source of tritium along the north side of the burial ground. This vadose zone source is likely the source of tritium in the groundwater. The helium-3/helium-4 ratios also suggest the groundwater plume is traveling east-northeast from the burial ground and the highest groundwater tritium value may be to the north of well 699-13-3A. Finally, there appears to be no immediately upgradient sources of tritium impacting the burial ground since all the upgradient helium-3/helium-4 ratios are approximately 1.0.

  2. Controlled preparation of wet granular media reveals limits to lizard burial ability.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Sarah S; Kuckuk, Robyn; Goldman, Daniel I

    2015-07-01

    Many animals move within ground composed of granular media (GM); the resistive properties of such substrates can depend on water content and compaction, but little is known about how such parameters affect locomotion or the physics of drag and penetration. Using apparatus to control compaction of GM, our recent studies of movement in dry GM have revealed locomotion strategies of specialized dry-sand-swimming reptiles. However, these animals represent a small fraction of the diversity and presumed burial strategies of fossorial reptilian fauna. Here we develop a system to create states of wet GM of varying moisture content and compaction in quantities sufficient to study the burial and subsurface locomotion of the Ocellated skink (C. ocellatus), a generalist lizard. X-ray imaging revealed that in wet and dry GM the lizard slowly buried (≈30 s) propagating a wave from head to tail, while moving in a start-stop motion. During forward movement, the head oscillated, and the forelimb on the convex side of the body propelled the animal. Although body kinematics and 'slip' were similar in both substrates, the burial depth was smaller in wet GM. Penetration and drag force experiments on smooth cylinders revealed that wet GM was ≈4× more resistive than dry GM. In total, our measurements indicate that while the rheology of the dry and wet GM differ substantially, the lizard's burial motor pattern is conserved across substrates, while its burial depth is largely constrained by environmental resistance. PMID:26109565

  3. Controlled preparation of wet granular media reveals limits to lizard burial ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Sarah S.; Kuckuk, Robyn; Goldman, Daniel I.

    2015-07-01

    Many animals move within ground composed of granular media (GM); the resistive properties of such substrates can depend on water content and compaction, but little is known about how such parameters affect locomotion or the physics of drag and penetration. Using apparatus to control compaction of GM, our recent studies of movement in dry GM have revealed locomotion strategies of specialized dry-sand-swimming reptiles. However, these animals represent a small fraction of the diversity and presumed burial strategies of fossorial reptilian fauna. Here we develop a system to create states of wet GM of varying moisture content and compaction in quantities sufficient to study the burial and subsurface locomotion of the Ocellated skink (C. ocellatus), a generalist lizard. X-ray imaging revealed that in wet and dry GM the lizard slowly buried (≈ 30 s) propagating a wave from head to tail, while moving in a start-stop motion. During forward movement, the head oscillated, and the forelimb on the convex side of the body propelled the animal. Although body kinematics and ‘slip’ were similar in both substrates, the burial depth was smaller in wet GM. Penetration and drag force experiments on smooth cylinders revealed that wet GM was ≈ 4× more resistive than dry GM. In total, our measurements indicate that while the rheology of the dry and wet GM differ substantially, the lizard's burial motor pattern is conserved across substrates, while its burial depth is largely constrained by environmental resistance.

  4. Porosity formation in deep-burial environment: overview, with examples, from Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Harris, P.M.

    1989-03-01

    Porosity formation accompanying deep burial is ubiquitous and widespread in the Permian basin, particularly but not exclusively in offshore platform and resedimented basinal carbonates of Pennsylvanian and Permian age. Hydrocarbon reservoirs in such platform carbonate examples locally contain evidence of subaerial exposure and meteoric diagenesis. Commonly, much of the porosity formed during exposure is ultimately reduced by compaction and cementation during early burial. By contrast, no evidence of meteoric diagenesis is observed in associated basinal carbonates, although compaction and cementation accompanying progressive burial are readily evident. In both cases, however, such early diagenesis is overprinted by late burial dissolution, sometimes coincident with hydrocarbon emplacement, creating rocks of high porosity. The formation of porosity by cement dissolution may exhume occluded pores or enhance relict pores that formed in the eogenetic zone, the result being a preponderance of interparticle and moldic pores and residual cements that mimic vadose and phreatic products. In other cases, nonfabric selective dissolution, locally associated with fractures or stylolites, creates vuggy porosity which may resemble that formed during eodiagenesis. Multiple phases of deep-burial dissolution and partial cementation or replacement (by calcite or dolomite) are indicated for many of these diagenetic systems and result in a complex suite of different pore types.

  5. Changes in landscape diversity induced by climate over a Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acampora, A.; Manfreda, Salvatore; Carone, M. T.; Simoniello, T.; Sole, Aurelia

    2010-05-01

    Climate is certainly a controlling factor for the spatial organization of vegetation and the distribution of ecosystems at the global scale (Scheiner and Rey-Benayas, 1994). At this and several other scales, plant types, species richness, distribution and structure of vegetation are closely related to resources availability (including water, nutrients, etc.), soil type and surface morphology. The study of the existing links between vegetation organization and climatic parameters can be extremely useful for determining the effects induced by future climate changes on our landscape. In this context, the Basilicata Region (in Southern Italy) is an ideal test area to analyze the relationship between climate and vegetation, since it is in the core of the Biodiversity Hotspot area of the Mediterranean basin and its territory includes a significant variety of climatic conditions ranging from humid to semi-arid and arid. This variability affects the spatial characteristics of land cover (composition and configuration of different patches) that have been studied using landscape ecology indices. In particular, some landscape metrics (e.g., Shannon's Diversity index, Simpson's Diversity index, Mean Patch Area, Shannon's Evenness index, Simpson's Evenness index, Interspersion and Juxtaposition index) are strongly influenced by the climatic conditions described through climatic indices as well as vegetation water stress defined using numerical simulation of soil-vegetation interactions. It was observed that landscape diversity tends to increase non linearly with climate changing from dry to humid, with a sharp increase observed when moving from arid to semiarid conditions. This behaviour seems to be similar to the relationship observed in literature between the number of plant species and climate (e.g., Shmida and Burgess, 1982). These findings can be a useful basis for the characterization of landscape diversity in the context of identification and delimitation of protected

  6. Natural and induced endoreic hydrological conditions in the Alta Murgia karstic region (Apulia, Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canora, F.; Fidelibus, M. D.; Spilotro, G.

    2009-04-01

    A study aimed at understanding the hydrological processes in karst areas related to the presence of natural and artificial endoreic basins and their modification due to land use change, as well as the influence of above factors on the infiltration rate has been carried out in the Alta Murgia region (Apulia, Southern Italy). The region is a Cretaceous limestone plateau of the Apulian platform, characterized by a mature karstic landscape: due to its elevation, climatic conditions and lithology, the plateau constitutes the main recharge area of the Murgia aquifer. The typical karst topography is essentially related to the subterranean drainage (sinkholes, caves, conduit): surface and subsurface karst geomorphology is strictly interrelated with hydrology. The morphological features of the karstic plateau are defined by the high density of surface karstic forms (mainly dolines), the presence of exposed karst and karren fields, as well as by the extensive outcrop of fractured rocks. Karst surface shows, on the bottom of the morpho-structural depressions called "lame", natural distribution of modest deposits of "terra rossa" and regolith. The "lame" work as streams during and after intense rainfall events, often outlining a primordial ephemeral hydrographical network, frequently convergent towards dolines, poljes or endoreic basins. Alta Murgia shows many natural endoreic basin conditions in a quite flat morphology. In this environment, when intense rainfall events cover large areas and rainfall intensity exceeds the infiltration capacity of soils and/or sinkholes, significant runoff amounts are produced and stored in the basins causing floods. Most of the natural endoreic basins are small and independent: while the majority of them continue functioning as endoreic even in presence of extreme events of high return time, others (quasi-endoreic), under the same circumstances can start contributing to other basins, due to exceeding their water storage capability. This way

  7. Radiation-Induced Reductions in Regional Lung Perfusion: 0.1-12 Year Data From a Prospective Clinical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Junan; Ma Jinli; Zhou Sumin; Hubbs, Jessica L.; Wong, Terence Z.; Folz, Rodney J.; Evans, Elizabeth S.; Jaszczak, Ronald J.; Clough, Robert; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the time and regional dependence of radiation therapy (RT)-induced reductions in regional lung perfusion 0.1-12 years post-RT, as measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion. Materials/Methods: Between 1991 and 2005, 123 evaluable patients receiving RT for tumors in/around the thorax underwent SPECT lung perfusion scans before and serially post-RT (0.1-12 years). Registration of pre- and post-RT SPECT images with the treatment planning computed tomography, and hence the three-dimensional RT dose distribution, allowed changes in regional SPECT-defined perfusion to be related to regional RT dose. Post-RT follow-up scans were evaluated at multiple time points to determine the time course of RT-induced regional perfusion changes. Population dose response curves (DRC) for all patients at different time points, different regions, and subvolumes (e.g., whole lungs, cranial/caudal, ipsilateral/contralateral) were generated by combining data from multiple patients at similar follow-up times. Each DRC was fit to a linear model, and differences statistically analyzed. Results: In the overall groups, dose-dependent reductions in perfusion were seen at each time post-RT. The slope of the DRC increased over time up to 18 months post-RT, and plateaued thereafter. Regional differences in DRCs were only observed between the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs, and appeared due to tumor-associated changes in regional perfusion. Conclusions: Thoracic RT causes dose-dependent reductions in regional lung perfusion that progress up to {approx}18 months post-RT and persists thereafter. Tumor shrinkage appears to confound the observed dose-response relations. There appears to be similar dose response for healthy parts of the lungs at different locations.

  8. Differential changes in Neuregulin-1 signaling in major brain regions in a lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhai; Jiang, Qiong; Chen, Shuang-Xi; Hu, Cheng-Liang; Shen, Hui-Fan; Huang, Pei-Zhi; Xu, Jun-Ping; Mei, Jin-Ping; Zhang, Ben-Ping; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2016-07-01

    Neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) is involved in multiple biological processes in the nervous system. The present study investigated changes in Nrg1 signaling in the major brain regions of mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation. At 24 h post‑intraperitoneal injection of LPS, mouse brain tissues, including tissues from the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus, were collected. Reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression of Nrg1 and its receptors, Neu and ErbB4, at the mRNA level. Western blotting was performed to determine the levels of these proteins and the protein levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)1/2 and Akt1. Immunohistochemical staining was utilized to detect the levels of pNeu and pErbB4 in these regions. LPS successfully induced sites of neuroinflammation in these regions, in which changes in Nrg1, Neu and ErbB4 at the mRNA and protein levels were identified compared with controls. LPS induced a reduction in pNeu and pErbB4 in the striatum and hypothalamus, although marginally increased pErbB4 levels were found in the hippocampus. LPS increased the overall phosphorylation of Src but this effect was reduced in the hypothalamus. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of Akt1 was found in the striatum and hippocampus. These data suggest diverse roles for Nrg1 signaling in these regions during the process of neuroinflammation. PMID:27220549

  9. Differential changes in Neuregulin-1 signaling in major brain regions in a lipopolysaccharide-induced neuroinflammation mouse model

    PubMed Central

    YANG, ZHAI; JIANG, QIONG; CHEN, SHUANG-XI; HU, CHENG-LIANG; SHEN, HUI-FAN; HUANG, PEI-ZHI; XU, JUN-PING; MEI, JIN-PING; ZHANG, BEN-PING; ZHAO, WEI-JIANG

    2016-01-01

    Neuregulin 1 (Nrg1) is involved in multiple biological processes in the nervous system. The present study investigated changes in Nrg1 signaling in the major brain regions of mice subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neuroinflammation. At 24 h post-intraperitoneal injection of LPS, mouse brain tissues, including tissues from the cortex, striatum, hippocampus and hypothalamus, were collected. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the expression of Nrg1 and its receptors, Neu and ErbB4, at the mRNA level. Western blotting was performed to determine the levels of these proteins and the protein levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (Erk)1/2 and Akt1. Immunohistochemical staining was utilized to detect the levels of pNeu and pErbB4 in these regions. LPS successfully induced sites of neuroinflammation in these regions, in which changes in Nrg1, Neu and ErbB4 at the mRNA and protein levels were identified compared with controls. LPS induced a reduction in pNeu and pErbB4 in the striatum and hypothalamus, although marginally increased pErbB4 levels were found in the hippocampus. LPS increased the overall phosphorylation of Src but this effect was reduced in the hypothalamus. Moreover, increased phosphorylation of Akt1 was found in the striatum and hippocampus. These data suggest diverse roles for Nrg1 signaling in these regions during the process of neuroinflammation. PMID:27220549

  10. Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima.

    PubMed

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Bianchi, Daniele; Jaccard, Samuel L; Galbraith, Eric D

    2016-01-01

    The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments removes carbon dioxide from the ocean-atmosphere pool, provides energy to the deep biosphere, and on geological timescales drives the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Here we quantify natural variations in the burial of organic carbon in deep-sea sediments over the last glacial cycle. Using a new data compilation of hundreds of sediment cores, we show that the accumulation rate of organic carbon in the deep sea was consistently higher (50%) during glacial maxima than during interglacials. The spatial pattern and temporal progression of the changes suggest that enhanced nutrient supply to parts of the surface ocean contributed to the glacial burial pulses, with likely additional contributions from more efficient transfer of organic matter to the deep sea and better preservation of organic matter due to reduced oxygen exposure. These results demonstrate a pronounced climate sensitivity for this global carbon cycle sink. PMID:26923945

  11. Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima

    PubMed Central

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Bianchi, Daniele; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2016-01-01

    The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments removes carbon dioxide from the ocean–atmosphere pool, provides energy to the deep biosphere, and on geological timescales drives the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Here we quantify natural variations in the burial of organic carbon in deep-sea sediments over the last glacial cycle. Using a new data compilation of hundreds of sediment cores, we show that the accumulation rate of organic carbon in the deep sea was consistently higher (50%) during glacial maxima than during interglacials. The spatial pattern and temporal progression of the changes suggest that enhanced nutrient supply to parts of the surface ocean contributed to the glacial burial pulses, with likely additional contributions from more efficient transfer of organic matter to the deep sea and better preservation of organic matter due to reduced oxygen exposure. These results demonstrate a pronounced climate sensitivity for this global carbon cycle sink. PMID:26923945

  12. Effects of sediment burial on grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella (Valenciennes,1844), eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Amy E.; Chapman, Duane C.; Deters, Joseph E.; Erwin, Susannah O.; Hayer, Cari-Ann

    2015-01-01

    It is thought that grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) eggs must remain suspended in the water column in order to hatch successfully. Using sand, the effects of varying sediment levels on grass carp eggs were tested at different developmental states and temperatures. Survival was high (15–35%, depending on temperature and trial) in the unburied treatment where eggs rested on a sand bed but were not covered by sediment. Survival was lower in the partial burial (5–10%) and very low (0–4%) in the full burial treatment. In all treatments, delayed hatching (organisms remaining in membranes past the stage of hatching competence) was noted. Deformities such as missing heads and pericardial edema occurred at high rates in the partial and full burials. Eggs that come in contact with the benthos and are resuspended in the water column should be considered in embryonic drift models.

  13. Social workers' final act of service: respectful burial arrangements for indigent, unclaimed, and unidentified people.

    PubMed

    Castex, Graciela M

    2007-10-01

    Social workers have long been involved in identifying resources and making final arrangements for clients who die without an estate or have no heirs, who may be institutionalized or unknown to the community, or whose body may be unclaimed for burial. Absent quick intervention, these individuals are often at risk for an anonymous potter's field burial, sometimes in coffins stacked eight deep, with no respectful ceremony of interment. This article provides an overview of societal responses to the need for a final disposition of all people; discusses demographic and social trends that, if realized, may result in a significant increase in indigent burials; and provides information on social work interventions and the identification of resources available for a respectful and dignified final disposition for a client. PMID:18232243

  14. Diachronous burial and exhumation of a single tectonic unit during collision orogenesis (Sulitjelma, central Scandinavian Caledonides)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Alan P.; Burton, Kevin W.; Westhead, R. Keith

    1994-11-01

    The Sulitjelma fold nappe represents part of a Caledonian marginal basin obducted during the closure of the Iapetus Ocean and collision between Laurentia and Baltica. Metamorphic pressure-temperature (P-T) paths indicate that various parts of the Sulitjelma fold nappe followed characteristic clockwise P-T paths involving prograde burial followed by prograde exhumation and then near-isothermal exhumation prior to cooling. Geochronological results indicate that foreland rocks followed this general P-T path before more hinterlandward rocks, such that foreland rocks underwent exhumation while hinterlandward rocks were still being buried. This is consistent with the fold nappe passing through a collisional orogen; burial and ultimately prograde metamorphism were terminated sequentially by exhumation as a given part of the fold nappe came into contact with the lower plate, basement ramp (Baltica) and was driven upward. Burial, heating, exhumation, and cooling were thus diachronous within a single tectonic unit.

  15. Global pulses of organic carbon burial in deep-sea sediments during glacial maxima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartapanis, Olivier; Bianchi, Daniele; Jaccard, Samuel L.; Galbraith, Eric D.

    2016-02-01

    The burial of organic carbon in marine sediments removes carbon dioxide from the ocean-atmosphere pool, provides energy to the deep biosphere, and on geological timescales drives the oxygenation of the atmosphere. Here we quantify natural variations in the burial of organic carbon in deep-sea sediments over the last glacial cycle. Using a new data compilation of hundreds of sediment cores, we show that the accumulation rate of organic carbon in the deep sea was consistently higher (50%) during glacial maxima than during interglacials. The spatial pattern and temporal progression of the changes suggest that enhanced nutrient supply to parts of the surface ocean contributed to the glacial burial pulses, with likely additional contributions from more efficient transfer of organic matter to the deep sea and better preservation of organic matter due to reduced oxygen exposure. These results demonstrate a pronounced climate sensitivity for this global carbon cycle sink.

  16. 1,3-dinitrobenzene induces age- and region-specific oxidation to mitochondria-related proteins in brain.

    PubMed

    Kubik, Laura L; Landis, Rory W; Remmer, Henriette; Bergin, Ingrid L; Philbert, Martin A

    2015-05-01

    Regions of the brain with high energy requirements are especially sensitive to perturbations in mitochondrial function. Hence, neurotoxicant exposures that target mitochondria in regions of high energy demand have the potential to accelerate mitochondrial damage inherently occurring during the aging process. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene (DNB) is a model neurotoxicant that selectively targets mitochondria in brainstem nuclei innervated by the eighth cranial nerve. This study investigates the role of age in the regional susceptibility of brain mitochondria-related proteins (MRPs) to oxidation following exposure to DNB. Male F344 rats (1 month old [young], 3 months old [adult], 18 months old [aged]) were exposed to 10 mg/kg DNB prior to mitochondrial isolation and histopathology experiments. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, 3 important region- and age-related increases in DNB-induced MRP oxidation were determined: (1) brainstem mitochondria are ×3 more sensitive to DNB-induced oxidation than cortical mitochondria; (2) oxidation of brainstem MRPs is significantly higher than in cortical counterparts; and (3) MRPs from the brainstems of older rats are significantly more oxidized than those from young or adult rats. Furthermore, lower levels of DNB cause signs of intoxication (ataxia, chromodacryorrhea) and vacuolation of the susceptible neuropil in aged animals, while neither is observed in DNB-exposed young rats. Additionally, methemoglobin levels increase significantly in DNB-exposed adult and aged animals, but not young DNB-exposed animals. This suggests that oxidation of key MRPs observed in brainstem of aged animals is necessary for DNB-induced signs of intoxication and lesion formation. These results provide compelling evidence that environmental chemicals such as DNB may aid in the acceleration of injury to specific brain regions by inducing oxidation of sensitive mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25716674

  17. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene Induces Age- and Region-Specific Oxidation to Mitochondria-Related Proteins in Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kubik, Laura L.; Landis, Rory W.; Remmer, Henriette; Bergin, Ingrid L.; Philbert, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Regions of the brain with high energy requirements are especially sensitive to perturbations in mitochondrial function. Hence, neurotoxicant exposures that target mitochondria in regions of high energy demand have the potential to accelerate mitochondrial damage inherently occurring during the aging process. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene (DNB) is a model neurotoxicant that selectively targets mitochondria in brainstem nuclei innervated by the eighth cranial nerve. This study investigates the role of age in the regional susceptibility of brain mitochondria-related proteins (MRPs) to oxidation following exposure to DNB. Male F344 rats (1 month old [young], 3 months old [adult], 18 months old [aged]) were exposed to 10 mg/kg DNB prior to mitochondrial isolation and histopathology experiments. Using a high-throughput proteomic approach, 3 important region- and age-related increases in DNB-induced MRP oxidation were determined: (1) brainstem mitochondria are ×3 more sensitive to DNB-induced oxidation than cortical mitochondria; (2) oxidation of brainstem MRPs is significantly higher than in cortical counterparts; and (3) MRPs from the brainstems of older rats are significantly more oxidized than those from young or adult rats. Furthermore, lower levels of DNB cause signs of intoxication (ataxia, chromodacryorrhea) and vacuolation of the susceptible neuropil in aged animals, while neither is observed in DNB-exposed young rats. Additionally, methemoglobin levels increase significantly in DNB-exposed adult and aged animals, but not young DNB-exposed animals. This suggests that oxidation of key MRPs observed in brainstem of aged animals is necessary for DNB-induced signs of intoxication and lesion formation. These results provide compelling evidence that environmental chemicals such as DNB may aid in the acceleration of injury to specific brain regions by inducing oxidation of sensitive mitochondrial proteins. PMID:25716674

  18. Geohydrology of the unsaturated zone at the burial site for low-level radioactive waste near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    Low-level radioactive solid waste has been buried in trenches at a site near Beatty, Nevada, since 1962. In 1976, as part of a national program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the geohydrology of the waste burial site to provide a basis for estimating the potential for radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste burial trenches. Data collected include meteorological information for calibration of a long-term water budget analysis, soil moisture profiles, soil water potentials, and hydraulic properties of representative unsaturated sediment samples to a depth of about 10 m. The waste burial facility is in the northern Amargosa Desert about 170 km northwest of Las Vegas, NV. The region is arid; mean annual precipitation at Lathrop Wells, 30 km south of the site, is only 7.4 cm. The mean daily maximum temperature at Lathrop Wells in July, the hottest month, is 37 C. The site is underlain by poorly stratified deposits of gravelly or silty sand and sandy gravel, and thick beds of clayey sediments. The total thickness of valley fill deposits beneath the site is about 175 m; the unsaturated zone is about 85 m thick. Volumetric soil moisture to depths of 4 m ranges from 4% to 10%, but commonly is in the range from 6% to 8%. Soil water potential, measured to depths of 3 to 10 m, ranged from -10 to -70 bars. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity computed from laboratory analyses of representative samples ranges from 10 to the -13th power to 10 to the -4th power cm/day. Evaporation studies over a 2-yr period were used to calibrate a numerical procedure for analyzing long-term precipitation data and estimating annual water budgets during the 15-yr period 1962-76. This analysis (1) demonstrated that a potential exists for deep percolation (> 2 m), despite high annual evaporation demands, and (2) provided predictions of the time of yr and the antecedent conditions which enhance the probability of deep percolation. Soil moisture profiles obtained

  19. Germination and emergence of annual species and burial depth: Implications for restoration ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limón, Ángeles; Peco, Begoña

    2016-02-01

    Due to the high content of viable seeds, topsoil is usually spread on ground left bare during railway and motorway construction to facilitate the regeneration of vegetation cover. However, during handling of the topsoil, seeds are often buried deeply and they cannot germinate or the seedlings cannot emerge from depth. This study experimentally explores the predictive value of seed mass for seed germination, mortality and seedling emergence at different burial depths for 13 common annual species in semiarid Mediterranean environments. We separate the effect of burial depth on germination and emergence by means of two experiments. In the germination experiment, five replicates of 20 seeds for each species were buried at depths ranging from 0 to 4 cm under greenhouse conditions. Germinated and empty or rotten seeds were counted after 8 weeks. In the emergence experiment, five replicates of four newly-germinated seeds per species were buried at the same depths under controlled conditions and emergence was recorded after 3 weeks. The effect of burial depth on percentage of germination and seedling emergence was dependent on seed size. Although all species showed a decrease in germination with burial depth, this decrease was greater for small-than large-seeded species. Percentage of emergence was positively related to seed mass but negatively related to burial depth. Seed mortality was higher for small-than large-seeded species, but there was no general effect of burial depth on this variable. Thus, the current practice of spreading 30 cm deep layers of topsoil in post-construction restoration projects is unadvisable. In this restoration scenario, thinner layers of topsoil should be used to achieve the maximum potential of the topsoil for germination and seedling establishment.

  20. New Hydroxyproline Radiocarbon Dates from Sungir, Russia, Confirm Early Mid Upper Palaeolithic Burials in Eurasia

    PubMed Central

    Nalawade-Chavan, Shweta; McCullagh, James; Hedges, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sungir (Russia) is a key Mid-Upper Palaeolithic site in Eurasia, containing several spectacular burials that disclose early evidence for complex burial rites in the form of a range of grave goods deposited along with the dead. Dating has been particularly challenging, with multiple radiocarbon dates ranging from 19,160±270 to 28,800±240 BP for burials that are believed to be closely similar in age. There are disparities in the radiocarbon dates of human bones, faunal remains and charcoal found on the floor of burials [1], [2], [3]. Our approach has been to develop compound-specific methods using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to separate single amino acids, such as hydroxyproline, and thereby avoid the known human contamination on the bones themselves. Previously, we applied this technique to obtain radiocarbon dates of ∼30,000 BP for Sungir 2, Sungir 3 and a mammoth bone from the occupation levels of the site [4]. The single amino acid radiocarbon dates were in good agreement with each other compared to all the dates previously reported, supporting their reliability. Here we report new hydroxyproline dates for two more human burials from the same site, Sungir 1 and Sungir 4. All five hydroxyproline dates reported are statistically indistinguishable and support an identical age for the group. The results suggest that compound-specific radiocarbon analysis should be considered seriously as the method of choice when precious archaeological remains are to be dated because they give a demonstrably contaminant-free radiocarbon age. The new ages are, together with the previously dated ‘Red Lady of Paviland’ human in the British Isles, the earliest for Mid Upper Palaeolithic burial behaviour in Eurasia, and point to the precocious appearance of this form of rite in Europe Russia. PMID:24416120

  1. Molecular and genetic analysis of the transferred DNA regions of the root-inducing plasmid of Agrobacterium rhizogenes.

    PubMed Central

    White, F F; Taylor, B H; Huffman, G A; Gordon, M P; Nester, E W

    1985-01-01

    The T-DNA regions of the root-inducing (Ri) plasmid pRiA4b of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were characterized. Two regions, designated TL-DNA and TR-DNA, were found to be integrated and stably maintained in the plant genome. The TL-DNA spanned a 15- to 20-kilobase region of pRiA4b and was separated from the TR-DNA region by at least 15 kilobases of nonintegrated plasmid DNA. The TR-DNA region also spanned a 15- to 20-kilobase region of pRiA4b and included a region of homology to the tms morphogenic loci of the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Eighteen deletions and 95 transposon insertions were generated in the T-DNA regions and tested for alterations in virulence. Insertions into four loci in the TL-DNA affected the morphology of root formation of Kalanchoë diagremontiana leaves and stems, but had no visible effects on other host plants. Insertions into two loci (tms-1 and tms-2) in the TR-DNA eliminated virulence symptoms on all plants tested, with the exception of K. diagremontiana stems, where sparse root formation occurred. Complementation experiments with Ri and Ti plasmid T-DNA mutations indicate that the tms genes of the two plasmids serve similar functions and suggest a functional relationship between one or more genes of the TL-DNA and the cytokinin synthesis locus tmr of the Ti plasmid. Images PMID:4044524

  2. Detection of Marked and Unmarked Burial Sites in Louisiana Using Ground Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Nunn, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar has been used in both north and south Louisiana, to locate marked and unmarked graves. Burials in Oak Ridge, Louisiana, which is in the northern part of the state, were in a church cemetery. Dates of burial ranged from the late 1800s to the present. The survey was conducted to determine the location of empty plots within the cemetery that could be used for future burials and to locate any unmarked burials. Burials in St. Gabriel, Louisiana, which is in the southern portion of the state, consisted of three marked graves on private property. Date of burials occurred in the 1970s. This survey was performed to confirm that the headstones were correctly placed over the bodies. A large surface depression was observed near the presumed location of the graves. Information regarding the exact location of the bodies was not known and one or more bodies were possibly buried in the area beneath the observed large surface depression. A Sensors and Software SmartCart bistatic ground penetrating radar unit equipped with 200-megahertz antennas with 0.5 meters of separation was used at both locations. Penetration was to a sufficient depth in order to determine locations of the burials at both sites. Longer wavelength antennas were available but not used because the 200-megahertz antennas adequately characterized the near subsurface. Sediments in the Oak Ridge site consisted of silty loams and a comparatively deeper depth of penetration was achieved. Sediment in the St. Gabriel site consisted of clays with less depth of penetration than in the Oak Ridge site. Previous studies by others in Baton Rouge, Louisiana just to the north of St. Gabriel have had poor results due to limited depth of penetration except in areas where the soil is covered by concrete or asphalt and thus remains dry year round. Both grave sites were surveyed while the soil was dry in order to ensure maximum depth of penetration. Data interpretation was completed on site during each survey

  3. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Borehole Sampling at 118-B-1 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    W. S. Thompson

    2007-04-02

    The Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) Field Remediation Project has removed all of the disposed materials and contaminated soil from the 118-B-1 Burial Ground with the exception of tritium-contaminated soil that is believed to extend from the bottom of the present excavation to groundwater and is believed to contribute to tritium contamination observed at down-gradient monitoring Well 199-B8-6. This sampling and analysis instruction (SAI) provides the requirements for sample collection and laboratory analysis for characterization of the vertical distribution of tritium contamination in the vadose zone soil below the 118-B-1 Burial Ground remedial action excavation.

  4. The Sulfur Isotope Composition of the Pyrite Burial Flux in the Modern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchyn, A. V.; Antler, G.; Byrne, D. J.; Sun, X.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction followed by sulfide mineral burial, typically as pyrite, represents the largest removal pathway for sulfur from the exogenic sulfur reservoir. During microbial sulfate reduction, sulfur isotopes are partitioned such that the lighter 32S isotope is preferentially reduced; the magnitude of this partitioning has a large range (0 to 72‰), and therefore the average sulfur isotope composition of the global pyrite burial flux remains enigmatic. Recent work has mapped the global spatial distribution of microbial sulfate reduction rates in the modern ocean, which allows conclusions to be drawn concerning the conditions and controls on where sulfate respiration occurs (Bowles et al., 2014). The local rate of sulfate reduction in a particular sediment column can be calculated by the change in sulfate concentrations in pore fluids below the surface, which yields the net flux of sulfate into marine sediments. A flux of sulfate into the sediment is assumed to be due to diffusion along a concentration gradient set up by the consumption of sulfate at depth. We have calculated the deep-sea rates of microbial sulfate reduction using over 700 drilling sites and arrive at a similar estimate of the global modern rate of sulfate respiration. Rates of sulfate reduction are not, however, the same as the rates of pyrite burial, which is likely limited to the uppermost sediments where reactive iron may be available, or in the most nearshore environments where the terrestrial supply of iron is high and rates of sulfate reduction are orders of magnitude higher than those in the deep-sea. Sulfur isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate reduction is a function of several environmental factors, including the rate of sulfate reduction. We use a new compilation of the link between sulfate reduction rate and sulfur isotope fractionation with a model of pyrite burial in a range of modern marine sediments to derive an estimate of the global pyrite burial flux and

  5. Tillage energy savings from zone burial of shredded and whole cotton stalks

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, L.; Chesson, J.; Thacker, G.; Penner, V.

    1996-04-01

    Two prototypes of a stalk burial implement were tested for energy requirements at the University of California, Shafter Research Station. Both versions of the implement are designed to bury the cotton stalks in a concentrated Zone and reform the bed in the same location. To plow under shredded stalks, both versions of the implement required less energy than a conventional tillage systems typical of the San Joaquin Valley of California. Both stalk burial implements were also used to plow under whole cotton stalks. This offers additional energy savings by eliminating the stalk shredding operation.

  6. Reducing Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury Using a Regional Multicenter Quality Improvement Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jeremiah R.; Solomon, Richard J.; Sarnak, Mark J.; McCullough, Peter A.; Splaine, Mark E.; Davies, Louise; Ross, Cathy S.; Dauerman, Harold L.; Stender, Janette L.; Conley, Sheila M.; Robb, John F.; Chaisson, Kristine; Boss, Richard; Lambert, Peggy; Goldberg, David J.; Lucier, Deborah; Fedele, Frank A.; Kellett, Mirle A.; Horton, Susan; Phillips, William J.; Downs, Cynthia; Wiseman, Alan; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Malenka, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality following percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) and is a patient safety objective of the National Quality Forum. However, no formal quality improvement program to prevent CI-AKI has been conducted. Therefore, we sought to determine if a six-year regional multi-center quality improvement intervention could reduce CI-AKI following PCI. Methods and Results We conducted a prospective multi-center quality improvement study to prevent CI-AKI (serum creatinine increase ≥0.3 mg/dL within 48 hours or ≥50% during hospitalization) among 21,067 non-emergent patients undergoing PCI at ten hospitals between 2007 and 2012. Six ‘intervention’ hospitals participated in the quality improvement intervention. Two hospitals with significantly lower baseline rates of CI-AKI, which served as “benchmark” sites and were used to develop the intervention and two hospitals not receiving the intervention were used as controls. Using time series analysis and multilevel poisson regression clustering to the hospital-level we calculated adjusted risk ratios (RR) for CI-AKI comparing the intervention period to baseline. Adjusted rates of CI-AKI were significantly reduced in hospitals receiving the intervention by 21% (RR 0.79; 95%CI: 0.67 to 0.93; p=0.005) for all patients and by 28% in patients with baseline eGFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m2 (RR 0.72; 95%CI: 0.56 to 0.91; p=0.007). Benchmark hospitals had no significant changes in CI-AKI. Key qualitative system factors associated with improvement included: multidisciplinary teams, limiting contrast volume, standardized fluid orders, intravenous fluid bolus, and patient education about oral hydration. Conclusions Simple cost-effective quality improvement interventions can prevent up to one in five CI-AKI events in patients with undergoing non-emergent PCI. PMID:25074372

  7. Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jianying; Chin, Mark H; Schepmoes, Athena A; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Weitz, Karl K; Petritis, Brianne O; Monroe, Matthew E; Camp, David G; Wood, Stephen A; Melega, William P; Bigelow, Diana J; Smith, Desmond J; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D

    2010-02-15

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal region of the brain; however, the neurodegeneration extends well beyond dopaminergic neurons. To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes relevant to PD, we applied two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to comparatively analyze the proteome changes in four brain regions (striatum, cerebellum, cortex, and the rest of brain) using a MPTP-induced PD mouse model with the objective to identify nigrostriatal-specific and other region-specific protein abundance changes. The combined analyses resulted in the identification of 4,895 non-redundant proteins with at least two unique peptides per protein. The relative abundance changes in each analyzed brain region were estimated based on the spectral count information. A total of 518 proteins were observed with significant MPTP-induced changes across different brain regions. 270 of these proteins were observed with specific changes occurring either only in the striatum and/or in the rest of the brain region that contains substantia nigra, suggesting that these proteins are associated with the underlying nigrostriatal pathways. Many of the proteins that exhibit significant abundance changes were associated with dopamine signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, the ubiquitin system, calcium signaling, the oxidative stress response, and apoptosis. A set of proteins with either consistent change across all brain regions or with changes specific to the cortex and cerebellum regions were also detected. One of the interesting proteins is ubiquitin specific protease (USP9X), a deubiquination enzyme involved in the protection of proteins from degradation and promotion of the TGF-β pathway, which exhibited altered abundances in all brain regions. Western blot validation showed similar spatial changes, suggesting that USP9X is potentially associated with neurodegeneration. Together, this study for the first time presents an overall picture of

  8. Preferential burial of permafrost-derived organic carbon in Siberian-Arctic shelf waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonk, Jorien E.; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Eglinton, Timothy I.; Andersson, August; Shakhova, Natalia; Charkin, Alexander; Heim, Birgit; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2014-12-01

    The rapidly changing East Siberian Arctic Shelf (ESAS) receives large amounts of terrestrial organic carbon (OC) from coastal erosion and Russian-Arctic rivers. Climate warming increases thawing of coastal Ice Complex Deposits (ICD) and can change both the amount of released OC, as well as its propensity to be converted to greenhouse gases (fueling further global warming) or to be buried in coastal sediments. This study aimed to unravel the susceptibility to degradation, and transport and dispersal patterns of OC delivered to the ESAS. Bulk and molecular radiocarbon analyses on surface particulate matter (PM), sinking PM and underlying surface sediments illustrate the active release of old OC from coastal permafrost. Molecular tracers for recalcitrant soil OC showed ages of 3.4-13 14C-ky in surface PM and 5.5-18 14C-ky in surface sediments. The age difference of these markers between surface PM and surface sediments is larger (i) in regions with low OC accumulation rates, suggesting a weaker exchange between water column and sediments, and (ii) with increasing distance from the Lena River, suggesting preferential settling of fluvially derived old OC nearshore. A dual-carbon end-member mixing model showed that (i) contemporary terrestrial OC is dispersed mainly by horizontal transport while being subject to active degradation, (ii) marine OC is most affected by vertical transport and also actively degraded in the water column, and (iii) OC from ICD settles rapidly and dominates surface sediments. Preferential burial of ICD-OC released into ESAS coastal waters might therefore lower the suggested carbon cycle climate feedback from thawing ICD permafrost.

  9. Geohydrology of the 218-W-5 Burial Ground, 200-West Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, B.N.

    1990-05-01

    Construction a disposal facility for solid, mixed low-level radioactive and hazardous wastes at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State (Figure 1) is planned. A site-specific performance assessment for each new disposal facility to ensure that wastes will be isolated from the environment is required. To demonstrate the adequacy of the facility for isolating the wastes, computer codes are used to simulate the physical processes that could cause the waste to migrate to underground water supplies or to the land's surface. The purpose of this report is provide a compilation and interpretation of geologic and hydrologic data available use in the performance assessment modeling. A variety of data are needed to model flow and transport from a solid-waste burial trench. These data include soil water content, soil moisture potential, saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, and phase mineralogy of the soils and sediments within the vadose zone. The hydrologic data that are critical for quantifying the water storage and transport properties for unsaturated soils require a characterization of the heterogeneities of various soil layers and the moisture characteristic curves for these layers. Hydraulic properties and mineralogic data for the saturated sediments are also important for modelling the flow and transport of wastes in the unconfined aquifer. This report begins with a discussion of the procedures and methods used to gather data both in the field and in the laboratory. This is followed by a summary of the geology, including the stratigraphic framework, lithofacies, and mineralogic/geochemical characteristics of the suprabasalt sediments. The hydrology of the region of the site is discussed next. In this discussion, the characteristics of the uppermost aquifer(s), unsaturated zone, and the various hydrogeologic units are presented. 54 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

  10. Resolving the Ripples (and a Mine): High-Resolution Multibeam Survey of Martha's Vineyard ONR Mine Burial Program Field Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, L. A.; Raymond, R.; Glang, G.; Huff, L.

    2002-12-01

    In an effort to better understand the coastal processes responsible for the burial and exposure of small objects on the seafloor, the Office of Naval Research is sponsoring the Mine Burial Program. Among the field areas chosen for this program is the site of the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO), a permanent instrumented node in 12 m of water about 500 m off the southern shore of Martha?s Vineyard. In support of the ONR program, several site surveys of the MVCO area have been conducted (see Goff et al); here we report the result of the most recent of these surveys, a very high-resolution multibeam survey aimed at establishing a detailed base map for the region and providing a baseline from which subsequent surveys can measure seafloor change In late July we conducted a five day survey of an approximately 3 x 5 km area surrounding the MVCO node using a Reson 8125 focused multibeam sonar aboard the SAIC survey vessel Ocean Explorer. The 8125 is a newly developed multibeam sonar that operates at 455 kHz and uses dynamic focusing to compensate for the curvature of the wavefront in the near-field. By using a relatively long array, the system can achieve very high spatial resolution (0.5 degree beam width) and with the dynamic focusing, can operate in the near field. The real constraint on resolution using this system is the ability to position the soundings and thus three kinematic DGPS base stations were established on Martha?s Vineyard and three kinematic receivers were used on the survey vessel. The kinematic GPS positioning is also critical to the ability to do repeat surveys with an accuracy high enough to resolve small (less than 10 cm) seafloor changes. Also to aid in our ability to accurately position repeat surveys, divers jetted sonar reflectors into the seafloor to act as fiducials. A super high-resolution (4 m overlap) survey was conducted in a small area surrounding the MVCO node and mine burial sites, a slightly lower resolution survey (12 to 25

  11. The presence of nuclear families in prehistoric collective burials revisited: the bronze age burial of Montanissell Cave (Spain) in the light of aDNA.

    PubMed

    Simón, Marc; Jordana, Xavier; Armentano, Nuria; Santos, Cristina; Díaz, Nancy; Solórzano, Eduvigis; López, Joan B; González-Ruiz, Mercedes; Malgosa, Assumpció

    2011-11-01

    Ancient populations have commonly been thought to have lived in small groups where extreme endogamy was the norm. To contribute to this debate, a genetic analysis has been carried out on a collective burial with eight primary inhumations from Montanissell Cave in the Catalan pre-Pyrenees. Radiocarbon dating clearly placed the burial in the Bronze Age, around 3200 BP. The composition of the group-two adults (one male, one female), one young woman, and five children from both sexes-seemed to represent the structure of a typical nuclear family. The genetic evidence proves this assumption to be wrong. In fact, at least five out of the eight mitochondrial haplotypes were different, denying the possibility of a common maternal ancestor for all of them. Nevertheless, 50% of the inhumations shared haplogroup J, so the possibility of a maternal relationship cannot be ruled out. Actually, combining different analyses performed using ancient and living populations, the probability of having four related J individuals in Montanissell Cave would range from 0.9884 to 0.9999. Owing to the particularities of this singular collective burial (small number of bodies placed altogether in a hidden cave, the evidence of non-simultaneous interments, close dating and unusual grave goods), we suggest that it might represent a small group with a patrilocal mating system. PMID:21959902

  12. ATM increases activation-induced cytidine deaminase activity at downstream S regions during class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Khair, Lyne; Guikema, Jeroen E J; Linehan, Erin K; Ucher, Anna J; Leus, Niek G J; Ogilvie, Colin; Lou, Zhenkun; Schrader, Carol E; Stavnezer, Janet

    2014-05-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates Ab class-switch recombination (CSR) in activated B cells resulting in exchanging the IgH C region and improved Ab effector function. During CSR, AID instigates DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation in switch (S) regions located upstream of C region genes. DSBs are necessary for CSR, but improper regulation of DSBs can lead to chromosomal translocations that can result in B cell lymphoma. The protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is an important proximal regulator of the DNA damage response (DDR), and translocations involving S regions are increased in its absence. ATM phosphorylates H2AX, which recruits other DNA damage response (DDR) proteins, including mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 (Mdc1) and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1), to sites of DNA damage. As these DDR proteins all function to promote repair and recombination of DSBs during CSR, we examined whether mouse splenic B cells deficient in these proteins would show alterations in S region DSBs when undergoing CSR. We find that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs are increased, whereas DSBs in downstream Sγ regions are decreased. We also find that mutations in the unrearranged Sγ3 segment are reduced in atm(-/-) cells. Our data suggest that ATM increases AID targeting and activity at downstream acceptor S regions during CSR and that in atm(-/-) cells Sμ DSBs accumulate as they lack a recombination partner. PMID:24729610

  13. Radiaxial fibrous calcite as early-burial, open-system cement: isotopic evidence from Permian of China

    SciTech Connect

    Halley, R.B.; Scholle, P.A.

    1985-02-01

    The Nanpanjiang basin of south China occupies about 100,000 km/sup 2/ in southern Guizhou and eastern Yunnan Provinces and northwestern Guangxi Autonomous Region. This basin contains a thick Paleozoic carbonate sequence overlain by about 3000 m of Triassic basinal deposits. Permian carbonate rocks comprise a large portion of the Paleozoic strata and form several platforms separated by basins containing dark, thin-bedded limestones, siliceous shales, and cherts. The platform margins are rimmed by sponge or algal reefs. Radiaxial fibrous calcite (RFC) is the most abundant cement in very coarse sponge or algal debris of Upper Permian reef and fore-reef sediments exposed along the western margin of the nanpanjiang basin. Small volumes of syndepositional cement,s interpreted to have been fibrous magnesium calcites and botryoidal aragonite, predate RFC. Coarse, blocky burial calcite postdates RFC. Evidence that RFC was precipitated during sediment deposition was not found. RFC occurs as isopach layers up to 15 mm thick and exhibits white, gray, and black bands about 1 mm wide. The presence of microdolomite inclusions in these cements indicates that they were originally magnesium calcites. delta/sup 18/O of RFC cements are more positive than any of the earlier or later components of the reef and fore-reef facies. Analyses of successive bands reveals the most positive delta/sup 18/O near the center of the isopach layers. delta/sup 13/C of successive bands reveals generally more negative values toward the centers of layers. RFC layers are interpreted to have precipitated during early burial of the platform margin while reef and fore-reef sediments were in communication with seawater. Cement layers recorded isotopic characteristics of seawater as platform-edge sediments subsided through the water column at the basin margin.

  14. Basal and stress-inducible expression of HSPA6 in human keratinocytes is regulated by negative and positive promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Vincent P; Stamatis, Michael; Shmukler, Anastasia; Aneskievich, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes serve as the primary barrier between the body and environmental stressors. They are subjected to numerous stress events and are likely to respond with a repertoire of heat shock proteins (HSPs). HSPA6 (HSP70B') is described in other cell types with characteristically low to undetectable basal expression, but is highly stress induced. Despite this response in other cells, little is known about its control in keratinocytes. We examined endogenous human keratinocyte HSPA6 expression and localized some responsible transcription factor sites in a cloned HSPA6 3 kb promoter. Using promoter 5' truncations and deletions, negative and positive regulatory regions were found throughout the 3 kb promoter. A region between -346 and -217 bp was found to be crucial to HSPA6 basal expression and stress inducibility. Site-specific mutations and DNA-binding studies show that a previously uncharacterized AP1 site contributes to the basal expression and maximal stress induction of HSPA6. Additionally, a new heat shock element (HSE) within this region was defined. While this element mediates increased transcriptional response in thermally stressed HaCaT keratinocytes, it preferentially binds a stress-inducible factor other than heat shock factor (HSF)1 or HSF2. Intriguingly, this newly characterized HSPA6 HSE competes HSF1 binding a consensus HSE and binds both HSF1 and HSF2 from other epithelial cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the HSPA6 promoter contains essential negative and positive promoter regions and newly identified transcription factor targets, which are key to the basal and stress-inducible expression of HSPA6. Furthermore, these results suggest that an HSF-like factor may preferentially bind this newly identified HSPA6 HSE in HaCaT cells. PMID:25073946

  15. The burial of headwater streams in drainage pipes reduces in-stream nitrate retention: results from two US metropolitan areas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urbanization causes stream degradation in various ways, but perhaps the most extreme example is the burial of streams in underground storm drains to facilitate above ground development or to promote the rapid conveyance of stormwater. Stream burial is extensive in urban basins (...

  16. The burial of headwater streams in drainage pipes reduces in-stream nitrate retention: results from two US metropolitan areas

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen (N) retention in stream networks is an important ecosystem service that may be affected by the widespread burial of headwater streams in urban watersheds. Stream burial occurs when segments of a channel are encased in drainage pipe and buried beneath the land surface to...

  17. 76 FR 77327 - Allowance for Private Purchase of an Outer Burial Receptacle in Lieu of a Government-Furnished...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... AFFAIRS Allowance for Private Purchase of an Outer Burial Receptacle in Lieu of a Government-Furnished.... SUMMARY: Public Law 104-275 was enacted on October 9, 1996. It allows the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide a monetary allowance towards the private purchase of an outer burial receptacle...

  18. 78 FR 76712 - Allowance for Private Purchase of an Outer Burial Receptacle in Lieu of a Government-Furnished...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... AFFAIRS Allowance for Private Purchase of an Outer Burial Receptacle in Lieu of a Government-Furnished.... SUMMARY: Public Law 104-275 was enacted on October 9, 1996. It allows the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide a monetary allowance towards the private purchase of an outer burial receptacle...

  19. 77 FR 74743 - Allowance for Private Purchase of an Outer Burial Receptacle in Lieu of a Government-Furnished...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-17

    ... AFFAIRS Allowance for Private Purchase of an Outer Burial Receptacle in Lieu of a Government-Furnished.... SUMMARY: Public Law 104-275 was enacted on October 9, 1996. It allows ] the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide a monetary allowance towards the private purchase of an outer burial receptacle...

  20. 75 FR 67454 - Allowance for Private Purchase of an Outer Burial Receptacle in Lieu of a Government-Furnished...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-02

    ... AFFAIRS Allowance for Private Purchase of an Outer Burial Receptacle in Lieu of a Government-Furnished.... SUMMARY: Public Law 104-275 was enacted on October 9, 1996. It allows the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to provide a monetary allowance towards the private purchase of an outer burial receptacle...

  1. 20 CFR 10.412 - Will OWCP pay the costs of burial and transportation of the remains?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Will OWCP pay the costs of burial and transportation of the remains? 10.412 Section 10.412 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS... the costs of burial and transportation of the remains? In a case accepted for death benefits,...

  2. 31 CFR 560.542 - Importation and exportation of human remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... remains for burial, cremation, or interment authorized. 560.542 Section 560.542 Money and Finance... Statements of Licensing Policy § 560.542 Importation and exportation of human remains for burial, cremation..., cremation, or interment, as well as of coffins or other receptacles containing such human remains, from...

  3. 38 CFR 3.1707 - Plot or interment allowances for burial in a State veterans cemetery or other cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Plot or interment...: Allowances & Expenses Paid by Va A08se3. § 3.1707 Plot or interment allowances for burial in a State veterans... met. (b) Plot or interment allowance for burial in a State veterans cemetery. VA will pay the plot...

  4. 38 CFR 1.10 - Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligibility for and disposition of the United States flag for burial purposes. 1.10 Section 1.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS The United States Flag for Burial Purposes § 1.10 Eligibility for and disposition of...

  5. The Differential DRP1 Phosphorylation and Mitochondrial Dynamics in the Regional Specific Astroglial Death Induced by Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ah-Reum; Hyun, Hye-Won; Min, Su-Ji; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2016-01-01

    The response and susceptibility to astroglial degenerations are relevant to the distinctive properties of astrocytes in a hemodynamic-independent manner following status epilepticus (SE). Since impaired mitochondrial fission plays an important role in mitosis, apoptosis and programmed necrosis, we investigated whether the unique pattern of mitochondrial dynamics is involved in the characteristics of astroglial death induced by SE. In the present study, SE induced astroglial apoptosis in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by decreased mitochondrial length. In contrast, clasmatodendritic (autophagic) astrocytes in the CA1 region showed mitochondrial elongation induced by SE. Mdivi-1 (an inhibitor of mitochondrial fission) effectively attenuated astroglial apoptosis, but WY14643 (an enhancer of mitochondrial fission) aggravated it. In addition, Mdivi-1 accelerated clasmatodendritic changes in astrocytes. These regional specific mitochondrial dynamics in astrocytes were closely correlated with dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) phosphorylation, not optic atrophy 1 (OPA1; a mitochondrial fusion protein) expression. To the best of our knowledge, the present data demonstrate for the first time the novel role of DRP1-mediated mitochondrial fission in astroglial loss. Thus, the present findings suggest that the differential astroglial mitochondrial dynamics may participate in the distinct characteristics of astroglial death induced by SE. PMID:27242436

  6. Time-temperature-burial significance of Devonian anthracite implies former great (˜6.5 km) depth of burial of Catskill Mountains, New York

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gerald M.; Sanders, John E.

    1982-02-01

    Specimens of coalified plant debris in Tully-correlative strata of the Gilboa Formation (uppermost Middle Devonian) within the eastern Cat-skill Mountains of New York State have been converted to anthracite having a vitrinite reflectance of 2.5%. This implies a level of organic metamorphism (LOM) of 16. A similar degree of thermal activity is implied by the black color (Staplin kerogen-alteration index of 4) of the associated (possibly recycled) carbonized kerogen, a conodont-alteration index of 4, and authigenic chlorite and local sericite fillings of the former interparticle pores of interbedded sandstones. The specimens are about 350 m.y. old; if 200 m.y. is taken as the duration of the time of exposure to the maximum geothermal temperature, then the LOM of 16 and other thermal indicators imply a maximum temperature of 190 °C. Using a geothermal gradient of 26 °C · km-1 (17 °F · 1,000 ft-1), a former depth of burial of 6.5 km is implied. Such former deep burial is not usually inferred for the Catskills, but it is consistent with the idea that the thick (about 6.4 km or 21,000 ft) Carboniferous strata of northeastern Pennsylvania formerly extended northeast far enough to bury the Catskills. The lack of metamorphism of the Paleozoic strata lying about 4.5 km beneath the Tully-correlative rocks and exposed in the adjacent Hudson Valley places low limits on the former geothermal gradient; this supports the concept of great depth of former burial of the Catskills. For example, 6.5 km of former burial and a geothermal gradient of 26 °C · km-1 imply a temperature of 307 °C for the base of the Paleozoic. By contrast, only 1 km of former burial requires a geothermal gradient of 170 °C · km-1, which would have subjected the base of the Paleozoic to a temperature of 955 °C, which is far higher than the 600 to 650 °C recently inferred for the Acadian-age metamorphism of the Taconic allochthon in southwestern Massachusetts and adjoining areas.

  7. Uncertainty evaluation of a regional real-time system for rain-induced landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Stanley, Thomas; Yatheendradas, Soni

    2015-04-01

    A new prototype regional model and evaluation framework has been developed over Central America and the Caribbean region using satellite-based information including precipitation estimates, modeled soil moisture, topography, soils, as well as regionally available datasets such as road networks and distance to fault zones. The algorithm framework incorporates three static variables: a susceptibility map; a 24-hr rainfall triggering threshold; and an antecedent soil moisture variable threshold, which have been calibrated using historic landslide events. The thresholds are regionally heterogeneous and are based on the percentile distribution of the rainfall or antecedent moisture time series. A simple decision tree algorithm framework integrates all three variables with the rainfall and soil moisture time series and generates a landslide nowcast in real-time based on the previous 24 hours over this region. This system has been evaluated using several available landslide inventories over the Central America and Caribbean region. Spatiotemporal uncertainty and evaluation metrics of the model are presented here based on available landslides reports. This work also presents a probabilistic representation of potential landslide activity over the region which can be used to further refine and improve the real-time landslide hazard assessment system as well as better identify and characterize the uncertainties inherent in this type of regional approach. The landslide algorithm provides a flexible framework to improve hazard estimation and reduce uncertainty at any spatial and temporal scale.

  8. WINTER FLOUNDER PSUEDOPLEURONECTES AMERICANUS HATCHING SUCCESS AS A FUNCTION OF BURIAL DEPTH IN THE LABORATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous experiments have shown that viable hatch of winter flounder eggs is reduced when the eggs are buried by as little as one half of one egg diameter (approximately 0.5 mm of sediment). This sensitivity to burial has resulted in seasonal banning of dredging in several north...

  9. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  10. Climate change decouples oceanic primary and export productivity and organic carbon burial.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Cristina; Kucera, Michal; Mix, Alan C

    2015-01-13

    Understanding responses of oceanic primary productivity, carbon export, and burial to climate change is essential for model-based projection of biological feedbacks in a high-CO2 world. Here we compare estimates of productivity based on the composition of fossil diatom floras with organic carbon burial off Oregon in the Northeast Pacific across a large climatic transition at the last glacial termination. Although estimated primary productivity was highest during the Last Glacial Maximum, carbon burial was lowest, reflecting reduced preservation linked to low sedimentation rates. A diatom size index further points to a glacial decrease (and deglacial increase) in the fraction of fixed carbon that was exported, inferred to reflect expansion, and contraction, of subpolar ecosystems that today favor smaller plankton. Thus, in contrast to models that link remineralization of carbon to temperature, in the Northeast Pacific, we find dominant ecosystem and sea floor control such that intervals of warming climate had more efficient carbon export and higher carbon burial despite falling primary productivity. PMID:25453073

  11. 77 FR 35755 - Agency Information Collection (Application for Burial Benefits) Activities Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-14

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Application for Burial Benefits) Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY... abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and comment. The PRA submission... Benefits (Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 23), VA Form 21-530. OMB Control Number: 2900-0003. Type of...

  12. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-B-6, 108-B Solid Waste Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Proctor

    2006-06-13

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-B-6, 108-B Solid Waste Burial Ground. The 118-B-6 site consisted of 2 concrete pipes buried vertically in the ground and capped by a concrete pad with steel lids. The site was used for the disposal of wastes from the "metal line" of the P-10 Tritium Separation Project.

  13. Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Old Burial Ground (OBG) source control technology and inventory study

    SciTech Connect

    Flach, G.P.; Rehder, T.E.; Kanzleiter, J.P.

    1996-10-02

    This report has been developed to support information needs for wastes buried in the Burial Ground Complex. Information discussed is presented in a total of four individual attachments. The general focus of this report is to collect information on estimated source inventories, leaching studies, source control technologies, and to provide information on modeling parameters and associated data deficiencies.

  14. Geologic Descriptions for the Solid-Waste Low Level Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.

    2007-09-23

    This document provides the stratigraphic framework and six hydrogeologic cross sections and interpretations for the solid-waste Low Level Burial Grounds on the Hanford Site. Four of the new cross sections are located in the 200 West Area while the other two are located within the 200 East Area. The cross sections display sediments of the vadose zone and uppermost unconfined aquifer.

  15. Social Workers' Final Act of Service: Respectful Burial Arrangements for Indigent, Unclaimed, and Unidentified People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castex, Graciela M.

    2007-01-01

    Social workers have long been involved in identifying resources and making final arrangements for clients who die without an estate or have no heirs, who may be institutionalized or unknown to the community, or whose body may be unclaimed for burial. Absent quick intervention, these individuals are often at risk for an anonymous potter's field…

  16. Passive Neutron Non-Destructive Assay for Remediation of Radiological Waste at Hanford Burial Grounds- 13189

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, A.; Pitts, M.; Ludowise, J.D.; Valentinelli, P.; Grando, C.J.; Haggard, D.L.

    2013-07-01

    The Hanford burial grounds contains a broad spectrum of low activity radioactive wastes, transuranic (TRU) wastes, and hazardous wastes including fission products, byproduct material (thorium and uranium), plutonium and laboratory chemicals. A passive neutron non-destructive assay technique has been developed for characterization of shielded concreted drums exhumed from the burial grounds. This method facilitates the separation of low activity radiological waste containers from TRU waste containers exhumed from the burial grounds. Two identical total neutron counting systems have been deployed, each consisting of He-3 detectors surrounded by a polyethylene moderator. The counts are processed through a statistical filter that removes outliers in order to suppress cosmic spallation events and electronic noise. Upon completion of processing, a 'GO / NO GO' signal is provided to the operator based on a threshold level equivalent to 0.5 grams of weapons grade plutonium in the container being evaluated. This approach allows instantaneous decisions to be made on how to proceed with the waste. The counting systems have been set up using initial on-site measurements (neutron emitting standards loaded into surrogate waste containers) combined with Monte Carlo modeling techniques. The benefit of this approach is to allow the systems to extend their measurement ranges, in terms of applicable matrix types and container sizes, with minimal interruption to the operations at the burial grounds. (authors)

  17. Preliminary fire hazard analysis for the PUTDR and TRU trenches in the Solid Waste Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    Gaschott, L.J.

    1995-06-16

    This document represents the Preliminary Fire Hazards Analysis for the Pilot Unvented TRU Drum Retrieval effort and for the Transuranic drum trenches in the low level burial grounds. The FHA was developed in accordance with DOE Order 5480.7A to address major hazards inherent in the facility.

  18. 32 CFR 553.15 - Persons eligible for burial in Arlington National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... individual concerned was disabled or died from a disease or injury incurred or aggravated in line of duty... collusion. (2) An unmarried adult child may be interred in the same grave in which the parent has been or... a group burial may be interred in the same cemetery but not in the same grave. (i) The...

  19. 32 CFR 553.15 - Persons eligible for burial in Arlington National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... individual concerned was disabled or died from a disease or injury incurred or aggravated in line of duty... collusion. (2) An unmarried adult child may be interred in the same grave in which the parent has been or... a group burial may be interred in the same cemetery but not in the same grave. (i) The...

  20. 618-10 Burial Ground VPU Nonintrusive Characterization Process and Data Collection Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    S. Khabir

    2010-12-21

    This report presents the nonintrusive characterization measurement results for the 618-10 Burial Ground and provides a general assessment of the estimated dose, isotopic concentrations, and bounding transuranic radionuclide inventories for the 618-10 vertical pipe units and trenches, based on interpretation of data from a system of in situ radiological multi-detector probes.

  1. Palmer amaranth seed mortality in response to burial depth and time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glyphosate resistant Palmer amaranth infests millions of arable acres in the SE US. One proposed method of reducing population numbers is to bury surface seeds deeply, below their optimal emergence zone. The objective of this study was to determine how burial longevity and depth impact Palmer amaran...

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of an Oceanobacillus sp. Strain Isolated from Soil in a Burial Crypt

    PubMed Central

    Arizaga, Ylenia; Bikandi, Joseba; Garaizar, Javier; Ganau, Giulia; Paglietti, Bianca; Deligios, Massimo; Rubino, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    We present the draft genome of an Oceanobacillus sp. strain isolated from spores found in soil samples from a burial crypt of the Cathedral of Sant'Antonio Abate in Castelsardo, Italy. The data obtained indicated the closest relation of the strain with Oceanobacillus caeni. PMID:27469952

  3. 38 CFR 3.1702 - Persons who may receive burial benefits; priority of payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... VA may grant additional burial benefits, including the plot or interment allowance, reimbursement for... an agency or political subdivision of a State, files under § 3.1707, Plot or interment allowance for... for the plot or interment allowance (except for claims filed by a State or an agency or...

  4. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Maxey Flats radioactive waste burial site, Fleming County, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zehner, H.H.

    1983-01-01

    Burial trenches at the Maxey Flats radioactive waste burial site cover an area of about 20 acres, and are located on a plateau, about 300 to 400 feet above surrounding valleys. All waste is buried in the Nancy Member of the Borden Formation, and most is in the weathered shale (regolith) part of this member. Recharge to the rocks is probably by infiltration of rainfall through regolith at the top of the hill. At least two water tables are present: near the base of the regolith, at a depth of about 25 feet and; in the Ohio Shale, at a depth of about 300 feet. About 95 percent of ground-water discharge to streams is from colluvium on hillsides and valley alluvium. The remaining 5 percent is discharge from bedrock, of which about 0.5 percent is from rocks underlying the burial area. Waste radionuclides in the subsurface, other than tritium, were observed only in the regolith of the Nancy Member. Only tritium was observed with certainty in deeper rocks and in the adjacent valley alluvium. Other waste radionuclides were in streamwater and stream sediment, and may have been transported with overland runoff from the surface of the burial site. (USGS)

  5. Geohydrology of the unsaturated zone at the burial site for low-level radioactive waste near Beatty, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, William D.

    1987-01-01

    Low-level radioactive solid waste has been buried in trenches at a site near Beatty, Nev., since 1962. In 1976, as part of a national program, the U.S. Geological Survey began a study of the geohydrology of the waste-burial site to provide a basis for estimating the potential for radionuclide migration in the unsaturated zone beneath the waste-burial trenches. Data collected include meteorological information for calibration of a long-term water-budget analysis, soil-moisture profiles, soil-water potentials, and hydraulic properties of representative unsaturated sediment samples to a depth of about 10 meters (m). The waste-burial facility is in the northern Amargosa Desert about 170 kilometers (km) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevo The region is arid; mean annual precipitation at Lathrop Wells, 30 km south of the site, is only 7.4 centimeters (cm). The mean daily maximum temperature at Lathrop Wells in July, the hottest month, is 37 ?C. The site is underlain by poorly stratified deposits of gravelly or silty sand and sandy gravel, and thick beds of clayey sediments. The total thickness of valley-fill deposits beneath the site is about 175 m; the unsaturated zone is about 85 m thick. Volumetric soil moisture to depths of 4 m ranges from 4 to 10 percent but commonly is in the range of 6 to 8 percent. Soil-water potential, measured to depths of 3 to 10 m, ranged from -10 to -70 bars. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivity computed from laboratory analyses of representative samples ranges from 10 -13 to 10 -14 centimeters per day (cm/d). Evaporation studies over a 2-year (yr) period were used to calibrate a numerical procedure for analyzing long-term precipitation data and estimating annual water budgets during the 15-yr period 1962-76. This analysis (1) demonstrated that a potential exists for deep percolation (greater than 2 m), despite high annual evaporation demands, and (2) provided predictions of the time of year and the antecedent conditions that enhance the probability

  6. Phanerozoic burial and exhumation history of southernmost Norway estimated from apatite fission-track analysis data and geological observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, Peter; Green, Paul F.; Bonow, Johan M.; Chalmers, James A.; Rasmussen, Erik S.

    2016-04-01

    We present new apatite fission-track analysis (AFTA) data from 27 basement samples from Norway south of ~60°N. The data define three events of cooling and exhumation that overlap in time with events defined from AFTA in southern Sweden (Japsen et al. 2015). The samples cooled below palaeotemperatures of >100°C in a major episode of Triassic cooling as also reported by previous studies (Rohrman et al. 1995). Our study area is just south of the Hardangervidda where Cambrian sediments and Caledonian nappes are present. We thus infer that these palaeotemperatures reflect heating below a cover that accumulated during the Palaeozoic and Triassic. By Late Triassic, this cover had been removed from the Utsira High, off SW Norway, resulting in deep weathering of a granitic landscape (Fredin et al. 2014). Our samples were therefore at or close to the surface at this time. Palaeotemperatures reached ~80°C prior to a second phase of cooling and exhumation in the Jurassic, following a phase of Late Triassic - Jurassic burial. Upper Jurassic sandstones rest on basement near Bergen, NW of our study area (Fossen et al. 1997), and we infer that the Jurassic event led to complete removal of any remaining Phanerozoic cover in the region adjacent to the evolving rift system prior to Late Jurassic subsidence and burial. The data reveal a third phase of cooling in the early Miocene when samples that are now near sea level cooled below palaeotemperatures of ~60°C. For likely values of the palaeogeothermal gradient, such palaeotemperatures correspond to burial below rock columns that reach well above the present-day landscape where elevations rarely exceed 1 km above sea level. This implies that the present-day landscape was shaped by Neogene erosion. This is in agreement with the suggestion of Lidmar-Bergström et al. (2013) that the near-horizontal Palaeic surfaces of southern Norway are the result of Cenozoic erosion to sea level followed by uplift to their present elevations in a

  7. 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating experiments on celadonite from the Skessa Tuff, eastern Iceland: Thermochronology of low-temperature alteration of a flood basalt pile during burial metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riishuus, M. S.; Miggins, D. P.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Duncan, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    Celadonite is a low-temperature (<~50 °C) alteration mineral that fills voids and fractures within buried and metasomatized volcanic rocks. The common occurrence, mineral chemistry and structural properties of celadonite (a K2O-rich and Ar retentive phyllosilicate) make it attractive as a monitor of not only spatial and temporal variability of low-temperature hydrothermal fluid circulation and alteration, but also potentially of burial rates of lava piles. The Neogene lava pile in E Iceland underwent burial metamorphism, tectonic tilting and subsequent glacial exhumation, and is today exposed with superimposed sub-horizontal regional zeolite facies mineral zones. From a single sample of the Skessa Tuff, a prominent welded pyroclastic flow, we present new 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating age determinations using the ARGUS-VI multi-collector mass spectrometer at OSU: plagioclase (10.26 ± 0.12 Ma), groundmass (10.15 ± 0.10 Ma), early-forming light green celadonite (9.73 ± 0.03 Ma) and later-forming dark blue-green celadonite (9.67 ± 0.03). The sample was collected at ~500 m above sea level (masl), beneath volcanic material from the Thingmuli dyke swarm and central volcano. The cooling ages of plagioclase and groundmass separates are in close agreement and represent the eruption age of this pyroclastic flow. The geochronologic data and petrographic observations suggest homogeneous and relatively rapid crystallization of celadonite. The inferred original top of the lava pile is ~650 m (1400 masl, and lost to erosion) above the top of the analcime zone (~750 masl). Celadonite is predominantly found as early-stage lining of primary pore space, but overgrown by chlorite/smectite clays and zeolites at higher grades. Above ~750 mals vesicles are void of celadonite, and hence, celadonite precipitates in a narrow zone at ~650 m depth. The pyroclastic flow and its subsequent burial to ~650 m depth is separated by ~600 ky, which suggests a burial rate of ~1100 m/m.y. This

  8. Cannabis cue-induced brain activation correlates with drug craving in limbic and visual salience regions: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Charboneau, Evonne J; Dietrich, Mary S; Park, Sohee; Cao, Aize; Watkins, Tristan J; Blackford, Jennifer U; Benningfield, Margaret M; Martin, Peter R; Buchowski, Maciej S; Cowan, Ronald L

    2013-11-30

    Craving is a major motivator underlying drug use and relapse but the neural correlates of cannabis craving are not well understood. This study sought to determine whether visual cannabis cues increase cannabis craving and whether cue-induced craving is associated with regional brain activation in cannabis-dependent individuals. Cannabis craving was assessed in 16 cannabis-dependent adult volunteers while they viewed cannabis cues during a functional MRI (fMRI) scan. The Marijuana Craving Questionnaire was administered immediately before and after each of three cannabis cue-exposure fMRI runs. FMRI blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity was determined in regions activated by cannabis cues to examine the relationship of regional brain activation to cannabis craving. Craving scores increased significantly following exposure to visual cannabis cues. Visual cues activated multiple brain regions, including inferior orbital frontal cortex, posterior cingulate gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, hippocampus, amygdala, superior temporal pole, and occipital cortex. Craving scores at baseline and at the end of all three runs were significantly correlated with brain activation during the first fMRI run only, in the limbic system (including amygdala and hippocampus) and paralimbic system (superior temporal pole), and visual regions (occipital cortex). Cannabis cues increased craving in cannabis-dependent individuals and this increase was associated with activation in the limbic, paralimbic, and visual systems during the first fMRI run, but not subsequent fMRI runs. These results suggest that these regions may mediate visually cued aspects of drug craving. This study provides preliminary evidence for the neural basis of cue-induced cannabis craving and suggests possible neural targets for interventions targeted at treating cannabis dependence. PMID:24035535

  9. Laser-induced autofluorescence of carious regions of human teeth and caries-involved bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Hibst, Raimund; Meyer, Herbert; Flemming, Gabriela; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    1993-12-01

    Carious regions of human teeth were investigated by means of remission-, fluorescence excitation- and fluorescence emission spectroscopy as well as time-resolved fluorescence measurements in the ns region. A detection of dental caries is possible with all of these spectroscopic methods. The peaks in measured remission- and fluorescence excitation spectra of carious regions correspond with the absorption bands of metal free porphyrins. The emission spectra and fluorescence decay kinetics indicate that protoporphyrin IX may be the main chromophore. HPLC measurement verify the existence of proto- (main component), copro- and probably Zn-protoporphyrin.

  10. Minor changes in gene expression in the mouse preoptic hypothalamic region by inflammation-induced prostaglandin E2.

    PubMed

    Vasilache, A M; Kugelberg, U; Blomqvist, A; Nilsberth, C

    2013-07-01

    We investigated to what extent inflammation-induced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) regulates gene expression in the central nervous system. Wild-type mice and mice with deletion of the gene encoding microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1), which cannot produce inflammation-induced PGE2 , were subjected to peripheral injection of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and killed after 5 h. The median and medial preoptic nuclei, which are rich in prostaglandin E receptors, were isolated by laser capture microdissection (LCM), and subjected to whole genome microarray analysis. Although the immune stimulus induced robust transcriptional changes in the brain, as seen by a quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) on selected genes, only small PGE2 -dependent gene expression changes were observed in the gene array analysis and, for only two genes, a pronounced differential expression between LPS-treated wild-type and mPGES-1 knockout mice could be verified by qRT-PCR. These were Hspa1a and Hspa1b, encoding heat shock proteins, which showed a two- to three-fold higher expression in wild-type mice than in knockout mice after immune challenge. However, the induced expression of these genes was found to be secondary to increased body temperature because they were induced also by cage exchange stress, which did not elicit PGE2 synthesis, and thus were not induced per se by PGE2 -elicited transcriptional events. Our findings suggest that inflammation-induced PGE2 has little effect on gene expression in the preoptic region, and that centrally elicited disease symptoms, although PGE2 -dependent, occur as a result of regulation of neuronal excitability that is a consequence of intracellular, transcriptional-independent signalling cascades. Our findings also imply that the profound changes in gene expression in the brain that are elicited by peripheral inflammation occur independently of PGE2 via a yet unidentified mechanism. PMID:23631667

  11. Organic carbon burial rates in mangrove sediments: strengthening the global budget

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breithaupt, J.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Smith, Thomas J., III; Sanders, Christian J.; Hoare, Armando

    2012-01-01

    Mangrove wetlands exist in the transition zone between terrestrial and marine environments and as such were historically overlooked in discussions of terrestrial and marine carbon cycling. In recent decades, mangroves have increasingly been credited with producing and burying large quantities of organic carbon (OC). The amount of available data regarding OC burial in mangrove soils has more than doubled since the last primary literature review (2003). This includes data from some of the largest, most developed mangrove forests in the world, providing an opportunity to strengthen the global estimate. First-time representation is now included for mangroves in Brazil, Colombia, Malaysia, Indonesia, China, Japan, Vietnam, and Thailand, along with additional data from Mexico and the United States. Our objective is to recalculate the centennial-scale burial rate of OC at both the local and global scales. Quantification of this rate enables better understanding of the current carbon sink capacity of mangroves as well as helps to quantify and/or validate the other aspects of the mangrove carbon budget such as import, export, and remineralization. Statistical analysis of the data supports use of the geometric mean as the most reliable central tendency measurement. Our estimate is that mangrove systems bury 163 (+40; -31) g OC m-2 yr-1 (95% C.I.). Globally, the 95% confidence interval for the annual burial rate is 26.1 (+6.3; -5.1) Tg OC. This equates to a burial fraction that is 42% larger than that of the most recent mangrove carbon budget (2008), and represents 10–15% of estimated annual mangrove production. This global rate supports previous conclusions that, on a centennial time scale, 8–15% of all OC burial in marine settings occurs in mangrove systems.

  12. Organic carbon burial rates in mangrove sediments: Strengthening the global budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breithaupt, Joshua L.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Smith, Thomas J., III; Sanders, Christian J.; Hoare, Armando

    2012-09-01

    Mangrove wetlands exist in the transition zone between terrestrial and marine environments and as such were historically overlooked in discussions of terrestrial and marine carbon cycling. In recent decades, mangroves have increasingly been credited with producing and burying large quantities of organic carbon (OC). The amount of available data regarding OC burial in mangrove soils has more than doubled since the last primary literature review (2003). This includes data from some of the largest, most developed mangrove forests in the world, providing an opportunity to strengthen the global estimate. First-time representation is now included for mangroves in Brazil, Colombia, Malaysia, Indonesia, China, Japan, Vietnam, and Thailand, along with additional data from Mexico and the United States. Our objective is to recalculate the centennial-scale burial rate of OC at both the local and global scales. Quantification of this rate enables better understanding of the current carbon sink capacity of mangroves as well as helps to quantify and/or validate the other aspects of the mangrove carbon budget such as import, export, and remineralization. Statistical analysis of the data supports use of the geometric mean as the most reliable central tendency measurement. Our estimate is that mangrove systems bury 163 (+40; -31) g OC m-2 yr-1 (95% C.I.). Globally, the 95% confidence interval for the annual burial rate is 26.1 (+6.3; -5.1) Tg OC. This equates to a burial fraction that is 42% larger than that of the most recent mangrove carbon budget (2008), and represents 10-15% of estimated annual mangrove production. This global rate supports previous conclusions that, on a centennial time scale, 8-15% of all OC burial in marine settings occurs in mangrove systems.

  13. Gsx2 controls region-specific activation of neural stem cells and injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    López-Juárez, Alejandro; Howard, Jennifer; Ullom, Kristy; Howard, Lindsey; Grande, Andrew; Pardo, Andrea; Waclaw, Ronald; Sun, Yu-Yo; Yang, Dianer; Kuan, Chia-Yi; Campbell, Kenneth; Nakafuku, Masato

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) reside in widespread regions along the lateral ventricle and generate diverse olfactory bulb (OB) interneuron subtypes in the adult mouse brain. Molecular mechanisms underlying their regional diversity, however, are not well understood. Here we show that the homeodomain transcription factor Gsx2 plays a crucial role in the region-specific control of adult NSCs in both persistent and injury-induced neurogenesis. In the intact brain, Gsx2 is expressed in a regionally restricted subset of NSCs and promotes the activation and lineage progression of stem cells, thereby controlling the production of selective OB neuron subtypes. Moreover, Gsx2 is ectopically induced in damaged brains outside its normal expression domains and is required for injury-induced neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ). These results demonstrate that mobilization of adult NSCs is controlled in a region-specific manner and that distinct mechanisms operate in continuous and injury-induced neurogenesis in the adult brain. PMID:23723414

  14. Simulations of flow induced structural transition of the β-switch region of glycoprotein Ibα.

    PubMed

    Han, Mengzhi; Xu, Ji; Ren, Ying; Li, Jinghai

    2016-02-01

    Binding of glycoprotein Ibα to von Willebrand factor induces platelet adhesion to injured vessel walls and initiates a multistep hemostatic process. It has been hypothesized that the flow condition could induce a loop to β-sheet conformational change in the β-switch region of glycoprotein Ibα, which regulates it binding to the von Willebrand factor and facilitates the blood clot formation and wound healing. In this work, direct molecular dynamics (MD), flow MD and metadynamics, were employed to investigate the mechanisms of this flow induced conformational transition process. Specifically, the free energy landscape of the whole transition process was drawn by metadynamics with the path collective variable approach. The results reveal that without flow, the free energy landscape has two main basins, including a random loop basin stabilized by large conformational entropy and a partially folded β-sheet basin. The free energy barrier separating these two basins is relatively high and the β-switch could not fold from loop to β-sheet state spontaneously. The fully β-sheet conformations located in high free energy regions, which are also unstable and gradually unfold into partially folded β-sheet state with flow. Relatively weak flow could trigger some folding of the β-switch but could not fold it into fully β-sheet state. Under strong flow conditions, the β-switch could readily overcome the high free energy barrier and fold into fully β-sheet state. PMID:26656380

  15. Lung deformations and radiation-induced regional lung collapse in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Diot, Quentin Kavanagh, Brian; Vinogradskiy, Yevgeniy; Gaspar, Laurie; Miften, Moyed; Garg, Kavita

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To differentiate radiation-induced fibrosis from regional lung collapse outside of the high dose region in patients treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods: Lung deformation maps were computed from pre-treatment and post-treatment computed tomography (CT) scans using a point-to-point translation method. Fifty anatomical landmarks inside the lung (vessel or airway branches) were matched on planning and follow-up scans for the computation process. Two methods using the deformation maps were developed to differentiate regional lung collapse from fibrosis: vector field and Jacobian methods. A total of 40 planning and follow-ups CT scans were analyzed for 20 lung SBRT patients. Results: Regional lung collapse was detected in 15 patients (75%) using the vector field method, in ten patients (50%) using the Jacobian method, and in 12 patients (60%) by radiologists. In terms of sensitivity and specificity the Jacobian method performed better. Only weak correlations were observed between the dose to the proximal airways and the occurrence of regional lung collapse. Conclusions: The authors presented and evaluated two novel methods using anatomical lung deformations to investigate lung collapse and fibrosis caused by SBRT treatment. Differentiation of these distinct physiological mechanisms beyond what is usually labeled “fibrosis” is necessary for accurate modeling of lung SBRT-induced injuries. With the help of better models, it becomes possible to expand the therapeutic benefits of SBRT to a larger population of lung patients with large or centrally located tumors that were previously considered ineligible.

  16. The Responsive Amygdala: Treatment-induced Alterations in Functional Connectivity in Pediatric Complex Regional Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Simons, LE; Pielech, M; Erpelding, N; Linnman, C; Moulton, E; Sava, S; Lebel, A; Serrano, P; Sethna, N; Berde, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2014-01-01

    The amygdala is a key brain region with efferent and afferent neural connections that involve complex behaviors such as pain, reward, fear and anxiety. This study evaluated resting state functional connectivity of the amygdala with cortical and subcortical regions in a group of chronic pain patients (pediatric complex regional pain syndrome) with age-gender matched controls before and after intensive physical-biobehavioral pain treatment. Our main findings include (1) enhanced functional connectivity from the amygdala to multiple cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions in patients compared to controls, with differences predominantly in the left amygdala in the pre-treated condition (disease state); (2) dampened hyperconnectivity from the left amygdala to the motor cortex, parietal lobe, and cingulate cortex after intensive pain rehabilitation treatment within patients with nominal differences observed among healthy controls from Time 1 to Time 2 (treatment effects); (3) functional connectivity to several regions key to fear circuitry (prefrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobe, bilateral cingulate, hippocampus) correlated with higher pain-related fear scores and (4) decreases in pain-related fear associated with decreased connectivity between the amygdala and the motor and somatosensory cortex, cingulate, and frontal areas. Our data suggest that there are rapid changes in amygdala connectivity following an aggressive treatment program in children with chronic pain and intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity activity serving as a potential indicator of treatment response. PMID:24861582

  17. The responsive amygdala: treatment-induced alterations in functional connectivity in pediatric complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Simons, L E; Pielech, M; Erpelding, N; Linnman, C; Moulton, E; Sava, S; Lebel, A; Serrano, P; Sethna, N; Berde, C; Becerra, L; Borsook, D

    2014-09-01

    The amygdala is a key brain region with efferent and afferent neural connections that involve complex behaviors such as pain, reward, fear, and anxiety. This study evaluated resting state functional connectivity of the amygdala with cortical and subcortical regions in a group of chronic pain patients (pediatric complex regional pain syndrome) with age-sex matched control subjects before and after intensive physical-biobehavioral pain treatment. Our main findings include (1) enhanced functional connectivity from the amygdala to multiple cortical, subcortical, and cerebellar regions in patients compared with control subjects, with differences predominantly in the left amygdala in the pretreated condition (disease state); (2) dampened hyperconnectivity from the left amygdala to the motor cortex, parietal lobe, and cingulate cortex after intensive pain rehabilitation treatment within patients with nominal differences observed among healthy control subjects from time 1 to time 2 (treatment effects); (3) functional connectivity to several regions key to fear circuitry (prefrontal cortex, bilateral middle temporal lobe, bilateral cingulate, hippocampus) correlated with higher pain-related fear scores; and (4) decreases in pain-related fear associated with decreased connectivity between the amygdala and the motor and somatosensory cortex, cingulate, and frontal areas. Our data suggest that there are rapid changes in amygdala connectivity after an aggressive treatment program in children with chronic pain and intrinsic amygdala functional connectivity activity serving as a potential indicator of treatment response. PMID:24861582

  18. Impacts of thermal circulations induced by urbanization on ozone formation in the Pearl River Delta region, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mengmeng; Song, Yu; Mao, Zhichun; Liu, Mingxu; Huang, Xin

    2016-02-01

    Thermal circulations induced by urbanization could exert important effects on regional ozone (O3) formation through regulating the chemical transformations and transport of O3 and its precursors. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem) model combined with remote sensing are used to investigate the impacts of urbanization-induced circulations on O3 formation in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, China. The urban heat island (UHI) effect in PRD significantly enhances turbulent mixing and modifies local circulations, i.e., initiates the UHI circulation and strengthens the sea breeze, which in turn cause a detectable decrease of daytime O3 concentration (-1.3 ppb) and an increase of O3 (+5.2 ppb) around the nocturnal rush-hours. The suppressed O3 titration destruction due to NOx dilution into the deeper urban boundary layer (200-400 m) is the main reason for elevated nocturnal O3 levels. In the daytime, however, the upward transport of O3 precursors weakens near-surface O3 photochemical production and conversely enhances upper-level O3 generation. Furthermore, the surface UHI convergence flow and intensified sea breeze act to effectively trap O3 at the suburban and coastal regions.

  19. Aluminium-induced imbalance in oxidant and antioxidant determinants in brain regions of female rats: protection by centrophenoxine.

    PubMed

    Nehru, Bimla; Bhalla, Punita

    2006-01-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the potential of centrophenoxine in modulating aluminium-induced neurotoxicity. Female Sprague Dawley rats were administered aluminium chloride orally (40 mg/kg b.w./day) for a period of 8 weeks. At the end of respective treatment, various markers of oxidative stress were determined in four different regions of brain: cerebrum cerebellum, medulla oblongata, and hypothalamus. Lipid peroxidation assay was also carried out using standard techniques. Simultaneously, the centrophenoxine group (100 mg/kg b.w./day) for 6 weeks was also run long to understand the role in ameliorating oxidative damage. A significant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase was noticed in all the four regions, the most significant being in the hypothalamus (0.603 +/- .06) and cerebrum (0.038 +/- .01). Due to aluminium toxicity, peroxidation of lipids was also found to be elevated in cerebrum (0.424 +/- .03), cerebellum (0.341 +/- .03), hypothalamus (1.018 +/- .007), and medulla oblongata (0.304 +/- .05). However, posttreatment with centrophenoxine significantly elevated the superoxide and catalase activities in different regions. In addition, lipid peroxidation status of membranes was significantly reduced after centrophenoxine posttreatment to aluminium-exposed animals. Centrophenoxine has proved to be beneficial in combating the damage caused by aluminium toxicity. However, further research is needed to have a better understanding of the molecular basis of aluminium-induced oxidative damage. In addition, the different aspects of centrophenoxine need to be unmasked. PMID:20021037

  20. Burial history and thermal maturity, Rocky Mountain front ranges, foothills, and foreland, east-central British Columbia and adjacent Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkreuth, W.; McMechan, M.

    1988-11-01

    The regional pattern of maturation of Cretaceous strata in the study area was determined from vitrinite-reflectance measurements. Maturation increases from west to east across the Foothills to a maximum near the eastern limit of Foothills deformation and decreases farther east. Maturation along the eastern limit of deformation also decreases northward significantly. Reflectance measurements from Carboniferous strata exposed in the Front Ranges are much lower than values from the Lower Cretaceous near the eastern limit of deformation. Modeling using burial history curves indicates the regional maturation pattern largely reflects variations in the depth and/or duration of burial beneath Maastrichtian-Eocene foredeep deposits. However, differential vertical movements associated with the Peace River arch/embayment in the Carboniferous, Triassic, Early Cretaceous and Maastrichtian-Eocene had an important effect on the maturation pattern. Determined and estimated maturation levels for reservoir strata are consistent with the known occurrences of gas fields and oil pools, except along the relatively unexplored western margin of the study area. There, moderate maturation levels indicate a potential for wet-gas or oil preservation in shallow structures containing Triassic and Lower Carboniferous carbonates in the south. In the north, structures in the western Foothills deforming Triassic strata with lower levels of maturation are breached. 15 figures.

  1. The oxygen content of ocean bottom waters, the burial efficiency of organic carbon, and the regulation of atmospheric oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betts, J. N.; Holland, H. D.

    1991-01-01

    Data for the burial efficiency of organic carbon with marine sediments have been compiled for 69 locations. The burial efficiency as here defined is the ratio of the quantity of organic carbon which is ultimately buried to that which reaches the sediment-water interface. As noted previously, the sedimentation rate exerts a dominant influence on the burial efficiency. The logarithm of the burial efficiency is linearly related to the logarithm of the sedimentation rate at low sedimentation rates. At high sedimentation rates the burial efficiency can exceed 50% and becomes nearly independent of the sedimentation rate. The residual of the burial efficiency after the effect of the sedimentation rate has been subtracted is a weak function of the O2 concentration in bottom waters. The scatter is sufficiently large, so that the effect of the O2 concentration in bottom waters on the burial efficiency of organic matter could be either negligible or a minor but significant part of the mechanism that controls the level of O2 in the atmosphere.

  2. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  3. Analysis of pumping-induced unsaturated regions beneath a perennial river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Su, G.W.; Jasperse, J.; Seymour, D.; Constante, J.; Zhou, Q.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of an unsaturated region beneath a streambed during groundwater pumping near streams can reduce the pumping capacity, change flow paths, and alter the types of biological transformations in the streambed sediments. A three-dimensional, multiphase flow model of two horizontal collector wells along the Russian River near Forestville, California, was developed to investigate the impact of varying the ratio of the aquifer to streambed permeability on (1) the formation of an unsaturated region beneath the stream, (2) the pumping capacity, (3) stream water fluxes through the streambed, and (4) stream water traveltimes to the collector wells. The aquifer to streambed permeability ratio at which the unsaturated region was initially observed ranged from 10 to 100. The size of the unsaturated region beneath the streambed increased as the aquifer to streambed permeability ratio increased. The simulations also indicated that for a particular aquifer permeability, decreasing the streambed permeability by only a factor of 2-3 from the permeability where desaturation initially occurred resulted in reducing the pumping capacity. In some cases, the stream water fluxes increased as the streambed permeability decreased. However, the stream water residence times increased and the fraction of stream water that reached that the wells decreased as the streambed permeability decreased, indicating that a higher streambed flux does not necessarily correlate to greater recharge of stream water around the wells. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. TGF-β Neutralization Enhances AngII-Induced Aortic Rupture and Aneurysm in Both Thoracic and Abdominal Regions

    PubMed Central

    Howatt, Deborah A.; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J.; Cassis, Lisa A.; Daugherty, Alan

    2016-01-01

    AngII and TGF-β interact in development of thoracic and abdominal aortic diseases, although there are many facets of this interaction that have not been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of TGF-β neutralization on AngII induced-aortic pathologies. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered with either a rabbit or mouse TGF-β neutralizing antibody and then infused with AngII. The rabbit TGF-β antibody modestly reduced serum TGF-β concentrations, with no significant enhancements to AngII-induced aneurysm or rupture. Administration of this rabbit TGF-β antibody in mice led to high serum titers against rabbit IgG that may have attenuated the neutralization. In contrast, a mouse TGF-β antibody (1D11) significantly increased rupture in both the ascending and suprarenal aortic regions, but only at doses that markedly decreased serum TGF-β concentrations. High doses of 1D11 antibody significantly increased AngII-induced ascending and suprarenal aortic dilatation. To determine whether TGF-β neutralization had effects in mice previously infused with AngII, the 1D11 antibody was injected into mice that had been infused with AngII for 28 days and were observed during continued infusion for a further 28 days. Despite near ablations of serum TGF-β concentrations, the mouse TGF-β antibody had no effect on aortic rupture or dimensions in either ascending or suprarenal region. These data provide further evidence that AngII-induced aortic rupture is enhanced greatly by TGF-β neutralization when initiated before pathogenesis. PMID:27104863

  5. Adenovirus type 5 early region 4 is responsible for E1A-induced p53-independent apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Marcellus, R C; Teodoro, J G; Wu, T; Brough, D E; Ketner, G; Shore, G C; Branton, P E

    1996-01-01

    In the absence of E1B, the 289- and 243-residue E1A products of human adenovirus type 5 induce p53-dependent apoptosis. However, our group has shown recently that the 289-residue E1A protein is also able to induce apoptosis by a p53-independent mechanism (J. G. Teodoro, G. C. Shore, and P. E. Branton, Oncogene 11:467-474, 1995). Preliminary results suggested that p53-independent cell death required expression of one or more additional adenovirus early gene products. Here we show that both the E1B 19-kDa protein and cellular Bcl-2 inhibit or significantly delay p53-independent apoptosis. Neither early region E2 or E3 appeared to be necessary for such cell death. Analysis of a series of E1A mutants indicated that mutations in the transactivation domain and other regions of E1A correlated with E1A-mediated transactivation of E4 gene expression. Furthermore, p53-deficient human SAOS-2 cells infected with a mutant which expresses E1B but none of the E4 gene products remained viable for considerably longer times than those infected with wild-type adenovirus type 5. In addition, an adenovirus vector lacking both E1 and E4 was unable to induce DNA degradation and cell killing in E1A-expressing cell lines. These data showed that an E4 product is essential for E1A-induced p53-independent apoptosis. PMID:8709247

  6. TGF-β Neutralization Enhances AngII-Induced Aortic Rupture and Aneurysm in Both Thoracic and Abdominal Regions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Rateri, Debra L; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Moorleghen, Jessica J; Cassis, Lisa A; Daugherty, Alan

    2016-01-01

    AngII and TGF-β interact in development of thoracic and abdominal aortic diseases, although there are many facets of this interaction that have not been clearly defined. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of TGF-β neutralization on AngII induced-aortic pathologies. Male C57BL/6J mice were administered with either a rabbit or mouse TGF-β neutralizing antibody and then infused with AngII. The rabbit TGF-β antibody modestly reduced serum TGF-β concentrations, with no significant enhancements to AngII-induced aneurysm or rupture. Administration of this rabbit TGF-β antibody in mice led to high serum titers against rabbit IgG that may have attenuated the neutralization. In contrast, a mouse TGF-β antibody (1D11) significantly increased rupture in both the ascending and suprarenal aortic regions, but only at doses that markedly decreased serum TGF-β concentrations. High doses of 1D11 antibody significantly increased AngII-induced ascending and suprarenal aortic dilatation. To determine whether TGF-β neutralization had effects in mice previously infused with AngII, the 1D11 antibody was injected into mice that had been infused with AngII for 28 days and were observed during continued infusion for a further 28 days. Despite near ablations of serum TGF-β concentrations, the mouse TGF-β antibody had no effect on aortic rupture or dimensions in either ascending or suprarenal region. These data provide further evidence that AngII-induced aortic rupture is enhanced greatly by TGF-β neutralization when initiated before pathogenesis. PMID:27104863

  7. Rhynchophylline Protects Against the Amyloid β-Induced Increase of Spontaneous Discharges in the Hippocampal CA1 Region of Rats.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hui; Mi, Ze; Ji, Wei-gang; Zhang, Cheng-huan; Zhang, Teng; Ren, Shuan-cheng; Zhu, Zhi-ru

    2015-11-01

    Accumulated soluble amyloid β (Aβ)-induced aberrant neuronal network activity has been recognized as a key causative factor leading to cognitive deficits which are the most outstanding characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As an important structure associated with learning and memory, the hippocampus is one of the brain regions that are impaired very early in AD, and the hippocampal CA1 region is selectively vulnerable to soluble Aβ oligomers. Our recent study showed that soluble Aβ1-42 oligomers induced hyperactivity and perturbed the firing patterns in hippocampal neurons. Rhynchophylline (RIN) is an important active tetracyclic oxindole alkaloid isolated from Uncaria rhynchophylla which is a traditional Chinese medicine and often used to treat central nervous system illnesses such as hypertension, convulsions, tremor, stroke etc. Previous evidence showed that RIN possessed neuroprotective effects of improving the cognitive function of mice with Alzheimer-like symptoms. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the protective effect of RIN against soluble Aβ1-42 oligomers-induced hippocampal hyperactivity. The results showed that (1) the mean frequency of spontaneous discharge was increased by the local application of 3 μM soluble Aβ1-42 oligomers; (2) 30 μM RIN did not exert any obvious effects on basal physiological discharges; and (3) treatment with RIN effectively inhibited the soluble Aβ1-42 oligomers-induced enhancement of spontaneous discharge, in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 = 9.0 μM. These in vivo electrophysiological results indicate that RIN can remold the spontaneous discharges disturbed by Aβ and counteract the deleterious effect of Aβ1-42 on neural circuit. The experimental findings provide further evidence to affirm the potential of RIN as a worthy candidate for further development into a therapeutic agent for AD. PMID:26441223

  8. Mitigation of effects of beam-induced energy deposition in the LHC high-luminosity interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolai V. Mokhov et al.

    2003-05-28

    Beam-induced energy deposition in the LHC high luminosity interaction region components is one of the serious limits for the machine performance. The results of further optimization and comprehensive MARS14 calculations in the IP1 and IP5 inner and outer triplets are summarized for the updated lattice, calculation model, baseline pp-collision source term, and for realistic engineering constraints on the hardware design. It is shown that the optimized layout and absorbers would provide a sufficient reduction of peak power density and dynamic heat load in the superconducting components with an adequate safety margin. Accumulated dose and residual dose rates in and around the region components are also kept below the tolerable limits in the proposed design.

  9. Development of Chemical Indicators of Groundwater Contamination Near the Carcass Burial Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H.; Choi, J.; Kim, M.; Choi, J.; Lee, M.; Lee, H.; Jeon, S.; Bang, S.; Noh, H.; Yoo, J.; Park, S.; Kim, H.; Kim, D.; Lee, Y.; Han, J.

    2011-12-01

    A serious outbreak of foot and mouth disease (FMD) and avian influenza (AI) led to the culling of millions of livestock in South Korea from late 2010 to earlier 2011. Because of the scale of FMD and AI epidemic in Korea and rapid spread of the diseases, mass burial for the disposal of carcass was conducted to halt the outbreak. The improper construction of the burial site or inappropriate management of the carcass burial facility can cause the contamination of groundwater mainly due to the discharges of leachate through the base of disposal pit. The leachate from carcass burial contains by products of carcass decay such as amino acids, nitrate, ammonia and chloride. The presence of these chemical components in groundwater can be used as indicators demonstrating contamination of groundwater with leachate from carcass. The major concern about using these chemical indicators is that other sources including manures, fertilizers and waste waters from human or animal activities already exist in farming area. However, we lack the understanding of how groundwater contamination due to mass burial of carcass can be differentiated from the contamination due to livestock manures which shows similar chemical characteristics. The chemical compositions of the leachate from carcass burial site and the wastewater from livestock manure treatment facilities were compared. The chemical compositions considered include total organic carbon (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), nitrate, organic nitrogen (Organic nitrogen =TN-Ammonium Nitrogen- Nitrate nitrogen), ammonia, chloride, sodium, potassium and amino acids (20 analytes). The ratios of concentrations of the chemical compositions as indicators of contamination were determined to distinguish the sources of contamination in groundwater. Indicators which showed a linear relationship between two factors and revealed a distinct difference between the carcass leachate and livestock manure were chosen. In addition, the background level of the

  10. A paleolatitude approach to assessing surface temperature history for use in burial heating models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, Charles E.

    2000-01-01

    Calculations using heat flow theory as well as case histories show that over geologic time scales (106 years), changes in mean annual surface temperature (Ts) on the order of 10°C penetrate kilometers deep into the crust. Thus, burial heating models of sedimentary basins, which typically span kilometers in depth and persist over geological time frames, should consider Ts history to increase their accuracy. In any case, Ts history becomes important when it changes enough to be detected by a thermal maturation index like vitrinite reflectance, a parameter widely used to constrain burial heating models. Assessment of the general temperature conditions leading to petroleum generation indicates that changes in Ts as small as 6°C can be detected by vitrinite reflectance measurements. This low temperature threshold indicates that oil and gas windows can be significantly influenced by Ts history. A review of paleoclimatic factors suggests the significant and geologically resolvable factors affecting Ts history are paleolatitude, long-term changes between cool and warm geological periods (climate mode), the degree to which a basin is removed from the sea (geographic isolation), and elevation or depth relative to sea level. Case studies using geologically realistic data ranges or different methods of estimating Ts in a burial heating model indicate a significant impact of Ts when: (1) continental drift, subduction, tectonism and erosion significantly change paleolatitude, paleoaltitude, or paleogeography; (2) strata are at, or near, maximum burial, and changes in Ts directly influence maximum burial temperature; and (3), when a significant change in Ts occurs near the opening or closing of the oil or gas windows causing petroleum generation to begin or cease. Case studies show that during the burial heating and petroleum generation phase of basin development changes in climate mode alone can influence Ts by about 15°C. At present, Ts changes from the poles to the equator

  11. The Hydrologic Characteristics of an Orogenic Wedge During Burial of Pelites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabelek, P. I.

    2014-12-01

    The burial and exhumation of oceanic sediments in orogenic wedges is one of the most important processes that occur during continental collisions. During progressive burial, pelites lose porosity and permeability, and eventually pass into the lithostatic pressure regime where the porosity and permeability are thought to be very small. However, prograde metamorphic reactions produce fluids that must ascent though the pore space or fractures. The hydrologic characteristics of schists undergoing burial were modeled using the program SUTRAMET, which is a modified version of the program SUTRA (Voss & Provost, 2002) that allows modeling of metamorphic reactions at high pressures and temperatures and incorporates transient porosity and permeability changes due to overpressure and changing volume of the metamorphic assemblage. The initial model crustal section includes a hydrostatic pressure regime to the depth of 5 km with φ ≥ 0.007 and k ≥ 10-17 m2. Within the lithostatic pressure domain, schists have φ ≤ 0.003 and k ≤ 10-18 m2. Below the schists that are undergoing burial (3 or 6 mm/y) is an impermeable substrate with φ = 0. P and T are maintained at the top and the bottom boundaries and P is also maintained at the top of the lithostatic domain. T-dependent thermal diffusivity and heat capacity were applied. The initial T gradient is ~30°/km. The only heat sink is endothermic metamorphic reactions and the only heat source is a small amount of radioactivity. The initial schist was assumed to have 17.9 wt.% qtz, 13.2% ab, 28.7% ksp, 9.0% ms, 22.8% chl, and 8.5% law. By the time it reaches the bottom of the crustal section, metamorphic reactions produce the anhydrous assemblage 14.5% qtz, 7.8% an, 13.7% ab, 36% ksp, 0.2% sil, and 27.5% grt. Results show that fluid pressure remains slightly above lithostatic within the initially lithostatic pressure regime as metamorphic fluids are released, even at the slow burial rate of 3 mm/y, because the fluids pass to the

  12. Sensitivity of climate and atmospheric CO2 to deep-ocean and shallow-ocean carbonate burial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Tyler

    1989-01-01

    A model of the carbonate-silicate geochemical cycle is presented that distinguishes carbonate masses produced by shallow-ocean and deep-ocean carbonate burial and shows that reasonable increases in deep-ocean burial could produce substantial warmings over a few hundred million years. The model includes exchanges between crust and mantle; transients from burial shifts are found to be sensitive to the fraction of nondegassed carbonates subducted into the mantle. Without the habitation of the open ocean by plankton such as foraminifera and coccolithophores, today's climate would be substantially colder.

  13. Long-term stabilization of deep soil carbon by fire and burial during early Holocene climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Spiotta, Erika; Chaopricha, Nina T.; Plante, Alain F.; Diefendorf, Aaron F.; Mueller, Carsten W.; Grandy, A. Stuart; Mason, Joseph A.

    2014-06-01

    Buried soils contain large reservoirs of organic carbon at depths that are not typically included in regional and global soil carbon inventories. One such palaeosol, the Brady soil of southwestern Nebraska, USA, is buried under six metres of loess. The Brady soil developed at the land surface on the late-Pleistocene-aged Peoria Loess in a period of warmth and wetness during which dunefields and dust sources across the region were stabilized. Abrupt climate change in the early Holocene led to increased loess deposition that buried the soil. Here, we used spectroscopic and isotopic analyses to determine the composition and stability of organic carbon in the Brady soil. We identify high levels of black carbon, indicating extensive biomass burning. In addition, we found intact vascular plant lipids in soil organic matter with radiocarbon ages ranging from 10,500 to 12,400 cal yr BP, indicating decomposition was slowed by rapid burial at the start of the Holocene. We conclude that landscape disturbance caused by abrupt climate change, fire and the loss of vegetative cover contributed to deep carbon sequestration as the soil was quickly buried under accumulating loess. We suggest that terrestrial soil carbon storage in arid and semi-arid environments could undergo landscape-scale shifts in response to rising temperatures, increased fire activity or drought.

  14. Reversal of an aluminium induced alteration in redox status in different regions of rat brain by administration of centrophenoxine.

    PubMed

    Nehru, Bimla; Bhalla, Punita

    2006-10-01

    Aluminium is one of the most studied neurotoxin, and its effects on nervous system are both structural and functional, involving various regions of brain. Aluminium toxicity is known to have multiple mechanisms of action in the central nervous system. Affinity of aluminium for thiol substrates is considered a possible molecular mechanism involved in aluminium neurotoxicity. The reduced glutathione (GSH) is especially important for cellular defence against aluminium toxicity. This study pertains to the modulatory action of centrophenoxine on GSH status in aluminium exposed different brain regions of the female rats. Aluminium was administered orally at a dose of 40 mg/Kg x b x wt x /day for a period of eight weeks whereas, centrophenoxine was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 100 mg/Kg x b x wt x /day for a period of six weeks. The study was carried out in different regions of brain namely cerebrum, cerebellum, medulla oblongata and hypothalamus. Animals exposed to aluminum, registered a significant decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione, and oxidized glutathione as well as in the activity of glutathione reductase in all the different regions studied when compared to normal control animals. Post-treatment with centrophenoxine, showed a significant improvement in the thiol levels in different regions. Centrophenoxine when administered alone also had a profound effect on the levels of reduced glutathione as well as on the activity of glutathione reductase. From the present results, it can be stated that centrophenoxine administration, as a thiol-antioxidant, arrests the aluminium induced cellular damage by improving the thiol status in brain regions. PMID:16969688

  15. Regional-Scale High-Latitude Extreme Geoelectric Fields Pertaining to Geomagnetically Induced Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, Antti; Bernabeu, Emanuel; Eichner, Jan; Viljanen, Ari; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the needs of the high-voltage power transmission industry, we use data from the high-latitude IMAGE magnetometer array to study characteristics of extreme geoelectric fields at regional scales. We use 10-s resolution data for years 1993-2013, and the fields are characterized using average horizontal geoelectric field amplitudes taken over station groups that span about 500-km distance. We show that geoelectric field structures associated with localized extremes at single stations can be greatly different from structures associated with regionally uniform geoelectric fields, which are well represented by spatial averages over single stations. Visual extrapolation and rigorous extreme value analysis of spatially averaged fields indicate that the expected range for 1-in-100-year extreme events are 3-8 V/km and 3.4-7.1 V/km, respectively. The Quebec reference ground model is used in the calculations.

  16. Oxidation induced amorphous stabilization of the subsurface region in Zr-Cu metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, K. R.; Park, J. M.; Park, S. H.; Na, M. Y.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, W. T.

    2014-01-20

    In the present study, we demonstrate that selective surface oxidation of Zr{sub 70}Cu{sub 30} metallic glass can stabilize the amorphous structure in the subsurface region of the matrix. The oxidation proceeds by selective oxidation of Zr, forming monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} layer on the surface, and the subsurface layer becomes Cu-enriched due to back diffusion of Cu atoms from the oxide layer. Interestingly, in this system, the composition change in the subsurface region leads to enhancement of glass stability, forming of a double layered surface structure consisted of inner amorphous layer and outer monoclinic ZrO{sub 2} layer even when the remaining matrix is completely crystallized.

  17. Limits on the Abundance and Burial Depth of Lunar Polar Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, Richard C.; Paige, David A.; Siegler, Matthew A.; Vasavada, Ashwin R.; Teodoro, Luis A.; Eke, Vincent R.

    2012-01-01

    The Diviner imaging radiometer experiment aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has revealed that surface temperatures in parts of the lunar polar regions are among the lowest in the solar system. Moreover, modeling of these Diviner data using realistic thermal conductivity profiles for lunar regolith and topography-based illumination has been done, with surprising results. Large expanses of circum-polar terrain appear to have near-subsurface temperatures well below 110K, despite receiving episodic low-angle solar illumination [Paige et al., 2010]. These subsurface cold traps could provide areally extensive reservoirs of volatiles. Here we examine the limits to abundance and burial depth of putative volatiles, based on the signature they would create for orbital thermal and epithermal neutrons. Epithermals alone are not sufficient to break the abundance-depth ambiguity, while thermal neutrons provide an independent constraint on the problem. The subsurface cold traps are so large that even modest abundances, well below that inferred from LCROSS observations, would produce readily detectable signatures in the Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer data [Colaprete et al., 2010]. Specifically, we forward-model the thermal and epithermal neutron leakage flux that would be observed for various ice concentrations, given the depth at which ice stability begins. The LCROSS results point to a water-equivalent hydrogen abundance (WEH) in excess of 10 wt%, when all hydrogenous species are added together (except for H2, detected by LAMP on LRO [Gladstone et al., 2010]). When such an ice abundance is placed in a layer below the stability depth of Paige et al., the epithermal and thermal neutron leakage fluxes are vastly reduced and very much at odds with orbital observations. So clearly an environment that is conducive to cold trapping is necessary but not sufficient for the presence of volatiles such as water. We present the limits on the abundances that are indeed consistent

  18. Limits on the Abundance and Burial Depth of Lunar Polar Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Paige, D. A.; Siegler, M. A.; Vasavada, A. R.; Teodoro, L. A.; Eke, V. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Diviner imaging radiometer experiment aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has revealed that surface temperatures in parts of the lunar polar regions are among the lowest in the solar system. Moreover, modeling of these Diviner data using realistic thermal conductivity profiles for lunar regolith and topography-based illumination has been done, with surprising results. Large expanses of circum-polar terrain appear to have near-subsurface temperatures well below 110K, despite receiving episodic low-angle solar illumination [Paige et al., 2010]. These subsurface cold traps could provide areally extensive reservoirs of volatiles. Here we examine the limits to abundance and burial depth of putative volatiles, based on the signature they would create for orbital thermal and epithermal neutrons. Epithermals alone are not sufficient to break the abundance-depth ambiguity, while thermal neutrons provide an independent constraint on the problem. The subsurface cold traps are so large that even modest abundances, well below that inferred from LCROSS observations, would produce readily detectable signatures in the Lunar Prospector neutron spectrometer data [Colaprete et al., 2010]. Specifically, we forward-model the thermal and epithermal neutron leakage flux that would be observed for various ice concentrations, given the depth at which ice stability begins. The LCROSS results point to a water-equivalent hydrogen abundance (WEH) in excess of 10 wt%, when all hydrogenous species are added together (except for H2, detected by LAMP on LRO [Gladstone et al., 2010]). When such an ice abundance is placed in a layer below the stability depth of Paige et al., the epithermal and thermal neutron leakage fluxes are vastly reduced and very much at odds with orbital observations. So clearly an environment that is conducive to cold trapping is necessary but not sufficient for the presence of volatiles such as water. We present the limits on the abundances that are indeed consistent

  19. VLF signatures of lightening-induced heating and ionization of the nighttime D-region

    SciTech Connect

    Inan, U.S.; Rodriquez, J.V. ); Idone, V.P. )

    1993-11-05

    48.5 kHz signals from a transmitter in Silver Creek, Nebraska, propagating to Huntsville (HU), Alabama over a [approximately]1200 km Great Circle Path (GCP) exhibit characteristic amplitude changes which appear within 20 ms of cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes located within 50 km of the path. Data are consistent with the heating of ionospheric electrons by the electromagnetic (EM) pulse from lightning producing ionization changes in the D-region over the thunderstorm.

  20. Nucleon-induced fission cross sections of heavy nuclei in the intermediate energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokofiev, Alexander V.

    Fission is the most important nuclear reaction for society at large today due to its use in energy production. However, this has raised the problem of how to treat the long-lived radioactive waste from nuclear reactors. A radical solution would be to change the composition of the waste into stable or short-lived nuclides, which could be done through nuclear transmutation. Such a concept requires accelerator-driven systems to be designed, where those for transmutation are reactor hybrids. This thesis is a contribution to the knowledge base for developing transmutation systems, specifically with respect to the computational modeling of the underlying nuclear reactions, induced by the incident and secondary particles. Intermediate energy fission cross sections are one important type of such data. Moreover, they are essential for understanding the fission process itself and related nuclear interactions. The experimental part of this work was performed at the neutron beam facility of The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. Fission cross sections of 238U, 209Bi, natPb, 208Pb, 197Au, natW, and 181Ta were measured for neutrons in the range En = 30-160 MeV using thin-film breakdown counters for the fission fragment detection. A model was developed for the determination of the efficiency of such detectors. A compilation of existing data on proton-induced fission cross sections for nuclei from 165Ho to 239Pu was performed. The results, which constitute the main body of information in this field, were added to the worldwide EXFOR database. The dependences of the cross sections on incident energy and target nucleus were studied, which resulted in systematics that make it possible to give estimates for unmeasured nuclides. Nucleon-induced fission cross sections were calculated using an extended version of the cascade exciton model. A comparison with the systematics and the experimental data obtained in the present work revealed significant discrepancies. A modification of the model

  1. Solar flare induced D-region ionospheric perturbations evaluated from VLF measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh K.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, Rajesh; Singh, R. P.

    2014-03-01

    The results of very low frequency (VLF) wave amplitude measurements carried out at the low latitude station Varanasi (geom. lat. 14∘55'N, long. 154∘E), India during solar flares are presented for the first time. The VLF waves (19.8 kHz) transmitted from the NWC-transmitter, Australia propagated in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide to long distances and were recorded at Varanasi. Data are analyzed and the reflection height H' and the sharpness factor β are evaluated. It is found that the reflection height decreases whereas sharpness factor increases with the increase of solar flare power. The H' is found to be higher and β smaller at low latitudes than the corresponding values at mid and high latitudes. The sunspot numbers were low during the considered period 2011-2012, being the rising phase of solar cycle 24 and as a result cosmic rays may impact the D-region ionosphere. The increased ionization from the flare lowers the effective reflecting height, H', of the D-region roughly in proportion to the logarithm of the X-ray flare intensity from a typical mid-day unperturbed value of about 71-72 km down to about 65 km for an X class flare. The sharpness ( β) of the lower edge of the D-region is also significantly increased by the flare but reaches a clear saturation value of about 0.48 km-1 for flares of magnitude greater than about X1 class.

  2. Noise trauma induced plastic changes in brain regions outside the classical auditory pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, G-D; Sheppard, A; Salvi, R

    2016-02-19

    The effects of intense noise exposure on the classical auditory pathway have been extensively investigated; however, little is known about the effects of noise-induced hearing loss on non-classical auditory areas in the brain such as the lateral amygdala (LA) and striatum (Str). To address this issue, we compared the noise-induced changes in spontaneous and tone-evoked responses from multiunit clusters (MUC) in the LA and Str with those seen in auditory cortex (AC) in rats. High-frequency octave band noise (10-20 kHz) and narrow band noise (16-20 kHz) induced permanent threshold shifts at high-frequencies within and above the noise band but not at low frequencies. While the noise trauma significantly elevated spontaneous discharge rate (SR) in the AC, SRs in the LA and Str were only slightly increased across all frequencies. The high-frequency noise trauma affected tone-evoked firing rates in frequency and time-dependent manner and the changes appeared to be related to the severity of noise trauma. In the LA, tone-evoked firing rates were reduced at the high-frequencies (trauma area) whereas firing rates were enhanced at the low-frequencies or at the edge-frequency dependent on severity of hearing loss at the high frequencies. The firing rate temporal profile changed from a broad plateau to one sharp, delayed peak. In the AC, tone-evoked firing rates were depressed at high frequencies and enhanced at the low frequencies while the firing rate temporal profiles became substantially broader. In contrast, firing rates in the Str were generally decreased and firing rate temporal profiles become more phasic and less prolonged. The altered firing rate and pattern at low frequencies induced by high-frequency hearing loss could have perceptual consequences. The tone-evoked hyperactivity in low-frequency MUC could manifest as hyperacusis whereas the discharge pattern changes could affect temporal resolution and integration. PMID:26701290

  3. Development of Laser-induced Grating Spectroscopy for Underwater Temperature Measurement in Shock Wave Focusing Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Saito, Tsutomu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2003-01-01

    In Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) underwater shock wave focusing generates high pressures at very short duration of time inside human body. However, it is not yet clear how high temperatures are enhanced at the spot where a shock wave is focused. The estimation of such dynamic temperature enhancements is critical for the evaluation of tissue damages upon shock loading. For this purpose in the Interdisciplinary Shock Wave Research Center a technique is developed which employs laser induced thermal acoustics or Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy. Unlike most of gasdynamic methods of measuring physical quantities this provides a non-invasive one having spatial and temporal resolutions of the order of magnitude of 1.0 mm3 and 400 ns, respectively. Preliminary experiments in still water demonstrated that this method detected sound speed and hence temperature in water ranging 283 K to 333 K with errors of 0.5%. These results may be used to empirically establish the equation of states of water, gelatin or agar cells which will work as alternatives of human tissues.

  4. Development of laser-induced grating spectroscopy for underwater temperature measurement in shock wave focusing regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gojani, Ardian B.; Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.; Saito, Tsutomu; Takayama, Kazuyoshi

    2004-02-01

    In Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL) underwater shock wave focusing generates high pressures at very short duration of time inside human body. However, it is not yet clear how high temperatures are enhanced at the spot where a shock wave is focused. The estimation of such dynamic temperature enhancements is critical for the evaluation of tissue damages upon shock loading. For this purpose in the Interdisciplinary Shock Wave Research Center a technique is developed which employs laser induced thermal acoustics or Laser Induced Grating Spectroscopy. Unlike most of gas-dynamic methods of measuring physical quantities this provides a non-invasive one having spatial and temporal resolutions of the order of magnitude of 1.0 mm 3 and 400 ns, respectively. Preliminary experiments in still water demonstrated that this method detected sound speed and hence temperature in water ranging 283 K to 333 K with errors of 0.5%. These results are used to empirically establish the equation of states of water, gelatin or agar cell which will work as alternatives of human tissues.

  5. Discriminating Between Induced vs. Tectonic Seismicity From Long-Term History of Fault Behavior in Intraplate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnani, M. B.; Hornbach, M. J.; DeShon, H. R.; Hayward, C.; Blanpied, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Since 2009 there has been an increase in rate of seismicity in the Central US (CUS), a major fraction of which has been associated with shale gas production and related wastewater injection. Within this context it is important to discriminate between seismic activity that is anthropogenically induced from that arising from natural tectonic deformation. This discrimination is particularly challenging because tectonic strain rates and natural seismicity rates are low in this intraplate region, such that tectonically active faults may display periods of quiescence that are long (100's to 1000's of years) relative to the short (10's of years) instrumental record. In addition, causative faults are unknown with a poor surface expression, both types of seismicity occur on or reactivate ancient faults in the Precambrian basement, and the instrumental seismic record is sparse. While seismicity provides information about the short-term history of deformation on the involved faults, the long-term is missing. Seismic reflection data offer a means by which to interrogate the long-term history of these faults, which can be discriminatory. In this paper we present examples from two regions of the CUS. The first region shows examples of tectonically active faults within the northern Mississippi Embayment south of the New Madrid Seismic Zone, which were imaged by a high-resolution seismic reflection survey along the Mississippi River. The faults deform Quaternary alluvium and underlying sediments dating from Tertiary through Paleozoic, with increasing amount of deformation with formation age, suggesting a long history of activity. The second region shows examples from the North Texas basin, a region of ongoing shale gas exploitation. Here, industry seismic reflection data image basement faults showing deformation of the Precambrian and Paleozoic sequences, and little to no deformation of younger formations. Specifically, vertical offsets, if any, in the post

  6. Gamma weld-logging in burial ground of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.; Hofstetter, K.J.; MacMurdo, K.W.

    1995-09-01

    Gamma well-logging measurements were conducted in an inactive, radioactive waste burial ground of the Savannah River Site to appraise whether any evidence existed for downward movement of radioactivity toward the water table. Similar measurements on the same wells were conducted earlier, providing a baseline from which to measure any changes in their radioactive plumes. In particular, the recent measurements sought to detect significant changes in depth location and radiation magnitude of the plumes, as well as the existence of any new plumes. By comparing measurements on a number of these wells, which were distributed on a grid pattern, it was anticipated that the general status of this section of the burial ground could be established.

  7. Gamma well-logging in burial ground of Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.; Hofstetter, K.J.; MacMurdo, K.W.

    1995-12-31

    Gamma well-logging measurements were conducted in an inactive radioactive waste burial ground of the Savannah River site to appraise whether any evidence existed for downward movement of radioactivity toward the water table. Similar measurements on the same wells were conducted in 1980, providing a baseline from which to measure any changes in their radioactive plumes. In particular, the recent measurements sought to detect significant changes in depth location and radiation magnitude of the plumes, as well as the existence of any new plumes. By comparing measurements on a number of these wells, which were distributed on a grid pattern, it was anticipated that the general status of this section of the burial ground could be established.

  8. Climate Induced Birch Mortality in Trans-Baikal Lake Region, Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kharuk, V. I.; Ranson, K. J.; Oskorbin, P. A.; Im, S. T.; Dvinskaya, M. L.

    2013-01-01

    The Trans-Baikal (or Zabailkal'e) region includes the forest-steppe ecotones south and east of Lake Baikal in Russia and has experienced drought for several years. The decline and mortality of birch (Betula pendula) stands within the forest-steppe ecotone Trans-Baikal region was studied based on a temporal series of satellite data, ground measurements, and tree ring analysis. During the first decade of the 21st century birch stands decline and mortality were observed on )about 5% of the total area of stands within our 1250 km(exp 2 study area. Birch forest decline and mortality occurs mainly at the margins of stands, within the forest-steppe ecotone on slopes with direct insolation. During the first decade of the 21st century summer (June-August) precipitation was about 25% below normal. Soil water content measurements were lowest within dead stands and highest within healthy stands and intermediate within damaged stands. Drought impact on stands was amplified by an increase in summer air temperatures (+0.9 C) in comparison with the previous decade. Tree ring data of ''surviving'' and ''dead'' tree groups showed a positive correlation with summer/annual precipitation and negative correlation with summer air temperatures. Temperature and precipitation extreme anomalies tend to occur in the region with a period of about 27 years. The observed anomaly was the most severe since the beginning of meteorological observations in the year 1900. Data for the other sites showed a positive climate impact on the growth and expansion of Siberian forests. That is, the same species (B. pendula) showed considerable increase (1.4 times both in height and stem volume) during 20th-21st centuries as temperature increased but precipitation remained at adequate levels.

  9. Indomethacin-induced impairment of regional cerebrovascular reactivity: implications for respiratory control

    PubMed Central

    Hoiland, Ryan L; Ainslie, Philip N; Wildfong, Kevin W; Smith, Kurt J; Bain, Anthony R; Willie, Chris K; Foster, Glen; Monteleone, Brad; Day, Trevor A

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity impacts CO2–[H+] washout at the central chemoreceptors and hence has marked influence on the control of ventilation. To date, the integration of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and ventilation has been investigated exclusively with measures of anterior CBF, which has a differential reactivity from the vertebrobasilar system and perfuses the brainstem. We hypothesized that: (1) posterior versus anterior CBF would have a stronger relationship to central chemoreflex magnitude during hypercapnia, and (2) that higher posterior reactivity would lead to a greater hypoxic ventilatory decline (HVD). End-tidal forcing was used to induce steady-state hyperoxic (300 mmHg ) hypercapnia (+3, +6 and +9 mmHg ) and isocapnic hypoxia (45 mmHg ) before and following pharmacological blunting (indomethacin; INDO; 1.45 ± 0.17 mg kg−1) of resting CBF and reactivity. In 22 young healthy volunteers, ventilation, intra-cranial arterial blood velocities and extra-cranial blood flows were measured during these challenges. INDO-induced blunting of cerebrovascular flow responsiveness (CVR) to CO2 was unrelated to variability in ventilatory sensitivity during hyperoxic hypercapnia. Further results in a sub-group of volunteers (n = 9) revealed that elevations of via end-tidal forcing reduce arterial–jugular venous gradients, attenuating the effect of CBF on chemoreflex responses. During isocapnic hypoxia, vertebral artery CVR was related to the magnitude of HVD (R2 = 0.27; P < 0.04; n = 16), suggesting that CO2–[H+] washout from central chemoreceptors modulates hypoxic ventilatory dynamics. No relationships were apparent with anterior CVR. As higher posterior, but not anterior, CVR was linked to HVD, our study highlights the importance of measuring flow in posterior vessels to investigate CBF and ventilatory integration. Key points Anterior and posterior cerebral circulations have differential reactivity to changes in arterial blood gases, but the

  10. Spatiotemporal profile of Map2 and microglial changes in the hippocampal CA1 region following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Schartz, Nicole D.; Herr, Seth A.; Madsen, Lauren; Butts, Sarah J.; Torres, Ceidy; Mendez, Loyda B.; Brewster, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    Status epilepticus (SE) triggers pathological changes to hippocampal dendrites that may promote epileptogenesis. The microtubule associated protein 2 (Map2) helps stabilize microtubules of the dendritic cytoskeleton. Recently, we reported a substantial decline in Map2 that coincided with robust microglia accumulation in the CA1 hippocampal region after an episode of SE. A spatial correlation between Map2 loss and reactive microglia was also reported in human cortex from refractory epilepsy. New evidence supports that microglia modulate dendritic structures. Thus, to identify a potential association between SE-induced Map2 and microglial changes, a spatiotemporal profile of these events is necessary. We used immunohistochemistry to determine the distribution of Map2 and the microglia marker IBA1 in the hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced SE from 4 hrs to 35 days. We found a decline in Map2 immunoreactivity in the CA1 area that reached minimal levels at 14 days post-SE and partially increased thereafter. In contrast, maximal microglia accumulation occurred in the CA1 area at 14 days post-SE. Our data indicate that SE-induced Map2 and microglial changes parallel each other’s spatiotemporal profiles. These findings may lay the foundation for future mechanistic studies to help identify potential roles for microglia in the dendritic pathology associated with SE and epilepsy. PMID:27143585

  11. The combination of organoselenium compounds and guanosine prevents glutamate-induced oxidative stress in different regions of rat brains.

    PubMed

    Dalla Corte, Cristiane L; Bastos, Luíza L; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Rocha, João B T; Soares, Félix A A

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of the combination of guanosine and 2 organoselenium compounds (ebselen and diphenyl diselenide) against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in different regions of rat brains. Glutamate caused an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and a decrease in [(3)H]-glutamate uptake in striatal, cortical, and hippocampal slices. Guanosine, ebselen, and diphenyl diselenide prevented glutamate-induced ROS production in striatal, cortical and hippocampal slices. The combination of guanosine with organoselenium compounds was more effective against glutamate-induced ROS production than the individual compounds alone. Guanosine prevented [(3)H]-glutamate uptake inhibition in striatal, cortical, and hippocampal slices. Thus, protection against the harmful effects of glutamate is possibly due to the combination of the antioxidant properties of organoselenium compounds and the stimulatory effect of guanosine on glutamate uptake. In conclusion, the combination of antioxidants and glutamatergic system modulators could be considered a potential therapy against the prooxidant effects of glutamate. PMID:22133308

  12. Stylolite shape, roughness growth dynamics and related burial history: a 3D analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Koehn, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Stylolites are dissolution features that develop under applied pressure and during chemical compaction. Stylolites are common in sedimentary basin, altering the chemistry and physical properties of rocks, as well as the small- to large-scale hydrological system. This contribution follows recent finding about the self-affine roughness growth properties leading to a fractal, stitch-like shape of stylolites. 3D surface scanning and X-ray computed microtomography imaging have been carried out onto numerous stylolites from the southern Permian Zechstein basin (Germany) and from the Umbria Marches fold-and-thrust belts (Italy). In these two environments stylolites have been sorted following a recent advanced classification of stylolite based on the shape and growth dynamics. This classification consists in four classes (rectangular layer type, seismogram pinning type suture/sharp peak type and simple wave-like type) and we aim to characterize the roughness properties for each of these classes. A fractal analysis has been conducted accordingly using Fourier transform and Correlation function signal analysis over roughness surfaces. These fractal analyses have been used to reconstruct the maximum burial depth recorded by each stylolite. The reconstruction of burial depths at the same place but regarding all stylolite classes returns and maximum depth evolution. This dataset is thus used 1- to understand the links between the roughness growth dynamics of stylolites and their final shape and 2- to establish a relationship linking the shape of roughness to the maximum burial depth recorded. We hope results and interpretation reported can push the community to consider stylolite as an efficient tool and reliable way to appraise burial history in sedimentary basins.

  13. Burial Diagenesis Effects on Clumped Isotope Signatures of Coexisting Dolomites and Calcites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelstern, I. Z.; Lohmann, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope paleothermometry is a promising method for diagenetic and deep time paleoclimate studies, but original clumped isotope (Δ47) compositions can be altered by fluid and thermal diagenetic processes. Previous work shows Δ47 resetting of calcite occurs at temperatures exceeding 100°C over time periods of millions of years, but such thermally-driven effects have not been considered for dolomite. Differences between calcite and dolomite temperature calibrations are also largely unquantified, and the effect of burial diagenesis on dolomite Δ47 has not been measured. Coexisting calcites and dolomites in a ~4500 meter core from Andros Island, Bahamas, offer a unique opportunity to address these questions. These dolomites and calcites formed over a time span from the Cretaceous to Pleistocene under near-surface temperature conditions. Clumped isotope analysis of this material reveals that where these carbonate phases are buried to depths greater than ~3000 meters, realistic surface temperatures (~25 °C) are not preserved. Moreover, these phases do not record reasonable geothermal conditions (> 80 °C), but rather record temperatures between 40 and 60°C. Here we evaluate whether this Δ47 "error" is due to solid-state resetting of clumped isotopes, emplacement of minor burial cements, fabric retentive recrystallization, or some combination thereof. Our results show that clumped isotope compositions of both calcite and dolomite respond similarly to diagenetic resetting of primary values under conditions of burial. These data further emphasize the need to constrain the diagenetic history of samples used for clumped isotope work. The similar Δ47 temperatures recorded by each carbonate type suggest that dolomites and calcites are equally viable temperature proxy sources under shallow burial conditions, yet both seem equally susceptible to "resetting" of their primary clumped isotope abundances.

  14. Thallium isotope a new tool for tracking the global marine ferromanganese burial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, J. D.; Nielsen, S.

    2014-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) isotopes are an emerging proxy with the potential to track surficial redox processes. To date Tl isotopes have not been extensively explored for the entire range of redox condition in the modern ocean. Thallium has a relatively short residence time, ~20 thousand years, however new and existing seawater data shows that the modern, dominantly oxic, ocean remains conservative with respect to concentration and isotopes. Past studies have shown that there are only two geologic processes that impart a large isotopic fractionation (1) adsorption onto manganese oxides and (2) low temperature oceanic crust alteration. However, for relatively short term redox events it is reasonable to assume that the dominate isotope fractionation process is associated with manganese oxide precipitation. We present new water column and sediment, authigenic and detrital, Tl isotope data from the Black Sea and Cariaco Basins - the largest permanently anoxic basins in the modern ocean. Preliminary authigenic sediment data from these anoxic basins suggest these settings effectively capture the seawater value. Combining new and existing oxic open ocean data along with calculated fluxes constrain the mass balance of Tl, which shows the ability to fingerprint the global extent of manganese oxide burial and thus infer the extent of oxic seafloor burial. Combining thallium isotopes with other reliable paleoredox proxies such as molybdenum (Mo) isotopes and can help to elucidate global redox events. We have employed a quantitative model to explore the possible utility of multiple isotope systems such as the links between Mo and Tl isotopes. As a case study, we have modeled Tl and Mo isotopes during the Toarcian oceanic anoxic event where thallium isotopes in early diagenetic pyrite and have shown the potential to record excursions in the local and/or possibly global burial of manganese oxides. This modeling exercise has shown that Tl isotopes lend insight into the global marine oxic

  15. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-F-3, Minor Construction Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect

    M. J. Appel

    2007-01-04

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-F-3, Minor Construction Burial Ground waste site. This site was an open field covered with cobbles, with no vegetation growing on the surface. The site received irradiated reactor parts that were removed during conversion of the 105-F Reactor from the Liquid 3X to the Ball 3X Project safety systems and received mostly vertical safety rod thimbles and step plugs.

  16. Hanford facility dangerous waste permit application, low-level burial grounds

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, R.H.

    1997-08-12

    The Hanford Facility Dangerous Plaste Permit Application is considered to be a single application organized into a General Information Portion (document number DOE/RL-91-28) and a Unit-Specific Portion. The scope of the Unit-Specific Portion is limited to Part B permit application documentation submitted for individual, `operating` treatment, storage, and/or disposal units, such as the Low-Level Burial Grounds (this document, DOE/RL-88-20).

  17. Transuranic element uptake and cycling in a forest over an old burial ground

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Tuckfield, J.C.

    1992-07-01

    The consequences of returning the Savannah River Site (SRS) burial ground area to general public access at the time of completion of the SRS mission is being investigated. This study includes evaluation of the radiological impact to inhabitants of the area under a number of scenarios that include the return of the land to farming or forestry use with or without exhumation of the buried waste.

  18. Transuranic element uptake and cycling in a forest over an old burial ground

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Tuckfield, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The consequences of returning the Savannah River Site (SRS) burial ground area to general public access at the time of completion of the SRS mission is being investigated. This study includes evaluation of the radiological impact to inhabitants of the area under a number of scenarios that include the return of the land to farming or forestry use with or without exhumation of the buried waste.

  19. Indomethacin-induced impairment of regional cerebrovascular reactivity: implications for respiratory control.

    PubMed

    Hoiland, Ryan L; Ainslie, Philip N; Wildfong, Kevin W; Smith, Kurt J; Bain, Anthony R; Willie, Chris K; Foster, Glen; Monteleone, Brad; Day, Trevor A

    2015-03-01

    Cerebrovascular reactivity impacts CO₂-[H(+)] washout at the central chemoreceptors and hence has marked influence on the control of ventilation. To date, the integration of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and ventilation has been investigated exclusively with measures of anterior CBF, which has a differential reactivity from the vertebrobasilar system and perfuses the brainstem. We hypothesized that: (1) posterior versus anterior CBF would have a stronger relationship to central chemoreflex magnitude during hypercapnia, and (2) that higher posterior reactivity would lead to a greater hypoxic ventilatory decline (HVD). End-tidal forcing was used to induce steady-state hyperoxic (300 mmHg P ET ,O₂) hypercapnia (+3, +6 and +9 mmHg P ET ,CO₂) and isocapnic hypoxia (45 mmHg P ET ,O₂) before and following pharmacological blunting (indomethacin; INDO; 1.45 ± 0.17 mg kg(-1)) of resting CBF and reactivity. In 22 young healthy volunteers, ventilation, intra-cranial arterial blood velocities and extra-cranial blood flows were measured during these challenges. INDO-induced blunting of cerebrovascular flow responsiveness (CVR) to CO₂ was unrelated to variability in ventilatory sensitivity during hyperoxic hypercapnia. Further results in a sub-group of volunteers (n = 9) revealed that elevations of P ET,CO₂ via end-tidal forcing reduce arterial-jugular venous gradients, attenuating the effect of CBF on chemoreflex responses. During isocapnic hypoxia, vertebral artery CVR was related to the magnitude of HVD (R(2) = 0.27; P < 0.04; n = 16), suggesting that CO₂-[H(+)] washout from central chemoreceptors modulates hypoxic ventilatory dynamics. No relationships were apparent with anterior CVR. As higher posterior, but not anterior, CVR was linked to HVD, our study highlights the importance of measuring flow in posterior vessels to investigate CBF and ventilatory integration. PMID:25641262

  20. Masticatory demands induce region-specific changes in mandibular bone density in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Mavropoulos, Anestis; Ammann, Patrick; Bresin, Andrea; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2005-07-01

    This study investigates the structural adaptation of the mandibular bone when subjected to different masticatory functional and mechanical demands during growth. The effect of two experimental factors, the insertion of a bite block and the alteration of food consistency, on the bone mineral density (BMD) of the mandible was investigated in growing rats. Fifty-two male albino rats were divided into two equal groups, fed with either the standard hard diet or soft diet, at the age of four weeks. After two weeks, half the animals in both groups had their upper molars fitted with an upper posterior bite block. The remaining animals served as a control. Region-specific BMD of the mandible was subsequently measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Soft diet and the consequent reduction of the forces applied to the mandible during mastication resulted in the reduction of BMD in all regions under study. The insertion of the bite-opening appliance (bite block) and the resulting stretching of the soft tissues led to the application of a continuous light force on the lower molars, which was associated with a significant increase of the BMD in the part of the alveolar process just below the root apices. These results raise the question of whether orthodontic treatment with similar appliances may have some, previously unsuspected, short- or long-term effects on the mandibular bone during growth and whether their effects depend on the individual soft-tissue characteristics. PMID:16097232

  1. Variable light environments induce plastic spectral tuning by regional opsin coexpression in the African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Brian E.; Lu, Jessica; Leips, Jeff; Cronin, Thomas W.; Carleton, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Critical behaviors such as predation and mate choice often depend on vision. Visual systems are sensitive to the spectrum of light in their environment, which can vary extensively both within and among habitats. Evolutionary changes in spectral sensitivity contribute to divergence and speciation. Spectral sensitivity of the retina is primarily determined by visual pigments, which are opsin proteins bound to a chromophore. We recently discovered that photoreceptors in different regions of the retina, which view objects against distinct environmental backgrounds, coexpress different pairs of opsins in an African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra. This coexpression tunes the sensitivity of the retinal regions to the corresponding backgrounds and may aid detection of dark objects, such as predators. Although intraretinal regionalization of spectral sensitivity in many animals correlates with their light environments, it is unknown whether variation in the light environment induces developmentally plastic alterations of intraretinal sensitivity regions. Here, we demonstrate with fluorescent in situ hybridization and qPCR that the spectrum and angle of environmental light both influence the development of spectral sensitivity regions by altering the distribution and level of opsins across the retina. Normally M. zebra coexpresses LWS opsin with RH2Aα opsin in double cones of the ventral but not the dorsal retina. However, when illuminated from below throughout development, adult M. zebra coexpressed LWS and RH2Aα in double cones both dorsally and ventrally. Thus, environmental background spectra alter the spectral sensitivity pattern that develops across the retina, potentially influencing behaviors and related evolutionary processes such as courtship and speciation. PMID:26175094

  2. Free radicals induced by sunlight in different spectral regions - in vivo versus ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Silke B; Müller, Robert; Albrecht, Stephanie; Mink, Kathrin; Tscherch, Kathrin; Ismaeel, Fakher; Lademann, Jürgen; Rohn, Sascha; Meinke, Martina C

    2016-05-01

    Sunlight represents an exogenous factor stimulating formation of free radicals which can induce cell damage. To assess the effect of the different spectral solar regions on the development of free radicals in skin, in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) investigations with human volunteers and ex vivo studies on excised human and porcine skin were carried out. For all skin probes, the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region stimulates the most intensive radical formation, followed by the visible (VIS) and the near infrared (NIR) regions. A comparison between the different skin models shows that for UV light, the fastest and highest production of free radicals could be detected in vivo, followed by excised porcine and human skin. The same distribution pattern was found for the VIS/NIR spectral regions, whereby the differences in radical formation between in vivo and ex vivo were less pronounced. An analysis of lipid composition in vivo before and after exposure to UV light clearly showed modifications in several skin lipid components; a decrease of ceramide subclass [AP2] and an increase of ceramide subclass [NP2], sodium cholesterol sulphate and squalene (SQ) were detectable. In contrast, VIS/NIR irradiation led to an increase of ceramides [AP2] and SCS, and a decrease of SQ. These results, which are largely comparable for the different skin models investigated in vivo and ex vivo, indicate that radiation exposure in different spectral regions strongly influences radical production in skin and also results in changes in skin lipid composition, which is essential for barrier function. PMID:26910569

  3. Variable light environments induce plastic spectral tuning by regional opsin coexpression in the African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Brian E; Lu, Jessica; Leips, Jeff; Cronin, Thomas W; Carleton, Karen L

    2015-08-01

    Critical behaviours such as predation and mate choice often depend on vision. Visual systems are sensitive to the spectrum of light in their environment, which can vary extensively both within and among habitats. Evolutionary changes in spectral sensitivity contribute to divergence and speciation. Spectral sensitivity of the retina is primarily determined by visual pigments, which are opsin proteins bound to a chromophore. We recently discovered that photoreceptors in different regions of the retina, which view objects against distinct environmental backgrounds, coexpress different pairs of opsins in an African cichlid fish, Metriaclima zebra. This coexpression tunes the sensitivity of the retinal regions to the corresponding backgrounds and may aid in detection of dark objects, such as predators. Although intraretinal regionalization of spectral sensitivity in many animals correlates with their light environments, it is unknown whether variation in the light environment induces developmentally plastic alterations of intraretinal sensitivity regions. Here, we demonstrate with fluorescent in situ hybridization and qPCR that the spectrum and angle of environmental light both influence the development of spectral sensitivity regions by altering the distribution and level of opsins across the retina. Normally, M. zebra coexpresses LWS opsin with RH2Aα opsin in double cones of the ventral but not the dorsal retina. However, when illuminated from below throughout development, adult M. zebra coexpressed LWS and RH2Aα in double cones both dorsally and ventrally. Thus, environmental background spectra alter the spectral sensitivity pattern that develops across the retina, potentially influencing behaviours and related evolutionary processes such as courtship and speciation. PMID:26175094

  4. RETRIEVING SUSPECT TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE FROM THE HANFORD BURIAL GROUNDS PROGRESS PLANS & CHALLENGES

    SciTech Connect

    FRENCH, M.S.

    2006-02-01

    This paper describes the scope and status of the program for retrieval of suspect transuranic (TRU) waste stored in the Hanford Site low-level burial grounds. Beginning in 1970 and continuing until the late 1980's, waste suspected of containing significant quantities of transuranic isotopes was placed in ''retrievable'' storage in designated modules in the Hanford burial grounds, with the intent that the waste would be retrieved when a national repository for disposal of such waste became operational. Approximately 15,000 cubic meters of waste, suspected of being TRU, was placed in storage modules in four burial grounds. With the availability of the national repository (the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), retrieval of the suspect TRU waste is now underway. Retrieval efforts, to date, have been conducted in storage modules that contain waste, which is in general, contact-handled, relatively new (1980's and later), is stacked in neat, engineered configurations, and has a relatively good record of waste characteristics. Even with these optimum conditions, retrieval personnel have had to deal with a large number of structurally degraded containers, radioactive contamination issues, and industrial hazards (including organic vapors). Future retrieval efforts in older, less engineered modules are expected to present additional hazards and difficult challenges.

  5. Diversity of burial rates in convergent settings decreased as Earth aged

    PubMed Central

    Nicoli, Gautier; Moyen, Jean-François; Stevens, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The evolution and the growth of the continental crust is inextricably linked to the evolution of Earth’s geodynamic processes. The detrital zircon record within the continental crust, as well as the isotopic composition of this crust, indicates that the amount of juvenile felsic material decreased with time and that in geologically recent times, the generation of new crust is balanced by recycling of the crust back into the mantle within subduction zones. However it cannot always have been so; yet the nature of the crust and the processes of crustal reworking in the Precambrian Earth are not well constrained. Here we use both detrital zircon ages and metamorphic pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) information from metasedimentary units deposited in proposed convergent settings from Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic terrains to characterize the evolution of minimum estimates of burial rate (km.Ma−1) as a function of the age of the rocks. The demonstrated decrease in burial rate correlates positively with a progressive decrease in the production of juvenile felsic crust in the Archaean and Proterozoic. Burial rates are also more diverse in the Archaean than in modern times. We interpret these features to reflect a progressive decrease in the diversity of tectonic processes from Archaean to present, coupled with the emergence of the uniquely Phanerozoic modern-style collision. PMID:27216133

  6. Diversity of burial rates in convergent settings decreased as Earth aged

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoli, Gautier; Moyen, Jean-François; Stevens, Gary

    2016-05-01

    The evolution and the growth of the continental crust is inextricably linked to the evolution of Earth’s geodynamic processes. The detrital zircon record within the continental crust, as well as the isotopic composition of this crust, indicates that the amount of juvenile felsic material decreased with time and that in geologically recent times, the generation of new crust is balanced by recycling of the crust back into the mantle within subduction zones. However it cannot always have been so; yet the nature of the crust and the processes of crustal reworking in the Precambrian Earth are not well constrained. Here we use both detrital zircon ages and metamorphic pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) information from metasedimentary units deposited in proposed convergent settings from Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic terrains to characterize the evolution of minimum estimates of burial rate (km.Ma‑1) as a function of the age of the rocks. The demonstrated decrease in burial rate correlates positively with a progressive decrease in the production of juvenile felsic crust in the Archaean and Proterozoic. Burial rates are also more diverse in the Archaean than in modern times. We interpret these features to reflect a progressive decrease in the diversity of tectonic processes from Archaean to present, coupled with the emergence of the uniquely Phanerozoic modern-style collision.

  7. Soil burial biodegradation studies of palm oil-based UV-curable films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajau, Rida; Salleh, Mek Zah; Salleh, Nik Ghazali Nik; Abdurahman, Mohamad Norahiman; Salih, Ashraf Mohammed; Fathy, Siti Farhana; Azman, Anis Asmi; Hamidi, Nur Amira

    2016-01-01

    The palm oil-based ultraviolet (uv)-curable films were subjected to an outdoor soil burial test to investigate the biodegradation under natural environment. The films were burial in the soil experiment plot at the Nuclear Malaysia's Dengkil complex. The uv-curable films were synthesized from the epoxidized palm oil acrylated (EPOLA) resin and the polyurethane palm oil (POBUA) resin, respectively. Biodegradation tests are more specific to burial film in soil experiments for 12 months under natural conditions. The biodegradability of palm oil resin based uv-curable films were investigated and compared with the petrochemical resin based film. The films properties were compared with respect to properties of the thermal characteristic, the crystallinity, the morphology and the weight loss which are analyzed using the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), the scanning electron microscope (SEM), an optical microscope and the weight loss of film calculation. These findings suggested that the palm oil-based uv-curable films show quite satisfactory biodegradation levels.

  8. Treatment of Bottled Liquid Waste During Remediation of the Hanford 618-10 Burial Ground - 13001

    SciTech Connect

    Faulk, Darrin E.; Pearson, Chris M.; Vedder, Barry L.; Martin, David W.

    2013-07-01

    A problematic waste form encountered during remediation of the Hanford Site 618-10 burial ground consists of bottled aqueous waste potentially contaminated with regulated metals. The liquid waste requires stabilization prior to landfill disposal. Prior remediation activities at other Hanford burial grounds resulted in a standard process for sampling and analyzing liquid waste using manual methods. Due to the highly dispersible characteristics of alpha contamination, and the potential for shock sensitive chemicals, a different method for bottle processing was needed for the 618-10 burial ground. Discussions with the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) led to development of a modified approach. The modified approach involves treatment of liquid waste in bottles, up to one gallon per bottle, in a tray or box within the excavation of the remediation site. Bottles are placed in the box, covered with soil and fixative, crushed, and mixed with a Portland cement grout. The potential hazards of the liquid waste preclude sampling prior to treatment. Post treatment verification sampling is performed to demonstrate compliance with land disposal restrictions and disposal facility acceptance criteria. (authors)

  9. Efficient organic carbon burial in the Bengal fan sustained by the Himalayan erosional system.

    PubMed

    Galy, Valier; France-Lanord, Christian; Beyssac, Olivier; Faure, Pierre; Kudrass, Hermann; Palhol, Fabien

    2007-11-15

    Continental erosion controls atmospheric carbon dioxide levels on geological timescales through silicate weathering, riverine transport and subsequent burial of organic carbon in oceanic sediments. The efficiency of organic carbon deposition in sedimentary basins is however limited by the organic carbon load capacity of the sediments and organic carbon oxidation in continental margins. At the global scale, previous studies have suggested that about 70 per cent of riverine organic carbon is returned to the atmosphere, such as in the Amazon basin. Here we present a comprehensive organic carbon budget for the Himalayan erosional system, including source rocks, river sediments and marine sediments buried in the Bengal fan. We show that organic carbon export is controlled by sediment properties, and that oxidative loss is negligible during transport and deposition to the ocean. Our results indicate that 70 to 85 per cent of the organic carbon is recent organic matter captured during transport, which serves as a net sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide. The amount of organic carbon deposited in the Bengal basin represents about 10 to 20 per cent of the total terrestrial organic carbon buried in oceanic sediments. High erosion rates in the Himalayas generate high sedimentation rates and low oxygen availability in the Bay of Bengal that sustain the observed extreme organic carbon burial efficiency. Active orogenic systems generate enhanced physical erosion and the resulting organic carbon burial buffers atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, thereby exerting a negative feedback on climate over geological timescales. PMID:18004382

  10. Intentions of burial: mourning, politics, and memorials following the massacre at Srebrenica.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Craig Evan

    2003-01-01

    In the aftermath of tragedy, memorials and grave sites are frequently constructed. Research needs to pay attention to the goals of mourners for such places. The 1995 massacre at Srebrenica in Bosnia-Herzegovina left over 7,000 Muslim men missing and presumed dead. Five years later, families fought to bury the remains that had been collected. Qualitative interviews with 67 people, including survivors and key informants were completed over the summer of 2000. This article examines the intentions of the burial from the perspective of two groups of family members who lost loved ones: survivors who remain politically isolated and those involved in advocacy or political organizations. For the politically isolated, burial was important in reshaping individual mourning after mass death and in the face of unidentified remains. For those involved in advocacy groups, burial was a means of recognizing the past massacre, understanding the massacre's impact on current political divisions, and shaping future directions. Both mourning and political functions are elaborated on in the setting of Bosnian culture and society. PMID:12678057

  11. Organic carbon burial in a mangrove forest, margin and intertidal mud flat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Christian J.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Naidu, A. Sathy; Sanders, Luciana M.; Patchineelam, Sambasiva R.

    2010-12-01

    The flux of total organic carbon (TOC) to depositional facies (intertidal mud flat, margin and forest) was quantified for a tropical mangrove forest in Brazil. Results indicate that these mangrove margins and intertidal mudflats are sites of large TOC accumulation, almost four times greater than the global averages for mangrove forests. The TOC burial rates were determined from organic carbon content in sediment cores which were dated using 210Pb. Burial rates were calculated to be 1129, 949, and 353 (g m -2 yr -1), for the mud flat, margin and forest, respectively. Sediment accumulation rates (SAR) were estimated to be 7.3, 5.0 and 2.8 mm yr -1. Sediment characterization (δ 13C, δ 15N, TOC/TN and mud fraction) indicated a representative mangrove system with a record of consistent organic matter flux of up to 100 years. Because of substantial burial of organic carbon in mangrove ecosystems, their role in the global carbon budget must be considered. More importantly, as climate change influences temperature and sea level, mangrove ecosystems will respond to specific climatic conditions.

  12. Runoff and erosion response of simulated waste burial covers in a semi-arid environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bent, G.C.; Goff, B.F.; Rightmire, K.G.; Sidle, R.C.

    1999-01-01

    Control of runoff (reducing infiltration) and erosion at shallow land burials is necessary in order to assure environmentally safe disposal of low-level radioactive-waste and other waste products. This study evaluated the runoff and erosion response of two perennial grass species on simulated waste burial covers at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Rainfall simulations were applied to three plots covered by crested wheatgrass [Agropyron desertorum (Fischer ex Link) Shultes], three plots covered by streambank wheatgrass [Elymus lanceolatus (Scribner and Smith) Gould spp. lanceolatus], and one bare plot. Average total runoff for rainfall simulations in 1987, 1989, and 1990 was 42 percent greater on streambank wheatgrass plots than on crested wheatgrass plots. Average total soil loss for rainfall simulations in 1987 and 1990 was 105 percent greater on streambank wheatgrass plots than on crested wheatgrass plots. Total runoff and soil loss from natural rainfall and snowmelt events during 1987 were 25 and 105 percent greater, respectively, on streambank wheatgrass plots than on crested wheatgrass plots. Thus, crested wheatgrass appears to be better suited in revegetation of waste burial covers at INEEL than streambank wheatgrass due to its much lower erosion rate and only slightly higher infiltration rate (lower runoff rate).

  13. Diversity of burial rates in convergent settings decreased as Earth aged.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Gautier; Moyen, Jean-François; Stevens, Gary

    2016-01-01

    The evolution and the growth of the continental crust is inextricably linked to the evolution of Earth's geodynamic processes. The detrital zircon record within the continental crust, as well as the isotopic composition of this crust, indicates that the amount of juvenile felsic material decreased with time and that in geologically recent times, the generation of new crust is balanced by recycling of the crust back into the mantle within subduction zones. However it cannot always have been so; yet the nature of the crust and the processes of crustal reworking in the Precambrian Earth are not well constrained. Here we use both detrital zircon ages and metamorphic pressure-temperature-time (P-T-t) information from metasedimentary units deposited in proposed convergent settings from Archaean, Proterozoic and Phanerozoic terrains to characterize the evolution of minimum estimates of burial rate (km.Ma(-1)) as a function of the age of the rocks. The demonstrated decrease in burial rate correlates positively with a progressive decrease in the production of juvenile felsic crust in the Archaean and Proterozoic. Burial rates are also more diverse in the Archaean than in modern times. We interpret these features to reflect a progressive decrease in the diversity of tectonic processes from Archaean to present, coupled with the emergence of the uniquely Phanerozoic modern-style collision. PMID:27216133

  14. Effects of particle size and velocity on burial depth of airborne particles in glass fiber filters

    SciTech Connect

    Higby, D.P.

    1984-11-01

    Air sampling for particulate radioactive material involves collecting airborne particles on a filter and then determining the amount of radioactivity collected per unit volume of air drawn through the filter. The amount of radioactivity collected is frequently determined by directly measuring the radiation emitted from the particles collected on the filter. Counting losses caused by the particle becoming buried in the filter matrix may cause concentrations of airborne particulate radioactive materials to be underestimated by as much as 50%. Furthermore, the dose calculation for inhaled radionuclides will also be affected. The present study was designed to evaluate the extent to which particle size and sampling velocity influence burial depth in glass-fiber filters. Aerosols of high-fired /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ were collected at various sampling velocities on glass-fiber filters. The fraction of alpha counts lost due to burial was determined as the ratio of activity detected by direct alpha count to the quantity determined by photon spectrometry. The results show that burial of airborne particles collected on glass-fiber filters appears to be a weak function of sampling velocity and particle size. Counting losses ranged from 0 to 25%. A correction that assumes losses of 10 to 15% would ensure that the concentration of airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides would not be underestimated when glass-fiber filters are used. 32 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  15. Luminescence dating at the archaeological and human burial site at Roonka, South Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, G. B.; Prescott, J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Roonka, the Aboriginal habitation and burial site on the River Murray, South Australia, was excavated from 1968 to 1983. In 1983, thermoluminescence (TL) ages were obtained for several fireplaces at the East Bank site. Sandy dune sediments collected from East Bank were also analysed using traditional TL methods and ages were found at depths down to the base at 2.6 m. Now, 20 years on, with optical dating methods well established, it seemed instructive to repeat the measurements using new techniques, specifically the single aliquot regeneration dose protocol. This has provided confirmation of the TL ages and provided an age framework for both the archaeological and geological aspects of Roonka. The ages confirm the archaeological description of the structure of the dune and show that only the top 20% is the Holocene Bunyip formation. The lower part is assigned to the Woorinen Formation, formed during and after the last glacial maximum. Burials at East Bank took place between about 16 and 20 ka, substantially earlier than those on the Roonka Flat, but consistent with the earliest evidence of occupation on the Flat. They are one of the very few securely dated Pleistocene burials in Australia. Whether the individuals were gracile or robust is not known.

  16. Dating of Pliocene Colorado River sediments: implications for cosmogenic burial dating and the evolution of the lower Colorado River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matmon, Ari; Stock, Greg M.; Granger, Darryl E.; Howard, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    We applied cosmogenic 26Al/10Be burial dating to sedimentary deposits of the ancestral Colorado River. We compared cosmogenic burial ages of sediments to the age of an independently well-dated overlying basalt flow at one site, and also applied cosmogenic burial dating to sediments with less precise independent age constraints. All dated gravels yielded old ages that suggest several episodes of sediment burial over the past ∼5.3 m.y. Comparison of burial ages to the overlying 4.4 Ma basalt yielded good agreement and suggests that under the most favorable conditions, cosmogenic burial dating can extend back 4–5 m.y. In contrast, results from other sites with more broadly independent age constraints highlight the complexities inherent in burial dating; these complexities arise from unknown and complicated burial histories, insufficient shielding, postburial production of cosmogenic isotopes by muons, and unknown initial 26Al/10Be ratios. Nevertheless, and in spite of the large range of burial ages and large uncertainties, we identify samples that provide reasonable burial age constraints on the depositional history of sediment along the lower ancestral Colorado River. These samples suggest possible sediment deposition and burial at ca. 5.3, 4.7, and 3.6 Ma. Our calculated basinwide erosion rate for sediment transported by the modern Colorado River (∼187 mm k.y.−1) is higher than the modern erosion rates inferred from the historic sediment load (80–100 mm k.y.−1). In contrast, basinwide paleo-erosion rates calculated from Pliocene sediments are all under 40 mm k.y.−1 The comparatively lower denudation rates calculated for the Pliocene sediment samples are surprising given that the sampled time intervals include significant Pliocene aggradation and may include much incision of the Grand Canyon and its tributaries. This conflict may arise from extensive storage of sediment along the route of the Colorado River, slower paleobedrock erosion, or the inclusion

  17. Examining (239+240)Pu, (210)Pb and historical events to determine carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus burial in mangrove sediments of Moreton Bay, Australia.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Christian J; Santos, Isaac R; Maher, Damien T; Breithaupt, Joshua L; Smoak, Joseph M; Ketterer, Michael; Call, Mitchell; Sanders, Luciana; Eyre, Bradley D

    2016-01-01

    Two sediment cores were collected in a mangrove forest to construct geochronologies for the previous century using natural and anthropogenic radionuclide tracers. Both sediment cores were dated using (239+240)Pu global fallout signatures as well as (210)Pb, applying both the Constant Initial Concentration (CIC) and the Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) models. The (239+240)Pu and CIC model are interpreted as having comparable sediment accretion rates (SAR) below an apparent mixed region in the upper ∼5 to 10 cm. In contrast, the CRS dating method shows high sediment accretion rates in the uppermost intervals, which is substantially reduced over the lower intervals of the 100-year record. A local anthropogenic nutrient signal is reflected in the high total phosphorus (TP) concentration in younger sediments. The carbon/nitrogen molar ratios and δ(15)N values further support a local anthropogenic nutrient enrichment signal. The origin of these signals is likely the treated sewage discharge to Moreton Bay which began in the early 1970s. While the (239+240)Pu and CIC models can only produce rates averaged over the intervals of interest within the profile, the (210)Pb CRS model identifies elevated rates of sediment accretion, organic carbon (OC), nitrogen (N), and TP burial from 2000 to 2013. From 1920 to 2000, the three dating methods provide similar OC, N and TP burial rates, ∼150, 10 and 2 g m(-2) year(-1), respectively, which are comparable to global averages. PMID:26004816

  18. Patterns and drivers of change in organic carbon burial across a diverse landscape: Insights from 116 Minnesota lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, Robert D.; Engstrom, Daniel R.; Anderson, N. John

    2015-05-01

    Lakes may store globally significant quantities of organic carbon (OC) in their sediments, but the extent to which burial rates vary across space and time is not well described. Using 210Pb-dated sediment cores, we explored patterns of OC burial in 116 lakes spanning several ecoregions and land use regimes in Minnesota, USA during the past 150-200 years. Rates for individual lakes (across all time periods) range from 3 to 204 g C m-2 yr-1 (median 33 g C m-2 yr-1) and show strong geographic separation in accordance with the degree of catchment disturbance and nutrient enrichment. Climate and basin morphometry exercise subordinate control over OC burial patterns, and diagenetic gradients introduce little bias to estimated temporal trends. Median burial rates in agricultural lakes exceed urban lakes and have increased fourfold since Euro-American settlement. The greatest increase in OC burial occurred prior to the widespread adoption of industrial fertilizers, during an era of land clearance and farmland expansion. Northern boreal lakes, impacted by historical logging and limited cottage development yet comparatively undisturbed by human activity, bury OC at rates 3X lower than agricultural lakes and exhibit much smaller increases in OC burial. Scaling up modern OC burial estimates to the entire state, we find that Minnesota lakes annually store 0.40 Tg C in their sediments, equal to 1.5% of annual statewide CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. During the period of Euro-American settlement (circa 1860-2000), cumulative OC burial amounted to 36 Tg C, 40% of which can be attributed to anthropogenic enhancement.

  19. The effect of loco-regional anaesthesia on motor activity induced by direct stimulation of the sciatic nerve in dogs.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, A P; Michou, J N

    2016-03-01

    A prospective, randomised, blinded, case-controlled clinical study was designed using client-owned dogs undergoing unilateral pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery, to determine the effect on induced motor activity by electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of local anaesthetic administration. Dogs were administered 0.5% bupivacaine either extradurally or via a femoral and transgluteal sciatic electrolocation-guided nerve block prior to pelvic limb surgery. Motor response to electrical stimulation of branches of the sciatic nerve was tested and the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch was recorded prior to bupivacaine administration. Provided sensory blockade had been deemed successful intraoperatively, testing was repeated postoperatively, with each dog acting as its own control. Paired t-tests were performed to compare pre- and postoperative minimum currents. Eleven dogs administered extradural and 11 dogs administered femoral and sciatic perineural bupivacaine were eligible for post-operative testing. All dogs displayed normal motor response to electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve at both sites tested before and after bupivacaine administration. There was no significant difference in the minimum current required to induce muscle twitch between pre- and post-operative testing (P = 0.31 sciatic site, P = 0.36 peroneal site), nor between the two groups using different loco-regional anaesthetic techniques (minimum P = 0.13). This study shows that stimulation of the sciatic nerve distal to the site of bupivacaine administration induces motor activity, despite adequate sensory blockade. This is relevant in surgical cases where mechanical stimulation of the sciatic nerve might be expected and needs to be recognised to avoid postoperative neurapraxia. PMID:26831173

  20. Solar flare induced ionospheric D-region perturbation as observed at a low latitude station Agra, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Uma; Singh, Birbal; Singh, O. P.; Saraswat, V. K.

    2015-05-01

    The results of solar flare induced D-region perturbation studies along a short great circle path (GCP=6690 km) lying entirely in the low and equatorial latitude region are presented. We use SoftPAL receiver at Agra (Geograph. lat. 27.2°N, long. 78°E), India and monitor NWC signal ( f=19.8 kHz) transmitted from Australia. We analyze the data for the year 2011 and find that the results of amplitude and phase perturbations, time delay, zenith angle independence, and electron density variation in the lower ionosphere are consistent with those observed along similar paths at low and high latitudes. The new work includes; (i) the distribution of peak X-ray flares in the mixed solar cycle period 2011 responsible for clear and measurable sudden phase anomalies (SPAs) is different from that in minimum solar cycle period, though the cut off hardening factor is the same; (ii) the phase anomalies are evaluated in terms of X-ray fluence (J/m2); (iii) the perturbation due to X-class of flare is used to calculate the electron densities in 70-60 km height range which are found to be 60-80 % lower than those in the polar region where X-ray flare is followed by solar proton event.

  1. [Region-wide professional practice evaluation with regards to antiemetic prescription into chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting].

    PubMed

    Tavernier, Jérôme; Jouannet-Romaszko, Mireille; Bertucat, Helena; Marchiset, Nathalie; Bahadoor, Mohum; Chevrier, Régine

    2016-01-01

    The anticancer drug technical commission (COTECH) of the Auvergne OMEDIT has set up a region-wide professional practice evaluation (PPE) with regards to antiemetic prescription practices in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV), in order to evaluate their compliance with OMEDIT's guidelines. Are not included pediatric and hematologic protocols. A prospective survey was carried from November 2013 to January 2014 out in 14 medical centers in Auvergne. This clinical audit was based on the HAS (national healthcare authority) framework and used as a reference regional standards based on the MASCC Antiemetic Guidelines. Altogether, 346 antiemetic prescriptions were compared to guidelines. We observed respectively 81 % and 42 % conformity rates in acute and delayed emesis for high emesis risk chemotherapy (HE); 86 % and 35 % conformity rates in acute and delayed emesis for moderate emesis risk chemotherapy (ME); 66 % and 85 % conformity rates in acute and delayed emesis for low emesis risk chemotherapy (LE). These results highlight deficiencies in compliance with guidelines, especially in the management of delayed CINV in HE and ME chemotherapy. The COTECH identified three priority improvement areas: under-prescribe NK1 antagonists in HE cure; under-prescribe corticosteroid; over-prescribe 5HT3 antagonists for delayed emesis. The COTECH is publicizing these results all over the Auvergne region, together with a reminder of recommendations. PMID:27178880

  2. Functional analysis of the 3' control region of the potato wound-inducible proteinase inhibitor II gene.

    PubMed Central

    An, G; Mitra, A; Choi, H K; Costa, M A; An, K; Thornburg, R W; Ryan, C A

    1989-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitor genes are expressed strongly in specific plant tissues under both developmental and environmental regulation. We have studied the role of the 3' control region of the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (PI-II) that is inducible in leaves in response to herbivore attacks or other severe wounding. Comparison of the terminator from the PI-II gene with two different terminators from the 6b and 7 genes, driven by a common PI-II promoter-cat fusion molecule, indicated that the PI-II terminator provided the most efficient expression of cat. The PI-II terminator also caused a significantly elevated cat gene expression driven by the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. The increase in the level of expression is probably not due to the presence of an enhancer element in the PI-II terminator region, but to cis-acting elements involved in mRNA processing or stability. Both transient and stable transformation analyses of the deletion mutants in the 3'-flanking sequence indicated that about a 100-base pair DNA fragment surrounding the polyadenylation site is essential for the efficient gene expression. This region seems to consist of several regulatory elements, including the conserved sequence, CGTGTCTT, which is located 9 bases downstream from the polyadenylation site. The elements appear to contribute to the increased stability of mRNAs containing the PI-II terminator. PMID:2535459

  3. Chronic food restriction and streptozotocin-induced diabetes differentially alter prodynorphin mRNA levels in rat brain regions.

    PubMed

    Berman, Y; Devi, L; Spangler, R; Kreek, M J; Carr, K D

    1997-06-01

    It was previously reported that chronic food restriction and streptozotocin-induced diabetes lead to brain region-specific changes in levels of Prodyn-derived peptides. These changes parallel behavioral adaptations that are reversed by opioid antagonists. In the present study, effects of food restriction and diabetes on Prodyn gene expression were measured in rat brain regions using a quantitative solution hybridization mRNA assay. Picogram amounts of Prodyn mRNA were determined in extracts of five brain regions. The highest density of Prodyn mRNA was observed in extracts of nucleus accumbens (4.68 pg/microg total RNA), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (4.18 pg/microg), and in caudate nucleus (3.51 pg/microg). Lower levels were observed in the lateral hypothalamus (1.87 pg/microg) and central nucleus of the amygdala (1.22 pg/microg). Food restriction and diabetes both markedly increased the levels of Prodyn mRNA in the central amygdala (163% and 93%, respectively). Levels in the lateral hypothalamus were also increased (35% and 29%, respectively), though only the food-restriction effect was statistically significant. Neither treatment altered prodynorphin mRNA levels in the caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens or bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. These results suggest that dynorphin neurons in central amygdala and lateral hypothalamus may be involved in behavioral or physiological adaptations to sustained metabolic need. PMID:9191075

  4. Regional specificity in deltamethrin induced cytochrome P450 expression in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Sanjay; Johri, Ashu; Dhawan, Alok; Seth, Prahlad K.; Parmar, Devendra . E-mail: parmar_devendra@hotmail.com

    2006-11-15

    Oral administration of deltamethrin (5 mg/kg x 7 or 15 or 21 days) was found to produce a time-dependent increase in the mRNA expression of xenobiotic metabolizing cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), 1A2 and CYP2B1, 2B2 isoenzymes in rat brain. RT-PCR studies further showed that increase in the mRNA expression of these CYP isoenzymes observed after 21 days of exposure was region specific. Hippocampus exhibited maximum increase in the mRNA expression of CYP1A1, which was followed by pons-medulla, cerebellum and hypothalamus. The mRNA expression of CYP2B1 also exhibited maximum increase in the hypothalamus and hippocampus followed by almost similar increase in midbrain and cerebellum. In contrast, mRNA expression of CYP1A2 and CYP2B2, the constitutive isoenzymes exhibited relatively higher increase in pons-medulla, cerebellum and frontal cortex. Immunoblotting studies carried out with polyclonal antibody raised against rat liver CYP1A1/1A2 or CYP2B1/2B2 isoenzymes also showed increase in immunoreactivity comigrating with CYP1A1/1A2 or 2B1/2B2 in the microsomal fractions isolated from hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum of rat treated with deltamethrin. Though the exact relationship of the xenobiotic metabolizing CYPs with the physiological function of the brain is yet to be clearly understood, the increase in the mRNA expression of the CYPs in the brain regions that regulate specific brain functions affected by deltamethrin have further indicated that modulation of these CYPs could be associated with the various endogenous functions of the brain.

  5. Dural neurogenic inflammation induced by neuropathic pain is specific to cranial region.

    PubMed

    Filipović, B; Matak, I; Lacković, Z

    2014-05-01

    Up to now, dural neurogenic inflammation (DNI) has been studied primarily as a part of migraine pain pathophysiology. A recent study from our laboratory demonstrated the occurrence of DNI in response to peripheral trigeminal nerve injury. In this report, we characterize the occurrence of DNI after different peripheral nerve injuries in and outside of the trigeminal region. We have used the infraorbital nerve constriction injury model (IoNC) as a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Greater occipital nerve constriction injury (GoNC), partial transection of the sciatic nerve (ScNT) and sciatic nerve constriction injury (SCI) were employed to characterize the occurrence of DNI in response to nerve injury outside of the trigeminal region. DNI was measured as colorimetric absorbance of Evans blue plasma protein complexes. In addition, cellular inflammatory response in dural tissue was histologically examined in IoNC and SCI models. In comparison to the strong DNI evoked by IoNC, a smaller but significant DNI has been observed following the GoNC. However, DNI has not been observed either in cranial or in lumbar dura following ScNT and SCI. Histological evidence has demonstrated a dural proinflammatory cell infiltration in the IoNC model, which is in contrast to the SCI model. Inflammatory cell types (lymphocytes, plasma cells, and monocytes) have indicated the presence of sterile cellular inflammatory response in the IoNC model. To our knowledge, this is the first observation that the DNI evoked by peripheral neuropathic pain is specific to the trigeminal area and the adjacent occipital area. DNI after peripheral nerve injury consists of both plasma protein extravasation and proinflammatory cell infiltration. PMID:24366531

  6. High water level impedes the adaptation of Polygonum hydropiper to deep burial: Responses of biomass allocation and root morphology

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ying; Xie, Yong H.; Deng, Zheng M.; Tang, Yue; Pan, Dong D.

    2014-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the individual effects of sedimentation or inundation on the performance of wetland plants, but few have examined the combined influence of these processes. Wetland plants might show greater morphological plasticity in response to inundation than to sedimentation when these processes occur simultaneously since inundation can negate the negative effects of burial on plant growth. Here, we evaluate this hypothesis by assessing growth of the emergent macrophyte Polygonum hydropiper under flooding (0 and 40 cm) and sedimentation (0, 5, and 10 cm), separately and in combination. Deep burial and high water level each led to low oxidation-reduction potential, biomass (except for 5-cm burial), and growth of thick, short roots. These characteristics were generally more significant under high water level than under deep burial conditions. More biomass was allocated to stems in the deep burial treatments, but more to leaves in the high water level treatments. Additionally, biomass accumulation was lower and leaf mass ratio was higher in the 40-cm water level + 10-cm burial depth treatment than both separate effects. Our data indicate that inundation plays a more important role than sedimentation in determining plant morphology, suggesting hierarchical effects of environmental stressors on plant growth. PMID:25002329

  7. The utility of ground-penetrating radar and its time-dependence in the discovery of clandestine burials.

    PubMed

    Salsarola, Dominic; Poppa, Pasquale; Amadasi, Alberto; Mazzarelli, Debora; Gibelli, Daniele; Zanotti, Emma; Porta, Davide; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2015-08-01

    In the field of forensic investigation burial is a relatively common method of hiding a corpse. The location of clandestine graves is, however, a particularly difficult task in which multiple forensic disciplines such as anthropology, botany or archaeology can provide valuable assistance. The use of GPR (ground-penetrating radar) has recently been introduced as a method in the detection of these graves, but what is the true potential of this tool in an operative search scenario? In this study a total of 11 pig carcasses were buried in two wooded areas, each presenting a similar soil composition. The animals were subsequently exhumed at regular intervals, ranging from 2 to 111 weeks, using systematic GPR analysis of the burial sites and archaeological recovery of the subjects that were then autopsied. GPR proved to be useful in recognizing anomalies at the chosen depths of burial and appeared to be dependent on the state of decay of the samples, producing only slight anomalous readings in the presence of skeletal remains: at 92 weeks from burial the difference in signal was weak and at 111 weeks GPR survey offered no helpful information as to burial location. The experiment, in this particular context, determined the technique as being successful in the presence of recent burials, highlighting the need for a multidisciplinary approach in the operative search for buried human remains. PMID:26119388

  8. The use of recently developed histochemical markers for localizing neurotoxicant induced regional brain pathologies.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sumit; Raymick, James; Schmued, Larry C

    2014-04-01

    Neuronal and vascular brain components are interrelated morphologically, physiologically and developmentally. Due to this close interrelationship, it is often difficult to understand the cause and effect relationship between neuronal vs. vascular dysfunction and pathology. This review will discuss four of the more promising recent developments for detecting vascular pathology, and will compare them with the labeling pattern seen with markers of glial and neuronal pathology; following exposure to well characterized neurotoxicants. To detect the vascular dysfunction in the brain, we recently developed a Fluoro-Turquoise gelatin conjugate (FT-gel), a fluorescent probe that helps to delineate between healthy vs. sclerotic vessels. Similarly, we have investigated the potential for Fluoro-Gold to label in vivo all the endothelial cells in the brain as they co-localize with RECA, an endothelial cell marker. We have also developed Amylo-Glo, a fluorescent tracer that can detect neurotoxic A-beta aggregates in the brain. In this article, we will discuss the potential use of these novel histochemical markers to study the neurotoxicant induced brain. We will also discuss neurovascular strategies that may offer novel therapeutic opportunities for neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24763333

  9. Reactivated afterslip induced by a large regional earthquake, Fiordland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamling, I. J.; Hreinsdóttir, S.

    2016-03-01

    The evaluation of seismic hazard along active faults requires knowledge of the long term slip rate, the portions of the fault which are accumulating strain, and the magnitude, number, and location of past earthquakes. Aseismic slip will lower the long-term seismic potential, but the distribution of seismic versus aseismic slip along faults is often poorly constrained. Changes to the local stress field may cause the distribution of slip to vary over time periods shorter than the seismic cycle, making it difficult to assess. Using interferometric synthetic aperture radar and GPS data, we present the coseismic and postseismic deformation associated with the 2007 Mw 6.8 George Sound (New Zealand) earthquake and the influence of the 2009 Mw 7.8 Dusky Sound earthquake on the postseismic deformation. Our results suggest that the stress change induced by the later magnitude 7.8 earthquake led to a period of reactivated aseismic slip along the Puysegur subduction interface which ruptured 2 years earlier.

  10. Thallium Isotopes Tracking Mn-Oxide Burial - A Proxy for Deoxygenation During Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrander, C.; Owens, J. D.; Nielsen, S.

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) is proving to be a useful paleoredox proxy given that the Tl isotope composition of seawater is highly dependent on the magnitude of manganese (Mn) oxide burial in the ocean. In turn, Mn oxides require oxygen at the sediment-water interface to precipitate, linking the Tl isotope cycle to ocean oxygenation. Currently, the marine residence time of Tl is ~20kyrs and the Tl isotope composition of seawater is invariant, which suggests Tl isotopes could be a global tracer of marine Mn-oxide burial. Importantly, recent research suggests sediments deposited under a euxinic water column faithfully record the Tl isotope value of the overlying oxic water column (e.g. Black Sea and Cariaco Basin). Therefore, analysis of organic-rich black shales may prove useful in evaluating the seawater Tl isotope composition of past oceans and, hence, large-scale burial of Mn-oxides and the extent of bottom water ocean oxygenation. A logical test for this proxy is during the well-studied Cenomanian-Turonian boundary event termed Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE-2) at ~94 Ma. It is known that the global extent of anoxia and euxinia increased during this event, however, to what extent global bottom water deoxygenation occured is unconstrained. If deep water deoxygenation occurred, it would be hypothesized that Mn-oxide precipitation would decrease, resulting in a positive Tl isotope excursion during OAE-2. We have analyzed the Tl isotope composition of organic-rich black shales from Site 1258 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) spanning the period before, during, and after OAE-2. Based on Fe redox proxies, the entire section is euxinic and thus no Mn-oxides are present (i.e. no local redox changes). Before the event, Tl isotope compositions are similar or slightly heavier than modern seawater values. Just prior to the onset of OAE-2, a positive shift occurs and is maintained until recovery, slightly before the termination of the event. The shift to heavier values and subsequent

  11. Forensic Geopedology and Micropedology: New Indications and Lookouts from Pigs Experimental Burials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Stephania Irmgard Elena; Trombino, Luca

    2013-04-01

    The role played by soil scientists in the modern forensic science is very real and important, above all in the crime scenes when buried remains, both strongly decomposed or skeletal, are found. Thanks to a PhD project on Forensic Geopedology, an interdisciplinary team of the Universities of Milano and Milano Bicocca, has been working for the last four years on several sets of experimental burials of pigs and piglets, in different soil types and for different times of burial, in order to get new evidences on environmental responses to the burial, including geopedological and micropedological aspects. The present work constitutes a conclusive synthesis of results emerged from comparative soil characterizations, listed as follow: - Grainsize analyses; - Determination of pH in H2O and KCl; - Total Nitrogen and Organic Carbon analyses: - Quantification of Available Phosphorous; - Determination of Cation Exchange Capacity and Base Saturation; - Analyses of Volatile Fatty Acids; - Scanning Electron Microscope and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy analyses; - Petrographic Optical Microscope analyses (including thin sections descriptions). It is proposed a diachronic picture of the project where it is possible to follow the variability of significance of the different kinds of analyses carried out. The achieved results, especially when cross-checked, are very stimulating as regards the setting of analytical protocols for: - The determination of time since burial (TSB); - The discrimination between primary and secondary burials; - The identification of corpses concealments. All the analyses and different approaches discussed and addressed in this work require extreme care when applied to real forensic scenarios; however, the protocols tested can be a piece of a large and articulated puzzle that depicts the major forensic case studies in which Geopedology can be of help in solving problems or in answering some peculiar questions. It is important to understand that a science so

  12. Opal burial in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific controlled by Si leakage and eolian dust inputs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Nathalie; Kienast, Markus; Kienast, Stephanie; François, Roger

    2010-05-01

    The Silicic Acid Leakage Hypothesis (SALH) attempts to explain part of the large and regular atmospheric CO2 changes over the last glacial-interglacial cycles by a floral shift in the equatorial ecosystem from coccolithophorids to diatoms. The SALH predicts that increased eolian iron input or extended sea ice cover during glacial stages created a pool of excess Si in the Southern Ocean that escaped to the low-latitudes. Numerous downcore opal records from the Equatorial Pacific have recently been investigated in an effort to test the SALH. In contrast to SALH predictions, sedimentary records from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific (EEP) do not show enhanced opal burial during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), but during the deglaciation and during Marine Isotopic Stage 3 (MIS3) [e.g. Bradtmiller et al., Paleoceanography, 2006; Kienast et al., GRL, 2006]. The peak in opal productivity during the deglaciation has been attributed to increased supply of nutrient-rich waters driven by stronger upwelling of deep water in the Southern Ocean [Anderson et al., Science, 2009]. The larger peak in opal burial during MIS3 was interpreted as evidence of Si leakage when Southern Ocean diatom productivity is limited by both low dust flux and extended sea ice [Kienast et al., GRL, 2006]. On the other hand, the paradoxical LGM decline in opal accumulation in the EEP was explained by enhanced dust input lowering the diatom Si:C uptake ratio [Pichevin et al., Nature, 2009]. Here we use a combination of molecular fingerprints of algal productivity and radioisotope tracers of sedimentation to revisit opal burial in the EEP, in particular during the MIS3 "opal peak". An increase in algal productivity is not supported by the sedimentary concentration of brassicasterol, a biomarker for diatoms, nor by the ratio of (231Pa/230Th)xs,0, a proxy for opal export production. We therefore conclude that the large peak in opal burial during MIS3 more likely reflects enhanced preservation of diatoms

  13. A population-induced renewable energy timeline in nine world regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Kevin; Jones, Glenn

    2016-04-01

    Population growth and increasing energy access are incongruous with forecasts of declining non-renewable energy production and climate change concerns. The current world population of 7.3 billion is projected to reach 8.4 billion by 2030 and 11.2 billion by 2100. Currently, 1.2 billion people worldwide do not have access to electricity. The World Bank's Sustainable Energy for All initiative seeks to provide universal global access to energy by the year 2030. Though universal energy access is desirable, a significant reduction in fossil fuel usage is required before mid-century if global warming is to be limited to <2°C. Today, the global energy mix is derived from 91% non-renewable (oil, coal, natural gas, nuclear) and 9% renewable (e.g., hydropower, wind, solar, biofuels) sources. Here we use a nine region model of the world to quantify the changes in the global energy mix necessary to address population and climate change under two energy-use scenarios and find that significant restructuring of the current energy mix will be necessary to support the 2014 UN population projections. We also find that renewable energy production must comprise 87-94% of global energy consumption by 2100. Our study suggests >50% renewable energy needs to occur by 2028 in a <2°C warming scenario, but not until 2054 in an unconstrained energy use scenario. Each of the nine regions faces unique energy-population challenges in the coming decades. We find that global energy demand in 2100 will be more than double that of today; of this demand, 82% will need to be derived from renewable sources. More renewable energy production will be required in 2100 than the 2014 total global energy production. Given the required rate and magnitude of this transition to renewable energy, it is unlikely that the <2°C goal can be met. Focus should be placed on expanding renewable energy as quickly as possible in order to supply the projected world energy demand and to limit warming to 2.5-3°C by 2100.

  14. Rare-Region-Induced Avoided Quantum Criticality in Disordered Three-Dimensional Dirac and Weyl Semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pixley, J. H.; Huse, David A.; Das Sarma, S.

    2016-04-01

    We numerically study the effect of short-ranged potential disorder on massless noninteracting three-dimensional Dirac and Weyl fermions, with a focus on the question of the proposed (and extensively theoretically studied) quantum critical point separating semimetal and diffusive-metal phases. We determine the properties of the eigenstates of the disordered Dirac Hamiltonian (H ) and exactly calculate the density of states (DOS) near zero energy, using a combination of Lanczos on H2 and the kernel polynomial method on H . We establish the existence of two distinct types of low-energy eigenstates contributing to the disordered density of states in the weak-disorder semimetal regime. These are (i) typical eigenstates that are well described by linearly dispersing perturbatively dressed Dirac states and (ii) nonperturbative rare eigenstates that are weakly dispersive and quasilocalized in the real-space regions with the largest (and rarest) local random potential. Using twisted boundary conditions, we are able to systematically find and study these two (essentially independent) types of eigenstates. We find that the Dirac states contribute low-energy peaks in the finite-size DOS that arise from the clean eigenstates which shift and broaden in the presence of disorder. On the other hand, we establish that the rare quasilocalized eigenstates contribute a nonzero background DOS which is only weakly energy dependent near zero energy and is exponentially small at weak disorder. We also find that the expected semimetal to diffusive-metal quantum critical point is converted to an avoided quantum criticality that is "rounded out" by nonperturbative effects, with no signs of any singular behavior in the DOS at the energy of the clean Dirac point. However, the crossover effects of the avoided (or hidden) criticality manifest themselves in a so-called quantum critical fan region away from the Dirac energy. We discuss the implications of our results for disordered Dirac and Weyl

  15. A River Runs Under It: Modeling the Distribution of Streams and Stream Burial in Large River Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, A. J.; Julian, J.; Guinn, S.; Weitzell, R.; Fitzpatrick, M.

    2011-12-01

    correctly predicts the presence of 91% of all 10-m stream segments, and rarely miscalculates tributary numbers. We apply this model to the entire Potomac River Basin (37,800 km2) and several adjacent basins to map stream channel density and compare our results with NHD flowline data. We find that NHD underestimates stream channel density by a factor of two in most sub watersheds and this effect is strongest in the densely urbanized cities of Washington, DC and Baltimore, MD. We then apply a second predictive model based on impervious surface area data to map the extent of stream burial. Results demonstrate that the extent of stream burial increases with decreasing stream catchment area. When applied at four time steps (1975, 1990, 2001, and 2006), we find that although stream burial rates have slowed in the recent decade, streams that are not mapped in NHD flowline data continue to be buried during development. This work is the most ambitious attempt yet to map stream network density over a large region and will have lasting implications for modeling and conservation efforts.

  16. Estimating changes in carbon burial on the western US coastal shelf due to anthropogenic influences on river exports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, M.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Smith, R. A.; Zhu, Z.; Shih, J.

    2012-12-01

    Flux of nutrients and sediments to the coastal zone varies in response to land-use modification, reservoir construction, management action and population change. It is anticipated that future changes in the flux of these components in response to climate and terrestrial processes will affect carbon (C) burial in the coastal ocean. Coastal oceans store appreciable amounts of C as a result of river inflows: coastal primary production is enhanced by inputs of terrestrially derived nutrients, and C burial is controlled by terrestrial sediment supply. Assessing the capacity and changes to coastal C preservation, therefore, requires estimation of (1) riverine nutrient and sediment delivery to the coastal ocean, and (2) the enhanced C production and sediment deposition in the coastal ocean. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has embarked on a congressionally-mandated nationwide effort to assess the future effects of climate and land use and land cover change (LULC) on C storage. The USGS has developed alternative scenarios for changes in US LULC from 2006 to 2100 based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) climate, economic, and demographic scenarios (Sohl et al 2012). These spatially-detailed scenarios provide inputs to national-scale SPARROW watershed models of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total organic C (TOC), and suspended sediment (Smith et al 1997; Schwarz et al, 2006). The watershed models, in turn, provide inputs of nutrients, TOC, and sediment to a coupled model of coastal transport, production, and sedimentation. This coastal modelling component includes particulate C sedimentation and burial estimated as functions of bathymetry and pycnocline depth (Armstrong, et al 2002; Dunne et al 2007). River borne fluxes of TOC to US Pacific coastal waters under baseline conditions (1992) were 1.59 TgC/yr. Projected future (2050) fluxes under a regionally-downscaled LULC scenario aligned with the IPCC A2 scenario were similar (1.61TgC/yr). C

  17. Shallow burial dolomitization of Mid-Cenozoic, cool-water, calcitic deep-shelf limestones, southern Australia

    SciTech Connect

    James. N.P. ); Bone, Y. ); Kyser, T.K. )

    1991-03-01

    Oligocene to middle Miocene, deep-shelf, bryozoan-rich limestones across southern Australia are variably replaced by green to orange, Ca-rich, zoned, medium-crystalline, sucrosic dolomite. The degree of replacement varies from scattered rhombs in limestone to complete dolostones a few tens of meters in thickness and a few kilometers in lateral extent. Dolostone texture ranges from dense and well lithified to completely unlithified, resembling a loose sand of dolomite rhombs. Dolomitization is fabric specific; calcite and Mg-calcite bryozoans are either the last components to be replaced or are molds. The timing and locale of dolomitization are tightly constrained; Sr isotopes indicate a middle to late Miocene age while clasts of dolostone in overlying Pliocene limestones above a regional unconformity confirm a shallow-burial, pre-Pliocene origin. {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O values support a marine source for the carbonate; the influence of meteoric fluids appears to have been negligible. Quaternary exposure has resulted in local dedolomitization and/or subaerial erosion, especially in the Murray basin. These rocks are excellent analogues for localized, lenticular dolostone bodies in calcite-rich Paleozoic platform carbonates.

  18. Cyclosporin A-induced new cementum formation: a morphometric evaluation in the periapical region of rats.

    PubMed

    Spolidorio, Luis Carlos; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Holzhausen, Marinella; Nassar, Carlos Augusto; Nassar, Patricia Oehlmeyer

    2007-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a potent immunosuppressor used in organ transplantation and in the management of various autoimmune diseases. Recent studies have shown that CsA stimulates deposition of cementum on root surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the periapical cementum thickness and the apical foramen width in CsA-treated rats. Rats weighing 50 g were treated with a daily injection of 10 mg/kg body weight of CsA in the chow for 60 days. The cementum of the mandibular 1st molars was histologically and morphometricaly examined by analysis of 5-microm-thick serial buccolingual paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Histometric and stereologic analyses revealed the presence of large amounts of cementum in all root surfaces, particularly abundant in the periapical region and obliterating the foramen. The volume density of cementoblasts did not increase. Five to 90 days after the termination of CsA therapy, there was no reduction of cementum thickness. These results suggest that cementum deposition is not reversible after cessation of CsA treatment. PMID:17639196

  19. Buruli-Ulcer Induced Disability in Ghana: A Study at Apromase in the Ashanti Region

    PubMed Central

    Agbenorku, Pius; Edusei, Anthony; Agbenorku, Margaret; Diby, Thomas; Nyador, Esenam; Nyamuame, Geoffrey; Saunderson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To describe trends and category of disabilities caused by Buruli ulcer disease. Design. This retrospective study was set up to quantify information on the disability trends caused by Buruli ulcer (BU) using data on patients attending BU and chronic ulcer clinics from 2004 to 2009, at Global Evangelical Mission Hospital, Apromase. Methods. Data was retrieved from the WHO BU1 form, case registry book, surgical theatre register, and BU patients' records book of the hospital. Disability was measured as the incapability of patients to perform one or more daily activities due to his/her state of BU disease before treatment. Results. A total of 336 positive BU cases comprising 181 males (53.9%) were recorded of which 113 (33.6%) cases of disabilities were identified. A mean age of 52.5 (±1.32) years was recorded. For the trend of disabilities, the year 2009 recorded the highest (N = 34, 31.0%). The lesions were mostly located at the lower limbs (N = 65, 57.5%) region of the patients. Lesions with diameter >15 cm were the major (59.3%) category of lesions. Conclusion. Trend of disability reveals proportional increase over the years from 2004 to 2009. Contracture at the knee and ankle joints was the commonest disability recorded. PMID:22666574

  20. IL-6 induces regionally selective spinal cord injury in patients with the neuroinflammatory disorder transverse myelitis.

    PubMed

    Kaplin, Adam I; Deshpande, Deepa M; Scott, Erick; Krishnan, Chitra; Carmen, Jessica S; Shats, Irina; Martinez, Tara; Drummond, Jennifer; Dike, Sonny; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Keswani, Sanjay C; Moran, Timothy H; Pardo, Carlos A; Calabresi, Peter A; Kerr, Douglas A

    2005-10-01

    Transverse myelitis (TM) is an immune-mediated spinal cord disorder associated with inflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage. We investigated the soluble immune derangements present in TM patients and found that IL-6 levels were selectively and dramatically elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid and directly correlated with markers of tissue injury and sustained clinical disability. IL-6 was necessary and sufficient to mediate cellular injury in spinal cord organotypic tissue culture sections through activation of the JAK/STAT pathway, resulting in increased activity of iNOS and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Rats intrathecally infused with IL-6 developed progressive weakness and spinal cord inflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage, which were blocked by PARP inhibition. Addition of IL-6 to brain organotypic cultures or into the cerebral ventricles of adult rats did not activate the JAK/STAT pathway, which is potentially due to increased expression of soluble IL-6 receptor in the brain relative to the spinal cord that may antagonize IL-6 signaling in this context. The spatially distinct responses to IL-6 may underlie regional vulnerability of different parts of the CNS to inflammatory injury. The elucidation of this pathway identifies specific therapeutic targets in the management of CNS autoimmune conditions. PMID:16184194

  1. Carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide associations with regional bacterial diversity patterns in microbially induced concrete corrosion.

    PubMed

    Ling, Alison L; Robertson, Charles E; Harris, J Kirk; Frank, Daniel N; Kotter, Cassandra V; Stevens, Mark J; Pace, Norman R; Hernandez, Mark T

    2014-07-01

    The microbial communities associated with deteriorating concrete corrosion fronts were characterized in 35 samples taken from wastewater collection and treatment systems in ten utilities. Bacterial communities were described using Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the V1V2 region of the small subunit ribosomal ribonucleic acid (SSU-rRNA) gene recovered from fresh corrosion products. Headspace gas concentrations (hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, and methane), pore water pH, moisture content, and select mineralogy were tested for correlation to community outcomes and corrosion extent using pairwise linear regressions and canonical correspondence analysis. Corroding concrete was most commonly characterized by moisture contents greater than 10%, pore water pH below one, and limited richness (<10 taxa). Bacterial community composition was not correlated to geographic location when considered independently from other environmental factors. Corrosion was most severe in sites with high levels of hydrogen sulfide (>100 ppm) and carbon dioxide (>1%) gases, conditions which also were associated with low diversity biofilms dominated by members of the acidophilic sulfur-oxidizer genus Acidithiobacillus. PMID:24842376

  2. Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for 239Pu thermal neutron induced fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Köster, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2011-09-01

    Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the 239Pu(nth,f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on γ-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

  3. Drought offset ecological restoration program-induced increase in vegetation activity in the Beijing-Tianjin Sand Source Region, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhitao; Wu, Jianjun; He, Bin; Liu, Jinghui; Wang, Qianfeng; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Yong

    2014-10-21

    To improve the ecological conditions, the Chinese government adopted six large-scale ecological restoration programs including 'Three-North Shelterbelt Project', "Grain for Green Project" and "Beijing-Tianjin Sand Source Control Project". Meanwhile, these ecologically vulnerable areas have experienced frequent droughts. However, little attention has been paid to the impact of drought on the effectiveness of these programs. Taking Beijing-Tianjin Sand Source Region (BTSSR) as study area, we investigated the role of droughts and ecological restoration program on trends of vegetation activities and to address the question of a possible "drought signal" in assessing effectiveness of ecological restoration program. The results demonstrate the following: (1) Vegetation activity increased in the BTSSR during 2000-2010, with 58.44% of the study area showing an increased NDVI, of which 11.80% had a significant increase at 0.95 confidential level. The decreasing NDVI trends were mainly concentrated in a southwest-to-northeast strip in the study area. (2) Drought was the main driving force for a decreasing trend of vegetation activity in the southwest-to-northeast regions of the BTSSR at the regional and spatial scales. Summer droughts in 2007 and 2009 contributed to the decreasing trend in NDVI. The severe and extreme droughts in summer reduced the NDVI by approximately 13.06% and 23.55%, respectively. (3) The residual analysis result showed that human activities, particularly the ecological restoration programs, have a positive impact on vegetation change. Hence, the decreasing trends in the southwest-to-northeast regions of the BTSSR cannot be explained by the improper ecological restoration program and is partly explained by droughts, especially summer droughts. Therefore, drought offset the ecological restoration program-induced increase in vegetation activity in the BTSSR. PMID:25203241

  4. Aging modifies brain region-specific vulnerability to experimental oxidative stress induced by low dose hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Irwin H.; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara; Bielinski, Donna; Dallal, Gerard E.; Joseph, James A.

    2007-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated a significant decline in brain function and behavior in Fischer 344 (F344) rats with age. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that dysregulation in calcium homeostasis (as assessed through 45Ca flux) may contribute to the increase in age-related vulnerability to oxidative stress in brain regions, and result in a deficit in behavior-mediated signaling. Crude membrane (P-2) and more purified synaptosomal fractions were isolated from the striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of young (6 months) and old (22 months) F344 rats and were assessed for calcium flux and extracellular-regulated kinase activity 1 (ERK) under control and oxidative stress conditions induced by low dose hydrogen peroxide (final concentration 5 μM). The level of oxidative stress responses was monitored by measuring reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH). The results showed a significant difference in oxidative stress responses between young and old rats in evaluated brain regions. Old rats showed higher sensitivity to oxidative stress than young rats. The present findings show the differential effects of oxidative stress on calcium flux in brain regions with age that are dependent upon the brain areas examined and the fraction assessed. The accumulation of ROS and the decrease in GSH in the frontal cortex were sufficient to decrease ERK activity in old rats. This is the first study, to our knowledge, that demonstrates age-related differential sensitivity to oxidative stress expressed as a function of behavior-mediated signaling and stress levels among different fractions isolated from brain regions controlling behavior. PMID:19424838

  5. Osmotic stress induces phosphorylation of histone H3 at threonine 3 in pericentromeric regions of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Casas-Mollano, Juan Armando; Xu, Jianping; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M.; Zhang, Chi; Cerutti, Heriberto

    2015-01-01

    Histone phosphorylation plays key roles in stress-induced transcriptional reprogramming in metazoans but its function(s) in land plants has remained relatively unexplored. Here we report that an Arabidopsis mutant defective in At3g03940 and At5g18190, encoding closely related Ser/Thr protein kinases, shows pleiotropic phenotypes including dwarfism and hypersensitivity to osmotic/salt stress. The double mutant has reduced global levels of phosphorylated histone H3 threonine 3 (H3T3ph), which are not enhanced, unlike the response in the wild type, by drought-like treatments. Genome-wide analyses revealed increased H3T3ph, slight enhancement in trimethylated histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3), and a modest decrease in histone H3 occupancy in pericentromeric/knob regions of wild-type plants under osmotic stress. However, despite these changes in heterochromatin, transposons and repeats remained transcriptionally repressed. In contrast, this reorganization of heterochromatin was mostly absent in the double mutant, which exhibited lower H3T3ph levels in pericentromeric regions even under normal environmental conditions. Interestingly, within actively transcribed protein-coding genes, H3T3ph density was minimal in 5′ genic regions, coincidental with a peak of H3K4me3 accumulation. This pattern was not affected in the double mutant, implying the existence of additional H3T3 protein kinases in Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that At3g03940 and At5g18190 are involved in the phosphorylation of H3T3 in pericentromeric/knob regions and that this repressive epigenetic mark may be important for maintaining proper heterochromatic organization and, possibly, chromosome function(s). PMID:26100864

  6. Performance Assessment Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site Low-Level Burial Grounds

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, requires a disposal authorization statement authorizing operation (or continued operation) for low-level waste disposal facilities. In fulfillment of these requirements, a disposal authorization statement was issued on October 25, 1999, authorizing the Hanford Site to transfer, receive, possess, and dispose of low-level radioactive waste at the 200 East Area burial grounds and the 200 West Area burial grounds. One of the conditions is that monitoring plans for the 200 East Area and 200 West Area low-level burial grounds be written and approved by the Richland Operations Office. As a result of a record of decision for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Program and acceptance of the Hanford Site Solid Waste Environmental Impact Statement, the use of the low-level burial ground (LLBG) as a disposal facility for low-level and mixed low-level wastes has been restricted to lined trenches and the Navy reactor-compartment trench only. Hence, as of July 2004, only the two lined trenches in burial ground 218-W-5 (trenches 31 and 34, see Appendix A) and the Navy reactor-compartment trench in burial ground 218 E 12B (trench 94) are allowed to receive waste. When the two lined trenches are filled, the LLBG will cease to operate except for reactor compartment disposal at trench 94. Remaining operational lifetime of the LLBG is dependent on waste volume disposal rates. Existing programs for air sampling and analyses and subsidence monitoring are currently adequate for performance assessment at the LLBG. The waste disposal authorization for the Hanford Site is based (in part) on the post-closure performance assessments for the LLBG. In order to maintain a useful link between operational monitoring (e.g., Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA], Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, and State Waste Discharge Permits), constituents, monitoring frequencies, and boundaries require

  7. Effects of delayed treatment with nafronyl oxalate on microsphere embolism-induced changes in monoamine levels of rat brain regions.

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, N.; Miyake, K.; Ohiwa, A.; Nukaga, R.; Takeo, S.

    1996-01-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of delayed treatment with nafronyl oxalate (nafronyl), a cerebral vasodilator, on monoamine neurotransmitters of brain regions in the microsphere-embolized rat. 2. Microsphere embolism was induced by injecting 900 microspheres with a diameter of 48 microns into the right internal carotid artery of rats. Microsphere-embolized rats were treated with nafronyl, 15 mg kg-1, i.p., twice daily from the first to the 5th day. Levels of monoamines and their metabolites in the cerebral cortex, striatum, and hippocampus were measured on days 3 and 5 after the operation by a high-performance liquid chromatograph with electrochemical detection. In vivo tyrosine or tryptophan hydroxylation was estimated by measurement of the accumulation of 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine or 5-hydroxy-1-tryptophan after administration of 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase. 3. Microsphere embolism induced decreases in dopamine, noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine in three brain regions of the right hemisphere on days 3 and 5. In the left hemisphere, the monoamines were reduced, but to a lesser degree than in the right hemisphere. On days 3 and 5, the decrease in the monoamines of the right hemisphere was attenuated by nafronyl treatment except for noradrenaline on day 3. The decrease in the monoamines levels in the left hemisphere was almost completely prevented by nafronyl treatment. 4. On day 3 after microsphere embolism, in vivo tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylation was lower than the pre-embolic value in all three brain regions. Treatment of the embolized rats with nafronyl significantly attenuated the decrease in in vivo tyrosine and tryptophan hydroxylation in the ipsilateral hemisphere, but not hippocampal tryptophan hydroxylation. 5. The results suggested that treatment with nafronyl improves or attenuates changes in monoamine neurotransmitter metabolism of the brain regions

  8. High-fat diet-induced brain region-specific phenotypic spectrum of CNS resident microglia.

    PubMed

    Baufeld, Caroline; Osterloh, Anja; Prokop, Stefan; Miller, Kelly R; Heppner, Frank L

    2016-09-01

    Diets high in fat (HFD) are known to cause an immune response in the periphery as well as the central nervous system. In peripheral adipose tissue, this immune response is primarily mediated by macrophages that are recruited to the tissue. Similarly, reactivity of microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, has been shown to occur in the hypothalamus of mice fed a high-fat diet. To characterize the nature of the microglial response to diets high in fat in a temporal fashion, we studied the phenotypic spectrum of hypothalamic microglia of mice fed high-fat diet for 3 days and 8 weeks by assessing their tissue reaction and inflammatory signature. While we observed a significant increase in Iba1+ myeloid cells and a reaction of GFAP+ astrocytes in the hypothalamus after 8 weeks of HFD feeding, we found the hypothalamic myeloid cell reaction to be limited to endogenous microglia and not mediated by infiltrating myeloid cells. Moreover, obese humans were found to present with signs of hypothalamic gliosis and exacerbated microglia dystrophy, suggesting a targeted microglia response to diet in humans as well. Notably, the glial reaction occurring in the mouse hypothalamus was not accompanied by an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines, but rather by an anti-inflammatory reaction. Gene expression analyses of isolated microglia not only confirmed this observation, but also revealed a downregulation of microglia genes important for sensing signals in the microenvironment. Finally, we demonstrate that long-term exposure of microglia to HFD in vivo does not impair the cell's ability to respond to additional stimuli, like lipopolysaccharide. Taken together, our findings support the notion that microglia react to diets high in fat in a region-specific manner in rodents as well as in humans; however, this response changes over time as it is not exclusively pro-inflammatory nor does exposure to HFD prime microglia in the hypothalamus. PMID:27393312

  9. SagE induces highly effective protective immunity against Streptococcus iniae mainly through an immunogenic domain in the extracellular region

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Streptococcus iniae is a Gram-positive bacterium and a severe pathogen of a wide range of farmed fish. S. iniae possesses a virulence-associated streptolysin S cluster composed of several components, one of which is SagE. SagE a transmembrane protein with one major extracellular region named ECR. This study aimed to develop a SagE-based DNA candidate vaccine against streptococcosis and examine the immunoprotective mechanism of the vaccine. Results We constructed a DNA vaccine, pSagE, based on the sagE gene and examined its immunological property in a Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) model. The results showed that at 7 days post-vaccination, expression of SagE at transcription and translation levels was detected in the tissues of the vaccinated fish. After challenge with S. iniae at one and two months post-vaccination, pSagE-vaccinated fish exhibited relative percent survival (RPS) of 95% and 88% respectively. Immunological analysis showed that (i) pSagE significantly upregulated the expression of a wide range of immune genes, (ii) pSagE induced the production of specific serum antibodies that bound whole-cell S. iniae, and (iii) treatment of S. iniae with pSagE-induced antibodies blocked bacterial invasion of host cells. To localize the immunoprotective domain of SagE, the ECR-expressing DNA vaccine pSagEECR was constructed. Immunization analysis showed that flounder vaccinated with pSagEECR exhibited a RPS of 68%, and that pSagEECR induced serum antibody production and immune gene expression in a manner similar to, though to lower magnitudes than, those induced by pSagE. Conclusions We in this study developed a DNA vaccine, pSagE, which induces highly protective immunity against S. iniae. The protective effect of pSagE is probably due to its ability to elicit systemic immune response, in particular that of the humoral branch, which leads to production of specific serum antibodies that impair bacterial infection. These results add insights to

  10. Repeated vapor ethanol exposure induces transient histone modifications in the brain that are modified by genotype and brain region

    PubMed Central

    Finegersh, Andrey; Ferguson, Carolyn; Maxwell, Seth; Mazariegos, David; Farrell, Daniel; Homanics, Gregg E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Emerging research implicates ethanol (EtOH)-induced epigenetic modifications in regulating gene expression and EtOH consumption. However, consensus on specific epigenetic modifications induced by EtOH has not yet emerged, making it challenging to identify mechanisms and develop targeted treatments. We hypothesized that chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) induces persistent changes in histone modifications across the cerebral cortex (CCx), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and prefrontal cortex (PFC), and that these histone modifications are altered in a knock-in mouse strain with altered sensitivity to EtOH. Methods: C57BL/6J (B6) mice and α1SHLA knockin mice on a B6 background were exposed to 16 h of vapor EtOH or room air followed by 8 h of room air for 4 consecutive days and sacrificed at multiple time points up to 72 h following exposure. Histone modifications were assessed using Western blot and dot blot. RT-qPCR was used to study expression of chromatin modifying enzymes in NAc and PFC. Results: In NAc, CIE significantly increased acetylation of histone subunit H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9ac) but not lysine 14 (H3K14ac) or lysine 27 (H3K27ac). In PFC, CIE significantly increased H3K9ac but not H3K14 or H3K27ac. There were no significant changes at 8 or 72 h after EtOH exposure in either NAc or PFC. CIE was also associated with increased expression of Kat2b, Kat5, and Tet1 in NAc but not PFC. In CCx, CIE had a significant effect on levels of H3K18ac; there was also a significant effect of the α1SHLA mutation on levels of H3K27me3, H3K14ac, and H3K18ac as well as a trend for H3S10pK14ac. Conclusions: The EtOH-induced histone modifications observed were transient and varied significantly between brain regions. A genetic mutation that altered sensitivity to EtOH was associated with altered induction of histone modifications during CIE. These results have implications for studying EtOH-induced histone modifications and EtOH sensitivity. PMID:26300722

  11. Burial and exhumation history of southern Sweden estimated from apatite fission-track data, stratigraphic landform analysis and the geological record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, Peter; Green, Paul F.; Lidmar-Bergström, Karna; Bonow, Johan M.; Erlström, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    We present new apatite fission-track analysis (AFTA) data from 87 samples of basement and sediment from southern Sweden, including samples from a 1.7 km deep borehole. The new AFTA data allow us to confirm the development of the South Swedish Dome as inferred from stratigraphic landform analysis (e.g. Lidmar-Bergström et al., 2013) and also to define the timing and magnitude of the events of burial and exhumation that shaped this prominent feature. Southern Sweden underwent a complex Palaeozoic - early Triassic history of burial and exhumation, but after a mid-Triassic event of uplift and exhumation, rocks on the Sub-Cambrian Peneplain cooled from palaeotemperatures ≥100°C. This event, that also affected southern Norway, West and East Greenland, marks an important phase in the breakup of Pangea. A second, regional phase of cooling and exhumation affected the area in the mid-Jurassic and eventually lead to stripping of the basement along the western and southern flanks of the South Swedish Dome prior to Late Cretaceous subsidence and burial and thus to formation of the sub-Cretaceous hilly relief. This event affected much of NW Europe as well as West and East Greenland, and it is coeval with the initial opening of the central Atlantic. A third, regional phase of cooling and exhumation from palaeotemperatures of 50-60°C took place in the Miocene and lead to the formation of the South Småland Peneplain. This phase affected southern Scandinavia but has no counterpart in Greenland. A final uplift phase that raised the South Småland Peneplain to its present elevation and lead to re-exposure of sub-Cretaceous hilly relief is not resolved in the AFTA data. The results underline the importance of epeirogenic movements (both uplift and subsidence) in regions that are often considered as stable cratons (cf. Green et al., 2013). Green, P.F., Lidmar-Bergström, K., Japsen, P., Bonow, J.M., Chalmers, J.A., 2013. Stratigraphic landscape analysis, thermochronology and the

  12. Hydroalcoholic seed extract of Coriandrum sativum (Coriander) alleviates lead-induced oxidative stress in different regions of rat brain.

    PubMed

    Velaga, Manoj Kumar; Yallapragada, Prabhakara Rao; Williams, Dale; Rajanna, Sharada; Bettaiya, Rajanna

    2014-06-01

    Lead exposure is known to cause apoptotic neurodegeneration and neurobehavioral abnormalities in developing and adult brain by impairing cognition and memory. Coriandrum sativum is an herb belonging to Umbelliferae and is reported to have a protective effect against lead toxicity. In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to evaluate the protective activity of the hydroalcoholic extract of C. sativum seed against lead-induced oxidative stress. Male Wistar strain rats (100-120 g) were divided into four groups: control group: 1,000 mg/L of sodium acetate; exposed group: 1,000 mg/L lead acetate for 4 weeks; C. sativum treated 1 (CST1) group: 250 mg/kg body weight/day for seven consecutive days after 4 weeks of lead exposure; C. sativum treated 2 (CST2) group: 500 mg/kg body weight/day for seven consecutive days after 4 weeks of lead exposure. After the exposure and treatment periods, rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation, and the whole brain was immediately isolated and separated into four regions: cerebellum, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and brain stem along with the control group. After sacrifice, blood was immediately collected into heparinized vials and stored at 4 °C. In all the tissues, reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation products (LPP), and total protein carbonyl content (TPCC) were estimated following standard protocols. An indicator enzyme for lead toxicity namely delta-amino levulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALAD) activity was determined in the blood. A significant (p<0.05) increase in ROS, LPP, and TPCC levels was observed in exposed rat brain regions, while δ-ALAD showed a decrease indicating lead-induced oxidative stress. Treatment with the hydroalcoholic seed extract of C. sativum resulted in a tissue-specific amelioration of oxidative stress produced by lead. PMID:24793421

  13. Decadal Erosion Rates Derived From An Earthquake-Induced Landslide Region, Central Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Y.; Lu, C.; Chang, K.; Chen, R.

    2010-12-01

    The island of Taiwan is resulted from the collision between the Philippine sea plate and the Eurasian plate. The subtropical climate and averaging four typhoons annually, combined with frequent earthquakes, influence much of the Taiwan region. Due to the factors above, not only the active orogeny of Taiwan causes the high uplift rate at about 4 mm/yr, but also drive amazing erosion rate of about 3-6 mm/yr. Previous study indicated approximately 1.9% of global suspended sediment is derived from the small island of Taiwan, which is only about 0.024% of Earth’s subaerial surface. Furthermore, modern erosion rates are strongly influenced by large earthquakes and typhoons, and the sediment fluxes after the Mw 7.6 Chi-Chi earthquake of Taiwan are much higher than those before the earthquake. Here we study the Chiufenerhshan landslide, which is one of the large landslides triggered by the Chi-Chi earthquake in the central Taiwan. The avalanche transported a mass of sedimentary rock about 60 m thick and 1.5 km long. Based on the high-resolution topographic data sets from LiDAR or photogrammetry at various years and rain fall data, we have reached the following conclusions: In the period of 8.5 years after the Chi-Chi earthquake, almost 4.2% of the landslide deposits were transported out of the landslide system. Comparing with the mean annual erosion rate of 3-6 mm/yr in Taiwan, the sediment brought out of Chiufenerhshan landslide area is 89.4 mm/yr, a significant amount contributed by the landslide. The mean sediment discharge from this small system is as large as 0.064% of the sediment discharge from the whole Taiwan annually; while the area is only about 0.005% of Taiwan’s subaerial surface. Thus, the landslide process has contributed much more to the surface erosion of the Taiwan mountain than other erosion processes.

  14. Caspase-6 activity in the CA1 region of the hippocampus induces age-dependent memory impairment

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, A C; Ramcharitar, J; Afonso, V; Hamel, E; Bennett, D A; Pakavathkumar, P; Albrecht, S

    2014-01-01

    Active Caspase-6 is abundant in the neuropil threads, neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles of Alzheimer disease brains. However, its contribution to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer disease is unclear. Here, we show that higher levels of Caspase-6 activity in the CA1 region of aged human hippocampi correlate with lower cognitive performance. To determine whether Caspase-6 activity, in the absence of plaques and tangles, is sufficient to cause memory deficits, we generated a transgenic knock-in mouse that expresses a self-activated form of human Caspase-6 in the CA1. This Caspase-6 mouse develops age-dependent spatial and episodic memory impairment. Caspase-6 induces neuronal degeneration and inflammation. We conclude that Caspase-6 activation in mouse CA1 neurons is sufficient to induce neuronal degeneration and age-dependent memory impairment. These results indicate that Caspase-6 activity in CA1 could be responsible for the lower cognitive performance of aged humans. Consequently, preventing or inhibiting Caspase-6 activity in the aged may provide an efficient novel therapeutic approach against Alzheimer disease. PMID:24413155

  15. Modification of Ad5 Hexon Hypervariable Regions Circumvents Pre-Existing Ad5 Neutralizing Antibodies and Induces Protective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bruder, Joseph T.; Semenova, Elena; Chen, Ping; Limbach, Keith; Patterson, Noelle B.; Stefaniak, Maureen E.; Konovalova, Svetlana; Thomas, Charlie; Hamilton, Melissa; King, C. Richter; Richie, Thomas L.; Doolan, Denise L.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an effective malaria vaccine is a high global health priority. Vaccine vectors based on adenovirus type 5 are capable of generating robust and protective T cell and antibody responses in animal models and are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for HIV and malaria. They appear to be more effective in terms of inducing antigen-specific immune responses as compared with non-Ad5 serotype vectors. However, the high prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to Ad5 in the human population, particularly in the developing world, has the potential to limit the effectiveness of Ad5-based vaccines. We have generated novel Ad5-based vectors that precisely replace the hexon hypervariable regions with those derived from Ad43, a subgroup D serotype with low prevalence of neutralizing antibody in humans. We have demonstrated that these hexon-modified adenovectors are not neutralized efficiently by Ad5 neutralizing antibodies in vitro using sera from mice, rabbits and human volunteers. We have also generated hexon-modified adenovectors that express a rodent malaria parasite antigen, PyCSP, and demonstrated that they are as immunogenic as an unmodified vector. Furthermore, in contrast to the unmodified vector, the hexon-modified adenovectors induced robust T cell responses in mice with high levels of Ad5 neutralizing antibody. We also show that the hexon-modified vector can be combined with unmodified Ad5 vector in prime-boost regimens to induce protective responses in mice. Our data establish that these hexon-modified vectors are highly immunogenic even in the presence of pre-existing anti-adenovirus antibodies. These hexon-modified adenovectors may have advantages in sub-Saharan Africa where there is a high prevalence of Ad5 neutralizing antibody in the population. PMID:22496772

  16. Regional brain dysregulation of Ca(2+)-handling systems in ketamine-induced rat model of experimental psychosis.

    PubMed

    Lisek, Malwina; Boczek, Tomasz; Ferenc, Bozena; Zylinska, Ludmila

    2016-03-01

    Chronic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist treatment can provide valuable neurochemical and neuroanatomical models of experimental psychosis. One such antagonist, ketamine, with its short half-time and well-documented psychotomimetic action, has cognitive effects resembling various aspects of schizophrenia-like symptoms. In order to obtain insights into possible relationships between Ca(2+) homeostasis and schizophrenia-related symptoms, we investigate the effects of chronic ketamine administration on intracellular Ca(2+) levels in various brain regions and on the expression level of key members of the neuronal Ca(2+)-handling system in rats. We show increased intracellular [Ca(2+)] in all of the examined brain regions following ketamine treatment but an altered cytosolic Ca(2+) level correlated with hyperlocomotor activity was only established for the cortex and striatum. Our findings also suggest that an imbalance in the expression between the calcium "on" and "off" systems contributes to the deregulation of brain Ca(2+) homeostasis in our ketamine-induced model of experimental psychosis. Identification of the genes whose expression is affected by ketamine treatment indicates their involvement as putative etiological factors in schizophrenia. PMID:26685921

  17. Rock outcrops reduce temperature-induced stress for tropical conifer by decoupling regional climate in the semiarid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locosselli, Giuliano Maselli; Cardim, Ricardo Henrique; Ceccantini, Gregório

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to understand the effect of rock outcrops on the growth of Podocarpus lambertii within a microrefuge. Our hypothesis holds that the growth and survival of this species depend on the regional climate decoupling provided by rock outcrops. To test this hypothesis, we characterized the microclimate of (1) surrounding vegetation, (2) rock outcrop corridors, and (3) adjacencies. We assessed population structure by collecting data of specimen stem diameter and height. We also assessed differences between vegetation associated or not with outcrops using satellite imaging. For dendrochronological analyses, we sampled 42 individuals. Tree rings of 31 individuals were dated, and climate-growth relationships were tested. Rock outcrops produce a favorable microclimate by reducing average temperature by 4.9 °C and increasing average air humidity by 12 %. They also reduce the variability of atmospheric temperature by 42 % and air humidity by 20 % supporting a vegetation with higher leaf area index. Within this vegetation, specimen height was strongly constrained by the outcrop height. Although temperature and precipitation modulate this species growth, temperature-induced stress is the key limiting growth factor for this population of P. lambertii. We conclude that this species growth and survival depend on the presence of rock outcrops. These topography elements decouple regional climate in a favorable way for this species growth. However, these benefits are restricted to the areas sheltered by rock outcrops. Although this microrefuge supported P. lambertii growth so far, it is unclear whether this protection would be sufficient to withstand the stress of future climate changes.

  18. Plasma modifications induced by an X-mode HF heater wave in the high latitude F region of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. F.; Borisova, T. D.; Yeoman, T. K.; Rietveld, M. T.; Häggström, I.; Ivanova, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    We presented experimental results of strong plasma modifications induced by X-mode powerful HF radio waves injected towards the magnetic zenith into the high latitude F region of the ionosphere. The experiments were conducted in 2009-2011 using the EISCAT Heating facility, UHF incoherent scatter radar and the EISCAT ionosonde at Tromsø, Norway; and the CUTLASS SuperDARN HF coherent radar at Hankasalmi, Finland. The results showed that the X-mode HF pump wave can generate strong small-scale artificial field aligned irregularities (AFAIs) in the F region of the high-latitude ionosphere. These irregularities, with spatial scales across the geomagnetic field of the order of 9-15 m, were excited when the heater frequency (fH) was above the ordinary-mode critical frequency (foF2) by 0.1-1.2 MHz. It was found that the X-mode AFAIs appeared between 10 s and 4 min after the heater is turned on. Their decay time varied over a wide range between 3 min and 30 min. The excitation of X-mode AFAIs was accompanied by electron temperature (Te) enhancements and an increase in the electron density (Ne) depending on the effective radiated power (ERP). Under ERPs of about 75-180 MW the Te enhances up to 50% above the background level and an increase in Ne of up to 30% were observed. Dramatic changes in the Te and Ne behavior occurred at effective radiated powers of about 370-840 MW, when the Ne and Te values increased up to 100% above the background ones. It was found that AFAIs, Ne and Te enhancements occurred, when the extraordinary-mode critical frequency (fxF2) lied in the frequency range fH-fce/2≤fxF2≤fH+fce/2, where fce is the electron gyrofrequency. The strong Ne enhancements were observed only in the magnetic field-aligned direction in a wide altitude range up to the upper limit of the UHF radar measurements. In addition, the maximum value of Ne is about 50 km higher than the Te enhancement peak. Such electron density enhancements (artificial ducts) cannot be explained by

  19. Regionalization of disturbance-induced nitrogen leakage from mid-Appalachian forests using a linear systems model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshleman, Keith N.; Fiscus, Daniel A.; Castro, Nancy M.; Webb, James R.; Herlihy, Alan T.

    2004-10-01

    The leakage of nitrate-nitrogen (nitrate-N) to surface waters is a common (but not universal) response of forest ecosystems to both human-induced and natural disturbances. There are several reported examples of the transient leakage of nitrate-N to surface waters from eastern US forests that have sustained outbreaks of defoliating insects, such as the introduced gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larva. Previous research has suggested that annual nitrate-N leakage from disturbed forests can be modelled using an empirically derived unit nitrogen export response function (UNERF) model. The model represents annual nitrate-N export as a linear deterministic process in both space and time and is analogous to a unit hydrograph. The goal of the present study was to verify and apply a regionalized, lithology-based UNERF model that references the geographic distribution of bedrock class and the timing and extent of gypsy moth defoliation of forests in the non-glaciated highlands of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Despite an inability to verify the model for most individual watersheds within the study area, the model was able to reproduce the statistical distribution of annual nitrate-N export to streams that comprised our target population. During water year 1991 (the year following peak defoliation) the model results indicated that regional annual nitrate-N export had transiently increased by nearly 1500% from a baseline rate of about 0.1 kg ha-1 to a peak value approaching 1.5 kg ha-1. We thus conclude that natural vegetation disturbance is an important mechanism by which dissolved nitrogen is leaked from forested lands to small streams, rivers, and Chesapeake Bay. The present study also illustrates how simple, empirically derived linear systems approaches like the UNERF model can be successfully applied to problems where regionalization is a primary goal.

  20. Modeling regional cropland GPP by empirically incorporating sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence into a coupled photosynthesis-fluorescence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Guanter, L.; Van der Tol, C.; Joiner, J.; Berry, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Global sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) retrievals are currently available from several satellites. SIF is intrinsically linked to photosynthesis, so the new data sets allow to link remotely-sensed vegetation parameters and the actual photosynthetic activity of plants. In this study, we used space measurements of SIF together with the Soil-Canopy Observation of Photosynthesis and Energy (SCOPE) balance model in order to simulate regional photosynthetic uptake of croplands in the US corn belt. SCOPE couples fluorescence and photosynthesis at leaf and canopy levels. To do this, we first retrieved a key parameter of photosynthesis model, the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax), from field measurements of CO2 and water flux during 2007-2012 at some crop eddy covariance flux sites in the Midwestern US. Then we empirically calibrated Vcmax with apparent fluorescence yield which is SIF divided by PAR. SIF retrievals are from the European GOME-2 instrument onboard the MetOp-A platform. The resulting apparent fluorescence yield shows a stronger relationship with Vcmax during the growing season than widely-used vegetation index, EVI and NDVI. New seasonal and regional Vcmax maps were derived based on the calibration model for the cropland of the corn belt. The uncertainties of Vcmax were also estimated through Gaussian error propagation. With the newly derived Vcmax maps, we modeled regional cropland GPP during the growing season for the Midwestern USA, with meteorological data from MERRA reanalysis data and LAI from MODIS product (MCD15A2). The results show the improvement in the seasonal and spatial patterns of cropland productivity in comparisons with both flux tower and agricultural inventory data.

  1. Neural correlates of cat odor-induced anxiety in rats: region-specific effects of the benzodiazepine midazolam.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Iain S; Hargreaves, Garth A; Apfelbach, Raimund; Hunt, Glenn E

    2004-04-28

    Cat odor elicits a profound defensive reaction in rats that is reduced by benzodiazepine drugs. The neural correlates of this phenomenon were investigated here using Fos immunohistochemistry. Rats received either midazolam (0.75 mg/kg, s.c.) or vehicle and were exposed to pieces of a collar that had been worn by a domestic cat or an unworn (dummy) collar. Cat odor caused midazolam-sensitive defensive behavioral responses, including avoidance of collar contact, inhibition of grooming, and prolonged rearing. Cat odor exposure induced Fos expression in the posterior accessory olfactory bulb (glomerular, mitral, and granule cell layers), with granule cell layer activation attenuated by midazolam. High basal Fos expression, and some cat odor-associated Fos expression, was evident in the main olfactory bulb (glomerular cell layer), and midazolam exerted a strong inhibitory effect in this region. Midazolam inhibited Fos expression in key limbic regions involved in pheromone transduction (medial amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis) and defensive behavior (prelimbic cortex, lateral septum, lateral and medial preoptic areas, and dorsal premammillary nucleus). However, midazolam failed to affect cat odor-related Fos expression in a range of key defense-related sites, including the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray, and cuneiform nucleus. These results indicate that midazolam exerts a region-specific effect on the neural substrates activated by predator odor, with effects in the lateral septum and dorsal premammillary nucleus likely to be of major importance. These findings also suggest the intriguing hypothesis that cat odor is processed by rats as a "pheromone-like" stimulus. PMID:15115808

  2. Information and redundancy in the burial folding code of globular proteins within a wide range of shapes and sizes.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Diogo C; van der Linden, Marx G; de Oliveira, Leandro C; Onuchic, José N; Pereira de Araújo, Antônio F

    2016-04-01

    Recent ab initio folding simulations for a limited number of small proteins have corroborated a previous suggestion that atomic burial information obtainable from sequence could be sufficient for tertiary structure determination when combined to sequence-independent geometrical constraints. Here, we use simulations parameterized by native burials to investigate the required amount of information in a diverse set of globular proteins comprising different structural classes and a wide size range. Burial information is provided by a potential term pushing each atom towards one among a small number L of equiprobable concentric layers. An upper bound for the required information is provided by the minimal number of layers L(min) still compatible with correct folding behavior. We obtain L(min) between 3 and 5 for seven small to medium proteins with 50 ≤ Nr  ≤ 110 residues while for a larger protein with Nr  = 141 we find that L ≥ 6 is required to maintain native stability. We additionally estimate the usable redundancy for a given L ≥ L(min) from the burial entropy associated to the largest folding-compatible fraction of "superfluous" atoms, for which the burial term can be turned off or target layers can be chosen randomly. The estimated redundancy for small proteins with L = 4 is close to 0.8. Our results are consistent with the above-average quality of burial predictions used in previous simulations and indicate that the fraction of approachable proteins could increase significantly with even a mild, plausible, improvement on sequence-dependent burial prediction or on sequence-independent constraints that augment the detectable redundancy during simulations. Proteins 2016; 84:515-531. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26815167

  3. A method for classifying underground targets and simultaneously estimating their burial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strifors, H. C.; Andersson, T.; Axelsson, D.; Gaunaurd, G. C.

    2005-05-01

    Ultra-wideband ground penetrating radar (GPR) systems are useful for extracting and displaying information for target recognition purposes. The frequency content of projected signals is designed to match the size and type of prospective targets and environments. Target signatures whether in the time, frequency, or joint time-frequency domains, will substantially depend on the target's burial conditions such as the type of soil, burial depth, and the soil"s moisture content. Such returned echoes from two targets for several moisture contents and burial depths in a soil with known electrical properties were simulated earlier by using a Method-of-Moments (MoM) code. The signature template of each target was computed using a time-frequency distribution of the returned echo when the target was buried at standard conditions, namely, a selected depth in the soil with a selected moisture content. For any returned echo the relative difference between the likewise computed target signature and a template signature was computed. That signature difference, chosen as objective function, or cost function, could then be minimized by adjusting the depth and moisture content, now taken to be unknown parameters. This can be done using the differential evolution method (DEM) together with our target translation method (TTM). The template that gave the smallest value of the minimized objective function for the returned echo signified the classification, and the corresponding values of the depth and moisture parameters turned out to be good predictions of the actual target depth and soil moisture content. Here, we implement a more efficient and faster running version of this classification method on a stepped-frequency continuous-wave (SFCW) GPR system. We demonstrate the ability to classify mines or mine-like targets buried underground from measured GPR signals. The targets are buried either in an indoor sandbox or in a test field at the Swedish Explosive Ordnance Disposal and

  4. Carbon dioxide and organic acids: origin and role in burial diagenesis (Texas Gulf Coast Tertiary)

    SciTech Connect

    Lundegard, P.D.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon dioxide produced by decarboxylation of organic matter is not a dominant factor in secondary porosity development. Material balance calculations indicate the amount of feldspar and carbonate dissolution that has taken place in Tertiary sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast far exceeds that which is explainable by decarboxylation. Other potential sources of acid for dissolution reactions include reverse weathering reactions in shales, an hydrous pyrolysis reactions between organic carbon and oxygen in H/sub 2/O to yield CO/sub 2/ or organic acids. Considerations of CO/sub 2/ solubility and the temperature distribution of organic acids imply that these species must be generated locally to cause significant dissolution. The CO/sub 2/ content of gas from Gulf Coast Tertiary sandstones is proportional to reservoir age, and increases with depth and temperature at a rate that is approximately exponential. In the Wilcox Formation the increase in CO/sub 2/ content continues beyond depths where dissolved organic acids are abundant and where kerogen has lost its oxygen from functional groups that are readily liberated as CO/sub 2/. In this formation the /sup 13/C of CO/sub 2/ and CH/sub 4/ are proportional to temperature and to each other. Either mixing with fluids derived from the Mesozoic carbonate section of deep CO/sub 2/ generation by kinetically controlled organic reactions may explain these data. Organic acid concentration with depth and temperature indicates a non-biological origin by thermal cracking of kerogen during burial. Continued burial leads to their thermal decomposition. Cessation of burial may lead to meteoric water invasion and organic acid destruction by biological processes. The effect of time on organic acid production is minor compared to temperature.

  5. Species sensitivity distributions for suspended clays, sediment burial, and grain size change in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Smit, Mathijs G D; Holthaus, Karlijn I E; Trannum, Hilde C; Neff, Jerry M; Kjeilen-Eilertsen, Grete; Jak, Robbert G; Singsaas, Ivar; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Hendriks, A Jan

    2008-04-01

    Assessment of the environmental risk of discharges, containing both chemicals and suspended solids (e.g., drilling discharges to the marine environment), requires an evaluation of the effects of both toxic and nontoxic pollutants. To date, a structured evaluation scheme that can be used for prognostic risk assessments for nontoxic stress is lacking. In the present study we challenge this lack of information by the development of marine species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) for three nontoxic stressors: suspended clays, burial by sediment, and change in sediment grain size. Through a literature study, effect levels were obtained for suspended clays, as well as for burial of biota. Information on the species preference range for median grain size was used to assess the sensitivity of marine species to changes in grain size. The 50% hazardous concentrations (HC50) for suspended barite and bentonite based on 50% effect concentrations (EC50s) were 3,010 and 1,830 mg/L, respectively. For burial the 50% hazardous level (HL50) was 5.4 cm. For change in median grain size, two SSDs were constructed; one for reducing and one for increasing the median grain size. The HL50 for reducing the median grain size was 17.8 mum. For increasing the median grain size this value was 305 mum. The SSDs have been constructed by using information related to offshore oil- and gas-related activities. Nevertheless, the results of the present study may have broader implications. The hypothesis of the present study is that the SSD methodology developed for the evaluation of toxic stress can also be applied to evaluate nontoxic stressors, facilitating the incorporation of nontoxic stressors in prognostic risk assessment tools. PMID:18333685

  6. Clay mineral burial diagenesis: A case study from the Calabar flank of the Niger Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braide, Sokari P.

    Detailed clay mineralogic and chemical analyses of Tertiary subsurface sediments of the Agbada and Akata Formations, from two wells on the Calabar Flank of the Niger Delta, have been systematically studied with a view to understanding clay mineral burial diagenesis. Five principal clay minerals, smectite, illite, kaolinite, chlorite and various proportions of mixed-layer illite/smectite were identified. Seven major oxides (SiO 2, Al 2O 3, MgO, Fe 2O 3, CaO, Na 2O, K 2O) were analysed for with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, with a view to ascertain any depth related variations. The geothermal gradient of the two wells (Uruan-1 and Uda-1) was also calculated. The results appear to suggest a transformation from smectite to a mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S) phase. The transformation first goes to a random I/S phase, and then to ordered I/S and back to random I/S, even though postulated conditions for a complete transformation to illite did exist. It would therefore seem, from this case study, that neither temperature nor the availability of potassium is the principal factor controlling the transformation. Kaolinite and chlorite distribution does not exhibit any systematic trend that could be related to burial diagenesis. These results provoked an extensive literature review on the subject, and key ideas discerned are summarized here. The prognosis? In the author's opinion, we still have a lot to learn about the factors that control the mechanics and reaction extent of clay mineral burial diagenesis.

  7. Clay mineralogy, organic carbon burial, and redox evolution in Proterozoic oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosca, Nicholas J.; Johnston, David T.; Mushegian, Alexandra; Rothman, Daniel H.; Summons, Roger E.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2010-03-01

    Clay minerals formed through chemical weathering have long been implicated in the burial of organic matter (OM), but because diagenesis and metamorphism commonly obscure the signature of weathering-derived clays in Precambrian rocks, clay mineralogy and its role in OM burial through much of geologic time remains incompletely understood. Here we have analyzed the mineralogy, geochemistry and total organic ca