Science.gov

Sample records for induced cracking hic

  1. Normal Platelet Integrin Function in Mice Lacking Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Clone-5 (Hic-5)

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Michael; Thielmann, Ina; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stegner, David

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αIIbβ3 plays a central role in the adhesion and aggregation of platelets and thus is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis. Integrin activation requires the transmission of a signal from the small cytoplasmic tails of the α or β subunit to the large extracellular domains resulting in conformational changes of the extracellular domains to enable ligand binding. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), a member of the paxillin family, serves as a focal adhesion adaptor protein associated with αIIbβ3 at its cytoplasmic tails. Previous studies suggested Hic-5 as a novel regulator of integrin αIIbβ3 activation and platelet aggregation in mice. To assess this in more detail, we generated Hic-5-null mice and analyzed activation and aggregation of their platelets in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, lack of Hic-5 had no detectable effect on platelet integrin activation and function in vitro and in vivo under all tested conditions. These results indicate that Hic-5 is dispensable for integrin αIIbβ3 activation and consequently for arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in mice. PMID:26172113

  2. Hic-5 mediates TGFβ-induced adhesion in vascular smooth muscle cells by a Nox4-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Isabel; Martin-Garrido, Abel; Zhou, Dennis W.; Clempus, Roza E.; Seidel-Rogol, Bonnie; Valdivia, Alejandra; Lassègue, Bernard; García, Andrés J.; Griendling, Kathy K.; Martin, Alejandra San

    2015-01-01

    Objective Focal adhesions (FAs) link the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix and as such play important roles in growth, migration and contractile properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Recently, it has been shown that downregulation of Nox4, a transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)-inducible, H2O2-producing enzyme, affects the number of FAs. However, the effectors downstream of Nox4 that mediate FA regulation are unknown. The FA resident protein hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5) is H2O2- and TGFβ-inducible, and a binding partner of the heat shock protein (Hsp)27. The objective of this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which Hic-5 and Hsp27 participate in TGFβ-induced, Nox4-mediated VSMC adhesion and migration. Approach and Results Through a combination of molecular biology and biochemistry techniques, we found that TGFβ, by a Nox4-dependent mechanism, induces the expression and interaction of Hic-5 and Hsp27, which is essential for Hic-5 localization to FAs. Importantly, we found that Hic-5 expression is required for the TGFβ-mediated increase in FA number, and adhesive forces and migration. Mechanistically, Nox4 downregulation impedes Smad signaling by TGFβ, and Hsp27 and Hic-5 upregulation by TGFβ is blocked in Smad4-deficient cells. Conclusions Hic-5 and Hsp27 are effectors of Nox4 required for TGFβ-stimulated FA formation and adhesion strength and migration in VSMC. PMID:25814672

  3. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking Assessment in Pipeline Steels Through Permeation and Crystallographic Texture Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; Karimdadashi, R.; Eskandari, M.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    Electrochemical hydrogen charging and permeation techniques were used to characterize hydrogen distribution, trapping, and diffusion in X60 and X60 sour service (X60SS) pipeline steels. The results obtained contribute to better understanding of hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). SEM observations illustrated that all HIC cracks were formed at the center of cross section in the X60 steel after 3-h hydrogen charging and length of cracks increased with charging time. No HIC cracks were recorded at the cross section of X60SS steel after the same charging for different durations. Hydrogen permeation tests showed that the density of reversible hydrogen traps was lower at the center of cross section in the X60SS steel compared to the X60 one, and this is considered as one of the main reasons for high resistance of X60SS steel to HIC. EBSD orientation imaging results proved that the accumulation of <111>||ND-oriented grains at the center of the cross section in the X60SS steel was high. This is also considered as another reason for higher resistance of this steel to HIC. Finally, the center segregation zone with higher hardness value in the X60 steel was more pronounced than in the X60SS steel which made the X60 steel susceptible to HIC cracking.

  4. Hydrogen-induced cracking of drip shield

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S C

    1999-08-01

    A simple and conservative model has been developed to evaluate the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking on the drip shield. The basic premise of the model is that failure will occur once the hydrogen content exceeds a certain limit or critical value, HC. This model is very conservative because it assumes that, once the environmental and material conditions can support that particular corrosion process, failure will be effectively instantaneous. In the description of the HIC model presented in Section 6.1, extensive evidence has been provided to support a qualitative assessment of Ti-7 as an excellent choice of material for the drip shield with regard to degradation caused by hydrogen-induced cracking. LTCTF test data observed at LLNL, although unqualified, provides additional indication beyond a qualitative level that hydrogen concentration appears to be low in titanium materials. Quantitative evaluation based on the HIC model described in Section 6.1 indicates that the hydrogen concentration does not exceed the critical value. It is concluded that drip shield material (Ti-7) is able to sustain the effects of hydrogen-induced cracking.

  5. Design of an electrochemical probe for monitoring susceptibility of steel in pickling to hydrogen-induced cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.F.; Du, Y.L. . Corrosion Science Lab.)

    1993-09-01

    The relationship between the measured signals (hydrogen [H] permeating rate) of an electrochemical H sensor and the strength/embrittlement of plain carbon steel in acid solution as defined by slow strain rate tensile tests and scanning electron microscopy was studied. Critical parameters and criteria for hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) reported may be useful in software design of an electrochemical probe for inspecting and monitoring the HIC susceptibility of steel in pickling.

  6. Loss of Hypermethylated in Cancer 1 (HIC1) in Breast Cancer Cells Contributes to Stress-induced Migration and Invasion through β-2 Adrenergic Receptor (ADRB2) Misregulation*

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Gaylor; Malaquin, Nicolas; Loison, Ingrid; Foveau, Bénédicte; Van Rechem, Capucine; Rood, Brian R.; Pourtier, Albin; Leprince, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor HIC1 (Hypermethylated in Cancer 1) is a tumor suppressor gene inactivated in many human cancers including breast carcinomas. In this study, we show that HIC1 is a direct transcriptional repressor of β-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2). Through promoter luciferase activity, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and sequential ChIP experiments, we demonstrate that ADRB2 is a direct target gene of HIC1, endogenously in WI-38 cells and following HIC1 re-expression in breast cancer cells. Agonist-mediated stimulation of ADRB2 increases the migration and invasion of highly malignant MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells but these effects are abolished following HIC1 re-expression or specific down-regulation of ADRB2 by siRNA treatment. Our results suggest that early inactivation of HIC1 in breast carcinomas could predispose to stress-induced metastasis through up-regulation of the β-2 adrenergic receptor. PMID:22194601

  7. Evaluation of Heat-affected Zone Hydrogen-induced Cracking in High-strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xin

    Shipbuilding is heavily reliant on welding as a primary fabrication technique. Any high performance naval steel must also possess good weldability. It is therefore of great practical importance to conduct weldability testing of naval steels. Among various weldability issues of high-strength steels, hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) following welding is one of the biggest concerns. As a result, in the present work, research was conducted to study the HAZ HIC susceptibility of several naval steels. Since the coarse-grained heat-affected zone (CGHAZ) is generally known to be the most susceptible to HIC in the HAZ region, the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behavior of the CGHAZ of naval steels HSLA-65, HSLA-100, and HY-100 was investigated. The CGHAZ microstructure over a range of cooling rates was characterized, and corresponding CCT diagrams were constructed. It was found that depending on the cooling rate, martensite, bainite, ferrite and pearlite can form in the CGHAZ of HSLA-65. For HSLA-100 and HY-100, only martensite and bainite formed over the range of cooling rates that were simulated. The constructed CCT diagrams can be used as a reference to select welding parameters to avoid the formation of high-hardness martensite in the CGHAZ, in order to ensure resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking. Implant testing was conducted on the naval steels to evaluate their susceptibility to HAZ HIC. Stress vs. time to failure curves were plotted, and the lower critical stress (LCS), normalized critical stress ratio (NCSR) and embrittlement index (EI) for each steel were determined, which were used to quantitatively compare HIC susceptibility. The CGHAZ microstructure of the naval steels was characterized, and the HIC fracture behavior was studied. Intergranular (IG), quasi-cleavage (QC) and microvoid coalescence (MVC) fracture modes were found to occur in sequence during the crack initiation and propagation process. This was

  8. Investigation of the susceptibility of conventional ASTM A515-70 pressure vessel steel to HIC and SOHIC in H{sub 2}S - containing DGA solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Anezi, M.A.; Frankel, G.S.; Agrawal, A.K.

    1999-07-01

    Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC) and Stress Oriented Hydrogen Induced Cracking (SOHIC) tests were conducted on a conventional ASTM A516-70 pressure vessel steel exposed to H{sub 2}S-containing diglycolamine (DGA) gas- sweetening environments. Baseline HIC and SOHIC tests were conducted in NACE TM-0284-A-96 solution. For the SOHIC tests, four-point double beam specimens were stressed to 60%, 80% or 100% of the yield strength of the steel in order to study the effect of applied stress. Test conditions included solutions containing 70 wt.% DGA and 500 ppm H{sub 2}S to 0.45 or higher mole-H{sub 2}S/mole-DGA and temperatures of 25, 45 and 80 C. Corrosion rates of the steel were calculated from weight loss of the HIC specimens in order to compare the severity of the test environment with the actual service environment. Cracks were characterized in terms of crack length ratio (CLR), crack thickness ratio (CTR) and crack sensitivity ratio (CSR). Results indicate that conventional ASTM A516-70 pressure vessel steel is not susceptible to HIC or SOHIC in various H{sub 2}S-containing DGA solutions at the temperatures studied.

  9. Hi-C Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    The High resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) was launched on a NASA Black Brant IX two-stage rocket from White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico July 11, 2012. The experiment reached a maximum velocit...

  10. AN EVALUATION OF HYDROGEN INDUCED CRACKING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF TITANIUM ALLOYS IN US HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE REPOSITORY ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    G. De; K. Mon; G. Gordon; D. Shoesmith; F. Hua

    2006-02-21

    This paper evaluates hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) susceptibility of titanium alloys in environments anticipated in the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository with particular emphasis on the. effect of the oxide passive film on the hydrogen absorption process of titanium alloys being evaluated. The titanium alloys considered in this review include Ti 2, 5 , 7, 9, 11, 12, 16, 17, 18, 24 and 29. In general, the concentration of hydrogen in a titanium alloy can increase due to absorption of atomic hydrogen produced from passive general corrosion of that alloy or galvanic coupling of it to a less noble metal. It is concluded that under the exposure conditions anticipated in the Yucca Mountain repository, the HIC of titanium drip shield will not occur because there will not be sufficient hydrogen in the metal even after 10,000 years of emplacement. Due to the conservatisms adopted in the current evaluation, this assessment is considered very conservative.

  11. Effective Process Design for the Production of HIC-Resistant Linepipe Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, J.; Elías, T.; López, G.; Campos, G.; López, F.; Garcia, R.; De, Amar K.

    2013-09-01

    Production of slabs for sour service applications requires stringent control in slab internal quality and secondary processing so as to guarantee resistance against hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). ArcelorMittal Steelmaking facility at Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico had recently implemented key steelmaking and casting processing technologies for production of sound, centerline free slabs for catering to the growing API Linepipe and off-shore market for sour service applications. State-of-the-art steelmaking with use of residual-free Direct-reduced Iron and continuous casting facilities with dynamic soft reduction were introduced for the production of slabs with ultra clean centerline. Introduction of controlled cooling of slabs for atomic hydrogen control well below 2 ppm has enabled production of slabs suitable for excellent HIC-resistant plate processing. Substantial tonnages of slabs were produced for production of API X52-X65 grade plates and pipes for sour service. Stringent quality control at each stage of steelmaking, casting, and slab inspection ensured slabs with excellent internal quality suitable for HIC resistance to be guaranteed in final product (Plates & Pipes). Details of production steps which resulted in successful HIC-resistant slab production have been described in this article.

  12. Hi-C First Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cirtain, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Hi-C obtained the highest spatial and temporal resolution observatoins ever taken in the solar corona. Hi-C reveals dynamics and structure at the limit of its temporal and spatial resolution. Hi-C observed ubiquitous fine-scale flows consistent with the local sound speed.

  13. Modeling Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of Titanium Alloys in Nuclear Waste Repository Environments

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua; K. Mon; P. Pasupathi; G. Gordon

    2004-09-08

    This paper reviews the current understanding of hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) of Ti Grade 7 and other relevant titanium alloys within the context of the current waste package design for the repository environmental conditions anticipated within the Yucca Mountain repository. The review concentrates on corrosion processes possible in the aqueous environments expected within this site. A brief background discussion of the relevant properties of titanium alloys, the hydrogen absorption process, and the properties of passive film on titanium alloys is presented as the basis for the subsequent discussion of model developments. The key corrosion processes that could occur are addressed individually. Subsequently, the expected corrosion performance of these alloys under the specific environmental conditions anticipated at Yucca Mountain is considered. It can be concluded that, based on the conservative modeling approaches adopted, hydrogen-induced cracking of titanium alloys will not occur under nuclear waste repository conditions since there will not be sufficient hydrogen in the alloy after 10,000 years of emplacement.

  14. Morphogenesis and propagation of complex cracks induced by thermal shocks.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Blaise; Marigo, Jean-Jacques; Maurini, Corrado; Sicsic, Paul

    2014-01-10

    We study the genesis and the selective propagation of complex crack networks induced by thermal shock or drying of brittle materials. We use a quasistatic gradient damage model to perform large-scale numerical simulations showing that the propagation of fully developed cracks follows Griffith criterion and depends only on the fracture toughness, while crack morphogenesis is driven by the material's internal length. Our numerical simulations feature networks of parallel cracks and selective arrest in two dimensions and hexagonal columnar joints in three dimensions, without any hypotheses on cracks geometry, and are in good agreement with available experimental results. PMID:24483901

  15. Prediction of thermal cycling induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal fatigue has been observed to cause matrix cracking in laminated composite materials. A method is presented to predict transverse matrix cracks in composite laminates subjected to cyclic thermal load. Shear lag stress approximations and a simple energy-based fracture criteria are used to predict crack densities as a function of temperature. Prediction of crack densities as a function of thermal cycling is accomplished by assuming that fatigue degrades the material's inherent resistance to cracking. The method is implemented as a computer program. A simple experiment provides data on progressive cracking of a laminate with decreasing temperature. Existing data on thermal fatigue is also used. Correlations of the analytical predictions to the data are very good. A parametric study using the analytical method is presented which provides insight into material behavior under cyclical thermal loads.

  16. Hydrogen-Induced Cracking of the Drip Shield

    SciTech Connect

    F. Hua

    2004-09-07

    Hydrogen-induced cracking is characterized by the decreased ductility and fracture toughness of a material due to the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. Corrosion is the source of hydrogen generation. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, hydrogen-induced cracking may be a concern because the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this report is to analyze whether the drip shield will fail by hydrogen-induced cracking under repository conditions within 10,000 years after emplacement. Hydrogen-induced cracking is a scenario of premature failure of the drip shield. This report develops a realistic model to assess the form of hydrogen-induced cracking degradation of the drip shield under the hydrogen-induced cracking. The scope of this work covers the evaluation of hydrogen absorbed due to general corrosion and galvanic coupling to less noble metals (e.g., Stainless Steel Type 316 and carbon steels) under the repository conditions during the 10,000-year regulatory period after emplacement and whether the absorbed hydrogen content will exceed the critical hydrogen concentration value, above which the hydrogen-induced cracking is assumed to occur. This report also provides the basis for excluding the features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to hydrogen-induced cracking of the drip shield with particular emphasis on FEP 2.1.03.04.OB, hydride cracking of drip shields (DTN: M00407SEPFEPLA.000 [DIRS 170760]). This report is prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169944]).

  17. Hic-5 Regulates Actin Cytoskeletal Reorganization and Expression of Fibrogenic Markers and Myocilin in Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan Paranji; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the role of inducible focal adhesion (FA) protein Hic-5 in actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FA formation, fibrogenic activity, and expression of myocilin in trabecular meshwork (TM) cells. Methods Using primary cultures of human TM (HTM) cells, the effects of various external factors on Hic-5 protein levels, as well as the effects of recombinant Hic-5 and Hic-5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) on actin cytoskeleton, FAs, myocilin, α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and collagen-1 were determined by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses. Results Hic-5 distributes discretely to the FAs in HTM cells and throughout the TM and Schlemm's canal of the human aqueous humor (AH) outflow pathway. Transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2), endothelin-1, lysophosphatidic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and RhoA significantly increased Hic-5 protein levels in HTM cells in association with reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and FAs. While recombinant Hic-5 induced actin stress fibers, FAs, αv integrin redistribution to the FAs, increased levels of αSMA, collagen-1, and myocilin, Hic-5 siRNA suppressed most of these responses in HTM cells. Hic-5 siRNA also suppressed TGF-β2-induced fibrogenic activity and dexamethasone-induced myocilin expression in HTM cells. Conclusions Taken together, these results reveal that Hic-5, whose levels were increased by various external factors implicated in elevated intraocular pressure, induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization, FAs, expression of fibrogenic markers, and myocilin in HTM cells. These characteristics of Hic-5 in TM cells indicate its importance in regulation of AH outflow through the TM in both normal and glaucomatous eyes. PMID:26313302

  18. On Modeling Hydrogen-Induced Crack Propagation Under Sustained Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen; Somerday, Brian p.; Schembri, Philip E.; Sofronis, Petros; Foulk, James W.; Nibur, Kevin A.; Balch, Dorian K.

    2014-08-01

    The failure of hydrogen containment components is generally associated with subcritical cracking. Understanding subcritical crack growth behavior and its dependence on material and environmental variables can lead to methods for designing structural components in a hydrogen environment and will be beneficial in developing materials resistant to hydrogen embrittlement. In order to identify the issues underlying crack propagation and arrest, we present a model for hydrogen-induced stress-controlled crack propagation under sustained loading. The model is based on the assumptions that (I) hydrogen reduces the material fracture strength and (II) crack propagation takes place when the opening stress over the characteristic distance ahead of a crack tip is greater than the local fracture strength. The model is used in a finite-element simulation of crack propagation coupled with simultaneous hydrogen diffusion in a model material through nodal release. The numerical simulations show that the same physics, i.e., diffusion-controlled crack propagation, can explain the existence of both stages I and II in the velocity versus stress intensity factor ( V- K) curve.

  19. Alternatives to HIC resistant steels in sour refinery environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jack, B.L.

    1999-07-01

    Based on recent laboratory data and field experiences, the use of HIC resistant steels as a viable solution to wet H{sub 2}S cracking problems in refineries is being questioned. The use of HIC resistant steels, even with post weld heat treatment (PWHT), may not be a valid means to achieve the common end user goals of both reducing the risk of through wall vessel leaks and reducing inspection and maintenance costs associated with refinery wet H{sub 2}S service vessels. Some currently available data does not support adjusting vessel inspection intervals based on type of steel, PWHT condition, or even prior cracking history, as even subtle changes in process conditions in higher risk services can promote cracking where none existed previously. Prior versions of some refinery wet H{sub 2}S inspection programs allowed for significant adjustments of inspection intervals based upon these parameters. Some current wet H{sub 2}S inspection programs call for frequent WFMT inspection (typically 5 years maximum) for all vessels in high risk wet H{sub 2}S service and allow for extension of inspection intervals only when corrosion barriers (e.g. cladding or coating) are present. This paper provides some specifics on the data behind these recent philosophy changes.

  20. Environment-induced cracking in structural titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, B.P.; Moody, N.R.; Costa, J.E.; Gangloff, R.P.

    1998-12-31

    Environment-induced crack growth can lead to premature failure of structural titanium alloys. In many cases, subcritical cracking is due to hydrogen. As a consequence, understanding the effects of hydrogen on crack growth susceptibility is important for the proper selection of alloys to be used in hydrogen and hydrogen-producing gaseous and aqueous environments. Of particular importance is the effect of microstructure. As the studies cited in this review consistently show, microstructure has a strong effect on crack growth susceptibility of structural titanium alloys. This is most apparent when Ti{sub 3}Al precipitation in {alpha} and {alpha}+{beta} alloys induces well-defined planar slip, and when grain boundary a precipitation and elemental segregation sensitize grain boundaries to failure in {beta} titanium alloys.

  1. Analysis of crack-induced-craze in polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, B. N.; Hou, H. S.; Hsiao, C. C.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper, the viscoelastic boundary element method is used to estimate the opening displacement and the envelope stress on the surface of an isolated crack-induced-craze system. To predict the propagation history of both the crack and the craze in a polymer sheet, the material properties of the glassy polymers are represented by a generalized linear viscoelastic model. Results are compared with the theoretical micromechanics predictions. Good agreements are obtained.

  2. Investigation of hydrogen induced cracking in 2205 duplex stainless steel in wet H{sub 2}S environments after isothermal treatment at 675, 750 and 900 deg. C

    SciTech Connect

    Sozanska, Maria . E-mail: maria.sozanska@polsl.pl; Klyk-Spyra, Katarzyna

    2006-06-15

    The effect of isothermal treatment (at 675, 750 and 900 deg. C) on HIC (hydrogen induced cracking) in sour environments containing hydrogen sulphide of a 2205 duplex stainless steel has been investigated. The performance and microstructure of failed material were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and also X-ray diffraction. Two kinds of Cr-, Mo-enriched intermetallic phases, {sigma} and {chi}, were found to precipitate preferentially at {alpha}/{gamma} interfaces and within {alpha} grains after different times of aging in the temperature range of 650-900 deg. C. After performing tests according to the NACE Standard TM 0284 (1987) the specimens were investigated by using quantitative metallography methods. The volume fraction of {sigma} phase was changed with the time of aging and {sigma} phase developed into coarse particles due to the high diffusibility of solute atoms at high temperatures. The variation of size and shape of {sigma} phase particles was obtained by applying different heat treatment conditions to 2205 steel specimens. The results showed that 2205 duplex stainless steel containing nearly 12 vol.% of {sigma} phase in dispersed conditions was resistant to step cracking in wet environments containing hydrogen sulphide. It was highly possible that a crack would propagate faster along the embrittled {sigma} phase. However, very small cracks were found at austenite-ferrite boundaries where o phase particles were also present.

  3. Technique to eliminate helium induced weld cracking in stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chin-An Wang; Chin, B.A.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1992-12-31

    Experiments have shown that Type 316 stainless steel is susceptible to heat-affected-zone (HAZ) cracking upon cooling when welded using the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process under lateral constraint. The cracking has been hypothesized to be caused by stress-assisted helium bubble growth and rupture at grain boundaries. This study utilized an experimental welding setup which enabled different compressive stresses to be applied to the plates during welding. Autogenous GTA welds were produced in Type 316 stainless steel doped with 256 appm helium. The application of a compressive stress, 55 Mpa, during welding suppressed the previously observed catastrophic cracking. Detailed examinations conducted after welding showed a dramatic change in helium bubble morphology. Grain boundary bubble growth along directions parallel to the weld was suppressed. Results suggest that stress-modified welding techniques may be used to suppress or eliminate helium-induced cracking during joining of irradiated materials.

  4. Prediction of thermal cycling induced cracking in polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the work done in the period February 1993 through July 1993 on the 'Prediction of Thermal Cycling Induced Cracking In Polymer Matrix Composites' program. An oral presentation of this work was given to Langley personnel in September of 1993. This document was prepared for archival purposes. Progress studies have been performed on the effects of spatial variations in material strength. Qualitative agreement was found with observed patterns of crack distribution. These results were presented to NASA Langley personnel in November 1992. The analytical methodology developed by Prof. McManus in the summer of 1992 (under an ASEE fellowship) has been generalized. A method for predicting matrix cracking due to decreasing temperatures and/or thermal cycling in all plies of an arbitrary laminate has been implemented as a computer code. The code also predicts changes in properties due to the cracking. Experimental progressive cracking studies on a variety of laminates were carried out at Langley Research Center. Results were correlated to predictions using the new methods. Results were initially mixed. This motivated an exploration of the configuration of cracks within laminates. A crack configuration study was carried out by cutting and/or sanding specimens in order to examine the distribution of cracks within the specimens. These investigations were supplemented by dye-penetrant enhanced X-ray photographs. The behavior of thin plies was found to be different from the behavior of thicker plies (or ply groups) on which existing theories are based. Significant edge effects were also noted, which caused the traditional metric of microcracking (count of cracks on a polished edge) to be very inaccurate in some cases. With edge and configuration taken into account, rough agreement with predictions was achieved. All results to date were reviewed with NASA Langley personnel in September 1993.

  5. Helium-induced weld cracking in irradiated 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Birchenall, A.K. )

    1989-01-01

    This report consists of slide notes for presentation to The Metallurgical Society of the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and Petroleum Engineers (AIME). The meeting in question will be held October 3, 1989 in Indianapolis. This presentation will be the second of three consecutive talks contributed by SRL personnel dealing with helium-induced weld cracking.

  6. The role of hydrogen in stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steel in hot MgCl{sub 2} solution

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, L.; Mao, X.; Chu, W.

    1995-07-01

    The role of hydrogen in stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel was investigated in boiling chloride solution. The tests in the mixed melted salt verified that hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) could occur at 160 C if sufficient hydrogen could be supplied continuously. It was found that the threshold SCC intensity factors of both 321 and 310 steels were lower than those of HIC during dynamic charging at high fugacity at 40 C and 160 C. In addition, anodic polarization decreased hydrogen concentration and promoted SCC in hot LiCl solution, while cathodic polarization increased hydrogen concentration and restrained SCC. Hydrogen could be introduced into the specimen and be concentrated at the crack tip during SCC. It could promote anodic dissolution and SCC remarkably, although it was not enough to produce cracking.

  7. Coronal Heating Observed with Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.

    2013-01-01

    The recent launch of the High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) as a sounding rocket has offered a new, different view of the Sun. With approx 0.3" resolution and 5 second cadence, Hi-C reveals dynamic, small-scale structure within a complicated active region, including coronal braiding, reconnection regions, Alfven waves, and flows along active region fans. By combining the Hi-C data with other available data, we have compiled a rich data set that can be used to address many outstanding questions in solar physics. Though the Hi-C rocket flight was short (only 5 minutes), the added insight of the small-scale structure gained from the Hi-C data allows us to look at this active region and other active regions with new understanding. In this talk, I will review the first results from the Hi-C sounding rocket and discuss the impact of these results on the coronal heating problem.

  8. Prediction of thermal cycling induced cracking in polmer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmanus, Hugh L.

    1994-01-01

    The work done in the period August 1993 through February 1994 on the 'Prediction of Thermal Cycling Induced Cracking In Polymer Matrix Composites' program is summarized. Most of the work performed in this period, as well as the previous one, is described in detail in the attached Master's thesis, 'Analysis of Thermally Induced Damage in Composite Space Structures,' by Cecelia Hyun Seon Park. Work on a small thermal cycling and aging chamber was concluded in this period. The chamber was extensively tested and calibrated. Temperatures can be controlled very precisely, and are very uniform in the test chamber. Based on results obtained in the previous period of this program, further experimental progressive cracking studies were carried out. The laminates tested were selected to clarify the differences between the behaviors of thick and thin ply layers, and to explore other variables such as stacking sequence and scaling effects. Most specimens tested were made available from existing stock at Langley Research Center. One laminate type had to be constructed from available prepreg material at Langley Research Center. Specimens from this laminate were cut and prepared at MIT. Thermal conditioning was carried out at Langley Research Center, and at the newly constructed MIT facility. Specimens were examined by edge inspection and by crack configuration studies, in which specimens were sanded down in order to examine the distribution of cracks within the specimens. A method for predicting matrix cracking due to decreasing temperatures and/or thermal cycling in all plies of an arbitrary laminate was implemented as a computer code. The code also predicts changes in properties due to the cracking. Extensive correlations between test results and code predictions were carried out. The computer code was documented and is ready for distribution.

  9. Desiccation-crack-induced salinization in deep clay sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Ronen, Z.; Kurtzman, D.; Küells, C.; Dahan, O.

    2012-11-01

    A study on water infiltration and solute transport in a clayey vadose zone underlying a dairy farm waste source was conducted to assess the impact of desiccation cracks on subsurface evaporation and salinization. The study is based on five years of continuous measurements of the temporal variation in the vadose zone water-content and on the chemical and isotopic composition of the sediment and pore-water in it. The isotopic composition of water stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) in water and sediment samples, from the area where desiccation crack networks prevail, indicated subsurface evaporation down to ∼3.5 m below land surface, and vertical and lateral preferential transport of water, following erratic preferential infiltration events. Chloride (Cl-) concentrations in the vadose zone pore water substantially increased with depth, evidence of deep subsurface evaporation and down flushing of concentrated solutions from the evaporation zones during preferential infiltration events. These observations led to development of a Desiccation-Crack-Induced Salinization (DCIS) conceptual model. DCIS suggests that thermally driven convective air flow in the desiccation cracks induces evaporation and salinization in relatively deep sections of the subsurface. This conceptual model supports previous conceptual models on vadose zone and groundwater salinization in fractured rock in arid environments and extends its validity to clayey soils in semi-arid environments.

  10. Desiccation-crack-induced salinization in deep clay sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Ronen, Z.; Kurtzman, D.; Külls, C.; Dahan, O.

    2013-04-01

    A study on water infiltration and solute transport in a clayey vadose zone underlying a dairy farm waste source was conducted to assess the impact of desiccation cracks on subsurface evaporation and salinization. The study is based on five years of continuous measurements of the temporal variation in the vadose zone water content and on the chemical and isotopic composition of the sediment and pore water in it. The isotopic composition of water stable isotopes (δ18O and δ2H) in water and sediment samples, from the area where desiccation crack networks prevail, indicated subsurface evaporation down to ~ 3.5 m below land surface, and vertical and lateral preferential transport of water, following erratic preferential infiltration events. Chloride (Cl-) concentrations in the vadose zone pore water substantially increased with depth, evidence of deep subsurface evaporation and down flushing of concentrated solutions from the evaporation zones during preferential infiltration events. These observations led to development of a desiccation-crack-induced salinization (DCIS) conceptual model. DCIS suggests that thermally driven convective air flow in the desiccation cracks induces evaporation and salinization in relatively deep sections of the subsurface. This conceptual model supports previous conceptual models on vadose zone and groundwater salinization in fractured rock in arid environments and extends its validity to clayey soils in semi-arid environments.

  11. Crack

    MedlinePlus

    ... sound the drug makes as it heats up. Short-Term Effects Crack is a stimulant that is absorbed through ... quickly, after about 5 or 10 minutes. Other short-term effects include: higher heart rate, breathing rate, blood pressure , ...

  12. An Evaluation of the Plasticity-Induced Crack-Closure Concept and Measurement Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    An assessment of the plasticity-induced crack-closure concept is made, in light of some of the questions that have been raised on the validity of the concept, and the assumptions that have been made concerning crack-dp damage below the crack-opening stress. The impact of using other crack-tip parameters, such as the cyclic crack-tip displacement, to model crack-growth rate behavior was studied. Crack-growth simulations, using a crack-closure model, showed a close relation between traditional Delta K eff, and the cyclic crack-tip displacement (Delta eff) for an aluminum alloy and a steel. Evaluations of the cyclic hysteresis energy demonstrated that the cyclic plastic damage below the crack-opening stress was negligible in the Paris crack-growth regime. Some of the standard and newly proposed remote measurement methods to determine the 'effective' crack-tip driving parameter were evaluated on middle-crack tension specimens. A potential source of the Kmax effect on crack-growth rates was studied on an aluminum alloy. Results showed that the ratio of Kmax to Kc had a strong effect on crack-growth rates at high stress ratios and at low stress ratios for very high stress levels. The crack-closure concept and the traditional crack-growth rate equations were able to correlate and predict crack-growth rates under these extreme conditions.

  13. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC. PMID:26066367

  14. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young's modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC. PMID:26066367

  15. Hydrogen Induced Damage in Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, Garrett R.

    The hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) resistance of several grades of plate steels was investigated using electrolytic hydrogen charging. HIC generated by electrolytic charging was also compared to the industrial standard test for HIC, the NACE standard TM0284. The electrolytic charging (EC) apparatus was designed to optimize the reproducibility of the HIC results and the robustness of the components during long charging times. A characterization study on the EC apparatus was undertaken. Alterations to applied current density and charging time were conducted on a highly susceptible plate steel, 100XF, to assess HIC damage as a function of charging conditions. Intermediate current densities of 10 to 15 mA/cm2 produced the greatest extent of cracking without significant corrosion related surface damage. The hydrogen charging time did not greatly affect the extent and depth of cracking for test times between 24 to 48 hours. Thus, for subsequent experiments, the applied current density was set to 15 mA/cm2 and the charging time was set to 24 hours. Plate steel grades X52, X60, X70, and 100XF were prestrained in tension to various levels and then electrolytically charged with hydrogen or tested with the NACE standard TM0284 test (solution A) saturated with H2S(g) to induce HIC. Prestrain was introduced to assess its impact on HIC. Hydrogen damage was quantified with the crack ratios defined in the NACE Standard TM0284. The results from the EC and NACE methods were very comparable to one, with respect to the magnitude of cracking and the trends between alloy and pre-strain conditions observed. Both methods showed that HIC substantially increased for the high strength 100XF steel compared to the lower strength alloys. This is consistent with NACE recommendations for HIC resistance steels, which suggests that alloy strength should be less than 116 ksi (800 MPa) or 248 HV (22 HRC). The HIC results were largely independent of the pre-strain levels imposed within the

  16. Induction of senescence-like phenotypes by forced expression of hic-5, which encodes a novel LIM motif protein, in immortalized human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Shibanuma, M; Mochizuki, E; Maniwa, R; Mashimo, J; Nishiya, N; Imai, S; Takano, T; Oshimura, M; Nose, K

    1997-01-01

    The hic-5 gene encodes a novel protein with Zn finger-like (LIM) motifs, the expression of which increases during cellular senescence. The ectopic expression of hic-5 in nontumorigenic immortalized human fibroblasts, whose expression levels of hic-5 were significantly reduced in comparison with those of mortal cells, decreased colony-forming efficiency. Stable clones expressing high levels of hic-5 mRNA showed higher levels of mRNAs for several extracellular matrix-related proteins, along with the alteration of an alternative splicing as seen in senescent cells and decreased c-fos inducibility. Furthermore, these clones acquired a senescence-like phenotype, such as growth retardation; senescence-like morphology; and increased expression of Cip1/WAF1/sdi1 after 20 to 40 population doublings. On the other hand, antisense RNA expression of hic-5 in human normal diploid fibroblasts delayed the senescence process. HIC-5 was localized in nuclei and had affinity for DNA. Based on these observations, we speculated that HIC-5 affected the expression of senescence-related genes through interacting with DNA and thereby induced the senescence-like phenotypes. To our knowledge, hic-5 is the first single gene that could induce senescence-like phenotypes in a certain type of immortalized human cell and mediate the normal process of senescence. PMID:9032249

  17. Hi-C and AIA View the Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    The movie starts with the full sun AIA images taken during the Hi-C flight and zooms into the Hi-C field of full field of view. Comparisons of the Hi-C data, show in the panel on the right, are com...

  18. HIC1 Expression Distinguishes Intestinal Carcinomas Sensitive to Chemotherapy12

    PubMed Central

    Janeckova, Lucie; Kolar, Michal; Svec, Jiri; Lanikova, Lucie; Pospichalova, Vendula; Baloghova, Nikol; Vojtechova, Martina; Sloncova, Eva; Strnad, Hynek; Korinek, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Neoplastic growth is frequently associated with genomic DNA methylation that causes transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. We used a collection of colorectal polyps and carcinomas in combination with bioinformatics analysis of large datasets to study the expression and methylation of Hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1), a tumor suppressor gene inactivated in many neoplasms. In premalignant stages, HIC1 expression was decreased, and the decrease was linked to methylation of a specific region in the HIC1 locus. However, in carcinomas, the HIC1 expression was variable and, in some specimens, comparable to healthy tissue. Importantly, high HIC1 production distinguished a specific type of chemotherapy-responsive tumors. PMID:27084425

  19. Instability of superconducting windings induced by cracking of impregnating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, H.; Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    Short, superconducting specimens simulating the structure of windings have been examined in order to investigate the instabilities of superconducting windings induced by heat generation due to wire movement, cracking or debonding of the impregnating material. The cryogenic properties of the impregnating materials were also measured. The results revealed the properties of the bobbin and the impregnation materials that are needed for stable superconducting magnets. The training behaviour of impregnated magnets was also studied. It was confirmed that the structure of the winding and the properties of the impregnating material are important factors in superconducting magnet stability.

  20. Application of induced circumferential current for cracks inspection on pipe string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin'an; Li, Wei; Yin, Xiaokang; Chen, Guoming; Ge, Jiuhao

    2016-02-01

    Pipe strings (such as drill pipe, tube, pipeline, riser) are critical facilities in oil & gas industry, which are highly susceptible to cracks caused by stress corrosion and fatigue damage. The most common defects are longitudinal and transverse surface cracks on pipe strings in oil & gas industry. Conventional nondestructive testing (NDT) methods are inadequate for these surface cracks on pipe strings. In this paper, a full 360° circumferential current induced by a coaxial excitation coil is present for inspection of longitudinal and transverse surface cracks on pipe strings. The finite element method (FEM) is employed to obtain characteristics signals by analyzing the distorted electromagnetic field above the cracks. The induced circumferential current test system is set up and crack inspection experiments are carried out. The results show that both longitudinal and transverse surface cracks can be detected effectively at one pass scanning on pipe string using the induced circumferential current.

  1. VDR Activity is Differentially Affected by Hic-5 in Prostate Cancer and Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Joshua D; Heitzer, Marjet D; Liu, Teresa T; Beumer, Jan H; Parise, Robert A; Normolle, Daniel P; Leach, Damien A; Buchanan, Grant; DeFranco, Donald B

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) eventually develop castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D3/calcitriol) is a potential adjuvant therapy that confers anti-proliferative and pro-differentiation effects in vitro, but has had mixed results in clinical trials. The impact of the tumor microenvironment on 1,25D3 therapy in CRPC patients has not been assessed. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), which is associated with the development of tumorigenic “reactive stroma” in prostate cancer, induced VDR expression in the human WPMY-1 prostate stromal cell line. Similarly, TGF-β enhanced 1,25D3-induced up-regulation of CYP24A1, which metabolizes 1,25D3 and thereby limits VDR activity. Ablation of Hic-5, a TGF-β-inducible nuclear receptor co-regulator, inhibited basal VDR expression, 1,25D3-induced CYP24A1 expression and metabolism of 1,25D3 and TGF-β-enhanced CYP24A1 expression. A Hic-5-responsive sequence was identified upstream (392-451 bp) of the CYP24A1 transcription start site that is occupied by VDR only in the presence of Hic-5. Ectopic expression of Hic-5 sensitized LNCaP prostate tumor cells to growth-inhibitory effects of 1,25D3 independent of CYP24A1. The sensitivity of Hic-5-expressing LNCaP cells to 1,25D3-induced growth inhibition was accentuated in co-culture with Hic-5-ablated WPMY-1 cells. Therefore, these findings indicate that the search for mechanisms to sensitize prostate cancer cells to the anti-proliferative effects of VDR ligands needs to account for the impact of VDR activity in the tumor microenvironment. Implications Hic-5 acts as a co-regulator with distinct effects on VDR transactivation, in prostate cancer and stromal cells, and may exert diverse effects on adjuvant therapy designed to exploit VDR activity in prostate cancer. PMID:24825850

  2. Dynamic Moss Observed with Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Caroline; Winebarger, Amy; Morton, Richard; Savage, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), flown on 11 July 2012, has revealed an unprecedented level of detail and substructure within the solar corona. Hi-C imaged a large active region (AR11520) with 0.2-0.3'' spatial resolution and 5.5s cadence over a 5 minute period. An additional dataset with a smaller FOV, the same resolution, but with a higher temporal cadence (1s) was also taken during the rocket flight. This dataset was centered on a large patch of 'moss' emission that initially seemed to show very little variability. Image processing revealed this region to be much more dynamic than first thought with numerous bright and dark features observed to appear, move and disappear over the 5 minute observation. Moss is thought to be emission from the upper transition region component of hot loops so studying its dynamics and the relation between the bright/dark features and underlying magnetic features is important to tie the interaction of the different atmospheric layers together. Hi-C allows us to study the coronal emission of the moss at the smallest scales while data from SDO/AIA and HMI is used to give information on these structures at different heights/temperatures. Using the high temporal and spatial resolution of Hi-C the observed moss features were tracked and the distribution of displacements, speeds, and sizes were measured. This allows us to comment on both the physical processes occurring within the dynamic moss and the scales at which these changes are occurring.

  3. Distinct roles for paxillin and Hic-5 in regulating breast cancer cell morphology, invasion, and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Deakin, Nicholas O.; Turner, Christopher E.

    2011-01-01

    Individual metastatic tumor cells exhibit two interconvertible modes of cell motility during tissue invasion that are classified as either mesenchymal or amoeboid. The molecular mechanisms by which invasive breast cancer cells regulate this migratory plasticity have yet to be fully elucidated. Herein we show that the focal adhesion adaptor protein, paxillin, and the closely related Hic-5 have distinct and unique roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell lung metastasis by modulating cell morphology and cell invasion through three-dimensional extracellular matrices (3D ECMs). Cells depleted of paxillin by RNA interference displayed a highly elongated mesenchymal morphology, whereas Hic-5 knockdown induced an amoeboid phenotype with both cell populations exhibiting reduced plasticity, migration persistence, and velocity through 3D ECM environments. In evaluating associated signaling pathways, we determined that Rac1 activity was increased in cells devoid of paxillin whereas Hic-5 silencing resulted in elevated RhoA activity and associated Rho kinase–induced nonmuscle myosin II activity. Hic-5 was essential for adhesion formation in 3D ECMs, and analysis of adhesion dynamics and lifetime identified paxillin as a key regulator of 3D adhesion assembly, stabilization, and disassembly. PMID:21148292

  4. Corrosion fatigue crack growth behavior of titanium alloys in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Shipilov, S.A.

    1998-01-01

    The corrosion fatigue crack growth (FCG) behavior, the effect of applied potential on corrosion FCG rates, and the fracture surfaces of VT20 (near-{alpha}) and TS6 (near-{beta}) titanium alloys were studied. Environments were aqueous solutions of sodium chloride (NaCl), sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH), ferric chloride (FeCl{sub 3}), and chromic acid (H{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}) with and without NaCl. Depending upon solution composition, corrosion FCG rates were found to be higher or lower than those in air. Cathodic polarization retarded the corrosion FCG, while anodic polarization accelerated insignificantly or almost did not influence it in most of the solutions investigated. However, cathodic polarization accelerated corrosion FCG in 0.6 M FeCl{sub 3} and 0.5 M to 2 M H{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} + 0.01 M to 0.1 M NaCl solutions by a dozen times when the maximum stress intensity (K{sub max}) exceeded certain critical values. When K{sub max} was lower than the critical values, the same cathodic polarization (with all other /conditions being equal) retarded corrosion FCG. Results suggested the accelerated crack growth at cathodic potentials resulted from hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC). Therefore, critical values of K{sub max}, as well as the stress intensity range ({Delta}K) were regarded as corresponding to the beginning of corrosion FCG according to a HIC mechanism and designated as K{sub HIC} and {Delta}K{sub HIC}.

  5. Loop Evolution Observed with AIA and Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana; Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Kobayashi, Ken; Korreck, Kelly E.; Golub, Leon; Kuzin, Sergei; Walsh, Robert William; DeForest, Craig E.; De Pontieu, Bart; Title, Alan M.; Weber, Mark

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, the evolution of EUV loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this presentation we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data. In the past decade, the evolution of EUV loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this presentation we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data.

  6. Nature and occurrence of cooling-induced cracking in volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, John; Meredith, Philip G.; Gudmundssom, Agust

    2015-04-01

    Several hypotheses have been proposed regarding the role of thermo-mechanical contraction in producing cracks and joints in volcanic rocks. Nevertheless, most studies of thermally-induced cracking to date have focused on the generation of cracks formed during heating. In this latter case, the cracks are formed under an overall compressional regime. By contrast, cooling cracks are formed under an overall tensile regime. Therefore, both the nature and mechanism of crack formation during cooling are hypothesised to be different from those for crack formation during heating. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether cooling simply reactivates pre-existing cracks, induces the growth of new cracks, or both. We present results from experiments based on a new method for testing ideas on cooling-induced cracking. Cored samples of volcanic rock (basaltic to dacitic in composition) were heated at varying rates to different maximum temperatures inside a tube furnace. In the highest temperature experiments samples of both rocks were raised to the liquidus temperature appropriate to their composition, forcing melt interaction and crack annealing. We present in-situ seismic velocity and acoustic emission data, which were recorded throughout each heating and cooling cycle. It is found consistently that the rate of acoustic emission is much higher during cooling than during heating. In addition, acoustic emission events produced on cooling tend to be significantly higher in energy than those produced during heating. We therefore suggest that cracks formed during cooling are significantly larger than those formed during heating. Thin-section and crack morphology analysis of our cyclically heated samples provide further evidence of contrasting fracture morphologies. These new data are important for assessing the contribution of cooling-induced damage within volcanic structures and layers such as sills and lava flows. Our observations may also help to constrain evolving ideas regarding

  7. The threshold stress intensity for hydrogen-induced crack growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhurst, K. N.; Baker, T. J.

    1981-06-01

    The crack growth rates and threshold stress intensities, K TH, for a 3 1/2 NiCrMoV steel (0.2 pct proof stress 1200 MPa) have been measured in a hydrogen environment at various temperatures and hydrogen pressures. Fractographic evidence and the observation of alternating fast and slow crack growth near K TH suggests that the crack advances by the repeated nucleation of microcracks at microstructural features ahead of the main crack. Transient crack growth is observed following load increases just below K TH. Using the idea, from unstable cleavage fracture theory, that for fracture a critical stress must be exceeded over a critical distance ahead of the crack, and assuming that this critical stress is reduced in proportion to the local hydrogen concentration (in equilibrium with the external hydrogen at K TH), a theoretical dependence of K TH on hydrogen pressure is derived which compares well with the experimental evidence.

  8. Influence of surface cracks on laser-induced damage resistance of brittle KH₂PO₄ crystal.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jian; Chen, Mingjun; Liao, Wei; Wang, Haijun; Wang, Jinghe; Xiao, Yong; Li, Mingquan

    2014-11-17

    Single point diamond turning (SPDT) currently is the leading finishing method for achieving ultra-smooth surface on brittle KH(2)PO(4) crystal. In this work, the light intensification modulated by surface cracks introduced by SPDT cutting is numerically simulated using finite-difference time-domain algorithm. The results indicate that the light intensification caused by surface cracks is wavelength, crack geometry and position dependent. Under the irradiation of 355 nm laser, lateral cracks on front surfaces and conical cracks on both front and rear surfaces can produce light intensification as high as hundreds of times, which is sufficient to trigger avalanche ionization and finally lower the laser damage resistance of crystal components. Furthermore, we experimentally tested the laser-induced damage thresholds (LIDTs) on both crack-free and flawed crystal surfaces. The results imply that brittle fracture with a series of surface cracks is the dominant source of laser damage initiation in crystal components. Due to the negative effect of surface cracks, the LIDT on KDP crystal surface could be sharply reduced from 7.85J/cm(2) to 2.33J/cm(2) (355 nm, 6.4 ns). In addition, the experiment of laser-induced damage growth is performed and the damage growth behavior agrees well with the simulation results of light intensification caused by surface cracks with increasing crack depths. PMID:25402114

  9. Hydrogen-Induced Cold Cracking in High-Frequency Induction Welded Steel Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Kumkum

    2016-04-01

    Detailed investigation was carried out on 0.4C steel tubes used for the telescopic front fork of two-wheelers to establish the root cause for the occurrence of transverse cracks at the weld heat-affected zone of the tubes. Fractographic and microstructural observations provide evidences of delayed hydrogen-induced cracking. The beneficial microstructure for avoiding the transverse cracks was found to be the bainitic-martensitic, while martensitic structure was noted to be deleterious.

  10. Dynamic Moss Observed with Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Caroline; Winebarger, Amy; Morton, Richard; Savage, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), flown on 11 July 2012, has revealed an unprecedented level of detail and substructure within the solar corona. Hi-­-C imaged a large active region (AR11520) with 0.2-0.3'' spatial resolution and 5.5s cadence over a 5 minute period. An additional dataset with a smaller FOV, the same resolution, but with a higher temporal cadence (1s) was also taken during the rocket flight. This dataset was centered on a large patch of 'moss' emission that initially seemed to show very little variability. Image processing revealed this region to be much more dynamic than first thought with numerous bright and dark features observed to appear, move and disappear over the 5 minute observation. Moss is thought to be emission from the upper transition region component of hot loops so studying its dynamics and the relation between the bright/dark features and underlying magnetic features is important to tie the interaction of the different atmospheric layers together. Hi-C allows us to study the coronal emission of the moss at the smallest scales while data from SDO/AIA and HMI is used to give information on these structures at different heights/temperatures. Using the high temporal and spatial resolution of Hi-C the observed moss features were tracked and the distribution of displacements, speeds, and sizes were measured. This allows us to comment on both the physical processes occurring within the dynamic moss and the scales at which these changes are occurring.

  11. Microstructural changes induced near crack tip during corrosion fatigue tests in austenitic-ferritic steel.

    PubMed

    Gołebiowski, B; Swiatnicki, W A; Gaspérini, M

    2010-03-01

    Microstructural changes occurring during fatigue tests of austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel (DSS) in air and in hydrogen-generating environment have been investigated. Hydrogen charging of steel samples during fatigue crack growth (FCG) tests was performed by cathodic polarization of specimens in 0.1M H(2)SO(4) aqueous solution. Microstructural investigations of specimens after FCG tests were carried out using transmission electron microscopy to reveal the density and arrangement of dislocations formed near crack tip. To determine the way of crack propagation in the microstructure, electron backscatter diffraction investigations were performed on fatigue-tested samples in both kinds of environment. To reveal hydrogen-induced phase transformations the atomic force microscopy was used. The above investigations allowed us to define the character of fatigue crack propagation and microstructural changes near the crack tip. It was found that crack propagation after fatigue tests in air is accompanied with plastic deformation; a high density of dislocations is observed at large distance from the crack. After fatigue tests performed during hydrogen charging the deformed zone containing high density of dislocations is narrow compared to that after fatigue tests in air. It means that hydrogenation leads to brittle character of fatigue crack propagation. In air, fatigue cracks propagate mostly transgranularly, whereas in hydrogen-generating environment the cracks have mixed transgranular/interfacial character. PMID:20500395

  12. Pressure-Induced Crack Propagation Behavior in a Particle-Reinforced Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Jae-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study pressure-induced crack propagation behavior of a particle-reinforced composite (PRC) under various pressurization rate conditions. A pre-cracked specimen of a metallic particle-reinforced rubbery composite was fixed in a holder which is installed in a windowed test chamber, and then high compressed nitrogen gas rapidly pressurized the chamber and the specimen. Chamber pressures were measured during the test, and detailed sequences of crack initiation and propagation were recorded by a high-speed digital video camera. Pressure vs. time traces were obtained from test results, and pressurization rates were defined from them. The crack propagation contours and lengths under various pressurization rates were observed through a stereoscopic microscope. Also, a progression of the crack initiation and propagation was observed by the sequences of the crack recorded by the high-speed digital video camera.

  13. Characteristics of thermally-induced transverse cracks in graphite epoxy composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, D. S.; Bowles, D. E.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    The characteristics of thermally induced transverse cracks in T300/5208 graphite-epoxy cross-ply and quasi-isotropic laminates were investigated both experimentally and analytically. The formation of transverse cracks and the subsequent crack spacing present during cool down to -250 F (116K) and thermal cycling between 250 and -250 F (116 and 394K) was investigated. The state of stress in the vicinity of a transverse crack and the influence of transverse cracking on the laminate coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was predicted using a generalized plane strain finite element analysis and a modified shear lag analysis. A majority of the cross-ply laminates experienced transverse cracking during the initial cool down to -250 F whereas the quasi-isotropic laminates remained uncracked. The in situ transverse strength of the 90 degree layers was more than 1.9 times greater than the transverse strength of the unidirectional 90 degree material for all laminates investigated.

  14. Crack propagation induced heating in crystalline energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, W.; Francis, R. S.; Fayer, M. D.

    1999-02-01

    A model is presented for time and spatial dependences of the heating of molecular vibrations and the possible initiation of chemical reaction from heat dissipated in the vicinity of a propagating crack in a molecular crystal. In the model, energy from a moving crack tip is released as phonons in proximity to the crack. Initially the phonons and the molecular vibrations are not in thermal equilibrium. Subsequently, there is a competition between excitation of molecular vibrations by multiphonon up-pumping and diffusion of phonons from the crack region. If the coupling between the locally hot phonon bath and the molecular vibrations is sufficiently large, a transitory high vibrational temperature will be achieved prior to eventual thermal equilibration with the bulk of the crystal. It is found that the peak vibrational temperature can be sufficiently high for a significant time period for chemical reactions to occur. The model calculates the local time-dependent vibrational temperature using reasonable values of the physical input parameters. For a crack tip moving near the speed of sound, the calculations show that vibrational temperatures can reach ˜800 K in 55 ps and exceed 550 K for ˜1 ns after the initial heating. This temperature change is sufficient to produce chemical reaction in a secondary explosive such as HMX, but given the duration and size of the heated region, a single crack should not result in self-sustaining chemical reaction. The role that cracks may play in shock sensitivity is discussed.

  15. Lead induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 690 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.K.; Lim, J.K.; Moriya, Shinichi; Watanabe, Yutaka; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1995-12-31

    Recent investigations of cracked steam generator tubes at nuclear power plants concluded that lead significantly contributed to cracking the Alloy 600 materials. In order to investigate the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of Alloy 690, slow strain rate tests (SSRT) and anodic polarization measurements were performed. The SSRTs were conducted in a lead-chloride solution (PbCl{sub 2}) and in a chloride but lead free solution (NaCl) at pH of 3 and 4.5 at 288 C. The anodic polarization measurements were carried out at 30 C using the same solutions as in SSRT. The SSRT results showed that Alloy 690 was susceptible to SCC in both solutions. In the lead chloride solution, cracking had slight dependence on lead concentration and pH. Cracking tend to increase with a higher lead concentration and a lower pH and was mainly intergranular and was to be a few tens to hundreds micrometers in length. In the chloride only solution, cracking was similar to the lead induced SCC. The results of anodic polarization measurement and electron probe micro analysis (EPMA) helped to understand lead induced SCC. Lead was a stronger active corrosive element but had a minor affect on cracking susceptibility of the alloy. While, chloride was quite different from lead effect to SCC. A possible mechanism of lead induced SCC of Alloy 690 was also discussed based on the test results.

  16. Role of Grain Boundaries and Microstructure on the Environment Assisted Cracking of Pipeline Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafin, Muhammad

    2011-12-01

    In this research, two common types of environment assisted cracking (EAC) of pipeline steels, namely the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and the hydrogen induced cracking (HIC), have been studied, and computer models have been developed to simulate the intergranular stress corrosion crack propagation behaviour in pipeline steel as well as to predict the intergranular fracture susceptibility, due to mechanical loading in non-corrosive environment, of polycrystalline materials. First, a new understanding of the IGSCC resistance of pipeline steel has been obtained by studying the grain boundary character and crystallographic orientation in both cracked and non-cracked pipeline steel samples using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and X-ray texture measurements. It has been found that the low-angle and certain types of special boundaries, known as the coincident site lattice (CSL) boundaries (S5, S11, and S13b types), are crack-resistant while the random high angle boundaries are prone to cracking. However, it has been also observed that the grain boundaries associated with {110} and {111} neighbour grain orientations having <110> and <111> rotation axis, respectively, are crack-resistant, while the cracked boundaries are mainly linked to the {100} orientation with <100> rotation axis. Subsequently, a novel integrated modeling approach, combining Voronoi Algorithm, Markov Chain theory, and Monte Carlo simulations, has been developed in order to predict the IGSCC behaviour of pipeline steels. The model takes both the physical microstructural features, such as the grain shape and grain size distribution, as well as the grain boundary characters and their orientations with respect to the external stress axis into account. The predicted crack propagation behaviour has been found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental crack-propagation and arrest data in API X65 pipeline steel. In addition, a texture based grain boundary character

  17. Fractographic analysis of gaseous hydrogen induced cracking in 18Ni maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangloff, R. P.; Wei, R. P.

    1978-01-01

    Electron microscope fractographic analysis supplemented an extensive study of the kinetics of gaseous hydrogen assisted cracking in 18Ni maraging steel. Temperature determined the crack path morphology in each steel which, in turn, was directly related to the temperature dependence of the crack growth rate. Crack growth in the low temperature regime proceeded along prior austenite grain boundaries. Increasing the temperature above a critical value produced a continuously increasing proportion of transgranular quasi-cleavage associated with lath martensite boundaries. The amount of transgranular cracking was qualitatively correlated with the degree of temperature-induced deviation from Arrhenius behavior. Fractographic observations are interpreted in terms of hypothesized mechanisms for gaseous hydrogen embrittlement. It is concluded that hydrogen segregation to prior austenite and lath martensite boundaries must be considered as a significant factor in developing mechanisms for gaseous embrittlement of high strength steels.

  18. Cracks in Martian boulders exhibit preferred orientations that point to solar-induced thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Eppes, Martha-Cary; Willis, Andrew; Molaro, Jamie; Abernathy, Stephen; Zhou, Beibei

    2015-01-01

    The origins of fractures in Martian boulders are unknown. Here, using Mars Exploration Rover 3D data products, we obtain orientation measurements for 1,857 cracks visible in 1,573 rocks along the Spirit traverse and find that Mars rock cracks are oriented in statistically preferred directions similar to those compiled herein for Earth rock cracks found in mid-latitude deserts. We suggest that Martian directional cracking occurs due to the preferential propagation of microfractures favourably oriented with respect to repeating geometries of diurnal peaks in sun-induced thermal stresses. A numerical model modified here with Mars parameters supports this hypothesis both with respect to the overall magnitude of stresses as well as to the times of day at which the stresses peak. These data provide the first direct field and numerical evidence that insolation-related thermal stress potentially plays a principle role in cracking rocks on portions of the Martian surface. PMID:25813699

  19. Hi-C: A Detailed View of the Sun

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 10-second movie includes imagery collected from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument flying on NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and Hi-C. Hi-C’s resolution is five times more detaile...

  20. Environment-induced embrittlement: Stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement; Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Milligan, W.W.; White, C.L.

    1991-01-01

    This research program has included two thrusts. The first addressed environment-induced embrittlement in a parallel study of stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement. This work has examined (1) mechanical properties as influenced by embrittling environments, (2) fractography and crystallography or transgranular cracking, (3) the mechanics of cracking, (4) the extent and role of local plastic flow, and (5) local chemistry within stress corrosion and metal-induced cracks. The embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys by air was addressed by determining the effect of water and hydrogen upon the mechanical properties. Slow strain rate testing in aqueous environments was carried out at controlled anodic and cathodic potentials. The effect of cathodically charged hydrogen and the effect of subsequent baking were measured. Environmental susceptibility was measured as affected by alloy composition, microstructure and degree of ordering.

  1. Stress-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steels: Effect on fatigue crack growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Z.; Ahmed, M.

    1996-04-01

    This paper addresses the influence of cyclic stress-induced martensitic transformation on fatigue crack growth rates in metastable austenitic stainless steels. At low applied stress and mean stress values in AISI type 301 stainless steel, fatigue crack growth rate is substantially retarded due to a cyclic stress-induced γ-α' and γ-ɛ martensitic transformation occurring at the crack-tip plastic zone. It is suggested that the transformation products produce a compressive residual stress at the tip of the fatigue crack, which essentially lowers the effective stress intensity and hence retards the fatigue crack growth rate. At high applied stress or mean stress values, fatigue crack growth rates in AISI type 301 steels become almost equal to those of stable AISI type 302 alloy. As the amount of transformed products increases (with an increase in applied or mean stress), the strain-hardening effect brought about by the transformed martensite phase appears to accelerate fatigue crack growth, offsetting the contribution from the compressive residual stress produced by the positive volume change of γ → α' or ɛ transformation.

  2. An Assessment of Remote Visual Testing System Capabilities for the Detection of Service Induced Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Michael T.; Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.

    2005-09-01

    Remote visual testing is typically employed to ascertain the condition of materials in components that are inaccessible for direct examination. In the power and petrochemical industries, remote visual testing is used to assess whether service-related degradation is being manifested that, if left unchecked, may eventually impair the structural reliability of a component. Several codes and standards require that visual examinations be periodically conducted. Many of these inspections must be performed remotely due to harsh environments or design geometries of the subject components. This paper describes the attributes and limitations of remote visual testing, performance demonstration standards for camera systems, typical dimensions for service-induced cracking phenomena, and an assessment of the reliability of remote video camera systems at finding cracks. Because many forms of service-induced cracks have very small crack opening dimensions, the reliability of remote visual testing may not be adequate to ensure component integrity, given the capabilities of current camera systems and application practices.

  3. Chemical aspects of lodine-induced stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cubicciotti, D.; Jones, R.L.; Syrett, B.C.

    1982-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the zirconium-iodine system are summarized. Thermodynamic information for iodine chemisorbed on zirconium surfaces is also presented. These thermochemical results are used to analyze chemical behavior in situations related to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Cracking initiation sites in commercial Zircaloy tubing were found to be associated with impurities (iron, aluminum, silicon, and chromium) in the Zircaloy surface in microsurface examination of failures produced in iodine-induced SCC tests. It is suggested that the impurity site may react with iodine to form a locally embrittled region that fails under stress and acts as a crack initiator.

  4. A Grain Boundary Fracture Model for Predicting Dynamic Embrittlement and Oxidation-Induced Cracking in Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwai S.

    2015-06-01

    Nickel-based superalloys are sometimes susceptible to oxygen embrittlement in the form of dynamic embrittlement or oxidation-induced grain boundary cracking during services at elevated temperatures. Dynamic embrittlement is a fracture process that involves the ingress and diffusion of atomic oxygen to induce time-dependent decohesion of grain boundaries. A related fracture process, also a time-dependent process, is stress-accelerated grain boundary oxidation and oxide-induced cracking along grain boundaries. In this paper, a micromechanical model is developed to treat both dynamic embrittlement and oxidation-induced crack growth in Ni-based superalloys. The model is utilized to assess: (1) the conditions where dynamic embrittlement are dominant, (2) the conditions where oxidation-induced crack growth are dominant, and (3) the role of oxidation in suppressing dynamic embrittlement in Ni-based superalloys. For illustration, the grain boundary fracture model is applied to predict the onset of dynamic embrittlement and oxidation-induced crack growth in superalloys such as IN 718.

  5. Evolution of Residual-Strain Distribution through an Overload-Induced Retardation Period during Fatigue Crack Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Sun, Yinan; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Hubbard, Camden R; Liaw, Peter K

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction was employed to investigate the crack-growth retardation phenomenon after a single tensile overload by mapping both one-dimensional and two-dimensional residual-strain distributions around the crack tip in a series of compact-tension specimens representing various crack-growth stages through an overload-induced retardation period. The results clearly show a large compressive residual-strain field near the crack tip immediately after the overload. As the fatigue crack propagates through the overload-induced plastic zone, the compressive residual strains are gradually relaxed, and a new compressive residual-strain field is developed around the propagating crack tip, illustrating that the subsequent fatigue-induced plastic zone grows out of the large plastic zone caused by the overloading. The relationship between the overload-induced plastic zone and subsequent fatigue-induced plastic zone, and its influence on the residual-strain distributions in the perturbed plastic zone are discussed.

  6. Acute crack cocaine exposure induces genetic damage in multiple organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Eduardo Gregolin; Yujra, Veronica Quispe; Claudio, Samuel Rangel; Silva, Marcelo Jose Dias; Vilegas, Wagner; Pereira, Camilo Dias Seabra; de Oliveira, Flavia; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2016-04-01

    Crack cocaine is a very toxic product derived from cocaine. The aim of this study was to evaluate genetic damage in multiple organs of rats following acute exposure to crack cocaine. A total of 20 Wistar rats were distributed into four groups (n = 5), as follows: 0, 4.5, 9, and 18 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) of crack cocaine administered by intraperitoneal route (i.p.). All animals were killed 24 h after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. The results showed that crack cocaine increased the number of micronucleated cells in bone marrow cells exposed to 18 mg/kg crack cocaine (p < 0.05). Peripheral blood and liver cells presented genetic damage as depicted by single cell gel (comet) assay at 9 and 18 mg/kg doses (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemistry data revealed significant increase in 8-hydroxy-20-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) immunoexpression in hepatocytes of animals exposed to crack cocaine at 9 and 18 mg/kg (p < 0.05) when compared with negative controls. Taken together, our results demonstrate that crack cocaine is able to induce genomic damage in multiple organs of Wistar rats. PMID:26825523

  7. Thermally-induced interlaminar crack-tip singularities in laminated anisotropic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyung J.; Thangjitham, S.

    1993-04-01

    Thermally-induced stress singularities of an interlaminar crack in a fiber-reinforced composite laminate under a state of generalized plane deformation are examined within the framework of steady-state anisotropic thermoelasticity. The crack is assumed to be embedded within a matrix-rich interlaminar region of the composite. The Fourier integral transform technique and the flexibility/stiffness matrix method are introduced to formulate the current mixed boundary value problem. As a result, two sets of simultaneous Cauchy-type singular integral equations of the first kind are derived for the heat conduction and thermoelasticity. Within the context of linear elastic fracture mechanics, the mixed-mode thermal stress intensity factors are defined in terms of the solutions of the corresponding integral equations. Numerical results are presented, addressing the effects of laminate stacking sequence, crack 1ocation, and crack surface partial insulation on the values of thermal stress intensity factors.

  8. The Studies of Thiosulfate and Lead-induced Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 800

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Liang

    Scratch test and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) were applied to study the effects of thiosulfate on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Alloy 800 in simulated crevice solutions. The results showed that thiosulfate cathodically shifted the pitting potential of Alloy 800 significantly and the pitting morphology on the electrode surface was also different from that formed in the absence of thiosulfate. The synergistic effect between thiosulfate and stress was also observed, which was mainly promoting enhanced anodic dissolution at active sites. In the lead-induced stress corrosion crackings (PbSCC) work, the crack propagation rate (CPR) of Alloy 800 double cantilever specimen were estimated in neutral crevice chemistries solutions at 300 degree Celsius. The PbSCC of alloy 800 at high temperature were investigated by comparing the CPR rate of Pb-contaminated and Pb-free conditions. A repetitive behavior of crack advance was observed from the measurement. This observation is consistent with the film rupture model.

  9. Experimental simulation of frost wedging-induced crack propagation in alpine rockwall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hailiang; Leith, Kerry; Krautblatter, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Frost wedging is widely presumed to be the principal mechanism responsible for shattering jointed low-porosity rocks in high alpine rockwalls. The interaction of ice and rock physics regulates the efficacy of frost wedging. In order to better understand temporal aspects of this interaction, we present results of a series of laboratory experiments monitoring crack widening as a result of ice formation in an artificial crack (4mm wide, 80mm deep) cut 20 mm from the end of a rectangular granite block. Our results indicate that i) freezing direction plays a key role in determining the magnitude of crack widening; in short-term (1 day) experiments, maximum crack widening during top-down freezing (associated with 'autumn' conditions) was around 0.11mm, while inside-out freezing (resulting from 'spring' conditions) produced only 0.02 mm of deformation; ii) neither ice, nor water pressure (direct tension and hydraulic fracturing respectively) caused measurable irreversible crack widening during short-term tests, as the calculated maximum stress intensity at the crack tip was less than the fracture toughness of our granite sample; iii) development of ice pressure is closely related to the mechanical properties of the fracture in which it forms, and as such, the interaction of ice and rock is intrinsically dynamic; iv) irreversible crack widening (about 0.03mm) was only observed following a long-term (53 day) experiment representing a simplified transition from autumn to winter conditions. We suggest this is the result of stress corrosion aided by strong opening during freezing, and to a lesser degree by ice segregation up to one week after the initial freezing period, and downward migration of liquid water during the remainder of the test. Our results suggest the fundamental assumption of frost wedging, that rapid freezing from open ends of cracks can seal water inside the crack and thus cause damage through excessive stresses induced by volumetric expansion seems

  10. Hi-C Observations of Sunspot Penumbral Bright Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Shane E.; Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Savage, Sabrina L.

    2016-05-01

    We report observations of bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot penumbra using High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) data in 193 Å and examine their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensities. The sizes of the BDs are on the order of 1″ and are therefore hard to identify in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 193 Å images, which have a 1.″2 spatial resolution, but become readily apparent with Hi-C's spatial resolution, which is five times better. We supplement Hi-C data with data from AIA's 193 Å passband to see the complete lifetime of the BDs that appeared before and/or lasted longer than Hi-C's three-minute observation period. Most Hi-C BDs show clear lateral movement along penumbral striations, either toward or away from the sunspot umbra. Single BDs often interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to have smaller displacements. These BDs are about as numerous but move slower on average than Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) BDs, which was recently reported by Tian et al., and the sizes and lifetimes are on the higher end of the distribution of IRIS BDs. Using additional AIA passbands, we compare the light curves of the BDs to test whether the Hi-C BDs have transition region (TR) temperatures like those of the IRIS BDs. The light curves of most Hi-C BDs peak together in different AIA channels, indicating that their temperatures are likely in the range of the cooler TR (1‑4 × 105 K).

  11. Hi-C Observations of Sunspot Penumbral Bright Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpert, Shane E.; Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Moore, Ronald L.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Savage, Sabrina L.

    2016-05-01

    We report observations of bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot penumbra using High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) data in 193 Å and examine their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensities. The sizes of the BDs are on the order of 1″ and are therefore hard to identify in the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 193 Å images, which have a 1.″2 spatial resolution, but become readily apparent with Hi-C's spatial resolution, which is five times better. We supplement Hi-C data with data from AIA's 193 Å passband to see the complete lifetime of the BDs that appeared before and/or lasted longer than Hi-C's three-minute observation period. Most Hi-C BDs show clear lateral movement along penumbral striations, either toward or away from the sunspot umbra. Single BDs often interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to have smaller displacements. These BDs are about as numerous but move slower on average than Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) BDs, which was recently reported by Tian et al., and the sizes and lifetimes are on the higher end of the distribution of IRIS BDs. Using additional AIA passbands, we compare the light curves of the BDs to test whether the Hi-C BDs have transition region (TR) temperatures like those of the IRIS BDs. The light curves of most Hi-C BDs peak together in different AIA channels, indicating that their temperatures are likely in the range of the cooler TR (1-4 × 105 K).

  12. Hic-5 mediates the initiation of endothelial sprouting by regulating a key surface metalloproteinase.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jui M; Abbey, Colette A; Duran, Camille L; Seo, Heewon; Johnson, Gregory A; Bayless, Kayla J

    2016-02-15

    During angiogenesis, endothelial cells must coordinate matrix proteolysis with migration. Here, we tested whether the focal adhesion scaffold protein Hic-5 (also known as TGFB1I1) regulated endothelial sprouting in three dimensions. Hic-5 silencing reduced endothelial sprouting and lumen formation, and sprouting defects were rescued by the return of Hic-5 expression. Pro-angiogenic factors enhanced colocalization and complex formation between membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP, also known as MMP14) and Hic-5, but not between paxillin and MT1-MMP. The LIM2 and LIM3 domains of Hic-5 were necessary and sufficient for Hic-5 to form a complex with MT1-MMP. The degree of interaction between MT1-MMP and Hic-5 and the localization of the complex within detergent-resistant membrane fractions were enhanced during endothelial sprouting, and Hic-5 depletion lowered the surface levels of MT1-MMP. In addition, we observed that loss of Hic-5 partially reduced complex formation between MT1-MMP and focal adhesion kinase (FAK, also known as PTK2), suggesting that Hic-5 bridges MT1-MMP and FAK. Finally, Hic-5 LIM2-LIM3 deletion mutants reduced sprout initiation. Hic-5, MT1-MMP and FAK colocalized in angiogenic vessels during porcine pregnancy, supporting that this complex assembles during angiogenesis in vivo. Collectively, Hic-5 appears to enhance complex formation between MT1-MMP and FAK in activated endothelial cells, which likely coordinates matrix proteolysis and cell motility. PMID:26769900

  13. The High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R.; Korreck, Kelly; Golub, Leon; Walsh, Robert W.; De Pontieu, Bart; DeForest, Craig; Title, Alan; Kuzin, Sergey; Savage, Sabrina; Beabout, Dyana; Beabout, Brent; Podgorski, William; Caldwell, David; McCracken, Kenneth; Ordway, Mark; Bergner, Henry; Gates, Richard; McKillop, Sean; Cheimets, Peter; Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick; Windt, David

    2014-11-01

    The High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) was flown on a NASA sounding rocket on 11 July 2012. The goal of the Hi-C mission was to obtain high-resolution (≈ 0.3 - 0.4''), high-cadence (≈ 5 seconds) images of a solar active region to investigate the dynamics of solar coronal structures at small spatial scales. The instrument consists of a normal-incidence telescope with the optics coated with multilayers to reflect a narrow wavelength range around 19.3 nm (including the Fe xii 19.5-nm spectral line) and a 4096×4096 camera with a plate scale of 0.1'' pixel-1. The target of the Hi-C rocket flight was Active Region 11520. Hi-C obtained 37 full-frame images and 86 partial-frame images during the rocket flight. Analysis of the Hi-C data indicates the corona is structured on scales smaller than currently resolved by existing satellite missions.

  14. Quantification of DNA cleavage specificity in Hi-C experiments

    PubMed Central

    Meluzzi, Dario; Arya, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Hi-C experiments produce large numbers of DNA sequence read pairs that are typically analyzed to deduce genomewide interactions between arbitrary loci. A key step in these experiments is the cleavage of cross-linked chromatin with a restriction endonuclease. Although this cleavage should happen specifically at the enzyme's recognition sequence, an unknown proportion of cleavage events may involve other sequences, owing to the enzyme's star activity or to random DNA breakage. A quantitative estimation of these non-specific cleavages may enable simulating realistic Hi-C read pairs for validation of downstream analyses, monitoring the reproducibility of experimental conditions and investigating biophysical properties that correlate with DNA cleavage patterns. Here we describe a computational method for analyzing Hi-C read pairs to estimate the fractions of cleavages at different possible targets. The method relies on expressing an observed local target distribution downstream of aligned reads as a linear combination of known conditional local target distributions. We validated this method using Hi-C read pairs obtained by computer simulation. Application of the method to experimental Hi-C datasets from murine cells revealed interesting similarities and differences in patterns of cleavage across the various experiments considered. PMID:26264668

  15. Mechanics of fatigue crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr. (Editor); Elber, Wolf (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on plasticity induced crack closure, crack closure in fatigue crack growth, the dependence of crack closure on fatigue loading variables, and a procedure for standardizing crack closure levels. Also considered are a statistical approach to crack closure determination, the crack closure behavior of surface cracks under pure bending, closure measurements on short fatigue cracks, and crack closure under plane strain conditions. Other topics include fatigue crack closure behavior at high stress ratios, the use of acoustic waves for the characterization of closed fatigue cracks, and the influence of fatigue crack wake length and state of stress on crack closure.

  16. Androgen receptor co-activator Hic-5/ARA55 as a molecular regulator of androgen sensitivity in dermal papilla cells of human hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Inui, Shigeki; Fukuzato, Yoko; Nakajima, Takeshi; Kurata, Sotaro; Itami, Satoshi

    2007-10-01

    Androgen site-specifically affects human hair growth after puberty through androgen receptors in the dermal papilla, which transactivate target genes acting in conjunction with co-activators. To examine the regulation of androgen sensitivity in hair follicles, we focused on androgen receptor co-activator Hic-5/ARA55. Its interaction with transfected androgen receptor in beard dermal papilla cells was confirmed with mammalian two-hybrid assays. The semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed that Hic-5/ARA55 mRNA expression was high in dermal papilla cells from the beard and bald frontal scalp but low in cells from the occipital scalp. To determine whether Hic-5/ARA55 mRNA level correlates with its endogenous activity, we studied the effect of dominant negative Hic-5/ARA55 on transfected androgen receptor transactivation induced by R1881 using mouse mammary tumor virus-luciferase assays. We found that it suppressed the transactivation by 64.5 and 71.4% in dermal papilla cells from the beard and bald frontal scalp, respectively, whereas it showed no significant effect in cells from the occipital scalp. Our findings suggest that Hic-5/ARA55 is a molecular regulator for androgen sensitivity in human hair follicles. PMID:17508020

  17. Laser cutting silicon-glass double layer wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yecheng; Yang, Lijun; Zhang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study was aimed at introducing the laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) technology to solve the silicon-glass double layer wafer dicing problems in the packaging procedure of silicon-glass device packaged by WLCSP technology, investigating the feasibility of this idea, and studying the crack propagation process of LITP cutting double layer wafer. In this paper, the physical process of the 1064 nm laser beam interact with the double layer wafer during the cutting process was studied theoretically. A mathematical model consists the volumetric heating source and the surface heating source has been established. The temperature and stress distribution was simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The extended finite element method (XFEM) was added to the simulation as the supplementary features to simulate the crack propagation process and the crack propagation profile. The silicon-glass double layer wafer cutting verification experiment under typical parameters was conducted by using the 1064 nm semiconductor laser. The crack propagation profile on the fracture surface was examined by optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and XFEM status. It was concluded that the quality of the finished fracture surface has been greatly improved, and the experiment results were well supported by the numerical simulation results.

  18. Influence of texture on iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, I.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-07-01

    A specific study was carried out to measure the influence of texture on the behaviour of Zircaloy-4 under iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking. The aim was to determine the relative effects of various metallurgical parameters involved in fuel rod fracture by pellet-clad interaction (PCI). Cladding tubes of different geometries were manufactured from a given Zircaloy-4 ingot. In this way tubes with different textures were obtained. Rings from these tubes were then subjected to slow tensile tests in an inert atmosphere and in an iodine vapour atmosphere. The sensitivity of the tubes to stress corrosion cracking is quantified by the loss of ductility on fracture between the tests in each atmosphere. Combined with the findings of other studies, the results showed that: (a) texture has a strong effect on the stress corrosion cracking behaviour of Zircaloy-4, (b) the mechanical properties do not have any bearing on the material behaviour under stress corrosion cracking, and that the better behaviour of a recrystallized material — compared to the same material in a stress-relieved state — can be explained solely by the texture effect, (c) texture is a more important parameter than chemical composition of Zircaloy-4, on condition that this composition remains within the ASTM specification. The conflict between the various mechanisms involved in stress corrosion crack propagation may explain these observations. Preliminary extrapolation of these conclusions to the irradiated material shows that a more specific study is needed using appropriate parameters.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 mediates reactive oxygen species signaling for hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Ru; Hu, Chi-Tan; You, Ren-In; Pan, Siou-Mei; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Wu, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chang-Shan; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-10-20

    One of the signaling components involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression is the focal adhesion adaptor paxillin. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), one of the paralogs of paxillin, exhibits many biological functions distinct from paxillin, but may cooperate with paxillin to trigger tumor progression. Screening of Hic-5 in 145 surgical HCCs demonstrated overexpression of Hic-5 correlated well with intra- and extra-hepatic metastasis. Hic-5 highly expressed in the patient derived HCCs with high motility such as HCC329 and HCC353 but not in the HCCs with low motility such as HCC340. Blockade of Hic-5 expression prevented constitutive migration of HCC329 and HCC353 and HGF-induced cell migration of HCC340. HCC329Hic-5(-), HCC353Hic-5(-), HCC372Hic-5(-), the HCCs stably depleted of Hic-5, exhibited reduced motility compared with each HCC expressing Scramble shRNA. Moreover, intra/extrahepatic metastasis of HCC329Hic-5(-) in SCID mice greatly decreased compared with HCC329Scramble. On the other hand, ectopic Hic-5 expression in HCC340 promoted its progression. Constitutive and HGF-induced Hic-5 expression in HCCs were suppressed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers catalase and dithiotheritol and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. On the contrary, depletion of Hic-5 blocked constitutive and HGF-induced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation in HCCs. Also, ectopic expression of Hic-5 enhanced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. These highlighted that Hic-5 plays a central role in the positive feedback ROS-JNK signal cascade. Finally, the Chinese herbal derived anti-HCC peptide LZ-8 suppressed constitutive Hic-5 expression and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Hic-5 mediates ROS-JNK signaling and may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention of HCC progression. PMID:26416447

  20. Hydrogen induced cracking tests of high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the bolt-loaded specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Vigilante, G.N.; Underwood, J.H.; Crayon, D.; Tauscher, S.; Sage, T.; Troiano, E.

    1997-12-31

    Hydrogen induced cracking tests were conducted on high strength steels and nickel-iron base alloys using the constant displacement bolt-loaded compact specimen. The bolt-loaded specimen was subjected to both acid and electrochemical cell environments in order to produce hydrogen. The materials tested were A723, Maraging 200, PH 13-8 Mo, Alloy 718, Alloy 706, and A286, and ranged in yield strength from 760--1400 MPa. The effects of chemical composition, refinement, heat treatment, and strength on hydrogen induced crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and thresholds were examined. In general, all high strength steels tested exhibited similar crack growth rates and threshold levels. In comparison, the nickel-iron base alloys tested exhibited up to three orders of magnitude lower crack growth rates than the high strength steels tested. It is widely known that high strength steels and nickel base alloys exhibit different crack growth rates, in part, because of their different crystal cell structure. In the high strength steels tested, refinement and heat treatment had some effect on hydrogen induced cracking, though strength was the predominant factor influencing susceptibility to cracking. When the yield strength of one of the high strength steels tested was increased moderately, from 1130 MPa to 1275 MPa, the incubation times decreased by over two orders of magnitude, the crack growth rates increased by an order of magnitude, and the threshold stress intensity was slightly lower.

  1. A study on fatigue crack growth behavior subjected to a single tensile overload: Part II. Transfer of stress concentration and its role in overload-induced transient crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.; Choo, Hahn; Liaw, Peter K; An, Ke; Hubbard, Camden R

    2011-01-01

    The combined effects of overload-induced enlarged compressive residual stresses and crack tip blunting with secondary cracks are suggested to be responsible for the observed changes in the crack opening load and resultant post-overload transient crack growth behavior [Lee SY, Liaw PK, Choo H, Rogge RB, Acta Mater 2010;59:485-94]. In this article, in situ neutron diffraction experiments were performed to quantify the influence of the combined effects by investigating the internal-stress evolution at various locations away from the crack tip. In the overload-retardation period, stress concentration occurs in the crack blunting region (an overload point) until a maximum crack arrest load is reached. The stress concentration is then transferred from the blunting region to the propagating crack tip (following the overload), requiring a higher applied load, as the closed crack is gradually opened. The transfer phenomena of the stress concentration associated with a crack opening process account for the nonlinearity of strain response in the vicinity of the crack tip. The delaying action of stress concentration at the crack tip is understood in conjunction with the concept of a critical stress (i.e. the stress required to open the closed crack behind the crack tip). A linear relationship between {Delta}{var_epsilon}{sub eff} and {Delta}K{sub eff} provides experimental support for the hypothesis that {Delta}K{sub eff} can be considered as the fatigue crack tip driving force.

  2. Volume analysis of heat-induced cracks in human molars: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Sandholzer, Michael A.; Baron, Katharina; Heimel, Patrick; Metscher, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Only a few methods have been published dealing with the visualization of heat-induced cracks inside bones and teeth. Aims: As a novel approach this study used nondestructive X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) for volume analysis of heat-induced cracks to observe the reaction of human molars to various levels of thermal stress. Materials and Methods: Eighteen clinically extracted third molars were rehydrated and burned under controlled temperatures (400, 650, and 800°C) using an electric furnace adjusted with a 25°C increase/min. The subsequent high-resolution scans (voxel-size 17.7 μm) were made with a compact micro-CT scanner (SkyScan 1174). In total, 14 scans were automatically segmented with Definiens XD Developer 1.2 and three-dimensional (3D) models were computed with Visage Imaging Amira 5.2.2. The results of the automated segmentation were analyzed with an analysis of variance (ANOVA) and uncorrected post hoc least significant difference (LSD) tests using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 17. A probability level of P < 0.05 was used as an index of statistical significance. Results: A temperature-dependent increase of heat-induced cracks was observed between the three temperature groups (P < 0.05, ANOVA post hoc LSD). In addition, the distributions and shape of the heat-induced changes could be classified using the computed 3D models. Conclusion: The macroscopic heat-induced changes observed in this preliminary study correspond with previous observations of unrestored human teeth, yet the current observations also take into account the entire microscopic 3D expansions of heat-induced cracks within the dental hard tissues. Using the same experimental conditions proposed in the literature, this study confirms previous results, adds new observations, and offers new perspectives in the investigation of forensic evidence. PMID:25125923

  3. Hi-C Observations of Penumbral Bright Dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, S. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Moore, R. L.; Savage, S. L.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We use high-quality data obtained by the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) to examine bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot's penumbra. The sizes of these BDs are on the order of 1 arcsecond (1") and are therefore hard to identify using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly's (AIA) 0.6" pixel(exp -1) resolution. These BD become readily apparent with Hi-C's 0.1" pixel(exp -1) resolution. Tian et al. (2014) found penumbral BDs in the transition region (TR) by using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). However, only a few of their dots could be associated with any enhanced brightness in AIA channels. In this work, we examine the characteristics of the penumbral BDs observed by Hi-C in a sunspot penumbra, including their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensity. We also attempt to find any association of these BDs to the IRIS BDs. There are fewer Hi-C BDs in the penumbra than seen by IRIS, though different sunspots were studied. We use 193 Angstroms Hi-C data from July 11, 2012 which observed from approximately 18:52:00 UT- 18:56:00 UT and supplement it with data from AIA's 193 Angstrom passband to see the complete lifetime of the dots that were born before and/or lasted longer than Hi- C's 5-minute observation period. We use additional AIA passbands and compare the light curves of the BDs at different temperatures to test whether the Hi-C BDs are TR BDs. We find that most Hi-C BDs show clear movement, and of those that do, they move in a radial direction, toward or away from the sunspot umbra. Single BDs interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to move less. Many of the properties of our BDs are similar to the extreme values of the IRIS BDs, e.g., they move slower on average and their sizes and lifetimes are on the higher end of the IRIS BDs. We infer that our penumbral BDs are the large-scale end of the distribution of BDs observed by IRIS.

  4. Probabilistic evaluation of initiation time in RC bridge beams with load-induced cracks exposed to de-icing salts

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhaohui; Zhao Yangang; Yu Zhiwu; Ding Faxing

    2011-03-15

    In this study, a reliability-based method for predicting the initiation time of reinforced concrete bridge beams with load-induced cracks exposed to de-icing salts is presented. A practical model for predicting the diffusion coefficient of chloride ingress into load-induced cracked concrete is proposed. Probabilistic information about uncertainties related to the surface chloride content and the threshold chloride concentration has been estimated from a wide review of previous experimental or statistical studies. Probabilistic analysis to estimate the time to corrosion initiation with/without considering the effect of the load-induced cracks on the chloride ingress into concrete has been carried out. Results of the analysis demonstrate the importance of considering the effect of the load-induced cracks for correct prediction of corrosion initiation in RC bridge beams exposed to chlorides.

  5. Observations on hydrogen induced delayed plasticity and cracking in 4340 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J.A.

    1983-02-01

    The crack growth rates measured by potential drop provided strong evidence that crack advance occurs continuously during hydrogen assisted cracking. If crack growth occurred by the stepwise HIDP-C mechanism, variations in growth rate would be expected to appear in the potential drop results. For example, during the period of plastic zone extension, a low crack growth rate would be expected, followed by a period of higher crack growth rate during actual extension of the crack. The results obtained in this investigation do not eliminate the possibility that stepwise crack growth occurred at different points along the crack front at different times, appearing as continuous average crack advance. Furthermore, these results do not provide evidence for the mechanism of crack extension. The results do show that the average crack front advance is continuous during hydrogen assisted cracking, not stepwise, as would be expected for the HIDP-C mechanism of crack growth. 13 references.

  6. Coronal Loop Evolution Observed with AIA and Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana; Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Kobayashi, K.; Korreck, K.; Golub, L.; Kuzin. S.; Walsh, R.; DeForest, C.; DePontieu, B.; Weber, M.

    2012-01-01

    Despite much progress toward understanding the dynamics of the solar corona, the physical properties of coronal loops are not yet fully understood. Recent investigations and observations from different instruments have yielded contradictory results about the true physical properties of coronal loops. In the past, the evolution of loops has been used to infer the loop substructure. With the recent launch of High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C), this inference can be validated. In this poster we discuss the first results of loop analysis comparing AIA and Hi-C data. We find signatures of cooling in a pixel selected along a loop structure in the AIA multi-filter observations. However, unlike previous studies, we find that the cooling time is much longer than the draining time. This is inconsistent with previous cooling models.

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide–Inducible Clone-5 Regulates Mesangial Cell Proliferation in Proliferative Glomerulonephritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jamba, Ariunbold; Kondo, Shuji; Urushihara, Maki; Nagai, Takashi; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Miyazaki, Akira; Kagami, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5) is a transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-inducible focal adhesion protein. We previously demonstrated that Hic-5 was localized in mesangial cells and its expression was associated with glomerular cell proliferation and matrix expansion in human and rat glomerulonephritis (GN). In the present study, we first assessed the role of Hic-5 in mesangioproliferative GN by injecting Habu venom into heminephrectomized wild type (Hic-5+/+) and Hic-5-deficient (Hic-5-/-) mice. Hic-5+/+ GN mice exhibited glomerular cell proliferation on day 7. Surprisingly, glomerular cell number and Ki-67-positive cells in Hic-5-/- GN mice were significantly greater than those in Hic-5+/+ GN mice on day 7, although the number of glomerular apoptotic cells and the expression of growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor-BB and TGF-β1) and their receptors were similarly increased in both Hic-5+/+ and Hic-5-/- GN mice. In culture experiments, proliferation assays showed that platelet-derived growth factor-BB and TGF-β1 enhanced the proliferation of Hic-5-/- mesangial cells compared with Hic-5+/+ mesangial cells. In addition, mitogenic regulation by Hic-5 was associated with altered and coordinated expression of cell cycle-related proteins including cyclin D1 and p21. The present results suggest that Hic-5 might regulate mesangial cell proliferation in proliferative GN in mice. In conclusion, modulation of Hic-5 expression might have a potential to prevent mesangial cell proliferation in the acute mitogenic phase of glomerulonephritis. PMID:25835392

  8. Hydrogen-induced crack nucleation in tensile testing of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels at elevated temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malitckii, Evgenii; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Hänninen, Hannu

    2015-11-01

    The effect of continuous hydrogen charging on tensile properties of EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels was studied at room and elevated temperatures of 100 °C and 300 °C. The hydrogen effect decreases with increase of the temperature for ODS-EUROFER steel, while susceptibility to hydrogen of EUROFER 97 steel remains approximately the same at all testing temperatures. Continuous hydrogen charging results in a reduction of the grain boundary cohesion of the EUROFER 97 and ODS-EUROFER steels tested at RT. With increase of the testing temperature up to 300 °C EUROFER 97 steel exhibits relatively high amount of micro-cracks which agglomerate in sub-micrometer size cracks, while the hydrogen-induced intergranular crack nucleation in ODS-EUROFER steel is effectively suppressed. Possible mechanism of the hydrogen-induced crack nucleation and propagation under applied external stress is discussed.

  9. Microcracking in Composite Laminates: Simulation of Crack-Induced Ultrasound Attenuation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckey, C. A. C.; Rogge, M. D.; Parker, F. R.

    2012-01-01

    Microcracking in composite laminates is a known precursor to the growth of inter-ply delaminations and larger scale damage. Microcracking can lead to the attenuation of ultrasonic waves due to the crack-induced scattering. 3D elastodynamic finite integration technique (EFIT) has been implemented to explore the scattering of ultrasonic waves due to microcracks in anisotropic composite laminates. X-ray microfocus computed tomography data was directly input into the EFIT simulation for these purposes. The validated anisotropic 3D EFIT code is shown to be a useful tool for exploring the complex multiple-scattering which arises from extensive microcracking.

  10. Quantification of Crack Interaction in Loading-Induced Rock Deformation Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Montes, J. M.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. H.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    The coalescence of microcracks into major fractures marks the onset of major damage in rock and induces significant changes in its geotechnical and sealing properties. The interaction between neighbouring fractures affects the deformation process leading to this major failure. This study presents the analysis of load-induced fracture using spatial and temporal patterns of recorded acoustic emission (AE) events to investigate the role of crack interaction during fracturing processes Two methods based on event separation are used to estimate correlation and interaction distances between events. The first method uses the spacing of sequential and non-sequential event pairs, thus, the distance bin where both distributions converge can be interpreted as an upper bound for the interaction distance of correlated events in each of the experiments. The second method compares the distribution of inter-event separation of recorded events with the distribution obtained for a random population of events, quantifying the divergence between both distributions and its variation with time. A positive deviation for a distance range including up to the interaction distance observed in the previous approach indicates spatial clustering and process dominated by interactive events. This deviation is used to quantify the degree of event interaction or degree of non-randomness (NR) during the process. Two load-stress induced fracturing tests, carried out at two different scales, are analysed in this study to investigate the role of crack interaction in the deformation and fracturing process. The first test registered a total of 15,198 AE events from a pillar created between two deposition holes at SKB's Aspö Pillar Stability Experiment. The results show a good correlation between maxima of NR and minima in b-value in the time period immediately preceding and during the development of the observed major damage in form of spalling. The result can be interpreted as an indication of spalling

  11. Transient cracks and triple junctions induced by Cocos-Nazca propagating rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, H.; Smith, D. K.; Zhu, W.; Montesi, L. G.; Mitchell, G. A.; Cann, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    The Galapagos triple junction is a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction where the Cocos, Nazca, and Pacific plates meet around the Galapagos microplate (GMP). On the Cocos plate, north of the large gore that marks the propagating Cocos-Nazca (C-N) Rift, a 250-km-long and 50-km-wide band of NW-SE-trending cracks crosscuts the N-S-trending abyssal hills of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). These appear as a succession of minor rifts, accommodating some NE-SW extension of EPR-generated seafloor. The rifts successively intersected the EPR in triple junctions at distances of 50-100 km north of the tip of the C-N Rift. We proposed a simple crack interaction model to explain the location of the transient rifts and their junction with the EPR. The model predicts that crack locations are controlled by the stress perturbation along the EPR, induced by the dominant C-N Rift, and scaled by the distance of its tip to the EPR (Schouten et al., 2008). The model also predicts that tensile stresses are symmetric about the C-N Rift and thus, similar cracks should have occurred south of the C-N Rift prior to formation of the GMP about 1 Ma. There were no data at the time to test this prediction. In early 2009 (AT 15-41), we mapped an area on the Nazca plate south of the C-N rift out to 4 Ma. The new bathymetric data confirm the existence of a distinctive pattern of cracks south of the southern C-N gore that mirrors the pattern on the Cocos plate until about 1 Ma, and lends support to the crack interaction model. The envelope of the symmetric cracking pattern indicates that the distance between the C-N Rift tip and the EPR varied between 40 and 65 km during this time (1-4 Ma). The breakdown of the symmetry at 1 Ma accurately dates the onset of a southern plate boundary of the GMP, now Dietz Deep Rift. At present, the southern rift boundary of the GMP joins the EPR with a steep-sided, 80 km long ridge. This ridge releases the stress perturbation otherwise induced along the EPR by elastic

  12. Environment-induced embrittlement: Stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement; Environmental embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys. Final report, September 1, 1986--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Heldt, L.A.; Milligan, W.W.; White, C.L.

    1991-12-31

    This research program has included two thrusts. The first addressed environment-induced embrittlement in a parallel study of stress corrosion cracking and metal-induced embrittlement. This work has examined (1) mechanical properties as influenced by embrittling environments, (2) fractography and crystallography or transgranular cracking, (3) the mechanics of cracking, (4) the extent and role of local plastic flow, and (5) local chemistry within stress corrosion and metal-induced cracks. The embrittlement of iron aluminide alloys by air was addressed by determining the effect of water and hydrogen upon the mechanical properties. Slow strain rate testing in aqueous environments was carried out at controlled anodic and cathodic potentials. The effect of cathodically charged hydrogen and the effect of subsequent baking were measured. Environmental susceptibility was measured as affected by alloy composition, microstructure and degree of ordering.

  13. Hadronization in nuclear DIS and ultra-relativistic HIC

    SciTech Connect

    Falter, T.; Cassing, W.; Gallmeister, K.; Mosel, U.

    2006-07-11

    We present a transport theoretical analysis of hadron attenuation in deep inelastic lepton scattering (DIS) off complex nuclei in the kinematic regime of the HERMES experiment. The HERMES data indicate the presence of strong prehadronic final state interactions shortly after the elementary lepton-nucleon interaction. The contribution of such (pre-)hadronic final state interactions to the observed jet quenching in ultra-relaticistic heavy ion collisions (HIC) at RHIC is estimated under the assumption that a similar space-time picture for hadronization also holds in a hot hadronic medium. Our results show that an additional mechanism for jet quenching must be at work for most central collisions.

  14. Numerical study on distribution law of magnetic field and temperature field around the crack induced by eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; Zheng, Wenpei; Zhang, Laibin; Zhou, Fan

    2016-02-01

    Alternative current field measurement (ACFM) and eddy current thermography are both induced by eddy currents, and it is a commonality between them. The commonality has laid a good foundation for the combination of the two testing techniques. In this paper, a numerical study on distribution law of magnetic field and temperature field around the crack using eddy current excitation is carried out. The feasibility of the combination of ACFM and eddy current thermography is discussed as well. A specimen made of ferromagnetic material is tested by a U-shaped inducer, and a semielliptical crack is built on the specimen. The distribution law of magnetic field and temperature field is both studied using the same eddy current excitation. The relationship between the crack size and distribution of magnetic field and temperature field is identified by altering the length and depth of the crack. Through comparisons, the magnetic distribution law around the crack in this paper is consistent with that of ACFM, and the maximum temperature difference around the crack meets the inspection requirement of a thermal imager. These findings might make it possible to eventually combine ACFM and eddy current thermography.

  15. Hydrogen-induced cold cracking in heat-affected zone of low-carbon high-strength steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Hu, Zhiyong; Qiu, Chunlin

    2014-12-01

    The Y-groove cracking test by submerged arc welding was employed to study the susceptibility of a low-carbon high-strength steel to hydrogen-induced cold cracking (HICC). The morphology of hydrogen cracks was observed using an electron probe microscope. The results showed that the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has a higher susceptibility to HICC than the weld metal and that increasing heat input can improve the HICC resistance of the weldment. The intergranular microcracking is the main HICC mode at the lowest heat input condition, accompanied with some transgranular microcracks attached to complex inclusions. In combination with phase transformation behaviour in sub-zones, the effect of the phase transformation sequence is proposed to try to illustrate the fact that the fine-grained HAZ has higher probability of hydrogen cracking than the coarse-grained HAZ owing to the occurrence of hydrogen enrichment in the fine-grained HAZ after the transformation.

  16. Hic-5 is required for myofibroblast differentiation by regulating mechanically dependent MRTF-A nuclear accumulation.

    PubMed

    Varney, Scott D; Betts, Courtney B; Zheng, Rui; Wu, Lei; Hinz, Boris; Zhou, Jiliang; Van De Water, Livingston

    2016-02-15

    How mechanical cues from the extracellular environment are translated biochemically to modulate the effects of TGF-β on myofibroblast differentiation remains a crucial area of investigation. We report here that the focal adhesion protein, Hic-5 (also known as TGFB1I1), is required for the mechanically dependent generation of stress fibers in response to TGF-β. Successful generation of stress fibers promotes the nuclear localization of the transcriptional co-factor MRTF-A (also known as MKL1), and this correlates with the mechanically dependent induction of α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Hic-5 in response to TGF-β. As a consequence of regulating stress fiber assembly, Hic-5 is required for the nuclear accumulation of MRTF-A and the induction of α-SMA as well as cellular contractility, suggesting a crucial role for Hic-5 in myofibroblast differentiation. Indeed, the expression of Hic-5 was transient in acute wounds and persistent in pathogenic scars, and Hic-5 colocalized with α-SMA expression in vivo. Taken together, these data suggest that a mechanically dependent feed-forward loop, elaborated by the reciprocal regulation of MRTF-A localization by Hic-5 and Hic-5 expression by MRTF-A, plays a crucial role in myofibroblast differentiation in response to TGF-β. PMID:26759173

  17. DISCOVERY OF FINELY STRUCTURED DYNAMIC SOLAR CORONA OBSERVED IN THE Hi-C TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Cirtain, Jonathan; Savage, Sabrina; Alexander, Caroline; Golub, Leon; DeLuca, Edward; Schuler, Timothy

    2014-05-20

    In the Summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew on board a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e., have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70% of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  18. Discovery of Finely Structured Dynamic Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore examine how the intensity scales from AIA resolution to Hi-C resolution. For each low-resolution pixel, we calculate the standard deviation in the contributing high-resolution pixel intensities and compare that to the expected standard deviation calculated from the noise. If these numbers are approximately equal, the corona can be assumed to be smoothly varying, i.e. have no evidence of substructure in the Hi-C image to within Hi-C's ability to measure it given its throughput and readout noise. A standard deviation much larger than the noise value indicates the presence of substructure. We calculate these values for each low-resolution pixel for each frame of the Hi-C data. On average, 70 percent of the pixels in each Hi-C image show no evidence of substructure. The locations where substructure is prevalent is in the moss regions and in regions of sheared magnetic field. We also find that the level of substructure varies significantly over the roughly 160 s of the Hi-C data analyzed here. This result indicates that the finely structured corona is concentrated in regions of heating and is highly time dependent.

  19. Coronal Fine Structure in Dynamic Events Observed by Hi-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, Amy; Schuler, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    The High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket on 2012 July 11 and captured roughly 345 s of high spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in a narrowband 193 Angstrom channel. We have analyzed the fluctuations in intensity of Active Region 11520. We selected events based on a lifetime greater than 11 s (two Hi-C frames) and intensities greater than a threshold determined from the photon and readout noise. We compare the Hi-C events with those determined from AIA. We find that HI-C detects shorter and smaller events than AIA. We also find that the intensity increase in the Hi-C events is approx. 3 times greater than the intensity increase in the AIA events we conclude the events are related to linear sub-structure that is unresolved by AIA

  20. Understanding spatial organizations of chromosomes via statistical analysis of Hi-C data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming; Deng, Ke; Qin, Zhaohui; Liu, Jun S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how chromosomes fold provides insights into the transcription regulation, hence, the functional state of the cell. Using the next generation sequencing technology, the recently developed Hi-C approach enables a global view of spatial chromatin organization in the nucleus, which substantially expands our knowledge about genome organization and function. However, due to multiple layers of biases, noises and uncertainties buried in the protocol of Hi-C experiments, analyzing and interpreting Hi-C data poses great challenges, and requires novel statistical methods to be developed. This article provides an overview of recent Hi-C studies and their impacts on biomedical research, describes major challenges in statistical analysis of Hi-C data, and discusses some perspectives for future research. PMID:26124977

  1. Small Activating RNA Restores the Activity of the Tumor Suppressor HIC-1 on Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yan; Guo, Shanyu; Dai, Qiancheng; Yu, Yingyan; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    HIC-1 is a gene that is hypermethylated in cancer, and commonly downregulated in human breast cancer. However, the precise mechanisms and molecular pathways regulated by HIC-1 remain unclear. We assessed HIC-1 expression on a tissue microarray containing 80 cases of breast cancer. We also analyzed its biological function by restoring HIC-1 expression using 5-aza-2′ deoxycytidine (5-CdR) and small-activating RNAs for the reversal of HIC-1 tumor suppressive effects on MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines. An Agilent Q44h global expressing microarray was probed after restoring the expression of HIC-1. Data demonstrated that HIC-1 expression was reduced significantly in breast cancer tissues. HIC-1 immunohistochemistry resulted in mean staining scores in cancer tissue and normal ductal epithelia of 3.54 and 8.2, respectively (p<0.01). 5-CdR partially reversed HIC-1 expression, and modulated cell growth and apoptosis. dsHIC1-2998, an saRNA, showed activating efficacy in breast cancer cells. A group of differentially expressed genes were characterized by cDNA microarray. Upon saRNA treatment, genes upregulated included those involved in immune activation, cell cycle interference, the induction of apoptosis, anti-metastasis, and cell differentiation. Downregulated genes included oncogenes and those that play roles in cell invasion, cell growth, and cell division. Our findings may provide valuable resources not only for gene functional studies, but also for potential clinical applications to develop novel drug targets. PMID:24489730

  2. Quantitative observations of hydrogen-induced, slow crack growth in a low alloy steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.; Williams, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth, da/dt, was studied in AISI-SAE 4130 low alloy steel in gaseous hydrogen and distilled water environments as a function of applied stress intensity, K, at various temperatures, hydrogen pressures, and alloy strength levels. At low values of K, da/dt was found to exhibit a strong exponential K dependence (Stage 1 growth) in both hydrogen and water. At intermediate values of K, da/dt exhibited a small but finite K dependence (Stage 2), with the Stage 2 slope being greater in hydrogen than in water. In hydrogen, at a constant K, (da/dt) sub 2 varied inversely with alloy strength level and varied essentially in the same complex manner with temperature and hydrogen pressure as noted previously. The results of this study provide support for most of the qualitative predictions of the lattice decohesion theory as recently modified by Oriani. The lack of quantitative agreement between data and theory and the inability of theory to explain the observed pressure dependence of slow crack growth are mentioned and possible rationalizations to account for these differences are presented.

  3. On the growth rate of bending induced edge cracks in panels excited by convected random pressure fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    Parts of an aircraft structure may be made to vibrate as a result of acoustic waves generated by various aircraft noise sources impinging on the structure. The stresses associated with this acoustically induced vibration may be sufficiently large to result in fatigue failure of portions of the structure. If acoustically induced fatigue cracks occur in the stiffened skin structure widely used in aircraft construction they may initiate in the skin panels near the stiffener attachment points. The initiation and subsequent propagation of these cracks at the panel edges is primarily due to the bending stresses arising from the out-of-plane vibration of the individual skin panels. The emphasis of the work described in this paper is on devising a method of predicting the growth rate of an edge crack in a panel which is excited by a convected random pressure field.

  4. Microwave-induced cracking of pyrolytic tars coupled to microwave pyrolysis for syngas production.

    PubMed

    Beneroso, D; Bermúdez, J M; Montes-Morán, M A; Arenillas, A; Menéndez, J A

    2016-10-01

    Herein a new process is proposed to produce a syngas-rich gas fraction (>80vol% H2+CO) from biowaste based on microwave heating within two differentiated steps in order to avoid tars production. The first step consists of the microwave pyrolysis of biowaste induced by a char-based susceptor at 400-800°C; tars, char and syngas-rich gas fractions being produced. The tars are then fed into the second step where a portion of the char from the first step is used as a bed material in a 0.3:1wt% ratio. This bed is heated up by microwaves up to 800°C, allowing thermal cracking of tars and additional syngas (>90vol% H2+CO) being then produced. This new concept arises as an alternative technology to the gasification of biowastes for producing syngas with no need for catalysts or gasifying reagents to minimise tars production. PMID:27420155

  5. Modelling of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in CANDU fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, B. J.; Thompson, W. T.; Kleczek, M. R.; Shaheen, K.; Juhas, M.; Iglesias, F. C.

    2011-01-01

    Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) is a recognized factor for fuel-element failure in the operation of nuclear reactors requiring the implementation of mitigation measures. I-SCC is believed to depend on certain factors such as iodine concentration, oxide layer type and thickness on the fuel sheath, irradiation history, metallurgical parameters related to sheath like texture and microstructure, and the mechanical properties of zirconium alloys. This work details the development of a thermodynamics and mechanistic treatment accounting for the iodine chemistry and kinetics in the fuel-to-sheath gap and its influence on I-SCC phenomena. The governing transport equations for the model are solved with a finite-element technique using the COMSOL Multiphysics® commercial software platform. Based on this analysis, this study also proposes potential remedies for I-SCC.

  6. Cognitive related electrophysiological changes induced by non-invasive cortical electrical stimulation in crack-cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Conti, Catarine Lima; Moscon, Janine Andrade; Fregni, Felipe; Nitsche, Michael Andreas; Nakamura-Palacios, Ester Miyuki

    2014-09-01

    Prefrontal dysfunction is a hallmark in drug addiction, yet interventions exploring modulation of prefrontal cortex function in drug addiction have not been fully investigated with regard to physiological alterations. We tested the hypothesis that non-invasive prefrontal stimulation would change neural activity in crack-cocaine addiction, investigating the effects of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) of Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex (DLPFC) induced cortical excitability modulation on the visual P3 Event Related Potentials (ERP) component under neutral and drug cue exposition in crack-cocaine addicts. Thirteen crack-cocaine users were randomly distributed to receive five applications (once a day, every other day) of bilateral (left cathodal/right anodal) tDCS (20 min, 2 mA, 35 cm2) or sham tDCS over the DLPFC. Brain activity was measured under crack-related or neutral visual-cued ERPs. There were significant differences in P3-related parameters when comparing group of stimulation (active vs. sham tDCS) and number of sessions (single vs. repetitive tDCS). After a single session of tDCS, P3 current intensity in the left DLPFC increased during neutral cues and decreased during crack-related cues. This effect was opposite to what was observed in the sham-tDCS group. In contrast, repetitive tDCS increased current density not only in the DLPFC, but also in a wider array of prefrontal areas, including presumably the frontopolar cortex (FPC) orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), when subjects were visualizing crack-related cues. Thus, single and repetitive application of tDCS can impact cognitive processing of neutral and especially crack-related visual cues in prefrontal areas, which may be of importance for treatment of crack-cocaine addiction. PMID:24776374

  7. Characteristics of lead induced stress corrosion cracking of alloy 690 in high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, K.K.; Lim, J.K.; Watanabe, Yutaka; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1996-10-01

    Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted on alloy 690 in various lead chloride solutions and metal lead added to 100 ppm chloride solution at 288 C. The corrosion potential (rest potential) for the alloy was measured with SSRT tests. The cracking was observed by metallographic examination and electron probe micro analyzer. Also, the corrosion behavior of the alloy was evaluated by anodic polarized measurement at 30 C. Resulting from the tests, cracking was characterized by cracking behavior, crack length and crack growth rate, and lead effects on cracking. The cracking was mainly intergranular in mode, approximately from 60 um to 450 um in crack length, and approximately 10{sup {minus}6} to 10{sup {minus}7} mmS-1 in crack velocity. The cracking was evaluated through the variation the corrosion potential in potential-time and lead behavior during SSRTs. The lead effect in corrosion was evaluated through active to passive transition behavior in anodic polarized curves. The corrosion reactions in the cracking region were confirmed by electron probe microanalysis. Alloy 690 is used for steam generation tubes in pressurized water reactors.

  8. Identification and Characterization of the HicAB Toxin-Antitoxin System in the Opportunistic Pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Shen, Mengyu; Lu, Shuguang; Le, Shuai; Tan, Yinling; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Xia; Shen, Wei; Guo, Keke; Yang, Yuhui; Zhu, Hongbin; Rao, Xiancai; Hu, Fuquan; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) systems are small genetic modules that are widely distributed in the genomes of bacteria and archaea and have been proposed to fulfill numerous functions. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of a type II TA system, comprising the hicAB locus in the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The hicAB locus consists of genes hicA and hicB encoding a toxin and its cognate antitoxin, respectively. BLAST analysis revealed that hicAB is prevalent in approximately 36% of P. aeruginosa strains and locates in the same genomic region. RT-PCR demonstrated that hicAB forms a bicistronic operon that is cotranscribed under normal growth conditions. Overproduction of HicA inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli, and this effect could be counteracted by co-expression of HicB. The Escherichia coli kill/rescue assay showed that the effect of HicA is bacteriostatic, rather than bactericidal. Deletion of hicAB had no effect on the biofilm formation and virulence of P. aeruginosa in a mice infection model. Collectively, this study presents the first characterization of the HicAB system in the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. PMID:27104566

  9. Development of chloride-induced corrosion in pre-cracked RC beams under sustained loading: Effect of load-induced cracks, concrete cover, and exposure conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Linwen; François, Raoul; Dang, Vu Hiep; L'Hostis, Valérie; Gagné, Richard

    2015-01-15

    This paper deals with corrosion initiation and propagation in pre-cracked reinforced concrete beams under sustained loading during exposure to a chloride environment. Specimen beams that were cast in 2010 were compared to specimens cast in 1984. The only differences between the two sets of beams were the casting direction in relation to tensile reinforcement and the exposure conditions in the salt-fog chamber. The cracking maps, corrosion maps, chloride profiles, and cross-sectional loss of one group of two beams cast in 2010 were studied and their calculated corrosion rates were compared to that of beams cast in 1984 in order to investigate the factors influencing the natural corrosion process. Experimental results show that, after rapid initiation of corrosion at the crack tip, the corrosion process practically halted and the time elapsing before corrosion resumed depended on the exposure conditions and cover depth.

  10. Surface roughness induced cracks of the deposition film from drying colloidal suspension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Luo, Hao; Ma, Jun; Xie, Weiguang; Wang, Yan; Jing, Guangyin

    2016-02-01

    We investigate crack formation in deposition films from drying colloidal suspension drops, by varying the roughness and texture of the substrate. The experimental results indicate that the crack number or crack spacing presents a general dependence on the substrate roughness, despite the orientation of the substrate textures. Interestingly, the crack spacing decreases with the increase of the roughness. Two possible mechanisms are proposed to understand the dependence of the cracks on roughness. Firstly, the concentration reduction of the drying suspension due to collecting colloidal particles from the substrate textures decreases the crack spacing. Secondly, stress concentration resulting from the defects (the notches in textures) in the dried deposition enhances crack formation. However, a quantitative estimation by the calculation of the stress concentrating factors reveals that the notch of the substrate textures dominates crack variation. The results here bring forth a practical method for controlling the crack orientation and suppression, and a potential application to crack-free coatings, films and paintings during the drying of complex fluids. PMID:26920527

  11. Juicebox Provides a Visualization System for Hi-C Contact Maps with Unlimited Zoom.

    PubMed

    Durand, Neva C; Robinson, James T; Shamim, Muhammad S; Machol, Ido; Mesirov, Jill P; Lander, Eric S; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-07-01

    Hi-C experiments study how genomes fold in 3D, generating contact maps containing features as small as 20 bp and as large as 200 Mb. Here we introduce Juicebox, a tool for exploring Hi-C and other contact map data. Juicebox allows users to zoom in and out of Hi-C maps interactively, just as a user of Google Earth might zoom in and out of a geographic map. Maps can be compared to one another, or to 1D tracks or 2D feature sets. PMID:27467250

  12. Juicer Provides a One-Click System for Analyzing Loop-Resolution Hi-C Experiments.

    PubMed

    Durand, Neva C; Shamim, Muhammad S; Machol, Ido; Rao, Suhas S P; Huntley, Miriam H; Lander, Eric S; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2016-07-01

    Hi-C experiments explore the 3D structure of the genome, generating terabases of data to create high-resolution contact maps. Here, we introduce Juicer, an open-source tool for analyzing terabase-scale Hi-C datasets. Juicer allows users without a computational background to transform raw sequence data into normalized contact maps with one click. Juicer produces a hic file containing compressed contact matrices at many resolutions, facilitating visualization and analysis at multiple scales. Structural features, such as loops and domains, are automatically annotated. Juicer is available as open source software at http://aidenlab.org/juicer/. PMID:27467249

  13. Effect of disorder on temporal fluctuations in drying-induced cracking.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Gabriel; Kun, Ferenc; Muñoz, José D

    2011-10-01

    We investigate by means of computer simulations the effect of structural disorder on the statistics of cracking for a thin layer of material under uniform and isotropic drying. For this purpose, the layer is discretized into a triangular lattice of springs with a slightly randomized arrangement. The drying process is captured by reducing the natural length of all springs by the same factor, and the amount of quenched disorder is controlled by varying the width ξ of the distribution of the random breaking thresholds for the springs. Once a spring breaks, the redistribution of the load may trigger an avalanche of breaks, not necessarily as part of the same crack. Our computer simulations revealed that the system exhibits a phase transition with the amount of disorder as control parameter: at low disorders, the breaking process is dominated by a macroscopic crack at the beginning, and the size distribution of the subsequent breaking avalanches shows an exponential form. At high disorders, the fracturing proceeds in small-sized avalanches with an exponential distribution, generating a large number of microcracks, which eventually merge and break the layer. Between both phases, a sharp transition occurs at a critical amount of disorder ξ(c)=0.40±0.01, where the avalanche size distribution becomes a power law with exponent τ=2.6±0.08, in agreement with the mean-field value τ=5/2 of the fiber bundle model. Moreover, good quality data collapses from the finite-size scaling analysis show that the average value of the largest burst ⟨Δ(max)⟩ can be identified as the order parameter, with β/ν=1.4 and 1/ν≃1.0, and that the average ratio ⟨m(2)/m(1)⟩ of the second m(2) and first moments m(1) of the avalanche size distribution shows similar behavior to the susceptibility of a continuous transition, with γ/ν=1, 1/ν≃0.9. These results suggest that the disorder-induced transition of the breakup of thin layers is analogous to a continuous phase transition

  14. Crack-induced debonding failure in fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) strengthened concrete beams: Experimental and theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jinlong

    External bonding of FRP plates to the tension substrate of RC beams has been accepted as an efficient and effective technique for flexural strengthening. In this thesis, different problems related to crack-induced debonding of the FRP plate in the flexural strengthened concrete beams have been investigated. FRP strengthened RC beam may fail by FRP debonding from the bottom of a major flexural crack in the span. This kind of failure is studied with the direct shear test in the present research work. Our experimental investigation focuses on the effect of concrete composition on the bond behavior between FRP and concrete. Based on the test results, the bond capacity of the specimen is found to be governed by the concrete surface tensile strength, aggregate size and aggregate content. Then, the neural network is employed to derive an empirical expression for the interfacial fracture energy in terms of concrete surface tensile strength and aggregate content. Using the empirical equation, simulated bond capacity is in good agreement with experimental results. In the FRP strengthened RC beams, debonding of the FRP plate often occurs under the presence of multiple cracks along the span. In the present thesis, experimental and theoretical investigations are performed to study the effect of multiple secondary cracks on the debonding behavior and ultimate load capacity. A new analytical model for FRP debonding under multiple cracks has been developed. The effect of the multiple secondary cracks on the shear softening in the debonded zone is explicitly considered in the model. Using the new model, the simulated values of ultimate load when debonding occurs are in good agreement with measured values. In the FRP strengthened RC beams, concrete cover separation or plate end debonding can be avoided by applying tapers at the FRP plate end. In this situation, it is easier for FRP debonding to be induced by a major flexural crack close to the support. To study the effect of the

  15. Identifying and Understanding Environment-Induced Crack propagation Behavior in Ni-based Superalloy INCONEL 617

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Longzhou

    2012-11-30

    The nickel-based superalloy INCONEL 617 is a candidate material for heat exchanger applications in the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) system. This project will study the crack propagation process of alloy 617 at temperatures of 650°C-950°C in air under static/cyclic loading conditions. The goal is to identify the environmental and mechanical damage components and to understand in-depth the failure mechanism. Researchers will measure the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rate (da/dn) under cyclic and hold-time fatigue conditions, and sustained crack growth rates (da/dt) at elevated temperatures. The independent FCP process will be identified and the rate-controlled sustained loading crack process will be correlated with the thermal activation equation to estimate the oxygen thermal activation energy. The FCP-dependent model indicates that if the sustained loading crack growth rate, da/dt, can be correlated with the FCP rate, da/dn, at the full time dependent stage, researchers can confirm stress-accelerated grain-boundary oxygen embrittlement (SAGBOE) as a predominate effect. Following the crack propagation tests, the research team will examine the fracture surface of materials in various cracking stages using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. In particular, the microstructure of the crack tip region will be analyzed in depth using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) mapping techniques to identify oxygen penetration along the grain boundary and to examine the diffused oxygen distribution profile around the crack tip. The cracked sample will be prepared by focused ion beam nanofabrication technology, allowing researchers to accurately fabricate the TEM samples from the crack tip while minimizing artifacts. Researchers will use these microscopic and spectroscopic results to interpret the crack propagation process, as well as distinguish and understand the environment or

  16. Computational modeling of micro-crack induced attenuation in CFRP composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R. A.; Leckey, C. A. C.

    2013-01-01

    A computational study is performed to determine the contribution to ultrasound attenuation in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates of linear elastic scattering by matrix micro-cracking. Multiple scattering approximations are benchmarked against exact computational approaches. Results support linear scattering as the source of observed increased attenuation in the presence of micro-cracking.

  17. Prediction of reinforcement corrosion using corrosion induced cracks width in corroded reinforced concrete beams

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Inamullah; François, Raoul; Castel, Arnaud

    2014-02-15

    This paper studies the evolution of reinforcement corrosion in comparison to corrosion crack width in a highly corroded reinforced concrete beam. Cracking and corrosion maps of the beam were drawn and steel reinforcement was recovered from the beam to observe the corrosion pattern and to measure the loss of mass of steel reinforcement. Maximum steel cross-section loss of the main reinforcement and average steel cross-section loss between stirrups were plotted against the crack width. The experimental results were compared with existing models proposed by Rodriguez et al., Vidal et al. and Zhang et al. Time prediction models for a given opening threshold are also compared to experimental results. Steel cross-section loss for stirrups was also measured and was plotted against the crack width. It was observed that steel cross-section loss in the stirrups had no relationship with the crack width of longitudinal corrosion cracks. -- Highlights: •Relationship between crack and corrosion of reinforcement was investigated. •Corrosion results of natural process and then corresponds to in-situ conditions. •Comparison with time predicting model is provided. •Prediction of load-bearing capacity from crack pattern was studied.

  18. Computational Modeling of Micro-Crack Induced Attenuation in CFRP Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, R. A.; Leckey, C. A. C.

    2012-01-01

    A computational study is performed to determine the contribution to ultrasound attenuation in carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite laminates of linear elastic scattering by matrix micro-cracking. Multiple scattering approximations are benchmarked against exact computational approaches. Results support linear scattering as the source of observed increased attenuation in the presence of micro-cracking.

  19. Modeling of water absorption induced cracks in resin-based composite supported ceramic layer structures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Thompson, V P; Rekow, E D; Soboyejo, W O

    2008-01-01

    Cracking patterns in the top ceramic layers of the modeled dental multilayers with polymer foundation are observed when they are immersed in water. This article developed a model to understand this cracking mechanism. When water diffuses into the polymer foundation of dental restorations, the foundation will expand; as a result, the stress will build up in the top ceramic layer because of the bending and stretching. A finite element model based on this mechanism is built to predict the stress build-up and the slow crack growth in the top ceramic layers during the water absorption. Our simulations show that the stress build-up by this mechanism is high enough to cause the cracking in the top ceramic layers and the cracking patterns predicted by our model are well consistent with those observed in experiments on glass/epoxy/polymer multilayers. The model is then used to discuss the life prediction of different dental ceramics. PMID:17497681

  20. The HicA toxin from Burkholderia pseudomallei has a role in persister cell formation

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Aaron; Higman, Victoria A.; Williams, Christopher; Crump, Matthew P.; Hemsley, Claudia M.; Harmer, Nicholas; Titball, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    TA (toxin–antitoxin) systems are widely distributed amongst bacteria and are associated with the formation of antibiotic tolerant (persister) cells that may have involvement in chronic and recurrent disease. We show that overexpression of the Burkholderia pseudomallei HicA toxin causes growth arrest and increases the number of persister cells tolerant to ciprofloxacin or ceftazidime. Furthermore, our data show that persistence towards ciprofloxacin or ceftazidime can be differentially modulated depending on the level of induction of HicA expression. Deleting the hicAB locus from B. pseudomallei K96243 significantly reduced persister cell frequencies following exposure to ciprofloxacin, but not ceftazidime. The structure of HicA(H24A) was solved by NMR and forms a dsRBD-like (dsRNA-binding domain-like) fold, composed of a triple-stranded β-sheet, with two helices packed against one face. The surface of the protein is highly positively charged indicative of an RNA-binding protein and His24 and Gly22 were functionality important residues. This is the first study demonstrating a role for the HicAB system in bacterial persistence and the first structure of a HicA protein that has been experimentally characterized. PMID:24502667

  1. Analysis of delamination in cross-ply laminates initiating from impact induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element analyses of (02/90(8)/02) glass/epoxy and graphite/epoxy composite laminates were performed to investigate some of the characteristics of damage development due to an impact load. A cross section through the thickness of the laminate with fixed ends, and carrying a transverse load in the center, was analyzed. Inclined matrix cracks, such as those produced by a low-velocity impact, were modeled in the 90 deg ply group. The introduction of the matrix cracks caused large interlaminar tensile and shear stresses in the vicinity of both crack tips in the 0/90 and 90/0 interfaces, indicating that matrix cracking may give rise to delamination. The ratio of Mode I to total strain energy release rate, G(I)/G(total), at the beginning of delamination, calculated at the two (top and bottom) matrix crack tips was 60 and 28 percent, respectively, in the glass/epoxy laminate. The corresponding ratio was 97 and 77 percent in the graphite/epoxy laminate. Thus, a significant Mode I component of strain energy release rate may be present at the delamination initiation due to an impact load. The value of strain energy release rate at either crack tip increased due to an increase in the delamination length at the other crack tip and may give rise to an unstable delamination growth under constant load.

  2. Effects of thickness on plasticity-induced fatigue crack closure: Analysis and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.; Chan, K.K.; Yu, J.

    1999-07-01

    The crack-opening stress was measured using a strain gage technique on 7050 aluminum alloy, under constant amplitude and repeated overload. The behavior of crack-opening stress predicted by Newman's FASTRAN-II is consistent with the experimental results for repeated overload. It is also found that the FASTRAN-II program is capable of predicting crack growth on the 7050-T76 aluminum plate and 7050-T76 aluminum plate and 7050-T7452 aluminum hand forging under complex simulated flight loading which contains a significant number of compression cycles.

  3. A fractographic study of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in irradiated Zircaloy-2 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Sachio; Nagai, Masayuki

    1983-02-01

    A fractographic interpretation of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Zircaloy-2 was made through detailed scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of cladding tubes irradiated and subjected to internal pressurization SCC tests in an iodine environment. The SEM examination of the fracture surface revealed that both intergranular and transgranular fracture appeared in the regions of crack initiation. The W-type voids were observed in the intergranular fracture. As the crack proceeded, transgranular fracture, or cleavage facet, became predominant. Cleavage facets were separated by tearing ridges as well as by fluting marks. The appearance of tearing ridges is consistent with the increase of slip systems in α-zirconium with increasing temperature.

  4. Hi-C Observations of Penumbral Bright Dots: Comparison with the IRIS Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alpert, S. E.; Tiwari, S. K.; Moore, R. L.; Savage, S. L.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    We observed bright dots (BDs) in a sunspot penumbra by using data acquired by the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C). The sizes of these BDs are on the order of 1 arcsecond (1') and are therefore hard to identify using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly's (AIA) 0.6' pixel -1 resolution. These BDs become readily apparent with Hi-C's 0.1' pixel -1 resolution. Tian et al. (2014) found penumbral BDs in the transition region (TR) by using the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). However, only a few of their dots could be associated with any enhanced brightness in AIA channels. In this work, we examine the characteristics of the penumbral BDs observed by Hi-C in a sunspot penumbra, including their sizes, lifetimes, speeds, and intensity. We also attempt to relate these BDs to the IRIS BDs. There are fewer Hi-C BDs in the penumbra than seen by IRIS, though different sunspots were studied and Hi-C had a short observation time. We use 193 A Hi-C data from July 11, 2012 which observed from 18:52:00 UT{18:56:00 UT and supplement it with data from AIA's 193 A passband to see the complete lifetime of the dots that were born before and/or lasted longer than Hi-C's 5-minute observation period. We use additional AIA passbands and compare the light curves of the BDs at different temperatures to test whether the Hi-C BDs are TR BDs. We find that most Hi-C BDs show clear movement, and of those that do, they move in a radial direction, toward or away from the sunspot umbra, sometimes doing both. BDs interact with other BDs, combining to fade away or brighten. The BDs that do not interact with other BDs tend to move less and last longer. We examine the properties of the Hi-C BDs and compare them with the IRIS BDs. Our BDs are similar to the exceptional values of the IRIS BDs: they move slower on average and their sizes and lifetimes are on the higher end of the distributions of IRIS BDs. We infer that our penumbral BDs are some of the larger BDs observed by IRIS.

  5. Analysis of delamination in cross ply laminates initiating from impact induced matrix cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salpekar, S. A.

    1991-01-01

    Several two dimensional finite element analyses of (0 sub 2/90 sub 8/0 sub 2) glass/epoxy and graphite-epoxy composite laminates were performed to study some of the characteristics of damage development due to an impact load. A cross section through the thickness of the laminate with fixed ends, and carrying a transverse load in the center was analyzed. Inclined matrix cracks such as those produced by low velocity impact were modeled in the 90 deg ply group. The introduction of the matrix cracks caused large interlaminar tension and shear stresses in the vicinity of both crack tips in the 0/90 and 90/0 interfaces. The large interlaminar stresses at the ends of the matrix cracks indicate that matrix cracking may give rise to delamination. The ratio of mode I to total strain energy release rate at the beginning of delamination calculated at the two matrix crack tips was 60 and 28 pct., respectively, in the glass/epoxy laminate. The corresponding ratio was 97 and 77 pct. in the graphite-epoxy laminate. Thus, a significant mode I component of strain energy release rate may be present at the delamination initiation due to an impact load.

  6. Hospital incident command system (HICS) performance in Iran; decision making during disasters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hospitals are cornerstones for health care in a community and must continue to function in the face of a disaster. The Hospital Incident Command System (HICS) is a method by which the hospital operates when an emergency is declared. Hospitals are often ill equipped to evaluate the strengths and vulnerabilities of their own management systems before the occurrence of an actual disaster. The main objective of this study was to measure the decision making performance according to HICS job actions sheets using tabletop exercises. Methods This observational study was conducted between May 1st 2008 and August 31st 2009. Twenty three Iranian hospitals were included. A tabletop exercise was developed for each hospital which in turn was based on the highest probable risk. The job action sheets of the HICS were used as measurements of performance. Each indicator was considered as 1, 2 or 3 in accordance with the HICS. Fair performance was determined as < 40%; intermediate as 41-70%; high as 71-100% of the maximum score of 192. Descriptive statistics, T-test, and Univariate Analysis of Variance were used. Results None of the participating hospitals had a hospital disaster management plan. The performance according to HICS was intermediate for 83% (n = 19) of the participating hospitals. No hospital had a high level of performance. The performance level for the individual sections was intermediate or fair, except for the logistic and finance sections which demonstrated a higher level of performance. The public hospitals had overall higher performances than university hospitals (P = 0.04). Conclusions The decision making performance in the Iranian hospitals, as measured during table top exercises and using the indicators proposed by HICS was intermediate to poor. In addition, this study demonstrates that the HICS job action sheets can be used as a template for measuring the hospital response. Simulations can be used to assess preparedness, but the correlation with

  7. Model boiler testing to evaluate inhibitors for caustic induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Daret, J.; Paine, J.P.N.; Partridge, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    A series of model boiler tests, using a mixture of precracked and non-precracked (virgin) tube-to-tube support plate intersections was performed. The testing supported the qualification of inhibitors for mitigating the secondary side corrosion of alloy 600 steam generator tubes. Many utilities suspect that the caustic impurities come from the feedwater. Candidate inhibitors included boric acid (as a reference), cerous acetate, and two forms of titanium dioxide: a laboratory produced titania-silica sol-gel, and manometer sized anatase The latter was combined with a 150 C pre-soaking with a titanium lactate, and was tested with and without a zeta potential treatment by sodium aluminate. Effectiveness of boric acid to prevent and retard caustic induced intergranular corrosion was confirmed in all crevice configurations (open and packed). The cerous acetate treatment multiplied by two to four the time necessary to detect a primary-to-secondary leak on virgin tubes, and reduced the propagation rate on precracked tubes. Cerium was found intimately mixed, as cerianite, with the free span and crevice deposits, when the crevices were sufficiently accessible. Due to its very low solubility and large particle size, the titania-silica sol-gel was unable to penetrate the crevices and had no effect on the degradation process. The nanometric particle size titania treatment and/or the preceding soaking with soluble titanium lactate drastically increased the titanium concentration in free span and open crevice deposit (with no added sodium aluminate, titania reacted with magnetite to form ilmenite) and showed undeniable capacity to prevent tubing degradation. Its effectiveness, in the case of packed crevices and for arresting cracks, was not so conclusive.

  8. Avoidance of crack inducement when laser welding hot-formed car body components - a variable analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, Johnny K.

    The Volvo XC60 car body contains numerous parts in Ultra High Strength Steels (UHSS) in order to guarantee the structural integrity of the car in the event of a crash situation. Most of the parts are manufactured in a hot-forming process, so called presshardening, resulting in component tensile strength in the range of 1,500 MPa. As this type of material also presents fairly high carbon content (˜0.22%) it brings a challenge when it comes to welding. The Volvo XC60 car body is at the same time to a large extent assembled by laser welding technology. In early development stages of the project (Y413), it was observed that laser welding of hot-formed components presented a number of challenges due to the unique conditions offered by this welding method. The presentation will thoroughly describe the modes of procedure how to avoid crack inducement during the welding operation. A variable analysis approach was used based on the present circumstances at the production facility in the Gent plant. Crucial variables at laser welding such as gap between sheets, focal point position, welding speed and laser weld position relative to the flange edge were included in a test matrix and welding trials were carried out accordingly in the Pilot Plant in Gothenburg. The paper will discuss those welding results, the subsequent analysis and plausible theoretic explanations. From the lessons learnt in this research, the optimum laser welding parameters were then transferred to the laser welding stations in the Gent plant. There it has been proven, that also at high volume automotive manufacturing, it is possible to provide an outstanding weld quality also at such difficult pre-conditions. The presentation ends with some facts and figures and experiences from high volume series production, which also includes aspects on quality assurance.

  9. Mechanistic studies on stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steels in near-neutral pH environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Biao

    2000-10-01

    potential (ECorr), hydrogen was evolved from environment and accumulated in a highly stressed region of the steel, which enhanced local dissolution or pitting process. The combination of preferential dissolution with stresses induced SCC cracks initiation. Once crack initiated it propagated by hydrogen-facilitated dissolution. At cathodic potentials, when hydrogen concentration reached a critical value, the cracking process is controlled by hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC).

  10. An analytical model which combines roughness- and plasticity- induced fatigue crack closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nong

    In this study an analytical PICC-RICC Model was developed to describe better the near-threshold fatigue behavior. The PICC-RICC Model was built upon a strip-yield type PICC model originally proposed by Newman and later modified by Hou and Lawrence. A zigzag crack growth path was introduced to simulate surface roughness. The two opposing crack surfaces were considered to be translated and thus mismatched by the mixed-mode displacements occurring near the deflected crack tip. The model is powerful and unique in that it combines the effects of RICC and PICC. Thus, the gradual transition from RICC to PICC dominated crack closure is handled naturally by this model. The influences of the geometrical features of the surface roughness, R-ratio and the cyclic load range on RICC were examined using the PICC-RICC Model. Near-threshold fatigue behavior of various materials was predicted. The effect of microstructure on the RICC level was studied. The predicted results compared favorably with experimental data. The fatigue notch size effect was investigated using the PICC-RICC model. The initial crack length (asb{i}) for propagation was estimated. The predicted notch fatigue strength compared favorably with the Initiation-Propagation (I-P) Model prediction and test data. The existence of a "worst case notch" previously postulated using the I-P Model was confirmed.

  11. Fatigue induced cracking in aluminum LN-2 shroud of 39 foot vacuum chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, A. A.

    1984-01-01

    Fourteen years after completion of Ford's 39-foot space simulation chamber, leaks began to appear in its LN2 shroud. Although the shroud had been tight since its acceptance, cracks appeared in 1983 in some of the field welds of the one inch tubes which interconnect the LN2 panels. The resulting leaks were large enough to prevent pump down to high vacuum and could be heard easily when the chamber was at ambient conditions. New cracks appeared during each thermal cycle making it impossible to utilize the chamber for thermal vacuum testing. The analysis presented here implies that many, if not all, of the aluminum LN2 shrouds now in use may be in various stages of fatigue failure. The probability is high that fatigue cracks are working through the aluminum tubing in heat-affected zones of some field welds. The cracks may not be apparent yet, but after the shroud has experienced a certain number of thermal cycles these cracks will work through the material and become serious leaks. Fortunately, appropriate planning, analysis, and checking can, with a relatively small expenditure of money, help to avoid large and unexpected shroud failures and keep the chamber operational as long as it is needed.

  12. Norwegian margin outer shelf cracking: a consequence of climate-induced gas hydrate dissociation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienert, J.; Vanneste, M.; Haflidason, H.; Bünz, S.

    2010-10-01

    A series of en echelon cracks run nearly parallel to the outer shelf edge of the mid-Norwegian margin. The features can be followed in a ~60-km-long and ~5-km-wide zone in which up to 10-m-deep cracks developed in the seabed at 400-550 m water depth. The time of the seabed cracking has been dated to 7350 14C years BP (8180 cal years BP), which corresponds with the main Storegga Slide event (8100 ± 250 cal. years BP). Reflection seismic data suggest that the cracks do not appear to result from deep-seated faults, but it cannot be ruled out completely that tension crevices were created in relation to past movements on the headwall of the Storegga slide. The cracking zone corresponds well to the zone where the base of the hydrate stability zone (BHSZ) outcrops. Evidence of fluid release in the BHSZ outcrop zone comes from an extensive pockmark field. We suggest that post-glacial ocean warming triggered the dissociation of gas hydrates while the interplay between dissociation, overpressure, and sediment fracturing on the outer shelf remains to be understood.

  13. van der Waals force-induced crack healing in dry rough interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soylemez, Emrecan; de Boer, Maarten P.

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous crack healing due to van der Waals forces is an important phenomenon in diverse areas such as precision assembly, locomotion, soft robotics, and micro- and nanomachines. For rough surfaces that can be described as a collection of asperities, parallel plate models are used to gain insight into the adhesion values. A single adhesion value is then found for a given surface description. However, experiments reveal a range of values. Here, implementing a simple beam model to gain physical insight, we show that an important contribution to the range can be due to the placement of asperities relative to the crack tip. For example, tall asperities far from the crack tip resist crack healing if they contact the substrate, but promote healing if not in contact with it. Due to this effect, the beam model predicts a range of values that is significant compared with the observed experiment variation. Furthermore, as the crack approaches mechanical equilibrium, the resisting action tends to dominate over the healing action, and the beam model predicts a lower adhesion value than the parallel plate model. These effects will be greatest in the case where the elasticity (Tabor) parameter is small.

  14. Cooperation between the Hic1 and Ptch1 tumor suppressors in medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, Kimberly J.; Corcoran-Schwartz, Ian M.; Zhang, Wei; Harcke, Thomas; Devereux, Wendy L.; Baylin, Stephen B.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Watkins, D. Neil

    2008-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is an embryonal tumor thought to arise from the granule cell precursors (GCPs) of the cerebellum. PATCHED (PTCH), an inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling, is the best-characterized tumor suppressor in medulloblastoma. However, <20% of medulloblastomas have mutations in PTCH. In the search for other tumor suppressors, interest has focused on the deletion events at the 17p13.3 locus, the most common genetic defect in medulloblastoma. This chromosomal region contains HYPERMETHYLATED IN CANCER 1 (HIC1), a transcriptional repressor that is a frequent target of epigenetic gene silencing in medulloblastoma. Here we use a mouse model of Ptch1 heterozygosity to reveal a critical tumor suppressor function for Hic1 in medulloblastoma. When compared with Ptch1 heterozygous mutants, compound Ptch1/Hic1 heterozygotes display a fourfold increased incidence of medulloblastoma. We show that Hic1 is a direct transcriptional repressor of Atonal Homolog 1 (Atoh1), a proneural transcription factor essential for cerebellar development, and show that ATOH1 expression is required for human medulloblastoma cell growth in vitro. Given that Atoh1 is also a putative target of Hh signaling, we conclude that the Hic1 and Ptch1 tumor suppressors cooperate to silence Atoh1 expression during a critical phase in GCP differentiation in which malignant transformation may lead to medulloblastoma. PMID:18347096

  15. Cooperation between the Hic1 and Ptch1 tumor suppressors in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Kimberly J; Corcoran-Schwartz, Ian M; Zhang, Wei; Harcke, Thomas; Devereux, Wendy L; Baylin, Stephen B; Eberhart, Charles G; Watkins, D Neil

    2008-03-15

    Medulloblastoma is an embryonal tumor thought to arise from the granule cell precursors (GCPs) of the cerebellum. PATCHED (PTCH), an inhibitor of Hedgehog signaling, is the best-characterized tumor suppressor in medulloblastoma. However, <20% of medulloblastomas have mutations in PTCH. In the search for other tumor suppressors, interest has focused on the deletion events at the 17p13.3 locus, the most common genetic defect in medulloblastoma. This chromosomal region contains HYPERMETHYLATED IN CANCER 1 (HIC1), a transcriptional repressor that is a frequent target of epigenetic gene silencing in medulloblastoma. Here we use a mouse model of Ptch1 heterozygosity to reveal a critical tumor suppressor function for Hic1 in medulloblastoma. When compared with Ptch1 heterozygous mutants, compound Ptch1/Hic1 heterozygotes display a fourfold increased incidence of medulloblastoma. We show that Hic1 is a direct transcriptional repressor of Atonal Homolog 1 (Atoh1), a proneural transcription factor essential for cerebellar development, and show that ATOH1 expression is required for human medulloblastoma cell growth in vitro. Given that Atoh1 is also a putative target of Hh signaling, we conclude that the Hic1 and Ptch1 tumor suppressors cooperate to silence Atoh1 expression during a critical phase in GCP differentiation in which malignant transformation may lead to medulloblastoma. PMID:18347096

  16. The Substructure of the Solar Corona Observed in the Hi-C Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winebarger, A.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; DeLuca, E.; Savage, S.; Alexander, C.; Schuler, T.

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket and collected the highest spatial resolution images ever obtained of the solar corona. One of the goals of the Hi-C flight was to characterize the substructure of the solar corona. We therefore calculate how the intensity scales from a low-resolution (AIA) pixels to high-resolution (Hi-C) pixels for both the dynamic events and "background" emission (meaning, the steady emission over the 5 minutes of data acquisition time). We find there is no evidence of substructure in the background corona; the intensity scales smoothly from low-resolution to high-resolution Hi-C pixels. In transient events, however, the intensity observed with Hi-C is, on average, 2.6 times larger than observed with AIA. This increase in intensity suggests that AIA is not resolving these events. This result suggests a finely structured dynamic corona embedded in a smoothly varying background.

  17. S/HIC: Robust Identification of Soft and Hard Sweeps Using Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Schrider, Daniel R.; Kern, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Detecting the targets of adaptive natural selection from whole genome sequencing data is a central problem for population genetics. However, to date most methods have shown sub-optimal performance under realistic demographic scenarios. Moreover, over the past decade there has been a renewed interest in determining the importance of selection from standing variation in adaptation of natural populations, yet very few methods for inferring this model of adaptation at the genome scale have been introduced. Here we introduce a new method, S/HIC, which uses supervised machine learning to precisely infer the location of both hard and soft selective sweeps. We show that S/HIC has unrivaled accuracy for detecting sweeps under demographic histories that are relevant to human populations, and distinguishing sweeps from linked as well as neutrally evolving regions. Moreover, we show that S/HIC is uniquely robust among its competitors to model misspecification. Thus, even if the true demographic model of a population differs catastrophically from that specified by the user, S/HIC still retains impressive discriminatory power. Finally, we apply S/HIC to the case of resequencing data from human chromosome 18 in a European population sample, and demonstrate that we can reliably recover selective sweeps that have been identified earlier using less specific and sensitive methods. PMID:26977894

  18. Scavenger Chemokine (CXC Motif) Receptor 7 (CXCR7) Is a Direct Target Gene of HIC1 (Hypermethylated in Cancer 1)*

    PubMed Central

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Rood, Brian R.; Touka, Majid; Pinte, Sébastien; Jenal, Mathias; Guérardel, Cateline; Ramsey, Keri; Monté, Didier; Bégue, Agnès; Tschan, Mario P.; Stephan, Dietrich A.; Leprince, Dominique

    2009-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene HIC1 (Hypermethylated in Cancer 1) that is epigenetically silenced in many human tumors and is essential for mammalian development encodes a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor. The few genes that have been reported to be directly regulated by HIC1 include ATOH1, FGFBP1, SIRT1, and E2F1. HIC1 is thus involved in the complex regulatory loops modulating p53-dependent and E2F1-dependent cell survival and stress responses. We performed genome-wide expression profiling analyses to identify new HIC1 target genes, using HIC1-deficient U2OS human osteosarcoma cells infected with adenoviruses expressing either HIC1 or GFP as a negative control. These studies identified several putative direct target genes, including CXCR7, a G-protein-coupled receptor recently identified as a scavenger receptor for the chemokine SDF-1/CXCL12. CXCR7 is highly expressed in human breast, lung, and prostate cancers. Using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analyses, we demonstrated that CXCR7 was repressed in U2OS cells overexpressing HIC1. Inversely, inactivation of endogenous HIC1 by RNA interference in normal human WI38 fibroblasts results in up-regulation of CXCR7 and SIRT1. In silico analyses followed by deletion studies and luciferase reporter assays identified a functional and phylogenetically conserved HIC1-responsive element in the human CXCR7 promoter. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and ChIP upon ChIP experiments demonstrated that endogenous HIC1 proteins are bound together with the C-terminal binding protein corepressor to the CXCR7 and SIRT1 promoters in WI38 cells. Taken together, our results implicate the tumor suppressor HIC1 in the transcriptional regulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR7, a key player in the promotion of tumorigenesis in a wide variety of cell types. PMID:19525223

  19. Shock-induced structural phase transition, plasticity, and brittle cracks in aluminum nitride ceramic.

    PubMed

    Branicio, Paulo S; Kalia, Rajiv K; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2006-02-17

    Atomistic mechanisms of fracture accompanying structural phase transformation (SPT) in AlN ceramic under hypervelocity impact are investigated using a 209 x 10(6) atom molecular-dynamics simulation. The shock wave generated by the impact splits into an elastic wave and a slower SPT wave that transforms the wurtzite structure into the rocksalt phase. The interaction between the reflected elastic wave and the SPT wave front generates nanovoids and dislocations into the wurtzite phase. Nanovoids coalesce into mode I cracks while dislocations give rise to kink bands and mode II cracking. PMID:16606007

  20. Chemical aspects of iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking failure of zircaloy-4 tubing above 50°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, P.; Spino, J.

    1983-02-01

    The chemical environment associated with iodine-induced SCC failure of Zircaloy-4 tubing above 500°C has been characterized. At the critical iodine concentrations which result in SCC initiation and propagation, most of the iodine is present as condensed zirconium subiodides ( I/ Zr ⩽ 0.4). Only a small part of the iodine remains in the gas phase as ZrI 4. The gaseous ZrI 4 is probably responsible for crack initiation and propagation. The critical ZrI 4 pressures for SCC failure have been estimated in zircaloy/iodine reaction experiments performed with unstressed zircaloy tube specimens. These pressures were confirmed in additional creep rupture tests conducted under controlled ZrI 4 partial pressure conditions. The estimated critical ZrI 4 pressure above which low-ductility SCC failure of the zircaloy tubing always occurs, independent of time-to-failure, varies between 0.005 bar at 550°C and 0.043 bar at 800°C. Below the critical values, however, a rather wide range of ZrI 4 pressures is associated with the onset of the SCC, especially at temperatures below 800°C. A comparison of the experimental results with available thermochemical data in the Zr-I system indicates that the main reaction involved during crack propagation is chemisorption of iodine-containing species on the fresh zircaloy surfaces created by metal straining at the crack tip.

  1. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer. PMID:26262686

  2. HIC1 attenuates invasion and metastasis by inhibiting the IL-6/STAT3 signalling pathway in human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bin; Zhang, Kundong; Li, Shaobo; Li, Hao; Yan, Zhaowen; Huang, Li; Wu, Jianghong; Han, Xiao; Jiang, Weiliang; Mulatibieke, Tunike; Zheng, Lin; Wan, Rong; Wang, Xingpeng; Hu, Guoyong

    2016-07-01

    Hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1) is a tumour suppressor gene that is frequently deleted or epigenetically silenced in many human cancers. However, the molecular function of HIC1 in pancreatic cancer has not been fully elucidated, especially in cancer invasion and metastasis. We aimed to clarify the clinical relevance of HIC1 and human pancreatic cancer and the mechanism of its effect on invasion and metastasis .HIC1 was downregulated in pancreatic cancer patient cancer tissue and pancreatic cancer cell lines. A tissue microarray analysis demonstrated that negative HIC1 expression predicted advanced pathological stages and worse patient survival. In addition, HIC1 inhibited the invasion and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, HIC1 repressed the expression of STAT3 target genes, including c-Myc, VEGF, CyclinD1, MMP2 and MMP9, by binding and interacting with STAT3 to impede its DNA-binding ability but without affecting the protein levels of STAT3 and p-STAT3. Therefore, HIC1 appears to function as a STAT3 inhibitor and may be a promising target for cancer research and for the development of an optimal treatment approach for pancreatic cancer. PMID:27085461

  3. Hypersensitivity and pain induced by operative procedures and the "cracked tooth" syndrome.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, S; Boston, D

    1997-01-01

    Various dental conditions are responsible for tooth hypersensitivity and pain. They include hypersensitive dentin; the "cracked tooth" syndrome; pulp and periapical irritation, inflammation and/or degeneration; barodontalgia (aerodontalgia); and periodontal pathoses, particularly the pulpal-periodontal syndrome. Each operative condition is reviewed with respect to its etiology, symptomatology, and diagnosis. Some treatment recommendations are made to prevent or reduce symptoms. PMID:9515403

  4. Hi-C Observations of an Active Region Corona, and Investigation of the Underlying Magnetic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. K.; Alexander, C. E.; Winebarger, A.; Moore, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The solar corona is much hotter (>=10(exp 6) K) than its surface (approx 6000 K), puzzling astrophysicists for several decades. Active region (AR) corona is again hotter than the quiet Sun (QS) corona by a factor of 4-10. The most widely accepted mechanism that could heat the active region corona is the energy release by current dissipation via reconnection of braided magnetic field structure, first proposed by E. N. Parker three decades ago. The first observational evidence for this mechanism has only recently been presented by Cirtain et al. by using High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) observations of an AR corona at a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec, which is required to resolve the coronal loops, and was not available before the rocket flight of Hi-C in July 2012. The Hi-C project is led by NASA/MSFC. In the case of the QS, work done by convection/granulation on the inter-granular feet of the coronal field lines translates into the heat observed in the corona. In the case of the AR, as here, there could be flux emergence, cancellation/submergence, or shear flows generating large stress and tension in coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. We are currently investigating the changes taking place in photospheric feet of the magnetic field involved with brightenings in the Hi-C AR corona. For this purpose, we are also using SDO/AIA data of +/- 2 hours around the 5 minutes Hi-C flight. In the present talk, I will first summarize some of the results of the Hi-C observations and then present some results from our recent analysis on what photospheric processes feed the magnetic energy that dissipates into heat in coronal loops.

  5. Disposal demonstration of a high integrity container (HIC) containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Tyacke, M.J.; Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.

    1985-02-01

    A high integrity container (HIC) was developed, tested, and certified for use in disposing of unusual low-level radioactive waste from Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The work was coordinated by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and funded by the US Department of Energy. A disposal demonstration using an HIC containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from TMI-2 was completed at the commercial disposal facility in the State of Washington. A Certification of Compliance was issued by the Department of Social and Health Services of the State of Washington to use the HIC in disposing of up to 50 EPICOR-II prefilters. That Certification of Compliance was issued after rigorous review of the HIC design and test program by the State and by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and disposing of the demonstration HIC and briefly describes the design, testing, and approval effort leading up to the demonstration.

  6. Corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goel, V.S.

    1986-01-01

    Various papers on corrosion cracking are presented. The topics addressed include: unique case studies on hydrogen embrittlement failures in components used in aeronautical industry; analysis of subcritical cracking in a Ti-5Al-2.5Sn liquid hydrogen control valve; corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking of 7475-T7351 aluminum alloy; effects of salt water environment and loading frequency on crack initiation in 7075-T7651 aluminum alloy and Ti-6Al-4V; stress corrosion cracking of 4340 steel in aircraft ignition starter residues. Also discussed are: stress corrosion cracking of a titanium alloy in a hydrogen-free environment; automation in corrosion fatigue crack growth rate measurements; the breaking load method, a new approach for assessing resistance to growth of early stage stress corrosion cracks; stress corrosion cracking properties of 2090 Al-Li alloy; repair welding of cracked free machining Invar 36; radial bore cracks in rotating disks.

  7. Scanning electron acoustic microscopy of indentation-induced cracks and residual stresses in ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Qian, Menglu; Ravichandran, M. V.; Knowles, K. M.

    1990-01-01

    The ability of scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM) to characterize ceramic materials is assessed. SEAM images of Vickers indentations in SiC whisker-reinforced alumina clearly reveal not only the radial cracks, the length of which can be used to estimate the fracture toughness of the material, but also reveal strong contrast, interpreted as arising from the combined effects of lateral cracks and the residual stress field left in the SiC whisker-reinforced alumina by the indenter. The strong contrast is removed after the material is heat treated at 1000 C to relieve the residual stresses around the indentations. A comparison of these observations with SEAM and reflected polarized light observations of Vickers indentations in soda-lime glass both before and after heat treatment confirms the interpretation of the strong contrast.

  8. The Release of Trapped Gases from Amorphous Solid Water Films: I. “Top-Down” Crystallization-Induced Crack Propagation Probed using the Molecular Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    May, Robert A.; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II) we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath of amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano". The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length and distribution are independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2 or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ/mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rate reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization/crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  9. Evaluation of the resistance of irradiated zirconium-liner cladding to iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Sachio; Nagai, Masayuki

    1983-02-01

    An evaluation was made of irradiated zirconium-liner cladding for its resistance to iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Emphasis was put on irradiation-induced hardening in zirconium and SCC resistance in zirconium-liner cladding as compared with Zircaloy-2 cladding. The Vickers microhardness test revealed that crystal bar zirconium experienced less hardening than Zircaloy-2 during neutron exposure. The SCC resistance of zirconium-liner cladding was evaluated for failure strains under the tube pressurization SCC test, and compared with the results of Zircaloy-2 cladding. The failure strains of zirconium-liner cladding were significantly larger than those of Zircaloy-2 cladding over all neutron fluence ranges examined, e.g., more than ten times at 1.0 × 10 21n/ cm2 ( E > 1 MeV). Judging from our results on the Vickers microhardness and SCC tests, good SCC resistance of zirconium-liner cladding could be expected even at high fluences.

  10. Anti-parallel filament flows and bright dots observed in the EUV with Hi-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. E.; Regnier, S.; Walsh, R. W.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    The Hi-C instrument imaged the million degree corona at the highest spatial and temporal resolution to date. The instrument imaged a complicated active region which contained several interesting features. Scientists at UCLan in the UK, in collaboration with other members of the Hi-C science team, studied two of these festures: anti-parallel filament flows and bright EUV dots. Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Evidence of ';counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). We present observations of an active region filament observed with Hi-C that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70 - 80 km/s) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.8' × 0.1'). The temperature distribution of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T(K) = 5.45 × 0.10 using EM loci analysis. Short-lived, small brightenings sparkling at the edge of the active region, calle EUV Bright Dots (EBDs) were also investigated. EBDs have a characteristic duration of 25 s with a characteristic length of 680 km. These brightenings are not fully resolved by the SDO/AIA instrument at the same wavelength, but can however be identified with respect to the Hi-C location of the EBDs. In addition, EBDs are seen in other chromospheric/coronal channels of SDO/AIA suggesting a temperature between 0.5 and 1.5 MK. Based on a potential field extrapolation from an SDO/HMI magnetogram, the EBDs appear at the footpoints of large-scale trans-equatorial coronal loops. The Hi-C observations provide the first evidence of small-scale EUV

  11. Behavioural, biochemical and molecular changes induced by chronic crack-cocaine inhalation in mice: The role of dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Areal, Lorena B; Rodrigues, Livia C M; Andrich, Filipe; Moraes, Livia S; Cicilini, Maria A; Mendonça, Josideia B; Pelição, Fabricio S; Nakamura-Palacios, Ester M; Martins-Silva, Cristina; Pires, Rita G W

    2015-09-01

    Crack-cocaine addiction has increasingly become a public health problem worldwide, especially in developing countries. However, no studies have focused on neurobiological mechanisms underlying the severe addiction produced by this drug, which seems to differ from powder cocaine in many aspects. This study investigated behavioural, biochemical and molecular changes in mice inhaling crack-cocaine, focusing on dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems in the prefrontal cortex. Mice were submitted to two inhalation sessions of crack-cocaine a day (crack-cocaine group) during 11 days, meanwhile the control group had no access to the drug. We found that the crack-cocaine group exhibited hyperlocomotion and a peculiar jumping behaviour ("escape jumping"). Blood collected right after the last inhalation session revealed that the anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AEME), a specific metabolite of cocaine pyrolysis, was much more concentrated than cocaine itself in the crack-cocaine group. Most genes related to the endocannabinoid system, CB1 receptor and cannabinoid degradation enzymes were downregulated after 11-day crack-cocaine exposition. These changes may have decreased dopamine and its metabolites levels, which in turn may be related with the extreme upregulation of dopamine receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase observed in the prefrontal cortex of these animals. Our data suggest that after 11 days of crack-cocaine exposure, neuroadaptive changes towards downregulation of reinforcing mechanisms may have taken place as a result of neurochemical changes observed on dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems. Successive changes like these have never been described in cocaine hydrochloride models before, probably because AEME is only produced by cocaine pyrolysis and this metabolite may underlie the more aggressive pattern of addiction induced by crack-cocaine. PMID:25940765

  12. Sparkling extreme-ultraviolet bright dots observed with Hi-C

    SciTech Connect

    Régnier, S.; Alexander, C. E.; Walsh, R. W.; Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J.; Golub, L.; Korreck, K. E.; Weber, M.; Mitchell, N.; Platt, S.; De Pontieu, B.; Title, A.; Kobayashi, K.; Kuzin, S.; DeForest, C. E.

    2014-04-01

    Observing the Sun at high time and spatial scales is a step toward understanding the finest and fundamental scales of heating events in the solar corona. The high-resolution coronal (Hi-C) instrument has provided the highest spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in the EUV wavelength range to date. Hi-C observed an active region on 2012 July 11 that exhibits several interesting features in the EUV line at 193 Å. One of them is the existence of short, small brightenings 'sparkling' at the edge of the active region; we call these EUV bright dots (EBDs). Individual EBDs have a characteristic duration of 25 s with a characteristic length of 680 km. These brightenings are not fully resolved by the SDO/AIA instrument at the same wavelength; however, they can be identified with respect to the Hi-C location of the EBDs. In addition, EBDs are seen in other chromospheric/coronal channels of SDO/AIA, which suggests a temperature between 0.5 and 1.5 MK. Based on their frequency in the Hi-C time series, we define four different categories of EBDs: single peak, double peak, long duration, and bursty. Based on a potential field extrapolation from an SDO/HMI magnetogram, the EBDs appear at the footpoints of large-scale, trans-equatorial coronal loops. The Hi-C observations provide the first evidence of small-scale EUV heating events at the base of these coronal loops, which have a free magnetic energy of the order of 10{sup 26} erg.

  13. Modeling of fatigue crack induced nonlinear ultrasonics using a highly parallelized explicit local interaction simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a parallelized modeling technique for the efficient simulation of nonlinear ultrasonics introduced by the wave interaction with fatigue cracks. The elastodynamic wave equations with contact effects are formulated using an explicit Local Interaction Simulation Approach (LISA). The LISA formulation is extended to capture the contact-impact phenomena during the wave damage interaction based on the penalty method. A Coulomb friction model is integrated into the computation procedure to capture the stick-slip contact shear motion. The LISA procedure is coded using the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), which enables the highly parallelized supercomputing on powerful graphic cards. Both the explicit contact formulation and the parallel feature facilitates LISA's superb computational efficiency over the conventional finite element method (FEM). The theoretical formulations based on the penalty method is introduced and a guideline for the proper choice of the contact stiffness is given. The convergence behavior of the solution under various contact stiffness values is examined. A numerical benchmark problem is used to investigate the new LISA formulation and results are compared with a conventional contact finite element solution. Various nonlinear ultrasonic phenomena are successfully captured using this contact LISA formulation, including the generation of nonlinear higher harmonic responses. Nonlinear mode conversion of guided waves at fatigue cracks is also studied.

  14. HIC1 interacts with a specific subunit of SWI/SNF complexes, ARID1A/BAF250A

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Leprince, Dominique

    2009-08-07

    HIC1, a tumor suppressor gene epigenetically silenced in many human cancers encodes a transcriptional repressor involved in regulatory loops modulating p53-dependent and E2F1-dependent cell survival and stress responses. HIC1 is also implicated in growth control since it recruits BRG1, one of the two alternative ATPases (BRM or BRG1) of SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes to repress transcription of E2F1 in quiescent fibroblasts. Here, through yeast two-hybrid screening, we identify ARID1A/BAF250A, as a new HIC1 partner. ARID1A/BAF250A is one of the two mutually exclusive ARID1-containing subunits of SWI/SNF complexes which define subsets of complexes endowed with anti-proliferative properties. Co-immunoprecipitation assays in WI38 fibroblasts and in BRG1-/- SW13 cells showed that endogenous HIC1 and ARID1A proteins interact in a BRG1-dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrate that HIC1 does not interact with BRM. Finally, sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-reChIP) experiments demonstrated that HIC1 represses E2F1 through the recruitment of anti-proliferative SWI/SNF complexes containing ARID1A.

  15. Single cell Hi-C reveals cell-to-cell variability in chromosome structure

    PubMed Central

    Schoenfelder, Stefan; Yaffe, Eitan; Dean, Wendy; Laue, Ernest D.; Tanay, Amos; Fraser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale chromosome structure and spatial nuclear arrangement have been linked to control of gene expression and DNA replication and repair. Genomic techniques based on chromosome conformation capture assess contacts for millions of loci simultaneously, but do so by averaging chromosome conformations from millions of nuclei. Here we introduce single cell Hi-C, combined with genome-wide statistical analysis and structural modeling of single copy X chromosomes, to show that individual chromosomes maintain domain organisation at the megabase scale, but show variable cell-to-cell chromosome territory structures at larger scales. Despite this structural stochasticity, localisation of active gene domains to boundaries of territories is a hallmark of chromosomal conformation. Single cell Hi-C data bridge current gaps between genomics and microscopy studies of chromosomes, demonstrating how modular organisation underlies dynamic chromosome structure, and how this structure is probabilistically linked with genome activity patterns. PMID:24067610

  16. Commercial disposal of High Integrity Containers (HICs) containing EPICOR-II prefilters from Three Mile Island

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, Jr, J W; Lynch, R J; Tyacke, M J

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and commercially disposing of 45 High Integrity Containers (HICs), each containing an EPICOR-II prefilter. Also described are the improvements that were applied in the disposition of the 45 commercial EPICOR-II prefilters at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), versus those used for the demonstration unit. The significance of this effort was that the commercial disposal campaign involved the first-of-a-kind production use of a reinforced concrete HIC at the US Ecology, Inc. facility in the State of Washington. This allowed for safe disposal of high-specific-activity ion exchange material in EPICOR-II prefilters generated during the cleanup of the Unit-2 Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Building of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station. 26 figs.

  17. Strain-induced crack formations in PDMS/DXA drug collars.

    PubMed

    Warner, J A; Polkinghorne, J C; Gonerka, J; Meyer, S; Luo, B; Frethem, C; Haugstad, G

    2013-07-01

    Drug-eluting systems are currently used in cardiac leads in order to reduce inflammation and fibrosis at the lead-tissue interface. Drug release from these drug delivery systems can be modulated by the manufacturing processes used to create the drug systems and assemble them onto the cardiac lead. In this study, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and Raman microscopy are employed to explore the material characteristics of a polydimethylsiloxane-dexamethasone acetate drug collar used on cardiac leads when varying the strain during collar assembly on the lead. A novel test fixture was created in order to investigate these drug collars under simulated stresses. Measurements of the collar while fitted to a rod revealed microcracks that are hypothesized to affect the drug release performance, resulting in increased drug elution. It was found that the strain that occurs during assembly of the collar onto the lead is a key factor in the formation of these microcracks. Results also suggest that cracks tend to form in areas of high drug particle density, and propagate between drug particles. PMID:23541599

  18. Forward Modeling Transient Brightenings and Microflares around an Active Region Observed with Hi-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobelski, Adam R.; McKenzie, David E.

    2014-10-01

    Small-scale flare-like brightenings around active regions are among the smallest and most fundamental of energetic transient events in the corona, providing a testbed for models of heating and active region dynamics. In a previous study, we modeled a large collection of these microflares observed with Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) using EBTEL and found that they required multiple heating events, but could not distinguish between multiple heating events on a single strand, or multiple strands each experiencing a single heating event. We present here a similar study, but with extreme-ultraviolet data of Active Region 11520 from the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket. Hi-C provides an order of magnitude improvement to the spatial resolution of XRT, and a cooler temperature sensitivity, which combine to provide significant improvements to our ability to detect and model microflare activity around active regions. We have found that at the spatial resolution of Hi-C (≈0.''3), the events occur much more frequently than expected (57 events detected, only 1 or 2 expected), and are most likely made from strands of the order of 100 km wide, each of which is impulsively heated with multiple heating events. These findings tend to support bursty reconnection as the cause of the energy release responsible for the brightenings.

  19. Forward modeling transient brightenings and microflares around an active region observed with Hi-C

    SciTech Connect

    Kobelski, Adam R.; McKenzie, David E.

    2014-10-20

    Small-scale flare-like brightenings around active regions are among the smallest and most fundamental of energetic transient events in the corona, providing a testbed for models of heating and active region dynamics. In a previous study, we modeled a large collection of these microflares observed with Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) using EBTEL and found that they required multiple heating events, but could not distinguish between multiple heating events on a single strand, or multiple strands each experiencing a single heating event. We present here a similar study, but with extreme-ultraviolet data of Active Region 11520 from the High Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) sounding rocket. Hi-C provides an order of magnitude improvement to the spatial resolution of XRT, and a cooler temperature sensitivity, which combine to provide significant improvements to our ability to detect and model microflare activity around active regions. We have found that at the spatial resolution of Hi-C (≈0.''3), the events occur much more frequently than expected (57 events detected, only 1 or 2 expected), and are most likely made from strands of the order of 100 km wide, each of which is impulsively heated with multiple heating events. These findings tend to support bursty reconnection as the cause of the energy release responsible for the brightenings.

  20. Accurate identification of centromere locations in yeast genomes using Hi-C.

    PubMed

    Varoquaux, Nelle; Liachko, Ivan; Ay, Ferhat; Burton, Joshua N; Shendure, Jay; Dunham, Maitreya J; Vert, Jean-Philippe; Noble, William S

    2015-06-23

    Centromeres are essential for proper chromosome segregation. Despite extensive research, centromere locations in yeast genomes remain difficult to infer, and in most species they are still unknown. Recently, the chromatin conformation capture assay, Hi-C, has been re-purposed for diverse applications, including de novo genome assembly, deconvolution of metagenomic samples and inference of centromere locations. We describe a method, Centurion, that jointly infers the locations of all centromeres in a single genome from Hi-C data by exploiting the centromeres' tendency to cluster in three-dimensional space. We first demonstrate the accuracy of Centurion in identifying known centromere locations from high coverage Hi-C data of budding yeast and a human malaria parasite. We then use Centurion to infer centromere locations in 14 yeast species. Across all microbes that we consider, Centurion predicts 89% of centromeres within 5 kb of their known locations. We also demonstrate the robustness of the approach in datasets with low sequencing depth. Finally, we predict centromere coordinates for six yeast species that currently lack centromere annotations. These results show that Centurion can be used for centromere identification for diverse species of yeast and possibly other microorganisms. PMID:25940625

  1. DETECTING NANOFLARE HEATING EVENTS IN SUBARCSECOND INTER-MOSS LOOPS USING Hi-C

    SciTech Connect

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Moore, Ronald; Cirtain, Jonathan; Walsh, Robert W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; Kobayashi, Ken; DeForest, Craig; Kuzin, Sergey

    2013-07-01

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) flew aboard a NASA sounding rocket on 2012 July 11 and captured roughly 345 s of high-spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in a narrowband 193 A channel. In this paper, we analyze a set of rapidly evolving loops that appear in an inter-moss region. We select six loops that both appear in and fade out of the Hi-C images during the short flight. From the Hi-C data, we determine the size and lifetimes of the loops and characterize whether these loops appear simultaneously along their length or first appear at one footpoint before appearing at the other. Using co-aligned, co-temporal data from multiple channels of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we determine the temperature and density of the loops. We find the loops consist of cool ({approx}10{sup 5} K), dense ({approx}10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}) plasma. Their required thermal energy and their observed evolution suggest they result from impulsive heating similar in magnitude to nanoflares. Comparisons with advanced numerical simulations indicate that such dense, cold and short-lived loops are a natural consequence of impulsive magnetic energy release by reconnection of braided magnetic field at low heights in the solar atmosphere.

  2. Hi-C Observations of an Active Region Corona, and Investigation of the Underlying Magnetic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Sanjiv K.; Alexander, Caroline E.; Winebarger, Amy R.; Moore, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Hi-C: first observational evidence of field line braiding in the AR corona; NLFFF extrapolations support. Flux emergence and/or cancellation in the coronal braided region generate large stresses and tension in the coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. The field in these sub-regions are highly sheared and have apparent high speed plasma flows, therefore, the contribution from shearing flows to power the coronal and transition region heating can not be ruled out! The spatial resolution of Hi-­C is five times better than AIA. The cadence of Hi-C is 2.5 - 6 times better than AIA. The 193 Å was selected because of the strong emission line of Fe XII (peak formation temperature of 1.5 MK). Hi-­C collected data for 345 s @ 5.4 s cadence. The Hi-C target region was NOAA AR 11520; 11 July 2012, 18:51-18:57 UT. NLFFF extrapolation confirms the braided structure, and free magnetic energy estimates in the given volume.

  3. Comparing Loop Cross Sections Observed with Hi-C and AIA/SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimchuk, James A.; DeForest, Craig

    2016-05-01

    Many studies have reported coronal loop widths measured with AIA/SDO, TRACE, and other data. For warm loops (T ~ 1 MK), the characteristic diameter is about 1500 km. Sub-structure is likely to exist on smaller scales, but the envelope of the "strands" has this typical size. Since 1500 km (2 arcsec) is not large compared to the spatial resolution of the observations, there remained a question about whether the loops are actually much thinner. To address this concern, we have measured the widths of several loops observed at 193 A by both AIA and the Hi-C rocket experiment. Hi-C has 3-6 times better spatial resolution, so if the loops are substantially unresolved by AIA, it should be readily apparent. We find that the measured widths are very similar. Small differences (< 25%) are explainable by uncertainties in the point spread functions. We conclude that previous measurements of loop widths made by AIA and TRACE are essentially correct. We also find little evidence for loop sub-structure at the resolution of Hi-C. The individual strands that comprise loops are therefore smaller than 200 km. These results have important implications for coronal heating.

  4. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Sanecki, J.E.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-12-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a significant materials issue for the light water reactor (LWR) industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power reactors that will use water as coolant. A new metallurgical process is proposed that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of minor impurity elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. MnS-type precipitates, which contain most of the sulfur in stainless steels, are thought to be unstable under irradiation. First, Mn transmutes strongly to Fe in thermalized neutron spectra. Second, cascade-induced disordering and the inverse Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates are thought to act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow sulfur, which is known to exert a deleterious influence on intergranular cracking, to re-enter the matrix. To test this hypothesis, compositions of MnS-type precipitates contained in several unirradiated and irradiated heats of Type 304, 316, and 348 stainless steels (SSs) were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Evidence is presented that shows a progressive compositional modification of MnS precipitates as exposure to neutrons increases in boiling water reactors. As the fluence increases, the Mn level in MnS decreases, whereas the Fe level increases. The S level also decreases relative to the combined level of Mn and Fe. MnS precipitates were also found to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as F and O which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates.

  5. Prediction of Shear-induced Crack Initiation in AHSS Deep Drawing Operation with a Phenomenological Fracture Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meng; Li, Yaning; Gerlach, Joerg; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    2010-06-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) draws enormous attentions in automotive industry because it has great potential in reducing weight and improving fuel efficiency. Nonetheless, their relatively low formability also causes many problems in manufacturing processes, such as shear-induced fracture during deep drawing or stamping. This type of fracture could not be predicted using traditional necking-based Forming Limit Diagram (FLD), which is commonly used by the forming community. In the present paper, a recently developed Modified Mohr-Coulomb (MMC)[1] ductile fracture model is employed to make up the deficiency of FLD. In the limiting case of plane stress, the MMC fracture locus consists of four branches when represented on the plane of the equivalent strain to fracture and the stress triaxiality. A transformation of above 2D fracture locus to the space of principal strains was performed which revealed the existence of two new branches not known before. The existence of those branches explains the formation of shear-induced fracture. As an illustration of this new approach, initiation and propagation of cracks in a series of deep drawing tests is predicted and compared with the experimental observations. It was shown that the location of fracture as well as the magnitude of punch travel corresponding to first fracture was correctly predicted by MMC fracture model for both square and circular punch cases.

  6. Proton irradiation effect on microstructure, strain localization and iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking in Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, L.; Serres, A.; Auzoux, Q.; Leboulch, D.; Was, G. S.

    2009-01-01

    The radiation-induced microstructure, strain localization, and iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking (I-SCC) behaviour of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 proton-irradiated to 2 dpa at 305 °C was examined. type dislocation loops having 1/3<1 1 2¯ 0> Burgers vector and a mean diameter and density of, respectively, 10 nm and 17 × 10 21 m -3 were observed while no Zr(Fe,Cr) 2 precipitates amorphization or Fe redistribution were detected after irradiation. After transverse tensile testing to 0.5% macroscopic plastic strain at room temperature, almost exclusively basal channels were imaged. Statistical Schmid factor analysis shows that irradiation leads to a change in slip system activation from prismatic to basal due to a higher increase of critical resolved shear stresses for prismatic slip systems than for basal slip system. Finite element calculations suggest that dislocation channeling occurs in the irradiated proton layer at an equivalent stress close to 70% of the yield stress of the irradiated material, i.e. while the irradiated layer is still in the elastic regime for a 0.5% applied macroscopic plastic strain. Comparative constant elongation rate tensile tests performed at a strain rate of 10 -5 s -1 in iodized methanol solutions at room temperature on specimens both unirradiated and proton-irradiated to 2 dpa demonstrated a detrimental effect of irradiation on I-SCC.

  7. Isolation and characterization of a novel acidic matrix protein hic22 from the nacreous layer of the freshwater mussel, Hyriopsis cumingii.

    PubMed

    Liu, X J; Jin, C; Wu, L M; Dong, S J; Zeng, S M; Li, J L

    2016-01-01

    Matrix proteins that either weakly acidic or unusually highly acidic have important roles in shell biomineralization. In this study, we have identified and characterized hic22, a weakly acidic matrix protein, from the nacreous layer of Hyriopsis cumingii. Total protein was extracted from the nacre using 5 M EDTA and hic22 was purified using a DEAE-sepharose column. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of hic22 was determined and the complete cDNA encoding hic22 was cloned and sequenced by rapid amplification of cDNA ends-polymerase chain reaction. Finally, the localization and distribution of hic22 was determined by in situ hybridization. Our results revealed that hic22 encodes a 22-kDa protein composed of 185 amino acids. Tissue expression analysis and in situ hybridization indicated that hic22 is expressed in the dorsal epithelial cells of the mantle pallial; moreover, significant expression levels of hic22 were observed after the early formation of the pearl sac (days 19-77), implying that hic22 may play an important role in biomineralization of the nacreous layer. PMID:27525898

  8. Reaction-Induced Permeability Change in Thermally Cracked and Deformed Aplite: Importance of Reactive Surface Area and Mineralogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenthorey, E.

    2004-12-01

    This experimental study investigates hydrothermal reactions in a granitic system and attempts to quantify how such reactions affect hydrologic properties, namely specimen permeability. Of specific interest is the evolution of permeability under variable differential stress conditions, from the compactional and dilatancy regimes to that of shear failure. Under these different stress conditions, reactive surface area will vary, possibly affecting the rate and absolute magnitude of permeability change. Experiments were conducted using a Paterson gas apparatus capable of independently controlling confining pressure (Pc), pore pressure (Pp) and axial load. Most experiments were conducted at Pc=100 MPa and Pp=50 MPa with temperatures of 200-600° C. Under isostatic conditions, permeability was observed to increase with temperature due to increased thermal cracking at grain boundaries. As differential stress was increased in each experiment, permeability was first observed to decrease, presumably due to crack closure. Upon continued loading to higher stresses, dilatancy resulted in significant permeability enhancement. In later experiments, permeability was allowed to evolve at each stress level and was observed to decay by an exponential function of the form k α 1-μ (1-exp(-rt))2, suggesting a precipitation type mechanism for the observed permeability change. The rate constant AƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.â_orAƒAøAøâ_sA¬? progressively increased up to 500° C, but was much smaller in the 600° C experiment, indicating a possible change in the precipitating mineral assemblage as suggested by experimental studies in the KNASH system. Overall, reaction rates were enhanced during dilatancy and after rupture, an observation suggesting a negative feedback effect, in which enhanced mineral precipitation moderates permeability generation during episodes of deformation. The nature of fluid flow in such systems is crucial to the formation of porphyry metal deposits and also plays a

  9. Combining Hi-C data with phylogenetic correlation to predict the target genes of distal regulatory elements in human genome

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yulan; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Tian, Weidong

    2013-01-01

    Defining the target genes of distal regulatory elements (DREs), such as enhancer, repressors and insulators, is a challenging task. The recently developed Hi-C technology is designed to capture chromosome conformation structure by high-throughput sequencing, and can be potentially used to determine the target genes of DREs. However, Hi-C data are noisy, making it difficult to directly use Hi-C data to identify DRE–target gene relationships. In this study, we show that DREs–gene pairs that are confirmed by Hi-C data are strongly phylogenetic correlated, and have thus developed a method that combines Hi-C read counts with phylogenetic correlation to predict long-range DRE–target gene relationships. Analysis of predicted DRE–target gene pairs shows that genes regulated by large number of DREs tend to have essential functions, and genes regulated by the same DREs tend to be functionally related and co-expressed. In addition, we show with a couple of examples that the predicted target genes of DREs can help explain the causal roles of disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms located in the DREs. As such, these predictions will be of importance not only for our understanding of the function of DREs but also for elucidating the causal roles of disease-associated noncoding single-nucleotide polymorphisms. PMID:24003029

  10. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-06-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the (HIC) system, which incorporates augmented reality, virtual reality and cloud-classroom to teach basic materials science courses. The study followed a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental research design. A total of 92 students (aged 19-20 years), in a second-year undergraduate program, participated in this 18-week-long experiment. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (36 males and 10 females) was instructed utilizing the HIC system, while the control group (34 males and 12 females) was led through traditional teaching methods. Pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest scores were evaluated by multivariate analysis of covariance. The results indicated that participants in the experimental group who used the HIC system outperformed the control group, in the both posttest and delayed posttest, across three learning dimensions. Based on these results, the HIC system is recommended to be incorporated in formal materials science learning settings.

  11. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-02-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the (HIC) system, which incorporates augmented reality, virtual reality and cloud-classroom to teach basic materials science courses. The study followed a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental research design. A total of 92 students (aged 19-20 years), in a second-year undergraduate program, participated in this 18-week-long experiment. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (36 males and 10 females) was instructed utilizing the HIC system, while the control group (34 males and 12 females) was led through traditional teaching methods. Pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest scores were evaluated by multivariate analysis of covariance. The results indicated that participants in the experimental group who used the HIC system outperformed the control group, in the both posttest and delayed posttest, across three learning dimensions. Based on these results, the HIC system is recommended to be incorporated in formal materials science learning settings.

  12. Competitive Nuclear Export of Cyclin D1 and Hic-5 Regulates Anchorage Dependence of Cell Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kazunori; Hirao, Etsuko; Toya, Yosuke; Oshima, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Nose, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Anchorage dependence of cell growth and survival is a critical trait that distinguishes nontransformed cells from transformed cells. We demonstrate that anchorage dependence is determined by anchorage-dependent nuclear retention of cyclin D1, which is regulated by the focal adhesion protein, Hic-5, whose CRM1-dependent nuclear export counteracts that of cyclin D1. An adaptor protein, PINCH, interacts with cyclin D1 and Hic-5 and potentially serves as an interface for the competition between cyclin D1 and Hic-5 for CRM1. In nonadherent cells, the nuclear export of Hic-5, which is redox-sensitive, was interrupted due to elevated production of reactive oxygen species, and cyclin D1 was exported from the nucleus. When an Hic-5 mutant that was continuously exported in a reactive oxygen species-insensitive manner was introduced into the cells, cyclin D1 was retained in the nucleus under nonadherent conditions, and a significant population of cells escaped from growth arrest or apoptosis. Interestingly, activated ras achieved predominant cyclin D1 nuclear localization and thus, growth in nonadherent cells. We report a failsafe system for anchorage dependence of cell growth and survival. PMID:18946086

  13. An investigation of penetrant techniques for detection of machining-induced surface-breaking cracks on monolithic ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, G.A.; Ellingson, W.A.

    1996-02-01

    The purpose of this effort was to evaluate penetrant methods for their ability to detect surface-breaking cracks in monolithic ceramic materials with an emphasis on detection of cracks generated by machining. There are two basic penetrant types, visible and fluorescent. The visible penetrant method is usually augmented by powder developers and cracks detected can be seen in visible light. Cracks detected by fluorescent penetrant are visible only under ultraviolet light used with or without a developer. The developer is basically a powder that wicks up penetrant from a crack to make it more observable. Although fluorescent penetrants were recommended in the literature survey conducted early in this effort, visible penetrants and two non-standard techniques, a capillary gaseous diffusion method under development at the institute of Chemical Physics in Moscow, and the {open_quotes}statiflux{close_quotes} method which involves use of electrically charged particles, were also investigated. SiAlON ring specimens (1 in. diameter, 3/4 in. wide) which had been subjected to different thermal-shock cycles were used for these tests. The capillary gaseous diffusion method is based on ammonia; the detector is a specially impregnated paper much like litmus paper. As expected, visible dye penetrants offered no detection sensitivity for tight, surface-breaking cracks in ceramics. Although the non-standard statiflux method showed promise on high-crack-density specimens, it was ineffective on limited-crack-density specimens. The fluorescent penetrant method was superior for surface-breaking crack detection, but successful application of this procedure depends greatly on the skill of the user. Two presently available high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrants were then evaluated for detection of microcracks on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and SiC from different suppliers. Although 50X optical magnification may be sufficient for many applications, 200X magnification provides excellent delectability.

  14. Hydrogen-induced slow crack growth of a plain carbon pipeline steel under conditions of cyclic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1976-01-01

    The investigation described was aimed at establishing the degree of compatibility between a plain carbon pipeline-type steel and hydrogen and also hydrogen-rich environments containing small additions of H2S, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, CH4, and natural gas at pressures near 1 atm. Test were carried out under conditions of static and cyclic loading; the subcritical crack growth was monitored. The rates of crack growth observed in the hydrogen and hydrogen-rich environments are compared with the crack rate observed in a natural gas environment to determine the compatibility of the present natural gas transmission system with gaseous hydrogen transport.

  15. Magnetic Structure of Sites of Braiding in Hi-C Active Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. K.; Alexander, C. E.; Winebarger, A.; Moore, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) observations of an active region (AR) corona, at a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec, have offered the first direct evidence of field lines braiding, which could deliver sufficient energy to heat the AR corona by current dissipation via magnetic reconnection, a proposal given by Parker three decades ago. The energy required to heat the corona must be transported from the photosphere along the field lines. The mechanism that drives the energy transport to the corona is not yet fully understood. To investigate simultaneous magnetic and intensity structure in and around the AR in detail, we use SDO/HMI+AIA data of + / - 2 hours around the 5 minute Hi-C flight. In the case of the QS, work done by convection/granulation on the inter-granular feet of the coronal field lines probably translates into the heat observed in the corona. In the case of the AR, as here, there could be flux emergence, cancellation/submergence, or shear flows generating large stress and tension in coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. However, to the best of our knowledge, there is no observational evidence available to these processes. We investigate the changes taking place in the photospheric feet of the magnetic field involved with brightenings in the Hi-C AR corona. Using HMI 45s magnetograms of four hours we find that, out of the two Hi-C sub-regions where the braiding of field lines were recently detected, flux emergence takes place in one region and flux cancellation in the other. The field in these sub-regions are highly sheared and have apparent high speed plasma flows at their feet. Therefore, shearing flows plausibly power much of the coronal and transition region heating in these areas of the AR. In addition, the presence of large flux emergence/cancellation strongly suggests that the work done by these processes on the pre-existing field also drives much of the observed heating.

  16. Single-cell Hi-C for genome-wide detection of chromatin interactions that occur simultaneously in a single cell.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Takashi; Lubling, Yaniv; Yaffe, Eitan; Wingett, Steven W; Dean, Wendy; Tanay, Amos; Fraser, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Hi-C is a powerful method that provides pairwise information on genomic regions in spatial proximity in the nucleus. Hi-C requires millions of cells as input and, as genome organization varies from cell to cell, a limitation of Hi-C is that it only provides a population average of genome conformations. We developed single-cell Hi-C to create snapshots of thousands of chromatin interactions that occur simultaneously in a single cell. To adapt Hi-C to single-cell analysis, we modified the protocol to include in-nucleus ligation. This enables the isolation of single nuclei carrying Hi-C-ligated DNA into separate tubes, followed by reversal of cross-links, capture of biotinylated ligation junctions on streptavidin-coated magnetic beads and PCR amplification of single-cell Hi-C libraries. The entire laboratory protocol can be carried out in 1 week, and although we have demonstrated its use in mouse T helper (TH1) cells, it should be applicable to any cell type or species for which standard Hi-C has been successful. We also developed an analysis pipeline to filter noise and assess the quality of data sets in a few hours. Although the interactome maps produced by single-cell Hi-C are sparse, the data provide useful information to understand cellular variability in nuclear genome organization and chromosome structure. Standard wet and dry laboratory skills in molecular biology and computational analysis are required. PMID:26540590

  17. Preventing Cracking of Anodized Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Charles C.; Heslin, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Anodized coatings have been used as optical and thermal surfaces in spacecraft. Particulate contamination from cracked coatings is a concern for many applications. The major cause for the cracking is the difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the oxide coatings and the aluminum substrate. The loss of water when the coating is exposed to a vacuum also could induce cracking of the coating. Hot-water sealing was identified as the major cause for the cracking of the coatings because of the large temperature change when the parts were immersed in boiling water and the water was absorbed in the coating. when the hot-water sealing process was eliminated, the cracking resistance of the anodized coatings was greatly improved. Also, it was found that dyed black coatings were more susceptible than clear coatings to cracking during thermo-vacuum cyclings.

  18. Nonlinear piezoelectric impedance modulation induced by a contact-type failure and its application in crack monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Arata; Aoki, Junsuke; Shinagawa, Tomohiro; Iba, Daisuke; Sone, Akira

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, a self-sensing, sensitive and baseline-free structural health monitoring methodology is developed, which aims to detect and characterize local structural failures of contact type, i.e. failures which arise along with the generation, growth and/or changes of imperfect solid-solid interfaces. The nonlinear piezoelectric impedance modulation (NPIM) method presented is based on the ideas of two existing damage detection principles; a piezoelectric impedance-based methodology and a nonlinear wave modulation spectroscopy. It uses a single piezoelectric active sensor bonded on the structural surface, which is driven by a high-frequency harmonic voltage source. When the structure including a contact-type failure is subjected to a low-frequency dynamic load, the induced structural vibration causes a fluctuation of the scattering conditions for the high-frequency elastic waves at the failure because of the contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN). This nonlinear effect of vibro-acoustic interaction yields a significant fluctuation in the driving-point impedance in the high-frequency range, which may lead to a modulation of the coupled electromechanical impedance (or admittance) of the piezoelectric active sensor. Therefore, if the sensor is driven by a fixed amplitude high-frequency harmonic voltage source, modulation of the coupled admittance can be observed as the amplitude modulation and phase modulation of the current flowing through the sensor. A simplified modeling study leads to the definition of a damage evaluation index that assesses the intensity of the stiffness fluctuation caused by the CAN. Experiments using cracked beam specimens are conducted to show how the NPIM can be observed and to examine the performance of the proposed method.

  19. Knuckle Cracking

    MedlinePlus

    ... older obese people. Question: Can cracking knuckles / joints lead to arthritis? Answer: There is no evidence of ... or damaged joints due to arthritis could potentially lead more easily to ligament injury or acute trauma ...

  20. Formation and interpretation of dilatant echelon cracks.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pollard, D.D.; Segall, P.; Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    The relative displacements of the walls of many veins, joints, and dikes demonstrate that these structures are dilatant cracks. We infer that dilatant cracks propagate in a principal stress plane, normal to the maximum tensile or least compressive stress. Arrays of echelon crack segments appear to emerge from the peripheries of some dilatant cracks. Breakdown of a parent crack into an echelon array may be initiated by a spatial or temporal rotation of the remote principal stresses about an axis parallel to the crack propagation direction. Near the parent-crack tip, a rotation of the local principal stresses is induced in the same sense, but not necessarily through the same angle. Incipient echelon cracks form at the parent-crack tip normal to the local maximum tensile stress. Further longitudinal growth along surfaces that twist about axes parallel to the propagation direction realigns each echelon crack into a remote principal stress plane. The walls of these twisted cracks may be idealized as helicoidal surfaces. An array of helicoidal cracks sweeps out less surface area than one parent crack twisting through the same angle. Thus, many echelon cracks grow from a single parent because the work done in creating the array, as measured by its surface area decreases as the number of cracks increases. -from Authors

  1. The effect of ion plated silver and sliding friction on tensile stress-induced cracking in aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1991-01-01

    A Hertzian analysis of the effect of sliding friction on contact stresses in alumina is used to predict the critical load for crack generation. The results for uncoated alumina and alumina coated with ion plated silver are compared. Friction coefficient inputs to the analysis are determined experimentally with a scratch test instrument employing an 0.2 mm radius diamond stylus. A series of scratches were made at constant load increments on coated and uncoated flat alumina surfaces. Critical loads for cracking are detected by microscopic examination of cross sections of scratches made at various loads and friction coefficients. Acoustic emission (AE) and friction trends were also evaluated as experimental techniques for determining critical loads for cracking. Analytical predictions correlate well with micrographic evidence and with the lowest load at which AE is detected in multiple scratch tests. Friction/load trends are not good indicators of early crack formation. Lubrication with silver films reduced friction and thereby increased the critical load for crack initiation in agreement with analytical predictions.

  2. The effect of ion-plated silver and sliding friction on tensile stress-induced cracking in aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Spalvins, Talivaldis

    1993-01-01

    A Hertzian analysis of the effect of sliding friction on contact stresses in alumina is used to predict the critical load for crack generation. The results for uncoated alumina and alumina coated with ion plated silver are compared. Friction coefficient inputs to the analysis are determined experimentally with a scratch test instrument employing an 0.2 mm radius diamond stylus. A series of scratches were made at constant load increments on coated and uncoated flat alumina surfaces. Critical loads for cracking are detected by microscopic examination of cross sections of scratches made at various loads and friction coefficients. Acoustic emission (AE) and friction trends were also evaluated as experimental techniques for determining critical loads for cracking. Analytical predictions correlate well with micrographic evidence and with the lowest load at which AE is detected in multiple scratch tests. Friction/load trends are not good indicators of early crack formation. Lubrication with silver films reduced friction and thereby increased the critical load for crack initiation in agreement with analytical predictions.

  3. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-01-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to…

  4. Hi-Corrector: a fast, scalable and memory-efficient package for normalizing large-scale Hi-C data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenyuan; Gong, Ke; Li, Qingjiao; Alber, Frank; Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Genome-wide proximity ligation assays, e.g. Hi-C and its variant TCC, have recently become important tools to study spatial genome organization. Removing biases from chromatin contact matrices generated by such techniques is a critical preprocessing step of subsequent analyses. The continuing decline of sequencing costs has led to an ever-improving resolution of the Hi-C data, resulting in very large matrices of chromatin contacts. Such large-size matrices, however, pose a great challenge on the memory usage and speed of its normalization. Therefore, there is an urgent need for fast and memory-efficient methods for normalization of Hi-C data. We developed Hi-Corrector, an easy-to-use, open source implementation of the Hi-C data normalization algorithm. Its salient features are (i) scalability—the software is capable of normalizing Hi-C data of any size in reasonable times; (ii) memory efficiency—the sequential version can run on any single computer with very limited memory, no matter how little; (iii) fast speed—the parallel version can run very fast on multiple computing nodes with limited local memory. Availability and implementation: The sequential version is implemented in ANSI C and can be easily compiled on any system; the parallel version is implemented in ANSI C with the MPI library (a standardized and portable parallel environment designed for solving large-scale scientific problems). The package is freely available at http://zhoulab.usc.edu/Hi-Corrector/. Contact: alber@usc.edu or xjzhou@usc.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25391400

  5. 3D chromosome rendering from Hi-C data using virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yixin; Selvaraj, Siddarth; Weber, Philip; Fang, Jennifer; Schulze, Jürgen P.; Ren, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Most genome browsers display DNA linearly, using single-dimensional depictions that are useful to examine certain epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation. However, these representations are insufficient to visualize intrachromosomal interactions and relationships between distal genome features. Relationships between DNA regions may be difficult to decipher or missed entirely if those regions are distant in one dimension but could be spatially proximal when mapped to three-dimensional space. For example, the visualization of enhancers folding over genes is only fully expressed in three-dimensional space. Thus, to accurately understand DNA behavior during gene expression, a means to model chromosomes is essential. Using coordinates generated from Hi-C interaction frequency data, we have created interactive 3D models of whole chromosome structures and its respective domains. We have also rendered information on genomic features such as genes, CTCF binding sites, and enhancers. The goal of this article is to present the procedure, findings, and conclusions of our models and renderings.

  6. CHiCAGO: robust detection of DNA looping interactions in Capture Hi-C data.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Jonathan; Freire-Pritchett, Paula; Wingett, Steven W; Várnai, Csilla; Dimond, Andrew; Plagnol, Vincent; Zerbino, Daniel; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Javierre, Biola-Maria; Osborne, Cameron; Fraser, Peter; Spivakov, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Capture Hi-C (CHi-C) is a method for profiling chromosomal interactions involving targeted regions of interest, such as gene promoters, globally and at high resolution. Signal detection in CHi-C data involves a number of statistical challenges that are not observed when using other Hi-C-like techniques. We present a background model and algorithms for normalisation and multiple testing that are specifically adapted to CHi-C experiments. We implement these procedures in CHiCAGO ( http://regulatorygenomicsgroup.org/chicago ), an open-source package for robust interaction detection in CHi-C. We validate CHiCAGO by showing that promoter-interacting regions detected with this method are enriched for regulatory features and disease-associated SNPs. PMID:27306882

  7. ANTI-PARALLEL EUV FLOWS OBSERVED ALONG ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT THREADS WITH HI-C

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Caroline E.; Walsh, Robert W.; Régnier, Stéphane; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R.; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; Kobayashi, Ken; Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick; DePontieu, Bart; Title, Alan; DeForest, Craig; Kuzin, Sergey

    2013-09-20

    Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from Hα and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of 'counter-steaming' flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s{sup –1}) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.

  8. Anti-parallel EUV Flows Observed along Active Region Filament Threads with Hi-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Caroline E.; Walsh, Robert W.; Régnier, Stéphane; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy R.; Golub, Leon; Kobayashi, Ken; Platt, Simon; Mitchell, Nick; Korreck, Kelly; DePontieu, Bart; DeForest, Craig; Weber, Mark; Title, Alan; Kuzin, Sergey

    2013-09-01

    Plasma flows within prominences/filaments have been observed for many years and hold valuable clues concerning the mass and energy balance within these structures. Previous observations of these flows primarily come from Hα and cool extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lines (e.g., 304 Å) where estimates of the size of the prominence threads has been limited by the resolution of the available instrumentation. Evidence of "counter-steaming" flows has previously been inferred from these cool plasma observations, but now, for the first time, these flows have been directly imaged along fundamental filament threads within the million degree corona (at 193 Å). In this work, we present observations of an AR filament observed with the High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) that exhibits anti-parallel flows along adjacent filament threads. Complementary data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager are presented. The ultra-high spatial and temporal resolution of Hi-C allow the anti-parallel flow velocities to be measured (70-80 km s-1) and gives an indication of the resolvable thickness of the individual strands (0.''8 ± 0.''1). The temperature of the plasma flows was estimated to be log T (K) = 5.45 ± 0.10 using Emission Measure loci analysis. We find that SDO/AIA cannot clearly observe these anti-parallel flows or measure their velocity or thread width due to its larger pixel size. We suggest that anti-parallel/counter-streaming flows are likely commonplace within all filaments and are currently not observed in EUV due to current instrument spatial resolution.

  9. Unbiased analysis of potential targets of breast cancer susceptibility loci by Capture Hi-C

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, Nicola H.; Broome, Laura R.; Dudbridge, Frank; Johnson, Nichola; Orr, Nick; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Nagano, Takashi; Andrews, Simon; Wingett, Steven; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Assiotis, Ioannis; Fenwick, Kerry; Maguire, Sarah L.; Campbell, James; Natrajan, Rachael; Lambros, Maryou; Perrakis, Eleni; Ashworth, Alan; Fraser, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified more than 70 common variants that are associated with breast cancer risk. Most of these variants map to non-protein-coding regions and several map to gene deserts, regions of several hundred kilobases lacking protein-coding genes. We hypothesized that gene deserts harbor long-range regulatory elements that can physically interact with target genes to influence their expression. To test this, we developed Capture Hi-C (CHi-C), which, by incorporating a sequence capture step into a Hi-C protocol, allows high-resolution analysis of targeted regions of the genome. We used CHi-C to investigate long-range interactions at three breast cancer gene deserts mapping to 2q35, 8q24.21, and 9q31.2. We identified interaction peaks between putative regulatory elements (“bait fragments”) within the captured regions and “targets” that included both protein-coding genes and long noncoding (lnc) RNAs over distances of 6.6 kb to 2.6 Mb. Target protein-coding genes were IGFBP5, KLF4, NSMCE2, and MYC; and target lncRNAs included DIRC3, PVT1, and CCDC26. For one gene desert, we were able to define two SNPs (rs12613955 and rs4442975) that were highly correlated with the published risk variant and that mapped within the bait end of an interaction peak. In vivo ChIP-qPCR data show that one of these, rs4442975, affects the binding of FOXA1 and implicate this SNP as a putative functional variant. PMID:25122612

  10. Stretch-Induced Drug Delivery from Superhydrophobic Polymer Composites: Use of Crack Propagation Failure Modes for Controlling Release Rates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Julia; Kaplan, Jonah A; Colson, Yolonda L; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2016-02-18

    The concept of using crack propagation in polymeric materials to control drug release and its first demonstration are reported. The composite drug delivery system consists of highly-textured superhydrophobic electrosprayed microparticle coatings, composed of biodegradable and biocompatible polymers poly(caprolactone) and poly(glycerol monostearate carbonate-co-caprolactone), and a cellulose/polyester core. The release of entrapped agents is controlled by the magnitude of applied strain, resulting in a graded response from water infiltration through the propagating patterned cracks in the coating. Strain-dependent delivery of the anticancer agents cisplatin and 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin to esophageal cancer cells (OE33) in vitro is observed. Finally the device is integrated with an esophageal stent to demonstrate delivery of fluorescein diacetate, using applied tension, to an ex vivo esophagus. PMID:26804182

  11. A computational algorithm for crack determination: The multiple crack case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, Kurt; Vogelius, Michael

    1992-01-01

    An algorithm for recovering a collection of linear cracks in a homogeneous electrical conductor from boundary measurements of voltages induced by specified current fluxes is developed. The technique is a variation of Newton's method and is based on taking weighted averages of the boundary data. The method also adaptively changes the applied current flux at each iteration to maintain maximum sensitivity to the estimated locations of the cracks.

  12. Crack detection by stimulated infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, the potential of stimulated infrared thermography is studied for the detection of cracks located in metallic materials. To start with, the feasibility of the method is shown with the use of numerical simulations. Stimulated infrared thermography allows detecting emerging cracks in samples whether reflective or not as well as non-emerging cracks. In addition, crack detection is due to the radiative effects and/or the thermal effects induced by the defects. Then, the experimental device implemented for the study is detailed. Finally, experiments confirm that stimulated infrared thermography enables to detect microscopic cracks, whether emerging or non-emerging, in metal samples.

  13. Further progress on the wavy-crack model of dynamic crack propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, H.; Pawlikowski, K.

    1995-12-31

    The state-of-the-art theory of dynamic crack propagation has not been able to provide an unequivocal explanation for a number of experimental findings. An important observation is that the crack surfaces, as the trace of fracture path, tend to exhibit a rough surface morphology during rapid crack propagation. In a wavy-crack model proposed recently by the author, the crack surface roughening is attributed to an inherent instability which causes the tip of the crack to propagate along an oscillatory fracture path. It appears that the wavy-crack model is capable of explaining important discrepancies currently existing between theory and experiments. In particular, experimentally observed terminal fracture speeds are significantly lower than the theoretically predicted value, i.e. the Rayleigh wave speed CR. This may be attributed to the oscillatory fracture path which makes the measured crack velocity appear lower than the actual crack speed. Also, the wavy-crack model explains how the local crack tip motion can exhibit high inertia behaviors while the measurable crack motion remains in the low inertia domain. As a result of different inertia effects associated with local and apparent crack motion, the high inertia field near the crack tip tends to induce nucleation of microcrack branches while the low inertia apparent crack field tends to suppress the microbranching. This view of dynamic fracture is not inconsistent with relevant experimental observations (e.g. see and references therein) and recent numerical simulation of fast crack motion. A planar wavy motion of a 3D crack front has been analyzed by Pice et al.. The wavy-crack model has also been applied to dynamic crack propagation along a weak interface having lower fracture resistance than the adjacent material. Further analytical and numerical developments of this model will be discussed in this presentation.

  14. Crack tip deformation and fatigue crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H.-W.

    1981-01-01

    Recent research on fatigue crack growth is summarized. Topics discussed include the use of the differential stress intensity factor to characterize crack tip deformation, the use of the unzipping model to study the growth of microcracks and the fatigue crack growth in a ferritic-martensitic steel, and the development of a model of fatige crack growth threshold. It is shown that in the case of small yielding, the differential stress intensity factor provides an adequate description of cyclic plastic deformation at the crack tip and correlates well with the crack growth rate. The unzipping model based on crack tip shear decohesion process is found to be in good agreement with the measured crack growth and striation spacing measurements. The proposed model of crack growth threshold gives correct predictions of the crack growth behavior in the near-threshold region.

  15. On Generating Fatigue Crack Growth Thresholds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Newman, James, Jr.; Forman, Royce G.

    2003-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth threshold, defining crack growth as either very slow or nonexistent, has been traditionally determined with standardized load reduction methodologies. These experimental procedures can induce load history effects that result in crack closure. This history can affect the crack driving force, i.e. during the unloading process the crack will close first at some point along the wake or blunt at the crack tip, reducing the effective load at the crack tip. One way to reduce the effects of load history is to propagate a crack under constant amplitude loading. As a crack propagates under constant amplitude loading, the stress intensity factor range, Delta K, will increase, as will the crack growth rate. da/dN. A fatigue crack growth threshold test procedure is experimentally validated that does not produce load history effects and can be conducted at a specified stress ratio, R. The authors have chosen to study a ductile aluminum alloy where the plastic deformations generated during testing may be of the magnitude to impact the crack opening.

  16. HSA: integrating multi-track Hi-C data for genome-scale reconstruction of 3D chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chenchen; Zhang, Yuping; Ouyang, Zhengqing

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide 3C technologies (Hi-C) are being increasingly employed to study three-dimensional (3D) genome conformations. Existing computational approaches are unable to integrate accumulating data to facilitate studying 3D chromatin structure and function. We present HSA ( http://ouyanglab.jax.org/hsa/ ), a flexible tool that jointly analyzes multiple contact maps to infer 3D chromatin structure at the genome scale. HSA globally searches the latent structure underlying different cleavage footprints. Its robustness and accuracy outperform or rival existing tools on extensive simulations and orthogonal experiment validations. Applying HSA to recent in situ Hi-C data, we found the 3D chromatin structures are highly conserved across various human cell types. PMID:26936376

  17. Palliative hepatic intraarterial chemotherapy (HIC) using a novel combination of gemcitabine and mitomycin C: results in hepatic metastases.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Thomas J; Zangos, Stephan; Eichler, Katrin; Selby, J Bayne; Bauer, Ralf W

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate repeated hepatic intraarterial chemotherapy (HIC) as a palliative treatment option for unresectable cholangiocarcinoma and liver metastases of various origins that were progressive under systemic chemotherapy. Between 2002 and 2006, 55 patients were treated in 4-week intervals (mean five sessions). Combined gemcitabine/mitomycin was administered intraarterially within 1 h. Tumor response was evaluated after the third session according to RECIST. Treated tumor entities were colorectal carcinoma (CRC) (n = 12), breast cancer (BC) (n = 12), cholangiocarcinoma (CCC) (n = 10), pancreatic (n = 4), ovarian (n = 3), gastric, cervical, papillary (each n = 2), prostate, esophageal carcinoma, leiomyosarcoma (each n = 1), cancer of unknown primacy (CUP) (n = 5). All patients tolerated the treatment well without any major side effects or complications. In total, there were 1 complete response (CR), 19 partial responses (PR), 19 stable (SD) and 16 progressive diseases (PD). We observed 5 PR, 3 SD and 4 PD in CRC; 1 CR, 4 PR, 6 SD in BC; and 2 PR, 2 SD and 6 PD in CCC. Median survival after first HIC was 9.7 months for CRC, 11.4 months for BC and 6.0 months for CCC. HIC with gemcitabine/mitomycin is a safe, minimally invasive, palliative treatment for hepatic metastases that are progressive under systemic chemotherapy. The treatment yields respectable tumor control rates in CRC and BC patients. PMID:17938935

  18. Elastomer-induced crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel heat exchanger plates in sour amine service

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M.G.; Baron, J.J.; Moffat, T.A.

    1996-08-01

    Types S31600 and S31254 stainless steel heat exchanger plates have suffered crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking under gaskets in rich amine service in a sour gas plant. The gasket material, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM), has been used successfully for many years at other sour gas plants. Laboratory testing has duplicated the corrosion observed and shown that the mechanism is synergistic sulfide-halide attack. The use of a bromine plus chlorine-activated curing system for the EPDM rubber gaskets provided the necessary halides. Laboratory testing identified some nickel-based superalloys which were resistant to this corrosion and also demonstrated that essentially halogen-free, peroxide-cured EPDM gaskets do not cause attack of S31600 or S31254. The heat exchanger packs were replaced with S31600 plates and peroxide-cured EPDM gaskets having a specified total halogen concentration of 200 ppm maximum. Field operating experience has been excellent.

  19. The Capabilities and Limitation of Remote Visual Methods to Detect Service-Induced Cracks in Reactor Components

    SciTech Connect

    Cumblidge, Stephen E.; Doctor, Steven R.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2006-11-01

    Since 1977, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has funded a multiyear program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques employed for inservice inspection (ISI). Recently, the U.S. nuclear industry proposed replacing current volumetric and/or surface examinations of certain components in commercial nuclear power plants, as required by ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI, with a simpler visual testing (VT) method. The advantages of VT are that these tests generally involve much less radiation exposure and examination times than do volumetric examinations such as ultrasonic testing (UT). However, for industry to justify supplamenting volumetric metods with VT, and analysis of pertinent issues is needed to support the reliability of VT in determining the structural intefrity of reactor components. As piping and pressure vessel compoents in a nuclear power station are generally underwater and in high radiation field, they need to be examined by VT from a distance with radiation-hardened video systems. Remote visual testing has been used by nuclear utilities to find cracks in pressure vessel cladding in pressurized water reactors, for shrouds in boiling water reactors, and to investigate leaks in piping and reactor components. These visual tests are performed using a wide variety of procedures and equipment. The techniques for remote visual testing use submersible closed-circuit video cameras to examine reactor components and welds. PNNL has conducted a parametric study that examines the important variables that affect the effectiveness of a remote visual test. Tested variables include lighting techniques, camera resolution, camera movement, and magnification. PNNL has also conductrd a laboratory test using a commercial visual testing camera system to experimentally determine the ability of the camera system to

  20. Head injury prediction capability of the HIC, HIP, SIMon and ULP criteria.

    PubMed

    Marjoux, Daniel; Baumgartner, Daniel; Deck, Caroline; Willinger, Rémy

    2008-05-01

    The objective of the present study is to synthesize and investigate using the same set of sixty-one real-world accidents the human head injury prediction capability of the head injury criterion (HIC) and the head impact power (HIP) based criterion as well as the injury mechanisms related criteria provided by the simulated injury monitor (SIMon) and the Louis Pasteur University (ULP) finite element head models. Each accident has been classified according to whether neurological injuries, subdural haematoma and skull fractures were reported. Furthermore, the accidents were reconstructed experimentally or numerically in order to provide loading conditions such as acceleration fields of the head or initial head impact conditions. Finally, thanks to this large statistical population of head trauma cases, injury risk curves were computed and the corresponding regression quality estimators permitted to check the correlation of the injury criteria with the injury occurrences. As different kinds of accidents were used, i.e. footballer, motorcyclist and pedestrian cases, the case-independency could also be checked. As a result, FE head modeling provides essential information on the intracranial mechanical behavior and, therefore, better injury criteria can be computed. It is clearly shown that moderate and severe neurological injuries can only be distinguished with a criterion that is computed using intracranial variables and not with the sole global head acceleration. PMID:18460382

  1. Comparative Hi-C reveals that CTCF underlies evolution of chromosomal domain architecture.

    PubMed

    Vietri Rudan, Matteo; Barrington, Christopher; Henderson, Stephen; Ernst, Christina; Odom, Duncan T; Tanay, Amos; Hadjur, Suzana

    2015-03-01

    Topological domains are key architectural building blocks of chromosomes, but their functional importance and evolutionary dynamics are not well defined. We performed comparative high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (Hi-C) in four mammals and characterized the conservation and divergence of chromosomal contact insulation and the resulting domain architectures within distantly related genomes. We show that the modular organization of chromosomes is robustly conserved in syntenic regions and that this is compatible with conservation of the binding landscape of the insulator protein CTCF. Specifically, conserved CTCF sites are co-localized with cohesin, are enriched at strong topological domain borders, and bind to DNA motifs with orientations that define the directionality of CTCF's long-range interactions. Conversely, divergent CTCF binding between species is correlated with divergence of internal domain structure, likely driven by local CTCF binding sequence changes, demonstrating how genome evolution can be linked to a continuous flux of local conformation changes. We also show that large-scale domains are reorganized during genome evolution as intact modules. PMID:25732821

  2. Generating Fatigue Crack Growth Thresholds with Constant Amplitude Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forth, Scott C.; Newman, James C., J.; Forman, Royce G.

    2002-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth threshold, defining crack growth as either very slow or nonexistent, has been traditionally determined with standardized load reduction methodologies. Some experimental procedures tend to induce load history effects that result in remote crack closure from plasticity. This history can affect the crack driving force, i.e. during the unloading process the crack will close first at some point along the wake, reducing the effective load at the crack tip. One way to reduce the effects of load history is to propagate a crack under constant amplitude loading. As a crack propagates under constant amplitude loading, the stress intensity factor, K, will increase, as will the crack growth rate, da/dN. A fatigue crack growth threshold test procedure is developed and experimentally validated that does not produce load history effects and can be conducted at a specified stress ratio, R.

  3. Combustion in cracks of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect

    Berghout, H. L.; Son, S. F.; Bolme, C. A.; Hill, L. G.; Asay, B. W.; Dickson, P. M.; Henson, B. F.; Smilowitz, L. B.

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments involving the combustion of PBX 9501 explosive under confined conditions reveal the importance of crack and flaws in reaction violence. Experiments on room temperature confined disks of pristine and thermally damaged PBX 9501 reveal that crack ignition depends on hot gases entering existing or pressure induced cracks rather than on energy release at the crack tip. PBX 9501 slot combustion experiments show that the reaction propagation rate in the slot does not depend on the external pressure. We have observed 1500 d s in long slots of highly-confined PBX 9501. We present experiments that examine the combustion of mechanically and thermally damaged samples of PBX 9501.

  4. Crack, crack house sex, and HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Inciardi, J A

    1995-06-01

    Limited attention has been focused on HIV risk behaviors of crack smokers and their sex partners, yet there is evidence that the crack house and the crack-using life-style may be playing significant roles in the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. The purposes of this research were to study the attributes and patterns of "sex for crack" exchanges, particularly those that occurred in crack houses, and to assess their potential impact on the spread of HIV. Structured interviews were conducted with 17 men and 35 women in Miami, Florida, who were regular users of crack and who had exchanged sex for crack (or for money to buy crack) during the past 30 days. In addition, participant observation was conducted in 8 Miami crack houses. Interview and observational data suggest that individuals who exchange sex for crack do so with considerable frequency, and through a variety of sexual activities. Systematic data indicated that almost a third of the men and 89% of the women had had 100 or more sex partners during the 30-day period prior to study recruitment. Not only were sexual activities anonymous, extremely frequent, varied, uninhibited (often undertaken in public areas of crack houses), and with multiple partners but, in addition, condoms were not used during the majority of contacts. Of the 37 subjects who were tested for HIV and received their test results 31% of the men and 21% of the women were HIV seropositive. PMID:7611845

  5. Scaling of crack propagation in rubber sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. H.; Zhang, H. P.; Niemczura, J.; Ravi-Chandar, K.; Marder, M.

    2011-11-01

    We have conducted experiments and numerical simulations to investigate supersonic cracks. The experiments are performed at 85 °C to suppress strain-induced crystallites that complicate experiments at lower temperature. Calibration experiments were performed to obtain the parameters needed to compare with a theory including viscous dissipation. We find that both experiments and numerical simulations support supersonic cracks, and we discover a transition from subsonic to supersonic as we plot experimental crack speed curves vs. extension ratio for different sized samples. Both experiments and simulations show two different scaling regimes: the speed of subsonic cracks scales with the elastic energy density while the speed of supersonic cracks scales with the extension ratio. Crack openings have qualitatively different shapes in the two scaling regimes.

  6. Statistical confidence estimation for Hi-C data reveals regulatory chromatin contacts

    PubMed Central

    Ay, Ferhat; Bailey, Timothy L.; Noble, William Stafford

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of how DNA is packed in the nucleus is most accurate at the fine scale of individual nucleosomes and at the large scale of chromosome territories. However, accurate modeling of DNA architecture at the intermediate scale of ∼50 kb–10 Mb is crucial for identifying functional interactions among regulatory elements and their target promoters. We describe a method, Fit-Hi-C, that assigns statistical confidence estimates to mid-range intra-chromosomal contacts by jointly modeling the random polymer looping effect and previously observed technical biases in Hi-C data sets. We demonstrate that our proposed approach computes accurate empirical null models of contact probability without any distribution assumption, corrects for binning artifacts, and provides improved statistical power relative to a previously described method. High-confidence contacts identified by Fit-Hi-C preferentially link expressed gene promoters to active enhancers identified by chromatin signatures in human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), capture 77% of RNA polymerase II-mediated enhancer-promoter interactions identified using ChIA-PET in mouse ESCs, and confirm previously validated, cell line-specific interactions in mouse cortex cells. We observe that insulators and heterochromatin regions are hubs for high-confidence contacts, while promoters and strong enhancers are involved in fewer contacts. We also observe that binding peaks of master pluripotency factors such as NANOG and POU5F1 are highly enriched in high-confidence contacts for human ESCs. Furthermore, we show that pairs of loci linked by high-confidence contacts exhibit similar replication timing in human and mouse ESCs and preferentially lie within the boundaries of topological domains for human and mouse cell lines. PMID:24501021

  7. Laser Peening--Strengthening Metals to Improve Fatigue Lifetime and Retard Stress-Induced Corrosion Cracking in Gears, Bolts and Cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L A; Chen, H-L

    2003-08-20

    Laser peening is an emerging modern process that impresses a compressive stress into the surfaces of metals. Treatment can reduce the rate of fatigue cracking and stress-corrosion-cracking in metals (such as gears, bolts and cutters) needed for tunnel boring and other construction & mining applications. Laser peening could also be used to form metals or alloys into a precise shape without yielding and leaving both sulfates in a crack resistant compressive state.

  8. Modeling the Interactions Between Multiple Crack Closure Mechanisms at Threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Riddell, William T.; Piascik, Robert S.

    2003-01-01

    A fatigue crack closure model is developed that includes interactions between the three closure mechanisms most likely to occur at threshold; plasticity, roughness, and oxide. This model, herein referred to as the CROP model (for Closure, Roughness, Oxide, and Plasticity), also includes the effects of out-of plane cracking and multi-axial loading. These features make the CROP closure model uniquely suited for, but not limited to, threshold applications. Rough cracks are idealized here as two-dimensional sawtooths, whose geometry induces mixed-mode crack- tip stresses. Continuum mechanics and crack-tip dislocation concepts are combined to relate crack face displacements to crack-tip loads. Geometric criteria are used to determine closure loads from crack-face displacements. Finite element results, used to verify model predictions, provide critical information about the locations where crack closure occurs.

  9. Influence of fatigue crack wake length and state of stress on crack closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesman, J.; Fisher, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The location of crack closure with respect to crack wake and specimen thickness under different loading conditions was determined. The rate of increase of K sub CL in the crack wake was found to be significantly higher for plasticity induced closure in comparison to roughness induced closure. Roughness induced closure was uniform throughout the thickness of the specimen while plasticity induced closure levels were 50 percent higher in the near surface region than in the midthickness. The influence of state of stress on low-high load interaction effects was also examined. Load interaction effects differed depending upon the state of stress and were explained in terms of delta K sub eff.

  10. Propagation of stress corrosion cracks in Zr-1% Nb claddings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibilashvily, Yu. K.; Dolgov, Yu. N.; Nesterov, B. I.; Novikov, V. V.

    1995-09-01

    Experimental results on iodine induced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) are analyzed. The studies were performed at 350°C using Zr-1% Nb tubular specimens. Fatigue crack at internal surface served as an initial defect. The relationship was derived between crack propagation rate and stress intensity factor; the threshold stress intensity factor of 4.8 MPa m{1}/{2} was determined.

  11. Why do drying films crack?

    PubMed

    Lee, Wai Peng; Routh, Alexander F

    2004-11-01

    Understanding the mechanism by which films fail during drying is the first step in controlling this natural process. Previous studies have examined the spacing between cracks with predictions made by assuming a balance between elastic energy released with a surface energy consumed. We introduce a new scaling for the spacing between cracks in drying dispersions. The scaling relates to the distance that solvent can flow, to relieve capillary stresses, as a film fails. The scaling collapses data for a range of evaporation rates, film thicknesses, particle sizes, and materials. This work identifies capillary pressures, induced by packed particle fronts travelling horizontally across films, as responsible for the failure in dried films. PMID:15518466

  12. Gear Crack Propagation Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Reduced weight is a major design goal in aircraft power transmissions. Some gear designs incorporate thin rims to help meet this goal. Thin rims, however, may lead to bending fatigue cracks. These cracks may propagate through a gear tooth or into the gear rim. A crack that propagates through a tooth would probably not be catastrophic, and ample warning of a failure could be possible. On the other hand, a crack that propagates through the rim would be catastrophic. Such cracks could lead to disengagement of a rotor or propeller from an engine, loss of an aircraft, and fatalities. To help create and validate tools for the gear designer, the NASA Lewis Research Center performed in-house analytical and experimental studies to investigate the effect of rim thickness on gear-tooth crack propagation. Our goal was to determine whether cracks grew through gear teeth (benign failure mode) or through gear rims (catastrophic failure mode) for various rim thicknesses. In addition, we investigated the effect of rim thickness on crack propagation life. A finite-element-based computer program simulated gear-tooth crack propagation. The analysis used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, and quarter-point, triangular elements were used at the crack tip to represent the stress singularity. The program had an automated crack propagation option in which cracks were grown numerically via an automated remeshing scheme. Crack-tip stress-intensity factors were estimated to determine crack-propagation direction. Also, various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack-propagation life. Experiments were performed in Lewis' Spur Gear Fatigue Rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Gears with various backup ratios were tested to validate crack-path predictions. Also, test gears were installed with special crack-propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending-fatigue crack growth. From both predictions and tests, gears with backup ratios

  13. Crack depth determination with inductive thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald-Tranta, B.; Schmidt, R.

    2015-05-01

    Castings, forgings and other steel products are nowadays usually tested with magnetic particle inspection, in order to detect surface cracks. An alternative method is active thermography with inductive heating, which is quicker, it can be well automated and as in this paper presented, even the depth of a crack can be estimated. The induced eddy current, due to its very small penetration depth in ferro-magnetic materials, flows around a surface crack, heating this selectively. The surface temperature is recorded during and after the short inductive heating pulse with an infrared camera. Using Fourier transformation the whole IR image sequence is evaluated and the phase image is processed to detect surface cracks. The level and the local distribution of the phase around a crack correspond to its depth. Analytical calculations were used to model the signal distribution around cracks with different depth and a relationship has been derived between the depth of a crack and its phase value. Additionally, also the influence of the heating pulse duration has been investigated. Samples with artificial and with natural cracks have been tested. Results are presented comparing the calculated and measured phase values depending on the crack depth. Keywords: inductive heating, eddy current, infrared

  14. Dynamics of cracking in drying colloidal sheets.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Rajarshi; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh S

    2016-04-01

    Colloidal dispersions are known to display a fascinating network of cracks on drying. We probe the fracture mechanics of free-standing films of aqueous polymer-particle dispersions. Thin films of the dispersion are cast between a pair of plain steel wires and allowed to dry under ambient conditions. The strain induced on the particle network during drying is relieved by cracking. The stress which causes the films to crack has been calculated by measuring the deflection of the wires. The critical cracking stress varied inversely to the two-thirds' power of the film thickness. We also measure the velocity of the tip of a moving crack. The motion of a crack has been modeled as a competition between the release of the elastic energy stored in the particle network, the increase in surface energy as a result of the growth of a crack, the rate of viscous dissipation of the interstitial fluid and the kinetic energy associated with a moving crack. There is fair agreement between the measured crack velocities and predictions. PMID:26924546

  15. Constraining the Coronal Heating Mechanism Using Data from AIA, EIS, and Hi-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, P. C.; Plowman, J.; Kankelborg, C. C.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed an ultra-fast DEM inversion code that computes over 1000 DEMs/sec for a sample active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on SDO, and achieves reduced chi-squareds of order unity with no negative emission in all but a few test cases (Plowman et al. 2013 ApJ). Applying the code to simultaneous Hinode/EIS data we find good agreement, and of course much less uncertainty in the EIS DEMs. For the short interval that we have Hi-C data we can estimate filling factors from those. We are using this new tool to constrain the still elusive mechanism of coronal heating. In one approach we use simultaneous AIA and EIS data of loops that are mostly north-south oriented, and hence do not require a broad EIS raster. We derive the density in these loops from density sensitive line pairs, and the DEMs from AIA data. In many cases the background subtracted DEMs indicate a single temperature at many points in the loop, and hence we have a measurement of both density and temperature along a good part of the loop. Combining these results with analytical (Martens 2010) models for loop heating we find that the heating is concentrated at the footpoints, consistent with, for example, Ohmic heating, but inconsistent with several other popular models for coronal heating. In the second approach we use the remarkable speed of our DEM inversion code to measure the occurrence of heating events in Active Regions (AR). We have determined that with the cadence of about ten seconds of the combined AIA channels, our code can detect heating events roughly down to the energy of nano-flares, about 10^24 ergs. By analyzing the DEMs sequences per pixel of target ARs we derive statistics on the heating events, in particular their frequency and energy distribution. Therefrom we can determine whether the energy input from nano-flares and more energetic events provides the energy required to sustain the AR corona.

  16. The sequencing bias relaxed characteristics of Hi-C derived data and implications for chromatin 3D modeling.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Fu, Liang-Yu; Dong, Peng-Fei; Deng, Zhi-Luo; Li, Jian-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Tao; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2013-10-01

    The 3D chromatin structure modeling by chromatin interactions derived from Hi-C experiments is significantly challenged by the intrinsic sequencing biases in these experiments. Conventional modeling methods only focus on the bias among different chromatin regions within the same experiment but neglect the bias arising from different experimental sequencing depth. We now show that the regional interaction bias is tightly coupled with the sequencing depth, and we further identify a chromatin structure parameter as the inherent characteristics of Hi-C derived data for chromatin regions. Then we present an approach for chromatin structure prediction capable of relaxing both kinds of sequencing biases by using this identified parameter. This method is validated by intra and inter cell-line comparisons among various chromatin regions for four human cell-lines (K562, GM12878, IMR90 and H1hESC), which shows that the openness of chromatin region is well correlated with chromatin function. This method has been executed by an automatic pipeline (AutoChrom3D) and thus can be conveniently used. PMID:23965308

  17. Crack spectra analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tiernan, M.

    1980-09-01

    Crack spectra derived from velocity data have been shown to exhibit systematics which reflect microstructural and textural differences between samples (Warren and Tiernan, 1980). Further research into both properties and information content of crack spectra have yielded the following: Spectral features are reproducible even at low pressures; certain observed spectral features may correspond to non-in-situ crack populations created during sample retrieval; the functional form of a crack spectra may be diagnostic of the sample's grain texture; hysteresis is observed in crack spectra between up and down pressure runs - it may be due to friction between the faces of closed crack populations.

  18. Gear crack propagation investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewicki, David G.; Ballarini, Roberto

    1996-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to investigate the effect of gear rim thickness on crack propagation life. The FRANC (FRacture ANalysis Code) computer program was used to simulate crack propagation. The FRANC program used principles of linear elastic fracture mechanics, finite element modeling, and a unique re-meshing scheme to determine crack tip stress distributions, estimate stress intensity factors, and model crack propagation. Various fatigue crack growth models were used to estimate crack propagation life based on the calculated stress intensity factors. Experimental tests were performed in a gear fatigue rig to validate predicted crack propagation results. Test gears were installed with special crack propagation gages in the tooth fillet region to measure bending fatigue crack growth. Good correlation between predicted and measured crack growth was achieved when the fatigue crack closure concept was introduced into the analysis. As the gear rim thickness decreased, the compressive cyclic stress in the gear tooth fillet region increased. This retarded crack growth and increased the number of crack propagation cycles to failure.

  19. Seeding Cracks Using a Fatigue Tester for Accelerated Gear Tooth Breaking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nenadic, Nenad G.; Wodenscheck, Joseph A.; Thurston, Michael G.; Lewicki, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes fatigue-induced seeded cracks in spur gears and compares them to cracks created using a more traditional seeding method, notching. Finite element analysis (FEA) compares the effective compliance of a cracked tooth to the effective compliance of a notched tooth where the crack and the notch are of the same depth. In this analysis, cracks are propagated to the desired depth using FRANC2D and effective compliances are computed in ANSYS. A compliance-based feature for detecting cracks on the fatigue tester is described. The initiated cracks are examined using both nondestructive and destructive methods. The destructive examination reveals variability in the shape of crack surfaces.

  20. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." Stacey is recovering from her ...

  1. Crack propagation in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budarapu, P. R.; Javvaji, B.; Sutrakar, V. K.; Roy Mahapatra, D.; Zi, G.; Rabczuk, T.

    2015-08-01

    The crack initiation and growth mechanisms in an 2D graphene lattice structure are studied based on molecular dynamics simulations. Crack growth in an initial edge crack model in the arm-chair and the zig-zag lattice configurations of graphene are considered. Influence of the time steps on the post yielding behaviour of graphene is studied. Based on the results, a time step of 0.1 fs is recommended for consistent and accurate simulation of crack propagation. Effect of temperature on the crack propagation in graphene is also studied, considering adiabatic and isothermal conditions. Total energy and stress fields are analyzed. A systematic study of the bond stretching and bond reorientation phenomena is performed, which shows that the crack propagates after significant bond elongation and rotation in graphene. Variation of the crack speed with the change in crack length is estimated.

  2. Strain oxidation cracking of austenitic stainless steels at 610 C

    SciTech Connect

    Calvar, M. Le; Scott, P.M.; Magnin, T.; Rieux, P.

    1998-02-01

    Strain oxidation cracking of both forged and welded austenitic stainless steels (SS) was studied. Creep and slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were performed in vacuum, air, and a gas furnace environment (air + carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}] + water [H{sub 2}O]). Results showed cracking was environmentally dependent. Almost no cracking was observed in vacuum, whereas intergranular cracking was observed with increasing severity in passing from an air to a gas furnace environment. The most severe cracking was associated with formation of a less protective film formed in the gas furnace environment (air: haematite-like M{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide; gas furnace environment: spinel M{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide). Cracking depended strongly on the carbon content and the sensitization susceptibility of the material: the higher the carbon content, the more susceptible the alloy. This cracking was believed to be similar to other oxidation-induced cracking phenomena.

  3. Short crack growth behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Sadananda, K.; Vasudevan, A.K.

    1997-12-01

    The authors have re-evaluated short crack growth behavior using concepts developed recently, and they show that these concepts provide a unified framework that can explain both short and long crack growth behavior without resorting to the crack closure effect. They consider that the behavior of long cracks, including the effects of load ratio, R, is fundamental. they had shown previously that, since fatigue is at least a two-parameter problem in that at least two load parameters are required for an unambiguous description, there are two critical driving forces required simultaneously for fatigue cracks to grow. In extending this analysis to the growth of short cracks, they reject the current notion of the lack of similitude for short cracks and express the similitude as a fundamental postulate that, for a given crack growth mechanism, equal crack tip driving forces result in equal crack growth rates. Short crack growth behavior confirms the concept that two parameters are required to define fatigue; consequently, for fatigue cracks to grow, two thresholds need to be satisfied simultaneously. The authors present examples from the literature to illustrate the concepts discussed.

  4. Fatigue life and crack growth prediction methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, R. A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model and life-prediction code to predict fatigue crack growth and fatigue lives of metallic materials are reviewed. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective-stress-intensity factor range (delta(K(sub eff))) under constant-amplitude loading. Some modifications to the delta(K(sub eff))-rate relations were needed in the near threshold regime to fit small-crack growth rate behavior and endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and in some cases total fatigue lives, for several aluminum and titanium alloys under constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude, and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  5. Crack initiation and near-threshold surface fatigue crack propagation behavior of the iron-base superalloy A-286

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daeubler, M. A.; Thompson, A. W.; Bernstein, I. M.

    1988-02-01

    The fatigue behavior of the iron-base superalloy A-286 was studied at room temperature in air for three aging conditions: underaged, peak aged, and overaged. A fatigue strength at 107 cycles of about 200 MPa, independent of aging condition, was measured for an applied load ratio of R =0.1. Surface crack initiation and propagation were measured using hourglass specimens. Surface cracks were invariably initiated in slip bands orientated between 45 and 55 deg to the load axis, and an average ratio of crack depth to crack length of about 0.45 for these semi-elliptical cracks was measured. These earliest observable short surface cracks grew at an accelerated propagation rate in the near-threshold regime but were retarded in a transition stage, resulting in a minimum in crack growth rate. This behavior was correlated to the interaction of the crack with specific microstructure features. Following this minimum, the crack growth accelerated again with increasing Δ K and appeared to converge with the crack growth behavior expected for long through cracks. The crack propagation rate at fixed Δ K was lowest in underaged, compared to peak aged and overaged microstructures. The minimum and trends in crack growth rate appeared to depend on the development of roughness-induced closure.

  6. Breaking/cracking and seating concrete pavements. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.R.

    1989-03-01

    This synthesis will be of interest to pavement designers, maintenance engineers, and others interested in reducing reflection cracking of asphalt overlays on portland cement concrete (PCC) pavement. Information is presented on the technique of breaking or cracking of the concrete pavement into small segments before overlaying with asphalt concrete. Asphalt concrete overlays on existing PCC pavements are subject to reflection cracking induced by thermal movements of PCC pavement. The report of the Transportation Research Board discusses the technique of breaking/cracking and seating of the existing PCC before an overlay as a means to reduce or eliminate reflection cracking.

  7. HiFive: a tool suite for easy and efficient HiC and 5C data analysis.

    PubMed

    Sauria, Michael E G; Phillips-Cremins, Jennifer E; Corces, Victor G; Taylor, James

    2015-01-01

    The chromatin interaction assays 5C and HiC have advanced our understanding of genomic spatial organization, but analysis approaches for these data are limited by usability and flexibility. The HiFive tool suite provides efficient data handling and a variety of normalization approaches for easy, fast analysis and method comparison. Integration of MPI-based parallelization allows scalability and rapid processing time. In addition to single-command analysis of an entire experiment from mapped reads to interaction values, HiFive has been integrated into the open-source, web-based platform Galaxy to connect users with computational resources and a graphical interface. HiFive is open-source software available from http://taylorlab.org/software/hifive/ . PMID:26498826

  8. Infrastructure for genomic interactions: Bioconductor classes for Hi-C, ChIA-PET and related experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lun, Aaron T. L.; Perry, Malcolm; Ing-Simmons, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The study of genomic interactions has been greatly facilitated by techniques such as chromatin conformation capture with high-throughput sequencing (Hi-C). These genome-wide experiments generate large amounts of data that require careful analysis to obtain useful biological conclusions. However, development of the appropriate software tools is hindered by the lack of basic infrastructure to represent and manipulate genomic interaction data. Here, we present the InteractionSet package that provides classes to represent genomic interactions and store their associated experimental data, along with the methods required for low-level manipulation and processing of those classes. The InteractionSet package exploits existing infrastructure in the open-source Bioconductor project, while in turn being used by Bioconductor packages designed for higher-level analyses. For new packages, use of the functionality in InteractionSet will simplify development, allow access to more features and improve interoperability between packages. PMID:27303634

  9. Specific Dephosphorylation at Tyr-554 of Git1 by Ptprz Promotes Its Association with Paxillin and Hic-5

    PubMed Central

    Fujikawa, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masahito; Kuboyama, Kazuya; Suzuki, Ryoko; Noda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interactor 1 (Git1) is involved in cell motility control by serving as an adaptor that links signaling proteins such as Pix and PAK to focal adhesion proteins. We previously demonstrated that Git1 was a multiply tyrosine-phosphorylated protein, its primary phosphorylation site was Tyr-554 in the vicinity of the focal adhesion targeting-homology (FAH) domain, and this site was selectively dephosphorylated by protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type Z (Ptprz). In the present study, we showed that Tyr-554 phosphorylation reduced the association of Git1 with the FAH-domain-binding proteins, paxillin and Hic-5, based on immunoprecipitation experiments using the Tyr-554 mutants of Git1. The Tyr-554 phosphorylation of Git1 was higher, and its binding to paxillin was consistently lower in the brains of Ptprz-deficient mice than in those of wild-type mice. We then investigated the role of Tyr-554 phosphorylation in cell motility control using three different methods: random cell motility, wound healing, and Boyden chamber assays. The shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Git1 impaired cell motility in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. The motility defect was rescued by the exogenous expression of wild-type Git1 and a Git1 mutant, which only retained Tyr-554 among the multiple potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites, but not by the Tyr-554 phosphorylation-defective or phosphorylation-state mimic Git1 mutant. Our results suggested that cyclic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation at Tyr-554 of Git1 was crucial for dynamic interactions between Git1 and paxillin/Hic-5 in order to ensure coordinated cell motility. PMID:25742295

  10. Specific dephosphorylation at tyr-554 of git1 by ptprz promotes its association with paxillin and hic-5.

    PubMed

    Fujikawa, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Masahito; Kuboyama, Kazuya; Suzuki, Ryoko; Noda, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interactor 1 (Git1) is involved in cell motility control by serving as an adaptor that links signaling proteins such as Pix and PAK to focal adhesion proteins. We previously demonstrated that Git1 was a multiply tyrosine-phosphorylated protein, its primary phosphorylation site was Tyr-554 in the vicinity of the focal adhesion targeting-homology (FAH) domain, and this site was selectively dephosphorylated by protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type Z (Ptprz). In the present study, we showed that Tyr-554 phosphorylation reduced the association of Git1 with the FAH-domain-binding proteins, paxillin and Hic-5, based on immunoprecipitation experiments using the Tyr-554 mutants of Git1. The Tyr-554 phosphorylation of Git1 was higher, and its binding to paxillin was consistently lower in the brains of Ptprz-deficient mice than in those of wild-type mice. We then investigated the role of Tyr-554 phosphorylation in cell motility control using three different methods: random cell motility, wound healing, and Boyden chamber assays. The shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Git1 impaired cell motility in A7r5 smooth muscle cells. The motility defect was rescued by the exogenous expression of wild-type Git1 and a Git1 mutant, which only retained Tyr-554 among the multiple potential tyrosine phosphorylation sites, but not by the Tyr-554 phosphorylation-defective or phosphorylation-state mimic Git1 mutant. Our results suggested that cyclic phosphorylation-dephosphorylation at Tyr-554 of Git1 was crucial for dynamic interactions between Git1 and paxillin/Hic-5 in order to ensure coordinated cell motility. PMID:25742295

  11. Investigation of Helicopter Longeron Cracks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Baughman, James; Wallace, Terryl A.

    2009-01-01

    Four cracked longerons, containing a total of eight cracks, were provided for study. Cracked regions were cut from the longerons. Load was applied to open the cracks, enabling crack surface examination. Examination revealed that crack propagation was driven by fatigue loading in all eight cases. Fatigue crack initiation appears to have occurred on the top edge of the longerons near geometric changes that affect component bending stiffness. Additionally, metallurgical analysis has revealed a local depletion in alloying elements in the crack initiation regions that may be a contributing factor. Fatigue crack propagation appeared to be initially driven by opening-mode loading, but at a crack length of approximately 0.5 inches (12.7 mm), there is evidence of mixed-mode crack loading. For the longest cracks studied, shear-mode displacements destroyed crack-surface features of interest over significant portions of the crack surfaces.

  12. Probability of pipe failure in the reactor coolant loops of Combustion Engineering PWR plants. Volume 2. Pipe failure induced by crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, T.Y.; Mensing, R.W.; Woo, H.H.; Holman, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    A study was conducted to determine if the probability of occurrence of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in the primary coolant piping warrants the current design requirements that safeguard against the effect of DEGB. This report describes the results of an assessment of reactor coolant loop piping systems designed by Combustion Engineering, Inc. A probabilistic fracture mechanics approach was used to estimate the crack growth and to assess the crack stability in the piping throughout the lifetime of the plant. The results of the assessment indicate that the probability of occurrence of DEGB due to crack growth and instability is extremely small, which supports the argument that the postulation of DEGB in design should be eliminated and replaced with more reasonable criteria.

  13. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  14. Analysis of crack closure under plane strain conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, Norman A.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The phenomenon of plasticity-induced crack closure is associated with the development of residual material on the flanks of an advancing fatigue crack. While it is easy to see that this residual material can come from the side faces of a specimen under plane stress conditions, it is difficult to discover the origin of this extra volume of material on the crack flanks when it is assumed that plane deformations occur and plastic flow is incompressible. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether plasticity-induced fatigue crack closure occurs in an elastic-perfectly plastic body under plane strain conditions.

  15. Analysis of crack closure under plane strain conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, N. A.; Newman, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    The phenomenon of plasticity-induced crack closure is associated with the development of residual material on the flanks of an advancing fatigue crack. While it is easy to see that this residual material can come from the side faces of a specimen under plane stress conditions, it is difficult to discover the origin of this extra volume of material on the crack flanks when it is assumed that plane deformations occur and plastic flow is incompressible. The purpose of this paper is to determine whether plasticity-induced fatigue crack closure occurs in an elastic-perfectly plastic body under plane strain conditions.

  16. CRACK MODELLING FOR RADIOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Chady, T.; Napierala, L.

    2010-02-22

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  17. Thermal cracking of butadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Duisters, H.A.M. )

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental data on the thermal cracking of butadiene in a pilot plant, under conditions representative of industrial operation. The product distribution of pure-butadiene cracking is shown. Results from cocracking experiments in naphtha and C[sub 4]-raffinate are also presented. It is shown that butadiene cracking can be an interesting outlet for the increasing butadiene overcapacity in steam crackers. Some aspects of coke formation during butadiene pyrolysis are addressed as well.

  18. Crack Modelling for Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chady, T.; Napierała, L.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, possibility of creation of three-dimensional crack models, both random type and based on real-life radiographic images is discussed. Method for storing cracks in a number of two-dimensional matrices, as well algorithm for their reconstruction into three-dimensional objects is presented. Also the possibility of using iterative algorithm for matching simulated images of cracks to real-life radiographic images is discussed.

  19. Fatigue life and crack growth prediction methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Phillips, E. P.; Everett, Richard A., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the capabilities of a plasticity-induced crack-closure model and life-prediction code to predict fatigue crack growth and fatigue lives of metallic materials. Crack-tip constraint factors, to account for three-dimensional effects, were selected to correlate large-crack growth rate data as a function of the effective stress-intensity factor range (Delta K(sub eff)) under constant amplitude loading. Some modifications to the Delta K(sub eff)-rate relations were needed in the near threshold regime to fit small-crackgrowth rate behavior and endurance limits. The model was then used to calculate small- and large-crack growth rates, and in some cases total fatigue lives, for several aluminum and titanium alloys under constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude, and spectrum loading. Fatigue lives were calculated using the crack-growth relations and microstructural features like those that initiated cracks. Results from the tests and analyses agreed well.

  20. Contact of nonflat crack surfaces during fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Sehitoglu, H.; Garcia, A.M.

    1999-07-01

    A model has been developed to predict crack opening and closure behavior for propagating fatigue cracks which are nonflat and undergo significant sliding displacements. Crack surfaces were characterized by a random distribution of asperity heights, density of asperities, and asperity radii. The propagating crack was subdivided into ligaments and each ligament was treated as a contact problem between two randomly rough surfaces. The far-field tensile stresses were varied in a cyclic manner for R = 0.1 and {minus}1 loading conditions. The contact stresses at the minimal load were determined by analyzing the local crushing of the asperities. Then, upon loading the crack opening, stresses were computed when the contact stresses were overcome. The results of crack opening stresses were correlated with CTOD/{sigma}{sub 0} where CTOD is the crack-tip opening displacement and {sigma}{sub 0} is the average asperity height. The asperity effects on closure were compared with plasticity-induced closure results from the literature for identification of conditions when one mechanism dominates the other.

  1. Automatic crack propagation tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shephard, M. S.; Weidner, T. J.; Yehia, N. A. B.; Burd, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    A finite element based approach to fully automatic crack propagation tracking is presented. The procedure presented combines fully automatic mesh generation with linear fracture mechanics techniques in a geometrically based finite element code capable of automatically tracking cracks in two-dimensional domains. The automatic mesh generator employs the modified-quadtree technique. Crack propagation increment and direction are predicted using a modified maximum dilatational strain energy density criterion employing the numerical results obtained by meshes of quadratic displacement and singular crack tip finite elements. Example problems are included to demonstrate the procedure.

  2. Immunotoxicity of cocaine and crack.

    PubMed

    Stefanidou, Maria; Loutsidou, Ariadni C; Chasapis, Christos T; Spiliopoulou, Chara A

    2011-06-01

    The toxicity of cocaine and crack was studied on the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis, using several endpoints, such as the DNA content of the macronuclei and the phagocytic ability. Both forms induced an increase in the DNA content of the protozoan, which indicates the stimulation of the mitotic process. In contrast, the phagocytic activity, of the protozoan was decreased after the administration of cocaine, an effect that was more extensive after the administration of crack. These results, derived from previous experiments, suggest a possible relationship between the observed immunosuppression in cocaine abusers and the immunosuppression found in the protozoan. This suppression subsequently may play a role in the development of other opportunistic infections in drug abusers. This paper, based on in vivo experiments with the protozoan Tetrahymena, suggests the compromised immune response in cocaine addicts and assures the reported effects of cocaine on immune cell function. PMID:21696343

  3. Probability of failure in BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) reactor coolant piping: Volume 2, Pipe failure induced by crack growth and failure of intermediate supports

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, T.; Bumpus, S.E.; Chinn, D.J.; Mensing, R.W.; Holman, G.S.

    1989-03-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) contracted with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct a study to determine if the probability of occurrence of a double-ended guillotine break (DEGB) in the major coolant piping systems of nuclear power plants is large enough to warrant the current stringent design requirements of designing against the postulated effects of a DEGB. The study includes both the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) and the BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) plants in the United States. Following the study of PWR plants, a study of BWR reactor coolant piping was performed. The Brunswick Steam Electric Plant at Southport, North Carolina was selected as the pilot plant for the BWR evaluation. The probability of pipe failure in three major coolant pipings was assessed: the recirculation loops, the primary steam lines, and the main feedwater lines. In the case of recirculation loops, both the existing and a proposed replacement system were studied. A probabilistic fracture mechanics approach was used in this study to estimate the crack growth and to assess the crack stability in the piping systems throughout the lifetime of the plant. The effects of the failure of intermediate pipe supports were also examined. The results of the assessment indicated that the probability of occurrence of DEGB due to crack growth and instability is small if the problem of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) is resolved by the use of the replacement system. 33 refs., 41 figs., 32 tabs.

  4. H-induced platelet and crack formation in hydrogenated epitaxial Si/Si{sub 0.98}B{sub 0.02}/Si structures

    SciTech Connect

    Shao Lin; Lin Yuan; Swadener, J.G.; Lee, J.K.; Jia, Q.X.; Wang, Y.Q.; Nastasi, M.; Thompson, Phillip E.; Theodore, N. David; Alford, T.L.; Mayer, J.W.; Chen Peng; Lau, S.S.

    2006-01-09

    An approach to transfer a high-quality Si layer for the fabrication of silicon-on-insulator wafers has been proposed based on the investigation of platelet and crack formation in hydrogenated epitaxial Si/Si{sub 0.98}B{sub 0.02}/Si structures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. H-related defect formation during hydrogenation was found to be very sensitive to the thickness of the buried Si{sub 0.98}B{sub 0.02} layer. For hydrogenated Si containing a 130 nm thick Si{sub 0.98}B{sub 0.02} layer, no platelets or cracking were observed in the B-doped region. Upon reducing the thickness of the buried Si{sub 0.98}B{sub 0.02} layer to 3 nm, localized continuous cracking was observed along the interface between the Si and the B-doped layers. In the latter case, the strains at the interface are believed to facilitate the (100)-oriented platelet formation and (100)-oriented crack propagation.

  5. Determination of crack morphology parameters from service failures for leak-rate analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkowski, G.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.

    1997-04-01

    In leak-rate analyses described in the literature, the crack morphology parameters are typically not well agreed upon by different investigators. This paper presents results on a review of crack morphology parameters determined from examination of service induced cracks. Service induced cracks were found to have a much more tortuous flow path than laboratory induced cracks due to crack branching associated with the service induced cracks. Several new parameters such as local and global surface roughnesses, as well as local and global number of turns were identified. The effect of each of these parameters are dependent on the crack-opening displacement. Additionally, the crack path is typically assumed to be straight through the pipe thickness, but the service data show that the flow path can be longer due to the crack following a fusion line, and/or the number of turns, where the number of turns in the past were included as a pressure drop term due to the turns, but not the longer flow path length. These parameters were statistically evaluated for fatigue cracks in air, corrosion-fatigue, IGSCC, and thermal fatigue cracks. A refined version of the SQUIRT leak-rate code was developed to account for these variables. Sample calculations are provided in this paper that show how the crack size can vary for a given leak rate and the statistical variation of the crack morphology parameters.

  6. Elapsed time for crack formation during drying.

    PubMed

    Giorgiutti-Dauphiné, F; Pauchard, L

    2014-05-01

    The drying of colloidal films usually leads to mechanical instabilities that affect the uniformity of the final deposit. The resulting patterns are the signature of the mechanical stress, and reveal the way the system consolidates. We report experimental results on the crack patterns induced by the drying of sessile drops of concentrated dispersions. Crack patterns exhibit a well-defined spatial order, and a regular temporal periodicity. In addition, the onset of cracking occurs after a well-defined elapsed time that depends on the mechanical properties of the gel, and on the drying kinetics. The estimation of the time elapsed before cracks form is related to the elastic properties of the material. This is supported by quantitative measurements using indentation testing and by a simple scaling law derived from poro-elastic theory. PMID:24853634

  7. Micromechanisms of fatigue crack propagation in particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, Jianku.

    1989-01-01

    Consequences of the interaction of cracks with SiC particles are examined with emphasis on micromechanisms influencing fatigue crack propagation in high strength aluminum alloy matrix composites. Fatigue crack propagation is found to show three distinct regimes; each accompanied by growth mechanisms reflecting different roles of SiC particles. At near-threshold levels, SiC particles impeded fatigue crack growth by deflecting the crack to promote roughness-induced crack closure and by acting as crack traps along the crack front. A two-dimensional crack trapping analysis based on the interaction of a finite crack with a SiC particle indicates that a limiting criterion for fatigue crack growth in SiC{sub p}/Al composites can be established, which requires that the maximum plastic-zone size exceed the effective mean particle size or that the tensile stress in the matrix beyond the particle on the crack front exceed the yield strength of the material. Implications of crack closure and crack trapping to near-threshold crack growth, including load-ration and particle-size dependence of fatigue thresholds, are discussed in terms of contributions from each mechanism. At higher stress intensities, limited fracture of SiC particles ahead of the crack tip leads to the development of uncracked ligaments along the crack length, resulting in a reduced crack-tip stress intensity from ligament bridging. Micromechanical models are developed for such bridges induced by both overlapping cracks and co-planar ligaments, based on the notion of a limiting crack opening displacement or limiting strain in the ligament. The predicted reduction in crack tip stress intensity is shown to be consistent with experimental observations.

  8. The effect of a capillary bridge on the crack opening of a penny crack.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fuqian; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2016-02-01

    Young's relation is based on the equilibrium of horizontal components of surface tensions for a liquid droplet on a "rigid" substrate without addressing the substrate deformation induced by the net vertical component of surface tensions. Upon realizing the importance of wetting in controlling the integrity of flexible structures and electronics, the effect of a capillary bridge or a liquid droplet on the crack opening of a penny crack under the action of a far-field tensile stress is analyzed. Closed-form solutions are derived for both the crack opening and the stress intensity factor, which are functions of the size of the capillary bridge or the droplet, surface tension, and the contact angle. Both the capillary bridge and the droplet can introduce the crack closure. The minimum far-field tensile stresses needed for complete crack opening, i.e. no crack closure, are obtained analytically. The net vertical component of the surface tensions introduces the formation of a surface ridge on the crack face at the edge of the droplet for an open crack. The amplitude of the surface ridge increases with the increase of the net vertical component of the surface tensions and the decrease of the breadth width. PMID:26660422

  9. CHiCP: a web-based tool for the integrative and interactive visualization of promoter capture Hi-C datasets

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, E. C.; Carver, T.; Achuthan, P.; Freire-Pritchett, P.; Spivakov, M.; Todd, J. A.; Burren, O. S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Promoter capture Hi-C (PCHi-C) allows the genome-wide interrogation of physical interactions between distal DNA regulatory elements and gene promoters in multiple tissue contexts. Visual integration of the resultant chromosome interaction maps with other sources of genomic annotations can provide insight into underlying regulatory mechanisms. We have developed Capture HiC Plotter (CHiCP), a web-based tool that allows interactive exploration of PCHi-C interaction maps and integration with both public and user-defined genomic datasets. Availability and Implementation: CHiCP is freely accessible from www.chicp.org and supports most major HTML5 compliant web browsers. Full source code and installation instructions are available from http://github.com/D-I-L/django-chicp. Contact: ob219@cam.ac.uk PMID:27153610

  10. Corrosion pitting and environmentally assisted small crack growth

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many applications, corrosion pits act as precursors to cracking, but qualitative and quantitative prediction of damage evolution has been hampered by lack of insights into the process by which a crack develops from a pit. An overview is given of recent breakthroughs in characterization and understanding of the pit-to-crack transition using advanced three-dimensional imaging techniques such as X-ray computed tomography and focused ion beam machining with scanning electron microscopy. These techniques provided novel insights with respect to the location of crack development from a pit, supported by finite-element analysis. This inspired a new concept for the role of pitting in stress corrosion cracking based on the growing pit inducing local dynamic plastic strain, a critical factor in the development of stress corrosion cracks. Challenges in quantifying the subsequent growth rate of the emerging small cracks are then outlined with the potential drop technique being the most viable. A comparison is made with the growth rate for short cracks (through-thickness crack in fracture mechanics specimen) and long cracks and an electrochemical crack size effect invoked to rationalize the data. PMID:25197249